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Sample records for vapor diffusion method

  1. Vapor generation methods for explosives detection research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.

    2012-12-01

    The generation of calibrated vapor samples of explosives compounds remains a challenge due to the low vapor pressures of the explosives, adsorption of explosives on container and tubing walls, and the requirement to manage (typically) multiple temperature zones as the vapor is generated, diluted, and delivered. Methods that have been described to generate vapors can be classified as continuous or pulsed flow vapor generators. Vapor sources for continuous flow generators are typically explosives compounds supported on a solid support, or compounds contained in a permeation or diffusion device. Sources are held at elevated isothermal temperatures. Similar sources can be used for pulsed vapor generators; however, pulsed systems may also use injection of solutions onto heated surfaces with generation of both solvent and explosives vapors, transient peaks from a gas chromatograph, or vapors generated by s programmed thermal desorption. This article reviews vapor generator approaches with emphasis on the method of generating the vapors and on practical aspects of vapor dilution and handling. In addition, a gas chromatographic system with two ovens that is configurable with up to four heating ropes is proposed that could serve as a single integrated platform for explosives vapor generation and device testing. Issues related to standards, calibration, and safety are also discussed.

  2. HYDROCARBON VAPOR DIFFUSION IN INTACT CORE SLEEVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The diffusion of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP) and 2,2,5-trimethylhexane (TMH) vapors put of residually contaminated sandy soil from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) field research site at Traverse City, Michigan, was measured and modeled. The headspace of an intact ...

  3. Review of enhanced vapor diffusion in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S.W.; Ho, C.K.

    1998-01-01

    Vapor diffusion in porous media in the presence of its own liquid has often been treated similar to gas diffusion. The gas diffusion rate in porous media is much lower than in free space due to the presence of the porous medium and any liquid present. However, enhanced vapor diffusion has also been postulated such that the diffusion rate may approach free-space values. Existing data and models for enhanced vapor diffusion, including those in TOUGH2, are reviewed in this paper

  4. Water vapor permeabilities through polymers: diffusivities from experiments and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seethamraju, Sindhu; Ramamurthy, Praveen Chandrashekarapura; Madras, Giridhar

    2014-01-01

    This study experimentally determines water vapor permeabilities, which are subsequently correlated with the diffusivities obtained from simulations. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used for determining the diffusion of water vapor in various polymeric systems such as polyethylene, polypropylene, poly (vinyl alcohol), poly (vinyl acetate), poly (vinyl butyral), poly (vinylidene chloride), poly (vinyl chloride) and poly (methyl methacrylate). Cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) based methodology has been used to determine the water vapor transmission rates. These values were then used to calculate the diffusion coefficients for water vapor through these polymers. A comparative analysis is provided for diffusivities calculated from CRDS and MD based results by correlating the free volumes. (paper)

  5. Development of More Cost-Effective Methods for Long-Term Monitoring of Soil Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air Using Quantitative Passive Diffusive-Adsorptive Sampling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    ASTM ASTM International ASU Arizona State University ATD automated thermal desorption BENZ Benzene C/Co passive sampler concentration...Protection Agency [USEPA], 1998a, b; California Department of Toxic Substance Control, 2011; ASTM International [ASTM] D7758, 2011). This demonstration... microporous sintered polyethylene, through which the vapors diffuse. Figure 1b. Radiello sampler with regular (white) and low-uptake rate

  6. Vaporization and diffusion studies on the stability of doped lanthanum gallates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanislowski, M.; Singheiser, L.; Hilpert, K. [Research Center Juelich, Institute for Materials and Processes in Energy Systems, IWV-2, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Peck, D.H.; Woo, S.K. [Korea Institute of Energy Research, 71-2 Jang-Dong, Yuseong, 305-343 Daejeon (Korea); Schulz, O.; Martin, M. [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Landoltweg 2, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    Vaporization and diffusion determine the stability of doped lanthanum gallates under SOFC operating conditions. Systematic vaporization studies of Ga and other elements were carried out using the vapor transpiration method. It was shown that the Ga vaporization is controlled by diffusion from the bulk to the surface. Diffusion coefficients D{sub Ga} and vaporization coefficients {alpha}{sub Ga} were determined by fitting the measured vaporization data to a vaporization model. Secondary phases formed as a result of the vaporization were detected. The influence of different doping levels of Sr, Mg and Fe on the Ga vaporization was elucidated. Moreover, cation self-diffusion of {sup 139}La, {sup 84}Sr and {sup 25}Mg as well as cation impurity diffusion of {sup 144}Nd, {sup 89}Y and {sup 56}Fe in polycrystalline samples of doped lanthanum gallate were directly determined for the composition La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}Mg{sub 0.1}O{sub 2.9} as an example, from diffusion profiles determined by SIMS. It was found that diffusion occurs by means of bulk and grain boundaries. The bulk diffusion coefficients are similar for all cations with activation energies which are strongly dependent on temperature. The results are explained by a frozen-in defect structure at low temperatures in the ABO{sub 3} perovskite lattice and by proposing a defect cluster containing cation vacancies in the A and B sublattices, as well as oxygen vacancies. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Water Vapor and Determination of Diffusion Characteristics in the Pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonov, Eduard G.; Pavluš, Miron; Popovičová, Mária

    2018-02-01

    One of the varieties of pores, often found in natural or artificial building materials, are the so-called blind pores of dead-end or saccate type. Three-dimensional model of such kind of pore has been developed in this work. This model has been used for simulation of water vapor interaction with individual pore by molecular dynamics in combination with the diffusion equation method. Special investigations have been done to find dependencies between thermostats implementations and conservation of thermodynamic and statistical values of water vapor - pore system. The two types of evolution of water - pore system have been investigated: drying and wetting of the pore. Full research of diffusion coefficient, diffusion velocity and other diffusion parameters has been made.

  8. Development of a primary diffusion source of organic vapors for gas analyzer calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecuna, M.; Demichelis, A.; Sassi, G.; Sassi, M. P.

    2018-03-01

    The generation of reference mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at trace levels (10 ppt-10 ppb) is a challenge for both environmental and clinical measurements. The calibration of gas analyzers for trace VOC measurements requires a stable and accurate source of the compound of interest. The dynamic preparation of gas mixtures by diffusion is a suitable method for fulfilling these requirements. The estimation of the uncertainty of the molar fraction of the VOC in the mixture is a key step in the metrological characterization of a dynamic generator. The performance of a dynamic generator was monitored over a wide range of operating conditions. The generation system was simulated by a model developed with computational fluid dynamics and validated against experimental data. The vapor pressure of the VOC was found to be one of the main contributors to the uncertainty of the diffusion rate and its influence at 10-70 kPa was analyzed and discussed. The air buoyancy effect and perturbations due to the weighing duration were studied. The gas carrier flow rate and the amount of liquid in the vial were found to play a role in limiting the diffusion rate. The results of sensitivity analyses were reported through an uncertainty budget for the diffusion rate. The roles of each influence quantity were discussed. A set of criteria to minimize the uncertainty contribution to the primary diffusion source (25 µg min-1) were estimated: carrier gas flow rate higher than 37.7 sml min-1, a maximum VOC liquid mass decrease in the vial of 4.8 g, a minimum residual mass of 1 g and vial weighing times of 1-3 min. With this procedure a limit uncertainty of 0.5% in the diffusion rate can be obtained for VOC mixtures at trace levels (10 ppt-10 ppb), making the developed diffusion vials a primary diffusion source with potential to become a new reference material for trace VOC analysis.

  9. Method of purifying zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride in a vapor stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, T.S.; Stolz, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method of purifying zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride in a vapor stream from a sand chlorinator in which the silicon and metals present in sand fed to the chlorinator are converted to chlorides at temperatures over about 800 degrees C. It comprises cooling a vapor stream from a sand chlorinator, the vapor stream containing principally silicon tetrachloride, zirconium tetrachloride, and hafnium tetrachloride contaminated with ferric chloride, to a temperature of from about 335 degrees C to about 600 degrees C; flowing the vapor stream through a gaseous diffusion separative barrier to produce a silicon tetrachloride-containing vapor stream concentrated in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride and a silicon tetrachloride-containing vapor stream depleted in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride; adsorbing the ferric chloride in the separative barrier; and recovering the silicon tetrachloride stream concentrated in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride separately from the silicon tetrachloride stream depleted in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride

  10. Self-diffusion coefficients of the metastable Lennard-Jones vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie Chu; Zhou Youhua; Marlow, W H; Hassan, Y A

    2008-01-01

    Self-diffusion coefficients of a metastable Lennard-Jones vapor were obtained using the memory function formalism and the frequency moments of the velocity autocorrelation function at reduced temperatures from 0.75 to 1.0. The radial density distribution functions used to evaluate the second, fourth and sixth frequency moments of the velocity autocorrelation function were obtained from the restricted canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulation (Corti and Debenedetti 1994 Chem. Eng. Sci. 49 2717). The self-diffusion coefficients at reduced temperature 0.75 do not vary monotonically as the density increases, and for the other three temperatures the self-diffusion coefficients vary normally

  11. Self-diffusion coefficients of the metastable Lennard-Jones vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie Chu; Zhou Youhua [School of Physics and Information Engineering, Jianghan University, Wuhan 430056 (China); Marlow, W H; Hassan, Y A [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)], E-mail: yhzhou@jhun.edu.cn

    2008-10-15

    Self-diffusion coefficients of a metastable Lennard-Jones vapor were obtained using the memory function formalism and the frequency moments of the velocity autocorrelation function at reduced temperatures from 0.75 to 1.0. The radial density distribution functions used to evaluate the second, fourth and sixth frequency moments of the velocity autocorrelation function were obtained from the restricted canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulation (Corti and Debenedetti 1994 Chem. Eng. Sci. 49 2717). The self-diffusion coefficients at reduced temperature 0.75 do not vary monotonically as the density increases, and for the other three temperatures the self-diffusion coefficients vary normally.

  12. Field Testing of an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation, Tiles, and Vapor Diffusion Venting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. W. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This research is a test implementation of an unvented tile roof assembly in a hot-humid climate (Orlando, FL; Zone 2A), insulated with air permeable insulation (netted and blown fiberglass). Given the localized moisture accumulation and failures seen in previous unvented roof field work, it was theorized that a 'diffusion vent' (water vapor open, but air barrier 'closed') at the highest points in the roof assembly might allow for the wintertime release of moisture, to safe levels. The 'diffusion vent' is an open slot at the ridge and hips, covered with a water-resistant but vapor open (500+ perm) air barrier membrane. As a control comparison, one portion of the roof was constructed as a typical unvented roof (self-adhered membrane at ridge). The data collected to date indicate that the diffusion vent roof shows greater moisture safety than the conventional, unvented roof design.

  13. Diffuse interface methods for multiphase flow modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamet, D.

    2004-01-01

    Full text of publication follows:Nuclear reactor safety programs need to get a better description of some stages of identified incident or accident scenarios. For some of them, such as the reflooding of the core or the dryout of fuel rods, the heat, momentum and mass transfers taking place at the scale of droplets or bubbles are part of the key physical phenomena for which a better description is needed. Experiments are difficult to perform at these very small scales and direct numerical simulations is viewed as a promising way to give new insight into these complex two-phase flows. This type of simulations requires numerical methods that are accurate, efficient and easy to run in three space dimensions and on parallel computers. Despite many years of development, direct numerical simulation of two-phase flows is still very challenging, mostly because it requires solving moving boundary problems. To avoid this major difficulty, a new class of numerical methods is arising, called diffuse interface methods. These methods are based on physical theories dating back to van der Waals and mostly used in materials science. In these methods, interfaces separating two phases are modeled as continuous transitions zones instead of surfaces of discontinuity. Since all the physical variables encounter possibly strong but nevertheless always continuous variations across the interfacial zones, these methods virtually eliminate the difficult moving boundary problem. We show that these methods lead to a single-phase like system of equations, which makes it easier to code in 3D and to make parallel compared to more classical methods. The first method presented is dedicated to liquid-vapor flows with phase-change. It is based on the van der Waals' theory of capillarity. This method has been used to study nucleate boiling of a pure fluid and of dilute binary mixtures. We discuss the importance of the choice and the meaning of the order parameter, i.e. a scalar which discriminates one

  14. Water Vapor Diffusion and Adsorption of Sandstones: Influence of Rock Texture and Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Keppert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The term sandstone is used for wide range of rocks containing quartz clasts which can be cemented by secondary precipitated quartz or calcite; moreover the space between clasts can be filled by matrix. These facts result in existence of numerous rocks having highly various properties. Sandstones have been used as construction materials due to their good accessibility and workability. Since most of sandstones are porous, water vapor can penetrate through sandstone constructions. The rate of water vapor diffusion, as well as the vapor sorption isotherm, was determined for range of sandstone types. The diffusion resistance factor was found to be dependent on the total porosity of sandstone but the sorption behavior was strongly influenced by nature of the particular sandstone; the specific surface area of stone and presence of clay matrix are determining its sorption isotherm. The published data enable estimating (i diffusion resistance factor of a sandstone via knowledge of its total porosity and (ii the sorption isotherm via knowledge of the stone’s nature and specific surface area. This approach can significantly reduce the time necessary to acquire vapor-related properties of a sandstone.

  15. Effects of thermal vapor diffusion on seasonal dynamics of water in the unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milly, Paul C.D.

    1996-01-01

    The response of water in the unsaturated zone to seasonal changes of temperature (T) is determined analytically using the theory of nonisothermal water transport in porous media, and the solutions are tested against field observations of moisture potential and bomb fallout isotopic (36Cl and 3H) concentrations. Seasonally varying land surface temperatures and the resulting subsurface temperature gradients induce thermal vapor diffusion. The annual mean vertical temperature gradient is close to zero; however, the annual mean thermal vapor flux is downward, because the temperature‐dependent vapor diffusion coefficient is larger, on average, during downward diffusion (occurring at high T) than during upward diffusion (low T). The annual mean thermal vapor flux is shown to decay exponentially with depth; the depth (about 1 m) at which it decays to e−1of its surface value is one half of the corresponding decay depth for the amplitude of seasonal temperature changes. This depth‐dependent annual mean flux is effectively a source of water, which must be balanced by a flux divergence associated with other transport processes. In a relatively humid environment the liquid fluxes greatly exceed the thermal vapor fluxes, so such a balance is readily achieved without measurable effect on the dynamics of water in the unsaturated zone. However, if the mean vertical water flux through the unsaturated zone is very small (theoretical prediction is supported by long‐term field measurements in the Chihuahuan Desert. The analysis also makes predictions, confirmed by the field observations, regarding the seasonal variations of matric potential at a given depth. The conceptual model of unsaturated zone water transport developed here implies the possibility of near‐surface trapping of any aqueous constituent introduced at the surface.

  16. Measuring methods of matrix diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Valkiainen, M.

    1988-03-01

    In Finland the spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed of at large depths in crystalline bedrock. The radionuclides which are dissolved in the groundwater may be able to diffuse into the micropores of the porous rock matrix and thus be withdrawn from the flowing water in the fractures. This phenomenon is called matrix diffusion. A review over matrix diffusion is presented in the study. The main interest is directed to the diffusion of non-sorbing species. The review covers diffusion experiments and measurements of porosity, pore size, specific surface area and water permeability

  17. EPA Method 245.2: Mercury (Automated Cold Vapor Technique)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Method 245.2 describes procedures for preparation and analysis of drinking water samples for analysis of mercury using acid digestion and cold vapor atomic absorption. Samples are prepared using an acid digestion technique.

  18. Mathematical methods for diffusion MRI processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenglet, C.; Lenglet, C.; Sapiro, G.; Campbell, J.S.W.; Pike, G.B.; Campbell, J.S.W.; Siddiqi, K.; Descoteaux, M.; Haro, G.; Wassermann, D.; Deriche, R.; Wassermann, D.; Anwander, A.; Thompson, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we review recent mathematical models and computational methods for the processing of diffusion Magnetic Resonance Images, including state-of-the-art reconstruction of diffusion models, cerebral white matter connectivity analysis, and segmentation techniques. We focus on Diffusion Tensor Images (DTI) and Q-Ball Images (QBI). (authors)

  19. Controlled surface diffusion in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of GaN nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, W C; Hong, Franklin Chau-Nan

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the growth of GaN nanowires by controlling the surface diffusion of Ga species on sapphire in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. Under nitrogen-rich growth conditions, Ga has a tendency to adsorb on the substrate surface diffusing to nanowires to contribute to their growth. The significance of surface diffusion on the growth of nanowires is dependent on the environment of the nanowire on the substrate surface as well as the gas phase species and compositions. Under nitrogen-rich growth conditions, the growth rate is strongly dependent on the surface diffusion of gallium, but the addition of 5% hydrogen in nitrogen plasma instantly diminishes the surface diffusion effect. Gallium desorbs easily from the surface by reaction with hydrogen. On the other hand, under gallium-rich growth conditions, nanowire growth is shown to be dominated by the gas phase deposition, with negligible contribution from surface diffusion. This is the first study reporting the inhibition of surface diffusion effects by hydrogen addition, which can be useful in tailoring the growth and characteristics of nanowires. Without any evidence of direct deposition on the nanowire surface, gallium and nitrogen are shown to dissolve into the catalyst for growing the nanowires at 900 deg. C.

  20. Experimental methods for studying the diffusion of radioactive gases in solids. VII. Sorption method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekman, I.N.

    1983-01-01

    The details of the use of a sorption method in the study of the diffusion of gasses and vapors labeled with radioactive tracers in solids have been considered. Three variants of diffusion systems, which permit the determination of the diffusion coefficient and the solubility constant of gases both from the increase in the amount of diffusate in the sample and from the decrease in its amount in the reservoir, have been tested. Different ways of conducting the experiment have been discussed. A universal method for taking into account the processes of the absorption and scattering of radiation in the material of the sample has been proposed. The experimental results were treated with the aid of a specially developed program package, which is realized on computers of the BESM-6 type. Various mathematical models of the diffusion of gases in solids have been analyzed. Solutions of the diffusion equations under the boundary conditions of the sorption method for the cases of diffusion with trapping, dissociative diffusion, and diffusion in a plate containing spherical inclusions have been obtained. The method has been tested in the example case of the diffusion of a radiative inert gas, viz., radon-22, in low-density polyethylene

  1. Chemical vapor deposition of refractory ternary nitrides for advanced diffusion barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Custer, Jonathan S.; Fleming, James G.; Roherty-Osmun, Elizabeth; Smith, Paul Martin

    1998-09-22

    Refractory ternary nitride films for diffusion barriers in microelectronics have been grown using chemical vapor deposition. Thin films of titanium-silicon-nitride, tungsten-boron-nitride, and tungsten-silicon-nitride of various compositions have been deposited on 150 mm Si wafers. The microstructure of the films are either fully amorphous for the tungsten based films, or nauocrystalline TiN in an amorphous matrix for titanium-silicon-nitride. All films exhibit step coverages suitable for use in future microelectronics generations. Selected films have been tested as diffusion barriers between copper and silicon, and generally perform extremely weH. These fiIms are promising candidates for advanced diffusion barriers for microelectronics applications. The manufacturing of silicon wafers into integrated circuits uses many different process and materials. The manufacturing process is usually divided into two parts: the front end of line (FEOL) and the back end of line (BEOL). In the FEOL the individual transistors that are the heart of an integrated circuit are made on the silicon wafer. The responsibility of the BEOL is to wire all the transistors together to make a complete circuit. The transistors are fabricated in the silicon itself. The wiring is made out of metal, currently aluminum and tungsten, insulated by silicon dioxide, see Figure 1. Unfortunately, silicon will diffuse into aluminum, causing aluminum spiking of junctions, killing transistors. Similarly, during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of tungsten from ~fj, the reactivity of the fluorine can cause "worn-holes" in the silicon, also destroying transistors. The solution to these problems is a so-called diffusion barrier, which will allow current to pass from the transistors to the wiring, but will prevent reactions between silicon and the metal.

  2. Modeling and control of diffusion and low-pressure chemical vapor deposition furnaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waard, H.; De Koning, W. L.

    1990-03-01

    In this paper a study is made of the heat transfer inside cylindrical resistance diffusion and low-pressure chemical vapor deposition furnaces, aimed at developing an improved temperature controller. A model of the thermal behavior is derived which also covers the important class of furnaces equipped with semitransparent quartz process tubes. The model takes into account the thermal behavior of the thermocouples. It is shown that currently used temperature controllers are highly inefficient for very large scale integration applications. Based on the model an alternative temperature controller of the linear-quadratic-Gaussian type is proposed which features direct wafer temperature control. Some simulation results are given.

  3. Field Testing of an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation, Tiles and Vapor Diffusion Venting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. W. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2016-02-05

    This research is a test implementation of an unvented tile roof assembly in a hot-humid climate (Orlando, FL; Zone 2A), insulated with air permeable insulation (netted and blown fiberglass). Given the localized moisture accumulation and failures seen in previous unvented roof field work, it was theorized that a 'diffusion vent' (water vapor open, but air barrier 'closed') at the highest points in the roof assembly might allow for the wintertime release of moisture, to safe levels. The 'diffusion vent' is an open slot at the ridge and hips, covered with a water-resistant but vapor open (500+ perm) air barrier membrane. As a control comparison, one portion of the roof was constructed as a typical unvented roof (self-adhered membrane at ridge). The data collected to date indicate that the diffusion vent roof shows greater moisture safety than the conventional, unvented roof design. The unvented roof had extended winter periods of 95-100% RH, and wafer (wood surrogate RH sensor) measurements indicating possible condensation; high moisture levels were concentrated at the roof ridge. In contrast, the diffusion vent roofs had drier conditions, with most peak MCs (sheathing) below 20%. In the spring, as outdoor temperatures warmed, all roofs dried well into the safe range (10% MC or less). Some roof-wall interfaces showed moderately high MCs; this might be due to moisture accumulation at the highest point in the lower attic, and/or shading of the roof by the adjacent second story. Monitoring will be continued at least through spring 2016 (another winter and spring).

  4. Method And Apparatus For Atomizing And Vaporizing Liquid

    KAUST Repository

    Lal, Amit

    2014-09-18

    A method and apparatus for atomizing and vaporizing liquid is described. An apparatus having an ejector configured to eject one or more droplets of liquid may be inserted into a reservoir containing liquid. The ejector may have a vibrating device that vibrates the ejector and causes liquid to move from the reservoir up through the ejector and out through an orifice located on the top of the ejector. The one or more droplets of liquid ejected from the ejector may be heated and vaporized into the air.

  5. Method And Apparatus For Atomizing And Vaporizing Liquid

    KAUST Repository

    Lal, Amit; Mayet, Abdulilah M.

    2014-01-01

    A method and apparatus for atomizing and vaporizing liquid is described. An apparatus having an ejector configured to eject one or more droplets of liquid may be inserted into a reservoir containing liquid. The ejector may have a vibrating device that vibrates the ejector and causes liquid to move from the reservoir up through the ejector and out through an orifice located on the top of the ejector. The one or more droplets of liquid ejected from the ejector may be heated and vaporized into the air.

  6. A level set method for vapor bubble dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Can, E.; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a finite-difference computational method suitable for the simulation of vapor–liquid (or gas–liquid) flows in which the dynamical effects of the vapor can be approximated by a time-dependent, spatially uniform pressure acting on the interface. In such flows it is not necessary

  7. Diffusion weighted imaging by MR method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikawa, Yoshiharu; Naruse, Shoji; Ebisu, Toshihiko; Tokumitsu, Takuaki; Ueda, Satoshi; Tanaka, Chuzo; Higuchi, Toshihiro; Umeda, Masahiro.

    1993-01-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging is a recently developed technique used to examine the micromovement of water molecules in vivo. We have applied this technique to examine various kinds of brain diseases, both experimentally and clinically. The calculated apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in vivo showed reliable values. In experimentally induced brain edema in rats, the pathophysiological difference of the type of edema (such as cytotoxic, and vasogenic) could be differentiated on the diffusion weighted MR images. Cytotoxic brain edema showed high intensity (slower diffusion) on the diffusion weighted images. On the other hand, vasogenic brain edema showed a low intensity image (faster diffusion). Diffusion anisotropy was demonstrated according to the direction of myelinated fibers and applied motion proving gradient (MPG). This anisotropy was also demonstrated in human brain tissue along the course of the corpus callosum, pyramidal tract and optic radiation. In brain ischemia cases, lesions were detected as high signal intensity areas, even one hour after the onset of ischemia. Diffusion was faster in brain tumor compared with normal brain. Histological differences were not clearly reflected by the ADC value. In epidermoid tumor cases, the intensity was characteristically high, was demonstrated, and the cerebrospinal fluid border was clearly demonstrated. New clinical information obtainable with this molecular diffusion method will prove to be useful in various clinical studies. (author)

  8. Vapor diffusion synthesis of rugby-shaped CoFe2O4/graphene composites as absorbing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shenli; Jiao, Qingze; Hu, Ju; Li, Jingjing; Zhao, Yun; Li, Hansheng; Wu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: CoFe 2 O 4 rugbies/graphene composites were prepared using a vapor diffusion method followed by calcination. As-synthesized rugby-like CoFe 2 O 4 particles were distributed on the graphene sheet. PVP played a key role for the formation of rugby-shaped morphology of CoFe 2 O 4 particles. A minimum reflection loss of −39.0 dB was observed at 10.9 GHz for the CoFe 2 O 4 rugbies/graphene composites with a thickness of 2 mm, and the effective absorption bandwidth was 4.7 GHz. The CoFe 2 O 4 rugbies/graphene composites exhibited better microwave absorbing performance than that of the CoFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles/graphene composites prepared without PVP. - Highlights: • CoFe 2 O 4 rugbies/graphene hybrids were synthesized using a vapor diffusion method. • PVP played a key role for the formation of CoFe 2 O 4 rugbies. • CoFe 2 O 4 rugbies/graphene composites showed excellent microwave absorbing property. - Abstract: Rugby-shaped CoFe 2 O 4 /graphene composites were synthesized using a vapor diffusion method in combination with calcination. The morphologies and structures of the products were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The magnetic and electromagnetic parameters were measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer and a vector network analyzer, respectively. Results show that rugby-shaped CoFe 2 O 4 particles are distributed on graphene sheets. A minimum reflection loss (RL) of −39.0 dB is observed at 10.9 GHz for the sample with a thickness of 2.0 mm, and the effective absorption frequency (RL < −10 dB) ranges from 9.6 to 14.3 GHz, indicating the excellent microwave absorption performance of the products. The absorbing performance of the CoFe 2 O 4 rugbies/graphene composites is better than that of the CoFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles/graphene composites

  9. Laser absorption spectroscopy of water vapor confined in nanoporous alumina: wall collision line broadening and gas diffusion dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Tomas; Lewander, Märta; Svanberg, Sune

    2010-08-02

    We demonstrate high-resolution tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) of water vapor confined in nanoporous alumina. Strong multiple light scattering results in long photon pathlengths (1 m through a 6 mm sample). We report on strong line broadening due to frequent wall collisions (gas-surface interactions). For the water vapor line at 935.685 nm, the HWHM of confined molecules are about 4.3 GHz as compared to 2.9 GHz for free molecules (atmospheric pressure). Gas diffusion is also investigated, and in contrast to molecular oxygen (that moves rapidly in and out of the alumina), the exchange of water vapor is found very slow.

  10. Lithium-ions diffusion kinetic in LiFePO4/carbon nanoparticles synthesized by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chao; Zhou, Jian; Liu, Guizhen; Wang, Lin

    2018-03-01

    Olivine structure LiFePO4/carbon nanoparticles are synthesized successfully using a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) method. Microwave is an effective method to synthesize nanomaterials, the LiFePO4/carbon nanoparticles with high crystallinity can shorten diffusion routes for ionic transfer and electron tunneling. Meanwhile, a high quality, complete and homogenous carbon layer with appropriate thickness coating on the surface of LiFePO4 particles during in situ chemical vapor deposition process, which can ensure that electrons are able to transfer fast enough from all sides. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is carried out to collect information about the kinetic behavior of lithium diffusion in LiFePO4/carbon nanoparticles during the charging and discharging processes. The chemical diffusion coefficients of lithium ions, DLi, are calculated in the range of 10-15-10-9 cm2s-1. Nanoscale LiFePO4/carbon particles show the longer regions of the faster solid-solution diffusion, and corresponding to the narrower region of the slower two-phase diffusion during the insertion/exaction of lithium ions. The CV and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements show that the LiFePO4/carbon nanoparticles perform an excellent electrochemical performance, especially the high rate capacity and cycle life.

  11. Piston pump and method of reducing vapor lock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Harvey, Michael N.

    2000-02-15

    A pump includes a housing defining a cavity, at least one bore, a bore inlet, and a bore outlet. The bore extends from the cavity to the outlet and the inlet communicates with the bore at a position between the cavity and the outlet. A crankshaft is mounted in supports and has an eccentric portion disposed in the cavity. The eccentric portion is coupled to a piston so that rotation of the crankshaft reciprocates the piston in the bore between a discharge position an intake position. The bore may be offset from an axis of rotation to reduce bending of the piston during crankshaft rotation. During assembly of the pump, separate parts of the housing can be connected together to facilitate installation of internal pumping components. Also disclosed is a method of reducing vapor lock by mixing vapor and liquid portions of a substance and introducing the mixture into a piston bore.

  12. Method of and apparatus for measuring vapor density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, L.D.; Cerni, T.A.

    1989-10-17

    Apparatus and method are disclosed which determine the concentration of an individual component, such as water vapor, of a multi-component mixture, such as a gaseous mixture for cooling a nuclear reactor. A hygrometer apparatus includes an infrared source for producing a broadband infrared energy beam that includes a strong water vapor absorption band and a weak water vapor absorption region. The beam is chopped to select infrared pulses. A temporally first pulse has a wavelength in the weakly absorbing region, a temporally second pulse has a wavelength in the strong band and a temporally third pulse has a wavelength in the weakly absorbing region. A fourth reference pulse representing background radiation is interposed in such chopped pulses. An indium arsenide infrared sensor is responsive to the pulses for generating an output signal in proportion to an equation given in the patent where N1 is proportional to the transmission through the sample of the first signal, N4 is related to the background radiation, and [K2 (N2-N4) + K3 (N3-N4)] is the time-weighted average of the transmission through the sample of the second and third pulses applicable at the time of the second pulse, with the reference pulse N4 being subtracted in each case to render the ratio independent of variations in the background radiation. 11 figs.

  13. Entropy methods for diffusive partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Jüngel, Ansgar

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a range of entropy methods for diffusive PDEs devised by many researchers in the course of the past few decades, which allow us to understand the qualitative behavior of solutions to diffusive equations (and Markov diffusion processes). Applications include the large-time asymptotics of solutions, the derivation of convex Sobolev inequalities, the existence and uniqueness of weak solutions, and the analysis of discrete and geometric structures of the PDEs. The purpose of the book is to provide readers an introduction to selected entropy methods that can be found in the research literature. In order to highlight the core concepts, the results are not stated in the widest generality and most of the arguments are only formal (in the sense that the functional setting is not specified or sufficient regularity is supposed). The text is also suitable for advanced master and PhD students and could serve as a textbook for special courses and seminars.

  14. Diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubaschewski, O.

    1983-01-01

    The diffusion rate values of titanium, its compounds and alloys are summarized and tabulated. The individual chemical diffusion coefficients and self-diffusion coefficients of certain isotopes are given. Experimental methods are listed which were used for the determination of diffusion coefficients. Some values have been taken over from other studies. Also given are graphs showing the temperature dependences of diffusion and changes in the diffusion coefficient with concentration changes

  15. New explicit equations for the accurate calculation of the growth and evaporation of hydrometeors by the diffusion of water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, R. C.; Coen, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    The traditional explicit growth equation has been widely used to calculate the growth and evaporation of hydrometeors by the diffusion of water vapor. This paper reexamines the assumptions underlying the traditional equation and shows that large errors (10-30 percent in some cases) result if it is used carelessly. More accurate explicit equations are derived by approximating the saturation vapor-density difference as a quadratic rather than a linear function of the temperature difference between the particle and ambient air. These new equations, which reduce the error to less than a few percent, merit inclusion in a broad range of atmospheric models.

  16. Diffusion in Solids Fundamentals, Methods, Materials, Diffusion-Controlled Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrer, Helmut

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion is a vital topic in solid-state physics and chemistry, physical metallurgy and materials science. Diffusion processes are ubiquitous in solids at elevated temperatures. A thorough understanding of diffusion in materials is crucial for materials development and engineering. This book first gives an account of the central aspects of diffusion in solids, for which the necessary background is a course in solid state physics. It then provides easy access to important information about diffuson in metals, alloys, semiconductors, ion-conducting materials, glasses and nanomaterials. Several diffusion-controlled phenomena, including ionic conduction, grain-boundary and dislocation pipe diffusion, are considered as well. Graduate students in solid-state physics, physical metallurgy, materials science, physical and inorganic chemistry or geophysics will benefit from this book as will physicists, chemists, metallurgists, materials engineers in academic and industrial research laboratories.

  17. In situ growth of ceramic quantum dots in polyaniline host via water vapor flow diffusion as potential electrode materials for energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mombrú, Dominique [Centro NanoMat/CryssMat/Física – DETEMA – Facultad de Química – Universidad de la República, C.P. 11800 Montevideo (Uruguay); Romero, Mariano, E-mail: mromero@fq.edu.uy [Centro NanoMat/CryssMat/Física – DETEMA – Facultad de Química – Universidad de la República, C.P. 11800 Montevideo (Uruguay); Faccio, Ricardo, E-mail: rfaccio@fq.edu.uy [Centro NanoMat/CryssMat/Física – DETEMA – Facultad de Química – Universidad de la República, C.P. 11800 Montevideo (Uruguay); Castiglioni, Jorge [Laboratorio de Fisicoquímica de Superficies – DETEMA – Facultad de Química – Universidad de la República, C.P. 11800 Montevideo (Uruguay); Mombrú, Alvaro W., E-mail: amombru@fq.edu.uy [Centro NanoMat/CryssMat/Física – DETEMA – Facultad de Química – Universidad de la República, C.P. 11800 Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2017-06-15

    In situ preparation of polyaniline-ceramic nanocomposites has recently demonstrated that the electrical properties are highly improved with respect to the typical ex situ preparations. In this report, we present for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the in situ growth of titanium oxide quantum dots in polyaniline host via water vapor flow diffusion as an easily adaptable route to prepare other ceramic-polymer nanocomposites. The main relevance of this method is the possibility to prepare ceramic quantum dots from alkoxide precursors using water vapor flow into any hydrophobic polymer host and to achieve good homogeneity and size-control. In addition, we perform full characterization by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, small angle X-ray scattering, thermogravimetric and calorimetric analyses, confocal Raman microscopy and impedance spectroscopy analyses. The presence of the polymer host and interparticle Coulomb repulsive interactions was evaluated as an influence for the formation of ~3–8 nm equally-sized quantum dots independently of the concentration. The polyaniline polaron population showed an increase for the quantum dots diluted regime and the suppression at the concentrated regime, ascribed to the formation of chemical bonds at the interface, which was confirmed by theoretical simulations. In agreement with the previous observation, the in situ growth of ceramic quantum dots in polyaniline host via water vapor flow diffusion could be very useful as a novel approach to prepare electrode materials for energy conversion and storage applications. - Highlights: • In situ growth of titanium oxide quantum dots in polyaniline host via water vapor flow diffusion. • Polyaniline charge carriers at the interface and charge interactions between quantum dots. • Easy extrapolation to sol-gel derived quantum dots into polymer host as potential electrode materials.

  18. Role of boundary layer diffusion in vapor deposition growth of chalcogenide nanosheets: the case of GeS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Huang, Liang; Snigdha, Gayatri Pongur; Yu, Yifei; Cao, Linyou

    2012-10-23

    We report a synthesis of single-crystalline two-dimensional GeS nanosheets using vapor deposition processes and show that the growth behavior of the nanosheet is substantially different from those of other nanomaterials and thin films grown by vapor depositions. The nanosheet growth is subject to strong influences of the diffusion of source materials through the boundary layer of gas flows. This boundary layer diffusion is found to be the rate-determining step of the growth under typical experimental conditions, evidenced by a substantial dependence of the nanosheet's size on diffusion fluxes. We also find that high-quality GeS nanosheets can grow only in the diffusion-limited regime, as the crystalline quality substantially deteriorates when the rate-determining step is changed away from the boundary layer diffusion. We establish a simple model to analyze the diffusion dynamics in experiments. Our analysis uncovers an intuitive correlation of diffusion flux with the partial pressure of source materials, the flow rate of carrier gas, and the total pressure in the synthetic setup. The observed significant role of boundary layer diffusions in the growth is unique for nanosheets. It may be correlated with the high growth rate of GeS nanosheets, ~3-5 μm/min, which is 1 order of magnitude higher than other nanomaterials (such as nanowires) and thin films. This fundamental understanding of the effect of boundary layer diffusions may generally apply to other chalcogenide nanosheets that can grow rapidly. It can provide useful guidance for the development of general paradigms to control the synthesis of nanosheets.

  19. Galerkin method for solving diffusion equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapelkin, E.S.

    1975-01-01

    A programme for the solution of the three-dimensional two-group multizone neutron diffusion problem in (x, y, z)-geometry is described. The programme XYZ-5 gives the currents of both groups, the effective neutron multiplication coefficient and several integral properties of the reactor. The solution was found with the Galerkin method using speciallly constructed and chosen coordinate functions. The programme is written in ALGOL-60 and consists of 5 parts. Its text is given

  20. Carbon diffusion in uncoated and titanium nitride coated iron substrates during microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiser, P.S.; Prawer, S.; Manory, R.R.; Paterson, P.J.K.; Stuart, Sue-Anne

    1992-01-01

    Auger Electron Spectroscopy has been employed to investigate the effectiveness of thin films of TiN as barriers to carbon diffusion during Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) of diamond onto Fe substrates. Auger Depth Profiling was used to monitor the C concentration in the TiN layer, through the interface and into the substrate both before and after CVD diamond deposition. The results show that a layer of TiN only 250 Angstroems thick is sufficient to inhibit soot formation on the Fe surface and C diffusion into the Fe bulk. 14 refs., 4 figs

  1. A simplified counter diffusion method combined with a 1D simulation program for optimizing crystallization conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroaki; Inaka, Koji; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Takahashi, Sachiko; Sano, Satoshi; Sato, Masaru; Yoshitomi, Susumu

    2004-01-01

    We developed a new protein crystallization method has been developed using a simplified counter-diffusion method for optimizing crystallization condition. It is composed of only a single capillary, the gel in the silicon tube and the screw-top test tube, which are readily available in the laboratory. The one capillary can continuously scan a wide range of crystallization conditions (combination of the concentrations of the precipitant and the protein) unless crystallization occurs, which means that it corresponds to many drops in the vapor-diffusion method. The amount of the precipitant and the protein solutions can be much less than in conventional methods. In this study, lysozyme and alpha-amylase were used as model proteins for demonstrating the efficiency of this method. In addition, one-dimensional (1-D) simulations of the crystal growth were performed based on the 1-D diffusion model. The optimized conditions can be applied to the initial crystallization conditions for both other counter-diffusion methods with the Granada Crystallization Box (GCB) and for the vapor-diffusion method after some modification.

  2. Method for the generation of variable density metal vapors which bypasses the liquidus phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnmann, Walter; Larese, John Z.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing a metal vapor that includes the steps of combining a metal and graphite in a vessel to form a mixture; heating the mixture to a first temperature in an argon gas atmosphere to form a metal carbide; maintaining the first temperature for a period of time; heating the metal carbide to a second temperature to form a metal vapor; withdrawing the metal vapor and the argon gas from the vessel; and separating the metal vapor from the argon gas. Metal vapors made using this method can be used to produce uniform powders of the metal oxide that have narrow size distribution and high purity.

  3. Homotopy analysis method for neutron diffusion calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavdar, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM), proposed in 1992 by Shi Jun Liao and has been developed since then, is based on a fundamental concept in differential geometry and topology, the homotopy. It has proved useful for problems involving algebraic, linear/non-linear, ordinary/partial differential and differential-integral equations being an analytic, recursive method that provides a series sum solution. It has the advantage of offering a certain freedom for the choice of its arguments such as the initial guess, the auxiliary linear operator and the convergence control parameter, and it allows us to effectively control the rate and region of convergence of the series solution. HAM is applied for the fixed source neutron diffusion equation in this work, which is a part of our research motivated by the question of whether methods for solving the neutron diffusion equation that yield straightforward expressions but able to provide a solution of reasonable accuracy exist such that we could avoid analytic methods that are widely used but either fail to solve the problem or provide solutions through many intricate expressions that are likely to contain mistakes or numerical methods that require powerful computational resources and advanced programming skills due to their very nature or intricate mathematical fundamentals. Fourier basis are employed for expressing the initial guess due to the structure of the problem and its boundary conditions. We present the results in comparison with other widely used methods of Adomian Decomposition and Variable Separation.

  4. Considerations of particle vaporization and analyte diffusion in single-particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Koon-Sing; Lui, Kwok-On; Lee, Kin-Ho; Chan, Wing-Tat

    2013-01-01

    The intensity of individual gold nanoparticles with nominal diameters of 80, 100, 150, and 200 nm was measured using single-particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Since the particles are not perfectly monodisperse, a distribution of ICP-MS intensity was obtained for each nominal diameter. The distribution of particle mass was determined from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image of the particles. The distribution of ICP-MS intensity and the distribution of particle mass for each nominal diameter were correlated to give a calibration curve. The calibration curves are linear, but the slope decreases as the nominal diameter increases. The reduced slope is probably due to a smaller degree of vaporization of the large particles. In addition to the degree of particle vaporization, the rate of analyte diffusion in the ICP is an important factor that determines the measured ICP-MS intensity. Simulated ICP-MS intensity versus particle size was calculated using a simple computer program that accounts for the vaporization rate of the gold nanoparticles and the diffusion rate and degree of ionization of the gold atoms. The curvature of the simulated calibration curves changes with sampling depth because the effects of particle vaporization and analyte diffusion on the ICP-MS intensity are dependent on the residence time of the particle in the ICP. Calibration curves of four hypothetical particles representing the four combinations of high and low boiling points (2000 and 4000 K) and high and low analyte diffusion rates (atomic masses of 10 and 200 Da) were calculated to further illustrate the relative effects of particle vaporization and analyte diffusion. The simulated calibration curves show that the sensitivity of single-particle ICP-MS is smaller than that of the ICP-MS measurement of continuous flow of standard solutions by a factor of 2 or more. Calibration using continuous flow of standard solution is semi-quantitative at best. An

  5. Post-Decontamination Vapor Sampling and Analytical Test Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-12

    is decontaminated that could pose an exposure hazard to unprotected personnel. The chemical contaminants may include chemical warfare agents (CWAs... decontamination process. Chemical contaminants can include chemical warfare agents (CWAs) or their simulants, nontraditional agents (NTAs), toxic industrial...a range of test articles from coupons, panels, and small fielded equipment items. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Vapor hazard; vapor sampling; chemical warfare

  6. The numerical methods for the development of the mixture region in the vapor explosion simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y.; Ohashi, H.; Akiyama, M. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    An attempt to numerically simulate the process of the vapor explosion with a general multi-component and multi-dimension code is being challenged. Because of the rapid change of the flow field and extremely nonuniform distribution of the components in the system of the vapor explosion, the numerical divergence and diffusion are subject to occur easily. A dispersed component model and a multiregion scheme, by which these difficulties can be effectively overcome, were proposed. The simulations have been performed for the processes of the premixing and the fragmentation propagation in the vapor explosion.

  7. Design Method for Channel Diffusers of Centrifugal Compressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola Kalinkevych

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The design method for channel diffusers of centrifugal compressors, which is based on the solving of the inverse problem of gas dynamics, is presented in the paper. The concept of the design is to provide high pressure recovery of the diffuser by assuming the preseparation condition of the boundary layer along one of the channel surfaces. The channel diffuser was designed with the use of developed method to replace the vaned diffuser of the centrifugal compressor model stage. The numerical simulation of the diffusers was implemented by means of CFD software. Obtained gas dynamic characteristics of the designed diffuser were compared to the base vaned diffuser of the compressor stage.

  8. Analysis and visualization methods for interpretation of diffusion MRI data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion MRI is an imaging technique that is very sensitive to microstructural changes in tissue. Diffusion tensor MRI, the most commonly used method, can estimate the magnitude and anisotropy of diffusion. These tensor-based diffusion parameters have been shown to change in many neuropathological

  9. Simulation of anisotropic diffusion by means of a diffusion velocity method

    CERN Document Server

    Beaudoin, A; Rivoalen, E

    2003-01-01

    An alternative method to the Particle Strength Exchange method for solving the advection-diffusion equation in the general case of a non-isotropic and non-uniform diffusion is proposed. This method is an extension of the diffusion velocity method. It is shown that this extension is quite straightforward due to the explicit use of the diffusion flux in the expression of the diffusion velocity. This approach is used to simulate pollutant transport in groundwater and the results are compared to those of the PSE method presented in an earlier study by Zimmermann et al.

  10. Macrokinetics of carbon nanotubes synthesis by the chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukhov, Artem; Dyachkova, Tatyana; Tugolukov, Evgeny; Besperstova, Galina

    2017-11-01

    A new approach to studying and developing basic processes which take place on the surface of a metal catalyst during the thermal decomposition of carbonaceous substances in the carbon nanotubes synthesis by the chemical vapor deposition method was proposed. In addition, an analysis was made of the interrelationships between these thermal, diffusion, hydrodynamic and other synthesis processes. A strong effect of the catalyst regeneration stage on the stage of nanotube formation has been shown. Based on the developed approach, a mathematical model was elaborated. Comparison of the calculation and the experiment carried out with the NiO-MgO catalyst at propane flow rate of 50 mL/min (standard conditions) and ethanol flow rate 0.3 mL/min (liq.) has revealed a discrepancy of less than 10%.

  11. Formulation and analyses of vaporization and diffusion-controlled combustion of fuel sprays

    OpenAIRE

    Arrieta Sanagustín, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the modelling of vaporization and combustion of sprays. A general two-continua formulation is given for the numerical computation of spray flows, including the treatment of the droplets as homogenized sources. Group combustion is considered, with the reaction between the fuel coming from the vaporizing droplets and the oxygen of the air modeled in the Burke-Schumann limit of infinitely fast chemical reaction, with nonunity Lewis numbers allowed for the different r...

  12. Universal method for effusive-flow characterization target ion source/vapor transport systems for radioactive ion beam generation (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.; Bilheux, J.-C.; Liu, Y.; Cole, J. A.; Williams, C.

    2004-01-01

    Worldwide interest in the use of accelerated radioactive ion beams (RIBs) for exploring reactions important in understanding the structure of the nucleus and nuclear astrophysical phenomena has motivated the construction of facilities dedicated to their production and acceleration. Many facilities utilize the isotope-separator-on-line (ISOL) method in which species of interest are generated within a solid or liquid target matrix. Experimentally useful RIBs are often difficult to generate by this technique because of the times required for diffusion from the interior of the target material, and to effusively transport the species of interest to the ion source following diffusion release in relation to its lifetime. Therefore, these delay times must be minimized. We have developed an experimental method that can be used to determine effusive-flow times of arbitrary geometry target/vapor transport systems. The technique utilizes a fast valve to measure effusive-flow times as short as 0.1 ms for any chemically active or inactive species through any target system, independent of size, geometry and materials of construction. In this report, we provide a theoretical basis for effusive flow through arbitrary geometry vapor transport systems, describe a universal experimental apparatus for measuring effusive-flow times, and provide time spectra for noble gases through prototype RIB target/vapor-transport systems

  13. Laser scattering in a hanging drop vapor diffusion apparatus for protein crystal growth in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casay, G. A.; Wilson, W. W.

    1992-01-01

    One type of hardware used to grow protein crystals in the microgravity environment aboard the U.S. Space Shuttle is a hanging drop vapor diffusion apparatus (HDVDA). In order to optimize crystal growth conditions, dynamic control of the HDVDA is desirable. A critical component in the dynamically controlled system is a detector for protein nucleation. We have constructed a laser scattering detector for the HDVDA capable of detecting the nucleation stage. The detector was successfully tested for several scatterers differing in size using dynamic light scattering techniques. In addition, the ability to detect protein nucleation using the HDVDA was demonstrated for lysozyme.

  14. Diffusion in condensed matter methods, materials, models

    CERN Document Server

    Kärger, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    Diffusion as the process of particle transport due to stochastic movement is a phenomenon of crucial relevance for a large variety of processes and materials. This comprehensive, handbook- style survey of diffusion in condensed matter gives detailed insight into diffusion as the process of particle transport due to stochastic movement. Leading experts in the field describe in 23 chapters the different aspects of diffusion, covering microscopic and macroscopic experimental techniques and exemplary results for various classes of solids, liquids and interfaces as well as several theoretical concepts and models. Students and scientists in physics, chemistry, materials science, and biology will benefit from this detailed compilation.

  15. Solid vapor pressure for five heavy PAHs via the Knudsen effusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Jinxia; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We report on vapor pressures and enthalpies of fusion and sublimation of five heavy PAHs. → Solid vapor pressures were measured using Knudsen effusion method. → Solid vapor pressures for benzo[b]fluoranthene, and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene have not been published in the open literature. → Reported subcooled liquid state vapor pressures may or may not lend themselves to correction to sublimation vapor pressure. → Subcooled liquid state vapor pressures might sometimes actually be closer to actual solid state sublimation vapor pressures. - Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are compounds resulting from incomplete combustion and many fuel processing operations, and they are commonly found as subsurface environmental contaminants at sites of former manufactured gas plants. Knowledge of their vapor pressures is the key to predict their fate and transport in the environment. The present study involves five heavy PAHs, i.e. benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[ghi]perylene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, and dibenz[a,h]anthracene, which are all as priority pollutants classified by the US EPA. The vapor pressures of these heavy PAHs were measured by using Knudsen effusion method over the temperature range of (364 to 454) K. The corresponding values of the enthalpy of sublimation were calculated from the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. The enthalpy of fusion for the five PAHs was also measured by using differential scanning calorimetry and used to convert earlier published sub-cooled liquid vapor pressure data to solid vapor pressure in order to compare with the present results. These adjusted values do not agree with the present measured actual solid vapor pressure values for these PAHs, but there is good agreement between present results and other earlier published sublimation data.

  16. Diffuse scattering from the liquid-vapor interfaces of dilute Bi:Ga, Tl:Ga, and Pb:Ga alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dongxu; Jiang Xu; Rice, Stuart A.; Lin Binhua; Meron, Mati

    2005-01-01

    As part of a study of the in-plane wave-vector (q xy ) dependence of the effective Hamiltonian for the liquid-vapor interface, H(q), the wave-vector dependences of diffuse x-ray scattering from the liquid-vapor interfaces of dilute alloys of Bi in Ga, Tl in Ga, and Pb in Ga have been measured. In these dilute alloys the solute component segregates as a monolayer that forms the outermost stratum of the liquid-vapor interfaces, and the density distribution along the normal to the interface is stratified. Over the temperature ranges that the alloy interfaces were studied, the Tl and Pb monolayers exhibit both crystalline and liquid phases while the Bi monolayer is always liquid. The diffuse scattering from the liquid-vapor interfaces of these alloys displays interesting differences with that from the liquid-vapor interface of pure Ga. The presence of a segregated monolayer of solute in the liquid-vapor interface of the alloy appears to slightly suppress the fluctuations in an intermediate wave-vector range in a fashion that preserves the validity of the macroscopic capillary wave model to smaller wavelengths than in pure liquid Ga, and there is an increase in diffuse scattering when the Tl and Pb monolayers melt. The surface intrinsic roughness from fitting the wave-vector dependence of surface tension is 5.0 pm for the Tl:Ga alloy and 1.4 pm for the Bi:Ga alloy. Also, a mode of excitation that contributes to diffuse scattering from the liquid-vapor interface of Pb in Ga, but does not contribute to diffuse scattering from the liquid-vapor interface of Ga, has been identified. It is proposed that this mode corresponds to the separation of the Pb and Ga layers in the regime 1 nm -1 ≤q xy ≤10 nm -1

  17. Comparison of vapor sampling system (VSS) and in situ vapor sampling (ISVS) methods on Tanks C-107, BY-108, and S-102. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Edwards, J.A.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-08-01

    This report discusses comparison tests for two methods of collecting vapor samples from the Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tank headspaces. The two sampling methods compared are the truck-mounted vapor sampling system (VSS) and the cart-mounted in-situ vapor sampling (ISVS). Three tanks were sampled by both the VSS and ISVS methods from the same access risers within the same 8-hour period. These tanks have diverse headspace compositions and they represent the highest known level of several key vapor analytes

  18. Water vapor mass balance method for determining air infiltration rates in houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. DeWalle; Gordon M. Heisler

    1980-01-01

    A water vapor mass balance technique that includes the use of common humidity-control equipment can be used to determine average air infiltration rates in buildings. Only measurements of the humidity inside and outside the home, the mass of vapor exchanged by a humidifier/dehumidifier, and the volume of interior air space are needed. This method gives results that...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Wwww... - Test Method for Determining Vapor Suppressant Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... premise of this method is to compare laminate samples made with vapor suppressant additive and made... additives. The effectiveness of a specific vapor suppressant and resin mixture is determined by comparing... ±.01g with digital output, such as an RS-232 bi-directional interface 13 for use with automatic data...

  20. Nicotine Vapor Method to Induce Nicotine Dependence in Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallupi, Marsida; George, Olivier

    2017-07-05

    Nicotine, the main addictive component of tobacco, induces potentiation of brain stimulation reward, increases locomotor activity, and induces conditioned place preference. Nicotine cessation produces a withdrawal syndrome that can be relieved by nicotine replacement therapy. In the last decade, the market for electronic cigarettes has flourished, especially among adolescents. The nicotine vaporizer or electronic nicotine delivery system is a battery-operated device that allows the user to simulate the experience of tobacco smoking without inhaling smoke. The device is designed to be an alternative to conventional cigarettes that emits vaporized nicotine inhaled by the user. This report describes a procedure to vaporize nicotine in the air to produce blood nicotine levels in rodents that are clinically relevant to those that are observed in humans and produce dependence. We also describe how to construct the apparatus to deliver nicotine vapor in a stable, reliable, and consistent manner, as well as how to analyze air for nicotine content. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Vapor diffusion synthesis of rugby-shaped CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/graphene composites as absorbing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shenli [School of Chemical Engineering and the Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Jiao, Qingze [School of Chemical Engineering and the Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Zhuhai, Zhuhai 519085 (China); Hu, Ju; Li, Jingjing [School of Chemical Engineering and the Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhao, Yun, E-mail: zhaoyun@bit.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and the Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Li, Hansheng; Wu, Qin [School of Chemical Engineering and the Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-05-05

    Graphical abstract: CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} rugbies/graphene composites were prepared using a vapor diffusion method followed by calcination. As-synthesized rugby-like CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles were distributed on the graphene sheet. PVP played a key role for the formation of rugby-shaped morphology of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles. A minimum reflection loss of −39.0 dB was observed at 10.9 GHz for the CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} rugbies/graphene composites with a thickness of 2 mm, and the effective absorption bandwidth was 4.7 GHz. The CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} rugbies/graphene composites exhibited better microwave absorbing performance than that of the CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles/graphene composites prepared without PVP. - Highlights: • CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} rugbies/graphene hybrids were synthesized using a vapor diffusion method. • PVP played a key role for the formation of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} rugbies. • CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} rugbies/graphene composites showed excellent microwave absorbing property. - Abstract: Rugby-shaped CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/graphene composites were synthesized using a vapor diffusion method in combination with calcination. The morphologies and structures of the products were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The magnetic and electromagnetic parameters were measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer and a vector network analyzer, respectively. Results show that rugby-shaped CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles are distributed on graphene sheets. A minimum reflection loss (RL) of −39.0 dB is observed at 10.9 GHz for the sample with a thickness of 2.0 mm, and the effective absorption frequency (RL < −10 dB) ranges from 9.6 to 14.3 GHz, indicating the excellent microwave absorption performance of the products. The absorbing performance of the CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} rugbies/graphene composites is better than that of the Co

  2. Method for Hot Real-Time Sampling of Pyrolysis Vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomeroy, Marc D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-29

    Biomass Pyrolysis has been an increasing topic of research, in particular as a replacement for crude oil. This process utilizes moderate temperatures to thermally deconstruct the biomass which is then condensed into a mixture of liquid oxygenates to be used as fuel precursors. Pyrolysis oils contain more than 400 compounds, up to 60 percent of which do not re-volatilize for subsequent chemical analysis. Vapor chemical composition is also complicated as additional condensation reactions occur during the condensation and collection of the product. Due to the complexity of the pyrolysis oil, and a desire to catalytically upgrade the vapor composition before condensation, online real-time analytical techniques such as Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) are of great use. However, in order to properly sample hot pyrolysis vapors, many challenges must be overcome. Sampling must occur within a narrow range of temperatures to reduce product composition changes from overheating or partial condensation or plugging of lines from condensed products. Residence times must be kept at a minimum to reduce further reaction chemistries. Pyrolysis vapors also form aerosols that are carried far downstream and can pass through filters resulting in build-up in downstream locations. The co-produced bio-char and ash from the pyrolysis process can lead to plugging of the sample lines, and must be filtered out at temperature, even with the use of cyclonic separators. A practical approach for considerations and sampling system design, as well as lessons learned are integrated into the hot analytical sampling system of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) to provide industrially relevant demonstrations of thermochemical transformations of biomass feedstocks at the pilot scale.

  3. Improved method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for gas cleanup to remove one or more metallic contaminants present as vapor. More particularly, the invention relates to a gas cleanup process using mass transfer to control the saturation levels such that essentially no particulates are formed, and the vapor condenses on the gas passage surfaces. It addresses the need to cleanup an inert gas contaminated with cadmium which may escape from the electrochemical processing of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel in a hot cell. The IFR is a complete, self-contained, sodium-cooled, pool-type fast reactor fueled with a metallic alloy of uranium, plutonium and zirconium, and is equipped with a close-coupled fuel cycle. Tests with a model have shown that removal of cadmium from argon gas is in the order of 99.99%. The invention could also apply to the industrial cleanup of air or other gases contaminated with zinc, lead, or mercury. In addition, the invention has application in the cleanup of other gas systems contaminated with metal vapors which may be toxic or unhealthy

  4. Germanium diffusion with vapor-phase GeAs and oxygen co-incorporation in GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Fu; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Hsieh, Kuang-Chien

    2018-01-01

    Vapor-phase germanium diffusion has been demonstrated in Zn-doped and semi-insulating GaAs in sealed ampoules with GeAs powders and excess arsenic. Secondary-ion-mass spectroscopy (SIMS) profiles indicate the presence of unintentional co-incorporation of oxygen in high densities (>1017/cm3) along with diffused germanium donors whose concentration (>>1018/cm3) determined by electro-chemical capacitance-voltage (ECV) profiler shows significant compensation near the surface. The source of oxygen mainly originates from the GeAs powder which contains Ge-O surface oxides. Variable-temperature photoluminescence (PL) shows that in GeAs-diffused samples, a broad peak ranging from 0.86-1.38 eV with the peak position around 1.1 eV predominates at low temperatures while the near band-edge luminescence quenches. The broad band is attributed to the GeGa-VGa self-activated (SA) centers possibly associated with nearby oxygen-related defect complex, and its luminescence persists up to 400 K. The configurational-coordinate modeling finds that the SA defect complex has a thermal activation energy of 150-180 meV and a vibrational energy 26.8 meV. The presence of oxygen does not much affect the SA emission intensity but may have influenced the peak position, vibration frequency and activation energy as compared to other common donor-VGa defects in GaAs.

