WorldWideScience

Sample records for vanishing viscosity method

  1. Boundary layers and the vanishing viscosity limit for incompressible 2D flow

    OpenAIRE

    Filho, Milton C. Lopes

    2007-01-01

    This manuscript is a survey on results related to boundary layers and the vanishing viscosity limit for incompressible flow. It is the lecture notes for a 10 hour minicourse given at the Morningside Center, Academia Sinica, Beijing, PRC from 11/28 to 12/07, 2007. The main topics covered are: a derivation of Prandtl's boundary layer equation; an outline of the rigorous theory of Prandtl's equation, without proofs; Kato's criterion for the vanishing viscosity limit; the vanishing viscosity limi...

  2. Vanishing Shear Viscosity Limit in the Magnetohydrodynamic Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jishan; Jiang, Song; Nakamura, Gen

    2007-03-01

    We study an initial boundary value problem for the equations of plane magnetohydrodynamic compressible flows, and prove that as the shear viscosity goes to zero, global weak solutions converge to a solution of the original equations with zero shear viscosity. As a by-product, this paper improves the related results obtained by Frid and Shelukhin for the case when the magnetic effect is neglected.

  3. Vanishing Viscosity Approach to the Compressible Euler Equations for Transonic Nozzle and Spherically Symmetric Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gui-Qiang G.; Schrecker, Matthew R. I.

    2018-04-01

    We are concerned with globally defined entropy solutions to the Euler equations for compressible fluid flows in transonic nozzles with general cross-sectional areas. Such nozzles include the de Laval nozzles and other more general nozzles whose cross-sectional area functions are allowed at the nozzle ends to be either zero (closed ends) or infinity (unbounded ends). To achieve this, in this paper, we develop a vanishing viscosity method to construct globally defined approximate solutions and then establish essential uniform estimates in weighted L p norms for the whole range of physical adiabatic exponents γ\\in (1, ∞) , so that the viscosity approximate solutions satisfy the general L p compensated compactness framework. The viscosity method is designed to incorporate artificial viscosity terms with the natural Dirichlet boundary conditions to ensure the uniform estimates. Then such estimates lead to both the convergence of the approximate solutions and the existence theory of globally defined finite-energy entropy solutions to the Euler equations for transonic flows that may have different end-states in the class of nozzles with general cross-sectional areas for all γ\\in (1, ∞) . The approach and techniques developed here apply to other problems with similar difficulties. In particular, we successfully apply them to construct globally defined spherically symmetric entropy solutions to the Euler equations for all γ\\in (1, ∞).

  4. Vanishing viscosity limits of mixed hyperbolic–elliptic systems arising in multilayer channel flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papaefthymiou, E S; Papageorgiou, D T

    2015-01-01

    This study considers the spatially periodic initial value problem of 2 × 2 quasi-linear parabolic systems in one space dimension having quadratic polynomial flux functions. These systems arise physically in the interfacial dynamics of viscous immiscible multilayer channel flows. The equations describe the spatiotemporal evolution of phase-separating interfaces with dissipation arising from surface tension (fourth-order) and/or stable stratification effects (second-order). A crucial mathematical aspect of these systems is the presence of mixed hyperbolic–elliptic flux functions that provide the only source of instability. The study concentrates on scaled spatially 2π-periodic solutions as the dissipation vanishes, and in particular the behaviour of such limits when generalized dissipation operators (spanning second to fourth-order) are considered. Extensive numerical computations and asymptotic analysis suggest that the existence (or not) of bounded vanishing viscosity solutions depends crucially on the structure of the flux function. In the absence of linear terms (i.e. homogeneous flux functions) the vanishing viscosity limit does not exist in the L ∞ -norm. On the other hand, if linear terms in the flux function are present the computations strongly suggest that the solutions exist and are bounded in the L ∞ -norm as the dissipation vanishes. It is found that the key mechanism that provides such boundedness centres on persistent spatiotemporal hyperbolic–elliptic transitions. Strikingly, as the dissipation decreases, the flux function becomes almost everywhere hyperbolic except on a fractal set of elliptic regions, whose dimension depends on the order of the regularized operator. Furthermore, the spatial structures of the emerging weak solutions are found to support an increasing number of discontinuities (measure-valued solutions) located in the vicinity of the fractally distributed elliptic regions. For the unscaled problem, such spatially

  5. The vanishing discount problem and viscosity Mather measures. Part 2: boundary value problems

    OpenAIRE

    Ishii, Hitoshi; Mitake, Hiroyoshi; Tran, Hung V.

    2016-01-01

    In arXiv:1603.01051 (Part 1 of this series), we have introduced a variational approach to studying the vanishing discount problem for fully nonlinear, degenerate elliptic, partial differential equations in a torus. We develop this approach further here to handle boundary value problems. In particular, we establish new representation formulas for solutions of discount problems, critical values, and use them to prove convergence results for the vanishing discount problems.

  6. Entropy viscosity method applied to Euler equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delchini, M. O.; Ragusa, J. C.; Berry, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    The entropy viscosity method [4] has been successfully applied to hyperbolic systems of equations such as Burgers equation and Euler equations. The method consists in adding dissipative terms to the governing equations, where a viscosity coefficient modulates the amount of dissipation. The entropy viscosity method has been applied to the 1-D Euler equations with variable area using a continuous finite element discretization in the MOOSE framework and our results show that it has the ability to efficiently smooth out oscillations and accurately resolve shocks. Two equations of state are considered: Ideal Gas and Stiffened Gas Equations Of State. Results are provided for a second-order time implicit schemes (BDF2). Some typical Riemann problems are run with the entropy viscosity method to demonstrate some of its features. Then, a 1-D convergent-divergent nozzle is considered with open boundary conditions. The correct steady-state is reached for the liquid and gas phases with a time implicit scheme. The entropy viscosity method correctly behaves in every problem run. For each test problem, results are shown for both equations of state considered here. (authors)

  7. Entropy viscosity method for nonlinear conservation laws

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2011-05-01

    A new class of high-order numerical methods for approximating nonlinear conservation laws is described (entropy viscosity method). The novelty is that a nonlinear viscosity based on the local size of an entropy production is added to the numerical discretization at hand. This new approach does not use any flux or slope limiters, applies to equations or systems supplemented with one or more entropy inequalities and does not depend on the mesh type and polynomial approximation. Various benchmark problems are solved with finite elements, spectral elements and Fourier series to illustrate the capability of the proposed method. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  8. Entropy viscosity method for nonlinear conservation laws

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc; Pasquetti, Richard; Popov, Bojan

    2011-01-01

    A new class of high-order numerical methods for approximating nonlinear conservation laws is described (entropy viscosity method). The novelty is that a nonlinear viscosity based on the local size of an entropy production is added to the numerical discretization at hand. This new approach does not use any flux or slope limiters, applies to equations or systems supplemented with one or more entropy inequalities and does not depend on the mesh type and polynomial approximation. Various benchmark problems are solved with finite elements, spectral elements and Fourier series to illustrate the capability of the proposed method. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  9. Gravimetric capillary method for kinematic viscosity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Iwan, J.; Alexander, D.; Jin, Wei-Qing

    1992-01-01

    A novel version of the capillary method for viscosity measurements of liquids is presented. Viscosity data can be deduced in a straightforward way from mass transfer data obtained by differential weighing during the gravity-induced flow of the liquid between two cylindrical chambers. Tests of this technique with water, carbon tetrachloride, and ethanol suggest that this arrangement provides an accuracy of about +/- 1 percent. The technique facilitates operation under sealed, isothermal conditions and, thus can readily be applied to reactive and/or high vapor pressure liquids.

  10. RELAP-7 Numerical Stabilization: Entropy Viscosity Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Berry; M. O. Delchini; J. Ragusa

    2014-06-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL's modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5's capability and extends the analysis capability for all reactor system simulation scenarios. RELAP-7 utilizes a single phase and a novel seven-equation two-phase flow models as described in the RELAP-7 Theory Manual (INL/EXT-14-31366). The basic equation systems are hyperbolic, which generally require some type of stabilization (or artificial viscosity) to capture nonlinear discontinuities and to suppress advection-caused oscillations. This report documents one of the available options for this stabilization in RELAP-7 -- a new and novel approach known as the entropy viscosity method. Because the code is an ongoing development effort in which the physical sub models, numerics, and coding are evolving, so too must the specific details of the entropy viscosity stabilization method. Here the fundamentals of the method in their current state are presented.

  11. Variational Iteration Method for Volterra Functional Integrodifferential Equations with Vanishing Linear Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Konuralp

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Application process of variational iteration method is presented in order to solve the Volterra functional integrodifferential equations which have multi terms and vanishing delays where the delay function θ(t vanishes inside the integral limits such that θ(t=qt for 0

  12. Methods of viscosity measurements in sealed ampoules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    1999-07-01

    Viscosity of semiconductors and metallic melts is usually measured by oscillating cup method. This method utilizes the melts contained in vacuum sealed silica ampoules, thus the problems related to volatility, contamination, and high temperature and pressure can be alleviate. In a typical design, the time required for a single measurement is of the order of one hour. In order to reduce this time to a minute range, a high resolution angular detection system is implemented in our design of the viscometer. Furthermore, an electromagnet generating a rotational magnetic field (RMF) is incorporated into the apparatus. This magnetic field can be used to remotely and nonintrusively measure the electrical conductivity of the melt. It can also be used to induce a well controlled rotational flow in the system. The transient behavior of this flow can potentially yield of the fluid. Based on RMF implementation, two novel viscometry methods are proposed in this work: a) the transient torque method, b) the resonance method. A unified theoretical approach to the three methods is presented along with the initial test result of the constructed apparatus. Advantages of each of the method are discussed.

  13. Chebyshev super spectral viscosity method for water hammer analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Chen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new fast and efficient algorithm, Chebyshev super spectral viscosity (SSV method, is introduced to solve the water hammer equations. Compared with standard spectral method, the method's advantage essentially consists in adding a super spectral viscosity to the equations for the high wave numbers of the numerical solution. It can stabilize the numerical oscillation (Gibbs phenomenon and improve the computational efficiency while discontinuities appear in the solution. Results obtained from the Chebyshev super spectral viscosity method exhibit greater consistency with conventional water hammer calculations. It shows that this new numerical method offers an alternative way to investigate the behavior of the water hammer in propellant pipelines.

  14. Convergence of a residual based artificial viscosity finite element method

    KAUST Repository

    Nazarov, Murtazo

    2013-02-01

    We present a residual based artificial viscosity finite element method to solve conservation laws. The Galerkin approximation is stabilized by only residual based artificial viscosity, without any least-squares, SUPG, or streamline diffusion terms. We prove convergence of the method, applied to a scalar conservation law in two space dimensions, toward an unique entropy solution for implicit time stepping schemes. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Chebyshev super spectral viscosity method for a fluidized bed model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarra, Scott A.

    2003-01-01

    A Chebyshev super spectral viscosity method and operator splitting are used to solve a hyperbolic system of conservation laws with a source term modeling a fluidized bed. The fluidized bed displays a slugging behavior which corresponds to shocks in the solution. A modified Gegenbauer postprocessing procedure is used to obtain a solution which is free of oscillations caused by the Gibbs-Wilbraham phenomenon in the spectral viscosity solution. Conservation is maintained by working with unphysical negative particle concentrations

  16. Microfluidic method for measuring viscosity using images from smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sooyeong; Kim, Kyung Chun; Yeom, Eunseop

    2018-05-01

    The viscosity of a fluid is the most important characteristic in fluid rheology. Many microfluidic devices have been proposed for easily measuring the fluid viscosity of small samples. A hybrid system consisting of a smartphone and microfluidic device can offer a mobile laboratory for performing a wide range of detection and analysis functions related to healthcare. In this study, a new mobile sensing method based on a microfluidic device was proposed for fluid viscosity measurements. By separately delivering sample and reference fluids into the two inlets of a Y-shaped microfluidic device, an interfacial line is induced at downstream of the device. Because the interfacial width (W) between the sample and reference fluid flows was determined by their pressure ratio, the viscosity (μ) of the sample could be estimated by measuring the interfacial width. To distinguish the interfacial width of a sample, optical images of the flows at downstream of the Y-shaped microfluidic device were acquired using a smartphone. To check the measurement accuracy of the proposed method, the viscosities of glycerol mixtures were compared with those measured by a conventional viscometer. The proposed technique was applied to monitor the variations in blood and oil samples depending on storage or rancidity. We expect that this mobile sensing method based on a microfluidic device could be utilized as a viscometer with significant advantages in terms of mobility, ease-of-operation, and data management.

  17. A combinatorial method for the vanishing of the Poisson brackets of an integrable Lotka-Volterra system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Yoshiaki

    2009-01-01

    The combinatorial method is useful to obtain conserved quantities for some nonlinear integrable systems, as an alternative to the Lax representation method. Here we extend the combinatorial method and introduce an elementary geometry to show the vanishing of the Poisson brackets of the Hamiltonian structure for a Lotka-Volterra system of competing species. We associate a set of points on a circle with a set of species of the Lotka-Volterra system, where the dominance relations between points are given by the dominance relations between the species. We associate each term of the conserved quantities with a subset of points on the circle, which simplifies to show the vanishing of the Poisson brackets

  18. Analysis and numerical simulation of compressible two-phase flows using relaxation methods. Contribution to the treatment of vanishing phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, K.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with the Baer-Nunziato two-phase flow model. The main objective of this work is to propose some techniques to cope with phase vanishing regimes which produce important instabilities in the model and its numerical simulations. Through analysis and simulation methods using Suliciu relaxation approximations, we prove that in these regimes, the solutions can be stabilised by introducing some extra dissipation of the total mixture entropy. In a first approach, called the Eulerian approach, the exact resolution of the relaxation Riemann problem provides an accurate entropy-satisfying numerical scheme, which turns out to be much more efficient in terms of CPU-cost than the classical and very simple Rusanov's scheme. Moreover, the scheme is proved to handle the vanishing phase regimes with great stability. The scheme, first developed in 1D, is then extended in 3D and implemented in an industrial code developed by EDF. The second approach, called the acoustic splitting approach, considers a separation of fast acoustic waves from slow material waves. The objective is to avoid the resonance due to the interaction between these two types of waves, and to allow an implicit treatment of the acoustics, while material waves are explicitly discretized. The resulting scheme is very simple and allows to deal simply with phase vanishing. The originality of this work is to use new dissipative closure laws for the interfacial velocity and pressure, in order to control the solutions of the Riemann problem associated with the acoustic step, in the phase vanishing regimes. (author)

  19. Tensor viscosity method for convection in numerical fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dukowicz, J.K.; Ramshaw, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    A new method, called the tensor viscosity method, is described for differencing the convective terms in multidimensional numerical fluid dynamics. The method is the proper generalization to two or three dimensions of interpolated donor cell differencing in one dimension, and is designed to achieve numerical stability with minimal numerical damping. It is a single-step method that is distinguished by simplicity and case of implementation, even in the case of an arbitrary non-rectangular mesh. It should therefore be useful in finite-element as well as finite-difference formulations

  20. High viscosity fluid simulation using particle-based method

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Yuanzhang

    2011-03-01

    We present a new particle-based method for high viscosity fluid simulation. In the method, a new elastic stress term, which is derived from a modified form of the Hooke\\'s law, is included in the traditional Navier-Stokes equation to simulate the movements of the high viscosity fluids. Benefiting from the Lagrangian nature of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method, large flow deformation can be well handled easily and naturally. In addition, in order to eliminate the particle deficiency problem near the boundary, ghost particles are employed to enforce the solid boundary condition. Compared with Finite Element Methods with complicated and time-consuming remeshing operations, our method is much more straightforward to implement. Moreover, our method doesn\\'t need to store and compare to an initial rest state. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective and efficient to handle the movements of highly viscous flows, and a large variety of different kinds of fluid behaviors can be well simulated by adjusting just one parameter. © 2011 IEEE.

  1. Implementation of the entropy viscosity method with the discontinuous Galerkin method

    KAUST Repository

    Zingan, Valentin

    2013-01-01

    The notion of entropy viscosity method introduced in Guermond and Pasquetti [21] is extended to the discontinuous Galerkin framework for scalar conservation laws and the compressible Euler equations. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Various methods for determination of liquid viscosity with nuclear track membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Shilun

    1991-01-01

    A systematic study has been performed of the methods for determination of liquid viscosity with nuclear track membranes. Absolute and relative measurements have been suggested, the latter including relative measurements of absolute viscosity and kinematic viscosity. The study shows that the nuclear track membrane is a unique element for determination of liquid viscosity because it is small in volume, accurate in results and easy to manipulate in industries and laboratories

  3. A new method to determine the energy of vanishing flow, using particle-particle azimuthal correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buta, A [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire; [Institute of Atomic Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Angelique, J C; Bizard, G; Brou, R; Cussol, D [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire; Auger, G; Cabot, C [Grand Accelerateur National d` Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Cassagnou, Y [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d` Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l` Instrumentation Associee; Crema, E [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire; [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; El Masri, Y [Louvain Univ., Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Unite de Physique Nucleaire; others, and

    1996-09-01

    Measuring the in-plane flow parameter appears to be a promising method to gain information on the equation of state of nuclear matter. A new method, based on particle-particle azimuthal correlations is proposed. This method does not require the knowledge of the reaction plane. The collisions Zn+Ni and Ar+Al are presented as an example. (K.A.).

  4. Effective viscosity of dispersions approached by a statistical continuum method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mellema, J.; Willemse, M.W.M.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of the determination of the effective viscosity of disperse systems (emulsions, suspensions) is considered. On the basis of the formal solution of the equations governing creeping flow in a statistically homogeneous dispersion, the effective viscosity is expressed in a series expansion

  5. Comparsion of maximum viscosity and viscometric method for identification of irradiated sweet potato starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Sang Duk; Yang, Jae Seung

    2000-01-01

    A study was carried out to compare viscosity and maximum viscosity methods for the detection of irradiated sweet potato starch. The viscosity of all samples decreased by increasing stirring speeds and irradiation doses. This trend was similar for maximum viscosity. Regression coefficients and expressions of viscosity and maximum viscosity with increasing irradiation dose were 0.9823 (y=335.02e -0. 3 366x ) at 120 rpm and 0.9939 (y =-42.544x+730.26). This trend in viscosity was similar for all stirring speeds. Parameter A, B and C values showed a dose dependent relation and were a better parameter for detecting irradiation treatment than maximum viscosity and the viscosity value it self. These results suggest that the detection of irradiated sweet potato starch is possible by both the viscometric and maximum visosity method. Therefore, the authors think that the maximum viscosity method can be proposed as one of the new methods to detect the irradiation treatment for sweet potato starch

  6. High pressure changes of the castor oil viscosity by ultrasonic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostocki, A J; Siegoczynski, R M; Kielczynski, P; Szalewski, M

    2008-01-01

    The pressure change of viscosity of castor oil have been measured by ultrasonic method within the range of pressure up to 0.9 GPa. For the measurement, the authors have applied a new ultrasonic method based on Bleustein-Gulyaev (B-G) waves. For the lower pressures (up to 0.3 GPa) the results have been compared with earlier results obtained by falling body method, whereas for the higher pressure range results were compared with those obtained by the flow type viscometer. The measurements have shown: 1. Exponential rise of viscosity with pressure up to 0.4 GPa according to the Barus formula. 2. Extraordinary increment of viscosity at constant pressure during phase transition. 3. The decomposition of the high pressure phase during the decompression process have shown very large hysteresis of viscosity on pressure. 4. After the decompression process the viscosity lasts higher then a initial value for several hours

  7. Stability analysis of explicit entropy viscosity methods for non-linear scalar conservation equations

    KAUST Repository

    Bonito, Andrea; Guermond, Jean-Luc; Popov, Bojan

    2013-01-01

    We establish the L2-stability of an entropy viscosity technique applied to nonlinear scalar conservation equations. First-and second-order explicit time-stepping techniques using continuous finite elements in space are considered. The method

  8. A comparison of automatic and intentional instructions when using the method of vanishing cues in acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Gerard A; Venn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-four participants with acquired brain injury learned word lists under two forms of vanishing cues - one in which the learning trial instructions encouraged intentional retrieval (i.e., explicit memory) and one in which they encouraged automatic retrieval (which encompasses implicit memory). The automatic instructions represented a novel approach in which the cooperation of participants was actively sought to avoid intentional retrieval. Intentional instructions resulted in fewer errors during the learning trials and better performance on immediate and delayed retrieval tests. The advantage of intentional over automatic instructions was generally less for those who had more severe memory and/or executive impairments. Most participants performed better under intentional instructions on both the immediate and the delayed tests. Although those who were more severely impaired in both memory and executive function also did better with intentional instructions on the immediate retrieval test, they were significantly more likely to show an advantage for automatic instructions on the delayed test. It is suggested that this pattern of results may reflect impairments in the consolidation of intentional memories in this group. When using vanishing cues, automatic instructions may be better for those with severe consolidation impairments, but otherwise intentional instructions may be better.

  9. Reliable Viscosity Calculation from Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulations: A Time Decomposition Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Otani, Akihito; Maginn, Edward J

    2015-08-11

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics is often used in conjunction with a Green-Kubo integral of the pressure tensor autocorrelation function to compute the shear viscosity of fluids. This approach is computationally expensive and is subject to a large amount of variability because the plateau region of the Green-Kubo integral is difficult to identify unambiguously. Here, we propose a time decomposition approach for computing the shear viscosity using the Green-Kubo formalism. Instead of one long trajectory, multiple independent trajectories are run and the Green-Kubo relation is applied to each trajectory. The averaged running integral as a function of time is fit to a double-exponential function with a weighting function derived from the standard deviation of the running integrals. Such a weighting function minimizes the uncertainty of the estimated shear viscosity and provides an objective means of estimating the viscosity. While the formal Green-Kubo integral requires an integration to infinite time, we suggest an integration cutoff time tcut, which can be determined by the relative values of the running integral and the corresponding standard deviation. This approach for computing the shear viscosity can be easily automated and used in computational screening studies where human judgment and intervention in the data analysis are impractical. The method has been applied to the calculation of the shear viscosity of a relatively low-viscosity liquid, ethanol, and relatively high-viscosity ionic liquid, 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane-sulfonyl)imide ([BMIM][Tf2N]), over a range of temperatures. These test cases show that the method is robust and yields reproducible and reliable shear viscosity values.

  10. Viscosity of confined two-dimensional Yukawa liquids: A nonequilibrium method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landmann, S.; Kählert, H.; Thomsen, H.; Bonitz, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present a nonequilibrium method that allows one to determine the viscosity of two-dimensional dust clusters in an isotropic confinement. By applying a tangential external force to the outer parts of the cluster (e.g., with lasers), a sheared velocity profile is created. The decay of the angular velocity towards the center of the confinement potential is determined by a balance between internal (viscosity) and external friction (neutral gas damping). The viscosity can then be calculated from a fit of the measured velocity profile to a solution of the Navier-Stokes equation. Langevin dynamics simulations are used to demonstrate the feasibility of the method. We find good agreement of the measured viscosity with previous results for macroscopic Yukawa plasmas

  11. Imaging by the SSFSE single slice method at different viscosities of bile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Hiroya; Usui, Motoki; Fukunaga, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Naruto; Ikegami, Toshimi [Kawasaki Hospital, Kobe (Japan)

    2001-11-01

    The single shot fast spin echo single thick slice method (single slice method) is a technique that visualizes the water component alone using a heavy T{sub 2}. However, this method is considered to be markedly affected by changes in the viscosity of the material because a very long TE is used, and changes in the T{sub 2} value, which are related to viscosity, directly affect imaging. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between the effects of TE and the T{sub 2} value of bile in the single slice method and also examined the relationship between the signal intensity of bile on T{sub 1}- and T{sub 2}-weighted images and imaging by MR cholangiography (MRC). It was difficult to image bile with high viscosities at a usual effective TE level of 700-1,500 ms. With regard to the relationship between the signal intensity of bile and MRC imaging, all T{sub 2} values of the bile samples showing relatively high signal intensities on the T{sub 1}-weighted images suggested high viscosities, and MRC imaging of these bile samples was poor. In conclusion, MRC imaging of bile with high viscosities was poor with the single slice method. Imaging by the single slice method alone of bile showing a relatively high signal intensity on T{sub 1}-weighted images should be avoided, and combination with other MRC sequences should be used. (author)

  12. Imaging by the SSFSE single slice method at different viscosities of bile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Hiroya; Usui, Motoki; Fukunaga, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Naruto; Ikegami, Toshimi

    2001-01-01

    The single shot fast spin echo single thick slice method (single slice method) is a technique that visualizes the water component alone using a heavy T 2 . However, this method is considered to be markedly affected by changes in the viscosity of the material because a very long TE is used, and changes in the T 2 value, which are related to viscosity, directly affect imaging. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between the effects of TE and the T 2 value of bile in the single slice method and also examined the relationship between the signal intensity of bile on T 1 - and T 2 -weighted images and imaging by MR cholangiography (MRC). It was difficult to image bile with high viscosities at a usual effective TE level of 700-1,500 ms. With regard to the relationship between the signal intensity of bile and MRC imaging, all T 2 values of the bile samples showing relatively high signal intensities on the T 1 -weighted images suggested high viscosities, and MRC imaging of these bile samples was poor. In conclusion, MRC imaging of bile with high viscosities was poor with the single slice method. Imaging by the single slice method alone of bile showing a relatively high signal intensity on T 1 -weighted images should be avoided, and combination with other MRC sequences should be used. (author)

  13. High viscosity fluid simulation using particle-based method

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Yuanzhang; Bao, Kai; Zhu, Jian; Wu, Enhua

    2011-01-01

    the boundary, ghost particles are employed to enforce the solid boundary condition. Compared with Finite Element Methods with complicated and time-consuming remeshing operations, our method is much more straightforward to implement. Moreover, our method doesn

  14. A general vanishing theorem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Let E be a vector bundle and L be a line bundle over a smooth projective variety X. In this article, we give a condition for the vanishing of Dolbeault cohomology groups of the form H p,q when Sα+β E ⊗ L is ample. This condition is shown to be invariant under the interchange of p and q. The optimality of.

  15. Convergence of a residual based artificial viscosity finite element method

    KAUST Repository

    Nazarov, Murtazo

    2013-01-01

    . We prove convergence of the method, applied to a scalar conservation law in two space dimensions, toward an unique entropy solution for implicit time stepping schemes. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Vanishing in Plain Sight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams, Grace Alexandra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Playfully negotiating the historical constructs of theatrical vanishing and its disturbingly female trappings this paper centers on the creation of Bautier de Kolta’s l’Escamotage D’une Dame, an illusion used to screen the anxieties of the male British populous, irked by a buoyant surplus in unmarried, white, middle class women, in the late 1880s. Introducing texts such as W. R Greg’s Why are women Redundant? This paper makes ever more apparent the political, violent and sexual connotations of the female body in magical feats of performative disappearance. From the photographic curios of hidden mothers to the dark room of the séance, the conversation unfurls around the many forms of female vanishing, culminating in a discussion of the contemporary artwork Escamotage (Grace A Williams, 2015 that takes the Persian rug as both a motif of magical vanishing and a tool for the exposure of form. This paper was originally delivered as a performance from within a ‘Zig-Zag’ illusion box, in collaboration with artist David Cheeseman. The first critical analysis of women’s role within magical illusions, delivered by a female artist from within a magical prop that continues to dismember female bodies for entertainment in the contemporary magic market.

  17. Applicability of Stokes method for measuring viscosity of mixtures with concentration gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Medina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available After measuring density and viscosity of a mixture of glycerin and water contained in a vertical pipe, a variation of these properties according to depth is observed. These gradients are typical of non-equilibrium states related to the lower density of water and the fact that relatively long times are necessary to achieve homogeneity. In the same pipe, the falling velocity of five little spheres is measured as a function of depth, and then a numerical fit is performed which agrees very well with experimental data. Based on the generalization of these results, the applicability of Stokes method is discussed for measuring viscosity of mixtures with a concentration gradient.

  18. Stability analysis of explicit entropy viscosity methods for non-linear scalar conservation equations

    KAUST Repository

    Bonito, Andrea

    2013-10-03

    We establish the L2-stability of an entropy viscosity technique applied to nonlinear scalar conservation equations. First-and second-order explicit time-stepping techniques using continuous finite elements in space are considered. The method is shown to be stable independently of the polynomial degree of the space approximation under the standard CFL condition. © 2013 American Mathematical Society.

  19. Viscosity of dilute suspensions of rodlike particles: A numerical simulation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Satoru; Matsuoka, Takaaki

    1994-02-01

    The recently developed simulation method, named as the particle simulation method (PSM), is extended to predict the viscosity of dilute suspensions of rodlike particles. In this method a rodlike particle is modeled by bonded spheres. Each bond has three types of springs for stretching, bending, and twisting deformation. The rod model can therefore deform by changing the bond distance, bond angle, and torsion angle between paired spheres. The rod model can represent a variety of rigidity by modifying the bond parameters related to Young's modulus and the shear modulus of the real particle. The time evolution of each constituent sphere of the rod model is followed by molecular-dynamics-type approach. The intrinsic viscosity of a suspension of rodlike particles is derived from calculating an increased energy dissipation for each sphere of the rod model in a viscous fluid. With and without deformation of the particle, the motion of the rodlike particle was numerically simulated in a three-dimensional simple shear flow at a low particle Reynolds number and without Brownian motion of particles. The intrinsic viscosity of the suspension of rodlike particles was investigated on orientation angle, rotation orbit, deformation, and aspect ratio of the particle. For the rigid rodlike particle, the simulated rotation orbit compared extremely well with theoretical one which was obtained for a rigid ellipsoidal particle by use of Jeffery's equation. The simulated dependence of the intrinsic viscosity on various factors was also identical with that of theories for suspensions of rigid rodlike particles. For the flexible rodlike particle, the rotation orbit could be obtained by the particle simulation method and it was also cleared that the intrinsic viscosity decreased as occurring of recoverable deformation of the rodlike particle induced by flow.

  20. Entropy Viscosity Method for High-Order Approximations of Conservation Laws

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, J. L.

    2010-09-17

    A stabilization technique for conservation laws is presented. It introduces in the governing equations a nonlinear dissipation function of the residual of the associated entropy equation and bounded from above by a first order viscous term. Different two-dimensional test cases are simulated - a 2D Burgers problem, the "KPP rotating wave" and the Euler system - using high order methods: spectral elements or Fourier expansions. Details on the tuning of the parameters controlling the entropy viscosity are given. © 2011 Springer.

  1. Entropy Viscosity Method for High-Order Approximations of Conservation Laws

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, J. L.; Pasquetti, R.

    2010-01-01

    A stabilization technique for conservation laws is presented. It introduces in the governing equations a nonlinear dissipation function of the residual of the associated entropy equation and bounded from above by a first order viscous term. Different two-dimensional test cases are simulated - a 2D Burgers problem, the "KPP rotating wave" and the Euler system - using high order methods: spectral elements or Fourier expansions. Details on the tuning of the parameters controlling the entropy viscosity are given. © 2011 Springer.

  2. Novel Detection Method for Consecutive DC Commutation Failure Based on Daubechies Wavelet with 2nd-Order Vanishing Moments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Lin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate detection and effective control strategy of commutation failure (CF of high voltage direct current (HVDC are of great significance for keeping the safe and stable operations of the hybrid power grid. At first, a novel detection method for consecutive CF is proposed. Concretely, the 2nd and higher orders’ derivative values of direct current are summarized as the core to judge CF by analyzing the physical characteristics of the direct current waveform of the converter station in CF. Then, the Daubechies wavelet coefficient that can represent the 2nd and higher order derivative values of direct current is derived. Once the wavelet coefficients of the sampling points are detected to exceed the threshold, the occurrence of CF is confirmed. Furthermore, by instantly increasing advanced firing angle β in the inverter side, an additional emergency control strategy to prevent subsequent CF is proposed. Eventually, with simulations of the benchmark model, the effectiveness and superiorities of the proposed detection method and additional control strategy in accuracy and rapidity are verified.

  3. Estimation of structural film viscosity based on the bubble rise method in a nanofluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Heon Ki; Nikolov, Alex D; Wasan, Darsh T

    2018-04-15

    When a single bubble moves at a very low capillary number (10 -7 ) through a liquid with dispersed nanoparticles (nanofluid) inside a vertical tube/capillary, a film is formed between the bubble surface and the tube wall and the nanoparticles self-layer inside the confined film. We measured the film thickness using reflected light interferometry. We calculated the film structural energy isotherm vs. the film thickness from the film-meniscus contact angle measurements using the reflected light interferometric method. Based on the experimental measurement of the film thickness and the calculated values of the film structural energy barrier, we estimated the structural film viscosity vs. the film thickness using the Frenkel approach. Because of the nanoparticle film self-layering phenomenon, we observed a gradual increase in the film viscosity with the decreasing film thickness. However, we observed a significant increase in the film viscosity accompanied by a step-wise decrease in the bubble velocity when the film thickness decreased from 3 to 2 particle layers due to the structural transition in the film. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tight closure and vanishing theorems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.E.

    2001-01-01

    Tight closure has become a thriving branch of commutative algebra since it was first introduced by Mel Hochster and Craig Huneke in 1986. Over the past few years, it has become increasingly clear that tight closure has deep connections with complex algebraic geometry as well, especially with those areas of algebraic geometry where vanishing theorems play a starring role. The purpose of these lectures is to introduce tight closure and to explain some of these connections with algebraic geometry. Tight closure is basically a technique for harnessing the power of the Frobenius map. The use of the Frobenius map to prove theorems about complex algebraic varieties is a familiar technique in algebraic geometry, so it should perhaps come as no surprise that tight closure is applicable to algebraic geometry. On the other hand, it seems that so far we are only seeing the tip of a large and very beautiful iceberg in terms of tight closure's interpretation and applications to algebraic geometry. Interestingly, although tight closure is a 'characteristic p' tool, many of the problems where tight closure has proved useful have also yielded to analytic (L2) techniques. Despite some striking parallels, there had been no specific result directly linking tight closure and L∼ techniques. Recently, however, the equivalence of an ideal central to the theory of tight closure was shown to be equivalent to a certain 'multiplier ideal' first defined using L2 methods. Presumably, deeper connections will continue to emerge. There are two main types of problems for which tight closure has been helpful: in identifying nice structure and in establishing uniform behavior. The original algebraic applications of tight closure include, for example, a quick proof of the Hochster-Roberts theorem on the Cohen-Macaulayness of rings of invariants, and also a refined version of the Brianqon-Skoda theorem on the uniform behaviour of integral closures of powers of ideals. More recent, geometric

  5. The calculation of viscosity of liquid n-decane and n-hexadecane by the Green-Kubo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, S. T.; Cummings, P. T.; Cochran, H. D.

    This short commentary presents the result of long molecular dynamics simulation calculations of the shear viscosity of liquid n-decane and n-hexadecane using the Green-Kubo integration method. The relaxation time of the stress-stress correlation function is compared with those of rotation and diffusion. The rotational and diffusional relaxation times, which are easy to calculate, provide useful guides for the required simulation time in viscosity calculations. Also, the computational time required for viscosity calculations of these systems by the Green-Kubo method is compared with the time required for previous non-equilibrium molecular dynamics calculations of the same systems. The method of choice for a particular calculation is determined largely by the properties of interest, since the efficiencies of the two methods are comparable for calculation of the zero strain rate viscosity.

  6. Continuous dependence estimates for viscosity solutions of fully nonlinear degenerate elliptic equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espen R. Jakobsen

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Using the maximum principle for semicontinuous functions [3,4], we prove a general ``continuous dependence on the nonlinearities'' estimate for bounded Holder continuous viscosity solutions of fully nonlinear degenerate elliptic equations. Furthermore, we provide existence, uniqueness, and Holder continuity results for bounded viscosity solutions of such equations. Our results are general enough to encompass Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman-Isaacs's equations of zero-sum, two-player stochastic differential games. An immediate consequence of the results obtained herein is a rate of convergence for the vanishing viscosity method for fully nonlinear degenerate elliptic equations.

  7. Clinical diagnostic of pleural effusions using a high-speed viscosity measurement method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurth, Cedric; Klein, Katherine; van Nimwegen, Lena; Korn, Ronald; Vijayaraghavan, Krishnaswami; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2011-08-01

    We present a novel bio-analytical method to discriminate between transudative and exudative pleural effusions based on a high-speed video analysis of a solid glass sphere impacting a liquid. Since the result depends on the solution viscosity, it can ultimately replace the battery of biochemical assays currently used. We present results obtained on a series of 7 pleural effusions obtained from consenting patients by analyzing both the splash observed after the glass impactor hits the liquid surface, and in a configuration reminiscent of the drop ball viscometer with added sensitivity and throughput provided by the high-speed camera. The results demonstrate distinction between the pleural effusions and good correlation with the fluid chemistry analysis to accurately differentiate exudates and transudates for clinical purpose. The exudative effusions display a viscosity around 1.39 ± 0.08 cP whereas the transudative effusion was measured at 0.89 ± 0.09 cP, in good agreement with previous reports.

  8. A frequency domain linearized Navier-Stokes method including acoustic damping by eddy viscosity using RANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Andreas; Kierkegaard, Axel; Weng, Chenyang

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a method for including damping of acoustic energy in regions of strong turbulence is derived for a linearized Navier-Stokes method in the frequency domain. The proposed method is validated and analyzed in 2D only, although the formulation is fully presented in 3D. The result is applied in a study of the linear interaction between the acoustic and the hydrodynamic field in a 2D T-junction, subject to grazing flow at Mach 0.1. Part of the acoustic energy at the upstream edge of the junction is shed as harmonically oscillating disturbances, which are conveyed across the shear layer over the junction, where they interact with the acoustic field. As the acoustic waves travel in regions of strong shear, there is a need to include the interaction between the background turbulence and the acoustic field. For this purpose, the oscillation of the background turbulence Reynold's stress, due to the acoustic field, is modeled using an eddy Newtonian model assumption. The time averaged flow is first solved for using RANS along with a k-ε turbulence model. The spatially varying turbulent eddy viscosity is then added to the spatially invariant kinematic viscosity in the acoustic set of equations. The response of the 2D T-junction to an incident acoustic field is analyzed via a plane wave scattering matrix model, and the result is compared to experimental data for a T-junction of rectangular ducts. A strong improvement in the agreement between calculation and experimental data is found when the modification proposed in this paper is implemented. Discrepancies remaining are likely due to inaccuracies in the selected turbulence model, which is known to produce large errors e.g. for flows with significant rotation, which the grazing flow across the T-junction certainly is. A natural next step is therefore to test the proposed methodology together with more sophisticated turbulence models.

  9. Longitudinal and bulk viscosities of expanded rubidium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaheri, Ali Hossein Mohammad; Srivastava, Sunita; Tankeshwar, K

    2003-01-01

    First three non-vanishing sum rules for the bulk and longitudinal stress auto-correlation functions have been evaluated for liquid Rb at six thermodynamic states along the liquid-vapour coexistence curve. The Mori memory function formalism and the frequency sum rules have been used to calculate bulk and longitudinal viscosities. The results thus obtained for the ratio of bulk viscosity to shear viscosity have been compared with experimental and other theoretical predictions wherever available. The values of the bulk viscosity have been found to be more than the corresponding values of the shear viscosity for all six thermodynamic states investigated here

  10. Preconditioning methods to improve SAGD performance in heavy oil and bitumen reservoirs with variable oil phase viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, I.D. [Gushor Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; Larter, S.R.; Adams, J.J.; Snowdon, L.; Jiang, C. [Gushor Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[Calgary Univ., Calgary, AB (Canada). Dept. of Geoscience

    2008-10-15

    This study investigated preconditioning techniques for altering reservoir fluid properties prior to steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) recovery processes. Viscosity-reducing agents were distributed in mobile reservoir water. Simulations were conducted to demonstrate the method's ability to modify oil viscosity prior to steam injection. The study simulated the action of water soluble organic solvents that preferentially partitioned in the oil phase. The solvent was injected with water into the reservoir in a slow waterflood that did not displace oil from the near wellbore region. A reservoir simulation model was used to investigate the technique. Shu's correlation was used to establish a viscosity correlation for the bitumen and solvent mixtures. Solvent injection was modelled by converting the oil phase viscosity through time. Over the first 2 years, oil rates of the preconditioned case were double that of the non-preconditioned case study. However, after 11 years, the preconditioned case's rates declined below rates observed in the non-preconditioned case. The model demonstrated that oil viscosity distributions were significantly altered using the preconditioners. The majority of the most viscous oil surrounding the production well was significantly reduced. It was concluded that accelerated steam chamber growth provided faster access to lower viscosity materials at the top of the reservoir. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  11. Upwind methods for the Baer–Nunziato equations and higher-order reconstruction using artificial viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraysse, F.; Redondo, C.; Rubio, G.; Valero, E.

    2016-01-01

    This article is devoted to the numerical discretisation of the hyperbolic two-phase flow model of Baer and Nunziato. A special attention is paid on the discretisation of intercell flux functions in the framework of Finite Volume and Discontinuous Galerkin approaches, where care has to be taken to efficiently approximate the non-conservative products inherent to the model equations. Various upwind approximate Riemann solvers have been tested on a bench of discontinuous test cases. New discretisation schemes are proposed in a Discontinuous Galerkin framework following the criterion of Abgrall and the path-conservative formalism. A stabilisation technique based on artificial viscosity is applied to the high-order Discontinuous Galerkin method and compared against classical TVD-MUSCL Finite Volume flux reconstruction.

  12. Upwind methods for the Baer–Nunziato equations and higher-order reconstruction using artificial viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraysse, F., E-mail: francois.fraysse@rs2n.eu [RS2N, St. Zacharie (France); E. T. S. de Ingeniería Aeronáutica y del Espacio, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Redondo, C.; Rubio, G.; Valero, E. [E. T. S. de Ingeniería Aeronáutica y del Espacio, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-12-01

    This article is devoted to the numerical discretisation of the hyperbolic two-phase flow model of Baer and Nunziato. A special attention is paid on the discretisation of intercell flux functions in the framework of Finite Volume and Discontinuous Galerkin approaches, where care has to be taken to efficiently approximate the non-conservative products inherent to the model equations. Various upwind approximate Riemann solvers have been tested on a bench of discontinuous test cases. New discretisation schemes are proposed in a Discontinuous Galerkin framework following the criterion of Abgrall and the path-conservative formalism. A stabilisation technique based on artificial viscosity is applied to the high-order Discontinuous Galerkin method and compared against classical TVD-MUSCL Finite Volume flux reconstruction.

  13. Regression and Sparse Regression Methods for Viscosity Estimation of Acid Milk From it’s Sls Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharifzadeh, Sara; Skytte, Jacob Lercke; Nielsen, Otto Højager Attermann

    2012-01-01

    Statistical solutions find wide spread use in food and medicine quality control. We investigate the effect of different regression and sparse regression methods for a viscosity estimation problem using the spectro-temporal features from new Sub-Surface Laser Scattering (SLS) vision system. From...... with sparse LAR, lasso and Elastic Net (EN) sparse regression methods. Due to the inconsistent measurement condition, Locally Weighted Scatter plot Smoothing (Loess) has been employed to alleviate the undesired variation in the estimated viscosity. The experimental results of applying different methods show...

  14. Development of a group contribution method for determination of viscosity of ionic liquids at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharagheizi, Farhad; Ilani-Kashkouli, Poorandokht; Mohammadi, Amir H.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a wide literature survey has been carried out to collect an extensive set of liquid viscosity data for ionic liquids (ILs). A data set consisting of 1672 viscosity values and comprising 443 ILs was collated from 204 different literature sources. Using this data set, a reliable grou...

  15. Paperless or vanishing society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner Luke, Joy

    2002-06-01

    In the 1940s color photography became available and within a few years, extremely popular. As people switched from black and white photographs made with the old metallic silver process to the new color films, pictures taken to record their lives and families began a slow disappearing act. The various color processes, coupled with the substrates they were printed on, affected their longevity, but many color photographs taken from the late 1950s through the 1970s, and even into the 1980s, faded not only when exposed to the light, but also when stored in the dark. Henry Wilhelm's excellent book 'The Permanence and Care of Color Photographs' documents this history in detail. Today we are making another transition in the storage of pictures and information. There are questions about the longevity of different types of digital storage, and also of the images printed by various types of inkjet printers, or by laser printers using colored toners. Very expensive and very beautiful works of art produced on Iris printers are appearing in art exhibitions. Some of these are referred to as Giclee prints and are offered on excellent papers. Artists are told the prints will last a lifetime; and if by change they don't it is only necessary to make another print. Henry Wilhelm has begun to test and rate these images for lightfastness; however, his test method was developed for examining longevity in colored photographs. It is of interest to find out how these prints will hold up in the tests required for fine art materials. Thus far companies producing digital inks and printers have not invested the time and money necessary to develop an American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard method for evaluating the lightfastness of digital prints. However, it is possible to use ASTM D 5383, Standard Practice for Visual Determination of the Lightfastness of Art Materials by Art Technologists, to pinpoint colors that will fade in a short time, even though the test is not as

  16. Viscosity measurements - a comprehensive overview on the method and its applicability for the identification of irradiated foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuernberger, E.; Heide, L.; Boegl, K.W.

    1991-01-01

    The viscosity of a foodstuff depends mainly on the composition and the amount of starch, pectins and cellulose, which may undergo changes after irradiation. The investigation on the applicability of viscosity measurement for the identification of irradiated foods showed so far that this method seems to be applicable only to a definite number of spices and foods. The optimal method has to be determined empirically, because the reason is still unknown, why in some cases, the viscosity values decrease and in other cases increase after irradiation - and why sometimes no changes occur at all. Until now, the following irradiated spices can be identified by this method: cardamom, cinnamon, curcuma, horse-radish, nutmeg, mustard-seed and white pepper. (21 figs, 2 tabs, 10 refs)

  17. Multi-lane detection based on multiple vanishing points detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanxiang; Nie, Yiming; Dai, Bin; Wu, Tao

    2015-03-01

    Lane detection plays a significant role in Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) for intelligent vehicles. In this paper we present a multi-lane detection method based on multiple vanishing points detection. A new multi-lane model assumes that a single lane, which has two approximately parallel boundaries, may not parallel to others on road plane. Non-parallel lanes associate with different vanishing points. A biological plausibility model is used to detect multiple vanishing points and fit lane model. Experimental results show that the proposed method can detect both parallel lanes and non-parallel lanes.

  18. Mangghuer Embroidery: A Vanishing Tradition

    OpenAIRE

    Aila Pullinen

    2015-01-01

    Aila Pullinen. 2015. Mangghuer Embroidery: A Vanishing Tradition IN Gerald Roche and CK Stuart (eds) Asian Highlands Perspectives 36: Mapping the Monguor, 178-188, 301-332. Visits were undertaken in the years 2001 and 2002 to Minhe Hui and Mangghuer (Tu) Autonomous County, Haidong Municipality, Qinghai Province, China to research and document Mangghuer embroidery. This research is summarized in terms of the history of Mangghuer embroidery, tools and materials, embroidery techniques, embr...

  19. Real-time monitoring of viscosity changes triggered by chemical reactions using a high-speed imaging method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooseok Jung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a method to monitor in real time peptide self-assembly or polymerization events. The temperature controlled modification of a previously reported splash test setup using high speed imaging enables to observe and measure rheological changes in liquid samples and can, in turn, monitor a peptide self-assembly or polymerization reaction accompanied with specific changes in solution viscosity. A series of 2 mm glass beads were dropped into an Fmoc-L3-OMe (methylated Fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl-trileucine solution mixed with Alcalase 2.4 L (EC 3.4.21.62 or first dipped in Tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED, a catalyst for acrylamide polymerization, then dropped into acrylamide. The resulting splashes were observed using a high speed camera. The results demonstrate that the viscosity changes of the peptide sample during the peptide self-assembly or acrylamide polymerization affect the specific shape and evolution of the splashing event. Typically, the increase in viscosity while the reaction occurs decreased the size of the splash and the amount of time for the splash to reach maximum extension from the moment for the beads to impact the sample. The ability to observe rheological changes of sample state presents the opportunity to monitor the real time dynamics of peptide self-assembly or cross-polymerization. Keywords: High-speed imaging, Self-assembly, Viscosity sensor

  20. Long-time stability effects of quadrature and artificial viscosity on nodal discontinuous Galerkin methods for gas dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Bradford; Hackl, Jason; Balachandar, Sivaramakrishnan

    2017-11-01

    Nodal discontinuous Galerkin schemes present an attractive approach to robust high-order solution of the equations of fluid mechanics, but remain accompanied by subtle challenges in their consistent stabilization. The effect of quadrature choices (full mass matrix vs spectral elements), over-integration to manage aliasing errors, and explicit artificial viscosity on the numerical solution of a steady homentropic vortex are assessed over a wide range of resolutions and polynomial orders using quadrilateral elements. In both stagnant and advected vortices in periodic and non-periodic domains the need arises for explicit stabilization beyond the numerical surface fluxes of discontinuous Galerkin spectral elements. Artificial viscosity via the entropy viscosity method is assessed as a stabilizing mechanism. It is shown that the regularity of the artificial viscosity field is essential to its use for long-time stabilization of small-scale features in nodal discontinuous Galerkin solutions of the Euler equations of gas dynamics. Supported by the Department of Energy Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program Contract DE-NA0002378.

  1. Comparing Two Methods of Neural Networks to Evaluate Dead Oil Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Dabiri-Atashbeyk

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Reservoir characterization and asset management require comprehensive information about formation fluids. In fact, it is not possible to find accurate solutions to many petroleum engineering problems without having accurate pressure-volume-temperature (PVT data. Traditionally, fluid information has been obtained by capturing samples and then by measuring the PVT properties in a laboratory. In recent years, neural network has been applied to a large number of petroleum engineering problems. In this paper, a multi-layer perception neural network and radial basis function network (both optimized by a genetic algorithm were used to evaluate the dead oil viscosity of crude oil, and it was found out that the estimated dead oil viscosity by the multi-layer perception neural network was more accurate than the one obtained by radial basis function network.

  2. A method for matching the refractive index and kinematic viscosity of a blood analog for flow visualization in hydraulic cardiovascular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T T; Biadillah, Y; Mongrain, R; Brunette, J; Tardif, J C; Bertrand, O F

    2004-08-01

    In this work, we propose a simple method to simultaneously match the refractive index and kinematic viscosity of a circulating blood analog in hydraulic models for optical flow measurement techniques (PIV, PMFV, LDA, and LIF). The method is based on the determination of the volumetric proportions and temperature at which two transparent miscible liquids should be mixed to reproduce the targeted fluid characteristics. The temperature dependence models are a linear relation for the refractive index and an Arrhenius relation for the dynamic viscosity of each liquid. Then the dynamic viscosity of the mixture is represented with a Grunberg-Nissan model of type 1. Experimental tests for acrylic and blood viscosity were found to be in very good agreement with the targeted values (measured refractive index of 1.486 and kinematic viscosity of 3.454 milli-m2/s with targeted values of 1.47 and 3.300 milli-m2/s).

  3. Numerical investigation on lateral migration and lift force of single bubble in simple shear flow in low viscosity fluid using volume of fluid method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhongchun, Li; Xiaoming, Song; Shengyao, Jiang; Jiyang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A VOF simulation of bubble in low viscosity fluid was conducted. • Lift force in different viscosity fluid had different lateral migration characteristics. • Bubble with different size migrated to different direction. • Shear stress triggered the bubble deformation process and the bubble deformation came along with the oscillation behaviors. - Abstract: Two phase flow systems have been widely used in industrial engineering. Phase distribution characteristics are vital to the safety operation and optimization design of two phase flow systems. Lift force has been known as perpendicular to the bubbles’ moving direction, which is one of the mechanisms of interfacial momentum transfer. While most widely used lift force correlations, such as the correlation of Tomiyama et al. (2002), were obtained by experimentally tracking single bubble trajectories in high viscosity glycerol–water mixture, the applicability of these models into low viscosity fluid, such as water in nuclear engineering system, needs to be further evaluated. In the present paper, bubble in low viscosity fluid in shear flow was investigated in a full 3D numerical simulation and the volume of fluid (VOF) method was applied to capture the interface. The fluid parameter: fluid viscosity, bubble parameter: diameter and external flow parameters: shear stress magnitude and liquid velocity were examined. Comparing with bubble in high viscosity shear flow and bubble in low viscosity still flow, relative large bubble in low viscosity shear flow keep an oscillation way towards the moving wall and experienced a shape deformation process. The oscillation amplitude increased as the viscosity of fluid decreased. Small bubble migrated to the static wall in a line with larger migration velocity than that in high viscosity fluid and no deformation occurred. The shear stress triggered the oscillation behaviors while it had no direct influence with the behavior. The liquid velocity had no effect on

  4. Bulk viscosity in holographic Lifshitz hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyos, Carlos; Kim, Bom Soo; Oz, Yaron

    2014-01-01

    We compute the bulk viscosity in holographic models dual to theories with Lifshitz scaling and/or hyperscaling violation, using a generalization of the bulk viscosity formula derived in arXiv:1103.1657 from the null focusing equation. We find that only a class of models with massive vector fields are truly Lifshitz scale invariant, and have a vanishing bulk viscosity. For other holographic models with scalars and/or massless vector fields we find a universal formula in terms of the dynamical exponent and the hyperscaling violation exponent

  5. Metrics with vanishing quantum corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coley, A A; Hervik, S; Gibbons, G W; Pope, C N

    2008-01-01

    We investigate solutions of the classical Einstein or supergravity equations that solve any set of quantum corrected Einstein equations in which the Einstein tensor plus a multiple of the metric is equated to a symmetric conserved tensor T μν (g αβ , ∂ τ g αβ , ∂ τ ∂ σ g αβ , ...,) constructed from sums of terms, the involving contractions of the metric and powers of arbitrary covariant derivatives of the curvature tensor. A classical solution, such as an Einstein metric, is called universal if, when evaluated on that Einstein metric, T μν is a multiple of the metric. A Ricci flat classical solution is called strongly universal if, when evaluated on that Ricci flat metric, T μν vanishes. It is well known that pp-waves in four spacetime dimensions are strongly universal. We focus attention on a natural generalization; Einstein metrics with holonomy Sim(n - 2) in which all scalar invariants are zero or constant. In four dimensions we demonstrate that the generalized Ghanam-Thompson metric is weakly universal and that the Goldberg-Kerr metric is strongly universal; indeed, we show that universality extends to all four-dimensional Sim(2) Einstein metrics. We also discuss generalizations to higher dimensions

  6. Suitability of thermoluminescence, chemiluminescence, ESR and viscosity measurements as detection method for the irradiation of medicinal herbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuettler, C.; Gebhardt, G.; Stock, A.; Helle, N.; Boegl, K.W.

