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Sample records for vander stoep gail

  1. VanderLaan Circulant Type Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulant matrices have become a satisfactory tools in control methods for modern complex systems. In the paper, VanderLaan circulant type matrices are presented, which include VanderLaan circulant, left circulant, and g-circulant matrices. The nonsingularity of these special matrices is discussed by the surprising properties of VanderLaan numbers. The exact determinants of VanderLaan circulant type matrices are given by structuring transformation matrices, determinants of well-known tridiagonal matrices, and tridiagonal-like matrices. The explicit inverse matrices of these special matrices are obtained by structuring transformation matrices, inverses of known tridiagonal matrices, and quasi-tridiagonal matrices. Three kinds of norms and lower bound for the spread of VanderLaan circulant and left circulant matrix are given separately. And we gain the spectral norm of VanderLaan g-circulant matrix.

  2. Vander Woude′s syndrome: The rarest of the rare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Advani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common developmental defects seen in south India is cleft lip and palate. Among them a few are associated with lip pits and termed as Vander Woude′s syndrome. The early diagnosis of this rare syndrome is very necessary followed by a multidisciplinary approach. It is also necessary to differentiate this syndrome from the other syndromes which may present similar features. A case report of the same is presented here requiring a multidisciplinary approach for a functional and esthetically pleasing outcome.

  3. Gail Harlamoff: Executive Director, Life Lab Science Program

    OpenAIRE

    Rabkin, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Gail Harlamoff is Executive Director of the Life Lab Science Program, a nationally recognized, award-winning nonprofit science and environmental organization located on the UC Santa Cruz campus. Founded in 1979, Life Lab helps schools develop gardens and implement curricula to enhance students’ learning about science, math, and the natural world. The program has trained tens of thousands of educators in more than 1400 schools across the country. Life Lab’s specialized initiatives inc...

  4. Beyond botany to genetic resource preservation: the S. P. Vander Kloet Vaccinium L. collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. S. P. Vander Kloet, botanist, traveled the world examining and obtaining specimens to redefine infrageneric taxonomic units within Vaccinium L., family Ericaceae. Besides his botanical treatises, his legacy includes herbarium voucher specimens and ex situ genetic resource collections including a...

  5. Transcribing Gail Jefferson: The 1977 Boston talk as it actually was

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice Richard

    2015-01-01

    A talk by Gail Jefferson, one of the founders of Conversation Analysis, has been recently made available, and Maurice Nevile undertook to transcribe it for the benefit of the language-in-interaction community. Here he reports on what it meant to him, and what we can all get out of such a powerful...

  6. Assessing Breast Cancer Risk Estimates Based on the Gail Model and Its Predictors in Qatari Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bener, Abdulbari; Çatan, Funda; El Ayoubi, Hanadi R; Acar, Ahmet; Ibrahim, Wanis H

    2017-07-01

    The Gail model is the most widely used breast cancer risk assessment tool. An accurate assessment of individual's breast cancer risk is very important for prevention of the disease and for the health care providers to make decision on taking chemoprevention for high-risk women in clinical practice in Qatar. To assess the breast cancer risk among Arab women population in Qatar using the Gail model and provide a global comparison of risk assessment. In this cross-sectional study of 1488 women (aged 35 years and older), we used the Gail Risk Assessment Tool to assess the risk of developing breast cancer. Sociodemographic features such as age, lifestyle habits, body mass index, breast-feeding duration, consanguinity among parents, and family history of breast cancer were considered as possible risks. The mean age of the study population was 47.8 ± 10.8 years. Qatari women and Arab women constituted 64.7% and 35.3% of the study population, respectively. The mean 5-year and lifetime breast cancer risks were 1.12 ± 0.52 and 10.57 ± 3.1, respectively. Consanguineous marriage among parents was seen in 30.6% of participants. We found a relationship between the 5-year and lifetime risks of breast cancer and variables such as age, age at menarche, gravidity, parity, body mass index, family history of cancer, menopause age, occupation, and level of education. The linear regression analysis identified the predictors for breast cancer in women such as age, age at menarche, age of first birth, family history and age of menopausal were considered the strong predictors and significant contributing risk factors for breast cancer after adjusting for ethnicity, parity and other variables. The current study is the first to evaluate the performance of the Gail model for Arab women population in the Gulf Cooperation Council. Gail model is an appropriate breast cancer risk assessment tool for female population in Qatar.

  7. “It Is Really a Big Achievement for a Small Community Like the One of Curaçao.” Jan Greshoff (1888–1971 and De Stoep (1940–1951: An Exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bant Willem

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available During the Second World War, both in the Dutch East Indies and in Curaçao, journals were published in which Dutch authors could publish their works unhampered by German censorship. In addition, literary works in Dutch were published in the Dutch East Indies, South Africa and New York. A man involved in all these initiatives was Jan Greshoff, an author who had played an important role in Dutch literature during the time between the two world wars. In this article, the role of Greshoff in relation to the literary journal De Stoep, which originated in Curaçao after the German occupation of Holland in 1940, will be explored. Although he never went to Curaçao and never met the journal’s founder, Luc. Tournier, in person, Greshoff played an important role in the history of De Stoep during the years of the war, and thus indirectly in the development of Dutch literature in Curaçao.

  8. Transcription of Gail Jefferson, Boston University Conference on Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis, 9 June 1977

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice Richard

    2015-01-01

    This is a CLAN transcription of the film recording of a conference talk by Gail Jefferson in Boston in 1977. The film recording was generously made available by George Psathas, Emeritus Professor of Sociology at Boston University. Prof Doug Maynard (University of Wisconsin) arranged for the origi...... paralleling the talk’s content, under the heading ‘The Boston talk (as it never was)’ (p.2) - this would therefore seem to be adapted from Hopper’s transcription. So in my transcription I aim to give a clearer sense of the Boston talk as it actually was.......This is a CLAN transcription of the film recording of a conference talk by Gail Jefferson in Boston in 1977. The film recording was generously made available by George Psathas, Emeritus Professor of Sociology at Boston University. Prof Doug Maynard (University of Wisconsin) arranged...... for the original film recording to be digitised. Jefferson later developed elements of her 1977 talk into the paper ‘On the poetics of ordinary talk’ (Jefferson. G. 1996, in Text and Performance Quarterly, 16,1:1-61). An indication of the significance of the talk is given in that paper’s abstract, where Jefferson...

  9. Madness Decolonized?: Madness as Transnational Identity in Gail Hornstein's Agnes's Jacket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gavin

    2017-02-13

    The US psychologist Gail Hornstein's monograph, Agnes's Jacket: A Psychologist's Search for the Meanings of Madness (2009), is an important intervention in the identity politics of the mad movement. Hornstein offers a resignified vision of mad identity that embroiders the central trope of an "anti-colonial" struggle to reclaim the experiential world "colonized" by psychiatry. A series of literal and figurative appeals makes recourse to the inner world and (corresponding) cultural world of the mad as well as to the ethno-symbolic cultural materials of dormant nationhood. This rhetoric is augmented by a model in which the mad comprise a diaspora without an origin, coalescing into a single transnational community. The mad are also depicted as persons displaced from their metaphorical homeland, the "inner" world "colonized" by the psychiatric regime. There are a number of difficulties with Hornstein's rhetoric, however. Her "ethnicity-and-rights" response to the oppression of the mad is symptomatic of Western parochialism, while her proposed transmutation of putative psychopathology from limit upon identity to parameter of successful identity is open to contestation. Moreover, unless one accepts Hornstein's porous vision of mad identity, her self-ascribed insider status in relation to the mad community may present a problematic "re-colonization" of mad experience.

  10. Advanced optical correlation and digital methods for pattern matching—50th anniversary of Vander Lugt matched filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, María S.

    2012-10-01

    On the verge of the 50th anniversary of Vander Lugt’s formulation for pattern matching based on matched filtering and optical correlation, we acknowledge the very intense research activity developed in the field of correlation-based pattern recognition during this period of time. The paper reviews some domains that appeared as emerging fields in the last years of the 20th century and have been developed later on in the 21st century. Such is the case of three-dimensional (3D) object recognition, biometric pattern matching, optical security and hybrid optical-digital processors. 3D object recognition is a challenging case of multidimensional image recognition because of its implications in the recognition of real-world objects independent of their perspective. Biometric recognition is essentially pattern recognition for which the personal identification is based on the authentication of a specific physiological characteristic possessed by the subject (e.g. fingerprint, face, iris, retina, and multifactor combinations). Biometric recognition often appears combined with encryption-decryption processes to secure information. The optical implementations of correlation-based pattern recognition processes still rely on the 4f-correlator, the joint transform correlator, or some of their variants. But the many applications developed in the field have been pushing the systems for a continuous improvement of their architectures and algorithms, thus leading towards merged optical-digital solutions.

  11. Advanced optical correlation and digital methods for pattern matching—50th anniversary of Vander Lugt matched filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millán, María S

    2012-01-01

    On the verge of the 50th anniversary of Vander Lugt’s formulation for pattern matching based on matched filtering and optical correlation, we acknowledge the very intense research activity developed in the field of correlation-based pattern recognition during this period of time. The paper reviews some domains that appeared as emerging fields in the last years of the 20th century and have been developed later on in the 21st century. Such is the case of three-dimensional (3D) object recognition, biometric pattern matching, optical security and hybrid optical–digital processors. 3D object recognition is a challenging case of multidimensional image recognition because of its implications in the recognition of real-world objects independent of their perspective. Biometric recognition is essentially pattern recognition for which the personal identification is based on the authentication of a specific physiological characteristic possessed by the subject (e.g. fingerprint, face, iris, retina, and multifactor combinations). Biometric recognition often appears combined with encryption–decryption processes to secure information. The optical implementations of correlation-based pattern recognition processes still rely on the 4f-correlator, the joint transform correlator, or some of their variants. But the many applications developed in the field have been pushing the systems for a continuous improvement of their architectures and algorithms, thus leading towards merged optical–digital solutions. (review article)

  12. Air/delta/sea surface temperature, pressure, and other data from MISS GAIL in a world-wide distribution from 21 October 1957 to 18 April 1961 (NODC Accession 0000366)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Air/delta/sea surface temperature, pressure, and other data were collected from the MISS GAIL in a world-wide distribution from October 21, 1957 to April 18, 1961....

  13. Holistic Spirituality in Gail Godwin’s Life and Fiction: Father Melancholy’s Daughter, The Good Husband, and Evensong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine LUX

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cet essaise concentre sur la qualité holistique du voyage spirituel féminin qui est explorée essentiellement ici à travers deux personnages importants des romans de Gail Godwin (Margaret Gower dans Father Melancholy’s Daughter et Evensong, et Magda Danvers dans The Good Husbandainsi que par le biais d’une interview que Godwin a accordée à Elaine Lux en 2009. La spiritualité exprimée par Godwin, dans sa vie et sa fiction, a une qualité holistique en cela qu’elle met l’accent sur la spiritualité comme quête et processus, et non seulement comme résultat. Il s’agit d’un voyage héroïque qui explore tour à tour la maturation, l’amour, l’individualisation, la créativité, et l’intégration psychologique. On y rencontre « the sacred kingdom within» (Heart, 83 mais aussi une tradition chrétienne qui s’inscrit dans le contexte d’autres traditions et enseignements. Cet article entrelace les histoires de ces trois femmes, en analysant l’amour et le mariage dans le contexte de la spiritualité, la quête spirituelle comme voyage héroïque, et des analogies bibliques du voyage spirituel féminin. Dans The Good Husband, Magda Danvers, professeur d’anglais visionnaire et prophète, affiche une personnalité forte tandis que Margaret Gower, ministre du culte dans une église épiscopalienne, est un personnage plus stable et plus humble, dont le cheminement spirituel est plus lent et moins spectaculaire. Godwin n’a pas le magnétisme puissant de Magda, ni le dévouement de Margaret, mais les deux personnages sont inclus dans l’écrivaine, car elle les a imaginés, ainsi que leur spiritualité. Pour les trois femmes, amour et quête spirituelle s’entremêlent et s’inscrivent dans l’instant présent tout en laissant deviner une autre réalité. Le mariage est la métaphore spirituelle de l’union de l’âme avec le Christ et un symbole Jungien du soi divisé qui a besoin de synthétiser ses contraires

  14. Integrating research and practice for optimal clinical outcomes: an interview with Tim Porter-O'Grady. Interview by Gail S Wick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter-O'Grady, T

    1996-06-01

    Dr. Porter-O'Grady has written over 125 articles and book chapters and has published eight books and is completing a ninth. He has consulted with over 500 institutions and has spoken in 1300 settings in the U.S., Canada, Europe, and Asia and logs about 350,000 miles a year. Dr. Porter-O'Grady is listed in six different categories of Who's Who in America, serves on 7 editorial boards, and is a member of the New York Academy of Sciences and a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing. He has served on a number of community boards and has been an elected officer in a variety of health related agencies and organizations. He is currently a health systems expert for the National Health Policy Council and is a member of the Georgia Health Care Reform Project. In this interview, which took place in Atlanta by ANNA Past President Gail Wick, Dr. Porter-O'Grady shares his wealth of knowledge and experience by challenging us to move beyond the old thinking of caring for a specific patient population to managing lives on a continuum of care in an interdependent relationship with other providers, to refine the term "patient care," letting go of the medical sickness model and returning to our life-centered, health-oriented nursing roots and to broaden our educational preparation to a systems perspective and a continuum of caring.

  15. PERANAN Anopheles barbirostris VANDER WULP SEBAGAI PENULAR PENYAKIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Boesri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An. barbirostris is one of mosquito of the genus Anopheles and was classified as 23-57 old days. It can be found at rice fields and swamps at an altitude of 2770 meters above sea level. The most preferred habitat is fresh water and pH 6-7. It is anthropolophilic and endophilic. This species in some areas, especially in East Nusa Tenggara role in transmitting malaria and filariasis.   Key words: An. barbirostris

  16. The Precinct, the Stoep and the Agora as travelling Ideas for Urban Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Niels Boje

    2017-01-01

    Redesigning urban space has become integral to urban planning as a means of dealing with urban restructuring. It is about functional and spatial aspects. But also, it is about introducing new meanings into urban space when former meaning has become obsolete. In this article, the disappearance...... of retail shops from urban centres forms the impetus to a search for new meanings and designs of urban space. A transformation of obsolete urban centres into residential usage is considered. Three traditional urban elements are suggested as metaphors for a new hermeneutics of urban restructuring...

  17. Antony Osler. 2008. "Stoep Zen – A Zen Life in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pale sun sets. The shadows creep across my shoes. Soon it will be time for meditation, Then a whiskey (104). Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's ...

  18. Comments on Surrogates measures and consistent surrogates (by Tyler VanderWeele)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    as a criterion for “good” surrogate, why can’t we create a new, formal definition of “ surrogacy ” that (1) will automatically avoid the paradox and (2...requirement of avoiding the paradox could not, in itself, constitute a satisfactory definition of surrogacy . As with other paradoxes of causal...situation in practice. A treatment that has such a negative direct effect on outcome would rarely be a candidate for surrogacy analysis. In practice

  19. Breast cancer risk assessment by Gail Model in women of Baghdad

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salam Hussein Ewaid

    2016-09-22

    Sep 22, 2016 ... Age, level of education, smoking, body mass index, low physical ... detection and screening such as breast self-examination and ..... from 2000–2009 Asian Pac. ... pessimistic breast cancer risk perception in a primary care.

  20. 8. Gail Presbey Kenyan Sages on Equality of the sexes pp111-145

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gail

    command reasonable acceptance or appreciation (Odera Oruka 1991, 4–5). Therefore, Odera Oruka ..... sphere. Kaj Arhem's study of the Maasai found them hiding women, children, and small animals in the safety of ... dangerous predators while the men go out of the home to conduct business, graze the animals, or fend off ...

  1. Revolutionizing gender: Mariela Castro MS, director, National Sex Education Center, Cuba. Interview by Gail Reed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Mariela

    2012-04-01

    Medicine, social conditions, culture and politics are inextricably bound as determinants of health and wellbeing. In Cuba, perhaps this is nowhere more evident than in the arduous struggle to consider non-discriminatory analysis of gender-sensitive components as fundamental to population health, medical practice and research; national policy; and above all, public consciousness. Among the standard-bearers of this cause is Mariela Castro, psychologist and educator with a master's degree in sexuality, who directs the National Sex Education Center (CENESEX), its journal Sexologia y Sociedad, and the National Commission for Comprehensive Attention to Transsexual People. The Center's work is at the vortex of national polemics on sexuality, approaches to sex education and health, and respect for the human rights of people of differing sexual orientations and gender identities. The daughter of President Raúl Castro and the late Vilma Espín--who, as founder and leader of the Federation of Cuban Women, pioneered the defense of both women and homosexuals--Mariela Castro nevertheless speaks with her own voice in national as well as international debates. MEDICC Review talked with her about the range of issues that link gender to WHO's broad definition of health as the highest level of physical and mental wellbeing.

  2. Tata võidujooks Jaguarile ja Roverile / Gail Edmondson, David Welch

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Edmondson, Gail

    2007-01-01

    India autotöösturile Ratan N. Tata kuuluv Tata Motors soovib osta kahjumis olevad Jaguar Carsi ja Land Roveri, mille Ford Motor on enampakkumisele pannud. Kaasautor Nandini Lakshman. Diagramm: Briti brändidest kaugel ees

  3. Building method (concreting) for an offshore platform equipped with several cantilevered pillars. Fremgangsmaate for fremstilling (stoeping) av en fralandsplattform som har flere mot hverandre hellende stoetteben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, O.

    1985-07-29

    The invention deals with a building method for an offshore platform made of concrete comprising several cantilevered pillars. In accordance with the invention, the building work is to be started in a dry dock, and can be completed in the same place or in deep water. The pillars and the foundation are made as separate structures. The foundation can also be made as separate structures for each of the pillars. The vertical positioned pillars are made by means of moving forms, and finally put into cantilevered position and permanently connected to the foundation and the upper end arrangement. The structure then is to be completed in the normal way. 7 drawings.

  4. The human dimension of AIDS in Cuba: Jorge Pérez MD MS, Director, Pedro Kourí Tropical Medicine Institute. Interviewed by Gail Reed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Jorge

    2011-04-01

    Except for the people living with the disease, no others have so immersed themselves in Cuba's world of HIV/AIDS as Dr Jorge Pérez. It is a world of Cuban returnees from Angola's war against apartheid South Africa, gay and bisexual men, housewives, transactional sex workers, rebellious teenagers, and infected surgeons and scientists-a cultural kaleidoscope reflecting all the faces of AIDS. To more than one international author, he is simply "Cuba's AIDS doctor." Speaking to his patients at the Pedro Kourí Tropical Medicine Institute in Havana, it is easy to see why, but also to appreciate the courage, compassion, and persistent search for new knowledge that characterize the Institute's staff as a whole. Dr Pérez's story-now told in two books based on his diaries-is not his alone. MEDICC Review held two interview sessions with Jorge Pérez just days apart at the beginning of April: one before and one after his designation as the new Director of the Tropical Medicine Institute, where he previously served as Deputy Director and Chief of Hospital Services. More than strictly medical matters, the conversation turned to the human dimension of HIV/AIDS, the depth to which it has touched many directly and affected Cuban society as a whole, and the challenges ahead for Cuba's flagship institution for research and treatment of infectious diseases.

  5. Zonder kunst heeft cultuur te weinig waarde

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gerwen, R.C.H.M.

    2017-01-01

    Cultuur is hoe mensen hun leefwereld vorm geven: architectuur en stadsplanning, maar ook de Kalverstraat, het niet vegen van de stoep, de manier waarop we auto's stallen, de media: alles wat de publieke ruimte vorm geeft. De politiek zegt dat cultuur zichzelf moet terugverdienen, en dat doet ze ook:

  6. Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Capasso, Aik Choon Tan, John J Arcaroli, Alicia Purkey, Wells A Messersmith, Jeffery A Ecsedy, S Gail Eckhardt. Antitumor Activity of the Aurora A...Peter J Klauck, Anna Capasso, Aik Choon Tan, John J Arcaroli, Alicia Purkey, Wells A Messersmith, S Gail Eckhardt. Dual Compartmental Targeting of...Tentler, John J Arcaroli, Alicia Purkey, Wells A Messersmith, S Gail Eckhardt. Antitumor Activity of the Polo-Like Kinase 1 Inhibitor, TAK960, Against

  7. 78 FR 7813 - Sanjay Trivedi, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ....; Decision and Order On September 25, 2012, Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) Gail A. Randall issued the... record, I have decided to adopt the ALJ's rulings, findings of fact, conclusions of law, and recommended..., Conclusions of Law, and Decision of the Administrative Law Judge I. Facts Gail A. Randall, Administrative Law...

  8. ERKÜ valimiste tulemused

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    8. aprilli koosolekul kinnitas valimiste peakomitee XIX Esinduskogu liikmed: Mati Kõiva, Ylo Anson, Juhan Simonson, Airi Vaga, Gilda M. Karu, Taavo Virkhaus, Marju Rink-Abel, Markus Vaga, Eric Suuberg, Endel Reinpõld, Jaak Juhansoo, Ülle Ederma, Lya Karm, Heino Jõgis, Kersti Linask, Jaak Rakfeldt, Erik Puskar, Jüri Linask, Viiu Vanderer, Andres Kurrik, Mati Valdek Laan, Ilmar Vanderer, Henno Uus, Jüri Tults, Urmas Wompa, Astrid Jaanson, Jüri Virkus, Lilian G. G. Bein, Tiina Harris, Tõnu Vanderer

  9. Page Oriented Holographic Memories And Optical Pattern Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, H. J.

    1987-08-01

    In the twenty-two years since VanderLugt's introduction of holographic matched filtering, the intensive research carried out throughout the world has led to no applications in complex environment. This leads one to the suspicion that the VanderLugt filter technique is insufficiently complex to handle truly complex problems. Therefore, it is of great interest to increase the complexity of the VanderLugt filtering operation. We introduce here an approach to the real time filter assembly: use of page oriented holographic memories and optically addressed SLMs to achieve intelligent and fast reprogramming of the filters using a 10 4 to 10 6 stored pattern base.

  10. Physiological and molecular insights into drought tolerance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physiological and molecular insights into drought tolerance. Sagadevan G Mundree, Bienyameen Baker, Shaheen Mowla, Shaun Peters, Saberi Marais, Clare Vander Willigen, Kershini Govender, Alice Maredza, Samson Muyanga, Jill M Farrant, Jennifer A Thomson ...

  11. RESEARCH ARTICLE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-01-11

    Jan 11, 2017 ... ... in a Techne thermocycler, amplified products were multiplexed ..... attempt and the basis for future research and conservation planning in A. altamirani. ..... Zambrano L., Valiente E. and Vander Zanden M.J. 2010 Food web ...

  12. Disease: H01588 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available estlessness or agitation. Headaches often recur at the same time each day during the cluster period, which c...ug) ... AUTHORS ... VanderPluym J ... TITLE ... Cluster Headache: Special Considerations for Treatment of Female P

  13. Comparison of the Clock Test and a questionnaire-based test for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparison of the Clock Test and a questionnaire-based test for screening for cognitive impairment in Nigerians. D J VanderJagt, S Ganga, M O Obadofin, P Stanley, M Zimmerman, B J Skipper, R H Glew ...

  14. 77 FR 63840 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... and directions to the NIH campus, parking, and security procedures is available on the internet at... limited available parking, visitors are encouraged to use public transportation. Contact Person: Gail...

  15. 77 FR 27030 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Notice of Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... physically accessible to people with disabilities. Requests for sign language interpretation or other auxiliary aids should be directed to Gail Bendixen at 907-271-2809 at least 7 working days prior to the...

  16. 78 FR 59657 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... Accommodations These meetings are physically accessible to people with disabilities. Requests for sign language interpretation or other auxiliary aids should be directed to Gail Bendixen at (907) 271-2809 at least 7 working...

  17. 78 FR 4391 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... Guard (USCG) Report (Report on Aleutian Island Risk Assessment) United States Fish & Wildlife Service... interpretation or other auxiliary aids should be directed to Gail Bendixen at (907) 271-2809 at least 7 working...

  18. Korean risk assessment model for breast cancer risk prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Boyoung; Ma, Seung Hyun; Shin, Aesun; Chang, Myung-Chul; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Kim, Sungwan; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Park, Sue K

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of the Gail model for a Korean population and developed a Korean breast cancer risk assessment tool (KoBCRAT) based upon equations developed for the Gail model for predicting breast cancer risk. Using 3,789 sets of cases and controls, risk factors for breast cancer among Koreans were identified. Individual probabilities were projected using Gail's equations and Korean hazard data. We compared the 5-year and lifetime risk produced using the modified Gail model which applied Korean incidence and mortality data and the parameter estimators from the original Gail model with those produced using the KoBCRAT. We validated the KoBCRAT based on the expected/observed breast cancer incidence and area under the curve (AUC) using two Korean cohorts: the Korean Multicenter Cancer Cohort (KMCC) and National Cancer Center (NCC) cohort. The major risk factors under the age of 50 were family history, age at menarche, age at first full-term pregnancy, menopausal status, breastfeeding duration, oral contraceptive usage, and exercise, while those at and over the age of 50 were family history, age at menarche, age at menopause, pregnancy experience, body mass index, oral contraceptive usage, and exercise. The modified Gail model produced lower 5-year risk for the cases than for the controls (p = 0.017), while the KoBCRAT produced higher 5-year and lifetime risk for the cases than for the controls (pKorean women, especially urban women.

  19. Solid Phase Synthesis of Polymacromer and Copolymacromer Brushes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    between immiscible polymers, which dictates the volume in which the interfacial reaction can occur, depends on the nature of thermodynamic interactions...Y.; Beers , K. L.; Byrd, H. C. M.; VanderHart, D. L.; Washburn, N. R. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2004, 126, 3472−3476. (4) Merrifield, R. B. J. Am. Chem. Soc...Hartmann, L.; Krause, E.; Antonietti, M.; Boerner, H. G. Biomacromolecules 2006, 7, 1239−1244. (16) Mei, Y.; Beers , K. L.; Byrd, H. C. M.; VanderHart, D. L

  20. Developing a clinical utility framework to evaluate prediction models in radiogenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yirong; Liu, Jie; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Page, David C.; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2015-03-01

    Combining imaging and genetic information to predict disease presence and behavior is being codified into an emerging discipline called "radiogenomics." Optimal evaluation methodologies for radiogenomics techniques have not been established. We aim to develop a clinical decision framework based on utility analysis to assess prediction models for breast cancer. Our data comes from a retrospective case-control study, collecting Gail model risk factors, genetic variants (single nucleotide polymorphisms-SNPs), and mammographic features in Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We first constructed three logistic regression models built on different sets of predictive features: (1) Gail, (2) Gail+SNP, and (3) Gail+SNP+BI-RADS. Then, we generated ROC curves for three models. After we assigned utility values for each category of findings (true negative, false positive, false negative and true positive), we pursued optimal operating points on ROC curves to achieve maximum expected utility (MEU) of breast cancer diagnosis. We used McNemar's test to compare the predictive performance of the three models. We found that SNPs and BI-RADS features augmented the baseline Gail model in terms of the area under ROC curve (AUC) and MEU. SNPs improved sensitivity of the Gail model (0.276 vs. 0.147) and reduced specificity (0.855 vs. 0.912). When additional mammographic features were added, sensitivity increased to 0.457 and specificity to 0.872. SNPs and mammographic features played a significant role in breast cancer risk estimation (p-value < 0.001). Our decision framework comprising utility analysis and McNemar's test provides a novel framework to evaluate prediction models in the realm of radiogenomics.

  1. Surface Modification of Sputtered Ga. In. 5 Sb hin Films | Ishu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This can be interpreted as reduction in surface states induced by passivating oxide formed after Ru and Pt treatment. Electrical characterization of the film viz. Vander Pauw resistivity, Hall mobility etc. measurements also showed improved result compared to untreated and Pd treated surface and is been reported. Finally

  2. Explanation in causal inference methods for mediation and interaction

    CERN Document Server

    VanderWeele, Tyler

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive examination of methods for mediation and interaction, VanderWeele's book is the first to approach this topic from the perspective of causal inference. Numerous software tools are provided, and the text is both accessible and easy to read, with examples drawn from diverse fields. The result is an essential reference for anyone conducting empirical research in the biomedical or social sciences.

  3. Clasificación pronóstica de los tumores malignos de glándula parótida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Maza-Solano

    2016-01-01

    Conclusiones: El índice de Vander Poorten es aplicable en áreas hospitalarias con escaso número de carcinomas de parótida. Permite establecer un pronóstico de supervivencia más certero sobre pacientes individuales.

  4. insights from a linkage map of the damselfly Ischnura elegans

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tion of achiasmiatic meiosis. Biochem. Genet. 19, 1237–. 1245. Cooper G., Miller P. L. and Holland P. W. H. 1994 Molecular genetic analysis of sperm competition in the damselfly Ischnura elegans (Vander Linden). Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. B 263,. 1343–1349. Huxley J. S. 1928 Sexual differences in linkage in Gammar-.

  5. Highland Medical Research Journal - Vol 5, No 1 (2007)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Nutritional Status and Hydration in Patients on Chronic Hemodialysis by Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. A H Tzamaloukas, E I Agaba, A Onime, D J VanderJagt, I Ma, A Lopez, R Martinez, R A Tzamaloukas, R H ...

  6. Estrogen induces axonal outgrowth in the nucleus retroambiguus-lumbosacral motoneuronal pathway in the adult female cat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderHorst, VGJM; Holstege, G

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, we discovered a new pathway in the cat, which originates from the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) and terminates in a distinct set of lumbosacral hindlimb, axial, and pelvic floor motoneuronal cell groups [VanderHorst VG.JM, Holstege G (1995) Caudal medullary pathways to lumbosacral

  7. Female reproductive anatonlY and developnlent of ovarian follicles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    occurs before hibernation (Vander Merwe 1979), the cells of the cumulus oophorus do not show any marked hyper- trophy. Miniopterusjraterculus, the species under study, is a hibernating vespertilionid, and as in M. schreibersi ovula- tion occurs before hibernation. Although a large number of follicles begin development.

  8. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 144 ... Vol 6, No 2 (2005): Postgraduate Medical Education and Training, Challenges for undergraduates adn postgraduate medical education in Nigeria, Abstract. Anthony O Marinho. Vol 8, No 2 (2007):, Child health research in Nigeria: Challenges and opportunities, Abstract. R H Glew, D J Vander Jagt.

  9. Lakewoodi Eesti Ühingu juubel kujunes suurpidustuseks : sajad endised lakewoodlased jagasid meenutusi "vanadest aegadest" / Airi Vaga ; fotod: Rein Linask, Maie Currie

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vaga, Airi, 1940-

    2006-01-01

    ülevaade 1. - 3. sept. kestnud pidustusest. Ettekande eesti kogukonna tekkest esitas Bill Karjane, LEÜ esimees Tõnu Vanderer kinkis juubelialbumi kõikidele endistele ühingu esimeestele, esinesid rahvuskultuuri selts "Kajakas" Pärnust, oli muusikat, ühislaule

  10. Euroopa Majandus- ja Rahaliit ning rahapoliitika maailma kolmes peamises valuutaregioonis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2002-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Alternative exchange rate regimes in the globalised world : conference dedicated to the 10th anniversary of the re-introduction of the Estonian kroon. - Tallinn. Vestlusringis esinesid Euroopa Keskpanga esindaja Pierre Vander Haegen, Saksa Liidupanga asepresident Jürgen Stark, Keio ülikooli professor Eisuke Sakakibara, USA rahandusministeeriumi atashee Euroopas James G. Wallar

  11. The Genomic Evolution of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Fan X, Wang J, Antic T, VanderWeele DJ, Oto A. “Quantitative Multi- parametric MRI Features and PTEN Expression in Prostate Cancer”. American...of Clinical Research I have yet to complete • Principles of Clinical Pharmacology 11. OPPORTUNITIES FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: I had the

  12. Factors influencing Nigerian men's decision to undergo prostate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As a result of the increased incidence ... increased awareness, accessibility to testing services and the knowledge of the PSA test. ..... IQ.30.3.g. 6. Iya D, Chanchani S, Belmonte J, Morris D, Glew RH,. VanderJagt OJ. Prostate specific antigen in Africa: a study in Nigerian men. The Nigerian Journal of Surgical Research.

  13. Prima Vistale tuleb tuntud kirjanikke mitmest Euroopa riigist / Kaarel Kressa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kressa, Kaarel, 1983-

    2010-01-01

    Prima Vista kirjandusfestivali külalisi: Leonie Swann, Attila Bartis, Dmitri Bõkov, Zinaida Lindén, Mihhail Šiškin, Fay Weldon, Jason Goodwin, Rosa Maria Rodríguez Magda, Inga Gaile, Juris Kronbergs, Guntars Godinš, Liana Langa

  14. PATTERNS OF SEVEN AND COMPLICATED MALARIA IN CHILDREN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2017-09-01

    Sep 1, 2017 ... 2015 to March 2015 were included. Two control groups were included from the health facility and community. Simple random sampling technique ..... Tropical Medicine and International Health. 2006; 11:1136–1144. 30. Yordanos M, Jennifer B, Nicola W, Peter B,. Peter A, Melanie N, Gail D. Individual.

  15. Proceedings of the United States Air Force STINFO Officers Policy Conference - 1981,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    breakthrough might sound the death knell for the STI community. A new information community would fill the vacuum, they contended. The study was completed a...OH 45433 Knudtson, Gail AFWAL/TST Horseman , Hazel WPAFB OH 45433 AFWAL/TST WPAFB OH 45433 Kowalsky, Tom HQ MAC/XPSR Huff, Frank Scott AFB IL 62225

  16. U.S. Naval Observatory: The Move to Georgetown Heights and Double Star Work (1850-1950)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-14

    et al. 200B. 23.3 Bibliography BROWN, STIMSON JOSEPH: In: Astronomische Nachrichten 152 (1900), 329. BURLINGAME, M. AND J. R. TURNER ETTLINGER...Washington 1989. CLEERE, GAIL S.: The House on Observatory Hill. Wash- ington 1989. DAVIS, CHARLES HENRY: In: Astronomische Nachrichten 87 (1876), 241

  17. If I Had a Hammer (and Several Million Dollars): The Saga of the AIHEC Cultural Learning Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinger, Anne; Ambler, Marjane

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interview with Gail Bruce and Anne Ediger, who, in the early 1990s, conceived the idea of building cultural centers on 30 tribal college campuses. States that they imagined the centers would simply serve as repositories for Indian artifacts; however, after years of fund-raising efforts and program obstacles, the buildings transformed…

  18. Sweet vs. Snap! Effective Dispositions in the Media Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standard, April

    2011-01-01

    In "What Defines an Exemplary School Librarian," Jami Jones and Gail Bush make a strong argument that professional disposition is the key to a successful library media program. The authors emphasize the relevance of INTASC standards which specify that teachers must promote "positive social interaction and (develop) healthy and helping…

  19. STD Awareness – Reaching Youth

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-16

    In this podcast, Dr. Gail Bolan, Director of CDC's Division of STD Prevention, discusses the problem of STDs in young people, 15-24, and what providers can do.  Created: 4/16/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 4/16/2012.

  20. Exploring Surfaces of Nanomaterials - MIT Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    +Engineering Mechanical Engineering Nanoparticles Nanoscience + Nanotechnology Yang Shao-Horn Also from this conversion and storage," says the Gail E. Kendall Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering. Her work could lead to everything from better fuel cells - environmentally

  1. Telecommunications Policy Research Conference. Capital Recovery Section. Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telecommunications Policy Research Conference, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Two papers consider the capital recovery difficulties of telephone companies in the current deregulatory environment. The first, "Capital Recovery in the Transition Period" (Gail Garfield Schwartz, New York State Public Service Commission) describes the process determining depreciation in both regulated and deregulated environments, and…

  2. Size & Flow: Adult Education Issues in the Senate Immigration Bill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Garrett; Spangenberg, Gail

    2014-01-01

    In this essay Garrett Murphy and Gail Spangenberg report on the need for understanding better than in the past, the number of undocumented immigrants likely to need adult education services under provisions of Senate Immigration Bill S.744. The essay looks at why the issues of "size and flow" are important for planners, providers, and…

  3. Rules of the Game for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canty, Becky

    2005-01-01

    In "Play Like a Man, Win Like a Woman," Gail Evans' matter-of-fact directness contributes so many helpful hints about success that women need to learn. Playing to their strengths and characteristics as women is important to enhance their professional success. In the author's working life as a superintendent (which included three years as a theatre…

  4. Introduction to "Multicultural Voices: Peer Tutoring and Critical Reflection in the Writing Center"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Nancy Maloney

    2010-01-01

    In 1991 when Diana George, Ed Lotto, and the author were publishing their first issue as "WCJ" editors, this multivoiced essay struck her as a prime example of their editorial belief that writing centers could be "agents of change in the academy." As Gail Okawa and Tom Fox observe, "Most universities are inhospitable to more democratic definitions…

  5. Academic Libraries: Reaching Up and Stretching Out. Proceedings of the Spring Meeting of the Nebraska Library Association, College and University Section (Crete, Nebraska, May 25, 1990).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesecke, Joan, Ed.

