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Sample records for vancomycin-resistant enterococcus methicillin-resistant

  1. Design and synthesis of benzenesulfonanilides active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus.

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    Namba, Kensuke; Zheng, Xiaoxia; Motoshima, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Hidetomo; Tai, Akihiro; Takahashi, Eizo; Sasaki, Kenji; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Kakuta, Hiroki

    2008-06-01

    Vancomycin is mainly used as an antibacterial agent of last resort, but recently vancomycin-resistant bacterial strains have been emerging. Although new antimicrobials have been developed in order to overcome drug-resistant bacteria, many are structurally complex beta-lactams or quinolones. In this study, we aimed to create new anti-drug-resistance antibacterials which can be synthesized in a few steps from inexpensive starting materials. Since sulfa drugs function as p-aminobenzoic acid mimics and inhibit dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) in the folate pathway, we hypothesized that sulfa derivatives would act as folate metabolite-mimics and inhibit bacterial folate metabolism. Screening of our sulfonanilide libraries, including benzenesulfonanilide-type cyclooxygenase-1-selective inhibitors, led us to discover benzenesulfonanilides with potent anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)/vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) activity, that is, N-3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl-3,5-dichlorobenzenesulfonanilide (16b) [MIC=0.5microg/mL (MRSA), 1.0microg/mL (VRE)], and 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)-N-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)benzenesulfonanilide (16c) [MIC=0.5microg/mL (MRSA), 1.0microg/mL (VRE)]. These compounds are more active than vancomycin [MIC=2.0microg/mL (MRSA), 125microg/mL (VRE)], but do not possess an amino group, which is essential for DHPS inhibition by sulfa drugs. These results suggested that the mechanism of antibacterial action of compounds 16b and 16c is different from that of sulfa drugs. We also confirmed the activity of these compounds against clinical isolates of Gram-positive bacteria.

  2. [Study of marine actinomycetes isolated from the central coast of Peru and their antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis].

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    León, Jorge; Aponte, Juan José; Rojas, Rosario; Cuadra, D'Lourdes; Ayala, Nathaly; Tomás, Gloria; Guerrero, Marco

    2011-06-01

    To determine the antimicrobial potential of marine actinomycetes against drug-resistant pathogens represented by strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE). Strains of actinomycetes (29) isolated from marine sediment were evaluated by their characteristics in two culture media and by testing their inhibitory capacity by in vitro antagonism against multi-drug resistant (MDR) pathogenic bacteria for MRSA and VRE. Organic extracts of 3 selected actinomicetes were processed to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the active compound. Most isolated actinomycetes belong to a homogeneous group of write-gray actinomycetes with a good growth in Marine Agar. The inhibitory rates of the isolates were above 85% for both pathogens with inhibition zones greater than 69 and 78 mm in diameter for MRSA and VRE respectively. Dichloromethane extracts of 3 isolates (I-400A, B1-T61, M10-77) showed strong inhibitory activity of both pathogens, M10-77 being the highest actinomycete strain with antibiotic activity against methicillin-resistant S. aureus ATCC 43300 and vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis ATCC 51299 with a minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 7.9 and 31.7 μg/ml respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of M10-77 strain showed 99% similarity with the marine species Streptomyces erythrogriseus. Marine sediments of the central coast of Peru, are a source of actinomycetes strains showing high capacity to produce bioactive compounds able to inhibit pathogens classified as multi-drug-resistant such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis.

  3. Reduction in hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus with daily chlorhexidine gluconate bathing for medical inpatients.

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    Lowe, Christopher F; Lloyd-Smith, Elisa; Sidhu, Baljinder; Ritchie, Gordon; Sharma, Azra; Jang, Willson; Wong, Anna; Bilawka, Jennifer; Richards, Danielle; Kind, Thomas; Puddicombe, David; Champagne, Sylvie; Leung, Victor; Romney, Marc G

    2017-03-01

    Daily bathing with chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) is increasingly used in intensive care units to prevent hospital-associated infections, but limited evidence exists for noncritical care settings. A prospective crossover study was conducted on 4 medical inpatient units in an urban, academic Canadian hospital from May 1, 2014-August 10, 2015. Intervention units used CHG over a 7-month period, including a 1-month wash-in phase, while control units used nonmedicated soap and water bathing. Rates of hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) colonization or infection were the primary end point. Hospital-associated S. aureus were investigated for CHG resistance with a qacA/B and smr polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and agar dilution. Compliance with daily CHG bathing was 58%. Hospital-associated MRSA and VRE was decreased by 55% (5.1 vs 11.4 cases per 10,000 inpatient days, P = .04) and 36% (23.2 vs 36.0 cases per 10,000 inpatient days, P = .03), respectively, compared with control cohorts. There was no significant difference in rates of hospital-associated Clostridium difficile. Chlorhexidine resistance testing identified 1 isolate with an elevated minimum inhibitory concentration (8 µg/mL), but it was PCR negative. This prospective pragmatic study to assess daily bathing for CHG on inpatient medical units was effective in reducing hospital-associated MRSA and VRE. A critical component of CHG bathing on medical units is sustained and appropriate application, which can be a challenge to accurately assess and needs to be considered before systematic implementation. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Frecuencia de aislamiento de Staphylococcus spp meticilina resistentes y Enterococcus spp vancomicina resistentes en hospitales de Cuba Frequency of methicilline-resistant Staphylococcus spp and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp isolates in Cuban hospitals

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    Leonora González Mesa

    2005-12-01

    Cuba , there was no updated data either on the rate of infection by methicilline-resistant Staphylococcus spp or on the circulation of this germ in the community; neither are there reports on vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp presence. In this study, 774 strains collected from hospitals in the country were analyzed. The mechanism of resistance was determined by the methods suggested in the NCCLS guidelines. The 9.3 % (23 and 4.0 % (7 of S. aureus isolates from the hospitals and the community respectively were methicilline-resistant carriers of mecA gen whereas 69.9 %(72 of negative Staphylococcus coagulase isolates showed resistance to oxacillin. Also, a vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp-carrying strain was detected. Our results revealed that in Cuba the methicilline-resistant S. aureus is not a problem neither at hospitals nor at the community setting. Despite the fact that the circulation of these germs in the community setting and also the circulation of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp at hospital setting have been reported for the first time, their frequency is very low as a consequence of the advances in the implementation of policies aimed at a more rational use and consumption of antibiotics.

  5. Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathe, Mathias; Kristensen, Lise; Ellermann-Eriksen, Svend

    2010-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have emerged to become a significant nosocomial pathogen. However, detection may be challenging and treatment possibilities are limited. Reports of resistance to linezolide, daptomycin and tigecycline underline the need for reliable susceptibility testing...... excellent in vitro activity towards all isolates. For daptomycin and tigecycline, the overall agreement between BMD and Etest was suboptimal. For both disc diffusion assays, use of current break points was inadequate to detect vancomycin resistance for isolates carrying the vanB gene. Inspection...

  6. A Discrete Event Simulation Model of Patient Flow in a General Hospital Incorporating Infection Control Policy for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus (VRE).

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    Shenoy, Erica S; Lee, Hang; Ryan, Erin E; Hou, Taige; Walensky, Rochelle P; Ware, Winston; Hooper, David C

    2018-02-01

    Hospitalized patients are assigned to available staffed beds based on patient acuity and services required. In hospitals with double-occupancy rooms, patients must be additionally matched by gender. Patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) must be bedded in single-occupancy rooms or cohorted with other patients with similar MRSA/VRE flags. We developed a discrete event simulation (DES) model of patient flow through an acute care hospital. Patients are matched to beds based on acuity, service, gender, and known MRSA/VRE colonization. Outcomes included time to bed arrival, length of stay, patient-bed acuity mismatches, occupancy, idle beds, acuity-related transfers, rooms with discordant MRSA/VRE colonization, and transmission due to discordant colonization. Observed outcomes were well-approximated by model-generated outcomes for time-to-bed arrival (6.7 v. 6.2 to 6.5 h) and length of stay (3.3 v. 2.9 to 3.0 days), with overlapping 90% coverage intervals. Patient-bed acuity mismatches, where patient acuity exceeded bed acuity and where patient acuity was lower than bed acuity, ranged from 0.6 to 0.9 and 8.6 to 11.1 mismatches per h, respectively. Values for observed occupancy, total idle beds, and acuity-related transfers compared favorably to model-predicted values (91% v. 86% to 87% occupancy, 15.1 v. 14.3 to 15.7 total idle beds, and 27.2 v. 22.6 to 23.7 transfers). Rooms with discordant colonization status and transmission due to discordance were modeled without an observed value for comparison. One-way and multi-way sensitivity analyses were performed for idle beds and rooms with discordant colonization. We developed and validated a DES model of patient flow incorporating MRSA/VRE flags. The model allowed for quantification of the substantial impact of MRSA/VRE flags on hospital efficiency and potentially avoidable nosocomial transmission.

  7. Fitness Cost of VanA-Type Vancomycin Resistance in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus▿

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    Foucault, Marie-Laure; Courvalin, Patrice; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    We have quantified the biological cost of VanA-type glycopeptide resistance due to the acquisition of the resistance operon by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from Enterococcus sp. Exponential growths of recipient strain HIP11713, its transconjugant VRSA-1, VRSA-5, and VRSA-6 were compared in the absence or, except for HIP11713, in the presence of vancomycin. Induction of resistance was performed by adding vancomycin in both the preculture and the culture or the culture at only 1/50 the MIC. In the absence of vancomycin, the growth rates of the vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) strains were similar to that of susceptible MRSA strain HIP11713. When resistance was induced, and under both conditions, there was a significant reduction of the growth rate of the VRSA strains relative to that of HIP11713 and to those of their noninduced counterparts, corresponding to a ca. 20% to 38% reduction in fitness. Competition experiments between isogenic VRSA-1 and HIP11713 mixed at a 1:1, 1:100, or 100:1 ratio revealed a competitive disadvantage of 0.4% to 3% per 10 generations of the transconjugant versus the recipient. This slight fitness burden can be attributed to the basal level of expression of the van genes in the absence of induction combined with a gene dosage effect due to the presence of the van operon on multicopy plasmids. These data indicate that VanA-type resistance, when induced, is highly costly for the MRSA host, whereas in the absence of induction, its biological cost is minimal. Thus, the potential for the dissemination of VRSA clinical isolates should not be underestimated. PMID:19332680

  8. Fitness cost of VanA-type vancomycin resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Foucault, Marie-Laure; Courvalin, Patrice; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2009-06-01

    We have quantified the biological cost of VanA-type glycopeptide resistance due to the acquisition of the resistance operon by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from Enterococcus sp. Exponential growths of recipient strain HIP11713, its transconjugant VRSA-1, VRSA-5, and VRSA-6 were compared in the absence or, except for HIP11713, in the presence of vancomycin. Induction of resistance was performed by adding vancomycin in both the preculture and the culture or the culture at only 1/50 the MIC. In the absence of vancomycin, the growth rates of the vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) strains were similar to that of susceptible MRSA strain HIP11713. When resistance was induced, and under both conditions, there was a significant reduction of the growth rate of the VRSA strains relative to that of HIP11713 and to those of their noninduced counterparts, corresponding to a ca. 20% to 38% reduction in fitness. Competition experiments between isogenic VRSA-1 and HIP11713 mixed at a 1:1, 1:100, or 100:1 ratio revealed a competitive disadvantage of 0.4% to 3% per 10 generations of the transconjugant versus the recipient. This slight fitness burden can be attributed to the basal level of expression of the van genes in the absence of induction combined with a gene dosage effect due to the presence of the van operon on multicopy plasmids. These data indicate that VanA-type resistance, when induced, is highly costly for the MRSA host, whereas in the absence of induction, its biological cost is minimal. Thus, the potential for the dissemination of VRSA clinical isolates should not be underestimated.

  9. Estudio de actinomicetos marinos aislados de la costa central del Perú y su actividad antibacteriana frente a Staphylococcus aureus Meticilina Resistentes y Enterococcus faecalis Vancomicina Resistentes Study of marine actinomycetes isolated from the central coast of Peru and their antibacterial activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis

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    Jorge León

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos. Determinar el potencial antimicrobiano de actinomicetos marinos frente a cepas S. aureus meticilino-resistentes (MRSA y E. faecalis vancomicina-resistentes (VRE. Materiales y métodos. En dos medios de cultivo se sembraron 29 cepas de actinomicetos aislados de sedimento marino. Se evaluó la capacidad inhibitoria mediante pruebas de antagonismo in vitro para MRSA y VRE. Se procesó los extractos orgánicos de tres actinomicetos seleccionados para determinar la Concentración Mínima Inhibitoria (CMI del compuesto activo. Resultados. La mayoría de los actinomicetos aislados correspondieron a un grupo homogéneo de blanco-grisáceos (62% con buen nivel de crecimiento en agar marino. Los porcentajes inhibitorios fueron superiores a 85% para ambos patógenos con halos de inhibición mayores a 69 y 78 mm de diámetro para MRSA y VRE respectivamente. Los extractos diclorometánicos de tres de los actinomicetos aislados (I-400A, B1-T61, M10-77 mostraron gran potencial inhibitorio de ambos patógenos, siendo M10-77 la cepa de actinomiceto de mayor actividad antibiótica frente a S. aureus ATCC 43300 resistente a meticilina y E. faecalis ATCC 51299 resistente a vancomicina con una Concentración Mínima Inhibitoria (CMI de 7,9 y 31,7 μg/ mL respectivamente. El análisis filogenético de la cepa M10- 77 presenta un 99% de similaridad con la especie marina Streptomyces erythrogriseus. Conclusiones. El sedimento marino de la costa central del Perú es fuente promisorio de cepas de actinomicetos con gran capacidad de producir compuestos bioactivos capaces de inhibir patógenos tipificados como multidrogo-resistentes tales como S. aureus meticilino resistentes y E. faecalis vancomicina resistentes.Objectives. To determine the antimicrobial potential of marine actinomycetes against drug-resistant pathogens represented by strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE. Materials and

  10. Daptomycin antimicrobial activity tested against methicillin-resistant staphylococci and vancomycin-resistant enterococci isolated in European medical centers (2005

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    Watters Amy A

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide with potent activity and broad spectrum against Gram-positive bacteria currently used for the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections and bacteremia, including right sided endocarditis. We evaluated the in vitro activity of this compound and selected comparator agents tested against clinical strains of staphylococci and enterococci collected in European medical centers in 2005. Methods A total of 4,640 strains from 23 medical centers located in 10 European countries, Turkey and Israel (SENTRY Program platform were tested for susceptibility by reference broth microdilution methods according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines and interpretative criteria. Mueller-Hinton broth was supplemented to 50 mg/L Ca++ for testing daptomycin. Results for oxacillin (methicillin-resistant staphylococci and vancomycin-resistant enterococci were analyzed separately. Results Oxacillin resistance rates among Staphylococcus aureus varied from 2.1% in Sweden to 42.5% in the United Kingdom (UK and 54.7% in Ireland (29.1% overall, while vancomycin resistance rates varied from 0.0% in France, Sweden and Switzerland to 66.7% in the UK and 71.4% in Ireland among Enterococcus faecium (17.9% overall. All S. aureus strains were inhibited at daptomycin MIC of 1 mg/L (MIC50/90, 0.25/0.5 mg/L; 100.0% susceptible and only one coagulase-negative staphylococci strain (0.1% showed an elevated (>1 mg/L daptomycin MIC value (4 mg/L. Among E. faecalis (MIC50/90, 0.5/1 mg/L; 100% susceptible the highest daptomycin MIC value was 2 mg/L; while among E. faecium (MIC50/90, 2/4 mg/L; 100% susceptible the highest MIC result was 4 mg/L. Conclusion Daptomycin showed excellent in vitro activity against staphylococci and enterococci collected in European medical centers in 2005 and resistance to oxacillin, vancomycin or quinupristin/dalfopristin did not compromise its activity overall against these

  11. Meningitis associated with Vancomycin resistant Enterococcus casseliflavus: First report

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    Duygu, Fazilet; Balcı, Pervin Özlem; Solmaz, Mehtap; Uçar, Nilay Sefa

    2015-01-01

    Enterococci are present in the gastrointestinal system as normal floral components. In the past two decades members of the genus Enterococcus have emerged as important nosocomial pathogens worldwide. Enterococci may cause a range of different disorders such as urinary tract, intraabdominal, and wound infections, as well as endocarditis, meningitis and bacteraemia. Nosocomial enterococcal meningitis is most commonly observed following ventriculoperitoneal shunt operations. Vancomycin resistant...