    1993-01-01

    Chemiluminescence, electron spin resonance, thermoluminescence and viscosity measurements have been investigated for their suitability as detection method for the irradiation of the medicinal herbs anise seeds (anisi fructus), valerian roots (valerianae radix), redberry leaves (uvae ursi folium), birch leaves (betulae folium), greek hay seeds (foenugraeci semen), cayenne pepper (capsici fructus acer), black-aldertee bark (frangulae cortex), fennel fruits (feoniculi fructus), rose hip shells (cynosbati fructus), coltsfoot (farfarae folium), acorus roots (calami rhizoma), chamomile flowers (matricariae flos), caraway (carvi fructus), lavender flowers (lavandulae flos), linseed (lini semen), lime tree flowers (tiliae flos), St. Mary's thistle fruit (cardui mariae herba), lemon balm (melissae folium), java tea (orthosiphonis folium), peppermint (menthae piperitae folium), sage leaves (salviae folium), scouring rush (equiseti herba), senna leaves (sennae folium), plantain herbs (plantaginis lanceolata herba), thyme herbs (thymi herba), juniper berries (juniperi fructus), hawthorne herbs (crataegi folium), wheat starch (amylum tritici) and wormwood (absinthii herba). Depending on the herbs, the methods used were more or less suitable. Chemiluminescence measurements showed the smallest differences between untreated and irradiated samples whereas thermoluminescence measurements on isolated minerals from the vegetable drugs gave better results. In some herbs radiation-specific radicals could be identified by ESR spectroscopy. Viscosity measurement is suitable for some herbs as fast and inexpensive method for screening. (orig.) [de

  7. Hide and vanish: data sets where the most parsimonious tree is known but hard to find, and their implications for tree search methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goloboff, Pablo A

    2014-10-01

    Three different types of data sets, for which the uniquely most parsimonious tree can be known exactly but is hard to find with heuristic tree search methods, are studied. Tree searches are complicated more by the shape of the tree landscape (i.e. the distribution of homoplasy on different trees) than by the sheer abundance of homoplasy or character conflict. Data sets of Type 1 are those constructed by Radel et al. (2013). Data sets of Type 2 present a very rugged landscape, with narrow peaks and valleys, but relatively low amounts of homoplasy. For such a tree landscape, subjecting the trees to TBR and saving suboptimal trees produces much better results when the sequence of clipping for the tree branches is randomized instead of fixed. An unexpected finding for data sets of Types 1 and 2 is that starting a search from a random tree instead of a random addition sequence Wagner tree may increase the probability that the search finds the most parsimonious tree; a small artificial example where these probabilities can be calculated exactly is presented. Data sets of Type 3, the most difficult data sets studied here, comprise only congruent characters, and a single island with only one most parsimonious tree. Even if there is a single island, missing entries create a very flat landscape which is difficult to traverse with tree search algorithms because the number of equally parsimonious trees that need to be saved and swapped to effectively move around the plateaus is too large. Minor modifications of the parameters of tree drifting, ratchet, and sectorial searches allow travelling around these plateaus much more efficiently than saving and swapping large numbers of equally parsimonious trees with TBR. For these data sets, two new related criteria for selecting taxon addition sequences in Wagner trees (the "selected" and "informative" addition sequences) produce much better results than the standard random or closest addition sequences. These new methods for Wagner

  8. ERROR DISTRIBUTION EVALUATION OF THE THIRD VANISHING POINT BASED ON RANDOM STATISTICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Li

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available POS, integrated by GPS / INS (Inertial Navigation Systems, has allowed rapid and accurate determination of position and attitude of remote sensing equipment for MMS (Mobile Mapping Systems. However, not only does INS have system error, but also it is very expensive. Therefore, in this paper error distributions of vanishing points are studied and tested in order to substitute INS for MMS in some special land-based scene, such as ground façade where usually only two vanishing points can be detected. Thus, the traditional calibration approach based on three orthogonal vanishing points is being challenged. In this article, firstly, the line clusters, which parallel to each others in object space and correspond to the vanishing points, are detected based on RANSAC (Random Sample Consensus and parallelism geometric constraint. Secondly, condition adjustment with parameters is utilized to estimate nonlinear error equations of two vanishing points (VX, VY. How to set initial weights for the adjustment solution of single image vanishing points is presented. Solving vanishing points and estimating their error distributions base on iteration method with variable weights, co-factor matrix and error ellipse theory. Thirdly, under the condition of known error ellipses of two vanishing points (VX, VY and on the basis of the triangle geometric relationship of three vanishing points, the error distribution of the third vanishing point (VZ is calculated and evaluated by random statistical simulation with ignoring camera distortion. Moreover, Monte Carlo methods utilized for random statistical estimation are presented. Finally, experimental results of vanishing points coordinate and their error distributions are shown and analyzed.

  9. Error Distribution Evaluation of the Third Vanishing Point Based on Random Statistical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.

    2012-07-01

    POS, integrated by GPS / INS (Inertial Navigation Systems), has allowed rapid and accurate determination of position and attitude of remote sensing equipment for MMS (Mobile Mapping Systems). However, not only does INS have system error, but also it is very expensive. Therefore, in this paper error distributions of vanishing points are studied and tested in order to substitute INS for MMS in some special land-based scene, such as ground façade where usually only two vanishing points can be detected. Thus, the traditional calibration approach based on three orthogonal vanishing points is being challenged. In this article, firstly, the line clusters, which parallel to each others in object space and correspond to the vanishing points, are detected based on RANSAC (Random Sample Consensus) and parallelism geometric constraint. Secondly, condition adjustment with parameters is utilized to estimate nonlinear error equations of two vanishing points (VX, VY). How to set initial weights for the adjustment solution of single image vanishing points is presented. Solving vanishing points and estimating their error distributions base on iteration method with variable weights, co-factor matrix and error ellipse theory. Thirdly, under the condition of known error ellipses of two vanishing points (VX, VY) and on the basis of the triangle geometric relationship of three vanishing points, the error distribution of the third vanishing point (VZ) is calculated and evaluated by random statistical simulation with ignoring camera distortion. Moreover, Monte Carlo methods utilized for random statistical estimation are presented. Finally, experimental results of vanishing points coordinate and their error distributions are shown and analyzed.

  10. Detection of Irradiated Korean Wheat Flour by Viscosity and Pulsed Photostimulated Luminescence (PPSL) Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, S.D.; Chang, K.S.; Oh, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    This study was carried out to establish methods for irradiation detection of irradiation in Korean wheat flour by pulsed photostimulated luminescence (PPSL) and viscometric methods. The photon counts of the irradiated Korean wheat flour measured by PPSL immediately after irradiation increased with increasing irradiation dose. The photon counts in the irradiated Korean wheat flour almost disappeared with lapse of time after storage in normal room conditions, but irradiation detection was still possible after 6 months in darkroom conditions

  11. On vanishing of vacuum energy for superstrings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, A.; Perelomov, A.

    1986-01-01

    Hypothesis, concerning the structure of formulae for vacuum diagrams in the first-quantized superstring theory is proposed. The analytical measure in the integration over moduli space is proportional to the sum over spin structures on Riemann surfaces and vanishes because of the Riemann identities for Θ-constants

  12. Natural occupation numbers: When do they vanish?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesbertz, K.J.H.; Van Leeuwen, R.

    The non-vanishing of the natural orbital (NO) occupation numbers of the one-particle density matrix of many-body systems has important consequences for the existence of a density matrix-potential mapping for nonlocal potentials in reduced density matrix functional theory and for the validity of the

  13. Leukoencephalopathy With Vanishing White Matter: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bugiani, M.; Boor, I.; Powers, J.M.; Scheper, G.C.; van der Knaap, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    Vanishing white matter (VWM) is one of the most prevalent inherited childhood leukoencephalopathies, but this may affect people ofall ages, including neonates and adults. It is a progressive disorder clinically dominated by cerebellar ataxia and in which minor stress conditions, such as fever or

  14. Leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bugiani, Marianna; Boor, Ilja; Powers, James M.; Scheper, Gert C.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.

    2010-01-01

    Vanishing white matter (VWM) is one of the most prevalent inherited childhood leukoencephalopathies, but this may affect people of all ages, including neonates and adults. It is a progressive disorder clinically dominated by cerebellar ataxia and in which minor stress conditions, such as fever or

  15. A comparison of performance of several artificial intelligence methods for predicting the dynamic viscosity of TiO2/SAE 50 nano-lubricant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmat Esfe, Mohammad; Tatar, Afshin; Ahangar, Mohammad Reza Hassani; Rostamian, Hossein

    2018-02-01

    Since the conventional thermal fluids such as water, oil, and ethylene glycol have poor thermal properties, the tiny solid particles are added to these fluids to increase their heat transfer improvement. As viscosity determines the rheological behavior of a fluid, studying the parameters affecting the viscosity is crucial. Since the experimental measurement of viscosity is expensive and time consuming, predicting this parameter is the apt method. In this work, three artificial intelligence methods containing Genetic Algorithm-Radial Basis Function Neural Networks (GA-RBF), Least Square Support Vector Machine (LS-SVM) and Gene Expression Programming (GEP) were applied to predict the viscosity of TiO2/SAE 50 nano-lubricant with Non-Newtonian power-law behavior using experimental data. The correlation factor (R2), Average Absolute Relative Deviation (AARD), Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), and Margin of Deviation were employed to investigate the accuracy of the proposed models. RMSE values of 0.58, 1.28, and 6.59 and R2 values of 0.99998, 0.99991, and 0.99777 reveal the accuracy of the proposed models for respective GA-RBF, CSA-LSSVM, and GEP methods. Among the developed models, the GA-RBF shows the best accuracy.

  16. Vanishing embryo syndrome’ in IVF/ICSI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Grove, Jakob; Schendel, Diana

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a Danish population-based cohort study assessing the risk of cerebral palsy in children bornafter IVF, we made some interesting observations regarding ‘vanishing co-embryos’. METHODS andRESULTS: All live-born children born in Denmark from 1 January 1995 to 31 December 2000 were...... included inthis analysis. The children conceived by IVF/ICSI (9444) were identified through the IVF Register, the childrenconceived without IVF/ICSI (395 025) were identified through The Danish Medical Birth Register. Main outcomemeasure was the incidence of cerebral palsy. Within the IVF/ICSI children we...... found indications of an increasedrisk of cerebral palsy in those children resulting from pregnancies, where the number of embryos transferred washigher than the number of children born. CONCLUSIONS: The association between vanishing embryo syndromeand incidence of cerebral palsy following IVF requires...

  17. The viscosity of dimethyl ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Jakobsen, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    and NOx traps are installed. The most significant problem encountered when engines are fuelled with DME is that the injection equipment breaks down prematurely due to extensive wear. This tribology issue can be explained by the very low lubricity and viscosity of DME. Recently, laboratory methods have...... appeared capable of measuring these properties of DME. The development of this is rendered difficult because DME has to be pressurised to remain in the liquid state and it dissolves most of the commercially available elastomers. This paper deals fundamentally with the measurement of the viscosity of DME...... and extends the discussion to the difficulty of viscosity establishing of very thin fluids. The main issue here is that it is not easy to calibrate the viscometers in the very low viscosity range corresponding to about one-fifth of that of water. The result is that the low viscosity is measured at high...

  18. Moose models with vanishing S parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casalbuoni, R.; De Curtis, S.; Dominici, D.

    2004-01-01

    In the linear moose framework, which naturally emerges in deconstruction models, we show that there is a unique solution for the vanishing of the S parameter at the lowest order in the weak interactions. We consider an effective gauge theory based on K SU(2) gauge groups, K+1 chiral fields, and electroweak groups SU(2) L and U(1) Y at the ends of the chain of the moose. S vanishes when a link in the moose chain is cut. As a consequence one has to introduce a dynamical nonlocal field connecting the two ends of the moose. Then the model acquires an additional custodial symmetry which protects this result. We examine also the possibility of a strong suppression of S through an exponential behavior of the link couplings as suggested by the Randall Sundrum metric

  19. Vanishing cosmological constant in elementary particles theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisano, F.; Tonasse, M.D.

    1997-01-01

    The quest of a vanishing cosmological constant is considered in the simplest anomaly-free chiral gauge extension of the electroweak standard model where the new physics is limited to a well defined additional flavordynamics above the Fermi scale, namely up to a few TeVs by matching the gauge coupling constants at the electroweak scale, and with an extended Higgs structure. In contrast to the electroweak standard model, it is shown how the extended scalar sector of the theory allows a vanishing or a very small cosmological constant. the details of the cancellation mechanism are presented. At accessible energies the theory is indistinguishable from the standard model of elementary particles and it is in agreement with all existing data. (author). 32 refs

  20. Free convective boundary layers in variable-viscosity fluids by the method of local nonsimilarity: application to plumes in the earth's mantle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quareni, F.; Yuen, D.A.; Eby, H.E.

    1983-01-01

    The effects due to departures from local similarity in steady-state boundary layers ascending through a fluid with strongly variable viscosity are examined with the local-nonsimilarity method. Both the absolute temperature and the hydrostatic pressure appear in the argument of an exponential in the viscosity function. The fluid-dynamical system studied here is that which characterizes plume structures in the Earth's mantle. By means of an iterative approach, two successive nonlinear boundary value problems are solved simultaneously and the errors incurred in the locally similar solutions are then assessed from a comparison between the first (locally similar) and the second level of a system of truncated equations. Three different sources of nonsimilarity have been considered: 1) localized radiogenic hearting within the plume, 2) ambient thermal stratification, 3) pressure dependence of mantle rheology. Of particular interest is an appraisal of the degree of accuracy of the locally similar solutions as a function of viscosity contrast within the boundary layer. For the range of viscosity contrast examined, up to 10 8 , the velocity and temperature fields between the first- and second-level solutions differ at most by 20 to 30%, for the rheological parameter values relevant to the Earth's mantle

  1. Vanishing points detection using combination of fast Hough transform and deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshkus, Alexander; Ingacheva, Anastasia; Nikolaev, Dmitry

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we propose a novel method for vanishing points detection based on convolutional neural network (CNN) approach and fast Hough transform algorithm. We show how to determine fast Hough transform neural network layer and how to use it in order to increase usability of the neural network approach to the vanishing point detection task. Our algorithm includes CNN with consequence of convolutional and fast Hough transform layers. We are building estimator for distribution of possible vanishing points in the image. This distribution can be used to find candidates of vanishing point. We provide experimental results from tests of suggested method using images collected from videos of road trips. Our approach shows stable result on test images with different projective distortions and noise. Described approach can be effectively implemented for mobile GPU and CPU.

  2. Determination of Viscosity-Average Molecular Weight of Chitosan using Intrinsic Viscosity Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norzita Yacob; Norhashidah Talip; Maznah Mahmud

    2011-01-01

    Molecular weight of chitosan can be determined by different techniques such as Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC), Static Light Scattering (SLS) and intrinsic viscosity measurement. Determination of molecular weight by intrinsic viscosity measurement is a simple method for characterization of chitosan. Different concentrations of chitosan were prepared and measurement was done at room temperature. The flow time data was used to calculate the intrinsic viscosity by extrapolating the reduced viscosity to zero concentration. The value of intrinsic viscosity was then recalculated into the viscosity-average molecular weight using Mark-Houwink equation. (author)

  3. The vanishing volume of D = 4 superspace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossard, Guillaume, E-mail: bossard@cpht.polytechnique.f [Ecole Polytechnique (CNRS), Palaiseau Cedex (France). Centre de Physique Theorique; Howe, P.S., E-mail: paul.howe@kcl.ac.u [University of London (United Kingdom). King' s College. Dept. of Mathematics; Stelle, K.S., E-mail: stelle@imperial.ac.u [Imperial College London (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Group; Vanhove, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.vanhove@cea.f [University of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2011-07-01

    The volume of on-shell D = 4, N = 8 superspace is shown to vanish. Despite this, it is shown that there is a fully supersymmetric and duality-invariant candidate {nabla}{sup 8}R{sup 4} counterterm corresponding to an anticipated seven-loop logarithmic divergence in D = 4. We construct this counterterm explicitly and also give the complete nonlinear extension of the 1=8-BPS {nabla}{sup 6}R{sup 4} invariant. Similar results are derived for N = 4; 5 and 6. (author)

  4. Neutrino mass matrices with vanishing determinant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Bhag C.; Pulido, Joao; Picariello, Marco

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the prospects for neutrinoless double beta decay, texture zeros. and equalities between neutrino mass matrix elements in scenarios with vanishing determinant mass matrices for vanishing and finite θ 13 mixing angles in normal and inverse mass hierarchies. For normal hierarchy and both zero and finite θ 13 it is found that neutrinoless double beta decay cannot be observed by any of the present or next generation experiments, while for inverse hierarchy it is, on the contrary, accessible to experiments. Regarding texture zeros and equalities between mass matrix elements, we find that in both normal and inverse hierarchies with θ 13 =0 no texture zeros nor any such equalities can exist apart from the obvious ones. For θ 13 ≠0 some texture zeros become possible. In normal hierarchy two texture zeros occur if 8.1x10 -2 ≤sinθ 13 ≤9.1x10 -2 while in inverse hierarchy three are possible, one with sinθ 13 ≥7x10 -3 and two others with sinθ 13 ≥0.18. All equalities between mass matrix elements are impossible with θ 13 ≠0

  5. Determination of the Viscosity by Means of the Optical Methods Utilizing the Bend Loss of the Vibrating Fiber

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fedorchenko, Alexander I.; Stachiv, Ivo

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2011), s. 741-744 ISSN 1546-198X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200760801; GA ČR GA106/09/1573 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : viscosity determination * bend loss sensor * resonance Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.819, year: 2011 http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/asp/senlet/2011/00000009/00000002/art00059

  6. The story of antimatter matter's vanished twin

    CERN Document Server

    Borissov, Guennadi

    2018-01-01

    Each elementary particle contained within every known substance has an almost identical twin called its antiparticle. Existing data clearly indicate that equal numbers of particles and antiparticles were initially created soon after the birth of the universe. Despite this, all objects around us, as well as all the stars in all the known galaxies, are made of particles, while antiparticles have almost completely vanished. The reasons behind this disappearance are not yet fully known. Uncovering them will allow us to not only penetrate much deeper into the structure of matter, but also to understand the secret mechanisms that determine the genesis and development of our immense universe. That is why explaining the mystery of the missing antimatter is currently considered to be one of the main tasks of particle physics. This book tells the story of all the achievements in solving the problem of the missing antiparticles including the latest developments in the field. It is written by Prof. Guennadi Borissov, an...

  7. Laser Induced Forward Transfer of High Viscosity Silver Paste for New Metallization Methods in Photovoltaic and Flexible Electronics Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Munoz-Martin, D.; Morales, M.; Molpeceres, C.; Sánchez-Cortezon, E.; Murillo-Gutierrez, J.

    Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) has been studied in the past as a promising approach for precise metallization in electronics using metallic inks and pastes. In this work we present large area metallization using LIFT of fully commercial silver-based pastes initially designed for solar cell screen-printing. We discuss the mechanisms for the material transfer both in ns and ps regimes of irradiation of these high viscosity materials, and the potential use of this technique in the photovoltaic industry (both in standard c-Si solar cells and thin film technologies) and flexible electronics devices. In particular we summarize the results of our group in this field, demonstrating that our approach is capable of improving the aspect ratio of the standard metallization patterns achieved with screen-printing technologies in those technological fields and, in addition, of fulfilling the requirements imposed by the mechanical properties of the substrates in flexible electronic applications.

  8. Stability analysis of WONDY (a hydrocode based on the artifical viscosity method of von Neumann and Richtmyer) for a special case of Maxwell's Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.L.

    1978-01-01

    The artification viscosity method of von Neumann and Richtmyer was originally designed and analyzed for stability in the case when the material was an ideal gas. Recently a hydrocode (WONDY) based on the von Neumann-Richymyer scheme was used in calculating wave progagation problems in materials obeying a form of Maxwell's material law; signs of an unstable difference scheme appeared. A stability analysis shows that the timestep restrictions required for stability in certain cases can be more stringent for material laws of the Maxwell type than they are for material laws of the ideal gas type

  9. The “Axial” (“Vanishing Axis” Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Sofron

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper approaches the axial perspective, a method of spatial representation that precedes the invention of the Renaissance geometrical perspective. Despite being typical to ancient Greek and Roman art, the axial perspective can also be identified during the Middle Ages and the early Renaissance period and it represents the first form of systematic convergence of parallel lines. At the same time, the paper presents Erwin Panofsky's theories on this spatial suggestion method. Trying to offer it a scientific foundation, the researcher builds a system that he calls "the vanishing axis perspective" and puts forward a series of arguments in favour of the existence of such a perspective. Although the axial perspectival constructions imply awkward superimpositions of planes that might seem geometrically inaccurate, this method of spatial structuring of the image constitutes an important stage in the process of identifying solutions for the faithful reproduction of concrete reality and an essential stepin the development process of thevanishing point perspective.

  10. Determination of viscosity-average molecular weight of chitosan using intrinsic viscosity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norzita Yacob; Norhashidah Talip; Maznah Mahmud; Nurul Aizam Idayu Mat Sani; Nor Akma Samsuddin; Norafifah Ahmad Fabillah

    2013-01-01

    Determination of molecular weight by intrinsic viscosity measurement is a simple method for characterization of chitosan. To study the effect of radiation on molecular weight, chitosan was first irradiated using electron beam at different doses prior to measurement. Different concentrations of chitosan were prepared and measurement was done at room temperature. The flow time data was used to calculate the intrinsic viscosity by extrapolating the reduced viscosity to zero concentration. The value of intrinsic viscosity was then recalculated into the viscosity-average molecular weight using Mark-Houwink equation. (Author)

  11. Vanishing "tattoo" multisensor for biomedical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moczko, E.; Meglinski, I.; Piletsky, S.

    2008-02-01

    Currently, precise non-invasive diagnostics systems for the real-time multi detection and monitoring of physiological parameters and chemical analytes in the human body are urgently required by clinicians, physiologists and bio-medical researchers. We have developed a novel cost effective smart 'vanishing tattoo' (similar to temporary child's tattoos) consisting of environmental-sensitive dyes. Painlessly impregnated into the skin the smart tattoo is capable of generating optical/fluorescence changes (absorbance, transmission, reflectance, emission and/or luminescence within UV, VIS or NIR regions) in response to physical or chemical changes. These changes allow the identification of colour pattern changes similar to bar-code scanning. Such a system allows an easy, cheap and robust comprehensive detection of various parameters and analytes in a small volume of sample (e.g. variations in pH, temperature, ionic strength, solvent polarity, presence of redox species, surfactants, oxygen). These smart tattoos have possible applications in monitoring the progress of disease and transcutaneous drug delivery. The potential of this highly innovative diagnostic tool is wide and diverse and can impact on routine clinical diagnostics, general therapeutic management, skin care and cosmetic products testing as well as fundamental physiological investigations.

  12. On the monoaxial stabilization of a rigid body under vanishing restoring torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, A. Yu.; Aleksandrova, E. B.; Tikhonov, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    The problem of monoaxial stabilization of a rigid body is studied. It is assumed that a linear time-invariant dissipative torque and a time-varying restoring torque vanishing as time increases act on the body. Both the case of linear restoring torque and that of essentially nonlinear one are considered. With the aid of the decomposition method, conditions are obtained under which we can guarantee the asymptotic stability of an equilibrium position of the body despite the vanishing of the restoring torque. A numerical simulation is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  13. Suitability of thermoluminescence, chemiluminescence, ESR and viscosity measurements as detection method for the irradiation of medicinal herbs; Eignung von Thermolumineszenz-, Chemilumineszenz-, ESR- und Viskositaetsmessungen zur Identifizierung strahlenbehandelter Arzneidrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuettler, C.; Gebhardt, G.; Stock, A.; Helle, N.; Boegl, K.W.

    1993-12-31

    Chemiluminescence, electron spin resonance, thermoluminescence and viscosity measurements have been investigated for their suitability as detection method for the irradiation of the medicinal herbs anise seeds (anisi fructus), valerian roots (valerianae radix), redberry leaves (uvae ursi folium), birch leaves (betulae folium), greek hay seeds (foenugraeci semen), cayenne pepper (capsici fructus acer), black-aldertee bark (frangulae cortex), fennel fruits (feoniculi fructus), rose hip shells (cynosbati fructus), coltsfoot (farfarae folium), acorus roots (calami rhizoma), chamomile flowers (matricariae flos), caraway (carvi fructus), lavender flowers (lavandulae flos), linseed (lini semen), lime tree flowers (tiliae flos), St. Mary`s thistle fruit (cardui mariae herba), lemon balm (melissae folium), java tea (orthosiphonis folium), peppermint (menthae piperitae folium), sage leaves (salviae folium), scouring rush (equiseti herba), senna leaves (sennae folium), plantain herbs (plantaginis lanceolata herba), thyme herbs (thymi herba), juniper berries (juniperi fructus), hawthorne herbs (crataegi folium), wheat starch (amylum tritici) and wormwood (absinthii herba). Depending on the herbs, the methods used were more or less suitable. Chemiluminescence measurements showed the smallest differences between untreated and irradiated samples whereas thermoluminescence measurements on isolated minerals from the vegetable drugs gave better results. In some herbs radiation-specific radicals could be identified by ESR spectroscopy. Viscosity measurement is suitable for some herbs as fast and inexpensive method for screening. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Eignung von Chemilumineszenz-, ESR-, Thermolumineszenz- und Viskositaetsmessungen als Nachweismethode fuer die Behandlung von Arzneidrogen mit ionisierenden Strahlen wurde an Anis, Baldrianwurzel, Baerentraubenblaettern, Birkenblaettern, Bockshornsamen, Cayennepfeffer, Faulbaumrinde, Fenchel, Hagebuttenschalen, Huflattichblaettern

  14. Evaluation of Relative Blood Viscosity During Menstruation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    ABSTRACT. The changes in blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, haematocrit and erythrocyte sedimentation rate before ... higher (6.78±0.18mm/hr) during the menstrual phase than during the premenstrual phase ... MATERIALS AND METHODS.

  15. Calculating effective diffusivities in the limit of vanishing molecular diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavliotis, G.A.; Stuart, A.M.; Zygalakis, K.C.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study the problem of the numerical calculation (by Monte Carlo methods) of the effective diffusivity for a particle moving in a periodic divergent-free velocity field, in the limit of vanishing molecular diffusion. In this limit traditional numerical methods typically fail, since they do not represent accurately the geometry of the underlying deterministic dynamics. We propose a stochastic splitting method that takes into account the volume-preserving property of the equations of motion in the absence of noise, and when inertial effects can be neglected. An extension of the method is then proposed for the cases where the noise has a non-trivial time-correlation structure and when inertial effects cannot be neglected. The method of modified equations is used to explain failings of Euler-based methods. The new stochastic geometric integrators are shown to outperform standard Euler-based integrators. Various asymptotic limits of physical interest are investigated by means of numerical experiments, using the new integrators

  16. Measurement of viscosity of slush at high shear rates

    OpenAIRE

    小林, 俊一; 川村, 公之; 津川, 圭一; 和泉, 薫; Kobayashi, Shun'ichi; Kawamura, Kimiyuki; Tugawa, Keiichi; Izumi, Kaoru

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of viscosity of slush were carried out using a method of flow along an inclined smooth surface in a 0℃cold room. The method was used to get the values of viscosity under high shear rates (25 and 75s^). From our experiments two important results were obtained: 1) the viscosity of slush decreases with increasing shear rates; 2) The fluid behavior is pseudoplastic that the values of non-Newtonian index of viscosity were less than unity.

  17. On Vanishing Two Loop Cosmological Constants in Nonsupersymmetric Strings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachru, S

    1998-10-22

    It has recently been suggested that in certain special nonsupersymmetric type II string compactifications, at least the first two perturbative contributions to the cosmological constant Lambda vanish. Support for perturbative vanishing beyond 1-loop (as well as evidence for the absence of some nonperturbative contributions) has come from duality arguments. There was also a direct 2-loop computation which was incomplete; in this note we explain the deficiency of the previous 2-loop calculation and discuss the complete 2-loop computation in two different models. The corrected analysis yields a vanishing 2-loop contribution to Lambda in these models.

  18. On vanishing two loop cosmological constants in nonsupersymmetric strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachru, Shamit; Silverstein, Eva

    1998-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that in certain special nonsupersymmetric type II string compactifications, at least the first two perturbative contributions to the cosmological constant Λ vanish. Support for perturbative vanishing beyond 1-loop (as well as evidence for the absence of some nonperturbative contributions) has come from duality arguments. There was also a direct 2-loop computation which was incomplete; in this note we explain the deficiency of the previous 2-loop calculation and discuss the complete 2-loop computation in two different models. The corrected analysis yields a vanishing 2-loop contribution to Λ in these models

  19. Determination Instructions Efficiency of Teaching Methods in Teaching Physics in the Case of Teaching Unit "Viscosity. Newtonian and Stokes Law"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulovic, Branka; Stojanovic, Maja

    2015-01-01

    The use of different teaching methods has resulted in different quality and quantity of students' knowledge. For this reason, it is important to constantly review the teaching methods and applied most effectively. One way of determining instruction efficiency is by using cognitive load and student achievement. Cognitive load can be generally…

  20. Genetics Home Reference: leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Torres C, Pröschel C. EIF2B5 mutations compromise GFAP+ astrocyte generation in vanishing white matter leukodystrophy. Nat Med. ... of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA HONCode ...

  1. vanishing bone disease in a tertiary teaching hospital in uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prior to the above presentation and review of systems were unremarkable. General examination revealed a ... syndrome or disease, massive osteolysis, disappearing bone disease, vanishing bone disease, idiopathic ... patient symptoms and anatomic location. Medical treatment involves, radiation therapy, anti-osteoclastic.

  2. Rapid viscosity measurements of powdered thermosetting resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, H. L.; Burks, H. D.; Dalal, S. K.

    1978-01-01

    A rapid and inexpensive method of obtaining processing-related data on powdered thermosetting resins has been investigated. The method involved viscosity measurements obtained with a small specimen (less than 100 mg) parallel plate plastometer. A data acquisition and reduction system was developed which provided a value of viscosity and strain rate about 12-13 second intervals during a test. The effects of specimen compaction pressure and reduction of adhesion between specimen and parallel plates were examined. The plastometer was used to measure some processing-related viscosity changes of an addition polyimide resin, including changes caused by pre-test heat treatment, test temperature, and strain rate.

  3. Viscosity measurement techniques in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boromand, Arman; Jamali, Safa; Maia, Joao M.

    2015-11-01

    In this study two main groups of viscosity measurement techniques are used to measure the viscosity of a simple fluid using Dissipative Particle Dynamics, DPD. In the first method, a microscopic definition of the pressure tensor is used in equilibrium and out of equilibrium to measure the zero-shear viscosity and shear viscosity, respectively. In the second method, a periodic Poiseuille flow and start-up transient shear flow is used and the shear viscosity is obtained from the velocity profiles by a numerical fitting procedure. Using the standard Lees-Edward boundary condition for DPD will result in incorrect velocity profiles at high values of the dissipative parameter. Although this issue was partially addressed in Chatterjee (2007), in this work we present further modifications (Lagrangian approach) to the original LE boundary condition (Eulerian approach) that will fix the deviation from the desired shear rate at high values of the dissipative parameter and decrease the noise to signal ratios in stress measurement while increases the accessible low shear rate window. Also, the thermostat effect of the dissipative and random forces is coupled to the dynamic response of the system and affects the transport properties like the viscosity and diffusion coefficient. We investigated thoroughly the dependency of viscosity measured by both Eulerian and Lagrangian methodologies, as well as numerical fitting procedures and found that all the methods are in quantitative agreement.

  4. Laboratory Tests for Dispersive Soil Viscosity Determining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter-Martirosyan, Z. G.; Ter-Martirosyan, A. Z.; Sobolev, E. S.

    2017-11-01

    There are several widespread methods for soil viscosity determining now. The standard shear test device and torsion test apparatus are the most commonly used installations to do that. However, the application of them has a number of disadvantages. Therefore, the specialists of Moscow State University of Civil Engineering proposed a new device to determine the disperse soil viscosity on the basis of a stabilometer with the B-type camera (viscosimeter). The paper considers the construction of a viscosimeter and the technique for determining soil viscosity inside this tool as well as some experimental verification results of its work.

  5. Viscosity of liquid sulfur under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terasaki, Hidenori; Kato, T; Funakoshi, K; Suzuki, A; Urakawa, S

    2004-01-01

    The viscosity of liquid sulfur up to 9.7 GPa and 1067 K was measured using the in situ x-ray radiography falling sphere method. The viscosity coefficients were found to range from 0.11 to 0.69 Pa s, and decreased continuously with increasing pressure under approximately constant homologous temperature conditions. The observed viscosity variation suggests that a gradual structural change occurs in liquid sulfur with pressure up to 10 GPa. The L-L' transition in liquid sulfur proposed by Brazhkin et al (1991 Phys. Lett. A 154 413) from thermobaric measurements has not been confirmed by the present viscometry

  6. Convergence of spectral methods for nonlinear conservation laws. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadmor, E.

    1987-08-01

    The convergence of the Fourier method for scalar nonlinear conservation laws which exhibit spontaneous shock discontinuities is discussed. Numerical tests indicate that the convergence may (and in fact in some cases must) fail, with or without post-processing of the numerical solution. Instead, a new kind of spectrally accurate vanishing viscosity is introduced to augment the Fourier approximation of such nonlinear conservation laws. Using compensated compactness arguments, it is shown that this spectral viscosity prevents oscillations, and convergence to the unique entropy solution follows

  7. Vanishing theorems and effective results in algebraic geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demailly, J.P.; Goettsche, L.; Lazarsfeld, R.

    2001-01-01

    The School on Vanishing Theorems and Effective Results in Algebraic Geometry took place in ICTP, Trieste from 25 April 2000 to 12 May 2000. It was organized by J. P. Demailly (Universite de Grenoble I) and R. Lazarsfeld (University of Michigan). The main topics considered were vanishing theorems, multiplyer ideal sheaves and effective results in algebraic geometry, tight closure, geometry of higher dimensional projective and Kahler manifolds, hyperbolic algebraic varieties. The school consisted of two weeks of lectures and one week of conference. This volume contains the lecture notes of most of the lectures in the first two weeks

  8. Exact penalty results for mathematical programs with vanishing constraints

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hoheisel, T.; Kanzow, Ch.; Outrata, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 5 (2010), s. 2514-2526 ISSN 0362-546X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Mathematical programs with vanishing constraints * Mathematical programs with equilibrium constraints * Exact penalization * Calmness * Subdifferential calculus * Limiting normal cone Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.279, year: 2010 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/MTR/outrata-exact penalty results for mathematical programs with vanishing constraints.pdf

  9. On the vanishing rate of smooth CR functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Della Sala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Let be a lineally convex hypersurface of ℂⁿ of finite type, 0∈. Then there exist non-trivial smooth CR functions on that are flat at 0, i.e. whose Taylor expansion about 0 vanishes identically. Our aim is to characterize the rate at which flat CR functions can decrease without vanishing identically. As it turns out, non-trivial CR functions cannot decay arbitrarily fast, and a possible way of expressing the critical rate is by comparison with a suitable exponential of the modulus of a local peak function.

  10. Vanishing theorems and effective results in algebraic geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demailly, J P [Universite de Grenoble (France); Goettsche, L [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Lazarsfeld, R [University of Michigan (United States)

    2001-12-15

    The School on Vanishing Theorems and Effective Results in Algebraic Geometry took place in ICTP, Trieste from 25 April 2000 to 12 May 2000. It was organized by J. P. Demailly (Universite de Grenoble I) and R. Lazarsfeld (University of Michigan). The main topics considered were vanishing theorems, multiplyer ideal sheaves and effective results in algebraic geometry, tight closure, geometry of higher dimensional projective and Kahler manifolds, hyperbolic algebraic varieties. The school consisted of two weeks of lectures and one week of conference. This volume contains the lecture notes of most of the lectures in the first two weeks.

  11. Design of a projection display screen with vanishing color shift for rear-projection HDTV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiu; Zhu, Jin-lin

    1996-09-01

    Using bi-convex cylinder lens with matrix structure, the transmissive projection display screen with high contrast and wider viewing angle has been widely used in large rear projection TV and video projectors, it obtained a inhere color shift and puzzled the designer of display screen for RGB projection tube in-line adjustment. Based on the method of light beam racing, the general software of designing projection display screen has been developed and the computer model of vanishing color shift for rear projection HDTV has bee completed. This paper discussed the practical designing method to vanish the defect of color shift and mentioned the relations between the primary optical parameters of display screen and relative geometry sizes of lens' surface. The distributions of optical gain to viewing angle and the influences on engineering design are briefly analyzed.

  12. Consequences of vanishing twins in IVF/ICSI pregnancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, Anja Bisgaard; Lidegaard, Ojvind; la Cour Freiesleben, Nina

    2005-01-01

    Spontaneous reductions are a possible cause of the increased morbidity in IVF singletons. The aim of this study was to assess incidence rates of spontaneous reductions in IVF/ICSI twin pregnancies and to compare short- and long-term morbidity in survivors of a vanishing co-twin with singletons...

  13. Ursodeoxycholic acid treatment of vanishing bile duct syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pusl, Thomas; Beuers, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    Vanishing bile duct syndromes (VBDS) are characterized by progressive loss of small intrahepatic ducts caused by a variety of different diseases leading to chronic cholestasis, cirrhosis, and premature death from liver failure. The majority of adult patients with VBDS suffer from primary biliary

  14. Type 1,1-operators defined by vanishing frequency modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Jon

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a general definition of pseudo-differential operators of type 1,1; the definition is shown to be the largest one that is both compatible with negliible operators and stable under vanishing frequency modulation. Elaborating counter-examples of Ching, Hörmander and Parenti...

  15. Type 1,1-operators defined by vanishing frequency modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Jon

    This paper presents a general definition of pseudo-differential operators of type 1,1; the definition is shown to be the largest one that is both compatible with negligible operators and stable under vanishing frequency modulation. Elaborating counter-examples of Ching andHörmander, type 1...

  16. Astrocytes are central in the pathomechanisms of vanishing white matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dooves, Stephanie; Bugiani, Marianna; Postma, Nienke L.; Polder, Emiel; Land, Niels; Horan, Stephen T.; van Deijk, Anne-Lieke F.; van de Kreeke, Aleid; Jacobs, Gerbren; Vuong, Caroline; Klooster, Jan; Kamermans, Maarten; Wortel, Joke; Loos, Maarten; Wisse, Lisanne E.; Scheper, Gert C.; Abbink, Truus E. M.; Heine, Vivi M.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.

    2016-01-01

    Vanishing white matter (VWM) is a fatal leukodystrophy that is caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B (eIF2B). Disease onset and severity are codetermined by genotype. White matter astrocytes and oligodendrocytes are almost exclusively affected;

  17. Technological characteristics of meat - viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    DIBĎÁK, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    This bachelor thesis is focused on the technological characteristics of meat, mainly viscosity of meat. At the beginning I dealt with construction of meat and various types of meat: beef, veal, pork, mutton, rabbit, poultry and venison. Then I described basic chemical composition of meat and it?s characteristic. In detail I dealt with viscosity of meat. Viscosity is the ability of meat to bind water both own and added. I mentioned influences, which effects viscosity and I presented the possib...

  18. Quad-Rotor Helicopter Autonomous Navigation Based on Vanishing Point Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialiang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Quad-rotor helicopter is becoming popular increasingly as they can well implement many flight missions in more challenging environments, with lower risk of damaging itself and its surroundings. They are employed in many applications, from military operations to civilian tasks. Quad-rotor helicopter autonomous navigation based on the vanishing point fast estimation (VPFE algorithm using clustering principle is implemented in this paper. For images collected by the camera of quad-rotor helicopter, the system executes the process of preprocessing of image, deleting noise interference, edge extracting using Canny operator, and extracting straight lines by randomized hough transformation (RHT method. Then system obtains the position of vanishing point and regards it as destination point and finally controls the autonomous navigation of the quad-rotor helicopter by continuous modification according to the calculated navigation error. The experimental results show that the quad-rotor helicopter can implement the destination navigation well in the indoor environment.

  19. Elastic gauge fields and Hall viscosity of Dirac magnons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiros, Yago; Vozmediano, María A. H.

    2018-02-01

    We analyze the coupling of elastic lattice deformations to the magnon degrees of freedom of magnon Dirac materials. For a honeycomb ferromagnet we find that, as happens in the case of graphene, elastic gauge fields appear coupled to the magnon pseudospinors. For deformations that induce constant pseudomagnetic fields, the spectrum around the Dirac nodes splits into pseudo-Landau levels. We show that when a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction is considered, a topological gap opens in the system and a Chern-Simons effective action for the elastic degrees of freedom is generated. Such a term encodes a phonon Hall viscosity response, entirely generated by quantum fluctuations of magnons living in the vicinity of the Dirac points. The magnon Hall viscosity vanishes at zero temperature, and grows as temperature is raised and the states around the Dirac points are increasingly populated.

  20. Application of a General Computer Algorithm Based on the Group-Additivity Method for the Calculation of Two Molecular Descriptors at Both Ends of Dilution: Liquid Viscosity and Activity Coefficient in Water at Infinite Dilution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Naef

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of a commonly used computer algorithm based on the group-additivity method for the calculation of the liquid viscosity coefficient at 293.15 K and the activity coefficient at infinite dilution in water at 298.15 K of organic molecules is presented. The method is based on the complete breakdown of the molecules into their constituting atoms, further subdividing them by their immediate neighborhood. A fast Gauss–Seidel fitting method using experimental data from literature is applied for the calculation of the atom groups’ contributions. Plausibility tests have been carried out on each of the calculations using a ten-fold cross-validation procedure which confirms the excellent predictive quality of the method. The goodness of fit (Q2 and the standard deviation (σ of the cross-validation calculations for the viscosity coefficient, expressed as log(η, was 0.9728 and 0.11, respectively, for 413 test molecules, and for the activity coefficient log(γ∞ the corresponding values were 0.9736 and 0.31, respectively, for 621 test compounds. The present approach has proven its versatility in that it enabled the simultaneous evaluation of the liquid viscosity of normal organic compounds as well as of ionic liquids.

  1. Dynamic viscosity of polymer solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterlin, A

    1982-03-01

    The dynamic viscosity investigation of solutions of long chain polymers in very viscous solvents has definitely shown the existence of the low and high frequency plateau with the gradual transition between them. In both extreme cases the extrapolation of the measured Newtonian viscosities of the plateaus to the infinite dilution yields the limiting intrinsic viscosities. Such a behavior is expected from the dynamic intrinsic viscosity of the necklace model of the linear polymer with finite internal viscosity. The plateau at low frequency shows up in any model of polymer solution. This work shows the constant dynamic intrinsic viscosity in both extreme cases is well reproducible by the necklace model with the internal viscosity acting only between the beads on the same link. 20 references.

  2. Improved High Resolution Models of Subduction Dynamics: Use of transversely isotropic viscosity with a free-surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Gurnis, M.; Stadler, G.; Rudi, J.; Ratnaswamy, V.; Ghattas, O.

    2017-12-01

    Dynamic topography, or uncompensated topography, is controlled by internal dynamics, and provide constraints on the buoyancy structure and rheological parameters in the mantle. Compared with other surface manifestations such as the geoid, dynamic topography is very sensitive to shallower and more regional mantle structure. For example, the significant dynamic topography above the subduction zone potentially provides a rich mine for inferring the rheological and mechanical properties such as plate coupling, flow, and lateral viscosity variations, all critical in plate tectonics. However, employing subduction zone topography in the inversion study requires that we have a better understanding of the topography from forward models, especially the influence of the viscosity formulation, numerical resolution, and other factors. One common approach to formulating a fault between the subducted slab and the overriding plates in viscous flow models assumes a thin weak zone. However, due to the large lateral variation in viscosity, topography from free-slip numerical models typically has artificially large magnitude as well as high-frequency undulations over subduction zone, which adds to the difficulty in making comparisons between model results and observations. In this study, we formulate a weak zone with the transversely isotropic viscosity (TI) where the tangential viscosity is much smaller than the viscosity in the normal direction. Similar with isotropic weak zone models, TI models effectively decouple subducted slabs from the overriding plates. However, we find that the topography in TI models is largely reduced compared with that in weak zone models assuming an isotropic viscosity. Moreover, the artificial `tooth paste' squeezing effect observed in isotropic weak zone models vanishes in TI models, although the difference becomes less significant when the dip angle is small. We also implement a free-surface condition in our numerical models, which has a smoothing

  3. Applicability of viscosity measurement to the detection of irradiated peppers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, T.; Todoriki, S.; Kohyama, K.

    1996-01-01

    Starch is degraded by ionising radiation, resulting in a decrease in viscosity. The viscosities of black and white peppers which contain large amounts of starch are reduced by irradiation so, therefore, viscosity measurement has been proposed as a method to detect the irradiation treatment of these food products. Although detection of irradiated spices by thermoluminescence measurement has been established, it is useful to establish the viscosity measuring technique for detecting irradiated peppers, as this method is carried out widely in the laboratories of food controlling authorities and food processing companies. (author)

  4. Emergent gravity from vanishing energy-momentum tensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carone, Christopher D.; Erlich, Joshua [High Energy Theory Group, Department of Physics, College of William and Mary,Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 (United States); Vaman, Diana [Department of Physics, University of Virginia,Box 400714, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2017-03-27

    A constraint of vanishing energy-momentum tensor is motivated by a variety of perspectives on quantum gravity. We demonstrate in a concrete example how this constraint leads to a metric-independent theory in which quantum gravity emerges as a nonperturbative artifact of regularization-scale physics. We analyze a scalar theory similar to the Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) theory with vanishing gauge fields, with the DBI Lagrangian modulated by a scalar potential. In the limit of a large number of scalars, we explicitly demonstrate the existence of a composite massless spin-2 graviton in the spectrum that couples to matter as in Einstein gravity. We comment on the cosmological constant problem and the generalization to theories with fermions and gauge fields.

  5. Emergent gravity from vanishing energy-momentum tensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carone, Christopher D.; Erlich, Joshua; Vaman, Diana

    2017-01-01

    A constraint of vanishing energy-momentum tensor is motivated by a variety of perspectives on quantum gravity. We demonstrate in a concrete example how this constraint leads to a metric-independent theory in which quantum gravity emerges as a nonperturbative artifact of regularization-scale physics. We analyze a scalar theory similar to the Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) theory with vanishing gauge fields, with the DBI Lagrangian modulated by a scalar potential. In the limit of a large number of scalars, we explicitly demonstrate the existence of a composite massless spin-2 graviton in the spectrum that couples to matter as in Einstein gravity. We comment on the cosmological constant problem and the generalization to theories with fermions and gauge fields.

  6. Skyrmions and Hall viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bom Soo

    2018-05-01

    We discuss the contribution of magnetic Skyrmions to the Hall viscosity and propose a simple way to identify it in experiments. The topological Skyrmion charge density has a distinct signature in the electric Hall conductivity that is identified in existing experimental data. In an electrically neutral system, the Skyrmion charge density is directly related to the thermal Hall conductivity. These results are direct consequences of the field theory Ward identities, which relate various physical quantities based on symmetries and have been previously applied to quantum Hall systems.

  7. Measuring Viscosities of Gases at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Hoshang, Chegini

    1987-01-01

    Variant of general capillary method for measuring viscosities of unknown gases based on use of thermal mass-flowmeter section for direct measurement of pressure drops. In technique, flowmeter serves dual role, providing data for determining volume flow rates and serving as well-characterized capillary-tube section for measurement of differential pressures across it. New method simple, sensitive, and adaptable for absolute or relative viscosity measurements of low-pressure gases. Suited for very complex hydrocarbon mixtures where limitations of classical theory and compositional errors make theoretical calculations less reliable.

  8. Vanishing of Littlewood-Richardson polynomials is in P

    OpenAIRE

    Adve, Anshul; Robichaux, Colleen; Yong, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    J. DeLoera-T. McAllister and K. D. Mulmuley-H. Narayanan-M. Sohoni independently proved that determining the vanishing of Littlewood-Richardson coefficients has strongly polynomial time computational complexity. Viewing these as Schubert calculus numbers, we prove the generalization to the Littlewood-Richardson polynomials that control equivariant cohomology of Grassmannians. We construct a polytope using the edge-labeled tableau rule of H. Thomas-A. Yong. Our proof then combines a saturation...

  9. Compactification over coset spaces with torsion and vanishing cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batakis, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    We consider the compactification of ten-dimensional Einstein-Yang-Mills theories over non-symmetric, six-dimensional homogeneous coset spaces with torsion. We examine the Einstein-Yang-Mills equations of motion requiring vanishing cosmological constant at ten and four dimensions and we present examples of compactifying solutions. It appears that the introduction of more than one radii in the coset space, when possible, may be mandatory for the existence of compactifying solutions. (orig.)

  10. Compactification over coset spaces with torsion and vanishing cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batakis, N.A.; Farakos, K.; Koutsoumbas, G.; Zoupanos, G.; Kapetanakis, D.

    1989-04-13

    We consider the compactification of ten-dimensional Einstein-Yang-Mills theories over non-symmetric, six-dimensional homogeneous coset spaces with torsion. We examine the Einstein-Yang-Mills equations of motion requiring vanishing cosmological constant at ten and four dimensions and we present examples of compactifying solutions. It appears that the introduction of more than one radii in the coset space, when possible, may be mandatory for the existence of compactifying solutions.

  11. Near horizon structure of extremal vanishing horizon black holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sadeghian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We study the near horizon structure of Extremal Vanishing Horizon (EVH black holes, extremal black holes with vanishing horizon area with a vanishing one-cycle on the horizon. We construct the most general near horizon EVH and near-EVH ansatz for the metric and other fields, like dilaton and gauge fields which may be present in the theory. We prove that (1 the near horizon EVH geometry for generic gravity theory in generic dimension has a three dimensional maximally symmetric subspace; (2 if the matter fields of the theory satisfy strong energy condition either this 3d part is AdS3, or the solution is a direct product of a locally 3d flat space and a d−3 dimensional part; (3 these results extend to the near horizon geometry of near-EVH black holes, for which the AdS3 part is replaced with BTZ geometry. We present some specific near horizon EVH geometries in 3, 4 and 5 dimensions for which there is a classification. We also briefly discuss implications of these generic results for generic (gauged supergravity theories and also for the thermodynamics of near-EVH black holes and the EVH/CFT proposal.

  12. Three theorems on near horizon extremal vanishing horizon geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sadeghian

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available EVH black holes are Extremal black holes with Vanishing Horizon area, where vanishing of horizon area is a result of having a vanishing one-cycle on the horizon. We prove three theorems regarding near horizon geometry of EVH black hole solutions to generic Einstein gravity theories in diverse dimensions. These generic gravity theories are Einstein–Maxwell-dilaton-Λ theories, and gauged or ungauged supergravity theories with U(1 Maxwell fields. Our three theorems are: (1 The near horizon geometry of any EVH black hole has a three dimensional maximally symmetric subspace. (2 If the energy momentum tensor of the theory satisfies strong energy condition either this 3d part is an AdS3, or the solution is a direct product of a locally 3d flat space and a d−3 dimensional part. (3 These results extend to the near horizon geometry of near-EVH black holes, for which the AdS3 part is replaced with BTZ geometry.

  13. The effect of viscosity on the resistive tearing mode with the presence of shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X.L.; Morrison, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of small isotropic viscosity on the ''constant ψ'' tearing mode in the presence of shear flow, is analyzed by the boundary layer approach. It is found that the influence of viscosity depends upon the parameter (G'(0)/F'(0)), where G'(0) and F'(0) denote that shear and magnetic field shear at the magnetic null plane, respectively. When |(G'(0)/F'(0))| much-lt 1, the tearing mode growth rate is suppressed by the viscosity, but not completely stabilized. When |(G'(0)/F'(0))| ∼ in the order of (1) and the viscosity is comparable with the resistivity, the growth rate vanishes as ((1 - G'(0) 2 /F'(0) 2 ) 1/3 ), when G'(0) 2 → F'(0) 2 from below. In the case where (1 - G'(0) 2 /F'(0) 2 ) < 0 matching cannot be achieved. 8 refs

  14. Rotational and spin viscosities of water: Application to nanofluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Søndergaard; Bruus, Henrik; Todd, B.D.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the rotational viscosity and the two spin viscosities for liquid water using equilibrium molecular dynamics. Water is modeled via the flexible SPC/Fw model where the Coulomb interactions are calculated via the Wolf method which enables the long simulation times required....... We find that the rotational viscosity is independent of the temperature in the range from 284 to 319 K. The two spin viscosities, on the other hand, decrease with increasing temperature and are found to be two orders of magnitude larger than that estimated by Bonthuis et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103...

  15. Viscosity and viscoelasticity of two-phase systems having diffuse interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    The equilibrium stability criterion for diffuse interfaces in a two-component solution with a miscibility gap requires that the interdiffusion flux vanish. If the system is continuously deformed, convective fluxes disrupt the equilibrium in the interface regions and induce a counter diffusive flux, which is dissipative and contributes to the apparent viscosity of the mixture. Chemical free energy is recoverably stored, causing viscoelastic phenomena. Both effects are significant.

  16. Role of viscosity in nonlinear effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, G V; Peshkin, M A; Polyakov, Ye Ye

    1980-01-01

    Data are presented on laboratory experiments for filtering of gases of liquids in clay, slightly permeable core samples. A method is proposed for processing the results of experiments which makes it possible to isolate the effect of viscosity of the fluid on the defined quantity of maximum pressure differential.

  17. Vanishing of cohomology over Cohen–Macaulay rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Winther; Holm, Henrik Granau

    2012-01-01

    A 2003 counterexample to a conjecture of Auslander brought attention to a family of rings—colloquially called AC rings—that satisfy a natural condition on vanishing of cohomology. Several results attest to the remarkable homological properties of AC rings, but their definition is barely operational......, and it remains unknown if they form a class that is closed under typical constructions in ring theory. In this paper, we study transfer of the AC property along local homomorphisms of Cohen–Macaulay rings. In particular, we show that the AC property is preserved by standard procedures in local algebra. Our...

  18. Viscosity of liquids theory, estimation, experiment, and data

    CERN Document Server

    Viswanath, Dabir S; Prasad, Dasika HL; Dutt, Nidamarty VK; Rani, Kalipatnapu Y

    2007-01-01

    Single comprehensive book on viscosity of liquids, as opposed to most of the books in this area which are data books, i.e., a compilation of viscosity data from the literature, where the information is scattered and the description and analysis of the experimental methods and governing theory are not readily available in a single place.

  19. Viscosity measurements of molten refractory metals using an electrostatic levitator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Takehiko; Paradis, Paul-François; Okada, Junpei T; Watanabe, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    Viscosities of several refractory metals (titanium, nickel, zirconium, niobium, ruthenium, rhodium, hafnium, iridium and platinum) and terbium have been measured by the oscillation drop method with an improved procedure. The measured data were less scattered than our previous measurements. Viscosities at their melting temperatures showed good agreement with literature values and some predicted values. (paper)

  20. Viscosity Meaurement Technique for Metal Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, Heng [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Kennedy, Rory [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-09

    Metallic fuels have exceptional transient behavior, excellent thermal conductivity, and a more straightforward reprocessing path, which does not separate out pure plutonium from the process stream. Fabrication of fuel containing minor actinides and rare earth (RE) elements for irradiation tests, for instance, U-20Pu-3Am-2Np-1.0RE-15Zr samples at the Idaho National Laboratory, is generally done by melt casting in an inert atmosphere. For the design of a casting system and further scale up development, computational modeling of the casting process is needed to provide information on melt flow and solidification for process optimization. Therefore, there is a need for melt viscosity data, the most important melt property that controls the melt flow. The goal of the project was to develop a measurement technique that uses fully sealed melt sample with no Americium vapor loss to determine the viscosity of metallic melts and at temperatures relevant to the casting process. The specific objectives of the project were to: develop mathematical models to establish the principle of the measurement method, design and build a viscosity measurement prototype system based on the established principle, and calibrate the system and quantify the uncertainty range. The result of the project indicates that the oscillation cup technique is applicable for melt viscosity measurement. Detailed mathematical models of innovative sample ampoule designs were developed to not only determine melt viscosity, but also melt density under certain designs. Measurement uncertainties were analyzed and quantified. The result of this project can be used as the initial step toward the eventual goal of establishing a viscosity measurement system for radioactive melts.