    This proceedings report provides the papers presented at the 1990 spring meeting. Titles and authors of the seven papers are as follows: (1) "Marketing without a Plan: Seizing Outreach Opportunities as They Occur" (Joan Giesecke, Gail Egbers, Kay Logan-Peters, and Debra Pearson); (2) "Historians and the Academic Library: Traditional…

  6. CBE Faculty and Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Us Research Staff Edward Arens Fred Bauman Gail Brager Darryl Dickerhoff Ali Ghahramani Partners Facilities Graduate Programs Visiting Scholar Program Careers CBE Faculty and Staff CBE is an performance of buildings. The core research group for CBE includes faculty and research staff members

  7. 77 FR 67633 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... subsistence) NOAA Enforcement Report United States Coast Guard (USCG) Report (including Aleutian Island Risk Assessment) United State Fish & Wildlife (USFWL) Report International Pacific Halibut Commission (IPHC... sign language interpretation or other auxiliary aids should be directed to Gail Bendixen at (907) 271...

  8. 78 FR 44972 - George R. Smith, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-25

    ... testimony that implicated an employee of the Hugman-Kent Clinic, who was functioning as a nurse, had... and DEA registrations. [Id.]. However, this unidentified nurse was later fired from the Clinic after....; Decision and Order On February 5, 2013, Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) Gail A. Randall issued the attached...

  9. Motivational Interviewing in the Prevention of Alcohol Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    Nova Moyers, Muller, Ruben Palmer, Freeman Phillips, Nancy Pietsch, Stephen Quam, Gail Stephanie Roberson, Adriana Roberts, Cody S Sarosy...Christopher, P., Manuel, J. K., Martin, T., & Moyers, T.B. (2005). Myers Briggs Personality Type and Competency in Motivational Interviewing

  10. 75 FR 62896 - Data Collection Available for Public Comments and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ..., Washington, DC 20416. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Gail Hepler, mail to: Office of Financial Assistance... well as participating lenders is used to determine eligibility for an ARC loan that is designed to... Recovery Capital (ARC) Loan Program.'' Description of Respondents: Participating Lenders to be eligible for...

  11. Binary phase masks on self-developing photopolymers: the technique for formation and testing in an optical correlator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yezhov, P V; Il'in, O A; Smirnova, T N; Tikhonov, E A

    2003-01-01

    Binary phase masks (PMs) of size 256x256 cells with a random distribution of elements, formed on the self-developing FPK-488 photopolymer, are studied. The masks were prepared by the projection method using amplitude transparencies. The phase shift between the mask elements corresponding to the regions of the amplitude transparency with the optical density D = 0 and 2 was (0.85±0.05)π at the wavelength of 0.633 μm. Holographic matched filters were recorded for PMs obtained. The diffraction efficiency of holographic matched PM filters was 40 %. The signal-to-noise ratio for recognition signals for PMs in the Vander Lugt correlator was 20 dB. The normalised power density of the recognition signal is studied as a function of the rotation angle of a PM in the input plane of the Vander Lugt correlator. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  12. Global distribution of upper tropospheric formic acid from the ACE-FTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. González Abad

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the first near global upper tropospheric distribution of formic acid (HCOOH observed from space using solar occultation measurements from the Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS on board the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE satellite. Using a new set of spectroscopic line parameters recently published for formic acid by Vander Auwera et al. (2007 and Perrin and Vander Auwera (2007, we have retrieved the concentrations of HCOOH between 5 km and the tropopause for ACE-FTS observations from February 2004 to September 2007. We observe a significant seasonal dependence for the HCOOH concentrations related to vegetation growth and biomass burning. We estimate an emission ratio of 0.0051±0.0015 for HCOOH relative to CO for tropical South American fires using a selected set of data for September 2004. Results from the balloon-borne MkIV Fourier transform spectrometer are also presented and compared with the ACE measurements.

  13. Counterfeit Parts Prevention Strategies Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-24

    requirements of 252.211-7003, Item Unique Identification and Valuation .” This section establishes a recommended approach for requirements, polices, and...7003 Item Unique Identification and Valuation DoDI 4140.67 DoD Counterfeit Prevention Policy DoDI 5200.39 Critical Program Information (CPI...Deborah Valley deborah.valley@ll.mit.edu MIT Fred Van Milligen fvanmilligen@jdsu.com JDSU Marvin VanderWeg marvin.vanderwag@spacex.c om SpaceX Gerrit

  14. Targeting Metabolic Survival Pathways in Lung Cancer via Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    H & Y Enterprise, Redwood City, CA). Following centrifugation at 750 3 g to remove unlysed cells and nuclei, mito - chondria were isolated by...clinically used for diabetes already) or phenformin and glutaminase inhibitors. Several compounds that inhibit GLS are currently under investigation at...Brian P. Fiske,1 Douglas McCloskey,2 Dan Y . Gui,1 Courtney R. Green,2 Natalie I. Vokes,1 Adam M. Feist,2 Matthew G. Vander Heiden,1,3,* and Christian M

  15. Science of Land Target Spectral Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    more mines than people. In addition to fatal casualties and enormous financial losses, mines ruin large areas of fertile farmland and waterways. In...fields as climatology [100], detection theory [74], anomaly detection [89], and financial analysis [25]. It is in the last field where most of the theory...thankful for their ability to endure my shenanigans . I thank Alina Zare, Nathan VanderKraats, Nicholas Fisher, Xuping Zhang, Raazia Mazhar, Wen

  16. Mineralization of TNT, RDX, and By-Products in an Anaerobic Granular Activated Carbon-Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    pipe fitters and safety personnel who constructed and installed the system. CERL personnel include Don Cropek, Pat Kemme, Neil Adrian and Clint Arnett...al. (2000), demonstrated the sequential conversion of the nitro-groups to amino-groups in TNT degradation, and Adrian and Sutherland , 1998...dinitrotoluene extended the research to TNT, RDX and pinkwater (Adrian and Sutherland , 1998, VanderLoop et al., 1998 and Hwang et al., 2000). Initial pilot

  17. They took off their uniform when they got home, but couldn’t remove the armour

    OpenAIRE

    Kinman, Gail; Teoh, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Although she has conducted research in several areas, Christina Maslach is best known for her pioneering work on ‘burnout’. It’s a concept with great academic and popular appeal as it captures a common experience among employees, especially those working within the helping professions. Gail Kinman and Kevin Teoh interviewed Professor Maslach at the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology conference in Athens, where she was a keynote speaker.

  18. اختبار الفعالية الحيوية لهرمون النمو المنتج من قبل البكتريا المهندسة وراثيا في تحفيز نمو الدواجن الفتية

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidr K. Z. AI-Saadi,

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The study includes the injection of young chicken by human growth hormone which produced from bacteria at level of 15 ugigm hody weight 'weekly. The rate of weig..i-tt gai:l was 811 gm~o per 28 days a,'ld 289.9 gm% per 70 days. This is highly sigificant (P

  19. What can the lived experience of participating in risky HIV cure-related studies establish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal, Nir

    2018-04-01

    This response to Gail Henderson et al argues that they were right that interviewees' appraisals of cure study participation should inform (future) protocol review decisions, but wrong to take these appraisals at face value. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. The role and importance of economic evaluation of traditional herbal medicine use for chronic non-communicable diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes GD; Aboyade OM; Hill JD; Rasu RS

    2015-01-01

    Gail D Hughes,1 Oluwaseyi M Aboyade,1 John D Hill,2 Rafia S Rasu3 1South African Herbal Science and Medicine Institute, University of the Western Cape, Western Cape, South Africa; 2Department of Pharmacy, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 3School of Pharmacy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA Background: Non-communicable diseases (NCD) constitute major public health problems globally, with an impact on morbidity and mortality ranking high and second to HIV/AIDS. Existing studies conduct...

  1. Applying Technology to Enhance Nursing Education in the Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Needs of Veterans and their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Referral Maslow s Hierarchy of Needs : A Framework for Prioritizing Referrals 202 PART 4: EVALUATE PATIENT SAFETY AND RISK FOR HARM TO SELF OR...Education in the Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Needs of Veterans and their Families" PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Gail Bond...average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed

  2. Onset of action and seizure control in Lennox-Gaustaut syndrome: focus on rufinamide

    OpenAIRE

    Saneto, Russell P; Anderson, Gail D

    2009-01-01

    Russell P Saneto1, Gail D Anderson21Division of Pediatric Neurology, Seattle Children’s Hospital/University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; 2Department of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USAAbstract: Lennox-Gaustaut syndrome is an electroclinical epilepsy syndrome characterized by the triad of electroencephalogram showing diffuse slow spike-and-wave discharges and paroxysmal fast activity, multiple intractable seizure types, and cognitive impairment...

  3. UC Riverside physicists contribute to state-of-the-art detector installed in Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    PMUC Riverside scientists led by Gail Hanson, a distinguished professor of physics, are part of a collaboration of approximately 2300 international physicists who announced Dec. 19 that the world 's largest silicon tracking detector at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, had been successfully installed (see also ). Called the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) Silicon Strip Tracking Detector, the six-ton instrument has a total surface area of 205 square meters, about the same as a singles tennis court.

  4. UC Riverside physicists contribute to state-of-the-art detector installed in Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    UC Riverside scientists led by Gail Hanson, a distinguished professor of physics, are part of a collaboration of approximately 2300 international physicists who announced Dec. 19 that the world's largest silicon tracking detector at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, had been successfully installed (see also ). Called the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) Silicon Strip Tracking Detector, the six-ton instrument has a total surface area of 205 square meters, about the same as a singles tennis court.

  5. A Methodology For Measuring Resilience in a Satellite-Based Communication Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Accessed 15 March 2013) Eremenko, P. & C. Roberts & O. Brown. “Cost Benefit Analysis of a Notional Fractionated SATCOM Architecture.” AIAA...http://www.dhs.gov/blog/2010/12/22/enhancing-critical-infrastructure- resilience (Accessed 15 March 2013) Keohane , Jonathan & Gail Rohrbach. “Ask an...rand/pubs/research_memoranda/2008/RM2778.pdf. (Accessed 5 August 2013) Miller, Robert D. “Computing the Area of a Spherical Polygon.” Graphic

  6. Advanced Teleprocessing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-31

    Nelson and Richard Gail with equations written on napkins at lunch time. Other students of the ATS (Advanced Teleprocessing Systems) group have also been... ink Mik 2Gk (I+S,)2 Mk = (1+k/Mk) 2 - Mi k M -I- - mk -- 2Gk, Eq.(2.11) reduces to Gk - ’h (2.13) k-1 which allows throughput of G,/e for group k ( k

  7. From Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Ugur Demiray

    2013-01-01

    Dear TOJDE Readers, Welcome to the Volume 14 Number: 2 of TOJDE! In this issue, 3 Notes for Editor, 2 Book Reviews and 21 articles of 40 authors from 14 different countries around the world have been published. These published articles are arrived to the TOJDE from Argentina, Australia, Bosnia Hersek, Egypt, India, Malaysia, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Tanzania, Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Emirate and USA. The 1st Notes for Editor is arrived from USA and written by Gail D. CARUTH,...

  8. Cyclin D1-AR Crosstalk: Potential Implications for Therapeutic Response in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    metastatic androgen-independent prostate cancer. Clin Cancer Res 2004; 10: 924–928. 12 Toogood PL, Harvey PJ, Repine JT, Sheehan DJ, VanderWel SN, Zhou H et...al. Discovery of a potent and selective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6. J Med Chem 2005; 48: 2388–2406. 13 Fry DW, Harvey PJ, Keller PR...cyclin- dependent kinase 6 specific inhibition. J Med Chem 2006; 49: 3826–3831. 58 Lim JT, Mansukhani M, Weinstein IB. Cyclin-dependent kinase 6

  9. Photoconductivity study of acid on Zinc phthalocyanine pyridine thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sukhwinder, E-mail: ss7667@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Govt. College for Girls, Ludhiana (India); Saini, G. S. S.; Tripathi, S. K. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India)

    2016-05-06

    The Metal Phthalocyanine (MPc) have attracted much interest because of chemical and high thermal stability. Molecules forming a crystal of MPc are held together by weak attractive Vander Waals forces. Organic semiconductors have π conjugate bonds which allow electrons to move via π-electron cloud overlaps. Conduction mechanisms for organic semiconductor are mainly through tunneling; hopping between localized states, mobility gaps, and phonon assisted hopping. The photo conductivity of thin films of these complexes changes when exposed to oxidizing and reducing gases. Arrhenius plot is used to find the thermal activation energy in the intrinsic region and impurity scattering region. Arrhenius plotsare used to find the thermal activation energy.

  10. Corrosion Control through a Better Understanding of the Metallic Substrate/Organic Coating/Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-06

    Mdssbauer Spectroscopy to Studies of Electrodeposits and the Chemistry of Metal Surfaces," Henry Leidheiser, Jr., J. Electrochem. Soc. 135(2), 5C-11C (1988...VanderHart, D. L. J.agn. Res, 1982, 48, 35. -21- (22) Venkatachalam, C. M.; Urry, D. W. J. Magn. Res, 1980, 41, 313. (23) Deck, P. PhD Thesis , Lehigh...that can serve as nucleation sites for the formation of an aqueous phase. Reduction in the probability that nucleation sites exist at the interface

  11. Development of a Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Model for Women in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengfeng; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Ademola, Adeyinka; Oluwasola, Olayiwola A; Adeoye, Adewunmi O; Sofoluwe, Adenike; Morhason-Bello, Imran; Odedina, Stella O; Agwai, Imaria; Adebamowo, Clement; Obajimi, Millicent; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Huo, Dezheng

    2018-04-20

    Risk prediction models have been widely used to identify women at higher risk of breast cancer. We aim to develop a model for absolute breast cancer risk prediction for Nigerian women. A total of 1,811 breast cancer cases and 2,225 controls from the Nigerian Breast Cancer Study (NBCS, 1998~2015) were included. Subjects were randomly divided into the training and validation sets. Incorporating local incidence rates, multivariable logistic regressions were used to develop the model. The NBCS model included age, age at menarche, parity, duration of breast feeding, family history of breast cancer, height, body mass index, benign breast diseases and alcohol consumption. The model developed in the training set performed well in the validation set. The discriminating accuracy of the NBCS model (area under ROC curve [AUC]=0.703, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.687-0.719) was better than the Black Women's Health Study (BWHS) model (AUC=0.605, 95% CI: 0.586-0.624), Gail model for White population (AUC=0.551, 95% CI: 0.531-0.571), and Gail model for Black population (AUC=0.545, 95% CI: 0.525-0.565). Compared to the BWHS, two Gail models, the net reclassification improvement of the NBCS model were 8.26%, 13.45% and 14.19%, respectively. We have developed a breast cancer risk prediction model specific to women in Nigeria, which provides a promising and indispensable tool to identify women in need of breast cancer early detection in SSA populations. Our model is the first breast cancer risk prediction model in Africa. It can be used to identify women at high-risk for breast cancer screening. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Male sexual orientation in independent samoa: evidence for fraternal birth order and maternal fecundity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderLaan, Doug P; Vasey, Paul L

    2011-06-01

    In Western cultures, male androphiles tend to have greater numbers of older brothers than male gynephiles (i.e., the fraternal birth order effect). In the non-Western nation of Independent Samoa, androphilic males (known locally as fa'afafine) have been shown to have greater numbers of older brothers, older sisters, and younger brothers (Vasey & VanderLaan, 2007). It is unclear, however, whether the observed older brother effect, in the context of the additional sibling category effects, represented a genuine fraternal birth order effect or was simply associated with elevated maternal fecundity. To differentiate between these two possibilities, this study employed a larger, independent replication sample of fa'afafine and gynephilic males from Independent Samoa. Fa'afafine had greater numbers of older brothers and sisters. The replication sample and the sample from Vasey and VanderLaan were then combined, facilitating a comparison that showed the older brother effect was significantly greater in magnitude than the older sister effect. These results suggest that fraternal birth order and maternal fecundity effects both exist in Samoa. The existence of these effects cross-culturally is discussed in the context of biological theories for the development of male androphilia.

  13. Mediation analysis of alcohol consumption, DNA methylation, and epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dongyan; Yang, Haitao; Winham, Stacey J; Natanzon, Yanina; Koestler, Devin C; Luo, Tiane; Fridley, Brooke L; Goode, Ellen L; Zhang, Yanbo; Cui, Yuehua

    2018-03-01

    Epigenetic factors and consumption of alcohol, which suppresses DNA methylation, may influence the development and progression of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). However, there is a lack of understanding whether these factors interact to affect the EOC risk. In this study, we aimed to gain insight into this relationship by identifying leukocyte-derived DNA methylation markers acting as potential mediators of alcohol-associated EOC. We implemented a causal inference test (CIT) and the VanderWeele and Vansteelandt multiple mediator model to examine CpG sites that mediate the association between alcohol consumption and EOC risk. We modified one step of the CIT by adopting a high-dimensional inference procedure. The data were based on 196 cases and 202 age-matched controls from the Mayo Clinic Ovarian Cancer Case-Control Study. Implementation of the CIT test revealed two CpG sites (cg09358725, cg11016563), which represent potential mediators of the relationship between alcohol consumption and EOC case-control status. Implementation of the VanderWeele and Vansteelandt multiple mediator model further revealed that these two CpGs were the key mediators. Decreased methylation at both CpGs was more common in cases who drank alcohol at the time of enrollment vs. those who did not. cg11016563 resides in TRPC6 which has been previously shown to be overexpressed in EOC. These findings suggest two CpGs may serve as novel biomarkers for EOC susceptibility.

  14. Application of PC-SAFT and cubic equations of state for the correlation of solubility of some pharmaceutical and statin drugs in SC-CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah El Hadj. A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the solubilities of some anti-inflammatory (nabumetone, phenylbutazone and salicylamide and statin drugs (fluvastatin, atorvastatin, lovastatin, simvastatin and rosuvastatin were correlated using the Perturbed-Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (PC-SAFT with one-parameter mixing rule and commonly used cubic equations of state Peng-Robinson (PR and Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK combining with van-der Waals-1 parameter (VDW1 and van-der Waals-2 parameters (VDW2 mixing rules. The experimental data for studied compounds were taken from literature at temperature and pressure in ranges (308-348 K and (100-360 bar respectively. The critical properties required for the correlation with PR and SRK were estimated using Gani and Noonalol contribution group methods whereas, PC-SAFT pure-component parameters; segment number (m, segment diameter (σ and energy parameter (ε/k have been estimated by tihic’s group contribution method for nabumetone. For phenylbutazone and salicylamide those parameters were determined using a linear correlation. For statin drugs, PC-SAFT parameters were fitted to solubility data, and binary interaction parameters (kij and lij have been obtained by fitting the experimental data. The result was found to be in good agreement with the experimental data and showed that PC-SAFT approach can be used to model solid-SCF equilibrium with better correlation accuracy than cubic equations of state.

  15. Reviews of recent publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Aizenberg, Edna. Parricide on the Pampa? A New Study and Translation of Alberto Gerchunoffs "Los gauchos judíos" by Jan Mennell Emerson, Caryl, ed. Critical Essays on Mikhail Bakhtin by Michael Barry Finney, Gail. Christa Wolf by Stephen Brockmann Hoeg, Jerry. Science, Technology, and Latin American Narrative in the Twentieth Century and Beyond by Paul Fallon Mendez-Ramirez, Hugo. Neruda's Ekphrastic Experience: Mural Art and Canto general by Agustin Boyer Perriam, Chris, Michael Thompson, Susan Frenk, and Vanessa Knights. A New History of Spanish Writing: 1939 to the 1990s by William Sherzer Soto, Francisco. Reinaldo Arenas by Marina Llorente

  16. Palliative care for patients in the USA with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: current challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houseman G

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gail Houseman,1 Mary Kelley2 1The ALS Association Greater Philadelphia Chapter, Ambler, PA, USA; 2Department of Neurology, ALS Center at Penn Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a motor neuron disease that results in eventual paralysis of all voluntary muscles. Cognitive impairment may be a co-occurring condition with the ALS patient. Palliative care, which involves symptom management, is the most utilized treatment of choice. Managing the symptoms of ALS can be challenging. This paper provides experience-based facts on daily care provision in the USA and some practical guidelines. Keywords: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ALS, palliative care, challenges, symptom management

  17. Language, Violence, and the State: Writing Tamil Dalits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel Roberts

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With the Dalit movement in Maharastra having grown stagnant, and Uttar Pradesh’s Dalit-led Bahujan Samaj Party possibly reaching the limits of its potential development, the vital forefront of Dalit politics has now shifted to Tamil Nadu. So writes Gail Omvedt in her introduction to Thol. Thirumavalan’s Talisman. Whether the recent upsurge of intellectual and political energy among Tamil Dalits shall indeed prove a model for Dalits elsewhere in India—or whether, on the contrary, there are not...

  18. United States Air Force Summer Research Program -- 1991. High School Apprenticeship Program (HSAP) Reports, Volume 12: Rome Laboratory, Arnold Engineering Development Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    convenient document retrieval and internal voice communications system. 12-12 AFOSR High School Apprenticeship Program July 22-August 16 1991 Gene ...with the computer software packages used here at Sverdrup; Gene Smith and Gail Arnold for their aid in faxing my pay voucher every two weeks. GENERAL...10M .,.n Z~ w z .; z z ZZ r3r M z X E X 2 z Y ZiMZ . Z Z Z Z X2X Z X Z X 2 rZ Z Z W: I. I 1 It W6 hfe II 1 - -- m _ V m-! ’ =t2Csu C1 M 0 oNt - ;I

  19. riskRegression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozenne, Brice; Sørensen, Anne Lyngholm; Scheike, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    In the presence of competing risks a prediction of the time-dynamic absolute risk of an event can be based on cause-specific Cox regression models for the event and the competing risks (Benichou and Gail, 1990). We present computationally fast and memory optimized C++ functions with an R interface...... for predicting the covariate specific absolute risks, their confidence intervals, and their confidence bands based on right censored time to event data. We provide explicit formulas for our implementation of the estimator of the (stratified) baseline hazard function in the presence of tied event times. As a by...... functionals. The software presented here is implemented in the riskRegression package....

  20. riskRegression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozenne, Brice; Sørensen, Anne Lyngholm; Scheike, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    In the presence of competing risks a prediction of the time-dynamic absolute risk of an event can be based on cause-specific Cox regression models for the event and the competing risks (Benichou and Gail, 1990). We present computationally fast and memory optimized C++ functions with an R interface......-product we obtain fast access to the baseline hazards (compared to survival::basehaz()) and predictions of survival probabilities, their confidence intervals and confidence bands. Confidence intervals and confidence bands are based on point-wise asymptotic expansions of the corresponding statistical...

  1. Annotated checklist and database for vascular plants of the Jemez Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxx, T. S.; Pierce, L.; Tierney, G. D.; Hansen, L. A.

    1998-03-01

    Studies done in the last 40 years have provided information to construct a checklist of the Jemez Mountains. The present database and checklist builds on the basic list compiled by Teralene Foxx and Gail Tierney in the early 1980s. The checklist is annotated with taxonomic information, geographic and biological information, economic uses, wildlife cover, revegetation potential, and ethnographic uses. There are nearly 1000 species that have been noted for the Jemez Mountains. This list is cross-referenced with the US Department of Agriculture Natural Resource Conservation Service PLANTS database species names and acronyms. All information will soon be available on a Web Page.

  2. Läti parimad majad / Karin Paulus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Paulus, Karin, 1975-

    2006-01-01

    Muljeid Läti arhitektuuriauhindade jagamiselt. Peapreemia: arhitektide Uldis Lukshevics'i ja Martins Oshans'i projekteeritud eramu. Parim avalik hoone: arhitektuuribüroo Kubs projekteeritud kontorihoone Riias. Suurim Baltikumis: arhitektuuribüroo Arhis projekteeritud Ljepaja politseihoone. Parim rekonstrueerimisprojekt: arhitektuuribüroo Arhis projekteeritud avatud kontor nõukogudeaegses tööstushoones. Parim interjöör: kohvik Vanilla (Ieva Dripe, Janis Broka) ja tekstiilipood Garage (Zaiga Gaile büroo). Uldis Lukshevics'i projekteeritud suvilad, mis paiknevad postidel

  3. Ku70 is required for late B cell development and immunoglobulin heavy chain class switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manis, J P; Gu, Y; Lansford, R; Sonoda, E; Ferrini, R; Davidson, L; Rajewsky, K; Alt, F W

    1998-06-15

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain (HC) class switch recombination (CSR) is a late B cell process that involves intrachromosomal DNA rearrangement. Ku70 and Ku80 form a DNA end-binding complex required for DNA double strand break repair and V(D)J recombination. Ku70(-/-) (K70T) mice, like recombination activating gene (RAG)-1- or RAG-2-deficient (R1T or R2T) mice, have impaired B and T cell development at an early progenitor stage, which is thought to result at least in part from defective V(D)J recombination (Gu, Y., K.J. Seidl, G.A. Rathbun, C. Zhu, J.P. Manis, N. van der Stoep, L. Davidson, H.L. Cheng, J.M. Sekiguchi, K. Frank, et al. 1997. Immunity. 7:653-665; Ouyang, H., A. Nussenzweig, A. Kurimasa, V.C. Soares, X. Li, C. Cordon-Cardo, W. Li, N. Cheong, M. Nussenzweig, G. Iliakis, et al. 1997. J. Exp. Med. 186:921-929). Therefore, to examine the potential role of Ku70 in CSR, we generated K70T mice that carry a germline Ig HC locus in which the JH region was replaced with a functionally rearranged VH(D)JH and Ig lambda light chain transgene (referred to as K70T/HL mice). Previously, we have shown that B cells from R1T or R2T mice carrying these rearranged Ig genes (R1T/HL or R2T/HL mice) can undergo CSR to IgG isotypes (Lansford, R., J. Manis, E. Sonoda, K. Rajewsky, and F. Alt. 1998. Int. Immunol. 10:325-332). K70T/HL mice had significant numbers of peripheral surface IgM+ B cells, which generated serum IgM levels similar to those of R2T/HL mice. However, in contrast to R2T/HL mice, K70T/HL mice had no detectable serum IgG isotypes. In vitro culture of K70T/HL B cells with agents that induce CSR in normal or R2T/HL B cells did lead to the induction of germline CH transcripts, indicating that initial signaling pathways for CSR were intact in K70T/HL cells. However, treatment with such agents did not lead to detectable CSR by K70T/HL B cells, and instead, led to cell death within 72 h. We conclude that Ku70 is required for the generation of B cells that have

  4. Conditional Monte Carlo randomization tests for regression models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhat, Parwen; Rosenberger, William F; Diao, Guoqing

    2014-08-15

    We discuss the computation of randomization tests for clinical trials of two treatments when the primary outcome is based on a regression model. We begin by revisiting the seminal paper of Gail, Tan, and Piantadosi (1988), and then describe a method based on Monte Carlo generation of randomization sequences. The tests based on this Monte Carlo procedure are design based, in that they incorporate the particular randomization procedure used. We discuss permuted block designs, complete randomization, and biased coin designs. We also use a new technique by Plamadeala and Rosenberger (2012) for simple computation of conditional randomization tests. Like Gail, Tan, and Piantadosi, we focus on residuals from generalized linear models and martingale residuals from survival models. Such techniques do not apply to longitudinal data analysis, and we introduce a method for computation of randomization tests based on the predicted rate of change from a generalized linear mixed model when outcomes are longitudinal. We show, by simulation, that these randomization tests preserve the size and power well under model misspecification. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Optoelectronic properties of cadmium sulfide thin films deposited by thermal evaporation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, N.; Iqbal, M.A.; Hussain, S.T.; Waris, M.; Munair, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    The substrate temperature in depositions of thin films plays a vital role in the characteristics of deposited films. We studied few characteristics of cadmium sulphide thin film deposited at different temperature (150 deg. C- 300 deg. C) on corning 7059 glass substrate. We measured transmittance, absorbance, band gap and reflectance via UV spectroscopy. It was found that the transmittance for 300 nm to 1100 nm was greater than 80%. The resistivity and mobility was calculated by Vander Pauw method which were 10-80 cm and 2-60 cm/sup 2/V/sup -1/S/sup -1/ respectively. The thermoelectric properties of the film were measured by hot and cold probe method which shows the N-type nature of the film. (author)

  6. People and things. CERN Courier, Dec 1990, v. 30(9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The article reports on achievements of various people, staff changes and position opportunities within the CERN organization and contains news updates on upcoming or past events: ; Prospects for approval of the proposed KAON Factory at the Canadian TRIUMF Laboratory in Vancouver took a further step forward in September when Premier Vander Zalm of British Columbia announced that his government would double their financial commitment to 236 million Canadian dollars. ; The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and the UK Rutherford Appleton Laboratory are organizing a course on R.F. Engineering for Particle Accelerators, to be held from 3-10 April 1991 at Exeter College, Oxford, aimed at staff in accelerator laboratories, universities and manufacturing companies specializing in r.f. and microwave equipment

  7. Mediation analysis allowing for exposure-mediator interactions and causal interpretation: theoretical assumptions and implementation with SAS and SPSS macros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeri, Linda; VanderWeele, Tyler J.

    2012-01-01

    Mediation analysis is a useful and widely employed approach to studies in the field of psychology and in the social and biomedical sciences. The contributions of this paper are several-fold. First we seek to bring the developments in mediation analysis for non linear models within the counterfactual framework to the psychology audience in an accessible format and compare the sorts of inferences about mediation that are possible in the presence of exposure-mediator interaction when using a counterfactual versus the standard statistical approach. Second, the work by VanderWeele and Vansteelandt (2009, 2010) is extended here to allow for dichotomous mediators and count outcomes. Third, we provide SAS and SPSS macros to implement all of these mediation analysis techniques automatically and we compare the types of inferences about mediation that are allowed by a variety of software macros. PMID:23379553

  8. Reviews of recent publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Sara Lennox. Cemetery of the Murdered Daughters: Feminism, History, and Ingeborg Bachmann by Kristin T. Vander Lugt Birgit Tautz. Reading and Seeing Ethnic Differences in the Enlightenment: From China to Africa by Susanne Kelley Patrick Greaney. Untimely Beggar. Poverty and Power from Baudelaire to Benjamin by Christine Rinne Philip Payne, Graham Bartram, and Galin Tihanov, eds. A Companion to the Works of Robert Musil by Geoffrey C. Howes Jennifer Willging. Telling Anxiety: Anxious Narration in the Work of Marguerite Duras, Annie Ernaux, Nathalie Sarraute and Anne Hébert by Natalie Edwards Michael Lucey. Never Say I: Sexuality and the First Person in Colette, Gide, and Proust by Elissa Gelfand Anthony Waine. Changing Cultural Tastes. Writers and the Popular in Modern Germany by Katrin Völkner Susan Ireland and Patrice Proulx, eds. Textualizing the Immigrant Experience in Contemporary Quebec by Amy Hubbell Cristina Peri Rossi. State of Exile . Trans. Marilyn Buck. by Reina Ruiz

  9. Thermo-acoustical molecular interaction study in binary mixtures of glycerol and ethylene glycol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Kirandeep; Juglan, K. C.; Kumar, Harsh

    2017-07-01

    Ultrasonic velocity, density and viscosity are measured over the entire composition range for binary liquid mixtures of glycerol (CH2OH-CHOH-CH2OH) and ethylene glycol (HOCH2CH2OH) at different temperatures and constant frequency of 2MHz using ultrasonic interferometer, specific gravity bottle and viscometer respectively. Measured experimental values are used to obtained various acoustical parameters such as adiabatic compressibility, acoustic impedance, intermolecular free length, relaxation time, ultrasonic attenuation, effective molar weight, free volume, available volume, molar volume, Wada's constant, Rao's constant, Vander Waal's constant, internal pressure, Gibb's free energy and enthalpy. The variation in acoustical parameters are interpreted in terms of molecular interactions between the components of molecules of binary liquid mixtures.

  10. A new Pb{sup II}(ethylenediaminetetraacetate) coordination polymer with a two-dimensional layer structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, D., E-mail: iamzd@hpu.edu.cn; Zhang, R. H.; Li, F. F. [Henan Polytechnic University, Department of Physics and Chemistry (China)

    2016-12-15

    A new Pb{sup II}−edta{sup 4–} coordination polymer, Pb{sub 2}(edta)(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.76} (edta{sup 4–} = ethylenediaminetetraacetate) was synthesized under hydrothermal condition. Single crystal X-ray analysis reveals that it represents a novel two-dimensional (2D) Pb{sup 2+}–edta{sup 4–} layer structure with a (4,8{sup 2})-topology. Each edta{sup 4–} ligand employs its four carboxylate O and two N atoms to chelate one Pb{sup II} atom (hexa-coordinated) and connects five Pb{sup II} atoms (ennea-coordinated) via its four carboxylate groups to form 2D layer framework. Adjacent layers are packed into the overall structure through vander Waals interactions.

  11. Massive parallel optical pattern recognition and retrieval via a two-stage high-capacity multichannel holographic random access memory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Luzhong; Liu, Hua-Kuang

    2000-01-01

    The multistage holographic optical random access memory (HORAM) system reported recently by Liu et al. provides a new degree of freedom for improving storage capacity. We further present a theoretical and practical analysis of the HORAM system with experimental results. Our discussions include the system design and geometrical requirements, its applications for multichannel pattern recognition and associative memory, the 2-D and 3-D information storage capacity, and multichannel image storage and retrieval via VanderLugt correlator (VLC) filters and joint transform holograms. A series of experiments are performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the multichannel pattern recognition and image retrieval with both the VLC and joint transform correlator (JTC) architectures. The experimental results with as many as 2025 channels show good agreement with the theoretical analysis. (c) 2000 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

  12. Mediation analysis allowing for exposure-mediator interactions and causal interpretation: theoretical assumptions and implementation with SAS and SPSS macros.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeri, Linda; Vanderweele, Tyler J

    2013-06-01

    Mediation analysis is a useful and widely employed approach to studies in the field of psychology and in the social and biomedical sciences. The contributions of this article are several-fold. First we seek to bring the developments in mediation analysis for nonlinear models within the counterfactual framework to the psychology audience in an accessible format and compare the sorts of inferences about mediation that are possible in the presence of exposure-mediator interaction when using a counterfactual versus the standard statistical approach. Second, the work by VanderWeele and Vansteelandt (2009, 2010) is extended here to allow for dichotomous mediators and count outcomes. Third, we provide SAS and SPSS macros to implement all of these mediation analysis techniques automatically, and we compare the types of inferences about mediation that are allowed by a variety of software macros. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Study the structural and optical behaviour of polyaniline/ZrO2 nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Gaganpreet Kaur; Kumar, Naresh; Kumar, Rajesh

    2018-05-01

    In nanoscience, hybrid material based on polymer and nanoparticles are of great interest because of much improved properties of components. Polymers are of enormous interest because of their various properties like flexibility, low weight and easy processing. Here, we studied the influence of ZrO2 nanoparticles on the structural and optical properties of Polyaniline (PANI). ZrO2 mixed with PANI, improve its structural and optical properties. XRD studies reveal that ZrO2 nanoparticles exist in the tetragonal phase in ZrO2/PANI nanocomposites. UV-Vis spectroscopic studies have been carried out to understand the presence of various energy levels and their involvement in absorbance of light. In PANI nanocomposites, aniline monomer attach with ZrO2 nanoparticles through p-p stacking interaction, Vander waal force and hydrogen bonding interaction.

  14. People and things. CERN Courier, Dec 1990, v. 30(9)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-12-15

    The article reports on achievements of various people, staff changes and position opportunities within the CERN organization and contains news updates on upcoming or past events: ; Prospects for approval of the proposed KAON Factory at the Canadian TRIUMF Laboratory in Vancouver took a further step forward in September when Premier Vander Zalm of British Columbia announced that his government would double their financial commitment to 236 million Canadian dollars. ; The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and the UK Rutherford Appleton Laboratory are organizing a course on R.F. Engineering for Particle Accelerators, to be held from 3-10 April 1991 at Exeter College, Oxford, aimed at staff in accelerator laboratories, universities and manufacturing companies specializing in r.f. and microwave equipment.

  15. Prestigious US awards for CERN computing

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    On 4 June in the distinguished surroundings of Washington's National Building Museum, IT Deputy Division Leader Les Robertson accepted a 21st Century Achievement Award from the Computerworld Honors Program on behalf of CERN. This prestigious award was made to CERN for its innovative application of information technology to the benefit of society. Members of the team that initiated the SHIFT project with the Computerworld trophy. The team was a collaboration between the Information Technology Division, the OPAL experiment and Indiana University. From left to right, Ben Segal, Matthias Schroeder, Gail Hanson, Bernd Panzer, Jean-Philippe Baud, Les Robertson and Frédéric Hemmer. CERN's award followed the Laboratory's nomination by Lawrence Ellison, Chairman and CEO of the Oracle Corporation. Ellison nominated CERN in recognition of 'pioneering work in developing a large scale data warehouse' - an innovative computing architecture that responds precisely to the global particle physics commun...

  16. Dental Health Services Research Unit celebrates 30 years: Report of conference to mark the 30th anniversary of the Dental Health Services Research Unit (DHSRU) at Dundee, held on 1st December 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Kenneth A; Pitts, Nigel B

    2009-04-01

    Over the years, several members of the staff of the Dental Health Services Research Unit (DHSRU) at Dundee have published papers in Primary Dental Care. Furthermore, its Director, Professor Nigel Pitts, together with Drs Jan Clarkson and Gail Topping have co-edited a number of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK)'s standards manuals and contributed to others. It had been suggested to the Unit by several parties that, having been in funded existence for some 30 years, it would be appropriate to mark this anniversary with a conference to explore 'Dental Health Services Research: After 30 years, what was the impact, what have we learned and where are we going?' So, following a range of consultations, the conference was convened at the West Park Conference Centre in Dundee with a mixed audience representing both dental research and dental practice.