  12. Isolation of vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium from food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Madsen, Mogens; Nielsen, Niels

    1997-01-01

    In a survey of vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREF) in Danish meat products, VREF could be detected in 16% of 160 samples of broilers collected at slaughterhouses and in 15% of 26 samples of pork collected from the retail trade. VREF were isolated by enrichment for 24 h in nutrient...

  13. Meningitis associated with Vancomycin resistant Enterococcus casseliflavus: First report

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    Nilay Sefa Uçar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Enterococci are present in the gastrointestinal system as normal floral components. In the past two decades membersof the genus Enterococcus have emerged as important nosocomial pathogens worldwide. Enterococci may cause arange of different disorders such as urinary tract, intraabdominal, and wound infections, as well as endocarditis, meningitisand bacteraemia. Nosocomial enterococcal meningitis is most commonly observed following ventriculoperitonealshunt operations. Vancomycin resistant enterococcus (VRE represents 30% of all enterococci infections.This report presents a vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus casseliflavus meningitis case in a 66-year-old patient withventriculoperitoneal shunt, which has not been reported in the literature before. Successful outcomes were obtainedwith daptomycin plus linezolid combined treatment in VRE meningitis. Treatment recommendations in VRE meningitisare also discussed in this article. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2011;1 (3:138-140

  14. [Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp. strains].

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    Kozuszko, Sylwia; Bogiel, Tomasz; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2009-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate a frequency of isolation and susceptibility to antibiotics of vancomycin-resistant enterococci isolated between 2005 and the first half of the 2009 from patients of University Hospital of Dr. A. Jurasz Collegium Medicum of L. Rydygier in Bydgoszcz Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruli. Study shows increasing frequency of VRE isolation from two in 2005, 8 in 2006, 30 in 2007 to 79 in 2008 and 40 in the first half of 2009 year. Among all isolated VRE strains E. faecium definitely predominated (75.0-90.0% in 2006-2009). The majority of strains were obtained from patients of the Pediatrics, Hematology and Oncology Clinic (43,4%) and Pediatric Surgery Clinic (41.5%). VRE strains were mainly isolated from digestive tract (79,9%). The isolates demonstrated frequently resistance to penicillin, ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, rifampicin and chloramphenicol. Percentage of VRE strain resistant to aminoglycosides decreased during the last four years of study. Over 56% of VRE isolates showed resistance to teicoplanin. Linezolid and quinupristin-dalfopristin were the only drugs presenting activity against isolated VRE strains.

  15. Structures of Two New Flavonoids and Effects of Licorice Phenolics on Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus Species

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    Eerdunbayaer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Since our previous study revealed that several licorice phenolics have antibacterial effects on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, and suppressive effects on the oxacillin resistance of MRSA, we further investigated effectiveness of licorice constituents on vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE bacteria, and purified 32 phenolic compounds. Two flavonoids among them were characterized structurally, and identified their structures as demethylglycyrol (31 and 5,7-di-O-methylluteone (32, respectively. Examination of antibacterial effects of licorice phenolics showed that 3-arylcoumarins such as licoarylcoumarin (9 and glycycoumarin (26, and 2-arylcoumarones such as gancaonin I (17, have moderate to potent antibacterial effects on the VRE strains used in this study.

  16. Bacteriocin Production in Vancomycin-Resistant and Vancomycin-Susceptible Enterococcus Isolates of Different Origins

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    del Campo, Rosa; Tenorio, Carmen; Jiménez-Díaz, Rufino; Rubio, Carmen; Gómez-Lus, Rafael; Baquero, Fernando; Torres, Carmen

    2001-01-01

    Bacteriocin production was determined for 218 Enterococcus isolates (Enterococcus faecalis [93] and E. faecium [125]) obtained from different origins (human clinical samples [87], human fecal samples [78], sewage [28], and chicken samples [25]) and showing different vancomycin susceptibility patterns (vancomycin resistant, all of them vanA positive [56], and vancomycin susceptible [162]). All enterococcal isolates were randomly selected except for the vancomycin-resistant ones. A total of 33 ...

  17. [Case report: a nosocomial infection caused by vancomycin resistant enterococcus].

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    Taşdelen Fişgin, Nuriye; Darka, Ozge; Sünbül, Mustafa; Coban, Ahmet Yilmaz; Sarikaya, Hanife; Altun, Belgin; Durupinar, Belma; Leblebicioğlu, Hakan

    2005-07-01

    Vancomycin resistant enterococcus (VRE) was recovered from the urine culture of a 61 years old female patient, who was being treated for sepsis, on the 15th day of hospitalization in Ondokuz Mayis University Hospital Infectious Disease Unit. The underlying diseases of this patient were chronic renal failure and diabetes mellitus. The patient died due to septic shock on the day of VRE isolation. Since this case was the first VRE infection in our hospital, a point prevalence study was planned. For this purpose, rectal swab samples collected from 10 patients from the same unit and 27 personnel who worked in the same unit, were screened for the presence of VRE. Nasal swabs and finger tip samples were also taken from the staff to determine if the transmission has occured in this way. As a result, a second VRE strain was isolated from another patient with chronic renal failure who was under treatment due to multiple pulmonary abscesses. Immediate isolation of this patient prevented a possible epidemic in this specific unit. In this report, the importance of VRE screening and isolation of the patients after the recovery of VRE has been emphasized.

  18. Successful treatment of vancomycin-resistant enterococcus ventriculitis in a child

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    Paulo Sérgio Lucas da Silva

    Full Text Available Enterococci are an uncommon cause of CNS infection. A 20 month-old boy, diagnosed with hydrocephalus with ventriculoperitoneal shunt and history of lengthy hospitalization and use of wide spectrum antibiotics, was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit diagnosed with ventriculitis. On the 14th day of empirical antibiotic therapy (vancomycin and meropenem the child presented fever while the CSF sample culture evidenced vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. The patient received intravenous linezolid achieving cerebrospinal fluid sterilization. Conclusion: Intravenous linezolid appears to be a safe and effective therapy for vancomycin-resistant enterococcus ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection.

  19. First nosocomial outbreak of vanA-type vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus raffinosus in France.

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    Jolivet, S; Fines-Guyon, M; Nebbad, B; Merle, J C; Le Pluart, D; Brun-Buisson, C; Decousser, J-W; Cattoir, V

    2016-12-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus raffinosus has rarely been associated with nosocomial infection and outbreaks. To report the successful control of a nosocomial outbreak of vanA-type vancomycin-resistant E. raffinosus in a surgical intensive care unit. The investigation of the outbreak is reported with control measures taken. Molecular typing of vancomycin-resistant E. raffinosus isolates was performed by repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Between September and October 2014, vancomycin-resistant E. raffinosus isolates were isolated from four patients. The index patient had been hospitalized previously in Portugal, and was not found to be colonized by vancomycin-resistant enterococci on screening cultures obtained at admission. However, vancomycin-resistant E. raffinosus was isolated from a bile sample 19 days after hospital admission. All four isolates were resistant to both vancomycin and teicoplanin due to the presence of the vanA gene, while remaining susceptible to daptomycin and linezolid. Repetitive sequence-based PCR confirmed the spread of a single vanA-positive E. raffinosus clone. Infection control measures including direct PCR screening on rectal specimens, contact precautions, and cohorting of patients and personnel led to successful control of the outbreak. This is the first reported outbreak of vanA-type vancomycin-resistant E. raffinosus in France in both clinical and screening specimens among hospitalized patients. The inability of routine selective screening media to detect the vancomycin-resistant E. raffinosus in the index case likely contributed to the outbreak. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Risk of Postdischarge Infection with Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus after Initial Infection or Colonization

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    Datta, Rupak; Huang, Susan S.

    2011-01-01

    Postdischarge risks of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) infection among carriers are unknown. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 199 patients newly detected as VRE carriers. Fifteen patients (8%) developed 27 VRE infections in the 18 months after detection. Among 10 postdischarge infections, 2 involved bacteremia and 3 resulted in readmission. PMID:20979493

  1. First outbreak of linezolid-resistant vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium in an Irish hospital, February to September 2014.

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    O'Driscoll, C; Murphy, V; Doyle, O; Wrenn, C; Flynn, A; O'Flaherty, N; Fenelon, L E; Schaffer, K; FitzGerald, S F

    2015-12-01

    An outbreak of linezolid-resistant vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (LRVREfm) occurred in the hepatology ward of a tertiary referral hospital in Ireland between February and September 2014. LRVREfm was isolated from 15 patients; pulsed-field gel electrophoresis confirmed spread of a single clone. This is the first report of an outbreak of linezolid-resistant vancomycin-resistant enterococcus in Ireland. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Virulence of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium According to Linezolid Resistance and Clinical Outbreak Status

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    McLaughlin, Milena; Malczynski, Michael; Qi, Chao; Barajas, Grace; Radetski, Jordan; Zembower, Teresa; Scheetz, Marc H.

    2013-01-01

    Assessing clinical virulence differences between vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREF) strains resistant to linezolid (LRVRE) and linezolid-susceptible VRE (LSVRE) strains is difficult due to confounding patient variables. Galleria mellonella is a validated host interaction model allowing straightforward organism virulence assessment. The objective of this study was to assess the virulence of VREF in G. mellonella according to linezolid resistance and clinical outbreak status. A ge...

  3. Transferable vancomycin resistance in clade B commensal-type Enterococcus faecium.

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    Lebreton, François; Valentino, Michael D; Schaufler, Katharina; Earl, Ashlee M; Cattoir, Vincent; Gilmore, Michael S

    2018-02-14

    Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium is a leading cause of MDR hospital infection. Two genetically definable populations of E. faecium have been identified: hospital-adapted MDR isolates (clade A) and vancomycin-susceptible commensal strains (clade B). VanN-type vancomycin resistance was identified in two isolates of E. faecium recovered from blood and faeces of an immunocompromised patient. To understand the genomic context in which VanN occurred in the hospitalized patient, the risk it posed for transmission in the hospital and its origins, it was of interest to determine where these strains placed within the E. faecium population structure. We obtained the genome sequence of the VanN isolates and performed comparative and functional genomics of the chromosome and plasmid content. We show that, in these strains, VanN occurs in a genetic background that clusters with clade B E. faecium, which is highly unusual. We characterized the chromosome and the conjugative plasmid that carries VanN resistance in these strains, pUV24. This plasmid exhibits signatures of in-host selection on the vanN operon regulatory system, which are associated with a constitutive expression of vancomycin resistance. VanN resistance in clade B strains may go undetected by current methods. We report a case of vancomycin resistance in a commensal lineage of E. faecium responsible for an atypical bacteraemia in an immunocompromised patient. A reservoir of transferable glycopeptide resistance in the community could pose a concern for public health.

  4. Genetic characterization of a VanG-type vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium clinical isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Mohamed; Guérin, François; Lesec, Léonie; Isnard, Christophe; Fines-Guyon, Marguerite; Cattoir, Vincent; Giard, Jean-Christophe

    2018-01-16

    To characterize, phenotypically and genotypically, the first Enterococcus faecium clinical isolate harbouring a vanG operon. The antibiotic resistance profile of E. faecium 16-346 was determined and its whole genome sequenced using PacBio technology. Attempts to transfer vancomycin resistance by filter mating were performed and the inducibility of expression of the vanG operon was studied by reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) in the presence or absence of subinhibitory concentrations of vancomycin. E. faecium 16-346 was resistant to rifampicin (MIC >4 mg/L), erythromycin (MIC >4 mg/L), tetracycline (MIC >16 mg/L) and vancomycin (MIC 8 mg/L), but susceptible to teicoplanin (MIC 0.5 mg/L). The strain harboured the vanG operon in its chromosome, integrated in a 45.5 kb putative mobile genetic element, similar to that of Enterococcus faecalis BM4518. We were unable to transfer vancomycin resistance from E. faecium 16-346 to E. faecium BM4107 and E. faecalis JH2-2. Lastly, transcription of the vanG gene was inducible by vancomycin. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of a VanG-type vancomycin-resistant strain of E. faecium. Despite the alarm pulled because of the therapeutic problems caused by VRE, our work shows that new resistant loci can still be found in E. faecium.

  5. Epidemiologic evaluation of Vancomycin Resistant genes in Enterococcus spp. isolated from clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Teymournejad

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Isolation of vancomycin resistant Enterococcus from clinical samples is very important. The aim of this study was evaluation of phenotype and genotype of van genes in vancomycine resistant Enterococcus. Materials and Methods: 411 Enterococcus isolates were collected from selected Tehran’s hospitals between March 2004 and December 2007. The enterococcal isolates were identified by biochemical confirmation tests. Resistance of each isolate to vancomycin determined by disk diffusion and agar dilution test. The presence of the vanA, B, C, D, E resistance gene was assessed by PCR. Results: 185(45% and 23(5.6% with disc-diffusion method and agar-dilution method were resistant to vancomucin (VRE and all of VREs were Enterococcus faecium. 12 (52.2%, 7(30.4% of the VRE isolates had vanA, vanB and 3(13% had both of vanA and vanB gene. Conclusion: Most important mechanism for high level resistance to vancomycin is presence of van genes and these genes can transfer between Enterococci. Significance of investigation in molecular level of resistance to vancomycin was due to relation between phenotypic resistant and presence of van genes.

  6. Successful control of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium outbreak in a neurosurgical unit at non-endemic region

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, VCC; Chan, JFW; Tai, JWM; Ho, YY; Li, IWS; To, KKW; Ho, PL; Yuen, KY

    2011-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have emerged in many parts of the world, but have only been reported sporadically in Hong Kong. We report an outbreak of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREfm) in a neurosurgical unit at a tertiary teaching hospital between 3 March and 3 April 2009 in Hong Kong. During the outbreak investigation, clinical samples from 193 (91.5%) of 211 patients who had stayed in the neurosurgical unit and 506 environmental samples were screened for VREfm. Bes...