  1. Viscosity Meaurement Technique for Metal Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Metallic fuels have exceptional transient behavior, excellent thermal conductivity, and a more straightforward reprocessing path, which does not separate out pure plutonium from the process stream. Fabrication of fuel containing minor actinides and rare earth (RE) elements for irradiation tests, for instance, U-20Pu-3Am-2Np-1.0RE-15Zr samples at the Idaho National Laboratory, is generally done by melt casting in an inert atmosphere. For the design of a casting system and further scale up development, computational modeling of the casting process is needed to provide information on melt flow and solidification for process optimization. Therefore, there is a need for melt viscosity data, the most important melt property that controls the melt flow. The goal of the project was to develop a measurement technique that uses fully sealed melt sample with no Americium vapor loss to determine the viscosity of metallic melts and at temperatures relevant to the casting process. The specific objectives of the project were to: develop mathematical models to establish the principle of the measurement method, design and build a viscosity measurement prototype system based on the established principle, and calibrate the system and quantify the uncertainty range. The result of the project indicates that the oscillation cup technique is applicable for melt viscosity measurement. Detailed mathematical models of innovative sample ampoule designs were developed to not only determine melt viscosity, but also melt density under certain designs. Measurement uncertainties were analyzed and quantified. The result of this project can be used as the initial step toward the eventual goal of establishing a viscosity measurement system for radioactive melts.

  2. The parity-preserving massive QED3: Vanishing β-function and no parity anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.M. Del Cima

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The parity-preserving massive QED3 exhibits vanishing gauge coupling β-function and is parity and infrared anomaly free at all orders in perturbation theory. Parity is not an anomalous symmetry, even for the parity-preserving massive QED3, in spite of some claims about the possibility of a perturbative parity breakdown, called parity anomaly. The proof is done by using the algebraic renormalization method, which is independent of any regularization scheme, based on general theorems of perturbative quantum field theory.

  3. Pressure Effect on Extensional Viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens Horslund; Kjær, Erik Michael

    1999-01-01

    The primary object of these experiments was to investigate the influence of hydrostatic pressure on entrance flow. The effect of pressure on shear and extensional viscosity was evaluated using an axis symmetric capillary and a slit die where the hydrostatic pressure was raised with valves....... The experiments show a significant increase in extensional viscosity with increasing pressure....

  4. Capillary waves with surface viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Denner, Fabian; Morgan, Neal; van Wachem, Berend; Dini, Daniele

    2017-11-01

    Experiments over the last 50 years have suggested a correlation between the surface (shear) viscosity and the stability of a foam or emulsion. With recent techniques allowing more accurate measurements of the elusive surface viscosity, we examine this link theoretically using small-amplitude capillary waves in the presence of the Marangoni effect and surface viscosity modelled via the Boussinesq-Scriven model. The surface viscosity effect is found to contribute a damping effect on the amplitude of the capillary wave with subtle differences to the effect of the convective-diffusive Marangoni transport. The general wave dispersion is augmented to take into account the Marangoni and surface viscosity effects, and a first-order correction to the critical damping wavelength is derived. The authors acknowledge the financial support of the Shell University Technology Centre for fuels and lubricants.

  5. Anti-levitation of Landau levels in vanishing magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, W.; Baldwin, K. W.; West, K. W.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; Tsui, D. C.

    Soon after the discovery of the quantum Hall effects in two-dimensional electron systems, the question on the fate of the extended states in a Landau level in vanishing magnetic (B) field arose. Many theoretical models have since been proposed, and experimental results remain inconclusive. In this talk, we report experimental observation of anti-levitation behavior of Landau levels in vanishing B fields (down to as low as B 58 mT) in a high quality heterojunction insulated-gated field-effect transistor (HIGFET). We observed that, in the Landau fan diagram of electron density versus magnetic field, the positions of the magneto-resistance minima at Landau level fillings ν = 4, 5, 6 move below the ``traditional'' Landau level line to lower electron densities. This clearly differs from what was observed in the earlier experiments where in the same Landau fan plot the density moved up. Our result strongly supports the anti-levitation behavior predicted recently. Moreover, the even and odd Landau level filling states show quantitatively different behaviors in anti-levitation, suggesting that the exchange interactions, which are important at odd fillings, may play a role. SNL is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. On the measurement of magnetic viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serletis, C. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Efthimiadis, K.G., E-mail: kge@auth.gr [Department of Physics, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

    2012-08-15

    This work is an investigation of the experimental method used for measuring the magnetic viscosity in a hard ferromagnetic material, i.e. the recording of the magnetization under constant applied field and temperature, after the material has been magnetically saturated. It investigates how the experimental results are affected by the initial conditions of the method (saturation field, field change rate and field oscillation prior to its stabilization), and by minor variations of field and temperature during the recording. Based on the arising conclusions and the use of a more complex fitting function of measurements, the accuracy and repeatability of experimental results is improved. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic viscosity is affected by initial measurement conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Minor field deviations prior to its stabilization cause large changes in viscosity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Viscosity is strongly dependent on the field change rate from saturation to the measurement field. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small changes in field and temperature during the experiment can lead to false measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Errors in measurements can be eliminated through the use of a proper fitting function.

  7. Gas-liquid Relative Permeability Estimation in 2D Porous Media by Lattice Boltzmann Method: Low Viscosity Ratio 2D LBM Relative Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Mahmoudi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This work is a primary achievement in studying the CO2 and N2–oil systems. To predict gas-liquid relative permeability curves, a Shan-Chen type multicomponent multiphase lattice Boltzmann model for two-phase flow through 2D porous media is developed. Periodic and bounce back boundary conditions are applied to the model with the Guo scheme for the external body force (i.e., the pressure gradient. The influence of relationship between cohesion and adsorption parameters and the interfacial tension values in Young's equation, pore structure (micro scan image derived porous media response is compared with corresponding porosity and permeability ideal sphere pack structure, and saturation distribution on relative permeability curves are studied with the aim to achieve the realistic stable condition for the simulation of gas-liquid systems with a low viscosity ratio.

  8. Sensor for Viscosity and Shear Strength Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, J.; Moore, J.E. Jr.; Ebadian, M.A.; Jones, W.K.

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. The work for this project will be performed in three phases. The first phase, carried out in FY96, involved (1) an evaluation of acoustic and other methods for viscosity measurement; (2) measurement of the parameters of slurries over the range of percent solids found in tanks and transport systems; (3) a comparison of physical properties (e.g., viscosity and density) to percent solids found composition; and (4) the design of a prototype sensor. The second phase (FY97) will involve the fabrication of a prototype hybrid sensor to measure the viscosity and mechanical properties of slurries in remote, high-radiation environments. Two different viscometer designs are being investigated in this study: a magnetostrictive pulse wave guide viscometer; an oscillating cylinder viscometer. In FY97, the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU), which has printed circuit, thick film, thin film, and co-fired ceramic fabrication capability, will fabricate five probes for demonstration after technology selection and evaluation

  9. Viscosity of iodinated contrast agents during renal excretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jost, Gregor; Lengsfeld, Philipp; Lenhard, Diana C.; Pietsch, Hubertus; Huetter, Joachim; Sieber, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Modern iodinated non-ionic contrast agents (CAs) can be classified based on their molecular structure into monomeric and dimeric CAs and have at comparable iodine concentrations a different viscosity and osmolality. During their renal excretion, CAs are concentrated in the renal tubuli which might enhance the viscosity difference between monomeric and dimeric CAs. The viscosity of a CA might have an underestimated importance for renal safety, as suggested by recent publications. In this study, we investigated the viscosities of CAs at the concentrations expected to be present in renal tubules. This concentration process was simulated in vitro using dialysis. Furthermore, we investigated urine viscosity and urine flow in rodents after administration of several non-ionic monomeric and dimeric CAs. Materials and methods: To estimate the viscosity of the CAs in vivo, we performed an in vitro dialysis of monomeric and dimeric CAs at various physiological osmolalities of the renal tubulus (290, 400, 500, 700 and 1000 mOsm/kg H 2 O). Following the dialysis, the iodine concentrations and the viscosities of the CAs were determined. Furthermore, to investigate the concentration process in vivo, we measured the urine viscosity and the urine flow in Han Wister rats after the administration of Iopromide, Iohexol, Ioversol, Iomeprol, Iodixanol, and Iosimenol at comparable iodine concentrations. As a control, saline was injected at the same volume. Results: In vitro dialysis of the dimeric CA increased the iodine concentration and strongly increased the viscosity at all tested osmolalities. In contrast, for the monomeric agents an increase in concentration and viscosity was observed only at 700 as well 1000 mOsm/kg H 2 O but to a lesser extent. In summary, dialysis strongly enhanced the viscosity differences between the non-ionic monomeric and dimeric CAs. The administration of dimeric CAs leads to a strong increase in urine viscosity; this was not observed for the

  10. Viscosity of iodinated contrast agents during renal excretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost, Gregor, E-mail: Gregor.Jost@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Lengsfeld, Philipp, E-mail: Philipp.Lengsfeld@bayer.com [Global Medical Affairs Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Lenhard, Diana C., E-mail: Diana.Lenhard@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Pietsch, Hubertus, E-mail: Hubertus.Pietsch@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Huetter, Joachim, E-mail: Joachim.Huetter@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Sieber, Martin A., E-mail: Martin.Sieber@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: Modern iodinated non-ionic contrast agents (CAs) can be classified based on their molecular structure into monomeric and dimeric CAs and have at comparable iodine concentrations a different viscosity and osmolality. During their renal excretion, CAs are concentrated in the renal tubuli which might enhance the viscosity difference between monomeric and dimeric CAs. The viscosity of a CA might have an underestimated importance for renal safety, as suggested by recent publications. In this study, we investigated the viscosities of CAs at the concentrations expected to be present in renal tubules. This concentration process was simulated in vitro using dialysis. Furthermore, we investigated urine viscosity and urine flow in rodents after administration of several non-ionic monomeric and dimeric CAs. Materials and methods: To estimate the viscosity of the CAs in vivo, we performed an in vitro dialysis of monomeric and dimeric CAs at various physiological osmolalities of the renal tubulus (290, 400, 500, 700 and 1000 mOsm/kg H{sub 2}O). Following the dialysis, the iodine concentrations and the viscosities of the CAs were determined. Furthermore, to investigate the concentration process in vivo, we measured the urine viscosity and the urine flow in Han Wister rats after the administration of Iopromide, Iohexol, Ioversol, Iomeprol, Iodixanol, and Iosimenol at comparable iodine concentrations. As a control, saline was injected at the same volume. Results: In vitro dialysis of the dimeric CA increased the iodine concentration and strongly increased the viscosity at all tested osmolalities. In contrast, for the monomeric agents an increase in concentration and viscosity was observed only at 700 as well 1000 mOsm/kg H{sub 2}O but to a lesser extent. In summary, dialysis strongly enhanced the viscosity differences between the non-ionic monomeric and dimeric CAs. The administration of dimeric CAs leads to a strong increase in urine viscosity; this was not observed for

  11. Vanishing twin syndrome among ART singletons and pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, Maria C; Ghaderi, Sara; Morken, Nils-Halvdan; Magnus, Per; Bente Romundstad, Liv; Skjærven, Rolv; Wilcox, Allen J; Eldevik Håberg, Siri

    2017-11-01

    Among babies born by ART, do singleton survivors of a vanishing twin have lower birth weight than other singletons? Vanishing twin syndrome (VTS) was associated with lower birth weight among ART singletons; a sibship analysis indicated that the association was not confounded by maternal characteristics that remain stable between deliveries. Previous studies indicate that ART singletons with VTS have increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, compared with other ART singletons. The potential contribution of unmeasured maternal background characteristics has been unclear. This was a Norwegian population-based registry study, including 17 368 mothers with 20 410 ART singleton deliveries between January 1984 and December 2013. The study population included 17 291 ART singletons without VTS, 638 ART singletons with VTS and 2418 ART singletons with uncertain vanishing twin status. We estimated differences in birth weight and gestational age comparing ART singletons with VTS first to all ART singletons without VTS, and subsequently to their ART siblings without VTS, using random- and fixed-effects linear regression, respectively. The corresponding comparisons for the associations with preterm birth and small for gestational age (SGA) were conducted using random-and fixed-effects logistic regression. The sibling analysis of preterm birth included 587 discordant siblings, while the sibling analysis of SGA included 674 discordant siblings. ART singletons with VTS had lower birth weight when compared to all ART singletons without VTS, with an adjusted mean difference (95% CI) of -116 g (-165, -67). When we compared ART singletons with VTS to their ART singletons sibling without VTS, the adjusted mean difference was -112 g (-209, -15). ART singletons with VTS also had increased risk of being born SGA, with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) (95% CI) of 1.48 (1.07, 2.03) compared to all ART singletons without VTS, and 2.79 (1.12, 6.91) in the sibship analyses. ART singletons with

  12. Vanishing auxiliary variables in PPS sampling - with applications in microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ina Trolle; Hahn, Ute; Jensen, Eva B. Vedel

    Recently, non-uniform sampling has been suggested in microscopy to increase efficiency. More precisely, sampling proportional to size (PPS) has been introduced where the probability of sampling a unit in the population is proportional to the value of an auxiliary variable. Unfortunately, vanishing...... auxiliary variables are a common phenomenon in microscopy and, accordingly, part of the population is not accessible, using PPS sampling. We propose a modification of the design, for which an optimal solution can be found, using a model assisted approach. The optimal design has independent interest...... in sampling theory. We verify robustness of the new approach by numerical results, and we use real data to illustrate the applicability....

  13. Vanishing Ponds and Regional Water Resources in Taoyuan, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuei-An Liou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Taiwan has a Subtropic to Tropical climate, but its precipitation varies widely in response to seasonal effects and weather events such as Typhoon and Meiyu systems. Precipitation must be held back in reservoirs to provide and regulate sufficient water supply. Balancing the irregular precipitation and increasing water demands generates tremendous pressure on water resources management for the water stored in the Shihmen Reservoir, which is the major unitary water supply system in the Greater Taoyuan Area. Such pressure will be significantly enlarged due to the huge 17 billion USD Taoyuan Aerotropolis Project. In earlier days many small artificial ponds (a common terminology in this article, including irrigation ponds, fishery ponds and others, were built to cope with water shortages in Taoyuan County. These small storage ponds provided a solution that resolved seasonal precipitation shortages. Unfortunately, these ponds have been vanishing one after another one due to regional industrialization and urbanization in recent decades and less than 40% of them still remain today. There is great urgency and importance to investigating the link between vanishing ponds and water resources management. Remote sensing technology was used in this study to monitor the environmental consequences in the Taoyuan area by conducting multi-temporal analysis on the changes in water bodies, i.e., ponds. SPOT satellite images taken in 1993, 2003, and 2010 were utilized to analyze and assess the importance of small-scale ponds as water conservation facilities. It was found that, during the seventeen years from 1993 - 2010, the number of irrigation ponds decreased by 35.94%. These ponds can reduce the burden on the major reservoir and increase the water recycling rate if they are properly conserved. They can also improve rainfall interception and surface detention capabilities, and provide another planning advantage for regional water management.

  14. Should you trust your heavy oil viscosity measurement?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, L.; Miller, K.; Almond, R. [Petrovera Resources Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    For the last 60 years, the heavy oil and bitumen reservoirs from western Canada have been exploited with varying degrees of success. There are many factors that may effect heavy oil and bitumen production rates. Primary production rates, which vary greatly from field to field, were found to improve with the addition of steam. Viscosity is the single most valued criteria in predicting cold production response from a new field. It is also the criteria used to determine whether thermal process are needed to reduce oil viscosity, or whether horizontal or vertical wells should be used. This study examined why production forecasts based on oil viscosity alone have been poor. It is based on an extensive data collection project in the Elk Point area reservoir which has lower than expected and erratic cold production rates. Viscosity values from the same wells were found to vary by a factor of four or more. One of the objectives of this study was to encourage commercial labs to develop an industry-wide standard method of heavy oil sample cleaning and viscosity measurement. It is generally understood that viscosity increases with an increase in the concentration of asphaltenes, but there is little information to quantify the relationship. Some studies suggest that viscosity increases logarithmically with increasing asphaltenes. It was concluded that the prediction of the viscosity of heavy oils and bitumens is very empirical, but there are ways to improve data comparisons and evaluation by applying available information from other scientific fields. 23 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs.

  15. Viscosity of particle laden films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timounay, Yousra; Rouyer, Florence

    2017-06-01

    We perform retraction experiments on soap films where large particles bridge the two interfaces. Local velocities are measured by PIV during the unstationnary regime. The velocity variation in time and space can be described by a continuous fluid model from which effective viscosity (shear and dilatational) of particulate films is measured. The 2D effective viscosity of particulate films η2D increases with particle surface fraction ϕ: at low ϕ, it tends to the interfacial dilatational viscosity of the liquid/air interfaces and it diverges at the critical particle surface fraction ϕc ≃ 0.84. Experimental data agree with classical viscosity laws of hard spheres suspensions adapted to the 2D geometry, assuming viscous dissipation resulting from the squeeze of the liquid/air interfaces between the particles. Finally, we show that the observed viscous dissipation in particulate films has to be considered to describe the edge velocity during a retraction experiment at large particle coverage.

  16. Determination of the viscosity by spherical drop using nuclear tecniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, F.V. da; Qassim, R.Y.; Souza, Roberto de; Rio de Janeiro Univ.

    1983-01-01

    The measurements of the drop limit velocity of a Sphere in a fluid using a radiotracer method are analyzed. The dynamic process involved was observed, identifying the density and viscosity of the fluid. (E.G.) [pt

  17. Measurement of viscosity as a means to identify irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuernberger, E.; Heide, L.; Boegl, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    The measurement of viscosity is a simple method to identify previous irradiation of some kinds of spices and foods, at least in combination with other methods. A possible change of the soaking capacity was examined up to a storage period of 18 months after irradiation of black pepper, white pepper, cinnamon, ginger and onion powder with a radiation dose of 10 kGy each. After irradiation, either increased or decreased viscosity values were measured; the results showed, also after the 18-months-storage period, considerable differences of the viscosity behaviour in non-irradiated and irradiated samples. The time of storage had no effect to the individual viscosity values, so that this method could also be applied to the examined spices after a longer storage period. (orig.) With 51 figs., 25 tabs [de

  18. Comparison of parallel viscosity with neoclassical theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, K.; Nakajima, N.

    1996-04-01

    Toroidal rotation profiles are measured with charge exchange spectroscopy for the plasma heated with tangential NBI in CHS heliotron/torsatron device to estimate parallel viscosity. The parallel viscosity derived from the toroidal rotation velocity shows good agreement with the neoclassical parallel viscosity plus the perpendicular viscosity. (μ perpendicular = 2 m 2 /s). (author)

  19. Hall viscosity of hierarchical quantum Hall states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremling, M.; Hansson, T. H.; Suorsa, J.

    2014-03-01

    Using methods based on conformal field theory, we construct model wave functions on a torus with arbitrary flat metric for all chiral states in the abelian quantum Hall hierarchy. These functions have no variational parameters, and they transform under the modular group in the same way as the multicomponent generalizations of the Laughlin wave functions. Assuming the absence of Berry phases upon adiabatic variations of the modular parameter τ, we calculate the quantum Hall viscosity and find it to be in agreement with the formula, given by Read, which relates the viscosity to the average orbital spin of the electrons. For the filling factor ν =2/5 Jain state, which is at the second level in the hierarchy, we compare our model wave function with the numerically obtained ground state of the Coulomb interaction Hamiltonian in the lowest Landau level, and find very good agreement in a large region of the complex τ plane. For the same example, we also numerically compute the Hall viscosity and find good agreement with the analytical result for both the model wave function and the numerically obtained Coulomb wave function. We argue that this supports the notion of a generalized plasma analogy that would ensure that wave functions obtained using the conformal field theory methods do not acquire Berry phases upon adiabatic evolution.

  20. Turbulent viscosity optimized by data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Leredde

    Full Text Available As an alternative approach to classical turbulence modelling using a first or second order closure, the data assimilation method of optimal control is applied to estimate a time and space-dependent turbulent viscosity in a three-dimensional oceanic circulation model. The optimal control method, described for a 3-D primitive equation model, involves the minimization of a cost function that quantifies the discrepancies between the simulations and the observations. An iterative algorithm is obtained via the adjoint model resolution. In a first experiment, a k + L model is used to simulate the one-dimensional development of inertial oscillations resulting from a wind stress at the sea surface and with the presence of a halocline. These results are used as synthetic observations to be assimilated. The turbulent viscosity is then recovered without the k + L closure, even with sparse and noisy observations. The problems of controllability and of the dimensions of the control are then discussed. A second experiment consists of a two-dimensional schematic simulation. A 2-D turbulent viscosity field is estimated from data on the initial and final states of a coastal upwelling event.

    Key words. Oceanography: general (numerical modelling · Oceanography: physical (turbulence · diffusion · and mixing processes

  1. Vanishing tattoo multi-sensor for biomedical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moczko, E.; Meglinski, I.; Piletsky, S.

    2008-04-01

    Currently, precise non-invasive diagnostics systems for the real-time multi detection and monitoring of physiological parameters and chemical analytes in the human body are urgently required by clinicians, physiologists and bio-medical researchers. We have developed a novel cost effective smart 'vanishing tattoo' (similar to temporary child's tattoos) consisting of environmental-sensitive dyes. Painlessly impregnated into the skin the smart tattoo is capable of generating optical/fluorescence changes (absorbance, transmission, reflectance, emission and/or luminescence within UV, VIS or NIR regions) in response to physical or chemical changes. These changes allow the identification of colour pattern changes similar to bar-code scanning. Such a system allows an easy, cheap and robust comprehensive detection of various parameters and analytes in a small volume of sample (e.g. variations in pH, temperature, ionic strength, solvent polarity, presence of redox species, surfactants, oxygen). These smart tattoos have possible applications in monitoring the progress of disease and transcutaneous drug delivery. The potential of this highly innovative diagnostic tool is wide and diverse and can impact on routine clinical diagnostics, general therapeutic management, skin care and cosmetic products testing as well as fundamental physiological investigations.

  2. Suprathermal viscosity of dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, Mark; Mahmoodifar, Simin; Schwenzer, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by the existence of unstable modes of compact stars that eventually grow large, we study the bulk viscosity of dense matter, taking into account non-linear effects arising in the large amplitude regime, where the deviation μ Δ of the chemical potentials from chemical equilibrium fulfills μ Δ > or approx. T. We find that this supra-thermal bulk viscosity can provide a potential mechanism for saturating unstable modes in compact stars since the viscosity is strongly enhanced. Our study confirms previous results on strange quark matter and shows that the suprathermal enhancement is even stronger in the case of hadronic matter. We also comment on the competition of different weak channels and the presence of suprathermal effects in various color superconducting phases of dense quark matter.

  3. Viscosity calculations at molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, E M; Norman, G E

    2015-01-01

    Viscosity and diffusion are chosen as an example to demonstrate the universality of diagnostics methods in the molecular dynamics method. To emphasize the universality, three diverse systems are investigated, which differ from each other drastically: liquids with embedded atom method and pairwise interatomic interaction potentials and dusty plasma with a unique multiparametric interparticle interaction potential. Both the Einstein-Helfand and Green-Kubo relations are used. Such a particular process as glass transition is analysed at the simulation of the aluminium melt. The effect of the dust particle charge fluctuation is considered. The results are compared with the experimental data. (paper)

  4. Design of Oil Viscosity Sensor Based on Plastic Optical Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Muhammad; Arifin, A.

    2018-03-01

    A research of plastic optical fiber based sensors have been studied for measurement of oil viscosity. This sensor was made with straight configuration, U configuration, and gamma configuration have two types, there are optical fiber sensor with cladding and without cladding. Viscosity sensor was made, dipped into an oil sample with a concentration of viscosity percentage about 270 mPa.s - 350 mPa.s. The light from the LED propagated into the optical fiber, then it was received by the photodetector converted to output power. When plastic optical fiber dipped into an oil sample, viscosity of oil affect increase of refractive index on optical fiber resulting in a bigger loss of power so the light intensity will be smaller, consequences the measured output power will be smaller. Sensitivity and resolution viscosity sensor without cladding peel showed the best result rather than viscosity sensor with cladding peel. The best result in the measurement showed in gamma configuration with 3 cm length of cladding peel and the diameter of bending 0,25 cm is the range 103,090 nWatt, sensitivity 1,289 nWatt/mPa.s, and resolution 0,776 mPa.s. This method is effectively and efficiently used as an oil viscosity sensor with high sensitivity and resolution.

  5. Viscosity Control Experiment Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Heidi E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bradley, Paul Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-31

    Turbulent mix has been invoked to explain many results in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density (HED) physics, such as reduced yield in capsule implosions. Many ICF capsule implosions exhibit interfacial instabilities seeded by the drive shock, but it is not clear that fully developed turbulence results from this. Many simulations use turbulent mix models to help match simulation results to data, but this is not appropriate if turbulence is not present. It would be useful to have an experiment where turbulent mixing could be turned on or off by design. The use of high-Z dopants to modify viscosity and the resulting influence on turbulence is considered here. A complicating factor is that the plasma in some implosions can become strongly coupled, which makes the Spitzer expression for viscosity invalid. We first consider equations that cover a broad parameter space in temperature and density to address regimes for various experimental applications. Next, a previous shock-tube and other ICF experiments that investigate viscosity or use doping to examine the effects on yield are reviewed. How viscosity and dopants play a role in capsule yield depends on the region and process under consideration. Experiments and simulations have been performed to study the effects of viscosity on both the hot spot and the fuel/ablator mix. Increases in yield have been seen for some designs, but not all. We then discuss the effect of adding krypton dopant to the gas region of a typical OMEGA and a 2-shock NIF implosion to determine approximately the effect of adding dopant on the computed Reynolds number. Recommendations for a path forward for possible experiments using high-Z dopants to affect viscosity and turbulence are made.

  6. Bulk viscosity and cosmological evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beesham, A.

    1996-01-01

    In a recent interesting paper, Pimentel and Diaz-Rivera (Nuovo Cimento B, 109(1994) 1317) have derived several solutions with bulk viscosity in homogeneous and isotropic cosmological models. They also discussed the properties of these solutions. In this paper the authors relate the solutions of Pimentel and Diaz-Rivera by simple transformations to previous solutions published in the literature, showing that all the solutions can be derived from the known existing ones. Drawbacks to these approaches of studying bulk viscosity are pointed out, and better approaches indicated

  7. Viscosity kernel of molecular fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puscasu, Ruslan; Todd, Billy; Daivis, Peter

    2010-01-01

    , temperature, and chain length dependencies of the reciprocal and real-space viscosity kernels are presented. We find that the density has a major effect on the shape of the kernel. The temperature range and chain lengths considered here have by contrast less impact on the overall normalized shape. Functional...... forms that fit the wave-vector-dependent kernel data over a large density and wave-vector range have also been tested. Finally, a structural normalization of the kernels in physical space is considered. Overall, the real-space viscosity kernel has a width of roughly 3–6 atomic diameters, which means...

  8. Vanishing twins: a predictor of small-for-gestational age in IVF singletons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, Anja; Lidegaard, Ojvind; Freiesleben, Nina la Cour

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a vanishing twin on the risk of being small-for-gestational age (SGA) in in vitro fertilization (IVF) singletons.......The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a vanishing twin on the risk of being small-for-gestational age (SGA) in in vitro fertilization (IVF) singletons....

  9. Singularities and Entropy in Bulk Viscosity Dark Energy Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Xinhe; Dou Xu

    2011-01-01

    In this paper bulk viscosity is introduced to describe the effects of cosmic non-perfect fluid on the cosmos evolution and to build the unified dark energy (DE) with (dark) matter models. Also we derive a general relation between the bulk viscosity form and Hubble parameter that can provide a procedure for the viscosity DE model building. Especially, a redshift dependent viscosity parameter ζ ∝ λ 0 + λ 1 (1 + z) n proposed in the previous work [X.H. Meng and X. Dou, Commun. Theor. Phys. 52 (2009) 377] is investigated extensively in this present work. Further more we use the recently released supernova dataset (the Constitution dataset) to constrain the model parameters. In order to differentiate the proposed concrete dark energy models from the well known ΛCDM model, statefinder diagnostic method is applied to this bulk viscosity model, as a complementary to the Om parameter diagnostic and the deceleration parameter analysis performed by us before. The DE model evolution behavior and tendency are shown in the plane of the statefinder diagnostic parameter pair {r, s} as axes where the fixed point represents the ΛCDM model. The possible singularity property in this bulk viscosity cosmology is also discussed to which we can conclude that in the different parameter regions chosen properly, this concrete viscosity DE model can have various late evolution behaviors and the late time singularity could be avoided. We also calculate the cosmic entropy in the bulk viscosity dark energy frame, and find that the total entropy in the viscosity DE model increases monotonously with respect to the scale factor evolution, thus this monotonous increasing property can indicate an arrow of time in the universe evolution, though the quantum version of the arrow of time is still very puzzling. (geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics)

  10. Nonlinear equilibrium in Tokamaks including convective terms and viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.; Castro, E.; Puerta, J.

    2003-01-01

    MHD equilibrium in tokamaks becomes very complex, when the non-linear convective term and viscosity are included in the momentum equation. In order to simplify the analysis, each new term has been separated in type gradient terms and vorticity depending terms. For the special case in which the vorticity vanishes, an extended Grad-Shafranov type equation can be obtained. However now the magnetic surface is not isobars or current surfaces as in the usual Grad-Shafranov treatment. The non-linear convective terms introduces gradient of Bernoulli type kinetic terms . Montgomery and other authors have shown the importance of the viscosity terms in tokamaks [1,2], here the treatment is carried out for the equilibrium condition, including generalized tokamaks coordinates recently described [3], which simplify the equilibrium analysis. Calculation of the new isobar surfaces is difficult and some computation have been carried out elsewhere for some particular cases [3]. Here, our analysis is extended discussing how the toroidal current density, plasma pressure and toroidal field are modified across the midplane because of the new terms (convective and viscous). New calculations and computations are also presented. (Author)

  11. Predicting Sediment Thickness on Vanished Ocean Crust Since 200 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, A.; Müller, R. D.; Wang, X.; O'Callaghan, S.; Cannon, J.; Wright, N. M.

    2017-12-01

    Tracing sedimentation through time on existing and vanished seafloor is imperative for constraining long-term eustasy and for calculating volumes of subducted deep-sea sediments that contribute to global geochemical cycles. We present regression algorithms that incorporate the age of the ocean crust and the mean distance to the nearest passive margin to predict sediment thicknesses and long-term decompacted sedimentation rates since 200 Ma. The mean sediment thickness decreases from ˜220 m at 200 Ma to a minimum of ˜140 m at 130 Ma, reflecting the replacement of old Panthalassic ocean floor with young sediment-poor mid-ocean ridges, followed by an increase to ˜365 m at present-day. This increase reflects the accumulation of sediments on ageing abyssal plains proximal to passive margins, coupled with a decrease in the mean distance of any parcel of ocean crust to the nearest passive margin by over 700 km, and a doubling of the total passive margin length at present-day. Mean long-term sedimentation rates increase from ˜0.5 cm/ky at 160 Ma to over 0.8 cm/ky today, caused by enhanced terrigenous sediment influx along lengthened passive margins, superimposed by the onset of ocean-wide carbonate sedimentation. Our predictive algorithms, coupled to a plate tectonic model, provide a framework for constraining the seafloor sediment-driven eustatic sea-level component, which has grown from ˜80 to 210 m since 120 Ma. This implies a long-term sea-level rise component of 130 m, partly counteracting the contemporaneous increase in ocean basin depth due to progressive crustal ageing.

  12. Viscosity of particle laden films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timounay Yousra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We perform retraction experiments on soap films where large particles bridge the two interfaces. Local velocities are measured by PIV during the unstationnary regime. The velocity variation in time and space can be described by a continuous fluid model from which effective viscosity (shear and dilatational of particulate films is measured. The 2D effective viscosity of particulate films η2D increases with particle surface fraction ϕ: at low ϕ, it tends to the interfacial dilatational viscosity of the liquid/air interfaces and it diverges at the critical particle surface fraction ϕc ≃ 0.84. Experimental data agree with classical viscosity laws of hard spheres suspensions adapted to the 2D geometry, assuming viscous dissipation resulting from the squeeze of the liquid/air interfaces between the particles. Finally, we show that the observed viscous dissipation in particulate films has to be considered to describe the edge velocity during a retraction experiment at large particle coverage.

  13. Effective viscosity of confined hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. We find that the logarithm of the effective viscosity ηeff for nanometer-thin films depends linearly on the logarithm of the shear rate: log ηeff=C-nlog γ̇, where...

  14. Bulk viscosity of molecular fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Frederike; Matar, Omar K.; Müller, Erich A.

    2018-05-01

    The bulk viscosity of molecular models of gases and liquids is determined by molecular simulations as a combination of a dilute gas contribution, arising due to the relaxation of internal degrees of freedom, and a configurational contribution, due to the presence of intermolecular interactions. The dilute gas contribution is evaluated using experimental data for the relaxation times of vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom. The configurational part is calculated using Green-Kubo relations for the fluctuations of the pressure tensor obtained from equilibrium microcanonical molecular dynamics simulations. As a benchmark, the Lennard-Jones fluid is studied. Both atomistic and coarse-grained force fields for water, CO2, and n-decane are considered and tested for their accuracy, and where possible, compared to experimental data. The dilute gas contribution to the bulk viscosity is seen to be significant only in the cases when intramolecular relaxation times are in the μs range, and for low vibrational wave numbers (<1000 cm-1); This explains the abnormally high values of bulk viscosity reported for CO2. In all other cases studied, the dilute gas contribution is negligible and the configurational contribution dominates the overall behavior. In particular, the configurational term is responsible for the enhancement of the bulk viscosity near the critical point.

  15. Fission hindrance and nuclear viscosity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is in exact conformity with all the previous measurements [7,10–13]. The CASCADE calculations (solid lines in figure 1) used in this first level of analysis do not include any viscosity or temperature-dependent nuclear level density parameter a. The γ and particle decay are calculated using the standard prescriptions as ...

  16. On the measurement of magnetic viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serletis, C.; Efthimiadis, K. G.

    2012-08-01

    This work is an investigation of the experimental method used for measuring the magnetic viscosity in a hard ferromagnetic material, i.e. the recording of the magnetization under constant applied field and temperature, after the material has been magnetically saturated. It investigates how the experimental results are affected by the initial conditions of the method (saturation field, field change rate and field oscillation prior to its stabilization), and by minor variations of field and temperature during the recording. Based on the arising conclusions and the use of a more complex fitting function of measurements, the accuracy and repeatability of experimental results is improved.

  17. Searching for perfect fluids: quantum viscosity in a universal Fermi gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, C; Elliott, E; Wu, H; Thomas, J E

    2011-01-01

    We measure the shear viscosity in a two-component Fermi gas of atoms, tuned to a broad s-wave collisional (Feshbach) resonance. At resonance, the atoms strongly interact and exhibit universal behavior, where the equilibrium thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients are universal functions of density n and temperature T. We present a new calibration of the temperature as a function of global energy, which is directly measured from the cloud profiles. Using the calibration, the trap-averaged shear viscosity in units of ℎn is determined as a function of the reduced temperature at the trap center, from nearly the ground state to the unitary two-body regime. Low-temperature data are obtained from the damping rate of the radial breathing mode, whereas high-temperature data are obtained from hydrodynamic expansion measurements. We also show that the best fit to the high-temperature expansion data is obtained for a vanishing bulk viscosity. The measured trap-averaged entropy per particle and shear viscosity are used to estimate the ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density, which is compared with that conjectured for a perfect fluid.

  18. Vanishing De Vega annuloplasty for functional tricuspid regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, C M; Kumar, N; Prabhakar, G; Ge, Z; Bianchi, S; Gometza, B

    1993-10-01

    pulmonary arteriolar resistance can be adequately treated by a vanishing De Vega annuloplasty, which will stent the tricuspid anulus for about 4 months.

  19. Second viscosity effects in cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potupa, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    The object of the investigation is to draw attention to two important aspects in the choice of a substance model, namely an allowance for the viscosity and behaviour of the metrics at the later stages of cosmological evolution. It is shown that in homogeneous cosmological models taking into account the viscosity there are solutions which realize interpolation between the Fridman and steady-state regimes. In a closed model a solution is obtained which corresponds to the ''curvature compensation'' regime with an unboundedly increasing radius. The problem of compensation of singularity at t → o is discussed as well as the choice of the equations of state for the early (hadron) stages of cosmological evolution in connection with the hydrodynamic theory of multiple hadron production

  20. Negative viscosity can enhance learning of inertial dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Felix C; Patton, James L; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A

    2009-06-01

    We investigated how learning of inertial load manipulation is influenced by movement amplification with negative viscosity. Using a force-feedback device, subjects trained on anisotropic loads (5 orientations) with free movements in one of three conditions (inertia only, negative viscosity only, or combined), prior to common evaluation conditions (prescribed circular pattern with inertia only). Training with Combined-Load resulted in lower error (6.89±3.25%) compared to Inertia-Only (8.40±4.32%) and Viscosity-Only (8.17±4.13%) according to radial deviation analysis (% of trial mean radius). Combined-Load and Inertia-Only groups exhibited similar unexpected no-load trials (8.38±4.31% versus 8.91±4.70% of trial mean radius), which suggests comparable low-impedance strategies. These findings are remarkable since negative viscosity, only available during training, evidently enhanced learning when combined with inertia. Modeling analysis suggests that a feedforward after-effect of negative viscosity cannot predict such performance gains. Instead, results from Combined-Load training are consistent with greater feedforward inertia compensation along with a small increase in impedance control. The capability of the nervous system to generalize learning from negative viscosity suggests an intriguing new method for enhancing sensorimotor adaptation.

  1. Relaxation-based viscosity mapping for magnetic particle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkur, M.; Muslu, Y.; Saritas, E. U.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) has been shown to provide remarkable contrast for imaging applications such as angiography, stem cell tracking, and cancer imaging. Recently, there is growing interest in the functional imaging capabilities of MPI, where ‘color MPI’ techniques have explored separating different nanoparticles, which could potentially be used to distinguish nanoparticles in different states or environments. Viscosity mapping is a promising functional imaging application for MPI, as increased viscosity levels in vivo have been associated with numerous diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and cancer. In this work, we propose a viscosity mapping technique for MPI through the estimation of the relaxation time constant of the nanoparticles. Importantly, the proposed time constant estimation scheme does not require any prior information regarding the nanoparticles. We validate this method with extensive experiments in an in-house magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) setup at four different frequencies (between 250 Hz and 10.8 kHz) and at three different field strengths (between 5 mT and 15 mT) for viscosities ranging between 0.89 mPa · s-15.33 mPa · s. Our results demonstrate the viscosity mapping ability of MPI in the biologically relevant viscosity range.

  2. Effect of viscosity on learned satiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mars, M.; Hogenkamp, P.S.; Gosses, A.M.; Stafleu, A.; Graaf, C.de

    2009-01-01

    A higher viscosity of a food leads to a longer orosensory stimulation. This may facilitate the learned association between sensory signals and metabolic consequences. In the current study we investigated the effect of viscosity on learned satiation. In two intervention groups a low viscosity (LV)

  3. On weighted hardy inequalities on semiaxis for functions vanishing at the endpoints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanov Vladimir

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the weighted Hardy inequalities on the semiaxis of the form for functions vanishing at the endpoints together with derivatives up to the order . The case is completely characterized.

  4. Wave instabilities in nonlinear Schrödinger systems with non vanishing background

    KAUST Repository

    Trillo, Stefano; Gongora, J. S. Totero; Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We investigate wave collapse in the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation and in the presence of a non vanishing background. Through the use of virial identities, we establish a new criterion for blow-up.

  5. The vanishing twin: a major determinant of infant outcome in IVF singleton births

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, Anja; Lidegaard, Ojvind; Andersen, Anders Nyboe

    2006-01-01

    This article attempts to assess the frequency of vanishing twins in assisted reproductive and spontaneously conceived pregnancies, including in-vitro fertilization (IVF), and its impact on the live-born surviving twin.......This article attempts to assess the frequency of vanishing twins in assisted reproductive and spontaneously conceived pregnancies, including in-vitro fertilization (IVF), and its impact on the live-born surviving twin....

  6. Investigation of viscosity of whole hydrolyze sweetened condensed milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Kalinina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Рaper is aimed at developing of low-lactose (hydrolyzed sweetened condensed milk products technology for lactose intolerant people and for the whole population. Materials and methods: Rheological characteristics were determined on a Reotest device by the 2 nd method of viscometry Results and discussion. Reasonability of ß-galactosidase use for milk lactose hydrolyze during the production of canned products with sugar was proved in the previous works. This technology gives possibility to increase the quality of condensed canned foods, to reduce sugar concentration till 50 %, to increase dietary properties. Due to the reducing of saccharose mass part till 22 and 31 % the products had a liquid consistency that’s why was a necessity to increase the viscosity properties of condensed products. One of method to increase the product viscosity is inoculation of stabilization systems. Reasonability of the usage of stabilization system Bivicioc 1L was proved. The researches of viscosity determination in whole hydrolyzed sweetened condensed milk were shown in the work. Relations of viscosity of whole hydrolyzed condensed milk to the deformation rate were presented. Conclusions Viscosity indices of experimental samples in the fresh produced products and during storage are determined and justified.

  7. When Dijkstra Meets Vanishing Point: A Stereo Vision Approach for Road Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yigong; Su, Yingna; Yang, Jian; Ponce, Jean; Kong, Hui

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a vanishing-point constrained Dijkstra road model for road detection in a stereo-vision paradigm. First, the stereo-camera is used to generate the u- and v-disparity maps of road image, from which the horizon can be extracted. With the horizon and ground region constraints, we can robustly locate the vanishing point of road region. Second, a weighted graph is constructed using all pixels of the image, and the detected vanishing point is treated as the source node of the graph. By computing a vanishing-point constrained Dijkstra minimum-cost map, where both disparity and gradient of gray image are used to calculate cost between two neighbor pixels, the problem of detecting road borders in image is transformed into that of finding two shortest paths that originate from the vanishing point to two pixels in the last row of image. The proposed approach has been implemented and tested over 2600 grayscale images of different road scenes in the KITTI data set. The experimental results demonstrate that this training-free approach can detect horizon, vanishing point, and road regions very accurately and robustly. It can achieve promising performance.

  8. Separation of gold nanorods by viscosity gradient centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Suli; Wang, Yawei; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Qingquan; Liu, Xiaojun; Tu, Yang; Liang, Aiye

    2016-01-01

    Size-uniform gold nanorods (Au-NRs) are used in biosensing, bioimaging, photothermal therapy, drug and gene delivery, and controlled release. Monodisperse Au-NRs are usually obtained by separation steps following their synthesis, and centrifugation is widely used because of the ease of operation, high recovery, and the good availability of equipment. So far, the effect of viscosity on the separation of Au-NRs has not been investigated. We have developed a method for separation of monodisperse Au-NRs that is based on centrifugation in a viscosity gradient. Monodisperse Au-NRs obtained from gold nanoparticles were obtained by centrifugation in viscosity gradient adjusted with poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline). Au-NRs in sizes ranging from 25.6 to 26.1 nm in effective radius can be separated 5500 g within 5 min, which appears to be the fastest method for separation of Au-NRs. (author)

  9. Using Quartz Crystal Microbalance for Field Measurement of Liquid Viscosities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingsong Bai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The field measurement of liquid viscosities, especially the high viscous liquids, is challenging and often requires expensive equipment, long processing time, and lots of reagent. We use quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs operating in solution which are also sensitive to the viscosity and density of the contacting solution. QCMs are typically investigated for sensor applications in which one surface of QCM completely immersed in Newtonian liquid, but the viscous damping in liquids would cause not only large frequency shifts but also large losses in the quality factor Q leading to instability and even cessation of oscillation. A novel mass-sensitivity-based method for field measurement of liquid viscosities using a QCM is demonstrated in this paper and a model describing the influence of the liquid properties on the oscillation frequency is established as well. Two groups of verified experiments were performed and the experimental results show that the presented method is effective and possesses potential applications.

  10. Shear viscosity and out of equilibrium dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    El, Andrej; Xu, Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Using Grad’s method, we calculate the entropy production and derive a formula for the second-order shear viscosity coefficient in a one-dimensionally expanding particle system, which can also be considered out of chemical equilibrium. For a one-dimensional expansion of gluon matter with Bjorken boost invariance, the shear tensor and the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η/s are numerically calculated by an iterative and self-consistent prescription within the second-order Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics and by a microscopic parton cascade transport theory. Compared with η/s obtained using the Navier-Stokes approximation, the present result is about 20% larger at a QCD coupling αs ∼ 0.3 (with η/s ≈ 0.18) and is a factor of 2–3 larger at a small coupling αs ∼ 0.01. We demonstrate an agreement between the viscous hydrodynamic calculations and the microscopic transport results on η/s, except when employing a small αs . On the other hand, we demonstrate that for such small αs , the gluon syst...

  11. Shear viscosity and out of equilibrium dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    El, Andrej; Xu, Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Using the Grad's method we calculate the entropy production and derive a formula for the second order shear viscosity coefficient in a one-dimensionally expanding particle system, which can also be considered out of chemical equilibrium. For a one-dimensional expansion of gluon matter with Bjorken boost invariance the shear tensor and the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio $\\eta/s$ are numerically calculated by an iterative and self-consistent prescription within the second order Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics and by a microscopic parton cascade transport theory. Compared with $\\eta/s$ obtained using the Navier-Stokes approximation, the present result is about 20% larger at a QCD coupling $\\alpha_s \\sim 0.3$(with $\\eta/s\\approx 0.18$) and is a factor of 2-3 larger at a small coupling $\\alpha_s \\sim 0.01$. We demonstrate an agreement between the viscous hydrodynamic calculations and the microscopic transport results on $\\eta/s$, except when employing a small $\\alpha_s$. On the other hand, we demonstrate th...

  12. Shear viscosity and out of equilibrium dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El, Andrej; Xu Zhe; Greiner, Carsten; Muronga, Azwinndini

    2009-01-01

    Using Grad's method, we calculate the entropy production and derive a formula for the second-order shear viscosity coefficient in a one-dimensionally expanding particle system, which can also be considered out of chemical equilibrium. For a one-dimensional expansion of gluon matter with Bjorken boost invariance, the shear tensor and the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η/s are numerically calculated by an iterative and self-consistent prescription within the second-order Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics and by a microscopic parton cascade transport theory. Compared with η/s obtained using the Navier-Stokes approximation, the present result is about 20% larger at a QCD coupling α s ∼0.3 (with η/s≅0.18) and is a factor of 2-3 larger at a small coupling α s ∼0.01. We demonstrate an agreement between the viscous hydrodynamic calculations and the microscopic transport results on η/s, except when employing a small α s . On the other hand, we demonstrate that for such small α s , the gluon system is far from kinetic and chemical equilibrium, which indicates the break down of second-order hydrodynamics because of the strong nonequilibrium evolution. In addition, for large α s (0.3-0.6), the Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics formally breaks down at large momentum p T > or approx. 3 GeV but is still a reasonably good approximation.

  13. Drop Spreading with Random Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    Airway mucus acts as a barrier to protect the lung. However as a biological material, its physical properties are known imperfectly and can be spatially heterogeneous. In this study we assess the impact of these uncertainties on the rate of spreading of a drop (representing an inhaled aerosol) over a mucus film. We model the film as Newtonian, having a viscosity that depends linearly on the concentration of a passive solute (a crude proxy for mucin proteins). Given an initial random solute (and hence viscosity) distribution, described as a Gaussian random field with a given correlation structure, we seek to quantify the uncertainties in outcomes as the drop spreads. Using lubrication theory, we describe the spreading of the drop in terms of a system of coupled nonlinear PDEs governing the evolution of film height and the vertically-averaged solute concentration. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to predict the variability in the drop centre location and width (1D) or area (2D). We show how simulation results are well described (at much lower computational cost) by a low-order model using a weak disorder expansion. Our results show for example how variability in the drop location is a non-monotonic function of the solute correlation length increases. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  14. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    KAUST Repository

    Pasquino, Rossana

    2013-10-15

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes, and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts η0,linear to their ring counterparts η0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as a function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime η0,linear/η 0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation η0,linear/ η0,ring = 2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of ring viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1 < Z < 20, η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.2±0.3, is weaker than the scaling prediction (η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.6±0.3) and the simulations (η0,linear/ η0,ring ∼ Z2.0±0.3). Nevertheless, the present collection of state-of-the-art experimental data unambiguously demonstrates that rings exhibit a universal trend clearly departing from that of their linear counterparts, and hence it represents a major step toward resolving a 30-year-old problem. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    KAUST Repository

    Pasquino, Rossana; Vasilakopoulos, Thodoris C.; Jeong, Youncheol; Lee, Hyojoon; Rogers, Simon A.; Sakellariou, Georgios; Allgaier, Jü rgen B.; Takano, Atsushi; Brá s, Ana Rita E; Chang, Taihyun; Gooß en, Sebastian; Pyckhout-Hintzen, Wim; Wischnewski, Andreas; Hadjichristidis, Nikolaos; Richter, Dieter R.; Rubinstein, Michael H.; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes, and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts η0,linear to their ring counterparts η0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as a function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime η0,linear/η 0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation η0,linear/ η0,ring = 2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of ring viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1 < Z < 20, η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.2±0.3, is weaker than the scaling prediction (η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.6±0.3) and the simulations (η0,linear/ η0,ring ∼ Z2.0±0.3). Nevertheless, the present collection of state-of-the-art experimental data unambiguously demonstrates that rings exhibit a universal trend clearly departing from that of their linear counterparts, and hence it represents a major step toward resolving a 30-year-old problem. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  16. VISCOSITY DICTATES METABOLIC ACTIVITY of Vibrio ruber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja eBoric

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about metabolic activity of bacteria, when viscosity of their environment changes. In this work, bacterial metabolic activity in media with viscosity ranging from 0.8 to 29.4 mPas was studied. Viscosities up to 2.4 mPas did not affect metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber. On the other hand, at 29.4 mPas respiration rate and total dehydrogenase activity increased 8 and 4-fold, respectively. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase increased up to 13-fold at higher viscosities. However, intensified metabolic activity did not result in faster growth rate. Increased viscosity delayed the onset as well as the duration of biosynthesis of prodigiosin. As an adaptation to viscous environment V. ruber increased metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and reduced synthesis of a secondary metabolite. In addition, V. ruber was able to modify the viscosity of its environment.

  17. A comparative study of high-viscosity cement percutaneous vertebroplasty vs. low-viscosity cement percutaneous kyphoplasty for treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Liu, Yang; Peng, Hao; Tan, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Mi; Zheng, Xian-Nian; Chen, Fang-Zhou; Li, Ming-Hui

    2016-06-01

    The clinical effects of two different methods-high-viscosity cement percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) and low-viscosity cement percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP) in the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs) were investigated. From June 2010 to August 2013, 98 cases of OVCFs were included in our study. Forty-six patients underwent high-viscosity PVP and 52 patients underwent low-viscosity PKP. The occurrence of cement leakage was observed. Pain relief and functional activity were evaluated using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), respectively. Restoration of the vertebral body height and angle of kyphosis were assessed by comparing preoperative and postoperative measurements of the anterior heights, middle heights and the kyphotic angle of the fractured vertebra. Nine out of the 54 vertebra bodies and 11 out of the 60 vertebra bodies were observed to have cement leakage in the high-viscosity PVP and low-viscosity PKP groups, respectively. The rate of cement leakage, correction of anterior vertebral height and kyphotic angles showed no significant differences between the two groups (P>0.05). Low-viscosity PKP had significant advantage in terms of the restoration of middle vertebral height as compared with the high-viscosity PVP (Pviscosity PVP and low-viscosity PKP have similar clinical effects in terms of the rate of cement leakage, restoration of the anterior vertebral body height, changes of kyphotic angles, functional activity, and pain relief. Low-viscosity PKP is better than high-viscosity PVP in restoring the height of the middle vertebra.

  18. String theory in polar coordinates and the vanishing of the one-loop Rindler entropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertens, Thomas G. [Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University,Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Verschelde, Henri [Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy,Krijgslaan, 281-S9, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Zakharov, Valentin I. [ITEP, B. Cheremushkinskaya 25, Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); Moscow Inst Phys & Technol,Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region, 141700 (Russian Federation); School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University,Sukhanova str 8, Vladivostok 690950 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-19

    We analyze the string spectrum of flat space in polar coordinates, following the small curvature limit of the SL(2,ℝ)/U(1) cigar CFT. We first analyze the partition function of the cigar itself, making some clarifications of the structure of the spectrum that have escaped attention up to this point. The superstring spectrum (type 0 and type II) is shown to exhibit an involution symmetry, that survives the small curvature limit. We classify all marginal states in polar coordinates for type II superstrings, with emphasis on their links and their superconformal structure. This classification is confirmed by an explicit large τ{sub 2} analysis of the partition function. Next we compare three approaches towards the type II genus one entropy in Rindler space: using a sum-over-fields strategy, using a Melvin model approach as in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP05(2015)106 and finally using a saddle point method on the cigar partition function. In each case we highlight possible obstructions and motivate that the correct procedures yield a vanishing result: S=0. We finally discuss how the QFT UV divergences of the fields in the spectrum disappear when computing the free energy and entropy using Euclidean techniques.

  19. Relative viscosity of emulsions in simple shear flow: Temperature, shear rate, and interfacial tension dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Se Bin; Lee, Joon Sang [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei Unversity, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    We simulate an emulsion system under simple shear rates to analyze its rheological characteristics using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). We calculate the relative viscosity of an emulsion under a simple shear flow along with changes in temperature, shear rate, and surfactant concentration. The relative viscosity of emulsions decreased with an increase in temperature. We observed the shear-thinning phenomena, which is responsible for the inverse proportion between the shear rate and viscosity. An increase in the interfacial tension caused a decrease in the relative viscosity of the decane-in-water emulsion because the increased deformation caused by the decreased interfacial tension significantly influenced the wall shear stress.

  20. Viscosity calculated in simulations of strongly coupled dusty plasmas with gas friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yan; Goree, J.; Liu Bin

    2011-01-01

    A two-dimensional strongly coupled dusty plasma is modeled using Langevin and frictionless molecular dynamical simulations. The static viscosity η and the wave-number-dependent viscosity η(k) are calculated from the microscopic shear in the random motion of particles. A recently developed method of calculating the wave-number-dependent viscosity η(k) is validated by comparing the results of η(k) from the two simulations. It is also verified that the Green-Kubo relation can still yield an accurate measure of the static viscosity η in the presence of a modest level of friction as in dusty plasma experiments.