  17. Reviews of recent publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Anne Fuchs, Mary Cosgrove, and Georg Grote. German Memory Contests: The Quest for Identity in Literature, Film, and Discourse since 1990 by Helen Cafferty Herschel Farbman. The Other Night: Dreaming, Writing, and Restlessness in Twentieth-Century Literature by Sidney Feshbach Richard Neupert. A History of the French New Wave Cinema by Candice Nicolas Dianne Marie Zandstra. Embodying Resistance: Griselda Gambaro and the Grotesque by James Gustafson Matthew J. Marr. Postmodern Metapoetry and the Replenishment of the Spanish Lyrical Genre, 1980-2000 by John Wilcox Gail A. Bulman. Staging Words, Performing Worlds: Intertextuality and Nation in Contemporary Latin American Theater by Patricia Tomé Alex E. Blazer. I Am Otherwise: The Romance Between Poetry and Theory after the Death of the Subject by Salah Khan Marcelline Block. Situating the Feminist Gaze and Spectatorship in Postwar Cinema by Marzia Caporale

  18. Lockheed Solar Observatory and the Discovery of Moreton-Ramsey Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbell, Theodore D.

    2014-06-01

    Moreton Waves are high-speed disturbances seen traveling away from large solar flares in H-alpha movies of the solar chromosphere. They were discovered by the observer Harry Ramsey in the late 1950s, and then published and publicized by the director Gail Moreton, both of the Lockheed Solar Observatory in the Hollywood Hills of Southern California. These efforts established the scientific reputation and secured continuing funding of the observatory, whose present-day successor is the Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab in Palo Alto. Moreton waves are rare, and there was limited interest in them until the EIT instrument on SOHO began seeing large numbers of similar waves in the corona in the late 1990s. The exact relation between the two observations is still a research topic today. This talk will describe some of the history of the observatory and the discovery and early interpretation of the waves.

  19. Effect of postharvest spray of apple polyphenols on the quality of fresh-cut red pitaya fruit during shelf life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Panhui; Huber, Donald J; Su, Zihan; Hu, Meijiao; Gao, Zhaoyin; Li, Min; Shi, Xuequn; Zhang, Zhengke

    2018-03-15

    Fresh-cut (FC) red pitaya fruit were treated with 5ga.i.l -1 apple polyphenols (APP) and then stored at 20°C for up to 4days to evaluate the effects on attributes. Results showed that FC pitaya fruit with APP treatment showed greater colour retention, delayed softening, reduced loss of soluble solids content, titratable acidity, betacyanin and total phenolics compared with untreated FC fruit. APP treatment also maintained antioxidant activity, as indicated by higher DPPH radical-scavenging activity and reducing power compared with untreated FC pitaya fruit. APP treatment strongly suppressed microbial growth, contributing to improvement of product safety. Because APP is a natural product, we propose that application of APP could be a convenient, safe and low-cost approach to maintain the quality and extend the shelf life of FC red pitaya fruit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Wada Test: contributions to standardization of the stimulus for language and memory assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mäder Maria Joana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Wada Test (WT is part of the presurgical evaluation for refractory epilepsy. The WT is not standardized and the protocols differ in important ways, including stimulus type of material presented for memory testing, timing of presentations and methods of assessment. The aim of this study was to contribute to establish parameters for a WT to Brazilian population investigating the performance of 100 normal subjects, without medication. Two parallel models were used based on Montreal Procedure adapted from Gail Risse's (MEG-MN,EUA protocol. The proportions of correct responses of normal subjects submitted to two parallel WT models were investigated and the two models were compared. The results showed that the two models are similar but significant differences among the stimulus type were observed. The results suggest that the stimulus type may influence the results of the WT and should be considered when constructing models and comparing different protocols.

  1. Gamma-Ray Bursts Shower the Universe with Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazi, A

    2006-01-01

    According to the results from a Livermore computer model, some of the small change jingling in your pocket contains zinc and copper created in massive gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that rank as the most impressive light shows in the universe. Livermore astrophysicist Jason Pruet and his colleagues Rebecca Surman and Gail McLaughlin from North Carolina State University (NCSU) reported on their calculations in the February 20, 2004, issue of ''Astrophysical Journal Letters''. They found that GRBs from black holes surrounded by a disk of dense, hot plasma may have contributed heavily to the galactic inventory of elements such as calcium, scandium, titanium, zinc, and copper. ''A typical GRB of this kind briefly outshines all the stars in millions of galaxies combined'', says Pruet. ''Plus it makes about 100 times as much of some common elements as an ordinary supernova''

  2. Restoring the Balance: First Nations Women, Community, and Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen Rodríguez de France

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available With empowering stories and histories from twelve Aboriginal women who are leaders in different contexts and communities, the book acknowledges and celebrates the contributions of Aboriginal women to diverse fields of work and disciplines such as art, culture, politics, language, law, community, education, and social activism. About the Authors Eric Guimond is an assistant director at the Strategic Research and Analysis Directorate at Indian and Northern Affairs Canada. Gail Guthrie Valaskakis was a Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Concordia University and was a leading authority on Aboriginal Media and Communication. She passed away in 2007. Madeleine Dion Stout is a former nurse and founding director of the Centre of Aboriginal Education, Research, and Culture at Carleton University.

  3. Review Essay: The Personal Past - Two Readings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobie Meyer-Fong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Esherick, Ancestral Leaves: A Family Journey through Chinese History. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2011. 392 pp. $28 (paper.Gail Hershatter, The Gender of Memory: Rural Women and China's Collective Past. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2011. 472 pp. $55 (cloth.What do we learn when we reconsider m­odern Chinese history from the vantage point of those who lived through it? Does our understanding of the grand narrative of key events change fundamentally when we think not in terms of the revolution or the state but in terms of life experience and memory? What happens when an empathic historian literally engages his or her sources in conversation? The authors of the two books under review offer radically different answers to these questions, even as they cover some of the same temporal ground. In The Gender of Memory: Rural Women and China’s Collective Past, Gail Hershatter uses oral interviews with rural women to call into question the inevitability of “campaign time” as an organizing principle. In Ancestral Leaves: A Family Journey through Chinese History, Joseph Esherick revisits the iconic events of modern Chinese history through the life experiences of several generations of elite men from his wife’s family, shedding new light on the familiar timeline while reiterating that chronology’s organizing power. Hershatter offers a breathtaking interrogation of her sources and methods, rendering elegantly transparent the thought processes behind her book’s production. Esherick integrates sources and storytelling, providing a confident and seamless narrative in which politics and personal lives are inextricably intertwined.

  4. The Role of Carbon in Core Formation Under Highly Reducing Conditions With Implications for the Planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E..; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent; Draper, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Results from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft have shown elevated abundances of carbon on the surface of Mercury. Furthermore, the X-Ray Spectrometer on board MESSENGER measured elevated abundances of sulfur and low abundances of iron, suggesting the planet's oxygen fugacity (fO2) is several log10 units below the Iron-Wüstite (IW) buffer. Similar to the role of other volatiles (e.g. sulfur) on highly reducing planetary bodies, carbon is expected to behave differently than it would under higher fO2. As discussed by Nittler et al. and Hauck et al., under such highly reducing conditions, the majority of the iron partitions into the core. On Mercury, this resulted in a relatively large core and a thin mantle. Using a composition similar to the largest volcanic field on the planet (the northern volcanic plains), Vander Kaaden and McCubbin conducted sink-float experiments to determine the density of melts and minerals on Mercury. They showed that graphite would be the only buoyant mineral in a mercurian magma ocean. Therefore, Vander Kaaden and McCubbin proposed a possible primary flotation crust on the planet composed of graphite. Concurrently, Peplowski et al. used GRS data from MESSENGER to show an average northern hemisphere abundance of C on the planet of 1.4 +/- 0.9 wt%. However, as this result was only at the one-sigma detection limit, possible carbon abundances at the three-sigma detection limit for Mercury range from 0 to 4.1 wt% carbon. Additionally, Murchie et al. investigated the possible darkening agent on Mercury and concluded that coarse-grained graphite could darken high reflectance plains to the low reflectance material. To further test the possibility of elevated abundances of carbon in Mercury's crust, Peplowski et al. used the low-altitude MESSENGER data to show that carbon is the only material consistent with both the visible to near-infrared spectra and the neutron measurements of low

  5. Adapted all-numerical correlator for face recognition applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbouz, M.; Bouzidi, F.; Alfalou, A.; Brosseau, C.; Leonard, I.; Benkelfat, B.-E.

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we suggest and validate an all-numerical implementation of a VanderLugt correlator which is optimized for face recognition applications. The main goal of this implementation is to take advantage of the benefits (detection, localization, and identification of a target object within a scene) of correlation methods and exploit the reconfigurability of numerical approaches. This technique requires a numerical implementation of the optical Fourier transform. We pay special attention to adapt the correlation filter to this numerical implementation. One main goal of this work is to reduce the size of the filter in order to decrease the memory space required for real time applications. To fulfil this requirement, we code the reference images with 8 bits and study the effect of this coding on the performances of several composite filters (phase-only filter, binary phase-only filter). The saturation effect has for effect to decrease the performances of the correlator for making a decision when filters contain up to nine references. Further, an optimization is proposed based for an optimized segmented composite filter. Based on this approach, we present tests with different faces demonstrating that the above mentioned saturation effect is significantly reduced while minimizing the size of the learning data base.

  6. Ultrasonic velocity and absorption study of binary mixtures of cyclohexane with acrylonitrile by interferometric method at different frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, N. R.; Chimankar, O. P.; Bhandakkar, V. D.; Padole, N. N.

    2012-12-01

    The ultrasonic velocity (u), absorption (α), density (ρ), and viscosity (η) has been measured at different frequencies (1MHz to 10MHz) in the binary mixtures of cyclohexane with acrylonitriile over the entire range of composition at temperature 303K. Vander Waal's constant (b), adiabatic compressibility (βa), acoustic impedance (Z), molar volume (V), free length (Lf), free volume, internal pressure, intermolecular radius and relative association have been also calculated. A special application for acrylonitrile is in the manufacture of carbon fibers. These are produced by paralysis of oriented poly acrylonitrile fibers and are used to reinforce composites for high-performance applications in the aircraft, defense and aerospace industries. Other applications of acrylonitrile are in the production of fatty amines, ion exchange resins and fatty amine amides used in cosmetics, adhesives, corrosion inhibitors and water-treatment resins. Cyclohexane derivatives can be used for the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, dyes, herbicides, plant growth regulator, plasticizers, rubber chemicals, nylon, cyclamens and other organic compounds. In the view of these extensive applications of acrylonitrile and cyclohexane in the engineering process, textile and pharmaceutical industries present study provides qualitative information regarding the nature and strength of interaction in the liquid mixtures through derive parameters from ultrasonic velocity and absorption measurement.

  7. TO FEAR OR NOT TO FEAR ON CYBERCRIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Bernik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To understand cybercrime and its various forms, one must be familiar with criminality in general. How individuals perceive crime, and how much they fear it is further influenced by news media (Crawford, 2007. Van Duyne (2009, who monitored criminality, wrote about changes which started to be noticed twenty years ago and have shaped a new Europe, a territory without inner borders, and so with more mobility and opportunities for the Europeans. But these novelties and changes in the way we work have also caused certain new problems. It can be said that perpetrators of crimes, who are no longer hindered by state borders, now know no geographical limitations. Vander Baken and Van Daele (2009, for example, have researched mobility in connection to transnational criminality. Von Lampe (2007 has established that perpetrators no longer act individually, but frequently work in cooperation with one another. Crime and mobility are being “greased” by money, and have become a part of everyday life (Van Duyne, 2009. An individual’s perception and understanding of criminality is also biased on certain cultural myths in regard to crime (Meško and Eman, 2009.

  8. The Prevalence of Only-Child Status Among Children and Adolescents Referred to a Gender Identity Service Versus a Clinical Comparison Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, S Kathleen; VanderLaan, Doug P; Blanchard, Ray; Wood, Hayley; Wasserman, Lori; Zucker, Kenneth J

    2017-08-18

    Several studies indicate that homosexual males have a high proportion of older brothers compared to heterosexual males. Natal males with gender dysphoria who are likely to be homosexual also display this sibship pattern. Until recently, there was little evidence linking homosexuality and/or gender dysphoria in females to unique sibship characteristics. Two studies have indicated that natal female youth clinically referred for gender dysphoria are more likely to be only children (Schagen, Delemarre-van de Waal, Blanchard, & Cohen-Kettenis, 2012; VanderLaan, Blanchard, Wood, & Zucker, 2014). However, these studies did not include control groups of youth clinically referred for other reasons. Thus, it is unclear whether the increased likelihood of only-child status is specific to gender-referred natal females. This study compared only-child status among youth referred to a mental health service for gender dysphoria (778 males, 245 females) versus other reasons (783 males, 281 females). Prehomosexual gender-referred males were less likely to be only children than clinical controls. Contrary to previous findings, gender-referred females were not more likely to be only children, indicating that increased likelihood of only-child status is not specific to gender-referred females, but is characteristic of clinic-referred females more generally.

  9. On the direct characterization and quantification of active ingredients in commercial solid drugs using PIXE, PIGE and TOF-SIMS techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nsouli, B. [IBA laboratory, Lebanese Atomic Energy Commission (CNRS), Beirut (Lebanon)], E-mail: bnsouli@cnrs.edu.lb; Zahraman, K; Roumie, M [IBA laboratory, Lebanese Atomic Energy Commission (CNRS), Beirut (Lebanon); Yazbi, F [Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analytical Chemistry, Beirut Arab University, Beirut (Lebanon); Thomas, J P [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon, Villeurbanne (France)

    2009-07-01

    The quantification of the active ingredient (AI) in drugs is a crucial and important step in the drug quality control process. This is usually performed by using wet chemical techniques like LC-MS, UV spectrophotometry and other appropriate organic analytical methods. In the case of an active ingredient contains specific heteroatoms (F, S, Cl, . . .), elemental IBA like PIXE and PIGE techniques, using small tandem accelerator of 1 - 2 MV, can be explored for molecular quantification. IBA techniques permit the analysis of the sample under solid form, without any laborious sample preparations. This is an advantage when the number of sample is relatively large. In this work, we demonstrate the ability of the Thick Target PIXE and PIGE technique for rapid and accurate quantification of low concentration of different fluorinated, sulfured and chlorinated active ingredients in several commercial anti-hyperlipidemic and anti-inflammatory commercial drugs. In this work we will demonstrate the ability of PIXE and PIGE techniques for rapid and accurate quantification of Celecoxib and Atorvastatin active ingredients contained in several solid commercial drugs. The experimental aspects related to the quantification validity are presented and discussed. In addition, the Time of Flight Secondary Ion Emission using multicharged Ar ions with {approx} 10 MeV energy, delivered by a 4 MV Vander Graaf single stage accelerator, was used for structural and chemical analysis for some cases of binary commercial drugs containing two different active ingredients. The aspect of sample preparation and the role of excipient will be highlighted and discussed. (author)

  10. 98TH ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Friday 7 December 2012 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002.      Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department Status of Vidyo Health insurance issues Usage of Gate E for family members and opening times Users’ Office news Matters arising Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting   Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch. Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are: Austria M. Jeitler manfred.jeitler@cern.ch Belgium C. Vander Velde (Chairperson) catherine....

  11. COLLABORATION BOARD (CB56) 22/06/07

    CERN Multimedia

    T. Virdee

    Thesis and Industrial Awards (L. Foa) C. Vander Velde has resigned from the Thesis Awards Committee and was thanked for her contributions. A replacement was being sought. A mail announcing the 2007 Award would be circulated to the whole collaboration. The schedule was as usual, with the deadline for nominations September 18th, and would be included in the mail and posted on the web. There was no action planned for Industrial Awards, but Project Managers could make suggestions to D. Campi before the September CMS Week. Contribution Update (L. Foa) The Collaboration Board Advisory Group was progressing well with updating the Constitution, but parts were still incomplete. However, certain parts were needed for the immediate business of the Board, and these had been posted on the Agenda for approval. Section 2.1 had been substantially revised, defining more clearly the roles of the Conference, Publications and Thesis Awards Committee, as well as that of the Authorship Board, how their members were appoint...

  12. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 June 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tAn update on safety at CERN 7.\tChildcare initiative 8.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 9.\tUsers’ Office news 10.\tAny Other Business 11.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under Item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75...

  13. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be heldon Wednesday 5 March 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management An update on Safety at CERN The CERN Ombudsperson proposal Childcare initiative Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) BelgiumnC. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denm...

  14. ACCU meeting

    CERN Document Server

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be heldon Wednesday 5 March 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management An update on Safety at CERN The CERN Ombudsperson proposal Childcare initiative Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) BelgiumnC. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denm...

  15. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Document Server

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 September 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria, W. Adam (71661) Belgium, C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic, P. Závada (75877) Denmark, J.B. Hansen (...

  16. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 June 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management An update on Safety at CERN Childcare initiative Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria - W. Adam (71661) Belgium - C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic - P. Závada (75877) Denmark - J.B. Hansen...

  17. Surgical treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in severely obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vander Naalt SJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Steven J Vander Naalt, Juan P Gurria, AiXuan L HoltermanUniversity of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Children's Hospital of Illinois, Department of Surgery/Pediatric Surgery, Peoria, IL, USAAbstract: Obesity is a multi-organ system disease with underlying metabolic abnormalities and chronic systemic inflammation. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a hepatic manifestation of obesity metabolic dysfunction and its associated cardiovascular- and liver-related morbidities and mortality. Our current understanding of NAFLD pathogenesis, disease characteristics, the role of insulin resistance, chronic inflammation, gut–liver and gut–brain crosstalk and the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy is still evolving. Bariatric surgery significantly improves metabolic and NAFLD histology in severely obese patients, although its positive effects on fibrosis are not universal. Bariatric surgery benefits NAFLD through its metabolic effect on insulin resistance, inflammation, and insulinotropic and anorexinogenic gastrointestinal hormones. Further studies are needed to understand the natural course of NAFLD in severely obese patients and the role of weight loss surgery as a primary treatment for NAFLD.Keywords: NAFLD, severe obesity, bariatric surgery

  18. Spectrofluoremetric and molecular docking study on the interaction of bisdemethoxycurcumin with bovine β-casein nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehranfar, Fahimeh [Department of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh, E-mail: bordbar@chem.ui.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Keyhanfar, Mehrnaz; Behbahani, Mandana [Faculty of Advanced Sciences and Technologies, Department of Biotechnology, University of Isfahan, Isfahan, 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    The interaction of bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC), as one of the main active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.), with bovine β-casein nanoparticle, as an efficient drug carrier system, was investigated using steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular docking calculations. Results of fluorescence quenching experiments, Forster energy transfer measurements and molecular docking calculations suggested that BDMC bind to the hydrophobic core of β-casein via formation of 3 hydrogen bonds and several vander Waals contacts that represented the encapsulation of BDMC in β-casein micelle nanoparticles. The binding parameters including number of substantive binding sites and the binding constants were evaluated by fluorescence quenching method. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of free BDMC and BDMC-β-casein complex in human breast cancer cell line MCF7 was evaluated in vitro. The study revealed the higher cytotoxic effects of encapsulated BDMC on MCF7 cells compared to equal dose of free BDMC. -- Highlights: • BDMC binds to the hydrophobic core of β-casein. • The effective encapsulation of BDMC in β-casein micelle nanoparticles was shown. • Enhanced cytotoxicity was observed for encapsulated BDMC in β-casein nanoparticles.

  19. Optical and Electrical Properties of Copper Oxide Thin Films Synthesized by Spray Pyrolysis Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Roy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Copper oxide (CuO thin films have been synthesized on to glass substrates at different temperatures in the range 250-450 °C by spray pyrolysis technique from aqueous solution using cupric acetate Cu(CH3COO2·H2O as a precursor. The structure of the deposited CuO thin films characterized by X-ray diffraction, the surface morphology was observed by a scanning electron microscope, the presence of elements was detected by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, the optical transmission spectra was recorded by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and electrical resistivity was studied by Van-der Pauw method. All the CuO thin films, irrespective of growth temperature, showed a monoclinic structure with the main CuO (111 orientation, and the crystallite size was about 8.4784 Å for the thin film synthesized at 350 °C. The optical transmission of the as-deposited film is found to decrease with the increase of substrate temperature, the optical band gap of the thin films varies from 1.90 to 1.60 eV and the room temperature electrical resistivity varies from 30 to18 Ohm·cm for the films grown at different substrate temperatures.

  20. Line Positions of Centrifugal Distorsion Induced Rotational Transitions of Methane Measured up to 2.6 Thz at Sub-Mhz Accuracy with a Cw-Thz Photomixing Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Cédric; Cuisset, Arnaud; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gaël; Bocquet, Robin; Boudon, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    Several Doppler limited rotational transitions of methane induced by centrifugal distortion have been measured with an unprecedented frequency accuracy using the THz photomixing synthesizer based on a frequency comb. Compared to previous synchrotron based FT-Far-IR measurements of Boudon et al., the accuracy of the line frequency measurements is improved by one order of magnitude, this yields a corresponding increase of two orders of magnitude to the weighting of these transitions in the global fit. The rotational transitions in the ν_4←ν_4 hot band are measured for the first time by the broad spectral coverage of the photomixing CW-THz spectrometer providing access up to R(5) transitions at 2.6 THz. The new global fit including the present lines has been used to update the methane line list of the HITRAN database. Some small, but significant variations of the parameter values are observed and are accompanied by a reduction of the 1-σ uncertainties on the rotational (B_0) and centrifugal distortion (D_0) constants. V. Boudon, O. Pirali, P. Roy, J.-B. Brubach, L. Manceron, J. Vander Auwera, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer, 111, 1117-1129 (2010).

  1. Synthesis of 5-Fluorouracil conjugated LaF3:Tb3+/PEG-COOH nanoparticles and its studies on the interaction with bovine serum albumin: spectroscopic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangaiyarkarasi, Rajendiran; Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2015-01-01

    The luminescent lanthanide-doped nanoparticles have gathered considerable attention in many fields especially in biomedicine. In this work, the lanthanum fluoride-doped terbium nanoparticles (LaF 3 :Tb 3+ NPs) via simple chemical precipitation method has been synthesized and functionalized with polyethylene glycol. The size and the shape of the nanoparticles are confirmed using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The conjugation of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and thus synthesized nanoparticles (NPs) were confirmed using various spectroscopic methods such as UV–Visible spectroscopy, fluorescence steady state, and excited state spectroscopy studies. The enhancement in fluorescence emission (λ = 543 nm) of drug-conjugated nanoparticles confirms the Vander Waals force of attraction due to F–F bonding between the drug and the nanoparticles. Further, the effects of 5FU-NPs in carrier protein were investigated using bovine serum albumin as a protein model. The 5FU–LaF 3 :Tb 3+ nanoparticles binding is illustrated with binding constant and number of binding sites. The structural change of bovine serum albumin has been studied using circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis.

  2. Interventional Effects for Mediation Analysis with Multiple Mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansteelandt, Stijn; Daniel, Rhian M

    2017-03-01

    The mediation formula for the identification of natural (in)direct effects has facilitated mediation analyses that better respect the nature of the data, with greater consideration of the need for confounding control. The default assumptions on which it relies are strong, however. In particular, they are known to be violated when confounders of the mediator-outcome association are affected by the exposure. This complicates extensions of counterfactual-based mediation analysis to settings that involve repeatedly measured mediators, or multiple correlated mediators. VanderWeele, Vansteelandt, and Robins introduced so-called interventional (in)direct effects. These can be identified under much weaker conditions than natural (in)direct effects, but have the drawback of not adding up to the total effect. In this article, we adapt their proposal to achieve an exact decomposition of the total effect, and extend it to the multiple mediator setting. Interestingly, the proposed effects capture the path-specific effects of an exposure on an outcome that are mediated by distinct mediators, even when-as often-the structural dependence between the multiple mediators is unknown, for instance, when the direction of the causal effects between the mediators is unknown, or there may be unmeasured common causes of the mediators.

  3. Dielectric property of NiTiO3 doped substituted ortho-chloropolyaniline composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohana Lakshmi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ortho-chloropolyaniline (OCP-NiTiO3 composites have been synthesized via in-situ polymerization of ortho-chloroaniline with various weight percentages of NiTiO3. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopic studies of Ortho-chloropolyaniline and its composites indicated the formation of composites as a result of Vander Waal's interaction between OCP and NiTiO3 particles. Surface morphology of OCP and OCP-NiTiO3 composites were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. The SEM micrographs indicated a modified morphology after the composite formation. Dielectric properties and electric modulus of OCP and OCP-NiTiO3 composites have been investigated in the frequency range of 50 Hz – 5 MHz. It has been noticed that electrical resistance decreases with increase in weight percentage of NiTiO3 particles in polymer matrix as well as with applied frequency. The display of semicircular arcs in Cole-Cole plots indicates the formation of series resistor and capacitor in network causing a decrease in the relaxation time and as a result conductivity enhances in these composites. The facile and cost effective synthesis process and excellent dielectric and conductivity response of these materials makes them promising materials for practical applications.

  4. Spectrofluoremetric and molecular docking study on the interaction of bisdemethoxycurcumin with bovine β-casein nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehranfar, Fahimeh; Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh; Keyhanfar, Mehrnaz; Behbahani, Mandana

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC), as one of the main active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.), with bovine β-casein nanoparticle, as an efficient drug carrier system, was investigated using steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular docking calculations. Results of fluorescence quenching experiments, Forster energy transfer measurements and molecular docking calculations suggested that BDMC bind to the hydrophobic core of β-casein via formation of 3 hydrogen bonds and several vander Waals contacts that represented the encapsulation of BDMC in β-casein micelle nanoparticles. The binding parameters including number of substantive binding sites and the binding constants were evaluated by fluorescence quenching method. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of free BDMC and BDMC-β-casein complex in human breast cancer cell line MCF7 was evaluated in vitro. The study revealed the higher cytotoxic effects of encapsulated BDMC on MCF7 cells compared to equal dose of free BDMC. -- Highlights: • BDMC binds to the hydrophobic core of β-casein. • The effective encapsulation of BDMC in β-casein micelle nanoparticles was shown. • Enhanced cytotoxicity was observed for encapsulated BDMC in β-casein nanoparticles

  5. Photoconductivity study of acid on Zinc phthalocyanine pyridine thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sukhwinder; Saini, G. S. S.; Tripathi, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    The Metal Phthalocyanine (MPc) have attracted much interest because of chemical and high thermal stability. Molecules forming a crystal of MPc are held together by weak attractive Vander Waals forces. Organic semiconductors have π conjugate bonds which allow electrons to move via π-electron cloud overlaps. Conduction mechanisms for organic semiconductor are mainly through tunneling; hopping between localized states, mobility gaps, and phonon assisted hopping. The photo conductivity of thin films of these complexes changes when exposed to oxidizing and reducing gases. Arrhenius plot is used to find the thermal activation energy in the intrinsic region and impurity scattering region. Arrhenius plotsare used to find the thermal activation energy. The original version of this article supplied to AIP Publishing contained erroneous text at the end of the abstract. "Arrhenius plots are used to find the thermal activation energy." was deleted as it does not pertain to the article. In addition, a figure citation was cited incorrectly and an equation was missing. This has been corrected in the updated version republished on 4 December 2017.

  6. Fuzzy logic and optical correlation-based face recognition method for patient monitoring application in home video surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbouz, Marwa; Alfalou, Ayman; Brosseau, Christian

    2011-06-01

    Home automation is being implemented into more and more domiciles of the elderly and disabled in order to maintain their independence and safety. For that purpose, we propose and validate a surveillance video system, which detects various posture-based events. One of the novel points of this system is to use adapted Vander-Lugt correlator (VLC) and joint-transfer correlator (JTC) techniques to make decisions on the identity of a patient and his three-dimensional (3-D) positions in order to overcome the problem of crowd environment. We propose a fuzzy logic technique to get decisions on the subject's behavior. Our system is focused on the goals of accuracy, convenience, and cost, which in addition does not require any devices attached to the subject. The system permits one to study and model subject responses to behavioral change intervention because several levels of alarm can be incorporated according different situations considered. Our algorithm performs a fast 3-D recovery of the subject's head position by locating eyes within the face image and involves a model-based prediction and optical correlation techniques to guide the tracking procedure. The object detection is based on (hue, saturation, value) color space. The system also involves an adapted fuzzy logic control algorithm to make a decision based on information given to the system. Furthermore, the principles described here are applicable to a very wide range of situations and robust enough to be implementable in ongoing experiments.

  7. Advanced driver assistance system: Road sign identification using VIAPIX system and a correlation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouerhani, Y.; Alfalou, A.; Desthieux, M.; Brosseau, C.

    2017-02-01

    We present a three-step approach based on the commercial VIAPIX® module for road traffic sign recognition and identification. Firstly, detection in a scene of all objects having characteristics of traffic signs is performed. This is followed by a first-level recognition based on correlation which consists in making a comparison between each detected object with a set of reference images of a database. Finally, a second level of identification allows us to confirm or correct the previous identification. In this study, we perform a correlation-based analysis by combining and adapting the Vander Lugt correlator with the nonlinear joint transformation correlator (JTC). Of particular significance, this approach permits to make a reliable decision on road traffic sign identification. We further discuss a robust scheme allowing us to track a detected road traffic sign in a video sequence for the purpose of increasing the decision performance of our system. This approach can have broad practical applications in the maintenance and rehabilitation of transportation infrastructure, or for drive assistance.

  8. Tricking the Troll: A Conversation with Berit Ellingsen on the Anthropocene and Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Hageman

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This conversation brought together Berit Ellingsen, the acclaimed writer of novels, short stories, non-fiction pieces, and video game criticism and fiction, with Andrew Hageman, a scholar who researches and teaches intersections of techno-culture and ecology. Ellingsen’s recent novel, Not Dark Yet (2015, has established her as an ascendant figure in the world of speculative, perhaps “weird,” fiction, and Jeff VanderMeer has praised it in his list of favorite book reads of 2015 as a significant contribution to fiction that engages the strangeness of coming to consciousness of climate change, referring to the novel as, “An ambiguous and luminous and mysterious text that changes shape and meaning on rereading, as with all the best fiction.” What follows is a conversation that unfolded over several conversational sessions spanning the Northern hemispheric late summer and autumn of 2016, as Andrew experienced the prolonged flooding of his basement in Northeast Iowa due to unusually high rainfalls, as well as the election of Donald Trump as President of the United States. Their conversation reflects on and engages with this emerging world of strange weather and strange days to articulate the roles of literature and the arts in the Anthropocene.

  9. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 March 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management The CERN Press Office An update on Safety at CERN The Burotel project Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel () Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark...

  10. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 March 2010 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairperson’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives on ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium C. Vander Velde (Chairperson) (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic S. Nemecek (71144) ...

  11. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 September 2011 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002   Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda      Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising       News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department Report on new CHIS rules Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria M. Jeitler (76307) Belgium C. Vander Velde (Chairperson)...

  12. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 September 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tCode of conduct 7.\tEqual Opportunities at CERN 8.\tAn update on safety at CERN 9.\tThe CERN shuttle service 10.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 11.\tUsers’ Office news 12.\tOther business 13.\tAgenda of the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives on ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Re...

  13. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 June 2009At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management CERN Social Services User services in GS Department An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria - G. Walzel (76592) Belgium - C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic - P. Závada (7587...

  14. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 December 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Restaurant No. 1 extension An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Election of the ACCU Chair Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Záv...

  15. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 September 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tCode of Conduct 7.\tEqual Opportunities at CERN 8.\tAn update on Safety at CERN 9.\tThe CERN shuttle service 10.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 11.\tUsers’ Office news 12.\tAny Other Business 13.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Cze...

  16. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 March 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tThe CERN Press Office 7.\tAn update on Safety at CERN 8.\tThe Burotel project 9.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 10.\tUsers’ Office news 11.\tAny Other Business 12.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel () Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria C...