  7. Successful control of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium outbreak in a neurosurgical unit at non-endemic region

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, V C C; Chan, J. F. W.; Tai, J. W. M.; Ho, Y Y; Li, I W S; To, K. K. W.; Ho, P. L.; Yuen, K Y

    2010-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have emerged in many parts of the world, but have only been reported sporadically in Hong Kong. We report an outbreak of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREfm) in a neurosurgical unit at a tertiary teaching hospital between 3 March and 3 April 2009 in Hong Kong. During the outbreak investigation, clinical samples from 193 (91.5%) of 211 patients who had stayed in the neurosurgical unit and 506 environmental samples were screened...

  8. Effect of meteorological factors and geographic location on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci colonization in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Natalia; Perencevich, Eli; Li, Shan Shan; Morgan, Daniel J; Pineles, Lisa; Johnson, J Kristie; Robinson, Gwen; Anderson, Deverick J; Jacob, Jesse T; Maragakis, Lisa L; Harris, Anthony D

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of meteorological conditions and geographical location on bacterial colonization rates particularly of antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. We aimed to evaluate the effect of season, meteorological factors, and geographic location on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) colonization. The prospective cohort included all adults admitted to 20 geographically-dispersed ICUs across the US from September 1, 2011 to October 4, 2012. Nasal and perianal swabs were collected at admission and tested for MRSA and VRE colonization respectively. Poisson regression models using monthly aggregated colonization counts as the outcome and mean temperature, relative humidity, total precipitation, season, and/or latitude as predictors were constructed for each pathogen. A total of 24,704 ICU-admitted patients were tested for MRSA and 24,468 for VRE. On admission, 10% of patients were colonized with MRSA and 12% with VRE. For MRSA and VRE, a 10% increase in relative humidity was associated with approximately a 9% increase in prevalence rate. Southerly latitudes in the US were associated with higher MRSA colonization, while northerly latitudes were associated with higher VRE colonization. In contrast to MRSA, the association between VRE colonization and latitude was observed only after adjusting for relative humidity, which demonstrates how this effect is highly driven by this meteorological factor. To our knowledge, we are the first to study the effect of meteorological factors and geographical location/latitude on MRSA and VRE colonization in adults. Increasing humidity was associated with greater MRSA and VRE colonization. Southerly latitudes in the US were associated with greater MRSA and less VRE. The effect of these factors on MRSA and VRE rates has the potential not only to inform patient management and treatment, but also infection prevention interventions.

  9. Refractory Clostridium difficile Infection Cured With Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus Colonized Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Mi-Ok; An, Jun Hwan; Jung, Sook-In

    2015-01-01

    The rates and severity of Clostridium difficile infections, including pseudomembranous colitis, have increased markedly. However, there are few effective treatments for refractory or recurrent C. difficile infections and the outcomes are poor. Fecal microbiota transplantation is becoming increasingly accepted as an effective and safe intervention in patients with recurrent disease, likely due to the restoration of a disrupted microbiome. Cure rates of >90% are being consistently reported from multiple centers. We cured a case of severe refractory C. difficile infection with fecal microbiota transplantation in a patient colonized by vancomycin-resistant enterococcus. PMID:25691847

  10. Prevalence of Diverse Clones of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium ST78 in a Chinese Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiyong; Jiang, Yufeng; Guo, Ling; Ye, LIyan; Ma, Yanning; Luo, Yanping

    2016-06-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) has been identified in China. However, little is known about the spread of VRE isolates. The genetic relatedness of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREfm) isolates was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), their antimicrobial susceptibilities were analyzed by E-test and the VITEK 2 AST-GP67 test Kit, and their sequence types (STs) were investigated by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). S1-PFGE was used for plasmid profiling, and PCR and subsequent sequencing were performed to identify the virulence genes. A total of 96 nonduplicated VREfm isolates were obtained and categorized into 38 PFGE types (type 1-38). The predominant MLST type was ST78, while ST17, ST341, and ST342 were also sporadically identified. All types of clinical VREfm strains harbored the vanA gene; however, they carried plasmids of different sizes. While 92.1%, 71.1%, and 60.5% of VREfm strains carried hyl, scm, and ecbA genes, respectively, all of them were positive for esp, acm, sgrA, pilA, and pilB genes. Clonal VREfm spread was observed, and nonplasmid-mediated horizontal transfer of vancomycin-resistant gene might have conveyed resistance to some vancomycin-susceptible E. faecium strains. E. faecium ST78 carrying vanA gene was the most prevalent clone in this study. The high prevalence of virulence genes, including esp, hyl, acm, scm, ecbA, sgrA, pilA, and pilB, confirmed their important roles in the emergence of VREfm ST78 in nosocomial infections.

  11. A mixed infection of Leuconostoc lactis and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus in a liver transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yao; Zhang, Zhongwei; Xie, Yi; Xiao, Yulin; Kang, Mei; Fan, Hong

    2012-11-01

    Bacterial infection in patients who have undergone liver transplantation is a major complication of the procedure. Leuconostoc spp. are important pathogenic bacteria in individuals with poor immune function, especially transplant patients. In this report, we describe the case of a 45-year-old Asian male liver transplant recipient who was initially preliminarily diagnosed with infection with Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides by using the microbial tests of the VITEK 2 system and the aesculin hydrolysis test, and with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. Subsequently, the Leuconostoc isolate was identified as Leuconostoc lactis by 16S rRNA gene partial sequencing. In this paper, we discuss our identification of L. lactis based on physiological characteristics and molecular methodology. Accurate identification of these infections is important for the outcome; use of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis offers a rapid and precise diagnostic approach. Administration of the drug linezolid may be useful for the treatment of both Leuconostoc spp. and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus infections. We suggest that clinical analysts should use molecular methods in addition to biochemical tests in order to identify Leuconostoc at the species level more accurately.

  12. Prevalence of a carbapenem-resistance gene (KPC), vancomycin-resistance genes (van A/B) and a methicillin-resistance gene (mecA) in hospital and municipal sewage in a southwestern province of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basode, Vinod Kumar; Abdulhaq, Ahmed; Alamoudi, Mohammed Uthman A; Tohari, Hassan Mohammad; Quhal, Waleed Ali; Madkhali, Aymen Mohammed; Hobani, Yahya Hasan; Hershan, Almonther Abdullah

    2018-01-15

    According to the World Health Organization, the increasing antibiotic resistance of pathogens is one of the most important threats to human health. Prevalence of a carbapenem-resistance gene (KPC), vancomycin-resistance genes (van A/B) and a methicillin-resistance gene (mecA) in hospital and municipal sewages will be potential threat to public health. Vancomycin-resistance genes were detected in the sewage of community tank-II, sewage tank of the tertiary and general hospital. Carbapenem-resistance gene was detected in sewage of community tank-II and sewage from tertiary hospital. Methicillin-resistance gene was detected in sewage of community tank-II, sewage from a fish market sewage tank and sewage from an animal slaughter house sewage tank. The detection of a KPC, van A/B and a mecA in sewages will help further the process to take the appropriate measures to prevent the spread of such bacteria in the environment.

  13. Transposon characterization of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREF) and dissemination of resistance associated with transferable plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Migura, Lourdes Garcia; Liebana, Ernesto; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    2007-01-01

    of the resistance. Methods and results: One hundred and one vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolated from 19 unrelated farms have been investigated. Tn 1546 characterization by long PCR and Clal-digestions of amplicons showed a very low diversity of Tn types (n = 4) in comparison to the high genotypic...

  14. Effect of vancomycin, tylosin, and chlortetracycline on vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium colonization of broiler chickens during grow-out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broiler chickens may serve as reservoirs for human colonization by vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE). We examined the effects of vancomycin and two commonly-used antimicrobial feed additives on VRE colonization in broiler chickens during grow-out. Chicks received unsupplemented feed or feed ...

  15. Cross-transmission of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus in patients undergoing dialysis and kidney transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Fram

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE cross-transmission between two patient groups (long-term dialysis and kidney transplant patients. Molecular typing, by automated ribotyping with the RiboPrinter Microbial Characterization System (Qualicon, USA, was used to analyze VRE isolates from 31 fecal samples of 320 dialysis patients and 38 fecal samples of 280 kidney transplant patients. Clonal spread of E. faecalis and E. casseliflavus was observed intragroup, but not between the two groups of patients. In turn, transmission of E. gallinarum and E. faecium between the groups was suggested by the finding of vancomycin-resistant isolates belonging to the same ribogroup in both dialysis and transplant patients. The fact that these patients were colonized by VRE from the same ribogroup in the same health care facility provides evidence for cross-transmission and supports the adoption of stringent infection control measures to prevent dissemination of these bacteria.

  16. Persistence of Vancomycin Resistance in Multiple Clones of Enterococcus faecium Isolated from Danish Broilers 15 Years after the Ban of Avoparcin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortolaia, Valeria; Mander, Manuela; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence and diversity of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREF) were investigated in 100 Danish broiler flocks 15 years after the avoparcin ban. VREF occurred in 47 flocks at low fecal concentrations detectable only by selective enrichment. Vancomycin resistance was prevalently...... associated with a transferable nontypeable plasmid lineage occurring in multiple E. faecium clones. Coselection of sequence type 842 by tetracycline use only partly explained the persistence of vancomycin resistance in the absence of detectable plasmid coresistance and toxin-antitoxin systems....

  17. Emergence of endemic MLST non-typeable vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Glen P; Buultjens, Andrew H; Ballard, Susan A; Baines, Sarah L; Tomita, Takehiro; Strachan, Janet; Johnson, Paul D R; Ferguson, John K; Seemann, Torsten; Stinear, Timothy P; Howden, Benjamin P

    2016-12-01

    Enterococcus faecium is a major nosocomial pathogen causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Assessment of E. faecium using MLST to understand the spread of this organism is an important component of hospital infection control measures. Recent studies, however, suggest that MLST might be inadequate for E. faecium surveillance. To use WGS to characterize recently identified vancomycin-resistant E. faecium (VREfm) isolates non-typeable by MLST that appear to be causing a multi-jurisdictional outbreak in Australia. Illumina NextSeq and Pacific Biosciences SMRT sequencing platforms were used to determine the genome sequences of 66 non-typeable E. faecium (NTEfm) isolates. Phylogenetic and bioinformatics analyses were subsequently performed using a number of in silico tools. Sixty-six E. faecium isolates were identified by WGS from multiple health jurisdictions in Australia that could not be typed by MLST due to a missing pstS allele. SMRT sequencing and complete genome assembly revealed a large chromosomal rearrangement in representative strain DMG1500801, which likely facilitated the deletion of the pstS region. Phylogenomic analysis of this population suggests that deletion of pstS within E. faecium has arisen independently on at least three occasions. Importantly, the majority of these isolates displayed a vancomycin-resistant genotype. We have identified NTEfm isolates that appear to be causing a multi-jurisdictional outbreak in Australia. Identification of these isolates has important implications for MLST-based typing activities designed to monitor the spread of VREfm and provides further evidence supporting the use of WGS for hospital surveillance of E. faecium. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Complex Routes of Nosocomial Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Transmission Revealed by Genome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, Kathy E; Gouliouris, Theodore; Brodrick, Hayley; Coll, Francesc; Brown, Nicholas M; Reynolds, Rosy; Reuter, Sandra; Török, M Estée; Parkhill, Julian; Peacock, Sharon J

    2017-04-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREfm) is a leading cause of nosocomial infection. Here, we describe the utility of whole-genome sequencing in defining nosocomial VREfm transmission. A retrospective study at a single hospital in the United Kingdom identified 342 patients with E. faecium bloodstream infection over 7 years. Of these, 293 patients had a stored isolate and formed the basis for the study. The first stored isolate from each case was sequenced (200 VREfm [197 vanA, 2 vanB, and 1 isolate containing both vanA and vanB], 93 vancomycin-susceptible E. faecium) and epidemiological data were collected. Genomes were also available for E. faecium associated with bloodstream infections in 15 patients in neighboring hospitals, and 456 patients across the United Kingdom and Ireland. The majority of infections in the 293 patients were hospital-acquired (n = 249) or healthcare-associated (n = 42). Phylogenetic analysis showed that 291 of 293 isolates resided in a hospital-associated clade that contained numerous discrete clusters of closely related isolates, indicative of multiple introductions into the hospital followed by clonal expansion associated with transmission. Fine-scale analysis of 6 exemplar phylogenetic clusters containing isolates from 93 patients (32%) identified complex transmission routes that spanned numerous wards and years, extending beyond the detection of conventional infection control. These contained both vancomycin-resistant and -susceptible isolates. We also identified closely related isolates from patients at Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and regional and national hospitals, suggesting interhospital transmission. These findings provide important insights for infection control practice and signpost areas for interventions. We conclude that sequencing represents a powerful tool for the enhanced surveillance and control of nosocomial E. faecium transmission and infection.

  19. Delayed-Onset Post-Keratoplasty Endophthalmitis Caused by Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Camarena, Julio C.; Bautista-de Lucio, Victor M.; Navas, Alejandro; Ramirez-Miranda, Arturo; Graue-Hernandez, Enrique O.

    2012-01-01

    Background Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) endophthalmitis after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) is very rare, the management is a challenge due to both the pattern of antibiotic resistance and the aggressive nature of the infectious process. We report the first delayed-onset case of VRE endophthalmitis after PKP. Materials and Methods Case report of a 51-year-old female with a 7-week history of PKP who arrived at the emergency room with signs and symptoms of endophthalmitis. Initial visual acuity was light perception, and a posterior pole exam was not possible due to the intense vitreous reaction. Mode B ultrasound was used to assess the posterior pole. The patient underwent pars plana vitrectomy and received intravitreous antibiotics. Results Vitreous stains and cultures were positive for Enterococcus faecium resistant to vancomycin. Donor rim cultures and viral PCR were negative. Treatment was carried out by repeated intravitreal antibiotics and systemic linezolid. Clinical improvement was seen after the second dose of intravitreous antibiotics and systemic linezolid, but visual acuity remained at light perception consistent with the ischemic changes observed in the posterior pole. Conclusion VRE endophthalmitis might be associated with positive donor rim cultures. Prompt use of systemic linezolid in addition to intravitreous antibiotics is recommendable, but even with prompt treatment, visual prognosis is guarded. PMID:23185179

  20. Delayed-Onset Post-Keratoplasty Endophthalmitis Caused by Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio C. Hernandez-Camarena

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE endophthalmitis after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP is very rare, the management is a challenge due to both the pattern of antibiotic resistance and the aggressive nature of the infectious process. We report the first delayed-onset case of VRE endophthalmitis after PKP. Materials and Methods: Case report of a 51-year-old female with a 7-week history of PKP who arrived at the emergency room with signs and symptoms of endophthalmitis. Initial visual acuity was light perception, and a posterior pole exam was not possible due to the intense vitreous reaction. Mode B ultrasound was used to assess the posterior pole. The patient underwent pars plana vitrectomy and received intravitreous antibiotics. Results: Vitreous stains and cultures were positive for Enterococcus faecium resistant to vancomycin. Donor rim cultures and viral PCR were negative. Treatment was carried out by repeated intravitreal antibiotics and systemic linezolid. Clinical improvement was seen after the second dose of intravitreous antibiotics and systemic linezolid, but visual acuity remained at light perception consistent with the ischemic changes observed in the posterior pole. Conclusion: VRE endophthalmitis might be associated with positive donor rim cultures. Prompt use of systemic linezolid in addition to intravitreous antibiotics is recommendable, but even with prompt treatment, visual prognosis is guarded.