  5. Germanium diffusion with vapor-phase GeAs and oxygen co-incorporation in GaAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Fu Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vapor-phase germanium diffusion has been demonstrated in Zn-doped and semi-insulating GaAs in sealed ampoules with GeAs powders and excess arsenic. Secondary-ion-mass spectroscopy (SIMS profiles indicate the presence of unintentional co-incorporation of oxygen in high densities (>1017/cm3 along with diffused germanium donors whose concentration (>>1018/cm3 determined by electro-chemical capacitance-voltage (ECV profiler shows significant compensation near the surface. The source of oxygen mainly originates from the GeAs powder which contains Ge-O surface oxides. Variable-temperature photoluminescence (PL shows that in GeAs-diffused samples, a broad peak ranging from 0.86-1.38 eV with the peak position around 1.1 eV predominates at low temperatures while the near band-edge luminescence quenches. The broad band is attributed to the GeGa-VGa self-activated (SA centers possibly associated with nearby oxygen-related defect complex, and its luminescence persists up to 400 K. The configurational-coordinate modeling finds that the SA defect complex has a thermal activation energy of 150-180 meV and a vibrational energy 26.8 meV. The presence of oxygen does not much affect the SA emission intensity but may have influenced the peak position, vibration frequency and activation energy as compared to other common donor-VGa defects in GaAs.

  6. Method of estimating changes in vapor concentrations continuously generated from two-component organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Hajime; Ishidao, Toru; Ishimatsu, Sumiyo

    2010-12-01

    We measured vapor concentrations continuously evaporated from two-component organic solvents in a reservoir and proposed a method to estimate and predict the evaporation rate or generated vapor concentrations. Two kinds of organic solvents were put into a small reservoir made of glass (3 cm in diameter and 3 cm high) that was installed in a cylindrical glass vessel (10 cm in diameter and 15 cm high). Air was introduced into the glass vessel at a flow rate of 150 ml/min, and the generated vapor concentrations were intermittently monitored for up to 5 hours with a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector. The solvent systems tested in this study were the methanoltoluene system and the ethyl acetate-toluene system. The vapor concentrations of the more volatile component, that is, methanol in the methanol-toluene system and ethyl acetate in the ethyl acetate-toluene system, were high at first, and then decreased with time. On the other hand, the concentrations of the less volatile component were low at first, and then increased with time. A model for estimating multicomponent organic vapor concentrations was developed, based on a theory of vapor-liquid equilibria and a theory of the mass transfer rate, and estimated values were compared with experimental ones. The estimated vapor concentrations were in relatively good agreement with the experimental ones. The results suggest that changes in concentrations of two-component organic vapors continuously evaporating from a liquid reservoir can be estimated by the proposed model.

  7. Intercomparison of diffusion coefficient derived from the through-diffusion experiment using different numerical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chih-Lung Chen; Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Tsing-Hai Wang; Shi-Ping Teng; Ching-Hor Lee

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion is a dominant mechanism regulating the transport of released nuclides. The through-diffusion method is typically applied to determine the diffusion coefficients (D). Depending on the design of the experiment, the concentrations in the source term [i.e., inlet reservoir (IR)] or the end term [i.e., outlet reservoir (OR)] can be fixed or vary. The combinations involve four distinct models (i.e., the CC-CC model, CC-VC model, VC-CC model, and the VC-VC model). Studies discussing the VC-CC model are scant. An analytical method considering the decay effect is required to accurately interpret the radioactive nuclide diffusion experiment results. Therefore, we developed a CC-CC model and a CC-VC model with a decay effect and the simplified formulas of these two models to determine the diffusion coefficient (i.e., the CC-CC method and CC-VC method). We also proposed two simplified methods using the VC-VC model to determine the diffusion coefficient straightforwardly based upon the concentration variation in IR and OR. More importantly, the best advantage of proposed method over others is that one can derive three diffusion coefficients based on one run of experiment. In addition, applying our CC-VC method to those data reported from Radiochemica Acta 96:111-117, 2008; and J Contam Hydrol 35:55-65, 1998, derived comparable diffusion coefficient lying in the identical order of magnitude. Furthermore, we proposed a formula to determine the conceptual critical time (Tc), which is particularly beneficial for the selection of using CC-VC or VC-VC method. Based on our proposed method, it becomes possible to calculate diffusion coefficient from a through-diffusion experiment in a shorter period of time. (author)

  8. Diffuse-Interface Methods in Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. M.; McFadden, G. B.; Wheeler, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    The authors review the development of diffuse-interface models of hydrodynamics and their application to a wide variety of interfacial phenomena. The authors discuss the issues involved in formulating diffuse-interface models for single-component and binary fluids. Recent applications and computations using these models are discussed in each case. Further, the authors address issues including sharp-interface analyses that relate these models to the classical free-boundary problem, related computational approaches to describe interfacial phenomena, and related approaches describing fully-miscible fluids.

  9. X-ray diffuse scattering study of height fluctuations at the liquid-vapor interface of gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Binhua [CARS, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Meron, Mati [CARS, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Gebhardt, Jeff [CARS, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Graber, Tim [CARS, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Li Dongxu [Department of Chemistry and James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Yang Bin [Department of Chemistry and James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Rice, Stuart A. [Department of Chemistry and James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)]. E-mail: s-rice@uchicago.edu

    2005-02-28

    We report an experimental study of wavelength dependent interfacial tension of liquid Ga using X-ray surface diffusion scattering. The observed surface tension can be explained by Mecke-Dietrich formalism derived from a microscopic density functional theory when the known stratified liquid-vapor interfacial density profile of Ga and a so-called individual local pseudo-potential for the pair-interaction potential of liquid metal are used. The quantitative behavior of the surface tension as a function of wavelength is very sensitive to the forms of both the interfacial density profile and the asymptotic part of the pair-potential, and is different from that observed from several dielectric liquids reported previously (Nature 403 (2000) 871; Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 (2003) 216101)

  10. Multitracer method of diffusion measurement in chromium-manganese steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudala, J.; Stegowski, Z.; Gilewicz-Wolter, J.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents an application of multitracer method to diffusion measurement in Cr-Mn steels. Radioisotope tracers of chromium 51 Cr, manganese 54 Mn and iron 59 Fe were used simultaneously in the diffusion process, Gamma-spectrum measurement and the proper analysis enabled evaluation of concentration distribution for each tracer. As a new tool, artificial neural networks (ANN) method was used for spectrum analysis. The proper solution of the diffusion model was applied to the experimental tracers' distribution data and diffusion coefficients were determined. (author)

  11. Comparison of radon diffusion coefficients measured by transient-diffusion and steady-state laboratory methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalwarf, D.R.; Nielson, K.K.; Rich, D.C.; Rogers, V.C.

    1982-11-01

    A method was developed and used to determine radon diffusion coefficients in compacted soils by transient-diffusion measurements. A relative standard deviation of 12% was observed in repeated measurements with a dry soil by the transient-diffusion method, and a 40% uncertainty was determined for moistures exceeding 50% of saturation. Excellent agreement was also obtained between values of the diffusion coefficient for radon in air, as measured by the transient-diffusion method, and those in the published literature. Good agreement was also obtained with diffusion coefficients measured by a steady-state method on the same soils. The agreement was best at low moistures, averaging less than ten percent difference, but differences of up to a factor of two were observed at high moistures. The comparison of the transient-diffusion and steady-state methods at low moistures provides an excellent verification of the theoretical validity and technical accuracy of these approaches, which are based on completely independent experimental conditions, measurement methods and mathematical interpretations

  12. Current trends in methods for neutron diffusion calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, C.H.

    1977-01-01

    Current work and trends in the application of neutron diffusion theory to reactor design and analysis are reviewed. Specific topics covered include finite-difference methods, synthesis methods, nodal calculations, finite-elements and perturbation theory

  13. Nodal spectrum method for solving neutron diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, D.; Garcia, C. R.; Barros, R. C. de; Milian, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    Presented here is a new numerical nodal method for solving static multidimensional neutron diffusion equation in rectangular geometry. Our method is based on a spectral analysis of the nodal diffusion equations. These equations are obtained by integrating the diffusion equation in X, Y directions and then considering flat approximations for the current. These flat approximations are the only approximations that are considered in this method, as a result the numerical solutions are completely free from truncation errors. We show numerical results to illustrate the methods accuracy for coarse mesh calculations

  14. Pore-Network Modeling of Water and Vapor Transport in the Micro Porous Layer and Gas Diffusion Layer of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, C.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; van Oosterhout, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    In the cathode side of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC), a micro porous layer (MPL) added between the catalyst layer (CL) and the gas diffusion layer (GDL) plays an important role in water management. In this work, by using both quasi-static and dynamic pore-network models, water and vapor

  15. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencs, László, E-mail: bencs.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Laczai, Nikoletta [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Ajtony, Zsolt [Institute of Food Science, University of West Hungary, H-9200 Mosonmagyaróvár, Lucsony utca 15–17 (Hungary)

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective–diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass — m{sub 0}) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m{sub 0} values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm{sup 3} min{sup −1}) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m{sub 0}(mini-flow)-to-m{sub 0}(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m{sub 0} data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m{sub 0} values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology. - Highlights: • A calculation scheme for convective–diffusive vapor loss in GFAAS is described. • Residence time (τ) formulas were compared for sensitivity (m{sub 0}) in a THGA furnace. • Effects of the sample/platform dimension and dosing hole on τ were assessed. • Theoretical m{sub 0} of 18 analytes were

  16. Determination of ion diffusion coefficients by the electromigration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonchev, G.D.; Milanov, M.V.; Bozhikov, G.A.; Ivanov, P.I.; Priemyshev, A.N.; Maslov, O.D.; Dmitriev, S.N.

    2003-01-01

    An electrophoretic method for measuring ion diffusion coefficients in aqueous solutions is developed. The value of the diffusion coefficient can be determined from the linear relationship between the square standard deviation of the electrophoretic zone and the time from the start of the diffusion process. Using the device for horizontal zone electrophoresis in a free electrolyte, a series of diffusion experiments are performed with no-carrier-added radionuclides in microconcentrations (10 -9 - 10 -10 M). Diffusion coefficients of 111 In(III), 175 Hf(IV) and 237 Pu(VI) ions at 25 0 C are determined in nitric acid media. Simultaneous determination of the diffusion coefficient and electrophoretic mobility allows one to calculate the effective charge of the investigated ions in accordance with the Nernst-Einstein law

  17. Analytic Method for Pressure Recovery in Truncated Diffusers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A prediction method is presented for the static pressure recovery in subsonic axisymmetric truncated conical diffusers. In the analysis, a turbulent boundary layer is assumed at the diffuser inlet and a potential core exists throughout the flow. When flow separation occurs, this approach cannot be used to predict the maximum ...

  18. Thermogravimetric measurements of liquid vapor pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong Yunhong; Gregson, Christopher M.; Parker, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Rapid determination of vapor pressure by TGA. ► Demonstration of limitations of currently available approaches in literature. ► New model for vapor pressure assessment of small size samples in TGA. ► New model accounts for vapor diffusion and sample geometry and measures vapor pressure normally within 10%. - Abstract: A method was developed using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) to determine the vapor pressure of volatile liquids. This is achieved by measuring the rate of evaporation (mass loss) of a pure liquid contained within a cylindrical pan. The influence of factors like sample geometry and vapor diffusion on evaporation rate are discussed. The measurement can be performed across a wide range of temperature yielding reasonable results up to 10 kPa. This approach may be useful as a rapid and automatable method for measuring the volatility of flavor and fragrance raw materials.

  19. An Accurate Method for Computing the Absorption of Solar Radiation by Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    The method is based upon molecular line parameters and makes use of a far wing scaling approximation and k distribution approach previously applied to the computation of the infrared cooling rate due to water vapor. Taking into account the wave number dependence of the incident solar flux, the solar heating rate is computed for the entire water vapor spectrum and for individual absorption bands. The accuracy of the method is tested against line by line calculations. The method introduces a maximum error of 0.06 C/day. The method has the additional advantage over previous methods in that it can be applied to any portion of the spectral region containing the water vapor bands. The integrated absorptances and line intensities computed from the molecular line parameters were compared with laboratory measurements. The comparison reveals that, among the three different sources, absorptance is the largest for the laboratory measurements.

  20. New complex variable meshless method for advection—diffusion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jian-Fei; Cheng Yu-Min

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an improved complex variable meshless method (ICVMM) for two-dimensional advection—diffusion problems is developed based on improved complex variable moving least-square (ICVMLS) approximation. The equivalent functional of two-dimensional advection—diffusion problems is formed, the variation method is used to obtain the equation system, and the penalty method is employed to impose the essential boundary conditions. The difference method for two-point boundary value problems is used to obtain the discrete equations. Then the corresponding formulas of the ICVMM for advection—diffusion problems are presented. Two numerical examples with different node distributions are used to validate and inestigate the accuracy and efficiency of the new method in this paper. It is shown that ICVMM is very effective for advection—diffusion problems, and has a good convergent character, accuracy, and computational efficiency

  1. New diffusion imaging method with a single acquisition sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melki, Ph.S.; Bittoun, J.; Lefevre, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is related to the molecular diffusion coefficient and to physiologic information: microcirculation in the capillary network, incoherent slow flow, and restricted diffusion. The authors present a new MR imaging sequence that yields computed ADC images in only one acquisition of 9-minutes with a 1.5-T imager (GE Signa). Compared to the previous method, this sequence is at least two times faster and thus can be used as a routine examination to supplement T1-, T2-, and density-weighted images. The method was assessed by measurement of the molecular diffusion in liquids, and the first clinical images obtained in neurologic diseases demonstrate its efficiency for clinical investigation. The possibility of separately imaging diffusion and perfusion is supported by an algorithm

  2. Vaporization study on vanadium-oxygen solid solution by mass spectrometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banchorndhevakul, W.; Matsui, Tsuneo; Naito, Keiji

    1986-01-01

    The vapor pressures over vanadium-oxygen solid solution (0.001 ≤ O/V ≤ 0.145) were measured by mass-spectrometric method in the temperature range of 1,855 ∼ 2,117 K. The main vapor species were observed to be V(g) and VO(g). The vapor pressure of V(g) is higher than that of VO(g) over the solid solutions with all O/V ratios except for O/V = 0.145. The vapor pressure of V(g) is nearly independent of O/V ratio. The vapor pressure of VO(g) decreases with decreasing O/V ratio. The oxygen partial pressure was calculated as a function of temperature and O/V ratio from the vapor pressures of V(g) and VO(g), from which the partial molar enthalpy and entropy of oxygen in the solid solution were determined. The partial molar enthalpy of oxygen was observed to be independent of composition, suggesting the presence of very weak interaction between interstitial oxygens. The compositional dependence of the partial molar entropy of oxygen can be explained by assuming the occupation of the octahedral site in bcc vanadium lattice by the interstitial oxygens. The excess partial molar entropy of oxygen was compared with the value derived from the sum of the contributions from the volume expansion, electronic heat capacity and vibrational terms. (author)

  3. SIMPOL.1: a simple group contribution method for predicting vapor pressures and enthalpies of vaporization of multifunctional organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Pankow

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The SIMPOL.1 group contribution method is developed for predicting the liquid vapor pressure poL (atm and enthalpy of vaporization Δ Hvap (kJ mol-1 of organic compounds as functions of temperature (T. For each compound i, the method assumes log10poL,i (T=∑kνk,ibk(T where νk,i is the number of groups of type k, and bk (T is the contribution to log10poL,i (T by each group of type k. A zeroeth group is included that uses b0 (T with ν0,i=1 for all i. A total of 30 structural groups are considered: molecular carbon, alkyl hydroxyl, aromatic hydroxyl, alkyl ether, alkyl ring ether, aromatic ether, aldehyde, ketone, carboxylic acid, ester, nitrate, nitro, alkyl amine (primary, secondary, and tertiary, aromatic amine, amide (primary, secondary, and tertiary, peroxide, hydroperoxide, peroxy acid, C=C, carbonylperoxynitrate, nitro-phenol, nitro-ester, aromatic rings, non-aromatic rings, C=C–C=O in a non-aromatic ring, and carbon on the acid-side of an amide. The T dependence in each of the bk (T is assumed to follow b(T=B1/T+B2+B3T+B4ln T. Values of the B coefficients are fit using an initial basis set of 272 compounds for which experimentally based functions po L,i=fi (T are available. The range of vapor pressure considered spans fourteen orders of magnitude. The ability of the initially fitted B coefficients to predict poL values is examined using a test set of 184 compounds and a T range that is as wide as 273

  4. Qualitative methods for the study of policy diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This article deals with the question whether and how processes of policy diffusion can be examined with qualitative methods. More specifically, how can qualitative methods address the “twin challenge of interdependence,” namely the challenge to identify diffusion, on the one hand, and the challen...... closes with some suggestions for further methodological development in the study of policy diffusion, including the combination of quantitative and qualitative methods.......This article deals with the question whether and how processes of policy diffusion can be examined with qualitative methods. More specifically, how can qualitative methods address the “twin challenge of interdependence,” namely the challenge to identify diffusion, on the one hand, and the challenge...... to discriminate between mechanisms of diffusion, on the other? I argue, first, that there are three distinct qualitative techniques that can be used, namely cross-case analysis (often based on systematic case selection), within-case process tracing, and counterfactual reasoning. I demonstrate how these techniques...

  5. Method of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond using methanol-based solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Yonhua (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Briefly described, methods of forming diamond are described. A representative method, among others, includes: providing a substrate in a reaction chamber in a non-magnetic-field microwave plasma system; introducing, in the absence of a gas stream, a liquid precursor substantially free of water and containing methanol and at least one carbon and oxygen containing compound having a carbon to oxygen ratio greater than one, into an inlet of the reaction chamber; vaporizing the liquid precursor; and subjecting the vaporized precursor, in the absence of a carrier gas and in the absence in a reactive gas, to a plasma under conditions effective to disassociate the vaporized precursor and promote diamond growth on the substrate in a pressure range from about 70 to 130 Torr.

  6. A new method for the determination of vaporization enthalpies of ionic liquids at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verevkin, Sergey P; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Emelyanenko, Vladimir N; Heintz, Andreas

    2011-11-10

    A new method for the determination of vaporization enthalpies of extremely low volatile ILs has been developed using a newly constructed quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) vacuum setup. Because of the very high sensitivity of the QCM it has been possible to reduce the average temperature of the vaporization studies by approximately 100 K in comparison to other conventional techniques. The physical basis of the evaluation procedure has been developed and test measurements have been performed with the common ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [C(2)mim][NTf(2)] extending the range of measuring vaporization enthalpies down to 363 K. The results obtained for [C(2)mim][NTf(2)] have been tested for thermodynamic consistency by comparison with data already available at higher temperatures. Comparison of the temperature-dependent vaporization enthalpy data taken from the literature show only acceptable agreement with the heat capacity difference of -40 J K(-1) mol(-1). The method developed in this work opens also a new way to obtain reliable values of vaporization enthalpies of thermally unstable ionic liquids.

  7. A safer and flexible method for the oxygen functionalization of carbon nanotubes by nitric acid vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santangelo, Saveria, E-mail: saveria.santangelo@unirc.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, dell’Energia, dell’Ambiente e dei Materiali (DICEAM), Università “Mediterranea”, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Piperopoulos, Elpida [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Eletronica, Chimica ed Ingegneria Industriale (DIECII), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy); Fazio, Enza [Dipartimento di Fisica e di Scienze della Terra (DFST), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy); Faggio, Giuliana [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell’Energia Sostenibile (DIIES), Università “Mediterranea”, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Ansari, Shabana [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Eletronica, Chimica ed Ingegneria Industriale (DIECII), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy); Lanza, Maurizio [Istituto per i Processi Chimico Fisici (IPCF) del CNR, 98158 Messina (Italy); Neri, Fortunato [Dipartimento di Fisica e di Scienze della Terra (DFST), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy); Messina, Giacomo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell’Energia Sostenibile (DIIES), Università “Mediterranea”, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Milone, Candida [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Eletronica, Chimica ed Ingegneria Industriale (DIECII), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    The functionalization by nitric acid vapors at azeotropic concentration has been recently proposed to eliminate drawbacks of the widely utilized liquid phase functionalization method. This work suggests to exploit the so-called “salt effect” to improve the vapor phase oxidation method in terms of safety and flexibility. Increasing the relative volatility of acid, the addition of Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt to the HNO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O solution allows (i) obtaining vapors with HNO{sub 3} at the azeotropic concentration from a more diluted liquid solution (i.e. operating under safer conditions), and (ii) varying the concentration of HNO{sub 3} in the vapor phase even above the azeotropic concentration limit (with improved process flexibility). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetry, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy systematic analyses are carried out on pristine and oxidized nanotubes in order to assess their functionalization degree, surface chemistry and structural evolution. The most relevant finding of this preliminary study is that the nanotube functionalization extent increases linearly with the HNO{sub 3} vapor concentration.

  8. A safer and flexible method for the oxygen functionalization of carbon nanotubes by nitric acid vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santangelo, Saveria; Piperopoulos, Elpida; Fazio, Enza; Faggio, Giuliana; Ansari, Shabana; Lanza, Maurizio; Neri, Fortunato; Messina, Giacomo; Milone, Candida

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization by nitric acid vapors at azeotropic concentration has been recently proposed to eliminate drawbacks of the widely utilized liquid phase functionalization method. This work suggests to exploit the so-called “salt effect” to improve the vapor phase oxidation method in terms of safety and flexibility. Increasing the relative volatility of acid, the addition of Mg(NO 3 ) 2 salt to the HNO 3 + H 2 O solution allows (i) obtaining vapors with HNO 3 at the azeotropic concentration from a more diluted liquid solution (i.e. operating under safer conditions), and (ii) varying the concentration of HNO 3 in the vapor phase even above the azeotropic concentration limit (with improved process flexibility). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetry, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy systematic analyses are carried out on pristine and oxidized nanotubes in order to assess their functionalization degree, surface chemistry and structural evolution. The most relevant finding of this preliminary study is that the nanotube functionalization extent increases linearly with the HNO 3 vapor concentration.

  9. Diffusion-synthetic acceleration methods for discrete-ordinates problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, E.W.

    1984-01-01

    The diffusion-synthetic acceleration (DSA) method is an iterative procedure for obtaining numerical solutions of discrete-ordinates problems. The DSA method is operationally more complicated than the standard source-iteration (SI) method, but if encoded properly it converges much more rapidly, especially for problems with diffusion-like regions. In this article we describe the basic ideas behind the DSA method and give a (roughly chronological) review of its long development. We conclude with a discussion which covers additional topics, including some remaining open problems an the status of current efforts aimed at solving these problems

  10. Vaporization of niobium dioxide by mass-effusion and mass-spectrometric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamegashira, N.; Matsui, T.; Harada, M.; Naito, K.

    1981-01-01

    The congruence of the vaporization process of NbO, NbO 2 , Nb 12 O 29 and Nb 2 O 5 in the niobium-oxygen system was investigated from the phase change of the solid residue after vaporization, and it was observed that only the NbO 2 phase vaporizes congruently. The vapor pressures over NbO 2 (s) were measured by means of a combination of mass-effusion (weight loss measurement) and mass-spectrometric methods in the temperature range 1953-2323 K. By applying the second and the third law treatments of thermodynamics to the partial pressures of the gaseous species NbO 2 (g), NbO(g) and O(g), the enthalpies of vaporization for the reactions NbO 2 (s,1)=NbO 2 (g) and NbO 2 (s,1)=NbO(g)+O(g), were calculated. From these data the enthalpies of formation and the dissociation energies of NbO 2 (g) and NbO(g) were also determined. The uncertainties included in the third law treatment were discussed, and the results calculated by the third law treatment using the most reliable data available at present were presented. (orig.)

  11. Retrofit device and method to improve humidity control of vapor compression cooling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Robert Paul; Hahn, David C.; Scaringe, Robert P.

    2016-08-16

    A method and device for improving moisture removal capacity of a vapor compression system is disclosed. The vapor compression system is started up with the evaporator blower initially set to a high speed. A relative humidity in a return air stream is measured with the evaporator blower operating at the high speed. If the measured humidity is above the predetermined high relative humidity value, the evaporator blower speed is reduced from the initially set high speed to the lowest possible speed. The device is a control board connected with the blower and uses a predetermined change in measured relative humidity to control the blower motor speed.

  12. [An Improved Spectral Quaternion Interpolation Method of Diffusion Tensor Imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yonghong; Gao, Shangce; Hao, Xiaofei

    2016-04-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging(DTI)is a rapid development technology in recent years of magnetic resonance imaging.The diffusion tensor interpolation is a very important procedure in DTI image processing.The traditional spectral quaternion interpolation method revises the direction of the interpolation tensor and can preserve tensors anisotropy,but the method does not revise the size of tensors.The present study puts forward an improved spectral quaternion interpolation method on the basis of traditional spectral quaternion interpolation.Firstly,we decomposed diffusion tensors with the direction of tensors being represented by quaternion.Then we revised the size and direction of the tensor respectively according to different situations.Finally,we acquired the tensor of interpolation point by calculating the weighted average.We compared the improved method with the spectral quaternion method and the Log-Euclidean method by the simulation data and the real data.The results showed that the improved method could not only keep the monotonicity of the fractional anisotropy(FA)and the determinant of tensors,but also preserve the tensor anisotropy at the same time.In conclusion,the improved method provides a kind of important interpolation method for diffusion tensor image processing.

  13. Diffusion accessibility as a method for visualizing macromolecular surface geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yingssu; Holton, Thomas; Yeates, Todd O

    2015-10-01

    Important three-dimensional spatial features such as depth and surface concavity can be difficult to convey clearly in the context of two-dimensional images. In the area of macromolecular visualization, the computer graphics technique of ray-tracing can be helpful, but further techniques for emphasizing surface concavity can give clearer perceptions of depth. The notion of diffusion accessibility is well-suited for emphasizing such features of macromolecular surfaces, but a method for calculating diffusion accessibility has not been made widely available. Here we make available a web-based platform that performs the necessary calculation by solving the Laplace equation for steady state diffusion, and produces scripts for visualization that emphasize surface depth by coloring according to diffusion accessibility. The URL is http://services.mbi.ucla.edu/DiffAcc/. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  14. Pulsed neutron method for diffusion, slowing down, and reactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoestrand, N.G.

    1985-01-01

    An outline is given on the principles of the pulsed neutron method for the determination of thermal neutron diffusion parameters, for slowing-down time measurements, and for reactivity determinations. The historical development is sketched from the breakthrough in the middle of the nineteen fifties and the usefulness and limitations of the method are discussed. The importance for the present understanding of neutron slowing-down, thermalization and diffusion are point out. Examples are given of its recent use for e.g. absorption cross section measurements and for the study of the properties of heterogeneous systems

  15. Reactive Chemical Vapor Deposition Method as New Approach for Obtaining Electroluminescent Thin Film Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina V. Utochnikova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The new reactive chemical vapor deposition (RCVD method has been proposed for thin film deposition of luminescent nonvolatile lanthanide aromatic carboxylates. This method is based on metathesis reaction between the vapors of volatile lanthanide dipivaloylmethanate (Ln(dpm3 and carboxylic acid (HCarb orH2Carb′ and was successfully used in case of HCarb. Advantages of the method were demonstrated on example of terbium benzoate (Tb(bz3 and o-phenoxybenzoate thin films, and Tb(bz3 thin films were successfully examined in the OLED with the following structure glass/ITO/PEDOT:PSS/TPD/Tb(bz3/Ca/Al. Electroluminescence spectra of Tb(bz3 showed only typical luminescent bands, originated from transitions of the terbium ion. Method peculiarities for deposition of compounds of dibasic acids H2Carb′ are established on example of terbium and europium terephtalates and europium 2,6-naphtalenedicarboxylate.

  16. An efficient method for computing the absorption of solar radiation by water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, M.-D.; Arking, A.

    1981-01-01

    Chou and Arking (1980) have developed a fast but accurate method for computing the IR cooling rate due to water vapor. Using a similar approach, the considered investigation develops a method for computing the heating rates due to the absorption of solar radiation by water vapor in the wavelength range from 4 to 8.3 micrometers. The validity of the method is verified by comparison with line-by-line calculations. An outline is provided of an efficient method for transmittance and flux computations based upon actual line parameters. High speed is achieved by employing a one-parameter scaling approximation to convert an inhomogeneous path into an equivalent homogeneous path at suitably chosen reference conditions.

  17. Domain decomposition method for solving the neutron diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulomb, F.

    1989-03-01

    The aim of this work is to study methods for solving the neutron diffusion equation; we are interested in methods based on a classical finite element discretization and well suited for use on parallel computers. Domain decomposition methods seem to answer this preoccupation. This study deals with a decomposition of the domain. A theoretical study is carried out for Lagrange finite elements and some examples are given; in the case of mixed dual finite elements, the study is based on examples [fr

  18. Applications of a systematic homogenization theory for nodal diffusion methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong-bin; Dorning, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The authors recently have developed a self-consistent and systematic lattice cell and fuel bundle homogenization theory based on a multiple spatial scales asymptotic expansion of the transport equation in the ratio of the mean free path to the reactor characteristics dimension for use with nodal diffusion methods. The mathematical development leads naturally to self-consistent analytical expressions for homogenized diffusion coefficients and cross sections and flux discontinuity factors to be used in nodal diffusion calculations. The expressions for the homogenized nuclear parameters that follow from the systematic homogenization theory (SHT) are different from those for the traditional flux and volume-weighted (FVW) parameters. The calculations summarized here show that the systematic homogenization theory developed recently for nodal diffusion methods yields accurate values for k eff and assembly powers even when compared with the results of a fine mesh transport calculation. Thus, it provides a practical alternative to equivalence theory and GET (Ref. 3) and to simplified equivalence theory, which requires auxiliary fine-mesh calculations for assemblies embedded in a typical environment to determine the discontinuity factors and the equivalent diffusion coefficient for a homogenized assembly

  19. Dispersion of UO2F2 aerosol and HF vapor in the operating floor during winter ventilation at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.; Chen, N.C.J.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W.; Carter, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    The gaseous diffusion process is currently employed at two plants in the US: the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, a postulated design basis accident involving large line-rupture induced releases of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) into the process building of a gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) is evaluated. When UF 6 is released into the atmosphere, it undergoes an exothermic chemical reaction with moisture (H 2 O) in the air to form vaporized hydrogen fluoride (HF) and aerosolized uranyl fluoride (UO 2 F 2 ). These reactants disperse in the process building and transport through the building ventilation system. The ventilation system draws outside air into the process building, distributes it evenly throughout the building, and discharges it to the atmosphere at an elevated temperature. Since air is recirculated from the cell floor area to the operating floor, issues concerning in-building worker safety and evacuation need to be addressed. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the transport of HF vapor and UO 2 F 2 aerosols throughout the operating floor area following B-line break accident in the cell floor area

  20. Stability, accuracy and numerical diffusion analysis of nodal expansion method for steady convection diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xiafeng; Guo, Jiong; Li, Fu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • NEMs are innovatively applied to solve convection diffusion equation. • Stability, accuracy and numerical diffusion for NEM are analyzed for the first time. • Stability and numerical diffusion depend on the NEM expansion order and its parity. • NEMs have higher accuracy than both second order upwind and QUICK scheme. • NEMs with different expansion orders are integrated into a unified discrete form. - Abstract: The traditional finite difference method or finite volume method (FDM or FVM) is used for HTGR thermal-hydraulic calculation at present. However, both FDM and FVM require the fine mesh sizes to achieve the desired precision and thus result in a limited efficiency. Therefore, a more efficient and accurate numerical method needs to be developed. Nodal expansion method (NEM) can achieve high accuracy even on the coarse meshes in the reactor physics analysis so that the number of spatial meshes and computational cost can be largely decreased. Because of higher efficiency and accuracy, NEM can be innovatively applied to thermal-hydraulic calculation. In the paper, NEMs with different orders of basis functions are successfully developed and applied to multi-dimensional steady convection diffusion equation. Numerical results show that NEMs with three or higher order basis functions can track the reference solutions very well and are superior to second order upwind scheme and QUICK scheme. However, the false diffusion and unphysical oscillation behavior are discovered for NEMs. To explain the reasons for the above-mentioned behaviors, the stability, accuracy and numerical diffusion properties of NEM are analyzed by the Fourier analysis, and by comparing with exact solutions of difference and differential equation. The theoretical analysis results show that the accuracy of NEM increases with the expansion order. However, the stability and numerical diffusion properties depend not only on the order of basis functions but also on the parity of

  1. Stability, accuracy and numerical diffusion analysis of nodal expansion method for steady convection diffusion equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xiafeng, E-mail: zhou-xf11@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn; Guo, Jiong, E-mail: guojiong12@tsinghua.edu.cn; Li, Fu, E-mail: lifu@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • NEMs are innovatively applied to solve convection diffusion equation. • Stability, accuracy and numerical diffusion for NEM are analyzed for the first time. • Stability and numerical diffusion depend on the NEM expansion order and its parity. • NEMs have higher accuracy than both second order upwind and QUICK scheme. • NEMs with different expansion orders are integrated into a unified discrete form. - Abstract: The traditional finite difference method or finite volume method (FDM or FVM) is used for HTGR thermal-hydraulic calculation at present. However, both FDM and FVM require the fine mesh sizes to achieve the desired precision and thus result in a limited efficiency. Therefore, a more efficient and accurate numerical method needs to be developed. Nodal expansion method (NEM) can achieve high accuracy even on the coarse meshes in the reactor physics analysis so that the number of spatial meshes and computational cost can be largely decreased. Because of higher efficiency and accuracy, NEM can be innovatively applied to thermal-hydraulic calculation. In the paper, NEMs with different orders of basis functions are successfully developed and applied to multi-dimensional steady convection diffusion equation. Numerical results show that NEMs with three or higher order basis functions can track the reference solutions very well and are superior to second order upwind scheme and QUICK scheme. However, the false diffusion and unphysical oscillation behavior are discovered for NEMs. To explain the reasons for the above-mentioned behaviors, the stability, accuracy and numerical diffusion properties of NEM are analyzed by the Fourier analysis, and by comparing with exact solutions of difference and differential equation. The theoretical analysis results show that the accuracy of NEM increases with the expansion order. However, the stability and numerical diffusion properties depend not only on the order of basis functions but also on the parity of

  2. A Hennart nodal method for the diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesaint, P.; Noceir, S.; Verwaerde, D.

    1995-01-01

    A modification of the Hennart nodal method for neutron diffusion problems is presented. The final system of equations obtained by this method is not positive definite. However, a flux elimination technique leads to a simple positive definite system, which can be solved by the traditional iterative methods. Calculations of a two-dimensional International Atomic Energy Agency benchmark problem are performed and compared with results of the original Hennart nodal method and some finite element methods. The high computational efficiency of this modified nodal method is clearly demonstrated

  3. Comparison of Two Disc Diffusion Methods with Minimum Inhibitory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of N. gonorrhoeae may change rapidly, especially in areas where ineffective treatment regimens are applied.[3]. There are no universally accepted guidelines for testing the antimicrobial susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae by a disc diffusion method, but different techniques are in practice, like ...

  4. Study of porous bed diffusion using the frequency response method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billy, J.

    1967-11-01

    The flow of an inert mixture of two gases across a catalytic bed is accompanied by diffusion phenomena in the inter-particulate space and inside the particles themselves, and adsorption phenomena at the surface of the particles. These phenomena are analyzed in turn and three coefficients which characterize each of them are defined. With a view to carrying out an experimental study by the frequency response method, the differential system deduced from the preceding analysis is then resolved with the help of two simplifying hypotheses; two relationships are given which make it possible to calculate the two diffusion coefficients and the absorption coefficient. (author) [fr

  5. Quantifying Diffuse Contamination: Method and Application to Pb in Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Karl; Reimann, Clemens; de Caritat, Patrice

    2017-06-20

    A new method for detecting and quantifying diffuse contamination at the continental to regional scale is based on the analysis of cumulative distribution functions (CDFs). It uses cumulative probability (CP) plots for spatially representative data sets, preferably containing >1000 determinations. Simulations demonstrate how different types of contamination influence elemental CDFs of different sample media. It is found that diffuse contamination is characterized by a distinctive shift of the low-concentration end of the distribution of the studied element in its CP plot. Diffuse contamination can be detected and quantified via either (1) comparing the distribution of the contaminating element to that of an element with a geochemically comparable behavior but no contamination source (e.g., Pb vs Rb), or (2) comparing the top soil distribution of an element to the distribution of the same element in subsoil samples from the same area, taking soil forming processes into consideration. Both procedures are demonstrated for geochemical soil data sets from Europe, Australia, and the U.S.A. Several different data sets from Europe deliver comparable results at different scales. Diffuse Pb contamination in surface soil is estimated to be contamination sources and can be used to efficiently monitor diffuse contamination at the continental to regional scale.

  6. CaC in ATM – the Diffuse Method

    OpenAIRE

    I. Baroňák; M. Vozňák

    2006-01-01

    Connection Admission Control is an element in the of preclusive mechanisms of ATM management. Its main task is to prevent overloading of the network and to ensure the required quality of service. This means that it has to predict the service of the network and according to its state it can manage both existing and new connections. This paper deals with the diffuse method, a CAC method that enables us to obtain the required results. 

  7. Prediction of high pressure vapor-liquid equilibria with mixing rule using ASOG group contribution method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tochigi, K.; Kojima, K.; Kurihara, K.

    1985-02-01

    To develop a widely applicable method for predicting high-pressure vapor-liquid equilibria by the equation of state, a mixing rule is proposed in which mixture energy parameter ''..cap alpha..'' of theSoave-RedlichKwong, Peng-Robinson, and Martin cubic equations of state is expressed by using the ASOG group contribution method. The group pair parameters are then determined for 14 group pairs constituted by six groups, i.e. CH/sub 4/, CH/sub 3/, CH/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, and CO/sub 2/ groups. By using the group pair parameters determined, high-pressure vapor-liquid equilibria are predicted with good accuracy for binary and ternary systems constituted by n-paraffins, nitrogen, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide in the temperature range of 100 - 450K.

  8. Two new methods of determining radon diffusion in fish otoliths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, N.E.; Ditchburn, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    Otoliths are bony structures found in the ears of fish and used in the 210 Pb/ 226 Ra dating method for age determination. This paper checks the assumption that 222 Rn is not lost from or added to orange roughy fish otoliths by diffusion, which would invalidate the technique. The first method of monitoring diffusion relies on measuring the gamma activity of daughter radionuclides. Otoliths were exposed to an atmosphere enriched in 222 Rn for 10 days, and the supported gamma activity inside them measured allowing for various decay corrections. The calculated radon addition was (0.5 ±0.5)% of the activity of the 226 Ra present. The second method used an alpha spectrometer and attempted to detect 222 Rn directly outguessed from otoliths in the detector vacuum chamber. The results were consistent within errors with those of the first method and showed no loss or gain of 222 Rn, supporting previous estimates of a long life-span for the orange rough y. In contrast it was found that approximately 10% of 222 Rn formed in orange roughy fish scales was lost to an evacuated environment, (hence perhaps to an aqueous environment) and that for this species it could be difficult to base a dating method on analysis of scales. Nevertheless a preliminary minimum age of 57 years was obtained. The methods could be used with non-biological samples to determine 222 Rn diffusion rates. (author). 17 refs., 5 figs

  9. Nested element method in multidimensional neutron diffusion calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altiparmakov, D.V.

    1983-01-01

    A new numerical method is developed that is particularly efficient in solving the multidimensional neutron diffusion equation in geometrically complex systems. The needs for a generally applicable and fast running computer code have stimulated the inroad of a nonclassical (R-function) numerical method into the nuclear field. By using the R-functions, the geometrical components of the diffusion problem are a priori analytically implemented into the approximate solution. The class of functions, to which the approximate solution belongs, is chosen as close to the exact solution class as practically acceptable from the time consumption point of view. That implies a drastic reduction of the number of degrees of freedom, compared to the other methods. Furthermore, the reduced number of degrees of freedom enables calculation of large multidimensional problems on small computers

  10. Some basic mathematical methods of diffusion theory. [emphasis on atmospheric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giere, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    An introductory treatment of the fundamentals of diffusion theory is presented, starting with molecular diffusion and leading up to the statistical methods of turbulent diffusion. A multilayer diffusion model, designed to permit concentration and dosage calculations downwind of toxic clouds from rocket vehicles, is described. The concepts and equations of diffusion are developed on an elementary level, with emphasis on atmospheric applications.

  11. Evaluation of Vapor Pressure Estimation Methods for Use in Simulating the Dynamic of Atmospheric Organic Aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Komkoua Mbienda

    2013-01-01

    Lee and Kesler (LK, and Ambrose-Walton (AW methods for estimating vapor pressures ( are tested against experimental data for a set of volatile organic compounds (VOC. required to determine gas-particle partitioning of such organic compounds is used as a parameter for simulating the dynamic of atmospheric aerosols. Here, we use the structure-property relationships of VOC to estimate . The accuracy of each of the aforementioned methods is also assessed for each class of compounds (hydrocarbons, monofunctionalized, difunctionalized, and tri- and more functionalized volatile organic species. It is found that the best method for each VOC depends on its functionality.

  12. Group vector space method for estimating enthalpy of vaporization of organic compounds at the normal boiling point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenying, Wei; Jinyu, Han; Wen, Xu

    2004-01-01

    The specific position of a group in the molecule has been considered, and a group vector space method for estimating enthalpy of vaporization at the normal boiling point of organic compounds has been developed. Expression for enthalpy of vaporization Delta(vap)H(T(b)) has been established and numerical values of relative group parameters obtained. The average percent deviation of estimation of Delta(vap)H(T(b)) is 1.16, which show that the present method demonstrates significant improvement in applicability to predict the enthalpy of vaporization at the normal boiling point, compared the conventional group methods.

  13. Support Operators Method for the Diffusion Equation in Multiple Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, Andrew R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shashkov, Mikhail J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14

    A second-order finite difference scheme for the solution of the diffusion equation on non-uniform meshes is implemented. The method allows the heat conductivity to be discontinuous. The algorithm is formulated on a one dimensional mesh and is derived using the support operators method. A key component of the derivation is that the discrete analog of the flux operator is constructed to be the negative adjoint of the discrete divergence, in an inner product that is a discrete analog of the continuum inner product. The resultant discrete operators in the fully discretized diffusion equation are symmetric and positive definite. The algorithm is generalized to operate on meshes with cells which have mixed material properties. A mechanism to recover intermediate temperature values in mixed cells using a limited linear reconstruction is introduced. The implementation of the algorithm is verified and the linear reconstruction mechanism is compared to previous results for obtaining new material temperatures.

  14. Comparison of vapor sampling system (VSS) and in situ vapor sampling (ISVS) methods on Tanks C-107, BY-108, and S-102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Edwards, J.A.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this report is to evaluate the equivalency of two methods used to sample nonradioactive gases and vapors in the Hanford Site high-level waste tank headspaces. In addition to the comparison of the two sampling methods, the effects of an in-line fine particle filter on sampling results are also examined to determine whether results are adversely affected by its presence. This report discusses data from a January 1996 sampling

  15. Maxwell iteration for the lattice Boltzmann method with diffusive scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weifeng; Yong, Wen-An

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we present an alternative derivation of the Navier-Stokes equations from Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook models of the lattice Boltzmann method with diffusive scaling. This derivation is based on the Maxwell iteration and can expose certain important features of the lattice Boltzmann solutions. Moreover, it will be seen to be much more straightforward and logically clearer than the existing approaches including the Chapman-Enskog expansion.

  16. The Method of Lines for Ternary Diffusion Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryk Leszczyński

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of lines (MOL for diffusion equations with Neumann boundary conditions is considered. These equations are transformed by a discretization in space variables into systems of ordinary differential equations. The proposed ODEs satisfy the mass conservation law. The stability of solutions of these ODEs with respect to discrete L2 norms and discrete W1,∞ norms is investigated. Numerical examples confirm the parabolic behaviour of this model and very regular dynamics.

  17. Benchmarking with high-order nodal diffusion methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasevic, D.; Larsen, E.W.

    1993-01-01

    Significant progress in the solution of multidimensional neutron diffusion problems was made in the late 1970s with the introduction of nodal methods. Modern nodal reactor analysis codes provide significant improvements in both accuracy and computing speed over earlier codes based on fine-mesh finite difference methods. In the past, the performance of advanced nodal methods was determined by comparisons with fine-mesh finite difference codes. More recently, the excellent spatial convergence of nodal methods has permitted their use in establishing reference solutions for some important bench-mark problems. The recent development of the self-consistent high-order nodal diffusion method and its subsequent variational formulation has permitted the calculation of reference solutions with one node per assembly mesh size. In this paper, we compare results for four selected benchmark problems to those obtained by high-order response matrix methods and by two well-known state-of-the-art nodal methods (the open-quotes analyticalclose quotes and open-quotes nodal expansionclose quotes methods)

  18. A method to investigate the diffusion properties of nuclear calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queisser, Gillian; Wittum, Gabriel

    2011-10-01

    Modeling biophysical processes in general requires knowledge about underlying biological parameters. The quality of simulation results is strongly influenced by the accuracy of these parameters, hence the identification of parameter values that the model includes is a major part of simulating biophysical processes. In many cases, secondary data can be gathered by experimental setups, which are exploitable by mathematical inverse modeling techniques. Here we describe a method for parameter identification of diffusion properties of calcium in the nuclei of rat hippocampal neurons. The method is based on a Gauss-Newton method for solving a least-squares minimization problem and was formulated in such a way that it is ideally implementable in the simulation platform uG. Making use of independently published space- and time-dependent calcium imaging data, generated from laser-assisted calcium uncaging experiments, here we could identify the diffusion properties of nuclear calcium and were able to validate a previously published model that describes nuclear calcium dynamics as a diffusion process.

  19. Ionic liquids: differential scanning calorimetry as a new indirect method for determination of vaporization enthalpies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verevkin, Sergey P; Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Ralys, Ricardas V; Schick, Christoph

    2012-04-12

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been used to measure enthalpies of synthesis reactions of the 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide [C(n)mim][Br] ionic liquids from 1-methylimidazole and n-alkyl bromides (with n = 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8). The optimal experimental conditions have been elaborated. Enthalpies of formation of these ionic liquids in the liquid state have been determined using the DSC results according to the Hess Law. The ideal-gas enthalpies of formation of [C(n)mim][Br] were calculated using the methods of quantum chemistry. They were used together with the DSC results to derive indirectly the enthalpies of vaporization of the ionic liquids under study. In order to validate the indirect determination, the experimental vaporization enthalpy of [C(4)mim][Br] was measured by using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The combination of reaction enthalpy measurements by DSC with modern high-level first-principles calculations opens valuable indirect thermochemical options to obtain values of vaporization enthalpies of ionic liquids.

  20. A theoretical global optimization method for vapor-compression refrigeration systems based on entransy theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yun-Chao; Chen, Qun

    2013-01-01

    The vapor-compression refrigeration systems have been one of the essential energy conversion systems for humankind and exhausting huge amounts of energy nowadays. Surrounding the energy efficiency promotion of the systems, there are lots of effectual optimization methods but mainly relied on engineering experience and computer simulations rather than theoretical analysis due to the complex and vague physical essence. We attempt to propose a theoretical global optimization method based on in-depth physical analysis for the involved physical processes, i.e. heat transfer analysis for condenser and evaporator, through introducing the entransy theory and thermodynamic analysis for compressor and expansion valve. The integration of heat transfer and thermodynamic analyses forms the overall physical optimization model for the systems to describe the relation between all the unknown parameters and known conditions, which makes theoretical global optimization possible. With the aid of the mathematical conditional extremum solutions, an optimization equation group and the optimal configuration of all the unknown parameters are analytically obtained. Eventually, via the optimization of a typical vapor-compression refrigeration system with various working conditions to minimize the total heat transfer area of heat exchangers, the validity and superior of the newly proposed optimization method is proved. - Highlights: • A global optimization method for vapor-compression systems is proposed. • Integrating heat transfer and thermodynamic analyses forms the optimization model. • A mathematical relation between design parameters and requirements is derived. • Entransy dissipation is introduced into heat transfer analysis. • The validity of the method is proved via optimization of practical cases

  1. Separation of Kr-Xe system by thermal diffusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Numata, Kazuyoshi; Matsuda, Yuji; Ouchi, Misao; Naruse, Yuji

    1979-11-01

    Separation experiments of Kr-Xe system were carried out to study the possibility of adapting thermal diffusion method for concentration of krypton in a fuel reprocessing off-gas treatment process. The results are as follows. (1) A batchwise thermal diffusion column of hot tube diameter 21 mm, cold tube diameter 32 mm, effective hight 1000 mm and volume -- 500 CC is the best in separation characteristics and in ease of operation under the different conditions. (2) The overall separation factor increases with increase of the operating temperature in the column with and without reservoir. (3) The optimum operating pressure (about 400 Torr) is independent of the operating conditions such as temperature, reservoir volume and feed gas content. (4) A preliminary design of the Kr-Xe separating plant for a reprocessing plant (1500 ton-U/yr) shows the required number of columns and the total electric power. (author)

  2. A comparison of Nodal methods in neutron diffusion calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavron, Barak [Israel Electric Company, Haifa (Israel) Nuclear Engineering Dept. Research and Development Div.

    1996-12-01

    The nuclear engineering department at IEC uses in the reactor analysis three neutron diffusion codes based on nodal methods. The codes, GNOMERl, ADMARC2 and NOXER3 solve the neutron diffusion equation to obtain flux and power distributions in the core. The resulting flux distributions are used for the furl cycle analysis and for fuel reload optimization. This work presents a comparison of the various nodal methods employed in the above codes. Nodal methods (also called Coarse-mesh methods) have been designed to solve problems that contain relatively coarse areas of homogeneous composition. In the nodal method parts of the equation that present the state in the homogeneous area are solved analytically while, according to various assumptions and continuity requirements, a general solution is sought out. Thus efficiency of the method for this kind of problems, is very high compared with the finite element and finite difference methods. On the other hand, using this method one can get only approximate information about the node vicinity (or coarse-mesh area, usually a feel assembly of a 20 cm size). These characteristics of the nodal method make it suitable for feel cycle analysis and reload optimization. This analysis requires many subsequent calculations of the flux and power distributions for the feel assemblies while there is no need for detailed distribution within the assembly. For obtaining detailed distribution within the assembly methods of power reconstruction may be applied. However homogenization of feel assembly properties, required for the nodal method, may cause difficulties when applied to fuel assemblies with many absorber rods, due to exciting strong neutron properties heterogeneity within the assembly. (author).

  3. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Yuen, C.R.; Cleland, J.H. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. The U-235 atoms are ionized when precisely tuned laser light -- of appropriate power, spectral, and temporal characteristics -- illuminates the uranium vapor and selectively photoionizes the U-235 isotope. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE site to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. 65 refs., 15 tabs.

  4. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Yuen, C.R.; Cleland, J.H.

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. The U-235 atoms are ionized when precisely tuned laser light -- of appropriate power, spectral, and temporal characteristics -- illuminates the uranium vapor and selectively photoionizes the U-235 isotope. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE site to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. 65 refs., 15 tabs

  5. Domain decomposition methods for the neutron diffusion problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerin, P.; Baudron, A. M.; Lautard, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    The neutronic simulation of a nuclear reactor core is performed using the neutron transport equation, and leads to an eigenvalue problem in the steady-state case. Among the deterministic resolution methods, simplified transport (SPN) or diffusion approximations are often used. The MINOS solver developed at CEA Saclay uses a mixed dual finite element method for the resolution of these problems. and has shown his efficiency. In order to take into account the heterogeneities of the geometry, a very fine mesh is generally required, and leads to expensive calculations for industrial applications. In order to take advantage of parallel computers, and to reduce the computing time and the local memory requirement, we propose here two domain decomposition methods based on the MINOS solver. The first approach is a component mode synthesis method on overlapping sub-domains: several Eigenmodes solutions of a local problem on each sub-domain are taken as basis functions used for the resolution of the global problem on the whole domain. The second approach is an iterative method based on a non-overlapping domain decomposition with Robin interface conditions. At each iteration, we solve the problem on each sub-domain with the interface conditions given by the solutions on the adjacent sub-domains estimated at the previous iteration. Numerical results on parallel computers are presented for the diffusion model on realistic 2D and 3D cores. (authors)

  6. Homogeneous and Light-Induced Nucleation of Sulfur Vapor-Diffusion Cloud Chamber Investigation of Constant Rate Supersaturation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uchtmann, H.; Kazitsyna, S. Yu.; Hensel, F.; Ždímal, Vladimír; Tříska, B.; Smolík, Jiří

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 47 (2001), s. 11754-11762 ISSN 1089-5647 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/97/1198 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : Cesium vapor * growth Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.379, year: 2001

  7. Optimization of a single-drop microextraction method for multielemental determination by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry following in situ vapor generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Sandra; Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T.C. de; Bendicho, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    A headspace single-drop microextraction (HS-SDME) method has been developed in combination with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) for the simultaneous determination of As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg in aqueous solutions. Vapor generation is carried out in a 40 mL volume closed-vial containing a solution with the target analytes in hydrochloric acid and potassium ferricyanide medium. Hydrides (As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn) and Hg vapor are trapped onto an aqueous single drop (3 μL volume) containing Pd(II), followed by the subsequent injection in the ETV. Experimental variables such as medium composition, sodium tetrahydroborate (III) volume and concentration, stirring rate, extraction time, sample volume, ascorbic acid concentration and palladium amount in the drop were fully optimized. The limits of detection (LOD) (3σ criterion) of the proposed method for As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg were 0.2, 0.04, 0.01, 0.07, 0.09 and 0.8 μg/L, respectively. Enrichment factors of 9, 85, 138, 130, 37 and 72 for As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg, respectively, were achieved in 210 s. The relative standard deviations (N = 5) ranged from 4 to 8%. The proposed HS-SDME-ETV-ICP-MS method has been applied for the determination of As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg in NWRI TM-28.3 certified reference material.

  8. Variational methods applied to problems of diffusion and reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Strieder, William

    1973-01-01

    This monograph is an account of some problems involving diffusion or diffusion with simultaneous reaction that can be illuminated by the use of variational principles. It was written during a period that included sabbatical leaves of one of us (W. S. ) at the University of Minnesota and the other (R. A. ) at the University of Cambridge and we are grateful to the Petroleum Research Fund for helping to support the former and the Guggenheim Foundation for making possible the latter. We would also like to thank Stephen Prager for getting us together in the first place and for showing how interesting and useful these methods can be. We have also benefitted from correspondence with Dr. A. M. Arthurs of the University of York and from the counsel of Dr. B. D. Coleman the general editor of this series. Table of Contents Chapter 1. Introduction and Preliminaries . 1. 1. General Survey 1 1. 2. Phenomenological Descriptions of Diffusion and Reaction 2 1. 3. Correlation Functions for Random Suspensions 4 1. 4. Mean Free ...

  9. A Review of Carbon Nanomaterials’ Synthesis via the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehia M. Manawi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials have been extensively used in many applications owing to their unique thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. One of the prime challenges is the production of these nanomaterials on a large scale. This review paper summarizes the synthesis of various carbon nanomaterials via the chemical vapor deposition (CVD method. These carbon nanomaterials include fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs, carbon nanofibers (CNFs, graphene, carbide-derived carbon (CDC, carbon nano-onion (CNO and MXenes. Furthermore, current challenges in the synthesis and application of these nanomaterials are highlighted with suggested areas for future research.

  10. A Review of Carbon Nanomaterials’ Synthesis via the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manawi, Yehia M.; Samara, Ayman; Al-Ansari, Tareq; Atieh, Muataz A.

    2018-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials have been extensively used in many applications owing to their unique thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. One of the prime challenges is the production of these nanomaterials on a large scale. This review paper summarizes the synthesis of various carbon nanomaterials via the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. These carbon nanomaterials include fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanofibers (CNFs), graphene, carbide-derived carbon (CDC), carbon nano-onion (CNO) and MXenes. Furthermore, current challenges in the synthesis and application of these nanomaterials are highlighted with suggested areas for future research. PMID:29772760

  11. Newton-Krylov methods applied to nonequilibrium radiation diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, D.A.; Rider, W.J.; Olsen, G.L.

    1998-01-01

    The authors present results of applying a matrix-free Newton-Krylov method to a nonequilibrium radiation diffusion problem. Here, there is no use of operator splitting, and Newton's method is used to convert the nonlinearities within a time step. Since the nonlinear residual is formed, it is used to monitor convergence. It is demonstrated that a simple Picard-based linearization produces a sufficient preconditioning matrix for the Krylov method, thus elevating the need to form or store a Jacobian matrix for Newton's method. They discuss the possibility that the Newton-Krylov approach may allow larger time steps, without loss of accuracy, as compared to an operator split approach where nonlinearities are not converged within a time step

  12. A fast nodal neutron diffusion method for cartesian geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makai, M.; Maeder, C.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical method based on an analytical solution to the three-dimensional two-group diffusion equation has been derived assuming that the flux is a sum of the functions of one variable. In each mesh the incoming currents are used as boundary conditions. The final equations for the average flux and the outgoing currents are of the response matrix type. The method is presented in a form that can be extended to the general multigroup case. In the SEXI computer program developed on the basis of this method, the response matrix elements are recalculated in each outer iteration to minimize the data transfer between disk storage and central memory. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated for a light water reactor (LWR) benchmark problem. The SEXI program has been incorporated into the LWR simulator SILWER code as a possible option

  13. Regression Methods for Virtual Metrology of Layer Thickness in Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purwins, Hendrik; Barak, Bernd; Nagi, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    The quality of wafer production in semiconductor manufacturing cannot always be monitored by a costly physical measurement. Instead of measuring a quantity directly, it can be predicted by a regression method (Virtual Metrology). In this paper, a survey on regression methods is given to predict...... average Silicon Nitride cap layer thickness for the Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) dual-layer metal passivation stack process. Process and production equipment Fault Detection and Classification (FDC) data are used as predictor variables. Various variable sets are compared: one most...... algorithm, and Support Vector Regression (SVR). On a test set, SVR outperforms the other methods by a large margin, being more robust towards changes in the production conditions. The method performs better on high-dimensional multivariate input data than on the most predictive variables alone. Process...