  17. Invited Commentary: Explaining the Relationship Between Attending Worship Services and Mortality-A Brief Excursion Into the Contribution of Social Relationships in Religious Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Neal

    2017-04-01

    In this issue of the Journal, VanderWeele et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2017;000(00):000-000) report that more frequent attendance at worship services is associated with a lower mortality risk. However, the underlying processes that might explain this relationship were not discussed fully. A problem arises because the potentially beneficial association between attending worship services and mortality risk may be due to a number of different factors. At least part of the explanation may be found by turning to social relationships that arise in religious institutions. Within this context, there are potentially important benefits of providing social support to others. Support can be provided in several ways that involve potentially important health-related associations. In this commentary, I briefly examine the possible relationships between religious social support systems and other dimensions of congregational life and health. In-depth conceptual analyses are needed to move research in religious involvement and mortality to the next level. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. A systematic review of breast cancer incidence risk prediction models with meta-analysis of their performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meads, Catherine; Ahmed, Ikhlaaq; Riley, Richard D

    2012-04-01

    A risk prediction model is a statistical tool for estimating the probability that a currently healthy individual with specific risk factors will develop a condition in the future such as breast cancer. Reliably accurate prediction models can inform future disease burdens, health policies and individual decisions. Breast cancer prediction models containing modifiable risk factors, such as alcohol consumption, BMI or weight, condom use, exogenous hormone use and physical activity, are of particular interest to women who might be considering how to reduce their risk of breast cancer and clinicians developing health policies to reduce population incidence rates. We performed a systematic review to identify and evaluate the performance of prediction models for breast cancer that contain modifiable factors. A protocol was developed and a sensitive search in databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE was conducted in June 2010. Extensive use was made of reference lists. Included were any articles proposing or validating a breast cancer prediction model in a general female population, with no language restrictions. Duplicate data extraction and quality assessment were conducted. Results were summarised qualitatively, and where possible meta-analysis of model performance statistics was undertaken. The systematic review found 17 breast cancer models, each containing a different but often overlapping set of modifiable and other risk factors, combined with an estimated baseline risk that was also often different. Quality of reporting was generally poor, with characteristics of included participants and fitted model results often missing. Only four models received independent validation in external data, most notably the 'Gail 2' model with 12 validations. None of the models demonstrated consistently outstanding ability to accurately discriminate between those who did and those who did not develop breast cancer. For example, random-effects meta-analyses of the performance of the

  19. National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene trial: advancing the science of recruitment and breast cancer risk assessment in minority communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Wilson, John W; Cook, Elise D; Edwards, Cora L; Gibson, Regina V; McElwain, Diane L; Figueroa-Moseley, Colmar D; Paskett, Electra D; Roberson, Noma L; Wickerham, D Lawrence; Wolmark, Norman

    2013-04-01

    One of the first chemoprevention trials conducted in the western hemisphere, the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project's (NSABP) Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (BCPT), demonstrated the need to evaluate all aspects of recruitment in real time and to implement strategies to enroll racial and ethnic minority women. The purpose of this report is to review various patient recruitment efforts the NSABP developed to enhance the participation of racial and ethnic minority women in the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) trial and to describe the role that the recruitment process played in the implementation and understanding of breast cancer risk assessment in minority communities. The NSABP STAR trial was a randomized, double-blinded study comparing the use of tamoxifen 20 mg/day to raloxifene 60 mg/day, for a 5-year period, to reduce the risk of developing invasive breast cancer. Eligible postmenopausal women were required to have a 5-year predicted breast cancer risk of 1.66% based on the modified Gail Model. For the current report, eligibility and enrollment data were tabulated by race/ethnicity for women who submitted STAR risk assessment forms (RAFs). A total of 184,460 RAFs were received, 145,550 (78.9%) from white women and 38,910 (21.1%) from minority women. Of the latter group, 21,444 (11.6%) were from African Americans/blacks, 7913 (4.5%) from Hispanics/Latinas, and 9553 (5.2%) from other racial or ethnic groups. The percentages of risk-eligible women among African Americans, Hispanics/Latinas, others, and whites were 14.2%, 23.3%, 13.7%, and 57.4%, respectively. Programs targeting minority enrollment submitted large numbers of RAFs, but the eligibility rates of the women referred from those groups tended to be lower than the rates among women referred outside of those programs. The average number of completed risk assessments increased among minority women over the course of the recruitment period compared to those from whites. We have not

  20. Differences in reproductive risk factors for breast cancer in middle-aged women in Marin County, California and a sociodemographically similar area of Northern California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uratsu Connie S

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Northern California county of Marin (MC has historically had high breast cancer incidence rates. Because of MC's high socioeconomic status (SES and racial homogeneity (non-Hispanic White, it has been difficult to assess whether these elevated rates result from a combination of established risk factors or other behavioral or environmental factors. This survey was designed to compare potential breast cancer risks and incidence rates for a sample of middle-aged MC women with those of a demographically similar population. Methods A random sample of 1500 middle-aged female members of a large Northern California health plan, half from Marin County (MC and half from a comparison area in East/Central Contra Costa County (ECCC, were mailed a survey covering family history, reproductive history, use of oral contraceptives (OC and hormone replacement therapy (HRT, behavioral health risks, recency of breast screening, and demographic characteristics. Weighted data were used to compare prevalence of individual breast cancer risk factors and Gail scores. Age-adjusted cumulative breast cancer incidence rates (2000–2004 were also calculated for female health plan members aged 40–64 residing in the two geographic areas. Results Survey response was 57.1% (n = 427 and 47.9% (n = 359 for MC and ECCC samples, respectively. Women in the two areas were similar in SES, race, obesity, exercise frequency, current smoking, ever use of OCs and HRT, age at onset of menarche, high mammography rates, family history of breast cancer, and Gail scores. However, MC women were significantly more likely than ECCC women to be former smokers (43.6% vs. 31.2%, have Ashkenazi Jewish heritage (12.8% vs. 7.1%, have no live births before age 30 (52.7% vs. 40.8%, and be nulliparous (29.2% vs. 15.4%, and less likely to never or rarely consume alcohol (34.4% vs. 41.9%. MC and ECCC women had comparable 2000–2004 invasive breast cancer incidence rates. Conclusion

  1. Assessing suicidal risk with antiepileptic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Mula

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Marco Mula2, Gail S Bell1, Josemir W Sander1,31Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, UCL Institute of Neurology, and National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, UCL Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom; 2Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neurology, Amedeo Avogadro University, University Hospital Maggiore della Carità, Novara, Italy; 3SEIN – Epilepsy Institute in the Netherlands Foundation, Heemstede, The NetherlandsAbstract: Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration issued an alert about an increased risk for suicidality during treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs for different indications, including epilepsy. We discuss the issue of suicide in epilepsy with special attention to AEDs and the assessment of suicide in people with epilepsy. It has been suggested that early medical treatment with AEDs might potentially reduce suicide risk of people with epilepsy, but it is of great importance that the choice of drug is tailored to the mental state of the patient. The issue of suicidality in epilepsy is likely to represent an example of how the underdiagnosis of psychiatric symptoms, the lack of input from professionals (eg, psychologists, social workers, and psychiatrists, and the delay in an optimized AED therapy may worsen the prognosis of the condition with the occurrence of severe complications such as suicide.Keywords: epilepsy, suicide, adverse effect, depression

  2. Living in the context of poverty and trajectories of breast cancer worry, knowledge, and perceived risk after a breast cancer risk education session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartle-Haring, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to demonstrate how living in neighborhoods with high levels of poverty (while controlling for personal income) impacts personal characteristics, which in turn impacts retention of breast cancer risk knowledge and changes in worry and perceived risk. The data from this project come from a larger, National Cancer Institute-funded study that included a pretest, a breast cancer risk education session, a posttest, the option of an individualized risk assessment via the Gail Model and three follow-up phone calls over the next 9 months. The percent of individuals living below poverty in the community in which the participant resided was predictive of the personal characteristics assessed, and these characteristics were predictive of changes in breast cancer worry and knowledge across time. Differentiation of self and monitoring, two of the individual characteristics that seem to allow people to process and use information to make "rational" decisions about health care, seem to be impacted by the necessity for adaptation to a culture of poverty. Thus, as a health care community, we need to tailor our messages and our recommendations with an understanding of the complex intersection of poverty and health care decision making. Copyright © 2010 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Theory and Experiment on Radiative Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R. Paul

    2005-07-01

    The current generation of high-energy-density research facilities has enabled the beginnings of experimental studies of radiation hydrodynamic systems, common in astrophysics but difficult to produce in the laboratory. Radiative shock experiments specifically have been a topic of increasing effort in recent years. Our group and collaborators [1] have emphasized the radiographic observation of structure in radiative shocks. These shocks have been produced on the Omega laser by driving a Be piston through Xenon at velocities above 100 km/s. The talk will summarize these experiments and their results. Interpreting these and other experiments is hampered by the limited range of assumptions used in published theories, and by the limitations in readily available simulation tools. This has motivated an examination of radiative shock theory [2]. The talk will summarize the key issues and present results for specific cases. [ 1 ] Gail Glendinning, Ted Perry, Bruce Remington, Jim Knauer, Tom Boehly, and other members of the NLUF Experimental Astrophysics Team. Publications: Reighard et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. submitted; Leibrandt, et al., Ap J., in press, Reighard et al., IFSA 03 Proceedings, Amer. Nucl. Soc. (2004). [2] Useful discussions with Dmitri Ryutov and Serge Bouquet. Supported by the NNSA programs via DOE Grants DE-FG52-03NA00064 and DE FG53 2005 NA26014

  4. Worry and risk perception of breast cancer in a prevention trial of low dose tamoxifen in midlife postmenopausal hormone users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondanina, Gabriella; Puntoni, Matteo; Guerrieri-Gonzaga, Aliana; Marra, Domenico; Bonanni, Bernardo; DeCensi, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    There is increasing interest in combining postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) and SERMs in midlife women. We previously showed that refusal to participate in a prevention trial of low dose tamoxifen in HT users was associated with higher worry about breast cancer. Given this counterintuitive finding, we studied which factors influenced worry and risk perception of breast cancer. We assessed the relationships of breast cancer worry and risk perception with age, age at menopause, Gail risk, education, adherence to mammographic screening, BMI, smoking, physical activity, alcohol use, anxiety and depression in 457 midlife HT users who were eligible to participate in the trial. Women with menopause 52 years (OR = 5.0, 95% CI, 1.2-21.1). Worry was also associated with high absolute risk perception and former smoking. Factors associated with higher risk perception were age>60 years, at-risk life style, worry about breast cancer and depression. The inverse association between early menopause and worry about breast cancer is in contrast with the known protective effect of early menopause on breast cancer risk and seems to reflect a feeling of aging and disease vulnerability. Our findings indicate that worry about cancer has an affective construct which is independent of breast cancer biology but is engaged in health decision making. Increasing breast cancer risk awareness in subjects high in worry without a plan of emotional coping may therefore be counterproductive because of avoidant attitudes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. The radiological situation at the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa. Proceedings of a conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-08-01

    In January 1996, France's programme of experiences nucleaires (nuclear experiments) at the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa ceased, and soon after that the French Government requested the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to carry out a study of the radiological situation at the two atolls. The study of the Radiological Situation at the Atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa lasted almost two years, giving rise to a number of reports which are being issued by the IAEA. From 30 June to 3 July 1998, the IAEA hosted, in Vienna, an International Conference on the Study, the main purpose being to facilitate discussion of the results of the study by the scientific community and other interested parties. The Conference was presided over by Eduardo Bobadilla Lopez of Chile. These proceedings contain the opening addresses of the Conference, a presentation made by a senior representative of France's Commissariat a l'energie atomique and closing remarks by the President of the Conference, by E. Gail de Planque, Chairman of the International Advisory Committee and by Mohamed ElBaradei, Director General of the IAEA. the also contain edited texts reflecting the discussions which took place during the Conference, mainly after the technical presentations covering the various aspects of the Study. These presentations generally paralleled the Main Report on the Study, to which reference is made in the edited texts

  6. Mapping the Spatial Distribution of Metal-Bearing Oxides in VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Andrew; Booth, S. Tom; Remijan, Anthony; Carroll, Brandon; Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2015-06-01

    The formation of silicate-based dust grains is not well constrained. Despite this, grain surface chemistry is essential to modern astrochemical formation models. In carbon-poor stellar envelopes, such as the red hypergiant VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa), metal-bearing oxides, the building blocks of silicate grains, dominate the grain formation, and thus are a key location to study dust chemistry. TiO_2, which was only first detected in the radio recently (Kaminski et al., 2013a), has been proposed to be a critical molecule for silicate grain formation, and not oxides containing more abundant metals (eg. Si, Fe, and Mg) (Gail and Sedlmayr, 1998). In addition, other molecules, such as SO_2, have been found to trace shells produced by numerous outflows pushing through the expanding envelope, resulting in a complex velocity structure (Ziurys et al., 2007). With the advanced capabilities of ALMA, it is now possible to individually resolve the velocity structure of each of these outflows and constrain the underlying chemistry in the region. Here, we present high resolution maps of rotational transitions of several metal-bearing oxides in VY CMa from the ALMA Band 7 and Band 9 Science Verification observations. With these maps, the physical parameters of the region and the formation chemistry of metal-bearing oxides will be studied.

  7. The role of effective human resource factors in participative management: A comparative Study between Indian and Iranian employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Boroumand

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an overwhelming need to focus on the human capital and the role of this important resource on organizations’ systems. In addition, there is a need for study on human resource development and participative management system. This would not be an interesting topic for study, if it were not a comparative study in the field of human capital and participative management system. Two important sectors were selected for the study i.e., Gas and Car parts companies. Gas Indian Ltd in Delhi (GAIL and the National Gas Company of Isfahan, Iran; and also, two manufacturers of car parts in India and Iran, named Sona Group Company (in India and Atlas Pump Sepahan (in Iran were selected. The objectives of the study were associated with the role of some important human resource factors in participative management system. Objectives of the study are as follows: The role of communication, employees compassion, employees sentiment, reward system and training in participative management system, also if there were any significant difference on the impact of mentioned variables in Indian and Iranian organizations from the perspective of employees. The questionnaires were distributed among randomly selected employees and the researcher collected responses through the questionnaires of employees. Analysis of data was based on the SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. Three levels of analyses were computed: 1.Descriptive analyses 2. T-Test 3. Correlation analyses. The general observations associated with attitudes of Indian and Iranian employees about hypotheses are presented in this paper.

  8. 14. Breast cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, A K; Fentiman, I S

    2002-05-01

    Increased risk of breast cancer may result from potentially modifiable causes such as endogenous hormone levels, obesity, HRT, and non-lactation, or non-modifiable factors including genetic susceptibility and increasing age. The Gail model, based on known factors, may be useful for estimating lifetime risk in some individuals, but those risk factors that are easier to modify may have a limited impact on the totality of breast cancer. Tamoxifen prevention still remains contentious, with a significant reduction in risk of breast cancer in women given tamoxifen in the NSABP P1 study but no effect in the Italian and Royal Marsden trials. Raloxifene, tested in the MORE trial, reduced the incidence of breast cancer by 65% but this was restricted to oestrogen receptor positive tumours. Lifestyle factors such as diet, obesity, exercise and age at first full term pregnancy and number of pregnancies have a mild to moderate impact on risk, so may have little effect on the incidence of breast cancer. Reduction of alcohol intake could lead to a modest reduction in the risk of breast cancer but possibly adversely affect other diseases. Fat reduction and GnRH analogue reduce mammographic density but have not yet been shown to affect risk. For women with BRCA1/2 mutation, options include unproven surveillance and prophylactic mastectomy with an unquantified risk reduction. Interesting new candidates for chemoprevention include aromatase inhibitors, new generation SERMs, demethylating agents, non-selective COX inhibitors, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and polyamine synthetic inhibitors.

  9. Fangirls in refrigerators: The politics of (invisibility in comic book culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Scott

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1999, Gail Simone circulated a list of female comic book characters who had been "depowered, raped, or cut up and stuck in the refrigerator," sparking a dialogue about gender and comic book culture that continues today. In particular, 2011 and 2012 have been marked by an exponential growth in conversations and criticisms surrounding the state of women in comics, both as producers and consumers. Through a survey of how scholars have gendered comic book readership, an overview of recent incidents that have renewed concern about women in comics, and an analysis of one transformative intervention in the wake of these conversations, this essay broadly discusses the relative invisibility of female comic book fans as a market segment and how fangirls are actively striving to become a visible and vocal force within comic book culture. This essay suggests that we are currently witnessing a transformative moment within comic book industry, comic book fandom, and comic book scholarship, in which gender is one of the primary axes of change.

  10. Advances in the physics of radiation oncology - 50 years of contributions by US Medical Physicists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suntharalingam, N.

    2008-01-01

    Medical Physicists have a long standing record in the advancement of the discipline of Radiation Oncology, not only in the United States but world-wide, going back to the pre-world war II era. In the United States the contributions of Failla and Quimby, first at Memorial Hospital and then at Columbia University in New York, laid the foundation for the Profession of Medical Physics in the US. Radiation Therapy first used low and high kilovoltage machines for external beam therapy. Radium (Parker) and radon seeds (Quimby) were used for brachytherapy. Subsequently, clinical Van-de-Graaff machines (Trump and Wright) and the Betatron (Kerst, Adams and Skaggs) provided the required photon beams and also made available clinically useful electron beams. The work of John Laughlin, Larry Lanzl, Jacques Ovadia together with Gail Adams and Lester Skaggs, needs to be recognized for their pioneering efforts. With the introduction of Cobalt-60 Teletherapy (Harold Johns and the Canadian Group, Gilbert Fletcher and the MD Anderson Group) and Linear Accelerators (Henry Kaplan and the Stanford Group, and Varian), in the late 1950s ∼ 1960, there was even a greater need for the strong participation of medical physicists, as a useful technical resource to the physicians

  11. Reviews of recent publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Alonso, Carlos J. The Burden of Modernity: The Rhetoric of Cultural Discourse in Spanish America Reviewed by Melvin S. Arrington, Jr. Kolocotroni, Vassiliki, Jane Goldman, and Olga Taxidou, eds, Modernism: An Anthology of Sources and Documents Reviewed by Gerd Bayer Motte, Warren. Small Worlds: Minimalism in Contemporary French Literature Reviewed by William Cloonan Melton, Judith M. The Face of Exile: Autobiographical Journeys Reviewed by Claude P. Desmarais Redding, Arthur. Raids on Human Consciousness: Writing, Anarchism, and Violence Reviewed by Gail Finney Chambers, Ross. Facing It: AIDS Diaries and the Death of the Author Reviewed by Melissa A. Fitch Marx-Scouras, Danielle. The Cultural Politics of Tel Quel: Literature and the Left in the Wake of Engagement Reviewed by Diane Fourny Foster, David William. Buenos Aires: Perspectives on the City and Cultural Production Reviewed by Gustavo Geirola Nelson, Ardis L., ed. Guillermo Cabrera Infante: Assays, essays, and other arts Reviewed by José Luis Martinez-Dueñas Fox, Claire F. The Fence and the River: Culture and Politics at the U.S.-Mexico Border Reviewed by Robert Neustadt

  12. A cross sectional study on the motivators for Asian women to attend opportunistic mammography screening in a private hospital in Malaysia: the MyMammo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Norhashimah; Ho, Weang Kee; Mariapun, Shivaani; Teo, Soo Hwang

    2015-06-12

    To date, because of limited budgets and lower incidence of breast cancer, the majority of Asian countries do not have population-based screening programmes, but instead offer opportunistic screening. However, there have been few studies which have assessed the motivators for women attending such programmes and the appropriateness of the programmes in terms of targeting women at risk. We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study of 1,619 women aged 40 to 74 years attending a subsidized opportunistic screening mammogram from October 2011 to October 2013 at a private hospital in Malaysia. Breast cancer risk was estimated using the Gail Model and two-step cluster analysis was used to examine the motivators of attending screening. Although Malaysia comprises 54.5% Malay, 24.5% Chinese and 7.3% Indian, the majority of women in the MyMammo Study were Chinese (70.1%) and 99.2% had a motivators. Of those with only secondary school education, their main motivators were doctors. Taken together, our results suggest the women attending opportunistic mammography screening in Asia are at low risk of breast cancer and this poses challenges to cost-effective and equitable strategies for cancer control. We propose that to improve uptake of screening mammography, awareness programmes should target both doctors and members of the public.

  13. Analyzing PSU’s Performance: A Case from Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Nan Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The high economic growth in the past few years and increasing industrialization coupled with a burgeoning population have created a lot of concern for India’s energy scenario. India’s crude oil production has not shown significant growth in the last 10 or more years whereas its refining capacity has grown by more than 20% over the last 5 years. Oil consumption is growing at approximately 4.1% per year and natural gas consumption is growing at 68% per year. Therefore, evaluation performances and pushing energy companies to improve become important issues. The purpose of this research is of evaluation the performance of Indian energy industry under multiple different inputs and outputs criteria. The data envelopment analysis (DEA and grey theory are used to conduct this study. There are total 14 public sector undertakings (PSUs under this industry and no any private company. However, only 10 of them are mature enough to be published in India stock markets. Therefore, the realistic data of all 10 companies are used for this evaluation. The results demonstrate that Gas Authority of India Limited (GAIL, Chennai Petroleum Corporation Limited (CPCL, and Oil India Limited (OIL are the top 3 of ranking influences. This integrated numerical study gives a better “past-present-future” insights into evaluation performance in India energy industry.

  14. Surveiller et « embellir »: the Writings of Prostitutes and Sex Workers in the Light of Discursive (Enframing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagos Koliopanos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The discourses of prostitutes are far less visible than the discourses on prostitutes. Based on this fact, we have in this article studied a corpus that is narrow albeit particularly heterogeneous and consisting entirely of books written by prostitutes and sex workers. While recognizing, along with Gail Pheterson and Paola Tabet, the obsolescence and arbitrariness of (the use of terms such as “prostitute” and “prostitution”, we have tried to show that those different written discourses are systematically (enframed. By describing the mechanisms of this (enframing process (mystification, expurgation, censorship, collaborative writing, editorial pretexts in different publishing contexts, we have claimed that it operates at the same time as enhancement and control of the concerned discourses. We have further weighed, from a gender point of view, the discursive  high-jacking and disqualification – on an ideological as well as esthetic level – undergone by the authors we have studied. The ongoing struggle of certain sex workers / authors to get rid of  (enframing procedures and their pressing need for discursive autonomy reveal the necessity to carry on this examination on a broader spectrum.

  15. Lessons learned from women in leadership positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Eileen

    2018-01-01

    Eileen Elias has decades of experience in leadership positions within government and nongovernmental organizations. As the first female Commissioner for Mental Health in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the US in the early 1990s, Elias gained experience on navigating gender-based challenges to attain recognized performance outcomes. From lessons learned from women leaders, educate young women entering their careers on attaining leadership positions. Comprehensive research of literature from 2012 through 2017 and interviews with women leaders representing non-Fortune 500 companies including academia, research, non-profit, for-profit, and primary and secondary education. Interviewees included:1.Gail Bassin, Co-Chief Executive Officer and Treasurer, JBS International Inc.2.Jeri Epstein, Executive Director, The Ambit Foundation3.Valerie Fletcher, Executive Director, Institute for Human Centered Design4.Christine James-Brown, President and CEO, Child Welfare League of America5.Daria Mochly-Rosen, PhD, Professor and Fellow, Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine6.Eileen O'Keefe, MD, MPH, Clinical Associate Professor and Director, Boston University Health Sciences7.Jeri Shaw, President and Co-Chief Executive Officer, JBS International Inc. A comprehensive understanding of key women leaders' lessons learned and recommendations targeting young women as they assess leadership opportunities in the public or private sectors.

  16. Adsorption/desorption kinetics of Na atoms on reconstructed Si (111)-7 x 7 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh; Govind; Shivaprasad, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembled nanostructures on a periodic template are fundamentally and technologically important as they put forward the possibility to fabricate and pattern micro/nano-electronics for sensors, ultra high-density memories and nanocatalysts. Alkali-metal (AM) nanostructure grown on a semiconductor surface has received considerable attention because of their simple hydrogen like electronic structure. However, little efforts have been made to understand the fundamental aspects of the growth mechanism of self-assembled nanostructures of AM on semiconductor surfaces. In this paper, we report organized investigation of kinetically controlled room-temperature (RT) adsorption/desorption of sodium (Na) metal atoms on clean reconstructed Si (111)-7 x 7 surface, by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The RT uptake curve shows a layer-by-layer growth (Frank-vander Merve growth) mode of Na on Si (111)-7 x 7 surfaces and a shift is observed in the binding energy position of Na (1s) spectra. The thermal stability of the Na/Si (111) system was inspected by annealing the system to higher substrate temperatures. Within a temperature range from RT to 350 o C, the temperature induced mobility to the excess Na atoms sitting on top of the bilayer, allowing to arrange themselves. Na atoms desorbed over a wide temperature range of 370 o C, before depleting the Si (111) surface at temperature 720 o C. The acquired valence-band (VB) spectra during Na growth revealed the development of new electronic-states near the Fermi level and desorption leads the termination of these. For Na adsorption up to 2 monolayers, decrease in work function (-1.35 eV) was observed, whereas work function of the system monotonically increases with Na desorption from the Si surface as observed by other studies also. This kinetic and thermodynamic study of Na adsorbed Si (111)-7 x 7 system can be utilized in fabrication of sensors used in night vision devices.

  17. Structural consequences of the natural substitution, E9K, on reactive-site-hydrolyzed squash (Cucurbita maxima) trypsin inhibitor (CMTI), as studied by two-dimensional NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthi, R; Lin, C L; VanderVelde, D

    1992-06-02

    Sequence-specific hydrogen-1 NMR assignments were made to all of the 29 amino acid residues of reactive-site-hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor I (CMTI-I*) by the application of two-dimensional NMR (2D NMR) techniques, and its secondary structural elements (two tight turns, a 3(10)-helix, and a triple-stranded beta-sheet) were identified on the basis of short-range NOESY cross peaks and deuterium-exchange kinetics. These secondary structural elements are present in the intact inhibitor [Holak, T. A., Gondol, D., Otlewski, J., & Wilusz, T. (1989) J. Mol. Biol. 210, 635-648] and are unaffected by the hydrolysis of the reactive-site peptide bond between Arg5 and Ile6, in accordance with the earlier conclusion reached for CMTI-III* [Krishnamoorthi, R., Gong, Y.-X., Lin, C. S., & VanderVelde, D. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 898-904]. Chemical shifts of backbone hydrogen atoms, peptide NH's, and C alpha H's, of CMTI-I* were compared with those of the intact inhibitor, CMTI-I, and of the reactive-site-hydrolyzed, natural, E9K variant, CMTI-III*. Cleavage of the Arg5-Ile6 peptide bond resulted in changes of chemical shifts of most of the backbone atoms of CMTI-I, in agreement with the earlier results obtained for CMTI-III. Comparison of chemical shifts of backbone hydrogen atoms of CMTI-I* and CMTI-III* revealed no changes, except for residues Glu9 and His25. However, the intact forms of the same two proteins, CMTI-I and CMTI-III, showed small but significant perturbations of chemical shifts of residues that made up the secondary structural elements of the inhibitors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Peer review of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Vessel Investigation Project metallurgical examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohl, R.W.; Gaydos, R.G.; Vander Voort, G.F.; Diercks, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Fifteen samples recovered from the lower head of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 nuclear reactor pressure vessel were subjected to detailed metallurgical examinations by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), with supporting work carried out by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and several of the European participants. These examinations determined that a portion of the lower head, a so-called elliptical ``hot spot`` measuring {approx}0.8 {times} 1 m, reached temperatures as high as 1100{degrees}C during the accident and cooled from these temperatures at {approx}10--100{degrees}C/min. The remainder of the lower head was found to have remained below the ferrite-toaustenite transformation temperature of 727{degrees}C during the accident. Because of the significance of these results and their importance to the overall analysis of the TMI accident, a panel of three outside peer reviewers, Dr. Robert W. Bohl, Mr. Richard G. Gaydos, and Mr. George F. Vander Voort, was formed to conduct an independent review of the metallurgical analyses. After a thorough review of the previous analyses and examination of photo-micrographs and actual lower head specimens, the panel determined that the conclusions resulting from the INEL study were fundamentally correct. In particular, the panel reaffirmed that four lower head samples attained temperatures as high as 1100{degrees}C, and perhaps as high as 1150--1200{degrees}C in one case, during the accident. They concluded that these samples subsequently cooled at a rate of {approx}50--125{degrees}C/min in the temperature range of 600--400{degrees}C, in good agreement with the original analysis. The reviewers also agreed that the remainder of the lower head samples had not exceeded the ferrite-to-austenite transformation temperature during the accident and suggested several refinements and alternative procedures that could have been employed in the original analysis.

  19. Cold molecules: formation, trapping and spectroscopy. - Piling up of cesium dimers in a quadrupolar magnetic trap. - Spectroscopy by lack of photo-association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhaecke, N.

    2003-10-01

    This thesis deals with the study of cold molecules obtained through the cold atom photo-association technique. Our study is focused both on manipulating external degrees of freedom of these Cs 2 molecules and on studying their internal interactions. A quadrupolar magnetic trap of about 2.10 5 cold Cs 2 molecules is demonstrated. The trap lifetime is on the order of 600 ms, mainly limited by the background gas pressure. The trapped molecules are identified, which allows the determination of the trapped molecule cloud temperature, which is about 35 μK. A dipolar trap is set up by the use of a focused CO 2 laser beam. Moreover, this thesis describes a two-photon photo-association spectroscopy. We report the first study of two-photon photo-association line shapes, which exhibit typical Fano profiles. Taking advantage of the detailed understanding of these line shapes, we measure over one hundred high-lying level energies with an accuracy on the order of 10 MHz. Then we interpret theoretically these energies. The huge hyperfine structure of the Cesium atom binds us to solve a coupled channel Schroedinger equation for internuclear distances above 15 a 0 . Hence we use an asymptotic theory to fit the potential parameters of the Cs 2 dimer. We adjust those parameters by the mean of both evolutionary strategies and deterministic optimum seeking. This is followed by a careful statistics study, which leads to a very accurate determination of the Vander Waals coefficient. Moreover we report the first experimental determination of the exchange interaction amplitude. (author)

  20. Invited commentary: boundless science--putting natural direct and indirect effects in a clearer empirical context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naimi, Ashley I

    2015-07-15

    Epidemiologists are increasingly using natural effects for applied mediation analyses, yet 1 key identifying assumption is unintuitive and subject to some controversy. In this issue of the Journal, Jiang and VanderWeele (Am J Epidemiol. 2015;182(2):105-108) formalize the conditions under which the difference method can be used to estimate natural indirect effects. In this commentary, I discuss implications of the controversial "cross-worlds" independence assumption needed to identify natural effects. I argue that with a binary mediator, a simple modification of the authors' approach will provide bounds for natural direct and indirect effect estimates that better reflect the capacity of the available data to support empirical statements on the presence of mediated effects. I discuss complications encountered when odds ratios are used to decompose effects, as well as the implications of incorrectly assuming the absence of exposure-induced mediator-outcome confounders. I note that the former problem can be entirely resolved using collapsible measures of effect, such as risk ratios. In the Appendix, I use previous derivations for natural direct effect bounds on the risk difference scale to provide bounds on the odds ratio scale that accommodate 1) uncertainty due to the cross-world independence assumption and 2) uncertainty due to the cross-world independence assumption and the presence of exposure-induced mediator-outcome confounders. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Cold molecules: formation, trapping and spectroscopy. - Piling up of cesium dimers in a quadrupolar magnetic trap. - Spectroscopy by lack of photo-association; Molecules froides: formation, piegeage et spectroscopie. - Accumulation de dimeres de cesium dans un piege quadrupolaire magnetique. - Spectroscopie par frustration de photoassociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhaecke, N

    2003-10-15

    This thesis deals with the study of cold molecules obtained through the cold atom photo-association technique. Our study is focused both on manipulating external degrees of freedom of these Cs{sub 2} molecules and on studying their internal interactions. A quadrupolar magnetic trap of about 2.10{sup 5} cold Cs{sub 2} molecules is demonstrated. The trap lifetime is on the order of 600 ms, mainly limited by the background gas pressure. The trapped molecules are identified, which allows the determination of the trapped molecule cloud temperature, which is about 35 {mu}K. A dipolar trap is set up by the use of a focused CO{sub 2} laser beam. Moreover, this thesis describes a two-photon photo-association spectroscopy. We report the first study of two-photon photo-association line shapes, which exhibit typical Fano profiles. Taking advantage of the detailed understanding of these line shapes, we measure over one hundred high-lying level energies with an accuracy on the order of 10 MHz. Then we interpret theoretically these energies. The huge hyperfine structure of the Cesium atom binds us to solve a coupled channel Schroedinger equation for internuclear distances above 15 a{sub 0}. Hence we use an asymptotic theory to fit the potential parameters of the Cs{sub 2} dimer. We adjust those parameters by the mean of both evolutionary strategies and deterministic optimum seeking. This is followed by a careful statistics study, which leads to a very accurate determination of the Vander Waals coefficient. Moreover we report the first experimental determination of the exchange interaction amplitude. (author)

  2. A Comparison of the Reproductive Output Among the Relatives of Samoan Androphilic Fa'afafine and Gynephilic Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenyna, Scott W; Petterson, Lanna J; VanderLaan, Doug P; Vasey, Paul L

    2017-01-01

    The sexually antagonistic gene hypothesis (SAGH) for male androphilia posits that genes associated with androphilia (i.e., sexual attraction to adult males) will result in lowered reproduction when present in males, but increased reproduction when present in females. Findings derived from some Western European samples furnish support for the SAGH; however, results from studies conducted in other regions of the world have been more equivocal. Our previous research in Samoa indicated that the mothers as well as the maternal and paternal grandmothers of androphilic males (known locally as fa'afafine) exhibit elevated reproductive output when compared to the relatives of gynephilic men (i.e., males that are sexually attracted to adult females). The present replication study tested the SAGH in Samoa using a sample that was 122 % larger than the one previously studied by our group (VanderLaan, Forrester, Petterson, & Vasey, 2012). In line with the predictions of the SAGH, we hypothesized that the grandmothers, aunts, and mothers of fa'afafine would show elevated reproductive output compared to those of Samoan gynephilic men. Data were collected from 191 fa'afafine and 191 gynephilic men on the reproductive output of their paternal and maternal biological relatives (i.e., mothers, grandmothers, aunts, uncles). The mothers and maternal grandmothers of fa'afafine showed elevated reproductive output compared to those of gynephilic men. The paternal grandmother effect was not replicated. Although these results are consistent with the SAGH, a lack of difference in the reproductive output of aunts renders support for the SAGH in Samoa equivocal.

  3. Synthesis, spectroscopic, structural and thermal characterizations of [(C7H6NO42TeBr6·4H2O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Smaoui

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tellurium (IV complexes with pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate ligand were synthesized by slow evaporation from aqueous solutions yielding a new compound: [(C7H6NO42TeBr6·4H2O]. The structure of this compound was solved and refined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The compound is centrosymmetric P21/c (N°: 14 with the parameters a = 8.875(5 Å, b = 15.174(5 Å, c = 10.199(5 Å, β = 94.271° (5 and Z = 2. The structure consists of isolated H2O, isolated [TeBr6]2− octahedral anions and (pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate [C7H6NO4]+ cations. The stability of the structure was ensured by ionic and hydrogen bonding contacts (N–H⋯Br and O–H⋯Br and Van-Der Walls interaction. The thermal decomposition of the compound was studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The FTIR and Raman spectroscopy at different temperatures confirm the existence of vibrational modes that correspond to the organic, inorganic and water molecular groups. Additionally, the UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectrum was recorded in order to investigate the band gap nature. The measurements show that this compound exhibits a semiconducting behavior with an optical band gap of 2.66 eV.

  4. An Investigation of Structural and Electrical Properties of Nano Crystalline SnO2:Cu Thin Films Deposited by Spray Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Podder

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Pure tin oxide (SnO2 and Cu doped SnO2 thin films have been deposited onto glass substrates by a simple spray pyrolysis technique under atmospheric pressure at temperature 350 °C. The doping concentration of Cu was varied from 1 to 8 wt. % while all other deposition parameters such as spray rate, carrier air gas pressure, deposition time, and distance between spray nozzle to substrate were kept constant. Surface morphology of the as-deposited thin films has been studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The SEM micrograph of the films shows uniform deposition. The structural properties of the as-deposited and annealed thin films have been studied by XRD and the electrical characterization was performed by Van-der Pauw method. The as-deposited films are found polycrystalline in nature with tetragonal crystal structure. Average grain sizes of pure and Cu doped SnO2 thin film have been obtained in the range of 7.2445 Å to 6.0699 Å, which indicates the nanometric size of SnO2 grains developed in the film. The resistivity of SnO2 films was found to decrease initially from 4.5095×10−4 Ωm to 1.1395× 10−4 Ωm for concentration of Cu up to 4 % but it was increased further with increasing of Cu concentrations. The experimental results depict the suitability of this material for using as transparent and conducting window materials in solar cells and gas sensors.

  5. Unknown Aspects of Self-Assembly of PbS Microscale Superstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querejeta-Fernández, Ana; Hernández-Garrido, Juan C.; Yang, Hengxi; Zhou, Yunlong; Varela, Aurea; Parras, Marina; Calvino-Gámez, José J.; González-Calbet, Jose M.; Green, Peter F.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    A lot of interesting and sophisticated examples of nanoparticle (NP) self-assembly (SA) are known. From both fundamental and technological standpoints this field requires advancements in three principle directions: a) understanding the mechanism and driving forces of three-dimensional (3D) SA with both nano- and micro-levels of organization; b) understanding of disassembly/deconstruction processes; and c) finding synthetic methods of assembly into continuous superstructures without insulating barriers. From this perspective, we investigated the formation of well-known star-like PbS superstructures and found a number of previously unknown or overlooked aspects that can advance the knowledge of NP self-assembly in these three directions. The primary one is that the formation of large seemingly monocrystalline PbS superstructures with multiple levels of octahedral symmetry can be explained only by SA of small octahedral NPs. We found five distinct periods in the formation PbS hyperbranched stars: 1) nucleation of early PbS NPs with an average diameter of 31 nm; 2) assembly into 100–500 nm octahedral mesocrystals; 3) assembly into 1000–2500 nm hyperbranched stars; 4) assembly and ionic recrystallization into six-arm rods accompanied by disappearance of fine nanoscale structure; 5) deconstruction into rods and cubooctahedral NPs. The switches in assembly patterns between the periods occur due to variable dominance of pattern–determining forces that include vander Waals and electrostatic (charge-charge, dipole-dipole, and polarization) interactions. The superstructure deconstruction is triggered by chemical changes in the deep eutectic solvent (DES) used as the media. PbS superstructures can be excellent models for fundamental studies of nanoscale organization and SA manufacturing of (opto)electronics and energy harvesting devices which require organization of PbS components at multiple scales. PMID:22515512

  6. Total, direct, and indirect effects of paan on oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Anwar T; Pitiphat, Waranuch

    2015-03-01

    Paan (betel leaf and betel nut quid) used with or without tobacco has been positively associated with oral cancer. Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF), a precancerous condition caused by paan, lies on the causal pathway between paan use and oral cancer. The purpose of this analysis was to estimate the effect of paan consumption on oral cancer risk when it is mediated by OSMF. We used mediation methods proposed by VanderWeele, which are based on causal inference principles, to characterize the total, direct, and indirect effects of paan, consumed with and without tobacco, on oral cancer mediated by OSMF. We reanalyzed case-control data collected from three hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan, between July 1996 and March 1998. For paan without tobacco, the total effect on oral cancer was OR 7.39, 95 % CI 1.01, 38.11, the natural indirect effect (due to OSMF among paan users) was OR 2.48, 95 % CI 0.99, 10.44, and the natural direct effect (due to paan with OSMF absent) was OR 3.32, 95 % CI 0.68, 10.07. For paan with tobacco, the total direct effect was OR 15.68, 95 % CI 3.00, 54.90, the natural indirect effect was OR 2.18, 95 % CI 0.82, 5.52, and the natural direct effect was OR 7.27, 95 % CI 2.15, 20.43. Paan, whether or not it contained tobacco, raised oral cancer risk irrespective of OSMF. Oral cancer risk was higher among those who used paan with tobacco.

  7. Reliability and validity of two self-report measures of cognitive flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnco, Carly; Wuthrich, Viviana M; Rapee, Ronald M

    2014-12-01

    Neuropsychological testing currently represents the gold standard in assessing cognitive flexibility. However, this format presents some challenges in terms of time and skills required for administration, scoring, and interpretation. Two self-report measures of cognitive flexibility have been developed to measure aspects of cognitive flexibility in everyday settings, although neither has been validated in an older sample. In this study, we investigated the psychometric properties of 2 self-report measures of cognitive flexibility, the Cognitive Flexibility Inventory (CFI; Dennis & Vander Wal, 2010) and the Cognitive Flexibility Scale (CFS; Martin & Rubin, 1995), against neuropsychological measures of cognitive flexibility in a clinical sample of 47 older adults with comorbid anxiety and depression and a nonclinical sample of 53 community-dwelling older adults. Internal consistency was good for the CFS and CFI in all samples. The clinical sample reported poorer cognitive flexibility than did the nonclinical sample on self-report measures and performed more poorly on some neuropsychological measures. There was evidence of convergent validity between the 2 self-report measures but little relationship between the self-report and neuropsychological measures of cognitive flexibility, suggesting that self-report measures assess a different aspect of cognitive flexibility than does neuropsychological testing. Divergent validity was weak from measures of anxiety and depression in the combined and nonclinical samples but acceptable in the clinical sample. Results suggest that these measures are suitable for use with an older adult sample but do not assess the same aspects of cognitive flexibility as are assessed by neuropsychological assessment. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Binding of chlorfenvinphos and malathion with DNA and their detection using new sensitive luminescent Tb(III) complex probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azab, Hassan A. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, 41522 Ismailia (Egypt); Kamel, Rasha M., E-mail: rashamoka@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez University, 43518 Suez (Egypt)

    2016-02-15

    In this work, the interaction of new luminescent terbium-N(acetoacetyl)-3-allyl-2hydroxybenzaldehyde hydrazone complex in a metal ligand ratio 1:2 in ethanol was studied with different pesticides, using fluorescence technique. The results indicate that the pesticides chlorfenvinphos and malathion exhibit quenching effect on the characteristics emission peak for Tb(III) at λ=545 nm. The luminescence variations values using the probe Tb(III)(HBH){sub 2} fit Stern–Volmer equation, where the detection limits are 4.53 and 9.59 µmol/L for chlorfenvinphos and malathion, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters associated with the interaction of the complex with the two pesticides were calculated, where the reaction is spontaneous through the obtained negative values of free energy change ΔG, and the process is of exothermic nature with decrease in entropy. Hence the nature of forces acting between the complex and pesticide molecules are Vander Val's and hydrogen bond. Also, it was found that the quenching mechanism is static type. Effect of some relevant interferents on the detection of pesticides has been investigated. The new sensing complex was applied to the determination of the pesticides in different real water samples (tap, river, and waste water) with precise recovery. Also, the effect of different concentrations of pesticides on the fluorescence spectrum of DNA was studied. - Highlights: • The method can be used for detection of pesticides in environmental samples. • The DL is 4.53 and 9.59 µmol L{sup −1} for chlorfenvinphos and malathion respectively. • Stern–Volmer studies at different temperatures were studied. • Effect of some interferents on the detection of pesticides has been investigated.