  1. Prevalence, outcome and risk factor associated with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, A; Shukla, S K; Singh, A; Prasad, K N

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence, genotype, risk factors and mortality in patients having vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VR E. faecalis) and Enterococcus faecium (VR E. faecium) infection or colonisation. A total of 1488 clinical isolates of E. faecalis and E. faecium were tested for vancomycin resistance by phenotypic (disk diffusion, E-test and broth micro-dilution test) and genotypic polymerase chain reaction methods. Records of all 1488 patients who had E. faecalis or E. faecium infection or colonisation were reviewed for the identification of host, hospital and medication related risk factors associated with VR E. faecalis and VR E. faecium. Of 1488 isolates, 118 (7.9%) were vancomycin-resistant and their distributions were as follows: E. faecalis=72 (61%) and E. faecium=46 (39%). All 118 vancomycin-resistant isolates were vanA genotype (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] to vancomycin ≥64 μg/ml and MIC to teicoplanin≥32 μg/ml) and none of the isolates was vanB genotype. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified ventilator support and hospital stay for ≥48 h as independent risk factors associated with VR E. faecalis and VR E. faecium infection or colonisation. Hospital stay≥48 h was the only independent risk factor for mortality in patients infected with vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Strategies to limit the nosocomial infection especially in patients on ventilator support can reduce VRE incidence and related mortality.

  2. Prevalence of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus fecal colonization among kidney transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbosa Dulce

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background End stage renal disease patients are at risk of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus (VRE infections. The first reports of VRE isolation were from hemodialysis patients. However, to date, VRE fecal colonization rates as well as associated risk factors in kidney transplant patients have not yet been established in prospective studies. Methods We collected one or two stool samples from 280 kidney transplant patients and analysed the prevalence of VRE and its associated risk factors. Patients were evaluated according to the post-transplant period: group 1, less than 30 days after transplantation (102 patients, group 2, one to 6 months after transplantation (73 patients and group 3, more than 6 months after transplantation (105 patients. Results The overall prevalence rate of fecal VRE colonization was 13.6% (38/280, respectively 13.7% for Group 1, 15.1% for group 2 and 12.4% for group 3. E. faecium and E. faecalis comprised 50% of all VRE isolates. No immunologic variables were clearly correlated with VRE colonization and no infections related to VRE colonization were reported. Conclusion Fecal VRE colonization rates in kidney transplant patients were as high as those reported for other high-risk groups, such as critical care and hemodialysis patients. This high rate of VRE colonization observed in kidney transplant recipients may have clinical relevance in infectious complications.

  3. Antibacterial activity of selected marine macro algae against vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manivachagam Chandrasekaran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of different extracts of Caulerpa chemnitzia (Epser J.V. Lamououx, Caulerpa racemosa (Frosk. Weber-van-Bosse (C. racemosa, Caulerpa scalpelliformis (R.Br. Weber-van-Bosse, Ulva lactuca Lin, Ulva fasciata Dellie, Ulva reticulata Forsk, Stoechospermum marginatum (Ag. Kutz (S. marginatum, Sargassum wightii Grev, Gracilaria verrucosa (Huds. Papenfuss and Gracilaria edulis (S.G. Gemelin P.C. Silva against Enterococcus faecalis (MTCC 439 (E. faecalis and one clinical isolate of vancomycin resistant E. faecalis. Methods: The selected marine macro algae were extracted with different solvents viz., hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol. Antibacterial assay was carried out by using disc diffusion method, determination of minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration. Results: The maximum antibacterial activity was recorded in the ethyl acetate extracts of S. marginatum and C. racemosa than the other extracts. The mean zone of inhibition produced by the extracts in agar diffusion assays against the tested bacterial strains ranged from 7.1 to 14.5 mm. The minimum inhibitory concentration was between 250 and 500 µg/mL, while the minimum bactericidal concentration was from 500 to 1 000 µg/mL. The ethyl acetate extracts of the seaweeds showed the presence of strong terpenoids, tannins and phenolic compounds compared with the other solvent extracts. Conclusions: These findings suggest that ethyl acetate extracts of S. marginatum and C. racemosa can be used as an antibacterial substance for the treatment of infection caused by E. faecalis.

  4. Evolutionary origins of the emergent ST796 clone of vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buultjens, Andrew H.; Lam, Margaret M.C.; Ballard, Susan; Monk, Ian R.; Mahony, Andrew A.; Grabsch, Elizabeth A.; Grayson, M. Lindsay; Pang, Stanley; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Robinson, J. Owen; Seemann, Torsten; Howden, Benjamin P.

    2017-01-01

    From early 2012, a novel clone of vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium (assigned the multi locus sequence type ST796) was simultaneously isolated from geographically separate hospitals in south eastern Australia and New Zealand. Here we describe the complete genome sequence of Ef_aus0233, a representative ST796 E. faecium isolate. We used PacBio single molecule real-time sequencing to establish a high quality, fully assembled genome comprising a circular chromosome of 2,888,087 bp and five plasmids. Comparison of Ef_aus0233 to other E. faecium genomes shows Ef_aus0233 is a member of the epidemic hospital-adapted lineage and has evolved from an ST555-like ancestral progenitor by the accumulation or modification of five mosaic plasmids and five putative prophage, acquisition of two cryptic genomic islands, accrued chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms and a 80 kb region of recombination, also gaining Tn1549 and Tn916, transposons conferring resistance to vancomycin and tetracycline respectively. The genomic dissection of this new clone presented here underscores the propensity of the hospital E. faecium lineage to change, presumably in response to the specific conditions of hospital and healthcare environments. PMID:28149688

  5. Daptomycin nonsusceptible vancomycin resistant Enterococcus bloodstream infections in patients with hematological malignancies: risk factors and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herc, Erica S; Kauffman, Carol A; Marini, Bernard L; Perissinotti, Anthony J; Miceli, Marisa H

    2017-12-01

    Daptomycin is typically the treatment of choice for vancomycin resistant Enterococcus (VRE) bloodstream infections (BSI) in patients with hematological malignancies, but increasingly daptomycin nonsusceptible VRE are being reported. We reviewed our experience with daptomycin nonsusceptible VRE BSI among patients with hematological malignancies. We compared risk factors and outcomes of 20 patients with daptomycin nonsusceptible VRE BSI (case patients) with 40 matched control patients with daptomycin susceptible VRE BSI. Case patients had more complications (6/20 vs. 2/40, p = .013); all-cause mortality was similar in both groups. By multivariable analysis, only prior daptomycin exposure within 90 days was significantly associated with daptomycin nonsusceptible VRE BSI (odds ratio 26.71; p < .0001). In 25% of case patients, all of whose VRE isolates had an initial minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 4 μg/mL, nonsusceptibility developed during treatment, raising the question of whether higher doses of daptomycin should be used for VRE BSI in hematology patients.

  6. Comparative genome analysis of multiple vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolated from two fatal cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Shu Yong; Yap, Kien-Pong; Teh, Cindy Shuan Ju; Jabar, Kartini Abdul; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2017-04-01

    Enterococcus faecium is both a commensal of the human intestinal tract and an opportunistic pathogen. The increasing incidence of enterococcal infections is mainly due to the ability of this organism to develop resistance to multiple antibiotics, including vancomycin. The aim of this study was to perform comparative genome analyses on four vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE fm ) strains isolated from two fatal cases in a tertiary hospital in Malaysia. Two sequence types, ST80 and ST203, were identified which belong to the clinically important clonal complex (CC) 17. This is the first report on the emergence of ST80 strains in Malaysia. Three of the studied strains (VREr5, VREr6, VREr7) were each isolated from different body sites of a single patient (patient Y) and had different PFGE patterns. While VREr6 and VREr7 were phenotypically and genotypically similar, the initial isolate, VREr5, was found to be more similar to VRE2 isolated from another patient (patient X), in terms of the genome contents, sequence types and phylogenomic relationship. Both the clinical records and genome sequence data suggested that patient Y was infected by multiple strains from different clones and the strain that infected patient Y could have derived from the same clone from patient X. These multidrug resistant strains harbored a number of virulence genes such as the epa locus and pilus-associated genes which could enhance their persistence. Apart from that, a homolog of E. faecalis bee locus was identified in VREr5 which might be involved in biofilm formation. Overall, our comparative genomic analyses had provided insight into the genetic relatedness, as well as the virulence potential, of the four clinical strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence of Virulence Factors and Vancomycin-resistant Genes among Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium Isolated from Clinical Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasaj, Mona; Mousavi, Seyed Masoud; Hosseini, Seyed Mostafa; Arabestani, Mohammad Reza

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of virulence determinants and vancomycin-resistant genes among Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium obtained from various clinical sources. The study was performed on the 280 enterococcal isolated from clinical specimens in Hamadan hospitals, western Iran in 2012-14. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion and Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) methods. The presence of vancomycin-resistant genes and virulence genes was investigated using PCR. Totally 280 enterococcal isolates were identified as follows: E. faecalis (62.5%), E. faecium (24%) and Enterococcus spp (13.5%). The results of antibiotic susceptibility testing showed that resistance rates to vancomycin and teicoplanin in E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates were 5% and 73%, respectively. Of Sixty vancomycin-resistant Enterococci strains, fifty-one isolates were identified as E. faecium (VREfm) and nine as E. faecalis (VREfs). Prevalence of esp, hyl, and asa1 genes were determined as 82%, 71.6%, and 100%, respectively in E. faecium strains; and 78%, 56/6%, and 97%, respectively in E. faecalis strains. The increased frequency of VREF, as seen with rapid rise in the number of vanA isolates should be considered in infection control practices.

  8. Identification and molecular characterization of Van A-type vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis in Northeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinalda Anselmo Vilela

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The isolation of vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE in Brazil has rapidly increased, following the world wide tendency. We report in the present study the first isolation of vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE in the Northeast of Brazil. The four VRE isolates were characterized for antimicrobial susceptibility, genotypic typing by macro restriction of chromosomal DNA followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and for characterization of the Tn1546-like element and plasmid contents. The isolates showed resistance to multiple antibiotics and a single genotype profile, suggesting the dissemination of a single clone among the patients. Tn1546 associated to genetic elements as plasmids shows the importance of infection control measures to avoid the spreading of glycopetide resistance by conjugative transfer of VanA elements.

  9. Successful management of post-traumatic vancomycin-resistant enterococcus endophthalmitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Nguyen

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions and importance: Good visual outcome was attained with intravitreal injection of amikacin 18 days following penetrating trauma and vancomycin resistant enterococcal endophthalmitis that smoldered following initial treatment of vitrectomy, intravitreal antibiotics and oral linezolid.

  10. Virulence of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium according to linezolid resistance and clinical outbreak status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Milena; Malczynski, Michael; Qi, Chao; Barajas, Grace; Radetski, Jordan; Zembower, Teresa; Scheetz, Marc H

    2013-08-01

    Assessing clinical virulence differences between vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREF) strains resistant to linezolid (LRVRE) and linezolid-susceptible VRE (LSVRE) strains is difficult due to confounding patient variables. Galleria mellonella is a validated host interaction model allowing straightforward organism virulence assessment. The objective of this study was to assess the virulence of VREF in G. mellonella according to linezolid resistance and clinical outbreak status. A genetically related pair of VREF strains with and without genotypically confirmed linezolid resistance was selected for analysis. Additionally, six strains of LSVRE and two strains of LRVRE were selected according to epidemiologic outbreak status. Mortality of G. mellonella was assessed daily over a 5-day period and analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival curves and log rank tests. Linezolid resistance did not have a significant effect on G. mellonella mortality in the genetically related pair (P = 0.93). There was no significant difference in mortality over time between strains (non-outbreak [i.e., no patient transmissions were recorded] [n = 2] versus outbreak [i.e., transmission occurred between 3 or more patients in a period of 30 days] [n = 6], P = 0.84; extensive transmission [i.e., the isolate was transmitted between at least 80 patients] [n = 2] versus limited transmission [i.e., the isolate was transmitted between fewer than 10 patients] [n = 4], P = 0.78). These results suggest that patients infected with LRVRE or outbreak strains of VREF are at no greater risk of poor outcomes mediated by organism virulence than those infected with LSVRE or non-outbreak strains.

  11. Genetic variability of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis isolates from humans, chickens, and pigs in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getachew, Yitbarek; Hassan, Latiffah; Zakaria, Zunita; Abdul Aziz, Saleha

    2013-08-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have been reported to be present in humans, chickens, and pigs in Malaysia. In the present study, representative samples of VRE isolated from these populations were examined for similarities and differences by using the multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method. Housekeeping genes of Enterococcus faecium (n = 14) and Enterococcus faecalis (n = 11) isolates were sequenced and analyzed using the MLST databases eBURST and goeBURST. We found five sequence types (STs) of E. faecium and six STs of E. faecalis existing in Malaysia. Enterococcus faecium isolates belonging to ST203, ST17, ST55, ST79, and ST29 were identified, and E. faecium ST203 was the most common among humans. The MLST profiles of E. faecium from humans in this study were similar to the globally reported nosocomial-related strain lineage belonging to clonal complex 17 (CC17). Isolates from chickens and pigs have few similarities to those from humans, except for one isolate from a chicken, which was identified as ST203. E. faecalis isolates were more diverse and were identified as ST4, ST6, ST87, ST108, ST274, and ST244, which were grouped as specific to the three hosts. E. faecalis, belonging to the high-risk CC2 and CC87, were detected among isolates from humans. In conclusion, even though one isolate from a chicken was found clonal to that of humans, the MLST analysis of E. faecium and E. faecalis supports the findings of others who suggest VRE to be predominantly host specific and that clinically important strains are found mainly among humans. The infrequent detection of a human VRE clone in a chicken may in fact suggest a reverse transmission of VRE from humans to animals.

  12. Global spread of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium from distinct nosocomial genetic complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Willems, Rob J L; Top, Janetta; van Santen, Marga; Robinson, D Ashley; Coque, Teresa M; Baquero, Fernando; Grundmann, Hajo; Bonten, Marc J M

    2005-01-01

    ...) has crossed genus boundaries to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Spread of VRE, therefore, represents an immediate threat for patient care and creates a reservoir of mobile resistance genes for other, more virulent pathogens...