  14. On matrix diffusion: formulations, solution methods and qualitative effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Jesús; Sánchez-Vila, Xavier; Benet, Inmaculada; Medina, Agustín; Galarza, Germán; Guimerà, Jordi

    Matrix diffusion has become widely recognized as an important transport mechanism. Unfortunately, accounting for matrix diffusion complicates solute-transport simulations. This problem has led to simplified formulations, partly motivated by the solution method. As a result, some confusion has been generated about how to properly pose the problem. One of the objectives of this work is to find some unity among existing formulations and solution methods. In doing so, some asymptotic properties of matrix diffusion are derived. Specifically, early-time behavior (short tests) depends only on φm2RmDm / Lm2, whereas late-time behavior (long tracer tests) depends only on φmRm, and not on matrix diffusion coefficient or block size and shape. The latter is always true for mean arrival time. These properties help in: (a) analyzing the qualitative behavior of matrix diffusion; (b) explaining one paradox of solute transport through fractured rocks (the apparent dependence of porosity on travel time); (c) discriminating between matrix diffusion and other problems (such as kinetic sorption or heterogeneity); and (d) describing identifiability problems and ways to overcome them. RésuméLa diffusion matricielle est un phénomène reconnu maintenant comme un mécanisme de transport important. Malheureusement, la prise en compte de la diffusion matricielle complique la simulation du transport de soluté. Ce problème a conduit à des formulations simplifiées, en partie à cause de la méthode de résolution. Il s'en est suivi une certaine confusion sur la façon de poser correctement le problème. L'un des objectifs de ce travail est de trouver une certaine unité parmi les formulations et les méthodes de résolution. C'est ainsi que certaines propriétés asymptotiques de la diffusion matricielle ont été dérivées. En particulier, le comportement à l'origine (expériences de traçage courtes) dépend uniquement du terme φm2RmDm / Lm2, alors que le comportement à long terme

  15. Chelating agent-free, vapor-assisted crystallization method to synthesize hierarchical microporous/mesoporous MIL-125 (Ti).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Nicholas D; Hicks, Jason C

    2015-03-11

    Titanium-based microporous heterogeneous catalysts are widely studied but are often limited by the accessibility of reactants to active sites. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), such as MIL-125 (Ti), exhibit enhanced surface areas due to their high intrinsic microporosity, but the pore diameters of most microporous MOFs are often too small to allow for the diffusion of larger reactants (>7 Å) relevant to petroleum and biomass upgrading. In this work, hierarchical microporous MIL-125 exhibiting significantly enhanced interparticle mesoporosity was synthesized using a chelating-free, vapor-assisted crystallization method. The resulting hierarchical MOF was examined as an active catalyst for the oxidation of dibenzothiophene (DBT) with tert-butyl hydroperoxide and outperformed the solely microporous analogue. This was attributed to greater access of the substrate to surface active sites, as the pores in the microporous analogues were of inadequate size to accommodate DBT. Moreover, thiophene adsorption studies suggested the mesoporous MOF contained larger amounts of unsaturated metal sites that could enhance the observed catalytic activity.

  16. Linear finite element method for one-dimensional diffusion problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Michele A.; Dominguez, Dany S.; Iglesias, Susana M., E-mail: micheleabrandao@gmail.com, E-mail: dany@labbi.uesc.br, E-mail: smiglesias@uesc.br [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (LCC/DCET/UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas. Laboratorio de Computacao Cientifica

    2011-07-01

    We describe in this paper the fundamentals of Linear Finite Element Method (LFEM) applied to one-speed diffusion problems in slab geometry. We present the mathematical formulation to solve eigenvalue and fixed source problems. First, we discretized a calculus domain using a finite set of elements. At this point, we obtain the spatial balance equations for zero order and first order spatial moments inside each element. Then, we introduce the linear auxiliary equations to approximate neutron flux and current inside the element and architect a numerical scheme to obtain the solution. We offer numerical results for fixed source typical model problems to illustrate the method's accuracy for coarse-mesh calculations in homogeneous and heterogeneous domains. Also, we compare the accuracy and computational performance of LFEM formulation with conventional Finite Difference Method (FDM). (author)

  17. Standard test method for measuring waste glass or glass ceramic durability by vapor hydration test

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 The vapor hydration test method can be used to study the corrosion of a waste forms such as glasses and glass ceramics upon exposure to water vapor at elevated temperatures. In addition, the alteration phases that form can be used as indicators of those phases that may form under repository conditions. These tests; which allow altering of glass at high surface area to solution volume ratio; provide useful information regarding the alteration phases that are formed, the disposition of radioactive and hazardous components, and the alteration kinetics under the specific test conditions. This information may be used in performance assessment (McGrail et al, 2002 (1) for example). 1.2 This test method must be performed in accordance with all quality assurance requirements for acceptance of the data. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practice...

  18. Prediction of Chloride Diffusion in Concrete Structure Using Meshless Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Degradation of RC structures due to chloride penetration followed by reinforcement corrosion is a serious problem in civil engineering. The numerical simulation methods at present mainly involve finite element methods (FEM, which are based on mesh generation. In this study, element-free Galerkin (EFG and meshless weighted least squares (MWLS methods are used to solve the problem of simulation of chloride diffusion in concrete. The range of a scaling parameter is presented using numerical examples based on meshless methods. One- and two-dimensional numerical examples validated the effectiveness and accuracy of the two meshless methods by comparing results obtained by MWLS with results computed by EFG and FEM and results calculated by an analytical method. A good agreement is obtained among MWLS and EFG numerical simulations and the experimental data obtained from an existing marine concrete structure. These results indicate that MWLS and EFG are reliable meshless methods that can be used for the prediction of chloride ingress in concrete structures.

  19. Apparatus of vaporizing and condensing liquid radioactive wastes and its operation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Hiromitsu; Tajima, Fumio.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To prevent corrosion of material for a vapor-condenser and a vapor heater and to prevent radioactive contamination of heated vapor. Structure: Liquid waste is fed from a liquid feeding tank to a vapor-condenser to vaporize and condense the waste. Uncondensed liquid waste, which is not in a level of a given density, is temporally stored in a batch tank through a switching valve and a pipe. Prior to successive feeding from the liquid feeding tank, the uncondensed liquid waste within the batch tank is returned by a return pump to the condenser, after which a new liquid is fed from the liquid feeding tank for re-vaporization and condensation in the vapor-condenser. Then, similar operation is repeated until the uncondensed liquid waste assumes a given density, and when the uncondensed liquid waste reaches a given density, the condensed liquid waste is discharged into the storage tank through the switching valve. (Ohara, T.)

  20. Method of stabilizing superconducting diffusion Nb3Sn strips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polak, M.; Hlasnik, I.; Sabo, M.; Okali, D.

    1982-01-01

    The claim of the patent is a method consisting in the etching of the remnant of tin or bronze with HCl or a solution of HCl and HNO 3 or another suitable etching agent after the end of the diffusion process. Then the strip is copper coated in an alkaline solution containing Seignette salt, NaOH and CuSO 4 with a layer of copper 1 μm thick. On this layer is electrolytically plated the stabilizing copper in an acid copper-plating solution. This method makes it possible to obtain a contact resistance between the superconducting material and the copper stabilizing layer as low as 6 to 8x10 - 9 Ohm.cm - 2 and to increase the mechanical cohesion of the superconducting material and the stabilizing layer. (Ha)

  1. Development of polishing methods for Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide mirrors for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, B.A.; Brown, N.J.

    1987-01-01

    Material properties of Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide (CVD SiC) make it ideal for use in mirrors for synchrotron radiation experiments. We developed methods to grind and polish flat samples of CVD SiC down to measured surface roughness values as low as 1.1 Angstroms rms. We describe the processing details, including observations we made during trial runs with alternative processing recipes. We conclude that pitch polishing using progressively finer diamond abrasive, augmented with specific water based lubricants and additives, produces superior results. Using methods based on these results, a cylindrical and a toroidal mirror, each about 100 x 300mm, were respectively finished by Continental Optical and Frank Cooke, Incorporated. WYCO Interferometry shows these mirrors have surface roughness less than 5.7 Angstroms rms. These mirrors have been installed on the LLNL/UC X-ray Calibration and Standards Facility at the Stanford Synthrotron Radiation Laboratory

  2. A residual Monte Carlo method for discrete thermal radiative diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.M.; Urbatsch, T.J.; Lichtenstein, H.; Morel, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    Residual Monte Carlo methods reduce statistical error at a rate of exp(-bN), where b is a positive constant and N is the number of particle histories. Contrast this convergence rate with 1/√N, which is the rate of statistical error reduction for conventional Monte Carlo methods. Thus, residual Monte Carlo methods hold great promise for increased efficiency relative to conventional Monte Carlo methods. Previous research has shown that the application of residual Monte Carlo methods to the solution of continuum equations, such as the radiation transport equation, is problematic for all but the simplest of cases. However, the residual method readily applies to discrete systems as long as those systems are monotone, i.e., they produce positive solutions given positive sources. We develop a residual Monte Carlo method for solving a discrete 1D non-linear thermal radiative equilibrium diffusion equation, and we compare its performance with that of the discrete conventional Monte Carlo method upon which it is based. We find that the residual method provides efficiency gains of many orders of magnitude. Part of the residual gain is due to the fact that we begin each timestep with an initial guess equal to the solution from the previous timestep. Moreover, fully consistent non-linear solutions can be obtained in a reasonable amount of time because of the effective lack of statistical noise. We conclude that the residual approach has great potential and that further research into such methods should be pursued for more general discrete and continuum systems

  3. An efficient method for model refinement in diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirak, A. R.; Khademi, M.

    2007-11-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a non-linear, ill-posed, boundary value and optimization problem which necessitates regularization. Also, Bayesian methods are suitable owing to measurements data are sparse and correlated. In such problems which are solved with iterative methods, for stabilization and better convergence, the solution space must be small. These constraints subject to extensive and overdetermined system of equations which model retrieving criteria specially total least squares (TLS) must to refine model error. Using TLS is limited to linear systems which is not achievable when applying traditional Bayesian methods. This paper presents an efficient method for model refinement using regularized total least squares (RTLS) for treating on linearized DOT problem, having maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimator and Tikhonov regulator. This is done with combination Bayesian and regularization tools as preconditioner matrices, applying them to equations and then using RTLS to the resulting linear equations. The preconditioning matrixes are guided by patient specific information as well as a priori knowledge gained from the training set. Simulation results illustrate that proposed method improves the image reconstruction performance and localize the abnormally well.

  4. Method for manufacturing nuclear radiation detector with deep diffused junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, R.N.

    1977-01-01

    Germanium radiation detectors are manufactured by diffusing lithium into high purity p-type germanium. The diffusion is most readily accomplished from a lithium-lead-bismuth alloy at approximately 430 0 C and is monitored by a quartz half cell containing a standard composition of this alloy. Detectors having n-type cores may be constructed by converting high purity p-type germanium to n-type by a lithium diffusion and subsequently diffusing some of the lithium back out through the surface to create a deep p-n junction. Production of coaxial germanium detectors comprising deep p-n junctions by the lithium diffusion process is described

  5. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Filley, T.H.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Cleland, J.H.

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. In the 1970s, the US Department of Energy (DOE) began investigating more efficient and cost-effective enrichment technologies. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. Initial facility operation is anticipated for 1999. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. The final evaluation, which included sensitivity studies, identified the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) site as having significant advantages over the other sites considered. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PORTS site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). This report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during site visits. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use. Socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3

  6. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Filley, T.H.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Cleland, J.H.

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. In the 1970s, the US Department of Energy (DOE) began investigating more efficient and cost-effective enrichment technologies. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. Initial facility operation is anticipated for 1999. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. The final evaluation, which included sensitivity studies, identified the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) site as having significant advantages over the other sites considered. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PORTS site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). This report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during site visits. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use. Socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3.

  7. Vaporization study on vanadium monoxide and two-phase mixture of vanadium and vanadium monoxide by mass-spectrometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banchorndhevakul, W.; Matsui, Tsuneo; Naito, Keiji

    1986-01-01

    The vapor pressures over single phase vanadium monoxide VO 1.022 (s) and the two-phase mixture of vanadium metal (β phase) and vanadium monoxide were measured by mass-spectrometric method in the temperature range of 1,803 ∼ 1,990 and 1,703 ∼ 1,884 K, respectively. The main gas species over both systems were found to be VO(g) and V(g). The vapor pressure of VO(g) over the two-phase mixture of V(s) and VO(s) was a little lower than that over single phase VO(s). The vapor pressure of V(g) over the two-phase mixture was nearly equal to that over single phase. From the vapor pressure data, the enthalpies of vaporization, the enthalpies of formation for VO(g) and V(g) and the dissociation energy of VO(g) were determined. The oxygen partial pressure was calculated as a function of temperature from the vapor pressures of VO(g) and V(g), from which the partial molar enthalpies and entropies of oxygen in both systems were obtained. (author)

  8. A mixed finite element method for nonlinear diffusion equations

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Martin; Carrillo, José ; Wolfram, Marie-Therese

    2010-01-01

    We propose a mixed finite element method for a class of nonlinear diffusion equations, which is based on their interpretation as gradient flows in optimal transportation metrics. We introduce an appropriate linearization of the optimal transport problem, which leads to a mixed symmetric formulation. This formulation preserves the maximum principle in case of the semi-discrete scheme as well as the fully discrete scheme for a certain class of problems. In addition solutions of the mixed formulation maintain exponential convergence in the relative entropy towards the steady state in case of a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation with uniformly convex potential. We demonstrate the behavior of the proposed scheme with 2D simulations of the porous medium equations and blow-up questions in the Patlak-Keller-Segel model. © American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

  9. Method and apparatus for suppressing electron generation in a vapor source for isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janes, G.S.

    1979-01-01

    A system for applying accelerating forces to ionized particles of a vapor in a manner to suppress the flow of electron current from the vapor source. The accelerating forces are applied as an electric field in a configuration orthogonal to a magnetic field. The electric field is applied between one or more anodes in the plasma and one or more cathodes operated as electron emitting surfaces. The circuit for applying the electric field floats the cathodes with respect to the vapor source, thereby removing the vapor source from the circuit of electron flow through the plasma and suppressing the flow of electrons from the vapor source. The potential of other conducting structures contacting the plasma is controlled at or permitted to seek a level which further suppresses the flow of electron currents from the vapor source. Reducing the flow of electrons from the vapor source is particularly useful where the vapor is ionized with isotopic selectivity because it avoids superenergization of the vapor by the electron current

  10. Comparison of Experimental Methods for Estimating Matrix Diffusion Coefficients for Contaminant Transport Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telfeyan, Katherine Christina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ware, Stuart Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Birdsell, Kay Hanson [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-06

    Diffusion cell and diffusion wafer experiments were conducted to compare methods for estimating matrix diffusion coefficients in rock core samples from Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS). A diffusion wafer method, in which a solute diffuses out of a rock matrix that is pre-saturated with water containing the solute, is presented as a simpler alternative to the traditional through-diffusion (diffusion cell) method. Both methods yielded estimates of matrix diffusion coefficients that were within the range of values previously reported for NNSS volcanic rocks. The difference between the estimates of the two methods ranged from 14 to 30%, and there was no systematic high or low bias of one method relative to the other. From a transport modeling perspective, these differences are relatively minor when one considers that other variables (e.g., fracture apertures, fracture spacings) influence matrix diffusion to a greater degree and tend to have greater uncertainty than diffusion coefficients. For the same relative random errors in concentration measurements, the diffusion cell method yields diffusion coefficient estimates that have less uncertainty than the wafer method. However, the wafer method is easier and less costly to implement and yields estimates more quickly, thus allowing a greater number of samples to be analyzed for the same cost and time. Given the relatively good agreement between the methods, and the lack of any apparent bias between the methods, the diffusion wafer method appears to offer advantages over the diffusion cell method if better statistical representation of a given set of rock samples is desired.

  11. Comparison of experimental methods for estimating matrix diffusion coefficients for contaminant transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telfeyan, Katherine; Ware, S. Doug; Reimus, Paul W.; Birdsell, Kay H.

    2018-02-01

    Diffusion cell and diffusion wafer experiments were conducted to compare methods for estimating effective matrix diffusion coefficients in rock core samples from Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS). A diffusion wafer method, in which a solute diffuses out of a rock matrix that is pre-saturated with water containing the solute, is presented as a simpler alternative to the traditional through-diffusion (diffusion cell) method. Both methods yielded estimates of effective matrix diffusion coefficients that were within the range of values previously reported for NNSS volcanic rocks. The difference between the estimates of the two methods ranged from 14 to 30%, and there was no systematic high or low bias of one method relative to the other. From a transport modeling perspective, these differences are relatively minor when one considers that other variables (e.g., fracture apertures, fracture spacings) influence matrix diffusion to a greater degree and tend to have greater uncertainty than effective matrix diffusion coefficients. For the same relative random errors in concentration measurements, the diffusion cell method yields effective matrix diffusion coefficient estimates that have less uncertainty than the wafer method. However, the wafer method is easier and less costly to implement and yields estimates more quickly, thus allowing a greater number of samples to be analyzed for the same cost and time. Given the relatively good agreement between the methods, and the lack of any apparent bias between the methods, the diffusion wafer method appears to offer advantages over the diffusion cell method if better statistical representation of a given set of rock samples is desired.

  12. A Critical Study of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Agglomerated multigrid techniques used in unstructured-grid methods are studied critically for a model problem representative of laminar diffusion in the incompressible limit. The studied target-grid discretizations and discretizations used on agglomerated grids are typical of current node-centered formulations. Agglomerated multigrid convergence rates are presented using a range of two- and three-dimensional randomly perturbed unstructured grids for simple geometries with isotropic and stretched grids. Two agglomeration techniques are used within an overall topology-preserving agglomeration framework. The results show that multigrid with an inconsistent coarse-grid scheme using only the edge terms (also referred to in the literature as a thin-layer formulation) provides considerable speedup over single-grid methods but its convergence deteriorates on finer grids. Multigrid with a Galerkin coarse-grid discretization using piecewise-constant prolongation and a heuristic correction factor is slower and also grid-dependent. In contrast, grid-independent convergence rates are demonstrated for multigrid with consistent coarse-grid discretizations. Convergence rates of multigrid cycles are verified with quantitative analysis methods in which parts of the two-grid cycle are replaced by their idealized counterparts.

  13. Diffusion models in metamorphic thermo chronology: philosophy and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munha, Jose Manuel; Tassinari, Colombo Celso Gaeta

    1999-01-01

    Understanding kinetics of diffusion is of major importance to the interpretation of isotopic ages in metamorphic rocks. This paper provides a review of concepts and methodologies involved on the various diffusion models that can be applied to radiogenic systems in cooling rocks. The central concept of closure temperature is critically discussed and quantitative estimates for the various diffusion models are evaluated, in order to illustrate the controlling factors and the limits of their practical application. (author)

  14. Apparatus and method for removing mercury vapor from a gas stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Kumar [Butte, MT

    2008-01-01

    A metallic filter effectively removes mercury vapor from gas streams. The filter captures the mercury which then can be released and collected as product. The metallic filter is a copper mesh sponge plated with a six micrometer thickness of gold. The filter removes up to 90% of mercury vapor from a mercury contaminated gas stream.

  15. Radiation induced diffusion as a method to protect surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumvol, I.J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation induced diffusion forms a coating adeherent and without interface on the surface of metalic substrates. This coating improves the behaviour of metal to corrosion and abrasion. The effect of radiation induced diffusion of tin and calcium on pure iron surface is described and analyzed in this work. (author) [pt

  16. Estimating the diffuseness of sound fields: A wavenumber analysis method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolan, Melanie; Davy, John L.; Brunskog, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    The concept of a diffuse sound field is widely used in the analysis of sound in enclosures. The diffuse sound field is generally described as composed of plane waves with random phases, which wave number vectors are uniformly distributed over all angles of incidence. In this study, an interpretat...

  17. Deposition of MgB2 Thin Films on Alumina-Buffered Si Substrates by using Hybrid Physical-Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T. G.; Park, S. W.; Seong, W. K.; Huh, J. Y.; Jung, S. G.; Kang, W. N.; Lee, B. K.; An, K. S.

    2008-01-01

    [ MgB 2 ] thin films were fabricated using hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) method on silicon substrates with buffers of alumina grown by using atomic layer deposition method. The growth war in a range of temperatures 500 - 600 degrees C and under the reactor pressures of 25 - 50 degrees C. There are some interfacial reactions in the as-grown films with impurities of mostly Mg 2 Si, MgAl 2 O 4 , and other phases. The T c 's of MgB 2 films were observed to be as high as 39 K, but the transition widths were increased with growth temperatures. The magnetization was measured as a function of temperature down to the temperature of 5 K, but the complete Meissner effect was not observed, which shows that the granular nature of weak links is prevailing. The formation of mostly Mg 2 Si impurity in HPCVD process is discussed, considering the diffusion and reaction of Mg vapor with silicon substrates.

  18. An Improved Computational Method for the Calculation of Mixture Liquid-Vapor Critical Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrakopoulos, Panagiotis; Jia, Wenlong; Li, Changjun

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of critical points is important to determine the phase behavior of a mixture. This work proposes a reliable and accurate method in order to locate the liquid-vapor critical point of a given mixture. The theoretical model is developed from the rigorous definition of critical points, based on the SRK equation of state (SRK EoS) or alternatively, on the PR EoS. In order to solve the resulting system of nonlinear equations, an improved method is introduced into an existing Newton-Raphson algorithm, which can calculate all the variables simultaneously in each iteration step. The improvements mainly focus on the derivatives of the Jacobian matrix, on the convergence criteria, and on the damping coefficient. As a result, all equations and related conditions required for the computation of the scheme are illustrated in this paper. Finally, experimental data for the critical points of 44 mixtures are adopted in order to validate the method. For the SRK EoS, average absolute errors of the predicted critical-pressure and critical-temperature values are 123.82 kPa and 3.11 K, respectively, whereas the commercial software package Calsep PVTSIM's prediction errors are 131.02 kPa and 3.24 K. For the PR EoS, the two above mentioned average absolute errors are 129.32 kPa and 2.45 K, while the PVTSIM's errors are 137.24 kPa and 2.55 K, respectively.

  19. Native Fluorescence Detection Methods and Detectors for Naphthalene and/or Other Volatile Organic Compound Vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Lane, Arthur L. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Naphthalene, benzene, toluene, xylene, and other volatile organic compounds have been identified as serious health hazards. This is especially true for personnel working with JP8 jet fuel and other fuels containing naphthalene as well as other hazardous volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Embodiments of the invention are directed to methods and apparatus for near-real-time in-situ detection and accumulated dose measurement of exposure to naphthalene vapor and other hazardous gaseous VOCs. The methods and apparatus employ excitation of fluorophors native or endogenous to compounds of interest using light sources emitting in the ultraviolet below 300 nm and measurement of native fluorescence emissions in distinct wavebands above the excitation wavelength. The apparatus of some embodiments are cell-phone-sized sensor/dosimeter "badges" to be worn by personnel potentially exposed to naphthalene or other hazardous VOCs. The badge sensor of some embodiments provides both real time detection and data logging of exposure to naphthalene or other VOCs of interest from which both instantaneous and accumulated dose can be determined. The badges employ a new native fluorescence based detection method to identify and differentiate VOCs. The particular focus of some embodiments are the detection and identification of naphthalene while other embodiments are directed to detection and identification of other VOCs like aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, toluene, and xylene.

  20. Faraday effect of polycrystalline bismuth iron garnet thin film prepared by mist chemical vapor deposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Situ; Kamakura, Ryosuke; Murai, Shunsuke; Fujita, Koji; Tanaka, Katsuhisa

    2017-01-01

    We have synthesized polycrystalline thin film composed of a single phase of metastable bismuth iron garnet, Bi_3Fe_5O_1_2, on a fused silica substrate, one of the most widely utilized substrates in the solid-state electronics, by using mist chemical vapor deposition (mist CVD) method. The phase purity and stoichiometry are confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The resultant thin film shows a small surface roughness of 3.251 nm. The saturation magnetization at room temperature is 1200 G, and the Faraday rotation angle at 633 nm reaches −5.2 deg/μm. Both the magnetization and the Faraday rotation angles are somewhat higher than those of polycrystalline BIG thin films prepared by other methods. - Highlights: • Thin film of polycrystalline Bi_3Fe_5O_1_2 was prepared by the mist CVD method. • Optimized conditions were found for the synthesis of single phase of Bi_3Fe_5O_1_2. • The Faraday rotation angle at 633 nm is –5.2 deg/μm at room temperature. • The Faraday rotation is interpreted by the electronic transitions of Fe"3"+ ions.

  1. Faraday effect of polycrystalline bismuth iron garnet thin film prepared by mist chemical vapor deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Situ; Kamakura, Ryosuke; Murai, Shunsuke; Fujita, Koji; Tanaka, Katsuhisa, E-mail: tanaka@dipole7.kuic.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2017-01-15

    We have synthesized polycrystalline thin film composed of a single phase of metastable bismuth iron garnet, Bi{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}, on a fused silica substrate, one of the most widely utilized substrates in the solid-state electronics, by using mist chemical vapor deposition (mist CVD) method. The phase purity and stoichiometry are confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The resultant thin film shows a small surface roughness of 3.251 nm. The saturation magnetization at room temperature is 1200 G, and the Faraday rotation angle at 633 nm reaches −5.2 deg/μm. Both the magnetization and the Faraday rotation angles are somewhat higher than those of polycrystalline BIG thin films prepared by other methods. - Highlights: • Thin film of polycrystalline Bi{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} was prepared by the mist CVD method. • Optimized conditions were found for the synthesis of single phase of Bi{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}. • The Faraday rotation angle at 633 nm is –5.2 deg/μm at room temperature. • The Faraday rotation is interpreted by the electronic transitions of Fe{sup 3+} ions.

  2. Finite element method for neutron diffusion problems in hexagonal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, T.Y.C.; Hansen, K.F.

    1975-06-01

    The use of the finite element method for solving two-dimensional static neutron diffusion problems in hexagonal reactor configurations is considered. It is investigated as a possible alternative to the low-order finite difference method. Various piecewise polynomial spaces are examined for their use in hexagonal problems. The central questions which arise in the design of these spaces are the degree of incompleteness permissible and the advantages of using a low-order space fine-mesh approach over that of a high-order space coarse-mesh one. There is also the question of the degree of smoothness required. Two schemes for the construction of spaces are described and a number of specific spaces, constructed with the questions outlined above in mind, are presented. They range from a complete non-Lagrangian, non-Hermite quadratic space to an incomplete ninth order space. Results are presented for two-dimensional problems typical of a small high temperature gas-cooled reactor. From the results it is concluded that the space used should at least include the complete linear one. Complete spaces are to be preferred to totally incomplete ones. Once function continuity is imposed any additional degree of smoothness is of secondary importance. For flux shapes typical of the small high temperature gas-cooled reactor the linear space fine-mesh alternative is to be preferred to the perturbation quadratic space coarse-mesh one and the low-order finite difference method is to be preferred over both finite element schemes

  3. Methods for calculation of engineering parameters for gas separation. [vapor pressure and solubility of gases in organic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, D. D.

    1979-01-01

    A group additivity method is generated which allows estimation, from the structural formulas alone, of the energy of vaporization and the molar volume at 25 C of many nonpolar organic liquids. Using these two parameters and appropriate thermodynamic relations, the vapor pressure of the liquid phase and the solubility of various gases in nonpolar organic liquids are predicted. It is also possible to use the data to evaluate organic and some inorganic liquids for use in gas separation stages or liquids as heat exchange fluids in prospective thermochemical cycles for hydrogen production.

  4. Polymeric hydrogen diffusion barrier, high-pressure storage tank so equipped, method of fabricating a storage tank and method of preventing hydrogen diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessing, Paul A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-07-22

    An electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier which comprises an anode layer, a cathode layer, and an intermediate electrolyte layer, which is conductive to protons and substantially impermeable to hydrogen. A catalytic metal present in or adjacent to the anode layer catalyzes an electrochemical reaction that converts any hydrogen that diffuses through the electrolyte layer to protons and electrons. The protons and electrons are transported to the cathode layer and reacted to form hydrogen. The hydrogen diffusion barrier is applied to a polymeric substrate used in a storage tank to store hydrogen under high pressure. A storage tank equipped with the electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier, a method of fabricating the storage tank, and a method of preventing hydrogen from diffusing out of a storage tank are also disclosed.

  5. Method for Hot Real-Time Analysis of Pyrolysis Vapors at Pilot Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomeroy, Marc D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-29

    Pyrolysis oils contain more than 400 compounds, up to 60% of which do not re-volatilize for subsequent chemical analysis. Vapor chemical composition is also complicated as additional condensation reactions occur during quenching and collection of the product. Due to the complexity of the pyrolysis oil, and a desire to catalytically upgrade the vapor composition before condensation, online real-time analytical techniques such as Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) are of great use. However, in order to properly sample hot pyrolysis vapors at the pilot scale, many challenges must be overcome.

  6. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth by pulsed laser deposition and thermal chemical vapor deposition methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Jung Inn; Nam, Chunghee; Lee, Seonghoon

    2002-01-01

    We have grown vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on the various substrates such as a planar p-type Si(1 0 0) wafer, porous Si wafer, SiO 2 , Si 3 N 4 , Al 2 O 3 , and Cr by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at 800 deg.C, using C 2 H 2 gas as a carbon source and Fe catalyst films deposited by a pulsed laser on the substrates. The Fe films were deposited for 5 min by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The advantage of Fe deposition by PLD over other deposition methods lies in the superior adhesion of Fe to a Si substrate due to high kinetic energies of the generated Fe species. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images show that vertically well-aligned carbon nanotubes are grown on Fe nanoparticles formed from the thermal annealing of the Fe film deposited by PLD on the various substrates. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show that the Fe film annealed at 800 deg.C is broken to Fe nanoparticles of 10-50 nm in size. We show that the appropriate density of Fe nanoparticles formed from the thermal annealing of the film deposited by PLD is crucial in growing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. Using a PLD and a lift-off method, we developed the selective growth of carbon nanotubes on a patterned Fe-coated Si substrate

  7. Water-assisted growth of graphene on carbon nanotubes by the chemical vapor deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jian-Min; Dai, Ye-Jing

    2013-05-21

    Combining carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with graphene has been proved to be a feasible method for improving the performance of graphene for some practical applications. This paper reports a water-assisted route to grow graphene on CNTs from ferrocene and thiophene dissolved in ethanol by the chemical vapor deposition method in an argon flow. A double injection technique was used to separately inject ethanol solution and water for the preparation of graphene/CNTs. First, CNTs were prepared from ethanol solution and water. The injection of ethanol solution was suspended and water alone was injected into the reactor to etch the CNTs. Thereafter, ethanol solution was injected along with water, which is the key factor in obtaining graphene/CNTs. Transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman scattering analyses confirmed that the products were the hybrid materials of graphene/CNTs. X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy analysis showed the presence of oxygen rich functional groups on the surface of the graphene/CNTs. Given the activity of the graphene/CNT surface, CdS quantum dots adhered onto it uniformly through simple mechanical mixing.

  8. Gas diffusion ultrabarriers on polymer substrates using Al2O3 atomic layer deposition and SiN plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcia, P. F.; McLean, R. S.; Groner, M. D.; Dameron, A. A.; George, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    Thin films grown by Al 2 O 3 atomic layer deposition (ALD) and SiN plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) have been tested as gas diffusion barriers either individually or as bilayers on polymer substrates. Single films of Al 2 O 3 ALD with thicknesses of ≥10 nm had a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of ≤5x10 -5 g/m 2 day at 38 deg. C/85% relative humidity (RH), as measured by the Ca test. This WVTR value was limited by H 2 O permeability through the epoxy seal, as determined by the Ca test for the glass lid control. In comparison, SiN PECVD films with a thickness of 100 nm had a WVTR of ∼7x10 -3 g/m 2 day at 38 deg. C/85% RH. Significant improvements resulted when the SiN PECVD film was coated with an Al 2 O 3 ALD film. An Al 2 O 3 ALD film with a thickness of only 5 nm on a SiN PECVD film with a thickness of 100 nm reduced the WVTR from ∼7x10 -3 to ≤5x10 -5 g/m 2 day at 38 deg. C/85% RH. The reduction in the permeability for Al 2 O 3 ALD on the SiN PECVD films was attributed to either Al 2 O 3 ALD sealing defects in the SiN PECVD film or improved nucleation of Al 2 O 3 ALD on SiN.

  9. Wielandt method applied to the diffusion equations discretized by finite element nodal methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mugica R, A.; Valle G, E. del

    2003-01-01

    Nowadays the numerical methods of solution to the diffusion equation by means of algorithms and computer programs result so extensive due to the great number of routines and calculations that should carry out, this rebounds directly in the execution times of this programs, being obtained results in relatively long times. This work shows the application of an acceleration method of the convergence of the classic method of those powers that it reduces notably the number of necessary iterations for to obtain reliable results, what means that the compute times they see reduced in great measure. This method is known in the literature like Wielandt method and it has incorporated to a computer program that is based on the discretization of the neutron diffusion equations in plate geometry and stationary state by polynomial nodal methods. In this work the neutron diffusion equations are described for several energy groups and their discretization by means of those called physical nodal methods, being illustrated in particular the quadratic case. It is described a model problem widely described in the literature which is solved for the physical nodal grade schemes 1, 2, 3 and 4 in three different ways: to) with the classic method of the powers, b) method of the powers with the Wielandt acceleration and c) method of the powers with the Wielandt modified acceleration. The results for the model problem as well as for two additional problems known as benchmark problems are reported. Such acceleration method can also be implemented to problems of different geometry to the proposal in this work, besides being possible to extend their application to problems in 2 or 3 dimensions. (Author)

  10. NUVEM - New methods to Use gnss water Vapor Estimates for Meteorology of Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, R. M. S.; Viterbo, P.; Bos, M. S.; Martins, J. P.; Sá, A. G.; Valentim, H.; Jones, J.

    2014-12-01

    NUVEM (New methods to Use gnss water Vapor Estimates for Meteorology of Portugal) is a collaborative project funded by the Portuguese National Science Foundation (FCT) aiming to implement a multi-disciplinary approach in order to operationalize the inclusion of GNSS-PWV estimates for nowcasting in Portugal, namely for the preparation of warnings of severe weather. To achieve such goal, the NUVEM project is divided in two major components: a) Development and implementation of methods to compute accurate estimates of PWV (Precipitable Water Vapor) in NRT (Near Real-Time); b) Integration of such estimates in nowcasting procedures in use at IPMA (Portuguese Meteorological Service). Methodologies will be optimized at SEGAL to passive and actively access to the data; the PWV estimations will be computed using PPP (Precise Point Positioning), which permits the estimation of each individual station separately; solutions will be validated using internal and external values; and computed solutions will be transferred timely to the IPMA Operational Center. Validation of derived estimations using robust statistics is an important component of the project. The need for sending computed values as soon as possible to IPMA requires fast but reliable internal (e.g., noise estimation) and external (e.g., feedback from IPMA using other sensors like radiosondes) assessment of the quality of the PWV estimates. At IPMA, the goal is to implement the operational use of GNSS-PWV to assist weather nowcasting in Portugal. This will be done with the assistance of the Meteo group of IDL. Maps of GNSS-PWV will be automatically created and compared with solutions provided by other operational systems in order to help IPMA to detect suspicious patterns at near real time. This will be the first step towards the assimilation of GNSS-PWV estimates at IPMA nowcasting models. The NUVEM (EXPL/GEO-MET/0413/2013) project will also contribute to the active participation of Portugal at the COST Action ES

  11. An atmospheric electrical method to determine the eddy diffusion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Atmospheric electrical profiles; electrode layer; ion–aerosol balance equations. ... eddy diffusion theory (K-theory) in our model equations. K-theory is appropriate for near neutral ...... limit of strong turbulent mixing; J. Geophys. Res.

  12. Study of arsenic diffusion in dental therapy by nuclear methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalis, M.

    1987-07-01

    Activation by fast neutrons (14 MeV) allows the evaluation of radioactive arsenic distribution in the different parts of teeth of which the nerve was killed. As an average 60 % of the arsenic is found in the upper part 4.3 % in the middle part and 2.2 % in the apical part. About 34 % of arsenious anhydride is diffused into the organism. This quantitative analysis is a contribution to the therapeutic choice in function of element diffusion [fr

  13. Effect of precursor supply on structural and morphological characteristics of fe nanomaterials synthesized via chemical vapor condensation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jong-Keun; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Kim, Ki-Won; Nam, Tae-Hyun; Cho, Kwon-Koo

    2012-01-01

    Various physical, chemical and mechanical methods, such as inert gas condensation, chemical vapor condensation, sol-gel, pulsed wire evaporation, evaporation technique, and mechanical alloying, have been used to synthesize nanoparticles. Among them, chemical vapor condensation (CVC) has the benefit of its applicability to almost all materials because a wide range of precursors are available for large-scale production with a non-agglomerated state. In this work, Fe nanoparticles and nanowires were synthesized by chemical vapor condensation method using iron pentacarbonyl (Fe(CO)5) as the precursor. The effect of processing parameters on the microstructure, size and morphology of Fe nanoparticles and nanowires were studied. In particular, we investigated close correlation of size and morphology of Fe nanoparticles and nanowires with atomic quantity of inflow precursor into the electric furnace as the quantitative analysis. The atomic quantity was calculated by Boyle's ideal gas law. The Fe nanoparticles and nanowires with various diameter and morphology have successfully been synthesized by the chemical vapor condensation method.

  14. Analysis of Diffusion Problems using Homotopy Perturbation and Variational Iteration Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barari, Amin; Poor, A. Tahmasebi; Jorjani, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, variational iteration method and homotopy perturbation method are applied to different forms of diffusion equation. The diffusion equations have found wide applications in heat transfer problems, theory of consolidation and many other problems in engineering. The methods proposed...

  15. A sharp interface method for compressible liquid–vapor flow with phase transition and surface tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fechter, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.fechter@iag.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Aerodynamik und Gasdynamik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 21, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Munz, Claus-Dieter, E-mail: munz@iag.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Aerodynamik und Gasdynamik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 21, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Rohde, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Rohde@mathematik.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Angewandte Analysis und Numerische Simulation, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Zeiler, Christoph, E-mail: Christoph.Zeiler@mathematik.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Angewandte Analysis und Numerische Simulation, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-05-01

    The numerical approximation of non-isothermal liquid–vapor flow within the compressible regime is a difficult task because complex physical effects at the phase interfaces can govern the global flow behavior. We present a sharp interface approach which treats the interface as a shock-wave like discontinuity. Any mixing of fluid phases is avoided by using the flow solver in the bulk regions only, and a ghost-fluid approach close to the interface. The coupling states for the numerical solution in the bulk regions are determined by the solution of local two-phase Riemann problems across the interface. The Riemann solution accounts for the relevant physics by enforcing appropriate jump conditions at the phase boundary. A wide variety of interface effects can be handled in a thermodynamically consistent way. This includes surface tension or mass/energy transfer by phase transition. Moreover, the local normal speed of the interface, which is needed to calculate the time evolution of the interface, is given by the Riemann solution. The interface tracking itself is based on a level-set method. The focus in this paper is the description of the two-phase Riemann solver and its usage within the sharp interface approach. One-dimensional problems are selected to validate the approach. Finally, the three-dimensional simulation of a wobbling droplet and a shock droplet interaction in two dimensions are shown. In both problems phase transition and surface tension determine the global bulk behavior.

  16. A novel method for furfural recovery via gas stripping assisted vapor permeation by a polydimethylsiloxane membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Song; Guan, Yu; Cai, Di; Li, Shufeng; Qin, Peiyong; Karim, M. Nazmul; Tan, Tianwei

    2015-03-01

    Furfural is an important platform chemical with a wide range of applications. However, due to the low concentration of furfural in the hydrolysate, the conventional methods for furfural recovery are energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Considering the disadvantages of pervaporation (PV) and distillation in furfural separation, a novel energy-efficient `green technique', gas stripping assisted vapor permeation (GSVP), was introduced in this work. In this process, the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane was prepared by employing water as solvent. Coking in pipe and membrane fouling was virtually non-existent in this new process. In addition, GSVP was found to achieve the highest pervaporation separation index of 216200 (permeate concentration of 71.1 wt% and furfural flux of 4.09 kgm-2h-1) so far, which was approximately 2.5 times higher than that found in pervaporation at 95°C for recovering 6.0 wt% furfural from water. Moreover, the evaporation energy required for GSVP decreased by 35% to 44% relative to that of PV process. Finally, GSVP also displayed more promising potential in industrial application than PV, especially when coupled with the hydrolysis process or fermentation in biorefinery industry.

  17. Superhydrophobic multi-scale ZnO nanostructures fabricated by chemical vapor deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Feng, Chengheng; Wu, Chunxia; Ma, Weiwei; Cai, Lan

    2009-07-01

    The ZnO nanostructures were synthesized on Si(100) substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Different Morphologies of ZnO nanostructures, such as nanoparticle film, micro-pillar and micro-nano multi-structure, were obtained with different conditions. The results of XRD and TEM showed the good quality of ZnO crystal growth. Selected area electron diffraction analysis indicates the individual nano-wire is single crystal. The wettability of ZnO was studied by contact angle admeasuring apparatus. We found that the wettability can be changed from hydrophobic to super-hydrophobic when the structure changed from smooth particle film to single micro-pillar, nano-wire and micro-nano multi-scale structure. Compared with the particle film with contact angle (CA) of 90.7 degrees, the CA of single scale microstructure and sparse micro-nano multi-scale structure is 130-140 degrees, 140-150 degrees respectively. But when the surface is dense micro-nano multi-scale structure such as nano-lawn, the CA can reach to 168.2 degrees . The results indicate that microstructure of surface is very important to the surface wettability. The wettability on the micro-nano multi-structure is better than single-scale structure, and that of dense micro-nano multi-structure is better than sparse multi-structure.

  18. A method for distinguishing between propagons, diffusions, and locons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyf, Hamid Reza; Henry, Asegun [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Heat Lab, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2016-07-14

    The majority of intuition on phonon transport has been derived from studies of homogenous crystalline solids, where the atomic composition and structure are periodic. For this specific class of materials, the solutions to the equations of motions for the atoms (in the harmonic limit) result in plane wave modulated velocity fields for the normal modes of vibration. However, it has been known for several decades that whenever a system lacks periodicity, either compositional or structural, the normal modes of vibration can still be determined (in the harmonic limit), but the solutions take on different characteristics and many modes may not be plane wave modulated. Previous work has classified the types of vibrations into three primary categories, namely, propagons, diffusions, and locons. One can use the participation ratio to distinguish locons, from propagons and diffusons, which measures the extent to which a mode is localized. However, distinguishing between propagons and diffusons has remained a challenge, since both are spatially delocalized. Here, we present a new method that quantifies the extent to which a mode's character corresponds to a propagating mode, e.g., exhibits plane wave modulation. This then allows for clear and quantitative distinctions between propagons and diffusons. By resolving this issue quantitatively, one can now automate the classification of modes for any arbitrary material or structure, subject to a single constraint that the atoms must vibrate stably around their respective equilibrium sites. Several example test cases are studied including crystalline silicon and germanium, crystalline silicon with different defect concentrations, as well as amorphous silicon, germanium, and silica.

  19. A generalized method for alignment of block copolymer films: solvent vapor annealing with soft shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Zhe; Zhang, Yuanzhong; Groff, Jesse A; Cavicchi, Kevin A; Vogt, Bryan D

    2014-08-28

    One of the key issues associated with the utilization of block copolymer (BCP) thin films in nanoscience and nanotechnology is control of their alignment and orientation over macroscopic dimensions. We have recently reported a method, solvent vapor annealing with soft shear (SVA-SS), for fabricating unidirectional alignment of cylindrical nanostructures. This method is a simple extension of the common SVA process by adhering a flat, crosslinked poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) pad to the BCP thin film. The impact of processing parameters, including annealing time, solvent removal rate and the physical properties of the PDMS pad, on the quality of alignment quantified by the Herman's orientational factor (S) is systematically examined for a model system of polystyrene-block-polyisoprene-block-polystyrene (SIS). As annealing time increases, the SIS morphology transitions from isotropic rods to highly aligned cylinders. Decreasing the rate of solvent removal, which impacts the shear rate imposed by the contraction of the PDMS, improves the orientation factor of the cylindrical domains; this suggests the nanostructure alignment is primarily induced by contraction of PDMS during solvent removal. Moreover, the physical properties of the PDMS controlled by the crosslink density impact the orientation factor by tuning its swelling extent during SVA-SS and elastic modulus. Decreasing the PDMS crosslink density increases S; this effect appears to be primarily driven by the changes in the solubility of the SVA-SS solvent in the PDMS. With this understanding of the critical processing parameters, SVA-SS has been successfully applied to align a wide variety of BCPs including polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-polystyrene (SBS), polystyrene-block-poly(N,N-dimethyl-n-octadecylammonium p-styrenesulfonate) (PS-b-PSS-DMODA), polystyrene-block-polydimethylsiloxane (PS-b-PDMS) and polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinlypyridine) (PS-b-P2VP). These results suggest that SVA-SS is a generalizable

  20. Application of impulsive methods to the study of diffusion in solid state alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belaidouni, Said

    1979-01-01

    This research thesis deals with the field of high temperature melt environments, and more particularly with the determination of the contribution of different steps of the electrochemical reaction (charge transfer, transport of electro-active species, variation of the electrode surface condition). The use of metal electrodes highlighted the importance of phenomena of diffusion in the metal. This leaded to the use of impulsive methods to determine solid-state transport properties. After a presentation of the theoretical processing of impulsive methods (cell potential, transport equations, double-layer charge), and a discussion of the diffusion in metal alloys (diffusion flow, diffusion coefficients, grain boundary diffusion), the author reports an experimental investigation (installation and measurement equipment) and discusses the obtained results (alloy thermodynamics, diffusion studied by the deposition method, impulsive methods with potentiostatic or galvano-static pulses) [fr

  1. A comparison of diamond growth rate using in-liquid and conventional plasma chemical vapor deposition methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Toyota, Hiromichi; Nomura, Shinfuku; Mukasa, Shinobu; Inoue, Toru

    2009-01-01

    In order to make high-speed deposition of diamond effective, diamond growth rates for gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition and in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition are compared. A mixed gas of methane and hydrogen is used as the source gas for the gas-phase deposition, and a methanol solution of ethanol is used as the source liquid for the in-liquid deposition. The experimental system pressure is in the range of 60-150 kPa. While the growth rate of diamond increases as the pressure increases, the amount of input microwave energy per unit volume of diamond is 1 kW h/mm 3 regardless of the method used. Since the in-liquid deposition method provides a superior cooling effect through the evaporation of the liquid itself, a higher electric input power can be applied to the electrodes under higher pressure environments. The growth rate of in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process is found to be greater than conventional gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process under the same pressure conditions.

  2. A comparison of diamond growth rate using in-liquid and conventional plasma chemical vapor deposition methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Toyota, Hiromichi; Nomura, Shinfuku; Mukasa, Shinobu; Inoue, Toru

    2009-06-01

    In order to make high-speed deposition of diamond effective, diamond growth rates for gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition and in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition are compared. A mixed gas of methane and hydrogen is used as the source gas for the gas-phase deposition, and a methanol solution of ethanol is used as the source liquid for the in-liquid deposition. The experimental system pressure is in the range of 60-150 kPa. While the growth rate of diamond increases as the pressure increases, the amount of input microwave energy per unit volume of diamond is 1 kW h/mm3 regardless of the method used. Since the in-liquid deposition method provides a superior cooling effect through the evaporation of the liquid itself, a higher electric input power can be applied to the electrodes under higher pressure environments. The growth rate of in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process is found to be greater than conventional gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process under the same pressure conditions.

  3. Improvements to water vapor transmission and capillary absorption measurements in porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Samuel V. Glass; Charles R. Boardman

    2016-01-01

    The vapor permeability (or equivalently the vapor diffusion resistance factor) and the capillary absorption coefficient are frequently used as inputs to hygrothermal or heat, air, and moisture (HAM) models. However, it has been well documented that the methods used to determine these properties are sensitive to the operator, and wide variations in the properties have...

  4. On Solution of a Fractional Diffusion Equation by Homotopy Transform Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salah, A.; Hassan, S.S.A.

    2012-01-01

    The homotopy analysis transform method (HATM) is applied in this work in order to find the analytical solution of fractional diffusion equations (FDE). These equations are obtained from standard diffusion equations by replacing a second-order space derivative by a fractional derivative of order α and a first order time derivative by a fractional derivative. Furthermore, some examples are given. Numerical results show that the homotopy analysis transform method is easy to implement and accurate when applied to a fractional diffusion equations.

  5. Parallel algorithms for solving the diffusion equation by finite elements methods and by nodal methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulomb, F.

    1989-06-01

    The aim of this work is to study methods for solving the diffusion equation, based on a primal or mixed-dual finite elements discretization and well suited for use on multiprocessors computers; domain decomposition methods are the subject of the main part of this study, the linear systems being solved by the block-Jacobi method. The origin of the diffusion equation is explained in short, and various variational formulations are reminded. A survey of iterative methods is given. The elemination of the flux or current is treated in the case of a mixed method. Numerical tests are performed on two examples of reactors, in order to compare mixed elements and Lagrange elements. A theoretical study of domain decomposition is led in the case of Lagrange finite elements, and convergence conditions for the block-Jacobi method are derived; the dissection decomposition is previously the purpose of a particular numerical analysis. In the case of mixed-dual finite elements, a study is led on examples and is confirmed by numerical tests performed for the dissection decomposition; furthermore, after being justified, decompositions along axes of symmetry are numerically tested. In the case of a decomposition into two subdomains, the dissection decomposition and the decomposition with an integrated interface are compared. Alternative directions methods are defined; the convergence of those relative to Lagrange elements is shown; in the case of mixed elements, convergence conditions are found [fr

  6. Thermal diffusivity measurement by lock-in photothermal shadowgraph method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cifuentes, A. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Ciudad de México 11500 (Mexico); Departamento de Física Aplicada I, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería, Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Alvarado, S. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Ciudad de México 11500 (Mexico); Laboratory for Soft Matter and Biophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Heverlee B-3001 (Belgium); Cabrera, H. [Centro Multidisciplinario de Ciencias, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, IVIC, Mérida 5101, Venezuela and SPIE-ICTP Anchor Research in Optics Program Lab, International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Strada Costiera 11, Trieste (Italy); Calderón, A.; Marín, E., E-mail: emarinm@ipn.mx [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Ciudad de México 11500 (Mexico)

    2016-04-28

    Here, we present a novel application of the shadowgraph technique for obtaining the thermal diffusivity of an opaque solid sample, inspired by the orthogonal skimming photothermal beam deflection technique. This new variant utilizes the shadow projected by the sample when put against a collimated light source. The sample is then heated periodically by another light beam, giving rise to thermal waves, which propagate across it and through its surroundings. Changes in the refractive index of the surrounding media due to the heating distort the shadow. This phenomenon is recorded and lock-in amplified in order to determine the sample's thermal diffusivity.

  7. Modelling and simulation of diffusive processes methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, SK

    2014-01-01

    This book addresses the key issues in the modeling and simulation of diffusive processes from a wide spectrum of different applications across a broad range of disciplines. Features: discusses diffusion and molecular transport in living cells and suspended sediment in open channels; examines the modeling of peristaltic transport of nanofluids, and isotachophoretic separation of ionic samples in microfluidics; reviews thermal characterization of non-homogeneous media and scale-dependent porous dispersion resulting from velocity fluctuations; describes the modeling of nitrogen fate and transport

  8. On the self-diffusion process in liquid metals and alloys by the radioactive tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganovici, L.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of self-diffusion process in liquid metals and alloys is presented. There are only a few pure metals for which diffusion coefficients in a liquid state are known. The thesis aims at increasing the number of liquid metals for which diffusion coefficients are available, by determining these values for liquids: Cd, Tl, Sb and Te. The self-diffusion coefficients of Te in some tellurium based liquid alloys such as Tl 2 Te, PbTe and Bi 90 Te 10 were also determined. Self-diffusion coefficients have been measured using two radioactive tracer methods: a) the capillary-reservoir method; b) the semi-infinite capillary method. The self-diffusion coefficients were derived from the measured radioactive concentration profile, using the solutions of Fick's second law for appropriate initial and limit conditions. The temperature dependence study of self-diffusion coefficients in liquids Cd, Tl, Sb and Te, was used to check some theoretical models on the diffusion mechanism in metallic melts. The experimental diffusion data interpreted in terms of the Arrhenius type temperature dependence, was used to propose two simple empiric relations for determining self diffusion coefficients of group I liquid metals and for liquid semi-metals. It was established a marked decrease of self-diffusion coefficients of liquid Te close to the solidification temperature. The diffusivity of Te in liquid Tl 2 Te points to an important decrease close to the solidification temperature. A simplified model was proposed for the diffusion structural unit in this alloy and the hard sphere model for liquid metals was checked by comparing the theoretical and experimental self-diffusion coefficients. (author)

  9. Note: interpreting iterative methods convergence with diffusion point of view

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Dohy

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we explain the convergence speed of different iteration schemes with the fluid diffusion view when solving a linear fixed point problem. This interpretation allows one to better understand why power iteration or Jacobi iteration may converge faster or slower than Gauss-Seidel iteration.

  10. Methods of diffusion of innovation within small seafood enterprises ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In present essay, technology level enhancement of small seafood enterprises is studied based on technology diffusion. New technologies attraction in small enterprises causes competition especially in small sea food enterprises in internal markets (considering lack of water resources). Therefore, to accomplish such thing, ...

  11. Atomic diffusion theory challenging the Cahn-Hilliard method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nastar, M.

    2014-01-01

    Our development of the self-consistent mean-field (SCMF) kinetic theory for nonuniform alloys leads to the statement that kinetic correlations induced by the vacancy diffusion mechanism have a dramatic effect on nano-scale diffusion phenomena, leading to nonlinear features of the interdiffusion coefficients. Lattice rate equations of alloys including nonuniform gradients of chemical potential are derived within the Bragg-Williams statistical approximation and the third shell kinetic approximation of the SCMF theory. General driving forces including deviations of the free energy from a local equilibrium thermodynamic formulation are introduced. These deviations are related to the variation of vacancy motion due to the spatial variation of the alloy composition. During the characteristic time of atomic diffusion, multiple exchanges of the vacancy with the same atoms may happen, inducing atomic kinetic correlations that depend as well on the spatial variation of the alloy composition. As long as the diffusion driving forces are uniform, the rate equations are shown to obey in this form the Onsager formalism of thermodynamics of irreversible processes (TIP) and the TIP-based Cahn-Hilliard diffusion equation. If now the chemical potential gradients are not uniform, the continuous limit of the present SCMF kinetic equations does not coincide with the Cahn-Hilliard (CH) equation. In particular, the composition gradient and higher derivative terms depending on kinetic parameters add to the CH thermodynamic-based composition gradient term. Indeed, a diffusion equation written as a mobility multiplied by a thermodynamic formulation of the driving forces is shown to be inadequate. In the reciprocal space, the thermodynamic driving force has to be multiplied by a nonlinear function of the wave vector accounting for the variation of kinetic correlations with composition inhomogeneities. Analytical expressions of the effective interdiffusion coefficient are given for two limit

  12. A symmetrized quasi-diffusion method for solving multidimensional transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miften, M.M.; Larsen, E.W.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors propose a 'symmetrized' QD (SQD) method in which the non-self-adjoint QD diffusion problem is replaced by two self-adjoint diffusion problems. These problems are more easily discretized and more efficiently solved than in the standard QD method. They also give SQD calculational results for transport problems in x-y geometry

  13. Analysis of the Diffuse Domain Method for Second Order Elliptic Boundary Value Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, Martin; Elvetun, Ole; Schlottbom, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    The diffuse domain method for partial differential equations on complicated geometries recently received strong attention in particular from practitioners, but many fundamental issues in the analysis are still widely open. In this paper, we study the diffuse domain method for approximating second

  14. Effective diffusion coefficient of radon in concrete, theory and method for field measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culot, M.V.J.; Olson, H.G.; Schiager, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    A linear diffusion model serves as the basis for determination of an effective radon diffusion coefficient in concrete. The coefficient was needed to later allow quantitative prediction of radon accumulation within and behind concrete walls after application of an impervious radon barrier. A resolution of certain discrepancies noted in the literature in the use of an effective diffusion coefficient to model diffusion of a radioactive gas through a porous medium is suggested. An outline of factors expected to affect the concrete physical structure and the effective diffusion coefficient of radon through it is also presented. Finally, a field method for evaluating effective radon diffusion coefficients in concrete is proposed and results of measurements performed on a concrete foundation wall are compared with similar published values of gas diffusion coefficients in concrete. (author)

  15. A novel pre-oxidation method for elemental mercury removal utilizing a complex vaporized absorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yi, E-mail: zhaoyi9515@163.com; Hao, Runlong; Guo, Qing

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An innovative liquid-phase complex absorbent (LCA) for Hg{sup 0} removal was prepared. • A novel integrative process for Hg{sup 0} removal was proposed. • The simultaneous removal efficiencies of SO{sub 2}, NO and Hg{sup 0} were 100%, 79.5% and 80.4%, respectively. • The reaction mechanism of simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2}, NO and Hg{sup 0} was proposed. - Abstract: A novel semi-dry integrative method for elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) removal has been proposed in this paper, in which Hg{sup 0} was initially pre-oxidized by a vaporized liquid-phase complex absorbent (LCA) composed of a Fenton reagent, peracetic acid (CH{sub 3}COOOH) and sodium chloride (NaCl), after which Hg{sup 2+} was absorbed by the resultant Ca(OH){sub 2}. The experimental results indicated that CH{sub 3}COOOH and NaCl were the best additives for Hg{sup 0} oxidation. Among the influencing factors, the pH of the LCA and the adding rate of the LCA significantly affected the Hg{sup 0} removal. The coexisting gases, SO{sub 2} and NO, were characterized as either increasing or inhibiting in the removal process, depending on their concentrations. Under optimal reaction conditions, the efficiency for the single removal of Hg{sup 0} was 91%. Under identical conditions, the efficiencies of the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2}, NO and Hg{sup 0} were 100%, 79.5% and 80.4%, respectively. Finally, the reaction mechanism for the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2}, NO and Hg{sup 0} was proposed based on the characteristics of the removal products as determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), the analysis of the electrode potentials, and through data from related research references.