  9. Experimental design in chemistry: A tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leardi, Riccardo

    2009-10-12

    In this tutorial the main concepts and applications of experimental design in chemistry will be explained. Unfortunately, nowadays experimental design is not as known and applied as it should be, and many papers can be found in which the "optimization" of a procedure is performed one variable at a time. Goal of this paper is to show the real advantages in terms of reduced experimental effort and of increased quality of information that can be obtained if this approach is followed. To do that, three real examples will be shown. Rather than on the mathematical aspects, this paper will focus on the mental attitude required by experimental design. The readers being interested to deepen their knowledge of the mathematical and algorithmical part can find very good books and tutorials in the references [G.E.P. Box, W.G. Hunter, J.S. Hunter, Statistics for Experimenters: An Introduction to Design, Data Analysis, and Model Building, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1978; R. Brereton, Chemometrics: Data Analysis for the Laboratory and Chemical Plant, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1978; R. Carlson, J.E. Carlson, Design and Optimization in Organic Synthesis: Second Revised and Enlarged Edition, in: Data Handling in Science and Technology, vol. 24, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2005; J.A. Cornell, Experiments with Mixtures: Designs, Models and the Analysis of Mixture Data, in: Series in Probability and Statistics, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1991; R.E. Bruns, I.S. Scarminio, B. de Barros Neto, Statistical Design-Chemometrics, in: Data Handling in Science and Technology, vol. 25, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2006; D.C. Montgomery, Design and Analysis of Experiments, 7th edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2009; T. Lundstedt, E. Seifert, L. Abramo, B. Thelin, A. Nyström, J. Pettersen, R. Bergman, Chemolab 42 (1998) 3; Y. Vander Heyden, LC-GC Europe 19 (9) (2006) 469].

  10. Peer review of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Vessel Investigation Project metallurgical examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohl, R.W.; Gaydos, R.G.; Vander Voort, G.F.; Diercks, D.R.

    1994-07-01

    Fifteen samples recovered from the lower head of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 nuclear reactor pressure vessel were subjected to detailed metallurgical examinations by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), with supporting work carried out by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and several of the European participants. These examinations determined that a portion of the lower head, a so-called elliptical ''hot spot'' measuring ∼0.8 x 1 m, reached temperatures as high as 1100 degrees C during the accident and cooled from these temperatures at ∼10--100 degrees C/min. The remainder of the lower head was found to have remained below the ferrite-toaustenite transformation temperature of 727 degrees C during the accident. Because of the significance of these results and their importance to the overall analysis of the TMI accident, a panel of three outside peer reviewers, Dr. Robert W. Bohl, Mr. Richard G. Gaydos, and Mr. George F. Vander Voort, was formed to conduct an independent review of the metallurgical analyses. After a thorough review of the previous analyses and examination of photo-micrographs and actual lower head specimens, the panel determined that the conclusions resulting from the INEL study were fundamentally correct. In particular, the panel reaffirmed that four lower head samples attained temperatures as high as 1100 degrees C, and perhaps as high as 1150--1200 degrees C in one case, during the accident. They concluded that these samples subsequently cooled at a rate of ∼50--125 degrees C/min in the temperature range of 600--400 degrees C, in good agreement with the original analysis. The reviewers also agreed that the remainder of the lower head samples had not exceeded the ferrite-to-austenite transformation temperature during the accident and suggested several refinements and alternative procedures that could have been employed in the original analysis

  11. Tag-elese or The Language of Tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Simons

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The core "meme" of Web 2.0 from which almost all other memes radiated was: 'You control your own data' (O'Reilly, 2005, 3. Key instruments for this user control are tagging systems that allow users to freely assign keywords of their own choosing to Internet resources of their own making as well as to documents produced by others. Of course, freely chosen keywords tags do not necessarily follow prefixed taxonomies or classification systems. But going by the maxim that interaction creates similarity and similarity creates interaction, the idea - or hope - is, however, that the tagging practices of individual users will eventually converge into an emergent common vocabulary or folksonomy (Merholz, 2004; Shirky, 2005; Vander Wal, 2005b; Mika, 2007. It is far from clear, however, that free tagging systems will eventually yield controlled vocabularies, and there are many incentives for idiosyncratic, ambiguous, and inconsistent uses of tags. Left to themselves, free tagging systems seem to be too wild and too chaotic for any order to emerge. But are these free tagging systems really as "feral" as they seem to be, or do they only look uncontrolled because one has been looking for order in the wrong place? I have done a quick-and-dirty" analysis of Flickr's tag cloud. The concept was: if folksonomies encourage users to tap on their own vernacular, everyday natural language must somehow "guide" the tagging practices of users of tagging systems. Flickr's tag cloud has been choosen because it may teach us something about tagging systems and folksonomies, and not - or not primarily - because of what tags may tell us about pictures.

  12. Benign breast diseases. Radiology, pathology, risk assessment. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinyama, Catherine N.

    2014-01-01

    Radiological and pathological correlation of the full range of benign breast lesions, with emphasis on screen-detected lesions. Detailed discussion of risk assessment. Revised and updated edition, with a new chapter on gynaecomastia. Ideal aid to the management of patients with benign or indeterminate breast lesions in a multidisciplinary setting. The second edition of this book has been extensively revised and updated. There have been numerous scientific advances in the radiology, pathology and risk assessment of benign breast lesions since the publication of the first edition. The first edition concentrated on screen-detected lesions, which has since been rectified; new symptomatic and screen-detected lesions are discussed in the second edition and include: mastitis and breast abscesses, idiopathic granulomatous mastitis, diabetic mastopathy, phyllodes tumours, gynaecomastia and pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia. The chapters on columnar cell lesions and mucocele-like lesions have been extensively updated. Where applicable, genetic analysis of the benign lesions, which is becoming part of personalised medicine in the field of breast cancer, has been included. The book also presents detailed analyses of the main models, such as the Gail Model, used to assess the subsequent risk of breast cancer in individuals. The current trend in the management of all cancers is preventative. Screening mammography detects early curable cancers as well as indeterminate lesions, the latter of which are invariably pathologically benign. The author has collated important benign lesions and, based on peer-reviewed publications, has documented the relative risk of subsequent cancer to allow the patient and the clinician to implement preventative measures where possible. This book will therefore serve as an essential component of multidisciplinary management of patients with symptomatic and screen-detected benign breast lesions.

  13. Lifetime measurements and oscillator strengths in singly ionized scandium and the solar abundance of scandium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivan Rhodin, A.; Belmonte, M. T.; Engström, L.; Lundberg, H.; Nilsson, H.; Hartman, H.; Pickering, J. C.; Clear, C.; Quinet, P.; Fivet, V.; Palmeri, P.

    2017-12-01

    The lifetimes of 17 even-parity levels (3d5s, 3d4d, 3d6s and 4p2) in the region 57 743-77 837 cm-1 of singly ionized scandium (Sc II) were measured by two-step time-resolved laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oscillator strengths of 57 lines from these highly excited upper levels were derived using a hollow cathode discharge lamp and a Fourier transform spectrometer. In addition, Hartree-Fock calculations where both the main relativistic and core-polarization effects were taken into account were carried out for both low- and high-excitation levels. There is a good agreement for most of the lines between our calculated branching fractions and the measurements of Lawler & Dakin in the region 9000-45 000 cm-1 for low excitation levels and with our measurements for high excitation levels in the region 23 500-63 100 cm-1. This, in turn, allowed us to combine the calculated branching fractions with the available experimental lifetimes to determine semi-empirical oscillator strengths for a set of 380 E1 transitions in Sc II. These oscillator strengths include the weak lines that were used previously to derive the solar abundance of scandium. The solar abundance of scandium is now estimated to logε⊙ = 3.04 ± 0.13 using these semi-empirical oscillator strengths to shift the values determined by Scott et al. The new estimated abundance value is in agreement with the meteoritic value (logεmet = 3.05 ± 0.02) of Lodders, Palme & Gail.

  14. Graphs to estimate an individualized risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benichou, J; Gail, M H; Mulvihill, J J

    1996-01-01

    Clinicians who counsel women about their risk for developing breast cancer need a rapid method to estimate individualized risk (absolute risk), as well as the confidence limits around that point. The Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project (BCDDP) model (sometimes called the Gail model) assumes no genetic model and simultaneously incorporates five risk factors, but involves cumbersome calculations and interpolations. This report provides graphs to estimate the absolute risk of breast cancer from the BCDDP model. The BCDDP recruited 280,000 women from 1973 to 1980 who were monitored for 5 years. From this cohort, 2,852 white women developed breast cancer and 3,146 controls were selected, all with complete risk-factor information. The BCDDP model, previously developed from these data, was used to prepare graphs that relate a specific summary relative-risk estimate to the absolute risk of developing breast cancer over intervals of 10, 20, and 30 years. Once a summary relative risk is calculated, the appropriate graph is chosen that shows the 10-, 20-, or 30-year absolute risk of developing breast cancer. A separate graph gives the 95% confidence limits around the point estimate of absolute risk. Once a clinician rules out a single gene trait that predisposes to breast cancer and elicits information on age and four risk factors, the tables and figures permit an estimation of a women's absolute risk of developing breast cancer in the next three decades. These results are intended to be applied to women who undergo regular screening. They should be used only in a formal counseling program to maximize a woman's understanding of the estimates and the proper use of them.

  15. The effects of high intensity exercise during pulmonary rehabilitation on ventilatory parameters in people with moderate to severe stable COPD: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osterling K

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Kristin Osterling,1 Kimbly MacFadyen,1 Robert Gilbert,2 Gail Dechman1 1School of Physiotherapy, 2School of Health Sciences, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada Objective: The objective of this systematic review was to determine whether people with moderate to severe COPD who are participating in pulmonary rehabilitation and exercising at high intensity demonstrate the changes in ventilatory parameters that are associated with decreased dyspnea. Data sources: The authors searched EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, and CINAHL databases up to December 2013 for relevant randomized control trials, systematic reviews, and observational studies. References of identified studies were also screened. Study selection: Studies conducted in a pulmonary rehabilitation setting that included education and exercise were included. Symptom-limited, graded exercise testing that measured tidal volume, respiratory rate, minute ventilation, and inspiratory capacity was required. The studies that contained these keywords in the title or the abstract were selected for further evaluation of the text. Disagreements between reviewers were resolved by consensus. Four studies met these inclusion criteria. Data extraction: Quality assessment and data extraction were performed independently by two reviewers. Risk of bias and quality was assessed according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Data synthesis: Participants in three studies trained at high intensity (70%–80% maximum workload, demonstrating statistically significant changes in tidal volume and respiratory rate. One study did not demonstrate positive ventilatory benefits; however, participants may not have met the desired training intensity. Two studies reported improvement in dyspnea at submaximal exercise intensities. One study noted an increased maximum workload with no significant change in dyspnea at peak exercise. Conclusion: People with moderate to severe, stable COPD were able

  16. Awareness of preventive medication among women at high risk for breast cancer and their willingness to consider transdermal or oral tamoxifen: a focus group study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karavites, Lindsey C.; Allu, Subhashini; Khan, Seema A.; Kaiser, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Despite demonstrated efficacy, acceptance of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), such as tamoxifen, for breast cancer risk reduction remains low. Delivering SERMs via local transdermal therapy (LTT) could significantly reduce systemic effects and therefore may increase acceptance. We aim to assess women’s knowledge of breast cancer prevention medications and views on LTT of SERMs. Focus groups were conducted with healthy women identified through the comprehensive breast center of a large urban cancer institution. Group discussions covered risk perceptions, knowledge of and concerns about risk reducing medications. Participants reported their perceived risk for breast cancer (average, below/above average), preference for SERMs in a pill or gel form, risk factors, and prior physician recommendations regarding risk-reducing medicines. Participants’ breast cancer risk was estimated using tools based on the Gail Model. Trained personnel examined all qualitative results systematically; risk perceptions and preferred method of medication delivery were tallied quantitatively. Four focus groups (N = 32) were conducted. Most participants had at least a college degree (78.2 %) and were of European (50 %) or African ancestry (31 %). The majority (72 %) were at elevated risk for breast cancer; approximately half of these women perceived themselves to be at elevated risk. Few participants had prior knowledge of preventive medications. The women noted a number of concerns about LTT, including dosage, impact on day-to-day life, and side effects; nonetheless, over 90 % of the women stated they would prefer LTT to a pill. Awareness of preventive medications was low even in a highly educated sample of high-risk women. If given a choice in the route of administration, most women preferred a gel to a pill, anticipating fewer side effects. Future work should focus on demonstrating equivalent efficacy and reduced toxicity of topical over oral medications and on raising

  17. Death and dying in the US: the barriers to the benefits of palliative and hospice care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert J Finestone

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Albert J Finestone, Gail InderwiesSchool of Medicine, Temple University, Philadephia, PA, USAIn August 2006, after a trip to the New Jersey Shore, Peggy was having great difficulty catching her breath. In consultation with her children, Peggy decided that she was ready for hospice care. But, she did not want to relinquish her independence just because shortness of breath and a weakening heart overtook her daily stride. However, a single episode at home had thrown Peggy into crisis. Since Peggy lived alone, hospice care at home presented a host of challenges including safety and how to manage her unstable cardiopulmonary condition. Peggy was an ideal candidate for the hospice’s TeleCare (see box monitoring program which provided a passive monitoring system, a medication dispenser, and vital signs monitoring for blood pressure, weight, and blood oxygen levels. In addition, the hospice authorized routine draws of BNP (beta naturetic peptide and BMP (basic metabolic profi le with GFR (glomerular filtration rate to manage her symptoms aggressively. Medications were adjusted accordingly to maximize quality of life and minimize symptoms. Though some would consider this treatment aggressive, it was the aggressive treatment of Peggy’s symptoms that allowed for an extended quality of life. There was sufficient evidence to support this action based on the concept of risk and reward, especially as there was a minimum of invasive therapies required. In Peggy’s case she went from being homebound and short of breath to living her life up to her final days.

  18. Results of the General Atomic deposition loop program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    The transport behavior of fission products in flowing helium streams has been studied to determine their deposition and re-entrainment characteristics. Such information is required for the design and safety analysis of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). A small high-pressure, high-temperature loop was constructed for deposition studies at near-HTGR conditions. Five loop experiments were performed to determine the plateout distribution of iodine, strontium, and cesium. In general, the plateout activity showed an exponential decrease with distance from the source with enhanced plateout at flow disturber locations (contractions, bends, etc.) and especially in a chill section where the surface was cooled. Blowdown tests were performed on selected loop specimens to determine the amount of re-entrainment caused by abnormally high wall shear stresses. The liftoff fraction (fractional amount removed) was shown to vary approximately linearly with the shear ratio (defined as the ratio of the steady state wall shear stress under blowdown conditions to that under normal operating conditions). Blowdown results are also reported for pipe sections taken from the GAIL-IV in-pile loop. Attempts were made to correlate these plateout data with the PAD code (Plateout Activity Distribution) which was developed for prediction of plateout distribution in an HTGR primary circuit. Because of inadequate modeling of the effects of the chill section, the agreement was generally poor. Consequently, to test further the PAD code, a review of the available plateout literature was made. Plateout distributions in the Peach Bottom and Dragon HTGRs and the Battelle Memorial Institute out-of-pile loop were successfully modeled

  19. The cost to society of a methane outbreak from the East Siberian shelf (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhams, P.

    2013-12-01

    Peter Wadhams (Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge) Chris Hope (Judge Institute, University of Cambridge) Gail Whiteman (Erasmus University, Rotterdam) The East Siberian Sea has been emitting an increasing volume of methane in the form of plumes in each of the recent summers that observations have been carried out by a US-Russian joint group led by I Semiletov and N Shakhova. We believe that the emissions are due to melt of offshore permafrost due to warming of sea temperatures associated with the summer retreat of the sea ice. The field observers believe that out of a reservoir of some 720 Gt it is possible that 50 Gt could be emitted rapidly, within a few years. We calculated in a paper in "Nature" what the impact of such an emission (occurring over 10 years) would be, and found a total economic cost over a century (using the Stern Review PAGE09 model) of 60 trillion dollars, and an additional warming of the climate of some 0.6 C by 2040. These results have aroused controversy, and to assist in further discussions of their implications we have carried out further analyses as follows: 1. We have considered smaller and larger emissions, and have considered the overall costs for emissions occurring more slowly over a longer period, and/or beginning at a later date. We find that costs are approximately proportional to volume of emission, and are actually increased if the emission date is delayed until later in the century. 2. A further field operation is being carried out in summer 2013, and we will carry out, in time for the AGU meeting, a further model calculation based on the latest opinions of Semiletov and Shakhova regarding the way in which the East Siberian Sea emission field is developing.

  20. A randomized, controlled trial to increase discussion of breast cancer in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Celia P; Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Tice, Jeffrey A; Kerlikowske, Karla; Gregorich, Steven E; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J; Pasick, Rena J; Chen, Alice; Quinn, Jessica; Karliner, Leah S

    2014-07-01

    Assessment and discussion of individual risk for breast cancer within the primary care setting are crucial to discussion of risk reduction and timely referral. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of a multiethnic, multilingual sample of women ages 40 to 74 years from two primary care practices (one academic, one safety net) to test a breast cancer risk assessment and education intervention. Patients were randomly assigned to control or intervention group. All patients completed a baseline telephone survey and risk assessment (via telephone for controls, via tablet computer in clinic waiting room before visit for intervention). Intervention (BreastCARE) patients and their physicians received an individualized risk report to discuss during the visit. One-week follow-up telephone surveys with all patients assessed patient-physician discussion of family cancer history, personal breast cancer risk, high-risk clinics, and genetic counseling/testing. A total of 655 control and 580 intervention women completed the risk assessment and follow-up interview; 25% were high-risk by family history, Gail, or Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium risk models. BreastCARE increased discussions of family cancer history [OR, 1.54; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.91], personal breast cancer risk (OR, 4.15; 95% CI, 3.02-5.70), high-risk clinics (OR, 3.84; 95% CI, 2.13-6.95), and genetic counseling/testing (OR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.34-3.68). Among high-risk women, all intervention effects were stronger. An intervention combining an easy-to-use, quick risk assessment tool with patient-centered risk reports at the point of care can successfully promote discussion of breast cancer risk reduction between patients and primary care physicians, particularly for high-risk women. Next steps include scaling and dissemination of BreastCARE with integration into electronic medical record systems. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. A Risk Assessment Comparison of Breast Cancer and Factors Affected to Risk Perception of Women in Turkey: A Cross-sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    YÜKSEL, Serpil; ALTUN UĞRAŞ, Gülay; ÇAVDAR, İkbal; BOZDOĞAN, Atilla; ÖZKAN GÜRDAL, Sibel; AKYOLCU, Neriman; ESENCAN, Ecem; VAROL SARAÇOĞLU, Gamze; ÖZMEN, Vahit

    2017-01-01

    Background: The increase in breast cancer incidence has enhanced attention towards breast cancer risk. The aim of this study was to determine the risk of breast cancer and risk perception of women, factors that affect risk perception, and to determine differences between absolute risk and the perception of risk. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out among 346 women whose score in the Gail Risk Model (GRM) was ≥ 1.67% and/or had a 1st degree relative with breast cancer in Bahçeşehir town in Istanbul, Turkey between Jul 2012 and Dec 2012. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews. The level of risk for breast cancer has been calculated using GRM and the Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Form (BCRAF). Breast cancer risk perception (BCRP), has been evaluated by visual analogue 100-cm-long scale. Results: Even though 39.6% of the women considered themselves as high-risk carriers, according to the GRM and the BCRAF, only 11.6% and 9.8% of women were in the “high risk” category, respectively. There was a positive significant correlation between the GRM and the BCRAF scores (Prisk perception were age (40–59 yr), post-menopausal phase, high-very high economic income level, existence of breast cancer in the family, having regular breast self-examination and clinical breast examination (Prisk of breast, cancer there is a significant difference between the women’s risk perception and their absolute risk level. PMID:28435816

  2. Impact of a primary care based intervention on breast cancer knowledge, risk perception and concern: A randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Karliner, Leah S; Tice, Jeffrey A; Kerlikowske, Karla; Gregorich, Steven; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J; Pasick, Rena J; Chen, Alice; Quinn, Jessica; Kaplan, Celia P

    2015-12-01

    To estimate the effects of a tablet-based, breast cancer risk education intervention for use in primary care settings (BreastCARE) on patients' breast cancer knowledge, risk perception and concern. From June 2011-August 2012, we enrolled women from two clinics, aged 40-74 years with no personal breast cancer history, and randomized them to the BreastCARE intervention group or to the control group. All patients completed a baseline telephone survey and risk assessment (via telephone for controls, via tablet computer in clinic waiting room prior to visit for intervention). All women were categorized as high or average risk based on the Referral Screening Tool, the Gail model or the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium model. Intervention patients and their physicians received an individualized risk report to discuss during the visit. All women completed a follow-up telephone survey 1-2 weeks after risk assessment. Post-test comparisons estimated differences at follow-up in breast cancer knowledge, risk perception and concern. 580 intervention and 655 control women completed follow-up interviews. Mean age was 56 years (SD = 9). At follow-up, 73% of controls and 71% of intervention women correctly perceived their breast cancer risk and 22% of controls and 24% of intervention women were very concerned about breast cancer. Intervention patients had greater knowledge (≥75% correct answers) of breast cancer risk factors at follow-up (24% vs. 16%; p = 0.002). In multivariable analysis, there were no differences in correct risk perception or concern, but intervention patients had greater knowledge ([OR] = 1.62; 95% [CI] = 1.19-2.23). A simple, practical intervention involving physicians at the point of care can improve knowledge of breast cancer without increasing concern. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01830933. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 25-Hydroxy vitamin-D, obesity, and associated variables as predictors of breast cancer risk and tamoxifen benefit in NSABP-P1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Eitan; Cecchini, Reena S; Ganz, Patricia A; Costantino, Joseph P; Beddows, Samantha; Hood, Nicola; Goodwin, Pamela J

    2012-06-01

    Observational studies suggest that host factors are associated with breast cancer risk. The influence of obesity, vitamin-D status, insulin resistance, inflammation, and elevated adipocytokines in women at high risk of breast cancer is unknown. The NSABP-P1 trial population was used for a nested case-control study. Cases were drawn from those who developed invasive breast cancer and controls selected from unaffected participants (≤4 per case) matched for age, race, 5 year Gail score, and geographic location of clinical center as a surrogate for latitude. Fasting serum banked at trial enrolment was assayed for 25-hydroxy vitamin-D (25OHD), insulin, leptin (adipocytokine), and C-reactive protein (CRP, marker of inflammation). Logistic regression was used to test for associations between study variables and the risk of invasive breast cancer. Two hundred and thirty-one cases were matched with 856 controls. Mean age was 54, and 49% were premenopausal. There were negative correlations for 25OHD with body mass index (BMI), insulin, CRP, and leptin. BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2) was associated with higher breast cancer risk (odds ratio [OR] 1.45, p = 0.02) and tamoxifen treatment was associated with lower risk (OR = 0.44, p continuous variables, 25OHD, insulin, CRP, and leptin levels were not associated with breast cancer risk (all p > 0.34). In this high risk population, higher BMI was associated with a greater breast cancer risk. Serum levels of 25OHD, insulin, CRP, and leptin were not independent predictors of either breast cancer risk or tamoxifen benefit.

  4. Awareness of preventive medication among women at high risk for breast cancer and their willingness to consider transdermal or oral tamoxifen: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavites, Lindsey C; Allu, Subhashini; Khan, Seema A; Kaiser, Karen

    2015-11-09

    Despite demonstrated efficacy, acceptance of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), such as tamoxifen, for breast cancer risk reduction remains low. Delivering SERMs via local transdermal therapy (LTT) could significantly reduce systemic effects and therefore may increase acceptance. We aim to assess women's knowledge of breast cancer prevention medications and views on LTT of SERMs. Focus groups were conducted with healthy women identified through the comprehensive breast center of a large urban cancer institution. Group discussions covered risk perceptions, knowledge of and concerns about risk reducing medications. Participants reported their perceived risk for breast cancer (average, below/above average), preference for SERMs in a pill or gel form, risk factors, and prior physician recommendations regarding risk-reducing medicines. Participants' breast cancer risk was estimated using tools based on the Gail Model. Trained personnel examined all qualitative results systematically; risk perceptions and preferred method of medication delivery were tallied quantitatively. Four focus groups (N = 32) were conducted. Most participants had at least a college degree (78.2 %) and were of European (50 %) or African ancestry (31 %). The majority (72 %) were at elevated risk for breast cancer; approximately half of these women perceived themselves to be at elevated risk. Few participants had prior knowledge of preventive medications. The women noted a number of concerns about LTT, including dosage, impact on day-to-day life, and side effects; nonetheless, over 90 % of the women stated they would prefer LTT to a pill. Awareness of preventive medications was low even in a highly educated sample of high-risk women. If given a choice in the route of administration, most women preferred a gel to a pill, anticipating fewer side effects. Future work should focus on demonstrating equivalent efficacy and reduced toxicity of topical over oral medications and on raising

  5. Comparative digital cartilage histology for human and common osteoarthritis models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen DR

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Douglas R Pedersen, Jessica E Goetz, Gail L Kurriger, James A MartinDepartment of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAPurpose: This study addresses the species-specific and site-specific details of weight-bearing articular cartilage zone depths and chondrocyte distributions among humans and common osteoarthritis (OA animal models using contemporary digital imaging tools. Histological analysis is the gold-standard research tool for evaluating cartilage health, OA severity, and treatment efficacy. Historically, evaluations were made by expert analysts. However, state-of-the-art tools have been developed that allow for digitization of entire histological sections for computer-aided analysis. Large volumes of common digital cartilage metrics directly complement elucidation of trends in OA inducement and concomitant potential treatments.Materials and methods: Sixteen fresh human knees, 26 adult New Zealand rabbit stifles, and 104 bovine lateral plateaus were measured for four cartilage zones and the cell densities within each zone. Each knee was divided into four weight-bearing sites: the medial and lateral plateaus and femoral condyles.Results: One-way analysis of variance followed by pairwise multiple comparisons (Holm–Sidak method at a significance of 0.05 clearly confirmed the variability between cartilage depths at each site, between sites in the same species, and between weight-bearing articular cartilage definitions in different species.Conclusion: The present study clearly demonstrates multisite, multispecies differences in normal weight-bearing articular cartilage, which can be objectively quantified by a common digital histology imaging technique. The clear site-specific differences in normal cartilage must be taken into consideration when characterizing the pathoetiology of OA models. Together, these provide a path to consistently analyze the volume and variety of histologic slides necessarily generated

  6. https://cross-currents.berkeley.edu/e-journal/issue-11/glosser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Glosser

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Back in the early 1980s, when I had the good luck to discover Chinese history, it was possible to read and keep up with everything published in English on the topic of women, family, gender, and sexuality in China. It has been a long time since anyone I know of could make that claim. In the late 1980s the field picked up momentum, and in the 1990s it seemed to expand exponentially. Gail Hershatter’s authoritative 2007 review of the post-1970 Anglophone literature on women in Chinese history, anthropology, politics, and sociology cited approximately 650 books and articles. A rough-and-ready search using those same parameters suggests that, since 2007, the reading list has grown by at least another 50 percent. A better sense of the overall size of Western scholarship on the field can be found in Robin Yates’s 2009 bibliography; it lists 2,500 books, articles, or chapters, and over one hundred dissertations. The range of topics and approaches runs the gamut. Angelina Chin’s and Margaret Kuo’s recently published histories are part of this fabulous profusion and could be connected in any number of ways to the genealogy of scholarship. Given the size of the field, this review will focus on one way in which American and European historiography on women, gender, and the family in the West has shaped our expectations of scholarship on these topics in China... Angelina Chin, Bound to Emancipate: Working Women and Urban Citizenship in Early Twentieth-Century China and Hong Kong. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2012. 302 pp. $85 (cloth/e-book. Margaret Kuo, Intolerable Cruelty: Marriage, Law, and Society in Early Twentieth-Century China. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2012. 252 pp. $75 (cloth/e-book.

  7. Onset of action and seizure control in Lennox-Gaustaut syndrome: focus on rufinamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell P Saneto

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Russell P Saneto1, Gail D Anderson21Division of Pediatric Neurology, Seattle Children’s Hospital/University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; 2Department of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USAAbstract: Lennox-Gaustaut syndrome is an electroclinical epilepsy syndrome characterized by the triad of electroencephalogram showing diffuse slow spike-and-wave discharges and paroxysmal fast activity, multiple intractable seizure types, and cognitive impairment. The intractability to seizure medications and cognitive impairment gives rise to eventual institutionalized patient care. Only a small subset of seizure medications has been shown to be helpful in seizure control. Most patients take up to 3 medications at high therapeutic dosing and are susceptible to medication-induced side effects. The lack of medication efficacy in seizure control has led one meta-analysis to conclude that there is no single medication that is highly efficacious in controlling seizures in this syndrome. On this background, a new and structurally novel seizure medication, rufinamide, has been found to be beneficial in the treatment of seizures in this syndrome. In a multicenter, double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study, rufinamide was found to reduce seizures by over 30%. More importantly, it reduced the frequency of the seizure type that induces most of the morbidity of this syndrome, the drop seizure, by over 40%. There were few side effects, the medication was well tolerated, and in the open labeled extension study, tolerance was not found. In this review, we describe the main electroclinical features of Lennox-Gaustaut syndrome and summarize the few controlled studies that have contributed to its rational treatment. Currently, there is no single agent or combination of agents that effectively treat the multiple seizure types and co-morbidities in this syndrome. Our focus will be on the role of the new medication rufinamide in

  8. Benign breast diseases. Radiology, pathology, risk assessment. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinyama, Catherine N. [Princess Elizabeth Hospital, Le Vauquiedor, St. Martin' s Guernsey, Channel Islands (United Kingdom); Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    Radiological and pathological correlation of the full range of benign breast lesions, with emphasis on screen-detected lesions. Detailed discussion of risk assessment. Revised and updated edition, with a new chapter on gynaecomastia. Ideal aid to the management of patients with benign or indeterminate breast lesions in a multidisciplinary setting. The second edition of this book has been extensively revised and updated. There have been numerous scientific advances in the radiology, pathology and risk assessment of benign breast lesions since the publication of the first edition. The first edition concentrated on screen-detected lesions, which has since been rectified; new symptomatic and screen-detected lesions are discussed in the second edition and include: mastitis and breast abscesses, idiopathic granulomatous mastitis, diabetic mastopathy, phyllodes tumours, gynaecomastia and pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia. The chapters on columnar cell lesions and mucocele-like lesions have been extensively updated. Where applicable, genetic analysis of the benign lesions, which is becoming part of personalised medicine in the field of breast cancer, has been included. The book also presents detailed analyses of the main models, such as the Gail Model, used to assess the subsequent risk of breast cancer in individuals. The current trend in the management of all cancers is preventative. Screening mammography detects early curable cancers as well as indeterminate lesions, the latter of which are invariably pathologically benign. The author has collated important benign lesions and, based on peer-reviewed publications, has documented the relative risk of subsequent cancer to allow the patient and the clinician to implement preventative measures where possible. This book will therefore serve as an essential component of multidisciplinary management of patients with symptomatic and screen-detected benign breast lesions.

  9. Bibliotheken im Fluss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The focus of the current issue 3/2015 of GMS Medizin – Bibliothek – Information is the annual conference 2015 of the German Medical Libraries Association in Mannheim. The motto of the conference was “Libraries in progress”. The authors in this issue are Bruno Bauer (Research data – a new field of activity (also for libraries, Markus Fischer (Search filter for local holdings in bibnet.org, Ursula Georgy (Strategic marketing: Benefit positioning strategy of libraries as a content provider in competition, Mareike Grisse (Reading and understanding licensing agreements for electronic resources, Regine Küfner Lein (Access to medical full texts and databases in Norway by national licensing, Annette Kustos (Collection management and service concept at the academic library of the Hochschule für Gesundheit, Oliver Weiner (Medical documents in university repositories, Sabine Buroh (Impressions from the EAHIL Workshop, Edinburgh, 10–12 June 2015, Mareike Grisse (Supra-regional availability of licensed electronic content – ZB MEDs’ new models, Jana Pössel (LIVIVO: The new ZB MED search portal for life sciences, Jasmin Schmitz (Offering advice on open access publishing in libraries, Fabian Gail (Product and innovation management ZB MED and Dagmar Härter (Medical libraries: libraries in progress – annual meeting 2015 of the German MLA, September 7 to 9 at Basel, Switzerland. Furthermore this focus issue features articles from Eike Hentschel (Pioneer projects in medical libraries 2015: Introduction of the winners and Iris Reimann (German MLA News; Pioneer projects in medical libraries 2016 – Announcement.

  10. Placement of an implantable port catheter in the biliary stent: an experimental study in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Gi Young; Lee, Im Sick; Choi, Won Chan

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of port catheter placement following a biliary stent placement. We employed 14 mongrel dogs as test subject and after the puncture of their gaIl bladders using sonographic guidance, a 10-mm in diameter metallic stent was placed at the common duct. In 12 dogs, a 6.3 F port catheter was placed into the duodenum through the common duct and a port was secured at the subcutaneous space following stent placement. As a control group, an 8.5 F drain tube was placed into the gallbladder without port catheter placement in the remaining two dogs. Irrigation of the bile duct was performed every week by injection of saline into the port, and the port catheter was replaced three weeks later in two dogs. Information relating to the success of the procedure, complications and the five-week follow-up cholangiographic findings were obtained. Placement of a biliary stent and a port catheter was technically successful in 13 (93%) dogs, while stent migration (n=3), gallbladder rupture (n=1) and death (n=5) due to subcutaneous abscess and peritonitis also occurred. The follow-up was achieved in eight dogs (seven dogs with a port catheter placement and one dog with a drain tube placement). Irrigation of the bile duct and port catheter replacement were successfully achieved without any complications. Cholangiograms obtained five weeks after stent placement showed diffuse biliary dilation with granulation tissue formation. However, focal biliary stricture was seen in one dog with stent placement alone. Placement of a port catheter following biliary stent placement seems to be feasible. However, further investigation is necessary to reduce the current complications

  11. Impact of a primary care based intervention on breast cancer knowledge, risk perception and concern: A randomized, controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Karliner, Leah S.; Tice, Jeffrey A.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Gregorich, Steven; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Pasick, Rena J.; Chen, Alice; Quinn, Jessica; Kaplan, Celia P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the effects of a tablet-based, breast cancer risk education intervention for use in primary care settings (BreastCARE) on patients' breast cancer knowledge, risk perception and concern. Methods From June 2011–August 2012, we enrolled women from two clinics, aged 40–74 years with no personal breast cancer history, and randomized them to the BreastCARE intervention group or to the control group. All patients completed a baseline telephone survey and risk assessment (via telephone for controls, via tablet computer in clinic waiting room prior to visit for intervention). All women were categorized as high or average risk based on the Referral Screening Tool, the Gail model or the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium model. Intervention patients and their physicians received an individualized risk report to discuss during the visit. All women completed a follow-up telephone survey 1–2 weeks after risk assessment. Post-test comparisons estimated differences at follow-up in breast cancer knowledge, risk perception and concern. Results 580 intervention and 655 control women completed follow-up interviews. Mean age was 56 years (SD = 9). At follow-up, 73% of controls and 71% of intervention women correctly perceived their breast cancer risk and 22% of controls and 24% of intervention women were very concerned about breast cancer. Intervention patients had greater knowledge (≥75% correct answers) of breast cancer risk factors at follow-up (24% vs. 16%; p = 0.002). In multivariable analysis, there were no differences in correct risk perception or concern, but intervention patients had greater knowledge ([OR] = 1.62; 95% [CI] = 1.19–2.23). Conclusions A simple, practical intervention involving physicians at the point of care can improve knowledge of breast cancer without increasing concern. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01830933. PMID:26476466

  12. Placement of an implantable port catheter in the biliary stent: an experimental study in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Gi Young; Lee, Im Sick; Choi, Won Chan [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    To investigate the feasibility of port catheter placement following a biliary stent placement. We employed 14 mongrel dogs as test subject and after the puncture of their gaIl bladders using sonographic guidance, a 10-mm in diameter metallic stent was placed at the common duct. In 12 dogs, a 6.3 F port catheter was placed into the duodenum through the common duct and a port was secured at the subcutaneous space following stent placement. As a control group, an 8.5 F drain tube was placed into the gallbladder without port catheter placement in the remaining two dogs. Irrigation of the bile duct was performed every week by injection of saline into the port, and the port catheter was replaced three weeks later in two dogs. Information relating to the success of the procedure, complications and the five-week follow-up cholangiographic findings were obtained. Placement of a biliary stent and a port catheter was technically successful in 13 (93%) dogs, while stent migration (n=3), gallbladder rupture (n=1) and death (n=5) due to subcutaneous abscess and peritonitis also occurred. The follow-up was achieved in eight dogs (seven dogs with a port catheter placement and one dog with a drain tube placement). Irrigation of the bile duct and port catheter replacement were successfully achieved without any complications. Cholangiograms obtained five weeks after stent placement showed diffuse biliary dilation with granulation tissue formation. However, focal biliary stricture was seen in one dog with stent placement alone. Placement of a port catheter following biliary stent placement seems to be feasible. However, further investigation is necessary to reduce the current complications.