  1. Viscosity in Modified Gravity 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iver Brevik

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A bulk viscosity is introduced in the formalism of modified gravity. It is shownthat, based on a natural scaling law for the viscosity, a simple solution can be found forquantities such as the Hubble parameter and the energy density. These solutions mayincorporate a viscosity-induced Big Rip singularity. By introducing a phase transition inthe cosmic fluid, the future singularity can nevertheless in principle be avoided. 

  2. Uniaxial Elongational viscosity of bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The startup and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for three bidisperse polystyrene (PS) melts, consisting of blends of monodisperse PS with molecular weights of 52 kg/mole or 103 kg/mole and 390 kg/mole. The bidisperse melts have a maximum in the steady elongational...... viscosity, of up to a factor of 7 times the Trouton limit of 3 times the zero-shear viscosity....

  3. VISCOSITY TEST OF VEHICLE ENGINE OILS

    OpenAIRE

    Rita Prasetyowati

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the value of the kinematic viscosity lubricants motorcycle that has been used at various temperatures and the use of distance. This study also aims to remedy mengtahui how the value of the kinematic viscosity of the lubricant car that has been used in a wide range of temperature variation and distance usage. Viscosity liquid, in this case is the lubricants, can be determined using the Redwood viscometer By using Redwood viscometer, can be measured flow time requir...

  4. Dependence of Helium II viscosity properties on oscillation frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadirashvili, Z.S.; Tsakadze, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    The causes of a discrepancy in the results of measurements of He II viscosity below Tapprox. =1.6 K obtained with different measurement methods are investigated. It is shown that to obtain correct results in oscillation experiments, the condition delta>>lambda/sub ph/ should obtain, where delta is the depth of viscous wave penetration and lambda/sub ph/ is the phonon free path length. Results of viscosity measurements at different ratios delta/lambda/sub ph/ (by a wire viscometer) are presented. It is shown that for the condition delta>>lambda/sub ph/, the results obtained are in good agreement with the results of Andronikashvili (in which delta/lambda/sub ph/>100). If the mentioned relation is not satisfied, then as the value of the ratio delta/lambda/sub ph/ is decreased, the value measured for the viscosity is increasingly lower than the results of Andronikashvili

  5. The influence of magnetic fields on crude oils viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Jose L.; Bombard, Antonio J. F. [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), Itajuba, MG (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Exatas. Lab. de Reologia

    2009-07-01

    The crystallization of paraffin causes serious problems in the process of transportation of petroleum. This phenomenon increases the crude oil viscosity and implies an organic resin accumulation on pipeline wall, resulting in a reduced flux area or totally blocked pipes. One of the most challenging tasks for pipeline maintenance is solving this problem at low cost. Therefore, a method that inhibits the crystallization of paraffin and reduces the viscosity of crude oil could have many useful applications within the petroleum industry. Recent studies showed that magnetic fields reduce the Wax Appearance Temperature (WAT) and the viscosity of paraffin-based crude oil. For better understanding of this discovery, a series of tests was performed. This paper will show the influence of a DC magnetic field on rheological proprieties of three crude oils with different paraffin concentrations: a crude oil sample with 11 % p/p of paraffin concentration (sample 1); a crude oil sample with 6 % p/p of paraffin concentration (sample 2); a mixture of paraffin plus light crude oil with a total of 11 % p/p of paraffin concentration. These samples were placed in an electromagnet that generates a magnetic field of 1.3 Tesla. The samples' temperatures were conditioned around their Wax Appearance Temperature (WAT), and they were exposed to the field. As the viscosity of crude oil is very sensitive to the changes in temperature, it was ensured that the temperature has remained constant throughout the process. The sample 1 revealed a considerable reduction of viscosity: its original viscosity was 66 cP before magnetic field exposure, after that its viscosity was reduced to 39 cP. The other samples showed the same viscosity, before and after the magnetic field exposure. Since the samples 1 and 3 have the same paraffin concentrations, the viscosity reduction is not due only to the presence of paraffin; there must be other factors responsible for the interaction of sample 1 with the

  6. Variable viscosity effects on mixed convection heat and mass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR OKE

    the effects of viscous dissipation and variable viscosity on the flow of heat and mass transfer characteristics in a viscous fluid over a semi-infinite vertical porous plate in the ..... been solved by Gauss-. Seidel iteration method and numerical values are carried out after executing the computer program for it. In order to prove.

  7. Intrinsic viscosity of guar gum in sweeteners solutions | Samavati ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rheological methods were applied to study the effect of sweeteners on the rheological behavior of guar gum in dilute solutions. The concentration of the sweeteners were 0.1, 0.2%w/v for aspartame, acesulfame-k and cyclamate, and 0.001, 0.002%w/v for neotame. Gum was evaluated for intrinsic viscosity by various ...

  8. The Asymptotic Solution for the Steady Variable-Viscosity Free ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Under an arbitrary time-dependent heating of an infinite vertical plate (or wall), the steady viscosity-dependent free convection flow of a viscous incompressible fluid is investigated. Using the asymptotic method of solution on the governing equations of motion and energy, the resulting Ordinary differential equations were ...

  9. Relook on fitting of viscosity with undercooling of glassy liquids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur ... The present approach is on the modification of viscosity fitting of undercooled liquid as a function of ... behaviour of glassy alloys and organic and ionic compounds ...... the present method is applied to calculate the analytical solu-.

  10. The experimental viscosity and calculated relative viscosity of liquid In-Sn allcoys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, A.Q.; Guo, L.J.; Liu, C.S.; Jia, E.G.; Zhu, Z.G.

    2007-01-01

    The experimental measured viscosity of liquid pure Sn, In 20 Sn 80 and In 80 Sn 20 alloys was studied, and to make a comparison, the calculated relative viscosity based on the pair distribution functions, g(r), has also been studied. There is one peak in each experimental viscosity and calculated relative-viscosity curve of liquid pure Sn about 1000 deg. C. One valley appears in each experimental viscosity and calculated viscosity curve of liquid In 20 Sn 80 alloy about 700 deg. C. There is no abnormal behavior on In 80 Sn 20 alloy. The behavior of experimental viscosity and calculated relative viscosity is coincident with each other. Those results conformed that the temperature-induced structure anomalies reported before did take place

  11. Hodgkin's lymphoma-related vanishing bile duct syndrome: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiong-Ming Wong

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 38-year-old man who developed vanishing bile duct syndrome in association with Hodgkin's lymphoma. He was noted to have cervical lymphadenopathy and marked elevation of total serum bilirubin at diagnosis. He achieved complete remission with normalization of serum bilirubin after eight courses of Adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine chemotherapy followed with autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation. Consecutive liver biopsies performed at diagnosis and at the stage of complete remission revealed the disappearance and regeneration of interlobular bile ducts, respectively. Our case provides pathological evidence that Hodgkin's lymphoma-related vanishing bile duct syndrome is a reversible bile duct injury disease. Bilirubin is a reliable serum marker to monitor the treatment response of these cases. The mechanism to develop hyperbilirubinemia with vanishing bile duct in such a case of Hodgkin's lymphoma remains to be studied. A literature review was carried out.

  12. So It Vanished: Art, Taboo and Shared Space in Contemporary Aotearoa New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Barrett

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In February 2012, The Dowse Art Museum in Lower Hutt, near Wellington, planned to host So It Vanishes, an exhibition by acclaimed Mexican artist Teresa Margolles, whose often shocking works seek to highlight how dispensable human life has become in the parts of Mexico riven by drugs wars. Margolles’s installation would have used infinitesimal amounts of morgue water in a bubble mixture dispensed into an empty, silent room in the same building that sacred Māori treasures are housed. The incorporation of water used to wash corpses in So It Vanishes, particularly in proximity to cultural treasures, would have been deeply offensive, indeed dangerous, for Māori people. Following objections, the exhibition was cancelled. This article analyses the cancellation of So It Vanishes and seeks to answer whether and how transgressive art and indigenous beliefs may be reconciled in contemporary Aotearoa New Zealand.

  13. The effects of size, clutter, and complexity on vanishing-point distances in visual imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, T L; Baird, J C

    1993-01-01

    The portrayal of vanishing-point distances in visual imagery was examined in six experiments. In all experiments, subjects formed visual images of squares, and the squares were to be oriented orthogonally to subjects' line of sight. The squares differed in their level of surface complexity, and were either undivided, divided into 4 equally sized smaller squares, or divided into 16 equally sized smaller squares. Squares also differed in stated referent size, and ranged from 3 in. to 128 ft along each side. After subjects had formed an image of a specified square, they transformed their image so that the square was portrayed to move away from them. Eventually, the imaged square was portrayed to be so far away that if it were any further away, it could not be identified. Subjects estimated the distance to the square that was portrayed in their image at that time, the vanishing-point distance, and the relationship between stated referent size and imaged vanishing-point distance was best described by a power function with an exponent less than 1. In general, there were trends for exponents (slopes on log axes) to increase slightly and for multiplicative constants (y intercepts on log axes) to decrease as surface complexity increased. No differences in exponents or in multiplicative constants were found when the vanishing-point was approached from either subthreshold or suprathreshold directions. When clutter in the form of additional imaged objects located to either side of the primary imaged object was added to the image, the exponent of the vanishing-point function increased slightly and the multiplicative constant decreased. The success of a power function (and the failure of the size-distance invariance hypothesis) in describing the vanishing-point distance function calls into question the notions (a) that a constant grain size exists in the imaginal visual field at a given location and (b) that grain size specifies a lower limit in the storage of information in

  14. Hydrodynamic radii of polyethylene glycols in different solvents determined from viscosity measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dohmen-Speelmans, M.P.J.; Pereira, A.M.; Timmer, J.M.K.; Benes, N.E.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2008-01-01

    The hydrodynamic radius, rh, of low molar mass polyethylene glycol, MPEG = (200 to 1000) g·mol-1, in a homologous series of primary alcohols, acetone, and toluene has been determined from viscosity measurements. The viscosity data have been collected using a fast one-point method as well as a more

  15. An application of stress energy tensor to the vanishing theorem of differential forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kairen Cai

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available The author applies the stress energy of differential forms to study the vanishing theorems of the Liouville type. It is shown that for a large class of underlying manifolds such as the Euclidean n-space, the complex n-space, and the complex hyperbolic space form, if any vector bundle valued p-form with conservative stress energy tensor is of finite norm or slowly divergent norm, then the p-form vanishes. This generalizes the recent results due to Hu and Sealey.

  16. Non-vanishing of Taylor coefficients and Poincaré series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Sullivan, C.; Risager, Morten S.

    2013-01-01

    We prove recursive formulas for the Taylor coefficients of cusp forms, such as Ramanujan's Delta function, at points in the upper half-plane. This allows us to show the non-vanishing of all Taylor coefficients of Delta at CM points of small discriminant as well as the non-vanishing of certain...... Poincaré series. At a "generic" point, all Taylor coefficients are shown to be non-zero. Some conjectures on the Taylor coefficients of Delta at CM points are stated....

  17. Enhancement of multiple cranial and spinal nerves in vanishing white matter: expanding the differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eluvathingal Muttikkal, Thomas Jose; Montealegre, Denia Ramirez; Matsumoto, Julie Ann

    2018-03-01

    Abnormal cranial or spinal nerve contrast enhancement on MRI in cases of suspected pediatric leukodystrophy is recognized as an important clue to the diagnosis of either metachromatic leukodystrophy or globoid cell leukodystrophy (Krabbe disease). We report a case of genetically confirmed childhood vanishing white matter with enhancement of multiple cranial and spinal nerves in addition to the more typical intracranial findings. This case expands the limited differential diagnosis of cranial nerve or spinal nerve enhancement in cases of suspected leukodystrophy and may aid in more efficient work-up and earlier diagnosis of vanishing white matter.

  18. Viscosity of aluminum under shock-loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xiao-Juan; Liu Fu-Sheng; Zhang Ming-Jian; Sun Yan-Yun

    2011-01-01

    A reliable data treatment method is critical for viscosity measurements using the disturbance amplitude damping method of shock waves. In this paper the finite difference method is used to obtain the numerical solutions for the disturbance amplitude damping behaviour of the sinusoidal shock front in a flyer-impact experiment. The disturbance amplitude damping curves are used to depict the numerical solutions of viscous flow. By fitting the experimental data to the numerical solutions of different viscosities, we find that the effective shear viscosity coefficients of shocked aluminum at pressures of 42, 78 and 101 GPa are (1500±100) Pa·s, (2800±100) Pa·s and (3500±100) Pa·s respectively. It is clear that the shear viscosity of aluminum increases with an increase in shock pressure, so aluminum does not melt below a shock pressure of 101 GPa. This conclusion is consistent with the sound velocity measurement. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  19. Separate density and viscosity measurements of unknown liquid using quartz crystal microbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Tan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous liquids have a wide range of applications in many fields. Basic physical properties like the density and the viscosity have great impacts on the functionalities of a given ionic liquid. For the millions kinds of existing liquids, only a few have been systematically measured with the density and the viscosity using traditional methods. However, these methods are limited to measure the density and the viscosity of an ionic liquid simultaneously especially in processing micro sample volumes. To meet this challenge, we present a new theoretical model and a novel method to separate density and viscosity measurements with single quartz crystal microbalance (QCM in this work. The agreement of experimental results and theocratical calculations shows that the QCM is capable to measure the density and the viscosity of ionic liquids.

  20. On the bulk viscosity of relativistic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canuto, V.; Hsieh, S.-H.

    1978-01-01

    An expression for the bulk viscosity coefficient in terms of the trace of the hydrodynamic energy-stress tensor is derived from the Kubo formula. This, along with a field-theoretic model of an interacting system of scalar particles, suggests that at high temperatures the bulk viscosity tends to zero, contrary to the often quoted resuls of Iso, Mori and Namiki. (author)

  1. Viscosity evolution of anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pevere, A.; Guibaud, G.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Lens, P.N.L.; Baudu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of the apparent viscosity at steady shear rate of sieved anaerobic granular sludge (20¿315 ¿m diameter) sampled from different full-scale anaerobic reactors was recorded using rotation tests. The ¿limit viscosity¿ of sieved anaerobic granular sludge was determined from the apparent

  2. Bulk-viscosity-driven asymmetric inflationary universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waga, I.; Lima, J.A.S.; Portugal, R.

    1987-01-01

    A primordial net bosinic charge is introduced in the context of the bulk-viscosity-driven inflationary models. The analysis is carried through a macroscopic point of view in the framework of the causal thermodynamic theory. The conditions for having exponetial and generalized inflation are obtained. A phenomenological expression for the bulk viscosity coefficient is also derived. (author) [pt

  3. The Friction Theory for Viscosity Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisneros, Sergio; Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2001-01-01

    , in the case when experimental information is available a more accurate modeling can be obtained by means of a simple tuning procedure. A tuned f-theory general model can deliver highly accurate viscosity modeling above the saturation pressure and good prediction of the liquid-phase viscosity at pressures......In this work the one-parameter friction theory (f-theory) general models have been extended to the viscosity prediction and modeling of characterized oils. It is demonstrated that these simple models, which take advantage of the repulsive and attractive pressure terms of cubic equations of state...... such as the SRK, PR and PRSV, can provide accurate viscosity prediction and modeling of characterized oils. In the case of light reservoir oils, whose properties are close to those of normal alkanes, the one-parameter f-theory general models can predict the viscosity of these fluids with good accuracy. Yet...

  4. Microfluidics for simultaneous quantification of platelet adhesion and blood viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Eunseop; Park, Jun Hong; Kang, Yang Jun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-01

    Platelet functions, including adhesion, activation, and aggregation have an influence on thrombosis and the progression of atherosclerosis. In the present study, a new microfluidic-based method is proposed to estimate platelet adhesion and blood viscosity simultaneously. Blood sample flows into an H-shaped microfluidic device with a peristaltic pump. Since platelet aggregation may be initiated by the compression of rotors inside the peristaltic pump, platelet aggregates may adhere to the H-shaped channel. Through correlation mapping, which visualizes decorrelation of the streaming blood flow, the area of adhered platelets (APlatelet) can be estimated without labeling platelets. The platelet function is estimated by determining the representative index IA·T based on APlatelet and contact time. Blood viscosity is measured by monitoring the flow conditions in the one side channel of the H-shaped device. Based on the relation between interfacial width (W) and pressure ratio of sample flows to the reference, blood sample viscosity (μ) can be estimated by measuring W. Biophysical parameters (IA·T, μ) are compared for normal and diabetic rats using an ex vivo extracorporeal model. This microfluidic-based method can be used for evaluating variations in the platelet adhesion and blood viscosity of animal models with cardiovascular diseases under ex vivo conditions. PMID:27118101

  5. Eruptive viscosity and volcano morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posin, S.B.; Greeley, R.

    1988-01-01

    Terrestrial central volcanoes formed predominantly from lava flows were classified as shields, stratovolcanoes, and domes. Shield volcanoes tend to be large in areal extent, have convex slopes, and are characterized by their resemblance to inverted hellenic war shields. Stratovolcanoes have concave slopes, whereas domes are smaller and have gentle convex slopes near the vent that increase near the perimeter. In addition to these differences in morphology, several other variations were observed. The most important is composition: shield volcanoes tend to be basaltic, stratovolcanoes tend to be andesitic, and domes tend to be dacitic. However, important exceptions include Fuji, Pico, Mayon, Izalco, and Fuego which have stratovolcano morphologies but are composed of basaltic lavas. Similarly, Ribkwo is a Kenyan shield volcano composed of trachyte and Suswa and Kilombe are shields composed of phonolite. These exceptions indicate that eruptive conditions, rather than composition, may be the primary factors that determine volcano morphology. The objective of this study is to determine the relationships, if any, between eruptive conditions (viscosity, erupted volume, and effusion rate) and effusive volcano morphology. Moreover, it is the goal of this study to incorporate these relationships into a model to predict the eruptive conditions of extraterrestrial (Martian) volcanoes based on their morphology

  6. Prediction of the viscosity of lubricating oil blends at any temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, R.M.; Bernardo, M.I.; Fernandez, A.M.; Folgueras, M.B. [University of Oviedo, Oveido (Spain). Dept. of Energy

    1996-04-01

    This paper discusses a method of predicting the viscosity of multicomponent base lubricating oil mixtures based on Andrade`s equation. The kinematic viscosity of three types of base lubricating oils and their binary and ternary mixtures were measured at different temperatures and the parameters of Andrade`s equation were calculated. The results obtained indicate that the Andrade parameters vary linearly with the mixture composition. From these linear equations, generalized mixing equations are derived which confirm the experimental results. By application of the mixing equations, a simple method is obtained for prediction of the viscosity of oil blends at any temperature from viscosity-temperature data of the oil components. The calculated viscosities gave an average absolute deviation of 10% over the temperature range 20-100{degree}C. 8 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Unusual case of a vanishing bronchus of the left allograft in a lung transplant recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don Hayes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an interesting case of a complete vanishing of the left main bronchus in a lung transplant recipient who had a successful outcome due to acute respiratory support with venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in order to perform airway dilation.

  8. VANISHING CALCIFICATION OF THE BRAIN IN AN INFANT AFTER OPEN-HEART-SURGERY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BEGEER, JH; RUTGERS, AWF; VENCKEN, LM; HOORNTJE, TM; MEUZELAAR, JJ; WOLTERSOMZWIERZYNSKA, BD

    1991-01-01

    Neurological complications after cardiac operations with the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia are well known. A 6 months-old child is described with severe neurological complications after cardiac surgery for Fallots tetralogy. On the CT scan cortical calcification was seen to vanish.

  9. Vanishing quantum vacuum energy in eleven-dimensional supergravity on the round seven-sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inami, T.; Yamagishi, K.

    1984-01-01

    Quantum corrections to the vacuum energy are evaluated at one-loop order in eleven-dimensional supergravity on the round seven-sphere S 7 and are shown to vanish. The cancellation is also shown for all ultraviolet poles at z = 11/2, 10/2,..., corresponding to divergences of eleventh and lower powers of momentum cut-off Λ. (orig.)

  10. Local invariants vanishing on stationary horizons: a diagnostic for locating black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Don N; Shoom, Andrey A

    2015-04-10

    Inspired by the example of Abdelqader and Lake for the Kerr metric, we construct local scalar polynomial curvature invariants that vanish on the horizon of any stationary black hole: the squared norms of the wedge products of n linearly independent gradients of scalar polynomial curvature invariants, where n is the local cohomogeneity of the spacetime.

  11. Application of SH surface acoustic waves for measuring the viscosity of liquids in function of pressure and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiełczyński, P; Szalewski, M; Balcerzak, A; Rostocki, A J; Tefelski, D B

    2011-12-01

    Viscosity measurements were carried out on triolein at pressures from atmospheric up to 650 MPa and in the temperature range from 10°C to 40°C using ultrasonic measuring setup. Bleustein-Gulyaev SH surface acoustic waves waveguides were used as viscosity sensors. Additionally, pressure changes occurring during phase transition have been measured over the same temperature range. Application of ultrasonic SH surface acoustic waves in the liquid viscosity measurements at high pressure has many advantages. It enables viscosity measurement during phase transitions and in the high-pressure range where the classical viscosity measurement methods cannot operate. Measurements of phase transition kinetics and viscosity of liquids at high pressures and various temperatures (isotherms) is a novelty. The knowledge of changes in viscosity in function of pressure and temperature can help to obtain a deeper insight into thermodynamic properties of liquids. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Excessive Additive Effect On Engine Oil Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kumbár

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is excessive additive (for oil filling effect on engine oil dynamic viscosity. Research is focused to commercially distribute automotive engine oil with viscosity class 15W–40 designed for vans. There were prepared blends of new and used engine oil without and with oil additive in specific ratio according manufacturer’s recommendations. Dynamic viscosity of blends with additive was compared with pure new and pure used engine oil. The temperature dependence dynamic viscosity of samples was evaluated by using rotary viscometer with standard spindle. Concern was that the oil additive can moves engine oil of several viscosity grades up. It is able to lead to failure in the engine. Mathematical models were used for fitting experimental values of dynamic viscosity. Exponential fit function was selected, which was very accurate because the coefficient of determination R2 achieved high values (0.98–0.99. These models are able to predict viscosity behaviour blends of engine oil and additive.

  13. Comparative evaluation of aqueous humor viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kyshia; Carter, Renee; Tully, Thomas; Negulescu, Ioan; Storey, Eric

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate aqueous humor viscosity in the raptor, dog, cat, and horse, with a primary focus on the barred owl (Strix varia). Twenty-six raptors, ten dogs, three cats, and one horse. Animals were euthanized for reasons unrelated to this study. Immediately, after horizontal and vertical corneal dimensions were measured, and anterior chamber paracentesis was performed to quantify anterior chamber volume and obtain aqueous humor samples for viscosity analysis. Dynamic aqueous humor viscosity was measured using a dynamic shear rheometer (AR 1000 TA Instruments, New Castle, DE, USA) at 20 °C. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics, unpaired t-tests, and Tukey's test to evaluate the mean ± standard deviation for corneal diameter, anterior chamber volume, and aqueous humor viscosity amongst groups and calculation of Spearman's coefficient for correlation analyses. The mean aqueous humor viscosity in the barred owl was 14.1 centipoise (cP) ± 9, cat 4.4 cP ± 0.2, and dog 2.9 cP ± 1.3. The aqueous humor viscosity for the horse was 1 cP. Of the animals evaluated in this study, the raptor aqueous humor was the most viscous. The aqueous humor of the barred owl is significantly more viscous than the dog (P humor viscosity of the raptor, dog, cat, and horse can be successfully determined using a dynamic shear rheometer. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  14. Measurement of viscosity of gaseous mixtures at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J. J.; Mall, G. H.; Chegini, H.

    1986-01-01

    Coefficients of viscosity of various types of gas mixtures, including simulated natural-gas samples, have been measured at atmospheric pressure and room temperature using a modified capillary tube method. Pressure drops across the straight capillary tube section of a thermal mass flowmeter were measured for small, well-defined, volume flow rates for the test gases and for standard air. In this configuration, the flowmeter provides the volumetric flow rates as well as a well-characterized capillary section for differential pressure measurements across it. The coefficients of viscosity of the test gases were calculated using the reported value of 185.6 micro P for the viscosity of air. The coefficients of viscosity for the test mixtures were also calculated using Wilke's approximation of the Chapman-Enskog (C-E) theory. The experimental and calculated values for binary mixtures are in agreement within the reported accuracy of Wilke's approximation of the C-E theory. However, the agreement for multicomponent mixtures is less satisfactory, possible because of the limitations of Wilkes's approximation of the classical dilute-gas state model.

  15. Temperature dependent viscosity of cobalt ferrite / ethylene glycol ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharat, Prashant B.; Somvanshi, Sandeep B.; Kounsalye, Jitendra S.; Deshmukh, Suraj S.; Khirade, Pankaj P.; Jadhav, K. M.

    2018-04-01

    In the present work, cobalt ferrite / ethylene glycol ferrofluid is prepared in 0 to 1 (in the step of 0.2) volume fraction of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation method. The XRD results confirmed the formation of single phase spinel structure. The Raman spectra have been deconvoluted into individual Lorentzian peaks. Cobalt ferrite has cubic spinel structure with Fd3m space group. FT-IR spectra consist of two major absorption bands, first at about 586 cm-1 (υ1) and second at about 392 cm-1 (υ2). These absorption bands confirm the formation of spinel-structured cobalt ferrite. Brookfield DV-III viscometer and programmable temperature-controlled bath was used to study the relationship between viscosity and temperature. Viscosity behavior with respect to temperature has been studied and it is revealed that the viscosity of cobalt ferrite / ethylene glycol ferrofluids increases with an increase in volume fraction of cobalt ferrite. The viscosity of the present ferrofluid was found to decrease with increase in temperature.

  16. Effects of Nattokinase on Whole Blood Viscosity and Mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike Cengiz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Nattokinase is a serin protease having potent fibrinolytic effect derived from fermentation of boiled soy bean by the use of Basillus Subtilis Natto. The aim of this experimental study is to investigate the effects of intragastric Nattokinase (6 mg/day administration for 7 days prior to formation of sepsis on plasma fibrinogen levels, whole blood viscosity and mortality in rats. Materials and Methods: Intraabdominal sepsis were performed by cecal ligation and puncture in rats supplemented with nattokinase or olive oil for 7 days prior to sepsis formation. Plasma fibrinogen, whole blood viscosity analysis and survival analysis was performed after intraabdominal sepsis formation. Results: Mean blood viscosity of rats was lower in Nattokinase and cecal ligation group at lowest shear rate (p<0.05. However, the differences between groups were not significant at higher shear rates. No difference was found in survival rates and survival times of Nattokinase and cecal ligation and cecal ligation and puncture groups. Conclusion: Our results were unable to show the effects of intragastric nattokinase supplementation prior to sepsis on plasma fibrinogen levels or whole blood viscosity, except low shear rate. Nattokinase did not altered survival in septic rats. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9: 85-9

  17. Shear and bulk viscosity of high-temperature gluon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Le; Hou, De-Fu

    2018-05-01

    We calculate the shear viscosity (η) and bulk viscosity (ζ) to entropy density (s) ratios η/s and ζ/s of a gluon plasma system in kinetic theory, including both the elastic {gg}≤ftrightarrow {gg} forward scattering and the inelastic soft gluon bremsstrahlung {gg}≤ftrightarrow {ggg} processes. Due to the suppressed contribution to η and ζ in the {gg}≤ftrightarrow {gg} forward scattering and the effective g≤ftrightarrow {gg} gluon splitting, Arnold, Moore and Yaffe (AMY) and Arnold, Dogan and Moore (ADM) have got the leading order computations for η and ζ in high-temperature QCD matter. In this paper, we calculate the correction to η and ζ in the soft gluon bremsstrahlung {gg}≤ftrightarrow {ggg} process with an analytic method. We find that the contribution of the collision term from the {gg}≤ftrightarrow {ggg} soft gluon bremsstrahlung process is just a small perturbation to the {gg}≤ftrightarrow {gg} scattering process and that the correction is at ∼5% level. Then, we obtain the bulk viscosity of the gluon plasma for the number-changing process. Furthermore, our leading-order result for bulk viscosity is the formula \\zeta \\propto \\tfrac{{α }s2{T}3}{ln}{α }s-1} in high-temperature gluon plasma. Supported by Ministry of Science and Technology of China (MSTC) under the “973” Project (2015CB856904(4)) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11735007, 11521064)

  18. Shear viscosity of liquid mixtures: Mass dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushal, Rohan; Tankeshwar, K.

    2002-06-01

    Expressions for zeroth, second, and fourth sum rules of transverse stress autocorrelation function of two component fluid have been derived. These sum rules and Mori's memory function formalism have been used to study shear viscosity of Ar-Kr and isotopic mixtures. It has been found that theoretical result is in good agreement with the computer simulation result for the Ar-Kr mixture. The mass dependence of shear viscosity for different mole fraction shows that deviation from ideal linear model comes even from mass difference in two species of fluid mixture. At higher mass ratio shear viscosity of mixture is not explained by any of the emperical model. (author)

  19. Intrinsic viscosity of a suspension of cubes

    KAUST Repository

    Mallavajula, Rajesh K.

    2013-11-06

    We report on the viscosity of a dilute suspension of cube-shaped particles. Irrespective of the particle size, size distribution, and surface chemistry, we find empirically that cubes manifest an intrinsic viscosity [η]=3.1±0.2, which is substantially higher than the well-known value for spheres, [η]=2.5. The orientation-dependent intrinsic viscosity of cubic particles is determined theoretically using a finite-element solution of the Stokes equations. For isotropically oriented cubes, these calculations show [η]=3.1, in excellent agreement with our experimental observations. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  20. Shear viscosity of liquid mixtures Mass dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Kaushal, R

    2002-01-01

    Expressions for zeroth, second, and fourth sum rules of transverse stress autocorrelation function of two component fluid have been derived. These sum rules and Mori's memory function formalism have been used to study shear viscosity of Ar-Kr and isotopic mixtures. It has been found that theoretical result is in good agreement with the computer simulation result for the Ar-Kr mixture. The mass dependence of shear viscosity for different mole fraction shows that deviation from ideal linear model comes even from mass difference in two species of fluid mixture. At higher mass ratio shear viscosity of mixture is not explained by any of the emperical model.

  1. The Flow of a Variable Viscosity Fluid down an Inclined Plane with a Free Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Tshehla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a temperature dependent variable viscosity fluid flow down an inclined plane with a free surface is investigated. The fluid film is thin, so that lubrication approximation may be applied. Convective heating effects are included, and the fluid viscosity decreases exponentially with temperature. In general, the flow equations resulting from the variable viscosity model must be solved numerically. However, when the viscosity variation is small, then an asymptotic approximation is possible. The full solutions for the temperature and velocity profiles are derived using the Runge-Kutta numerical method. The flow controlling parameters such as the nondimensional viscosity variation parameter, the Biot and the Brinkman numbers, are found to have a profound effect on the resulting flow profiles.

  2. Determination of the density and the viscosities of biodiesel-diesel fuel blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alptekin, Ertan; Canakci, Mustafa [Department of Mechanical Education, Kocaeli University, 41380 Kocaeli (Turkey); Alternative Fuels R and D Center, Kocaeli University, 41040 Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2008-12-15

    In this study, commercially available two different diesel fuels were blended with the biodiesels produced from six different vegetable oils (sunflower, canola, soybean, cottonseed, corn oils and waste palm oil). The blends (B2, B5, B10, B20, B50 and B75) were prepared on a volume basis. The key fuel properties such as density and viscosities of the blends were measured by following ASTM test methods. Generalized equations for predicting the density and viscosities for the blends were given and a mixing equation, originally proposed by Arrhenius and described by Grunberg and Nissan, was used to predict the viscosities of the blends. For all blends, it was found that there is an excellent agreement between the measured and estimated values of the density and viscosities. According to the results, the density and viscosities of the blends increased with the increase of biodiesel concentration in the fuel blend. (author)

  3. The "vanishing follicle" in women with low number of developing follicles during assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Johnny S; Yakovi, Shiran; Izhaki, Ido; Haddad, Sami; Ben-Ami, Moshe

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the occurrence of the "vanishing follicle" phenomenon in women with low number of developing follicles in assisted reproduction. Women with ≤ 6 follicles on the day of hCG administration with ≥ 14mm diameter were prospectively studied. Primary outcome measures were disappearance of ≥14mm and all-diameter follicles on the day of oocyte pick-up compared to the day of hCG administration. Among the 120 women recruited, 95 were found eligible and completed the study. The "vanishing follicle" phenomenon occurred in 3.1% (95% confidence level: 0.7%-9.0%) and 18.9% (95% confidence level: 11.6%-28.3%) of cases affecting ≥14mm and all-diameter follicles, respectively. In all cases, mid-late follicular serum LH and P levels remained within normal follicular phase range and trans-vaginal scan did not show signs of ovulation. Markedly, the main significant difference between the study and control groups in the ≥14mm follicle group was serum E 2 level on the day of hCG administration; median (Interquartile range), corresponding to 395 (382.0-405.5) versus 823.0 (544.5-1291.0) pg/mL, respectively (P=0.04). The same trend was encountered in all-diameter vanishing follicles group but it did not reach significance. Interestingly, in all-diameter vanishing group, chronic smoking and the P/E 2 ratio on the hCG day were significantly higher than controls. Post hoc multiple logistic regression analysis of data in accordance with the Bologna criteria reveled that antral follicle count was found to significantly affect the development of the "vanishing follicle" phenomenon. The "vanishing follicle" phenomenon occasionally occurs in women with low number of developing follicles during assisted reproduction with no signs of ovulation. Our preliminary findings suggest that this phenomenon may be related to exhausted ovarian reserve however, an early-unrecognized LH elevation could not be ruled out. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Viscosity and diffusivity in melts: from unary to multicomponent systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weimin; Zhang, Lijun; Du, Yong; Huang, Baiyun

    2014-05-01

    Viscosity and diffusivity, two important transport coefficients, are systematically investigated from unary melt to binary to multicomponent melts in the present work. By coupling with Kaptay's viscosity equation of pure liquid metals and effective radii of diffusion species, the Sutherland equation is modified by taking the size effect into account, and further derived into an Arrhenius formula for the convenient usage. Its reliability for predicting self-diffusivity and impurity diffusivity in unary liquids is then validated by comparing the calculated self-diffusivities and impurity diffusivities in liquid Al- and Fe-based alloys with the experimental and the assessed data. Moreover, the Kozlov model was chosen among various viscosity models as the most reliable one to reproduce the experimental viscosities in binary and multicomponent melts. Based on the reliable viscosities calculated from the Kozlov model, the modified Sutherland equation is utilized to predict the tracer diffusivities in binary and multicomponent melts, and validated in Al-Cu, Al-Ni and Al-Ce-Ni melts. Comprehensive comparisons between the calculated results and the literature data indicate that the experimental tracer diffusivities and the theoretical ones can be well reproduced by the present calculations. In addition, the vacancy-wind factor in binary liquid Al-Ni alloys with the increasing temperature is also discussed. What's more, the calculated inter-diffusivities in liquid Al-Cu, Al-Ni and Al-Ag-Cu alloys are also in excellent agreement with the measured and theoretical data. Comparisons between the simulated concentration profiles and the measured ones in Al-Cu, Al-Ce-Ni and Al-Ag-Cu melts are further used to validate the present calculation method.

  5. Viscosity effect in Landau's hydrodynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, T.F.; Phua, K.K.; Nanyang Univ., Singapore

    1979-01-01

    The Bose-Einstein distribution is used to investigate Landau's hydrodynamical model with viscosity. In case the viscosity dependence on the temperature is T 3 , the correction to the multiplicity behaves like I/E and is found to be negligible for the pp data. A discussion is presented on a possibility of reconciling E 1 / 2 and logE dependence of the multiplicity law. (orig.)

  6. A Simple BODIPY-Based Viscosity Probe for Imaging of Cellular Viscosity in Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong Su

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that indicates the functioning of cells. In this work, we developed a simple boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY-based probe, BTV, for cellular mitochondria viscosity imaging by coupling a simple BODIPY rotor with a mitochondria-targeting unit. The BTV exhibited a significant fluorescence intensity enhancement of more than 100-fold as the solvent viscosity increased. Also, the probe showed a direct linear relationship between the fluorescence lifetime and the media viscosity, which makes it possible to trace the change of the medium viscosity. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that BTV could achieve practical applicability in the monitoring of mitochondrial viscosity changes in live cells through fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM.

  7. Relationship between viscosity of the ankle joint complex and functional ankle instability for inversion ankle sprain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Che-Yu; Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Wang, Chung-Li; Shau, Yio-Wha

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of viscosity of the ankle joint complex is a novel method to assess mechanical ankle instability. In order to further investigate the clinical significance of the method, this study intended to investigate the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. Cross-sectional study. 15 participants with unilateral inversion ankle sprain and 15 controls were recruited. Their ankles were further classified into stable and unstable ankles. Ankle viscosity was measured by an instrumental anterior drawer test. Severity of functional ankle instability was measured by the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Unstable ankles were compared with stable ankles. Injured ankles were compared with uninjured ankles of both groups. The spearman's rank correlation coefficient was applied to determine the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability in unstable ankles. There was a moderate relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability (r=-0.64, pankles exhibited significantly lower viscosity (pankle instability (pankles. Injured ankles exhibited significantly lower viscosity and more severe functional ankle instability than uninjured ankles (pankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. This finding suggested that, severity of functional ankle instability may be partially attributed to mechanical insufficiencies such as the degenerative changes in ankle viscosity following the inversion ankle sprain. In clinical application, measurement of ankle viscosity could be a useful tool to evaluate severity of chronic ankle instability. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Viscosity properties of sodium borophosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaylord, S.; Tincher, B.; Petit, L.; Richardson, K.

    2009-01-01

    The viscosity behavior of (1 - x)NaPO 3 -xNa 2 B 4 O 7 glasses (x = 0.05-0.20) have been measured as a function of temperature using beam-bending and parallel-plate viscometry. The viscosity was found to shift to higher temperatures with increasing sodium borate content. The kinetic fragility parameter, m, estimated from the viscosity curve, decreases from 52 to 33 when x increases from 0.05 to 0.20 indicating that the glass network transforms from fragile to strong with the addition of Na 2 B 4 O 7 . The decrease in fragility with increasing x is due to the progressive depolymerization of the phosphate network by the preferred four-coordinated boron atoms present in the low alkali borate glasses. As confirmed by Raman spectroscopy increasing alkali borate leads to enhanced B-O-P linkages realized with the accompanying transition from solely four-coordinated boron (in BO 4 units) to mixed BO 4 /BO 3 structures. The glass viscosity characteristics of the investigated glasses were compared to those of P-SF67 and N-FK5 commercial glasses from SCHOTT. We showed that the dependence of the viscosity of P-SF67 was similar to the investigated glasses due to similar phosphate network organization confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, whereas N-FK5 exhibited a very different viscosity curve and fragility parameter due to its highly coordinated silicate network

  9. Viscosity Measurement: A Virtual Experiment - Abstract of Issues 9907W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, N.; Pitta, A. T.; Markopoulos, N.; Limniou, M.; Lemos, M. A. N. D. A.; Lemos, F.; Freire, F. G.

    1999-11-01

    experiments at hand and not on learning how to use the program. It communicates its ideas visually with pictures and diagrams relegating on-screen text to the minimum required for the student to understand the presentation. A full presentation of viscosity is reserved for the textbook, which the computer cannot replace. It is well established (2) that people read text on a computer screen more slowly and with greater strain than they do text in a book. Moreover, relatively open-ended exploration does not appear to be a successful method of practice, because practice devised by the learner tends, not to be well conceived and well integrated in the students' learning path (3). For every virtual experiment we suggest a set of coherent exercises that highlight what we want students to know before they enter the real laboratory. Acknowledgment The Greek Ministry of Education and the European Community provided financial help to create the New Educational Technologies for the Teaching of Chemistry course that made development of the viscosity simulator possible. Literature Cited Bensebasat, I.; Todd, P. Int. J. Man-Machine Studies 1993, 38, 369-402. Gould, J. D.; Alfato, L.; Finn, R.; Haupt, B.; Minununo, A. Human Factors 1987, 26, 497-515. Wiedenbeck, S.; Zila, P. L. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction 1997, 4, 169-196. Please refer to PDF for better views of the Ostwald viscometer.

  10. The role of fluid viscosity in an immersed granular collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Geng Chao; Kwok, Chung Yee; Sobral, Yuri Dumaresq

    2017-06-01

    Instabilities of immersed slopes and cliffs can lead to catastrophic events that involve a sudden release of huge soil mass. The scaled deposit height and runout distance are found to follow simple power laws when a granular column collapses on a horizontal plane. However, if the granular column is submerged in a fluid, the mobility of the granular collapse due to high inertia effects will be reduced by fluid-particle interactions. In this study, the effects of fluid viscosity on granular collapse is investigated qualitatively by adopting a numerical approach based on the coupled lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and discrete element method (DEM). It is found that the granular collapse can be dramatically slowed down due to the presence of viscous fluids. For the considered granular configuration, when the fluid viscosity increases. the runout distance decreases and the final deposition shows a larger deposit angle.

  11. The role of fluid viscosity in an immersed granular collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Geng Chao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Instabilities of immersed slopes and cliffs can lead to catastrophic events that involve a sudden release of huge soil mass. The scaled deposit height and runout distance are found to follow simple power laws when a granular column collapses on a horizontal plane. However, if the granular column is submerged in a fluid, the mobility of the granular collapse due to high inertia effects will be reduced by fluid-particle interactions. In this study, the effects of fluid viscosity on granular collapse is investigated qualitatively by adopting a numerical approach based on the coupled lattice Boltzmann method (LBM and discrete element method (DEM. It is found that the granular collapse can be dramatically slowed down due to the presence of viscous fluids. For the considered granular configuration, when the fluid viscosity increases. the runout distance decreases and the final deposition shows a larger deposit angle.

  12. Shear Elasticity and Shear Viscosity Imaging in Soft Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiqun

    In this thesis, a new approach is introduced that provides estimates of shear elasticity and shear viscosity using time-domain measurements of shear waves in viscoelastic media. Simulations of shear wave particle displacements induced by an acoustic radiation force are accelerated significantly by a GPU. The acoustic radiation force is first calculated using the fast near field method (FNM) and the angular spectrum approach (ASA). The shear waves induced by the acoustic radiation force are then simulated in elastic and viscoelastic media using Green's functions. A parallel algorithm is developed to perform these calculations on a GPU, where the shear wave particle displacements at different observation points are calculated in parallel. The resulting speed increase enables rapid evaluation of shear waves at discrete points, in 2D planes, and for push beams with different spatial samplings and for different values of the f-number (f/#). The results of these simulations show that push beams with smaller f/# require a higher spatial sampling rate. The significant amount of acceleration achieved by this approach suggests that shear wave simulations with the Green's function approach are ideally suited for high-performance GPUs. Shear wave elasticity imaging determines the mechanical parameters of soft tissue by analyzing measured shear waves induced by an acoustic radiation force. To estimate the shear elasticity value, the widely used time-of-flight method calculates the correlation between shear wave particle velocities at adjacent lateral observation points. Although this method provides accurate estimates of the shear elasticity in purely elastic media, our experience suggests that the time-of-flight (TOF) method consistently overestimates the shear elasticity values in viscoelastic media because the combined effects of diffraction, attenuation, and dispersion are not considered. To address this problem, we have developed an approach that directly accounts for all

  13. Inference of viscosity jump at 670 km depth and lower mantle viscosity structure from GIA observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Masao; Okuno, Jun'ichi; Irie, Yoshiya

    2018-03-01

    A viscosity model with an exponential profile described by temperature (T) and pressure (P) distributions and constant activation energy (E_{{{um}}}^{{*}} for the upper mantle and E_{{{lm}}}^* for the lower mantle) and volume (V_{{{um}}}^{{*}} and V_{{{lm}}}^*) is employed in inferring the viscosity structure of the Earth's mantle from observations of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). We first construct standard viscosity models with an average upper-mantle viscosity ({\\bar{η }_{{{um}}}}) of 2 × 1020 Pa s, a typical value for the oceanic upper-mantle viscosity, satisfying the observationally derived three GIA-related observables, GIA-induced rate of change of the degree-two zonal harmonic of the geopotential, {\\dot{J}_2}, and differential relative sea level (RSL) changes for the Last Glacial Maximum sea levels at Barbados and Bonaparte Gulf in Australia and for RSL changes at 6 kyr BP for Karumba and Halifax Bay in Australia. Standard viscosity models inferred from three GIA-related observables are characterized by a viscosity of ˜1023 Pa s in the deep mantle for an assumed viscosity at 670 km depth, ηlm(670), of (1 - 50) × 1021 Pa s. Postglacial RSL changes at Southport, Bermuda and Everglades in the intermediate region of the North American ice sheet, largely dependent on its gross melting history, have a crucial potential for inference of a viscosity jump at 670 km depth. The analyses of these RSL changes based on the viscosity models with {\\bar{η }_{{{um}}}} ≥ 2 × 1020 Pa s and lower-mantle viscosity structures for the standard models yield permissible {\\bar{η }_{{{um}}}} and ηlm (670) values, although there is a trade-off between the viscosity and ice history models. Our preferred {\\bar{η }_{{{um}}}} and ηlm (670) values are ˜(7 - 9) × 1020 and ˜1022 Pa s, respectively, and the {\\bar{η }_{{{um}}}} is higher than that for the typical value of oceanic upper mantle, which may reflect a moderate laterally heterogeneous upper

  14. Direct observations of the viscosity of Earth's outer core and extrapolation of measurements of the viscosity of liquid iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smylie, D E; Brazhkin, Vadim V; Palmer, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Estimates vary widely as to the viscosity of Earth's outer fluid core. Directly observed viscosity is usually orders of magnitude higher than the values extrapolated from high-pressure high-temperature laboratory experiments, which are close to those for liquid iron at atmospheric pressure. It turned out that this discrepancy can be removed by extrapolating via the widely known Arrhenius activation model modified by lifting the commonly used assumption of pressure-independent activation volume (which is possible due to the discovery that at high pressures the activation volume increases strongly with pressure, resulting in 10 2 Pa s at the top of the fluid core, and in 10 11 Pa s at its bottom). There are of course many uncertainties affecting this extrapolation process. This paper reviews two viscosity determination methods, one for the top and the other for the bottom of the outer core, the former of which relies on the decay of free core nutations and yields 2371 ± 1530 Pa s, while the other relies on the reduction in the rotational splitting of the two equatorial translational modes of the solid inner core oscillations and yields an average of 1.247 ± 0.035 Pa s. Encouraged by the good performance of the Arrhenius extrapolation, a differential form of the Arrhenius activation model is used to interpolate along the melting temperature curve and to find the viscosity profile across the entire outer core. The viscosity variation is found to be nearly log-linear between the measured boundary values. (methodological notes)

  15. Enhancement of Hydrodynamic Processes in Oil Pipelines Considering Rheologically Complex High-Viscosity Oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konakhina, I. A.; Khusnutdinova, E. M.; Khamidullina, G. R.; Khamidullina, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes a mathematical model of flow-related hydrodynamic processes for rheologically complex high-viscosity bitumen oil and oil-water suspensions and presents methods to improve the design and performance of oil pipelines.

  16. Application of the DTM to Nonlinear Cases Arising in Fluid Flows with Variable Viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barari, Amin; Rahimi, M; Hosseini, M.J

    2012-01-01

    This paper employs the differential transformation method to investigate two nonlinear ordinary differential systems for plane coquette flow having variable viscosity and thermal conductivity. The concept of differential transformation is briefly introduced, and then differential transformation m...

  17. Effects of Nattokinase on Whole Blood Viscosity and Mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Melike Cengiz; Pınar Karadamar; Murat Yılmaz; Nesil Coşkunfırat; Atilla Ramazanoğlu; Sabahat Özdem; Oğuz Kerim Başkurt; Herbert J Meiselman

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Nattokinase is a serin protease having potent fibrinolytic effect derived from fermentation of boiled soy bean by the use of Basillus Subtilis Natto. The aim of this experimental study is to investigate the effects of intragastric Nattokinase (6 mg/day) administration for 7 days prior to formation of sepsis on plasma fibrinogen levels, whole blood viscosity and mortality in rats. Materials and Methods: Intraabdominal sepsis were performed by cecal ligation and puncture in rats s...

  18. Vanishing bone disease of the orbital roof: now you see it, now you don't

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharsono, Ferry; Van Heerden, Jolandi; McAuliffe, William; Ardakani, Nima M.; Franconi, Catherine; Honeybul, Stephen; Lind, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a rare case of vascularised orbital roof and calvarial erosions with an associated venous malformation. In the absence of infection, malignancy, trauma and eosinophillic granuloma, the closest previously described entity is vanishing bone disease. Computed tomography (CT), MRI, catheter angiography and pathology were all important in the diagnostic workup to enable surgical planning for biopsy and reconstruction. Ongoing CT and MRI follow-up imaging will determine future treatment planning.

  19. Long Time Evolution of Populations under Selection and Vanishing Mutations

    KAUST Repository

    Raoul, Gaël

    2011-02-08

    In this paper, we consider a long time and vanishing mutations limit of an integro-differential model describing the evolution of a population structured with respect to a continuous phenotypic trait. We show that the asymptotic population is a steady-state of the evolution equation without mutations, and satisfies an evolutionary stability condition. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  20. Long Time Evolution of Populations under Selection and Vanishing Mutations

    KAUST Repository

    Raoul, Gaë l

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a long time and vanishing mutations limit of an integro-differential model describing the evolution of a population structured with respect to a continuous phenotypic trait. We show that the asymptotic population is a steady-state of the evolution equation without mutations, and satisfies an evolutionary stability condition. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  1. On the vanishing electron-mass limit in plasma hydrodynamics in unbounded media

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Donatelli, D.; Feireisl, Eduard; Novotný, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 6 (2012), s. 985-1012 ISSN 0938-8974 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/0917 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : vanishing electron mass limit * plasma hydrodynamics * compressible fluid Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.566, year: 2012 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00332-012-9134-5

  2. Vanishing calcification of the brain in an infant after open heart surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begeer, J.H.; Rutgers, A.W.F.; Vencken, L.M.; Hoorntje, T.M.; Meuzelaar, J.J.; Woltersom-Zwierzynska, B.D.

    1991-01-01

    Neurological complications after cardiac operations with the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia are well known. A 6 months-old child is described with severe neurological complications after cardiac surgery for Fallots tetralogy. On the CT scan cortical calcification was seen to vanish. Such calcification has not been reported in similar patients. Possible causes are discussed but the precise pathophysiology of this phenomenon remains unclear. (orig.)

  3. Vanishing calcification of the brain in an infant after open heart surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begeer, J.H.; Rutgers, A.W.F. (Groningen Univ. Hospital (Netherlands). Dept. of Child Neurology); Vencken, L.M. (Groningen Univ. Hospital (Netherlands). Dept. of Neuroradiology); Hoorntje, T.M. (Groningen Univ. Hospital (Netherlands). Dept. of Pediatrics); Meuzelaar, J.J. (Groningen Univ. Hospital (Netherlands). Dept. of Thoracic Surgery); Woltersom-Zwierzynska, B.D. (Groningen Univ. Hospital (Netherlands). Dept. of Anaesthesia)

    1991-08-01

    Neurological complications after cardiac operations with the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia are well known. A 6 months-old child is described with severe neurological complications after cardiac surgery for Fallots tetralogy. On the CT scan cortical calcification was seen to vanish. Such calcification has not been reported in similar patients. Possible causes are discussed but the precise pathophysiology of this phenomenon remains unclear. (orig.).

  4. Elongational viscosity of photo-oxidated LDPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolón-Garrido, Víctor H.; Wagner, Manfred H.

    2014-05-01

    Sheets of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) were photo-oxidatively treated at room temperature, and subsequently characterized rheologically in the melt state by shear and uniaxial extensional experiments. For photo-oxidation, a xenon lamp was used to irradiate the samples for times between 1 day and 6 weeks. Linear-viscoelastic characterization was performed in a temperature range of 130 to 220°C to obtain the master curve at 170°C, the reference temperature at which the elongational viscosities were measured. Linear viscoelasticity is increasingly affected by increasing photo-oxidation due to crosslinking of LDPE, as corroborated by an increasing gel fraction as determined by a solvent extraction method. The elongational measurements reveal a strong enhancement of strain hardening until a saturation level is achieved. The elongational data are analyzed in the frame work of two constitutive equations, the rubber-like liquid and the molecular stress function models. Within the experimental window, timedeformation separability is confirmed for all samples, independent of the degree of photo-oxidation.

  5. Viscosities of cesium vapor to 1,620 K and of liquid gallium to 1,800 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tippelskirch, H. v.

    1976-01-01

    The viscosity of cesium at 1,620 K and 40 bar has been determined to 41 x 10 -6 (Pa x s) by the oscillating cup method. The saturated vapor density at 1,580 K could be derived from the viscosity measurements. The viscosity of liquid gallium has been determined from 370 K to 1,800 K. The experimental results have been compared with calculations based on the Enskog hard-sphere transport theory for dense fluids. (orig.) [de

  6. A microfluidic device for simultaneous measurement of viscosity and flow rate of blood in a complex fluidic network

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Kang, Yang; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Blood viscosity has been considered as one of important biophysical parameters for effectively monitoring variations in physiological and pathological conditions of circulatory disorders. Standard previous methods make it difficult to evaluate variations of blood viscosity under cardiopulmonary bypass procedures or hemodialysis. In this study, we proposed a unique microfluidic device for simultaneously measuring viscosity and flow rate of whole blood circulating in a complex fluidic network i...

  7. Experimental determination of gamma radiation effect from cobalt 60 on the viscosity of SSBR-B polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, L.G. dos; Silva Filho, E.

    1989-01-01

    Samples of the polymer known as SSBR-B (Solution Styrenne Butadiene Rubber-Blockade) were irradiated with gamma rays from a 60 Co source. Viscosity analysis performed by using the method of Ostwald Showed that the viscosity remains about constant for doses in the range of zero to 11560 Gray (Gy). For doses greater than 11560 Gy the viscosity increases. This result characterizes an irradiation induced hardening of the polymer. (author) [pt

  8. Investigations on the detection of irradiated food by measuring the viscosity of suspended spices and dried vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heide, L.; Nürnberger, E.; Bögl, K. W.

    Studies on the viscosity behavior were performed with 20 different spices or dried vegetables. In nine spices (cinnamon, ginger, mustard seed, celery, onions, shallots, lemon peel, black and white pepper) differences between unirradiated and irradiated samples were observed. Further lots were investigated to estimate the variations of viscosity depending on the origin of the samples. Additional storage experiments showed that measuring the viscosity may be a simple method to identify some radiation treated spices even after years.