  16. A novel pre-oxidation method for elemental mercury removal utilizing a complex vaporized absorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yi; Hao, Runlong; Guo, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An innovative liquid-phase complex absorbent (LCA) for Hg 0 removal was prepared. • A novel integrative process for Hg 0 removal was proposed. • The simultaneous removal efficiencies of SO 2 , NO and Hg 0 were 100%, 79.5% and 80.4%, respectively. • The reaction mechanism of simultaneous removal of SO 2 , NO and Hg 0 was proposed. - Abstract: A novel semi-dry integrative method for elemental mercury (Hg 0 ) removal has been proposed in this paper, in which Hg 0 was initially pre-oxidized by a vaporized liquid-phase complex absorbent (LCA) composed of a Fenton reagent, peracetic acid (CH 3 COOOH) and sodium chloride (NaCl), after which Hg 2+ was absorbed by the resultant Ca(OH) 2 . The experimental results indicated that CH 3 COOOH and NaCl were the best additives for Hg 0 oxidation. Among the influencing factors, the pH of the LCA and the adding rate of the LCA significantly affected the Hg 0 removal. The coexisting gases, SO 2 and NO, were characterized as either increasing or inhibiting in the removal process, depending on their concentrations. Under optimal reaction conditions, the efficiency for the single removal of Hg 0 was 91%. Under identical conditions, the efficiencies of the simultaneous removal of SO 2 , NO and Hg 0 were 100%, 79.5% and 80.4%, respectively. Finally, the reaction mechanism for the simultaneous removal of SO 2 , NO and Hg 0 was proposed based on the characteristics of the removal products as determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), the analysis of the electrode potentials, and through data from related research references

  17. Modelling of multicomponent diffusion in a two-phase oxide-metal corium pool by a diffuse interface method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardon, Clement

    2016-01-01

    This Ph.D. topic is focused on the modelling of stratification kinetics for an oxide-metal corium pool (U-O-Zr-steel system) in terms of multicomponent and multiphase diffusion. This work is part of a larger research effort for the development of a detailed corium pool modelling based on a CFD approach for thermal hydraulics. The overall goal is to improve the understanding of the involved phenomena and obtain closure laws for integral macroscopic models. The phase-field method coupled with an energy functional using the CALPHAD method appears to be relevant for this purpose. In a first part, we have developed a diffuse interface model in order to describe the diffusion process in the U-O system. This model has been coupled with a CALPHAD thermodynamic database and its parameterization has been developed with, in particular, an up-scaling procedure related to the interface thickness. Then, within the framework of a modelling for the U-O-Zr ternary system, we have proposed a generalization of the diffuse interface model through an assumption of local equilibrium for redox mechanisms. A particular attention was paid to the model analysis by 1D numerical simulations with a special focus on the steady state composition profiles. Finally we have applied this model to the U-O-Zr-Fe system. For that purpose, we have considered a configuration close to small-scale experimental tests of oxide-metal corium pool stratification. (author) [fr

  18. Monte Carlo Finite Volume Element Methods for the Convection-Diffusion Equation with a Random Diffusion Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a framework for the construction of Monte Carlo finite volume element method (MCFVEM for the convection-diffusion equation with a random diffusion coefficient, which is described as a random field. We first approximate the continuous stochastic field by a finite number of random variables via the Karhunen-Loève expansion and transform the initial stochastic problem into a deterministic one with a parameter in high dimensions. Then we generate independent identically distributed approximations of the solution by sampling the coefficient of the equation and employing finite volume element variational formulation. Finally the Monte Carlo (MC method is used to compute corresponding sample averages. Statistic error is estimated analytically and experimentally. A quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC technique with Sobol sequences is also used to accelerate convergence, and experiments indicate that it can improve the efficiency of the Monte Carlo method.

  19. Diffusion Geometry Based Nonlinear Methods for Hyperspectral Change Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    for matching biological spectra across a data base of hyperspectral pathology slides acquires with different instruments in different conditions, as...generalizing wavelets and similar scaling mechanisms. Plain Sight Systems, Inc. -7- Proprietary and Confidential To be specific, let the bi-Markov...remarkably well. Conventional nearest neighbor search , compared with a diffusion search. The data is a pathology slide ,each pixel is a digital

  20. Improvement of wind tunnel experiment method for atmospheric diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Masayuki; Sada, Koichi

    1987-01-01

    A wind direction fluctuation vane was added to CRIEPI's large - scale atmospheric diffusion wind tunnel for the purpose of increasing and controlling turbulence intensity. When the wind direction fluctuation vane was operated lateral plume spread and lateral turbulence intersity became greater than for cases when it was not operated. Use of the vane improved the ability of the wind tunnel to simulate plane spread under natural conditions. (author)

  1. A novel family of DG methods for diffusion problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Philip; Johnsen, Eric

    2017-11-01

    We describe and demonstrate a novel family of numerical schemes for handling elliptic/parabolic PDE behavior within the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) framework. Starting from the mixed-form approach commonly applied for handling diffusion (examples include Local DG and BR2), the new schemes apply the Recovery concept of Van Leer to handle cell interface terms. By applying recovery within the mixed-form approach, we have designed multiple schemes that show better accuracy than other mixed-form approaches while being more flexible and easier to implement than the Recovery DG schemes of Van Leer. While typical mixed-form approaches converge at rate 2p in the cell-average or functional error norms (where p is the order of the solution polynomial), many of our approaches achieve order 2p +2 convergence. In this talk, we will describe multiple schemes, including both compact and non-compact implementations; the compact approaches use only interface-connected neighbors to form the residual for each element, while the non-compact approaches add one extra layer to the stencil. In addition to testing the schemes on purely parabolic PDE problems, we apply them to handle the diffusive flux terms in advection-diffusion systems, such as the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  2. Research on GPU-accelerated algorithm in 3D finite difference neutron diffusion calculation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qi; Yu Ganglin; Wang Kan; Sun Jialong

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the adaptability of the neutron diffusion numerical algorithm on GPUs was studied, and a GPU-accelerated multi-group 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method was developed. The IAEA 3D PWR benchmark problem was calculated in the numerical test. The results demonstrate both high efficiency and adequate accuracy of the GPU implementation for neutron diffusion equation. (authors)

  3. New diffusion-sythetic acceleration methods for the SN equations with corner balance spatial differencing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wareing, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    New methods are presented for diffusion-synthetic accelerating the S N equations in slab and x-y geometries with the corner balance spatial differencing scheme. With the standard diffusion-synthetic acceleration method, the discretized diffusion problem is derived from the discretized S N problem to insure stability through consistent differencing. The major difference between our new methods and standard diffusion-synthetic acceleration is that the discretized diffusion problem is derived from a discretization of the P 1 equations, independently of the discretized S N problem. We present theoretical and numerical results to show that these new methods are unconditionally efficient in slab and x-y geometries with rectangular spatial meshes and isotropic scattering. (orig.)

  4. Spectral nodal method for one-speed X,Y-geometry Eigenvalue diffusion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, Dany S.; Lorenzo, Daniel M.; Hernandez, Carlos G.; Barros, Ricardo C.; Silva, Fernando C. da

    2001-01-01

    Presented here is a new numerical nodal method for steady-state multidimensional neutron diffusion equation in rectangular geometry. Our method is based on a spectral analysis of the transverse-integrated nodal diffusion equations. These equations are obtained by integrating the diffusion equation in X and Y directions, and then considering flat approximations for the transverse leakage terms. These flat approximations are the only approximations that we consider in this method; as a result the numerical solutions are completely free from truncation errors in slab geometry. We show numerical results to illustrate the method's accuracy for coarse mesh calculations in a heterogeneous medium. (author)

  5. Diffusion Capillary Phantom vs. Human Data: Outcomes for Reconstruction Methods Depend on Evaluation Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah D. Lichenstein

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Diffusion MRI provides a non-invasive way of estimating structural connectivity in the brain. Many studies have used diffusion phantoms as benchmarks to assess the performance of different tractography reconstruction algorithms and assumed that the results can be applied to in vivo studies. Here we examined whether quality metrics derived from a common, publically available, diffusion phantom can reliably predict tractography performance in human white matter tissue. Material and Methods: We compared estimates of fiber length and fiber crossing among a simple tensor model (diffusion tensor imaging, a more complicated model (ball-and-sticks and model-free (diffusion spectrum imaging, generalized q-sampling imaging reconstruction methods using a capillary phantom and in vivo human data (N=14. Results: Our analysis showed that evaluation outcomes differ depending on whether they were obtained from phantom or human data. Specifically, the diffusion phantom favored a more complicated model over a simple tensor model or model-free methods for resolving crossing fibers. On the other hand, the human studies showed the opposite pattern of results, with the model-free methods being more advantageous than model-based methods or simple tensor models. This performance difference was consistent across several metrics, including estimating fiber length and resolving fiber crossings in established white matter pathways. Conclusions: These findings indicate that the construction of current capillary diffusion phantoms tends to favor complicated reconstruction models over a simple tensor model or model-free methods, whereas the in vivo data tends to produce opposite results. This brings into question the previous phantom-based evaluation approaches and suggests that a more realistic phantom or simulation is necessary to accurately predict the relative performance of different tractography reconstruction methods. Acronyms: BSM: ball-and-sticks model; d

  6. Blackness coefficients, effective diffusion parameters, and control rod worths for thermal reactors - Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretscher, M M [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    1985-07-01

    Simple diffusion theory cannot be used to evaluate control rod worths in thermal neutron reactors because of the strongly absorbing character of the control material. However, reliable control rod worths can be obtained within the framework of diffusion theory if the control material is characterized by a set of mesh-dependent effective diffusion parameters. For thin slab absorbers the effective diffusion parameters can be expressed as functions of a suitably-defined pair of 'blackness coefficients'. Methods for calculating these blackness coefficients in the P1, P3, and P5 approximations, with and without scattering, are presented. For control elements whose geometry does not permit a thin slab treatment, other methods are needed for determining the effective diffusion parameters. One such method, based on reaction rate ratios, is discussed. (author)

  7. Experimental Methods and Development of Models on Diffusion of Nuclides onto Rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chung-Kyun; Lee, Jae-Kwang; Baik, Min-Hoon

    2007-01-01

    In the context of nuclear waste repositories, the rock matrix can act as a barrier against radionuclide migration and matrix diffusion can be an important mechanism for delaying the arrival times to the biosphere. It takes a growing interest whether matrix diffusion is an important retarding and dispersing transport mechanism for solutes carried by groundwater in fractured porous media. It can retard solutes by spreading them from the flowing groundwater into the diluting reservoir of the interconnected pore space of the rock matrix, and providing an increased surface for sorption processes. Diffusion experiments has been carried in crystalline rocks to determine the diffusivities of some radionuclides either by through-diffusion cells or in-diffusion setups. We'd like to compare the experimental methods and their functions according to sorption properties of species

  8. Computation of short-time diffusion using the particle simulation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janicke, L.

    1983-01-01

    The method of particle simulation allows a correct description of turbulent diffusion even in areas near the source and the computation of overall average values (anticipated values). The model is suitable for dealing with complex situation. It is derived from the K-model which describes the dispersion of noxious matter using the diffusion formula. (DG) [de

  9. A multigrid Newton-Krylov method for flux-limited radiation diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rider, W.J.; Knoll, D.A.; Olson, G.L.

    1998-01-01

    The authors focus on the integration of radiation diffusion including flux-limited diffusion coefficients. The nonlinear integration is accomplished with a Newton-Krylov method preconditioned with a multigrid Picard linearization of the governing equations. They investigate the efficiency of the linear and nonlinear iterative techniques

  10. VLE measurements using a static cell vapor phase manual sampling method accompanied with an empirical data consistency test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitag, Joerg; Kosuge, Hitoshi; Schmelzer, Juergen P.; Kato, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We use a new, simple static cell vapor phase manual sampling method (SCVMS) for VLE (x, y, T) measurement. • The method is applied to non-azeotropic, asymmetric and two-liquid phase forming azeotropic binaries. • The method is approved by a data consistency test, i.e., a plot of the polarity exclusion factor vs. pressure. • The consistency test reveals that with the new SCVMS method accurate VLE near ambient temperature can be measured. • Moreover, the consistency test approves that the effect of air in the SCVMS system is negligible. - Abstract: A new static cell vapor phase manual sampling (SCVMS) method is used for the simple measurement of constant temperature x, y (vapor + liquid) equilibria (VLE). The method was applied to the VLE measurements of the (methanol + water) binary at T/K = (283.2, 298.2, 308.2 and 322.9), asymmetric (acetone + 1-butanol) binary at T/K = (283.2, 295.2, 308.2 and 324.2) and two-liquid phase forming azeotropic (water + 1-butanol) binary at T/K = (283.2 and 298.2). The accuracy of the experimental data was approved by a data consistency test, that is, an empirical plot of the polarity exclusion factor, β, vs. the system pressure, P. The SCVMS data are accurate, because the VLE data converge to the same lnβ vs. lnP straight line determined from conventional distillation-still method and a headspace gas chromatography method

  11. Interferometric measurement of a diffusion coefficient: comparison of two methods and uncertainty analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riquelme, Rodrigo; Lira, Ignacio; Perez-Lopez, Carlos; Rayas, Juan A; RodrIguez-Vera, Ramon

    2007-01-01

    Two methods to measure the diffusion coefficient of a species in a liquid by optical interferometry were compared. The methods were tested on a 1.75 M NaCl aqueous solution diffusing into water at 26 deg. C. Results were D = 1.587 x 10 -9 m 2 s -1 with the first method and D = 1.602 x 10 -9 m 2 s -1 with the second method. Monte Carlo simulation was used to assess the possible dispersion of these results. The standard uncertainties were found to be of the order of 0.05 x 10 -9 m 2 s -1 with both methods. We found that the value of the diffusion coefficient obtained by either method is very sensitive to the magnification of the optical system, and that if diffusion is slow the measurement of time does not need to be very accurate

  12. Method and apparatus for simulating atomospheric absorption of solar energy due to water vapor and CO.sub.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the accuracy of the simulation of sunlight reaching the earth's surface includes a relatively small heated chamber having an optical inlet and an optical outlet, the chamber having a cavity that can be filled with a heated stream of CO.sub.2 and water vapor. A simulated beam comprising infrared and near infrared light can be directed through the chamber cavity containing the CO.sub.2 and water vapor, whereby the spectral characteristics of the beam are altered so that the output beam from the chamber contains wavelength bands that accurately replicate atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to atmospheric CO.sub.2 and moisture.

  13. Method and apparatus for simulating atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to water vapor and CO{sub 2}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-06-20

    A method and apparatus for improving the accuracy of the simulation of sunlight reaching the earth`s surface includes a relatively small heated chamber having an optical inlet and an optical outlet, the chamber having a cavity that can be filled with a heated stream of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. A simulated beam comprising infrared and near infrared light can be directed through the chamber cavity containing the CO{sub 2} and water vapor, whereby the spectral characteristics of the beam are altered so that the output beam from the chamber contains wavelength bands that accurately replicate atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to atmospheric CO{sub 2} and moisture. 8 figs.

  14. Order parameter free enhanced sampling of the vapor-liquid transition using the generalized replica exchange method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing; Kim, Jaegil; Straub, John E

    2013-03-14

    The generalized Replica Exchange Method (gREM) is extended into the isobaric-isothermal ensemble, and applied to simulate a vapor-liquid phase transition in Lennard-Jones fluids. Merging an optimally designed generalized ensemble sampling with replica exchange, gREM is particularly well suited for the effective simulation of first-order phase transitions characterized by "backbending" in the statistical temperature. While the metastable and unstable states in the vicinity of the first-order phase transition are masked by the enthalpy gap in temperature replica exchange method simulations, they are transformed into stable states through the parameterized effective sampling weights in gREM simulations, and join vapor and liquid phases with a succession of unimodal enthalpy distributions. The enhanced sampling across metastable and unstable states is achieved without the need to identify a "good" order parameter for biased sampling. We performed gREM simulations at various pressures below and near the critical pressure to examine the change in behavior of the vapor-liquid phase transition at different pressures. We observed a crossover from the first-order phase transition at low pressure, characterized by the backbending in the statistical temperature and the "kink" in the Gibbs free energy, to a continuous second-order phase transition near the critical pressure. The controlling mechanisms of nucleation and continuous phase transition are evident and the coexistence properties and phase diagram are found in agreement with literature results.

  15. A method to measure the diffusion coefficient by neutron wave propagation for limited samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woznicka, U.

    1986-03-01

    A study has been made of the use of the neutron wave and pulse propagation method for measurement of thermal neutron diffusion parameters. Earlier works an homogenous and heterogeneous media are reviewed. A new method is sketched for the determination of the diffusion coefficient for samples of limited size. The principle is to place a relatively thin slab of the material between two blocks of a medium with known properties. The advantages and disadvantages of the method are discussed. (author)

  16. Determination of axial diffusion coefficients by the Monte-Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milgram, M.

    1994-01-01

    A simple method to calculate the homogenized diffusion coefficient for a lattice cell using Monte-Carlo techniques is demonstrated. The method relies on modelling a finite reactor volume to induce a curvature in the flux distribution, and then follows a large number of histories to obtain sufficient statistics for a meaningful result. The goal is to determine the diffusion coefficient with sufficient accuracy to test approximate methods built into deterministic lattice codes. Numerical results are given. (author). 4 refs., 8 figs

  17. An accurate method for the determination of unlike potential parameters from thermal diffusion data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Geubeily, S.

    1997-01-01

    A new method is introduced by means of which the unlike intermolecular potential parameters can be determined from the experimental measurements of the thermal diffusion factor as a function of temperature. The method proved to be easy, accurate, and applicable two-, three-, and four-parameter potential functions whose collision integrals are available. The potential parameters computed by this method are found to provide a faith full representation of the thermal diffusion data under consideration. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Vaporization study on nonstoichiometric NbOsub(2+-x) by mass-spectrometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, T.; Naito, K.

    1981-01-01

    The vapor pressures over nonstoichiometric NbOsub(2+-x)(s) (1.972 2 (g) and NbO(g) over nonstoichiometric NbOsub(2+-x), from which the partial molar enthalpies and entropies of oxygen were calculated as a function of O/Nb composition. The composition dependence of the partial molar enthalpy and entropy obtained suggested the existence of some kind of short-range ordering in the nonstoichiometric Nbsub(2+-x) (s) phase. The enthalpies of formation of nonstoichiometric NbOsub(2+-x) (s) were also determined as a function of composition by combining the partial molar enthalpies of oxygen with the enthalpy of formation of stoichiometric NbOsub(2.000) (s). The phase diagram around NbOsub(2+-x) at high temperatures was determined from the vaporization study. (orig.)

  19. Vaporous Decontamination Methods: Potential Uses and Research Priorities for Chemical and Biological Contamination Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    over time. Ammonia gas is typically used to neutralise formaldehyde forming a white precipitate, hexamethylene- tetramine, which is then washed down...sulphite scrubbers DSTO-GD-0465 4 and a carbon bed to prevent any leakage of the ClO2 gas into the environment. The decontamination period (12...of ammonia gas) produces a broad-spectrum decontaminant against C agents [7]. However, initial studies have shown that the modified vaporous

  20. Formation of graphene on BN substrate by vapor deposition method and size effects on its structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giang, Nguyen Hoang; Hanh, Tran Thi Thu; Ngoc, Le Nhu; Nga, Nguyen To; Van Hoang, Vo

    2018-04-01

    We report MD simulation of the growth of graphene by the vapor deposition on a two-dimensional hBN substrate. The systems (containing carbon vapor and hBN substrate) are relaxed at high temperature (1500 K), and then it is cooled down to room one (300 K). Carbon atoms interact with the substrate via the Lennard-Jones potential while the interaction between carbon atoms is computed via the Tersoff potential. Depending on the size of the model, different crystalline honeycomb structures have been found. Structural properties of the graphene obtained at 300 K are studied by analyzing radial distribution functions (RDFs), coordination numbers, ring statistics, interatomic distances, bond-angle distributions and 2D visualization of atomic configurations. We find that the models containing various numbers of atoms have a honeycomb structure. Besides, differences in structural properties of graphene formed by the vapor deposition on the substrate and free standing one are found. Moreover, the size effect on the structure is significant.

  1. Numerical methods for calculating thermal residual stresses and hydrogen diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblond, J.B.; Devaux, J.; Dubois, D.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal residual stresses and hydrogen concentrations are two major factors intervening in cracking phenomena. These parameters were numerically calculated by a computer programme (TITUS) using the FEM, during the deposition of a stainless clad on a low-alloy plate. The calculation was performed with a 2-dimensional option in four successive steps: thermal transient calculation, metallurgical transient calculation (determination of the metallurgical phase proportions), elastic-plastic transient (plain strain conditions), hydrogen diffusion transient. Temperature and phase dependence of hydrogen diffusion coefficient and solubility constant. The following results were obtained: thermal calculations are very consistent with experiments at higher temperatures (due to the introduction of fusion and solidification latent heats); the consistency is not as good (by 70 degrees) for lower temperatures (below 650 degrees C); this was attributed to the non-introduction of gamma-alpha transformation latent heat. The metallurgical phase calculation indicates that the heat affected zone is almost entirely transformed into bainite after cooling down (the martensite proportion does not exceed 5%). The elastic-plastic calculations indicate that the stresses in the heat affected zone are compressive or slightly tensile; on the other hand, higher tensile stresses develop on the boundary of the heat affected zone. The transformation plasticity has a definite influence on the final stress level. The return of hydrogen to the clad during the bainitic transformation is but an incomplete phenomenon and the hydrogen concentration in the heat affected zone after cooling down to room temperature is therefore sufficient to cause cold cracking (if no heat treatment is applied). Heat treatments are efficient in lowering the hydrogen concentration. These results enable us to draw preliminary conclusions on practical means to avoid cracking. (orig.)

  2. An incident flux expansion transport theory method suitable for coupling to diffusion theory methods in hexagonal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, Robert M.; Rahnema, Farzad; Zhang, Dingkang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new hybrid stochastic–deterministic transport theory method to couple with diffusion theory. ► The method is implemented in 2D hexagonal geometry. ► The new method produces excellent results when compared with Monte Carlo reference solutions. ► The method is fast, solving all test cases in less than 12 s. - Abstract: A new hybrid stochastic–deterministic transport theory method, which is designed to couple with diffusion theory, is presented. The new method is an extension of the incident flux response expansion method, and it combines the speed of diffusion theory with the accuracy of transport theory. With ease of use in mind, the new method is derived in such a way that it can be implemented with only minimal modifications to an existing diffusion theory method. A new angular expansion, which is necessary for the diffusion theory coupling, is developed in 2D and 3D. The method is implemented in 2D hexagonal geometry, and an HTTR benchmark problem is used to test its accuracy in a standalone configuration. It is found that the new method produces excellent results (with average relative error in partial current less than 0.033%) when compared with Monte Carlo reference solutions. Furthermore, the method is fast, solving all test cases in less than 12 s

  3. A method for optimizing the cosine response of solar UV diffusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulli, Tomi; Kärhä, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

    2013-07-01

    Instruments measuring global solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiance at the surface of the Earth need to collect radiation from the entire hemisphere. Entrance optics with angular response as close as possible to the ideal cosine response are necessary to perform these measurements accurately. Typically, the cosine response is obtained using a transmitting diffuser. We have developed an efficient method based on a Monte Carlo algorithm to simulate radiation transport in the solar UV diffuser assembly. The algorithm takes into account propagation, absorption, and scattering of the radiation inside the diffuser material. The effects of the inner sidewalls of the diffuser housing, the shadow ring, and the protective weather dome are also accounted for. The software implementation of the algorithm is highly optimized: a simulation of 109 photons takes approximately 10 to 15 min to complete on a typical high-end PC. The results of the simulations agree well with the measured angular responses, indicating that the algorithm can be used to guide the diffuser design process. Cost savings can be obtained when simulations are carried out before diffuser fabrication as compared to a purely trial-and-error-based diffuser optimization. The algorithm was used to optimize two types of detectors, one with a planar diffuser and the other with a spherically shaped diffuser. The integrated cosine errors—which indicate the relative measurement error caused by the nonideal angular response under isotropic sky radiance—of these two detectors were calculated to be f2=1.4% and 0.66%, respectively.

  4. Growth of Cd0.96Zn0.04Te single crystals by vapor phase gas transport method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Tabatabai Yazdi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available   Cd0.96Zn0.04Te crystals were grown using vapor phase gas transport method (VPGT. The results show that dendritic crystals with grain size up to 3.5 mm can be grown with this technique. X-ray diffraction and Laue back-reflection patterns show that dendritic crystals are single-phase, whose single crystal grains are randomly oriented with respect to the gas-transport axis. Electrical measurements, carried out using Van der Pauw method, show that the as-grown crystals have resistivity of about 104 Ω cm and n-type conductivity.

  5. DETERMINATION OF MOISTURE DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT OF LARCH BOARD WITH FINITE DIFFERENCE METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaofang Zhou

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the moisture diffusion coefficient of Dahurian Larch (Larix gmelinii Rupr. by use of the Finite Difference Method (FDM. To obtain moisture distributions the dimensional boards of Dahurian Larch were dried, from which test samples were cut and sliced evenly into 9 pieces in different drying periods, so that moisture distributions at different locations and times across the thickness of Dahurian Larch were obtained with a weighing method. With these experimental data, FDM was used to solve Fick’s one-dimensional unsteady-state diffusion equation, and the moisture diffusion coefficient across the thickness at specified time was obtained. Results indicated that the moisture diffusion coefficient decreased from the surface to the center of the Dahurian Larch wood, and it decreased with decreasing moisture content at constant wood temperature; as the wood temperature increased, the moisture diffusion coefficient increased, and the effect of the wood temperature on the moisture diffusion coefficient was more significant than that of moisture content. Moisture diffusion coefficients were different for the two experiments due to differing diffusivity of the specimens.

  6. Direct diffusion tensor estimation using a model-based method with spatial and parametric constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanjie; Peng, Xi; Wu, Yin; Wu, Ed X; Ying, Leslie; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong; Liang, Dong

    2017-02-01

    To develop a new model-based method with spatial and parametric constraints (MB-SPC) aimed at accelerating diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) by directly estimating the diffusion tensor from highly undersampled k-space data. The MB-SPC method effectively incorporates the prior information on the joint sparsity of different diffusion-weighted images using an L1-L2 norm and the smoothness of the diffusion tensor using a total variation seminorm. The undersampled k-space datasets were obtained from fully sampled DTI datasets of a simulated phantom and an ex-vivo experimental rat heart with acceleration factors ranging from 2 to 4. The diffusion tensor was directly reconstructed by solving a minimization problem with a nonlinear conjugate gradient descent algorithm. The reconstruction performance was quantitatively assessed using the normalized root mean square error (nRMSE) of the DTI indices. The MB-SPC method achieves acceptable DTI measures at an acceleration factor up to 4. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can estimate the diffusion tensor more accurately than most existing methods operating at higher net acceleration factors. The proposed method can significantly reduce artifact, particularly at higher acceleration factors or lower SNRs. This method can easily be adapted to MR relaxometry parameter mapping and is thus useful in the characterization of biological tissue such as nerves, muscle, and heart tissue. © 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. A high-order boundary integral method for surface diffusions on elastically stressed axisymmetric rods

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaofan; Nie, Qing

    2009-01-01

    Many applications in materials involve surface diffusion of elastically stressed solids. Study of singularity formation and long-time behavior of such solid surfaces requires accurate simulations in both space and time. Here we present a high-order boundary integral method for an elastically stressed solid with axi-symmetry due to surface diffusions. In this method, the boundary integrals for isotropic elasticity in axi-symmetric geometry are approximated through modified alternating quadratu...

  8. Polarization switching detection method using a ferroelectric liquid crystal for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock frequency stabilization techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzik, Grzegorz; Rzepka, Janusz; Abramski, Krzysztof M

    2015-04-01

    We present a concept of the polarization switching detection method implemented for frequency-stabilized lasers, called the polarization switching dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (PSDAVLL) technique. It is a combination of the well-known dichroic atomic vapor laser lock method for laser frequency stabilization with a synchronous detection system based on the surface-stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal (SSFLC).The SSFLC is a polarization switch and quarter wave-plate component. This technique provides a 9.6 dB better dynamic range ratio (DNR) than the well-known two-photodiode detection configuration known as the balanced polarimeter. This paper describes the proposed method used practically in the VCSEL laser frequency stabilization system. The applied PSDAVLL method has allowed us to obtain a frequency stability of 2.7×10⁻⁹ and a reproducibility of 1.2×10⁻⁸, with a DNR of detected signals of around 81 dB. It has been shown that PSDAVLL might be successfully used as a method for spectra-stable laser sources.

  9. A combined reconstruction-classification method for diffuse optical tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiltunen, P [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Helsinki University of Technology, PO Box 3310, FI-02015 TKK (Finland); Prince, S J D; Arridge, S [Department of Computer Science, University College London, Gower Street London, WC1E 6B (United Kingdom)], E-mail: petri.hiltunen@tkk.fi, E-mail: s.prince@cs.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: s.arridge@cs.ucl.ac.uk

    2009-11-07

    We present a combined classification and reconstruction algorithm for diffuse optical tomography (DOT). DOT is a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem. Therefore, some regularization is needed. We present a mixture of Gaussians prior, which regularizes the DOT reconstruction step. During each iteration, the parameters of a mixture model are estimated. These associate each reconstructed pixel with one of several classes based on the current estimate of the optical parameters. This classification is exploited to form a new prior distribution to regularize the reconstruction step and update the optical parameters. The algorithm can be described as an iteration between an optimization scheme with zeroth-order variable mean and variance Tikhonov regularization and an expectation-maximization scheme for estimation of the model parameters. We describe the algorithm in a general Bayesian framework. Results from simulated test cases and phantom measurements show that the algorithm enhances the contrast of the reconstructed images with good spatial accuracy. The probabilistic classifications of each image contain only a few misclassified pixels.

  10. A method to calibrate a solar pyranometer for measuring reference diffuse irradiance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reda, I.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    2003-02-01

    Accurate pyranometer calibrations, traceable to internationally recognized standards, are critical for solar irradiance measurements. One calibration method is the component summation, where the pyranometers are calibrated outdoors under clear sky conditions, and the reference global solar irradiance is calculated as the sum of two reference components, the diffuse and subtended beam solar irradiances. The beam component is measured with pyrheliometers traceable to the World Radiometric Reference, while there is no internationally recognized reference for the diffuse component. In the absence of such a reference, we present a method to consistently calibrate pyranometers for measuring the diffuse component with an estimated uncertainty of {+-} (3% of reading +1 W/m{sup 2}). The method is based on using a modified shade/unshade method, and pyranometers with less than 1 W/m{sup 2} thermal offset errors. We evaluated the consistency of our method by calibrating three pyranometers four times. Calibration results show that the responsivity change is within {+-} 0.52% for the three pyranometers. We also evaluated the effect of calibrating pyranometers unshaded, then using them shaded to measure diffuse irradiance. We calibrated three unshaded pyranometers using the component summation method. Their outdoor measurements of clear sky diffuse irradiance, from sunrise to sundown, showed that the three calibrated pyranometers can be used to measure the diffuse irradiance to within {+-} 1.4 W/m{sup 2} variation from the reference irradiance. (author)

  11. Application of the SPH method in nodal diffusion analyses of SFR cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, Evgeny; Fridman, Emil [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Reactor Safety; Mikityuk, K. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    The current study investigated the potential of the SPH method, applied to correct the few-group XS produced by Serpent, to further improve the accuracy of the nodal diffusion solutions. The procedure for the generation of SPH-corrected few-group XS is presented in the paper. The performance of the SPH method was tested on a large oxide SFR core from the OECD/NEA SFR benchmark. The reference SFR core was modeled with the DYN3D and PARCS nodal diffusion codes using the SPH-corrected few-group XS generated by Serpent. The nodal diffusion results obtained with and without SPH correction were compared to the reference full-core Serpent MC solution. It was demonstrated that the application of the SPH method improves the accuracy of the nodal diffusion solutions, particularly for the rodded core state.

  12. An inherently parallel method for solving discretized diffusion equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eccleston, B.R.; Palmer, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    A Monte Carlo approach to solving linear systems of equations is being investigated in the context of the solution of discretized diffusion equations. While the technique was originally devised decades ago, changes in computer architectures (namely, massively parallel machines) have driven the authors to revisit this technique. There are a number of potential advantages to this approach: (1) Analog Monte Carlo techniques are inherently parallel; this is not necessarily true to today's more advanced linear equation solvers (multigrid, conjugate gradient, etc.); (2) Some forms of this technique are adaptive in that they allow the user to specify locations in the problem where resolution is of particular importance and to concentrate the work at those locations; and (3) These techniques permit the solution of very large systems of equations in that matrix elements need not be stored. The user could trade calculational speed for storage if elements of the matrix are calculated on the fly. The goal of this study is to compare the parallel performance of Monte Carlo linear solvers to that of a more traditional parallelized linear solver. The authors observe the linear speedup that they expect from the Monte Carlo algorithm, given that there is no domain decomposition to cause significant communication overhead. Overall, PETSc outperforms the Monte Carlo solver for the test problem. The PETSc parallel performance improves with larger numbers of unknowns for a given number of processors. Parallel performance of the Monte Carlo technique is independent of the size of the matrix and the number of processes. They are investigating modifications to the scheme to accommodate matrix problems with positive off-diagonal elements. They are also currently coding an on-the-fly version of the algorithm to investigate the solution of very large linear systems

  13. Comparison of two disc diffusion methods with minimum inhibitory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Susceptibility to penicillin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, ceftriaxone and spectinomycin and cefixime were determined by CSLI and AGSP method and Kappa statistics used to analyse the data with SPSS software. Results: All isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone and spectinomycin by three methods. Ninety‑nine (99%) ...

  14. Numerical study of water diffusion in biological tissues using an improved finite difference method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Junzhong; Does, Mark D; Gore, John C

    2007-01-01

    An improved finite difference (FD) method has been developed in order to calculate the behaviour of the nuclear magnetic resonance signal variations caused by water diffusion in biological tissues more accurately and efficiently. The algorithm converts the conventional image-based finite difference method into a convenient matrix-based approach and includes a revised periodic boundary condition which eliminates the edge effects caused by artificial boundaries in conventional FD methods. Simulated results for some modelled tissues are consistent with analytical solutions for commonly used diffusion-weighted pulse sequences, whereas the improved FD method shows improved efficiency and accuracy. A tightly coupled parallel computing approach was also developed to implement the FD methods to enable large-scale simulations of realistic biological tissues. The potential applications of the improved FD method for understanding diffusion in tissues are also discussed. (note)

  15. Non-destructive testing method for determining the solvent diffusion coefficient in the porous materials products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, V. P.; Mishchenko, S. V.; Belyaev, P. S.

    2018-01-01

    Ensuring non-destructive testing of products in industry is an urgent task. Most of the modern methods for determining the diffusion coefficient in porous materials have been developed for bodies of a given configuration and size. This leads to the need for finished products destruction to make experimental samples from them. The purpose of this study is the development of a dynamic method that allows operatively determine the diffusion coefficient in finished products from porous materials without destroying them. The method is designed to investigate the solvents diffusion coefficient in building constructions from materials having a porous structure: brick, concrete and aerated concrete, gypsum, cement, gypsum or silicate solutions, gas silicate blocks, heat insulators, etc. A mathematical model of the method is constructed. The influence of the design and measuring device operating parameters on the method accuracy is studied. The application results of the developed method for structural porous products are presented.

  16. Tellurium self-diffusion and point defects in lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simirskij, Yu.N.; Firsova, L.P.

    1982-01-01

    Method of radioactive indicators was used to determine factors of tellurium self-diffusion in lead telluride with different deviation of the composition from stoichiometric in the range of enrichment by tellurium. It was found that at 973 K factors of tellurium self-diffusion in lead telluride depend slightly on the vapor pressure of tellurium equilibrium with solid phase

  17. Interface methods for hybrid Monte Carlo-diffusion radiation-transport simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.

    2006-01-01

    Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Monte Carlo simulations in diffusive media. An important aspect of DDMC is the treatment of interfaces between diffusive regions, where DDMC is used, and transport regions, where standard Monte Carlo is employed. Three previously developed methods exist for treating transport-diffusion interfaces: the Marshak interface method, based on the Marshak boundary condition, the asymptotic interface method, based on the asymptotic diffusion-limit boundary condition, and the Nth-collided source technique, a scheme that allows Monte Carlo particles to undergo several collisions in a diffusive region before DDMC is used. Numerical calculations have shown that each of these interface methods gives reasonable results as part of larger radiation-transport simulations. In this paper, we use both analytic and numerical examples to compare the ability of these three interface techniques to treat simpler, transport-diffusion interface problems outside of a more complex radiation-transport calculation. We find that the asymptotic interface method is accurate regardless of the angular distribution of Monte Carlo particles incident on the interface surface. In contrast, the Marshak boundary condition only produces correct solutions if the incident particles are isotropic. We also show that the Nth-collided source technique has the capacity to yield accurate results if spatial cells are optically small and Monte Carlo particles are allowed to undergo many collisions within a diffusive region before DDMC is employed. These requirements make the Nth-collided source technique impractical for realistic radiation-transport calculations

  18. Method of independently operating a group of stages within a diffusion cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, M.; Allen, J.F.; Levey, H.B.

    1976-01-01

    A method of operating a group of the diffusion stages of a productive diffusion cascade with counter-current flow is described. The group consists of a top and a bottom stage which isolates the group from the cascade. The diffused gas produced in the top stage is circulated to the feed of the bottom stage, while at the same time undiffused gas from the bottom stage is circulated to the feed of the top stage whereby major changes in inventory distribution within the group of stages are prevented

  19. Preparation of standard mixtures of gas hydrocarbons in air by the diffusion dilution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M. R.; Perez, M. M.

    1979-01-01

    An original diffusion system able to produce continuously gaseous samples is described. This system can generate samples with concentrations of benzene in air from 0.1 to 1 ppm a reproducible way. The diffusion dilution method used Is also studied. The use of this diffusion system has been extended to the preparation of binary mixtures (benzene-toluene). Whit a secondary dilution device is possible preparing these mixtures over a wide range of concentrations (0.11 to 0.04 ppm for benzene and 0.06 to 0.02 for toluene). (Author) 7 refs

  20. On the Diffusion Coefficient of Two-step Method for LWR analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Deokjung; Choi, Sooyoung; Smith, Kord S.

    2015-01-01

    The few-group constants including diffusion coefficients are generated from the assembly calculation results. Once the assembly calculation is done, the cross sections (XSs) are spatially homogenized, and a critical spectrum calculation is performed in order to take into account the neutron leakages of the lattice. The diffusion coefficient is also generated through the critical spectrum calculation. Three different methods of the critical spectrum calculation such as B1 method, P1 method, and fundamental mode (FM) calculation method are considered in this paper. The diffusion coefficients can also be affected by transport approximations for the transport XS calculation which is used in the assembly transport lattice calculation in order to account for the anisotropic scattering effects. The outflow transport approximation and the inflow transport approximation are investigated in this paper. The accuracy of the few group data especially the diffusion coefficients has been studied to optimize the combination of the transport correction methods and the critical spectrum calculation methods using the UNIST lattice physics code STREAM. The combination of the inflow transport approximation and the FM method is shown to provide the highest accuracy in the LWR core calculations. The methodologies to calculate the diffusion coefficients have been reviewed, and the performances of them have been investigated with a LWR core problem. The combination of the inflow transport approximation and the fundamental mode critical spectrum calculation shows the smallest errors in terms of assembly power distribution

  1. A hybrid transport-diffusion Monte Carlo method for frequency-dependent radiative-transfer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Thompson, Kelly G.; Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2012-01-01

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations in optically thick media. In DDMC, particles take discrete steps between spatial cells according to a discretized diffusion equation. Each discrete step replaces many smaller Monte Carlo steps, thus improving the efficiency of the simulation. In this paper, we present an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold, as optical thickness is typically a decreasing function of frequency. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo, which results in a hybrid transport-diffusion scheme. With a set of frequency-dependent test problems, we confirm the accuracy and increased efficiency of our new DDMC method.

  2. Diffusion-synthetic acceleration methods for the discrete-ordinates equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, E.W.

    1983-01-01

    The diffusion-synthetic acceleration (DSA) method is an iterative procedure for obtaining numerical solutions of discrete-ordinates problems. The DSA method is operationally more complicated than the standard source-iteration (SI) method, but if encoded properly it converges much more rapidly, especially for problems with diffusion-like regions. In this article we describe the basic ideas beind the DSA method and give a (roughly chronological) review of its long development. We conclude with a discussion which covers additional topics, including some remaining open problems and the status of current efforts aimed at solving these problems

  3. Vapor pressures and enthalpies of vaporization of azides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verevkin, Sergey P.; Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N.; Algarra, Manuel; Manuel Lopez-Romero, J.; Aguiar, Fabio; Enrique Rodriguez-Borges, J.; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C.G.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We prepared and measured vapor pressures and vaporization enthalpies of 7 azides. → We examined consistency of new and available in the literature data. → Data for geminal azides and azido-alkanes selected for thermochemical calculations. - Abstract: Vapor pressures of some azides have been determined by the transpiration method. The molar enthalpies of vaporization Δ l g H m of these compounds were derived from the temperature dependencies of vapor pressures. The measured data sets were successfully checked for internal consistency by comparison with vaporization enthalpies of similarly structured compounds.

  4. First-Order Hyperbolic System Method for Time-Dependent Advection-Diffusion Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    accuracy, with rapid convergence over each physical time step, typically less than five Newton iter - ations. 1 Contents 1 Introduction 3 2 Hyperbolic...however, we employ the Gauss - Seidel (GS) relaxation, which is also an O(N) method for the discretization arising from hyperbolic advection-diffusion system...advection-diffusion scheme. The linear dependency of the iterations on Table 1: Boundary layer problem ( Convergence criteria: Residuals < 10−8.) log10Re

  5. A coarse-mesh nodal method-diffusive-mesh finite difference method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, H.; Nichols, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    Modern nodal methods have been successfully used for conventional light water reactor core analyses where the homogenized, node average cross sections (XSs) and the flux discontinuity factors (DFs) based on equivalence theory can reliably predict core behavior. For other types of cores and other geometries characterized by tightly-coupled, heterogeneous core configurations, the intranodal flux shapes obtained from a homogenized nodal problem may not accurately portray steep flux gradients near fuel assembly interfaces or various reactivity control elements. This may require extreme values of DFs (either very large, very small, or even negative) to achieve a desired solution accuracy. Extreme values of DFs, however, can disrupt the convergence of the iterative methods used to solve for the node average fluxes, and can lead to a difficulty in interpolating adjacent DF values. Several attempts to remedy the problem have been made, but nothing has been satisfactory. A new coarse-mesh nodal scheme called the Diffusive-Mesh Finite Difference (DMFD) technique, as contrasted with the coarse-mesh finite difference (CMFD) technique, has been developed to resolve this problem. This new technique and the development of a few-group, multidimensional kinetics computer program are described in this paper

  6. An efficient reliable method to estimate the vaporization enthalpy of pure substances according to the normal boiling temperature and critical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmandoust, Babak; Sanjari, Ehsan; Vatani, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    The heat of vaporization of a pure substance at its normal boiling temperature is a very important property in many chemical processes. In this work, a new empirical method was developed to predict vaporization enthalpy of pure substances. This equation is a function of normal boiling temperature, critical temperature, and critical pressure. The presented model is simple to use and provides an improvement over the existing equations for 452 pure substances in wide boiling range. The results s...

  7. Asymptotic equilibrium diffusion analysis of time-dependent Monte Carlo methods for grey radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Larsen, Edward W.

    2004-01-01

    The equations of nonlinear, time-dependent radiative transfer are known to yield the equilibrium diffusion equation as the leading-order solution of an asymptotic analysis when the mean-free path and mean-free time of a photon become small. We apply this same analysis to the Fleck-Cummings, Carter-Forest, and N'kaoua Monte Carlo approximations for grey (frequency-independent) radiative transfer. Although Monte Carlo simulation usually does not require the discretizations found in deterministic transport techniques, Monte Carlo methods for radiative transfer require a time discretization due to the nonlinearities of the problem. If an asymptotic analysis of the equations used by a particular Monte Carlo method yields an accurate time-discretized version of the equilibrium diffusion equation, the method should generate accurate solutions if a time discretization is chosen that resolves temperature changes, even if the time steps are much larger than the mean-free time of a photon. This analysis is of interest because in many radiative transfer problems, it is a practical necessity to use time steps that are large compared to a mean-free time. Our asymptotic analysis shows that: (i) the N'kaoua method has the equilibrium diffusion limit, (ii) the Carter-Forest method has the equilibrium diffusion limit if the material temperature change during a time step is small, and (iii) the Fleck-Cummings method does not have the equilibrium diffusion limit. We include numerical results that verify our theoretical predictions

  8. An innovative method for determining the diffusion coefficient of product nuclide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chih Lung [Dept. of Nuclear Back-end Management, Taiwan Power Company, Taipei (China); Wang, Tsing Hai [Dept. Biomedical Engineering and Environment Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu (China)

    2017-08-15

    Diffusion is a crucial mechanism that regulates the migration of radioactive nuclides. In this study, an innovative numerical method was developed to simultaneously calculate the diffusion coefficient of both parent and, afterward, series daughter nuclides in a sequentially reactive through-diffusion model. Two constructed scenarios, a serial reaction (RN{sub 1} → RN{sub 2} → RN{sub 3}) and a parallel reaction (RN{sub 1} → RN{sub 2}A + RN{sub 2}B), were proposed and calculated for verification. First, the accuracy of the proposed three-member reaction equations was validated using several default numerical experiments. Second, by applying the validated numerical experimental concentration variation data, the as-determined diffusion coefficient of the product nuclide was observed to be identical to the default data. The results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method. The significance of the proposed numerical method will be particularly powerful in determining the diffusion coefficients of systems with extremely thin specimens, long periods of diffusion time, and parent nuclides with fast decay constants.

  9. Inverse method for determining radon diffusion coefficient and free radon production rate of fragmented uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Yong-jun; Wang, Li-heng; Ding, De-xin; Zhao, Ya-li; Fan, Nan-bin

    2014-01-01

    The radon diffusion coefficient and the free radon production rate are important parameters for describing radon migration in the fragmented uranium ore. In order to determine the two parameters, the pure diffusion migration equation for radon was firstly established and its analytic solution with the two parameters to be determined was derived. Then, a self manufactured experimental column was used to simulate the pure diffusion of the radon, the improved scintillation cell method was used to measure the pore radon concentrations at different depths of the column loaded with the fragmented uranium ore, and the nonlinear least square algorithm was used to inversely determine the radon diffusion coefficient and the free radon production rate. Finally, the solution with the two inversely determined parameters was used to predict the pore radon concentrations at some depths of the column, and the predicted results were compared with the measured results. The results show that the predicted results are in good agreement with the measured results and the numerical inverse method is applicable to the determination of the radon diffusion coefficient and the free radon production rate for the fragmented uranium ore. - Highlights: • Inverse method for determining two transport parameters of radon is proposed. • A self-made experimental apparatus is used to simulate radon diffusion process. • Sampling volume and position for measuring radon concentration are optimized. • The inverse results of an experimental sample are verified

  10. Biexponential analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging: comparison of three different calculation methods in transplanted kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusch, Philipp; Wittsack, Hans-Jörg; Pentang, Gael; Buchbender, Christian; Miese, Falk; Schek, Julia; Kröpil, Patric; Antoch, Gerald; Lanzman, Rotem S

    2013-12-01

    Biexponential analysis has been used increasingly to obtain contributions of both diffusion and microperfusion to the signal decay in diffusion-weighted imaging DWI of different parts of the body. To compare biexponential diffusion parameters of transplanted kidneys obtained with three different calculation methods. DWI was acquired in 15 renal allograft recipients (eight men, seven women; mean age, 52.4 ± 14.3 years) using a paracoronal EPI sequence with 16 b-values (b = 0-750 s/mm(2)) and six averages at 1.5T. No respiratory gating was used. Three different calculation methods were used for the calculation of biexponential diffusion parameters: Fp, ADCP, and ADCD were calculated without fixing any parameter a priori (calculation method 1); ADCP was fixed to 12.0 µm(2)/ms, whereas Fp and ADCD were calculated using the biexponential model (calculation method 2); multistep approach with monoexponential fitting of the high b-value portion (b ≥ 250 s/mm(2)) for determination of ADCD and assessment of the low b intercept for determination of Fp (calculation method 3). For quantitative analysis, ROI measurements were performed on the according parameter maps. Mean ADCD values of the renal cortex using calculation method 1 were significantly lower than using calculation methods 2 and 3 (P < 0.001). There was a significant correlation between calculation methods 1 and 2 (r = 0.69 (P < 0.005) and calculation methods 1 and 3 (r = 0.59; P < 0.05) as well as calculation methods 2 and 3 (r = 0.98; P < 0.001). Mean Fp values of the renal cortex were higher with calculation method 1 than with calculation methods 2 and 3 (P < 0.001). For Fp, only the correlation between calculation methods 2 and 3 was significant (r = 0.98; P < 0.001). Biexponential diffusion parameters differ significantly depending on the calculation methods used for their calculation.

  11. Local transport method for hybrid diffusion-transport calculations in 2-D cylindrical (R, THETA) geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Dingkang; Rahnema, Farzad; Ougouag, Abderrfi M.

    2011-01-01

    A response-based local transport method has been developed in 2-D (r, θ) geometry for coupling to any coarse-mesh (nodal) diffusion method/code. Monte Carlo method is first used to generate a (pre-computed) the response function library for each unique coarse mesh in the transport domain (e.g., the outer reflector region of the Pebble Bed Reactor). The scalar flux and net current at the diffusion/transport interface provided by the diffusion method are used as an incoming surface source to the transport domain. A deterministic iterative sweeping method together with the response function library is utilized to compute the local transport solution within all transport coarse meshes. After the partial angular currents crossing the coarse mesh surfaces are converged, albedo coefficients are computed as boundary conditions for the diffusion methods. The iteration on the albedo boundary condition (for the diffusion method via transport) and the incoming angular flux boundary condition (for the transport via diffusion) is continued until convergence is achieved. The method was tested for in a simplified 2-D (r, θ) pebble bed reactor problem consisting of an inner reflector, an annular fuel region and a controlled outer reflector. The comparisons have shown that the results of the response-function-based transport method agree very well with a direct MCNP whole core solution. The agreement in coarse mesh averaged flux was found to be excellent: relative difference of about 0.18% and a maximum difference of about 0.55%. Note that the MCNP uncertainty was less than 0.1%. (author)

  12. Three-group albedo method applied to the diffusion phenomenon with up-scattering of neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terra, Andre M. Barge Pontes Torres; Silva, Jorge A. Valle da; Cabral, Ronaldo G.

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to develop a three-group neutron Albedo algorithm considering the up-scattering of neutrons in order to analyse the diffusion phenomenon in nonmultiplying media. The neutron Albedo method is an analytical method that does not try to solve describing explicit equations for the neutron fluxes. Thus the neutron Albedo methodology is very different from the conventional methodology, as the neutron diffusion theory model. Graphite is analyzed as a model case. One major application is in the determination of the nonleakage probabilities with more understandable results in physical terms than conventional radiation transport method calculations. (author)

  13. Double-diffusive natural convection in an enclosure filled with nanofluid using ISPH method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelraheem M. Aly

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The double-diffusive natural convection in an enclosure filled with nanofluid is studied using ISPH method. The model used for the nanofluid incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. In addition the thermal energy equations include regular diffusion and cross-diffusion terms. In ISPH algorithm, a semi implicit velocity correction procedure is utilized and the pressure is implicitly evaluated by solving pressure Poisson equation. The results are presented with flow configurations, isotherms, concentration and nanoparticle volume fraction contours and average Nusselt and Sherwood numbers for different cases. The results from this investigation are well validated and have favorable comparisons with previously published results. It is found that, among all cases, a good natural convection can be obtained by considering the double diffusive case. An increase in Soret number accompanied by a decrease in Dufour number results in an increase in average Nusselt number and a decrease in average Sherwood number.

  14. Mosquito knock-down and adulticidal activities of essential oils by vaporizer, impregnated filter paper and aerosol methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ramar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils from 12 medicinal plants were evaluated by three different bioassay methods (Vaporizer, Filter paper and Aerosol for Knock-down and adulticidal efficacy on the filarial vector mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus. Based on screening results the effective plants were selected for investigating Knock-down and adulticidal potential against adult female of the laboratory-reared mosquito species, Cx. quinquefasciatus. In vaporizer bioassay method four different doses (1.25, 2.5, 5 and 10% were used. Four different doses (0.625, 1.25, 2.5 and 10% were used both filter paper (cm2 and aerosol (cm3 bioassay methods. Five essential oils (calamus, camphor, citronella, clove and eucalyptus were identified as potential treatments in vaporizer bioassay. The result showed that the knock down time decreased with increased concentration in clove oil treatment; the Knock-down time (KT 50 = 46.1 ± 0.1, 38.5 ± 0.1, 30.7 ± 0.2, and 20.1 ± 0.1 minutes was recorded at 1.25, 2.5, 5 and 10% /cm3 respectively. In filter paper method nine essential oils were identified as potential treatments. After 1 hr exposure period clove oil recorded the lowest median Knock-down time (KT50 which was calculated as 9.15 ± 0.1min/cm2. Followed by citronella (KT50 =11.4 ± 0.1 min and eucalyptus (KT50 =11.4 ±0.1min oils since they recorded lower median Knock-down time. All the twelve essential oils were identified as potential treatments in aerosol activity. The lethal time decreased when the concentration increased. At 5 % concentration the median lethal time (LT50 for clove oil was calculated as (LT50=3.80 ± 0.1minutes. The Cinnamon oil was effective which recorded (LT50 = 1.99 mins as median lethal time. Camphor (LT50 =19.6± 0.1 min oil were found to be less toxic by aerosol method. These results suggest that clove oil and cinnamon oil have the potential to be used as a eco-friendly approach for the control of the major important filaria vector Cx. quinquefasciatus

  15. Enthalpy of Vaporization and Vapor Pressures: An Inexpensive Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battino, Rubin; Dolson, David A.; Hall, Michael A.; Letcher, Trevor M.

    2007-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive method to determine the enthalpy of vaporization of liquids by measuring vapor pressure as a function of temperature is described. The vapor pressures measured with the stopcock cell were higher than the literature values and those measured with the sidearm rubber septum cell were both higher and lower than literature…

  16. Local Fractional Series Expansion Method for Solving Wave and Diffusion Equations on Cantor Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Min Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a local fractional series expansion method to solve the wave and diffusion equations on Cantor sets. Some examples are given to illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method to obtain analytical solutions to differential equations within the local fractional derivatives.

  17. Analysis of the applicability of acceleration methods for a triangular prism geometry nodal diffusion code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Toichiro; Okumura, Keisuke

    2002-11-01

    A prototype version of a diffusion code has been developed to analyze the hexagonal core as reduced moderation reactor and the applicability of some acceleration methods have been investigated to accelerate the convergence of the iterative solution method. The hexagonal core is divided into regular triangular prisms in the three-dimensional code MOSRA-Prism and a polynomial expansion nodal method is applied to approximate the neutron flux distribution by a cubic polynomial. The multi-group diffusion equation is solved iteratively with ordinal inner and outer iterations and the effectiveness of acceleration methods is ascertained by applying an adaptive acceleration method and a neutron source extrapolation method, respectively. The formulation of the polynomial expansion nodal method is outlined in the report and the local and global effectiveness of the acceleration methods is discussed with various sample calculations. A new general expression of vacuum boundary condition, derived in the formulation is also described. (author)

  18. Microstructure analysis of zirconium carbide layer on pyrocarbon-coated particles prepared by zirconium chloride vapor method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongsheng; Liu Bing; Zhang Kaihong; Tang Chunhe

    2012-01-01

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) layer on pyrocarbon-coated particles was successfully prepared in a fluidized bed coater furnace by chemical vapor deposition using a zirconium chloride (ZrCl 4 ) vapor method and quantitative controlling of the Zr-source through a ZrCl 4 powder feeder. The crystal phase, microstructure and chemical composition of ZrC-coating layer were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical metallographical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that the deposited ZrC-coating layer has smooth and compact surface, no obvious holes, clear interface with dense pyrocarbon layer, and a thickness of 35 μm. The main phase of ZrC-coating layer is fcc-ZrC crystal, which is composed of small grains with the size of 20–50 nm. The grain size increases monotonously with the deposition temperature increasing. The main elements of ZrC-coating layer are Zr and C, and the Zr/C molar ratio is close to 1:1. The analysis of composition and crystal structure suggest that a stoichiometric fcc-ZrC crystal was obtained and no obvious preferred orientation of the grains was found.

  19. Catalyst-Free Vapor-Phase Method for Direct Integration of Gas Sensing Nanostructures with Polymeric Transducing Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Vallejos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten oxide nanoneedles (NNs are grown and integrated directly with polymeric transducing platforms for gas sensors via aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD method. Material analysis shows the feasibility to grow highly crystalline nanomaterials in the form of NNs with aspect ratios between 80 and 200 and with high concentration of oxygen vacancies at the surface, whereas gas testing demonstrates moderate sensing responses to hydrogen at concentrations between 10 ppm and 50 ppm, which are comparable with results for tungsten oxide NNs grown on silicon transducing platforms. This method is demonstrated to be an attractive route to fabricate next generation of gas sensors devices, provided with flexibility and functionality, with great potential in a cost effective production for large-scale applications.

  20. Physical and mathematical modeling of diesel fuel liquid and vapor movement in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T.E.; Kreamer, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional physical modeling of diesel fuel leaks was conducted in sand tanks to determine liquid and vapor migration characteristics. Mathematical modeling provided estimation of vapor concentrations at discrete times and distances from the vapor source and was compared to the physical experiment. The mathematical gaseous diffusion model was analogous to the Theis equation for ground-water flow, accounted for sorptive effects of the media, and was calibrated using measured concentrations from the sand tank. Mathematically different positions of the vapor source were tested to better relate observed liquid flow rates and media configuration to gaseous concentrations. The calculated diffusion parameters were then used to estimate theoretical, three-dimensional vapor transport from a hypothetical liquid leak of 2.0 1/hr for 30 days. The associated three-dimensional vapor plume, which would be reasonably detectable by commercially available vadose zone monitors, was estimated to have a diameter of 8 m with a vapor concentration of 50 ppm at the outside edge of the vapor plume. A careful application of the method and values can be used to give a first approximation to the number of vapor monitors required at a field site as well as the optimal locations for the monitors

  1. Electrical characterization of 6H-SiC grown by physical vapor transport method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaremba, G., E-mail: gzaremba@ite.waw.p [Institute of Electron Technology, Department of Analysis of Semiconductor Nanostructures, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Kaniewska, M.; Jung, W. [Institute of Electron Technology, Department of Analysis of Semiconductor Nanostructures, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Guziewicz, M. [Institute of Electron Technology, Department of Semiconductor Processing for Photonics, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Grasza, K. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, ul. Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland)

    2009-11-25

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and capacitance versus voltage (C-V) measurements have been used to study the electrical properties of electron traps in n-type 6H-silicon carbide (SiC) grown by physical vapor transport (PVT) technique, designed as Schottky diodes. Ir Schottky- and Ni ohmic-contacts were deposited by sputtering. Current versus voltage (I-V) measurements showed that sputter deposition of the Schottky contact yields diodes with a reduced barrier height and poor rectification characteristics. Four main electron traps revealed in DLTS spectra have activation energies at 0. 39, 0.41, 0,66, and 0.74 eV below the conduction band. Based on a comparison made with electron traps reported in the literature, we conclude that three of them are well-known traps found in the as-grown or irradiated material. There was no emission signature in the literature to make such a correspondence for the trap at 0.74 eV. Strongly nonhomogenous spatial distribution with a tendency of the trap to accumulation at the surface was found by DLTS and C-V profiling. This together with the fact that the trap at 0.74 eV has not been previously reported in as-grown or processed material makes it possible that the trap is sputter deposition induced defect.

  2. Nucleation and growth of microdroplets of ionic liquids deposited by physical vapor method onto different surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, José C. S.; Coelho, Ana F. S. M. G.; Mendes, Adélio; Santos, Luís M. N. B. F.

    2018-01-01

    Nanoscience and technology has generated an important area of research in the field of properties and functionality of ionic liquids (ILs) based materials and their thin films. This work explores the deposition process of ILs droplets as precursors for the fabrication of thin films, by means of physical vapor deposition (PVD). It was found that the deposition (by PVD on glass, indium tin oxide, graphene/nickel and gold-coated quartz crystal surfaces) of imidazolium [C4mim][NTf2] and pyrrolidinium [C4C1Pyrr][NTf2] based ILs generates micro/nanodroplets with a shape, size distribution and surface coverage that could be controlled by the evaporation flow rate and deposition time. No indication of the formation of a wetting-layer prior to the island growth was found. Based on the time-dependent morphological analysis of the micro/nanodroplets, a simple model for the description of the nucleation process and growth of ILs droplets is presented. The proposed model is based on three main steps: minimum free area to promote nucleation; first order coalescence; second order coalescence.