  13. Mineral abundances of comet 17P/Holmes derived from the mid-infrared spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Yamaguchi, MItsuru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Kawakita, Hideyo; Sakon, Itsuki; Honda, Mitsuhiko; Watanabe, Jun-ichi

    2017-10-01

    Dust grains of crystalline silicate, which is rarely presented in an interstellar space, were found in cometary nuclei (Messenger et al. 1996, LPI, 27, 867; Wooden et al. 1999, ApJ, 517, 1058, references therein). It is thought that these crystalline silicates had formed by annealing or condensations of amorphous grains near the Sun in the solar nebula, and incorporated into a cometary nucleus in a cold region (farther than formation regions of the crystalline silicates) by radial transportation in the solar nebula. It is considered that transportation mechanisms to outside of the solar nebula were turbulent and/or X-wind. An abundance of the crystalline dust grains was therefore expected to be smaller as far from the Sun (Gail, 2001, A&A, 378, 192; Bockelée-Morvan et al. 2002, A&A, 384, 1107). Namely, the abundance ratio of the crystalline silicate in cometary dust grains relates a degree of mass transportation and a distance from the Sun when cometary nucleus formed in the Solar nebula. The mass ratio of crystalline silicates of dust grains is determined from by Si-O stretching vibrational bands of silicate grains around 10 μm using difference of spectral band features between crystalline and amorphous grains. We present the crystalline-to-amorphous mass ratio of silicate grains in the comet 17P/Holmes by using the thermal emission mode of the dust grains (Ootsubo et al. 2007, P&SS, 55, 1044) applied to the mid-infrared spectra of the comet. These spectra were taken by the COMICS mounted on the Subaru Telescope on 2007 October 25, 26, 27 and 28 immediately after the great outburst of the comet (started on October 23). We discuss about formation conditions of the nucleus of the comet based on the derived mass ratio of silicate grains of the comet.

  14. Telemedicine vs in-person cancer genetic counseling: measuring satisfaction and conducting economic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Datta SK

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Santanu K Datta1,2, Adam H Buchanan3, Gail P Hollowell4, Henry F Beresford5, Paul K Marcom1,3, Martha B Adams1,61Department of Medicine, Duke University; 2Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham VA Medical Center; 3Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University; 4Department of Biology, North Carolina Central University; 5School of Nursing, Duke University; 6Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: Cancer genetic counseling (CGC provides benefits and is the standard of care for individuals at increased risk of having a hereditary cancer syndrome. CGC services are typically centered in urban medical centers, leading to limited access to counseling in rural communities. Telemedicine has the potential to improve access to CGC, increase efficient use of genetic counselors, and improve patient care in rural communities. For telemedicine CGC to gain wide acceptance and implementation it needs to be shown that individuals who receive telemedicine CGC have high satisfaction levels and that CGC is cost-effective; however little research has been conducted to measure the impact of telemedicine CGC. This paper describes the design and methodology of a randomized controlled trial comparing telemedicine with in-person CGC. Measurement of patient satisfaction and effectiveness outcomes are described, as is measurement of costs that are included in an economic analysis. Study design and methodologies used are presented as a contribution to future comparative effectiveness investigations in the telemedicine genetic counseling field.Keywords: cancer genetics, genetic counseling, rural health services, telemedicine, satisfaction, cost

  15. Medizinbibliotheken: Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer, Bruno

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available [english] The focus of the current issue 3/2014 of GMS Medizin – Bibliothek – Information is the annual conference 2014 of the German Medical Libraries Association in Mannheim. The motto of the conference was “Medical libraries: Information”. The authors in this issue are Michaele Adam (Bibliometrics 2.0 – Altmetrics in Medicine, Bruno Bauer (Open access cooperation in Austria: Open Access Network Austria and Austria – recent developments since 2012, Fabian Gail & Ulrich Korwitz (Market and strategy – results of the ZB MED market study, Sabine Gehrlein (Library goes Anatomy: Anatomical teaching media at Heidelberg University Library, Kaja Scheliga (Opening science: New publication forms in science, Ulrike Ostrzinski (The four types of social media user in the academic and research community. Results of a nationwide study, Sandra Pfob & Alena Ittner (First aid for library use on PC: webinars increase library visits, reach everyone, save costs, Simone Waldboth (Integration of e-learning in the lecture “Information Literacy” at the Provincial College for Health-Care Professions Claudiana, Maike Piegler (The pick up box of the library of the Hamburg medical association – a way to bring scientific information to medical specialists and Christoph Wehrmüller & Heidrun Janka (Medical : Information – Annual meeting 2014 of the German MLA, September 22 to 24 in Mannheim.Furthermore this focus issue features articles from Bruno Bauer (: transformation strategies for subscription-based journaleport on the 8 Open Access Days at Cologne, September 8–9 2014, Eike Hentschel (German MLA News; Pioneer projects in medical libraries 2014: Introduction of the winners; Pioneer projects in medical libraries 2015 – Announcement and Franz J. Kühnen (Klaus Gerber 1934–2014.

  16. Seabird tissue archival and monitoring project: Egg collections and analytical results 1999-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Pol, Stacy S.; Christopher, Steven J.; Roseneau, David G.; Becker, Paul R.; Day, Russel D.; Kucklick, John R.; Pugh, Rebecca S.; Simac, Kristin S.; Weston-York, Geoff

    2003-01-01

    have been developed by STAMP (see York et al. 2001). Eggs are being collected on an annual basis for several species at nesting colonies throughout Alaska. Aliquots of these egg samples are being analyzed on a regular basis for persistent organic pollutants and mercury. Results of this work have been published in scientific journals (Christopher et al. 2002) and in conference proceedings (Kucklick et al. 2002; Vander Pol et al. 2002a, 2002b). The intent of this report is to provide an up-to-date description of STAMP. The report contains the most recent egg collection inventory, analytical data, preliminary interpretations based on these data, and a discussion of possible future directions of the project.

  17. SU-G-TeP2-13: Patient-Specific Reduction of Range Uncertainties in Proton Therapy by Proton Radiography with a Multi-Layer Ionization Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deffet, S; Macq, B; Farace, P; Righetto, R; Vander Stappen, F

    2016-01-01

    submitted work. Francois Vander Stappen reports being employed by Ion Beam Applications (IBA) during the confines of the study and outside the submitted work.

  18. Chronic obstructive lung disease and posttraumatic stress disorder: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrams TE

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Thad E Abrams,1,2 Amy Blevins,1,3 Mark W Vander Weg1,2,4 1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, 2Center for Comprehensive Access and Delivery Research and Evaluation, Iowa City VA Health Care System, 3Hardin Health Sciences Library, 4Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA Background: Several studies have reported on the co-occurrence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and psychiatric conditions, with the most robust evidence base demonstrating an impact of comorbid anxiety and depression on COPD-related outcomes. In recent years, research has sought to determine if there is a co-occurrence between COPD and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD as well as for associations between PTSD and COPD-related outcomes. To date, there have been no published reviews summarizing this emerging literature.Objectives: The primary objective of this review was to determine if there is adequate evidence to support a co-occurrence between PTSD and COPD. Secondary objectives were to: 1 determine if there are important clinical considerations regarding the impact of PTSD on COPD management, and 2 identify targeted areas for further research.Methods: A structured review was performed using a systematic search strategy limited to studies in English, addressing adults, and to articles that examined: 1 the co-occurrence of COPD and PTSD and 2 the impact of PTSD on COPD-related outcomes. To be included, articles must have addressed some type of nonreversible obstructive lung pathology.Results: A total of 598 articles were identified for initial review. Upon applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, n=19 articles or abstracts addressed our stated objectives. Overall, there is inconclusive evidence to support the co-occurrence between PTSD and COPD. Studies finding a significant co-occurrence generally had inferior methods of identifying COPD; in contrast, studies that utilized more robust COPD

  19. SU-G-TeP2-13: Patient-Specific Reduction of Range Uncertainties in Proton Therapy by Proton Radiography with a Multi-Layer Ionization Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deffet, S; Macq, B [Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Farace, P; Righetto, R [Trento Hospital / APSS, Trento (Italy); Vander Stappen, F [Ion Beam Applications (IBA), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    submitted work. Francois Vander Stappen reports being employed by Ion Beam Applications (IBA) during the confines of the study and outside the submitted work.

  20. Overview of the science activities for the 2002 Mallik gas hydrate production research well program, Mackenzie Delta, N.W.T., Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallimore, S. R.; Collett, T. S.; Uchida, T.; Weber, M.

    2003-04-01

    With the completion of scientific studies undertaken as part of the 1998 Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well, an international research site was established for the study of Arctic natural gas hydrates in the Mackenzie Delta of northwestern Canada. Quantitative well log analysis and core studies reveal multiple gas hydrate layers from 890 m to 1106 m depth, exceeding 110 m in total thickness. High gas hydrate saturation values, which in some cases exceed 80% of the pore volume, establish the Mallik gas hydrate field as one of the most concentrated gas hydrate reservoirs in the world. Beginning in December 2001 and continuing to the middle of March 2002, two 1188 m deep science observation wells were drilled and instrumented and a 1166 m deep production research well program was carried out. The program participants include 8 partners; The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), The Japan National Oil Corporation (JNOC), GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ), United States Geological Survey (USGS), United States Department of the Energy (USDOE), India Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (MOPNG)/Gas Authority of India (GAIL) and the Chevron-BP-Burlington joint venture group. In addition the project has been accepted as part of the International Scientific Continental Drilling Program. The Geological Survey of Canada is coordinating the science program for the project and JAPEX Canada Ltd. acted as the designated operator for the fieldwork. Primary objectives of the research program are to advance fundamental geological, geophysical and geochemical studies of the Mallik gas hydrate field and to undertake advanced production testing of a concentrated gas hydrate reservoir. Full-scale field experiments in the production well monitored the physical behavior of the hydrate deposits in response to depressurization and thermal stimulation. The observation wells facilitated cross-hole tomography and vertical seismic profile experiments (before and after production) as well as

  1. Gas geochemistry studies at the gas hydrate occurrence in the permafrost environment of Mallik (NWT, Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersberg, T.; Erzinger, J.; Zimmer, M.; Schicks, J.; Dahms, E.; Mallik Working Group

    2003-04-01

    We present real-time mud gas monitoring data as well as results of noble gas and isotope investigations from the Mallik 2002 Production Research Well Program, an international research project on Gas Hydrates in the Northwest Territories of Canada. The program participants include 8 partners; The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), The Japan National Oil Corporation (JNOC), GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ), United States Geological Survey (USGS), United States Department of the Energy (USDOE), India Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (MOPNG)/Gas Authority of India (GAIL) and the Chevron-BP-Burlington joint venture group. Mud gas monitoring (extraction of gas dissolved in the drill mud followed by real-time analysis) revealed more or less complete gas depth profiles of Mallik 4L-38 and Mallik 5L-38 wells for N_2, O_2, Ar, He, CO_2, H_2, CH_4, C_2H_6, C_3H_8, C_4H10, and 222Rn; both wells are approx. 1150 m deep. Based on the molecular and and isotopic composition, hydrocarbons occurring at shallow depth (down to ˜400 m) are mostly of microbial origin. Below 400 m, the gas wetness parameter (CH_4/(C_2H_6 + C_3H_8)) and isotopes indicate mixing with thermogenic gas. Gas accumulation at the base of permafrost (˜650 m) as well as δ13C and helium isotopic data implies that the permafrost inhibits gas flux from below. Gas hydrate occurrence at Mallik is known in a depth between ˜890 m and 1100 m. The upper section of the hydrate bearing zone (890 m--920 m) consists predominantly of methane bearing gas hydrates. Between 920 m and 1050 m, concentration of C_2H_6, C_3H_8, and C_4H10 increases due to the occurrence of organic rich sediment layers. Below that interval, the gas composition is similar to the upper section of the hydrate zone. At the base of the hydrate bearing zone (˜1100 m), elevated helium and methane concentrations and their isotopic composition leads to the assumption that gas hydrates act as a barrier for gas migration from below. In mud gas

  2. Introduction of the 2007-2008 JOGMEC/NRCan/Aurora Mallik Gas Hydrate Production Research Program, NWT, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K.; Dallimore, S. R.; Numasawa, M.; Yasuda, M.; Fujii, T.; Fujii, K.; Wright, J.; Nixon, F.

    2007-12-01

    prolonged testing planned in the near future. The authors acknowledge the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21), the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) and NRCan for the support and funding. The Mallik 2002 program was undertaken jointly by JNOC, NRCan, GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ), the United State Geological Survey (USGS), the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), the India Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (MOPNG)-Gas Authority of India (GAIL), and the BP-Chevron Texaco Mackenzie Delta Joint Venture.

  3. Support needs of patients with COPD: a systematic literature search and narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardener AC

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A Carole Gardener,1 Gail Ewing,2 Isla Kuhn,3 Morag Farquhar4 1Primary Care Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; 2Centre for Family Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; 3University of Cambridge Medical School Library, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; 4School of Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK Introduction: Understanding the breadth of patients’ support needs is important for the delivery of person-centered care, particularly in progressive long-term conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Existing reviews identify important aspects of managing life with COPD with which patients may need support (support needs; however, none of these comprehensively outlines the full range of support needs that patients can experience. We therefore sought to systematically determine the full range of support needs for patients with COPD to inform development of an evidence-based tool to enable person-centered care.Methods: We conducted a systematic search and narrative review of the literature. Medline (Ovid, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, and CINAHL were systematically searched for papers which included data addressing key aspects of support need, as identified by patients with COPD. Relevant data were extracted, and a narrative analysis was conducted.Results: Thirty-one papers were included in the review, and the following 13 domains (broad areas of support need were identified: 1 understanding COPD, 2 managing symptoms and medication, 3 healthy lifestyle, 4 managing feelings and worries, 5 living positively with COPD, 6 thinking about the future, 7 anxiety and depression, 8 practical support, 9 finance work and housing, 10 families and close relationships, 11 social and recreational life, 12 independence, and 13 navigating services. These 13 domains of support need were mapped to three of the four overarching categories of need

  4. A Personalized Self-Management Rehabilitation System with an Intelligent Shoe for Stroke Survivors: A Realist Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawson, Susan; Nasr, Nasrin; Parker, Jack; Davies, Richard; Zheng, Huiru; Mountain, Gail

    2016-01-07

    caregivers during a series of focus groups and home visits. These CMOs were then tested in five in-depth case studies with stroke survivors and their caregivers. While two new propositions emerged, the second importantly related to the self-management aspects of the system. The study revealed that the system should also encourage independent use and the setting of personalized goals or activities. Information communication technology that purports to support the self-management of stroke rehabilitation should give significant consideration to the need for motivational feedback that provides quantitative, reliable, accurate, context-specific, and culturally sensitive information about the achievement of personalized goal-based activities. ©Susan Mawson, Nasrin Nasr, Jack Parker, Richard Davies, Huiri Zheng, Gail Mountain. Originally published in JMIR Rehabilitation and Assistive Technology (http://rehab.jmir.org), 07.01.2016.

  5. Ocular iontophoresis of EGP-437 (dexamethasone phosphate in dry eye patients: results of a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patane MA

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Michael A Patane¹, Amy Cohen¹, Stephen From¹, Gail Torkildsen², Donna Welch³, George W Ousler III³¹Eyegate Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Waltham, MA, USA; ²Andover Eye Associates, Andover, MA, USA; ³Ora, Inc, Andover, MA, USAPurpose: To assess safety and efficacy of EGP-437 (dexamethasone phosphate 40 mg/mL [DP] in dry eye patients.Methods: The study employed a prospective, single-center, double-masked design utilizing a Controlled Adverse Environment (CAE. Patients (n = 103 with confirmed signs and symptoms of dry eye syndrome were randomized into 1 of 3 iontophoresis treatment groups: 7.5 mA-min at 2.5 mA (DP 7.5, n = 41; 10.5 mA-min at 3.5 mA (DP 10.5, n = 37; or 10.5 mA-min at 3.5 mA (placebo, n = 25. Three CAE visits and 4 follow-up visits occurred over 3 weeks. Patients meeting enrollment criteria received iontophoresis in both eyes after the second CAE exposure (visit 3 and before the third CAE exposure (visit 5. Primary efficacy endpoints were corneal staining and ocular discomfort. Secondary endpoints included tear film break-up time, ocular protection index (OPI, and symptomatology.Results: The DP 7.5 and DP 10.5 treatment groups showed statistically significant improvements in signs and symptoms of dry eye at various time points; however, the primary endpoints were not achieved. The DP 7.5 treatment group exhibited statistically significant improvements in corneal staining (when comparing the differences between study entry and exit, 3 weeks, P = 0.039, OPI (immediately following the second treatment, P = 0.048 and ocular discomfort at follow-up visits (a week after the first treatment, P = 0.032; 24 hours after the second treatment, P = 0.0032. Treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs were experienced by 87% of patients and were consistent across all treatment groups. Most AEs were mild and no severe AEs were observed.Conclusion: Ocular iontophoresis of EGP-437 demonstrated statistically and clinically significant improvements in

  6. Safety and efficacy of MIM D3 ophthalmic solutions in a randomized placebo controlled Phase 2 clinical trial in patients with dry eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meerovitch K

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Karen Meerovitch,1 Gail Torkildsen,2 John Lonsdale,3 Heidi Goldfarb,4 Teresa Lama,1 Garth Cumberlidge,1 George W Ousler III5 1Mimetogen Pharmaceuticals Inc, Montreal, QC, Canada; 2Andover Eye Associates, Andover, MA, USA; 3Central Maine Eye Care, Lewiston, ME, USA; 4SDC, Tempe, AZ, USA; 5Ora Inc, Andover, MA, USA Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ophthalmic MIM-D3, a tyrosine kinase TrkA receptor agonist, in patients with dry eye. Design: A prospective, two-center, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled Phase 2 study. Methods: A total of 150 dry eye patients were randomized 1:1:1 to study medication (1% MIM-D3, 5% MIM-D3, or placebo and dosed twice daily (BID for 28 days. Key eligibility criteria included exacerbation in corneal staining and ocular discomfort in the Controlled Adverse Environment (CAESM on two visits, separated by 1 week of BID dosing with artificial tears. Safety and efficacy were evaluated at baseline, throughout treatment, and for 2 weeks post-treatment. The pre-specified primary outcome measures were fluorescein corneal staining post-CAE at day 28 and diary worst symptom scores over 28 days. Secondary outcomes included the pre-, post-, and the change from pre- to post-CAE fluorescein and lissamine green staining in both corneal and conjunctival regions, as well as individual diary symptoms. Results: The prespecified primary endpoints were not met. Compared with placebo, fluorescein corneal staining at day 28 was significantly improved (P < 0.05 in the 1% MIM-D3 group for the assessment of change from pre-CAE to post-CAE. In addition, following CAE exposure, patients in the 1% MIM-D3 group showed significant improvements versus placebo (P < 0.05 in inferior fluorescein and lissamine green staining after 14 and 28 days. Compared with placebo, patients in the 5% MIM-D3 group reported significantly lower daily diary scores for ocular dryness (P < 0.05. In a subgroup defined by higher symptom scores during

  7. Shadowing emergency medicine residents by medical education specialists to provide feedback on non-medical knowledge-based ACGME sub-competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waterbrook AL

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Anna L Waterbrook,1 Karen C Spear Ellinwood,2 T Gail Pritchard,3 Karen Bertels,1 Ariel C Johnson,4 Alice Min,1 Lisa R Stoneking1 1Department of Emergency Medicine, The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA; 3Department of Pediatrics, The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA; 4College of Medicine, The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA Objective: Non-medical knowledge-based sub-competencies (multitasking, professionalism, accountability, patient-centered communication, and team management are challenging for a supervising emergency medicine (EM physician to evaluate in real-time on shift while also managing a busy emergency department (ED. This study examines residents’ perceptions of having a medical education specialist shadow and evaluate their nonmedical knowledge skills.Methods: Medical education specialists shadowed postgraduate year 1 and postgraduate year 2 EM residents during an ED shift once per academic year. In an attempt to increase meaningful feedback to the residents, these specialists evaluated resident performance in selected non-medical knowledge-based Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME sub-competencies and provided residents with direct, real-time feedback, followed by a written evaluation sent via email. Evaluations provided specific references to examples of behaviors observed during the shift and connected these back to ACGME competencies and milestones.Results: Twelve residents participated in this shadow experience (six post graduate year 1 and six postgraduate year 2. Two residents emailed the medical education specialists ahead of the scheduled shadow shift requesting specific feedback. When queried, five residents voluntarily requested their feedback to be included in their formal biannual review. Residents received

  8. Organic Minerals in the Origin of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, S.; Biondi, E.; Kim, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    nine, in preparation for their use in key steps on probiotic synthesis. This prevents a model from needing to do everything from start to finish at the same time. This talk will review current progress in this area, and show how it is confirmed by recent Mars exploration on Gail crater, which may resemble the environment on early Earth where life originated.

  9. Tailored breast cancer screening program with microdose mammography, US, and MR Imaging: short-term results of a pilot study in 40-49-year-old women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Elena; Losio, Claudio; Panizza, Pietro; Rodighiero, Maria Grazia; Fedele, Isabella; Tacchini, Simona; Schiani, Elena; Ravelli, Silvia; Cristel, Giulia; Panzeri, Marta Maria; De Cobelli, Francesco; Del Maschio, Alessandro

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, performance, and cost of a breast cancer screening program aimed at 40-49-year-old women and tailored to their risk profile with supplemental ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The institutional review board approved this study, and informed written consent was obtained. A total of 3017 40-49-year-old women were invited to participate. The screening program was tailored to lifetime risk (Gail test) and mammographic density (according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data Systems [BI-RADS] criteria) with supplemental US or MR imaging and bilateral two-view microdose mammography. The indicators suggested by European guidelines, US incremental cancer detection rate (CDR), and estimated costs were evaluated. A total of 1666 women (67.5% participation rate) were recruited. The average lifetime risk of breast cancer was 11.6%, and nine women had a high risk of breast cancer; 917 women (55.0%) had a high density score (BI-RADS density category 3 or 4). The average glandular dose for screening examinations was 1.49 mGy. Screening US was performed in 835 study participants (50.1%), mostly due to high breast density (800 of 1666 women [48.0%]). Screening MR imaging was performed in nine women (0.5%) at high risk for breast cancer. Breast cancer was diagnosed in 14 women (8.4 cases per 1000 women). Twelve diagnoses were made with microdose mammography, and two were made with supplemental US in dense breasts (2.4 cases per 1000 women). All patients were submitted for surgery, and 10 underwent breast-conserving surgery. The sentinel lymph node was evaluated in 11 patients, resulting in negative findings in six. Pathologic analysis resulted in the diagnosis of four ductal carcinomas in situ and 10 invasive carcinomas (five at stage I). A tailored breast cancer screening program in 40-49-year-old women yielded a greater-than-expected number of cancers, most of which were low-stage disease.

  10. Development of a novel sports medicine rotation for emergency medicine residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waterbrook AL

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Anna L Waterbrook,1 T Gail Pritchard,2 Allison D Lane,1 Lisa R Stoneking,1 Bryna Koch,2 Robert McAtee,1 Kristi H Grall,1 Alice A Min,1 Jessica Prior,1 Isaac Farrell,1 Holly G McNulty,1 Uwe Stolz1 1Department of Emergency Medicine, 2Office of Medical Student Education, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA Abstract: Musculoskeletal complaints are the most common reason for patients to visit a physician, yet competency in musculoskeletal medicine is invariably reported as a deficiency in medical education in the USA. Sports medicine clinical rotations improve both medical students' and residents' musculoskeletal knowledge. Despite the importance of this knowledge, a standardized sports medicine curriculum in emergency medicine (EM does not exist. Hence, we developed a novel sports medicine rotation for EM residents to improve their musculoskeletal educational experience and to improve their knowledge in musculoskeletal medicine by teaching the evaluation and management of many common musculoskeletal disorders and injuries that are encountered in the emergency department. The University of Arizona has two distinct EM residency programs, South Campus (SC and University Campus (UC. The UC curriculum includes a traditional 4-week orthopedic rotation, which consistently rated poorly on evaluations by residents. Therefore, with the initiation of a new EM residency at SC, we replaced the standard orthopedic rotation with a novel sports medicine rotation for EM interns. This rotation includes attendance at sports medicine clinics with primary care and orthopedic sports medicine physicians, involvement in sport event coverage, assigned reading materials, didactic experiences, and an on-call schedule to assist with reductions in the emergency department. We analyzed postrotation surveys completed by residents, postrotation evaluations of the residents completed by primary care sports medicine faculty and orthopedic chief residents, as well as the

  11. Ranolazine versus placebo in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and persistent chest pain or dyspnea despite optimal medical and revascularization therapy: randomized, double-blind crossover pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shammas NW

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas W Shammas,1 Gail A Shammas,1 Kathleen Keyes,2 Shawna Duske,1 Ryan Kelly,1 Michael Jerin3 1Midwest Cardiovascular Research Foundation, 2Cardiovascular Medicine, Private Corporation, 3St Ambrose University, Davenport, IA, USA Background: Patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM may continue to experience persistent chest pain and/or dyspnea despite pharmacologic therapy and revascularization. We hypothesized that ranolazine would reduce anginal symptoms or dyspnea in optimally treated ICM patients.Methods: In this randomized, double-blind, crossover-design pilot study, 28 patients with ICM (ejection fraction less or equal 40% were included after providing informed consent. A total of 24 patients completed both placebo and ranolazine treatments and were analyzed. All patients were on treatment with a beta blocker, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (or angiotensin receptor blocker, and at least one additional antianginal drug. After randomization, patients received up to 1,000 mg ranolazine orally twice a day, as tolerated, versus placebo. The primary end point was change in angina as assessed by the Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ, or in dyspnea as assessed by the Rose Dyspnea Scale (RDS. Change in the RDS and SAQ score from baseline was compared, for ranolazine and placebo, using the Wilcoxon signed rank test or paired t-test.Results: Patients had the following demographic and clinical variables: mean age of 71.5 years; male (82.1%; prior coronary bypass surgery (67.9%; prior coronary percutaneous intervention (85.7%; prior myocardial infarction (82.1%; diabetes (67.9%; and mean ejection fraction of 33.1%. No statistical difference was seen between baseline RDS score and that after placebo or ranolazine (n=20 (P≥0.05. There was however, an improvement in anginal frequency (8/10 patients (P=0.058, quality of life (8/10 patients (P=0.048, and mean score of all components of the SAQ questionnaire (n=10 (P=0.047 with ranolazine

  12. Patient adherence and persistence with topical ocular hypotensive therapy in real-world practice: a comparison of bimatoprost 0.01% and travoprost Z 0.004% ophthalmic solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell JH

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Joanna H Campbell,1 Gail F Schwartz,2 Britni LaBounty,3 Jonathan W Kowalski,1 Vaishali D Patel1 1Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA; 2Greater Baltimore Medical Center and Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Principled Strategies, Inc., Encinitas, CA, USA Background: Effective control of intraocular pressure is predicated upon patient compliance with pharmacotherapy. We compared patient adherence and persistence with two new ocular hypotensive formulations, using real-world utilization data. Methods: This observational cohort study employed pharmacy claims data from the Source® Lx (Wolters Kluwer Pharma Solutions database. Patients with an initial (index prescription for topical bimatoprost 0.01% or travoprost Z (April to June 2011 and no claim for ophthalmic prostaglandin or prostamide analogs within the previous 18 months were identified. Treatment adherence was expressed as proportion of days covered with study medication during the first 365 days after the index prescription. Treatment persistence with study medication was assessed over the first 12 months using Kaplan–Meier survival analyses, allowing a maximum 30-day gap for prescription refill. Treatment status was determined monthly over this period. Results: A total of 12,985 patients were assessed for treatment adherence, and 10,470 for treatment persistence. Adherence was better with bimatoprost 0.01% than with travoprost Z (mean proportion of days covered 0.540 versus [vs] 0.486, P<0.001, and more patients showed high adherence (proportion of days covered >0.80 with bimatoprost 0.01% than travoprost Z (29.1% vs 22.3%, P<0.001. Continuous 12-month persistence was higher with bimatoprost 0.01% than with travoprost Z (29.5% vs 24.2%, P<0.001. At month 12, more patients were on treatment with bimatoprost 0.01% than travoprost Z (48.8% vs 45.7%, P<0.01. Similar findings were demonstrated in cohorts of ocular hypotensive treatment-naïve patients, branded

  13. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and tolerability of verinurad, a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor, in healthy adult male subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Z

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Zancong Shen,1 Michael Gillen,2 Jeffrey N Miner,1 Gail Bucci,1 David M Wilson,1 Jesse W Hall1 1Ardea Biosciences, Inc., San Diego, CA, 2AstraZeneca, Gaithersburg, MD, USA Purpose: Verinurad (RDEA3170 is a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor in clinical development for the treatment of gout and asymptomatic hyperuricemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and tolerability of verinurad in healthy adult males.Subjects and methods: This was a Phase I, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single and multiple ascending dose study. Panels of eight male subjects received a single oral dose of verinurad or placebo in either a fasted or fed state; panels of 10–12 male subjects received ascending doses of once-daily verinurad or placebo in a fasted state for 10 days. Serial blood and urine samples were assayed for verinurad and uric acid. Safety was assessed by adverse event (AE reports, laboratory tests, vital signs, and electrocardiograms (ECGs.Results: A total of 81 adult males completed the study. Following single doses of verinurad, maximum observed plasma concentration (Cmax and area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC increased in a dose-proportional manner; Cmax occurred at 0.5–0.75 hours and 1.25 hours in the fasted and fed states, respectively. Food decreased AUC by 23% and Cmax by 37%-53%. There was a modest accumulation of verinurad following multiple daily doses. Verinurad reduced serum urate levels by up to 62% (40 mg, single dose and 61% (10 mg, multiple dose. The increase in urinary excretion of uric acid was greatest in the first 6 hours after dosing and was still evident ≥24 hours for verinurad doses ≥2 mg. Verinurad was well tolerated at all doses. No serious AEs, severe AEs, discontinuations due to AEs, or clinically significant laboratory or ECG abnormalities were reported.Conclusion: Single and multiple doses of verinurad were well tolerated

  14. Risk modeling and screening for BRCA1 mutations among Filipino breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nato, Alejandro Q. Jr.

    2003-03-01

    Breast cancer susceptibility gene, type 1(BRCA1) has been thought to be responsible for ∼45% of families with multiple breast carcinomas and for ∼80% of breast and ovarian cancer families. In this study, we investigated 34 familial Filipino breast cancer (BC) patients to: (a) estimate breast cancer risks and BRCA1/2 mutation carrier probabilities using risk assessment and prior probability models, respectively; (b) screen for putative polymorphisms at selected smaller exons of BRCA1 by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis; (c) screen for truncated mutations at BRCA1 exon 11 by radioactive protein truncation test (PTT); and (d) estimate posterior probabilities upon incorporation of screening results. SSCP analysis revealed 8 unique putative polymorphisms. Low prevalence of unique putative polymorphisms at exon 2, 5, 17, and 22 may indicate probable mutations. Contrastingly, high prevalence of unique putative polymorphisms at exons 13, 15, and 16 may suggest true polymorphisms which are biologically insignificant. PTT, DHPLC, and sequence analyses revealed a novel mutation in exon 11 involving GT insertion that resulted to a stop codon which generated a 29.7 kDa truncated protein product. This is the second documented mutation in BRCA1 exon 11 in a Filipino BC patient since 1998. Initial genotype-phenotype correlations in Filipino BC patients may be elucidated based on screening tests performed. Our results corroborate the findings of a study on unselected incident Filipino BC cases where the reported prevalence of BRCA1 mutation is low. The higher prevalence of putative polypmorphisms may be attributed to the increased stringency in patient prospecting. The Gail, Claus, and BRCAPRO models can be utilized to estimate BC risk in unaffected high-risk individuals but validation is needed. Most of the BRCAPRO and Myriad.com prior probability estimates coincide with the presence of BRCA1 mutation and/or putative polymorphisms. This pioneering

  15. The role and importance of economic evaluation of traditional herbal medicine use for chronic non-communicable diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes GD

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gail D Hughes,1 Oluwaseyi M Aboyade,1 John D Hill,2 Rafia S Rasu3 1South African Herbal Science and Medicine Institute, University of the Western Cape, Western Cape, South Africa; 2Department of Pharmacy, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 3School of Pharmacy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA Background: Non-communicable diseases (NCD constitute major public health problems globally, with an impact on morbidity and mortality ranking high and second to HIV/AIDS. Existing studies conducted in South Africa have demonstrated that people living with NCD rely on traditional herbal medicine (THM primarily or in combination with conventional drugs. The primary research focus has been on the clinical and experimental aspects of THM use for NCD, with limited data on the economic impact of health care delivery. Therefore, the purpose of this study will be to determine the cost and utilization of resources on THM in South Africa for NCD. Materials and methods: Study describes the methods toward incorporating cost estimations and economic evaluation illustrated with the Prospective Urban and rural Epidemiological (PURE study in South Africa. The South African PURE cohort is investigating the geographic and socioeconomic influence of THM spending and utilization, variations in spending based on perceived health status, marital status, and whether spending patterns have any impact on hospitalizations and disability. Data collection and evaluation plan: Since the individual costs of THM are not regulated nor do they have a standardized price value, information obtained through this study can be utilized to assess differences and determine underlying factors contributing to spending. This insight into THM spending patterns can aid in the development and implementation of guidelines or standardized legislation governing THM use and distribution. An economic evaluation and cost estimation model has been proposed, while the data collection is still ongoing

  16. Out of the Shadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Nina; Williams, Gary

    2010-12-01

    . Williams; 39. Gail G. Hanson 1947 David G. Cassel; 40. San Lan Wu David B. Cline.

  17. Complications following arthroscopic fixation of acromioclavicular separations: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woodmass JM

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Jarret M Woodmass,1 John G Esposito,1 Yohei Ono,1,2 Atiba A Nelson,1 Richard S Boorman,1 Gail M Thornton,1,3 Ian KY Lo1 1Department of Surgery, Section of Orthopaedic Surgery, McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan; 3Department of Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Purpose: Over the past decade, a number of arthroscopic or arthroscopically assisted reconstruction techniques have emerged for the management of acromioclavicular (AC separations. These techniques provide the advantage of superior visualization of the base of the coracoid, less soft tissue dissection, and smaller incisions. While these techniques have been reported to provide excellent functional results with minimal complications, discrepancies exist within the literature. This systematic review aims to assess the rate of complications following these procedures. Methods: Two independent reviewers completed a search of Medline, Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library entries up to December 2013. The terms “Acromioclavicular Joint (MeSH” OR “acromioclavicular* (text” OR “coracoclavicular* (text” AND “Arthroscopy (MeSH” OR “Arthroscop* (text” were used. Pooled estimates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated assuming a random-effects model. Statistical heterogeneity was quantified using the I2 statistic. Level of evidence: IV Results: A total of 972 abstracts met the search criteria. After removal of duplicates and assessment of inclusion/exclusion criteria, 12 articles were selected for data extraction. The rate of superficial infection was 3.8% and residual shoulder/AC pain or hardware irritation occurred at a rate of 26.7%. The rate of coracoid/clavicle fracture was 5.3% and occurred most commonly with techniques utilizing bony tunnels. Loss of AC joint reduction occurred in 26

  18. Les femmes américaines et la guerre du Vietnam : mise en place et utilisation d’un processus de mimétisme American Women, the Vietnam War and Mimetism:  Constructing and Developing an Unconscious Imitation of the Soldier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Boudet-Brugal

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available By and large, women have been maintained at a “reasonable” distance from the war. Their historic identity has mainly been that of mother, and therefore that of those who do not make war. They are not to belong to this sphere; it is to remain masculine, a men’s world. The Vietnam War (1964-1973 is no exception to the rule. This characteristic may be even more visible in the context of Vietnam given the power granted to authenticity: “having been there” has been essential. However, it seems that, just as Vietnam was a confused war, the border between genders has been sometimes blurred as well. We have thus found that some women have constructed and developed a strange process, a(n (unconscious strategy, in order to enter the world of war while not “having been there” really, while not knowing physically what war is and was. If “Vietnam is the land of [their] imagination”, as Barbara Sonneborn put it (Regret to inform, 1999, mimetism has allowed them to fill out the blanks, to uncover and discover their man’s reality, to “see what it was he saw […] to be in the field with him”, says Gail Gilberg (Snake’s Daugher, 1997. I will therefore expose and study this phenomenon that appears in various women’s stories, written or told, by themselves or others, through their own narrative styles and speeches. In doing so, I intend to examine whether the use of this mechanism reinforces the traditional representations of men and women in war: Does it allow a re-writing of these excluded female voices, while putting forward the specificities of women’s experiences in war? Does it grant women a voice and a visible presence? Considering that “societies are, in some sense, the sum total of the war stories” (Jean B. Elshtain, it seems interesting to examine to what extent this strategy allows the American women to find their place in the story of the Vietnam war, in a very specific way.