  9. Experimental study on the viscosity and adhesive performance of exogenous liquid fibrin glue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takuro; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Inamasu, Joji; Adachi, Kazuhide; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hirose, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Exogenous fibrin glue (FG) is highly suitable for neurosurgical procedures, because of its viscosity and adhesive properties. Several FGs are commercially available, but only few reports detail their differences. In the present study, we investigated the viscosity and adhesive performance of two types of FG: one is derived from blood donated in Europe and the United States (CSL Behring's Beriplast(®), BP) and the other is derived from blood donated in Japan (the Chemo-Sero-Therapeutic Research Institute's Bolheal(®), BH). The viscosity test that measured fibrinogen viscosity revealed that BP had significantly higher viscosity than BH. Similarly, the dripping test showed that BP traveled a significantly shorter drip distance in the vertical direction than BH, although the transverse diameter of the coagulated FG did not differ statistically significantly. In the tensile strength test, BP showed superior adhesion performance over BH. The histological study of the hematoxylin-eosin-stained specimens in both groups showed favorable adhesion. Although further studies are required on its manufacturing and usage methods, FG shows differences in viscosity and adhesive performance according to the blood from which it is derived. We conclude that it is desirable to select the type and usage method of FG according to the characteristics of the surgical operation in question. Our findings suggest that FG produced from the blood donated in Europe and the United States might be more suitable for use in surgical procedures that demand an especially high degree of viscosity and rapid adhesive performance.

  10. Applying Magneto-rheology to Reduce Blood Viscosity and Suppress Turbulence to Prevent Heart Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, R.

    Heart attacks are the leading causes of death in USA. Research indicates one common thread, high blood viscosity, linking all cardiovascular diseases. Turbulence in blood circulation makes different regions of the vasculature vulnerable to development of atherosclerotic plaque. Turbulence is also responsible for systolic ejection murmurs and places heavier workload on heart, a possible trigger of heart attacks. Presently, neither medicine nor method is available to suppress turbulence. The only method to reduce the blood viscosity is to take medicine, such as aspirin. However, using medicine to reduce the blood viscosity does not help suppressing turbulence. In fact, the turbulence gets worse as the Reynolds number goes up with the viscosity reduction by the medicine. Here we report our new discovery: application of a strong magnetic field to blood along its flow direction, red blood cells are polarized in the magnetic field and aggregated into short chains along the flow direction. The blood viscosity becomes anisotropic: Along the flow direction the viscosity is significantly reduced, but in the directions perpendicular to the flow the viscosity is considerably increased. In this way, the blood flow becomes laminar, turbulence is suppressed, the blood circulation is greatly improved, and the risk for heart attacks is reduced. While these effects are not permanent, they last for about 24 hours after one magnetic therapy treatment.

  11. Artificial Neural Network Model to Estimate the Viscosity of Polymer Solutions for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan-Sang Kang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Polymer flooding is now considered a technically- and commercially-proven method for enhanced oil recovery (EOR. The viscosity of the injected polymer solution is the key property for successful polymer flooding. Given that the viscosity of a polymer solution has a non-linear relationship with various influential parameters (molecular weight, degree of hydrolysis, polymer concentration, cation concentration of polymer solution, shear rate, temperature and that measurement of viscosity based on these parameters is a time-consuming process, the range of solution samples and the measurement conditions need to be limited and precise. Viscosity estimation of the polymer solution is effective for these purposes. An artificial neural network (ANN was applied to the viscosity estimation of FlopaamTM 3330S, FlopaamTM 3630S and AN-125 solutions, three commonly-used EOR polymers. The viscosities measured and estimated by ANN and the Carreau model using Lee’s correlation, the only method for estimating the viscosity of an EOR polymer solution in unmeasured conditions, were compared. Estimation accuracy was evaluated by the average absolute relative deviation, which has been widely used for accuracy evaluation of the results of ANN models. In all conditions, the accuracy of the ANN model is higher than that of the Carreau model using Lee’s correlation.

  12. Correlation of shear and dielectric ion viscosity of dental resins - Influence of composition, temperature and filler content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Johannes; Hausnerova, Berenika; Haenel, Thomas; Selig, Daniela; Duvenbeck, Fabian; Moeginger, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    Shear viscosity and ion viscosity of uncured visible light-curing (VLC) resins and resin based composites (RBC) are correlated with respect to the resin composition, temperature and filler content to check where Dielectric Analysis (DEA) investigations of VLC RBC generate similar results as viscosity measurements. Mixtures of bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) as well as the pure resins were investigated and compared with two commercial VLC dental resins and RBCs (VOCO, Arabesk Top and Grandio). Shear viscosity data was obtained using a Haake Mars III, Thermo Scientific. Ion viscosity measurements performed by a dielectric cure analyzer (DEA 231/1 Epsilon with Mini IDEX-Sensor, Netzsch-Gerätebau). Shear viscosity depends reciprocally on the mobility of molecules, whereas the ion viscosity also depends on the ion concentration as it is affected by both ion concentration and mixture viscosity. Except of pure TEGDMA, shear and ion viscosities depend on the resin composition qualitatively in a similar manner. Furthermore, shear and ion viscosities of the commercial VLC dental resins and composites exhibited the same temperature dependency regardless of filler content. Application of typical rheological models (Kitano and Quemada) revealed that ion viscosity measurements can be described with respect to filler contents of up to 30vol.%. Rheological behavior of a VLC RBC can be characterized by DEA under the condition that the ion concentration is kept constant. Both methods address the same physical phenomenon - motion of molecules. The proposed relations allows for calculating the viscosity of any Bis-GMA-TEGDMA mixture on the base of the viscosities of the pure components. This study demonstrated the applicability of DEA investigations of VLC RBCs with respect to quality assurance purposes. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of the positioning force of electrostatic levitators on viscosity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Takehiko; Paradis, Paul-Francois; Koike, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Yuki

    2009-01-01

    Electrostatic levitators use strong electric fields to levitate and accurately position a sample against gravity. In this study, the effects of the electric field are investigated with regard to viscosity measurements conducted with the oscillating drop method. The effects of the external field on viscosity measurements are experimentally confirmed by changing the sample size. Moreover, a numerical simulation based on a simple mass-spring-damper system can reproduce the experimental observations. Based on the above results, measurement procedures are improved. These help to minimize the effect of the positioning force and to increase the accuracy of the viscosity measurements.

  14. Experimental study of electric conductivity, density and viscosity of Wood's alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazandzhan, B.I.; Matveev, V.M.; Savich, T.B.; Umarov, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    Electric conductivity, density and kinematic viscosity of commercially pure Wood's alloy are obtained in a wide temperature range. Electric conductivity and density are investigated from the room temperature to 1000 K. Measurements of kinematic viscosity are carried out from 372 to 1000 K by means of torsional vibrations method using informatiom computer system permitting to automate data acquisition and processing and to increase the measurement accuracy. On the basis of analysis the character of electric conductivity and kinematic viscosity polyterms Wood's alloy liquidus and solidus temperatures are estimated

  15. MHD natural convection from a heated vertical wavy surface with variable viscosity and thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, M.; Hazarika, G.C.; Sibanda, P.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effects of temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity on natural convection flow of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid along a vertical wavy surface. The flow is permeated by uniform transverse magnetic field. The fluid viscosity and thermal conductivity are assumed to vary as inverse linear functions of temperature. The coupled non-linear systems of partial differential equations are solved using the finite difference method. The effects of variable viscosity parameter, variable thermal conductivity parameter and magnetic parameter on the flow field and the heat transfer characteristics are discussed and shown graphically. (author)

  16. Viscosity measurements on metal melts at high pressure and viscosity calculations for the earth's core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineev, Vladimir N; Funtikov, Aleksandr I

    2004-01-01

    A review is given of experimental and calculated data on the viscosity of iron-based melts on the melting curve. The interest in these data originates in the division of opinion on whether viscosity increases rather moderately or considerably in the high-pressure range. This disagreement is especially pronounced in the interpretation of the values of molten iron and its compounds in the environment of the earth's outer core. The conclusion on a substantial rise in viscosity mostly follows from the universal law, proposed by Brazhkin and Lyapin [1], of viscosity changing along the metal melting curve in the high-pressure range. The review analyzes available experimental and computational data, including the most recent ones. Data on viscosity of metals under shock wave compression in the megabar pressure range are also discussed. It is shown that data on viscosity of metal melts point to a small increase of viscosity on the melting curve. Specifics are discussed of the phase diagram of iron made more complex by the presence of several phase transitions and by the uncertainty in the position of the melting curve in the high-pressure range. Inaccuracies that arise in extrapolating the results of viscosity measurements to the pressure range corresponding to the earth's core environment are pointed out. (reviews of topical problems)

  17. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Aguilar Sandoval

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD of thermal fluctuations together with Sader’s model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0.03 mPa·s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 µL.

  18. Gas distribution effects on waste properties: Viscosities of bubbly slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Shah, R.R.; Davis, R.L.

    1994-09-01

    The retention and episodic release of flammable gases are critical safety concerns for double-shell tanks that contain waste slurries. The rheological behavior of the waste, particularly of the settled sludge, is critical to characterizing the tendency of the waste to retain gas bubbles. The presence of gas bubbles is expected to affect the rheology of the sludge, but essentially no literature data are available to assess the effect of bubbles. Accordingly, the objectives of this study are to develop models for the effect of gas bubbles on the viscosity of a particulate slurry, develop an experimental method (capillary rheometer), collect data on the viscosity of a bubbly slurry, and develop a theoretical basis for interpreting the experimental data from the capillary rheometer

  19. Effective Shear Viscosity of Iron under Shock-Loading Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xiao-Juan; Liu Fu-Sheng; Sun Yan-Yun; Zhang Ming-Jian; Peng Xiao-Juan; Li Yong-Hong

    2011-01-01

    We combine the flyer-impact experiment and improve the finite difference method to solve whether the shear viscosity coefficient of shock iron is more reliable. We find that the numerical simulated profile agrees well with the measured one, from which the determined effective shear viscosity coefficients of shocked iron are 3000 ± 100 Pa·s and 4000 ± 100 Pa·s, respectively, at 103 GPa and 159 GPa. These values are more than 2000 ± 300 Pa·s of Li Y L et al.[Chin. Phys. Lett. 26 (2009) 038301] Our values are more reasonable because they are obtained from a comprehensive simulation for the full-shocked perturbation evolving process. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  20. Preparation of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low viscosity fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhardt, Mark R.; Flynn, Peter F.; Wand, A. Joshua

    1999-01-01

    The majority of proteins are too large to be comprehensively examined by solution NMR methods, primarily because they tumble too slowly in solution. One potential approach to making the NMR relaxation properties of large proteins amenable to modern solution NMR techniques is to encapsulate them in a reverse micelle which is dissolved in a low viscosity fluid. Unfortunately, promising low viscosity fluids such as the short chain alkanes, supercritical carbon dioxide, and various halocarbon refrigerants all require the application of significant pressure to be kept liquefied at room temperature. Here we describe the design and use of a simple cost effective NMR tube suitable for the preparation of solutions of proteins encapsulated in reverse micelles dissolved in such fluids

  1. A model for the viscosity of dilute smectite gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Di; Liu, Longcheng

    2010-01-01

    the region of low volume fraction will also increase. This linear part is, in practice, a direct reflection of pair interaction, whereas the deviation from the linear part of inherent viscosity, appears at a volume fraction of ∼ 0.3%, indicates the onset of multiparticle interaction. Using the nonlinear least squares method to fit the experimental results, the model gives an expression for the relative viscosity of the sodium montmorillonite suspension as a function of the product of the effective intrinsic viscosity and the effective volume fraction, i.e. and it is actually the first term of the relative viscosity increment. The data points, originally scattered, now fall onto a single curve for all cases of NaCl concentrations; in practice about 99.8% of the experimental results are well represented by this expression which has well accounted not only for the pair interaction but also for the multiparticle interaction. Using the co-volume fraction instead of defining the effective volume fraction would violate the fact that the effect of pair interaction between suspended particle is more significant than that of the multiparticle interaction, even in dense suspension. This partly supports that our definition of the effective volume fraction is appropriate. The validation of the model against other experimental measurements has also been made. The results demonstrate that the model works quite well in predicting the viscosity of dilute suspensions of sodium montmorillonite in low ionic strength waters. The model will be used to quantify the release of colloidal particles from an expanding buffer around the canister containing spent nuclear fuel, together with a dynamic force balance model

  2. Towards adjoint-based inversion of time-dependent mantle convection with nonlinear viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dunzhu; Gurnis, Michael; Stadler, Georg

    2017-04-01

    We develop and study an adjoint-based inversion method for the simultaneous recovery of initial temperature conditions and viscosity parameters in time-dependent mantle convection from the current mantle temperature and historic plate motion. Based on a realistic rheological model with temperature-dependent and strain-rate-dependent viscosity, we formulate the inversion as a PDE-constrained optimization problem. The objective functional includes the misfit of surface velocity (plate motion) history, the misfit of the current mantle temperature, and a regularization for the uncertain initial condition. The gradient of this functional with respect to the initial temperature and the uncertain viscosity parameters is computed by solving the adjoint of the mantle convection equations. This gradient is used in a pre-conditioned quasi-Newton minimization algorithm. We study the prospects and limitations of the inversion, as well as the computational performance of the method using two synthetic problems, a sinking cylinder and a realistic subduction model. The subduction model is characterized by the migration of a ridge toward a trench whereby both plate motions and subduction evolve. The results demonstrate: (1) for known viscosity parameters, the initial temperature can be well recovered, as in previous initial condition-only inversions where the effective viscosity was given; (2) for known initial temperature, viscosity parameters can be recovered accurately, despite the existence of trade-offs due to ill-conditioning; (3) for the joint inversion of initial condition and viscosity parameters, initial condition and effective viscosity can be reasonably recovered, but the high dimension of the parameter space and the resulting ill-posedness may limit recovery of viscosity parameters.

  3. The Viscosity of Organic Liquid Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Len, C. W.; Trusler, J. P. M.; Vesovic, V.; Wakeham, W. A.

    2006-01-01

    The paper reports measurements of the viscosity and density of two heavy hydrocarbon mixtures, Dutrex and Arab Light Flashed Distillate (ALFD), and of their mixtures with hydrogen. The measurements have been carried out with a vibrating-wire device over a range of temperatures from 399 to 547 K and at pressures up to 20 MPa. Measurements have also been carried out on systems in which hydrogen at different concentrations has been dissolved in the liquids. The measurements have an estimated uncertainty of ±5% for viscosity and ±2% for density and represent the first results on these prototypical heavy hydrocarbons. The results reveal that the addition of hydrogen reduces both the density and viscosity of the original hydrocarbon mixture at a particular temperature and pressure.

  4. Viscosity of Ga-Li liquid alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyaev, Dmitriy; Boretsky, Evgeny; Verkhorubov, Dmitriy

    2018-03-01

    The measurement of dynamic viscosity of Ga-Li liquid alloys has been performed using low-frequency vibrational viscometer at five temperatures in the range 313-353 K and four gallium-based dilute alloy compositions containing 0-1.15 at.% Li. It was found that the viscosity of the considered alloys increases with decreasing temperature and increasing lithium concentration in the above ranges. It was shown that dependence of the viscosity of Ga-Li alloys in the investigated temperature range has been described by Arrhenius equation. For this equation the activation energy of viscous flow and pre-exponential factor were calculated. This study helped to determine the conditions of the alkali metals separating process in gallam-exchange systems.

  5. Lack of age-related increase in carotid artery wall viscosity in cardiorespiratory fit men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kenta; Gando, Yuko; Tanimoto, Michiya; Murakami, Haruka; Ohmori, Yumi; Sanada, Kiyoshi; Tabata, Izumi; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Miyachi, Motohiko

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Age-related arterial stiffening and reduction of arterial elasticity are attenuated in individuals with high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness. Viscosity is another mechanical characteristic of the arterial wall; however, the effects of age and cardiorespiratory fitness have not been determined. We examined the associations among age, cardiorespiratory fitness and carotid arterial wall viscosity. Methods: A total of 111 healthy men, aged 25–39 years (young) and 40–64 years (middle-aged), were divided into either cardiorespiratory fit or unfit groups on the basis of peak oxygen uptake. The common carotid artery was measured noninvasively by tonometry and automatic tracking of B-mode images to obtain instantaneous pressure and diameter hysteresis loops, and we calculated the effective compliance, isobaric compliance and viscosity index. Results: In the middle-aged men, the viscosity index was larger in the unfit group than in the fit group (2533 vs. 2018 mmHg·s/mm, respectively: P viscosity index was increased with advancing age, but these parameters were unaffected by cardiorespiratory fitness level. Conclusion: These results suggest that the wall viscosity in the central artery is increased with advancing age and that the age-associated increase in wall viscosity may be attenuated in cardiorespiratory fit men. PMID:24029868

  6. Technical Note: New methodology for measuring viscosities in small volumes characteristic of environmental chamber particle samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Renbaum-Wolff

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, a method for the determination of viscosities of small sample volumes is introduced, with important implications for the viscosity determination of particle samples from environmental chambers (used to simulate atmospheric conditions. The amount of sample needed is < 1 μl, and the technique is capable of determining viscosities (η ranging between 10−3 and 103 Pascal seconds (Pa s in samples that cover a range of chemical properties and with real-time relative humidity and temperature control; hence, the technique should be well-suited for determining the viscosities, under atmospherically relevant conditions, of particles collected from environmental chambers. In this technique, supermicron particles are first deposited on an inert hydrophobic substrate. Then, insoluble beads (~1 μm in diameter are embedded in the particles. Next, a flow of gas is introduced over the particles, which generates a shear stress on the particle surfaces. The sample responds to this shear stress by generating internal circulations, which are quantified with an optical microscope by monitoring the movement of the beads. The rate of internal circulation is shown to be a function of particle viscosity but independent of the particle material for a wide range of organic and organic-water samples. A calibration curve is constructed from the experimental data that relates the rate of internal circulation to particle viscosity, and this calibration curve is successfully used to predict viscosities in multicomponent organic mixtures.

  7. Dressing method and quadratic bundles related to symmetric spaces. Vanishing boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valchev, T. I.

    2016-02-01

    We consider quadratic bundles related to Hermitian symmetric spaces of the type SU(m + n)/S(U(m) × U(n)). The simplest representative of the corresponding integrable hierarchy is given by a multi-component Kaup-Newell derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation which serves as a motivational example for our general considerations. We extensively discuss how one can apply Zakharov-Shabat's dressing procedure to derive reflectionless potentials obeying zero boundary conditions. Those could be used for one to construct fast decaying solutions to any nonlinear equation belonging to the same hierarchy. One can distinguish between generic soliton type solutions and rational solutions.

  8. Gas viscosity measurement with diamagnetic-levitation viscometer based on electromagnetically spinning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Y; Matsuura, Y; Hirano, T; Sakai, K

    2016-12-01

    Utilizing a graphite-disk probe attached with a thin aluminum disk, we have developed a friction-free viscosity measurement system. The probe is levitated above a NdFeB magnet because of diamagnetic effect and rotated by an electromagnetically induced torque. The probe is absolutely free form mechanical friction, and therefore, the accurate measurements of the viscosity of gases can be achieved. To demonstrate the accuracy and sensitivity of our method, we measured the viscosity of 8 kinds of gases and its temperature change from 278 K to 318 K, and we confirmed a good agreement between the obtained values and literature values. This paper demonstrates that our method has the ability to measure the fluid viscosity in the order of μPa ⋅ s.

  9. Gas viscosity measurement with diamagnetic-levitation viscometer based on electromagnetically spinning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Y.; Matsuura, Y.; Hirano, T.; Sakai, K.

    2016-12-01

    Utilizing a graphite-disk probe attached with a thin aluminum disk, we have developed a friction-free viscosity measurement system. The probe is levitated above a NdFeB magnet because of diamagnetic effect and rotated by an electromagnetically induced torque. The probe is absolutely free form mechanical friction, and therefore, the accurate measurements of the viscosity of gases can be achieved. To demonstrate the accuracy and sensitivity of our method, we measured the viscosity of 8 kinds of gases and its temperature change from 278 K to 318 K, and we confirmed a good agreement between the obtained values and literature values. This paper demonstrates that our method has the ability to measure the fluid viscosity in the order of μPa ṡ s.

  10. Communication: Simple liquids' high-density viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigliola, Lorenzo; Pedersen, Ulf R.; Heyes, David M.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2018-02-01

    This paper argues that the viscosity of simple fluids at densities above that of the triple point is a specific function of temperature relative to the freezing temperature at the density in question. The proposed viscosity expression, which is arrived at in part by reference to the isomorph theory of systems with hidden scale invariance, describes computer simulations of the Lennard-Jones system as well as argon and methane experimental data and simulation results for an effective-pair-potential model of liquid sodium.

  11. Communication: Simple liquids' high-density viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigliola, Lorenzo; Pedersen, Ulf R; Heyes, David M; Schrøder, Thomas B; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2018-02-28

    This paper argues that the viscosity of simple fluids at densities above that of the triple point is a specific function of temperature relative to the freezing temperature at the density in question. The proposed viscosity expression, which is arrived at in part by reference to the isomorph theory of systems with hidden scale invariance, describes computer simulations of the Lennard-Jones system as well as argon and methane experimental data and simulation results for an effective-pair-potential model of liquid sodium.

  12. Use of Intrinsic Viscosity for evaluation of polymer-solvent affinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marani, Debora; Hjelm, Johan; Wandel, Marie

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the current paper was to define a rheological method for the study of the solvent/binder affinity. The adopted strategy involves the study of the intrinsic viscosity [η] of polymer solutions. [η] was estimated via an extrapolation procedure using the Huggins and Kramer equations....... The intrinsic viscosity and the Mark-Houwink shape parameter were estimated for the three polymers and used as criteria for estimating the polymer/solvent affinity....

  13. Effect of Polyvinyl Siloxane Viscosity on Accuracy of Dental Implant Impressions

    OpenAIRE

    Ghahremanloo, Ahmad; Seifi, Mahdieh; Ghanbarzade, Jalil; Abrisham, Seyyed Mohammad; Javan, Rashid Abdolah

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of dental implant impressions obtained by a combination of different impression techniques and viscosities of polyvinyl siloxane (PVS).Materials and Methods: Four parallel fixtures were placed between mental foramina in a master model of lower dental arch. Three different viscosities (putty/light body, medium body/light body, and monophase: heavy body) and direct and indirect techniques (six groups) were used, and seven impressions...

  14. Estimated Viscosities and Thermal Conductivities of Gases at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svehla, Roger A.

    1962-01-01

    Viscosities and thermal conductivities, suitable for heat-transfer calculations, were estimated for about 200 gases in the ground state from 100 to 5000 K and 1-atmosphere pressure. Free radicals were included, but excited states and ions were not. Calculations for the transport coefficients were based upon the Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential for all gases. This potential was selected because: (1) It is one of the most realistic models available and (2) intermolecular force constants can be estimated from physical properties or by other techniques when experimental data are not available; such methods for estimating force constants are not as readily available for other potentials. When experimental viscosity data were available, they were used to obtain the force constants; otherwise the constants were estimated. These constants were then used to calculate both the viscosities and thermal conductivities tabulated in this report. For thermal conductivities of polyatomic gases an Eucken-type correction was made to correct for exchange between internal and translational energies. Though this correction may be rather poor at low temperatures, it becomes more satisfactory with increasing temperature. It was not possible to obtain force constants from experimental thermal conductivity data except for the inert atoms, because most conductivity data are available at low temperatures only (200 to 400 K), the temperature range where the Eucken correction is probably most in error. However, if the same set of force constants is used for both viscosity and thermal conductivity, there is a large degree of cancellation of error when these properties are used in heat-transfer equations such as the Dittus-Boelter equation. It is therefore concluded that the properties tabulated in this report are suitable for heat-transfer calculations of gaseous systems.

  15. 'Vanishing' structural effects of temperature in polymer glasses close to the glass-transition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shantarovich, V.P.; Suzuki, T.; Ito, Y.; Yu, R.S.; Kondo, K.; Yampolskii, Yu. P.; Alentiev, A.Yu.

    2007-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) measurements were used for observation of structural effects of temperature in polystyrene (PS), super-cross-linked polystyrene networks (CPS), and in polyimides (PI) below and in the vicinity of glass-transition temperature T g . 'Vanishing' of these structural effects in the repeating cycles of the temperature controlled PAL experiments due to the slow relaxation processes in different conditions and details of chemical structure is demonstrated. Obtained results illustrate complex, dependent on thermal history, inhomogeneous character of the glass structure. In fact, structure of some polymer glasses is changing continuously. Calculations of the number density of free volume holes in these conditions are discussed

  16. Texture one zero Dirac neutrino mass matrix with vanishing determinant or trace condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Madan

    2018-06-01

    In the light of non-zero and relatively large value of rector mixing angle (θ13), we have performed a detailed analysis of texture one zero neutrino mass matrix Mν in the scenario of vanishing determinant/trace conditions, assuming the Dirac nature of neutrinos. In both the scenarios, normal mass ordering is ruled out for all the six possibilities of Mν, however for inverted mass ordering, only two are found to be viable with the current neutrino oscillation data at 3σ confidence level. Numerical and some approximate analytical results are presented.

  17. Vanishing lung syndrome: the importance of the high-resolution CT in its diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Cerezo, M.I.; Porres Azcona, E.; Pina Insausti, L.; Inchusta Sarasibar, M.I.; Mellado Rodriguez, M.

    1995-01-01

    Vanishing lung syndrome, also referred to as idiopathic giant bullions emphysema is a dissolver that has yet to be fully characterized. It is considered a different entry from classic pulmonary emphysema. It is characterized by the presence of large bullae associated with some type of emphysema. High-resolution CT is the best imaging technique to identify the underlying type of emphysema and it helps to determine the viability of the nonbullous lung. We present the case of an asymptomatic patient in whom the diagnosis was suspected on the basis of plain chest X ray and was confirmed by high-resolution CT. 13 refs

  18. On weighted hardy inequalities on semiaxis for functions vanishing at the endpoints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Stepanov

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the weighted Hardy inequalities on the semiaxis of the form ‖Fu‖2≤C‖F(kv‖2  (1 for functions vanishing at the endpoints together with derivatives up to the order k−1. The case k=2 is completely characterized.

  19. ''Vanishing theorem'' for a positive holomorphic vector bundle of undefined rank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Potier, J.

    1974-01-01

    Let M ba a compact complex manifold of dimension n and let E→M be a holomorphic vector bundle over M. Theorem: If E is positive of rank r and if Hsup(p,q)(M,E) is the cohomology of type (p,q) of M with values in E, then Hsup(p,q)(M,E) = O as soon as p+q >=n+r. If r = 1, this is the ''precise vanishing theorem'' due to Kodaira and Nakano; the present paper contains a proof of the general case

  20. Gluon gas viscosity in nonperturbative region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'in, S.V.; Mogilevskij, O.A.; Smolyanskij, S.A.; Zinov'ev, G.M.

    1992-01-01

    Using the Green-Kubo-type formulae and the cutoff model motivated by Monte Carlo lattice gluodynamics simulations we find the temperature behaviour of shear viscosity of gluon gas in the region of deconfinement phase transition. 22 refs.; 1 fig. (author)

  1. Bulk viscosity in 2SC quark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, Mark G; Schmitt, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The bulk viscosity of three-flavour colour-superconducting quark matter originating from the nonleptonic process u + s ↔ u + d is computed. It is assumed that up and down quarks form Cooper pairs while the strange quark remains unpaired (2SC phase). A general derivation of the rate of strangeness production is presented, involving contributions from a multitude of different subprocesses, including subprocesses that involve different numbers of gapped quarks as well as creation and annihilation of particles in the condensate. The rate is then used to compute the bulk viscosity as a function of the temperature, for an external oscillation frequency typical of a compact star r-mode. We find that, for temperatures far below the critical temperature T c for 2SC pairing, the bulk viscosity of colour-superconducting quark matter is suppressed relative to that of unpaired quark matter, but for T ∼> T c /30 the colour-superconducting quark matter has a higher bulk viscosity. This is potentially relevant for the suppression of r-mode instabilities early in the life of a compact star

  2. Jet collimation by turbulent viscosity. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, R.N.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper it is assumed that the subscale turbulent eddies induced in an ambient medium by the emergence of a (already collimated) jet from a galactic nucleus (VLBI jet) are the source of the viscosity which causes material to be entrained into the large-scale (VLA) jet. New analytic solutions are derived by a generalization of the self-similar Ansatz used in the Landau-Squires solution to include variable density and viscosity. It is shown that such a process of viscous collimation of the VLA jets can account for the observed collimation-luminosity correlation, the magnetic flux, and the inferred mass flux of these jets. Order of magnitude comparisons of velocity and density fields with recently observed emission-line flow regions near radio jets are made. All of the viscosity-dependent observational checks imply roughly the same plausible value for the eddy viscosity. It is emphasized that storing the initial VLBI jet energy in the intermediate scales occupied by the turbulent eddies allows this energy to be largely undetected. 35 references

  3. Effect of Viscosity on Liquid Curtain Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Suszynski, Wieslaw; Francis, Lorraine; Carvalho, Marcio; Dow Chemical Company Collaboration; PUC Rio Collaboration; University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    The effect of viscosity on the stability of Newtonian liquid curtains was explored by high-speed visualization. Glycerol/water solutions with viscosity ranging from 19.1 to 210 mPa.s were used as coating liquids. The experimental set-up used a slide die delivery and steel tube edge guides. The velocity along curtain at different positions was measured by tracking small particles at different flow conditions. The measurements revealed that away from edge guides, velocity is well described by free fall effect. However, close to edge guides, liquid moves slower, revealing formation of a viscous boundary layer. The size of boundary layer and velocity near edge guides are strong function of viscosity. The critical condition was determined by examining flow rate below which curtain broke. Curtain failure was initiated by growth of a hole within liquid curtain, close to edge guides. Visualization results showed that the hole forms in a circular shape then becomes elliptical as it grows faster in vertical direction compared to horizontal direction. As viscosity rises, minimum flow rate for destabilization of curtain increased, indicating connection between interaction with edge guides and curtain stability. We would like to acknowledge the financial support from the Dow Chemical Company.

  4. Lennard-Jones triple-point bulk and shear viscosities. Green-Kubo theory, Hamiltonian mechanics, and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, W.G.; Evans, D.J.; Hickman, R.B.; Ladd, A.J.C.; Ashurst, W.T.; Moran, B.

    1980-01-01

    A new Hamiltonian method for deformation simulations is related to the Green-Kubo fluctuation theory through perturbation theory and linear-response theory. Numerical results for the bulk and shear viscosity coefficients are compared to corresponding Green-Kubo calculations. Both viscosity coefficients depend similarly on frequency, in a way consistent with enhanced ''long-time tails.''

  5. Conditions of viscosity measurement for detecting irradiated peppers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Toru; Todoriki, Setsuko; Okadome, Hiroshi; Kohyama, Kaoru

    1995-01-01

    Viscosity of gelatinized suspensions of black and white peppers decreased depending upon dose. The viscosity was influenced by gelatinization and viscosity measurement conditions. The difference between unirradiated pepper and an irradiated one was larger at a higher pH and temperature for gelatinization. A viscosity parameter normalized with the starch content of pepper sample and the viscosity of a 5% suspension of corn starch could get rid of the influence of the conditions for viscosity measurement such as type of viscometer, shear rate and temperature. (author)

  6. Study on viscosity measurement using fiber Bragg grating micro-vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Le; Fang, Fengzhou; Zhao, Jibo

    2013-01-01

    It is now ascertained that traditional electric sensors are vulnerable to electromagnetic interference when measuring viscosity. Here, we propose a new viscosity-sensitive structure based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing principle and a micro-vibration measurement method. The symmetric micro-vibration motivation method is also described, and a mathematical model for compensational voltage and fluid viscosity is established. The probe amplitude, which is produced by reciprocating stimulation, is accessible by means of an FBG sensor mounted on an equal-strength beam. Viscosity can be therefore calculated using a demodulation technique based on linear edge filtering with long period grating. After performing a group of verifying tests, the sensor has been subsequently calibrated with a series of standard fluids to determine uncertain parameters in the mathematical model. The results of the experiment show that the relative measurement error was less than 2% when the viscosity ranged from 200 to 500 mPa s. The proposed architecture utilizes the characteristics of anti-interference, fast response speed, high resolution and compact structure of FBG, thereby offering a novel modality to achieve an online viscosity measurement. (paper)

  7. Viscosity estimation utilizing flow velocity field measurements in a rotating magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    2008-01-01

    The importance of viscosity in determining plasma flow structures has been widely recognized. In laboratory plasmas, however, viscosity measurements have been seldom performed so far. In this paper we present and discuss an estimation method of effective plasma kinematic viscosity utilizing flow velocity field measurements. Imposing steady and axisymmetric conditions, we derive the expression for radial flow velocity from the azimuthal component of the ion fluid equation. The expression contains kinematic viscosity, vorticity of azimuthal rotation and its derivative, collision frequency, azimuthal flow velocity and ion cyclotron frequency. Therefore all quantities except the viscosity are given provided that the flow field can be measured. We applied this method to a rotating magnetized argon plasma produced by the Hyper-I device. The flow velocity field measurements were carried out using a directional Langmuir probe installed in a tilting motor drive unit. The inward ion flow in radial direction, which is not driven in collisionless inviscid plasmas, was clearly observed. As a result, we found the anomalous viscosity, the value of which is two orders of magnitude larger than the classical one. (author)

  8. Vanishing Lung Syndrome in a Patient with HIV Infection and Heavy Marijuana Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basheer Tashtoush

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanishing lung syndrome (VLS is a rare and distinct clinical syndrome that usually affects young men. VLS leads to severe progressive dyspnea and is characterized by extensive, asymmetric, peripheral, and predominantly upper lobe giant lung bullae. Case reports have suggested an additive role of marijuana use in the development of this disease in young male tobacco smokers. We herein report a case of a 65-year-old Hispanic male previously diagnosed with severe emphysema and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS, with a history of intravenous heroin use and active marijuana smoking who presents to the emergency department with severe progressive shortness of breath he was found to have multiple large subpleural bullae occupying more than one-third of the hemithorax on chest computerized tomography (CT, characteristic of vanishing lung syndrome. The patient was mechanically ventilated and later developed a pneumothorax requiring chest tube placement and referral for surgical bullectomy. Surgical bullectomy has shown high success rates in alleviating the debilitating symptoms and preventing the life threatening complications of this rare syndrome. This case further emphasizes the importance of recognizing VLS in patients with severe emphysema and heavy marijuana smoking.

  9. BULK THERMODYNAMICS AND CHARGE FLUCTUATIONS AT NON-VANISHING BARYON DENSITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MIAO, C.; SCHMIDT, C.

    2007-01-01

    We present results on bulk thermodynamic quantities as well as net baryon number, strangeness and electric charge fluctuations in QCD at non-zero density and temperature obtained from lattice calculations with almost physical quark masses for two values of the lattice cut-off aT = 1/4 and 1/6. We show that with our improved p4fa3-action the cut-off effects are under control when using lattices with a temporal extent of 6 or larger and that the contribution to the equation of state, which is due to a finite chemical potential is small for μ q /T < 1. Moreover, at vanishing chemical potential, i.e. under conditions almost realized at RHIC and the LHC, quartic fluctuations of net baryon number and strangeness are large in a narrow temperature interval characterizing the transition region from the low to high temperature phase. At non-zero baryon number density, strangeness fluctuations are enhanced and correlated to fluctuations of the net baryon number. If strangeness is furthermore forced to vanish, as it may be the case in systems created in heavy ion collisions, strangeness fluctuations are significantly smaller than baryon number fluctuations

  10. Method of cutting steeply falling coal beds. [Bacteria, which only grow on methane, are injected into the coal bed and form low viscosity polysaccharides: as a result the coal collapses into the haulage gallery and is hauled away

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gretsinger, B Ye; Chernyshenko, D V; Levin, A D; Malashenko, Yu R; Shinkovskiy, V A; Shurova, Z P; Volkov, V I

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to reduce outlays for collapse and output of coal by creating artificial cavities of sliding along the coal bed in the surrounding rocks. This goal is achieved because in the well drilled in the bed for the entire height of the level, a suspension of cells of methane-oxidizing microorganisms is injected. The methane-oxidizing microorganisms used are, for example, the thermophilic culture Methylococcus thermophilus of strains ShP which grow at 45-65/sup 0/ C, or the mesophilic culture Methanomonas rubna of strains 15 Sh growing at 20-37/sup 0/ C. As a result of the vital activity of these cultures, polysaccharides are formed with viscosity of 5-7 and 3-4 St respectively. The mine pressure disrupts the blocks between the wells, and the outline section of the steeply dropping coal bed, being destroyed, slides on the products of vital activity of the microorganisms to the haulage gallery. Then the coal drops on cross cuts to the field gallery through which it is transported. Studies established that the only coal substrate which is suitable for growth of these microorganism cultures is methane. The synthesis of one g of absolutely dry substance of these microorganism requires 1.78 g of methane and 4.7 g of oxygen. The cultures are resistant to hydrostatic pressure from 20 to 150 atm and short-term pressure of gradient drops which occur during injection of the cellular suspension into the coal bed. They are filtered through the coal with preservation of the oxidizing and reproductive properties and are cultivated on the methane contained in the bed and form considerable number of exopolysaccarides. The polysaccarides weaken the bond between the bed and the surrounding rocks and serve as a unique lubricant promoting the sliding towards the haulage gallery of the coal blocks destroyed by mine pressure.

  11. Mechanism of viscosity effect on magnetic island rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhailovskii, A.B.; Konovalov, S.V. [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Russian Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , Kurchatov Sq., 1, Moscow (Russian Federation); Pustovitov, V.D. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Tsypin, V.S. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, SP (Brazil)

    2000-04-01

    It is shown that plasma viscosity does not influence the magnetic island rotation directly. Nevertheless, it leads to nonstationarity of the plasma velocity. This nonstationarity is the reason of the viscosity effect on island rotation. (author)

  12. Viscose kink and drift-kink modes in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuvshinov, B.N.; Mikhajlovskij, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    Intristic kink modes in a tokamak are theoretically investigated taking account of longitudinal viscosity of ions and electrons and drift effect. It is marked that dispersion equation of investigated modes coinsides in form with that for ballooning modes. It is shown that five types of intrinsic kink instability may be distinguished in disregard of viscosity and drift effects. Effect of stabilizing quasiideal viscose kink and viscose resistive kink modes by finite Larmuir ion radius is investigated. A branch of viscose reclosure mode which instability is due to electron viscosity is pointed out. A series of other viscose and drift-kink tokamak modes is considered. Both general disperse equations of the above-mentioned kink instability varieties, taking account of viscose and drift ones, and disperse equations of separate branches are presented

  13. Adequacy of human milk viscosity to respond to infants with dysphagia: experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Bartha de Mattos de Almeida

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal nutrition is an important subject in health in the short, medium and long term. In preterm newborns, nutrition assumes a predominant role for the child's overall development. Babies with uncoordinated swallowing or respiration may not have the necessary oral abilities to suck the mother's breast and will need to implement different feeding practices; one of them is changing the consistency of the milk offered. Objectives: Determine viscosity variations of untreated human and pasteurized milk without and with thickening to adapt the diet to the needs of dysphagic infants hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Cara Unit (NICU. Material and Methods: The authors altered the viscosity of natural infant powdered milk and, after thickening, determined and adopted a thickening standard for human milk. Untreated human and pasteurized milk was thickened in concentrations of 2%, 3%, 5% and 7% and the viscosity were determined every 20 minutes for a period of 60 minutes at a temperature of 37ºC. Results: The infant lactose formula thickened at concentrations of 2% and 3% produced viscosities of 8.97cP and 27.73 cP, respectively. The increases were significantly different after 1 hour. Inversely, untreated human milk at 2%, 3%, 5% and 7% produced diminished viscosity over time; the changes were more accentuated in the first 20 minutes. In pasteurized human milk, the 2% concentration had no variation in viscosity, but with the 3%, 5% and 7% concentrations, there was a significant decrease in the first 20 minutes with stability observed in the subsequent times. Conclusion: In powdered milk, the viscosity increases over time; the viscosity in human milk diminishes. The results point out the importance not only of considering the concentration of the thickener but also the time being administered after its addition to effectively treat dysphagic infants.

  14. Caldera resurgence driven by magma viscosity contrasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galetto, Federico; Acocella, Valerio; Caricchi, Luca

    2017-11-24

    Calderas are impressive volcanic depressions commonly produced by major eruptions. Equally impressive is the uplift of the caldera floor that may follow, dubbed caldera resurgence, resulting from magma accumulation and accompanied by minor eruptions. Why magma accumulates, driving resurgence instead of feeding large eruptions, is one of the least understood processes in volcanology. Here we use thermal and experimental models to define the conditions promoting resurgence. Thermal modelling suggests that a magma reservoir develops a growing transition zone with relatively low viscosity contrast with respect to any newly injected magma. Experiments show that this viscosity contrast provides a rheological barrier, impeding the propagation through dikes of the new injected magma, which stagnates and promotes resurgence. In explaining resurgence and its related features, we provide the theoretical background to account for the transition from magma eruption to accumulation, which is essential not only to develop resurgence, but also large magma reservoirs.

  15. Shear viscosity, cavitation and hydrodynamics at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, Jitesh R.; Mishra, Hiranmaya; Sreekanth, V.

    2011-01-01

    We study evolution of quark-gluon matter in the ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions within the frame work of relativistic second-order viscous hydrodynamics. In particular, by using the various prescriptions of a temperature-dependent shear viscosity to the entropy ratio, we show that the hydrodynamic description of the relativistic fluid becomes invalid due to the phenomenon of cavitation. For most of the initial conditions relevant for LHC, the cavitation sets in very early stage. The cavitation in this case is entirely driven by the large values of shear viscosity. Moreover we also demonstrate that the conformal terms used in equations of the relativistic dissipative hydrodynamic can influence the cavitation time.

  16. Pendulum Underwater - An Approach for Quantifying Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leme, José Costa; Oliveira, Agostinho

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of the experiment presented in this paper is to quantify the viscosity of a liquid. Viscous effects are important in the flow of fluids in pipes, in the bloodstream, in the lubrication of engine parts, and in many other situations. In the present paper, the authors explore the oscillations of a physical pendulum in the form of a long and lightweight wire that carries a ball at its lower end, which is totally immersed in water, so as to determine the water viscosity. The system used represents a viscous damped pendulum and we tried different theoretical models to describe it. The experimental part of the present paper is based on a very simple and low-cost image capturing apparatus that can easily be replicated in a physics classroom. Data on the pendulum's amplitude as a function of time were acquired using digital video analysis with the open source software Tracker.

  17. Viscosity, ion mobility, and the lambda transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodstein, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    A model is presented of the lambda transition in superfluid helium in which fluctuations near the transition are approximated by distinct regions of normal fluid and superfluid. The macroscopic viscosity of such a medium is computed. The ion mobility is also computed, taking into account a region of normal fluid around the ion induced by electrostriction. The results are, for the viscosity, eta/sub lambda/ - eta approx. t/sup 0.67/ and for the mobility μ - μ/sub lambda/ approx. t/sup 0.92/, both in excellent agreement with recent experiments. The model suggests that the lambda transition itself is the point at which superfluid regions become macroscopically connected

  18. Influence of fluid viscosity on vortex cavitation at a suction pipe inlet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezure, Toshiki; Ito, Kei; Kamide, Hideki; Kameyama, Yuri; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    Cavitation is a highly important issue in various fluid machineries. In the design of an advanced loop-type sodium-cooled fast reactor in Japan, vortex cavitation is also a significant issue for the integrity of the reactor structure. Thus, an evaluation method for vortex cavitation is required. In this study, vortex cavitation at a single suction pipe inlet was studied under several different viscosity conditions including its transient behavior. The intermittent occurrence behaviors of vortex cavitation were grasped by visualization measurements. The experimental results showed that the influence of the kinematic viscosity was obvious under a high kinematic viscosity. However, the influence became smaller with decreasing kinematic viscosity. From these results, the non-dimensional circulation, which was defined as the ratio of the local circulation to the kinematic viscosity, was deduced as an evaluation parameter to estimate the influence of the kinematic viscosity. Cavitation factors at transition points from continuous occurrence to intermittent occurrences were also evaluated as representative points where vortex cavitation occurs. Then, the occurrences of vortex cavitation were expressed as a relation between the cavitation factor at transition points and the non-dimensional circulation. As a result, it was clarified that the cavitation factor at transition points increased linearly in relatively small non-dimensional circulation, while it was nearly constant in relatively large non-dimensional circulation. (author)

  19. Study on viscosity modification of human and formula milk for infants with dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Bartha de Mattos Almeida

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: to analyze the modification of the viscosity of human milk and infant formula. Methods: three studies were performed to assess the viscosity and effect of time on infant formula with a thickener, at concentrations of 2, 3, and 5%, as well as raw and pasteurized human milk at concentrations of 2, 3, 5, and 7% at 37ºC, for 60 minutes. Rice cereal was used as a thickening agent. The viscosity was evaluated using a Ford Cup-type viscometer, and the samples were analyzed at 20-minute intervals. Significant differences were assessed using the ANOVA test. Results: no significant differences in viscosity were observed over time in concentrations of 2, 3, and 5%. There was a difference in the viscosity between human milk and infant formula, in concentrations of 2% and 5%, 2% and 7%, 3% and 5%, and 3% and 7%, independently of the time intervals evaluated. Conclusion: the findings of this study demonstrate the need for different concentrations of the thickening agent for human milk and infant formula. Rice cereal is a suitable therapeutic option for newborns presented with dysphagia in concentrations of 2, 3, 5, and 7%, due to its effect on the viscosity and flow reduction, provided that the feeding time is considered.

  20. A viscosity measurement during the high pressure phase transition in triolein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegoczynski, R M; Rostocki, A J; Kielczynski, P; Szalewski, M

    2008-01-01

    The high-pressure properties of triolein, a subject of extensive research at the Faculty of Physics of Warsaw University of Technology (WUT) have been enhanced by the results of viscosity measurement within the pressure range up to 0.8 GPa. For the measurement the authors have adopted a new ultrasonic method based on Bleustein-Gulyaev waves, successfully developed earlier for the low pressures in the Section of Acoustoelectronics of the Institute of Fundamental Technological Research. The measurements have shown: 1. Exponential rise of viscosity with pressure up to 0.5 GPa. 2. Extraordinary increment of viscosity at constant pressure during phase transition. 3. Further exponential rise of viscosity with pressure of the high-pressure phase of triolein. 4. The pressure exponents of the viscosity of both phases were different (the high-pressure phase had much smaller exponent). 5. The decomposition of the high pressure phase due to the slow decompression have shown very large hysteresis of viscosity on pressure dependence

  1. An empirical model for the melt viscosity of polymer blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrescu, V.

    1981-01-01

    On the basis of experimental data for blends of polyethylene with different polymers an empirical equation is proposed to describe the dependence of melt viscosity of blends on component viscosities and composition. The model ensures the continuity of viscosity vs. composition curves throughout the whole composition range, the possibility of obtaining extremum values higher or lower than the viscosities of components, allows the calculation of flow curves of blends from the flow curves of components and their volume fractions. (orig.)

  2. Elongational viscosity of narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Anders; Almdal, Kristoffer; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2003-01-01

    Transient and steady elongational viscosity has been measured for two narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene melts of molar masses 200 000 and 390 000 by means of a filament stretching rheometer. Total Hencky strains of about five have been obtained. The transient elongational viscosity rises...... above the linear viscoelastic prediction at intermediate strains, indicating strain hardening. The steady elongational viscosities are monotone decreasing functions of elongation rate. At elongation rates larger than the inverse reptation time, the steady elongational viscosity scales linearly...

  3. A study on the impact of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose on the viscosity of PEG melt suspensions using surface plots and principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ching Mien; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Chan, Lai Wah

    2015-04-01

    An understanding of the rheological behaviour of polymer melt suspensions is crucial in pharmaceutical manufacturing, especially when processed by spray congealing or melt extruding. However, a detailed comparison of the viscosities at each and every temperature and concentration between the various grades of adjuvants in the formulation will be tedious and time-consuming. Therefore, the statistical method, principal component analysis (PCA), was explored in this study. The composite formulations comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) of ten different grades (K100 LV, K4M, K15M, K100M, E15 LV, E50 LV, E4M, F50 LV, F4M and Methocel VLV) at various concentrations were prepared and their viscosities at different temperatures determined. Surface plots showed that concentration of HPMC had a greater effect on the viscosity compared to temperature. Particle size and size distribution of HPMC played an important role in the viscosity of melt suspensions. Smaller particles led to a greater viscosity than larger particles. PCA was used to evaluate formulations of different viscosities. The complex viscosity profiles of the various formulations containing HPMC were successfully classified into three clusters of low, moderate and high viscosity. Formulations within each group showed similar viscosities despite differences in grade or concentration of HPMC. Formulations in the low viscosity cluster were found to be sprayable. PCA was able to differentiate the complex viscosity profiles of different formulations containing HPMC in an efficient and time-saving manner and provided an excellent visualisation of the data.

  4. Possible ambiguities when testing viscosity in compendial monographs - characterisation of grades of cellulose ethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doelker, E

    2010-10-01

    The European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) monographs for the water-soluble cellulose ethers require viscosity determination, either in the "Tests" section or in the non-mandatory "Functionality-related characteristics" section. Although the derivatives are chemically closely related and used for similar applications, the viscosity tests strongly differ. Some monographs generically speak of the rotating viscometer method (2.2.10) and a fixed shear rate (e.g. 10 s-1), which would necessitate an absolute measuring system, while others recommend the capillary viscometer method for product grades of less than 600 mPa∙s and the rotating viscometer method and given operating conditions for grades of higher nominal viscosity. Viscometer methods also differ between the United States Pharmacopeia/National Formulary (USP/NF) and the Japanese Pharmacopoeia (JP) monographs. In addition, for some cellulose ethers the tests sometimes diverge from one pharmacopoeia to the other, although the three compendiums are in a harmonisation process. But the main issue is that the viscometer methods originally employed by the product manufacturers are often not those described in the corresponding monographs and generally vary from one manufacturer to the other. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate whether such a situation could invalidate the present pharmacopoeial requirements. 2 per cent solutions of several viscosity grades of hydroxyethylcellulose, hypromellose and methylcellulose were prepared and their (apparent) viscosity determined using both relative and absolute viscometer methods. The viscometer method used not only affects the measured viscosity but experimental values generally do not correspond to the product nominal viscosities. It emerges that, in contrast to Newtonian solutions (i.e. those of grades of up to ca. 50 mPa∙s nominal viscosity), some of the viscometer methods currently specified in the monographs are not able unambiguously to characterise the

  5. Alternative derivation of the parallel ion viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravenec, R.V.; Berk, H.L.; Hammer, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    A set of double-adiabatic fluid equations with additional collisional relaxation between the ion temperatures parallel and perpendicular to a magnetic field are shown to reduce to a set involving a single temperature and a parallel viscosity. This result is applied to a recently published paper [R. V. Bravenec, A. J. Lichtenberg, M. A. Leiberman, and H. L. Berk, Phys. Fluids 24, 1320 (1981)] on viscous flow in a multiple-mirror configuration

  6. Viscosity and Plasticity of Latvian Illite Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Jurgelāne, I; Vecstaudža, J; Stepanova, V; Mālers, J; Bērziņa-Cimdiņa, L

    2012-01-01

    Due to viscosity and plasticity, clays and clay minerals are used in civil engineering, pottery and also in cosmetics and medicine as thickening agents and emulsion and suspension stabilizers. The rheological properties of clay suspensions are complex. Mostly it is an interaction between mineral composition, clay particle size and pH value and also depends on clay minerals. Clay-water suspension is non-Newtonian fluid showing thixotropic and pseudoplastic properties. Results showed that plast...

  7. A bulk viscosity driven inflationary model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waga, I.; Falcao, R.C.; Chanda, R.

    1985-01-01

    Bulk viscosity associated with the production of heavy particles during the GUT phase transition can lead to exponential or 'generalized' inflation. The condition of inflation proposed is independent of the details of the phase transition and remains unaltered in presence of a cosmological constant. Such mechanism avoids the extreme supercooling and reheating needed in the usual inflationary models. The standard baryongenesis mechanism can be maintained. (Author) [pt

  8. Viscosity characteristics of selected volcanic rock melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobiger, Manuel; Sonder, Ingo; Büttner, Ralf; Zimanowski, Bernd

    2011-02-01

    A basic experimental study of the behavior of magma rheology was carried out on remelted volcanic rocks using wide gap viscometry. The complex composition of magmatic melts leads to complicated rheologic behavior which cannot be described with one simple model. Therefore, measurement procedures which are able to quantify non-Newtonian behavior have to be employed. Furthermore, the experimental apparatus must be able to deal with inhomogeneities of magmatic melts. We measured the viscosity of a set of materials representing a broad range of volcanic processes. For the lower viscous melts (low-silica compositions), non-Newtonian behavior is observed, whereas the high-silica melts show Newtonian behavior in the measured temperature and shear rate range (T = 1423 K - 1623 K, γ˙ = 10 - 2 s - 1 - 20 s - 1 ). The non-Newtonian materials show power-law behavior. The measured viscosities η and power-law indexes m lie in the intervals 8 Pa s ≤ η ≤ 210 3 Pa s, 0.71 ≤ m ≤ 1.0 (Grímsvötn basalt), 0.9 Pa s ≤ η ≤ 350 Pa s, 0.61 ≤ m ≤ 0.93 (Hohenstoffeln olivine-melilitite), and 8 Pa s ≤ η ≤ 1.510 4 Pa s, 0.55 ≤ m ≤ 1.0 (Sommata basalt). Measured viscosities of the Newtonian high-silica melts lie in the range 10 4 Pa s ≤ η ≤ 310 5 Pa s.

  9. More on non-supersymmetric asymmetric orbifolds with vanishing cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Yuji; Wada, Taiki

    2016-01-01

    We explore various non-supersymmetric type II string vacua constructed based on asymmetric orbifolds of tori with vanishing cosmological constant at the one loop. The string vacua we present are modifications of the models studied in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2016)184, of which orbifold group is just generated by a single element. We especially focus on two types of modifications: (i) the orbifold twists include different types of chiral reflections not necessarily removing massless Rarita-Schwinger fields in the 4-dimensional space-time, (ii) the orbifold twists do not include the shift operator. We further discuss the unitarity and stability of constructed non-supersymmetric string vacua, with emphasizing the common features of them.