  3. Laser interferometric method for determining the carrier diffusion length in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manukhov, V. V. [Saint Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Fedortsov, A. B.; Ivanov, A. S., E-mail: ivaleks58@gmail.com [Saint Petersburg Mining University (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    A new laser interferometric method for measuring the carrier diffusion length in semiconductors is proposed. The method is based on the interference–absorption interaction of two laser radiations in a semiconductor. Injected radiation generates additional carriers in a semiconductor, which causes a change in the material’s optical constants and modulation of the probing radiation passed through the sample. When changing the distance between carrier generation and probing points, a decrease in the carrier concentration, which depends on the diffusion length, is recorded. The diffusion length is determined by comparing the experimental and theoretical dependences of the probe signal on the divergence of the injector and probe beams. The method is successfully tested on semiconductor samples with different thicknesses and surface states and can be used in scientific research and the electronics industry.

  4. An instrument for small-animal imaging using time-resolved diffuse and fluorescence optical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montcel, Bruno; Poulet, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    We describe time-resolved optical methods that use diffuse near-infrared photons to image the optical properties of tissues and their inner fluorescent probe distribution. The assembled scanner uses picosecond laser diodes at 4 wavelengths, an 8-anode photo-multiplier tube and time-correlated single photon counting. Optical absorption and reduced scattering images as well as fluorescence emission images are computed from temporal profiles of diffuse photons. This method should improve the spatial resolution and the quantification of fluorescence signals. We used the diffusion approximation of the radiation transport equation and the finite element method to solve the forward problem. The inverse problem is solved with an optimization algorithm such as ART or conjugate gradient. The scanner and its performances are presented, together with absorption, scattering and fluorescent images obtained with it

  5. Homotopy decomposition method for solving one-dimensional time-fractional diffusion equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuasad, Salah; Hashim, Ishak

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we present the homotopy decomposition method with a modified definition of beta fractional derivative for the first time to find exact solution of one-dimensional time-fractional diffusion equation. In this method, the solution takes the form of a convergent series with easily computable terms. The exact solution obtained by the proposed method is compared with the exact solution obtained by using fractional variational homotopy perturbation iteration method via a modified Riemann-Liouville derivative.

  6. Tracer diffusion in an ordered alloy: application of the path probability and Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Akbar, S.A.; Murch, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Tracer diffusion technique has been extensively utilized to investigate diffusion phenomena and has contributed a great deal to the understanding of the phenomena. However, except for self diffusion and impurity diffusion, the meaning of tracer diffusion is not yet satisfactorily understood. Here we try to extend the understanding to concentrated alloys. Our major interest here is directed towards understanding the physical factors which control diffusion through the comparison of results obtained by the Path Probability Method (PPM) and those by the Monte Carlo simulation method (MCSM). Both the PPM and the MCSM are basically in the same category of statistical mechanical approaches applicable to random processes. The advantage of the Path Probability method in dealing with phenomena which occur in crystalline systems has been well established. However, the approximations which are inevitably introduced to make the analytical treatment tractable, although their meaning may be well-established in equilibrium statistical mechanics, sometimes introduce unwarranted consequences the origin of which is often hard to trace. On the other hand, the MCSM which can be carried out in a parallel fashion to the PPM provides, with care, numerically exact results. Thus a side-by-side comparison can give insight into the effect of approximations in the PPM. It was found that in the pair approximation of the CVM, the distribution in the completely random state is regarded as homogeneous (without fluctuations), and hence, the fluctuation in distribution is not well represented in the PPM. These examples thus show clearly how the comparison of analytical results with carefully carried out calculations by the MCSM guides the progress of theoretical treatments and gives insights into the mechanism of diffusion

  7. Green's function method and its application to verification of diffusion models of GASFLOW code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Z.; Travis, J.R.; Breitung, W.

    2007-07-01

    To validate the diffusion model and the aerosol particle model of the GASFLOW computer code, theoretical solutions of advection diffusion problems are developed by using the Green's function method. The work consists of a theory part and an application part. In the first part, the Green's functions of one-dimensional advection diffusion problems are solved in infinite, semi-infinite and finite domains with the Dirichlet, the Neumann and/or the Robin boundary conditions. Novel and effective image systems especially for the advection diffusion problems are made to find the Green's functions in a semi-infinite domain. Eigenfunction method is utilized to find the Green's functions in a bounded domain. In the case, key steps of a coordinate transform based on a concept of reversed time scale, a Laplace transform and an exponential transform are proposed to solve the Green's functions. Then the product rule of the multi-dimensional Green's functions is discussed in a Cartesian coordinate system. Based on the building blocks of one-dimensional Green's functions, the multi-dimensional Green's function solution can be constructed by applying the product rule. Green's function tables are summarized to facilitate the application of the Green's function. In the second part, the obtained Green's function solutions benchmark a series of validations to the diffusion model of gas species in continuous phase and the diffusion model of discrete aerosol particles in the GASFLOW code. Perfect agreements are obtained between the GASFLOW simulations and the Green's function solutions in case of the gas diffusion. Very good consistencies are found between the theoretical solutions of the advection diffusion equations and the numerical particle distributions in advective flows, when the drag force between the micron-sized particles and the conveying gas flow meets the Stokes' law about resistance. This situation is corresponding to a very small Reynolds number based on the particle

  8. A hybrid transport-diffusion method for Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Urbatsch, Todd J.; Evans, Thomas M.; Buksas, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Monte Carlo particle-transport simulations in diffusive media. If standard Monte Carlo is used in such media, particle histories will consist of many small steps, resulting in a computationally expensive calculation. In DDMC, particles take discrete steps between spatial cells according to a discretized diffusion equation. Each discrete step replaces many small Monte Carlo steps, thus increasing the efficiency of the simulation. In addition, given that DDMC is based on a diffusion equation, it should produce accurate solutions if used judiciously. In practice, DDMC is combined with standard Monte Carlo to form a hybrid transport-diffusion method that can accurately simulate problems with both diffusive and non-diffusive regions. In this paper, we extend previously developed DDMC techniques in several ways that improve the accuracy and utility of DDMC for nonlinear, time-dependent, radiative-transfer calculations. The use of DDMC in these types of problems is advantageous since, due to the underlying linearizations, optically thick regions appear to be diffusive. First, we employ a diffusion equation that is discretized in space but is continuous in time. Not only is this methodology theoretically more accurate than temporally discretized DDMC techniques, but it also has the benefit that a particle's time is always known. Thus, there is no ambiguity regarding what time to assign a particle that leaves an optically thick region (where DDMC is used) and begins transporting by standard Monte Carlo in an optically thin region. Also, we treat the interface between optically thick and optically thin regions with an improved method, based on the asymptotic diffusion-limit boundary condition, that can produce accurate results regardless of the angular distribution of the incident Monte Carlo particles. Finally, we develop a technique for estimating radiation momentum deposition during the

  9. Measurement of through-thickness thermal diffusivity of thermoplastics using thermal wave method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R.; Mellinger, A.

    2015-04-01

    Thermo-physical properties, such as thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat are important quantities that are needed to interpret and characterize thermoplastic materials. Such characterization is necessary for many applications, ranging from aerospace engineering to food packaging, electrical and electronic industry and medical science. In this work, the thermal diffusivity of commercially available polymeric films is measured in the thickness direction at room temperature using thermal wave method. The results obtained with this method are in good agreement with theoretical and experimental values.

  10. Determination of diffusion coefficients in polypyrrole thin films using a current pulse relaxation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Reginald M.; Vandyke, Leon S.; Martin, Charles R.

    1987-01-01

    The current pulse E sub oc relaxation method and its application to the determination of diffusion coefficients in electrochemically synthesized polypyrrole thin films is described. Diffusion coefficients for such films in Et4NBF4 and MeCN are determined for a series of submicron film thicknesses. Measurement of the double-layer capacitance, C sub dl, and the resistance, R sub u, of polypyrrole thin films as a function of potential obtained with the galvanostatic pulse method is reported. Measurements of the electrolyte concentration in reduced polypyrrole films are also presented to aid in the interpretation of the data.

  11. Homotopy perturbation transform method for pricing under pure diffusion models with affine coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Rodrigue Bambe Moutsinga

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Most existing multivariate models in finance are based on diffusion models. These models typically lead to the need of solving systems of Riccati differential equations. In this paper, we introduce an efficient method for solving systems of stiff Riccati differential equations. In this technique, a combination of Laplace transform and homotopy perturbation methods is considered as an algorithm to the exact solution of the nonlinear Riccati equations. The resulting technique is applied to solving stiff diffusion model problems that include interest rates models as well as two and three-factor stochastic volatility models. We show that the present approach is relatively easy, efficient and highly accurate.

  12. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR SOLVING THE MULTI-TERM TIME-FRACTIONAL WAVE-DIFFUSION EQUATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F; Meerschaert, M M; McGough, R J; Zhuang, P; Liu, Q

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, the multi-term time-fractional wave-diffusion equations are considered. The multi-term time fractional derivatives are defined in the Caputo sense, whose orders belong to the intervals [0,1], [1,2), [0,2), [0,3), [2,3) and [2,4), respectively. Some computationally effective numerical methods are proposed for simulating the multi-term time-fractional wave-diffusion equations. The numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of theoretical analysis. These methods and techniques can also be extended to other kinds of the multi-term fractional time-space models with fractional Laplacian.

  13. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR SOLVING THE MULTI-TERM TIME-FRACTIONAL WAVE-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, F.; Meerschaert, M.M.; McGough, R.J.; Zhuang, P.; Liu, Q.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the multi-term time-fractional wave-diffusion equations are considered. The multi-term time fractional derivatives are defined in the Caputo sense, whose orders belong to the intervals [0,1], [1,2), [0,2), [0,3), [2,3) and [2,4), respectively. Some computationally effective numerical methods are proposed for simulating the multi-term time-fractional wave-diffusion equations. The numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of theoretical analysis. These methods and technique...

  14. Thermal Diffusivity Measurement for Thermal Spray Coating Attached to Substrate Using Laser Flash Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoshima, Megumi; Tanaka, Takashi; Endo, Satoshi; Baba, Tetsuya; Harada, Yoshio; Kojima, Yoshitaka; Kawasaki, Akira; Ono, Fumio

    2011-11-01

    Ceramic-based thermal barrier coatings are used as heat and wear shields of gas turbine blades. There is a strong need to evaluate the thermal conductivity of coating for thermal design and use. The thermal conductivity of a bulk material is obtained as the product of thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity, and density above room temperature in many cases. Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity are unique for a given material because they are sensitive to the structure of the material. Therefore, it is important to measure them in each sample. However it is difficult to measure the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of coatings because coatings are attached to substrates. In order to evaluate the thermal diffusivity of a coating attached to the substrate, we have examined the laser flash method with the multilayer model on the basis of the response function method. We carried out laser flash measurements in layered samples composed of a CoNiCrAlY bond coating and a 8YSZ top coating by thermal spraying on a Ni-based superalloy substrate. It was found that the procedure using laser flash method with the multilayer model is useful for the thermal diffusivity evaluation of a coating attached to a substrate.

  15. Discontinuous Galerkin methods and a posteriori error analysis for heterogenous diffusion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephansen, A.F.

    2007-12-01

    In this thesis we analyse a discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method and two computable a posteriori error estimators for the linear and stationary advection-diffusion-reaction equation with heterogeneous diffusion. The DG method considered, the SWIP method, is a variation of the Symmetric Interior Penalty Galerkin method. The difference is that the SWIP method uses weighted averages with weights that depend on the diffusion. The a priori analysis shows optimal convergence with respect to mesh-size and robustness with respect to heterogeneous diffusion, which is confirmed by numerical tests. Both a posteriori error estimators are of the residual type and control the energy (semi-)norm of the error. Local lower bounds are obtained showing that almost all indicators are independent of heterogeneities. The exception is for the non-conforming part of the error, which has been evaluated using the Oswald interpolator. The second error estimator is sharper in its estimate with respect to the first one, but it is slightly more costly. This estimator is based on the construction of an H(div)-conforming Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec flux using the conservativeness of DG methods. Numerical results show that both estimators can be used for mesh-adaptation. (author)

  16. Synthesis of highly dispersed platinum particles on carbon nanotubes by an in situ vapor-phase method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercado-Zúñiga, C. [Depto. Ing. Metalurgia y Materiales, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico 07300 D.F. (Mexico); Vargas-García, J.R., E-mail: rvargasga@ipn.mx [Depto. Ing. Metalurgia y Materiales, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico 07300 D.F. (Mexico); Hernández-Pérez, M.A. [Depto. Ing. Metalurgia y Materiales, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico 07300 D.F. (Mexico); Figueroa-Torres, M.Z. [Depto. Eco-Materiales y Energia, Univ. Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); Cervantes-Sodi, F. [Depto. Fisica y Matematicas, Univ. Iberoamericana, Mexico 01209 D.F. (Mexico); Torres-Martínez, L.M. [Depto. Eco-Materiales y Energia, Univ. Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles were prepared on functionalized carbon nanotubes. • A simple and competitive vapor-phase method was employed. • Carbonyl groups were assumed to be responsible for assisted decomposition of Pt-acac. • Pt particles were highly dispersed because carbonyl groups served as reaction sites. • Particles of 2.3 nm in size were highly dispersed even the high loading (27 wt%Pt). - Abstract: Highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles were prepared on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) using a simple in situ vapor-phase method. The method consisted in two-step procedure in which an initial mixture of Pt precursor (Pt-acac) and f-MWCNTs was heated in a quartz tube reactor, first at 180 °C and then at 400 °C. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR–ATR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to follow the chemical and structural transformations of mixture components during heating steps. The functionalization of MWCNTs with HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution resulted in formation of surface carbonyl groups. The FTIR–ATR and XRD results indicated that individual Pt-acac withstood heating at 180 °C, whereas it was dissociated when heated in contact with f-MWCNTs at the same temperature. Thus, the functional carbonyl groups were found to be responsible for assisted decomposition of Pt-acac at 180 °C. Since carbonyl groups served as reaction sites for decomposition of Pt-acac, the resulting particles were highly and homogeneously dispersed on the surface of MWCNTs even the relatively high metallic loading of 27 wt%. TEM observations revealed that crystalline Pt particles exhibit narrow size distribution with a mean size of 2.3 nm.

  17. Synthesis of highly dispersed platinum particles on carbon nanotubes by an in situ vapor-phase method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercado-Zúñiga, C.; Vargas-García, J.R.; Hernández-Pérez, M.A.; Figueroa-Torres, M.Z.; Cervantes-Sodi, F.; Torres-Martínez, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles were prepared on functionalized carbon nanotubes. • A simple and competitive vapor-phase method was employed. • Carbonyl groups were assumed to be responsible for assisted decomposition of Pt-acac. • Pt particles were highly dispersed because carbonyl groups served as reaction sites. • Particles of 2.3 nm in size were highly dispersed even the high loading (27 wt%Pt). - Abstract: Highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles were prepared on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) using a simple in situ vapor-phase method. The method consisted in two-step procedure in which an initial mixture of Pt precursor (Pt-acac) and f-MWCNTs was heated in a quartz tube reactor, first at 180 °C and then at 400 °C. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR–ATR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to follow the chemical and structural transformations of mixture components during heating steps. The functionalization of MWCNTs with HNO 3 /H 2 SO 4 solution resulted in formation of surface carbonyl groups. The FTIR–ATR and XRD results indicated that individual Pt-acac withstood heating at 180 °C, whereas it was dissociated when heated in contact with f-MWCNTs at the same temperature. Thus, the functional carbonyl groups were found to be responsible for assisted decomposition of Pt-acac at 180 °C. Since carbonyl groups served as reaction sites for decomposition of Pt-acac, the resulting particles were highly and homogeneously dispersed on the surface of MWCNTs even the relatively high metallic loading of 27 wt%. TEM observations revealed that crystalline Pt particles exhibit narrow size distribution with a mean size of 2.3 nm

  18. Applicability of the Galerkin method to the approximate solution of the multigroup diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obradovic, D.

    1970-04-01

    In the study of the nuclear reactors space-time behaviour the modal analysis is very often used though some basic mathematical problems connected with application of this methods are still unsolved. In this paper the modal analysis is identified as a set of the methods in the mathematical literature known as the Galerkin methods (or projection methods, or sometimes direct methods). Using the results of the mathematical investigations of these methods the applicability of the Galerkin type methods to the calculations of the eigenvalue and eigenvectors of the stationary and non-stationary diffusion operator, as well as for the solutions of the corresponding functional equations, is established (author)

  19. Efficient kinetic Monte Carlo method for reaction-diffusion problems with spatially varying annihilation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Karsten; Rieger, Heiko

    2013-03-01

    We present an efficient Monte Carlo method to simulate reaction-diffusion processes with spatially varying particle annihilation or transformation rates as it occurs for instance in the context of motor-driven intracellular transport. Like Green's function reaction dynamics and first-passage time methods, our algorithm avoids small diffusive hops by propagating sufficiently distant particles in large hops to the boundaries of protective domains. Since for spatially varying annihilation or transformation rates the single particle diffusion propagator is not known analytically, we present an algorithm that generates efficiently either particle displacements or annihilations with the correct statistics, as we prove rigorously. The numerical efficiency of the algorithm is demonstrated with an illustrative example.

  20. Comparative study of two methods for determining the diffusible hydrogen content in welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celio de Abreu, L.; Modenesi, P.J.; Villani-Marques, P.

    1994-01-01

    This work presents a comparative study of the methods for measurement of the amount of diffusible hydrogen in welds: glycerin, mercury and gaseous chromatography. The effect of the variables collecting temperatures and times were analyzed. Basic electrodes type AWS E 9018-M were humidified and dried at different times and temperatures in order to obtain a large variation in the diffusible hydrogen contents. The results showed that the collecting time can be reduced when the collecting temperature is raised, the mercury and chromatography methods present similar results, higher than those obtained by the glycerin method, the use of liquid nitrogen in the preparation of the specimens for test is unessential. The chromatography method presents the lower dispersion and is the method that can have the collecting time more reduced by the raising of the collecting temperature. The use of equations for comparison between results obtained by the various methods encountered in the literature is also discussed. (Author) 16 refs

  1. A practical implementation of the higher-order transverse-integrated nodal diffusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prinsloo, Rian H.; Tomašević, Djordje I.; Moraal, Harm

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A practical higher-order nodal method is developed for diffusion calculations. • The method resolves the issue of the transverse leakage approximation. • The method achieves much superior accuracy as compared to standard nodal methods. • The calculational cost is only about 50% greater than standard nodal methods. • The method is packaged in a module for connection to existing nodal codes. - Abstract: Transverse-integrated nodal diffusion methods currently represent the standard in full core neutronic simulation. The primary shortcoming of this approach is the utilization of the quadratic transverse leakage approximation. This approach, although proven to work well for typical LWR problems, is not consistent with the formulation of nodal methods and can cause accuracy and convergence problems. In this work, an improved, consistent quadratic leakage approximation is formulated, which derives from the class of higher-order nodal methods developed some years ago. Further, a number of iteration schemes are developed around this consistent quadratic leakage approximation which yields accurate node average results in much improved calculational times. The most promising of these iteration schemes results from utilizing the consistent leakage approximation as a correction method to the standard quadratic leakage approximation. Numerical results are demonstrated on a set of benchmark problems and further applied to a realistic reactor problem, particularly the SAFARI-1 reactor, operating at Necsa, South Africa. The final optimal solution strategy is packaged into a standalone module which may simply be coupled to existing nodal diffusion codes

  2. Development of advanced methods for analysis of experimental data in diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaques, Alonso V.

    There are numerous experimental configurations and data analysis techniques for the characterization of diffusion phenomena. However, the mathematical methods for estimating diffusivities traditionally do not take into account the effects of experimental errors in the data, and often require smooth, noiseless data sets to perform the necessary analysis steps. The current methods used for data smoothing require strong assumptions which can introduce numerical "artifacts" into the data, affecting confidence in the estimated parameters. The Boltzmann-Matano method is used extensively in the determination of concentration - dependent diffusivities, D(C), in alloys. In the course of analyzing experimental data, numerical integrations and differentiations of the concentration profile are performed. These methods require smoothing of the data prior to analysis. We present here an approach to the Boltzmann-Matano method that is based on a regularization method to estimate a differentiation operation on the data, i.e., estimate the concentration gradient term, which is important in the analysis process for determining the diffusivity. This approach, therefore, has the potential to be less subjective, and in numerical simulations shows an increased accuracy in the estimated diffusion coefficients. We present a regression approach to estimate linear multicomponent diffusion coefficients that eliminates the need pre-treat or pre-condition the concentration profile. This approach fits the data to a functional form of the mathematical expression for the concentration profile, and allows us to determine the diffusivity matrix directly from the fitted parameters. Reformulation of the equation for the analytical solution is done in order to reduce the size of the problem and accelerate the convergence. The objective function for the regression can incorporate point estimations for error in the concentration, improving the statistical confidence in the estimated diffusivity matrix

  3. Determination of mercury in ash and soil samples by oxygen flask combustion method-Cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Wenhua; Nakajima, Tsunenori; Takanashi, Hirokazu; Ohki, Akira

    2008-01-01

    A simple method was developed for the determination of mercury (Hg) in coal fly ash (CFA), waste incineration ash (WIA), and soil by use of oxygen flask combustion (OFC) followed by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS). A KMnO 4 solution was used as an absorbent in the OFC method, and the sample containing a combustion agent and an ash or soil sample was combusted by the OFC method. By use of Hg-free graphite as the combustion agent, the determination of Hg in ash and soil was successfully carried out; the Hg-free graphite was prepared by use of a mild pyrolysis procedure at 500 deg. C. For six certified reference materials (three CFA samples and three soil samples), the values of Hg obtained by this method were in good agreement with the certified or reference values. In addition, real samples including nine CFAs collected from some coal-fired power plants, five WIAs collected from waste incineration plants, and two soils were analyzed by the present method, and the data were compared to those from microwave-acid digestion (MW-AD) method

  4. Nano-Crystalline Diamond Films with Pineapple-Like Morphology Grown by the DC Arcjet vapor Deposition Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Zhang, Qin-Jian; Shi, Yan-Chao; Li, Jia-Jun; Li, Hong; Lu, Fan-Xiu; Chen, Guang-Chao

    2014-08-01

    A nano-crystlline diamond film is grown by the dc arcjet chemical vapor deposition method. The film is characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectra, respectively. The nanocrystalline grains are averagely with 80 nm in the size measured by XRD, and further proven by Raman and HRTEM. The observed novel morphology of the growth surface, pineapple-like morphology, is constructed by cubo-octahedral growth zones with a smooth faceted top surface and coarse side surfaces. The as-grown film possesses (100) dominant surface containing a little amorphous sp2 component, which is far different from the nano-crystalline film with the usual cauliflower-like morphology.

  5. A novel finite volume discretization method for advection-diffusion systems on stretched meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, D. G.; Malan, A. G.; van Rooyen, J. A.

    2018-06-01

    This work is concerned with spatial advection and diffusion discretization technology within the field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). In this context, a novel method is proposed, which is dubbed the Enhanced Taylor Advection-Diffusion (ETAD) scheme. The model equation employed for design of the scheme is the scalar advection-diffusion equation, the industrial application being incompressible laminar and turbulent flow. Developed to be implementable into finite volume codes, ETAD places specific emphasis on improving accuracy on stretched structured and unstructured meshes while considering both advection and diffusion aspects in a holistic manner. A vertex-centered structured and unstructured finite volume scheme is used, and only data available on either side of the volume face is employed. This includes the addition of a so-called mesh stretching metric. Additionally, non-linear blending with the existing NVSF scheme was performed in the interest of robustness and stability, particularly on equispaced meshes. The developed scheme is assessed in terms of accuracy - this is done analytically and numerically, via comparison to upwind methods which include the popular QUICK and CUI techniques. Numerical tests involved the 1D scalar advection-diffusion equation, a 2D lid driven cavity and turbulent flow case. Significant improvements in accuracy were achieved, with L2 error reductions of up to 75%.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann method for multi-component, non-continuum mass diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Abhijit S; Peracchio, Aldo A; Grew, Kyle N; Chiu, Wilson K S

    2007-01-01

    Recently, there has been a great deal of interest in extending the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to model transport phenomena in the non-continuum regime. Most of these studies have focused on single-component flows through simple geometries. This work examines an ad hoc extension of a recently developed LBM model for multi-component mass diffusion (Joshi et al 2007 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 40 2961) to model mass diffusion in the non-continuum regime. In order to validate the method, LBM results for ternary diffusion in a two-dimensional channel are compared with predictions of the dusty gas model (DGM) over a range of Knudsen numbers. A calibration factor based on the DGM is used in the LBM to correlate Knudsen diffusivity to pore size. Results indicate that the LBM can be a useful tool for predicting non-continuum mass diffusion (Kn > 0.001), but additional research is needed to extend the range of applicability of the algorithm for a larger parameter space. Guidelines are given on using the methodology described in this work to model non-continuum mass transport in more complex geometries where the DGM is not easily applicable. In addition, the non-continuum LBM methodology can be extended to three-dimensions. An envisioned application of this technique is to model non-continuum mass transport in porous solid oxide fuel cell electrodes

  7. Standard test method for accelerated leach test for diffusive releases from solidified waste and a computer program to model diffusive, fractional leaching from cylindrical waste forms

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method provides procedures for measuring the leach rates of elements from a solidified matrix material, determining if the releases are controlled by mass diffusion, computing values of diffusion constants based on models, and verifying projected long-term diffusive releases. This test method is applicable to any material that does not degrade or deform during the test. 1.1.1 If mass diffusion is the dominant step in the leaching mechanism, then the results of this test can be used to calculate diffusion coefficients using mathematical diffusion models. A computer program developed for that purpose is available as a companion to this test method (Note 1). 1.1.2 It should be verified that leaching is controlled by diffusion by a means other than analysis of the leach test solution data. Analysis of concentration profiles of species of interest near the surface of the solid waste form after the test is recommended for this purpose. 1.1.3 Potential effects of partitioning on the test results can...

  8. Conjugate Gradient like methods and their application to fixed source neutron diffusion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suetomi, Eiichi; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a number of fast iterative methods for solving systems of linear equations appearing in fixed source problems for neutron diffusion. We employed the conjugate gradient and conjugate residual methods. In order to accelerate the conjugate residual method, we proposed the conjugate residual squared method by transforming the residual polynomial of the conjugate residual method. Since the convergence of these methods depends on the spectrum of coefficient matrix, we employed the incomplete Choleski (IC) factorization and the modified IC (MIC) factorization as preconditioners. These methods were applied to some neutron diffusion problems and compared with the successive overrelaxation (SOR) method. The results of these numerical experiments showed superior convergence characteristics of the conjugate gradient like method with MIC factorization to the SOR method, especially for a problem involving void region. The CPU time of the MICCG, MICCR and MICCRS methods showed no great difference. In order to vectorize the conjugate gradient like methods based on (M)IC factorization, the hyperplane method was used and implemented on the vector computers, the HITAC S-820/80 and ETA10-E (one processor mode). Significant decrease of the CPU times was observed on the S-820/80. Since the scaled conjugate gradient (SCG) method can be vectorized with no manipulation, it was also compared with the above methods. It turned out the SCG method was the fastest with respect to the CPU times on the ETA10-E. These results suggest that one should implement suitable algorithm for different vector computers. (author)

  9. A moving mesh finite difference method for equilibrium radiation diffusion equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaobo, E-mail: xwindyb@126.com [Department of Mathematics, College of Science, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116 (China); Huang, Weizhang, E-mail: whuang@ku.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Qiu, Jianxian, E-mail: jxqiu@xmu.edu.cn [School of Mathematical Sciences and Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Mathematical Modeling and High-Performance Scientific Computing, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2015-10-01

    An efficient moving mesh finite difference method is developed for the numerical solution of equilibrium radiation diffusion equations in two dimensions. The method is based on the moving mesh partial differential equation approach and moves the mesh continuously in time using a system of meshing partial differential equations. The mesh adaptation is controlled through a Hessian-based monitor function and the so-called equidistribution and alignment principles. Several challenging issues in the numerical solution are addressed. Particularly, the radiation diffusion coefficient depends on the energy density highly nonlinearly. This nonlinearity is treated using a predictor–corrector and lagged diffusion strategy. Moreover, the nonnegativity of the energy density is maintained using a cutoff method which has been known in literature to retain the accuracy and convergence order of finite difference approximation for parabolic equations. Numerical examples with multi-material, multiple spot concentration situations are presented. Numerical results show that the method works well for radiation diffusion equations and can produce numerical solutions of good accuracy. It is also shown that a two-level mesh movement strategy can significantly improve the efficiency of the computation.

  10. A moving mesh finite difference method for equilibrium radiation diffusion equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiaobo; Huang, Weizhang; Qiu, Jianxian

    2015-01-01

    An efficient moving mesh finite difference method is developed for the numerical solution of equilibrium radiation diffusion equations in two dimensions. The method is based on the moving mesh partial differential equation approach and moves the mesh continuously in time using a system of meshing partial differential equations. The mesh adaptation is controlled through a Hessian-based monitor function and the so-called equidistribution and alignment principles. Several challenging issues in the numerical solution are addressed. Particularly, the radiation diffusion coefficient depends on the energy density highly nonlinearly. This nonlinearity is treated using a predictor–corrector and lagged diffusion strategy. Moreover, the nonnegativity of the energy density is maintained using a cutoff method which has been known in literature to retain the accuracy and convergence order of finite difference approximation for parabolic equations. Numerical examples with multi-material, multiple spot concentration situations are presented. Numerical results show that the method works well for radiation diffusion equations and can produce numerical solutions of good accuracy. It is also shown that a two-level mesh movement strategy can significantly improve the efficiency of the computation

  11. A asymptotic numerical method for the steady-state convection diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qiguang

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, A asymptotic numerical method for the steady-state Convection diffusion equation is proposed, which need not take very fine mesh size in the neighbourhood of the boundary layer. Numerical computation for model problem show that we can obtain the numerical solution in the boundary layer with moderate step size

  12. Iterative method for obtaining the prompt and delayed alpha-modes of the diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, K.P.; Degweker, S.B.; Modak, R.S.; Singh, Kanchhi

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A method for obtaining α-modes of the neutron diffusion equation has been developed. → The difference between the prompt and delayed modes is more pronounced for the higher modes. → Prompt and delayed modes differ more in reflector region. - Abstract: Higher modes of the neutron diffusion equation are required in some applications such as second order perturbation theory, and modal kinetics. In an earlier paper we had discussed a method for computing the α-modes of the diffusion equation. The discussion assumed that all neutrons are prompt. The present paper describes an extension of the method for finding the α-modes of diffusion equation with the inclusion of delayed neutrons. Such modes are particularly suitable for expanding the time dependent flux in a reactor for describing transients in a reactor. The method is illustrated by applying it to a three dimensional heavy water reactor model problem. The problem is solved in two and three neutron energy groups and with one and six delayed neutron groups. The results show that while the delayed α-modes are similar to λ-modes they are quite different from prompt modes. The difference gets progressively larger as we go to higher modes.

  13. A nodal method applied to a diffusion problem with generalized coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laazizi, A.; Guessous, N.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we consider second order neutrons diffusion problem with coefficients in L ∞ (Ω). Nodal method of the lowest order is applied to approximate the problem's solution. The approximation uses special basis functions in which the coefficients appear. The rate of convergence obtained is O(h 2 ) in L 2 (Ω), with a free rectangular triangulation. (authors)

  14. The Induced Dimension Reduction method applied to convection-diffusion-reaction problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astudillo, R.; Van Gijzen, M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Discretization of (linearized) convection-diffusion-reaction problems yields a large and sparse non symmetric linear system of equations, Ax = b. (1) In this work, we compare the computational behavior of the Induced Dimension Reduction method (IDR(s)) [10], with other short-recurrences Krylov

  15. Method of moments approach to pricing double barrier contracts in polynomial jump-diffusion models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksson, B.; Pistorius, M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: We present a method of moments approach to pricing double barrier contracts when the underlying is modelled by a polynomial jump-diffusion. By general principles the price is linked to certain infinite dimensional linear programming problems. Subsequently approximating these by finite

  16. Thermal diffusivity measurements with a photothermal method of fusion solid breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolotti, M.; Fabri, L.; Ferrari, A.; Sibilia, C.; Alvani, C.; Casadio, S.

    1989-01-01

    The Photothermal Deflection method is employed in thermal diffusivity measurements. A theoretical analysis is performed to reduce the influence of arbitrary parameters. Measurements on gamma-lithium aluminate samples as a function of temperatures are performed. (author). 5 refs.; 4 figs

  17. A new in-situ method to determine the apparent gas diffusion coefficient of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laemmel, Thomas; Paulus, Sinikka; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Maier, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Soil aeration is an important factor for the biological activity in the soil and soil respiration. Generally, gas exchange between soil and atmosphere is assumed to be governed by diffusion and Fick's Law is used to describe the fluxes in the soil. The "apparent soil gas diffusion coefficient" represents the proportional factor between the flux and the gas concentration gradient in the soil and reflects the ability of the soil to "transport passively" gases through the soil. One common way to determine this coefficient is to take core samples in the field and determine it in the lab. Unfortunately this method is destructive and needs laborious field work and can only reflect a small fraction of the whole soil. As a consequence insecurity about the resulting effective diffusivity on the profile scale must remain. We developed a new in-situ method using new gas sampling device, tracer gas and inverse soil gas modelling. The gas sampling device contains several sampling depths and can be easily installed into vertical holes of an auger, which allows for fast installation of the system. At the lower end of the device inert tracer gas is injected continuously. The tracer gas diffuses into the surrounding soil. The resulting distribution of the tracer gas concentrations is used to deduce the diffusivity profile of the soil. For Finite Element Modeling of the gas sampling device/soil system the program COMSOL is used. We will present the results of a field campaign comparing the new in-situ method with lab measurements on soil cores. The new sampling pole has several interesting advantages: it can be used in-situ and over a long time; so it allows following modifications of diffusion coefficients in interaction with rain but also vegetation cycle and wind.

  18. The arbitrary order mimetic finite difference method for a diffusion equation with a non-symmetric diffusion tensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyrya, V.; Lipnikov, K.

    2017-11-01

    We present the arbitrary order mimetic finite difference (MFD) discretization for the diffusion equation with non-symmetric tensorial diffusion coefficient in a mixed formulation on general polygonal meshes. The diffusion tensor is assumed to be positive definite. The asymmetry of the diffusion tensor requires changes to the standard MFD construction. We present new approach for the construction that guarantees positive definiteness of the non-symmetric mass matrix in the space of discrete velocities. The numerically observed convergence rate for the scalar quantity matches the predicted one in the case of the lowest order mimetic scheme. For higher orders schemes, we observed super-convergence by one order for the scalar variable which is consistent with the previously published result for a symmetric diffusion tensor. The new scheme was also tested on a time-dependent problem modeling the Hall effect in the resistive magnetohydrodynamics.

  19. An efficient reliable method to estimate the vaporization enthalpy of pure substances according to the normal boiling temperature and critical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Mehmandoust

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The heat of vaporization of a pure substance at its normal boiling temperature is a very important property in many chemical processes. In this work, a new empirical method was developed to predict vaporization enthalpy of pure substances. This equation is a function of normal boiling temperature, critical temperature, and critical pressure. The presented model is simple to use and provides an improvement over the existing equations for 452 pure substances in wide boiling range. The results showed that the proposed correlation is more accurate than the literature methods for pure substances in a wide boiling range (20.3–722 K.

  20. An efficient reliable method to estimate the vaporization enthalpy of pure substances according to the normal boiling temperature and critical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmandoust, Babak; Sanjari, Ehsan; Vatani, Mostafa

    2014-03-01

    The heat of vaporization of a pure substance at its normal boiling temperature is a very important property in many chemical processes. In this work, a new empirical method was developed to predict vaporization enthalpy of pure substances. This equation is a function of normal boiling temperature, critical temperature, and critical pressure. The presented model is simple to use and provides an improvement over the existing equations for 452 pure substances in wide boiling range. The results showed that the proposed correlation is more accurate than the literature methods for pure substances in a wide boiling range (20.3-722 K).

  1. A Fully Discrete Galerkin Method for a Nonlinear Space-Fractional Diffusion Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunying Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial transport process in fractal media is generally anomalous. The space-fractional advection-diffusion equation can be used to characterize such a process. In this paper, a fully discrete scheme is given for a type of nonlinear space-fractional anomalous advection-diffusion equation. In the spatial direction, we use the finite element method, and in the temporal direction, we use the modified Crank-Nicolson approximation. Here the fractional derivative indicates the Caputo derivative. The error estimate for the fully discrete scheme is derived. And the numerical examples are also included which are in line with the theoretical analysis.

  2. Modified micro-diffusion method for 15N-enriched soil solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigner, M.

    2000-01-01

    The preparation of solutions for determination of 15 N/ 14 N isotope ratios is described, with special reference to dilute samples. A micro-diffusion method has been simplified to be more suitable for rapid isotope-ratio determination in soil solutions collected in tensionics. Ammonia expelled during micro-diffusion is captured on acidified filter discs fixed to the caps of gas-tight vials. The discs are transferred to tin capsules for shipment to the Soil Science Unit for 15 N-enrichment determination. (author)

  3. MODELING OF SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTION KINETIC OF FLAXSEED OIL BY DIFFUSION CONTROL METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emir Zafer HOŞGÜN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Flaxseed oil was extracted by Supercritical Carbondioxide Extraction, and extractionkinetics was modelled using diffusion controlled method.The effect of process parameters, such as pressure (20, 35, 55 MPa, temperature (323 and 343 K, and CO2 flow rate (1 and 3 L CO2 /min on the extraction yield and effective diffusivity (De was investigated. The effective diffusion coefficient varied between 2.4 x10-12 and 10.8 x10-12 m2s-1 for the entire range of experiments and increased with the pressure and flow rate. The model fitted well theexperimental data (ADD varied between 2.35 and 7.48%.

  4. Visual quantification of diffuse emphysema with Sakal's method and high-resolution chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuerstein, I.M.; McElvaney, N.G.; Simon, T.R.; Hubbard, R.C.; Crystal, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the accuracy and efficacy of visual quantitation for a diffuse form of pulmonary emphysema with high-resolution CT (HRCT). Twenty- five adults patients with symptomatic emphysema due to α-antitrypsin deficiency prospectively underwent HRCT with 1.5-mm sections, a high-spatial-resolution algorithm, and targeted reconstruction. Photography was performed with narrow lung windows to accentuate diffuse emphysema. Emphysema was then scored with use of a modification of Sakai's extent and severity scoring method. The scans were all scored by the same blinded observer. Pulmonary function testing (PFT), including diffusing capacity measurement, was performed in all patients. Results were statistically correlated with the use of regression analysis

  5. Axisymmetric vortex method for low-Mach number, diffusion-controlled combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Lakkis, I

    2003-01-01

    A grid-free, Lagrangian method for the accurate simulation of low-Mach number, variable-density, diffusion-controlled reacting flow is presented. A fast-chemistry model in which the conversion rate of reactants to products is limited by the local mixing rate is assumed in order to reduce the combustion problem to the solution of a convection-diffusion-generation equation with volumetric expansion and vorticity generation at the reaction fronts. The solutions of the continuity and vorticity equations, and the equations governing the transport of species and energy, are obtained using a formulation in which particles transport conserved quantities by convection and diffusion. The dynamic impact of exothermic combustion is captured through accurate integration of source terms in the vorticity transport equations at the location of the particles, and the extra velocity field associated with volumetric expansion at low Mach number computed to enforced mass conservation. The formulation is obtained for an axisymmet...

  6. Adaptive collocation method for simultaneous heat and mass diffusion with phase change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, T.C.; Leaf, G.; Minkowycz, W.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Shouman, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    The present study is carried out to determine melting rates of a lead slab of various thicknesses by contact with sodium coolant and to evaluate the extent of penetration and the mixing rates of molten lead into liquid sodium by molecular diffusion alone. The study shows that these two calculations cannot be performed simultaneously without the use of adaptive coordinates which cause considerable stretching of the physical coordinates for mass diffusion. Because of the large difference in densities of these two liquid metals, the traditional constant density approximation for the calculation of mass diffusion cannot be used for studying their interdiffusion. The use of orthogonal collocation method along with adaptive coordinates produces extremely accurate results which are ascertained by comparing with the existing analytical solutions for concentration distribution for the case of constant density approximation and for melting rates for the case of infinite lead slab

  7. The entropy dissipation method for spatially inhomogeneous reaction-diffusion-type systems

    KAUST Repository

    Di Francesco, M.

    2008-12-08

    We study the long-time asymptotics of reaction-diffusion-type systems that feature a monotone decaying entropy (Lyapunov, free energy) functional. We consider both bounded domains and confining potentials on the whole space for arbitrary space dimensions. Our aim is to derive quantitative expressions for (or estimates of) the rates of convergence towards an (entropy minimizing) equilibrium state in terms of the constants of diffusion and reaction and with respect to conserved quantities. Our method, the so-called entropy approach, seeks to quantify convergence to equilibrium by using functional inequalities, which relate quantitatively the entropy and its dissipation in time. The entropy approach is well suited to nonlinear problems and known to be quite robust with respect to model variations. It has already been widely applied to scalar diffusion-convection equations, and the main goal of this paper is to study its generalization to systems of partial differential equations that contain diffusion and reaction terms and admit fewer conservation laws than the size of the system. In particular, we successfully apply the entropy approach to general linear systems and to a nonlinear example of a reaction-diffusion-convection system arising in solid-state physics as a paradigm for general nonlinear systems. © 2008 The Royal Society.

  8. Numerical simulation of compressible two-phase flow using a diffuse interface method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, M.R.; Daramizadeh, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Compressible two-phase gas–gas and gas–liquid flows simulation are conducted. ► Interface conditions contain shock wave and cavitations. ► A high-resolution diffuse interface method is investigated. ► The numerical results exhibit very good agreement with experimental results. -- Abstract: In this article, a high-resolution diffuse interface method is investigated for simulation of compressible two-phase gas–gas and gas–liquid flows, both in the presence of shock wave and in flows with strong rarefaction waves similar to cavitations. A Godunov method and HLLC Riemann solver is used for discretization of the Kapila five-equation model and a modified Schmidt equation of state (EOS) is used to simulate the cavitation regions. This method is applied successfully to some one- and two-dimensional compressible two-phase flows with interface conditions that contain shock wave and cavitations. The numerical results obtained in this attempt exhibit very good agreement with experimental results, as well as previous numerical results presented by other researchers based on other numerical methods. In particular, the algorithm can capture the complex flow features of transient shocks, such as the material discontinuities and interfacial instabilities, without any oscillation and additional diffusion. Numerical examples show that the results of the method presented here compare well with other sophisticated modeling methods like adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and local mesh refinement (LMR) for one- and two-dimensional problems

  9. Development of Multigrid Methods for diffusion, Advection, and the incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjesdal, Thor

    1997-12-31

    This thesis discusses the development and application of efficient numerical methods for the simulation of fluid flows, in particular the flow of incompressible fluids. The emphasis is on practical aspects of algorithm development and on application of the methods either to linear scalar model equations or to the non-linear incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The first part deals with cell centred multigrid methods and linear correction scheme and presents papers on (1) generalization of the method to arbitrary sized grids for diffusion problems, (2) low order method for advection-diffusion problems, (3) attempt to extend the basic method to advection-diffusion problems, (4) Fourier smoothing analysis of multicolour relaxation schemes, and (5) analysis of high-order discretizations for advection terms. The second part discusses a multigrid based on pressure correction methods, non-linear full approximation scheme, and papers on (1) systematic comparison of the performance of different pressure correction smoothers and some other algorithmic variants, low to moderate Reynolds numbers, and (2) systematic study of implementation strategies for high order advection schemes, high-Re flow. An appendix contains Fortran 90 data structures for multigrid development. 160 refs., 26 figs., 22 tabs.

  10. Direct measurement of gaseous activities by diffusion-in long proportional counter method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Wu, Y.; Aratani, T.; Uritani, A.; Mori, C.

    1993-01-01

    Direct measurement of gaseous activities by the diffusion-in long proportional counter method (DLPC method) was studied. The measuring time without end effect was estimated by observing the behavior of 37 Ar in the counter and was long enough to carry out the accurate activity measurement. The correction for wall effect was also examined on the basis of the measured and calculated correction factors. Among the tested gases of methane, P10 gas and propane, P10 gas was made clear to be a suitable counting gas for the DLPC method because of good diffusion properties and small wall effect. This method is quite effective for standardization of gaseous activities used for tracer experiments and calibration works of radioactive gas monitoring instruments. (orig.)

  11. IN-SITU MEASURING METHOD OF RADON AND THORON DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT IN SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Yakovleva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple and valid in-situ measurement method of effective diffusion coefficient of radon and thoron in soil and other porous materials was designed. The analysis of numerical investigation of radon and thoron transport in upper layers of soil revealed that thoron flux density from the earth surface does not depend on soil gas advective velocity and varies only with diffusion coefficient changes. This result showed the advantages of thoron using versus radon using in the suggested method. The comparison of the new method with existing ones previously developed. The method could be helpful for solving of problems of radon mass-transport in porous media and gaseous exchange between soil and atmosphere.

  12. A simple method for calculation of the hydrogen diffusion in composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraschiv, M.C.; Paraschiv, A.; Grecu, V. V.

    2008-01-01

    A method for calculating the diffusion of various chemical species in composite materials when the material compounds can not be described as a function of the position coordinate in every point has been proposed. The method can be applied only for such systems in which a quasi-continuous presence of every component can be defined in every arbitrary region. Since the complete random distribution of the boundaries between the components will influence the diffusion process, the continuity equation associated to the diffusion problem was extended for arbitrary volumes that keep the volume concentration of every component of the alloy as the entire material volume. Its consistency with the Fick's second law was also proved. To visualise the differences of hydrogen migration in a thermal gradient inside the TRIGA fuels, arising as a result of increasing the uranium content from ∼ 10% wt. U to ∼ 45% wt. U in the TRIGA U-ZrH δ alloy, the method has been applied for the two concentrations of uranium. To this aim, the assumption that the rate-controlling parameter of hydrogen diffusion is the dissociation equilibrium pressure of hydrogen in zirconium hydride has been used. The results show significant differences of both hydrogen distribution and the kinetics of hydrogen migration in a thermal gradient for the two cases analysed. (authors)

  13. A finite difference method for space fractional differential equations with variable diffusivity coefficient

    KAUST Repository

    Mustapha, K.

    2017-06-03

    Anomalous diffusion is a phenomenon that cannot be modeled accurately by second-order diffusion equations, but is better described by fractional diffusion models. The nonlocal nature of the fractional diffusion operators makes substantially more difficult the mathematical analysis of these models and the establishment of suitable numerical schemes. This paper proposes and analyzes the first finite difference method for solving {\\\\em variable-coefficient} fractional differential equations, with two-sided fractional derivatives, in one-dimensional space. The proposed scheme combines first-order forward and backward Euler methods for approximating the left-sided fractional derivative when the right-sided fractional derivative is approximated by two consecutive applications of the first-order backward Euler method. Our finite difference scheme reduces to the standard second-order central difference scheme in the absence of fractional derivatives. The existence and uniqueness of the solution for the proposed scheme are proved, and truncation errors of order $h$ are demonstrated, where $h$ denotes the maximum space step size. The numerical tests illustrate the global $O(h)$ accuracy of our scheme, except for nonsmooth cases which, as expected, have deteriorated convergence rates.

  14. Diffusion and dispersion characteristics of hybridized discontinuous Galerkin methods for under-resolved turbulence simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Rodrigo; Fernandez, Pablo; Mengaldo, Gianmarco

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the dispersion and diffusion characteristics of hybridized discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods. This provides us with insights to develop robust and accurate high-order DG discretizations for under-resolved flow simulations. Using the eigenanalysis technique introduced in (Moura et al., JCP, 2015 and Mengaldo et al., Computers & Fluids, 2017), we present a dispersion-diffusion analysis for the linear advection-diffusion equation. The effect of the accuracy order, the Riemann flux and the viscous stabilization are investigated. Next, we examine the diffusion characteristics of hybridized DG methods for under-resolved turbulent flows. The implicit large-eddy simulation (iLES) of the inviscid and viscous Taylor-Green vortex (TGV) problems are considered to this end. The inviscid case is relevant in the limit of high Reynolds numbers Re , i.e. negligible molecular viscosity, while the viscous case explores the effect of Re on the accuracy and robustness of the simulations. The TGV cases considered here are particularly crucial to under-resolved turbulent free flows away from walls. We conclude the talk with a discussion on the connections between hybridized and standard DG methods for under-resolved flow simulations.

  15. Sediment diffusion method improves wastewater nitrogen removal in the receiving lake sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, Sanni L; Saarenheimo, Jatta; Ropponen, Janne; Juntunen, Janne; Rissanen, Antti J; Tiirola, Marja

    2018-07-01

    Sediment microbes have a great potential to transform reactive N to harmless N 2 , thus decreasing wastewater nitrogen load into aquatic ecosystems. Here, we examined if spatial allocation of the wastewater discharge by a specially constructed sediment diffuser pipe system enhanced the microbial nitrate reduction processes. Full-scale experiments were set on two Finnish lake sites, Keuruu and Petäjävesi, and effects on the nitrate removal processes were studied using the stable isotope pairing technique. All nitrate reduction rates followed nitrate concentrations, being highest at the wastewater-influenced sampling points. Complete denitrification with N 2 as an end-product was the main nitrate reduction process, indicating that the high nitrate and organic matter concentrations of wastewater did not promote nitrous oxide (N 2 O) production (truncated denitrification) or ammonification (dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium; DNRA). Using 3D simulation, we demonstrated that the sediment diffusion method enhanced the contact time and amount of wastewater near the sediment surface especially in spring and in autumn, altering organic matter concentration and oxygen levels, and increasing the denitrification capacity of the sediment. We estimated that natural denitrification potentially removed 3-10% of discharged wastewater nitrate in the 33 ha study area of Keuruu, and the sediment diffusion method increased this areal denitrification capacity on average 45%. Overall, our results indicate that sediment diffusion method can supplement wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) nitrate removal without enhancing alternative harmful processes. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. A finite difference method for space fractional differential equations with variable diffusivity coefficient

    KAUST Repository

    Mustapha, K.; Furati, K.; Knio, Omar; Maitre, O. Le

    2017-01-01

    Anomalous diffusion is a phenomenon that cannot be modeled accurately by second-order diffusion equations, but is better described by fractional diffusion models. The nonlocal nature of the fractional diffusion operators makes substantially more difficult the mathematical analysis of these models and the establishment of suitable numerical schemes. This paper proposes and analyzes the first finite difference method for solving {\\em variable-coefficient} fractional differential equations, with two-sided fractional derivatives, in one-dimensional space. The proposed scheme combines first-order forward and backward Euler methods for approximating the left-sided fractional derivative when the right-sided fractional derivative is approximated by two consecutive applications of the first-order backward Euler method. Our finite difference scheme reduces to the standard second-order central difference scheme in the absence of fractional derivatives. The existence and uniqueness of the solution for the proposed scheme are proved, and truncation errors of order $h$ are demonstrated, where $h$ denotes the maximum space step size. The numerical tests illustrate the global $O(h)$ accuracy of our scheme, except for nonsmooth cases which, as expected, have deteriorated convergence rates.

  17. Fast solution of neutron diffusion problem by reduced basis finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chunyu, Zhang; Gong, Chen

    2018-01-01

    Highlights: •An extremely efficient method is proposed to solve the neutron diffusion equation with varying the cross sections. •Three orders of speedup is achieved for IAEA benchmark problems. •The method may open a new possibility of efficient high-fidelity modeling of large scale problems in nuclear engineering. -- Abstract: For the important applications which need carry out many times of neutron diffusion calculations such as the fuel depletion analysis and the neutronics-thermohydraulics coupling analysis, fast and accurate solutions of the neutron diffusion equation are demanding but necessary. In the present work, the certified reduced basis finite element method is proposed and implemented to solve the generalized eigenvalue problems of neutron diffusion with variable cross sections. The order reduced model is built upon high-fidelity finite element approximations during the offline stage. During the online stage, both the k eff and the spatical distribution of neutron flux can be obtained very efficiently for any given set of cross sections. Numerical tests show that a speedup of around 1100 is achieved for the IAEA two-dimensional PWR benchmark problem and a speedup of around 3400 is achieved for the three-dimensional counterpart with the fission cross-sections, the absorption cross-sections and the scattering cross-sections treated as parameters.

  18. Non-destructive measurement methods for large scale gaseous diffusion process equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, R.L.; Hagenauer, R.C.; McGinnis, B.R.

    1994-01-01

    Two measurement methods have been developed to measure non-destructively uranium hold-up in gaseous diffusion plants. These methods include passive neutron and passive γ ray measurements. An additional method, high resolution γ ray spectroscopy, provides supplementary information about additional γ ray emitting isotopes, γ ray correction factors, 235 U/ 234 U ratios and 235 U enrichment. Many of these methods can be used as a general purpose measurement technique for large containers of uranium. Measurement applications for these methods include uranium hold-up, waste measurements, criticality safety and nuclear accountability

  19. Non-standard finite difference and Chebyshev collocation methods for solving fractional diffusion equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, P.; El-Sayed, A. A.

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, a new numerical technique for solving the fractional order diffusion equation is introduced. This technique basically depends on the Non-Standard finite difference method (NSFD) and Chebyshev collocation method, where the fractional derivatives are described in terms of the Caputo sense. The Chebyshev collocation method with the (NSFD) method is used to convert the problem into a system of algebraic equations. These equations solved numerically using Newton's iteration method. The applicability, reliability, and efficiency of the presented technique are demonstrated through some given numerical examples.

  20. A self-consistent nodal method in response matrix formalism for the multigroup diffusion equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malambu, E.M.; Mund, E.H.

    1996-01-01

    We develop a nodal method for the multigroup diffusion equations, based on the transverse integration procedure (TIP). The efficiency of the method rests upon the convergence properties of a high-order multidimensional nodal expansion and upon numerical implementation aspects. The discrete 1D equations are cast in response matrix formalism. The derivation of the transverse leakage moments is self-consistent i.e. does not require additional assumptions. An outstanding feature of the method lies in the linear spatial shape of the local transverse leakage for the first-order scheme. The method is described in the two-dimensional case. The method is validated on some classical benchmark problems. (author)

  1. Diffusion Parameters of BeO by the Pulsed Neutron Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, B.V.; Nargundkar, V.R.; Subbarao, K.

    1965-01-01

    The use of the pulsed neutron method for the precise determination of the diffusion parameters of moderators is described. The diffusion parameters of BeO have been obtained by this method. The neutron bursts were produced from a cascade accelerator by pulsing the ion source and using the Be (d, n) reaction. The detector was an enriched boron trifluoride proportional counter. It is shown that by a proper choice of the counter position arid length, and the source position, most of the space harmonics can be eliminated. Any constant background can be accounted for in the calculation of the decay constant. Very large bucklings were not used to avoid time harmonics. Any remaining harmonic content was rendered ineffective by the use of adequate time delay. The decay constant of the fundamental mode of the thermal neutron population was determined for several bucklings. Conditions to be satisfied for an accurate determination of the diffusion cooling constant C are discussed. The following values are obtained for BeO: λ 0 = absorption constant = 156.02 ± 4.37 s -1 D = diffusion coefficient = (1.3334 ± 0.0128) x 10 5 cm 2 /s C = diffusion cooling constant = (-4.8758 ± 0.5846) x 10 5 cm 4 /s. The effect of neglecting the contribution of the B 6 term on the determination of the diffusion parameters was estimated and is shown to be considerable. The reason for the longstanding discrepancy between the values of C obtained for the same moderator by different workers is attributed to this. (author) [fr

  2. Elaboration of a nodal method to solve the steady state multigroup diffusion equation. Study and use of the multigroup diffusion code DAHRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halilou, A.; Lounici, A.

    1981-01-01

    The subject is divided in two parts: In the first part a nodal method has been worked out to solve the steady state multigroup diffusion equation. This method belongs to the same set of nodal methods currently used to calculate the exact fission powers and neutron fluxes in a very short computing time. It has been tested on a two dimensional idealized reactors. The effective multiplication factor and the fission powers for each fuel element have been calculated. The second part consists in studying and mastering the multigroup diffusion code DAHRA - a reduced version of DIANE - a two dimensional code using finite difference method

  3. The use of photon correlation spectroscopy method for determining diffusion coefficient in brine and herring flesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumanova M.V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The process fish salting has been studied by the method of photon correlation spectroscopy; the distribution of salt concentration in the solution and herring flesh with skin has been found, diffusion coefficients and salt concentrations used for creating a mathematical model of the salting technology have been worked out; the possibility of determination by this method the coefficient of dynamic viscosity of solutions and different media (minced meat etc. has been considered

  4. The vapor pressures of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.; Atkinson, David A.; Grate, Jay W.; Hotchkiss, Peter

    2013-01-05

    The vapor pressures of many explosive compounds are extremely low and thus determining accurate values proves difficult. Many researchers, using a variety of methods, have measured and reported the vapor pressures of explosives compounds at single temperatures, or as a function of temperature using vapor pressure equations. There are large variations in reported vapor pressures for many of these compounds, and some errors exist within individual papers. This article provides a review of explosive vapor pressures and describes the methods used to determine them. We have compiled primary vapor pressure relationships traceable to the original citations and include the temperature ranges for which they have been determined. Corrected values are reported as needed and described in the text. In addition, after critically examining the available data, we calculate and tabulate vapor pressures at 25 °C.