  13. Role of Combination Antimicrobial Therapy for Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Infections: Review of the Current Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Juwon; Smith, Jordan R; Rybak, Michael J

    2017-05-01

    Enterococcus species are the second most common cause of nosocomial infections in the United States and are particularly concerning in critically ill patients with preexisting comorbid conditions. Rising resistance to antimicrobials that were historically used as front-line agents for treatment of enterococcal infections, such as ampicillin, vancomycin, and aminoglycosides, further complicates the treatment of these infections. Of particular concern are Enterococcus faecium strains that are associated with the highest rate of vancomycin resistance. The introduction of antimicrobial agents with specific activity against vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) faecium including daptomycin, linezolid, quinupristin-dalfopristin, and tigecycline did not completely resolve this clinical dilemma. In this review, the mechanisms of action and resistance to currently available anti-VRE antimicrobial agents including newer agents such as oritavancin and dalbavancin will be presented. In addition, novel combination therapies including β-lactams and fosfomycin, and the promising results from in vitro, animal studies, and clinical experience in the treatment of VRE faecium will be discussed. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  14. Evolutionary dynamics ofEnterococcus faeciumreveals complex genomic relationships between isolates with independent emergence of vancomycin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hal, Sebastiaan J; Ip, Camilla L C; Ansari, M Azim; Wilson, Daniel J; Espedido, Bjorn A; Jensen, Slade O; Bowden, Rory

    2016-01-19

    Enterococcus faecium , a major cause of hospital-acquired infections, remains problematic because of its propensity to acquire resistance to vancomycin, which currently is considered first-line therapy. Here, we assess the evolution and resistance acquisition dynamics of E. faecium in a clinical context using a series of 132 bloodstream infection isolates from a single hospital. All isolates, of which 49 (37 %) were vancomycin-resistant, underwent whole-genome sequencing. E. faecium was found to be subject to high rates of recombination with little evidence of sequence importation from outside the local E. faecium population. Apart from disrupting phylogenetic reconstruction, recombination was frequent enough to invalidate MLST typing in the identification of clonal expansion and transmission events, suggesting that, where available, whole-genome sequencing should be used in tracing the epidemiology of E. faecium nosocomial infections and establishing routes of transmission. Several forms of the Tn 1549 -like element- vanB gene cluster, which was exclusively responsible for vancomycin resistance, appeared and spread within the hospital during the study period. Several transposon gains and losses and instances of in situ evolution were inferred and, although usually chromosomal, the resistance element was also observed on a plasmid background. There was qualitative evidence for clonal expansions of both vancomycin-resistant and vancomycin-susceptible E. faecium with evidence of hospital-specific subclonal expansion. Our data are consistent with continuing evolution of this established hospital pathogen and confirm hospital vancomycin-susceptible and vancomycin-resistant E. faecium patient transmission events, underlining the need for careful consideration before modifying current E. faecium infection control strategies.

  15. Incidence and risk factors of vancomycin-resistant enterococcus colonization in burn unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altoparlak, Ulku; Koca, Ozlem; Ozkurt, Zulal; Akcay, Mufide N

    2011-02-01

    This study was aimed to identify the incidence of vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) colonization in burn patients, to collate risk factors for colonization and to determine the VRE resistance profile to different antimicrobial agents. This prospective study was carried out on the burn unit, during the period from September 2008 to January 2010, in 128 patients who were hospitalized at least 3 weeks or more. Periodic swabs were taken from burn wound, rectal, axillary, umblicaly and throat regions of the patients on admission and 7th, 14th, 21st days of hospitalization. Demographics and known risk factors were retrieved and assessed by statistical methods. Only 20 patients (15.6%) were colonized with enterococci on admission and these strains isolated from rectal, umblical and throat samples were sensitive to vancomycin. Initial VRE isolation was made in the first samples from the rectum of two patients on the 7th day. The rates of rectal, umblical, throat and axillary colonization increased to 21.9%, 3.1%, 3.1% and 3.1% at 28th day, respectively. VRE strains were the first isolated from burn wounds of only one patient (0.8%) on the 14th day and the colonization rate increased to 7.0% at the 28th day. Our study indicated that rectal colonization was seen more than other sites of colonization and was strictly correlate to colonizing enterococci between burn wound and other body regions. Multivariate analyses showed that glycopeptide use, burn depth and total burn surface area were independent risk factors for acquisition of VRE. All VSE strains were susceptible to teicoplanin, tigecycline and linezolid. VSE strains were more resistant to gentamicin and streptomycin, and VRE strains were more resistant to penicillin and ampicillin. The present study showed tigecycline and linezolid to be most active agents against VRE strains. The determined VRE colonization and risk factors of VRE acquisition are expected to be useful in establishing guidelines for preventing

  16. Spread without known selective pressure of a vancomycin-resistant clone of Enterococcus faecium among broilers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nilsson, O.; Greko, C.; Top, Janetta; Franklin, A.; Bengtsson, B.

    The aim of this paper was to describe an increased occurrence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in Swedish broilers since 2000 and to investigate the genetic relatedness of isolates. Caecal content from slaughtered broilers was cultured for VRE on medium supplemented with vancomycin (16

  17. Molecular characterization of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium strains isolated from carriage and clinical samples in a tertiary hospital, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozalan, Aysegul; Coskun-Ari, Fatma Filiz; Ozdem, Birsen; Unaldi, Ozlem; Celikbilek, Nevreste; Kirca, Fisun; Aydogan, Sibel; Muderris, Tuba; Guven, Tumer; Acikgoz, Ziya Cibali; Durmaz, Riza

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the presence of vancomycin resistance (vanA and vanB) and virulence genes (esp, asa1, gelE, ace, hyl, cylA, cpd and ebpA) in vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREfm) strains and to analyse the clonal relationships among the strains. E. faecium strains were identified from rectal and clinical specimens by biochemical tests and the API-20 Strep kit. Susceptibility testing was performed using disc-diffusion and broth-dilution methods. PFGE was used for molecular typing of the VREfm strains. The vancomycin resistance and virulence genes were amplified by two-step multiplex PCR. All 55 VREfm isolates were resistant to penicillin G, ampicillin and high-level gentamicin but were susceptible to quinupristin/dalfopristin and linezolid. Multiplex PCR analysis indicated that all isolates harboured vanA and that 41 (75 %) were positive for virulence genes. The esp gene was the most common virulence factor and was detected in nine (41 %) invasive and 32 (96.7 %) non-invasive isolates. Multiple virulence genes were observed only in two non-invasive isolates; one harboured esp and ebpA and the other harboured esp, ebpA, asa1, gelE and cpd. PFGE typing yielded 16 different types, seven of which were clusters with two to 14 strains each. The clustering rates of the rectal swab, blood and urine isolates were 72.7 %, 61.5 % and 87.5 %, respectively. The genetic similarity observed among the VREfm isolates indicated cross-transmission in the hospital. Further studies on the virulence factors present in the strains might provide insight into the acquisition of these traits and their contribution to increased prevalence of VREfm.

  18. Vancomycin-resistant enterococcus outbreak in a pediatric intensive care unit: report of successful interventions for control and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Carmona

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to retrospectively report the results of interventions for controlling a vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE outbreak in a tertiary-care pediatric intensive care unit (PICU of a University Hospital. After identification of the outbreak, interventions were made at the following levels: patient care, microbiological surveillance, and medical and nursing staff training. Data were collected from computer-based databases and from the electronic prescription system. Vancomycin use progressively increased after March 2008, peaking in August 2009. Five cases of VRE infection were identified, with 3 deaths. After the interventions, we noted a significant reduction in vancomycin prescription and use (75% reduction, and the last case of VRE infection was identified 4 months later. The survivors remained colonized until hospital discharge. After interventions there was a transient increase in PICU length-of-stay and mortality. Since then, the use of vancomycin has remained relatively constant and strict, no other cases of VRE infection or colonization have been identified and length-of-stay and mortality returned to baseline. In conclusion, we showed that a bundle intervention aiming at a strict control of vancomycin use and full compliance with the Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee guidelines, along with contact precautions and hand-hygiene promotion, can be effective in reducing vancomycin use and the emergence and spread of vancomycin-resistant bacteria in a tertiary-care PICU.

  19. Molecular characterization of resistance, virulence and clonality in vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis: A hospital-based study in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing-xian; Li, Tong; Ning, Yong-zhong; Shao, Dong-hua; Liu, Jing; Wang, Shu-qin; Liang, Guo-wei

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) in China is increasing, the molecular epidemiology of VRE in China is only partly known. This study was conducted to assess the molecular characterization of resistance, virulence and clonality of 69 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREfm) and seven vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VREfs) isolates obtained from a Chinese hospital between July 2011 and July 2013. The glycopeptide resistance genes (VanA and VanB) were screened by multiplex PCR. The presence of five putative virulence genes (esp, gelE, asa1, hyl and cylA) were evaluated by another multiplex PCR. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme was used to assess the clonality. All 76 VRE isolates exhibited VanA phenotype and harbored VanA gene. Esp was the only gene detected both in VREfm and VREfs strains, accounting for 89.9% and 42.9%, respectively. The hyl gene was merely positive in 27.5% of VREfm strains. MLST analysis demonstrated three STs (ST6, ST4 and ST470) in VREfs and twelve STs (ST78, ST571, ST17, ST564, ST389, ST18, ST547, ST341, ST414, ST343, ST262 and ST203) in VREfm, which were all designated as CC17 by eBURST algorithm. An outbreak of VREfm belonging to ST571 was found to happen within the neurology ward in this hospital. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ST6 (CC2) VREfs strains in China and the first outbreak report of VREfm strains belonging to ST571 around the world. Our data could offer important information for understanding the molecular features of VRE in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular characterization of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates from Bermuda.

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    Patrick Eberechi Akpaka

    Full Text Available Molecular characteristics of vancomycin resistant enterococci isolates from Bermuda Island is currently unknown. This study was conducted to investigate phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of VRE isolates from Bermuda Island using the chromogenic agar, E-tests, polymerase chain reaction (PCR, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST. Eighteen E. faecium isolates were completely analyzed and were all resistant to vancomycin, susceptible to linezolid and quinupristin/dalfopristin, positive for vanA and esp genes. The MLST analysis confirmed most isolates were of the sequence types linked to clonal complex 17 (CC17 that is widely associated with outbreaks in hospitals. Infection control measures, antibiotic stewardship, and surveillance activities will continue to be a priority in hospital on the Island.

  1. Emergence of linezolid- and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium in a department for hematologic stem cell transplantation

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    M. Krull

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevalence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci has increased in Germany. Here, we report the cluster of linezolid- and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (LVRE in a German department for hematologic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Methods In this retrospective analysis we included all patients with LVRE in a university-based department for HSCT in 2014 and 2015. Patients chart reviews were used to investigate the epidemiology and clinical outcome. Available LVRE isolates underwent detailed microbiological characterization and genotyping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. Results In total, 20 patients with LVRE were identified within the observed time period. All except two patients underwent allogeneic HSCT. Surveillance culture results from incoming patients and chart review revealed that 10 of 20 patients were colonized at hospital admission. Eight of 10 patients with in-hospital acquired LVRE had previous linezolid treatment. Analysis of spatio-temporal patterns showed no evidence for LVRE patient-to-patient or environment-to-patient transmission within the HSCT department. In five cases (25 % LVRE bloodstream infection occurred. Nine LVRE isolates could be saved for characterization. Eight isolates carried vanA, one isolate vanB. PFGE analysis showed that four different LVRE clones were responsible for the cluster. One single genotype was present in six LVRE isolates whereupon the corresponding patients were all referred from the same hospital to the HSCT department. Conclusions This is the first report demonstrating the emergence of LVRE in a German HSCT department. (LVRE screening at patients’ admission and appropriate infection control strategies were sufficient to prevent any transmission. Further studies in this predisposed patient collective are warranted.

  2. New combinations of mutations in VanD-Type vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus avium strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depardieu, F; Foucault, M-L; Bell, J; Dubouix, A; Guibert, M; Lavigne, J-P; Levast, M; Courvalin, P

    2009-05-01

    We studied the clinical isolates Enterococcus faecium NEF1, resistant to high levels of vancomycin (MIC, 512 microg/ml) and teicoplanin (MIC, 64 microg/ml); Enterococcus faecium BM4653 and BM4656 and Enterococcus avium BM4655, resistant to moderate levels of vancomycin (MIC, 32 microg/ml) and to low levels of teicoplanin (MIC, 4 microg/ml); and Enterococcus faecalis BM4654, moderately resistant to vancomycin (MIC, 16 microg/ml) but susceptible to teicoplanin (MIC, 0.5 microg/ml). The strains were distinct, were constitutively resistant via the synthesis of peptidoglycan precursors ending in D-alanyl-D-lactate, and harbored a chromosomal vanD gene cluster that was not transferable. New mutations were found in conserved domains of VanS(D): at T(170)I near the phosphorylation site in NEF1, at V(67)A at the membrane surface in BM4653, at G(340)S in the G2 ATP-binding domain in BM4655, in the F domain in BM4656 (a 6-bp insertion), and in the G1 and G2 domains of BM4654 (three mutations). The mutations resulted in constitutivity, presumably through the loss of the phosphatase activity of the sensor. The chromosomal Ddl D-Ala:D-Ala ligase had an IS19 copy in NEF1, a mutation in the serine (S(185)F) or near the arginine (T(289)P) involved in D-Ala1 binding in BM4653 or BM4655, respectively, and a mutation next to the lysine (P(180)S) involved in D-Ala2 binding in BM4654, leading to the production of an impaired enzyme. In BM4653 vanY(D), a new insertion sequence, ISEfa9, belonging to the IS3 family, resulted in the absence of D,D-carboxypeptidase activity. Strain BM4656 had a functional D-Ala:D-Ala ligase, associated with high levels of both VanX(D) and VanY(D) activities, and is the first example of a VanD-type strain with a functional Ddl enzyme. Study of these five clinical isolates, displaying various assortments of mutations, confirms that all VanD-type strains isolated so far have undergone mutations in the vanS(D) or vanR(D) gene, leading to constitutive resistance

  3. Global spread of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium from distinct nosocomial genetic complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Willems, Rob J L; Top, Janetta; van Santen, Marga; Robinson, D Ashley; Coque, Teresa M; Baquero, Fernando; Grundmann, Hajo; Bonten, Marc J M

    2005-01-01

    .... Evolutionary genetics, population structure, and geographic distribution of 411 VRE and vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecium isolates, recovered from human and nonhuman sources and community...

  4. Antimicrobial Resistance and Multilocus Sequence Typing of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Isolated from the Chungcheong Area

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2011-01-01

    ...). In the present study, characterization of the glycopeptide resistance mechanism, genetic relatedness, and pathogenicity in isolates of vancomycin-resistant in the Chungcheong area were investigated...

  5. A novel bacteriocin from Enterococcus faecalis 478 exhibits a potent activity against vancomycin-resistant enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phumisantiphong, Uraporn; Siripanichgon, Kanokrat; Reamtong, Onrapak; Diraphat, Pornphan

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant enterococci (MDRE) and particularly vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) is considered a serious health problem worldwide, causing the need for new antimicrobials. The aim of this study was to discover and characterize bacteriocin against clinical isolates of MDRE and VRE. Over 10,000 bacterial isolates from water, environment and clinical samples were screened. E. faecalis strain 478 isolated from human feces produced the highest antibacterial activity against several MDRE and VRE strains. The optimum condition for bacteriocin production was cultivation in MRS broth at 37°C, pH 5-6 for 16 hours. The bacteriocin-like substance produced from E. faecalis strain EF478 was stable at 60°C for at least 1 hour and retained its antimicrobial activity after storage at -20°C for 1 year, at 4°C for 6 months, and at 25°C for 2 months. A nano-HPLC electrospray ionization multi-stage tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis showed that the amino acid sequences of the bacteriocin-like substance was similar to serine protease of E. faecalis, gi|488296663 (NCBI database), which has never been reported as a bacteriocin. This study reported a novel bacteriocin with high antibacterial activity against VRE and MDRE.