  10. Multiloop amplitudes and vanishing theorems using the pure spinor formalism for the superstring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkovits, Nathan

    2004-01-01

    A ten-dimensional super-Poincare covariant formalism for the superstring was recently developed which involves a BRST operator constructed from superspace matter variables and a pure spinor ghost variable. A super-Poincare covariant prescription was defined for computing tree amplitudes and was shown to coincide with the standard RNS prescription. In this paper, picture-changing operators are used to define functional integration over the pure spinor ghosts and to construct a suitable b ghost. A super-Poincare covariant prescription is then given for the computation of N-point multiloop amplitudes. One can easily prove that massless N-point multiloop amplitudes vanish for N 4 terms in the effective action receive no perturbative contributions above one loop. (author)

  11. Brane solutions sourced by a scalar with vanishing potential and classification of scalar branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadoni, Mariano [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari,Cittadella Universitaria, 09042 Monserrato (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Cagliari,Cagliari (Italy); Franzin, Edgardo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari,Cittadella Universitaria, 09042 Monserrato (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Cagliari,Cagliari (Italy); CENTRA, Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa,Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049 Lisboa (Portugal); Serra, Matteo [Dipartimento di Matematica, Sapienza Università di Roma,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2016-01-20

    We derive exact brane solutions of minimally coupled Einstein-Maxwell-scalar gravity in d+2 dimensions with a vanishing scalar potential and we show that these solutions are conformal to the Lifshitz spacetime whose dual QFT is characterized by hyperscaling violation. These solutions, together with the AdS brane and the domain wall sourced by an exponential potential, give the complete list of scalar branes sourced by a generic potential having simple (scale-covariant) scaling symmetries not involving Galilean boosts. This allows us to give a classification of both simple and interpolating brane solution of minimally coupled Einstein-Maxwell-scalar gravity having no Schrödinger isometries, which may be very useful for holographic applications.

  12. Vanishing corrections on intermediate scale and implications for unification of forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parida, M.K.

    1996-02-01

    In two-step breakings of a class of grand unified theories including SO(10), we prove a theorem showing that the scale (M I ) where the Pati-Salam gauge symmetry with parity breaks down to the standard gauge group, has vanishing corrections due to all sources emerging from higher scales (μ > M I ) such as the one-loop and all higher-loop effects, the GUT-threshold, gravitational smearing, and string threshold effects. Implications of such a scale for the unification of gauge couplings with small Majorana neutrino masses are discussed. In string inspired SO(10), we show that M I ≅ 5 x 10 12 GeV, needed for neutrino masses, with the GUT scale M U ≅ M str can be realized provided certain particle states in the predicted spectrum are light. (author). 28 refs, 1 tab

  13. Remarks on a Class of Nonlinear Schrödinger Equations with Potential Vanishing at Infinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the following nonlinear Schrödinger equation −Δu+V(xu=K(xf(u,  x∈ℝN,  u∈H1(ℝN, where the potential V(x vanishes at infinity. Working in weighted Sobolev space, we obtain the ground states of problem ( under a Nahari type condition. Furthermore, if V(x,K(x are radically symmetric with respect to x∈ℝN, it is shown that problem ( has a positive solution with some more general growth conditions of the nonlinearity. Particularly, if f(u=up, then the growth restriction σ≤p≤N+2/N-2 in Ambrosetti et al. (2005 can be relaxed to σ~≤p≤N+2/N-2, where σ~<σ if 0<β<α<2.

  14. The unified approach to integrable relativistic equations: Soliton solutions over non-vanishing backgrounds - 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barashenkov, I.V.; Getmanov, B.S.; Kovtun, V.E.

    1992-01-01

    The scheme for unified description of integrable relativistic massive systems provides an inverse scattering formalism that covers universally all (1+1)- dimensional systems of this kind. In this work we construct the N-soliton solution (over an arbitrary background) for some generic system which is associated with the sl(2,C) case of the scheme and whose reductions include the complex sine-Gordon equation, the massive Thirring model and other equations, both in the Euclidean and Minkowski spaces. Thus the N-soliton solutions for all these systems emerge in a unified form differing only in the type of constraints imposed on their parameters. In an earlier paper the case of the zero background was considered while here we concentrate on the case of the non-vanishing constant background i.e., on the N-kink solutions. (author). 18 refs

  15. Simultaneous measurement of surface tension and viscosity using freely decaying oscillations of acoustically levitated droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, J.; Kilzer, A.; Petermann, M.

    2018-01-01

    Oscillations of small liquid drops around a spherical shape have been of great interest to scientists measuring physical properties such as interfacial tension and viscosity, over the last few decades. A powerful tool for contactless positioning is acoustic levitation, which has been used to simultaneously determine the surface tension and viscosity of liquids at ambient pressure. In order to extend this acoustic levitation measurement method to high pressure systems, the method is first evaluated under ambient pressure. To measure surface tension and viscosity using acoustically levitated oscillating drops, an image analysis method has to be developed and factors which may affect measurement, such as sound field or oscillation amplitude, have to be analyzed. In this paper, we describe the simultaneous measurement of surface tension and viscosity using freely decaying shape oscillations of acoustically levitated droplets of different liquids (silicone oils AK 5 and AK 10, squalane, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 1-pentanol, 1-hexanol, 1-heptanol, and 1-octanol) in air. These liquids vary in viscosity from 2 to about 30 mPa s. An acoustic levitation system, including an optimized standing wave acoustic levitator and a high-speed camera, was used for this study. An image analysis was performed with a self-written Matlab® code. The frequency of oscillation and the damping constant, required for the determination of surface tension and viscosity, respectively, were calculated from the evolution of the equatorial and polar radii. The results and observations are compared to data from the literature in order to analyze the accuracy of surface tension and viscosity determination, as well as the effect of non-spherical drop shape or amplitude of oscillation on measurement.

  16. Study of viscosity of aluminum melt during glass transition by molecular dynamics and Green–Kubo formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, E M; Pisarev, V V

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics study of shear viscosity behavior of liquid aluminum is performed. The embedded atom method potential is used at the simulation of isobaric cooling. The viscosity is calculated using the Green–Kubo formula. The stress autocorrelation functions are obtained in the range 300-1200 K. The calculated kinematic viscosity is in agreement with the experimental data for the temperatures above melting temperature. The steep change of the shear viscosity is found below 650 K which we associate with the glass transition and is in a good agreement with the temperature which is obtained using the calorimetric criterion Kolotova et al (2015 J. Non-Cryst. Solids 429 98). The viscosity coefficient can not be calculated using the direct atomistic simulations below that temperature. (paper)

  17. Predicting the glass transition temperature and viscosity of secondary organic material using molecular composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-S. W. DeRieux

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol (SOA accounts for a large fraction of submicron particles in the atmosphere. SOA can occur in amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states depending on chemical composition, relative humidity (RH, and temperature. The phase transition between amorphous solid and semi-solid states occurs at the glass transition temperature (Tg. We have recently developed a method to estimate Tg of pure compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms (CHO compounds with molar mass less than 450 g mol−1 based on their molar mass and atomic O : C ratio. In this study, we refine and extend this method for CH and CHO compounds with molar mass up to ∼ 1100 g mol−1 using the number of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms. We predict viscosity from the Tg-scaled Arrhenius plot of fragility (viscosity vs. Tg∕T as a function of the fragility parameter D. We compiled D values of organic compounds from the literature and found that D approaches a lower limit of ∼ 10 (±1.7 as the molar mass increases. We estimated the viscosity of α-pinene and isoprene SOA as a function of RH by accounting for the hygroscopic growth of SOA and applying the Gordon–Taylor mixing rule, reproducing previously published experimental measurements very well. Sensitivity studies were conducted to evaluate impacts of Tg, D, the hygroscopicity parameter (κ, and the Gordon–Taylor constant on viscosity predictions. The viscosity of toluene SOA was predicted using the elemental composition obtained by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS, resulting in a good agreement with the measured viscosity. We also estimated the viscosity of biomass burning particles using the chemical composition measured by HRMS with two different ionization techniques: electrospray ionization (ESI and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI. Due to differences in detected organic compounds and signal intensity, predicted viscosities at low RH based on ESI and

  18. Predicting the glass transition temperature and viscosity of secondary organic material using molecular composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong DeRieux, Wing-Sy; Li, Ying; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Bertram, Allan K.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2018-05-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a large fraction of submicron particles in the atmosphere. SOA can occur in amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states depending on chemical composition, relative humidity (RH), and temperature. The phase transition between amorphous solid and semi-solid states occurs at the glass transition temperature (Tg). We have recently developed a method to estimate Tg of pure compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms (CHO compounds) with molar mass less than 450 g mol-1 based on their molar mass and atomic O : C ratio. In this study, we refine and extend this method for CH and CHO compounds with molar mass up to ˜ 1100 g mol-1 using the number of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms. We predict viscosity from the Tg-scaled Arrhenius plot of fragility (viscosity vs. Tg/T) as a function of the fragility parameter D. We compiled D values of organic compounds from the literature and found that D approaches a lower limit of ˜ 10 (±1.7) as the molar mass increases. We estimated the viscosity of α-pinene and isoprene SOA as a function of RH by accounting for the hygroscopic growth of SOA and applying the Gordon-Taylor mixing rule, reproducing previously published experimental measurements very well. Sensitivity studies were conducted to evaluate impacts of Tg, D, the hygroscopicity parameter (κ), and the Gordon-Taylor constant on viscosity predictions. The viscosity of toluene SOA was predicted using the elemental composition obtained by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), resulting in a good agreement with the measured viscosity. We also estimated the viscosity of biomass burning particles using the chemical composition measured by HRMS with two different ionization techniques: electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Due to differences in detected organic compounds and signal intensity, predicted viscosities at low RH based on ESI and APPI measurements differ by 2-5 orders

  19. The role of viscosity in TATB hot spot ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Laurence E.; Zepeda-Ruis, Luis; Howard, W. Michael; Najjar, Fady; Reaugh, John E.

    2012-03-01

    The role of dissipative effects, such as viscosity, in the ignition of high explosive pores is investigated using a coupled chemical, thermal, and hydrodynamic model. Chemical reactions are tracked with the Cheetah thermochemical code coupled to the ALE3D hydrodynamic code. We perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine the viscosity of liquid TATB. We also analyze shock wave experiments to obtain an estimate for the shock viscosity of TATB. Using the lower bound liquid-like viscosities, we find that the pore collapse is hydrodynamic in nature. Using the upper bound viscosity from shock wave experiments, we find that the pore collapse is closest to the viscous limit.

  20. Microcantilever based disposable viscosity sensor for serum and blood plasma measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Onur; Elbuken, Caglar; Ermek, Erhan; Mostafazadeh, Aref; Baris, Ibrahim; Erdem Alaca, B; Kavakli, Ibrahim Halil; Urey, Hakan

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel method for measuring blood plasma and serum viscosity with a microcantilever-based MEMS sensor. MEMS cantilevers are made of electroplated nickel and actuated remotely with magnetic field using an electro-coil. Real-time monitoring of cantilever resonant frequency is performed remotely using diffraction gratings fabricated at the tip of the dynamic cantilevers. Only few nanometer cantilever deflection is sufficient due to interferometric sensitivity of the readout. The resonant frequency of the cantilever is tracked with a phase lock loop (PLL) control circuit. The viscosities of liquid samples are obtained through the measurement of the cantilever's frequency change with respect to a reference measurement taken within a liquid of known viscosity. We performed measurements with glycerol solutions at different temperatures and validated the repeatability of the system by comparing with a reference commercial viscometer. Experimental results are compared with the theoretical predictions based on Sader's theory and agreed reasonably well. Afterwards viscosities of different Fetal Bovine Serum and Bovine Serum Albumin mixtures are measured both at 23°C and 37°C, body temperature. Finally the viscosities of human blood plasma samples taken from healthy donors are measured. The proposed method is capable of measuring viscosities from 0.86 cP to 3.02 cP, which covers human blood plasma viscosity range, with a resolution better than 0.04 cP. The sample volume requirement is less than 150 μl and can be reduced significantly with optimized cartridge design. Both the actuation and sensing are carried out remotely, which allows for disposable sensor cartridges. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Electron treatment of wood pulp for the viscose process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanik, T. M.; Ewing, D. E.; Whitehouse, R.

    2000-03-01

    Electron processing is currently being evaluated by several viscose producers for integration into their process. The viscose industry converts dissolving wood pulp into products such as staple fibre, filament, cord, film, packaging, and non-edible sausage casings. These materials are used in the clothing, drapery, hygiene, automobile, food, and packaging industries. Viscose producers are facing increasingly high production costs and stringent environmental regulations that have forced some plants to close. Electron treatment of wood pulp can significantly reduce the amounts of chemicals used for producing viscose and the production of hazardous pollutants. Acsion Industries has worked with companies worldwide to demonstrate the benefits of using electron treated pulp for producing viscose (rayon). This paper describes the viscose process, the benefits of using electron treatment in the viscose process, and Acsion's efforts in developing this technology.

  2. On the gravitational collapse of a gas cloud in the presence of bulk viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlevaro, Nakia; Montani, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    We analyse the effects induced by the bulk (or second) viscosity on the dynamics associated with the extreme gravitational collapse. The aim of the work is to investigate whether the presence of viscous corrections to the evolution of a collapsing gas cloud influences the top-down fragmentation process. To this end, we generalize the approach presented by Hunter (1962 Astrophys. J. 136 594) to include in the dynamics of the (uniform and spherically symmetric) cloud the negative pressure contribution associated with the bulk viscosity phenomenology. Within the framework of a Newtonian approach (whose range of validity is outlined), we extend to the viscous case either the Lagrangian or the Eulerian motion of the system addressed in Hunter (1962 Astrophys. J. 136 594) and we treat the asymptotic evolution in correspondence with a viscosity coefficient of the form ζ = ζ 0 ρ 5/6 (ρ being the cloud density and ζ 0 = const). We show how the adiabatic-like behaviour of the gas (i.e. when the polytropic index γ takes values 4/3 < γ ≤ 5/3) is deeply influenced by viscous correction when its collapse reaches the extreme regime toward the singularity. In fact, for sufficiently large viscous contributions, density contrasts associated with a given scale of the fragmentation process acquire, asymptotically, a vanishing behaviour which prevents the formation of sub-structures. Since in the non-dissipative case density contrasts diverge (except for the purely adiabatic behaviour γ = 5/3 in which they remain constant), we can conclude that in the adiabatic-like collapse the top-down mechanism of structure formation is suppressed as soon as enough strong viscous effects are taken into account. Such a feature is not present in the isothermal-like (i.e. 1 ≤ γ < 4/3) collapse because the sub-structure formation is yet present and outlines the same behaviour as in the non-viscous case. We emphasize that in the adiabatic-like collapse the bulk viscosity is also responsible

  3. Nuclear viscosity of hot rotating 240Cf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, N. P.; Dioszegi, I.; Mazumdar, I.; Buda, A.; Morton, C. R.; Velkovska, J.; Beene, J. R.; Stracener, D. W.; Varner, R. L.; Thoennessen, M.

    2000-01-01

    The absolute γ-ray/fission multiplicities from hot rotating 240 Cf, populated at seven bombarding energies using the reaction 32 S+ 208 Pb, are reported. Statistical model calculations including nuclear dissipation have been performed to extract the dependence of the nuclear viscosity on temperature and/or nuclear deformation. The extracted nuclear dissipation coefficient is found to be independent of temperature. Large dissipation during the saddle to scission path provides a good fit to the γ-ray spectra. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  4. From Suitable Weak Solutions to Entropy Viscosity

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2010-12-16

    This paper focuses on the notion of suitable weak solutions for the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and discusses the relevance of this notion to Computational Fluid Dynamics. The purpose of the paper is twofold (i) to recall basic mathematical properties of the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and to show how they might relate to LES (ii) to introduce an entropy viscosity technique based on the notion of suitable weak solution and to illustrate numerically this concept. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  5. Viscosity in the edge of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M.

    1993-05-01

    A fluid representation of viscosity has been incorporated into a set of fluid equations that are maximally ordered in the ''short-radial-gradient-scale-length'' (srgsl) ordering that is appropriate for the edge of tokamak plasmas. The srgsl ordering raises viscous drifts and other viscous terms to leading order and fundamentally alters the character of the fluid equations. A leasing order viscous drift is identified. Viscous-driven radial particle and energy fluxes in the scrape-off layer and divertor channel are estimated to have an order unity effect in reducing radial peaking of energy fluxes transported along the field lines to divertor collector plates

  6. Viscosity of many-component glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Arrigoni, Benjamin M.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of composition on the viscosity of multicomponent glasses was expressed as a function of temperature and composition for three composition regions containing various subsets of Al2O3, B2O3, Bi2O3, CaO, Cr2O3, F, Fe2O3, K2O, Li2O, MgO, MnO, Na2O, NiO, P2O5, SiO2, UO2, and ZrO2. Limits of applicability of the composition models are discussed

  7. A technique for evaluating the oil/heavy-oil viscosity changes under ultrasound in a simulated porous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Hossein; Mohammadian, Erfan; Junin, Radzuan; Rafati, Roozbeh; Manan, Mohammad; Azdarpour, Amin; Junid, Mundzir

    2014-02-01

    Theoretically, Ultrasound method is an economical and environmentally friendly or "green" technology, which has been of interest for more than six decades for the purpose of enhancement of oil/heavy-oil production. However, in spite of many studies, questions about the effective mechanisms causing increase in oil recovery still existed. In addition, the majority of the mechanisms mentioned in the previous studies are theoretical or speculative. One of the changes that could be recognized in the fluid properties is viscosity reduction due to radiation of ultrasound waves. In this study, a technique was developed to investigate directly the effect of ultrasonic waves (different frequencies of 25, 40, 68 kHz and powers of 100, 250, 500 W) on viscosity changes of three types of oil (Paraffin oil, Synthetic oil, and Kerosene) and a Brine sample. The viscosity calculations in the smooth capillary tube were based on the mathematical models developed from the Poiseuille's equation. The experiments were carried out for uncontrolled and controlled temperature conditions. It was observed that the viscosity of all the liquids was decreased under ultrasound in all the experiments. This reduction was more significant for uncontrolled temperature condition cases. However, the reduction in viscosity under ultrasound was higher for lighter liquids compare to heavier ones. Pressure difference was diminished by decreasing in the fluid viscosity in all the cases which increases fluid flow ability, which in turn aids to higher oil recovery in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations. Higher ultrasound power showed higher liquid viscosity reduction in all the cases. Higher ultrasound frequency revealed higher and lower viscosity reduction for uncontrolled and controlled temperature condition experiments, respectively. In other words, the reduction in viscosity was inversely proportional to increasing the frequency in temperature controlled experiments. It was concluded that cavitation

  8. Simultaneous viscosity and density measurement of small volumes of liquids using a vibrating microcantilever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payam, A F; Trewby, W; Voïtchovsky, K

    2017-05-02

    Many industrial and technological applications require precise determination of the viscosity and density of liquids. Such measurements can be time consuming and often require sampling substantial amounts of the liquid. These problems can partly be overcome with the use of microcantilevers but most existing methods depend on the specific geometry and properties of the cantilever, which renders simple, accurate measurement difficult. Here we present a new approach able to simultaneously quantify both the density and the viscosity of microliters of liquids. The method, based solely on the measurement of two characteristic frequencies of an immersed microcantilever, is completely independent of the choice of a cantilever. We derive analytical expressions for the liquid's density and viscosity and validate our approach with several simple liquids and different cantilevers. Application of our model to non-Newtonian fluids shows that the calculated viscosities are remarkably robust when compared to measurements obtained from a standard rheometer. However, the results become increasingly dependent on the cantilever geometry as the frequency-dependent nature of the liquid's viscosity becomes more significant.

  9. Real-time viscosity and mass density sensors requiring microliter sample volume based on nanomechanical resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, Benjamin A; Duempelmann, Luc; Renggli, Kasper; Lang, Hans Peter; Gerber, Christoph; Bruns, Nico; Braun, Thomas

    2013-09-17

    A microcantilever based method for fluid viscosity and mass density measurements with high temporal resolution and microliter sample consumption is presented. Nanomechanical cantilever vibration is driven by photothermal excitation and detected by an optical beam deflection system using two laser beams of different wavelengths. The theoretical framework relating cantilever response to the viscosity and mass density of the surrounding fluid was extended to consider higher flexural modes vibrating at high Reynolds numbers. The performance of the developed sensor and extended theory was validated over a viscosity range of 1-20 mPa·s and a corresponding mass density range of 998-1176 kg/m(3) using reference fluids. Separating sample plugs from the carrier fluid by a two-phase configuration in combination with a microfluidic flow cell, allowed samples of 5 μL to be sequentially measured under continuous flow, opening the method to fast and reliable screening applications. To demonstrate the study of dynamic processes, the viscosity and mass density changes occurring during the free radical polymerization of acrylamide were monitored and compared to published data. Shear-thinning was observed in the viscosity data at higher flexural modes, which vibrate at elevated frequencies. Rheokinetic models allowed the monomer-to-polymer conversion to be tracked in spite of the shear-thinning behavior, and could be applied to study the kinetics of unknown processes.

  10. Slabs and plumes crossing a broad density/viscosity discontinuity in the mid lower mantle (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, G.; Yuen, D. A.; Cammarano, F.

    2010-12-01

    The depth-dependence of the viscosity is not well constrained by observations alone. Non-monotonic viscosity profiles have been often proposed in the past and are in the range of possible solutions. Such viscosity structures find new vigor on the light of recent discoveries of iron-spin transition in mantle minerals and their consequences on seismic interpretation [1] and dynamical evolution of the mantle. Using the recently introduced Multipole-Accelerated Boundary Element Method, we study the entire space of possible models of plumes and slabs crossing a broad region where mantle viscosity and/or density are non-monotonic [2]. The viscosity peak considered are 1, to 100 times then the rest of the mantle, while the density step considered is 0 to 2% different from the adiabatic profile. We identify the critical viscosity and density profiles that produce stalling or penetration of slabs and the continuous or intermittent penetration of plumes through the mid lower mantle. Based on our results, we envisage possible dynamic scenarios that would separate the mantle in two regions,suggesting a long term bifurcation originating, probably, from the spin transition itself. References: [1] Cammarano, F.; Marquardt, H.; Speziale, S.; Tackley, P. J., 2010, Role of iron-spin transition in ferropericlase on seismic interpretation: A broad thermochemical transition in the mid mantle? Geophysical Research Letters, Volume 37, Issue 3, CiteID L03308 [2] G. Morra, D. A. Yuen, L. Boschi, P. Chatelain, P. Koumoutzakos and P. Tackley, 2010, The fate of the slabs interacting with a smooth viscosity discontinuity in the mid lower mantle, Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Volume 180, Issues 3-4, 271-282, doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2010.04.001

  11. Effects of plasma viscosity modulation on cardiac function during moderate hemodilution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatpun Surapong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Previous studies have found that increasing plasma viscosity as whole blood viscosity decrease has beneficial effects in microvascular hemodynamics. As the heart couples with systemic vascular network, changes in plasma and blood viscosity during hemodilution determine vascular pressure drop and flow rate, which influence cardiac function. This study aimed to investigate how changes in plasma viscosity affect on cardiac function during acute isovolemic hemodilution. Materials and Methods: Plasma viscosity was modulated by hemodilution of 40% of blood volume with three different plasma expanders (PEs. Dextran 2000 kDa (Dx2M, 6.3 cP and dextran 70 kDa (Dx70, 3.0 cP were used as high and moderate viscogenic PEs, respectively. Polyethylene glycol conjugated with human serum albumin (PEG-HSA, 2.2 cP was used as low viscogenic PE. The cardiac function was assessed using a miniaturized pressure-volume conductance catheter. Results: After hemodilution, pressure dropped to 84%, 79%, and 78% of baseline for Dx2M, Dx70 and PEG-HSA, respectively. Cardiac output markedly increased for Dx2M and PEG-HSA. Dx2M significantly produced higher stroke work relative to baseline and compared to Dx70. Conclusion: Acute hemodilution with PEG-HSA without increasing plasma viscosity provided beneficial effects on cardiac function compared to Dx70, and similar to those measured with Dx2M. Potentially negative effects of increasing peripheral vascular resistance due to the increase in plasma viscosity were prevented.

  12. Fabrication and Testing of Viscosity Measuring Instrument (Viscometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. HASSAN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the fabrication and testing of a simple and portable viscometer for the measurement of bulk viscosity of different Newtonian fluids. It is aimed at making available the instrument in local markets and consequently reducing or eliminating the prohibitive cost of importation. The method employed is the use of a D.C motor to rotate a disc having holes for infra-red light to pass through and fall on a photo-diode thus undergoing amplification and this signal being translated on a moving-coil meter as a deflection. The motor speed is kept constant but varies with changes in viscosity of the fluid during stirring, which alter signals being read on the meter. The faster is revolution per minute of the disc, the less the deflection on the meter and vise-versa. From the results of tests conducted on various sample fluids using data on standard Newtonian fluids as reliable guide the efficiency of the viscometer was 76.5%.

  13. Density, viscosity and electrical conductivity of protic alkanolammonium ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkert, André; Ang, Keng L; Marsh, Kenneth N; Pang, Shusheng

    2011-03-21

    Ionic liquids are molten salts with melting temperatures below the boiling point of water, and their qualification for applications in potential industrial processes does depend on their fundamental physical properties such as density, viscosity and electrical conductivity. This study aims to investigate the structure-property relationship of 15 ILs that are primarily composed of alkanolammonium cations and organic acid anions. The influence of both the nature and number of alkanol substituents on the cation and the nature of the anion on the densities, viscosities and electrical conductivities at ambient and elevated temperatures are discussed. Walden rule plots are used to estimate the ionic nature of these ionic liquids, and comparison with other studies reveals that most of the investigated ionic liquids show Walden rule values similar to many non-protic ionic liquids containing imidazolium, pyrrolidinium, tetraalkylammonium, or tetraalkylphosphonium cations. Comparison of literature data reveals major disagreements in the reported properties for the investigated ionic liquids. A detailed analysis of the reported experimental procedures suggests that inappropriate drying methods can account for some of the discrepancies. Furthermore, an example for the improved presentation of experimental data in scientific literature is presented.

  14. Microrheometric upconversion-based techniques for intracellular viscosity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sevilla, Paloma; Zhang, Yuhai; de Sousa, Nuno; Marqués, Manuel I.; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco; Jaque, Daniel; Liu, Xiaogang; Haro-González, Patricia

    2017-08-01

    Rheological parameters (viscosity, creep compliance and elasticity) play an important role in cell function and viability. For this reason different strategies have been developed for their study. In this work, two new microrheometric techniques are presented. Both methods take advantage of the analysis of the polarized emission of an upconverting particle to determine its orientation inside the optical trap. Upconverting particles are optical materials that are able to convert infrared radiation into visible light. Their usefulness has been further boosted by the recent demonstration of their three-dimensional control and tracking by single beam infrared optical traps. In this work it is demonstrated that optical torques are responsible of the stable orientation of the upconverting particle inside the trap. Moreover, numerical calculations and experimental data allowed to use the rotation dynamics of the optically trapped upconverting particle for environmental sensing. In particular, the cytoplasm viscosity could be measured by using the rotation time and thermal fluctuations of an intracellular optically trapped upconverting particle, by means of the two previously mentioned microrheometric techniques.

  15. Thermophysical Properties of Liquid Te: Density, Electrical Conductivity, and Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Su, C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Scripa, R. N.; Ban, H.; Lin, B.

    2004-01-01

    The thermophysical properties of liquid Te, namely, density, electrical conductivity, and viscosity, were determined using the pycnometric and transient torque methods from the melting point of Te (723 K) to approximately 1150 K. A maximum was observed in the density of liquid Te as the temperature was increased. The electrical conductivity of liquid Te increased to a constant value of 2.89 x 10(exp 5 OMEGA-1m-1) as the temperature was raised above 1000 K. The viscosity decreased rapidly upon heating the liquid to elevated temperatures. The anomalous behaviors of the measured properties are explained as caused by the structural transitions in the liquid and discussed in terms of Eyring's and Bachiskii's predicted behaviors for homogeneous liquids. The Properties were also measured as a function of time after the liquid was coded from approximately 1173 or 1123 to 823 K. No relaxation phenomena were observed in the properties after the temperature of liquid Te was decreased to 823 K, in contrast to the relaxation behavior observed for some of the Te compounds.

  16. The Vanished Child: An inquiry into figures and their modes of appearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Gervais

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sophie Calle's texts are elaborate devices that facilitate the production of figures, of complex symbolic entities. In fact, her work enables us to better understand how figures emerge and unfold in the imaginary. Thus, we find in her Disparitions (Disappearances, a startling figure, which we can name the "Vanished Child". I will present this figure and explain how it stems from the description of a painting by Rembrandt, stolen at the Gardner Museum in Boston. I will start by identifying some of the essential processes implied in the identification of a figure, and, to do so, I will give two short examples, drawn from Witold Gombrowicz and Don DeLillo. Then, after having described in details the figure of the Vanished Child, I will argue, following the French art historian Georges Didi-Huberman in his reading of Walter Benjamin, that figures are auratic objects. Dans ses textes, Sophie Calle emploie des techniques détaillées qui facilitent la production de figures, d'entités symboliques complexes. Son œuvre nous permet effectivement de mieux comprendre comment les figures émergent et se déploient dans l'imaginaire. Ainsi, nous trouvons dans ses Disparitions (Disappearances une figure surprenante que nous pouvons désigner comme « l'enfant disparu ». Je présenterai cette figure en expliquant comment elle découle de la description d'un tableau de Rembrandt volé au musée Gardner à Boston. J'identifierai d'abord quelques-uns des procédés essentiels à l'identification d'une figure, et pour ce faire je donnerai deux exemples, tirés des œuvres de Witold Gombrowicz et Don DeLillo. Puis je décrirai de façon détaillée la figure de l'enfant disparu, avant de démontrer le caractère auratique des figures à partir de la lecture de Walter Benjamin qu'exécute l'historien de l'art français Georges Didi-Huberman.

  17. Shear viscosity coefficient from microscopic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muronga, Azwinndini

    2004-01-01

    The transport coefficient of shear viscosity is studied for a hadron matter through microscopic transport model, the ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD), using the Green-Kubo formulas. Molecular-dynamical simulations are performed for a system of light mesons in a box with periodic boundary conditions. Starting from an initial state composed of π,η,ω,ρ,φ with a uniform phase-space distribution, the evolution takes place through elastic collisions, production, and annihilation. The system approaches a stationary state of mesons and their resonances, which is characterized by common temperature. After equilibration, thermodynamic quantities such as the energy density, particle density, and pressure are calculated. From such an equilibrated state the shear viscosity coefficient is calculated from the fluctuations of stress tensor around equilibrium using Green-Kubo relations. We do our simulations here at zero net baryon density so that the equilibration times depend on the energy density. We do not include hadron strings as degrees of freedom so as to maintain detailed balance. Hence we do not get the saturation of temperature but this leads to longer equilibration times

  18. Viscosity properties of tellurite-based glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tincher, B.; Massera, J.; Petit, L.; Richardson, K.

    2010-01-01

    The viscosity behavior of glasses with the composition (90-x)TeO 2 -10Bi 2 O 3 -xZnO with x = 15, 17.5, and 20 (TBZ glasses) and 80TeO 2 -(20-y)Na 2 O-yZnO system with y = 0, 5, and 10 (TNZ glasses) have been measured as a function of temperature using a beam-bending (BBV) and a parallel-plate (PPV) viscometer. The structure of the glass' network has been characterized using Raman spectroscopy and has been related to the viscosity temperature behavior and the fragility parameter (m) of the glasses. As the concentration of ZnO in the TBZ system (x) increases, the fragility parameter of the glass increases, whereas it decreases with an increase of the ZnO concentration (y) in the TNZ system. In both glasses, these variations in m have been related to the partial depolymerization of the tellurite network associated with the level of modifier content. The depolymerization of the tellurite network is believed to be the result of a reduction in the number of [TeO 4 ] units and the formation of [TeO 3 ] and [TeO 3+1 ] units that occurs with a change in TeO 2 content in the TBZ system and modifier content in the TNZ system.

  19. Vanishing of the vacuum amplitude of heterotic string compactified on a tensor product of N=2 superconformal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kei Ito.

    1988-07-01

    The vacuum amplitude of heterotic string compactified on a tensor product of nine copies of c=1, N=2 superconformal models is shown to vanish due to a generalized Riemann's theta identity associated with the 12x12 matrix identity t BB=6 2 I 12 , identity B ij =-5(i=j), 1(i≠j). (author). 4 refs

  20. No evidence that polymorphisms of the vanishing white matter disease genes are risk factors in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, J.C.; Scheper, G.C.; Andel, R.J.; van Berkel, C.G.M.; Polman, C.H.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; van der Knaap, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    Febrile infections are known to cause exacerbations in the white matter disorders 'vanishing white matter' (VWM) and multiple sclerosis (MS). We hypothesized that polymorphisms in EIF2B1-5, the genes involved in VWM, might be risk factors for the development of MS or temperature sensitivity in

  1. Acute vanishing bile duct syndrome after therapy with cephalosporin, metronidazole, and clotrimazole: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zonghao; Bao, Lei; Yu, Xiaolan; Zhu, Chuanlong; Xu, Jing; Wang, Yu; Yin, Ming; Li, Yi; Li, Wenting

    2017-09-01

    Vanishing bile duct syndrome (VBDS) consists of a series of diseases characterized by the loss of >50% bile duct in portal areas. Many factors are associated with VBDS including infections, neoplasms, and drugs. Antibiotic is one of the most frequently reported causes of VBDS. A 29-year-old female was admitted because of liver injury for over 3 months. Tests for viruses that can cause hepatitis and autoantibodies were all negative. She was prescribed with antibiotics approximately a week before liver injury while there was no history of alcohol consumption. Liver biopsy demonstrated a loss of intrahepatic bile duct in most of the portal tracts. This patient was treated with ursodeoxycholic acid, polyene phosphatidylcholine, and bicyclol. Most importantly, the treatments in our hospital were proved by the ethics committee of Department of Infectious Disease, Anhui Provincial Hospital. The symptoms were improved. She is still under treatment. VBDS is rare but can be severe. A liver biopsy offers an important evidence for the diagnosis of VBDS, especially for those with a history of susceptible drugs taking.

  2. Grafting and Poisson Structure in (2+1)-Gravity with Vanishing Cosmological Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusburger, C.

    2006-09-01

    We relate the geometrical construction of (2+1)-spacetimes via grafting to phase space and Poisson structure in the Chern-Simons formulation of (2+1)-dimensional gravity with vanishing cosmological constant on manifolds of topology mathbb{R} × S_g, where S g is an orientable two-surface of genus g>1. We show how grafting along simple closed geodesics λ is implemented in the Chern-Simons formalism and derive explicit expressions for its action on the holonomies of general closed curves on S g .We prove that this action is generated via the Poisson bracket by a gauge invariant observable associated to the holonomy of λ. We deduce a symmetry relation between the Poisson brackets of observables associated to the Lorentz and translational components of the holonomies of general closed curves on S g and discuss its physical interpretation. Finally, we relate the action of grafting on the phase space to the action of Dehn twists and show that grafting can be viewed as a Dehn twist with a formal parameter θ satisfying θ2 = 0.

  3. Isospin effects on the system mass dependence of nuclear stopping around the energy of vanishing flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anupriya; Kumar, Suneel

    2014-10-01

    We study the effect of isospin degree of freedom on nuclear stopping throughout the mass range 50 and 350 for two sets of isotopic systems with N/Z ≈ 1.5 and 1.8, as well as isobaric systems with N/Z = 1.0 and 1.4. Analysis is carried out at incident energies below, at, and above the energy of vanishing flow (EVF) using the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. Our findings reveal that nuclear stopping does not show any particular behavior at the EVF. Moreover, system size effects dominate the isospin effects throughout the range of colliding geometry. The Coulomb effects, however, become important at peripheral geometry. The comparative study of the counterbalancing of Coulomb and mean field by removing the nucleon-nucleon collisions and symmetry potential clearly indicates the dominance of nucleon-nucleon cross-section over the Coulomb repulsions. Moreover, the theoretical results presented in this manuscript for the set of reactions can be experimentally verified.

  4. Similarities and differences between infantile and early childhood onset vanishing white matter disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ling; Zhang, Haihua; Chen, Na; Zhang, Zhongbin; Liu, Ming; Dai, Lifang; Wang, Jingmin; Jiang, Yuwu; Wu, Ye

    2018-06-01

    Vanishing white matter disease (VWM) is one of the most prevalent inherited leukoencephalopathies in childhood. Infantile VWM is more severe but less understood than the classic early childhood type. We performed a follow-up study on 14 infantile and 26 childhood patients to delineate the natural history and neuroimaging features of VWM. Infantile and childhood patients shared similarities in the incidence of epileptic seizure (35.7 vs. 38.5%) and episodic aggravation (92.9 vs. 84.6%). Developmental delay before disease onset was more common in infantile patients. Motor disability was earlier and more severe in infantile VWM. In survivors with disease durations of 1-3 years, the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) was classified as IV-V in 66.7% of infantile and only 29.4% of childhood patients. Kaplan-Meier survival curve analysis indicated that the 5-year survival rates were 21.6 and 91.3% in infantile and childhood VWM, respectively. In terms of MRI, infantile patients showed more extensive involvement and earlier rarefaction, with more common involvement of subcortical white matter, internal capsule, brain stem and dentate nuclei of the cerebellum. Restricted diffusion was more diffuse or extensive in infantile patients. In addition, four novel mutations were identified. In conclusion, we identified some similarities and differences in the natural history and neuroimaging features between infantile and early childhood VWM.

  5. Isospin effects on the system mass dependence of nuclear stopping around the energy of vanishing flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Anupriya; Kumar, Suneel

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of isospin degree of freedom on nuclear stopping throughout the mass range 50 and 350 for two sets of isotopic systems with N/Z ≈ 1.5 and 1.8, as well as isobaric systems with N/Z = 1.0 and 1.4. Analysis is carried out at incident energies below, at, and above the energy of vanishing flow (EVF) using the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. Our findings reveal that nuclear stopping does not show any particular behavior at the EVF. Moreover, system size effects dominate the isospin effects throughout the range of colliding geometry. The Coulomb effects, however, become important at peripheral geometry. The comparative study of the counterbalancing of Coulomb and mean field by removing the nucleon–nucleon collisions and symmetry potential clearly indicates the dominance of nucleon–nucleon cross-section over the Coulomb repulsions. Moreover, the theoretical results presented in this manuscript for the set of reactions can be experimentally verified. (paper)

  6. Vanishing of local non-Gaussianity in canonical single field inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Rafael; Mooij, Sander; Palma, Gonzalo A.; Pradenas, Bastián

    2018-05-01

    We study the production of observable primordial local non-Gaussianity in two opposite regimes of canonical single field inflation: attractor (standard single field slow-roll inflation) and non attractor (ultra slow-roll inflation). In the attractor regime, the standard derivation of the bispectrum's squeezed limit using co-moving coordinates gives the well known Maldacena's consistency relation fNL = 5 (1‑ns) / 12. On the other hand, in the non-attractor regime, the squeezed limit offers a substantial violation of this relation given by fNL = 5/2. In this work we argue that, independently of whether inflation is attractor or non-attractor, the size of the observable primordial local non-Gaussianity is predicted to be fNLobs = 0 (a result that was already understood to hold in the case of attractor models). To show this, we follow the use of the so-called Conformal Fermi Coordinates (CFC), recently introduced in the literature. These coordinates parametrize the local environment of inertial observers in a perturbed FRW spacetime, allowing one to identify and compute gauge invariant quantities, such as n-point correlation functions. Concretely, we find that during inflation, after all the modes have exited the horizon, the squeezed limit of the 3-point correlation function of curvature perturbations vanishes in the CFC frame, regardless of the inflationary regime. We argue that such a cancellation should persist after inflation ends.

  7. Body fat and blood rheology: Evaluation of the association between different adiposity indices and blood viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripolino, Cesare; Irace, Concetta; Carallo, Claudio; Scavelli, Faustina Barbara; Gnasso, Agostino

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, new measures of body adiposity have been introduced: lipid accumulation product (LAP), body adiposity index (BAI) and body shape index (ABSI). These indices have been demonstrated to better associate with cardiovascular disease than other measures of adiposity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if LAP or BAI better associate with blood viscosity than other measures of adiposity (body mass index, BMI; waist circumference, WC; waist-to-hip ratio, W/HR; waist-to-height ratio, W/HtR). 344 subjects were recruited for the present investigation. Exclusion criteria were: diabetes, elevated triglycerides, smoking and drug use. Blood lipids and glucose were measured by routine methods. Blood and plasma viscosity were measured by a cone-plate viscometer. Adiposity measures were computed as previously described. In simple correlation analyses, blood viscosity (BV) correlated with BMI, BAI, and LAP in males and with LAP in females. Correlations between plasma viscosity and adiposity indices were weak and not statistically significant. Other variables significantly related with BV were: gender, HDL- and LDL-Cholesterol, and triglycerides (p index is strongly associated to blood viscosity. This result, along with previous evidence, identifies LAP index as a potential cardiovascular risk marker.

  8. The effect of low molecular weight multifunctional additives on heavy oil viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, T.B.P.; Yarranton, H.W.; Larter, S.R. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Crude oils contain many small multifunctional low molecular weight components that act as linking molecules between larger functionalized species. The linkage molecules have a significant impact on the flow properties of hydrocarbon systems. This study investigated the use of a low molecular weight multiheteroatom species (LMWMH) as a molecular Velcro linking high molecular weight components together. LMWMH species were added to Albertan bitumens and heavy oil, and their impact on viscosity was investigated. Results of the experimental studies were then compared with the effects of hydrocarbon solvents on similar samples. The LMWMH species included bifunctional species and analogous alkyl and aryl monoamines that acted as blocking molecules to hinder the association of larger petroleum species. Density and viscosity measurements were conducted. A correlation method was used to predict the viscosity of the solvent-diluted heavy oil and bitumen samples. The study showed that of the tested additives, only aniline demonstrated an additional viscosity-reducing effect. The aniline inhibited asphaltene association and is a promising candidate for enhanced in-situ bitumen viscosity reduction. 23 refs., 4 tabs.

  9. Deep and wide gaps by super Earths in low-viscosity discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Sivan; Sari, Re'em

    2018-06-01

    Planets can open cavities (gaps) in the protoplanetary gaseous discs in which they are born by exerting gravitational torques. Viscosity counters these torques and limits the depletion of the gaps. We present a simple one-dimensional scheme to calculate the gas density profile inside gaps by balancing the gravitational and viscous torques. By generalizing the results of Goodman & Rafikov (2001), our scheme properly accounts for the propagation of angular momentum by density waves. This method allows us to easily study low-viscosity discs, which are challenging for full hydrodynamical simulations. We complement our numerical integration by analytical equations for the gap's steady-state depth and width as a function of the planet's to star's mass ratio μ, the gas disc's aspect ratio h, and its Shakura & Sunyaev viscosity parameter α. Specifically, we focus on low-mass planets (μ < μth ≡ h3) and identify a new low-viscosity regime, α < h(μ/μth)5, in which the classical analytical scaling relations are invalid. Equivalently, this low-viscosity regime applies to every gap that is depleted by more than a factor of (μth/μ)3 relative to the unperturbed density. We show that such gaps are significantly deeper and wider than previously thought, and consequently take a longer time to reach equilibrium.

  10. Viscosity measurement - probably a means for detecting radiation treatment of spices?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heide, L.; Albrich, S.; Boegl, K.W.

    1987-12-01

    The viscosity of 13 different spices and dried vegetables in total was measured. Optimal conditions were first determined for each product, i.e. concentration, pH-value, temperature, particle size and soaking time. For method evaluation, examinations were primarily performed to study the effect of storage, the reproducibility and the influence of the different varieties of the same spice. In supplement, for pepper, the viscosity was measured as a function of radiation dose. In summation, significant changes in the gel forming capability after irradiation could be observed after preliminary experiments in 8 dried spices (ginger, carrots, leek, cloves, pepper, celery, cinnamon and onions). With 3 spices (ginger, pepper and cinnamon) could the results from examining all different varieties of the same spice be substantiated. An additional influence of storage time on viscosity could not be proved during the investigative period of 8 months. Generally seen, there is no possibility of being able to identify an irradiated spice on the basis of viscosity measurements alone, since the difference between the varieties of one and the same spice is considerably great. However, radiation treatment can be reliably excluded with ginger, pepper and cinnamon, if the viscosities are high (10-20 Pa x s). (orig./MG) [de

  11. A neural network model and an update correlation for estimation of dead crude oil viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naseri, A.; Gharesheikhlou, A.A. [Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). PVT Dept.; Yousefi, S.H.; Sanaei, A. [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Faculty of Petroleum Engineering], E-mail: alirezasanaei.aut@gmail.com

    2012-01-15

    Viscosity is one of the most important physical properties in reservoir simulation, formation evaluation, in designing surface facilities and in the calculation of original hydrocarbon in-place. Mostly, oil viscosity is measured in PVT laboratories only at reservoir temperature. Hence, it is of great importance to use an accurate correlation for prediction of oil viscosity at different operating conditions and various temperatures. Although, different correlations have been proposed for various regions, the applicability of the existing correlations for Iranian oil reservoirs is limited due to the nature of the Iranian crude oil. In this study, based on Iranian oil reservoir data, a new correlation for the estimation of dead oil viscosity was provided using non-linear multivariable regression and non-linear optimization methods simultaneously with the optimization of the other existing correlations. This new correlation uses API Gravity and temperature as an input parameter. In addition, a neural-network-based model for prediction of dead oil viscosity is presented. Detailed comparisons show that validity and accuracy of the new correlation and the neural-network model are in good agreement with large data set of Iranian oil reservoir when compared with other correlations. (author)

  12. A MEMS Resonant Sensor to Measure Fluid Density and Viscosity under Flexural and Torsional Vibrating Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libo Zhao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Methods to calculate fluid density and viscosity using a micro-cantilever and based on the resonance principle were put forward. Their measuring mechanisms were analyzed and the theoretical equations to calculate the density and viscosity were deduced. The fluid-solid coupling simulations were completed for the micro-cantilevers with different shapes. The sensing chips with micro-cantilevers were designed based on the simulation results and fabricated using the micro electromechanical systems (MEMS technology. Finally, the MEMS resonant sensor was packaged with the sensing chip to measure the densities and viscosities of eight different fluids under the flexural and torsional vibrating modes separately. The relative errors of the measured densities from 600 kg/m3 to 900 kg/m3 and viscosities from 200 μPa·s to 1000 μPa·s were calculated and analyzed with different microcantilevers under various vibrating modes. The experimental results showed that the effects of the shape and vibrating mode of micro-cantilever on the measurement accuracies of fluid density and viscosity were analyzed in detail.

  13. Experiment and Artificial Neural Network Prediction of Thermal Conductivity and Viscosity for Alumina-Water Nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ningbo; Li, Zhiming

    2017-05-19

    To effectively predict the thermal conductivity and viscosity of alumina (Al₂O₃)-water nanofluids, an artificial neural network (ANN) approach was investigated in the present study. Firstly, using a two-step method, four Al₂O₃-water nanofluids were prepared respectively by dispersing different volume fractions (1.31%, 2.72%, 4.25%, and 5.92%) of nanoparticles with the average diameter of 30 nm. On this basis, the thermal conductivity and viscosity of the above nanofluids were analyzed experimentally under various temperatures ranging from 296 to 313 K. Then a radial basis function (RBF) neural network was constructed to predict the thermal conductivity and viscosity of Al₂O₃-water nanofluids as a function of nanoparticle volume fraction and temperature. The experimental results showed that both nanoparticle volume fraction and temperature could enhance the thermal conductivity of Al₂O₃-water nanofluids. However, the viscosity only depended strongly on Al₂O₃ nanoparticle volume fraction and was increased slightly by changing temperature. In addition, the comparative analysis revealed that the RBF neural network had an excellent ability to predict the thermal conductivity and viscosity of Al₂O₃-water nanofluids with the mean absolute percent errors of 0.5177% and 0.5618%, respectively. This demonstrated that the ANN provided an effective way to predict the thermophysical properties of nanofluids with limited experimental data.

  14. Effect of Polyvinyl Siloxane Viscosity on Accuracy of Dental Implant Impressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ghahremanloo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of dental implant impressions obtained by a combination of different impression techniques and viscosities of polyvinyl siloxane (PVS.Materials and Methods: Four parallel fixtures were placed between mental foramina in a master model of lower dental arch. Three different viscosities (putty/light body, medium body/light body, and monophase: heavy body and direct and indirect techniques (six groups were used, and seven impressions were obtained from each group (n=42. To measure the accuracy of impressions, drift, horizontal, and vertical angles of the implants, as well as the hex rotation of the implants in casts were evaluated using a digitizer device (1μm accuracy, in comparison with master arch. Data were analyzed using five-factor two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test.Results: The accuracy of impressions was assessed and the results showed that direct technique was not significantly different from indirect technique (P>0.05. Also, there were no significant differences between the mentioned viscosities except for the horizontal angle (P=0.006.Conclusions: Viscosity of impression materials is of high significance for the accuracy of dental impressions.Keywords: Dental Materials; Dental Implants; Dental Impression Technique; Viscosity; Vinyl Polysiloxane; Dimensional Measurement Accuracy

  15. Viscosity of glasses containing simulated Savannah River Plant waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1978-08-01

    The viscosity of glass melts containing four simulated sludge types and two frit candidates (Frits 18 and 21) was measured over the temperature range 750 to 1200 0 C. The viscosity of melts made with either frit was reduced by the addition of high iron sludge, unchanged by average sludge, and increased by composite and high aluminum sludge. High aluminium sludge greatly increased the viscosity. Frit 21 (containing 4 wt % Li 2 O substituted for 4 wt % Na 2 O in Frit 18) was clearly better than Frit 18 in terms of its low viscosity. However, further reductions in viscosity are desirable, especially for glasses containing high aluminum sludge. Changing any frit component by 1 wt % did not significantly affect the viscosity of the glasses. Therefore, variability of 1 wt % in any frit component can be tolerated

  16. Viscosity calculations of simulated ion-exchange resin waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cheon Woo; Park, Jong Kil; Lee, Kyung Ho; Lee, Myung Chan; Song, Myung Jae; BRUNELOT, Pierre

    2000-01-01

    An induction cold crucible melter (CCM) located in the NETEC-KEPCO has been used to vitrify simulated ion-exchange resin. During vitrification, the CCM operations were tightly constrained by glass viscosity as an important process parameter. Understanding the role of viscosity and quantifying viscosity is highly required in the determination of optimized feed formulations and in the selection of the processing temperature. Therefore, existing process models of glass viscosity based on a relationship between the glass composition, its structure polymerization, and the temperature were searched and adapted to our borosilicate glass systems. Calculated data using a viscosity model based on calculation of non-bridging oxygen (NBO) were in good agreement with the measured viscosity data of benchmark glasses

  17. Modeling of Viscosity and Thermal Expansion of Bioactive Glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Farid, Saad B. H.

    2012-01-01

    The behaviors of viscosity and thermal expansion for different compositions of bioactive glasses have been studied. The effect of phosphorous pentoxide as a second glass former in addition to silica was investigated. Consequently, the nonlinear behaviors of viscosity and thermal expansion with respect to the oxide composition have been modeled. The modeling uses published data on bioactive glass compositions with viscosity and thermal expansion. -regression optimization technique has been uti...

  18. Viscosity, thermal diffusivity and Prandtl number of nanoparticle suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Buxuan; ZHOU Leping; PENG Xiaofeng

    2004-01-01

    Using our reported experimental data of effective thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity and viscosity for CuO nanoparticle suspensions, the corresponding thermal diffusivity and Prandtl number are calculated. With the hard sphere model and considering effects of particle clustering and surface adsorption, the increase of viscosity for nanoparticle suspension observed is explained. It is shown that the effective thermal conductivity will be strongly affected by the formation and correlated spatial distribution of nanoparticle clusters when compared to viscosity in hosting liquid.

  19. Study of Bovine Serum Albumin Solubility in Aqueous Solutions by Intrinsic Viscosity Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Alberto Masuelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of bovine serum albumin (BSA in water is scarcely studied, and the thermodynamic properties arising from the experimental measurements have not been reported. Intrinsic viscosity measurements are very useful in assessing the interaction between the solute and solvent. This work discussed in a simple determination of the enthalpy of BSA in aqueous solution when the concentration ranges from 0.2 to 36.71% wt. and the temperature from 35 to 40°C. The relationship between the concentration and intrinsic viscosity is determined according to the method of Huggins. The temperature increase reduces the ratio between inherent viscosity and concentration (ηi/c. This is reflected in the Van't Hoff curve. Furthermore, this work proposes hydrodynamic cohesion value as an indicator of the degree of affinity of protein with water and thermodynamic implications in conformational changes.

  20. Friction Theory Prediction of Crude Oil Viscosity at Reservoir Conditions Based on Dead Oil Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisneros, Sergio; Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2003-01-01

    The general one-parameter friction theory (f-theory) models have been further extended to the prediction of the viscosity of real "live" reservoir fluids based on viscosity measurements of the "dead" oil and the compositional information of the live fluid. This work representation of the viscosity...... of real fluids is obtained by a simple one-parameter tuning of a linear equation derived from a general one-parameter f-theory model. Further, this is achieved using simple cubic equations of state (EOS), such as the Peng-Robinson (PR) EOS or the Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) EOS, which are commonly used...... within the oil industry. In sake of completeness, this work also presents a simple characterization procedure which is based on compositional information of an oil sample. This procedure provides a method for characterizing an oil into a number of compound groups along with the critical constants...

  1. Noncontact surface tension and viscosity measurements of rhenium in the liquid and undercooled states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Takehiko; Paradis, Paul-Francois; Yoda, Shinichi

    2004-01-01

    Surface tension and viscosity of liquid rhenium, which have hardly been measured due to the extremely high melting temperature of rhenium, were measured using an electrostatic levitation method combined with the oscillation drop technique. Sample position instability problems caused by the photon pressure of the heating lasers and by sample evaporation were solved by modifying the electrodes design. Good sample stability allowed the measurements of the surface tension and the viscosity over wide temperature ranges including the undercooled states. Over the 2800-3600 K interval, the surface tension of rhenium was measured as σ(T)=2.71x10 3 -0.23(T-T m ), where T m is the melting temperature, 3453 K. At T m , the datum agrees well with the literature values. Similarly, on the same temperature range, the viscosity was determined as η(T)=0.08 exp[1.33x10 5 /(RT)] (mPa s)

  2. Determination of viscosity of fayalite slags for kv model and measurements by means of inclined plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazan, V.; Goni, C.; Castella, L.; Brandaleze, E.; Verdeja, L. F.; Parra, R.

    2006-01-01

    The viscosity of the lands represents one of the most relevant variables of most of the processes metallurgical and kinetics of the refine operations, since it is one of the decisive factors of the efficiency in the reactions between metal and lag, as much as slag-refractory. In the last decades, the mathematical models of different metallurgical processes have established methods to predict viscosity of mixtures of oxides fused to high temperatures in function of the chemical composition. The model developed by Toguri, based on the data reported by Johasen and Winterhager et al has proposed the Kv model. The used index it is similar to the relationship used in the steel industry like the basicity index. It is presented in this work values determined of viscosity in experimental form by means of the technique of inclined plane. (Author)

  3. Computing bulk and shear viscosities from simulations of fluids with dissipative and stochastic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Gerhard, E-mail: jungge@uni-mainz.de; Schmid, Friederike, E-mail: friederike.schmid@uni-mainz.de [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Staudingerweg 9, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2016-05-28

    Exact values for bulk and shear viscosity are important to characterize a fluid, and they are a necessary input for a continuum description. Here we present two novel methods to compute bulk viscosities by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of steady-state systems with periodic boundary conditions — one based on frequent particle displacements and one based on the application of external bulk forces with an inhomogeneous force profile. In equilibrium simulations, viscosities can be determined from the stress tensor fluctuations via Green-Kubo relations; however, the correct incorporation of random and dissipative forces is not obvious. We discuss different expressions proposed in the literature and test them at the example of a dissipative particle dynamics fluid.