  5. An in situ method for real-time monitoring of soil gas diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laemmel, Thomas; Maier, Martin; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Lang, Friederike

    2016-04-01

    Soil aeration is an important factor for the biogeochemistry of soils. Generally, gas exchange between soil and atmosphere is assumed to be governed by molecular diffusion and by this way fluxes can be calculated using by Fick's Law. The soil gas diffusion coefficient DS represents the proportional factor between the gas flux and the gas concentration gradient in the soil and reflects the ability of the soil to "transport passively" gas through the soil. One common way to determine DS is taking core samples in the field and measuring DS in the lab. Unfortunately this method is destructive and laborious and it can only reflect a small fraction of the whole soil. As a consequence, uncertainty about the resulting effective diffusivity on the profile scale, i.e. the real aeration status remains. We developed a method to measure and monitor DS in situ. The set-up consists of a custom made gas sampling device, the continuous injection of an inert tracer gas and inverse gas transport modelling in the soil. The gas sampling device has seven sampling depths (from 0 to -43 cm of depth) and can be easily installed into vertical holes drilled by an auger, which allows for fast installation of the system. Helium (He) as inert tracer gas was injected continuously at the lower end of the device. The resulting steady state distribution of He was used to deduce the DS depth distribution of the soil. For Finite Element Modeling of the gas-sampling-device/soil system the program COMSOL was used. We tested our new method both in the lab and in a field study and compared the results with a reference lab method using soil cores. DS profiles obtained by our in-situ method were consistent with DS profiles determined based on soil core analyses. Soil gas profiles could be measured with a temporal resolution of 30 minutes. During the field study, there was an important rain event and we could monitor the decrease in soil gas diffusivity in the top soil due to water infiltration. The effect

  6. GPU-accelerated 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Q.; Yu, G.; Wang, K. [Dept. of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua Univ. (China)

    2012-07-01

    Finite difference method, as a traditional numerical solution to neutron diffusion equation, although considered simpler and more precise than the coarse mesh nodal methods, has a bottle neck to be widely applied caused by the huge memory and unendurable computation time it requires. In recent years, the concept of General-Purpose computation on GPUs has provided us with a powerful computational engine for scientific research. In this study, a GPU-Accelerated multi-group 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method was developed. First, a clean-sheet neutron diffusion code (3DFD-CPU) was written in C++ on the CPU architecture, and later ported to GPUs under NVIDIA's CUDA platform (3DFD-GPU). The IAEA 3D PWR benchmark problem was calculated in the numerical test, where three different codes, including the original CPU-based sequential code, the HYPRE (High Performance Pre-conditioners)-based diffusion code and CITATION, were used as counterpoints to test the efficiency and accuracy of the GPU-based program. The results demonstrate both high efficiency and adequate accuracy of the GPU implementation for neutron diffusion equation. A speedup factor of about 46 times was obtained, using NVIDIA's Geforce GTX470 GPU card against a 2.50 GHz Intel Quad Q9300 CPU processor. Compared with the HYPRE-based code performing in parallel on an 8-core tower server, the speedup of about 2 still could be observed. More encouragingly, without any mathematical acceleration technology, the GPU implementation ran about 5 times faster than CITATION which was speeded up by using the SOR method and Chebyshev extrapolation technique. (authors)

  7. GPU-accelerated 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Q.; Yu, G.; Wang, K.

    2012-01-01

    Finite difference method, as a traditional numerical solution to neutron diffusion equation, although considered simpler and more precise than the coarse mesh nodal methods, has a bottle neck to be widely applied caused by the huge memory and unendurable computation time it requires. In recent years, the concept of General-Purpose computation on GPUs has provided us with a powerful computational engine for scientific research. In this study, a GPU-Accelerated multi-group 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method was developed. First, a clean-sheet neutron diffusion code (3DFD-CPU) was written in C++ on the CPU architecture, and later ported to GPUs under NVIDIA's CUDA platform (3DFD-GPU). The IAEA 3D PWR benchmark problem was calculated in the numerical test, where three different codes, including the original CPU-based sequential code, the HYPRE (High Performance Pre-conditioners)-based diffusion code and CITATION, were used as counterpoints to test the efficiency and accuracy of the GPU-based program. The results demonstrate both high efficiency and adequate accuracy of the GPU implementation for neutron diffusion equation. A speedup factor of about 46 times was obtained, using NVIDIA's Geforce GTX470 GPU card against a 2.50 GHz Intel Quad Q9300 CPU processor. Compared with the HYPRE-based code performing in parallel on an 8-core tower server, the speedup of about 2 still could be observed. More encouragingly, without any mathematical acceleration technology, the GPU implementation ran about 5 times faster than CITATION which was speeded up by using the SOR method and Chebyshev extrapolation technique. (authors)

  8. Application of numerical inverse method in calculation of composition-dependent interdiffusion coefficients in finite diffusion couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yuanrong; Chen, Weimin; Zhong, Jing

    2017-01-01

    The previously developed numerical inverse method was applied to determine the composition-dependent interdiffusion coefficients in single-phase finite diffusion couples. The numerical inverse method was first validated in a fictitious binary finite diffusion couple by pre-assuming four standard...... sets of interdiffusion coefficients. After that, the numerical inverse method was then adopted in a ternary Al-Cu-Ni finite diffusion couple. Based on the measured composition profiles, the ternary interdiffusion coefficients along the entire diffusion path of the target ternary diffusion couple were...... obtained by using the numerical inverse approach. The comprehensive comparisons between the computations and the experiments indicate that the numerical inverse method is also applicable to high-throughput determination of the composition-dependent interdiffusion coefficients in finite diffusion couples....

  9. Techniques for the generation and monitoring of vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, G.O.

    1981-01-01

    Controlled test atmospheres can be produced using a variety of techniques. Gases are usually generated by using flow dilution methods while vapors are produced by using solvent injection and vaporization, saturation, permeation and diffusion techniques. The resulting gas mixtures can be monitored and measured using flame ionization, photoionization, electrochemical and infrared analytical systems. An ideal system for the production of controlled test atmospheres would not only be able to generate controlled test atmospheres, but also monitor all pertinent environmental parameters, such as temperature, humidity, and air flow

  10. CMOS-compatible method for doping of buried vertical polysilicon structures by solid phase diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turkulets, Yury [Micron Semiconductor Israel Ltd., Qiryat Gat 82109 (Israel); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 8410501 (Israel); Silber, Amir; Ripp, Alexander; Sokolovsky, Mark [Micron Semiconductor Israel Ltd., Qiryat Gat 82109 (Israel); Shalish, Ilan, E-mail: shalish@bgu.ac.il [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 8410501 (Israel)

    2016-03-28

    Polysilicon receives attention nowadays as a means to incorporate 3D-structured photonic devices into silicon processes. However, doping of buried layers of a typical 3D structure has been a challenge. We present a method for doping of buried polysilicon layers by solid phase diffusion. Using an underlying silicon oxide layer as a dopant source facilitates diffusion of dopants into the bottom side of the polysilicon layer. The polysilicon is grown on top of the oxide layer, after the latter has been doped by ion implantation. Post-growth heat treatment drives in the dopant from the oxide into the polysilicon. To model the process, we studied the diffusion of the two most common silicon dopants, boron (B) and phosphorus (P), using secondary ion mass spectroscopy profiles. Our results show that shallow concentration profiles can be achieved in a buried polysilicon layer using the proposed technique. We present a quantitative 3D model for the diffusion of B and P in polysilicon, which turns the proposed method into an engineerable technique.

  11. Numerical simulation of reaction-diffusion systems by modified cubic B-spline differential quadrature method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, R.C.; Rohila, Rajni

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have applied modified cubic B-spline based differential quadrature method to get numerical solutions of one dimensional reaction-diffusion systems such as linear reaction-diffusion system, Brusselator system, Isothermal system and Gray-Scott system. The models represented by these systems have important applications in different areas of science and engineering. The most striking and interesting part of the work is the solution patterns obtained for Gray Scott model, reminiscent of which are often seen in nature. We have used cubic B-spline functions for space discretization to get a system of ordinary differential equations. This system of ODE’s is solved by highly stable SSP-RK43 method to get solution at the knots. The computed results are very accurate and shown to be better than those available in the literature. Method is easy and simple to apply and gives solutions with less computational efforts.

  12. Flow injection analysis simulations and diffusion coefficient determination by stochastic and deterministic optimization methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucza, Witold

    2013-07-25

    Stochastic and deterministic simulations of dispersion in cylindrical channels on the Poiseuille flow have been presented. The random walk (stochastic) and the uniform dispersion (deterministic) models have been used for computations of flow injection analysis responses. These methods coupled with the genetic algorithm and the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization methods, respectively, have been applied for determination of diffusion coefficients. The diffusion coefficients of fluorescein sodium, potassium hexacyanoferrate and potassium dichromate have been determined by means of the presented methods and FIA responses that are available in literature. The best-fit results agree with each other and with experimental data thus validating both presented approaches. Copyright © 2013 The Author. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Vapor pressure and enthalpy of vaporization of linear aliphatic alkanediamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozdeev, Vasiliy A.; Verevkin, Sergey P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We measured vapor pressure of diamines H 2 N-(CH 2 ) n -NH 2 with n = 3 to 12. → Vaporization enthalpies at 298 K were derived. → We examined consistency of new and available in the literature data. → Enthalpies of vaporization show linear dependence on numbers n. → Enthalpies of vaporization correlate linearly with Kovat's indices. - Abstract: Vapor pressures and the molar enthalpies of vaporization of the linear aliphatic alkanediamines H 2 N-(CH 2 ) n -NH 2 with n = (3 to 12) have been determined using the transpiration method. A linear correlation of enthalpies of vaporization (at T = 298.15 K) of the alkanediamines with the number n and with the Kovat's indices has been found, proving the internal consistency of the measured data.

  14. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology, with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate the U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts (Wolsko et al. 1991). The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were then subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the ORGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use, socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3. Following the site description and additional data requirements, Sec. 4 provides a short, qualitative assessment of potential environmental issues. 37 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs.

  15. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology, with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate the U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts (Wolsko et al. 1991). The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were then subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the ORGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use, socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3. Following the site description and additional data requirements, Sec. 4 provides a short, qualitative assessment of potential environmental issues. 37 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs

  16. Prediction of heat capacities and heats of vaporization of organic liquids by group contribution methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceriani, Roberta; Gani, Rafiqul; Meirelles, A.J.A.

    2009-01-01

    In the present work a group contribution method is proposed for the estimation of the heat capacity of organic liquids as a function of temperature for fatty compounds found in edible oil and biofuels industries. The data bank used for regression of the group contribution parameters (1395 values...

  17. Preconditioned iterative methods for space-time fractional advection-diffusion equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi; Jin, Xiao-Qing; Lin, Matthew M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose practical numerical methods for solving a class of initial-boundary value problems of space-time fractional advection-diffusion equations. First, we propose an implicit method based on two-sided Grünwald formulae and discuss its stability and consistency. Then, we develop the preconditioned generalized minimal residual (preconditioned GMRES) method and preconditioned conjugate gradient normal residual (preconditioned CGNR) method with easily constructed preconditioners. Importantly, because resulting systems are Toeplitz-like, fast Fourier transform can be applied to significantly reduce the computational cost. We perform numerical experiments to demonstrate the efficiency of our preconditioners, even in cases with variable coefficients.

  18. Numerical solution of the unsteady diffusion-convection-reaction equation based on improved spectral Galerkin method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jiaqi; Zeng, Cheng; Yuan, Yupeng; Zhang, Yuzhe; Zhang, Ye

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an explicit numerical algorithm based on improved spectral Galerkin method for solving the unsteady diffusion-convection-reaction equation. The principal characteristics of this approach give the explicit eigenvalues and eigenvectors based on the time-space separation method and boundary condition analysis. With the help of Fourier series and Galerkin truncation, we can obtain the finite-dimensional ordinary differential equations which facilitate the system analysis and controller design. By comparing with the finite element method, the numerical solutions are demonstrated via two examples. It is shown that the proposed method is effective.

  19. A clutter removal method for the Doppler ultrasound signal based on a nonlinear diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Peng; Xin Pengcheng; Bian Zhengzhong; Yu Gang

    2008-01-01

    Strong clutter components produced by stationary and slow-moving tissue structures render the lower frequency part of the spectrogram useless and degrade the accuracy of clinical ultrasound indices. An adaptive method based on the nonlinear forward-and-backward diffusion equation (FAB-DE) is proposed to remove strong clutter components from the contaminated Doppler signal. The clutter signal is extracted first by the FAB-DE accurately, in which the nonlinear diffusion coefficient function of the FAB-DE locally adjusts according to signal features and the diffusion adaptively switches between forward and backward mode. The present method has been validated by simulated and realistic pulse wave Doppler signals, and compared with the conventional high pass filter and the matching pursuit method. The simulation results, including spectrogram, mean velocity error, standard deviation of mean velocity and signal-to-clutter ratio of a decontaminated signal, demonstrate that the present FAB-DE method can remove clutter sufficiently and retain more low blood components simultaneously as compared with the other two methods. Results of the realistic Doppler blood signal, including spectrogram and low-frequency part of the spectrum, support the conclusion drawn from simulation cases

  20. Domain decomposition methods for the mixed dual formulation of the critical neutron diffusion problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerin, P.

    2007-12-01

    The neutronic simulation of a nuclear reactor core is performed using the neutron transport equation, and leads to an eigenvalue problem in the steady-state case. Among the deterministic resolution methods, diffusion approximation is often used. For this problem, the MINOS solver based on a mixed dual finite element method has shown his efficiency. In order to take advantage of parallel computers, and to reduce the computing time and the local memory requirement, we propose in this dissertation two domain decomposition methods for the resolution of the mixed dual form of the eigenvalue neutron diffusion problem. The first approach is a component mode synthesis method on overlapping sub-domains. Several Eigenmodes solutions of a local problem solved by MINOS on each sub-domain are taken as basis functions used for the resolution of the global problem on the whole domain. The second approach is a modified iterative Schwarz algorithm based on non-overlapping domain decomposition with Robin interface conditions. At each iteration, the problem is solved on each sub domain by MINOS with the interface conditions deduced from the solutions on the adjacent sub-domains at the previous iteration. The iterations allow the simultaneous convergence of the domain decomposition and the eigenvalue problem. We demonstrate the accuracy and the efficiency in parallel of these two methods with numerical results for the diffusion model on realistic 2- and 3-dimensional cores. (author)

  1. A new diffusion nodal method based on analytic basis function expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, J.M.; Cho, N.Z.

    1993-01-01

    The transverse integration procedure commonly used in most advanced nodal methods results in some limitations. The first is that the transverse leakage term that appears in the transverse integration procedure must be appropriately approximated. In most advanced nodal methods, this term is expanded in a quadratic polynomial. The second arises when reconstructing the pinwise flux distribution within a node. The available one-dimensional flux shapes from nodal calculation in each spatial direction cannot be used directly in the flux reconstruction. Finally, the transverse leakage defined for a hexagonal node becomes so complicated as not to be easily handled and contains nonphysical singular terms. In this paper, a new nodal method called the analytic function expansion nodal (AFEN) method is described for both the rectangular geometry and the hexagonal geometry in order to overcome these limitations. This method does not solve the transverse-integrated one-dimensional diffusion equations but instead solves directly the original multidimensional diffusion equation within a node. This is a accomplished by expanding the solution (or the intranodal homogeneous flux distribution) in terms of nonseparable analytic basis functions satisfying the diffusion equation at any point in the node

  2. A novel method for calculating the energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchitchekova, Deyana S.; Morthomas, Julien; Ribeiro, Fabienne; Ducher, Roland; Perez, Michel

    2014-07-01

    A novel method for accurate and efficient evaluation of the change in energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress is introduced. This method, called Linear Combination of Stress States, is based on the knowledge of the effects of simple stresses (uniaxial or shear) on these diffusion barriers. Then, it is assumed that the change in energy barriers under a complex stress can be expressed as a linear combination of these already known simple stress effects. The modifications of energy barriers by either uniaxial traction/compression and shear stress are determined by means of atomistic simulations with the Climbing Image-Nudge Elastic Band method and are stored as a set of functions. The results of this method are compared to the predictions of anisotropic elasticity theory. It is shown that, linear anisotropic elasticity fails to predict the correct energy barrier variation with stress (especially with shear stress) whereas the proposed method provides correct energy barrier variation for stresses up to ˜3 GPa. This study provides a basis for the development of multiscale models of diffusion under non-uniform stress.

  3. Splitting Method for Solving the Coarse-Mesh Discretized Low-Order Quasi-Diffusion Equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiruta, Hikaru; Anistratov, Dmitriy Y.; Adams, Marvin L.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the development is presented of a splitting method that can efficiently solve coarse-mesh discretized low-order quasi-diffusion (LOQD) equations. The LOQD problem can reproduce exactly the transport scalar flux and current. To solve the LOQD equations efficiently, a splitting method is proposed. The presented method splits the LOQD problem into two parts: (a) the D problem that captures a significant part of the transport solution in the central parts of assemblies and can be reduced to a diffusion-type equation and (b) the Q problem that accounts for the complicated behavior of the transport solution near assembly boundaries. Independent coarse-mesh discretizations are applied: the D problem equations are approximated by means of a finite element method, whereas the Q problem equations are discretized using a finite volume method. Numerical results demonstrate the efficiency of the methodology presented. This methodology can be used to modify existing diffusion codes for full-core calculations (which already solve a version of the D problem) to account for transport effects

  4. Comparison of diffusion charging and mobility-based methods for measurement of aerosol agglomerate surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2012-05-01

    We compare different approaches to measure surface area of aerosol agglomerates. The objective was to compare field methods, such as mobility and diffusion charging based approaches, with laboratory approach, such as Brunauer, Emmett, Teller (BET) method used for bulk powder samples. To allow intercomparison of various surface area measurements, we defined 'geometric surface area' of agglomerates (assuming agglomerates are made up of ideal spheres), and compared various surface area measurements to the geometric surface area. Four different approaches for measuring surface area of agglomerate particles in the size range of 60-350 nm were compared using (i) diffusion charging-based sensors from three different manufacturers, (ii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate, (iii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate assuming a linear chain morphology with uniform primary particle size, and (iv) surface area estimation based on tandem mobility-mass measurement and microscopy. Our results indicate that the tandem mobility-mass measurement, which can be applied directly to airborne particles unlike the BET method, agrees well with the BET method. It was also shown that the three diffusion charging-based surface area measurements of silver agglomerates were similar within a factor of 2 and were lower than those obtained from the tandem mobility-mass and microscopy method by a factor of 3-10 in the size range studied. Surface area estimated using the mobility diameter depended on the structure or morphology of the agglomerate with significant underestimation at high fractal dimensions approaching 3.

  5. A novel method for calculating the energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchitchekova, Deyana S.; Morthomas, Julien; Perez, Michel; Ribeiro, Fabienne; Ducher, Roland

    2014-01-01

    A novel method for accurate and efficient evaluation of the change in energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress is introduced. This method, called Linear Combination of Stress States, is based on the knowledge of the effects of simple stresses (uniaxial or shear) on these diffusion barriers. Then, it is assumed that the change in energy barriers under a complex stress can be expressed as a linear combination of these already known simple stress effects. The modifications of energy barriers by either uniaxial traction/compression and shear stress are determined by means of atomistic simulations with the Climbing Image-Nudge Elastic Band method and are stored as a set of functions. The results of this method are compared to the predictions of anisotropic elasticity theory. It is shown that, linear anisotropic elasticity fails to predict the correct energy barrier variation with stress (especially with shear stress) whereas the proposed method provides correct energy barrier variation for stresses up to ∼3 GPa. This study provides a basis for the development of multiscale models of diffusion under non-uniform stress

  6. A novel method for calculating the energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tchitchekova, Deyana S. [IRSN, PSN, SEMIA, LPTM, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Univ. Lyon, INSA Lyon, MATEIS, UMR CNRS 5510, Villeurbanne (France); Morthomas, Julien; Perez, Michel [Univ. Lyon, INSA Lyon, MATEIS, UMR CNRS 5510, Villeurbanne (France); Ribeiro, Fabienne [IRSN, PSN, SEMIA, LPTM, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Ducher, Roland [IRSN, PSN, SAG, LETR, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2014-07-21

    A novel method for accurate and efficient evaluation of the change in energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress is introduced. This method, called Linear Combination of Stress States, is based on the knowledge of the effects of simple stresses (uniaxial or shear) on these diffusion barriers. Then, it is assumed that the change in energy barriers under a complex stress can be expressed as a linear combination of these already known simple stress effects. The modifications of energy barriers by either uniaxial traction/compression and shear stress are determined by means of atomistic simulations with the Climbing Image-Nudge Elastic Band method and are stored as a set of functions. The results of this method are compared to the predictions of anisotropic elasticity theory. It is shown that, linear anisotropic elasticity fails to predict the correct energy barrier variation with stress (especially with shear stress) whereas the proposed method provides correct energy barrier variation for stresses up to ∼3 GPa. This study provides a basis for the development of multiscale models of diffusion under non-uniform stress.

  7. A multiscale method for compressible liquid-vapor flow with surface tension*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaegle Felix

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Discontinuous Galerkin methods have become a powerful tool for approximating the solution of compressible flow problems. Their direct use for two-phase flow problems with phase transformation is not straightforward because this type of flows requires a detailed tracking of the phase front. We consider the fronts in this contribution as sharp interfaces and propose a novel multiscale approach. It combines an efficient high-order Discontinuous Galerkin solver for the computation in the bulk phases on the macro-scale with the use of a generalized Riemann solver on the micro-scale. The Riemann solver takes into account the effects of moderate surface tension via the curvature of the sharp interface as well as phase transformation. First numerical experiments in three space dimensions underline the overall performance of the method.

  8. Assessment of condensation of water vapor in the mixing chamber by CFD method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojkůvková Petra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The analyzed topic belongs to the field of design and operation of HVAC systems, focusing mainly on mixing chambers. The paper deals with problems of condensation and freezing of water vapour on walls of mixing chambers in a special case, when the partial pressure of the final resulting state of the mixture of warm moist air and colder air is located above the saturation limit. Experimental in situ methods and computer computational fluid dynamics (CFD modelling method were used for processing. The main contribution of this work is the finding that partial condensation and freezing of water vapour may occur in local parts of the mixing chamber. It causes problems in terms of hygienic safety and service life of these devices. In particular it has been found that condensation and freezing of water vapour may occur even if relative humidity of the resulting mixture is about 70 %.

  9. Investigation of the fluidized bed-chemical vapor deposition (FBCVD) process using CFD-DEM method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Malin; Liu Rongzheng; Wen Yuanyun; Liu Bing; Shao Youlin

    2014-01-01

    The CFD-DEM-CVD multiscale coupling simulation concept was proposed based on the mass/momentum/energy transfer involved in the FB-CVD process. The pyrolysis process of the reaction gas in the spouted bed can be simulated by CFD method, then the concentration field and velocity field can be extracted and coupled with the particle movement behavior which can be simulated by DEM. Particle deposition process can be described by the CVD model based on particle position, velocity and neighboring gas concentration. This multiscale coupling method can be implemented in the Fluent@-EDEM@ software with their UDF (User Definition Function) and API (Application Programming Interface). Base on the multiscale coupling concept, the criterion for evaluating FB-CVD process is given. At first, the volume in the coating furnace is divided into two parts (active coating area and non-active coating area) based on simulation results of chemical pyrolysis process. Then the residence time of all particles in the active coating area can be obtained using the CFD-DEM simulation method. The residence time distribution can be used as a criterion for evaluating the gas-solid contact efficiency and operation performance of the coating furnace. At last different coating parameters of the coating furnace are compared based on the proposed criterion. And also, the future research emphasis is discussed. (author)

  10. Expanding Clinical Laboratory Tobacco Product Evaluation Methods to Loose-leaf Tobacco Vaporizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Alexa A.; Hiler, Marzena; Maloney, Sarah; Eissenberg, Thomas; Breland, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Background Novel tobacco products entering the US market include electronic cigarettes (ECIGs) and products advertised to “heat, not burn” tobacco. There is a growing literature regarding the acute effects of ECIGs. Less is known about “heat, not burn” products. This study’s purpose was to expand existing clinical laboratory methods to examine, in cigarette smokers, the acute effects of a “heat, not burn” “loose-leaf tobacco vaporizer” (LLTV). Methods Plasma nicotine and breath carbon monoxide (CO) concentration and tobacco abstinence symptom severity were measured before and after two 10-puff (30-sec interpuff interval) product use bouts separated by 60 minutes. LLTV effects were compared to participants’ own brand (OB) cigarettes and an ECIG (3.3 V; 1.5 Ohm; 18 mg/ml nicotine). Results Relative to OB, LLTV increased plasma nicotine concentration to a lesser degree, did not increase CO, and appeared to not reduce abstinence symptoms as effectively. Relative to ECIG, LLTV nicotine and CO delivery and abstinence symptom suppression did not differ. Participants reported that both the LLTV and ECIG were significantly less satisfying than OB. Conclusions Results demonstrate that LLTVs are capable of delivering nicotine and suppressing tobacco abstinence symptoms partially; acute effects of these products can be evaluated using existing clinical laboratory methods. Results can inform tobacco product regulation and may be predictive of the extent that these products have the potential to benefit or harm overall public health. PMID:27768968

  11. Operator Splitting Methods for Degenerate Convection-Diffusion Equations I: Convergence and Entropy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Helge; Karlsen, Kenneth H.; Lie, Knut-Andreas

    1999-10-01

    We present and analyze a numerical method for the solution of a class of scalar, multi-dimensional, nonlinear degenerate convection-diffusion equations. The method is based on operator splitting to separate the convective and the diffusive terms in the governing equation. The nonlinear, convective part is solved using front tracking and dimensional splitting, while the nonlinear diffusion equation is solved by a suitable difference scheme. We verify L{sup 1} compactness of the corresponding set of approximate solutions and derive precise entropy estimates. In particular, these results allow us to pass to the limit in our approximations and recover an entropy solution of the problem in question. The theory presented covers a large class of equations. Important subclasses are hyperbolic conservation laws, porous medium type equations, two-phase reservoir flow equations, and strongly degenerate equations coming from the recent theory of sedimentation-consolidation processes. A thorough numerical investigation of the method analyzed in this paper (and similar methods) is presented in a companion paper. (author)

  12. Model for determining vapor equilibrium rates in the hanging drop method for protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, James K.; Frieden, Richard W.; Meehan, E. J., Jr.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Howard, Sandra B.; Fowlis, William A.

    1987-01-01

    An engineering analysis of the rate of evaporation of solvent in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth is presented. Results are applied to 18 drop and well arrangements commonly encountered in the laboratory. The chemical nature of the salt, drop size and shape, drop concentration, well size, well concentration, and temperature are taken into account. The rate of evaporation increases with temperature, drop size, and the salt concentration difference between the drop and the well. The evaporation in this model possesses no unique half-life. Once the salt in the drop achieves 80 percent of its final concentration, further evaporation suffers from the law of diminishing returns.

  13. Modeling of three-dimensional diffusible resistors with the one-dimensional tube multiplexing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillet, Jean-Numa; Degorce, Jean-Yves; Meunier, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Electronic-behavior modeling of three-dimensional (3D) p + -π-p + and n + -ν-n + semiconducting diffusible devices with highly accurate resistances for the design of analog resistors, which are compatible with the CMOS (complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor) technologies, is performed in three dimensions with the fast tube multiplexing method (TMM). The current–voltage (I–V) curve of a silicon device is usually computed with traditional device simulators of technology computer-aided design (TCAD) based on the finite-element method (FEM). However, for the design of 3D p + -π-p + and n + -ν-n + diffusible resistors, they show a high computational cost and convergence that may fail with fully non-separable 3D dopant concentration profiles as observed in many diffusible resistors resulting from laser trimming. These problems are avoided with the proposed TMM, which divides the 3D resistor into one-dimensional (1D) thin tubes with longitudinal axes following the main orientation of the average electrical field in the tubes. The I–V curve is rapidly obtained for a device with a realistic 3D dopant profile, since a system of three first-order ordinary differential equations has to be solved for each 1D multiplexed tube with the TMM instead of three second-order partial differential equations in the traditional TCADs. Simulations with the TMM are successfully compared to experimental results from silicon-based 3D resistors fabricated by laser-induced dopant diffusion in the gaps of MOSFETs (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors) without initial gate. Using thin tubes with other shapes than parallelepipeds as ring segments with toroidal lateral surfaces, the TMM can be generalized to electronic devices with other types of 3D diffusible microstructures

  14. Measurement of the thermal diffusivity on ceramics and metals using the laser flash method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumm, J.; Sauseng, B.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: In the past few decades measurement of the thermophysical properties such as thermal expansion, specific heat, thermal diffusivity or thermal conductivity has become increasingly important for industrial applications. One example is the optimization of the heat transfer in industrial assemblies used for automotive or space applications. The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of all components exposed to high and/or sub-ambient temperatures or large temperature gradients should be accurately known. Another well known example is the characterization of materials such as graphite used in nuclear reactors. Furthermore, analysis of solid and liquid metals is of paramount importance for the simulation of casting processes using finite element software programs. Thermal barrier coatings (zirconia) are used more and more often for high-temperature turbine blades. Reducing the thermal conductivity and the heat transfer through such coatings usually allows higher working temperatures and therefore higher efficiency of the gas turbine. These examples clearly demonstrate the need of instrumentation for the accurate measurement of the required thermophysical properties. The laser flash method has been developed to become one of the most commonly used techniques for the measurement of the thermal diffusivity of various kinds of solids and liquids. Easy sample preparation, small sample dimensions, fast measurement times and high accuracy are only some of the advantages of this non-destructive measurement technique. In addition, temperature dependent measurements can easily be realized. Since the development of the method by Parker et al. new routines for processing of the raw data have been established. Analytical mathematical descriptions were found to compensate for heat loss and finite pulse effects. Using modern personal computers and non-linear regression routines, mathematical models can be used to fit the raw data, yielding improved results for thermal

  15. Mixed dual finite element methods for the numerical treatment of the diffusion equation in hexagonal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, D.

    2001-01-01

    The nodal method Minos has been developed to offer a powerful method for the calculation of nuclear reactor cores in rectangular geometry. This method solves the mixed dual form of the diffusion equation and, also of the simplified P N approximation. The discretization is based on Raviart-Thomas' mixed dual finite elements and the iterative algorithm is an alternating direction method, which uses the current as unknown. The subject of this work is to adapt this method to hexagonal geometry. The guiding idea is to construct and test different methods based on the division of a hexagon into trapeze or rhombi with appropriate mapping of these quadrilaterals onto squares in order to take into advantage what is already available in the Minos solver. The document begins with a review of the neutron diffusion equation. Then we discuss its mixed dual variational formulation from a functional as well as from a numerical point of view. We study conformal and bilinear mappings for the two possible meshing of the hexagon. Thus, four different methods are proposed and are completely described in this work. Because of theoretical and numerical difficulties, a particular treatment has been necessary for methods based on the conformal mapping. Finally, numerical results are presented for a hexagonal benchmark to validate and compare the four methods with respect to pre-defined criteria. (authors)

  16. Iterative Two- and One-Dimensional Methods for Three-Dimensional Neutron Diffusion Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Chul; Lee, Deokjung; Downar, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Two methods are proposed for solving the three-dimensional neutron diffusion equation by iterating between solutions of the two-dimensional (2-D) radial and one-dimensional (1-D) axial solutions. In the first method, the 2-D/1-D equations are coupled using a current correction factor (CCF) with the average fluxes of the lower and upper planes and the axial net currents at the plane interfaces. In the second method, an analytic expression for the axial net currents at the interface of the planes is used for planar coupling. A comparison of the new methods is made with two previously proposed methods, which use interface net currents and partial currents for planar coupling. A Fourier convergence analysis of the four methods was performed, and results indicate that the two new methods have at least three advantages over the previous methods. First, the new methods are unconditionally stable, whereas the net current method diverges for small axial mesh size. Second, the new methods provide better convergence performance than the other methods in the range of practical mesh sizes. Third, the spectral radii of the new methods asymptotically approach zero as the mesh size increases, while the spectral radius of the partial current method approaches a nonzero value as the mesh size increases. Of the two new methods proposed here, the analytic method provides a smaller spectral radius than the CCF method, but the CCF method has several advantages over the analytic method in practical applications

  17. Investigation of the diffusion {proportional_to} brasses using methods depending on the evaporation or condensation of zinc; Etude de la diffusion dans les laitons {proportional_to} au moyen des methodes d'evaporation ou de condensation du zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Accary, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Centre d' Etudes de Chimie Metallurgique du CNRS (France)

    1959-07-01

    Diffusion in {alpha} brasses has been investigated using methods involving the evaporation and the condensation of zinc. Having shown that at sufficiently high temperatures intergranular diffusion has no effect, it was then proved that the rate of evaporation or of condensation can only be defined if the mechanical treatment of the test piece before diffusion, the direction of the diffusion and the nature of the impurities present are also defined. The coefficient of diffusion D is then given by the equation D ({pi}/4t){rho}{sup 2}{sub 0} where t is the duration of the diffusion; {rho}{sub 0} is the extrapolated value of {rho} = ({delta}m)/({delta}C) for a zero value of the variation of concentration ({delta}m in is the change in weight of the test piece per unit surface; {delta}C is the difference between the concentration at the surface and the initial concentration of the test piece). This method has been used to study the effect of the direction of the diffusion on the coefficient of diffusion. The coefficient for diffusion which decreases the concentration of zinc is 5 times greater than that for diffusion which increases the quantity of zinc in the metal; an interpretation of this phenomena based on the mechanism of diffusion vacancies in the structure has been proposed. By means of micrographic investigation and by weighing it has been shown that the presence of certain impurities, such as phosphorous, arsenic, antimony, silicon, and aluminium can result in a marked increase of the rate of diffusion: the effect of these impurities on the coefficient of diffusion has been related to their valency and atomic weight. (author) [French] La diffusion dans les laitons {alpha} a ete etudiee au moyen des methodes d'evaporation et de condensafion du zinc. Apres avoir montre qu'aux temperatures suffisamment elevees, la diffusion intergranulaire ne jouait aucun role, l'auteur a prouve que la vitesse d'evaporation ou de condensation n'est definie que dans la mesure ou

  18. A new method to monitor water vapor cycles in active volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girona, T.; Costa Rodriguez, F.; Taisne, B.

    2014-12-01

    Simultaneous monitoring of different gas species of volcanic plumes is crucial to understand the mechanisms involved in persistent degassing, and to anticipate volcanic unrest episodes and magma ascent towards the surface. Progress in gas remote-sensing techniques during the last decades has led to the development of ultraviolet absorption spectrometers and UV cameras, which enable to monitor SO2 emission cycles in real time, at very high-frequency (~ 1Hz), and from several kilometers away from the volcanic plume. However, monitoring of the more abundant gases, i.e., H2O and CO2, is limited to volcanoes where infrared spectrometers and infrared lamps can be installed at both sides of the crater rims. In this study, we present a new and simple methodology to register H2O emission cycles from long distances (several kilometers), which is based on the light scattered by the micrometric water droplets of condensed plumes. The method only requires a commercial digital camera and a laptop for image processing, since, as we demonstrate, there is a linear correlation between the digital brightness of the plume and its volcanogenic water content. We have validated the method experimentally by generating controlled condensed plumes with an ultrasonic humidifier, and applied it to the plume of Erebus volcano using a 30 minutes-long movie [1]. The wavelet transforms of the plume brightness and SO2 time series (measured with DOAS [1]) show two common periodic components in the bands ~100­-250 s and ~500-­650 s. However, there is a third periodic component in the band ~300-­450 s in the SO2 time series that is absent in the brightness time series. We propose that the common periodic components are induced by magmatic foams collapsing intermittently beneath shallow geometrical barriers composed by bubbles with high content of both H2O and SO2, whereas the third periodic component could be induced by foams collapsing beneath a deeper geometrical barrier composed by bubbles with

  19. Accuracy analysis of the thermal diffusivity measurement of molten salts by stepwise heating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yoshio; Furukawa, Kazuo

    1976-11-01

    The stepwise heating method for measuring thermal diffusivity of molten salts is based on the electrical heating of a thin metal plate as a plane heat source in the molten salt. In this method, the following estimations on error are of importance: (1) thickness effect of the metal plate, (2) effective length between the plate and a temperature measuring point and (3) effect of the noise on the temperature rise signal. In this report, a measuring apparatus is proposed and measuring conditions are suggested on the basis of error estimations. The measurements for distilled water and glycerine were made first to test the performance; the results agreed well with standard values. The thermal diffusivities of molten NaNO 3 at 320-380 0 C and of molten Li 2 BeF 4 at 470-700 0 C were measured. (auth.)

  20. Cu diffusion as an alternative method for nanopatterned CuTCNQ film growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capitán, M J; Álvarez, J; Miranda, R; Navío, C

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we show by means of ‘in situ’ x-ray diffraction studies that CuTCNQ formation from Cu(solid)–TCNQ(solid tetracyanoquinodimethane) goes through Cu diffusion at room temperature. The film quality depends on the TCNQ evaporation rate. At low evaporation rate we get a single phase-I CuTCNQ film very well crystallized and well oriented. The film has a CuTCNQ(0 2 0) orientation. The film is formed by CuTCNQ nanorods of a very homogeneous size. The film homogeneity has also been seen by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The electronic properties of the film have been measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). Thus, the Cu-diffusion method has arisen as a very simple, clean and efficient method to grow localized CuTCNQ nanorods on Cu, opening up new insights for technological applications. (paper)

  1. Solution of the multilayer multigroup neutron diffusion equation in cartesian geometry by fictitious borders power method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanette, Rodrigo; Petersen, Caudio Zen [Univ. Federal de Pelotas, Capao do Leao (Brazil). Programa de Pos Graduacao em Modelagem Matematica; Schramm, Marcello [Univ. Federal de Pelotas (Brazil). Centro de Engenharias; Zabadal, Jorge Rodolfo [Univ. Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Tramandai (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    In this paper a solution for the one-dimensional steady state Multilayer Multigroup Neutron Diffusion Equation in cartesian geometry by Fictitious Borders Power Method and a perturbative analysis of this solution is presented. For each new iteration of the power method, the neutron flux is reconstructed by polynomial interpolation, so that it always remains in a standard form. However when the domain is long, an almost singular matrix arises in the interpolation process. To eliminate this singularity the domain segmented in R regions, called fictitious regions. The last step is to solve the neutron diffusion equation for each fictitious region in analytical form locally. The results are compared with results present in the literature. In order to analyze the sensitivity of the solution, a perturbation in the nuclear parameters is inserted to determine how a perturbation interferes in numerical results of the solution.

  2. Entropy methods for reaction-diffusion equations: slowly growing a-priori bounds

    KAUST Repository

    Desvillettes, Laurent; Fellner, Klemens

    2008-01-01

    In the continuation of [Desvillettes, L., Fellner, K.: Exponential Decay toward Equilibrium via Entropy Methods for Reaction-Diffusion Equations. J. Math. Anal. Appl. 319 (2006), no. 1, 157-176], we study reversible reaction-diffusion equations via entropy methods (based on the free energy functional) for a 1D system of four species. We improve the existing theory by getting 1) almost exponential convergence in L1 to the steady state via a precise entropy-entropy dissipation estimate, 2) an explicit global L∞ bound via interpolation of a polynomially growing H1 bound with the almost exponential L1 convergence, and 3), finally, explicit exponential convergence to the steady state in all Sobolev norms.

  3. New method and installation for rapid determination of radon diffusion coefficient in various materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapalov, Andrey; Gulabyants, Loren; Livshits, Mihail; Kovler, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    The mathematical apparatus and the experimental installation for the rapid determination of radon diffusion coefficient in various materials are developed. The single test lasts not longer than 18 h and allows testing numerous materials, such as gaseous and liquid media, as well as soil, concrete and radon-proof membranes, in which diffusion coefficient of radon may vary in an extremely wide range, from 1·10 −12 to 5·10 −5 m 2 /s. The uncertainty of radon diffusion coefficient estimation depends on the permeability of the sample and varies from about 5% (for the most permeable materials) to 40% (for less permeable materials, such as radon-proof membranes). - Highlights: • The new method and installation for determination of radon diffusion coefficient D are developed. • The measured D-values vary in an extremely wide range, from 5×10 -5 to 1×10 -12 m 2 /s. • The materials include water, air, soil, building materials and radon-proof membranes. • The duration of the single test does not exceed 18 hours. • The measurement uncertainty varies from 5% (in permeable materials) to 40% (in radon gas barriers)

  4. Matrix diffusion studies by electrical conductivity methods. Comparison between laboratory and in-situ measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlsson, Y.; Neretnieks, I.

    1998-01-01

    Traditional laboratory diffusion experiments in rock material are time consuming, and quite small samples are generally used. Electrical conductivity measurements, on the other hand, provide a fast means for examining transport properties in rock and allow measurements on larger samples as well. Laboratory measurements using electrical conductivity give results that compare well to those from traditional diffusion experiments. The measurement of the electrical resistivity in the rock surrounding a borehole is a standard method for the detection of water conducting fractures. If these data could be correlated to matrix diffusion properties, in-situ diffusion data from large areas could be obtained. This would be valuable because it would make it possible to obtain data very early in future investigations of potentially suitable sites for a repository. This study compares laboratory electrical conductivity measurements with in-situ resistivity measurements from a borehole at Aespoe. The laboratory samples consist mainly of Aespoe diorite and fine-grained granite and the rock surrounding the borehole of Aespoe diorite, Smaaland granite and fine-grained granite. The comparison shows good agreement between laboratory measurements and in-situ data

  5. Method and equipment of separation of gaseous and vaporous materials, particularly isotopes, with separation nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, E.W.; Eisenbeiss, G.; Ehrfeld, W.

    1975-01-01

    The invention improves on the already known separation nozzle method by the two following steps: 1) The partial flows produced within the cascade with various shares of additional gas are introduced into the separating nozzle systems in such a manner that with regard to the additional gas, a molar fraction gradient is created which is in the opposite direction to the gradient created by the separation process. 2) The partial flows produced within the cascade with various compositions of the mixture of substances to be separated are introduced into the separating nozzle systems in such a manner that regarding the substances to be separated, a molar fraction gradient is created which is in the same direction as the molar fraction gradient formed by the separation process. Both measures can be separately applied or in combination with one another; flowsheets of the invented cascade circuits and separating nozzle systems are given. (GG/LH) [de

  6. Flashed-feed VMD configuration as a novel method for eliminating temperature polarization effect and enhancing water vapor flux

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaadi, Ahmad Salem; Alpatova, Alla; Lee, Jung Gil; Francis, Lijo; Ghaffour, NorEddine

    2018-01-01

    The coupling of heat and mass transfer in membrane distillation (MD) process makes enhancing water vapor flux and determining MD membrane mass transfer coefficient (MTC) fairly challenging due to the development of temperature gradient near

  7. A fractional spline collocation-Galerkin method for the time-fractional diffusion equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezza L.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to numerically solve a diffusion differential problem having time derivative of fractional order. To this end we propose a collocation-Galerkin method that uses the fractional splines as approximating functions. The main advantage is in that the derivatives of integer and fractional order of the fractional splines can be expressed in a closed form that involves just the generalized finite difference operator. This allows us to construct an accurate and efficient numerical method. Several numerical tests showing the effectiveness of the proposed method are presented.

  8. A grey diffusion acceleration method for time-dependent radiative transfer calculations: analysis and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, P.F.

    1993-01-01

    A grey diffusion acceleration method is presented and is shown by Fourier analysis and test calculations to be effective in accelerating radiative transfer calculations. The spectral radius is bounded by 0.9 for the continuous equations, but is significantly smaller for the discretized equations, especially in the optically thick regimes characteristic to radiation transport problems. The GDA method is more efficient than the multigroup DSA method because its slightly higher iteration count is more than offset by the much lower cost per iteration. A wide range of test calculations confirm the efficiency of GDA compared to multifrequency DSA. (orig.)

  9. Two-Dimensional Space-Time Dependent Multi-group Diffusion Equation with SLOR Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yulianti, Y.; Su'ud, Z.; Waris, A.; Khotimah, S. N.

    2010-01-01

    The research of two-dimensional space-time diffusion equations with SLOR (Successive-Line Over Relaxation) has been done. SLOR method is chosen because this method is one of iterative methods that does not required to defined whole element matrix. The research is divided in two cases, homogeneous case and heterogeneous case. Homogeneous case has been inserted by step reactivity. Heterogeneous case has been inserted by step reactivity and ramp reactivity. In general, the results of simulations are agreement, even in some points there are differences.

  10. Approximate analytical solution of diffusion equation with fractional time derivative using optimal homotopy analysis method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Das

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, optimal homotopy-analysis method is used to obtain approximate analytic solution of the time-fractional diffusion equation with a given initial condition. The fractional derivatives are considered in the Caputo sense. Unlike usual Homotopy analysis method, this method contains at the most three convergence control parameters which describe the faster convergence of the solution. Effects of parameters on the convergence of the approximate series solution by minimizing the averaged residual error with the proper choices of parameters are calculated numerically and presented through graphs and tables for different particular cases.

  11. A variational nodal diffusion method of high accuracy; Varijaciona nodalna difuziona metoda visoke tachnosti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasevic, Dj; Altiparmarkov, D [Institut za Nuklearne Nauke Boris Kidric, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1988-07-01

    A variational nodal diffusion method with accurate treatment of transverse leakage shape is developed and presented in this paper. Using Legendre expansion in transverse coordinates higher order quasi-one-dimensional nodal equations are formulated. Numerical solution has been carried out using analytical solutions in alternating directions assuming Legendre expansion of the RHS term. The method has been tested against 2D and 3D IAEA benchmark problem, as well as 2D CANDU benchmark problem. The results are highly accurate. The first order approximation yields to the same order of accuracy as the standard nodal methods with quadratic leakage approximation, while the second order reaches reference solution. (author)

  12. Method for the determination of oxygen consumption rates and diffusion coefficients in multicellular spheroids

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller-Klieser, W.

    1984-01-01

    A method has been developed for the quantitative evaluation of oxygen tension (PO2) distributions in multicellular spheroids measured with O2-sensitive microelectrodes. The experimental data showed that multicellular tumor spheroids in stirred growth media were characterized by a diffusion-depleted zone surrounding the spheroids. This zone was elicited by an unstirred layer of medium next to the spheroid leading to a continuous decrease in the PO2 values from the bulk medium towards the spher...

  13. Cytotoxicity of ferrite particles by MTT and agar diffusion methods for hyperthermic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Se-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Shim, In-Bo; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the cytotoxicity of the prepared various ferrites (Fe-, Li-, Ni/Zn/Cu-, Ba-, Sr-, Co-, Co/Ni-ferrites) using MTT assay as well as agar diffusion method. Their cytotoxicity was compared with that of alginate-encapsulated ferrites. In the MTT assay, Fe 3 O 4 and SrFe 12 O 19 ferrite showed the highest cell viability of 90%. Alginate-encapsulated Ba-ferrite was ranked mildly cytotoxic, whereas their ferrite particles were ranked cytotoxic

  14. An analytical method for determining the temperature dependent moisture diffusivities of pumpkin seeds during drying process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Can, Ahmet [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Trakya, 22030 Edirne (Turkey)

    2007-02-15

    This paper presents an analytical method, which determines the moisture diffusion coefficients for the natural and forced convection hot air drying of pumpkin seeds and their temperature dependence. In order to obtain scientific data, the pumpkin seed drying process was investigated under both natural and forced hot air convection regimes. This paper presents the experimental results in which the drying air was heated by solar energy. (author)

  15. The Galerkin Finite Element Method for A Multi-term Time-Fractional Diffusion equation

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Bangti; Lazarov, Raytcho; Liu, Yikan; Zhou, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    We consider the initial/boundary value problem for a diffusion equation involving multiple time-fractional derivatives on a bounded convex polyhedral domain. We analyze a space semidiscrete scheme based on the standard Galerkin finite element method using continuous piecewise linear functions. Nearly optimal error estimates for both cases of initial data and inhomogeneous term are derived, which cover both smooth and nonsmooth data. Further we develop a fully discrete scheme based on a finite...

  16. The Water Vapor Source and Transport Characteristic of Rainy Seasons in Eastern China Base on Lagrangian Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y.; Jiang, Z.; Liu, Z.; Li, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory platform is employed in this studyto simulate trajectories of air parcels in the different rainy seasons in East China from 1961 to 2010,with the purpose of investigating general and specific characteristics of moisture sources and the eventual relationship withprecipitation in each rainy season.The moisture transport andsource-sink characteristics of different rainy seasons have evident differences. The results show that the frontal pre-rainy season is mainly influenced bywinter monsoon system, and the precipitation is strongly affected by water vapor from Pacific Ocean (PO) and East China (EC). Afterthe onset of South China Sea Summer Monsoon (SCSMS), the moisture from Pacific Ocean decreases and from Indian Ocean monsoon area increases. Afterwards, with the northward of the rain belt, the parcels from Southwest region (South China Sea (SCS), Indian Ocean (IO) andIndo-China Peninsula and Indian Peninsula(IP)) decrease and from North region (EC, Eurasia (EA) and PO) increase. Besides, most of the land areas are water vapor sink region and most of sea areas are water vapor source region. Before the onset of SCSMS, EC and PO are two main water vapor source areas.After the onset of SCSMS, the source from PO decreasesand Indian monsoon area becomes the main vapor source region. IP is the main water vapor sink area for all four rainy seasons.As for moisture circulation characteristics, the results of vertical structure of water vapor transport indicate that the maximum water vapor transport in west and east boundaries is located in mid-troposphere and in south and north boundaries is at low-troposphere. The spatiotemporal analysis of moisture trajectory based onmultivariate empirical orthogonal function (MVEOF) indicates that the first mode has close relationship with the precipitation in North China and PDO pattern; the second mode is closely related with the precipitation in Yangtze-Huaihe river basin and

  17. Vapor Pressure Measurements of LiBH4, NaBH 4 and Ca(BH4)2 using Knudsen Torsion Effusion Gravimetric Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danyan, Mohammad Masoumi

    Hydrogen storage is one of the critical technologies needed on the path towards commercialization for mobile applications. In the past few years, a range of new light weight hydrogen containing material has been discovered with good storage properties. Among them, lithium borohydride (LiBH 4) sodium borohydride (NaBH4) and calcium borohydride (Ca(BH 4)2) have shown promising results to be used as solid state hydrogen storage material. In this work, we have determined equilibrium vapor pressures of LiBH 4 NaBH4 and Ca(BH4)2 obtained by Torsion effusion thermogravimetric method. Results for all the three hydrides exhibited that a small fraction of the materials showed congruency, and sublimed as gaseous compound, but the majority of the material showed incongruent vaporization. Two Knudsen cells of 0.3 and 0.6mm orifice size was employed to measure the total vapor pressures. A Whitman-Motzfeldt method is used to extrapolate the measured vapor pressures to zero orifice size to calculate the equilibrium vapor pressures. In the case of LiBH4 we found that 2% of the material evaporated congruently (LiBH4(s) → LiBH4(g)) according to the equation: logPLiBH4/P 0 =-3263.5 +/-309/T + (1.079 +/-0.69) and rest as incongruent vaporization to LiH, B, and hydrogen gas according to the equation logPeq/P0 =(-3263.5 +/-309)/T+ (2.458 +/-0.69) with DeltaH evap.= 62.47+/-5.9 kJ/mol of H2, DeltaSevap. = 47.05+/-13 J/mol of H2.K. The NaBH4 also had somewhat similar behavior, with 9% congruent evaporation and equilibrium vapor pressure equation of logPLiBH4=-7700+/-335/ T+ (6.7+/-1.5) and 91% incongruent decomposition to Na and Boron metal, and hydrogen gas. The enthalpy of vaporization; DeltaHevap. = 147.2+/-6.4kJ/molH2 and DeltaSevap.= 142 +/-28 kJ/molH2.K (550-650K). The Ca(BH4) 2 exhibited similar vaporization behavior with congruency of 3.2%. The decomposition products are CaH2 and Boron metal with evolution of hydrogen gas varying with the pressure equation as logPeq /P0 =(-1562

  18. A method for the determination of gas diffusion coefficients in undisturbed Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacops, E.; Volckaert, G.; Maes, N.; Weetjens, E.; Maes, T.; Vandervoort, F.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The main mechanisms by which gas will be generated in deep geological repositories are: anaerobic corrosion of metals in wastes and packaging; radiolysis of water and organic materials in the packages, and microbial degradation of various organic wastes. Corrosion and radiolysis yield mainly hydrogen while microbial degradation leads to methane and carbon dioxide. The gas generated in the near field of a geological repository in clay will dissolve in the ground water and be transported away from the repository by diffusion as dissolved species. However if the gas generation rate is larger than the diffusive flux, the pore water will get over-saturated and a free gas phase will be formed. This will lead to a gas pressure build-up and finally to an advective gas flux. The latter might influence the performance of the repository. Therefore it is important to assess whether or not gas production rates can exceed the capacity of the near field to store and dissipate these gases by dissolution and diffusion only. The current available gas diffusion parameters for hydrogen in Boom Clay, obtained from the MEGAS project, suffer from an uncertainty of 1 to 2 orders of magnitude. Sensitivity calculations performed by Weetjens et al. (2006) for the disposal of vitrified high-level waste showed that with this uncertainty on the diffusion coefficient, the formation of a free gas phase cannot be excluded. Furthermore, recent re-evaluations of the MEGAS experiments by Krooss (2008) and Aertsens (2008) showed that the applied technique does not allow precise determination of the diffusion coefficient. Therefore a new method was developed to determine more precisely the gas diffusion coefficient for dissolved gases (especially dissolved hydrogen) in Boom Clay. This should allow for a more realistic assessment of the gas flux evolution of a repository as function of the estimated gas generation rates. The basic idea is to perform a

  19. An On-Line Method for Thermal Diffusivity Detection of Thin Films Using Infrared Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Huilong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for thermal diffusivity evolution of thin-film materials with pulsed Gaussian beam and infrared video is reported. Compared with common pulse methods performed in specialized labs, the proposed method implements a rapid on-line measurement without producing the off-centre detection error. Through mathematical deduction of the original heat conduction model, it is discovered that the area s, which is encircled by the maximum temperature curve rTMAX(θ, increases linearly over elapsed time. The thermal diffusivity is acquired from the growth rate of the area s. In this study, the off-centre detection error is avoided by performing the distance regularized level set evolution formulation. The area s was extracted from the binary images of temperature variation rate, without inducing errors from determination of the heat source centre. Thermal diffusivities of three materials, 304 stainless steel, titanium, and zirconium have been measured with the established on-line detection system, and the measurement errors are: −2.26%, −1.07%, and 1.61% respectively.

  20. Contribution to an effective design method for stationary reaction-diffusion patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szalai, István; Horváth, Judit [Laboratory of Nonlinear Chemical Dynamics, Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest 112 (Hungary); De Kepper, Patrick [Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal, CNRS, University of Bordeaux, 115, Avenue Schweitzer, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2015-06-15

    The British mathematician Alan Turing predicted, in his seminal 1952 publication, that stationary reaction-diffusion patterns could spontaneously develop in reacting chemical or biochemical solutions. The first two clear experimental demonstrations of such a phenomenon were not made before the early 1990s when the design of new chemical oscillatory reactions and appropriate open spatial chemical reactors had been invented. Yet, the number of pattern producing reactions had not grown until 2009 when we developed an operational design method, which takes into account the feeding conditions and other specificities of real open spatial reactors. Since then, on the basis of this method, five additional reactions were shown to produce stationary reaction-diffusion patterns. To gain a clearer view on where our methodical approach on the patterning capacity of a reaction stands, numerical studies in conditions that mimic true open spatial reactors were made. In these numerical experiments, we explored the patterning capacity of Rabai's model for pH driven Landolt type reactions as a function of experimentally attainable parameters that control the main time and length scales. Because of the straightforward reversible binding of protons to carboxylate carrying polymer chains, this class of reaction is at the base of the chemistry leading to most of the stationary reaction-diffusion patterns presently observed. We compare our model predictions with experimental observations and comment on agreements and differences.

  1. Contribution to an effective design method for stationary reaction-diffusion patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szalai, István; Horváth, Judit; De Kepper, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The British mathematician Alan Turing predicted, in his seminal 1952 publication, that stationary reaction-diffusion patterns could spontaneously develop in reacting chemical or biochemical solutions. The first two clear experimental demonstrations of such a phenomenon were not made before the early 1990s when the design of new chemical oscillatory reactions and appropriate open spatial chemical reactors had been invented. Yet, the number of pattern producing reactions had not grown until 2009 when we developed an operational design method, which takes into account the feeding conditions and other specificities of real open spatial reactors. Since then, on the basis of this method, five additional reactions were shown to produce stationary reaction-diffusion patterns. To gain a clearer view on where our methodical approach on the patterning capacity of a reaction stands, numerical studies in conditions that mimic true open spatial reactors were made. In these numerical experiments, we explored the patterning capacity of Rabai's model for pH driven Landolt type reactions as a function of experimentally attainable parameters that control the main time and length scales. Because of the straightforward reversible binding of protons to carboxylate carrying polymer chains, this class of reaction is at the base of the chemistry leading to most of the stationary reaction-diffusion patterns presently observed. We compare our model predictions with experimental observations and comment on agreements and differences

  2. Space-Varying Iterative Restoration of Diffuse Optical Tomograms Reconstructed by the Photon Average Trajectories Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravtsenyuk Olga V

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of improving the spatial resolution of diffuse optical tomograms reconstructed by the photon average trajectories (PAT method is substantiated. The PAT method recently presented by us is based on a concept of an average statistical trajectory for transfer of light energy, the photon average trajectory (PAT. The inverse problem of diffuse optical tomography is reduced to a solution of an integral equation with integration along a conditional PAT. As a result, the conventional algorithms of projection computed tomography can be used for fast reconstruction of diffuse optical images. The shortcoming of the PAT method is that it reconstructs the images blurred due to averaging over spatial distributions of photons which form the signal measured by the receiver. To improve the resolution, we apply a spatially variant blur model based on an interpolation of the spatially invariant point spread functions simulated for the different small subregions of the image domain. Two iterative algorithms for solving a system of linear algebraic equations, the conjugate gradient algorithm for least squares problem and the modified residual norm steepest descent algorithm, are used for deblurring. It is shown that a gain in spatial resolution can be obtained.

  3. Space-Varying Iterative Restoration of Diffuse Optical Tomograms Reconstructed by the Photon Average Trajectories Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Lyubimov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of improving the spatial resolution of diffuse optical tomograms reconstructed by the photon average trajectories (PAT method is substantiated. The PAT method recently presented by us is based on a concept of an average statistical trajectory for transfer of light energy, the photon average trajectory (PAT. The inverse problem of diffuse optical tomography is reduced to a solution of an integral equation with integration along a conditional PAT. As a result, the conventional algorithms of projection computed tomography can be used for fast reconstruction of diffuse optical images. The shortcoming of the PAT method is that it reconstructs the images blurred due to averaging over spatial distributions of photons which form the signal measured by the receiver. To improve the resolution, we apply a spatially variant blur model based on an interpolation of the spatially invariant point spread functions simulated for the different small subregions of the image domain. Two iterative algorithms for solving a system of linear algebraic equations, the conjugate gradient algorithm for least squares problem and the modified residual norm steepest descent algorithm, are used for deblurring. It is shown that a 27% gain in spatial resolution can be obtained.

  4. A simple method for finding explicit analytic transition densities of diffusion processes with general diploid selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yun S; Steinrücken, Matthias

    2012-03-01

    The transition density function of the Wright-Fisher diffusion describes the evolution of population-wide allele frequencies over time. This function has important practical applications in population genetics, but finding an explicit formula under a general diploid selection model has remained a difficult open problem. In this article, we develop a new computational method to tackle this classic problem. Specifically, our method explicitly finds the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the diffusion generator associated with the Wright-Fisher diffusion with recurrent mutation and arbitrary diploid selection, thus allowing one to obtain an accurate spectral representation of the transition density function. Simplicity is one of the appealing features of our approach. Although our derivation involves somewhat advanced mathematical concepts, the resulting algorithm is quite simple and efficient, only involving standard linear algebra. Furthermore, unlike previous approaches based on perturbation, which is applicable only when the population-scaled selection coefficient is small, our method is nonperturbative and is valid for a broad range of parameter values. As a by-product of our work, we obtain the rate of convergence to the stationary distribution under mutation-selection balance.