  6. Risk Factors Associated with Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus in Intensive Care Unit Settings in Saudi Arabia

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    Mahmoud Shorman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE are significant nosocomial pathogens worldwide. There is one report about the epidemiology of VRE in Saudi Arabia. Objective. To determine the risk factors associated with VRE infection or colonization in intensive care unit (ICU settings. Design. This is a descriptive, epidemiologic hospital-based case-control study of patients with VRE from February 2006 to March 2010 in ICU in a tertiary hospital in Saudi Arabia. Methods. Data were collected from hospital records of patients with VRE. The main outcome measure was the adjusted odds ratio estimates of potential risk factors for VRE. Results. Factors associated with VRE included ICU admission for multiorgan failure, chronic renal failure, prior use of antimicrobial agents in the past three months and before ICU admission, gastrointestinal oral contrast procedure, and hemodialysis. Being located in a high risk room (roommate of patients colonized or infected with VRE was found to be protective. Conclusions. Factors associated with VRE acquisition are often complex and may be confounded by local variables.

  7. A novel bacteriocin from Enterococcus faecalis 478 exhibits a potent activity against vancomycin-resistant enterococci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uraporn Phumisantiphong

    Full Text Available The emergence of multidrug-resistant enterococci (MDRE and particularly vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE is considered a serious health problem worldwide, causing the need for new antimicrobials. The aim of this study was to discover and characterize bacteriocin against clinical isolates of MDRE and VRE. Over 10,000 bacterial isolates from water, environment and clinical samples were screened. E. faecalis strain 478 isolated from human feces produced the highest antibacterial activity against several MDRE and VRE strains. The optimum condition for bacteriocin production was cultivation in MRS broth at 37°C, pH 5-6 for 16 hours. The bacteriocin-like substance produced from E. faecalis strain EF478 was stable at 60°C for at least 1 hour and retained its antimicrobial activity after storage at -20°C for 1 year, at 4°C for 6 months, and at 25°C for 2 months. A nano-HPLC electrospray ionization multi-stage tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis showed that the amino acid sequences of the bacteriocin-like substance was similar to serine protease of E. faecalis, gi|488296663 (NCBI database, which has never been reported as a bacteriocin. This study reported a novel bacteriocin with high antibacterial activity against VRE and MDRE.

  8. Peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis caused by vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus: Comprehensive review on treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-kwan Lam

    2015-10-01

    抗萬古黴素腸球菌(vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus已發展成一個全球性的公共衛生威脅,其所導致的腹膜透析相關腹膜炎基於治療選項有限,對腎科醫生更是一大挑戰。在本文中我們將回顧linezolid、quinupristin/dalfopristin (Q/P、及daptomycin對此病的功效,並探討tigecycline的潛在角色。基於相關臨床研究與治療經驗的不足,目前這方面的資料主要來自個案報告/系列。我們大致可見,過去的治療策略從Q/P發展至linezolid;而近年來則出現關於成功使用daptomycin的個案報告,所有個案的透析導管均得以保存。至於何種治療方案佔優,仍然有待更多研究的進一步證實。

  9. Comparative analysis of the complete genome of an epidemic hospital sequence type 203 clone of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In this report we have explored the genomic and microbiological basis for a sustained increase in bloodstream infections at a major Australian hospital caused by Enterococcus faecium multi-locus sequence type (ST) 203, an outbreak strain that has largely replaced a predecessor ST17 sequence type. Results To establish a ST203 reference sequence we fully assembled and annotated the genome of Aus0085, a 2009 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREfm) bloodstream isolate, and the first example of a completed ST203 genome. Aus0085 has a 3.2 Mb genome, comprising a 2.9 Mb circular chromosome and six circular plasmids (2 kb–130 kb). Twelve percent of the 3222 coding sequences (CDS) in Aus0085 are not present in ST17 E. faecium Aus0004 and ST18 E. faecium TX16. Extending this comparison to an additional 12 ST17 and 14 ST203 E. faecium hospital isolate genomes revealed only six genomic regions spanning 41 kb that were present in all ST203 and absent from all ST17 genomes. The 40 CDS have predicted functions that include ion transport, riboflavin metabolism and two phosphotransferase systems. Comparison of the vancomycin resistance-conferring Tn1549 transposon between Aus0004 and Aus0085 revealed differences in transposon length and insertion site, and van locus sequence variation that correlated with a higher vancomycin MIC in Aus0085. Additional phenotype comparisons between ST17 and ST203 isolates showed that while there were no differences in biofilm-formation and killing of Galleria mellonella, ST203 isolates grew significantly faster and out-competed ST17 isolates in growth assays. Conclusions Here we have fully assembled and annotated the first ST203 genome, and then characterized the genomic differences between ST17 and ST203 E. faecium. We also show that ST203 E. faecium are faster growing and can out-compete ST17 E. faecium. While a causal genetic basis for these phenotype differences is not provided here, this study revealed conserved genetic

  10. Selection of a Teicoplanin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Mutant during an Outbreak Caused by Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci with the VanB Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawalec, Magdalena; Gniadkowski, Marek; Kędzierska, Jolanta; Skotnicki, Aleksander; Fiett, Janusz; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2001-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have recently become an increasing problem in hospitals in Poland, being responsible for a growing number of nosocomial outbreaks. In this work, we have analyzed the second outbreak of VRE with the VanB phenotype to be identified in the country. It was caused by clonal dissemination of a single strain of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRES) and horizontal transmission of vancomycin resistance genes among several vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREM) strains. Two similar restriction fragment length polymorphism types of the vanB gene cluster characterized VRES and VREM isolates, and they both contained the same vanB2 variant of the vanB gene. Two vancomycin-susceptible E. faecium (VSEM) isolates, recovered from the same wards during the outbreak, proved to be related to certain VREM isolates and could represent endemic strains that had acquired vancomycin resistance. One VSEM and four VREM isolates, all identified in the same patient, belonged to a single clone, although they revealed remarkable diversity in terms of susceptibility, PFGE patterns, plasmid content, and number of vanB gene cluster copies. Most probably they reflected the dynamic evolution of an E. faecium strain in the course of infection of a single patient. One of the VREM isolates turned out to be resistant to teicoplanin, which coincided with the use of this antibiotic in the patient's therapy. Its vanB gene variant differed by a single mutation from that found in other isolates; however, it also lacked a large part of the vanB gene cluster, including the regulatory genes vanRB and -SB, and the vancomycin-inducible promoter PYB. Expression of the resistance genes vanHB, -B, and -XB was constitutive in the mutant, and this phenomenon was responsible for its unusual phenotype. PMID:11724832

  11. Risk factors for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus colonization in hematologic patients

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    Mioljević Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE is one of the most important hospital pathogens. The aim of the study was to evaluate VRE colonization in patients hospitalized at the Hematology Intensive Care Unit, as well as the associated risk factors. Methods. A prospective cohort study involved 70 patients hospitalized at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU, Clinic for Hematology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, during 3 months. Baseline demographic data, data about antibiotic usage and other risk factors for VRE colonization during the present and previous hospitalizations (within 6 months were recorded for each patient using the questionnaire. Feces or rectal swab was collected for culture from patients on admission and at discharge in case when VRE was not isolated on admission. Enterococci were isolated by standard microbiological methods. Isolate sensitivity was tested by disk-diffusion test using 30 μg/mL (BBL Vancomycin plates according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI standard. Results. Analysing results showed that 7% of the patients had been already colonized with VRE upon ICU admission. The rate of VRE colonization during present hospitalization was 41.5%. Univariate logistic regression demonstrated the statistically significant differences in diagnosis, length of present stay, use of aminoglycosides and piperacillin/tazobactam in present hospitalization, duration of use of carbapenem and piperacillin/ tazobactam in present hospitalization between the VREcolonized and non-colonized patients. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML, use of carbapenem in previous hospitalization and duration of use of piperacillin/tazobactam in present hospitalization were independent risk factors for VRE-colonized patients according to multivariate logistic regression. Conclusion. VRE colonization rate was high among the patients admitted to hematology ICU. Rational use of antibiotics and active surveillance may be helpful

  12. Effectiveness of a Lytic Phage SRG1 against Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis in Compost and Soil

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    Sidra Rahmat Ullah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections caused by vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus have become a major problem. Bacteriophage therapy is proposed as a potential alternative therapy. Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria and are ubiquitous in nature. Lytic bacteriophage was isolated from sewage water that infects VREF, the causative agent of endocarditis, bacteraemia, and urinary tract infections (UTIs. The phage produced clear plaques with unique clear morphology and well-defined boundaries. TEM results of phage revealed it to be 108±0.2 nm long and 90±0.5 nm wide. The characterization of bacteriophage revealed that infection process of phage was calcium and magnesium dependent and phage titers were highest under optimum conditions for VREF, with an optimal temperature range of 37–50°C. The maximum growth was observed at 37°C, hence having 100% viability. The latent period for phage was small with a burst size of 512 viral particles per bacterial cell. The phage was tested against various clinical strains and results proved it to be host specific. It can be used as a potential therapeutic agent for VREF infections. The phage efficiently eradicated VREF inoculated in cattle compost, poultry compost, and a soil sample which makes it a potential agent for clearing compost and soil sample.

  13. Distinct but Spatially Overlapping Intestinal Niches for Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium and Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae.

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    Silvia Caballero

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance among enterococci and γ-proteobacteria is an increasing problem in healthcare settings. Dense colonization of the gut by antibiotic-resistant bacteria facilitates their spread between patients and also leads to bloodstream and other systemic infections. Antibiotic-mediated destruction of the intestinal microbiota and consequent loss of colonization resistance are critical factors leading to persistence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The mechanisms underlying microbiota-mediated colonization resistance remain incompletely defined and are likely distinct for different antibiotic-resistant bacterial species. It is unclear whether enterococci or γ-proteobacteria, upon expanding to high density in the gut, confer colonization resistance against competing bacterial species. Herein, we demonstrate that dense intestinal colonization with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE does not reduce in vivo growth of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. Reciprocally, K. pneumoniae does not impair intestinal colonization by VRE. In contrast, transplantation of a diverse fecal microbiota eliminates both VRE and K. pneumoniae from the gut. Fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrates that VRE and K. pneumoniae localize to the same regions in the colon but differ with respect to stimulation and invasion of the colonic mucus layer. While VRE and K. pneumoniae occupy the same three-dimensional space within the gut lumen, their independent growth and persistence in the gut suggests that they reside in distinct niches that satisfy their specific in vivo metabolic needs.

  14. [Risk factor of intestinal colonization with vancomycin resistant Enterococcus spp in hospitalized pediatric patients with oncological disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyola, Paula; Tordecilla, Juan; Benadof, Dona; Yohannessen, Karla; Acuña, Mirta

    2015-08-01

    The isolation of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp (ERV) has increased significantly within the last few years, along with the risk of infection and dissemination of these bacteria. Our aim was to determine risk factors (RF) for intestinal colonization in hospitalized pediatric patients with oncological disease at Hospital de Niños Roberto del Río. Between January 2012 and December 2013 a transversal study was performed with 107 rectal swabs and processed with a PCR for ERV. The patients were classified as "colonized with ERV" and "not colonized with ERV" and we evaluated possible RF for intestinal colonization in both groups. VRE colonization was found in 51 patients (52%). The median of time elapsed between oncological diagnosis and VRE colonization was 35 days. The significant RF associated with VRE colonization were days of hospitalization prior to study, neutropenia and treatment with antibiotics within 30 days prior to study and mucositis. According to the RF revealed in this study we may suggest prevention standards to avoid ERV colonization. This is the first investigation in our country in hospitalized pediatric patients with oncological disease and processed with a multiplex PCR for ERV, therefore it is a great contribution about this subject in Chile.

  15. Virulence Determinants and Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns of Vancomycin-resistantEnterococcus faeciumIsolated from Different Sources in Southwest Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshadi, Maniya; Mahmoudi, Mahmood; Motahar, Moloud Sadat; Soltani, Saber; Pourmand, Mohammad Reza

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the incidence of antibiotic-resistance and virulence genes in vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolated from different sources in southwest Iran from Mar to Sep 2015. Overall, 120 E. faecium isolates (80 VRE and 40 vancomycin-susceptible enterococci [VSE] isolates) were obtained from four hospitals. The resistance of the VRE isolates was determined by disk diffusion method. Multiplex PCR was performed to detect the virulence genes carried by the E. faecium isolates, namely, enterococcal surface protein ( esp ), hyaluronidase ( hyl ), and collagen-binding adhesin ( acm ). All the VRE isolates exhibited multidrug resistance, with the rates of resistance to ampicillin, erythromycin, and ciprofloxacin reaching high levels. The isolates were least resistant to chloramphenicol and nitrofurantoin, but all of them were susceptible to linezolid. 46.6%, 20.8%, and 86.6% of the E. faecium isolates carried the esp , hyl , and acm genes, respectively. There is a significant difference between the prevalence of esp and hyl genes in the VRE and VSE isolates. In the VRE isolates, the high prevalence of multidrug resistance were found and the difference in the prevalence of esp among various sources was significant. The findings reflected a relationship between the prevalence of esp and hyl and resistance to certain antibiotics.