  19. Identifying cost-effective treatment with raloxifene in postmenopausal women using risk algorithms for fractures and invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivergård, M; Ström, O; Borgström, F; Burge, R T; Tosteson, A N A; Kanis, J

    2010-11-01

    The National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) recommends considering treatment in women with a 20% or higher 10-year probability of a major fracture. However, raloxifene reduces both the risk of vertebral fractures and invasive breast cancer so that raloxifene treatment may be clinically appropriate and cost-effective in women who do not meet a 20% threshold risk. The aim of this study was to identify cost-effective scenarios of raloxifene treatment compared to no treatment in younger postmenopausal women at increased risk of invasive breast cancer and fracture risks below 20%. A micro-simulation model populated with data specific to American Caucasian women was used to quantify the costs and benefits of 5-year raloxifene treatment. The population evaluated was selected based on 10-year major fracture probability as estimated with FRAX® being below 20% and 5-year invasive breast cancer risk as estimated with the Gail risk model ranging from 1% to 5%. The cost per QALY gained ranged from US $22,000 in women age 55 with 5% invasive breast cancer risk and 15-19.9% fracture probability, to $110,000 in women age 55 with 1% invasive breast cancer risk and 5-9.9% fracture probability. Raloxifene was progressively cost-effective with increasing fracture risk and invasive breast cancer risk for a given age cohort. At lower fracture risk in combination with lower invasive breast cancer risk or when no preventive raloxifene effect on invasive breast cancer was assumed, the cost-effectiveness of raloxifene worsened markedly and was not cost-effective given a willingness-to-pay of US $50,000. At fracture risk of 15-19.9% raloxifene was cost-effective also in women at lower invasive breast cancer risk. Raloxifene is potentially cost-effective in cohorts of young postmenopausal women, who do not meet the suggested NOF 10-year fracture risk threshold. The cost-effectiveness is contingent on their 5-year invasive breast cancer risk. The result highlights the importance of considering

  20. International vision requirements for driver licensing and disability pensions: using a milestone approach in characterization of progressive eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain M Bron

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Alain M Bron1, Ananth C Viswanathan2, Ulrich Thelen3, Renato de Natale4, Antonio Ferreras5, Jens Gundgaard6, Gail Schwartz7, Patricia Buchholz81Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital, Dijon, France; 2Glaucoma Research Unit, Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and Department of Genetics, University College of London Institute of Ophthalmology, London, UK; 3Private Practice, Munster, Germany; 4Ospedale Civile di Monselice, Monselice, Italy; 5Ophthalmology, Miguel Servet University Hospital, Zaragoza, Spain; 6COWI, Kolding, Denmark; 7Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Glaucoma Consultants, Baltimore, MD, USA; 8Patricia Buchholz Consulting, Karlsruhe, GermanyObjective: Low vision that causes forfeiture of driver’s licenses and collection of disability pension benefits can lead to negative psychosocial and economic consequences. The purpose of this study was to review the requirements for holding a driver’s license and rules for obtaining a disability pension due to low vision. Results highlight the possibility of using a milestone approach to describe progressive eye disease.Methods: Government and research reports, websites, and journal articles were evaluated to review rules and requirements in Germany, Spain, Italy, France, the UK, and the US.Results: Visual acuity limits are present in all driver’s license regulations. In most countries, the visual acuity limit is 0.5. Visual field limits are included in some driver’s license regulations. In Europe, binocular visual field requirements typically follow the European Union standard of ≥120°. In the US, the visual field requirements are typically between 110° and 140°. Some countries distinguish between being partially sighted and blind in the definition of legal blindness, and in others there is only one limit.Conclusions: Loss of driving privileges could be used as a milestone to monitor progressive eye disease. Forfeiture could be standardized as a

  1. Do patients and carers agree on symptom burden in advanced COPD?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi E

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Emma Mi,1 Ella Mi,1 Gail Ewing,2 Patrick White,3 Ravi Mahadeva,4 A Carole Gardener,5 Morag Farquhar6 On behalf of the Living with Breathlessness Study Team 1School of Clinical Medicine, 2Centre for Family Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, 3Primary Care and Public Health Sciences, King’s College London, London, 4Department of Respiratory Medicine, Cambridge NIHR BRC, Addenbrookes Hospital, 5Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, 6School of Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK Objective: Accurate informal carer assessment of patient symptoms is likely to be valuable for decision making in managing the high symptom burden of COPD in the home setting. Few studies have investigated agreement between patients and carers in COPD. We aimed to assess agreement between patients and carers on symptoms, and factors associated with disagreement in a population-based sample of patients with advanced COPD. Patients and methods: This was a prospective, cross-sectional analysis of data from 119 advanced COPD patients and their carers. Patients and carers separately rated symptoms on a 4-point scale. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and weighted Cohen’s kappa determined differences in patient and carer scores and patient–carer agreement, respectively. We identified characteristics associated with incongruence using Spearman’s rank correlation and Mann–Whitney U tests. Results: There were no significant differences between group-level patient and carer scores for any symptom. Patient–carer individual-level agreement was moderate for constipation (k=0.423, just below moderate for diarrhea (k=0.393 and fair for depression (k=0.341, fatigue (k=0.294, anxiety (k=0.289 and breathlessness (k=0.210. Estimation of greater patient symptom burden by carers relative to patients themselves was associated with non-spousal patient–carer relationship, non-cohabitating patients and carers, carer

  2. Contributions of COPD, asthma, and ten comorbid conditions to health care utilization and patient-centered outcomes among US adults with obstructive airway disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy TE

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Terrence E Murphy,1 Gail J McAvay,1 Heather G Allore,1 Jason A Stamm,2 Paul F Simonelli2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Geriatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Thoracic Medicine, Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA, USA Background: Among persons with obstructive airway disease, the relative contributions of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, asthma, and common comorbid conditions to health care utilization and patient-centered outcomes (PCOs have not been previously reported.Methods: We followed a total of 3,486 persons aged ≥40 years with COPD, asthma, or both at baseline, from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS cohorts enrolled annually from 2008 through 2012 for 1 year. MEPS is a prospective observational study of US households recording self-reported COPD, asthma, and ten medical conditions: angina, arthritis, cancer, coronary heart disease, cognitive impairment, diabetes, hypertension, lung cancer, myocardial infarction, and stroke/transient ischemic attack. We studied the separate contributions of these conditions to health care utilization (all-cause and respiratory disease hospitalization, any emergency department [ED] visit, and six or more outpatient visits and PCOs (seven or more days spent in bed due to illness, incident loss of mobility, and incident decline in self-perceived health.Results: COPD made the largest contributions to all-cause and respiratory disease hospitalization and ED visits, while arthritis made the largest contribution to outpatient health care. Arthritis and COPD, respectively, made the greatest contributions to the PCOs.Conclusion: COPD made the largest and second largest contributions to health care utilization and PCOs among US adults with obstructive airway disease. The twelve medical conditions collectively accounted for between 52% and 61% of the health care utilization outcomes and between 53

  3. Safety and comfort evaluation of a new formulation of Visine® lubricant eye drops containing HydroBlend™ and GentlePur™

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torkildsen G

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Gail Torkildsen,1 Sherryl Frisch,2 Mingqi Bai,2 Louis Gentner III,2 Uday Doshi,2 Jane Zhang2 1Andover Eye Associates, Andover, MA, USA; 2Johnson & Johnson Consumer and Personal Products Worldwide, Division of Johnson & Johnson Consumer Companies, Inc, Morris Plains, NJ, USA Purpose: To evaluate the clinical safety and comfort of a new benzalkonium chloride-free Visine® lubricant eye drop formulation (Hydroblend™ and GentlePur™ in healthy and dry eye subjects.Methods: This was a single-site, open-label clinical study comprised of 22 healthy and 22 dry eye subjects. Subjects were instructed to instill 1–2 drops of the test product four times a day for 2 weeks and were examined at visit 1 (day 0, visit 2 (day 7, and visit 3 (day 14. Assessments at each visit included postdosing product usage comfort scores, predosing fluorescein corneal staining score, predosing visual acuity, and pre- and postdosing ocular structure change using slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Adverse events were monitored throughout the course of the study.Results: Throughout the 14 days of the trial period, subjects from both healthy and dry eye groups rated the eye drops as “very comfortable”. For dry eye group, the mean product usage comfort scores for the first 3 minutes postdosing ranged from 8.5 to 8.8 at visit 1 and 9.2 to 9.6 at visit 3 on a 0–10 point scale, with 0 being very uncomfortable and 10 being very comfortable. The mean corneal staining scores over five corneal regions changed from 0.65 at visit 1 to 0.39 at visit 3 for dry eye group. The individual region corneal staining scores were also decreased from visits 1 to 3 for dry eye group. All subjects maintained pretreatment means visual acuity at visits 2 and 3. Biomicroscopic examination indicated no structural changes at all visits. There were no significant adverse events reported during the course of the study.Conclusion: The study confirms that GentlePur™ is an appropriate choice as a preservative

  4. Thermal regime of a continental permafrost associated gas hydrate occurrence a continuous temperature profile record after drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henninges, J.; Huenges, E.; Mallik Working Group

    2003-04-01

    boundary of the methane hydrate stability zone a temperature of 12.2 °C was measured. (*) The program participants include 8 partners; The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), The Japan National Oil Corporation (JNOC), GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ), United States Geological Survey (USGS), United States Department of the Energy (USDOE), India Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (MOPNG)/Gas Authority of India (GAIL) and the Chevron-BP-Burlington joint venture group.

  5. An innovative longitudinal curriculum to increase emergency medicine residents’ exposure to rarely encountered and technically challenging procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grall KH

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kristi H Grall,1 Lisa R Stoneking,1 Lawrence A DeLuca,1 Anna L Waterbrook,1 T Gail Pritchard,2,3 Kurt R Denninghoff1 1Department of Emergency Medicine, The College of Medicine, The University of Arizona, 2Office Medical Student Education, 3Office of Graduate Medical Education, The College of Medicine, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA Background: Procedural skills have historically been taught at the bedside. In this study, we aimed to increase resident knowledge of uncommon emergency medical procedures to increase residents’ procedural skills in common and uncommon emergency medical procedures and to integrate cognitive training with hands-on procedural instruction using high- and low-fidelity simulation. Methods: We developed 13 anatomically/physiologically-based procedure modules focusing on uncommon clinical procedures and/or those requiring higher levels of technical skills. A departmental expert directed each session with collaboration from colleagues in related subspecialties. Sessions were developed based on Manthey and Fitch’s stages of procedural competency including 1 knowledge acquisition, 2 experience/technical skill development, and 3 competency evaluation. We then distributed a brief, 10-question, online survey to our residents in order to solicit feedback regarding their perceptions of increased knowledge and ability in uncommon and common emergency medical procedures, and their perception of the effectiveness of integrated cognitive training with hands-on instruction through high- and low-fidelity simulation. Results: Fifty percent of our residents (11/22 responded to our survey. Responses indicated the procedure series helped with understanding of both uncommon (65% strongly agreed [SA], 35% agreed [A] and common (55% SA, 45% A emergency medicine procedures and increased residents’ ability to perform uncommon (55% SA, 45% A and common (45% SA, 55% A emergency medical procedures. In addition, survey results

  6. Risk modeling and screening for BRCA1 mutations among Filipino breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nato, Jr, Alejandro Q

    2003-03-01

    Breast cancer susceptibility gene, type 1(BRCA1) has been thought to be responsible for {approx}45% of families with multiple breast carcinomas and for {approx}80% of breast and ovarian cancer families. In this study, we investigated 34 familial Filipino breast cancer (BC) patients to: (a) estimate breast cancer risks and BRCA1/2 mutation carrier probabilities using risk assessment and prior probability models, respectively; (b) screen for putative polymorphisms at selected smaller exons of BRCA1 by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis; (c) screen for truncated mutations at BRCA1 exon 11 by radioactive protein truncation test (PTT); and (d) estimate posterior probabilities upon incorporation of screening results. SSCP analysis revealed 8 unique putative polymorphisms. Low prevalence of unique putative polymorphisms at exon 2, 5, 17, and 22 may indicate probable mutations. Contrastingly, high prevalence of unique putative polymorphisms at exons 13, 15, and 16 may suggest true polymorphisms which are biologically insignificant. PTT, DHPLC, and sequence analyses revealed a novel mutation in exon 11 involving GT insertion that resulted to a stop codon which generated a 29.7 kDa truncated protein product. This is the second documented mutation in BRCA1 exon 11 in a Filipino BC patient since 1998. Initial genotype-phenotype correlations in Filipino BC patients may be elucidated based on screening tests performed. Our results corroborate the findings of a study on unselected incident Filipino BC cases where the reported prevalence of BRCA1 mutation is low. The higher prevalence of putative polypmorphisms may be attributed to the increased stringency in patient prospecting. The Gail, Claus, and BRCAPRO models can be utilized to estimate BC risk in unaffected high-risk individuals but validation is needed. Most of the BRCAPRO and Myriad.com prior probability estimates coincide with the presence of BRCA1 mutation and/or putative polymorphisms. This

  7. Guidelines for Authors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Demir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Guidelines for Authors cumhuriyet theology journal  reguires writers to use the The Chicago Manual of Style “notes and bibliography” system of referencing.First citation: author(s first name and last name, title, (if applicable first and last name of translator or editor, place of publication, publisher, date of publication, page number.Subsequent citations: author’s last name, the short title, and the page number should be indicated in all subsequent citations. Footnote citations should conform to the following examples.References: References should be placed at the end of the text in alphabetical order. If a source has more than one author, the surname and name of the first author should be written, and the other authors should be indicated by et.al. The titles of books and journals should be italicized; article titles and book chapters should be placed in quotation marks. Translator’s and editor’s names (if there are any should follow the title of the work: BOOKa One Author: 
1. Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals (New York: Penguin, 2006, 99–100.2. Pollan, Omnivore’s Dilemma, 3.Bibliography: Pollan, Michael. The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals. New York: Penguin, 2006.  b Two Authors1. Geoffrey C. Ward and Ken Burns, The War: An Intimate History 1941–1945 (New York: Knopf, 2007, 52.2. Ward and Burns, War, 59–61. Bibliography: Ward, Geoffrey C., and Ken Burns. The War: An Intimate History 1941–1945. New York: Knopf, 2007.c Three or More Authors
For three or more authors, list all of the authors in the bibliography; in the note, list only the first author, followed by et al. (“and others”:1. Mitchell L. Eisen, Jodi A. Quas, and Gail S. Goodman, eds., Memory and Suggestibility in the Forensic Interview (Mahwah, NJ: L. Erlbaum Assoicates, 2002, 65.2. Eisen and et al., Memory and Suggestibility in the Forensic Interview, 67.Bibliography: Eisen, Mitchell

  8. Book reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    1992-07-01

    Full Text Available -Jay B. Haviser, Jerald T. Milanich ,First encounters: Spanish explorations in the Caribbean and the United States, 1492-1570. Gainesville FL: Florida Museum of Natural History & University Presses of Florida, 1989. 221 pp., Susan Milbrath (eds -Marvin Lunenfeld, The Libro de las profecías of Christopher Columbus: an en face edition. Delano C. West & August Kling, translation and commentary. Gainesville FL: University of Florida Press, 1991. x + 274 pp. -Suzannah England, Charles R. Ewen, From Spaniard to Creole: the archaeology of cultural formation at Puerto Real, Haiti. Tuscaloosa AL; University of Alabama Press, 1991. xvi + 155 pp. -Piero Gleijeses, Bruce Palmer Jr., Intervention in the Caribbean: the Dominican crisis of 1965. Lexington KY: University Press of Kentucky, 1989. -Piero Gleijeses, Herbert G. Schoonmaker, Military crisis management: U.S. intervention in the Dominican Republic, 1965. Westport CT: Greenwood Press, 1990. 152 pp. -Jacqueline A. Braveboy-Wagner, Fitzroy André Baptiste, War, cooperation, and conflict: the European possessions in the Caribbean, 1939-1945. Westport CT: Greenwood Press, 1988. xiv + 351 pp. -Peter Meel, Paul Sutton, Europe and the Caribbean. London: Macmillan Caribbean, 1991. xii + 260 pp. -Peter Meel, Betty Secoc-Dahlberg, The Dutch Caribbean: prospects for democracy. New York: Gordon and Breach, 1990. xix + 333 pp. -Michiel Baud, Rosario Espinal, Autoritarismo y democracía en la política dominicana. San José, Costa Rica: Ediciones CAPEL, 1987. 208 pp. -A.J.G. Reinders, J.M.R. Schrils, Een democratie in gevaar: een verslag van de situatie op Curacao tot 1987. Assen, Maastricht: Van Gorcum, 1990. xii + 292 pp. -Andrés Serbin, David W. Dent, Handbook of political science research on Latin America: trends from the 1960s to the 1990s. Westport CT: Greenwood, 1990. -D. Gail Saunders, Dean W. Collinwood, The Bahamas between worlds. Decatur IL: White Sound Press, 1989. vii + 119 pp. -D. Gail Saunders, Dean

  9. Numerical Investigation of the Thermal Conductivity of Graphite Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakak Khadem, Masoud

    The thermal conductivity of graphite nano-fibers (GNFs) with different styles is predicted computationally. GNFs are formed as basal planes of graphene stacked based on the catalytic configuration. The large GNF thermal conductivity relative to a base phase change material (PCM) may lead to improved PCM performance when embedded with GNFs. Three different types of GNFs are modeled: platelet, ribbon, and herringbone. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used in this study as a means to predict the thermal conductivity tensor based on atomic behavior. The in-house MD code, Molecular Dynamics in Arbitrary Geometries (MDAG), was updated with the features required to create the predictions. To model both interlayer van-der Waals and intralayer covalent bonding of carbon atoms in GNFs, a combination of the optimized Tersoff potential function for atoms within the layers and a pairwise Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential function to model the interactions between the layers was used. Tests of energy conservation in the NVE ensemble have been performed to validate the employed potential model. Nose-Hoover, Andersen, and Berendsen thermostats were also incorporated into MDAG to enable MD simulations in NVT ensembles, where the volume, number of atoms, and temperature of the system are conserved. Equilibrium MD with Green-Kubo (GK) relations was then employed to extract the thermal conductivity tensor for symmetric GNFs (platelet and ribbon). The thermal conductivity of solid argon at different temperatures was calculated and compared to other studies to validate the GK implementation. Different heat current formulations, as a result of using the three-body Tersoff potential, were considered and the discrepancy in the calculated thermal conductivity values of graphene using each formula was resolved by employing a novel comparative technique that identifies the most accurate formulation. The effect of stacking configuration on the thermal conductivity of platelet and ribbon GNFs

  10. Impacts of fuel formulation and engine operating parameters on the nanostructure and reactivity of diesel soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehliu, Kuen

    between soot reactivity and structural disorder is consistent with past work by Vander Wal and co-workers, but stands in contrast to past work by Boehman and co-workers which identified surface oxygen content as the primary explanation for increased oxidative reactivity. The characterization results of this study indicate that changing fuel formulation is a potential method to enhance soot reactivity, and thus diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration, through decreasing the degree of order in soot nanostructure. All soot samples were partially oxidized to investigate the structural and elemental surface changes during the oxidation process. The HRTEM image analysis of the B100 and BP15 soot at 50% burn-off shows the highly ordered soot nanostructure, coinciding with significant decreases in the apparent rate constants for soot oxidation. In contrast, for FT soot, no significant changes in the soot nanostructure is observed, coinciding with only a slight decrease in apparent rate constant for soot oxidation. The result of HRTEM image analysis and apparent rate constants for soot oxidation show a relationship between the lattice fringe parameters (the median fringe length and mean fringe tortuosity) and the apparent rate constant, coinciding with the trend observed among the initial soot samples generated by different fuels.

  11. Potential utility of environmental DNA for early detection of Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Jeremy; Sepulveda, Adam; Sylvester, K; Thum, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Considering the harmful and irreversible consequences of many biological invasions, early detection of an invasive species is an important step toward protecting ecosystems (Sepulveda et al. 2012). Early detection increases the probability that suppression or eradication efforts will be successful because invasive populations are small and localized (Vander Zanden et al. 2010). However, most invasive species are not detected early because current tools have low detection probabilities when target species are rare and the sampling effort required to achieve acceptable detection capabilities with current tools is seldom tractable (Jerde et al. 2011). As a result, many invasive species go undetected until they are abundant and suppression efforts become costly. Novel DNA-based surveillance tools have recently revolutionized early detection abilities using environmental DNA (eDNA) present in the water (Darling and Mahon 2011, Bohmann et al. 2014). In brief, eDNA monitoring enables the identification of organisms from DNA present and collected in water samples. Aquatic and semiaquatic organisms release DNA contained in sloughed, damaged, or partially decomposed tissue and waste products into the water and molecular techniques allow this eDNA in the water column to be identified from simple and easy-tocollect water samples (Darling and Mahon 2011). Despite limited understanding of the production, persistence, and spread of DNA in water (Barnes et al. 2014), eDNA monitoring has been applied not only to invasive species (Jerde et al. 2011), but also to species that are rare, endangered, or highly elusive (Spear et al. 2014). However, most eDNA research and monitoring has focused on detection of invertebrates and vertebrates and less attentionhas been given to developing eDNA techniques for detecting aquatic invasive plants. Eurasian watermilfoil (EWM; Myriophyllum spicatum L.) is an invasive species for which improved early detection would be particularly helpful. Advanced

  12. Establishing Baseline Key Ecological Functions of Fish and Wildlife for Subbasin Planning, Final Report 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neil, Thomas A.

    2001-08-01

    As we strive to manage the Columbia River Basin for its sustainable, productive, and diverse ecosystems, we are, in fact, managing these systems to provide an a array of ecological functions upon which these systems are based. These ecological functions avail themselves as an important tool with which to assess our historical and current habitat conditions, as well as proposed future or ideal conditions under differing management scenarios. So what are key ecological functions (KEFs) and which ones are involved? Key ecological functions refer to the major ecological roles played by an organism in its ecosystem that can affect environmental conditions for themselves or other species, or that directly influences other organisms (Marcot and Vander Heyden 2001). Currently, 111 KEFs are identified for fish and wildlife species as a result of Task 1 of this project. Even though the assessment phase of this project encompasses the entire Columbia River Basin, only a subset of KEFs (58) that are associated with the lotic systems, which includes 7 anadromous fish, 20 co-occurring resident fish, and 137 wildlife species linked to salmon are addressed. Since the basin has not be systematically surveyed for each fish and wildlife species, baseline conditions for each KEF are determined by developing basin-wide species range maps using the following information: wildlife-habitat type associations, county and ecoprovince occurrence, literature (like individual state atlases), and expert peer review. This approach produced a set of species range maps that depict a species potential for occurrence given the current or historic conditions. It is this potential occurrence that serves as a baseline condition to determine the key ecological functions. The results offer a framework and a set of baseline assessments that can be done with existing databases. Thus, allowing resource managers the ability to assess future management activities against this norm and guide their activities in

  13. Establishing baseline key ecological functions of fish and wildlife for subbasin planning, final report 2001.; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neil, Thomas A.

    2001-01-01

    As we strive to manage the Columbia River Basin for its sustainable, productive, and diverse ecosystems, we are, in fact, managing these systems to provide an a array of ecological functions upon which these systems are based. These ecological functions avail themselves as an important tool with which to assess our historical and current habitat conditions, as well as proposed future or ideal conditions under differing management scenarios. So what are key ecological functions (KEFs) and which ones are involved? Key ecological functions refer to the major ecological roles played by an organism in its ecosystem that can affect environmental conditions for themselves or other species, or that directly influences other organisms (Marcot and Vander Heyden 2001). Currently, 111 KEFs are identified for fish and wildlife species as a result of Task 1 of this project. Even though the assessment phase of this project encompasses the entire Columbia River Basin, only a subset of KEFs (58) that are associated with the lotic systems, which includes 7 anadromous fish, 20 co-occurring resident fish, and 137 wildlife species linked to salmon are addressed. Since the basin has not be systematically surveyed for each fish and wildlife species, baseline conditions for each KEF are determined by developing basin-wide species range maps using the following information: wildlife-habitat type associations, county and ecoprovince occurrence, literature (like individual state atlases), and expert peer review. This approach produced a set of species range maps that depict a species potential for occurrence given the current or historic conditions. It is this potential occurrence that serves as a baseline condition to determine the key ecological functions. The results offer a framework and a set of baseline assessments that can be done with existing databases. Thus, allowing resource managers the ability to assess future management activities against this norm and guide their activities in

  14. Progress in the ICDP Mallik 2002 Data and Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewner, R.; Conze, R.; Mallik Working Group

    2003-04-01

    This contribution forms part of the scientific activities for the Mallik 2002 Production Research Well Program. The program participants include 8 partners: The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), The Japan National Oil Corporation (JNOC), GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ), United States Geological Survey (USGS), United States Department of the Energy (USDOE), India Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (MOPNG)/Gas Authority of India (GAIL) and the Chevron-BP-Burlington joint venture group. Since December 2001 the scientific investigations of the Mallik Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program in the Canadian Mackenzie Delta were supported by a new Data and Information System. Due to the particular conditions and characteristics of methane drilling projects, we were able to elaborate a data management system in three main phases. These phases were realized very close in time and space to the activities and operations at the drill site, and in the laboratories of the Inuvik Research Center: 1. The first approach was to set up a database structure supported by the ICDP Drilling Information System (DIS) during the planning phase since fall 2001. This system encompasses various components helping in administration and operation of the system as well as in presentation of the data. 2. During the second phase, the drilling period of the main well hole (Mallik5L-38), we installed the Mallik-DIS in a small local network at the Inuvik Research Center, and maintained this system for data acquisition and core scanning. Each day we transferred all digital core pictures and archiving information of the core runs to the confidential Mallik Web sites, under extremely high security precautions. 3. While the scientific evaluation phase still continues since end of March 2002, several data sets have been already collected, prepared and incorporated into the Mallik Data Warehouse. These processed data have been made available on the Mallik Web sites within the ICDP Information

  15. Technologies to Support Community-Dwelling Persons With Dementia: A Position Paper on Issues Regarding Development, Usability, Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness, Deployment, and Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiland, Franka; Innes, Anthea; Mountain, Gail; Robinson, Louise; van der Roest, Henriëtte; García-Casal, J Antonio; Gove, Dianne; Thyrian, Jochen René; Evans, Shirley; Dröes, Rose-Marie; Kelly, Fiona; Kurz, Alexander; Casey, Dympna; Szcześniak, Dorota; Dening, Tom; Craven, Michael P; Span, Marijke; Felzmann, Heike; Tsolaki, Magda; Franco-Martin, Manuel

    2017-01-16

    for researchers to include in their evaluation of assistive technologies. Based on these findings, various actions are recommended for development, usability, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, deployment, and ethics of assistive and health technologies across Europe. These include avoiding replication of technology development that is unhelpful or ineffective and focusing on how technologies succeed in addressing individual needs of persons with dementia. Furthermore, it is suggested to include these recommendations in national and international calls for funding and assistive technology research programs. Finally, practitioners, policy makers, care insurers, and care providers should work together with technology enterprises and researchers to prepare strategies for the implementation of assistive technologies in different care settings. This may help future generations of persons with dementia to utilize available and affordable technologies and, ultimately, to benefit from them. ©Franka Meiland, Anthea Innes, Gail Mountain, Louise Robinson, Henriëtte van der Roest, J Antonio García-Casal, Dianne Gove, Jochen René Thyrian, Shirley Evans, Rose-Marie Dröes, Fiona Kelly, Alexander Kurz, Dympna Casey, Dorota Szcześniak, Tom Dening, Michael P Craven, Marijke Span, Heike Felzmann, Magda Tsolaki, Manuel Franco-Martin. Originally published in JMIR Rehabilitation and Assistive Technology (http://rehab.jmir.org), 16.01.2017.

  16. Associations between the psychological health of patients and carers in advanced COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi E

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ella Mi,1 Emma Mi,1 Gail Ewing,2 Ravi Mahadeva,3 A Carole Gardener,4 Hanne Holt Butcher,4 Sara Booth,5 Morag Farquhar6 On behalf of the Living with Breathlessness Study Team 1School of Clinical Medicine, 2Centre for Family Research, University of Cambridge, 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, 4Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, 5Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, 6School of Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK Objective: Anxiety and depression are highly prevalent in patients with COPD and their informal carers, and associated with numerous risk factors. However, few studies have investigated these in primary care or the link between patient and carer anxiety and depression. We aimed to determine this association and factors associated with anxiety and depression in patients, carers, and both (dyads, in a population-based sample.Materials and methods: This was a prospective, cross-sectional study of 119 advanced COPD patients and their carers. Patient and carer scores ≥8 on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale defined symptoms of anxiety and depression, χ2 tests determined associations between patient and carer symptoms of anxiety/depression, and χ2 and independent t-tests for normally distributed variables (otherwise Mann–Whitney U tests were used to identify other variables significantly associated with these symptoms in the patient or carer. Patient–carer dyads were categorized into four groups relating to the presence of anxious/depressive symptoms in: both patient and carer, patient only, carer only, and neither. Factors associated with dyad symptoms of anxiety/depression were determined with χ2 tests and one-way analysis of variance for normally distributed variables (otherwise Kruskal–Wallis tests.Results: Prevalence of symptoms of anxiety and depression was 46.4% (n=52 and 42.9% (n=48

  17. Tracing dust in old stellar populations : the mid-infrared spectrum of globular cluster AGB stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, H.

    2010-01-01

    occupy the same area in the CMD are comparably evolved and have similar MIR-spectra. The excellent coverage of the AGB in NGC104, both photometrically and spectroscopically, allows to investigate the effect of various weighting methods like different LFs or assumptions on the frequency of TP-AGB stars in their minimum phase. In this context it is also possible to reproduce the flat dust excess and the reduced silicate domination found in early-type galaxies. For the intermediate and high metallicity groups such a study is not successful due to the limited number of spectra available in these groups. We report that all co-added MIR-spectra are dominated by a prominent dust excess due to silicate grains present in the stellar outflows. The excess increases with increasing metallicity. A future perspective of the project would be to achieve a more complete observational coverage of stars evolving up the AGB at intermediate metallicities, which would lead to a further improved understanding of the integrated MIR-spectra of old unresolved stellar populations in general. The thesis is completed by first model calculations to predict the MIR-spectrum using the wind code by H.-P. Gail. (author) [de

  18. Pulmonary Rehabilitation With Balance Training for Fall Reduction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Marla K; Brooks, Dina; Ellerton, Cindy; Lee, Annemarie; Alison, Jennifer; Camp, Pat G; Dechman, Gail; Haines, Kimberley; Harrison, Samantha L; Holland, Anne E; Marques, Alda; Moineddin, Rahim; Skinner, Elizabeth H; Spencer, Lissa; Stickland, Michael K; Xie, Feng; Goldstein, Roger S

    2017-11-20

    be returned to the research centers in prepaid envelopes each month. Secondary measures collected by a blinded assessor at baseline (pre-PR), post-PR, and 12-month follow-up will include clinical measures of balance, balance confidence, functional lower body strength, and health status. The cost-effectiveness of the intervention group compared with the control group will be evaluated using the incremental cost per number of falls averted and the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life years gained. Recruitment for the study began in January 2017 and is anticipated to be complete by December 2019. Results are expected to be available in 2020. Findings from this study will improve our understanding of the effectiveness and resource uses of tailored balance training for reducing falls in individuals with COPD. If effective, the intervention represents an opportunity to inform international guidelines and health policy for PR in individuals with COPD who are at risk of falling. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02995681; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02995681 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6ukhxgAsg). ©Marla K Beauchamp, Dina Brooks, Cindy Ellerton, Annemarie Lee, Jennifer Alison, Pat G Camp, Gail Dechman, Kimberley Haines, Samantha L Harrison, Anne E Holland, Alda Marques, Rahim Moineddin, Elizabeth H Skinner, Lissa Spencer, Michael K Stickland, Feng Xie, Roger S Goldstein. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 20.11.2017.