  4. Automation of a high-speed imaging setup for differential viscosity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurth, C.; Duane, B.; Whitfield, D.; Smith, S.; Nordquist, A.; Zenhausern, F.

    2013-12-01

    We present the automation of a setup previously used to assess the viscosity of pleural effusion samples and discriminate between transudates and exudates, an important first step in clinical diagnostics. The presented automation includes the design, testing, and characterization of a vacuum-actuated loading station that handles the 2 mm glass spheres used as sensors, as well as the engineering of electronic Printed Circuit Board (PCB) incorporating a microcontroller and their synchronization with a commercial high-speed camera operating at 10 000 fps. The hereby work therefore focuses on the instrumentation-related automation efforts as the general method and clinical application have been reported earlier [Hurth et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 034701 (2011)]. In addition, we validate the performance of the automated setup with the calibration for viscosity measurements using water/glycerol standard solutions and the determination of the viscosity of an "unknown" solution of hydroxyethyl cellulose.

  5. Automation of a high-speed imaging setup for differential viscosity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurth, C.; Duane, B.; Whitfield, D.; Smith, S.; Nordquist, A.; Zenhausern, F. [Center for Applied Nanobioscience and Medicine, The University of Arizona College of Medicine, 425 N 5th Street, Phoenix, Arizona 85004 (United States)

    2013-12-28

    We present the automation of a setup previously used to assess the viscosity of pleural effusion samples and discriminate between transudates and exudates, an important first step in clinical diagnostics. The presented automation includes the design, testing, and characterization of a vacuum-actuated loading station that handles the 2 mm glass spheres used as sensors, as well as the engineering of electronic Printed Circuit Board (PCB) incorporating a microcontroller and their synchronization with a commercial high-speed camera operating at 10 000 fps. The hereby work therefore focuses on the instrumentation-related automation efforts as the general method and clinical application have been reported earlier [Hurth et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 034701 (2011)]. In addition, we validate the performance of the automated setup with the calibration for viscosity measurements using water/glycerol standard solutions and the determination of the viscosity of an “unknown” solution of hydroxyethyl cellulose.

  6. Entropy Viscosity and L1-based Approximations of PDEs: Exploiting Sparsity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-23

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0337 Entropy Viscosity and L1-based Approximations of PDEs: Exploiting Sparsity Jean-Luc Guermond TEXAS A & M UNIVERSITY 750...REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 09-05-2015 2. REPORT TYPE Final report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01-07-2012 - 30-06-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Entropy ...conservation equations can be stabilized by using the so-called entropy viscosity method and we proposed to to investigate this new technique. We

  7. Magnetization-dependent viscosity in brute-force-polarized liquid 3He

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeulen, G.A.; Schuhl, A.; Joffrin, J.

    1988-01-01

    A new method to measure the magnetization dependence of the viscosity in polarized liquid He3 is presented. The magnetization is obtained by "brute-force polarization" at 45 mK in magnetic fields up to 11 T; it is subsequently destroyed by saturation of the NMR signal. Our result, a relative...... increase of the viscosity of (31.5)×10-3 at 3.9% polarization and a pressure of 30 bars, disagrees with a prediction based on the "nearly metamagnetic" model....

  8. Fundamental study on the new method to estimate vibration level on a ship. Formulation of the damping matrix based on dissipation energy caused by fluid viscosity; Senpaku no shindo level suitei ni kansuru kisoteki kenkyu. Ryutai no nensei ni yoru san`itsu energy ni motozuku gensui matrix no teishikika

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funaki, T.; Hayashi, S. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of engineering

    1996-12-31

    It is known in estimating vibration characteristics of a ship that fluid range affects largely a structure. In order to analyze the compound vibration therein, a method was proposed, which estimates vibration levels without using the finite element method. However, the problem of mode decay ratio has not been solved. Therefore, this paper first describes a method to introduce an equivalent linear decay matrix. The paper then mentions difference in the decay effects due to fluid viscosity in a shallow and deep water regions. Furthermore, vibration levels in the deep water region were estimated in a model experiment to verify the estimation result. Under a hypothesis that two-node vibration in a rotating ellipse has displacement distributions in the deep and shallow water regions equivalent, and when a case of vibration in a layer flow condition is calculated, dissipation energy in the shallow region is larger than that in the deep region by about 26%. About 5% of the total dissipation energy is consumed at bottom of the sea. According to a frequency response calculation, estimated values for the response levels still differ from experimental values, although the trend that the vibration levels change can be reproduced. 6 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Fundamental study on the new method to estimate vibration level on a ship. Formulation of the damping matrix based on dissipation energy caused by fluid viscosity; Senpaku no shindo level suitei ni kansuru kisoteki kenkyu. Ryutai no nensei ni yoru san`itsu energy ni motozuku gensui matrix no teishikika

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funaki, T; Hayashi, S [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of engineering

    1997-12-31

    It is known in estimating vibration characteristics of a ship that fluid range affects largely a structure. In order to analyze the compound vibration therein, a method was proposed, which estimates vibration levels without using the finite element method. However, the problem of mode decay ratio has not been solved. Therefore, this paper first describes a method to introduce an equivalent linear decay matrix. The paper then mentions difference in the decay effects due to fluid viscosity in a shallow and deep water regions. Furthermore, vibration levels in the deep water region were estimated in a model experiment to verify the estimation result. Under a hypothesis that two-node vibration in a rotating ellipse has displacement distributions in the deep and shallow water regions equivalent, and when a case of vibration in a layer flow condition is calculated, dissipation energy in the shallow region is larger than that in the deep region by about 26%. About 5% of the total dissipation energy is consumed at bottom of the sea. According to a frequency response calculation, estimated values for the response levels still differ from experimental values, although the trend that the vibration levels change can be reproduced. 6 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Viscosity of Heterogeneous Silicate Melts: A Non-Newtonian Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuangzhuang; Blanpain, Bart; Guo, Muxing

    2017-12-01

    The recently published viscosity data of heterogeneous silicate melts with well-documented structure and experimental conditions are critically re-analyzed and tabulated. By using these data, a non-Newtonian viscosity model incorporating solid fraction, solid shape, and shear rate is proposed on the basis of the power-law equation. This model allows calculating the viscosity of the heterogeneous silicate melts with solid fraction up to 34 vol pct. The error between the calculated and measured data is evaluated to be 32 pct, which is acceptable considering the large error in viscosity measurement of the completely liquid silicate melt.

  11. In situ viscosity of oil sands using low field NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, J.; Moon, D.; Kantzas, A.

    2005-01-01

    In heavy oil and bitumen reservoirs, oil viscosity is a vital piece of information that will have great bearing on the chosen EOR scheme and the recovery expected. Prediction of in situ viscosity with a logging tool would he very beneficial in reservoir characterization and exploitation design. Low field NMR is a technology that has shown great potential as a tool for characterizing hydrocarbon properties in heavy oil and bitumen reservoirs. An oil viscosity correlation has previously been developed that is capable of providing order of magnitude viscosity estimates for a wide range of oils taken from various fields in Alberta. This paper presents tuning procedures to improve the NMR predictions for different viscosity ranges, and extends the NMR viscosity model to in situ heavy oil in unconsolidated sands. The results of this work show that the NMR oil peak can be de-convoluted from the in situ signals of the oil and water, and the bulk viscosity correlation that was developed for bulk oils can he applied to predict the in situ oil viscosity. These results can be translated to an NMR logging tool algorithm, allowing for in situ measurements of oil viscosity at the proper reservoir conditions. (author)

  12. Determination of viscosity in recirculating fluidized bed using radioactive tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, G.G. da.

    1986-01-01

    The use of radioactive tracer for measuring viscosity is proposed. The methodology relates the terminal velocity of a radioactive sphere in interior of fluid with the viscosity, which can be a fluidized bed or total flow of solids. The arrangement is composed by two γ detectors placed externally and along the bed. Both detectors are coupled by amplifier to electronic clock. The drop time of sphere between two detectors is measured. The bed viscosity two detectors is measured. The bed viscosity is calculated from mathematical correlations of terminal velocity of the sphere. (M.C.K.)

  13. On bulk viscosity and moduli decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laine, Mikko

    2010-01-01

    This pedagogically intended lecture, one of four under the header 'Basics of thermal QCD', reviews an interesting relationship, originally pointed out by Boedeker, that exists between the bulk viscosity of Yang-Mills theory (of possible relevance to the hydrodynamics of heavy ion collision experiments) and the decay rate of scalar fields coupled very weakly to a heat bath (appearing in some particle physics inspired cosmological scenarios). This topic serves, furthermore, as a platform on which a number of generic thermal field theory concepts are illustrated. The other three lectures (on the QCD equation of state and the rates of elastic as well as inelastic processes experienced by heavy quarks) are recapitulated in brief encyclopedic form. (author)

  14. Sensor for viscosity and shear strength measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Dillion, J.; Moore, J.; Jones, K.

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. Two different viscometer techniques are being investigated in this study, based on: magnetostrictive pulse generated acoustic waves; and an oscillating cylinder. Prototype sensors have been built and tested which are based on both techniques. A base capability instrumentation system has been designed, constructed, and tested which incorporates both of these sensors. It requires manual data acquisition and off-line calculation. A broad range of viscous media has been tested using this system. Extensive test results appear in this report. The concept for each technique has been validated by these test results. This base capability system will need to be refined further before it is appropriate for field tests. The mass of the oscillating system structure will need to be reduced. A robust acoustic probe assembly will need to be developed. In addition, in March 1997 it was made known for the first time that the requirement was for a deliverable automated viscosity instrumentation system. Since then such a system has been designed, and the hardware has been constructed so that the automated concept can be proved. The rest of the hardware, which interfaced to a computer, has also been constructed and tested as far as possible. However, for both techniques the computer software for automated data acquisition, calculation, and logging had not been completed before funding and time ran out.

  15. The peak in anomalous magnetic viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collocott, S.J.; Watterson, P.A.; Tan, X.H.; Xu, H.

    2014-01-01

    Anomalous magnetic viscosity, where the magnetization as a function of time exhibits non-monotonic behaviour, being seen to increase, reach a peak, and then decrease, is observed on recoil lines in bulk amorphous ferromagnets, for certain magnetic prehistories. A simple geometrical approach based on the motion of the state line on the Preisach plane gives a theoretical framework for interpreting non-monotonic behaviour and explains the origin of the peak. This approach gives an expression for the time taken to reach the peak as a function of the applied (or holding) field. The theory is applied to experimental data for bulk amorphous ferromagnet alloys of composition Nd 60−x Fe 30 Al 10 Dy x , x = 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4, and it gives a reasonable description of the observed behaviour. The role played by other key magnetic parameters, such as the intrinsic coercivity and fluctuation field, is also discussed. When the non-monotonic behaviour of the magnetization of a number of alloys is viewed in the context of the model, features of universal behaviour emerge, that are independent of alloy composition. - Highlights: • Development of a simple geometrical model based on the Preisach model which gives a complete explanation of the peak in the magnetic viscosity. • Geometrical approach is extended by considering equations that govern the motion of the state line. • The model is used to deduce the relationship between the holding field and the time it takes to reach the peak. • The model is tested with experimental results for a range of Nd–Fe–Al–Dy bulk amorphous ferromagnets. • There is good agreement between the model and the experimental data

  16. Application of the model of micro inhomogeneous structure of liquid metals to calculation of their viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilin, I.V.; Ershov, G.S.

    1979-01-01

    A method was developed for calculating the dynamic viscosity coefficient of liquid metals based on the assumption of the microinhomogeneity of their structure. The functions eta=f(T) were calculated accordingly using computers both for the refractory (Fe, Ni, Co, Cu) and the readily melting (Al, An, Cd) metals. The experimental and the calculated values eta=f(T) agreed satisfactorily

  17. Solubility of carbon dioxide in the low-viscosity ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tetracyanoborate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mota Martinez, M.T.; Althuluth, M.A.M.; Kroon, M.C.; Peters, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    The solubility of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a new low-viscosity and non-fluorinated ionic liquid, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tetracyanoborate ([hmim][TCB]), has been studied experimentally using a synthetic method. Bubble point pressures (up to 12.34 MPa) of the system CO2 + [hmim][TCB] are reported

  18. The determination of the pressure-viscosity coefficient of two traction oils using film thickness measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van H.J.

    2010-01-01

    The pressure-viscosity coefficients of two commercial traction fluids are determined by fitting calculation results on accurate film thickness measurements, obtained at a wide range of speeds, and different temperatures. Film thickness values are calculated using a numerical method and approximation

  19. Viscosity bound violation in holographic solids and the viscoelastic response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberte, Lasma [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP),Strada Costiera 11, 34151, Trieste (Italy); Baggioli, Matteo [Institut de Física d’Altes Energies (IFAE),The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST),Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Physics, Institute for Condensed Matter Theory, University of Illinois,1110 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Pujolàs, Oriol [Institut de Física d’Altes Energies (IFAE),The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST),Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-07-14

    We argue that the Kovtun-Son-Starinets (KSS) lower bound on the viscosity to entropy density ratio holds in fluid systems but is violated in solid materials with a non-zero shear elastic modulus. We construct explicit examples of this by applying the standard gauge/gravity duality methods to massive gravity and show that the KSS bound is clearly violated in black brane solutions whenever the massive gravity theories are of solid type. We argue that the physical reason for the bound violation relies on the viscoelastic nature of the mechanical response in these materials. We speculate on whether any real-world materials can violate the bound and discuss a possible generalization of the bound that involves the ratio of the shear elastic modulus to the pressure.

  20. Viscosity bound violation in holographic solids and the viscoelastic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberte, Lasma; Baggioli, Matteo; Pujolàs, Oriol

    2016-01-01

    We argue that the Kovtun-Son-Starinets (KSS) lower bound on the viscosity to entropy density ratio holds in fluid systems but is violated in solid materials with a non-zero shear elastic modulus. We construct explicit examples of this by applying the standard gauge/gravity duality methods to massive gravity and show that the KSS bound is clearly violated in black brane solutions whenever the massive gravity theories are of solid type. We argue that the physical reason for the bound violation relies on the viscoelastic nature of the mechanical response in these materials. We speculate on whether any real-world materials can violate the bound and discuss a possible generalization of the bound that involves the ratio of the shear elastic modulus to the pressure.

  1. Electrical conductivity and viscosity of borosilicate glasses and melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrt, Doris; Keding, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    , 0 to 62·5 mol% B2O3, and 25 to 85 mol% SiO2. The glass samples were characterised by different methods. Refractive indices, density and thermal expansion were measured. Phase separation effects were investigated by electron microscopy. The electrical conductivity of glasses and melts were determined......Simple sodium borosilicate and silicate glasses were melted on a very large scale (35 l Pt crucible) to prepare model glasses of optical quality in order to investigate various properties depending on their structure. The composition of the glass samples varied in a wide range: 3 to 33·3 mol% Na2O...... by impedance measurements in a wide temperature range (250 to 1450°C). The activation energies were calculated by Arrhenius plots in various temperature regions: below the glass transition temperature, Tg, above the melting point, Tl, and between Tg and Tl. Viscosity measurements were carried out...

  2. Turbulence closure: turbulence, waves and the wave-turbulence transition – Part 1: Vanishing mean shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Z. Baumert

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends a turbulence closure-like model for stably stratified flows into a new dynamic domain in which turbulence is generated by internal gravity waves rather than mean shear. The model turbulent kinetic energy (TKE, K balance, its first equation, incorporates a term for the energy transfer from internal waves to turbulence. This energy source is in addition to the traditional shear production. The second variable of the new two-equation model is the turbulent enstrophy (Ω. Compared to the traditional shear-only case, the Ω-equation is modified to account for the effect of the waves on the turbulence time and space scales. This modification is based on the assumption of a non-zero constant flux Richardson number in the limit of vanishing mean shear when turbulence is produced exclusively by internal waves. This paper is part 1 of a continuing theoretical development. It accounts for mean shear- and internal wave-driven mixing only in the two limits of mean shear and no waves and waves but no mean shear, respectively.

    The new model reproduces the wave-turbulence transition analyzed by D'Asaro and Lien (2000b. At small energy density E of the internal wave field, the turbulent dissipation rate (ε scales like ε~E2. This is what is observed in the deep sea. With increasing E, after the wave-turbulence transition has been passed, the scaling changes to ε~E1. This is observed, for example, in the highly energetic tidal flow near a sill in Knight Inlet. The new model further exhibits a turbulent length scale proportional to the Ozmidov scale, as observed in the ocean, and predicts the ratio between the turbulent Thorpe and Ozmidov length scales well within the range observed in the ocean.

  3. Understanding the Viscosity of Liquids used in Infant Dysphagia Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Jackie; Chestnut, Amanda; Jackson, Arwen; Barbon, Carly E. A.; Steele, Catriona M.; Pickler, Laura

    2016-01-01

    When assessing swallowing in infants, it is critical to have confidence that the liquids presented during the swallow study closely replicate the viscosity of liquids in the infant's typical diet. However, we lack research on rheological properties of frequently used infant formulas or breastmilk, and various forms of barium contrast media used in swallow studies. The aim of the current study was to provide objective viscosity measurements for typical infant liquid diet options and barium contrast media. A TA-Instruments AR2000 Advanced Rheometer was used to measure the viscosity, five standard infant formulas, three barium products and two breastmilk samples. Additionally, this study measured the viscosity of infant formulas and breastmilk when mixed with powdered barium contrast in a 20% weight-to-volume (w/v) concentration. Study findings determined that standard infant formulas and the two breastmilk samples had low viscosities, at the lower end of the National Dysphagia Diet (NDD) thin liquid range. Two specialty formulas tested had much thicker viscosities, close to the NDD nectar-thick liquid range lower boundary. The study showed differences in viscosity between two 60% w/v barium products (Liquid E-Z-Paque® and E-Z-Paque® powder); the powdered product had a much lower viscosity, despite identical barium concentration. When E-Z-Paque® powdered barium was mixed in a 20% w/v concentration using water, standard infant formulas or breastmilk, the resulting viscosities were at the lower end of the NDD thin range, and only slightly thicker than the non-barium comparator liquids. When E-Z-Paque® powdered barium was mixed in a 20% w/v concentration with the two thicker specialty formulas (Enfamil AR 20kcal and 24 kcal), unexpected alterations in their original viscosity occurred. These findings highlight the clinical importance of objective measures of viscosity as well as objective data on how infant formulas or breastmilk may change in consistency when mixed

  4. Whole-blood viscosity and the insulin-resistance syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høieggen, A; Fossum, E; Moan, A; Enger, E; Kjeldsen, S E

    1998-02-01

    In a previous study we found that elevated blood viscosity was linked to the insulin resistance syndrome, and we proposed that high blood viscosity may increase insulin resistance. That study was based on calculated viscosity. To determine whether directly measured whole-blood viscosity was related to the insulin-resistance syndrome in the same way as calculated viscosity had been found to be. Healthy young men were examined with the hyperinsulinemic isoglycemic glucose clamp technique, and we related insulin sensitivity (glucose disposal rate) to other metabolic parameters and to blood viscosity. We established a technique for direct measurement of whole-blood viscosity. There were statistically significant negative correlations between glucose disposal rate and whole-blood viscosity at low and high shear rates (r = -0.41, P = 0.007 for both, n = 42). Whole-blood viscosity was correlated positively (n = 15) to serum triglyceride (r = 0.54, P = 0.04) and total cholesterol (r = 0.52, P = 0.05), and negatively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = -0.53, P = 0.04) concentrations. Insulin sensitivity index was correlated positively to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = 0.54, P = 0.04) and negatively to serum triglyceride (r = -0.69, P = 0.005) and to total cholesterol (r = -0.81, P = 0.0003) concentrations. The present results demonstrate for the first time that there is a negative relationship between directly measured whole-blood viscosity and insulin sensitivity as a part of the insulin-resistance syndrome. Whole-blood viscosity contributes to the total peripheral resistance, and these results support the hypothesis that insulin resistance has a hemodynamic basis.

  5. Measurement and calculation of the viscosity of metals—a review of the current status and developing trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, J; Hort, N; Kainer, K U; Gröbner, J; Schmid-Fetzer, R

    2014-01-01

    Viscosity is an important rheological property of metals in casting because it controls the rate of transport of liquid metals, which may lead to casting defects such as hot tearing and porosity. The measurement methods and numerical models of the viscosity of liquid and semi-solid state metals that have been published to date are reviewed in this paper. Most experimental measurements have been performed with rotational and oscillatory viscometers, which offer advantages at low viscosities in particular. Besides these two traditional methods for measuring viscosities, a couple of studies also introduced the technique of isothermal compression for alloys in the semi-solid state, and even an optical basicity method for the viscosity of slags. As to numerical models, most published results show that the viscosity of liquid and semi-solid state metals can be described by the Arrhenius, Andrade, Kaptay or Budai–Bemkő–Kaptay equations. In addition, there are some alternative models, such as the power model and the isothermal stress–strain model. (topical review)

  6. Electroosmotic flow in capillary channels filled with nonconstant viscosity electrolytes: exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otevrel, Marek; Klepárník, Karel

    2002-10-01

    The partial differential equation describing unsteady velocity profile of electroosmotic flow (EOF) in a cylindrical capillary filled with a nonconstant viscosity electrolyte was derived. Analytical solution, based on the general Navier-Stokes equation, was found for constant viscosity electrolytes using the separation of variables (Fourier method). For the case of a nonconstant viscosity electrolyte, the steady-state velocity profile was calculated assuming that the viscosity decreases exponentially in the direction from the wall to the capillary center. Since the respective equations with nonconstant viscosity term are not solvable in general, the method of continuous binding conditions was used to solve this problem. In this method, an arbitrary viscosity profile can be modeled. The theoretical conclusions show that the relaxation times at which an EOF approaches the steady state are too short to have an impact on a separation process in any real systems. A viscous layer at the wall affects EOF significantly, if it is thicker than the Debye length of the electric double layer. The presented description of the EOF dynamics is applicable to any microfluidic systems.

  7. The determination of the pressure viscosity coefficient of a lubricant through an accurate film thickness formula and accurate film thickness measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van H.J.

    2009-01-01

    The pressure viscosity coefficient is an indispensable property in the EHD lubrication of hard contacts, but often not known. A guess will easily lead to enormous errors in the film thickness. This paper describes a method to deduct this coefficient by adapting the value of the pressure viscosity

  8. Green-Kubo relations for the viscosity of biaxial nematic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarman, Sten

    1996-09-01

    We derive Green-Kubo relations for the viscosities of a biaxial nematic liquid crystal. In this system there are seven shear viscosities, three twist viscosities, and three cross coupling coefficients between the antisymmetric strain rate and the symmetric traceless pressure tensor. According to the Onsager reciprocity relations these couplings are equal to the cross couplings between the symmetric traceless strain rate and the antisymmetric pressure. Our method is based on a comparison of the microscopic linear response generated by the SLLOD equations of motion for planar Couette flow (so named because of their close connection to the Doll's tensor Hamiltonian) and the macroscopic linear phenomenological relations between the pressure tensor and the strain rate. In order to obtain simple Green-Kubo relations we employ an equilibrium ensemble where the angular velocities of the directors are identically zero. This is achieved by adding constraint torques to the equations for the molecular angular accelerations. One finds that all the viscosity coefficients can be expressed as linear combinations of time correlation function integrals (TCFIs). This is much simpler compared to the expressions in the conventional canonical ensemble, where the viscosities are complicated rational functions of the TCFIs. The reason for this is, that in the constrained angular velocity ensemble, the thermodynamic forces are given external parameters whereas the thermodynamic fluxes are ensemble averages of phase functions. This is not the case in the canonical ensemble. The simplest way of obtaining numerical estimates of viscosity coefficients of a particular molecular model system is to evaluate these fluctuation relations by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

  9. Viscosity of HI-I2-H2O solution at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Songzhe; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Laijun; Xu, Jingming; Gao, Mengxue

    2014-01-01

    Iodine-Sulfur thermochemical cycle (IS-cycle) is one of the most promising massive hydrogen production methods. Basic properties data of the HI-I 2 -H 2 O solution involved in the HI decomposition section of IS-cycle are found to be very important. HI, I 2 , and H 2 O make up a highly non-ideal solution system. Viscosity and its variation with the composition/temperature are very essential for the flowsheet work and HI-H 2 O-I 2 solution’s fluid simulation, especially in the distillation and electro-electrodialysis processes. In this paper, viscosity values of HI-H 2 O-I 2 solutions were measured at atmospheric pressure and varying temperatures (from 20 to 125 ºC). As for the composition, the HI/H2O molar ratio of the samples ranged from 1:5.36 to 1:12.00, while the HI/I 2 molar ratio from 1.0 to 1.4.0. Both temperature and composition have dramatic influence on the viscosity. Increasing temperature or H 2 O/HI molar ratio will lead to the reduction of viscosity; while increasing of I 2 /HI molar ratio results in the increase of viscosity. It was also found that I 2 content has a larger and more complex influence on the viscosity of the HI-H 2 O-I 2 solution than H 2 O content does, especially at low temperature (<50 °C). (author)

  10. Heritability and Seasonal Changes in Viscosity of Slash Pine Oleoresin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert D. McReynolds

    1971-01-01

    Oleoresin viscosity was measured in slash pine (Pinus elliottii var. elliottii) trees of known genetic origin over a 1-year period. A strong broad-sense heritability of this trait was found. Seasonal variation followed a definite pattern, with the highest viscosities occurring in early spring and a gradual decline occurring in...

  11. Viscosity of low-temperature substances at pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudenko, N.S.; Slyusar', V.P.

    1976-01-01

    The review presents an analysis of data available on the viscosity coefficients of hydrogen, deuterohydrogen, deuterium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon, nitrogen and methane under pressure in the temperature range from triple points to 300 deg K. Averaged values of viscosity coefficients for all the substances listed above versus temperature, pressure and density are tabulated

  12. Elongational viscosity of monodisperse and bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The start-up and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for two monodisperse polystyrene melts with molecular weights of 52 and 103 kg/mole, and for three bidisperse polystyrene melts. The monodisperse melts show a maximum in the steady elongational viscosity vs. the elongational...

  13. On-line measurement of food viscosity during flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mason, Sarah Louise; Friis, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Sarah L. Mason and Alan Friis discuss some of the principles and equipment used to monitor food viscosity in real time.......Sarah L. Mason and Alan Friis discuss some of the principles and equipment used to monitor food viscosity in real time....

  14. A Riemann problem with small viscosity and dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayyunnapara Thomas Joseph

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we prove existence of global solutions to a hyperbolic system in elastodynamics, with small viscosity and dispersion terms and derive estimates uniform in the viscosity-dispersion parameters. By passing to the limit, we prove the existence of solution the Riemann problem for the hyperbolic system with arbitrary Riemann data.

  15. Nonlinear Eddy Viscosity Models applied to Wind Turbine Wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laan, van der, Paul Maarten; Sørensen, Niels N.; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan

    2013-01-01

    The linear k−ε eddy viscosity model and modified versions of two existing nonlinear eddy viscosity models are applied to single wind turbine wake simulations using a Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes code. Results are compared with field wake measurements. The nonlinear models give better results...

  16. Viscosity Prediction of Hydrocarbon Mixtures Based on the Friction Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Cisneros, Sergio; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2001-01-01

    The application and capability of the friction theory (f-theory) for viscosity predictions of hydrocarbon fluids is further illustrated by predicting the viscosity of binary and ternary liquid mixtures composed of n-alkanes ranging from n-pentane to n-decane for wide ranges of temperature and from...

  17. Fluctuation expressions for fast thermal transport processes: Vortex viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.J.; Hanley, H.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    The vortex viscosity of a model diatomic fluid is calculated using both equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics. The two calculations agree within statistical uncertainties. The results show that vortex viscosity does not have a conventional Kubo-Green relation. An argument as to why this is so is presented

  18. Modified enthalpy method for the simulation of melting and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These include the implicit time stepping method of Voller & Cross. (1981), explicit enthalpy method of Tacke (1985), centroidal temperature correction method ... In variable viscosity method, viscosity is written as a function of liquid fraction.

  19. Angiomatosis of bone and soft tissue: A spectrum of disease from diffuse lymphangiomatosis to vanishing bone disease in young patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aviv, R.I.; McHugh, K.; Hunt, J.

    2001-01-01

    The application of cross-sectional imaging in the investigation of patients with angiomatosis reveals that lymphangiomatosis and vanishing bone disease should not be considered as separate entities, but rather as a spectrum of disease. We present a pictorial review of eight patients demonstrating the manifestations of soft tissue and bony involvement. We highlight a subgroup of patients with chyloid pleural effusions who have a poor prognosis. Aviv, R. I. et al. (2001)

  20. Bulk viscosity of spin-one color superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa' d, Basil A.

    2009-08-27

    The bulk viscosity of several quark matter phases is calculated. It is found that the effect of color superconductivity is not trivial, it may suppress, or enhance the bulk viscosity depending on the critical temperature and the temperature at which the bulk viscosity is calculated. Also, is it found that the effect of neutrino-emitting Urca processes cannot be neglected in the consideration of the bulk viscosity of strange quark matter. The results for the bulk viscosity of strange quark matter are used to calculate the r-mode instability window of quark stars with several possible phases. It is shown that each possible phase has a different structure for the r-mode instability window. (orig.)

  1. Viscosity of melts in the sodium borosilicate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tait, J.C.; Mandolesi, D.L.; Rummens, H.E.C.

    1984-01-01

    The viscosities of a series of glasses in the sodium borosilicate system (5-35Na 2 O, 5-35B 2 O 3 , 45-80SiO 2 mol%) have been determined between 950 and 1500 deg C, using a rotating bob viscometer. A simplex lattice experimental design was used to define a series of compositions suitable for numerical analysis of the data. The viscosity data were fitted using the Fulcher equation for each composition. Nonlinear regression analysis of the viscosities at constant temperatures gave expressions for the variation in viscosity as a function of composition. The results are displayed as isoviscosity contours on the Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -SiO 2 composition diagram. The viscosity behaviour as a function of composition is discussed in terms of structural bonding in the melt. (author)

  2. Temperature dependence of bulk viscosity in water using acoustic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, M J; Parker, N G; Povey, M J W

    2011-01-01

    Despite its fundamental role in the dynamics of compressible fluids, bulk viscosity has received little experimental attention and there remains a paucity of measured data. Acoustic spectroscopy provides a robust and accurate approach to measuring this parameter. Working from the Navier-Stokes model of a compressible fluid one can show that the bulk viscosity makes a significant and measurable contribution to the frequency-squared acoustic attenuation. Here we employ this methodology to determine the bulk viscosity of Millipore water over a temperature range of 7 to 50 0 C. The measured attenuation spectra are consistent with the theoretical predictions, while the bulk viscosity of water is found to be approximately three times larger than its shear counterpart, reinforcing its significance in acoustic propagation. Moreover, our results demonstrate that this technique can be readily and generally applied to fluids to accurately determine their temperature dependent bulk viscosities.

  3. Viscosity Prediction of Natural Gas Using the Friction Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Cisneros, Sergio; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2002-01-01

    Based on the concepts of the friction theory (f-theory) for viscosity modeling, a procedure is introduced for predicting the viscosity of hydrocarbon mixtures rich in one component, which is the case for natural gases. In this procedure, the mixture friction coefficients are estimated with mixing...... rules based on the values of the pure component friction coefficients. Since natural gases contain mainly methane, two f-theory models are combined, where the friction coefficients of methane are estimated by a seven-constant f-theory model directly fitted to methane viscosities, and the friction...... coefficients of the other components are estimated by the one-parameter general f-theory model. The viscosity predictions are performed with the SRK, the PR, and the PRSV equations of state, respectively. For recently measured viscosities of natural gases, the resultant AAD (0.5 to 0.8%) is in excellent...

  4. Bulk viscosity of spin-one color superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sa'd, Basil A.

    2009-01-01

    The bulk viscosity of several quark matter phases is calculated. It is found that the effect of color superconductivity is not trivial, it may suppress, or enhance the bulk viscosity depending on the critical temperature and the temperature at which the bulk viscosity is calculated. Also, is it found that the effect of neutrino-emitting Urca processes cannot be neglected in the consideration of the bulk viscosity of strange quark matter. The results for the bulk viscosity of strange quark matter are used to calculate the r-mode instability window of quark stars with several possible phases. It is shown that each possible phase has a different structure for the r-mode instability window. (orig.)

  5. Crustal Viscosity Structure Estimated from Multi-Phase Mixing Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinevar, W. J.; Behn, M. D.; Hirth, G.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of lower crustal viscosity are typically constrained by analyses of isostatic rebound, post seismic creep, and laboratory-derived flow laws for crustal rocks and minerals. Here we follow a new approach for calculating the viscosity structure of the lower continental crust. We use Perple_X to calculate mineral assemblages for different crustal compositions. Effective viscosity is then calculated using the rheologic mixing model of Huet et al. (2014) incorporating flow laws for each mineral phase. Calculations are performed along geotherms appropriate for the Basin and Range, Tibetan Plateau, Colorado Plateau, and the San Andreas Fault. To assess the role of crustal composition on viscosity, we examined two compositional gradients extending from an upper crust with ~67 wt% SiO2 to a lower crust that is either: (i) basaltic with ~53 wt% SiO2 (Rudnick and Gao, 2003), or (ii) andesitic with ~64% SiO2 (Hacker et al., 2011). In all cases, the middle continental crust has a viscosity that is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than that inferred for wet quartz, a common proxy for mid-crustal viscosities. An andesitic lower crust results in viscosities of 1020-1021 Pa-s and 1021-1022 Pa-s for hotter and colder crustal geotherms, respectively. A mafic lower crust predicts viscosities that are an order of magnitude higher for the same geotherm. In all cases, the viscosity calculated from the mixing model decreases less with depth compared to single-phase estimates. Lastly, for anhydrous conditions in which alpha quartz is stable, we find that there is a strong correlation between Vp/Vs and bulk viscosity; in contrast, little to no correlation exists for hydrous conditions.

  6. Effect of Water Glass Modification on Its Viscosity and Wettability of Quartz Grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kmita A.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to develop a modifier for water glass. The method of thermal generation of metal oxide nanoparticles was adapted and used in the research. Nanoparticles of ZnO from the thermal decomposition of basic zinc carbonate were used. A method for the modifier introduction was developed, and the effect of modifier content and organic solvent type on the physico-chemical properties of binder (viscosity and quartz wettability was determined. Binder viscosity was examined from the flow curves plotted with the help of a RHEOTEST 2 rotational rheometer equipped with proper software. Quartz wettability was determined examining timerelated changes in the value of the contact angle in a quartz-binder system, until full stabilisation of the angle value has been achieved. Binder modification was carried out on sodium water glass designated as R"145". The water glass modifiers were suspensions of ZnO nanoparticles in propanol and methanol at a fixed concentration of c = 0.3 M and with the size of nanoparticles comprised in a range of . Water glass modification with the suspensions of ZnO nanoparticles in methanol and propanol showed the effect of modifier on the water glass viscosity and quartz wettability. This effect depends on the type of alcohol used. The ZnO suspension in propanol (alcohol with a longer hydrocarbon chain affects more strongly the viscosity of binder and quartz wettability than the methanol suspension

  7. Wave anisotropy of shear viscosity and elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Sarvazyan, A. P.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents the theory of shear wave propagation in a "soft solid" material possessing anisotropy of elastic and dissipative properties. The theory is developed mainly for understanding the nature of the low-frequency acoustic characteristics of skeletal muscles, which carry important diagnostic information on the functional state of muscles and their pathologies. It is shown that the shear elasticity of muscles is determined by two independent moduli. The dissipative properties are determined by the fourth-rank viscosity tensor, which also has two independent components. The propagation velocity and attenuation of shear waves in muscle depend on the relative orientation of three vectors: the wave vector, the polarization vector, and the direction of muscle fiber. For one of the many experiments where attention was distinctly focused on the vector character of the wave process, it was possible to make a comparison with the theory, estimate the elasticity moduli, and obtain agreement with the angular dependence of the wave propagation velocity predicted by the theory.

  8. Effect of ionic and non-ionic contrast media on whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity and hematocrit in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspelin, P.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of the ionic contrast media diatrizoate, iocarmate and metrizoate and the non-ionic metrizamide on whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity and hematocrit was investigated. All the contrast media increased whole blood and plasma viscosity and reduced the hematocrit. The whole blood viscosity increased with increasing osmolality of the contrast medium solutions, whereas the plasma viscosity increased with increasing viscosity of the contrast medium solutions. The higher the osmolality of the contrast media, the lower the hematocrit became. The normal shear-thinning (decreasing viscosity with increasing shear rate) property of blood was reduced when contrast medium was added to the blood. At 50 per cent volume ratio (contrast medium to blood), the ionic contrast media converted the blood into a shear-thickening (increasing viscosity with increasing shear rate) suspension, indicating a marked rigidification of the single red cell, while the non-ionic contrast medium still produced shear-thinning, indicating less rigidification of the red cell (p<0.01). (Auth.)

  9. Magma viscosity estimation based on analysis of erupted products. Potential assessment for large-scale pyroclastic eruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Shingo

    2010-01-01

    After the formulation of guidelines for volcanic hazards in site evaluation for nuclear installations (e.g. JEAG4625-2009), it is required to establish appropriate methods to assess potential of large-scale pyroclastic eruptions at long-dormant volcanoes, which is one of the most hazardous volcanic phenomena on the safety of the installations. In considering the volcanic dormancy, magma eruptability is an important concept. The magma eruptability is dominantly controlled by magma viscosity, which can be estimated from petrological analysis of erupted materials. Therefore, viscosity estimation of magmas erupted in past eruptions should provide important information to assess future activities at hazardous volcanoes. In order to show the importance of magma viscosity in the concept of magma eruptability, this report overviews dike propagation processes from a magma chamber and nature of magma viscosity. Magma viscosity at pre-eruptive conditions of magma chambers were compiled based on previous petrological studies on past eruptions in Japan. There are only 16 examples of eruptions at 9 volcanoes satisfying data requirement for magma viscosity estimation. Estimated magma viscosities range from 10 2 to 10 7 Pa·s for basaltic to rhyolitic magmas. Most of examples fall below dike propagation limit of magma viscosity (ca. 10 6 Pa·s) estimated based on a dike propagation model. Highly viscous magmas (ca. 10 7 Pa·s) than the dike propagation limit are considered to lose eruptability which is the ability to form dikes and initiate eruptions. However, in some cases, small precursory eruptions of less viscous magmas commonly occurred just before climactic eruptions of the highly viscous magmas, suggesting that the precursory dike propagation by the less viscous magmas induced the following eruptions of highly viscous magmas (ca. 10 7 Pa·s). (author)

  10. Universal viscosity growth in metallic melts at megabar pressures: the vitreous state of the Earth's inner core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazhkin, Vadim V; Lyapin, A G

    2000-01-01

    Experimental data on and theoretical models for the viscosity of various types of liquids and melts under pressure are reviewed. Experimentally, the least studied melts are those of metals, whose viscosity is considered to be virtually constant along the melting curve. The authors' new approach to the viscosity of melts involves the measurement of the grain size in solidified samples. Measurements on liquid metals at pressures up to 10 GPa using this method show, contrary to the empirical approach, that the melt viscosity grows considerably along the melting curves. Based on the experimental data and on the critical analysis of current theories, a hypothesis of a universal viscosity behavior is introduced for liquids under pressure. Extrapolating the liquid iron results to the pressures and temperatures at the Earth's core reveals that the Earth's outer core is a very viscous melt with viscosity values ranging from 10 2 Pa s to 10 11 Pa s depending on the depth. The Earth's inner core is presumably an ultraviscous (>10 11 Pa s) glass-like liquid - in disagreement with the current idea of a crystalline inner core. The notion of the highly viscous interior of celestial bodies sheds light on many mysteries of planetary geophysics and astronomy. From the analysis of the pressure variation of the melting and glass-transition temperatures, an entirely new concept of a stable metallic vitreous state arises, calling for further experimental and theoretical study. (reviews of topical problems)

  11. Viscosity and surface tension of binary systems of N,N-dimethylformamide with alkan-1-ols at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad, Abubaker A.; Alkhaldi, Khaled H.A.E.; AlTuwaim, Mohammad S.; Al-Jimaz, Adel S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Physical properties of binary mixtures of DMF+1-pentanol, 1-hexanol, or 1-heptanol. ► Viscosity and surface tension were measured. ►Δη, Δσ σ and G ∗E were calculated using the experimental data. ► H σ and S σ were determined using the surface tension data. ► Semi-empirical relations were used to estimate the viscosity of liquid mixtures. - Abstract: Viscosity η and surface tension σ were measured for binary mixtures of N,N-dimethylformamide DMF with pentan-1-ol, hexan-1-ol, and heptan-1-ol at T = (298.15, 303.15, 308.15, and 313.15) K and atmospheric pressure over the entire mole fraction range. Deviations in viscosity Δη and surface tension Δσ were calculated using experimental results. Moreover, the values of the excess Gibbs free energy of activation G ∗E , surface enthalpy H σ and surface entropy S σ of these mixtures were determined. Viscosity measurements of the binary systems were correlated with Grunberg and Nissan, the three-body and four-body McAllister expressions. Viscosity deviation, surface tension deviation and excess Gibbs energy of activation functions were fitted to the method of Redlich–Kister (R–K) polynomial to estimate the coefficients and standard deviations. The effects of chain length of alkan-1-ols and temperature on the thermodynamic properties of binary systems were studied.

  12. An eddy viscosity model for flow in a tube bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soussan, D.; Grandotto, M.

    1998-01-01

    The work described in this paper is part of the development of GENEPI a 3-dimensional finite element code, designed for the thermalhydraulic analysis of steam generators. It focuses on the implementation of two-phase flow turbulence-induced viscosity in a tube bundle. The GENEPI code, as other industrial codes, uses the eddy viscosity concept introduced by Boussinesq for single phase flow. The concept assumes that the turbulent momentum transfer is similar to the viscous shear stresses. Eddy viscosity formulation is reasonably well known for single phase flows, especially in simple geometries (i.e., in smooth tube, around a single body, or behind a row of bars/tubes), but there exists very little information on it for two-phase flows. An analogy between single and two-phases is used to set up a model for eddy viscosity. The eddy viscosity model examined in this paper is used for a tube bundle geometry and, therefore, is extended to include anisotropy to the classic model. Each of the main flow directions (cross flow inline, cross flow staggered, and parallel flows) gives rise to a specific eddy viscosity formula. The results from a parametric study indicate that the eddy viscosity in the staggered flow is roughly 1.5 times as large as that for the inline cross flow, 60 times as large as that for the parallel flow, and 105 as large as that for the molecular viscosity. Then, the different terms are combined with each other to result in a global eddy viscosity model for a steam generator tube bundle flow. (author)

  13. Effect of viscosity on tear drainage and ocular residence time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Heng; Chauhan, Anuj

    2008-08-01

    An increase in residence time of dry eye medications including artificial tears will likely enhance therapeutic benefits. The drainage rates and the residence time of eye drops depend on the viscosity of the instilled fluids. However, a quantitative understanding of the dependence of drainage rates and the residence time on viscosity is lacking. The current study aims to develop a mathematical model for the drainage of Newtonian fluids and also for power-law non-Newtonian fluids of different viscosities. This study is an extension of our previous study on the mathematical model of tear drainage. The tear drainage model is modified to describe the drainage of Newtonian fluids with viscosities higher than the tear viscosity and power-law non-Newtonian fluids with rheological parameters obtained from fitting experimental data in literature. The drainage rate through canaliculi was derived from the modified drainage model and was incorporated into a tear mass balance to calculate the transients of total solute quantity in ocular fluids and the bioavailability of instilled drugs. For Newtonian fluids, increasing the viscosity does not affect the drainage rate unless the viscosity exceeds a critical value of about 4.4 cp. The viscosity has a maximum impact on drainage rate around a value of about 100 cp. The trends are similar for shear thinning power law fluids. The transients of total solute quantity, and the residence time agrees at least qualitatively with experimental studies. A mathematical model has been developed for the drainage of Newtonian fluids and power-law fluids through canaliculi. The model can quantitatively explain different experimental observations on the effect of viscosity on the residence of instilled fluids on the ocular surface. The current study is helpful for understanding the mechanism of fluid drainage from the ocular surface and for improving the design of dry eye treatments.

  14. Viscosity of melts of the system KCl-KBF4-K2TiF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D.K.; Danek, V.

    1997-01-01

    The viscosity of melts of the system KCl-KBF 4 -K 2 TiF 6 has been measured by means of the computerized torsional pendulum method. The viscosity of KCl is higher that of KBF 4 at the same temperature, most probably due to the substantial overheating of KBF 4 . In the ternary system the viscosity increases with increasing with increasing content of K 2 TiF 6 . Additivity of algorithms of viscosity was adopted as the ideal behaviour of the mixture. Negative deviations from such additive behaviour were found in the binary system KCl-KBF 4 probably due to the breaks of the weak B-Cl-B bridges caused by the excess of Cl - ions. Positive deviations from the ideal behaviour were found in the binaries KCl-K 2 TiF 6 and KBF 4 -K 2 TiF 6 due to the formation of larger anions TiF 6 Cl 3- and TiF 7 3- caused by the reactions K 2 TiF 6 (l) + KCl(l) = K 3 TiF 6 Cl(l) and KBF 4 (l) + K 2 TiF 6 (l) = K 3 TiF 7 (l) + BF 3 (g). Statistically significant ternary interaction confirmed that the above chemical reactions take place also in the ternary system. (authors)

  15. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shit, G.C.; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-01-01

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank–Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance. - Highlights: • We have investigated the pulsatile MHD flow of blood and heat transfer in arteries. • The influence of periodic body acceleration has been taken into account. • The temperature dependent viscosity of blood is considered. • The variable viscosity has an increasing effect on blood flow and heat transfer. • The overall temperature distribution enhances in the presence of magnetic field

  16. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shit, G.C., E-mail: gopal_iitkgp@yahoo.co.in; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-08-15

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank–Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance. - Highlights: • We have investigated the pulsatile MHD flow of blood and heat transfer in arteries. • The influence of periodic body acceleration has been taken into account. • The temperature dependent viscosity of blood is considered. • The variable viscosity has an increasing effect on blood flow and heat transfer. • The overall temperature distribution enhances in the presence of magnetic field.

  17. Study of specific loss power of magnetic fluids with various viscosities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phong, P.T., E-mail: phamthanhphong@tdt.edu.vn [Department for Management of Science and Technology Development, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Nguyen, L.H., E-mail: luuhuunguyen@ukh.edu.vn [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology,18- Hoang Quoc Viet Street, Cau Giay District, Ha Noi City (Viet Nam); Khanh Hoa University, 1- Nguyen Chanh Street, Nha Trang City, Khanh Hoa Province (Viet Nam); Phong, L.T.H., E-mail: lthp52a@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology,18- Hoang Quoc Viet Street, Cau Giay District, Ha Noi City (Viet Nam); Nam, P.H., E-mail: namph.ims@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology,18- Hoang Quoc Viet Street, Cau Giay District, Ha Noi City (Viet Nam); Manh, D.H., E-mail: manhdh.ims@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology,18- Hoang Quoc Viet Street, Cau Giay District, Ha Noi City (Viet Nam); Lee, I.J., E-mail: lij@dongguk.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Chemistry, Dongguk University-Gyeongju, Dongdae-roDongdae-ro 123, Gyeongju-Si, Gyeongbuk 38066 (Korea, Republic of); Phuc, N.X., E-mail: phucnx1949@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology,18- Hoang Quoc Viet Street, Cau Giay District, Ha Noi City (Viet Nam)

    2017-04-15

    Abstracts: Using hydrothermal method, CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (hard ferrite) and MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (soft ferrite) nanoparticles of size up to 20 nm were synthesized and the viscosities were controlled using various concentrations of agar. The hydrodynamic diameter of these particles was measured and fitted to a lognormal distribution and the results showed their polydispersity is very narrow. From the calorimetric measurements of the particles stabilized in agar solutions, we have demonstrated that at a given frequency, the dependence of the specific loss power of magnetic fluids on the viscosity is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions made in the earlier studies. - Highlights: • CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (hard ferrite) and MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (soft ferrite) nanoparticles size up to 20 nm were synthesized. • The relaxation loss depends on both the particle's intrinsic properties and the viscosity of the environment. • The SLP of hard nanoparticles strongly decreases with increasing the viscosity whereas that of soft nanoparticles remains almost unchanged.

  18. Temperature dependence of shear viscosity of SU(3)-gluodynamics within lattice simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrakhantsev, N.Yu. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics,25 B. Cheremushkinskaya St., 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology,9 Institutskii per., 141700, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Braguta, V.V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics,25 B. Cheremushkinskaya St., 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute for High Energy Physics NRC “Kurchatov Institute”,1 Pobedy St., Protvino, 142281 (Russian Federation); School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University,8 Sukhanova St., 690950, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Kotov, A.Yu. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics,25 B. Cheremushkinskaya St., 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-18

    In this paper we study the SU(3)-gluodynamics shear viscosity temperature dependence on the lattice. To do so, we measure the correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor in the range of temperatures T/T{sub c}∈[0.9,1.5]. To extract the shear viscosity we used two approaches. The first one is to fit the lattice data with a physically motivated ansatz for the spectral function with unknown parameters and then determine the shear viscosity. The second approach is to apply the Backus-Gilbert method allowing to extract the shear viscosity from the lattice data nonparametrically. The results obtained within both approaches agree with each other. Our results allow us to conclude that within the range T/T{sub c}∈[0.9,1.5] the SU(3)-gluodynamics reveals the properties of a strongly interacting system, which cannot be described perturbatively, and has the ratio η/s close to the value 1/4π of the N=4 Supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

  19. Effect of Water Glass Modification on Its Viscosity and Wettability of Quartz Grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kmita

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to develop a modifier for water glass. The method of thermal generation of metal oxide nanoparticleswas adapted and used in the research. Nanoparticles of ZnO from the thermal decomposition of basic zinc carbonate were used. A methodfor the modifier introduction was developed, and the effect of modifier content and organic solvent type on the physico-chemicalproperties of binder (viscosity and quartz wettability was determined. Binder viscosity was examined from the flow curves plotted with the help of a RHEOTEST 2 rotational rheometer equipped with proper software. Quartz wettability was determined examining timerelated changes in the value of the contact angle in a quartz-binder system, until full stabilisation of the angle value has been achieved.Binder modification was carried out on sodium water glass designated as R"145". The water glass modifiers were suspensions of ZnOnanoparticles in propanol and methanol at a fixed concentration of c = 0.3 M and with the size of nanoparticles comprised in a range of. Water glass modification with the suspensions of ZnO nanoparticles in methanol and propanol showed the effect ofmodifier on the water glass viscosity and quartz wettability. This effect depends on the type of alcohol used. The ZnO suspension inpropanol (alcohol with a longer hydrocarbon chain affects more strongly the viscosity of binder and quartz wettability than the methanol suspension.

  20. A Study of Nonlinear Variable Viscosity in Finite-Length Tube with Peristalsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Abd Elmaboud

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Peristaltic motion of an incompressible Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity induced by periodic sinusoidal traveling wave propagating along the walls of a finite-length tube has been investigated. A perturbation method of solution is sought. The viscosity parameter α (α << 1 is chosen as a perturbation parameter and the governing equations are developed up to the first-order in the viscosity parameter (α. The analytical solution has been derived for the radial velocity at the tube wall, the axial pressure gradient across the length of the tube, and the wall shear stress under the assumption of low Reynolds number and long wavelength approximation. The impacts of physical parameters such as the viscosity and the parameter determining the shape of the constriction on the pressure distribution and on the wall shear stress for integral and non-integral number of waves are illustrated. The main conclusion that can be drawn out of this study is that the peaks of pressure fluctuate with time and attain different values with non-integral numbers of peristaltic waves. The considered problem is very applicable in study of biological flow and industrial flow.

  1. Viscosity and attenuation of sound wave in high density deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Kazuko; Ariyasu, Tomio

    1985-01-01

    The penetration of low frequency sound wave into the fuel deuterium is discussed as for laser fusion. The sound velocity and the attenuation constant due to viscosity are calculated for high density (n = 10 24 -- 10 27 cm -3 , T = 10 -1 -- 10 4 eV) deuterium. The shear viscosity of free electron gas and the bulk viscosity due to ion-ion interaction mainly contribute to the attenuation of sound wave. The sound wave of the frequency below 10 10 Hz can easily penetrate through the compressed fuel deuterium of diameter 1 -- 10 3 μm. (author)

  2. Effect of ion viscosity on neoclassical tearing mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Shigeki; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Yagi, Masatoshi; Azumi, Masafumi

    2004-01-01

    Linear stability analysis of neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) is performed on the basis of four-field reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model which takes account of fluctuating ion parallel flow and ion neoclassical viscosity. The dependence of the growth rate on the kinetic effects is investigated. It is shown that the linear NTM is stabilized by ion neoclassical viscosity and that the stabilizing effect of ion parallel compressibility is weak in the banana-plateau regime. It is found that not only ion neoclassical viscosity but also both ion and electron diamagnetic effects are important for the stabilization of NTM. (author)

  3. Plasma viscosity increase with progression of peripheral arterial atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poredos, P; Zizek, B

    1996-03-01

    Increased blood and plasma viscosity has been described in patients with coronary and peripheral arterial disease. However, the relation of viscosity to the extent of arterial wall deterioration--the most important determinant of clinical manifestation and prognosis of the disease--is not well known. Therefore, the authors studied plasma viscosity as one of the major determinants of blood viscosity in patients with different stages of arterial disease of lower limbs (according to Fontaine) and its relation to the presence of some risk factors of atherosclerosis. The study encompassed four groups of subjects: 19 healthy volunteers (group A), 18 patients with intermittent claudication up to 200 m (stage II; group B), 15 patients with critical ischemia of lower limbs (stage III and IV; group C), and 16 patients with recanalization procedures on peripheral arteries. Venous blood samples were collected from an antecubital vein without stasis for the determination of plasma viscosity (with a rotational capillary microviscometer, PAAR), fibrinogen, total cholesterol, alpha-2-macroglobulin, and glucose concentrations. In patients with recanalization procedure local plasma viscosity was also determined from blood samples taken from a vein on the dorsum of the foot. Plasma viscosity was most significantly elevated in the patients with critical ischemia (1.78 mPa.sec) and was significantly higher than in the claudicants (1.68 mPa.sec), and the claudicants also had significantly higher viscosity than the controls (1.58 mPa.sec). In patients in whom a recanalization procedure was performed, no differences in systemic and local plasma viscosity were detected, neither before nor after recanalization of the diseased artery. In all groups plasma viscosity was correlated with fibrinogen concentration (r=0.70, P < 0.01) and total cholesterol concentration (r=0.24, P < 0.05), but in group C (critical ischemia) plasma viscosity was most closely linked to the concentration of alpha-2

  4. Elongational viscosity of multiarm (Pom-Pom) polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2006-01-01

    -Pom was estimated to have 2.5 arms on average, while the estimate is 3.3 for the asymmetric star. The molar mass of each arm is about 27 kg/mol. The melts were characterized in the linear viscoelastic regime and in non-linear elongational rheometry. The transient elongational viscosity for the Pom-Pom molecule...... it corresponds well with an estimate of the maximum stretchability of the backbone. Time-strain separability was not observed for the 'Asymmetric star' molecule at the elongation rates investigated. The transient elongational viscosity for the 'Pom-Pom' molecule went through a reproducible maximum...... in the viscosity at the highest elongational rate....