  5. Coarse-mesh method for multidimensional, mixed-lattice diffusion calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodds, H.L. Jr.; Honeck, H.C.; Hostetler, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    A coarse-mesh finite difference method has been developed for multidimensional, mixed-lattice reactor diffusion calculations, both statics and kinetics, in hexagonal geometry. Results obtained with the coarse-mesh (CM) method have been compared with a conventional mesh-centered finite difference method and with experiment. The results of this comparison indicate that the accuracy of the CM method for highly heterogeneous (mixed) lattices using one point per hexagonal mesh element (''hex'') is about the same as the conventional method with six points per hex. Furthermore, the computing costs (i.e., central processor unit time and core storage requirements) of the CM method with one point per hex are about the same as the conventional method with one point per hex

  6. Quantifying diffusion MRI tractography of the corticospinal tract in brain tumors with deterministic and probabilistic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, Monica; Mandelli, Maria Luisa; Berman, Jeffrey I; Amirbekian, Bagrat; Nguyen, Christopher; Berger, Mitchel S; Henry, Roland G

    2013-01-01

    sensitivity (79%) as determined from cortical IES compared to deterministic q-ball (50%), probabilistic DTI (36%), and deterministic DTI (10%). The sensitivity using the q-ball algorithm (65%) was significantly higher than using DTI (23%) (p probabilistic algorithms (58%) were more sensitive than deterministic approaches (30%) (p = 0.003). Probabilistic q-ball fiber tracks had the smallest offset to the subcortical stimulation sites. The offsets between diffusion fiber tracks and subcortical IES sites were increased significantly for those cases where the diffusion fiber tracks were visibly thinner than expected. There was perfect concordance between the subcortical IES function (e.g. hand stimulation) and the cortical connection of the nearest diffusion fiber track (e.g. upper extremity cortex). This study highlights the tremendous utility of intraoperative stimulation sites to provide a gold standard from which to evaluate diffusion MRI fiber tracking methods and has provided an object standard for evaluation of different diffusion models and approaches to fiber tracking. The probabilistic q-ball fiber tractography was significantly better than DTI methods in terms of sensitivity and accuracy of the course through the white matter. The commonly used DTI fiber tracking approach was shown to have very poor sensitivity (as low as 10% for deterministic DTI fiber tracking) for delineation of the lateral aspects of the corticospinal tract in our study. Effects of the tumor/edema resulted in significantly larger offsets between the subcortical IES and the preoperative fiber tracks. The provided data show that probabilistic HARDI tractography is the most objective and reproducible analysis but given the small sample and number of stimulation points a generalization about our results should be given with caution. Indeed our results inform the capabilities of preoperative diffusion fiber tracking and indicate that such data should be used carefully when making pre-surgical and

  7. A simple method to deposit palladium doped SnO2 thin films using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Soon; Wahab, Rizwan; Shin, Hyung-Shik; Ansari, S. G.; Ansari, Z. A.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a simple method to deposit palladium doped tin oxide (SnO 2 ) thin films using modified plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition as a function of deposition temperature at a radio frequency plasma power of 150 W. Stannic chloride (SnCl 4 ) was used as precursor and oxygen (O 2 , 100 SCCM) (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) as reactant gas. Palladium hexafluroacetyleacetonate (Pd(C 5 HF 6 O 2 ) 2 ) was used as a precursor for palladium. Fine granular morphology was observed with tetragonal rutile structure. A peak related to Pd 2 Sn is observed, whose intensity increases slightly with deposition temperature. Electrical resistivity value decreased from 8.6 to 0.9 mΩ cm as a function of deposition temperature from 400 to 600 deg. C. Photoelectron peaks related to Sn 3d, Sn 3p3, Sn 4d, O 1s, and C 1s were detected with varying intensities as a function of deposition temperature.

  8. Magnetic and Electrical Properties of Nitrogen-Doped Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes Fabricated by a Modified Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa García-Betancourt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical vapor deposition (CVD is a preferential method to fabricate carbon nanotubes (CNTs. Several changes have been proposed to obtain improved CNTs. In this work we have fabricated nitrogen-doped multiwall carbon nanotubes (N-MWCNTs by means of a CVD which has been slightly modified. Such modification consists in changing the content of the by-product trap. Instead of acetone, we have half-filled the trap with an aqueous solution of NaCl (0–26.82 wt.%. Scanning electron microscope (SEM characterization showed morphological changes depending upon concentration of NaCl included in the trap. Using high resolution transmission electron microscopy several shape changes on the catalyst nanoparticles were also observed. According to Raman spectroscopy results N-MWCNTs fabricated using pure distillate water exhibit better crystallinity. Resistivity measurements performed on different samples by physical properties measurement Evercool system (PPMS showed metallic to semiconducting temperature dependent transitions when high content of NaCl is used. Results of magnetic properties show a ferromagnetic response to static magnetic fields and the coercive fields were very similar for all the studied cases. However, saturation magnetization is decreased if aqueous solution of NaCl is used in the trap.

  9. Diffusion abnormalities of the uncinate fasciculus in Alzheimer's disease: diffusion tensor tract-specific analysis using a new method to measure the core of the tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasmin, Hasina; Nakata, Yasuhiro; Abe, Osamu; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Ohtomo, Kuni; Aoki, Shigeki; Sato, Noriko; Nemoto, Kiyotaka; Arima, Kunimasa; Furuta, Nobuo; Uno, Masatake; Hirai, Shigeo

    2008-01-01

    Our aim was to determine diffusion abnormalities in the uncinate fasciculus (UF) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) using a new method for measuring the core of the tract. We studied 19 patients with AD and 19 age-matched control subjects who underwent MRI using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). DTT of the UF was generated. The mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) of the core of the tract were measured after voxelized tract shape processing. Student's t-test was used to compare results between patients with AD and controls. Intraobserver correlation tests were also performed. FA was significantly lower (P 0.93 for measured FA and r > 0.92 for measured MD. Our results suggest that FA reflects progression of AD-related histopathological changes in the UF of the white matter and may represent a useful biological index in monitoring AD. Diffusion tensor tract-specific analysis with voxelized tract shape processing to measure the core of the tract may be a sensitive tool for evaluation of diffusion abnormalities of white matter tracts in AD. (orig.)

  10. Numerical analysis for multi-group neutron-diffusion equation using Radial Point Interpolation Method (RPIM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung-O; Jeong, Hae Sun; Jo, Daeseong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Employing the Radial Point Interpolation Method (RPIM) in numerical analysis of multi-group neutron-diffusion equation. • Establishing mathematical formation of modified multi-group neutron-diffusion equation by RPIM. • Performing the numerical analysis for 2D critical problem. - Abstract: A mesh-free method is introduced to overcome the drawbacks (e.g., mesh generation and connectivity definition between the meshes) of mesh-based (nodal) methods such as the finite-element method and finite-difference method. In particular, the Point Interpolation Method (PIM) using a radial basis function is employed in the numerical analysis for the multi-group neutron-diffusion equation. The benchmark calculations are performed for the 2D homogeneous and heterogeneous problems, and the Multiquadrics (MQ) and Gaussian (EXP) functions are employed to analyze the effect of the radial basis function on the numerical solution. Additionally, the effect of the dimensionless shape parameter in those functions on the calculation accuracy is evaluated. According to the results, the radial PIM (RPIM) can provide a highly accurate solution for the multiplication eigenvalue and the neutron flux distribution, and the numerical solution with the MQ radial basis function exhibits the stable accuracy with respect to the reference solutions compared with the other solution. The dimensionless shape parameter directly affects the calculation accuracy and computing time. Values between 1.87 and 3.0 for the benchmark problems considered in this study lead to the most accurate solution. The difference between the analytical and numerical results for the neutron flux is significantly increased in the edge of the problem geometry, even though the maximum difference is lower than 4%. This phenomenon seems to arise from the derivative boundary condition at (x,0) and (0,y) positions, and it may be necessary to introduce additional strategy (e.g., the method using fictitious points and

  11. Physics-based preconditioning and the Newton-Krylov method for non-equilibrium radiation diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousseau, V.A.; Knoll, D.A.; Rider, W.J.

    2000-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for the solution of the time dependent reaction-diffusion systems which arise in non-equilibrium radiation diffusion applications. This system of nonlinear equations is solved by coupling three numerical methods, Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov, operator splitting, and multigrid linear solvers. An inexact Newton's method is used to solve the system of nonlinear equations. Since building the Jacobian matrix for problems of interest can be challenging, the authors employ a Jacobian-free implementation of Newton's method, where the action of the Jacobian matrix on a vector is approximated by a first order Taylor series expansion. Preconditioned generalized minimal residual (PGMRES) is the Krylov method used to solve the linear systems that come from the iterations of Newton's method. The preconditioner in this solution method is constructed using a physics-based divide and conquer approach, often referred to as operator splitting. This solution procedure inverts the scalar elliptic systems that make up the preconditioner using simple multigrid methods. The preconditioner also addresses the strong coupling between equations with local 2 x 2 block solves. The intra-cell coupling is applied after the inter-cell coupling has already been addressed by the elliptic solves. Results are presented using this solution procedure that demonstrate its efficiency while incurring minimal memory requirements

  12. Numerical calculation of the tensor of diffusion in the nuclear reactor cells by Monte-Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorodkov, S.S.; Kalugin, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    New algorithm based on the sequential application of the RMS path method has been proposed for the diffusion constants calculation. The offered algorithm conforms to the diffusion constants calculation in arbitrary segments of nuclear reactors without detail description of geometry, dependence of cross-sections from energy or neutron scattering anisotropy by kernel medium. The proposed algorithm is used for the diffusion constants calculation in uranium-graphite reactor sells

  13. Solution of the Multigroup-Diffusion equation by the response matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.R.E.

    1980-10-01

    A preliminary analysis of the response matrix method is made, considering its application to the solution of the multigroup diffusion equations. The one-dimensional formulation is presented and used to test some flux expansions, seeking the application of the method to the two-dimensional problem. This formulation also solves the equations that arise from the integro-differential synthesis algorithm. The slow convergence of the power method, used to solve the eigenvalue problem, and its acceleration by means of the Chebyshev polynomial method, are also studied. An algorithm for the estimation of the dominance ratio is presented, based on the residues of two successive iteration vectors. This ratio, which is not known a priori, is fundamental for the efficiency of the method. Some numerical problems are solved, testing the 1D formulation of the response matrix method, its application to the synthesis algorithm and also, at the same time, the algorithm to accelerate the source problem. (Author) [pt

  14. Five-point form of the nodal diffusion method and comparison with finite-difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Nodal Methods have been derived, implemented and numerically tested for several problems in physics and engineering. In the field of nuclear engineering, many nodal formalisms have been used for the neutron diffusion equation, all yielding results which were far more computationally efficient than conventional Finite Difference (FD) and Finite Element (FE) methods. However, not much effort has been devoted to theoretically comparing nodal and FD methods in order to explain the very high accuracy of the former. In this summary we outline the derivation of a simple five-point form for the lowest order nodal method and compare it to the traditional five-point, edge-centered FD scheme. The effect of the observed differences on the accuracy of the respective methods is established by considering a simple test problem. It must be emphasized that the nodal five-point scheme derived here is mathematically equivalent to previously derived lowest order nodal methods. 7 refs., 1 tab

  15. A discussion on validity of the diffusion theory by Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Dong-qing; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2008-12-01

    Diffusion theory was widely used as a basis of the experiments and methods in determining the optical properties of biological tissues. A simple analytical solution could be obtained easily from the diffusion equation after a series of approximations. Thus, a misinterpret of analytical solution would be made: while the effective attenuation coefficient of several semi-infinite bio-tissues were the same, the distribution of light fluence in the tissues would be the same. In order to assess the validity of knowledge above, depth resolved internal fluence of several semi-infinite biological tissues which have the same effective attenuation coefficient were simulated with wide collimated beam in the paper by using Monte Carlo method in different condition. Also, the influence of bio-tissue refractive index on the distribution of light fluence was discussed in detail. Our results showed that, when the refractive index of several bio-tissues which had the same effective attenuation coefficient were the same, the depth resolved internal fluence would be the same; otherwise, the depth resolved internal fluence would be not the same. The change of refractive index of tissue would have affection on the light depth distribution in tissue. Therefore, the refractive index is an important optical property of tissue, and should be taken in account while using the diffusion approximation theory.

  16. Diffuse-Interface Capturing Methods for Compressible Two-Phase Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurel, Richard; Pantano, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Simulation of compressible flows became a routine activity with the appearance of shock-/contact-capturing methods. These methods can determine all waves, particularly discontinuous ones. However, additional difficulties may appear in two-phase and multimaterial flows due to the abrupt variation of thermodynamic properties across the interfacial region, with discontinuous thermodynamical representations at the interfaces. To overcome this difficulty, researchers have developed augmented systems of governing equations to extend the capturing strategy. These extended systems, reviewed here, are termed diffuse-interface models, because they are designed to compute flow variables correctly in numerically diffused zones surrounding interfaces. In particular, they facilitate coupling the dynamics on both sides of the (diffuse) interfaces and tend to the proper pure fluid-governing equations far from the interfaces. This strategy has become efficient for contact interfaces separating fluids that are governed by different equations of state, in the presence or absence of capillary effects, and with phase change. More sophisticated materials than fluids (e.g., elastic-plastic materials) have been considered as well.

  17. Prediction of tablets disintegration times using near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy as a nondestructive method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso, M; Ghaly, Evone S

    2005-01-01

    The goals of this study are to user near-infrared reflectance (NIR) spectroscopy to measure the disintegration time of a series of tablets compacted at different compressional forces, calibrate NIR data vs. laboratory equipment data, develop a model equation, validate the model, and test the model's predictive ability. Seven theophylline tablet formulations of the same composition but with different disintegration time values (0.224, 1.141, 2.797, 5.492, 9.397, 16.8, and 30.092 min) were prepared along with five placebo tablet formulations with different disintegration times. Laboratory disintegration time was compared to near-infrared diffuse reflectance data. Linear regression, quadratic, cubic, and partial least square techniques were used to determine the relationship between disintegration time and near-infrared spectra. The results demonstrated that an increase in disintegration time produced an increase in near-infrared absorbance. Series of model equations, which depended on the mathematical technique used for regression, were developed from the calibration of disintegration time using laboratory equipment vs. the near-infrared diffuse reflectance for each formulation. The results of NIR disintegration time were similar to laboratory tests. The near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy method is an alternative nondestructive method for measurement of disintegration time of tablets.

  18. One step linear reconstruction method for continuous wave diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhrowiyah, N.; Yasin, M.

    2017-09-01

    The method one step linear reconstruction method for continuous wave diffuse optical tomography is proposed and demonstrated for polyvinyl chloride based material and breast phantom. Approximation which used in this method is selecting regulation coefficient and evaluating the difference between two states that corresponding to the data acquired without and with a change in optical properties. This method is used to recovery of optical parameters from measured boundary data of light propagation in the object. The research is demonstrated by simulation and experimental data. Numerical object is used to produce simulation data. Chloride based material and breast phantom sample is used to produce experimental data. Comparisons of results between experiment and simulation data are conducted to validate the proposed method. The results of the reconstruction image which is produced by the one step linear reconstruction method show that the image reconstruction almost same as the original object. This approach provides a means of imaging that is sensitive to changes in optical properties, which may be particularly useful for functional imaging used continuous wave diffuse optical tomography of early diagnosis of breast cancer.

  19. A high-order boundary integral method for surface diffusions on elastically stressed axisymmetric rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofan; Nie, Qing

    2009-07-01

    Many applications in materials involve surface diffusion of elastically stressed solids. Study of singularity formation and long-time behavior of such solid surfaces requires accurate simulations in both space and time. Here we present a high-order boundary integral method for an elastically stressed solid with axi-symmetry due to surface diffusions. In this method, the boundary integrals for isotropic elasticity in axi-symmetric geometry are approximated through modified alternating quadratures along with an extrapolation technique, leading to an arbitrarily high-order quadrature; in addition, a high-order (temporal) integration factor method, based on explicit representation of the mean curvature, is used to reduce the stability constraint on time-step. To apply this method to a periodic (in axial direction) and axi-symmetric elastically stressed cylinder, we also present a fast and accurate summation method for the periodic Green's functions of isotropic elasticity. Using the high-order boundary integral method, we demonstrate that in absence of elasticity the cylinder surface pinches in finite time at the axis of the symmetry and the universal cone angle of the pinching is found to be consistent with the previous studies based on a self-similar assumption. In the presence of elastic stress, we show that a finite time, geometrical singularity occurs well before the cylindrical solid collapses onto the axis of symmetry, and the angle of the corner singularity on the cylinder surface is also estimated.

  20. Application of finite difference method in the study of diffusion with chemical kinetics of first order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beltrán-Prieto Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical modelling of diffusion of a bleaching agent into a porous material is studied in the present paper. Law of mass conservation was applied to analize the mass transfer of a reactant from the bulk into the external surface of a solid geometrically described as a flat plate. After diffusion of the reactant, surface reaction following kinetics of first order was considered to take place. The solution of the differential equation that described the process leaded to an equation that represents the concentration profile in function of distance, porosity and Thiele modulus. The case of interfacial mass resistance is also discused. In this case, finite difference method was used for the solution of the differential equation taking into account the respective boundary conditions. The profile of concentration can be obtained after numerical especification of Thiele modulus and Biot number.

  1. Analytical-numerical method for treatment of turbulent diffusion of particles in the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsov, L.J.

    1976-01-01

    This work deals with the problem of air pollution around a stationary punctual source. For description of air pollution from a punctual source a mathematical model is suggested, and for calculation of effluents concentration an analytical-numerical algorithm is given. In addition to the analitical treatment the mathematical model is far more flexible and complete. Eddy diffusivity is represented by an arbitrary function, and an arbitrary wind velocity profile ahs been proposed. The apsorption of the ground is introduced through a variable apsorption coefficient, and the sedimentation through the mean velocity of deposition. To determine the movement of particles a parabolic equation of diffusion is used. The method has been tested through calculation of effluents concentration for different values of physical parameters

  2. Direct estimation of diffuse gaseous emissions from coal fires: current methods and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Mark A.; Olea, Ricardo A.; O'Keefe, Jennifer M. K.; Hower, James C.; Geboy, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Coal fires occur in nature spontaneously, contribute to increases in greenhouse gases, and emit atmospheric toxicants. Increasing interest in quantifying coal fire emissions has resulted in the adaptation and development of specialized approaches and adoption of numerical modeling techniques. Overview of these methods for direct estimation of diffuse gas emissions from coal fires is presented in this paper. Here we take advantage of stochastic Gaussian simulation to interpolate CO2 fluxes measured using a dynamic closed chamber at the Ruth Mullins coal fire in Perry County, Kentucky. This approach allows for preparing a map of diffuse gas emissions, one of the two primary ways that gases emanate from coal fires, and establishing the reliability of the study both locally and for the entire fire. Future research directions include continuous and automated sampling to improve quantification of gaseous coal fire emissions.

  3. The development of coastal diffusion observation method with a model airplane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masaharu; Fukuda, Masaaki

    1982-01-01

    A tethered ballon system has been developed in order to take aerial photograph of dye-cloud in times of coastal diffusion experiment. The system has some weakpoints; it can not be used both under strong wind and under on-shore blowing wind. To cover these wind conditions, another method of aerial photography is developed making use of model airplane. Radio controlled airplane on the market is reconstructed to mount 35 mm camera, the shutter of which is handled through the channel ordinarily used to control wheel logs. The procedure of the new system in case of diffusion experiment is similar to that of the tethered balloon system. Observations with this system has been carried out from winter to summer this year. Some results of them are described. (author)

  4. A balancing domain decomposition method by constraints for advection-diffusion problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Xuemin; Li, Jing

    2008-12-10

    The balancing domain decomposition methods by constraints are extended to solving nonsymmetric, positive definite linear systems resulting from the finite element discretization of advection-diffusion equations. A pre-conditioned GMRES iteration is used to solve a Schur complement system of equations for the subdomain interface variables. In the preconditioning step of each iteration, a partially sub-assembled finite element problem is solved. A convergence rate estimate for the GMRES iteration is established, under the condition that the diameters of subdomains are small enough. It is independent of the number of subdomains and grows only slowly with the subdomain problem size. Numerical experiments for several two-dimensional advection-diffusion problems illustrate the fast convergence of the proposed algorithm.

  5. Numerical method for solving the three-dimensional time-dependent neutron diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaled, S.M.; Szatmary, Z.

    2005-01-01

    A numerical time-implicit method has been developed for solving the coupled three-dimensional time-dependent multi-group neutron diffusion and delayed neutron precursor equations. The numerical stability of the implicit computation scheme and the convergence of the iterative associated processes have been evaluated. The computational scheme requires the solution of large linear systems at each time step. For this purpose, the point over-relaxation Gauss-Seidel method was chosen. A new scheme was introduced instead of the usual source iteration scheme. (author)

  6. Multi-level nonlinear diffusion acceleration method for multigroup transport k-Eigenvalue problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anistratov, Dmitriy Y.

    2011-01-01

    The nonlinear diffusion acceleration (NDA) method is an efficient and flexible transport iterative scheme for solving reactor-physics problems. This paper presents a fast iterative algorithm for solving multigroup neutron transport eigenvalue problems in 1D slab geometry. The proposed method is defined by a multi-level system of equations that includes multigroup and effective one-group low-order NDA equations. The Eigenvalue is evaluated in the exact projected solution space of smallest dimensionality, namely, by solving the effective one- group eigenvalue transport problem. Numerical results that illustrate performance of the new algorithm are demonstrated. (author)

  7. Determining the performance of a Diffuser Augmented Wind Turbine using a combined CFD/BEM method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesby Joss E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the optimisation of a Diffuser Augmented Wind Turbine has focused on maximising power output. However, due to the often less than ideal location of small-scale turbines, cut-in speed and starting time are of equal importance in maximising Annual Energy Production, which is the ultimate goal of any wind turbine design. This paper proposes a method of determining power output, cut-in speed and starting time using a combination of Computational Fluid Dynamics and Blade Element Momentum theory. The proposed method has been validated against published experimental data.

  8. Exact and approximate interior corner problem in neutron diffusion by integral transform methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bareiss, E.H.; Chang, K.S.J.; Constatinescu, D.A.

    1976-09-01

    The mathematical solution of the neutron diffusion equation exhibits singularities in its derivatives at material corners. A mathematical treatment of the nature of these singularities and its impact on coarse network approximation methods in computational work is presented. The mathematical behavior is deduced from Green's functions, based on a generalized theory for two space dimensions, and the resulting systems of integral equations, as well as from the Kontorovich--Lebedev Transform. The effect on numerical calculations is demonstrated for finite difference and finite element methods for a two-region corner problem

  9. Enriched reproducing kernel particle method for fractional advection-diffusion equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yuping; Lian, Yanping; Tang, Shaoqiang; Liu, Wing Kam

    2018-06-01

    The reproducing kernel particle method (RKPM) has been efficiently applied to problems with large deformations, high gradients and high modal density. In this paper, it is extended to solve a nonlocal problem modeled by a fractional advection-diffusion equation (FADE), which exhibits a boundary layer with low regularity. We formulate this method on a moving least-square approach. Via the enrichment of fractional-order power functions to the traditional integer-order basis for RKPM, leading terms of the solution to the FADE can be exactly reproduced, which guarantees a good approximation to the boundary layer. Numerical tests are performed to verify the proposed approach.

  10. Methods to assess radioisotope migration in cementitious media using radial diffusion and advection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinchliff, J.; Felipe-Sotero, M.; Evans, N.D.M.; Read, D.; Drury, D.

    2012-01-01

    One of the primary aims of this project is to understand how a range of isotopes associated with radioactive wastes, move through the cementitious media potentially present in a geological disposal facility (GDF). This paper describes the development of experimental methods that use radial flow from intact cylinders of cementitious material to evaluate the potential for diffusion and advection of relevant isotopes through Nirex reference vault backfill (NRVB). The small scale and cost effectiveness of the approach means that multiple experiments can be undertaken encompassing the full range of physical (and chemical) variations. The radial flow experimental method uses small pre-cast cylinders of the matrix under investigation. For diffusion an appropriate concentration of the isotope of interest ( 90 Sr in the present experiments) is introduced into a cavity in the centre of the cylinder, which is then sealed, and placed in a solution previously equilibrated with the matrix. The increase in concentration of the isotope in the external solution is then determined at defined time intervals. For advection 90 Sr is similarly introduced into the central core of the cylinder and then equilibrated water is forced under nitrogen pressure, from the central core to the outside of the cylinder where it is collected in a tray prior to analysis. Both experimental set ups and results have been modelled using conventional numerical solutions and the simulation package GoldSim. Concerning diffusion experiments the modelled data reproduces the observed data effectively with a right diffusivity value of 9*10 -11 m 2 /s. Concerning advection results are more mitigated and need further investigation

  11. A study on the determination of diffusion coefficient of carbon in 304 austenitic stainless steels by internal friction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.S.; Kim, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    Internal friction peaks associated with the presence of carbon in 18-8 type 304 stainless steel have been observed from measurements with a torsion pendulum. The temperature for maximum internal friction lies between 250degC and 300degC with a frequency of vibration. The height of the peak rises and the position of the peak shifts to a lower temperature with an increase of the carbon content. And a comparison of the activation energy and the diffusion coefficient determined by internal friction methods with those measured in conventional macro-diffusion experiments reveals that the diffusion data measured by internal friction method and the diffusion data measured by conventional method exist in the same line. It follows from the above fact that observed internal friction peak is associated with the stress-induced diffusion of carbon in face-centered cubic alloys. (Author)

  12. Numerical method in reproducing kernel space for an inverse source problem for the fractional diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wenyan; Han, Bo; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new numerical method for reproducing kernel Hilbert space to solve an inverse source problem for a two-dimensional fractional diffusion equation, where we are required to determine an x-dependent function in a source term by data at the final time. The exact solution is represented in the form of a series and the approximation solution is obtained by truncating the series. Furthermore, a technique is proposed to improve some of the existing methods. We prove that the numerical method is convergent under an a priori assumption of the regularity of solutions. The method is simple to implement. Our numerical result shows that our method is effective and that it is robust against noise in L 2 -space in reconstructing a source function. (paper)

  13. A least squares principle unifying finite element, finite difference and nodal methods for diffusion theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackroyd, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    A least squares principle is described which uses a penalty function treatment of boundary and interface conditions. Appropriate choices of the trial functions and vectors employed in a dual representation of an approximate solution established complementary principles for the diffusion equation. A geometrical interpretation of the principles provides weighted residual methods for diffusion theory, thus establishing a unification of least squares, variational and weighted residual methods. The complementary principles are used with either a trial function for the flux or a trial vector for the current to establish for regular meshes a connection between finite element, finite difference and nodal methods, which can be exact if the mesh pitches are chosen appropriately. Whereas the coefficients in the usual nodal equations have to be determined iteratively, those derived via the complementary principles are given explicitly in terms of the data. For the further development of the connection between finite element, finite difference and nodal methods, some hybrid variational methods are described which employ both a trial function and a trial vector. (author)

  14. Comparison of antimicrobial susceptibilities of Corynebacterium species by broth microdilution and disk diffusion methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, K; Laverdière, M; Rivest, R

    1996-01-01

    Corynebacterium species are increasingly being implicated in foreign-body infections and in immunocompromised-host infections. However, there are no specific recommendations on the method or the criteria to use in order to determine the in vitro activities of the antibiotics commonly used to treat Corynebacterium infections. The first aim of our study was to compare the susceptibilities of various species of Corynebacterium to vancomycin, erythromycin, and penicillin by using a broth microdilution method and a disk diffusion method. Second, the activity of penicillin against our isolates was assessed by using the interpretative criteria recommended by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards for the determination of the susceptibility of streptococci and Listeria monocytogenes to penicillin. Overall, 100% of the isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, while considerable variations in the activities of erythromycin and penicillin were noted for the different species tested, including the non-Corynebacterium jeikeium species. A good correlation in the susceptibilities of vancomycin and erythromycin between the disk diffusion and the microdilution methods was observed. However, a 5% rate of major or very major errors was detected with the Listeria criteria, while a high rate of minor errors (18%) was noted when the streptococcus criteria were used. Our findings indicate considerable variations in the activities of erythromycin and penicillin against the various species of Corynebacterium. Because of the absence of definite recommendations, important discrepancies were observed between the methods and the interpretations of the penicillin activity. PMID:8849254

  15. Strategies for Solving Potential Problems Associated with Laboratory Diffusion and Batch Experiments - Part 1: An Overview of Conventional Test Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, M.; Takeda, M.; Nakajima, H.

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory diffusion testing as well as batch experiments are well established and widely adopted techniques for characterizing the diffusive and adsorptive properties of geological, geotechnical, and synthetic materials in both scientific and applied fields, including geological disposal of radioactive waste. Although several types of diffusion test, such as the through- diffusion test, in-diffusion test, out-diffusion test, and column test, are currently available, different methods may have different advantages and disadvantages. In addition, traditional methods may have limitations, such as the need for relatively long test times, cumbersome test procedures, and the possibility of errors due to differences between analytical assumptions and actual test conditions. Furthermore, traditional batch experiments using mineral powders are known to overestimate the sorption coefficient. In part 1 of this report, we present a brief overview of laboratory diffusion and batch experiments. The advantages, disadvantages, limitations, and/or potential problems associated with individual tests were compared and summarized. This comprehensive report will provide practical references for reviewing the results obtained from relevant experiments, especially from the viewpoint of regulation. To solve and/or eliminate the potential problems associated with conventional methods, and to obtain the diffusion coefficient and rock capacity factor from a laboratory test both rapidly and accurately, part 2 of this study discusses possible strategies involving the development of rigorous solutions to some relevant test methods, and sensitivity analyses for the related tests that may be helpful to judge the accuracy of the two parameters to be determined from individual tests. (authors)

  16. Solid state reaction studies in Fe3O4–TiO2 system by diffusion couple method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Zhongshan; Hu, Xiaojun; Xue, Xiangxin; Chou, Kuochih

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The solid state reactions of Fe2O3-TiO2 system was studied by the diffusion couple method. •Different products were formed by diffusion, and the FeTiO3 was more stable phase. •The inter-diffusion coefficients and diffusion activation energy were estimated. -- Abstract: The solid state reactions in Fe 3 O 4 –TiO 2 system has been studied by diffusion couple experiments at 1323–1473 K, in which the oxygen partial pressure was controlled by the CO–CO 2 gas mixture. The XRD analysis was used to confirm the phases of the inter-compound, and the concentration profiles were determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Based on the concentration profile of Ti, the inter-diffusion coefficients in Fe 3 O 4 phase, which were both temperature and concentration of Ti ions dependent, were calculated by the modified Boltzmann–Matano method. According to the relation between the thickness of diffusion layer and temperature, the diffusion coefficient of the Fe 3 O 4 –TiO 2 system was obtained. According to the Arrhenius equation, the estimated diffusion activation energy was about 282.1 ± 18.8 kJ mol −1

  17. Method and apparatus for rapid adjustment of process gas inventory in gaseous diffusion cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A method is specified for the operation of a gaseous diffusion cascade wherein electrically driven compressors circulate a process gas through a plurality of serially connected gaseous diffusion stages to establish first and second countercurrently flowing cascade streams of process gas, one of the streams being at a relatively low pressure and enriched in a component of the process gas and the other being at a higher pressure and depleted in the same, and wherein automatic control systems maintain the stage process gas pressures by positioning process gas flow control valve openings at values which are functions of the difference between reference-signal inputs to the systems, and signal inputs proportional to the process gas pressures in the gaseous diffusion stages associated with the systems, the cascade process gas inventory being altered, while the cascade is operating, by simultaneously directing into separate process-gas freezing zones a plurality of substreams derived from one of the first and second streams at different points along the lengths thereof to solidify approximately equal weights of process gas in the zone while reducing the reference-signal inputs to maintain the positions of the control valves substantially unchanged despite the removal of process gas inventory via the substreams. (author)

  18. Solution of the diffusion equations for several groups by the finite elements method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arredondo S, C.

    1975-01-01

    The code DELFIN has been implemented for the solution of the neutrons diffusion equations in two dimensions obtained by applying the approximation of several groups of energy. The code works with any number of groups and regions, and can be applied to thermal reactors as well as fast reactor. Providing it with the diffusion coefficients, the effective sections and the fission spectrum we obtain the results for the systems multiplying constant and the flows of each groups. The code was established using the method of finite elements, which is a form of resolution of the variational formulation of the equations applying the Ritz-Galerkin method with continuous polynomial functions by parts, in one case of the Lagrange type with rectangular geometry and up to the third grade. The obtained results and the comparison with the results in the literature, permit to reach the conclusion that it is convenient, to use the rectangular elements in all the cases where the geometry permits it, and demonstrate also that the finite elements method is better than the finite differences method. (author)

  19. Applying the response matrix method for solving coupled neutron diffusion and transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibiya, G.S.

    1980-01-01

    The numerical determination of the flux and power distribution in the design of large power reactors is quite a time-consuming procedure if the space under consideration is to be subdivided into very fine weshes. Many computing methods applied in reactor physics (such as the finite-difference method) require considerable computing time. In this thesis it is shown that the response matrix method can be successfully used as an alternative approach to solving the two-dimension diffusion equation. Furthermore it is shown that sufficient accuracy of the method is achieved by assuming a linear space dependence of the neutron currents on the boundaries of the geometries defined for the given space. (orig.) [de

  20. Transport and diffusion of material quantities on propagating interfaces via level set methods

    CERN Document Server

    Adalsteinsson, D

    2003-01-01

    We develop theory and numerical algorithms to apply level set methods to problems involving the transport and diffusion of material quantities in a level set framework. Level set methods are computational techniques for tracking moving interfaces; they work by embedding the propagating interface as the zero level set of a higher dimensional function, and then approximate the solution of the resulting initial value partial differential equation using upwind finite difference schemes. The traditional level set method works in the trace space of the evolving interface, and hence disregards any parameterization in the interface description. Consequently, material quantities on the interface which themselves are transported under the interface motion are not easily handled in this framework. We develop model equations and algorithmic techniques to extend the level set method to include these problems. We demonstrate the accuracy of our approach through a series of test examples and convergence studies.

  1. Transport and diffusion of material quantities on propagating interfaces via level set methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adalsteinsson, David; Sethian, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    We develop theory and numerical algorithms to apply level set methods to problems involving the transport and diffusion of material quantities in a level set framework. Level set methods are computational techniques for tracking moving interfaces; they work by embedding the propagating interface as the zero level set of a higher dimensional function, and then approximate the solution of the resulting initial value partial differential equation using upwind finite difference schemes. The traditional level set method works in the trace space of the evolving interface, and hence disregards any parameterization in the interface description. Consequently, material quantities on the interface which themselves are transported under the interface motion are not easily handled in this framework. We develop model equations and algorithmic techniques to extend the level set method to include these problems. We demonstrate the accuracy of our approach through a series of test examples and convergence studies

  2. A fast collocation method for a variable-coefficient nonlocal diffusion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Che; Wang, Hong

    2017-02-01

    We develop a fast collocation scheme for a variable-coefficient nonlocal diffusion model, for which a numerical discretization would yield a dense stiffness matrix. The development of the fast method is achieved by carefully handling the variable coefficients appearing inside the singular integral operator and exploiting the structure of the dense stiffness matrix. The resulting fast method reduces the computational work from O (N3) required by a commonly used direct solver to O (Nlog ⁡ N) per iteration and the memory requirement from O (N2) to O (N). Furthermore, the fast method reduces the computational work of assembling the stiffness matrix from O (N2) to O (N). Numerical results are presented to show the utility of the fast method.

  3. Analytical synthetic methods of solution of neutron transport equation with diffusion theory approaches energy multigroup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Pedro Gabriel B.; Leite, Michel C.A.; Barros, Ricardo C.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we developed a software to model and generate results in tables and graphs of one-dimensional neutron transport problems in multi-group formulation of energy. The numerical method we use to solve the problem of neutron diffusion is analytic, thus eliminating the truncation errors that appear in classical numerical methods, e.g., the method of finite differences. This numerical analytical method increases the computational efficiency, since they are not refined spatial discretization necessary because for any spatial discretization grids used, the numerical result generated for the same point of the domain remains unchanged unless the rounding errors of computational finite arithmetic. We chose to develop a computational application in MatLab platform for numerical computation and program interface is simple and easy with knobs. We consider important to model this neutron transport problem with a fixed source in the context of shielding calculations of radiation that protects the biosphere, and could be sensitive to ionizing radiation

  4. Study on the measurement method of diffusion coefficient for radon in the soil. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Takao

    2000-03-01

    To investigate radon behavior in the soil at Ningyo Pass, the radon concentrations in the soil and the radon exhalation rate from soil surface were measured by four continuous soil radon monitoring systems, soil gas sampling method, and accumulation method. The radon concentrations in the soil measured with continuous soil radon monitoring systems varied form 5000 Bq·m -3 to 15000 Bq·m -3 at 10 cm to 40 cm depth. On the other hand, the radon concentrations measured by soil gas sampling method was 15000 Bq·m -3 at 15 cm depth. The accumulation method gives the vales of 0. 36∼0.68 Bq·m -2 ·s -1 for radon exhalation rate from soil surface. To simulate the radon transport in soil, the following parameters of the soil are important: radon diffusion coefficients, dry density, wet density, soil particle density, true density, water content and radium concentration. The measured radon diffusion coefficients in the soil were (1.61±0.09)x10 -6 m 2 s -1 , (8.68±0.23)x10 -7 m 2 s -1 ∼ (1.53±0.12)x10 -6 m 2 s -1 and (2.99±0.32)x10 -6 m 2 s -1 ∼ (4.39±0.43)x10 -6 m 2 s -1 for sandy soils of the campus of Nagoya University, Tsuruga peninsula, and Ningyo Pass, respectively. By using these parameters, the radon transport phenomena in the soil of two layers were calculated by analytical and numerical methods. The radon profile calculated by numerical method agrees fairly well with measured values. By covering of 2 m soil, the radon exhalation rate decreases to 1/4 by analytical method, and 3/5 by numerical method. The covering of normal soil is not so effective for reducing the radon exhalation rate. (author)

  5. Study of the diffusion in the {alpha} brasses, using the evaporation or condensation of zinc - influence of the diffusion sense and of impurities (first and second thesis); Etude de la diffusion dans les laitons {alpha} au moyen des methodes d'evaporation ou de condensation du zinc influence du sens de diffusion et de la presence d'impurete (premiere et deuxieme these)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Accary, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-12-15

    The author develops a zero concentration extrapolation method for the exact determination of the diffusion coefficient. He applies it to the comparison of the inward and outward diffusion coefficient in {alpha} brasses. In a second part he shows the large influence of traces of some elements such as P, As, Sb, on the diffusion velocity in {alpha} brasses. (author) [French] L'auteur montre comment, au moyen d'une extrapolation a variation de concentration nulle, ces methodes permettent d'atteindre rigoureusement la valeur du coefficient de diffusion. Il les utilise pour comparer la valeur du coefficient de diffusion avec enrichissement en zinc a la valeur du coefficient de diffusion avec appauvrissement en zinc. Dans une seconde partie, il met en evidence la grande influence de traces d'elements tels que le phosphore, l'arsenic, l'antimoine sur la vitesse de diffusion dans les laitons {alpha}. (auteur)

  6. The Galerkin finite element method for a multi-term time-fractional diffusion equation

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Bangti

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 The Authors. We consider the initial/boundary value problem for a diffusion equation involving multiple time-fractional derivatives on a bounded convex polyhedral domain. We analyze a space semidiscrete scheme based on the standard Galerkin finite element method using continuous piecewise linear functions. Nearly optimal error estimates for both cases of initial data and inhomogeneous term are derived, which cover both smooth and nonsmooth data. Further we develop a fully discrete scheme based on a finite difference discretization of the time-fractional derivatives, and discuss its stability and error estimate. Extensive numerical experiments for one- and two-dimensional problems confirm the theoretical convergence rates.

  7. The modeling method of diffusion of radio activated materials in clay waste disposals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saberi, Reza; Sepanloo, Kamran [NSTRI, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alinejad, Majid [Engineering Research Institute of Natural Hazard, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mozaffari, Ali [KNT Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    New nuclear power plants are necessary to meet today's and future challenges of energy supply. Nuclear power is the only large-scale energy source that takes full responsibility for all its wastes. Nuclear wastes are particularly hazardous and hard to manage relative to different toxic industrial wastes. Three methods are presented and analysed to model the diffusion of the waste from the waste disposal to the bottom surface. For this purpose three software programmes such as ABAQUS, Matlab coding, Geostudio and ArcGIS have been applied.

  8. Cytotoxicity of ferrite particles by MTT and agar diffusion methods for hyperthermic application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Se-Ho [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung-Nam [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Mahn [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, In-Bo [Department of Electronic Physics, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong-Keun [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of) and Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: leeyk@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr

    2005-05-15

    We investigated the cytotoxicity of the prepared various ferrites (Fe-, Li-, Ni/Zn/Cu-, Ba-, Sr-, Co-, Co/Ni-ferrites) using MTT assay as well as agar diffusion method. Their cytotoxicity was compared with that of alginate-encapsulated ferrites. In the MTT assay, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} ferrite showed the highest cell viability of 90%. Alginate-encapsulated Ba-ferrite was ranked mildly cytotoxic, whereas their ferrite particles were ranked cytotoxic.

  9. The modeling method of diffusion of radio activated materials in clay waste disposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saberi, Reza; Sepanloo, Kamran; Alinejad, Majid; Mozaffari, Ali

    2017-01-01

    New nuclear power plants are necessary to meet today's and future challenges of energy supply. Nuclear power is the only large-scale energy source that takes full responsibility for all its wastes. Nuclear wastes are particularly hazardous and hard to manage relative to different toxic industrial wastes. Three methods are presented and analysed to model the diffusion of the waste from the waste disposal to the bottom surface. For this purpose three software programmes such as ABAQUS, Matlab coding, Geostudio and ArcGIS have been applied.

  10. Method of controlling the mercury vapor pressure in a photo-chemical lamp or vapor filter used for Hg.sup.196 enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Mark W.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method of eliminating the cold spot zones presently used on Hg.sup.196 isotope separation lamps and filters by the use of a mercury amalgams, preferably mercury - indium amalgams. The use of an amalgam affords optimization of the mercury density in the lamp and filter of a mercury enrichment reactor, particularly multilamp enrichment reactors. Moreover, the use of an amalgam in such lamps and/or filters affords the ability to control the spectral line width of radiation emitted from lamps, a requirement for mercury enrichment.

  11. Method of controlling the mercury vapor pressure in a photo-chemical lamp or vapor filter used for Hg[sup 196] enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, M.W.

    1993-02-16

    The present invention is directed to a method of eliminating the cold spot zones presently used on Hg[sup 196] isotope separation lamps and filters by the use of a mercury amalgams, preferably mercury - indium amalgams. The use of an amalgam affords optimization of the mercury density in the lamp and filter of a mercury enrichment reactor, particularly multilamp enrichment reactors. Moreover, the use of an amalgam in such lamps and/or filters affords the ability to control the spectral line width of radiation emitted from lamps, a requirement for mercury enrichment.

  12. Method of controlling the mercury vapor pressure in a photo-chemical lamp or vapor filter used for Hg196 enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, M.W.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method of eliminating the cold spot zones presently used on Hg 196 isotope separation lamps and filters by the use of a mercury amalgams, preferably mercury - indium amalgams. The use of an amalgam affords optimization of the mercury density in the lamp and filter of a mercury enrichment reactor, particularly multilamp enrichment reactors. Moreover, the use of an amalgam in such lamps and/or filters affords the ability to control the spectral line width of radiation emitted from lamps, a requirement for mercury enrichment

  13. Research and development of groundwater dating (Part 3). A proposal of determination method for diffusion coefficients of dissolved helium in rock and applicability of estimation of diffusion coefficients using anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashihara, Tomohiro; Nakata, Kotaro; Hasegawa, Takuma

    2006-01-01

    Dissolved helium in groundwater is one of the most suitable tracers for the groundwater dating. The diffusion coefficients in aquitard and aquifer were important to estimate an accumulation of the helium in groundwater. However, few papers have been reported about the diffusion of helium in rocks. In this study, effective diffusion coefficients of the helium in sandstones and mudstone were determined using a through-diffusion method. The effective diffusion coefficients of helium were in the range of 1.5 x 10 -10 to 1.1 x 10 -9 m 2 s -1 and larger than those of Br - ions. Geometrical factors for the diffusion of helium were also larger than those for the diffusion of Br - ions. This fact suggests that diffusion path of helium in the rocks is not more restricted than that of Br - ions. The diffusion coefficients of helium were also estimated using the diffusion coefficient of helium in bulk water and formation factors for diffusion of Br - ions. The estimated diffusion coefficients of helium were larger than the effective diffusion coefficients. It is clarified that the effective diffusion coefficients of helium are underestimated by the estimation method using anions. (author)

  14. Diffuse reflectance startigraphy - a new method in the study of loess (?)

    Science.gov (United States)

    József, Szeberényi; Balázs, Bradák; Klaudia, Kiss; József, Kovács; György, Varga; Réka, Balázs; Viczián, István

    2017-04-01

    The different varieties of loess (and intercalated paleosol layers) together constitute one of the most widespread terrestrial sediments, which was deposited, altered, and redeposited in the course of the changing climatic conditions of the Pleistocene. To reveal more information about Pleistocene climate cycles and/or environments the detailed lithostratigraphical subdivision and classification of the loess variations and paleosols are necessary. Beside the numerous method such as various field measurements, semi-quantitative tests and laboratory investigations, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is one of the well applied method on loess/paleosol sequences. Generally, DRS has been used to separate the detrital and pedogenic mineral component of the loess sections by the hematite/goethite ratio. DRS also has been applied as a joint method of various environmental magnetic investigations such as magnetic susceptibility- and isothermal remanent magnetization measurements. In our study the so-called "diffuse reflectance stratigraphy method" were developed. At First, complex mathematical method was applied to compare the results of the spectral reflectance measurements. One of the most preferred multivariate methods is cluster analysis. Its scope is to group and compare the loess variations and paleosol based on the similarity and common properties of their reflectance curves. In the Second, beside the basic subdivision of the profiles by the different reflectance curves of the layers, the most characteristic wavelength section of the reflectance curve was determined. This sections played the most important role during the classification of the different materials of the section. The reflectance value of individual samples, belonged to the characteristic wavelength were depicted in the function of depth and well correlated with other proxies like grain size distribution and magnetic susceptibility data. The results of the correlation showed the significance of the

  15. Synthesis of metal-organic framework films by pore diffusion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Naohiro; Nishimura, Yuki; Kajiro, Hiroshi; Kishida, Satoru; Kinoshita, Kentaro; Tottori Univ Team; Nippon Steel; Sumitomo Metal Co. Collaboration; Tottori Integrated Frontier Resaerch Center (Tifrec) Collaboration; Tottori University Electronic Display Resaerch Center (Tedrec) Collaboration

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) presents high controllability in designing the nano-scale pore, and this enable molecular storages, catalysts, gas sensors, gas separation membranes, and electronic devices for next-generation. Therefore, a simple method for film synthesis of MOFs compared with conventional methods [1] is strongly required. In this paper, we provide pore diffusion method, in which a substrate containing constituent metals of MOF is inserted in solution that includes only linker molecules of MOF. As a result, 2D growth of MOF was effectively enhanced, and the formation of flat and dense MOF films was attained. The growth time, t, dependence of film thickness, d, can be expressed by the relation of d = Aln(t + 1) + B, where A and B are constants. It means that ionized coppers diffuse through the pores of MOFs and the synthesis reaction proceeds at the MOF/solvent interface. We demonstrated the fabrication of a HKUST-1/Cu-TPA hetero structure by synthesizing a Cu-TPA film continuously after the growth of a HKUST-1 film on the CuOx substrate.

  16. Trace mercury determination in drinking and natural water after preconcentration and separation by DLLME-SFO method coupled with cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollahi Atousa; Amirkavehei Mooud; Gheisari Mohammad Mehdi; Tadayon Fariba

    2014-01-01

    A novel dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) for simultaneous separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of mercury was used. A method based on amalgamation was used for collection of gaseous mercury on gold coated sand (Gold trap). The concentration of mercury was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). The DLLME-SFO behavior of mercury by using dithizone as complexing agent was systematically ...

  17. Nodal integral method for the neutron diffusion equation in cylindrical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1987-01-01

    The nodal methodology is based on retaining a higher a higher degree of analyticity in the process of deriving the discrete-variable equations compared to conventional numerical methods. As a result, extensive numerical testing of nodal methods developed for a wide variety of partial differential equations and comparison of the results to conventional methods have established the superior accuracy of nodal methods on coarse meshes. Moreover, these tests have shown that nodal methods are more computationally efficient than finite difference and finite-element methods in the sense that they require shorter CPU times to achieve comparable accuracy in the solutions. However, nodal formalisms and the final discrete-variable equations they produce are, in general, more complicated than their conventional counterparts. This, together with anticipated difficulties in applying the transverse-averaging procedure in curvilinear coordinates, has limited the applications of nodal methods, so far, to Cartesian geometry, and with additional approximations to hexagonal geometry. In this paper the authors report recent progress in deriving and numerically implementing a nodal integral method (NIM) for solving the neutron diffusion equation in cylindrical r-z geometry. Also, presented are comparisons of numerical solutions to two test problems with those obtained by the Exterminator-2 code, which indicate the superior accuracy of the nodal integral method solutions on much coarser meshes

  18. Reassembling the Information Technology Innovation Process: An Actor Network Theory Method for Managing the Initiation, Production, and Diffusion of Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendejas, Gerardo; Chiasson, Mike

    This paper will propose and explore a method to enhance focal actors' abilities to enroll and control the many social and technical components interacting during the initiation, production, and diffusion of innovations. The reassembling and stabilizing of such components is the challenging goal of the focal actors involved in these processes. To address this possibility, a healthcare project involving the initiation, production, and diffusion of an IT-based innovation will be influenced by the researcher, using concepts from actor network theory (ANT), within an action research methodology (ARM). The experiences using this method, and the nature of enrolment and translation during its use, will highlight if and how ANT can provide a problem-solving method to help assemble the social and technical actants involved in the diffusion of an innovation. Finally, the paper will discuss the challenges and benefits of implementing such methods to attain widespread diffusion.

  19. Development of EUCAST disk diffusion method for susceptibility testing of the Bacteroides fragilis group isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagy, Elisabeth; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Eitel, Zsuzsa

    2015-01-01

    -clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, clindamycin, imipenem, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, tigecycline by agar dilution method previously. The inhibition zones of the same antibiotics including meropenem disc were determined by the disc diffusion on Brucella blood agar supplemented with haemin...

  20. The Nodal Polynomial Expansion method to solve the multigroup diffusion equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, R.D.M.

    1983-03-01

    The methodology of the solutions of the multigroup diffusion equations and uses the Nodal Polynomial Expansion Method is covered. The EPON code was developed based upon the above mentioned method for stationary state, rectangular geometry, one-dimensional or two-dimensional and for one or two energy groups. Then, one can study some effects such as the influence of the baffle on the thermal flux by calculating the flux and power distribution in nuclear reactors. Furthermore, a comparative study with other programs which use Finite Difference (CITATION and PDQ5) and Finite Element (CHD and FEMB) Methods was undertaken. As a result, the coherence, feasibility, speed and accuracy of the methodology used were demonstrated. (Author) [pt

  1. Fast Drift and Diffusion in a Class of Isochronous Systems with the Windows Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortunati, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.fortunati@bristol.ac.uk [University of Bristol, School of Mathematics (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    The aim of the paper is to deal with some peculiar difficulties arising from the use of the geometrical tool known as windows method in the context of the well known problem of Arnold’s diffusion for isochronous nearly-integrable Hamiltonian systems. Despite the simple features of the class of systems at hand, it is possible to show how the absence of an anisochrony term leads to several substantial differences in the application of the method, requiring some additional devices, such as non-equally spaced transition chains and variable windows. As a consequence, we show the existence of a set of unstable orbits, whose drifting time matches, up to a constant, the one obtained via variational methods.

  2. Solution of the multigroup neutron diffusion Eigenvalue problem in slab geometry by modified power method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanette, Rodrigo [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pós-Graduação em Matemática Aplicada; Petersen, Claudio Z.; Tavares, Matheus G., E-mail: rodrigozanette@hotmail.com, E-mail: claudiopetersen@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: matheus.gulartetavares@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPEL), RS (Brazil). Programa de Pós-Graduação em Modelagem Matemática

    2017-07-01

    We describe in this work the application of the modified power method for solve the multigroup neutron diffusion eigenvalue problem in slab geometry considering two-dimensions for nuclear reactor global calculations. It is well known that criticality calculations can often be best approached by solving eigenvalue problems. The criticality in nuclear reactors physics plays a relevant role since establishes the ratio between the numbers of neutrons generated in successive fission reactions. In order to solve the eigenvalue problem, a modified power method is used to obtain the dominant eigenvalue (effective multiplication factor (K{sub eff})) and its corresponding eigenfunction (scalar neutron flux), which is non-negative in every domain, that is, physically relevant. The innovation of this work is solving the neutron diffusion equation in analytical form for each new iteration of the power method. For solve this problem we propose to apply the Finite Fourier Sine Transform on one of the spatial variables obtaining a transformed problem which is resolved by well-established methods for ordinary differential equations. The inverse Fourier transform is used to reconstruct the solution for the original problem. It is known that the power method is an iterative source method in which is updated by the neutron flux expression of previous iteration. Thus, for each new iteration, the neutron flux expression becomes larger and more complex due to analytical solution what makes propose that it be reconstructed through an polynomial interpolation. The methodology is implemented to solve a homogeneous problem and the results are compared with works presents in the literature. (author)

  3. Application of nonlinear nodal diffusion method for a small research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaradat, Mustafa K.; Alawneh, Luay M.; Park, Chang Je; Lee, Byungchul

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We applied nonlinear unified nodal method for 10 MW IAEA MTR benchmark problem. • TRITION–NEWT system was used to obtain two-group burnup dependent cross sections. • The criticality and power distribution compared with reference (IAEA-TECDOC-233). • Comparison between different fuel materials was conducted. • Satisfactory results were provided using UNM for MTR core calculations. - Abstract: Nodal diffusion methods are usually used for LWR calculations and rarely used for research reactor calculations. A unified nodal method with an implementation of the coarse mesh finite difference acceleration was developed for use in plate type research reactor calculations. It was validated for two PWR benchmark problems and then applied for IAEA MTR benchmark problem for static calculations to check the validity and accuracy of the method. This work was conducted to investigate the unified nodal method capability to treat material testing reactor cores. A 10 MW research reactor core is considered with three calculation cases for low enriched uranium fuel depending on the core burnup status of fresh, beginning-of-life, and end-of-life cores. The validation work included criticality calculations, flux distribution, and power distribution; in addition, a comparison between different fuel materials with the same uranium content was conducted. The homogenized two-group cross sections were generated using the TRITON–NEWT system. The results were compared with a reference, which was taken from IAEA-TECDOC-233. The unified nodal method provides satisfactory results for an all-rod out case, and the three-dimensional, two-group diffusion model can be considered accurate enough for MTR core calculations

  4. An artificial nonlinear diffusivity method for supersonic reacting flows with shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorina, B.; Lele, S. K.

    2007-03-01

    A computational approach for modeling interactions between shocks waves, contact discontinuities and reactions zones with a high-order compact scheme is investigated. To prevent the formation of spurious oscillations around shocks, artificial nonlinear viscosity [A.W. Cook, W.H. Cabot, A high-wavenumber viscosity for high resolution numerical method, J. Comput. Phys. 195 (2004) 594-601] based on high-order derivative of the strain rate tensor is used. To capture temperature and species discontinuities a nonlinear diffusivity based on the entropy gradient is added. It is shown that the damping of 'wiggles' is controlled by the model constants and is largely independent of the mesh size and the shock strength. The same holds for the numerical shock thickness and allows a determination of the L2 error. In the shock tube problem, with fluids of different initial entropy separated by the diaphragm, an artificial diffusivity is required to accurately capture the contact surface. Finally, the method is applied to a shock wave propagating into a medium with non-uniform density/entropy and to a CJ detonation wave. Multi-dimensional formulation of the model is presented and is illustrated by a 2D oblique wave reflection from an inviscid wall, by a 2D supersonic blunt body flow and by a Mach reflection problem.

  5. Mixed-hybrid finite element method for the transport equation and diffusion approximation of transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartier, J.

    2006-04-01

    This thesis focuses on mathematical analysis, numerical resolution and modelling of the transport equations. First of all, we deal with numerical approximation of the solution of the transport equations by using a mixed-hybrid scheme. We derive and study a mixed formulation of the transport equation, then we analyse the related variational problem and present the discretization and the main properties of the scheme. We particularly pay attention to the behavior of the scheme and we show its efficiency in the diffusion limit (when the mean free path is small in comparison with the characteristic length of the physical domain). We present academical benchmarks in order to compare our scheme with other methods in many physical configurations and validate our method on analytical test cases. Unstructured and very distorted meshes are used to validate our scheme. The second part of this thesis deals with two transport problems. The first one is devoted to the study of diffusion due to boundary conditions in a transport problem between two plane plates. The second one consists in modelling and simulating radiative transfer phenomenon in case of the industrial context of inertial confinement fusion. (author)

  6. Vapor liquid fraction determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This invention describes a method of measuring liquid and vapor fractions in a non-homogeneous fluid flowing through an elongate conduit, such as may be required with boiling water, non-boiling turbulent flows, fluidized bed experiments, water-gas mixing analysis, and nuclear plant cooling. (UK)

  7. A fast semi-discrete Kansa method to solve the two-dimensional spatiotemporal fractional diffusion equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, HongGuang; Liu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Yong; Pang, Guofei; Garrard, Rhiannon

    2017-09-01

    Fractional-order diffusion equations (FDEs) extend classical diffusion equations by quantifying anomalous diffusion frequently observed in heterogeneous media. Real-world diffusion can be multi-dimensional, requiring efficient numerical solvers that can handle long-term memory embedded in mass transport. To address this challenge, a semi-discrete Kansa method is developed to approximate the two-dimensional spatiotemporal FDE, where the Kansa approach first discretizes the FDE, then the Gauss-Jacobi quadrature rule solves the corresponding matrix, and finally the Mittag-Leffler function provides an analytical solution for the resultant time-fractional ordinary differential equation. Numerical experiments are then conducted to check how the accuracy and convergence rate of the numerical solution are affected by the distribution mode and number of spatial discretization nodes. Applications further show that the numerical method can efficiently solve two-dimensional spatiotemporal FDE models with either a continuous or discrete mixing measure. Hence this study provides an efficient and fast computational method for modeling super-diffusive, sub-diffusive, and mixed diffusive processes in large, two-dimensional domains with irregular shapes.

  8. The effect of carrier gas flow rate and source cell temperature on low pressure organic vapor phase deposition simulation by direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takao; Ueda, Noriaki

    2013-01-01

    The process of low pressure organic vapor phase deposition (LP-OVPD) controls the growth of amorphous organic thin films, where the source gases (Alq3 molecule, etc.) are introduced into a hot wall reactor via an injection barrel using an inert carrier gas (N2 molecule). It is possible to control well the following substrate properties such as dopant concentration, deposition rate, and thickness uniformity of the thin film. In this paper, we present LP-OVPD simulation results using direct simulation Monte Carlo-Neutrals (Particle-PLUS neutral module) which is commercial software adopting direct simulation Monte Carlo method. By estimating properly the evaporation rate with experimental vaporization enthalpies, the calculated deposition rates on the substrate agree well with the experimental results that depend on carrier gas flow rate and source cell temperature. PMID:23674843

  9. The effect of carrier gas flow rate and source cell temperature on low pressure organic vapor phase deposition simulation by direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takao; Ueda, Noriaki

    2013-04-01

    The process of low pressure organic vapor phase deposition (LP-OVPD) controls the growth of amorphous organic thin films, where the source gases (Alq3 molecule, etc.) are introduced into a hot wall reactor via an injection barrel using an inert carrier gas (N2 molecule). It is possible to control well the following substrate properties such as dopant concentration, deposition rate, and thickness uniformity of the thin film. In this paper, we present LP-OVPD simulation results using direct simulation Monte Carlo-Neutrals (Particle-PLUS neutral module) which is commercial software adopting direct simulation Monte Carlo method. By estimating properly the evaporation rate with experimental vaporization enthalpies, the calculated deposition rates on the substrate agree well with the experimental results that depend on carrier gas flow rate and source cell temperature.