  19. Enhancing the health of women living with HIV: the SMART/EST Women's Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Weiss

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Stephen M Weiss1, Jonathan N Tobin2, Michael Antoni1, Gail Ironson1, Mary Ishii1, Anita Vaughn2, Andrea Cassells2, Deborah Jones1, Neil Schneiderman1, Elizabeth Brondolo3, Arthur LaPerriere1, Maria Lopez1, Olga Villar-Loubet1, Joanne Camille2, Mahendra Kumar1, J Bryan Page1, SMART/EST Women's Project Team*1University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; 2Clinical Directors Network, New York, NY, USA; 3St Johns University, Queens, NY, USA; *The SMART/EST Womens' Project Team: DeVieux J, Jean-Gilles M, Gousse Y, Alexander K, Bustamonte V, Lopez E, Casani J, Stanley H, Asthana D, Van Splunteren F, Goldstein A, Nasajon R, Wiesner Y, Zukerman M, Segal-Isaacson CJ, Romanowsky A, Masheb R, Coma C, Ubiera M, D'Andrea SM, Ittai N.Abstract: The principal objective of these multisite studies (Florida, New York, New Jersey: epicenters for human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] among women was to develop and implement effective combinations of behavioral interventions to optimize the health status of the most neglected and understudied population affected by the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS epidemic in the United States: poor women of color living with HIV. The two studies enrolled nearly 900 women randomly assigned to “high intensity” (cognitive–behavioral stress management training combined with expressive–supportive therapy [CBSM]+ group or “low intensity” (individual psychoeducational program treatment conditions over a period of 9 years. The initial study of the stress management and relaxation training/expressive–supportive therapy (SMART/EST Women's Project (SWP I focused on reducing depression and anxiety, as well as improving self-efficacy and overall quality of life for women with case-defined AIDS. Findings from this study demonstrated the utility of CBSM+ in reducing distress (depression, anxiety and denial, while improving social support, self-efficacy, coping skills, and quality of life. The second study (SWP II, which included all

  20. ارزیابی رابطه مراحل رویش دندانی و مراحل بلوغ اسکلتال به روش بررسی ستون مهره‏ های گردنی

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    شهین امامی میبدی

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available مقدمه: تعیین زمان درمان یک بخش اساسی در طرح ریزی درمان ارتودنسی است. سن اسکلتی یک شاخص استاندارد است که در تعیین زمان مناسب درمان مورد استفاده قرار می‏گیرد. از طرف دیگر برای شروع درمان، بررسی نتایج درمانی و یا مقایسه نتایج درمان زودهنگام و دیرهنگام در کلینیک، فازهای دندانی (Deciduous, Early mixed, Late mixed, Permanent مورد استفاده قرار می‏گیرند. با توجه به این موضوع و عدم وجود تحقیقات مشابه در کودکان و نوجوانان ایرانی، این تحقیق با هدف تعیین رابطه مراحل رویش دندانی و بلوغ اسکلتال در نژاد ایرانی به روش بررسی ستون مهره‏های گردنی انجام پذیرفت. مواد و روش‏ها: رادیوگرافی سفالوگرام و پانورامیک 200 بیمار شامل 100 پسر و 100 دختر مورد استفاده قرار گرفت.فازهای دندانی با روش Vander Linden و مراحل بلوغ استخوانی توسط روش بررسی ستون مهره‏های گردنیتعیین گردید. همبستگی دو روش توسط آنالیز آماری Spearman’s rho و همچنین تست‏های تشخیصی مورد بررسی قرار گرفت. یافته‏ها: همبستگی مراحل بلوغ استخوانی مهره‏های گردنی و فازهای دندانی براساس آزمون Spearman's rho، 755/0 به دست آمد که نشانگر رابطه نسبتاً قوی بین فازهای دندانی و مراحل بلوغ استخوانی مهره‏های گردنی بود (001/0P

  1. Dabartinės lietuvių kalbos priesagos -ėti denominatyviniai statyvai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurgis Pakerys

    2011-12-01

    appropriate, decent’, skanė́ti ‘to be delicious, tasty’ : skanùs ‘delicious, tasty’.Type 2 (i-stem posits some problems, because it is not always easy to prove the denominative origin of some verbs. The synchronic interpretation is usually obscured by the general tendency of Modern Lithuanian to derive deverbative u-stem adjectives from primary or secondary (the so called „mixed type“ which includes presents in -a, -ia, -i and -o beside suffixed infinitive stems verbs. The main list of less problematic cases of type 2 includes gailė́ti, gaĩl-i ‘to feel sorry, pity’ : gaĩla ‘(impers. it is a pity’, mylė́ti, mýl-i : dial., Old Lithuanian mýlas (cf. Latvian mĩlêt : mīls, mĩļš, Old Prussian milijt : mijls, Bulgarian милея, Macedonian милее beside common Slavic *milъ, šykštė́ti, šỹkšti-i ‘to be stingy’ : šykštùs ‘stingy’, viešė́ti, viė̃š-i ‘to be on a visit’ : (rare, archaic viẽšis, -ỹs ‘guest’ (cf. Latvian viêsêt(ies2 : vìesis. Problematic (at least from the synchronic point of view cases can be exemplified by tylė́ti, tỹl-i and tingė́ti, tìng-i. The first one could be deverbative in origin if we accept the comparative evidence from Slavic (OCS tьlĕti ‘modern, vergehen’, Germanic (Gothic þulan, -aiþ ‘ertragen, dulden’ and Celtic (Old Irish -tuili ‘schläft’. The second one could be denominative if Lithuanian tingùs is considered archaic based on correspondences in Slavic (*tęgъkъ, cf. OCS otęgъčiti, -ati; note also prefixed inchoative *-ē- verb otęžati ‘to become burdened’ and Germanic (Old Icelandic þungr. The list of rare verbs includes non-problematic skonė́ti, skõn-i, skomė́ti, skõm-i ‘to be delicious, tasty’ (: skõnis, skõmas ‘taste’, a lengthened grade deverbative gorė́ti, gõr-i ‘to experience a bitter taste’ (beside garė́ti, gãr-i, an etymologically unclear spulė́ti, spùl-i (denomina­tive derivation

  2. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available -James Sidbury, Peter Linebaugh ,The many-headed Hydra: Sailors, slaves, commoners, and the hidden history of the revolutionary Atlantic. Boston: Beacon Press, 2000. 433 pp., Marcus Rediker (eds -Ray A. Kea, Herbert S. Klein, The Atlantic slave trade. Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 1999. xxi + 234 pp. -Johannes Postma, P.C. Emmer, De Nederlandse slavenhandel 1500-1850. Amsterdam: De Arbeiderspers, 2000. 259 pp. -Karen Racine, Mimi Sheller, Democracy after slavery: Black publics and peasant radicalism in Haiti and Jamaica. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2001. xv + 224 pp. -Clarence V.H. Maxwell, Michael Craton ,Islanders in the stream: A history of the Bahamian people. Volume two: From the ending of slavery to the twenty-first century. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1998. xv + 562 pp., Gail Saunders (eds -César J. Ayala, Guillermo A. Baralt, Buena Vista: Life and work on a Puerto Rican hacienda, 1833-1904. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1999. xix + 183 pp. -Elizabeth Deloughrey, Thomas W. Krise, Caribbeana: An anthology of English literature of the West Indies 1657-1777. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999. xii + 358 pp. -Vera M. Kutzinski, John Gilmore, The poetics of empire: A study of James Grainger's The Sugar Cane (1764. London: Athlone Press, 2000. x + 342 pp. -Sue N. Greene, Adele S. Newson ,Winds of change: The transforming voices of Caribbean women writers and scholars. New York: Peter Lang, 1998. viii + 237 pp., Linda Strong-Leek (eds -Sue N. Greene, Mary Condé ,Caribbean women writers: Fiction in English. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999. x + 233 pp., Thorunn Lonsdale (eds -Cynthia James, Simone A. James Alexander, Mother imagery in the novels of Afro-Caribbean women. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 2001. x + 214 pp. -Efraín Barradas, John Dimitri Perivolaris, Puerto Rican cultural identity and the work of Luis Rafael Sánchez. Chapel Hill: University of North

  3. Bilimsel Toplantı Duyuruları

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adli Tıp Uzmanları Derneği ATUD

    2003-04-01

    , Croatia 2003Scientific Committee of EAICCFG dragan.primorac@st.tel.hr Tel/Fax. + + 385 1 370 4509 10. Ulusal Adli Tıp Günleri Adli Tıp Kurumu, 8-12 Ekim 2003. Aksu, Antalya İletişim: Adli Tıp Kurumu Başkanlığı34246, Esekapı, Cerrahpaşa hagritmis@hotmail.com International Society of Crimonology Thirdteenth World Congress of Criminology: Reducing Crime and promoting Justice: Challenges to Society, Policy and Practice 17-22 August, 2003, Rio de Janiero, Brasil Info: Prof. Tony Peters e-mail: tony.peters@law.kuleuven.ec.be. 19th European Congress of Pathology 6-\t11 September, 2003. Slovenia Info: Tel: +386 1 2417135 e-mail: teja.alic@cd-cc.si 8th International Congress of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring and Clinical Toxicology 7-\t11 September, 2003. Switzerland Info: ICTDMCT 2003 c/o Congress Plus GmbH, Haltingerstrasse 104, CH-4057 www.ictdmct2003.ch International Symposium on Forensic DNA Technologies 19-20 September, 2003. Münster, Germany Info: +49 -617 2679600 28th Congress of the International Academy of Law and Mental Health Sydney, Australia Information: Gail Fowler, Managinign Director, Capital Conferences, P.O. Box 253, Church Point, NSW 2105, Australia Tel: +61-2-99996577 Fax: +61-299995733 E-mail: syndey2003@ialmh.org http://www.ialmh.org/Sydney2003/ main.htm Association for Crime Scene Reconstruction Annual Workshop and Training Conference Oklahoma City, OK, USA Information: Tim Bevel, 2115 Westwod Drive, Norman, OK 73069, USA Tel: + 1-405-4474469 Fax: + 1-405-4474481 E-mail: tbevell@cox.net http://www.acsr.org 29th Annual Meeting of the Northeastern Association of Forensic Scientists Pittsfield, MA, USA Information: Jennifer F. Limoges, NEAFS President- Elect, New York State Police, Forensic Investigation Center, 1220 Washington Avenue, Bldg 30 Albany, NY 12226, USA Tel: +1-518-4570054 Fax: +1-518-4858502 E-mail: jlimoges@troopers.state.ny.us 41st Meeting of The International Association of Forensic Toxicologists (TIAFT 2003 Melmourne, Australia

  4. Bilimsel Toplantı Duyuruları

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adli Tıp Uzmanları Derneği ATUD

    2007-04-01

    Contact: Rebecca Wilson University of Tennessee E-mail: rwilson8@utk.edu North American Forensic Entomology Association Annual Conference July 11-13, 2007 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada Simon Fraser University Contact: Gail Anderson Simon Fraser University E-mail: ganderso@sfu.ca Web site: http://www.nafea.net + 1-604-291-3589 (Voice Indo-Pacific Congress on Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences of the Indo-Pacific Association of the Law, Medicine and Science (INPALMS July 22 -27, 2007 Cinnamon Grand Flotel Colombo, Sri Lanka Contact: Richard Flarruff Chief Medical Examiner Seattle, Washington E-mail: richard.harruff@metrokc.gov Web site: http://www.inpalmscolombo2007.lk/ + 1-206-731-2886 (Voice 22nd Congress of die International Society for Forensic Genetics 21 - 25August, 2007 Copenhagen, Denmark Contact: Niels Morling, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Congress Secretariat Welcome ApS, Billedvbej 4, l.sal, DK-2100 Copenhagen. Phone: +45 70 25 80 20. E-mail: info@welcomehome.dk. Web : www.isfg2007.org 5th ISABS Conference in Forensic Genetics and Molecular Anthropology September 3-7, 2007 Hotel Le Méridien Lav, Split, Croatia Contact: International Society for Applied Biological Sciences - ISABS Domobranska 21, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia Phone/Fax: ++385 1 3702 961 E-mail:info@isabs.hr The 2007 Midwestern Association of Forensic Scientists Annual Meeting September 24 - 28, 2007 Park Place Hotel in downtown Traverse City, Michigan. Contact: Guy Nutter Program Chair 248-380-1029 E-mail: NutterG@michigan.gov The 44th Congress of the European Societies of Toxicology Amsterdam 7-10 October, 2007 Contact: Eurocongres Conference Management Jan van Goyenkade 11 1075 HP Amsterdam The Netherlands http:// www.eurotox2007.org/ 2007 Annual NAME Meeting "Crime Scene Investigation:Reality (The Operations of the Medical Examiner Office in the Real World" October 12-17, 2007 Savannah Marriott Riverfront Hotel in Savannah, Contact: Mary Fran Ernst NAME Meetings

  5. Bilimsel Toplantı Duyuruları

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adli Tıp Uzmanları Derneği ATUD

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available VII. Adli Bilimler Sempozyumu 24-27 Mayıs 2007 Gaziantep, Türkiye İletişim: Yrd.Doç.Dr.Aysun Baransel Isırr Gaziantep Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi Adli Tıp Anabilim Dalı E-posta: aysunbaransel@yahoo.com Web: atud.org.tr 6th International Congress of the Baltic Medico-Legal Association 14.-16. June 2007 Vilnius - Lithuania Contact: Mykolas Romeris University Institute of Forensic Medicine S. Iukausko 12 LT-08234 Vilnius, Lithuania Tel: +370 5 278 90 48 Fax: +370 5 278 90 47 E-mail: congress@bmla2007.org Web: www.bmla2007.org m Mediterranean Academy of Forensic Sciences Congress V Latin-American Congress of Medical Law m Iberian Congress of Legal Medicine 21-23 June 2007 Porto, Portugal Contact: Instituto Nacional de Medicina Legal Delegaçâo do Porto Jardim Carrilho Videira 4050-167 Porto, Portugal Phone: +351 22 2073850 Fax:\t+351 22 2083978 e-mail: portocongresses2007@dpinml.mj.pt Web: www.inml.mj.pt/portocongresses2007 Human Identification: Laboratory Methods in Forensic Anthropology July 9-14, 2007 Forensic Anthropology Center University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee Contact: Rebecca Wilson University of Tennessee E-mail: rwilson8@utk.edu North American Forensic Entomology Association Annual Conference July 11-13, 2007 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada Simon Fraser University Contact: Gail Anderson Simon Fraser University E-mail: ganderso@sfu.ca Web site: http://www.nafea.net + 1-604-291-3589 (Voice Indo-Pacific Congress on Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences of the Indo-Pacific Association of the Law, Medicine and Science (INPALMS July 22 -27, 2007 Cinnamon Grand Hotel Colombo, Sri Lanka Contact: Richard Harruff Chief Medical Examiner Seattle, Washington E-mail: richard.harruff@metrokc.gov Web site: http://www.inpalmscolombo2007.lk/ + 1-206-731-2886 Advanced Death Investigation Masters 12 Conference July 23-26, 2007 St. Louis University School of Medicine Division of Forensic Pathology St. Louis, Missouri Contact: Julie Howe

  6. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    1994-07-01

    Halebsky ,Cuba in transition: Crisis and transformation. With Carolee Bengelsdorf, Richard L. Harris, Jean Stubbs & Andrew Zimbalist. Boulder CO: Westview, 1992. xi + 244 pp., John M. Kirk (eds -Michiel Baud, Andrés L. Mateo, Mito y cultura en la era de Trujillo. Santo Domingo: Librería La Trinitario/Instituto del Libro, 1993. 224 pp. -Edgardo Meléndez, Andrés Serbin, Medio ambiente, seguridad y cooperacíon regional en el Caribe. Caracas: Editorial Nueva Sociedad, 1992. 147 pp. -Dean W. Collinwood, Michael Craton ,Islanders in the stream: A history of the Bahamian people. Volume One: From Aboriginal times to the end of slavery. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1992. xxxiii + 455 pp., Gail Saunders (eds -Gary Brana-Shute, Alan A. Block, Masters of paradise: Organized crime and the internal revenue service in the Bahamas. New Brunswick NJ: Transaction Publishers, 1991. vii + 319 pp. -Michaeline Crichlow, Patrick Bryan, The Jamaican people 1880-1902. London: Macmillan Caribbean, 1991. xiv + 300 pp. -Faye V Harrison, Lisa Douglass, The power of sentiment: Love, hierarchy, and the Jamaican family elite. Boulder CO: Westview, 1992. xviii + 298 pp. -Frank Jan van Dijk, Bob Marley, Songs of freedom: From 'Judge Not' to 'Redemption Song.' Kingston: Tuff Gong/Bob Marley Foundation / London : Island Records, 1992 (limited edition. 63 pp. + 4 compact discs. -Riva Berleant-Schiller, Veront M. Satchell, From plots to plantations: Land transactions in Jamaica, 1866-1900. Mona: University of the West Indies, 1990. xiii + 197 pp. -Hymie Rubenstein, Christine Barrow, Family, land and development in St. Lucia. Cave Hill, Barbados: Institute for social and economic studies (ISER, University of the West Indies, 1992. xii + 83 pp. -Bonham C. Richardson, Selwyn Ryan, Social and occupational stratification in contemporary Trinidad and Tobago. St. Augustine, Trinidad: ISER, 1991. xiv + 474 pp. -Bill Maurer, Roland Littlewood, Pathology and identity: The work of Mother Earth in Trinidad

  7. Assessment and management of dead-wood habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagar, Joan

    2007-01-01

    ; Marcot, 2003). For example, by puncturing bark and fragmenting sapwood, woodpeckers create sites favorable for wood-decaying organisms (Farris et al., 2004), which in turn create habitat for other species and facilitate nutrient cycling. Small mammals that use down wood for cover function in the dispersal of plant seeds and fungal spores (Carey et al., 1999). Resident cavitynesting birds may regulate insect populations by preying on overwintering arthropods (Jackson, 1979; Kroll and Fleet, 1979). These examples illustrate how dead wood not only directly provides habitat for a large number of wildlife species, but also forms the foundation of functional webs that critically influence forest ecosystems (Marcot, 2002; Marcot, 2003). The important and far-reaching implications of management of decaying wood highlight the need for conservation of dead-wood resources in managed forests. Consideration of the key ecological functions of species associated with dead wood can help guide management of dead wood in a framework consistent with the paradigm of ecosystem management (Marcot and Vander Heyden, 2001; Marcot, 2002.) As more information is revealed about the ecological and habitat values of decaying wood, concern has increased over a reduction in the current amounts of dead wood relative to historic levels (Ohmann and Waddell, 2002). Past management practices have tended to severely reduce amounts of dead wood throughout all stages of forest development (Hansen et al., 1991). The large amounts of legacy wood that characterize young post-disturbance forests are not realized in managed stands, because most of the wood volume is removed at harvest for economic and safety reasons. Mid-rotation thinning is used to “salvage” some mortality that might otherwise occur due to suppression, so fewer snags are recruited in mid-seral stages. Harvest rotations of 80 years or less truncate tree size in managed stands, and thus limit the production of large-diameter wood. As a

  8. BOOK REVIEW: Case Studies in Knowledge Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Dr. Adnan BOYACI

    2005-10-01

    In the fourth chapter, Gail Corbitt discussesdefinition identification and the transfer of the core competencies associated with thesplit to all employees who need to have them when HP splits into HP and AgilentSection three explores the importance of a KM strategy in the implementation of a KMinitiative. In chapter five, Afsoun Hatami and Robert D. Galliers discuss long term impactsof knowledge (re use and organizational memory on effectiveness of strategic decisions.Suzanne Zyngier, Frada Burstein, and Judy McKay, in chapter six discusses governancestrategies to manage organizational knowledge in Australia’s Science and TechnologyDevelopment Organization. In chapter seven, Summer E. Bartczak and Ellen C. Englanddiscuss the issues and challenges in developing KM strategy for the United States’ AirForce Material Command’s.In section four, the use of KM in the support of projects and project management arediscussed. Elayne Coakes, Anton Bradburn, and Cathy Blake, in chapter eight discuss thetopic ‘KM in a projects-t climate’. Under this topic, they mainly focus on using of KM tominimize mischance by promoting best practices in the British construction firm TaylorWoodrow In chapter nine, Jill Owen and Frada Burstein look at where knowledge residesin an Australian consulting firm and how the firm uses this knowledge to improve projectperformance. This case study highlights the importance of understanding the drivers ofknowledge transfer and reuse in the projects.In section five KM in support of knowledge transfer is explored and discussed. Zhang Li,Tian Yezhuang, and Li Ping, in chapter ten, focus on the effect of knowledge sharing inthe process of enterprise resource planning (ERP system implementation in a Chinesemanufacturing firm. Thomas Hahn, Bernhard Schmiedinger, and Elisabeth Stephan, inchapter eleven, discuss the use of communities of practice and other techniques toimprove the transfer of knowledge in and between Austrian small and medium

  9. Chiral Dynamics 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohammad W.; Gao, Haiyan; Weller, Henry R.; Holstein, Barry

    2007-10-01

    effects in hyperon semileptonic decays from lattice QCD / S. Simula. Uncertainty bands for chiral extrapolations / B.U. Musch. Update of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors / C. B. Crawford. N and N to ? transition from factors from lattice QCD / C. Alexandrou. The [equation] transition at low Q2 and the pionic contribution / S. Stave. Strange Quark CoNtributions to the form factors of the nucleon / F. Benmokhtar. Dynamical polarizabilities of the nucleon / B. Pasquini. Hadron magnetic moments and polarizabilities in lattice QCD / F.X. Lee. Spin-dependent compton scattering from 3He and the neutron spin polarizabilities / H. Gao. Chiral dynamics from Dyson-Schwinger equations / C.D. Roberts. Radiative neutron [Beta symbol]-decay in effective field theory / S. Gardner. Comparison between different renormalization schemes for co-variant BChPT / T.A. Gail. Non-perturbative study of the light pseudoscalar masses in chiral dynamics / José Antonio Oller. Masses and widths of hadrons in nuclear matter / M. Kotulla. Chiral effective field theory at finite density / R.J. Furnstahl. The K-nuclear interaction: a search fro deeply bound K-nuclear clusters / P. Camerini. Moments of GPDs from lattice QCD / D.G. Richards. Generalized parton distributions in effective field theory / J.W. Chen. Near-threshold pion production: experimental update / M.W. Ahmed. Pion photoproduction near threshold theory update / L. Tiator.

  10. Effectiveness of professional oral health care intervention on the oral health of residents with dementia in residential aged care facilities: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi Mohammadi, Joanna Jin; Franks, Kay; Hines, Sonia

    2015-10-01

    . Statistically significant differences in mean dental and denture plaque scores at six months in both groups occurred (student t-test, p effects of this intervention are unknown. Further studies exploring the long-term effects of staff training on oral health education are needed as well as ongoing staff training in aged care facilities.A systematic review on oral health and aspiration pneumonia conducted by Vander Maarel-Wierink et al. has suggested that, in the frail elderly, the best intervention to reduce the incidence of aspiration pneumonia is brushing of teeth after each meal, cleaning dentures once a day, and receiving professional oral health care once a week.The need to advocate for a new model of geriatric dentistry is critical. A holistic multi-disciplinary approach to health care for residents entering aged care homes is imperative to achieve better oral health and comfort for residents, especially with Australia's ageing dentate population. A dental examination and assessment on admission to a RACF should be conducted by a Registered Nurse (RN), followed by an oral health professional such as a dentist, dental hygienist or oral health therapist. Current practice in the majority of Australian government funded nursing homes is that the RN or the Assistant in Nursing (AIN) conduct the oral health assessment as part of the aged care funding instrument (ACFI). Ongoing oral health care supported by an oral health professional is important throughout the individual's residency and eventual palliation whilst in an aged care facility.No systematic reviews conducted on the impact of professional oral care on the oral health of elderly people living in residential aged care facilities could be located, despite extensive searching of Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Central Register of Trials and Dentistry & Oral Sciences Source (DOSS) databases. A JBI systematic review was conducted in 2004, titled, "Oral hygiene care for adults with dementia in residential

  11. {Data and metadata schemes in chains of direct and inverse problems in spectroscopy of water} A.Fazliev (1), A.Kozodoev (1), N.Lavrentiev (1), A.Privezentsev (1), J.Tennyson (2) (1) Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS, Tomsk, Russia, (2) University Col

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazliev, A.

    2009-04-01

    file of columnar structure with fixed columns width and should contain a set of nonrepeatable entities in a row. All the lines in this file should be of identical structure. In the given system data upload and adjusting for the organization of results of solution of a definite task of a chain in domain database is actualized by application programmer. An XML-scheme is created for each task. This scheme describes the structure of uploaded data as well as some constraints on the values. A list of molecular spectroscopy concepts was created by a knowledge engineer. Basing on this list data scheme of each task was formulated. A menu that defines a sequence of user operations in the process of data input was created. The scripts (PHP) that implement these operations were developed. REFERENCES L.S. Rothman, D. Jacquemart, A. Barbe, D.Chris Benner, M. Birk, L.R. Brown, M.R. Carleer, C. Chackerian, Jr, K. Chance, V. Dana, V.M. Devi, J.-M. Flaud, R.R. Gamache, A. Goldman, J.-M. Hartmann, K.W. Jucks, A.G. Maki, J.-Y. Mandin, S.T. Massie, J. Orphal, A. Perrin, C.P. Rinsland, M.A.H. Smith, J. Tennyson, R.N. Tolchenov, R.A. Toth, J. Vander Auwera, P. Varanasi, G. Wagner, The HITRAN 2004 Molecular Spectroscopic Database, Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 96 (2005) 139-204, Data bank HITRAN, http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/hitran/ Geisa, http://ether.ipsl.jussieu.fr/ Internet-accessible information system "Spectroscopy of Atmospheric Gases", http://spectra.iao.ru A.D.Bykov, A.Z. Fazliev, N.N.Filippov, A.V. Kozodoev, A.I.Privezentsev, L.N.Sinitsa, M.V.Tonkov and M.Yu.Tretyakov, Distributed information system on atmospheric spectroscopy, Geophysical Research Abstracts, SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU2007-A-01906, 2007, v. 9, p. 01906. A.V. Kozodoev. A.I.Prevezentsev, A.Z. Fazliev Annotation of information resources in "Molecular spectroscopy" distributed information system, Electronic Libraries, 2006, Ch.9, ver.3 (in Russian) http

  12. PREFACE: Physics-Based Mathematical Models for Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, Lok C. Lew Yan; Melnik, Roderick; Willatzen, Morten

    2008-03-01

    -Foreman correction) coupled to strain and piezoelectric potential calculation. In its turn, in its general setting the problem of strain and piezoelectric potential calculation requires the solution of a nonlinear system of partial differential equation. A large experience in solving these two parts of the problem separately, independently of each other, has been already accumulated in the distinct communities of the researchers. This BIRS workshop effectively combined expertise of these research communities, summarized the state-of-the-art for modeling LDSNs and key challenges facing these communities, and explored ways to address those challenges in interdisciplinary team settings. The workshop brought together researchers working on different aspects of the analysis and modeling of LDSNs which require a concerted efforts of teams of researchers with close interactions between applied and pure mathematicians, physicists (theoreticians and experimentalists), computational scientists, and engineers. These scientific and engineering communities were represented in Banff by the researchers from Japan, Canada, the USA, Russia, France, Denmark, Germany, and the UK (further details can be found at http://www.m2netlab.wlu.ca/ldsn-banff/). We had four main plenary talks of one hour duration that gave state-of-the-art overviews of the subject from perspectives of applied mathematics (Professor Russel Caflisch of the University of California at Los Angeles), physics (Professor Antti-Pekka Jauho of the Danish Technical University), and computational science and engineering communities (Professor Gerhard Klimeck of Purdue University), as well as from a point of view of experimentalists (Dr Gail Brown of the Materials Lab/Air Force Research Lab at Wright-Patterson AFB). These talks helped identify the areas where joint efforts needed to be directed to, and they set up the scene for further work during the workshop, including discussions at the workshop open problem sessions. All participants

  13. Preface: SciDAC 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Rick

    2008-07-01

    scenes an enormous amount of work is required to make a large conference go smoothly. First I thank Cheryl Zidel for her tireless efforts as organizing committee liaison and posters chair and, in general, handling all of my end of the program and keeping me calm. I also thank Gail Pieper for her work in editing the proceedings, Beth Cerny Patino for her work on the Organizing Committee website and electronic theater, and Ken Raffenetti for his work in keeping that website working. Jon Bashor and John Hules did an excellent job in handling conference communications. I thank Caitlin Youngquist for the striking graphic design; Dan Fay for tutorials arrangements; and Lynn Dory, Suzanne Stevenson, Sarah Pebelske and Sarah Zidel for on-site registration and conference support. We all owe Yeen Mankin an extra-special thanks for choosing the hotel, handling contracts, arranging menus, securing venues, and reassuring the chair that everything was under control. We are pleased to have obtained corporate sponsorship from Cray, IBM, Intel, HP, and SiCortex. I thank all the speakers and panel presenters. I also thank the former conference chairs Tony Metzzacappa, Bill Tang, and David Keyes, who were never far away for advice and encouragement. Finally, I offer my thanks to Michael Strayer, without whose leadership, vision, and persistence the SciDAC program would not have come into being and flourished. I am honored to be part of his program and his friend. Rick Stevens Seattle, Washington July 18, 2008

  14. 12th WINFOCUS world congress on ultrasound in emergency and critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Yahya; Tezel, Onur; Salman, Necati; Cevik, Erdem; Algaba-Montes, Margarita; Oviedo-García, Alberto; Patricio-Bordomás, Mayra; Mahmoud, Mustafa Z; Sulieman, Abdelmoneim; Ali, Abbas; Mustafa, Alrayah; Abdelrahman, Ihab; Bahar, Mustafa; Ali, Osama; Lester Kirchner, H; Prosen, Gregor; Anzic, Ajda; Leeson, Paul; Bahreini, Maryam; Rasooli, Fatemeh; Hosseinnejad, Houman; Blecher, Gabriel; Meek, Robert; Egerton-Warburton, Diana; Ćuti, Edina Ćatić; Belina, Stanko; Vančina, Tihomir; Kovačević, Idriz; Rustemović, Nadan; Chang, Ikwan; Lee, Jin Hee; Kwak, Young Ho; Kim, Do Kyun; Cheng, Chi-Yung; Pan, Hsiu-Yung; Kung, Chia-Te; Ćurčić, Ela; Pritišanac, Ena; Planinc, Ivo; Medić, Marijana Grgić; Radonić, Radovan; Fasina, Abiola; Dean, Anthony J; Panebianco, Nova L; Henwood, Patricia S; Fochi, Oliviero; Favarato, Moreno; Bonanomi, Ezio; Tomić, Ivan; Ha, Youngrock; Toh, Hongchuen; Harmon, Elizabeth; Chan, Wilma; Baston, Cameron; Morrison, Gail; Shofer, Frances; Hua, Angela; Kim, Sharon; Tsung, James; Gunaydin, Isa; Kekec, Zeynep; Ay, Mehmet Oguzhan; Kim, Jinjoo; Kim, Jinhyun; Choi, Gyoosung; Shim, Dowon; Lee, Ji-Han; Ambrozic, Jana; Prokselj, Katja; Lucovnik, Miha; Simenc, Gabrijela Brzan; Mačiulienė, Asta; Maleckas, Almantas; Kriščiukaitis, Algimantas; Mačiulis, Vytautas; Macas, Andrius; Mohite, Sharad; Narancsik, Zoltan; Možina, Hugon; Nikolić, Sara; Hansel, Jan; Petrovčič, Rok; Mršić, Una; Orlob, Simon; Lerchbaumer, Markus; Schönegger, Niklas; Kaufmann, Reinhard; Pan, Chun-I; Wu, Chien-Hung; Pasquale, Sarah; Doniger, Stephanie J; Yellin, Sharon; Chiricolo, Gerardo; Potisek, Maja; Drnovšek, Borut; Leskovar, Boštjan; Robinson, Kristine; Kraft, Clara; Moser, Benjamin; Davis, Stephen; Layman, Shelley; Sayeed, Yusef; Minardi, Joseph; Pasic, Irmina Sefic; Dzananovic, Amra; Pasic, Anes; Zubovic, Sandra Vegar; Hauptman, Ana Godan; Brajkovic, Ana Vujaklija; Babel, Jaksa; Peklic, Marina; Radonic, Vedran; Bielen, Luka; Ming, Peh Wee; Yezid, Nur Hafiza; Mohammed, Fatahul Laham; Huda, Zainal Abidin; Ismail, Wan Nasarudin Wan; Isa, W Yus Haniff W; Fauzi, Hashairi; Seeva, Praveena; Mazlan, Mohd Zulfakar

    2016-09-01

    veterans: a retrospective analysis from the first Croatian veteran's hospitalEdina Ćatić Ćuti, Stanko Belina, Tihomir Vančina, Idriz KovačevićA15 The challenge of AAA: unusual case of obstructive jaundiceEdina Ćatić Ćuti, Nadan RustemovićA16 Educational effectiveness of easy-made new simulator model for ultrasound-guided procedures in pediatric patients: vascular access and foreign body managementIkwan Chang, Jin Hee Lee, Young Ho Kwak, Do Kyun KimA17 Detection of uterine rupture by point-of-care ultrasound at emergency department: a case reportChi-Yung Cheng, Hsiu-Yung Pan, Chia-Te KungA18 Abdominal probe in the hands of interns as a relevant diagnostic tool in revealing the cause of heart failureEla Ćurčić, Ena Pritišanac, Ivo Planinc, Marijana Grgić Medić, Radovan RadonićA19 Needs assessment of the potential utility of point-of-care ultrasound within the Zanzibar health systemAbiola Fasina, Anthony J. Dean, Nova L. Panebianco, Patricia S. HenwoodA20 Ultrasonographic diagnosis of tracheal compressionOliviero Fochi, Moreno Favarato, Ezio BonanomiA21 The role of ultrasound in the detection of lung infiltrates in critically ill patients: a pilot studyMarijana Grgić Medić, Ivan Tomić, Radovan RadonićA22 The SAFER Lasso; a novel approach using point-of-care ultrasound to evaluate patients with abdominal complaints in the emergency departmentYoungrock Ha, Hongchuen TohA23 Awareness and use of clinician-performed ultrasound among clinical clerkship facultyElizabeth Harmon, Wilma Chan, Cameron Baston, Gail Morrison, Frances Shofer, Nova Panebianco, Anthony J. DeanA24 Clinical outcomes in the use of lung ultrasound for the diagnosis of pediatric pneumoniasAngela Hua, Sharon Kim, James TsungA25 Effectiveness of ultrasound in hypotensive patientsIsa Gunaydin, Zeynep Kekec, Mehmet Oguzhan AyA26 Moderate-to-severe left ventricular ejection fraction related to short-term mortality of patients with post-cardiac arrest syndrome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

  15. From Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dear TOJDE Readers, Welcome to the Volume 14 Number: 2 of TOJDE! In this issue, 3 Notes for Editor, 2 Book Reviews and 21 articles of 40 authors from 14 different countries around the world have been published. These published articles are arrived to the TOJDE from Argentina, Australia, Bosnia Hersek, Egypt, India, Malaysia, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Tanzania, Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Emirate and USA. The 1st Notes for Editor is arrived from USA and written by Gail D. CARUTH, Department of Educational Leadership Texas A&M University and Donald L. CARUTH Texas USA, from Independent Management Consultant, on “Understanding Resistance To Change: A Challenge For Universities”. This paper explores organizational change and the challenge it poses for universities. Because universities are slow to change due to maintaining a balance of tradition and change successful implementation of change will continue to be a challenge both now and in the future. The challenge of change is real but the task is not impossible. Historically, universities have met the challenges that faced them, they must be prepared to confront this challenge too. The 2nd Notes for Editor is arrived from UAE, in the context of “iPAD LEARNING ECOSYSTEM: Developing Challenge-Based Learning using Design Thinking” which iritten by Catalina MARIN, Jace HARGIS and Cathy CAVANAUGH,HCT ADWC, Abu Dhabi, UAE. This article describes the course design, which was grounded in design thinking, and provides an overview of the pilot implementation of the course. The course achieved its goals to a great extent in that learners felt that they were beginning to help build a better college community by sharing stories of their learning experience and their insights about the essential question they chose with other students and with other teachers. Third Notes for Editor titled as “ Use of Distance Education By Chritian religion to Train Edify and Educate Adherents” and written by Dr. P

  16. From The Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2013-01-01

    Satisfaction of Students In E-Learning”, written by Levent CALLI, from Sakarya University, Faculty of Computer and Informatics, Department of Information Systems, Cem BALCIKANLI, from Gazi University, Gazi Faculty of Education, Foreign Languages Teaching Department, English Language Teaching Program, Ankara, Fatih CALLI , Halil Ibrahim CEBECI and Msc. Omer Faruk SEYMEN from Sakarya University, Computer and Information Sciences Faculty, Information Sciences Department, Sakarya Universitesi sakarya. This paper set out to investigate the effects of several variables on the learning processes of 930 e-learning students in the Sakarya University distance learning program. The findings of the research indicated that factors perceived playfulness, perceived ease of use and Multimedia Content Effectiveness Had A Significant Effect On Perceived Usefulness. The 9h article is titled as “GRADE INFLATION: An Issue for Higher Education?”. Written by Donald L. CARUTH, as coresponding author, Independent Management Consultant Rockwall, Texas and Gail D. CARUTH, Department of Educational Leadership, Texas A&M University-Commerce, Texas USA. This paper aims to evaluate students more accurately; universities must identify the problems in grading and grading practices. Once this is accomplished new practices can be designed and policies implemented. The 10th article from Malaysia has written on Effective Learning Interaction As A Prerequisite To Successful Open Distance Learning (ODL: A Case Study of Learners In The Northern State of Kedah And Perlis, Malaysia”. Written by Hisham DZAKIRIA, Azilah KASIM, Abdul Halim MOHAMED and Anne Althea CHRISTOPHER, from Universiti Utara Malaysia, MALAYSIA. This paper looks at the issue of interactivity as reported in this research on students’ perspectives and experiences of ODL programs in the northern part of Malaysia. The study supported the widely held belief that a high level of interaction is desirable in ODL environment and positively affects

  17. Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    -Learning”, written by Levent CALLI, from Sakarya University, Faculty of Computer and Informatics, Department of Information Systems, Cem BALCIKANLI, from Gazi University, Gazi Faculty of Education, Foreign Languages Teaching Department, English Language Teaching Program, Ankara, Fatih CALLI , Halil Ibrahim CEBECI and Msc. Omer Faruk SEYMEN from Sakarya University, Computer and Information Sciences Faculty, Information Sciences Department, Sakarya Universitesi sakarya. This paper set out to investigate the effects of several variables on the learning processes of 930 e-learning students in the Sakarya University distance learning program. The findings of the research indicated that factors perceived playfulness, perceived ease of use and Multimedia Content Effectiveness Had A Significant Effect On Perceived Usefulness.The 9h article is titled as “GRADE INFLATION: An Issue for Higher Education?”. Written by Donald L. CARUTH, as coresponding author, Independent Management Consultant Rockwall, Texas and Gail D. CARUTH, Department of Educational Leadership, Texas A&M University-Commerce, Texas USA. This paper aims to evaluate students more accurately; universities must identify the problems in grading and grading practices. Once this is accomplished new practices can be designed and policies implemented.The 10th article from Malaysia has written on Effective Learning Interaction As A Prerequisite To Successful Open Distance Learning (ODL: A Case Study of Learners In The Northern State of Kedah And Perlis, Malaysia”. Written by Hisham DZAKIRIA, Azilah KASIM, Abdul Halim MOHAMED and Anne Althea CHRISTOPHER, from Universiti Utara Malaysia, MALAYSIA. This paper looks at the issue of interactivity as reported in this research on students’ perspectives and experiences of ODL programs in the northern part of Malaysia. The study supported the widely held belief that a high level of interaction is desirable in ODL environment and positively affects the learning experiences. This study

  18. From the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2013-10-01

    Sought Africa, “Linking Emotional Intelligence t Achieve Technology Enhanced Learning In Higher Education” nd written by dr. Janette kruger and prof. Dr. A. Seugnet bliignaut. This research explores and describes links between emotional intelligence and faculty’s ability to cope with new learning technologies. The purposive sampling comprised ten participants who completed a set of e-activities. A mixed methods approach triangulated the findings which provided insight into the coping tactics participants used to accomplish tel for odl. Five trends emerged: perception of adequate ability, cognitive decision making; perception of stressful situations; emotional disclosure; and social networking. Although the study identified links between emotional intelligence and coping strategies, the interdependency of coping strategies and emotional intelligence remains elusive. The 8th article is titled as “THE IMPACT OF DISTANCE EDUCATION On HigHER EUCATION: A Case Study of the United States”, written by Gail D. CARUTH (Corresponding Author, Department of Educational Leadership Texas A&M University-Commerce, Commerce, Texas USA and Donald L. CARUTH Independent Management Consultant, Texas USA. This study used a qualitative case study approach to examine the research to determine the impact of distance education on higher education in the United States. This look into the impact of distance education is significant to higher education because informed knowledge of the impact will provide insight into the effects of overall education in the United States. The researchers asked the following two exploratory questions: What happened during the evolution of distance education in the United States? What themes emerged over time? The findings suggested that the impact of distance education on higher education in the United States has been change. It can be anticipated that in the future changes will continue to occur. Consequently, higher education has to be prepared to teach

  19. From Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2013-10-01

    Sought Africa, “Linking Emotional Intelligence t Achieve Technology Enhanced Learning In Higher Education” nd written by dr. Janette kruger and prof. Dr. A. Seugnet bliignaut. This research explores and describes links between emotional intelligence and faculty’s ability to cope with new learning technologies. The purposive sampling comprised ten participants who completed a set of e-activities. A mixed methods approach triangulated the findings which provided insight into the coping tactics participants used to accomplish tel for odl. Five trends emerged: perception of adequate ability, cognitive decision making; perception of stressful situations; emotional disclosure; and social networking. Although the study identified links between emotional intelligence and coping strategies, the interdependency of coping strategies and emotional intelligence remains elusive. The 8th article is titled as “THE IMPACT OF DISTANCE EDUCATION On HigHER EUCATION: A Case Study of the United States”, written by Gail D. CARUTH (Corresponding Author, Department of Educational Leadership Texas A&M University-Commerce, Commerce, Texas USA and Donald L. CARUTH Independent Management Consultant, Texas USA. This study used a qualitative case study approach to examine the research to determine the impact of distance education on higher education in the United States. This look into the impact of distance education is significant to higher education because informed knowledge of the impact will provide insight into the effects of overall education in the United States. The researchers asked the following two exploratory questions: What happened during the evolution of distance education in the United States? What themes emerged over time? The findings suggested that the impact of distance education on higher education in the United States has been change. It can be anticipated that in the future changes will continue to occur. Consequently, higher education has to be prepared to teach