  16. Temporal changes in pulsed-field gel electrophoresis banding in vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium and implications for outbreak investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Milena; Malczynski, Michael; Qi, Chao; Radetski, Jordan; Zembower, Teresa; Scheetz, Marc H

    2013-04-01

    Patients are often screened with surveillance cultures to discern transmissions vs transformation of an isolate to vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. To determine the amount of time between which isolates could be considered genetically similar by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, isolate change over time within single patients was studied. A minimum of 4 isolates per patient, separated by at least 2 months, were collected from previously frozen stores. Visual comparison of banding patterns was conducted, and percent relatedness was calculated. Twenty-eight isolates from 6 patients were studied. No isolate differed by more than 3 bands before 150 days, and the average percent difference per band was 3.7%. The isolates diverged genetically as a linear function of number of bands over time (good model fit intrapatient r(2) = 0.42; poor model fit interpatient r(2) = 0.0062). Trajectory of genetic variation appears to be isolate/patient specific; however, commonalities exist and tested isolates were relatively stable out to 150 days. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Vancomycin-resistant enterococcus colonization in neonatal intensive care unit: prevention and eradication experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzer, Derya; Yavuzcan Öztürk, Dilek; Gürsoy, Tuğba; Ocalmaz, Mutlu Seyda; Karatekin, Güner; Ovalı, Hüsnü Fahri

    2012-10-01

    Vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) are important etiologic agents of nosocomial infections and colonization for hospitalized patients. Isolation rate of VRE is higher especially in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), due to the immune insufficiency of neonates, frequent use of antibiotics and prolonged duration of hospitalization. The aims of this report were to present the rapid dissemination of VRE colonization in our NICU, to determine the factors related to colonization and to share the precautions taken to prevent the dissemination. Upon the isolation of VRE from the urine culture of a premature infant followed up in the NICU, rectal swab specimens were obtained from this index patient, other patients staying at the NICU, the related health-care personnel and also environmental sampling was performed. Although strict contact precautions were implemented for the VRE positive patient, VRE were isolated from the rectal swabs of other patients and the number of VRE positive cases increased to 11 on the 18th day. No VRE were detected in the environmental samples. By strict adherence and compliance to isolation precautions, physical separation of VRE positive newborns and healthcare workers and education of the personnel, VRE colonization was eradicated on the 55th day. During the period between the first detection of VRE colonization and the management of eradication (August 10th-October 4th 2009), 133 patients were followed up in the NICU and 52 (40%) of those patients were colonized by VRE. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of VRE colonization. These patients' anthropometric and clinical findings were evaluated retrospectively. Gestational age and birth weights of VRE positive and negative patients were 30.9 ± 3.8 weeks and 1441 ± 543 g; 34.5 ± 4 weeks and 2396 ± 917 g, respectively (pinfection or sepsis due to VRE and no fatal case was detected. Mean durations of mechanical ventilation, hospitalization and

  18. Polyclonal emergence of vanA vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hal, Sebastiaan J; Espedido, Björn A; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Howden, Benjamin P; Korman, Tony M; Nimmo, Graeme R; Gosbell, Iain B; Jensen, Slade O

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the genetic context associated with the emergence of vanA VRE in Australia. The whole genomes of 18 randomly selected vanA -positive Enterococcus faecium patient isolates, collected between 2011 and 2013 from hospitals in four Australian capitals, were sequenced and analysed. In silico typing and transposon/plasmid assembly revealed that the sequenced isolates represented (in most cases) different hospital-adapted STs and were associated with a variety of different Tn 1546 variants and plasmid backbone structures. The recent emergence of vanA VRE in Australia was polyclonal and not associated with the dissemination of a single 'dominant' ST or vanA -encoding plasmid. Interestingly, the factors contributing to this epidemiological change are not known and future studies may need to consider investigation of potential community sources.

  19. Does vancomycin prescribing intervention affect vancomycin-resistant enterococcus infection and colonization in hospitals? A systematic review

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    Riley Lee W

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vancomycin resistant enterococcus (VRE is a major cause of nosocomial infections in the United States and may be associated with greater morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs than vancomycin-susceptible enterococcus. Current guidelines for the control of VRE include prudent use of vancomycin. While vancomycin exposure appears to be a risk factor for VRE acquisition in individual patients, the effect of vancomycin usage at the population level is not known. We conducted a systematic review to determine the impact of reducing vancomycin use through prescribing interventions on the prevalence and incidence of VRE colonization and infection in hospitals within the United States. Methods To identify relevant studies, we searched three electronic databases, and hand searched selected journals. Thirteen studies from 12 articles met our inclusion criteria. Data were extracted and summarized for study setting, design, patient characteristics, types of intervention(s, and outcome measures. The relative risk, 95% confidence interval, and p-value associated with change in VRE acquisition pre- and post-vancomycin prescription interventions were calculated and compared. Heterogeneity in study results was formally explored by stratified analysis. Results No randomized clinical trials on this topic were found. Each of the 13 included studies used a quasi-experimental design of low hierarchy. Seven of the 13 studies reported statistically significant reductions in VRE acquisition following interventions, three studies reported no significant change, and three studies reported increases in VRE acquisition, one of which reported statistical significance. Results ranged from a reduction of 82.5% to an increase of 475%. Studies of specific wards, which included sicker patients, were more likely to report positive results than studies of an entire hospital including general inpatients (Fisher's exact test 0.029. The type of intervention

  20. Genomic analysis of 495 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium reveals broad dissemination of a vanA plasmid in more than 19 clones from Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, Mette; Gumpert, Heidi; Bayliss, Sion

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: From 2012 to 2014, there has been a huge increase in vancomycin-resistant (vanA) Enterococcus faecium (VREfm) in Copenhagen, Denmark, with 602 patients infected or colonized with VREfm in 2014 compared with just 22 in 2012. The objective of this study was to describe the genetic......A plasmid was highly covered by reads from isolates containing the type 4 transposon. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that it was the dissemination of the type 4 Tn1546-like transposon and plasmid via horizontal transfer to multiple populations of E. faecium, followed by clonal spread of new VREfm clones...

  1. Genomic analysis of teicoplanin resistance emerging during treatment of vanB vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium infections in solid organ transplant recipients including donor-derived cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Natasha E; Ballard, Susan A; Lam, Margaret M C; Johnson, Paul D R; Grayson, M Lindsay; Stinear, Timothy P; Howden, Benjamin P

    2013-09-01

    We noted four cases of apparent in vivo emergence of teicoplanin resistance during failed therapy for initially teicoplanin-susceptible vanB vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREfm) infections in solid organ transplant recipients at our institution over a 12 month period. We investigated if in vivo emergence of resistance had occurred, if transplant-related vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) infections had occurred and identified clinical predictors of resistance emergence. Whole genome sequencing was performed on nine VREfm isolates for phylogenetic analysis and to identify determinants of teicoplanin resistance. Clinical treatment details were compared with other patients who received teicoplanin for confirmed vanB VRE infections but did not develop resistance during the same year at our institution. A high-resolution, core genome phylogeny was inferred for nine VREfm isolates and confirmed in vivo development of resistance during failed therapy in four cases. Four different non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were observed in the vanRS genes of teicoplanin-resistant strains compared with the index teicoplanin-susceptible strains, and these SNPs were predicted to confer teicoplanin resistance. VREfm within a cluster of early transplant-related infections were phylogenetically identical at the core genome level, indicating a common source donor. Focus eradication and absence of prosthetic material were characteristics of those patients treated successfully. Clinicians should be cautious of resistance emerging during teicoplanin therapy for vanB VRE, particularly in immunosuppressed patients or where source control is difficult.

  2. Susceptibility of vancomycin-resistant and –sensitive Enterococcus faecium obtained from Danish hospitals to benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine and hydrogen eroxide biocides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alotaibi, Sulaiman M.I.; Ayibiekea, Alafate; Pedersen, Annemette Frøling

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. In Danish hospitals, the number of infections caused by vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE faecium) has dramatically increased in recent years. Hospital disinfectants are essential in eliminating pathogenic microorganisms, and reduced susceptibility may contribute to hospital......-associated infections. We have addressed whether clinical VRE faecium display decreased biocide susceptibility when compared to vancomycin-sensitive Enterococcus faecium (VSE faecium) isolates. Methodology. In total 12 VSE faecium and 37 VRE faecium isolates obtained from Danish hospitals over an extended time period...... were tested for susceptibility towards three commonly applied biocides, namely benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine and hydrogen peroxide. Results. For benzalkonium chloride, 89% of VRE faecium strains had a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 8mg l–1, whereas for VSE faecium, only 25...

  3. Epidemiological alteration in pathogens found in ground meat in Iran: unexpected predominance of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis

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    Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Colonization of the human and animal intestinal tract with potential pathogenic bacteria is correlated with the risk of contamination of food products. The current study analyzed the prevalence of and O157H7 in ground meat in Ilam, Iran. Both index organisms were identified following standard food microbiological methods. For , the susceptibility to vancomycin was tested, and PCR was used to check for the gene. was present in all 24 ground meat samples, with no O157H7 detected in samples. The analysis showed the presence of the gene in 5/24 vancomycin resistant enterococci. In conclusion, this study for the first time demonstrates the presence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in ground meat in Iran. This observation warrants further epidemiologic investigation and should be followed up in the future.

  4. Is the mazEF toxin-antitoxin system responsible for vancomycin resistance in clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis?

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    Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available [english] The current study was conducted to investigate the relationship between vancomycin-resistant (VRE and the presence of toxin-antitoxin (TA system, which may be useful as target for novel antimicrobial therapy concepts. The susceptibility of was determined by MIC, and the presence of the TA system was evaluated by PCR. Among 200 isolates 39.5% showed resistance to vancomycin (VRE, while 60.5% were susceptible strains (VSE. The TA system was positive in all VRE isolates (100%, but less prevalent (38/121, 31.4% among the 121 VSE strains. In conclusion, our study demonstrated a positive relationship between the presence of vancomycin resistance and TA system. This observation may introduce therapeutic options against a novel antimicrobial target in enterococci.

  5. The Bacteriophage EF-P29 Efficiently Protects against Lethal Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Alleviates Gut Microbiota Imbalance in a Murine Bacteremia Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mengjun; Liang, Jiaming; Zhang, Yufeng; Hu, Liyuan; Gong, Pengjuan; Cai, Ruopeng; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Hao; Ge, Jinli; Ji, Yalu; Guo, Zhimin; Feng, Xin; Sun, Changjiang; Yang, Yongjun; Lei, Liancheng; Han, Wenyu; Gu, Jingmin

    2017-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is becoming an increasingly important opportunistic pathogen worldwide, especially because it can cause life-threatening nosocomial infections. Treating E. faecalis infections has become increasingly difficult because of the prevalence of multidrug-resistant E. faecalis strains. Because bacteriophages show specificity for their bacterial hosts, there has been a growth in interest in using phage therapies to combat the rising incidence of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. In this study, we isolated a new lytic phage, EF-P29, which showed high efficiency and a broad host range against E. faecalis strains, including vancomycin-resistant strains. The EF-P29 genome contains 58,984 bp (39.97% G+C), including 101 open reading frames, and lacks known putative virulence factors, integration-related proteins or antibiotic resistance determinants. In murine experiments, the administration of a single intraperitoneal injection of EF-P29 (4 × 105 PFU) at 1 h after challenge was sufficient to protect all mice against bacteremia caused by infection with a vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis strain (2 × 109 CFU/mouse). E. faecalis colony counts were more quickly eliminated in the blood of EF-P29-protected mice than in unprotected mice. We also found that exogenous E. faecalis challenge resulted in enrichment of members of the genus Enterococcus (family Enterococcaceae) in the guts of the mice, suggesting that it can enter the gut and colonize there. The phage EF-P29 reduced the number of colonies of genus Enterococcus and alleviated the gut microbiota imbalance that was caused by E. faecalis challenge. These data indicate that the phage EF-P29 shows great potential as a therapeutic treatment for systemic VREF infection. Thus, phage therapies that are aimed at treating opportunistic pathogens are also feasible. The dose of phage should be controlled and used at the appropriate level to avoid causing imbalance in the gut microbiota. PMID:28536572

  6. Identification of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis as vanC-type Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) from sewage and river water in the provincial city of Miyazaki, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Masateru; Iguchi, Atsushi; Suzuki, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    As a first step for assessing the risk to human health posed by vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in the aquatic environment, we screened sewage and urban river water samples from Miyazaki, Japan for VRE. Because vancomycin-resistant organisms are not as prevalent in sewage and river water as vancomycin-susceptible organisms, the samples were screened by minimum inhibitory concentration test using the vancomycin-supplemented membrane-Enterococcus indoxyl-β-d-glucoside (mEI) agar. The isolates, presumed to be enterococci, were identified using 16S rRNA sequencing analysis. The percentages of VRE isolates screened using 4 μg mL(-1) vancomycin-supplemented mEI agar from sewage and urban river water samples were 12% and 24%, respectively. The vancomycin-resistant genes vanC1 and vanC2/3 were detected in the isolates from both samples by PCR analysis. All enterococci isolates containing vanC1, which is a specific gene for vanC-type of VRE, were identified as Enterococcus casseliflavus/gallinarum. Further, 92% enterococci isolates containing vanC2/3 were identified as E. casseliflavus/gallinarum, the remaining isolates containing vanC2/3 were E. faecium (4%) and E. faecalis (4%). Thereafter, the distribution of E. faecium and E. faecalis, which are the major types of enterococci in humans containing vanC2/3, was observed in the water samples collected.

  7. Analysis of VanA vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates from Saudi Arabian hospitals reveals the presence of clonal cluster 17 and two new Tn 1546 lineage types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Khan (Mushtaq); M. van der Wal (Martin); D.J. Farrell (David); L. Cossins (Luke); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); A. Alaidan (Alwaleed); J.P. Hays (John)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjectives; The aim of this study was to characterize 34 vancomycin-resistant VanA Enterococcus faecium isolates obtained from two hospitals in Saudi Arabia and to assess Tn 1546 variation within these isolates. Methods: PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) genotypes, antibiotic

  8. Characterization of vancomycin-resistant and vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecium isolates from humans, chickens and pigs by RiboPrinting and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Anette Marie; Fussing, Vivian; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2000-01-01

    Forty-eight vancomycin-resistant and 35 vancomycin-sensitive Danish Enterococcus faecium isolates obtained from pigs, chickens and humans, as well as the human vanA reference isolate BM4147, were characterized by EcoRI RiboPrinting and Smal pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. RiboPrinting of the 84...... isolates yielded 40 types whereas PFGE-typing yielded 57 types discriminated by differences in more than three bands. By molecular typing, both clonal spread of E. faecium as well as horizontal transmission of Tn1546 between animals and humans was supported. Furthermore, it was found that the population...... of E. faecium spreads freely between the animal and human reservoir....