  10. Solution of two group neutron diffusion equation by using homotopy analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavdar, S.

    2010-01-01

    The Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM), proposed in 1992 by Shi Jun Liao and has been developed since then, is based on differential geometry as well as homotopy which is a fundamental concept in topology. It has proved to be useful for obtaining series solutions of many such problems involving algebraic, linear/non-linear, ordinary/partial differential equations, differential-integral equations, differential-difference equations, and coupled equations of them. Briefly, through HAM, it is possible to construct a continuous mapping of an initial guess approximation to the exact solution of the equation of concern. An auxiliary linear operator is chosen to construct such kind of a continuous mapping and an auxiliary parameter is used to ensure the convergence of series solution. We present the solutions of two-group neutron diffusion equation through HAM in this work. We also compare the results with that obtained by other well-known solution analytical and numeric methods.

  11. On the application of finite element method in the solution of steady state diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, S.

    1982-01-01

    The solution of the steady state neutron diffusion equation is obtained by using the finite element method. Specifically the variational approach is used for one dimensional problems and the weighted residual method (Galerkin) for one and two dimensional problems. The spatial domain is divided into retangular elements and the neutron flux is approximated by linear (one dimensional case), and bilinear (two-dimensional case) functions. Numerical results are obtained with a FORTRAN IV computer program and compared with those obtained by the finite difference CITATION code. The results show that linear or bilinear functions, do not satisfactorily describe the differential parameters in highly heterogeneous reactor cases, but provide good results for integral parameters such as multiplication factor. (Author) [pt

  12. Error analysis of semidiscrete finite element methods for inhomogeneous time-fractional diffusion

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, B.; Lazarov, R.; Pasciak, J.; Zhou, Z.

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved. We consider the initial-boundary value problem for an inhomogeneous time-fractional diffusion equation with a homogeneous Dirichlet boundary condition, a vanishing initial data and a nonsmooth right-hand side in a bounded convex polyhedral domain. We analyse two semidiscrete schemes based on the standard Galerkin and lumped mass finite element methods. Almost optimal error estimates are obtained for right-hand side data f (x, t) ε L∞ (0, T; Hq(ω)), ≤1≥ 1, for both semidiscrete schemes. For the lumped mass method, the optimal L2(ω)-norm error estimate requires symmetric meshes. Finally, twodimensional numerical experiments are presented to verify our theoretical results.

  13. Error analysis of semidiscrete finite element methods for inhomogeneous time-fractional diffusion

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, B.

    2014-05-30

    © 2014 Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved. We consider the initial-boundary value problem for an inhomogeneous time-fractional diffusion equation with a homogeneous Dirichlet boundary condition, a vanishing initial data and a nonsmooth right-hand side in a bounded convex polyhedral domain. We analyse two semidiscrete schemes based on the standard Galerkin and lumped mass finite element methods. Almost optimal error estimates are obtained for right-hand side data f (x, t) ε L∞ (0, T; Hq(ω)), ≤1≥ 1, for both semidiscrete schemes. For the lumped mass method, the optimal L2(ω)-norm error estimate requires symmetric meshes. Finally, twodimensional numerical experiments are presented to verify our theoretical results.

  14. Three-dimensional multiple reciprocity boundary element method for one-group neutron diffusion eigenvalue computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itagaki, Masafumi; Sahashi, Naoki.

    1996-01-01

    The multiple reciprocity method (MRM) in conjunction with the boundary element method has been employed to solve one-group eigenvalue problems described by the three-dimensional (3-D) neutron diffusion equation. The domain integral related to the fission source is transformed into a series of boundary-only integrals, with the aid of the higher order fundamental solutions based on the spherical and the modified spherical Bessel functions. Since each degree of the higher order fundamental solutions in the 3-D cases has a singularity of order (1/r), the above series of boundary integrals requires additional terms which do not appear in the 2-D MRM formulation. The critical eigenvalue itself can be also described using only boundary integrals. Test calculations show that Wielandt's spectral shift technique guarantees rapid and stable convergence of 3-D MRM computations. (author)

  15. Investigation of the vapor pressure p of zinc bromide or zinc chloride solutions with methanol by static method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safarov, Javid T.

    2006-01-01

    Vapor pressures p of ZnBr 2 + CH 3 OH and ZnCl 2 + CH 3 OH solutions at T (298.15 to 323.15) K were measured, activity of solvent a s and osmotic φ coefficients have been evaluated. The experiments were carried out for the ZnBr 2 + CH 3 OH solutions in the molality range m = (0.19972 to 11.05142) mol . kg -1 and for the ZnCl 2 + CH 3 OH solutions in the molality range m (0.42094 to 8.25534) mol . kg -1 . The Antoine equation for the empirical description of the experimental vapor pressure results and the Pitzer-Mayorga model with inclusion of ionic strength dependence of the third virial coefficient for the description of calculated osmotic coefficients were used. The parameters of Pitzer-Mayorga model were used for evaluation of activity coefficients

  16. Identification of Yeast Species In the Oral Cavity of Iranian Soldiers By Disk Diffusion Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Imami

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:The disk diffusion method for identification of yeasts species was performed based on different but distinct susceptibilities of yeasts spp.to chemicals:janus green, ethidium bromide,2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride, brilliant green, cycloheximide and rhodamine 6G. Methods: Atotal of 568 Iranian soldiers went under study for isolation and identification of Yeast species from their oral cavity. Asterile swab was used for each individual and specimens were collected from the nasopharynx region, then inoculated to petri dishes containing Sabouraud Dextrose Agar and incubated for 48 hrs at 37 °C. All colonies were counted and stocked in distilled water and stored in a refrigerator for further analysis. The yeasts were identified by the “disk diffusion test” [6,8]. This is a simple, rapid, accurate, and inexpensive technique presented by Sobczak [8]. By this method we identified yeast species within 24-48 hrs. Results: 51.4% of petri dishes were positive for yeast species and 318 strains were identified. Candida albicans, Candida kefyr, Candida tropicalis and Candida guilliermondii were the most common yeast species isolated from the oral cavity of soldiers. Conclusion: We used this method because of its simplicity and other beneficial characteristics for rapid identification of large and numerous isolates and the results were compared with other morphological characters such as chlamydospore and germ tube production. In addition,we used some type strains (Candida parapsilosis: PTCC 5089,Candida tropicalis: PTCC 5028,Saccharomyces cerevisiae:PTCC 5052,Candida lipolytica: PTCC 5063,Candida lipolytica:PTCC 5064,and the results were acceptable.

  17. Convergence of methods for coupling of microscopic and mesoscopic reaction–diffusion simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Flegg, Mark B.; Hellander, Stefan; Erban, Radek

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. In this paper, three multiscale methods for coupling of mesoscopic (compartment-based) and microscopic (molecular-based) stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations are investigated. Two of the three methods that will be discussed in detail have been previously reported in the literature; the two-regime method (TRM) and the compartment-placement method (CPM). The third method that is introduced and analysed in this paper is called the ghost cell method (GCM), since it works by constructing a "ghost cell" in which molecules can disappear and jump into the compartment-based simulation. Presented is a comparison of sources of error. The convergent properties of this error are studied as the time step δ. t (for updating the molecular-based part of the model) approaches zero. It is found that the error behaviour depends on another fundamental computational parameter h, the compartment size in the mesoscopic part of the model. Two important limiting cases, which appear in applications, are considered:. (i)δt→0 and h is fixed;(ii)δt→0 and h→0 such that δt/h is fixed. The error for previously developed approaches (the TRM and CPM) converges to zero only in the limiting case (ii), but not in case (i). It is shown that the error of the GCM converges in the limiting case (i). Thus the GCM is superior to previous coupling techniques if the mesoscopic description is much coarser than the microscopic part of the model.

  18. Convergence of methods for coupling of microscopic and mesoscopic reaction–diffusion simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Flegg, Mark B.

    2015-05-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. In this paper, three multiscale methods for coupling of mesoscopic (compartment-based) and microscopic (molecular-based) stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations are investigated. Two of the three methods that will be discussed in detail have been previously reported in the literature; the two-regime method (TRM) and the compartment-placement method (CPM). The third method that is introduced and analysed in this paper is called the ghost cell method (GCM), since it works by constructing a "ghost cell" in which molecules can disappear and jump into the compartment-based simulation. Presented is a comparison of sources of error. The convergent properties of this error are studied as the time step δ. t (for updating the molecular-based part of the model) approaches zero. It is found that the error behaviour depends on another fundamental computational parameter h, the compartment size in the mesoscopic part of the model. Two important limiting cases, which appear in applications, are considered:. (i)δt→0 and h is fixed;(ii)δt→0 and h→0 such that δt/h is fixed. The error for previously developed approaches (the TRM and CPM) converges to zero only in the limiting case (ii), but not in case (i). It is shown that the error of the GCM converges in the limiting case (i). Thus the GCM is superior to previous coupling techniques if the mesoscopic description is much coarser than the microscopic part of the model.

  19. Characteristic of doping and diffusion of heavily doped n and p type InP and InGaAs epitaxial layers grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinzone, C.J.; Dupuis, R.D.; Ha, N.T.; Luftman, H.S.; Gerrard, N.D.

    1990-01-01

    Electronic and photonic device applications of the InGaAs/InP materials system often require the growth of epitaxial material doped to or near the solubility limit of the impurity in the host material. These requirements present an extreme challenge for the crystal grower. To produce devices with abrupt dopant profiles, preserve the junction during subsequent growth, and retain a high degree of crystalline perfection, it is necessary to understand the limits of dopant incorporation and the behavior of the impurity in the material. In this study, N-type doping above 10 19 cm -3 has been achieved in InP and InGaAs using Sn as a dopant. P-type Zn doping at these levels has also been achieved in these materials but p type activation above ∼3 x 10 18 cm -3 in InP has not been seen. All materials were grown by the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) crystal growth technique. Effective diffusion coefficients have been measured for Zn and Sn in both materials from analysis of secondary ion mass spectra (SIMS) of specially grown and annealed samples

  20. Cd(1-x)Zn(x)O [0.05 ≤x≤ 0.26] synthesized by vapor-diffusion induced hydrolysis and co-nucleation from aqueous metal salt solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, Birgit; Neilson, James R; Jeffries, Stacie M; Morse, Daniel E

    2011-02-14

    Nanoparticulate Cd(1-x)Zn(x)O (x = 0, 0.05-0.26, 1) is synthesized in a simple two-step synthesis approach. Vapor-diffusion induced catalytic hydrolysis of two molecular precursors at low temperature induces co-nucleation and polycondensation to produce bimetallic layered hydroxide salts (M = Cd, Zn) as precursor materials which are subsequently converted to Cd(1-x)Zn(x)O at 400 °C. Unlike ternary materials prepared by standard co-precipitation procedures, all products presented here containing < 30 mol% Zn(2+) ions are homogeneous in elemental composition on the micrometre scale. This measured compositional homogeneity within the samples, as determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy, is a testimony to the kinetic control achieved by employing slow hydrolysis conditions. In agreement with this observation, the optical properties of the materials obey Vegard's Law for a homogeneous solid solution of Cd(1-x)Zn(x)O, where x corresponds to the values determined by inductively coupled plasma analysis, even though powder X-ray diffraction shows phase separation into a cubic mixed metal oxide phase and a hexagonal ZnO phase at all doping levels.

  1. Mobile vapor recovery and vapor scavenging unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, C.A.; Steppe, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a mobile anti- pollution apparatus, for the recovery of hydrocarbon emissions. It comprises a mobile platform upon which is mounted a vapor recovery unit for recovering vapors including light hydrocarbons, the vapor recovery unit having an inlet and an outlet end, the inlet end adapted for coupling to an external source of hydrocarbon vapor emissions to recover a portion of the vapors including light hydrocarbons emitted therefrom, and the outlet end adapted for connection to a means for conveying unrecovered vapors to a vapor scavenging unit, the vapor scavenging unit comprising an internal combustion engine adapted for utilizing light hydrocarbon in the unrecovered vapors exiting from the vapor recovery unit as supplemental fuel

  2. Operational methods for minimising soil compaction and diffuse pollution risk from wheelings in winter cereals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Bob; Silgram, Martyn; Quinton, John

    2010-05-01

    Recent UK government-funded research has shown that compacted, unvegetated tramlines wheelings can represent an important source and transport pathway, which can account for 80% of surface runoff, sediment and phosphorus losses to edge-of-field from cereals on moderate slopes. For example, recent research found 5.5-15.8% of rainfall lost as runoff, and losses of 0.8-2.9 kg TP/ha and 0.3-4.8 T/ha sediment from tramline wheelings. When compaction was released by shallow cultivation, runoff was reduced to 0.2-1.7% of rainfall with losses of 0.0-0.2 kg TP/ha and 0.003-0.3 T/ha sediment respectively i.e. close to reference losses from control areas without tramlines. Recent independent assessments using novel tracer techniques have also shown that tramline wheelings can represent important sediment sources at river catchment scale. In response to these latest findings, a new project is now underway investigating the most cost-effective and practical ways of operationalising methods for managing tramline wheelings in autumn-sown cereal systems to reduce the risk of soil compaction from the autumn spray operation and the associated risk of surface runoff and diffuse pollution loss of sediment, phosphorus and nitrogen to edge of field. Research is focusing on the over-winter period when soils are close to field capacity and the physical protection of the soil surface granted by growing crop is limited. This paper outlines this new multi-disciplinary project and associated methodologies, which include hillslope-scale event-based evaluations of the effectiveness of novel mitigation methods on surface runoff and diffuse pollution losses to edge of field, assessments of the economic and practical viability of mitigation methods, and modelling the impact on water quality of implementation of the most promising techniques at both farm and catchment scale. The study involves a large consortium with 20 partners, including many industrial organisations representing tractor, crop

  3. Diffuse interface immersed boundary method for multi-fluid flows with arbitrarily moving rigid bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jitendra Kumar; Natarajan, Ganesh

    2018-05-01

    We present an interpolation-free diffuse interface immersed boundary method for multiphase flows with moving bodies. A single fluid formalism using the volume-of-fluid approach is adopted to handle multiple immiscible fluids which are distinguished using the volume fractions, while the rigid bodies are tracked using an analogous volume-of-solid approach that solves for the solid fractions. The solution to the fluid flow equations are carried out using a finite volume-immersed boundary method, with the latter based on a diffuse interface philosophy. In the present work, we assume that the solids are filled with a "virtual" fluid with density and viscosity equal to the largest among all fluids in the domain. The solids are assumed to be rigid and their motion is solved using Newton's second law of motion. The immersed boundary methodology constructs a modified momentum equation that reduces to the Navier-Stokes equations in the fully fluid region and recovers the no-slip boundary condition inside the solids. An implicit incremental fractional-step methodology in conjunction with a novel hybrid staggered/non-staggered approach is employed, wherein a single equation for normal momentum at the cell faces is solved everywhere in the domain, independent of the number of spatial dimensions. The scalars are all solved for at the cell centres, with the transport equations for solid and fluid volume fractions solved using a high-resolution scheme. The pressure is determined everywhere in the domain (including inside the solids) using a variable coefficient Poisson equation. The solution to momentum, pressure, solid and fluid volume fraction equations everywhere in the domain circumvents the issue of pressure and velocity interpolation, which is a source of spurious oscillations in sharp interface immersed boundary methods. A well-balanced algorithm with consistent mass/momentum transport ensures robust simulations of high density ratio flows with strong body forces. The

  4. Apparent diffusion coefficient measurement in glioma: Influence of region-of-interest determination methods on apparent diffusion coefficient values, interobserver variability, time efficiency, and diagnostic ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Suo, Shiteng; Sun, Yawen; Zu, Jinyan; Qu, Jianxun; Zhou, Yan; Chen, Zengai; Xu, Jianrong

    2017-03-01

    To compare four methods of region-of-interest (ROI) placement for apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements in distinguishing low-grade gliomas (LGGs) from high-grade gliomas (HGGs). Two independent readers measured ADC parameters using four ROI methods (single-slice [single-round, five-round and freehand] and whole-volume) on 43 patients (20 LGGs, 23 HGGs) who had undergone 3.0 Tesla diffusion-weighted imaging and time required for each method of ADC measurements was recorded. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to assess interobserver variability of ADC measurements. Mean and minimum ADC values and time required were compared using paired Student's t-tests. All ADC parameters (mean/minimum ADC values of three single-slice methods, mean/minimum/standard deviation/skewness/kurtosis/the10 th and 25 th percentiles/median/maximum of whole-volume method) were correlated with tumor grade (low versus high) by unpaired Student's t-tests. Discriminative ability was determined by receiver operating characteristic curves. All ADC measurements except minimum, skewness, and kurtosis of whole-volume ROI differed significantly between LGGs and HGGs (all P determination methods. Whole-volume histogram analysis did not yield better results than single-slice methods and took longer. Mean ADC value derived from single-round ROI is the most optimal parameter for differentiating LGGs from HGGs. 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:722-730. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the characterization of testicular germ cell neoplasms: Effect of ROI methods on apparent diffusion coefficient values and interobserver variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsili, Athina C., E-mail: a_tsili@yahoo.gr [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, University Campus, 45110, Ioannina (Greece); Ntorkou, Alexandra, E-mail: alexdorkou@hotmail.com [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, University Campus, 45110, Ioannina (Greece); Astrakas, Loukas, E-mail: astrakas@uoi.gr [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Ioannina, University Campus, 45110, Ioannina (Greece); Xydis, Vasilis, E-mail: vxydis@cc.uoi.gr [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, University Campus, 45110, Ioannina (Greece); Tsampalas, Stavros, E-mail: stamp@gmail.com [Department of Urology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, University Campus, 45110, Ioannina (Greece); Sofikitis, Nikolaos, E-mail: akrosnin@hotmail.com [Department of Urology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, University Campus, 45110, Ioannina (Greece); Argyropoulou, Maria I., E-mail: margyrop@cc.uoi.gr [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, University Campus, 45110, Ioannina (Greece)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Seminomas have lower mean ADC compared to NSGCNs. • Round ROI is accurate in characterizing TGCNS. • ROI shape has no significant effect on interobserver variability. - Abstract: Introduction: To evaluate the difference in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements at diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging of differently shaped regions-of-interest (ROIs) in testicular germ cell neoplasms (TGCNS), the diagnostic ability of differently shaped ROIs in differentiating seminomas from nonseminomatous germ cell neoplasms (NSGCNs) and the interobserver variability. Materials and methods: Thirty-three TGCNs were retrospectively evaluated. Patients underwent MR examinations, including DWI on a 1.5-T MR system. Two observers measured mean tumor ADCs using four distinct ROI methods: round, square, freehand and multiple small, round ROIs. The interclass correlation coefficient was analyzed to assess interobserver variability. Statistical analysis was used to compare mean ADC measurements among observers, methods and histologic types. Results: All ROI methods showed excellent interobserver agreement, with excellent correlation (P < 0.001). Multiple, small ROIs provided the lower mean ADC in TGCNs. Seminomas had lower mean ADC compared to NSGCNs for each ROI method (P < 0.001). Round ROI proved the most accurate method in characterizing TGCNS. Conclusion: Interobserver variability in ADC measurement is excellent, irrespective of the ROI shape. Multiple, small round ROIs and round ROI proved the more accurate methods for ADC measurement in the characterization of TGCNs and in the differentiation between seminomas and NSGCNs, respectively.

  6. Experience with the Incomplete Cholesky Conjugate Gradient method in a diffusion code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoebel, W.

    1985-01-01

    For the numerical solution of sparse systems of linear equations arising from finite difference approximation of the multidimensional neutron diffusion equation fast methods are needed. Effective algorithms for scalar computers may not be likewise suitable on vector computers. In the improved version DIXY2 of the Karlsruhe two-dimensional neutron diffusion code for rectangular geometries an Incomplete Cholesky Conjugate Gradient (ICCG) algorithm has been combined with the originally implemented Cyclically Reduced 4-Lines SOR (CR4LSOR) inner iteration method. The combined procedure is automatically activated for slowly converging applications, thus leading to a drastic reduction of iterations as well as CPU-times on a scalar computer. In a follow-up benchmark study necessary modifications to ICCG and CR4LSOR for their use on a vector computer were investigated. It was found that a modified preconditioning for the ICCG algorithm restricted to the block diagonal matrix is an effective method both on scalar and vector computers. With a splitting of the 9-band-matrix in two triangular Cholesky matrices necessary inversions are performed on a scalar machine by recursive forward and backward substitutions. On vector computers an additional factorization of the triangular matrices into four bidiagonal matrices enables Buneman reduction and the recursive inversion is restricted to a small system. A similar strategy can be realized with CR4LSOR if the unvectorizable Gauss-Seidel iteration is replaced by Double Jacobi and Buneman technique for a vector computer. Compared to single line blocking over the original mesh the cyclical 4-lines reduction of the DIXY inner iteration scheme reduces numbers of iterations and CPU-times considerably

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Estradiol-Loaded PLGA Nanoparticles Using Homogenization-Solvent Diffusion Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Dinarvand

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The inherent shortcomings of conventional drug delivery systems containing estrogens and the potential of nanoparticles (NPs have offered tremendous scope for investigation. Although polymeric NPs have been used as drug carriers for many active agents, the use of appropriate polymer and method of NP preparation to overcome different challenges is very important. Materials and methods: Poly lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA NPs containing estradiol valerate were prepared by the modified spontaneous emulsification solvent diffusion method. Several parameters including the drug/polymer ratios in range of 2.5-10%, poly vinyl alcohol (PVA in concentration of 0-4% as stabilizer and internal phase volume and composition were examined to optimize formulation. The size distribution and morphology of the NPs, encapsulation efficacy and in vitro release profile in phosphate buffer medium (pH 7.4 during 12 hrs were then investigated. Results: The NPs prepared in this study were spherical with a relatively mono-dispersed size distribution. By adjustment of the process parameters, the size and the drug encapsulation efficacy as well as the drug release kinetics can be optimally controlled. The mean particle size of the best formula with encapsulation efficiency of 100% was 175 ± 19, in which release profile was best fitted to Higuchi's model of release which showed that release mechanism was mainly controlled by diffusion of the drug to the release medium. Conclusion: According to the size and surface properties of the prepared particles, it may be concluded that they are a good formulation for non-parenteral routes of administration.

  8. Experience with the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient method in a diffusion code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoebel, W.

    1986-01-01

    For the numerical solution of sparse systems of linear equations arising from the finite difference approximation of the multidimensional neutron diffusion equation, fast methods are needed. Effective algorithms for scalar computers may not be likewise suitable on vector computers. In the improved version (DIXY2) of the Karlsruhe two-dimensional neutron diffusion code for rectangular geometries, an incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient (ICCG) algorithm has been combined with the originally implemented cyclically reduced four-line successive overrelaxation (CR4LSOR) inner iteration method. The combined procedure is automatically activated for slowly converging applications, thus leading to a drastic reduction of iterations as well as CPU times on a scalar computer. In a follow-up benchmark study, necessary modifications to ICCG and CR4LSOR for use on a vector computer were investigated. It was found that a modified preconditioning for the ICCG algorithm restricted to the block diagonal matrix is an effective method both on scalar and vector computers. With a splitting of the nine-band matrix in two triangular Cholesky matrices, necessary inversions are performed on a scalar machine by recursive forward and backward substitutions. On vector computers an additional factorization of the triangular matrices into four bidiagonal matrices enables Buneman reduction, and the recursive inversion is restricted to a small system. A similar strategy can be realized with CR4LSOR if the unvectorizable Gauss-eidel iteration is replaced by Double Jacobi and Buneman techniques for a vector computer. Compared to single-line blocking over the original mesh, the cyclical four-line reduction of the DIXY inner iteration scheme reduces numbers of iterations and CPU times considerably

  9. Determination of ferrite formation coefficient of tin in an austenitic stainless steel by the diffusion couple method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchive, Daniel; Treheux, Daniel; Guiraldenq, Pierre

    1976-01-01

    The ferritic action of tin for a 18-10 stainless steel has been measured by two different methods: the first is based on the diffusion couple method and the graphical representation of compositions in a diagram α/α + γ/γ corresponding to ferrite and austenitic elements of the steel. In the second method, ferrite formation is analyzed in small ingots prepared with different chromium and tin concentrations. Ferrite coefficient of tin, compared to chromium is 0.25 with diffusion couples and this value is in good agreement with the classical method [fr

  10. Numerical analysis for the fractional diffusion and fractional Buckmaster equation by the two-step Laplace Adam-Bashforth method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sonal

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to use the alternative numerical scheme given by Gnitchogna and Atangana for solving partial differential equations with integer and non-integer differential operators. We applied this method to fractional diffusion model and fractional Buckmaster models with non-local fading memory. The method yields a powerful numerical algorithm for fractional order derivative to implement. Also we present in detail the stability analysis of the numerical method for solving the diffusion equation. This proof shows that this method is very stable and also converges very quickly to exact solution and finally some numerical simulation is presented.

  11. Controlled Crystal Grain Growth in Mixed Cation-Halide Perovskite by Evaporated Solvent Vapor Recycling Method for High Efficiency Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Youhei; Kogo, Atsushi; Udagawa, Yosuke; Kunugita, Hideyuki; Ema, Kazuhiro; Sanehira, Yoshitaka; Miyasaka, Tsutomu

    2017-06-07

    We developed a new and simple solvent vapor-assisted thermal annealing (VA) procedure which can reduce grain boundaries in a perovskite film for fabricating highly efficient perovskite solar cells (PSCs). By recycling of solvent molecules evaporated from an as-prepared perovskite film as a VA vapor source, named the pot-roast VA (PR-VA) method, finely controlled and reproducible device fabrication was achieved for formamidinium (FA) and methylammonium (MA) mixed cation-halide perovskite (FAPbI 3 ) 0.85 (MAPbBr 3 ) 0.15 . The mixed perovskite was crystallized on a low-temperature prepared brookite TiO 2 mesoporous scaffold. When exposed to very dilute solvent vapor, small grains in the perovskite film gradually unified into large grains, resulting in grain boundaries which were highly reduced and improvement of photovoltaic performance in PSC. PR-VA-treated large grain perovskite absorbers exhibited stable photocurrent-voltage performance with high fill factor and suppressed hysteresis, achieving the best conversion efficiency of 18.5% for a 5 × 5 mm 2 device and 15.2% for a 1.0 × 1.0 cm 2 device.

  12. Application of a primitive variable Newton's method for the calculation of an axisymmetric laminar diffusion flame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yuenong; Smooke, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we present a primitive variable Newton-based solution method with a block-line linear equation solver for the calculation of reacting flows. The present approach is compared with the stream function-vorticity Newton's method and the SIMPLER algorithm on the calculation of a system of fully elliptic equations governing an axisymmetric methane-air laminar diffusion flame. The chemical reaction is modeled by the flame sheet approximation. The numerical solution agrees well with experimental data in the major chemical species. The comparison of three sets of numerical results indicates that the stream function-vorticity solution using the approximate boundary conditions reported in the previous calculations predicts a longer flame length and a broader flame shape. With a new set of modified vorticity boundary conditions, we obtain agreement between the primitive variable and stream function-vorticity solutions. The primitive variable Newton's method converges much faster than the other two methods. Because of much less computer memory required for the block-line tridiagonal solver compared to a direct solver, the present approach makes it possible to calculate multidimensional flames with detailed reaction mechanisms. The SIMPLER algorithm shows a slow convergence rate compared to the other two methods in the present calculation

  13. Nodal methods with non linear feedback for the three dimensional resolution of the diffusion's multigroup equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferri, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Nodal methods applied in order to calculate the power distribution in a nuclear reactor core are presented. These methods have received special attention, because they yield accurate results in short computing times. Present nodal schemes contain several unknowns per node and per group. In the methods presented here, non linear feedback of the coupling coefficients has been applied to reduce this number to only one unknown per node and per group. The resulting algorithm is a 7- points formula, and the iterative process has proved stable in the response matrix scheme. The intranodal flux shape is determined by partial integration of the diffusion equations over two of the coordinates, leading to a set of three coupled one-dimensional equations. These can be solved by using a polynomial approximation or by integration (analytic solution). The tranverse net leakage is responsible for the coupling between the spatial directions, and two alternative methods are presented to evaluate its shape: direct parabolic approximation and local model expansion. Numerical results, which include the IAEA two-dimensional benchmark problem illustrate the efficiency of the developed methods. (M.E.L.) [es

  14. Green method for ultrasensitive determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry following sono-induced cold vapor generation and 'in-atomizer trapping'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Sandra; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Sono-induced cold vapor generation (SI-CVG) has been used for the first time in combination with a graphite furnace atomizer for determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry after in situ trapping onto a noble metal-pretreated platform (Pd, Pt or Rh) inserted into a graphite tube. The system allows 'in-atomizer trapping' of Hg without the use of conventional reduction reactions based on sodium borohydride or tin chloride in acid medium for cold vapor generation. The sono-induced reaction is accomplished by applying ultrasound irradiation to the sample solution containing Hg(II) in the presence of an organic compound such as formic acid. As this organic acid is partly degraded upon ultrasound irradiation to yield CO, CO 2 , H 2 and H 2 O, the amount of lab wastes is minimized and a green methodology is achieved. For this purpose, experimental variables influencing the generation/trapping process are fully investigated. The limit of detection for a 10 min trapping time and 10 mL sample volume was 0.03 μg L -1 (Integrated absorbance) and the repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation was about 3%. Carbonates and chlorides at 100 mg L -1 level caused a signal depression by 20-30%. The enhanced trapping efficiency observed with the sono-induced cold vapor generation as compared with 'in-atomizer trapping' methods employing chemical vapor generation is discussed. A reaction pathway for SI-CVG is proposed on the basis of the current knowledge for synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles by ultrasound

  15. Application of the Laplace transform method for the albedo boundary conditions in multigroup neutron diffusion eigenvalue problems in slab geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Claudio Zen; Vilhena, Marco T.; Barros, Ricardo C.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the application of the Laplace transform method is described in order to determine the energy-dependent albedo matrix that is used in the boundary conditions multigroup neutron diffusion eigenvalue problems in slab geometry for nuclear reactor global calculations. In slab geometry, the diffusion albedo substitutes without approximation the baffle-reflector system around the active domain. Numerical results to typical test problems are shown to illustrate the accuracy and the efficiency of the Chebysheff acceleration scheme. (orig.)

  16. Measurement of time series variation of thermal diffusivity of magnetic fluid under magnetic field by forced Rayleigh scattering method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motozawa, Masaaki, E-mail: motozawa.masaaki@shizuoka.ac.jp [Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 432-8561 (Japan); Muraoka, Takashi [Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 432-8561 (Japan); Motosuke, Masahiro, E-mail: mot@rs.tus.ac.jp [Tokyo University of Science, 6-3-1 Niijuku, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan); Fukuta, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: fukuta.mitsuhiro@shizuoka.ac.jp [Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 432-8561 (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    It can be expected that the thermal diffusivity of a magnetic fluid varies from time to time after applying a magnetic field because of the growth of the inner structure of a magnetic fluid such as chain-like clusters. In this study, time series variation of the thermal diffusivity of a magnetic fluid caused by applying a magnetic field was investigated experimentally. For the measurement of time series variation of thermal diffusivity, we attempted to apply the forced Rayleigh scattering method (FRSM), which has high temporal and high spatial resolution. We set up an optical system for the FRSM and measured the thermal diffusivity. A magnetic field was applied to a magnetic fluid in parallel and perpendicular to the heat flux direction, and the magnetic field intensity was 70 mT. The FRSM was successfully applied to measurement of the time series variation of the magnetic fluid from applying a magnetic field. The results show that a characteristic configuration in the time series variation of the thermal diffusivity of magnetic fluid was obtained in the case of applying a magnetic field parallel to the heat flux direction. In contrast, in the case of applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the heat flux, the thermal diffusivity of the magnetic fluid hardly changed during measurement. - Highlights: • Thermal diffusivity was measured by forced Rayleigh scattering method (FRSM). • FRSM has high temporal and high spatial resolutions for measurement. • We attempted to apply FRSM to magnetic fluid (MF). • Time series variation of thermal diffusivity of MF was successfully measured by FRSM. • Anisotropic thermal diffusivity of magnetic fluid was also successfully confirmed.

  17. Hybrid Monte Carlo-Diffusion Method For Light Propagation in Tissue With a Low-Scattering Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Toshiyuki; Kashio, Yoshihiko; Okada, Eiji

    2003-06-01

    The heterogeneity of the tissues in a head, especially the low-scattering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layer surrounding the brain has previously been shown to strongly affect light propagation in the brain. The radiosity-diffusion method, in which the light propagation in the CSF layer is assumed to obey the radiosity theory, has been employed to predict the light propagation in head models. Although the CSF layer is assumed to be a nonscattering region in the radiosity-diffusion method, fine arachnoid trabeculae cause faint scattering in the CSF layer in real heads. A novel approach, the hybrid Monte Carlo-diffusion method, is proposed to calculate the head models, including the low-scattering region in which the light propagation does not obey neither the diffusion approximation nor the radiosity theory. The light propagation in the high-scattering region is calculated by means of the diffusion approximation solved by the finite-element method and that in the low-scattering region is predicted by the Monte Carlo method. The intensity and mean time of flight of the detected light for the head model with a low-scattering CSF layer calculated by the hybrid method agreed well with those by the Monte Carlo method, whereas the results calculated by means of the diffusion approximation included considerable error caused by the effect of the CSF layer. In the hybrid method, the time-consuming Monte Carlo calculation is employed only for the thin CSF layer, and hence, the computation time of the hybrid method is dramatically shorter than that of the Monte Carlo method.

  18. Solution verification, goal-oriented adaptive methods for stochastic advection–diffusion problems

    KAUST Repository

    Almeida, Regina C.

    2010-08-01

    A goal-oriented analysis of linear, stochastic advection-diffusion models is presented which provides both a method for solution verification as well as a basis for improving results through adaptation of both the mesh and the way random variables are approximated. A class of model problems with random coefficients and source terms is cast in a variational setting. Specific quantities of interest are specified which are also random variables. A stochastic adjoint problem associated with the quantities of interest is formulated and a posteriori error estimates are derived. These are used to guide an adaptive algorithm which adjusts the sparse probabilistic grid so as to control the approximation error. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the methodology for a specific model problem. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Surface morphology and molecular bonding of CaCO3 nanocrystallites by gas diffusion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulimai, N. H.; Rani, Rozina Abdul; Khusaimi, Z.; Abdullah, S.; Salifairus, M. J.; Alrokayan, Salman; Khan, Haseeb; Rusop, M.

    2018-05-01

    Calcium carbonate with the chemical formula of (CaCO3) is the most abundant element in the world. Its usage on certain applications is largely affected by its properties. The best means to control its properties is through controlled preparation of CaCO3. This study uses diffusion method between the precursors Calcium Chloride and Ammonium Carbonate. Instead of using water, ethanol was used to prepare the salt. Reaction was done in room temperature (RT) for 6h-24h. Smallest average crystallite size measured by FESEM micrograph is 500nm produced by synthesis of CaCO3 reacted for 168 hours. From energy-dispersive X-ray spectrum also indicated the smallest particle size is by CaCO3 reacted for 168 hours. Changes was seen for element Ca at 3.7keV.

  20. Solution verification, goal-oriented adaptive methods for stochastic advection–diffusion problems

    KAUST Repository

    Almeida, Regina C.; Oden, J. Tinsley

    2010-01-01

    A goal-oriented analysis of linear, stochastic advection-diffusion models is presented which provides both a method for solution verification as well as a basis for improving results through adaptation of both the mesh and the way random variables are approximated. A class of model problems with random coefficients and source terms is cast in a variational setting. Specific quantities of interest are specified which are also random variables. A stochastic adjoint problem associated with the quantities of interest is formulated and a posteriori error estimates are derived. These are used to guide an adaptive algorithm which adjusts the sparse probabilistic grid so as to control the approximation error. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the methodology for a specific model problem. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Scalable implicit methods for reaction-diffusion equations in two and three space dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronese, S.V.; Othmer, H.G. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the implementation of a solver for systems of semi-linear parabolic partial differential equations in two and three space dimensions. The solver is based on a parallel implementation of a non-linear Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) scheme which uses a Cartesian grid in space and an implicit time-stepping algorithm. Various reordering strategies for the linearized equations are used to reduce the stride and improve the overall effectiveness of the parallel implementation. We have successfully used this solver for large-scale reaction-diffusion problems in computational biology and medicine in which the desired solution is a traveling wave that may contain rapid transitions. A number of examples that illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the method are given here; the theoretical analysis will be presented.

  2. Corticospinal MRI tractography in space-occupying brain lesions by diffusion tensor and kurtosis imaging methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leote, Joao [epartment of Neurosurgery, Hospital Garcia de Orta, Almada (Portugal); Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon, Lisboa (Portugal); Nunes, Rita; Cerqueira, Luis; Ferreira, Hugo Alexandre [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2015-05-18

    Recently, DKI-based tractography has been developed, showing improved crossing-fiber resolution in comparison to deterministic DTI-based tractography in healthy subjects. In this work, DTI and DKI-based tractography methods were compared regarding the assessment of the corticospinal tract in patients presenting space-occupying brain lesions near cortical motor areas. Nine patients (4 males) aged 23 to 62 years old, with space-occupying brain lesions (e.g. tumors) were studied for pre-surgical planning using a 1.5T MRI scanner and a 12-channel head coil. In 5 patients diffusion data was acquired along 64 directions and in 4 patients along 32 directions both with b-values 0, 1000 and 2000 s/mm2. Corticospinal tracts were estimated using deterministic DTI and DKI methods and also using probabilistic DTI. The superior cerebellar peduncles and the motor cortical areas, ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesions, were used as seed regions-of-interest for fiber tracking. Tracts courses and volumes were documented and compared between methods. Results showed that it was possible to estimate fiber tracts using deterministic DTI and DKI methods in 8/9 patients, and using the probabilistic DTI method in all patients. Overall, it was observed that DKI-based tractography showed more voluminous fiber tracts than when using deterministic DTI. The DKI method also showed curvilinear fibers mainly above lesions margins, which were not visible with deterministic DTI in 5 patients. Similar tracts were observed when using probabilistic DTI in 3 of those patients. Results suggest that the DKI method contribute with additional information about the corticospinal tract course in comparison with the DTI method, especially with subcortical lesions and near lesions’ margins. Therefore, this study suggests that DKI-based tractography could be useful in MRI and hybrid PET-MRI pre-surgical planning protocols for improved corticospinal tract evaluation.

  3. Sediment transport via needle ice: a new method for diffusive transport on laboratory-scale hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, K. E.; Roering, J. J.; Rempel, A. W.

    2012-12-01

    controlled by systematically varying the frequency and/or duration of temperature perturbations. The rate of sediment transport on soil mantled hillslopes depends on topographic slope and transport occurs in an "active layer", i.e., the soil mantle. We show that needle ice transports sediment diffusively and has great potential as a method for laboratory simulation of a soil-mantled hillslope since transport is confined to a layer only a few millimeters from the surface. Furthermore, while past experiments are limited to modeling landscape response to precipitation or uplift, our method to systematically control the vigor of hillslope processes will enable us to model potential climate-driven changes in hillslope transport efficiency.

  4. Vapor pressure and enthalpy of vaporization of aliphatic propanediamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verevkin, Sergey P.; Chernyak, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We measured vapor pressure of four aliphatic 1,3-diamines. ► Vaporization enthalpies at 298 K were derived. ► We examined consistency of new and available data in the literature. ► A group-contribution method for prediction was developed. - Abstract: Vapor pressures of four aliphatic propanediamines including N-methyl-1,3-propanediamine (MPDA), N,N-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine (DMPDA), N,N-diethyl-1,3-propanediamine (DEPDA) and N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-1,3-propanediamine (4MPDA) were measured using the transpiration method. The vapor pressures developed in this work and reported in the literature were used to derive molar enthalpy of vaporization values at the reference temperature 298.15 K. An internal consistency check of the enthalpy of vaporization was performed for the aliphatic propanediamines studied in this work. A group-contribution method was developed for the validation and prediction vaporization enthalpies of amines and diamines.

  5. Impact of post-processing methods on apparent diffusion coefficient values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeilinger, Martin Georg; Lell, Michael; Uder, Michael [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Baltzer, Pascal Andreas Thomas [Medical University Vienna, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Doerfler, Arnd; Dietzel, Matthias [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neuroradiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is increasingly used as a quantitative biomarker in oncological imaging. ADC calculation is based on raw diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) data, and multiple post-processing methods (PPMs) have been proposed for this purpose. We investigated whether PPM has an impact on final ADC values. Sixty-five lesions scanned with a standardized whole-body DWI-protocol at 3 T served as input data (EPI-DWI, b-values: 50, 400 and 800 s/mm{sup 2}). Using exactly the same ROI coordinates, four different PPM (ADC{sub 1}-ADC{sub 4}) were executed to calculate corresponding ADC values, given as [10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s] of each lesion. Statistical analysis was performed to intra-individually compare ADC values stratified by PPM (Wilcoxon signed-rank tests: α = 1 %; descriptive statistics; relative difference/∇; coefficient of variation/CV). Stratified by PPM, mean ADCs ranged from 1.136-1.206 *10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s (∇ = 7.0 %). Variances between PPM were pronounced in the upper range of ADC values (maximum: 2.540-2.763 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, ∇ = 8 %). Pairwise comparisons identified significant differences between all PPM (P ≤ 0.003; mean CV = 7.2 %) and reached 0.137 *10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s within the 25th-75th percentile. Altering the PPM had a significant impact on the ADC value. This should be considered if ADC values from different post-processing methods are compared in patient studies. (orig.)

  6. A method of precise profile analysis of diffuse scattering for the KENS pulsed neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todate, Y.; Fukumura, T.; Fukazawa, H.

    2001-01-01

    An outline of our profile analysis method, which is now of practical use for the asymmetric KENS pulsed thermal neutrons, are presented. The analysis of the diffuse scattering from a single crystal of D 2 O is shown as an example. The pulse shape function is based on the Ikeda-Carpenter function adjusted for the KENS neutron pulses. The convoluted intensity is calculated by a Monte-Carlo method and the precision of the calculation is controlled. Fitting parameters in the model cross section can be determined by the built-in nonlinear least square fitting procedure. Because this method is the natural extension of the procedure conventionally used for the triple-axis data, it is easy to apply with generality and versatility. Most importantly, furthermore, this method has capability of precise correction of the time shift of the observed peak position which is inevitably caused in the case of highly asymmetric pulses and broad scattering function. It will be pointed out that the accurate determination of true time-of-flight is important especially in the single crystal inelastic experiments. (author)

  7. Flashed-feed VMD configuration as a novel method for eliminating temperature polarization effect and enhancing water vapor flux

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaadi, Ahmad Salem

    2018-05-28

    The coupling of heat and mass transfer in membrane distillation (MD) process makes enhancing water vapor flux and determining MD membrane mass transfer coefficient (MTC) fairly challenging due to the development of temperature gradient near the membrane surface, referred to as temperature polarization (TP). As a result, the change in feed temperature at the membrane surface will be difficult to measure accurately. In this paper, the effect of TP was decoupled from the membrane MTC by preventing the liquid feed stream from contacting the membrane surface through the use of a novel custom-made vacuum MD (VMD) module design. Results showed that a temperature difference of 10°C between the feed bulk and feed temperatures at the membrane surface/interface is estimated to take place in the typical VMD configuration, while the proposed flashed-feed VMD configuration eliminates TP effect and gives a flux 3.5-fold higher (200kg/m2.hr) under similar operating conditions. Therefore, it can be concluded that heat transfer coefficient is considered to be the main factor controlling resistance of water vapor flux in the typical VMD configuration. The measured MTC of the tested commercial membrane was found to be more accurate and the highest among all reported MTCs in the MD literature (2.44×10−6kg/m2.s.Pa). Additionally, a transmembrane temperature difference of 5°C and 10°C in the novel configuration can produce water vapor fluxes of about 9kg/m2.hr and 40kg/m2.hr, respectively, at a feed temperature of 70°C, which is very attractive for scaling-up the process.

  8. A method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient (KdPAR)from paired temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jordan S.; Rose, Kevin C.; Winslow, Luke A.; Read, Emily K.

    2015-01-01

    A new method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient for photosynthetically active radiation (KdPAR) from paired temperature sensors was derived. We show that during cases where the attenuation of penetrating shortwave solar radiation is the dominant source of temperature changes, time series measurements of water temperatures at multiple depths (z1 and z2) are related to one another by a linear scaling factor (a). KdPAR can then be estimated by the simple equation KdPAR ln(a)/(z2/z1). A suggested workflow is presented that outlines procedures for calculating KdPAR according to this paired temperature sensor (PTS) method. This method is best suited for conditions when radiative temperature gains are large relative to physical noise. These conditions occur frequently on water bodies with low wind and/or high KdPARs but can be used for other types of lakes during time periods of low wind and/or where spatially redundant measurements of temperatures are available. The optimal vertical placement of temperature sensors according to a priori knowledge of KdPAR is also described. This information can be used to inform the design of future sensor deployments using the PTS method or for campaigns where characterizing sub-daily changes in temperatures is important. The PTS method provides a novel method to characterize light attenuation in aquatic ecosystems without expensive radiometric equipment or the user subjectivity inherent in Secchi depth measurements. This method also can enable the estimation of KdPAR at higher frequencies than many manual monitoring programs allow.

  9. A numerical method for osmotic water flow and solute diffusion with deformable membrane boundaries in two spatial dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lingxing; Mori, Yoichiro

    2017-12-01

    Osmotic forces and solute diffusion are increasingly seen as playing a fundamental role in cell movement. Here, we present a numerical method that allows for studying the interplay between diffusive, osmotic and mechanical effects. An osmotically active solute obeys a advection-diffusion equation in a region demarcated by a deformable membrane. The interfacial membrane allows transmembrane water flow which is determined by osmotic and mechanical pressure differences across the membrane. The numerical method is based on an immersed boundary method for fluid-structure interaction and a Cartesian grid embedded boundary method for the solute. We demonstrate our numerical algorithm with the test case of an osmotic engine, a recently proposed mechanism for cell propulsion.

  10. Mathematical basis for the measurement of absolute and fractional cardiac output with diffusible tracers by compartmental analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charkes, N.D.

    1984-01-01

    Using compartmental analysis methods, a mathematical basis is given for the measurement of absolute and fractional cardiac output with diffusible tracers. Cardiac output is shown to be the product of the blood volume and the sum of the rate constants of tracer egress from blood, modified by a factor reflecting transcapillary diffusibility, the transfer fraction. The return of tracer to the blood and distant (intracellular) events are shown to play no role in the solution. Fractional cardiac output is the ratio of the rate constant of tracer egress from blood to an organ, divided by the sum of the egress constants from blood. Predominantly extracellular ions such as sodium or bromide are best suited for this technique, although theoretically any diffusible tracer whose compartmental model can be solved may be used. It is shown that fractional cardiac output is independent of the transfer fraction, and therefore can be measured accurately by tracers which are not freely diffusible

  11. Diffusion approximation-based simulation of stochastic ion channels: which method to use?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo ePezo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To study the effects of stochastic ion channel fluctuations on neural dynamics, several numerical implementation methods have been proposed. Gillespie’s method for Markov Chains (MC simulation is highly accurate, yet it becomes computationally intensive in the regime of high channel numbers. Many recent works aim to speed simulation time using the Langevin-based Diffusion Approximation (DA. Under this common theoretical approach, each implementation differs in how it handles various numerical difficulties – such as bounding of state variables to [0,1]. Here we review and test a set of the most recently published DA implementations (Dangerfield et al., 2012; Linaro et al., 2011; Huang et al., 2013a; Orio and Soudry, 2012; Schmandt and Galán, 2012; Goldwyn et al., 2011; Güler, 2013, comparing all of them in a set of numerical simulations that asses numerical accuracy and computational efficiency on three different models: the original Hodgkin and Huxley model, a model with faster sodium channels, and a multi-compartmental model inspired in granular cells. We conclude that for low channel numbers (usually below 1000 per simulated compartment one should use MC – which is both the most accurate and fastest method. For higher channel numbers, we recommend using the method by Orio and Soudry (2012, possibly combined with the method by Schmandt and Galán (2012 for increased speed and slightly reduced accuracy. Consequently, MC modelling may be the best method for detailed multicompartment neuron models – in which a model neuron with many thousands of channels is segmented into many compartments with a few hundred channels.

  12. Diffusion approximation-based simulation of stochastic ion channels: which method to use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezo, Danilo; Soudry, Daniel; Orio, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    To study the effects of stochastic ion channel fluctuations on neural dynamics, several numerical implementation methods have been proposed. Gillespie's method for Markov Chains (MC) simulation is highly accurate, yet it becomes computationally intensive in the regime of a high number of channels. Many recent works aim to speed simulation time using the Langevin-based Diffusion Approximation (DA). Under this common theoretical approach, each implementation differs in how it handles various numerical difficulties—such as bounding of state variables to [0,1]. Here we review and test a set of the most recently published DA implementations (Goldwyn et al., 2011; Linaro et al., 2011; Dangerfield et al., 2012; Orio and Soudry, 2012; Schmandt and Galán, 2012; Güler, 2013; Huang et al., 2013a), comparing all of them in a set of numerical simulations that assess numerical accuracy and computational efficiency on three different models: (1) the original Hodgkin and Huxley model, (2) a model with faster sodium channels, and (3) a multi-compartmental model inspired in granular cells. We conclude that for a low number of channels (usually below 1000 per simulated compartment) one should use MC—which is the fastest and most accurate method. For a high number of channels, we recommend using the method by Orio and Soudry (2012), possibly combined with the method by Schmandt and Galán (2012) for increased speed and slightly reduced accuracy. Consequently, MC modeling may be the best method for detailed multicompartment neuron models—in which a model neuron with many thousands of channels is segmented into many compartments with a few hundred channels. PMID:25404914

  13. Boundary element methods applied to two-dimensional neutron diffusion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itagaki, Masafumi

    1985-01-01

    The Boundary element method (BEM) has been applied to two-dimensional neutron diffusion problems. The boundary integral equation and its discretized form have been derived. Some numerical techniques have been developed, which can be applied to critical and fixed-source problems including multi-region ones. Two types of test programs have been developed according to whether the 'zero-determinant search' or the 'source iteration' technique is adopted for criticality search. Both programs require only the fluxes and currents on boundaries as the unknown variables. The former allows a reduction in computing time and memory in comparison with the finite element method (FEM). The latter is not always efficient in terms of computing time due to the domain integral related to the inhomogeneous source term; however, this domain integral can be replaced by the equivalent boundary integral for a region with a non-multiplying medium or with a uniform source, resulting in a significant reduction in computing time. The BEM, as well as the FEM, is well suited for solving irregular geometrical problems for which the finite difference method (FDM) is unsuited. The BEM also solves problems with infinite domains, which cannot be solved by the ordinary FEM and FDM. Some simple test calculations are made to compare the BEM with the FEM and FDM, and discussions are made concerning the relative merits of the BEM and problems requiring future solution. (author)

  14. The evaluation of a population based diffusion tensor image atlas using a ground truth method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hecke, Wim; Leemans, Alexander; D'Agostino, Emiliano; De Backer, Steve; Vandervliet, Evert; Parizel, Paul M.; Sijbers, Jan

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Voxel based morphometry (VBM) is increasingly being used to detect diffusion tensor (DT) image abnormalities in patients for different pathologies. An important requisite for these VBM studies is the use of a high-dimensional, non-rigid coregistration technique, which is able to align both the spatial and the orientational information. Recent studies furthermore indicate that high-dimensional DT information should be included during coregistration for an optimal alignment. In this context, a population based DTI atlas is created that preserves the orientational DT information robustly and contains a minimal bias towards any specific individual data set. Methods: A ground truth evaluation method is developed using a single subject DT image that is deformed with 20 deformation fields. Thereafter, an atlas is constructed based on these 20 resulting images. Thereby, the non-rigid coregistration algorithm is based on a viscous fluid model and on mutual information. The fractional anisotropy (FA) maps as well as the DT elements are used as DT image information during the coregistration algorithm, in order to minimize the orientational alignment inaccuracies. Results: The population based DT atlas is compared with the ground truth image using accuracy and precision measures of spatial and orientational dependent metrics. Results indicate that the population based atlas preserves the orientational information in a robust way. Conclusion: A subject independent population based DT atlas is constructed and evaluated with a ground truth method. This atlas contains all available orientational information and can be used in future VBM studies as a reference system.

  15. Direct method of solving finite difference nonlinear equations for multicomponent diffusion in a gas centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potemki, Valeri G.; Borisevich, Valentine D.; Yupatov, Sergei V.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the the next evolution step in development of the direct method for solving systems of Nonlinear Algebraic Equations (SNAE). These equations arise from the finite difference approximation of original nonlinear partial differential equations (PDE). This method has been extended on the SNAE with three variables. The solving SNAE bases on Reiterating General Singular Value Decomposition of rectangular matrix pencils (RGSVD-algorithm). In contrast to the computer algebra algorithm in integer arithmetic based on the reduction to the Groebner's basis that algorithm is working in floating point arithmetic and realizes the reduction to the Kronecker's form. The possibilities of the method are illustrated on the example of solving the one-dimensional diffusion equation for 3-component model isotope mixture in a ga centrifuge. The implicit scheme for the finite difference equations without simplifying the nonlinear properties of the original equations is realized. The technique offered provides convergence to the solution for the single run. The Toolbox SNAE is developed in the framework of the high performance numeric computation and visualization software MATLAB. It includes more than 30 modules in MATLAB language for solving SNAE with two and three variables. (author)

  16. Coherent quantum transport in disordered systems: II. Temperature dependence of carrier diffusion coefficients from the time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Xinxin; Zhao, Yi; Cao, Jianshu

    2014-01-01

    The time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method for carrier quantum dynamics (Zhong and Zhao 2013 J. Chem. Phys. 138 014111), a truncated version of the stochastic Schrödinger equation/wavefunction approach that approximately satisfies the detailed balance principle and scales well with the size of the system, is applied to investigate the carrier transport in one-dimensional systems including both the static and dynamic disorders on site energies. The predicted diffusion coefficients with respect to temperature successfully bridge from band-like to hopping-type transport. As demonstrated in paper I (Moix et al 2013 New J. Phys. 15 085010), the static disorder tends to localize the carrier, whereas the dynamic disorder induces carrier dynamics. For the weak dynamic disorder, the diffusion coefficients are temperature-independent (band-like property) at low temperatures, which is consistent with the prediction from the Redfield equation, and a linear dependence of the coefficient on temperature (hopping-type property) only appears at high temperatures. In the intermediate regime of dynamic disorder, the transition from band-like to hopping-type transport can be easily observed at relatively low temperatures as the static disorder increases. When the dynamic disorder becomes strong, the carrier motion can follow the hopping-type mechanism even without static disorder. Furthermore, it is found that the memory time of dynamic disorder is an important factor in controlling the transition from the band-like to hopping-type motions. (paper)

  17. Formulation of improved basis sets for the study of polymer dynamics through diffusion theory methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspari, Roberto; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2008-06-28

    In this work a new method is proposed for the choice of basis functions in diffusion theory (DT) calculations. This method, named hybrid basis approach (HBA), combines the two previously adopted long time sorting procedure (LTSP) and maximum correlation approximation (MCA) techniques; the first emphasizing contributions from the long time dynamics, the latter being based on the local correlations along the chain. In order to fulfill this task, the HBA procedure employs a first order basis set corresponding to a high order MCA one and generates upper order approximations according to LTSP. A test of the method is made first on a melt of cis-1,4-polyisoprene decamers where HBA and LTSP are compared in terms of efficiency. Both convergence properties and numerical stability are improved by the use of the HBA basis set whose performance is evaluated on local dynamics, by computing the correlation times of selected bond vectors along the chain, and on global ones, through the eigenvalues of the diffusion operator L. Further use of the DT with a HBA basis set has been made on a 71-mer of syndiotactic trans-1,2-polypentadiene in toluene solution, whose dynamical properties have been computed with a high order calculation and compared to the "numerical experiment" provided by the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in explicit solvent. The necessary equilibrium averages have been obtained by a vacuum trajectory of the chain where solvent effects on conformational properties have been reproduced with a proper screening of the nonbonded interactions, corresponding to a definite value of the mean radius of gyration of the polymer in vacuum. Results show a very good agreement between DT calculations and the MD numerical experiment. This suggests a further use of DT methods with the necessary input quantities obtained by the only knowledge of some experimental values, i.e., the mean radius of gyration of the chain and the viscosity of the solution, and by a suitable vacuum

  18. Investigation of the vapor pressure p of zinc bromide or zinc chloride solutions with methanol by static method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safarov, Javid T. [Heat and Refrigeration Techniques, Azerbaijan Technical University, H. Javid Avn. 25, AZ1073 Baku (Azerbaijan)]. E-mail: javids@azdata.net

    2006-03-15

    Vapor pressures p of ZnBr{sub 2} + CH{sub 3}OH and ZnCl{sub 2} + CH{sub 3}OH solutions at T (298.15 to 323.15) K were measured, activity of solvent a {sub s} and osmotic {phi} coefficients have been evaluated. The experiments were carried out for the ZnBr{sub 2} + CH{sub 3}OH solutions in the molality range m = (0.19972 to 11.05142) mol . kg{sup -1} and for the ZnCl{sub 2} + CH{sub 3}OH solutions in the molality range m (0.42094 to 8.25534) mol . kg{sup -1}. The Antoine equation for the empirical description of the experimental vapor pressure results and the Pitzer-Mayorga model with inclusion of ionic strength dependence of the third virial coefficient for the description of calculated osmotic coefficients were used. The parameters of Pitzer-Mayorga model were used for evaluation of activity coefficients.

  19. Traveling wave solutions of a biological reaction-convection-diffusion equation model by using $(G'/G$ expansion method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnam Javadi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the $(G'/G$-expansion method is applied to solve a biological reaction-convection-diffusion model arising in mathematical biology. Exact traveling wave solutions are obtained by this method. This scheme can be applied to a wide class of nonlinear partial differential equations.

  20. High Stability Performance of Quinary Indium Gallium Zinc Aluminum Oxide Films and Thin-Film Transistors Deposited Using Vapor Cooling Condensation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Hao; Lee, Ching-Ting

    2017-08-01

    High-quality indium gallium zinc aluminum oxide (IGZAO) thin films with various Al contents have been deposited using the vapor cooling condensation method. The electron mobility of the IGZAO films was improved by 89.4% on adding Al cation to IGZO film. The change in the electron concentration and mobility of the IGZAO films was 7.3% and 7.0%, respectively, when the temperature was changed from 300 K to 225 K. These experimental results confirm the high performance and stability of the IGZAO films. The performance stability mechanisms of IGZAO thin-film transistors (TFTs) were investigated in comparison with IGZO TFTs.