  5. Shear viscosities of photons in strongly coupled plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di-Lun Yang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the shear viscosity of thermalized photons in the quark gluon plasma (QGP at weak coupling and N=4 super Yang–Mills plasma (SYMP at both strong and weak couplings. We find that the shear viscosity due to the photon–parton scattering up to the leading order of electromagnetic coupling is suppressed when the coupling of the QGP/SYMP is increased, which stems from the blue-shift of the thermal-photon spectrum at strong coupling. In addition, the shear viscosity rapidly increases near the deconfinement transition in a phenomenological model analogous to the QGP.

  6. Shear viscosity of liquid argon and liquid rubidium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiakwelu, O.

    1978-01-01

    A direct evaluation of the shear viscosity coefficient for models of liquid rubidium and liquid argon is presented by neglecting the cross-terms in the autocorrelation function of the transverse component of the momentum stress tensor. The time dependence of the shear viscosity for liquid argon is found to display a long decaying tail in qualitative agreement with a computer calculation of Levesque et al. However, the numerical values of the shear viscosity coefficients are smaller than the experimentally determined values of about 45% for liquid rubidium and 35% for liquid argon

  7. Screening for High Conductivity/Low Viscosity Ionic Liquids Using Product Descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Shawn; Pratt, Harry D; Anderson, Travis M

    2017-07-01

    We seek to optimize Ionic liquids (ILs) for application to redox flow batteries. As part of this effort, we have developed a computational method for suggesting ILs with high conductivity and low viscosity. Since ILs consist of cation-anion pairs, we consider a method for treating ILs as pairs using product descriptors for QSPRs, a concept borrowed from the prediction of protein-protein interactions in bioinformatics. We demonstrate the method by predicting electrical conductivity, viscosity, and melting point on a dataset taken from the ILThermo database on June 18 th , 2014. The dataset consists of 4,329 measurements taken from 165 ILs made up of 72 cations and 34 anions. We benchmark our QSPRs on the known values in the dataset then extend our predictions to screen all 2,448 possible cation-anion pairs in the dataset. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Experimental investigation of heavy water vapor viscosity at 100-5000C and (0.08-1,3).105n/m2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timrot, D.L.; Serednitskaya, M.A.; Bespalov, M.S.

    1974-01-01

    The heavy water steam viscosity is measured at a facility used earlier to measure steam viscosity of a conventional water. The measurements are performed by a relative method. The maximum relative error of the experiment is as low as 0.35%. The viscosity isotherm slope in the P-diagram is obtained with an accuracy of 0.1% which is connected with the exclusion of the systematic error in the calibration of the facility, and the error of reference to a given temperature. The viscosity is investigated on five isotherms from 100 to 500 0 C. It appeared possible to describe the viscosity of heavy and conventional water in the temperature range studied by a unified relationship: Mosup(D 2 O)=αMosup(H 2 ))+β

  9. Viscosity Prediction for Petroleum Fluids Using Free Volume Theory and PC-SAFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnamvand, Younes; Assareh, Mehdi

    2018-04-01

    In this study, free volume theory ( FVT) in combination with perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory is implemented for viscosity prediction of petroleum reservoir fluids containing ill-defined components such as cuts and plus fractions. FVT has three adjustable parameters for each component to calculate viscosity. These three parameters for petroleum cuts (especially plus fractions) are not available. In this work, these parameters are determined for different petroleum fractions. A model as a function of molecular weight and specific gravity is developed using 22 real reservoir fluid samples with API grades in the range of 22 to 45. Afterward, the proposed model accuracy in comparison with the accuracy of De la Porte et al. with reference to experimental data is presented. The presented model is used for six real samples in an evaluation step, and the results are compared with available experimental data and the method of De la Porte et al. Finally, the method of Lohrenz et al. and the method of Pedersen et al. as two common industrial methods for viscosity calculation are compared with the proposed approach. The absolute average deviation was 9.7 % for free volume theory method, 15.4 % for Lohrenz et al., and 22.16 for Pedersen et al.

  10. Molecular dynamics calculation of shear viscosity for molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Yokokawa, Mitsuo; Ogawa, Toru

    1993-12-01

    A computer program of molecular dynamics simulation has been made to calculate shear viscosity of molten salt. Correlation function for an off-diagonal component of stress tensor can be obtained as the results of calculation. Shear viscosity is calculated by integration of the correlation function based on the Kubo-type formula. Shear viscosities for a molten KCl ranging in temperature from 1047K to 1273K were calculated using the program. Calculation of 10 5 steps (1 step corresponds to 5 x 10 -15 s) was performed for each temperature in the 216 ions system. The obtained results were in good agreement with the reported experimental values. The program has been vectorized to achieve a faster computation in supercomputer. It makes possible to calculate the viscosity using a large number of statistics amounting to several million MD steps. (author)

  11. Relating Fresh Concrete Viscosity Measurements from Different Rheometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Chiara F; Martys, Nicos S

    2003-01-01

    Concrete rheological properties need to be properly measured and predicted in order to characterize the workability of fresh concrete, including special concretes such as self-consolidating concrete (SCC). It was shown by a round-robin test held in 2000 [1,2] that different rheometer designs gave different values of viscosity for the same concrete. While empirical correlation between different rheometers was possible, for a procedure that is supposed to "scientifically" improve on the empirical slump tests, this situation is unsatisfactory. To remedy this situation, a new interpretation of the data was developed. In this paper, it is shown that all instruments tested could be directly and quantitatively compared in terms of relative plastic viscosity instead of the plastic viscosity alone. This should eventually allow the measurements from various rheometer designs to be directly calibrated against known standards of plastic viscosity, putting concrete rheometry and concrete workability on a sounder materials science basis.

  12. Diffusivities and Viscosities of Poly(ethylene oxide) Oligomers †

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Bingbing; Escobedo, Fernando; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusivities and viscosities of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) oligomer melts with 1 to 12 repeat units have been obtained from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations using the TraPPE-UA force field. The simulations generated diffusion coefficients

  13. High Ra, high Pr convection with viscosity gradients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. High Ra, high Pr convection with viscosity gradients. Weak upward flow through mesh. Top fluid more viscous. Unstable layer Instability Convection.

  14. Viscosity and density tables of sodium chloride solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fair, J.A.; Ozbek, H. (comps.)

    1977-04-01

    A file is presented containing tabulated data extracted from the scientific literature on the density and viscosity of aqueous sodium chloride solutions. Also included is a bibliography of the properties of aqueous sodium chloride solutions. (MHR)

  15. The viscosity window of the silicate glass foam production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2017-01-01

    which can offer a practical starting point for the optimisation procedure. The melt viscosity might be the most important parameter for controlling the foaming process and the glass foam density. In this work, we attempt to define a viscosity range in which foaming of different glasses results...... in a maximum of foam expansion. The expansion maximum is obtained for different glasses (labware, E-glass, CRT panel, soda-lime-silica) by foaming with CaCO3 at isokom temperature and from literature data. In general, the viscosity window was found to be within 104–106 Pa s when foaming with MnO2 or metal...... carbonates (CaCO3, Na2CO3, MgCO3, SrCO3, dolomite) whereas SiC requires higher temperatures and correspondingly lower viscosities (103.3–104.0 Pa s). These findings can help assessing the implementation of new resources in the glass foam production....

  16. PVT characterization and viscosity modeling and prediction of crude oils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisneros, Eduardo Salvador P.; Dalberg, Anders; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2004-01-01

    In previous works, the general, one-parameter friction theory (f-theory), models have been applied to the accurate viscosity modeling of reservoir fluids. As a base, the f-theory approach requires a compositional characterization procedure for the application of an equation of state (EOS), in most...... pressure, is also presented. The combination of the mass characterization scheme presented in this work and the f-theory, can also deliver accurate viscosity modeling results. Additionally, depending on how extensive the compositional characterization is, the approach,presented in this work may also...... deliver accurate viscosity predictions. The modeling approach presented in this work can deliver accurate viscosity and density modeling and prediction results over wide ranges of reservoir conditions, including the compositional changes induced by recovery processes such as gas injection....

  17. Shear viscosity enhancement in water–nanoparticle suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, Ganesh; Sen, Swarnendu; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2012-01-01

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations characterize the increase in the shear viscosity of water around a suspended silicon dioxide nanoparticle. Water layering on the solid surface decreases the fraction of adjacent fluid molecules that are more mobile and hence less viscous, thereby increasing the shear viscosity. The contribution of the nanoparticle surface area to this rheological behavior is identified and an empirical model that accounts for it is provided. The model successfully reproduces the shear viscosity predictions from previous experimental measurements as well as our simulations. -- Highlights: ► Layering of water on the solid surfaces increases the fraction of less mobile molecules adjacent to them. ► A nondimensional parameter predicts of viscosity enhancement due to particle shape, volume fraction. ► Model predictions agree with the results of atomistic simulations and experimental measurements.

  18. Effect of soft mode on shear viscosity of quark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukutome, Takahiko; Iwasaki, Masaharu

    2008-01-01

    We calculate the shear viscosity of quark matter at finite temperature and density. If we assume that the quark interacts with the soft mode, which is a collective mode of a quark-antiquark pair, the self-energy of the quark is calculated by quasi-particle random phase approximation. It is shown that its imaginary part is large and its mean free path is short. With the use of the Kubo formula, the shear viscosity of quark matter decreases. The Reynolds number of quark matter is estimated to be about 10. As temperature increases, shear viscosity increases gradually for T>200 MeV. Moreover it is shown that the shear viscosity also increases with the chemical potential for μ>200 MeV. (author)

  19. effect of electrochemical oxidation of a viscose rayon based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    KEYWORDS: Viscose rayon based activated carbon cloth; Sorption isotherms; Electrochemical oxidation; Arsenic .... (AAS ) in acetylene-air flame emission mode. 2.9. Quality ..... of the EO ACC thereby restricting the number of binding sites for ...

  20. Viscosity and volume properties of the Al-Cu melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurochkin A.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Temperature dependences of the kinematic viscosity v and the density ρ of Al-Cu melts were investigated in the same regime taking into account that viscometric experiments with the melts enriched with cupper have not been repeated since 1960th and densimetric measurements did not perform before at all. The first measurements were fulfilled using the method of dumping oscillation of a crucible filled in by a melt investigated. Its precision was as high as 1.5%. Density was measured using the gamma-absorption method with the accuracy of 0.2 to 0.3%. Crucibles of BeO were used in both the cases. In the course of the measurements a distinct branching of the heating and cooling curves were fixed below some temperature characteristic of each composition for most of the investigated samples. The branching temperature systematically changes with growth of cupper content. The authors believe that the effect is caused by the irreversible transition of the melts from microheterogeneous state inherited from the initial rough materials into a true solution state.

  1. Understanding the Viscosity of Liquids used in Infant Dysphagia Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Jacqueline; Chestnut, Amanda H; Jackson, Arwen; Barbon, Carly E A; Steele, Catriona M; Pickler, Laura

    2016-10-01

    When assessing swallowing in infants, it is critical to have confidence that the liquids presented during the swallow study closely replicate the viscosity of liquids in the infant's typical diet. However, we lack research on rheological properties of frequently used infant formulas or breastmilk, and various forms of barium contrast media used in swallow studies. The aim of the current study was to provide objective viscosity measurements for typical infant liquid diet options and barium contrast media. A TA-Instruments AR2000 Advanced Rheometer was used to measure the viscosity of five standard infant formulas, three barium products, and two breastmilk samples. Additionally, this study measured the viscosity of infant formulas and breastmilk when mixed with powdered barium contrast in a 20 % weight-to-volume (w/v) concentration. The study findings determined that standard infant formulas and the two breastmilk samples had low viscosities, at the lower end of the National Dysphagia Diet (NDD) thin liquid range. Two specialty formulas tested had much thicker viscosities, close to the lower boundary of the NDD nectar-thick liquid range. The study showed differences in viscosity between 60 % w/v barium products (Liquid E-Z-Paque(®) and E-Z-Paque(®) powder); the powdered product had a much lower viscosity, despite identical barium concentration. When E-Z-Paque(®) powdered barium was mixed in a 20 % w/v concentration using water, standard infant formulas, or breastmilk, the resulting viscosities were at the lower end of the NDD thin range and only slightly thicker than the non-barium comparator liquids. When E-Z-Paque(®) powdered barium was mixed in a 20 % w/v concentration with the two thicker specialty formulas (Enfamil AR 20 and 24 kcal), unexpected alterations in their original viscosity occurred. These findings highlight the clinical importance of objective measures of viscosity as well as objective data on how infant formulas or breastmilk may change in

  2. WCSPH with Limiting Viscosity for Modeling Landslide Hazard at the Slopes of Artificial Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauro Manenti

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This work illustrated an application of the FOSS code SPHERA v.8.0 (RSE SpA, Milano, Italy to the simulation of landslide hazard at the slope of a water basin. SPHERA is based on the weakly compressible SPH method (WCSPH and holds a mixture model, consistent with the packing limit of the Kinetic Theory of Granular Flow (KTGF, which was previously tested for simulating two-phase free-surface rapid flows involving water-sediment interaction. In this study a limiting viscosity parameter was implemented in the previous formulation of the mixture model to limit the growth of the apparent viscosity, thus saving computational time while preserving the solution accuracy. This approach is consistent with the experimental behavior of high polymer solutions for which an almost constant value of viscosity may be approached at very low deformation rates near the transition zone of elastic–plastic regime. In this application, the limiting viscosity was used as a numerical parameter for optimization of the computation. Some preliminary tests were performed by simulating a 2D erosional dam break, proving that a proper selection of the limiting viscosity leads to a considerable drop of the computational time without altering significantly the numerical solution. SPHERA was then validated by simulating a 2D scale experiment reproducing the early phase of the Vajont landslide when a tsunami wave was generated that climbed the opposite mountain side with a maximum run-up of about 270 m. The obtained maximum run-up was very close to the experimental result. Influence of saturation of the landslide material below the still water level was also accounted, showing that the landslide dynamics can be better represented and the wave run-up can be properly estimated.

  3. Densities, viscosities, and isobaric heat capacities of the system (1-butanol + cyclohexane) at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torín-Ollarves, Geraldine A.; Martín, M. Carmen; Chamorro, César R.; Segovia, José J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The densities of cyclohexane and its mixtures with 1-butanol were measured. • The excess molar volumes were calculated and correlated. • The viscosities were measured at atmospheric pressure. • The isobaric heat capacities were measured at p = (0.1 to 25) MPa at T = (293.15 and 313.15) K. • A positive deviation from the ideal behavior is observed. - Abstract: The cyclohexane and the system of 1-butanol + cyclohexane have been characterized using densities, viscosities and isobaric heat capacities measurements. For that, the densities were measured in a high-pressure vibrating tube densimeter at five temperatures from (293.15 to 333.15) K and pressures up to 100 MPa. The measurements were correlated with the empirical Tamman–Tait equation. Moreover, the isobaric heat capacities of the binary system were measured in a high-pressure automated flow calorimeter at T = (293.15 and 313.15) K and pressures up to 25 MPa for pure cyclohexane and in admixture with 1-butanol. The excess molar heat capacities were assessed for the mixture and a positive deviation from the ideality was obtained, except for a small part in the region rich in alkanol. The viscosity measurements were carried out, at the calorimeter conditions, for correcting the experimental values of isobaric heat capacities due to friction along the tube. The viscosity was measured at atmospheric pressure in a Stabinger Anton Paar SVM 3000 viscometer in the temperature range of (293.15 to 333.15) K for cyclohexane and the mixtures. At high pressure, the viscosities were estimated using Lucas method

  4. Response of cardiac endothelial nitric oxide synthase to plasma viscosity modulation in acute isovolemic hemodilution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanyanatt Kanokwiroon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS is generally expressed in endocardial cells, vascular endothelial cells and ventricular myocytes. However, there is no experimental study elucidating the relationship between cardiac eNOS expression and elevated plasma viscosity in low oxygen delivery pathological conditions such as hemorrhagic shock-resuscitation and hemodilution. This study tested the hypothesis that elevated plasma viscosity increases cardiac eNOS expression in a hemodilution model, leading to positive effects on cardiac performance. Materials and Methods: Two groups of golden Syrian hamster underwent an acute isovolemic hemodilution where 40% of blood volume was exchanged with 2% (low-viscogenic plasma expander [LVPE] or 6% (high-viscogenic plasma expander [HVPE] of dextran 2000 kDa. In control group, experiment was performed without hemodilution. All groups were performed in awake condition. Experimental parameters, i.e., mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, heart rate, hematocrit, blood gas content and viscosity, were measured. The eNOS expression was evaluated by eNOS Western blot analysis. Results: After hemodilution, MAP decreased to 72% and 93% of baseline in the LVPE and HVPE, respectively. Furthermore, pO 2 in the LVPE group increased highest among the groups. Plasma viscosity in the HVPE group was significantly higher than that in control and LVPE groups. The expression of eNOS in the HVPE group showed higher intensity compared to other groups, especially compared with the control group. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that cardiac eNOS has responded to plasma viscosity modulation with HVPE and LVPE. This particularly supports the previous studies that revealed the positive effects on cardiac function in animals hemodiluted with HVPE.

  5. A note on the mixture viscosity using the Shannak definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awad, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A note on the mixture viscosity using the Shannak definition is presented. • The Shannak definition gives μ (2ph) > μ f at low x. • Attention must be taken when using the Shannak definition at low x. - Abstract: In this study, a note on the mixture viscosity using the Shannak definition is presented [Shannak, B. A., 2008. Frictional pressure drop of gas liquid two-phase flow in pipes. Nucl. Eng. Des. 238, 3277–3284]. From his definition of the two-phase Reynolds number (Re (2ph) ), an expression of the two-phase viscosity (μ (2ph) ) is obtained. This expression of the two-phase viscosity (μ (2ph) ) satisfies the following important limiting conditions: i. at x = 0, μ (2ph) = μ f , and at x = 1, μ (2ph) = μ g . This definition of the two-phase viscosity (μ (2ph) ) can be used to compute the two-phase frictional pressure gradient using the homogeneous modeling approach in circular pipes, minichannels and microchannels. By plotting μ (2ph) /μ f versus x for air–water system at atmospheric conditions using the Shannak definition as well as the other most commonly used formulas of the two-phase viscosity (μ (2ph) ) in gas–liquid two-phase flows such as McAdams et al. (1942), Cicchitti et al. (1960), and Awad and Muzychka (2008) (Definition 1, Definition 2, Definition 3, and Definition 4), it is clear that the Shannak definition of the two-phase viscosity gives μ (2ph) > μ f at low x. This is impossible because we must have μ g (2ph) f for 0 < x < 1. Therefore, attention must be taken when using the Shannak definition of the two-phase viscosity at low x

  6. Magnetic viscosity study in FePt/C granular films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Y.; Butler, W.; Zhang, Y.; Hadjipanayis, G.C.; Weller, D.

    2004-01-01

    The magnetic viscosity of FePt/C granular thin films was studied in the temperature range from 2 to 300 K in order to examine the thermal stability of the nanoparticles. The magnetic viscosity coefficient (S max ) was found to decrease with temperature because of decreased thermal activation. At low temperatures, S max showed an almost linear dependence on temperature. However, S max does not extrapolate to zero but seems to have a finite value at cryogenic temperatures

  7. Effect of Fluid Dynamic Viscosity on the Strength of Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, K.; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    The mechanical strength of high porosity and weakly cemented chalk is affected by the fluid in the pores. In this study, the effect of the dynamic viscosity of non-polar fluids has been measured on outcrop chalk from Sigerslev Quarry, Stevns, Denmark. The outcome is that the measured strength...... of the chalk decreases with increasing dynamic viscosity. The proposed qualitative explanation is that pressure difference supports and enhances the generation of microscopic shear and tensile failures....

  8. Coefficients of viscosity for heavy impurity element in tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sharif, R N; Bekhit, A M [Plasma Physics dept., NRC, Atomic energy Authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    The transport of heavy impurity element in to tokamak was studied theoretically. The viscosity coefficients of chromium impurities has been calculated in 13 and 21 moment approximation, in the limit of strong fields where is the gyrofrequency of species it was found that the off diagonal coefficient approximately tends to zero. This means that the friction force in the off-diagonal direction is very small, for the perpendicular viscosity coefficient the two approximation coincide to each other. 3 figs.

  9. Refractive index and viscosity: dual sensing with plastic fibre gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ricardo; Bilro, Lúcia; Marques, Carlos; Oliveira, Ricardo; Nogueira, Rogério

    2014-05-01

    A refractive index and viscosity sensor based on FBGs in mPOF is reported for the first time. The refractive index was measured with a sensitivity of -10:98nm=RIU and a resolution of 1 - 10-4RIU. Viscosity measurements were performed with acousto-optic modulation, obtaining a sensitivity of -94:42%=mPa • s and a resolution of 0:06mPa • s.

  10. Viscosity and density models for copper electrorefining electrolytes

    OpenAIRE

    Kalliomäki Taina; Aji Arif T.; Aromaa Jari; Lundström Mari

    2016-01-01

    Viscosity and density are highly important physicochemical properties of copper electrolyte since they affect the purity of cathode copper and energy consumption [1, 2] affecting the mass and heat transfer conditions in the cell [3]. Increasing viscosity and density decreases the rate in which the anode slime falls to the bottom of the cell [4, 5] and lowers the diffusion coefficient of cupric ion (DCu2+) [6]. Decreasing the falling rate of anode slime increases movement of the slime to other...

  11. Predicting specific gravity and viscosity of biodiesel fuels

    OpenAIRE

    Tesfa, Belachew; Mishra, Rakesh; Gu, Fengshou; Ball, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Biodiesel is a promising non-toxic and biodegradable alternative fuel in transport sector. Of all the biodiesel properties, specific gravity and viscosity are the most significant for the effects they have on the utilization of biodiesel fuels in unmodified engines. This paper presents models, which have been derived from experimental data, for predicting the specific gravity and dynamic viscosity of biodiesel at various temperatures and fractions. In addition a model has also been developed ...

  12. A microfluidic device for simultaneous measurement of viscosity and flow rate of blood in a complex fluidic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun Kang, Yang; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Blood viscosity has been considered as one of important biophysical parameters for effectively monitoring variations in physiological and pathological conditions of circulatory disorders. Standard previous methods make it difficult to evaluate variations of blood viscosity under cardiopulmonary bypass procedures or hemodialysis. In this study, we proposed a unique microfluidic device for simultaneously measuring viscosity and flow rate of whole blood circulating in a complex fluidic network including a rat, a reservoir, a pinch valve, and a peristaltic pump. To demonstrate the proposed method, a twin-shaped microfluidic device, which is composed of two half-circular chambers, two side channels with multiple indicating channels, and one bridge channel, was carefully designed. Based on the microfluidic device, three sequential flow controls were applied to identify viscosity and flow rate of blood, with label-free and sensorless detection. The half-circular chamber was employed to achieve mechanical membrane compliance for flow stabilization in the microfluidic device. To quantify the effect of flow stabilization on flow fluctuations, a formula of pulsation index (PI) was analytically derived using a discrete fluidic circuit model. Using the PI formula, the time constant contributed by the half-circular chamber is estimated to be 8 s. Furthermore, flow fluctuations resulting from the peristaltic pumps are completely removed, especially under periodic flow conditions within short periods (T viscosity with respect to varying flow rate conditions [(a) known blood flow rate via a syringe pump, (b) unknown blood flow rate via a peristaltic pump]. As a result, the flow rate and viscosity of blood can be simultaneously measured with satisfactory accuracy. In addition, the proposed method was successfully applied to identify the viscosity of rat blood, which circulates in a complex fluidic network. These observations confirm that the proposed method can be used for

  13. Vanishing current hysteresis under competing nuclear spin pumping processes in a quadruplet spin-blockaded double quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaha, S., E-mail: s-amaha@riken.jp [Quantum Spin Information Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency, ICORP, 3-1, Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); Quantum Functional System Research Group, RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science, RIKEN, 3-1 Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hatano, T. [Quantum Spin Information Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency, ICORP, 3-1, Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai-shi, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Tarucha, S. [Quantum Spin Information Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency, ICORP, 3-1, Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); Quantum Functional System Research Group, RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science, RIKEN, 3-1 Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Gupta, J. A.; Austing, D. G. [National Research Council of Canada, M50, Montreal Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2015-04-27

    We investigate nuclear spin pumping with five-electron quadruplet spin states in a spin-blockaded weakly coupled vertical double quantum dot device. Two types of hysteretic steps in the leakage current are observed on sweeping the magnetic field and are associated with bidirectional polarization of nuclear spin. Properties of the steps are understood in terms of bias-voltage-dependent conditions for the mixing of quadruplet and doublet spin states by the hyperfine interaction. The hysteretic steps vanish when up- and down-nuclear spin pumping processes are in close competition.

  14. Exponential vanishing of the ground-state gap of the quantum random energy model via adiabatic quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adame, J.; Warzel, S.

    2015-11-01

    In this note, we use ideas of Farhi et al. [Int. J. Quantum. Inf. 6, 503 (2008) and Quantum Inf. Comput. 11, 840 (2011)] who link a lower bound on the run time of their quantum adiabatic search algorithm to an upper bound on the energy gap above the ground-state of the generators of this algorithm. We apply these ideas to the quantum random energy model (QREM). Our main result is a simple proof of the conjectured exponential vanishing of the energy gap of the QREM.

  15. Exponential vanishing of the ground-state gap of the quantum random energy model via adiabatic quantum computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adame, J.; Warzel, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this note, we use ideas of Farhi et al. [Int. J. Quantum. Inf. 6, 503 (2008) and Quantum Inf. Comput. 11, 840 (2011)] who link a lower bound on the run time of their quantum adiabatic search algorithm to an upper bound on the energy gap above the ground-state of the generators of this algorithm. We apply these ideas to the quantum random energy model (QREM). Our main result is a simple proof of the conjectured exponential vanishing of the energy gap of the QREM

  16. Local viscosity distribution in bifurcating microfluidic blood flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliviotis, E.; Sherwood, J. M.; Balabani, S.

    2018-03-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) aggregation phenomenon is majorly responsible for the non-Newtonian nature of blood, influencing the blood flow characteristics in the microvasculature. Of considerable interest is the behaviour of the fluid at the bifurcating regions. In vitro experiments, using microchannels, have shown that RBC aggregation, at certain flow conditions, affects the bluntness and skewness of the velocity profile, the local RBC concentration, and the cell-depleted layer at the channel walls. In addition, the developed RBC aggregates appear unevenly distributed in the outlets of these channels depending on their spatial distribution in the feeding branch, and on the flow conditions in the outlet branches. In the present work, constitutive equations of blood viscosity, from earlier work of the authors, are applied to flows in a T-type bifurcating microchannel to examine the local viscosity characteristics. Viscosity maps are derived for various flow distributions in the outlet branches of the channel, and the location of maximum viscosity magnitude is obtained. The viscosity does not appear significantly elevated in the branches of lower flow rate as would be expected on the basis of the low shear therein, and the maximum magnitude appears in the vicinity of the junction, and towards the side of the outlet branch with the higher flow rate. The study demonstrates that in the branches of lower flow rate, the local viscosity is also low, helping us to explain why the effects of physiological red blood cell aggregation have no adverse effects in terms of in vivo vascular resistance.

  17. Bulk and shear viscosities of hot and dense hadron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadam, Guru Prakash; Mishra, Hiranmaya

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the bulk and the shear viscosity at finite temperature and baryon densities of hadronic matter within a hadron resonance gas model which includes a Hagedorn spectrum. The parameters of the Hagedorn spectrum are adjusted to fit recent lattice QCD simulations at finite chemical potential. For the estimation of the bulk viscosity we use low energy theorems of QCD for the energy momentum tensor correlators. For the shear viscosity coefficient, we estimate the same using molecular kinetic theory to relate the shear viscosity coefficient to average momentum of the hadrons in the hot and dense hadron gas. The bulk viscosity to entropy ratio increases with chemical potential and is related to the reduction of velocity of sound at nonzero chemical potential. The shear viscosity to entropy ratio on the other hand, shows a nontrivial behavior with the ratio decreasing with chemical potential for small temperatures but increasing with chemical potential at high temperatures and is related to decrease of entropy density with chemical potential at high temperature due to finite volume of the hadrons

  18. A viscosity and density meter with a magnetically suspended rotor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bano, Mikulas; Strharsky, Igor; Hrmo, Igor

    2003-01-01

    A device for measuring the viscosity and density of liquids is presented. It is a Couette-type viscometer that uses a submerged rotor to measure the viscosity without errors originating in the contact of the rotor with the sample/air boundary. The inner cylinder is a glass rotor suspended in the liquid, and the outer cylinder is also made of glass. The rotor is stabilized on the axis of the outer cylinder by an electromagnetic force controlled by feedback from the rotor's vertical position. In the lower part of the rotor is an aluminum cylinder located in a magnetic field generated by rotating permanent magnets. The interaction of this rotating magnetic field with eddy currents generated in the aluminum cylinder causes rotation of the rotor. This rotation is optically detected, and viscosity is calculated from the measured angular velocity of rotor. The density of the liquid is calculated from the applied vertical equilibrating force. A computer controls the whole measurement. The device works at constant temperature or while scanning temperature. The sample volume is 1.6 ml, and the accuracy of measurement of both viscosity and density is ∼0.1%. The range of measured densities is (0.7-1.4) g/ml, and viscosity can be measured in the range (3x10 -4 -0.3) Pa s. The shear rate of the viscosity measurement varies in the range (20-300) s-1. The accuracy of the temperature measurement is 0.02 K

  19. Temperature dependent kinematic viscosity of different types of engine oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Severa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to measure how the viscosity of engine oil changes with temperature. Six different commercially distributed engine oils (primarily intended for motorcycle engines of 10W–40 viscosity grade have been evaluated. Four of the oils were of synthetic type, two of semi–synthetic type. All oils have been assumed to be Newtonian fluids, thus flow curves have not been determined. Oils have been cooled to below zero temperatures and under controlled temperature regulation, kinematic viscosity (mm2 / s have been measured in the range of −5 °C and +115 °C. Anton Paar digital viscometer with concentric cylinders geometry has been used. In accordance with expected behavior, kinematic viscosity of all oils was decreasing with increasing temperature. Viscosity was found to be independent on oil’s density. Temperature dependence has been modeled using se­ve­ral mathematical models – Vogel equation, Arrhenius equation, polynomial, and Gaussian equation. The best match between experimental and computed data has been achieved for Gaussian equation (R2 = 0.9993. Knowledge of viscosity behavior of an engine oil as a function of its temperature is of great importance, especially when considering running efficiency and performance of combustion engines. Proposed models can be used for description and prediction of rheological behavior of engine oils.

  20. Temperature Dependence Viscosity and Density of Different Biodiesel Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kumbár

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to assess the effect of rapeseed oil methyl ester (RME concentration in diesel fuel on its viscosity and density behaviour. The density and dynamic viscosity were observed at various mixing ratios of RME and diesel fuel. All measurements were performed at constant temperature of 40 °C. Increasing ratio of RME in diesel fuel was reflected in increased density value and dynamic viscosity of the blend. In case of pure RME, pure diesel fuel, and a blend of both (B30, temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity and density was examined. Temperature range in the experiment was −10 °C to 80 °C. Considerable temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity and density was found and demonstrated for all three samples. This finding is in accordance with theoretical assumptions and reference data. Mathematical models were developed and tested. Temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity was modeled using a polynomial 3rd polynomial degree. Correlation coefficients R −0.796, −0.948, and −0.974 between measured and calculated values were found. Temperature dependence of density was modeled using a 2nd polynomial degree. Correlation coefficients R −0.994, −0.979, and −0.976 between measured and calculated values were acquired. The proposed models can be used for flow behaviour prediction of RME, diesel fuel, and their blends.

  1. Characterization of Amylopectin irradiated by gamma rays using viscosity and radius gyration technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku Sarah Syahidah Ku Muhamad

    2012-01-01

    Food irradiation is one of the most applicable methods that have been used in food industry especially to preserve food. Besides preservation of food, irradiation can also reduce microorganism, inhibit budding and others. However, this method can be misused by some irresponsible organization or person such as irradiate the food over the dose limit value. Therefore, the detection method is important to detect any misused in irradiation method. The objective of this research is to identify any changes in the structure of amylopectin by using radius gyration technique. Besides that, the viscosity of the sample is also determined by using Rheometer. The last objective of this research is to find a relationship between radius gyration and irradiation dose can be determined. Amylopectin and cassava powder were the sample in this research. The samples were irradiated in the gamma-cell at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, and 10.0 kGy doses. 0 kGy were the controlled sample. The sample were made into gel to analysed using Rheometer and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). The viscosity of the sample were analysed by using Rheometer while the radius gyration of the sample were analysed by using SAXS. Hence, the result of this experiment is, the viscosity of amylopectin reduces as the doses increases. But, at 10 kGy, the viscosity of the cassava starch was increased significantly. For the SAXS analysis, it is shows that the graph for amylopectin were fluctuates. While, for cassava starch the radius gyration increases with doses. Hence, the rheometer technique is suitable to be develop as a detection method in food irradiation. Further research should be done to improve the detection technique in food irradiation. (author)

  2. On the Measurements of Numerical Viscosity and Resistivity in Eulerian MHD Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rembiasz, Tomasz; Obergaulinger, Martin; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; Aloy, Miguel-Ángel [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad de Valencia, C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); Müller, Ewald, E-mail: tomasz.rembiasz@uv.es [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-06-01

    We propose a simple ansatz for estimating the value of the numerical resistivity and the numerical viscosity of any Eulerian MHD code. We test this ansatz with the help of simulations of the propagation of (magneto)sonic waves, Alfvén waves, and the tearing mode (TM) instability using the MHD code Aenus. By comparing the simulation results with analytical solutions of the resistive-viscous MHD equations and an empirical ansatz for the growth rate of TMs, we measure the numerical viscosity and resistivity of Aenus. The comparison shows that the fast magnetosonic speed and wavelength are the characteristic velocity and length, respectively, of the aforementioned (relatively simple) systems. We also determine the dependence of the numerical viscosity and resistivity on the time integration method, the spatial reconstruction scheme and (to a lesser extent) the Riemann solver employed in the simulations. From the measured results, we infer the numerical resolution (as a function of the spatial reconstruction method) required to properly resolve the growth and saturation level of the magnetic field amplified by the magnetorotational instability in the post-collapsed core of massive stars. Our results show that it is most advantageous to resort to ultra-high-order methods (e.g., the ninth-order monotonicity-preserving method) to tackle this problem properly, in particular, in three-dimensional simulations.

  3. Theory of the high-frequency limiting viscosity of a dilute polymer solution. Pt. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, M; Nakajima, H; Wada, Y

    1976-06-01

    High-frequency limiting viscosities of dilute polymer solutions are calculated on the basis of the author's previous theory for (1) necklace model of a chain with constant bond length and bond angle under a hindering rotational potential, and (2) broken rod model consisting of N rods with equal length connected by universal joints. Exact treatment is possible for a once-broken rod model, but the Monte Carlo method is used in the other calculations.

  4. Extensional flow of low-viscosity fluids in capillary bridges formed by pulsed surface acoustic wave jetting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, P K; McDonnell, A G; Prabhakar, R; Yeo, L Y; Friend, J, E-mail: james.friend@monash.edu.au [MicroNanophysics Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800 (Australia); Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication, Melbourne, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2011-02-15

    Forming capillary bridges of low-viscosity ({approx}<10 mPa s) fluids is difficult, making the study of their capillary-thinning behavior and the measurement of the fluid's extensional viscosity difficult as well. Current techniques require some time to form a liquid bridge from the stretching of a droplet. Rapidly stretching a liquid bridge using these methods can cause its breakup if the viscosity is too low. Stretching more slowly allows the bridge to thin and break up before a suitable bridge geometry can be established to provide reliable and accurate rheological data. Using a pulsed surface acoustic wave to eject a jet from a sessile droplet, a capillary bridge may be formed in about 7.5 ms, about seven times quicker than current methods. With this approach, capillary bridges may be formed from Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids having much lower viscosities-water, 0.04% by weight solution of high-molecular-weight (7 MDa) polystyrene in dioctyl phthalate and 0.25% fibrinogen solution in demineralized water, for example. Details of the relatively simple system used to achieve these results are provided, as are experimental results indicating deviations from a Newtonian response by the low-viscosity non-Newtonian fluids used in our study.

  5. Extensional flow of low-viscosity fluids in capillary bridges formed by pulsed surface acoustic wave jetting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, P K; McDonnell, A G; Prabhakar, R; Yeo, L Y; Friend, J

    2011-01-01

    Forming capillary bridges of low-viscosity (∼<10 mPa s) fluids is difficult, making the study of their capillary-thinning behavior and the measurement of the fluid's extensional viscosity difficult as well. Current techniques require some time to form a liquid bridge from the stretching of a droplet. Rapidly stretching a liquid bridge using these methods can cause its breakup if the viscosity is too low. Stretching more slowly allows the bridge to thin and break up before a suitable bridge geometry can be established to provide reliable and accurate rheological data. Using a pulsed surface acoustic wave to eject a jet from a sessile droplet, a capillary bridge may be formed in about 7.5 ms, about seven times quicker than current methods. With this approach, capillary bridges may be formed from Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids having much lower viscosities-water, 0.04% by weight solution of high-molecular-weight (7 MDa) polystyrene in dioctyl phthalate and 0.25% fibrinogen solution in demineralized water, for example. Details of the relatively simple system used to achieve these results are provided, as are experimental results indicating deviations from a Newtonian response by the low-viscosity non-Newtonian fluids used in our study.

  6. Magnetic Viscosity for Cyclostratigraphic Logging of Argillaceous Sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Tabbagh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic susceptibility (MS is currently used as a directly representative proxy for the study of climatic variations, and for cyclostratigraphic studies. It depends on the concentration of magnetic minerals in the rocks, but does not allow identifying the magnetic minerals. In the case of argillaceous sediments, the paramagnetism of clay particles often plays a major role in determining the magnitude of their magnetic susceptibility, while the presence of ferrimagnetic iron oxides or sulfides cannot be assessedusing susceptibility measurements alone. Among the different methods that can be used to detect ferrimagnetic particles magnetic viscosity (MV characterizing the delay corresponding to the acquisition or loss of induced magnetization, has the same advantages as MS. Itsmeasurement is direct, rapid and has been proven to be very efficient in detecting the presence of secondary ferrimagnetic minerals in soils. A MV measurement technique was tested on cores taken from a borehole, in Callovian-Oxfordian formations in the eastern Paris Basin (France (Fig. 1. Although the MV values are very small, they have cyclic variations of which strongest values are found at the base of the Lower Oxfordian. These values, when correlated to MS,Gamma Ray (GR and a sequential interpretation of a borehole drilled close-by are found to be associated with the maximum clay fraction in the core samples, a MS maximum, and a major transgression event. Consequently, a significant increase in ferrimagnetic minerals can be associated with this event.

  7. Photo-oxidation of LDPE: Effects on elongational viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolón-Garrido, Víctor H.; Wagner, Manfred H.

    2013-04-01

    Sheets of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) were photo-oxidatively treated at room temperature, and subsequently characterized rheologically in the melt state by shear and uniaxial extensional experiments. For photo-oxidation, a xenon lamp was used to irradiate the samples for times between 1 day and 6 weeks. Linear-viscoelastic characterization was performed in a temperature range of 130 to 220°C to obtain the master curve at 170°C, the reference temperature at which the elongational viscosities were measured. Linear viscoelasticity is increasingly affected by increasing photo-oxidation due to crosslinking of LDPE, as corroborated by an increasing gel fraction as determined by a solvent extraction method. The elongational measurements reveal a strong enhancement of strain hardening until a saturation level is achieved. The elongational data are analyzed in the frame work of two constitutive equations, the rubber-like liquid and the molecular stress function models. Within the experimental window, time-deformation separability is confirmed for all samples, independent of the degree of photo-oxidation.

  8. Dynamical vanishing of the order parameter in a confined Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer Fermi gas after an interaction quench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, S.; Kettmann, P.; Croitoru, M. D.; Axt, V. M.; Kuhn, T.

    2018-01-01

    We present a numerical study of the Higgs mode in an ultracold confined Fermi gas after an interaction quench and find a dynamical vanishing of the superfluid order parameter. Our calculations are done within a microscopic density-matrix approach in the Bogoliubov-de Gennes framework which takes the three-dimensional cigar-shaped confinement explicitly into account. In this framework, we study the amplitude mode of the order parameter after interaction quenches starting on the BCS side of the BEC-BCS crossover close to the transition and ending in the BCS regime. We demonstrate the emergence of a dynamically vanishing superfluid order parameter in the spatiotemporal dynamics in a three-dimensional trap. Further, we show that the signal averaged over the whole trap mirrors the spatiotemporal behavior and allows us to systematically study the effects of the system size and aspect ratio on the observed dynamics. Our analysis enables us to connect the confinement-induced modifications of the dynamics to the pairing properties of the system. Finally, we demonstrate that the signature of the Higgs mode is contained in the dynamical signal of the condensate fraction, which, therefore, might provide a new experimental access to the nonadiabatic regime of the Higgs mode.

  9. Control of radio degradation of natural polymers by measurement of viscosity and molecular weight determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabinger Machado, Patricia; Cerchietti, Maria Luciana; Mondino, Angel V.; Smolko, Eduardo E.

    2009-01-01

    Applications are now being made in various fields of oligosaccharides obtained by the depolymerization of large molecules such as natural alginates, carrageenan, pectin and chitosan. Find use in various disciplines such as crop production, sanitation, pharmacy, cosmetics, etc. Given the diversity of origins of these materials, almost all of marine origin, was the need for universal methods for recognition and composition, then the possible ways to get processed. A centralized program by the IAEA is promoting the use of ionizing radiation for these changes. This paper resents the calculations used to obtain the molecular weight of polysaccharides from determinations of viscosity. It has been found the molecular weight of sodium alginate and kappa-carrageenan irradiated with cobalt-60 gamma rays at doses between 2 and 35 kGy in solid state. We used a capillary Cannon Viscometer Ubbelohde-type and a protocol for standardized calculation procedure for this purpose. Were obtained reading times for passage through the capillary Viscometer, with various concentrations of polymer solutions of virgin material and the irradiated and from there calculated the relative viscosities, specific, inherent, reduced and intrinsic and then using the ratio of Mark-Houwink-SAKURADA calculate the viscosity average molecular weight of the different polymers. The changes found in the molecular weights by radio-depolymerization reach two orders of magnitude in some cases giving oligosaccharides of 8-12 monomer units. It is considered that this depolymerization method is effective and inexpensive compared to enzymatic or chemical methods. (author)

  10. The influence of tongue strength on oral viscosity discrimination acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catriona M

    2018-06-01

    The ability to generate tongue pressures is widely considered to be critical for liquid bolus propulsion in swallowing. It has been proposed that the application of tongue pressure may also serve the function of collecting sensory information regarding bolus viscosity (resistance to flow). In this study, we explored the impact of age-related reductions in tongue strength on oral viscosity discrimination acuity. The experiment employed a triangle test discrimination protocol with an array of xanthan-gum thickened liquids in the mildly to moderately thick consistency range. A sample of 346 healthy volunteers was recruited, with age ranging from 12 to 86 (164 men, 182 women). On average, participants were able to detect a 0.29-fold increase in xanthan-gum concentration, corresponding to a 0.5-fold increase in viscosity at 50/s. Despite having significantly reduced tongue strength on maximum isometric tongue-palate pressure tasks, and regardless of sex, older participants in this study showed no reductions in viscosity discrimination acuity. In this article, the relationship between tongue strength and the ability to discriminate small differences in liquid viscosity during oral processing is explored. Given that tongue strength declines with age in healthy adults and is also reduced in individuals with dysphagia, it is interesting to determine whether reduced tongue strength might contribute to difficulties in evaluating liquid viscosity during the oral stage of swallowing. Using an array of mildly to moderately thick xanthan-gum thickened liquids, this experiment failed to find any evidence that reductions in tongue strength influence oral viscosity discrimination acuity. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Carbohydrate composition, viscosity, solubility, and sensory acceptance of sweetpotato- and maize-based complementary foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amagloh, Francis Kweku; Mutukumira, Anthony N.; Brough, Louise; Weber, Janet L.; Hardacre, Allan; Coad, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Background Cereal-based complementary foods from non-malted ingredients form a relatively high viscous porridge. Therefore, excessive dilution, usually with water, is required to reduce the viscosity to be appropriate for infant feeding. The dilution invariably leads to energy and nutrient thinning, that is, the reduction of energy and nutrient densities. Carbohydrate is the major constituent of food that significantly influences viscosity when heated in water. Objectives To compare the sweetpotato-based complementary foods (extrusion-cooked ComFa, roller-dried ComFa, and oven-toasted ComFa) and enriched Weanimix (maize-based formulation) regarding their 1) carbohydrate composition, 2) viscosity and water solubility index (WSI), and 3) sensory acceptance evaluated by sub-Sahara African women as model caregivers. Methods The level of simple sugars/carbohydrates was analysed by spectrophotometry, total dietary fibre by enzymatic-gravimetric method, and total carbohydrate and starch levels estimated by calculation. A Rapid Visco™ Analyser was used to measure viscosity. WSI was determined gravimetrically. A consumer sensory evaluation was used to evaluate the product acceptance of the roller-dried ComFa, oven-toasted ComFa, and enriched Weanimix. Results The sweetpotato-based complementary foods were, on average, significantly higher in maltose, sucrose, free glucose and fructose, and total dietary fibre, but they were markedly lower in starch content compared with the levels in the enriched Weanimix. Consequently, the sweetpotato-based complementary foods had relatively low apparent viscosity, and high WSI, than that of enriched Weanimix. The scores of sensory liking given by the caregivers were highest for the roller-dried ComFa, followed by the oven-toasted ComFa, and, finally, the enriched Weanimix. Conclusion The sweetpotato-based formulations have significant advantages as complementary food due to the high level of endogenous sugars and low starch content that

  12. Determination of Viscosity Versus Pressure by Means of a Clearance Seal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Schmidt Hansen, Niels; Lund, Martin Thomas Overdahl

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes the construction and testing of a simple, experimental tool setup that enables determination of the pressure–viscosity relationship for high viscosity oils. Comparing the determined pressure–viscosity relationship with a reference rheometer measuring the viscosity at ambient ...

  13. Structural and molecular basis of starch viscosity in hexaploid wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ral, J-P; Cavanagh, C R; Larroque, O; Regina, A; Morell, M K

    2008-06-11

    Wheat starch is considered to have a low paste viscosity relative to other starches. Consequently, wheat starch is not preferred for many applications as compared to other high paste viscosity starches. Increasing the viscosity of wheat starch is expected to increase the functionality of a range of wheat flour-based products in which the texture is an important aspect of consumer acceptance (e.g., pasta, and instant and yellow alkaline noodles). To understand the molecular basis of starch viscosity, we have undertaken a comprehensive structural and rheological analysis of starches from a genetically diverse set of wheat genotypes, which revealed significant variation in starch traits including starch granule protein content, starch-associated lipid content and composition, phosphate content, and the structures of the amylose and amylopectin fractions. Statistical analysis highlighted the association between amylopectin chains of 18-25 glucose residues and starch pasting properties. Principal component analysis also identified an association between monoesterified phosphate and starch pasting properties in wheat despite the low starch-phosphate level in wheat as compared to tuber starches. We also found a strong negative correlation between the phosphate ester content and the starch content in flour. Previously observed associations between internal starch granule fatty acids and the swelling peak time and pasting temperature have been confirmed. This study has highlighted a range of parameters associated with increased starch viscosity that could be used in prebreeding/breeding programs to modify wheat starch pasting properties.

  14. Calculated viscosity-distance dependence for some actively flowing lavas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieri, D.

    1987-01-01

    The importance of viscosity as a gauge of the various energy and momentum dissipation regimes of lava flows has been realized for a long time. Nevertheless, despite its central role in lava dynamics and kinematics, it remains among the most difficult of flow physical properties to measure in situ during an eruption. Attempts at reconstructing the actual emplacement viscosities of lava flows from their solidified topographic form are difficult. Where data are available on the position of an advancing flow front as a function of time, it is possible to calculate the effective viscosity of the front as a function of distance from the vent, under the assumptions of a steady state regime. As an application and test of an equation given, relevant parameters from five recent flows on Mauna Loa and Kilauea were utilized to infer the dynamic structure of their aggregate flow front viscosity as they advanced, up to cessation. The observed form of the viscosity-distance relation for the five active Hawaiian flows examined appears to be exponential, with a rapid increase just before the flows stopped as one would expect

  15. Viscosity of diluted suspensions of vegetal particles in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szydłowska Adriana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Viscosity and rheological behaviour of sewage as well as sludge are essential while designing apparatuses and operations employed in the sewage treatment process and its processing. With reference to these substances, the bio-suspensions samples of three size fractions ((i 150÷212 μm, (ii 106÷150 μm and (iii below106 μm of dry grass in water with solid volume fraction 8%, 10% and 11% were prepared. After twenty four hours prior to their preparation time, the suspension samples underwent rheometeric measurements with the use of a rotational rheometer with coaxial cylinders. On the basis of the obtained results, flow curves were plotted and described with both the power model and Herschel-Bulkley model. Moreover, the viscosity of the studied substances was determined that allowed to conclude that the studied bio-suspensions display features of viscoelastic fluids. The experimentally established viscosity was compared to the calculated one according to Manley and Manson equation, recommended in the literature. It occurred that the measured viscosity values substantially exceed the calculation viscosity values, even by 105 times. The observations suggest that it stems from water imbibition of fibrous vegetal particles, which causes their swelling and decreases the amount of liquid phase in the suspension.

  16. Dynamic viscosity study of barley malt and chicory concentrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. O. Magomedov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of research is to find optimal conditions for dispersing and subsequent dehydration of liquid food environments in the nozzle spray drying chamber through the study of dynamic changes in viscosity according to temperature, velocities gradients and dry residue content. The objects of study were roasted chicory and malt barley concentrates with dry residue content of 20, 40, 60 and 80%. Research of dynamic viscosity were carried out at the measuring complex based on the rotational viscometer Rheotest II, analog-to-digital converter, module Laurent and a personal computer with a unique software that allows to record in real time (not only on a tape recorder, but also in the form of graphic files the behavior of the viscosity characteristics of concentrates. Registration of changes of dynamic viscosity was carried out at a shear rate gradient from 1,0 с -1 to 27,0 с -1 and the products temperature thermostating : 35, 55, 75˚ C. The research results are presented in the form of graphic dependences of effective viscosity on shear rate and flow curves (dependencies of shear stresses on the velocity gradient, which defined flow regimes, the optimal modes of dispersion concentrates into spray dryer chambers in obtaining of powdered semi-finished products and instanting were found: dry residue content - 40 %, concentrate temperature - 75 ˚C, velocity gradient in the air channel of the nozzle at least 20 c-1

  17. Drop splashing: the role of surface wettability and liquid viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almohammadi, Hamed; Amirfazli, Alidad; -Team

    2017-11-01

    There are seemingly contradictory results in the literature about the role of surface wettability and drop viscosity for the splashing behavior of a drop impacting onto a surface. Motivated by such issues, we conducted a systematic experimental study where splashing behavior for a wide range of the liquid viscosity (1-100 cSt) and surface wettability (hydrophilic to hydrophobic) are examined. The experiments were performed for the liquids with both low and high surface tensions ( 20 and 72 mN/m). We found that the wettability affects the splashing threshold at high or low contact angle values. At the same drop velocity, an increase of the viscosity (up to 4 cSt) promotes the splashing; while, beyond such value, any increase in viscosity shows the opposite effect. It is also found that at a particular combination of liquid surface tension and viscosity (e.g. silicone oil, 10 cSt), an increase in the drop velocity changes the splashing to spreading. We relate such behaviors to the thickness, shape, and the velocity of the drop's lamella. Finally, to predict the splashing, we developed an empirical correlation which covers all of the previous reported data, hence clarifying the ostensible existing contradictions.

  18. Bulk viscosity, interaction and the viability of phantom solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyva, Yoelsy; Sepulveda, Mirko [Universidad de Tarapaca, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Arica (Chile)

    2017-06-15

    We study the dynamics of a bulk viscosity model in the Eckart approach for a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) Universe. We have included radiation and dark energy, assumed as perfect fluids, and dark matter treated as an imperfect fluid having bulk viscosity. We also introduce an interaction term between the dark matter and dark energy components. Considering that the bulk viscosity is proportional to the dark matter energy density and imposing a complete cosmological dynamics, we find bounds on the bulk viscosity in order to reproduce a matter-dominated era (MDE). This constraint is independent of the interaction term. Some late time phantom solutions are mathematically possible. However, the constraint imposed by a MDE restricts the interaction parameter, in the phantom solutions, to a region consistent with a null value, eliminating the possibility of late time stable solutions with w < -1. From the different cases that we study, the only possible scenario, with bulk viscosity and interaction term, belongs to the quintessence region. In the latter case, we find bounds on the interaction parameter compatible with latest observational data. (orig.)

  19. The effect of gasses on the viscosity of dimethyl ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Jakobsen, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    media, but their effect on DME viscosity is unknown. Argon (Ar), nitrogen (NA carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen (H-2) and propane (C3H8) have been investigated at pressure levels of 12-15 bar. A Cannon-Manning semi-micro capillary glass viscometer, size 25, enclosed in a cylindrical pressure container......, of glass, submerged completely in a constant temperature bath, has been used. A distinct reduction of efflux times was found only for the gas, CO2. The reduction in efflux time was about 9%. The kinematic viscosity of pure DME was determined to be: 0.188 +/- 0.001 cSt, 25 degrees C. A previously reported...... viscosity of pure DME has been corrected for the surface tension effect. Viscosity determination was initially based on a direct comparison of efflux times of DME with that of distilled water. The calculation gave a revised viscosity of 0.186 +/- 0.002 cSt, 25 degrees C, consistent with the above...

  20. The effect of compressive viscosity and thermal conduction on the longitudinal MHD waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahari, K.; Shahhosaini, N.

    2018-05-01

    longitudinal Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations have been studied in a slowly cooling coronal loop, in the presence of thermal conduction and compressive viscosity, in the linear MHD approximation. WKB method has been used to solve the governing equations. In the leading order approximation the dispersion relation has been obtained, and using the first order approximation the time dependent amplitude has been determined. Cooling causes the oscillations to amplify and damping mechanisms are more efficient in hot loops. In cool loops the oscillation amplitude increases with time but in hot loops the oscillation amplitude decreases with time. Our conclusion is that in hot loops the efficiency of the compressive viscosity in damping longitudinal waves is comparable to that of the thermal conduction.