  9. Possible Connection between a Widely Disseminated Conjugative Gentamicin Resistance (pMG1-Like) Plasmid and the Emergence of Vancomycin Resistance in Enterococcus faecium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Haruyoshi; Pierson, Carl; Lim, Suk Kyung; Clewell, Don B.; Ike, Yasuyoshi

    2002-01-01

    A total of 640 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) isolates, which were obtained between 1994 and 1999 from the Medical School Hospital of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, were used in this study. Of the 640 strains, 611 and 29 were VanA and VanB VRE, respectively, based on PCR analysis. Four hundred ninety-two (77%) of the strains exhibited resistance to concentrations of gentamicin from 64 μg/ml (MIC) to more than 1,024 μg/ml (MIC). The gentamicin resistance of each of 261 (53%) of the 492 gentamicin-resistant strains was transferred to E. faecium at a frequency of about 10−5 to 10−6 per donor cell in broth mating. More than 90% of vancomycin resistances of the 261 strains cotransferred with the gentamicin resistances to E. faecium strains by filter mating. The conjugative gentamicin resistance plasmids were identified and were classified into five types (A through E) with respect to their EcoRI restriction profiles. The transfer frequencies of each type of plasmid between E. faecium strains or Enterococcus faecalis strains were around 10−3 to 10−5 per donor cell or around 10−6 to 10−7 per donor cell, respectively, in broth mating. Type A and type B were the most frequently isolated, at an isolation frequency of about 40% per VRE isolate harboring the gentamicin resistance conjugative plasmid. The plasmids did not show any homology in Southern hybridization with the pheromone-responsive plasmids and broad-host-range plasmids pAMβ1 and pIP501. The EcoRI or NdeI restriction fragments of each type of plasmids hybridized to the conjugative gentamicin resistance plasmid pMG1 (65.1 kb), which was originally isolated from an E. faecium clinical isolate, and transfer efficiently in broth mating. PMID:12202574

  10. Dispersion of the vancomycin resistance genes vanA and vanC of Enterococcus isolated from Nile tilapia on retail sale: A public health hazard

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    Kamelia Mahmoud Osman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Although normally regarded harmless commensals, enterococci may cause a range of different infections in humans, including urinary tract infections, sepsis, and endocarditis. The acquisition of vancomycin resistance by enterococci (VRE has seriously affected the treatment and infection control of these organisms. VRE are frequently resistant to all antibiotics that are effective treatment for vancomycin-susceptible enterococci, which leaves clinicians treating VRE infections with limited therapeutic options. With VRE emerging as a global threat to public health, we aimed to isolate, identify enterococci species from tilapia and their resistance to van-mediated glycopeptide (vanA and vanC as well as the presence of enterococcal surface protein (esp using conventional and molecular methods. The cultural, biochemical (Vitek 2 system and PCR results revealed eight Enterococcus isolates from the 80 fish samples (10% to be further identified as E. faecalis (6/8, 75% and E gallinarum (2/8, 25%. Intraperitoneal injection of healthy Nile tilapia with the eight Enterococcus isolates caused significant morbidity (70% within 3 days and 100% mortality at 6 days post injection with general signs of septicemia. All of the eight Enterococcus isolates were found to be resistant to tetracycline. The 6/6 E. faecalis isolates were susceptible for penicillin, nitrofurantoin, gentamicin, and streptomycin. On the other hand 5/6 were susceptible for ampicillin, vancomycin, chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin. The two isolates of E. gallinarum were sensitive to rifampicin and ciprofloxacin and resistant to vancomycin, chloramphenicol and erythromycin. Molecular characterization proved that they all presented the prototypic vanC element. On the whole, one of the two vancomycin resistance gene was present in 3/8 of the enterococci isolates, while the esp virulence gene was present in 1/8 of the enterococci isolates. The results in this study emphasise the potential role

  11. Hypogammaglobulinemia and Poor Performance Status are Predisposing Factors for Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus Colonization in Patients with Hematological Malignancies

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    Elif Gülsüm Ümit

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE are common pathogens of hospital-acquired infection. Long hospitalization periods, use of broadspectrum antibiotics, and immunosuppression are major risks for VRE colonization. We aimed to evaluate patients’ characteristics and factors that may contribute to VRE colonization. Materials and Methods: Data of 66 patients with colonization and 112 patients without colonization who were hospitalized in the hematology clinic were collected. Hematological malignancies, preexisting gastrointestinal complaints, the presence of hypogammaglobulinemia at the time of diagnosis, complications like neutropenic enterocolitis (NEC, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG and Karnofsky performance statuses were recorded. Results: Ages of the patients ranged between 19 and 95 years (mean: 55.99. Karnofsky and ECOG scores were statistically related to VRE colonization (p7 days may also be accepted as a risk factor, independent of diagnosis or antibiotic use. Performance status is also an important factor for colonization, which may be related to poorer hygiene and increased external help.

  12. Antibacterial resistance of Enterococcus spp. isolated from commercial poultry of the Russian Federation farms in 2013–2016, and identification of vancomycin resistance genes

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    E. A. Svetoch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Enterococci are the leading cause of a number of nosocomial and community-acquired human diseases. In the last decade, these pathogens are becoming resistant to antibacterials, including vancomycin. Multidrug-resistant enterococci have been also isolated from agricultural animals in many countries worldwide, which raises concern of scientists because of possible horizontal transfer of resistance genes. Aim: To assess antibacterial sensitivity of Enterococcus spp. isolates collected from the poultry in the Russian Federation from 2013 to 2016, and to identify vancomycin-resistance genes in their genomes. Materials and methods: Eightyseven enterococci isolates belonging to E.  faecalis (n=47, 54%, E.  faecium (n=25, 28.7% and other species (n=15, 17.2% were collected from clinical samples of 297 heads of poultry (liver, lungs, heart, spleen, contents of the nasal and sinus cavities from 17  poultry farms of the Northwest, Central, Volga, Ural and Southern Federal districts of the Russian Federation. Sensitivity of enterococci to antibacterials was determined by disk-diffusion and broth microdilution methods. Vancomycin resistance genes van was detected by polymerase chain reaction with specific primers. Results: Most enterococci isolates were resistant to erythromycin (74/87, 85.1%, gentamicin (70/87, 80.5%, ceftriaxone (61/87, 70.1%, ciprofloxacin (56/87, 64.4%, tetracycline (57/87, 65.5%, and rifampicin (48/87, 55.2%, fewer ones to trimethoprim (38/87, 43.7%, ampicillin (28/87, 32.2%, linezolid (15/87, 17.2% and chloramphenicol (5/87, 5.7%. The vanC type genes (vanC1 and vanC2/3 were identified in 10  isolates. Vancomycin minimal inhibitory concentrations for these isolates were 2 to 8  mg/L. E. faecium with vanC1 gene was isolated from poultry probably for the first time ever. Conclusion: Commercial poultry in the Russian poultry farms is an important reservoir and source of antibiotic-resistant enterococci populations

  13. Molecular characteristics of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium from a tertiary care hospital in Chengdu, China: molecular characteristics of VRE in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, M; Xie, Y; He, C; Chen, Z X; Guo, L; Yang, Q; Liu, J Y; Du, Y; Ou, Q S; Wang, L L

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREfm) isolates phenotypically and molecularly, and investigate associations between the virulence factors enterococcal surface protein (esp), hyaluronidase (hyl), and collagen adhesin (acm) and colonization/infection. A total of 126 E. faecium [66 VREfm and 60 vancomycin-susceptible (VSEfm)] were collected in West China Hospital. Nine E. faecium isolates (7 VREfm and 2 VSEfm) were selected at random for comparative study in a large region from China. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were measured by Etest and agar dilution, vancomycin resistance genes (vanA, vanB, and vanC) and virulence genes (esp, acm, and hyl) were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Thirty-four VREfm underwent repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). One linezolid-resistant isolate (MIC = 8 μg/ml) was found; none were tigecycline resistant. All 73 VREfm (28 infective strains and 45 intestinal colonizers) had the vanA gene and VanA phenotype. Positivity for esp, hyl, and acm in VREfm was 79.5, 46.6, and 86.3%, respectively, which was higher than in VSEfm (54.8, 27.4, and 56.5%, respectively). Among VSEfm, positivity for acm in isolates from pleural or cerebrospinal fluid (84.6%) was higher than that from blood (32.4%). There were 11 rep-PCR types (similarity >95%) and MLST revealed nine sequence types (STs) among the selected isolates. Most VREfm and all VSEfm belonged to clonal complex 17. A new ST was found, with allele sequence (15, 1, 38, 1, 1, 1, 1). In China, most VREfm seem to belong to the classical nosocomial CC17 clone, and many of them have acquired virulence genes, further strengthening a hospital-adapted type.

  14. Emergence of vanA vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium in a hospital in Porto Alegre, South Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Mariah; Caierão, Juliana; Prates, Juliana Gil; Narvaez, Gabriel Azambuja; Dias, Cícero Armídio Gomes; d'Azevedo, Pedro Alves

    2014-02-13

    In Porto Alegre (South Brazil), since the first VRE isolation in 2000 until the middle of the last decade, the epidemiology of enterococcal infections presented the peculiarity that, as opposed to other regions of the country, almost all VRE were E. faecalis. The aim of this study was to investigate the microbiological and epidemiological characteristics of a VRE outbreak that occurred between August 2010 and September 2011 in Porto Alegre, South Brazil. Twenty-nine isolates from inpatients of Mãe de Deus Hospital that were identified and characterized for their susceptibility profile, vancomycin genotype, presence of esp gene, biofilm production, and clonal relationship were collected.  Patients' records were reviewed for clinical information. All isolates were identified as vancomycin/ampicillin resistant E. faecium carrying the vanA gene. Almost all were susceptible to gentamicin and streptomycin. Most patients died and were associated with a hemodialysis unit stay. All but the first isolate were clustered in a main clone. An important change in vancomycin-resistant enterococci was observed. Studies like this are necessary to monitor the dissemination of VRE, especially of some individual clones.

  15. Susceptibility of vancomycin-resistant and -sensitive Enterococcus faecium obtained from Danish hospitals to benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine and hydrogen peroxide biocides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Sulaiman M I; Ayibiekea, Alafate; Pedersen, Annemette Frøling; Jakobsen, Lotte; Pinholt, Mette; Gumpert, Heidi; Hammerum, Anette M; Westh, Henrik; Ingmer, Hanne

    2017-12-01

    In Danish hospitals, the number of infections caused by vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE faecium) has dramatically increased in recent years. Hospital disinfectants are essential in eliminating pathogenic microorganisms, and reduced susceptibility may contribute to hospital-associated infections. We have addressed whether clinical VRE faecium display decreased biocide susceptibility when compared to vancomycin-sensitive Enterococcus faecium (VSE faecium) isolates. In total 12 VSE faecium and 37 VRE faecium isolates obtained from Danish hospitals over an extended time period were tested for susceptibility towards three commonly applied biocides, namely benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine and hydrogen peroxide. For benzalkonium chloride, 89 % of VRE faecium strains had a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 8 mg l -1 , whereas for VSE faecium, only 25 % of the strains had an MIC of 8 mg l -1 . For chlorhexidine, the MIC of 95 % of VRE faecium strains was 4 mg l -1 or higher, while only 33 % of VSE faecium strains displayed MIC values at the same level. In contrast, both VRE and VSE faecium displayed equal susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide, but a higher minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) was found for the former. The efflux activity was also assessed, and this was generally higher for the VRE faecium strains compared to VSE faecium. VRE faecium from Danish hospitals demonstrated decreased susceptibility towards benzalkonium chloride and chlorhexidine compared to VSE faecium, where the use of chlorhexidine is particularly heavy in the hospital environment. These findings suggest that biocide tolerance may characterize VRE faecium isolated in Danish hospitals.

  16. Vancomycin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Will A; Malachowa, Natalia; DeLeo, Frank R

    2017-06-01

    The evolution of Staphylococcus aureus during the modern antibiotic era has been delineated by distinct strain emergence events, many of which include acquisition of antibiotic resistance. The relative high burden of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in healthcare and community settings is a major concern worldwide. Vancomycin, a glycopeptide antibiotic that inhibits cell wall biosynthesis, remains a drug of choice for treatment of severe MRSA infections. S. aureus strains exhibiting increased resistance to vancomycin, known as vancomycin intermediate-resistant S. aureus (VISA) (MIC = 4-8 µg/mL), were discovered in the 1990s. The molecular basis of resistance in VISA is polygenic and involves stepwise mutations in genes encoding molecules predominantly involved in cell envelope biosynthesis. S. aureus isolates with complete resistance to vancomycin (MIC ≥ 16 µg/mL) are termed vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA)-they were first reported in the U.S. in 2002. Resistance in VRSA is conferred by the vanA gene and operon, which is present on a plasmid. Although treatment of VRSA infections is challenging, the total number of human VRSA infections to date is limited (14 in the U.S.). By comparison, the burden of VISA is relatively high and the molecular mechanisms of resistance are less well-defined. VISA are associated with persistent infections, vancomycin treatment failure, and poor clinical outcomes. Here, we review in brief progress made toward understanding the acquisition of antibiotic resistance in S. aureus, with an emphasis on the molecular mechanisms underlying vancomycin resistance.

  17. Detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci from faecal samples of Iberian wolf and Iberian lynx, including Enterococcus faecium strains of CC17 and the new singleton ST573.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Alexandre; Igrejas, Gilberto; Radhouani, Hajer; López, María; Guerra, Ana; Petrucci-Fonseca, Francisco; Alcaide, Eva; Zorrilla, Irene; Serra, Rodrigo; Torres, Carmen; Poeta, Patrícia

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to perform the molecular characterization of vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) within the faecal flora of Iberian wolf and Iberian lynx. The association with other resistance genes and the detection of virulence genes were also analysed. From 2008 to 2010, 365 faecal samples from Iberian wolf and Iberian lynx were collected and tested for VRE recovery. Mechanisms of resistance to vancomycin and other antibiotics, as well as genes encoding virulence factors were detected through PCR. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) was performed for Enterococcus faecium strains. VRE were recovered in 8 of the 365 analysed samples. The vanA gene was identified in two E. faecium isolates recovered from Iberian wolf faecal samples and the remaining six showed intrinsic resistance (3 vanC1-E. gallinarum and 3 vanC2-E. casseliflavus, from Iberian wolf and Iberian lynx faecal samples, respectively). One vanA-containing isolate showed tetracycline and erythromycin resistance [with erm(B) and tet(L) genes] and the other one also exhibited ampicillin and kanamycin resistance [with erm(B), tet(M) and aph(3')-III genes]. One of the vanA-isolates revealed a new sequence type named ST573 and the other one belonged to the CC17 clonal complex (ST18). The hyl gene was detected in one E. casseliflavus and three E. gallinarum but not among vanA-positive isolates, and the occurrence of cylA and cylL genes was confirmed in two E. casseliflavus isolates. A low prevalence of VRE has been detected in faecal samples of Iberian wolf and Iberian lynx and strains with an acquired mechanism of resistance to vancomycin have not been detected among Iberian lynx. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Virulence determinants in vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium vanB: clonal distribution, prevalence and significance of esp and hyl in Australian patients with haematological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, L J; Slavin, M A; Vankerckhoven, V; Goossens, H; Grabsch, E A; Thursky, K A

    2008-02-01

    European studies have suggested that the esp gene and other virulence factors have roles in vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREfm) infections. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between the spectrum of clinical disease and putative virulence factors in vanB VREfm isolates. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify potential virulence genes (asa1, gel E, cylA, esp and hyl) in VREfm isolates obtained from an Australian population of haematology patients. Clonality was assessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and automated ribotyping. Infection, requirement for intensive care unit (ICU) admission and all-cause 30-day mortality were used as clinical indicators of organism virulence. Forty-one VREfm vanB isolates (41 patients; 14 infected and 27 colonised only) were analysed. Thirty-five of these isolates were typed by PFGE, 31 of which were represented by three clusters. The esp gene was identified in 22 of 27 (81.5%) screening and 11 of 14 (78.6%) infection-associated isolates. One isolate was hyl gene positive, and no isolate contained asa1, gel E or cylA genes. VREfm infection was independently associated with host factors (underlying diagnosis of acute myeloid leukaemia, age esp gene. ICU admission was negatively associated with presence of the esp gene (OR: 0.05; 95% CI: 0.01-0.61; P=0.02). There was no association between 30-day mortality and host factors or the presence of the esp gene. When compared to European and US reports, a high esp gene prevalence and low hyl gene prevalence was observed in polyclonal VRE isolates obtained from this immunocompromised population.

  19. Eradication of vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium from a paediatric oncology unit and prevalence of colonization in hospitalized and community-based children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourse, C; Byrne, C; Murphy, H; Kaufmann, M E; Clarke, A; Butler, K

    2000-02-01

    We previously reported an outbreak of vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) in a paediatric oncology unit in December 1995 which was associated with widespread environmental contamination of the unit with VRE. We undertook this study to evaluate the effectiveness of the infection control policy instituted subsequent to the outbreak and to investigate the underlying prevalence of VRE colonization in hospitalized, outpatient and community-based children. We sought to establish the molecular similarity of VRE isolates from the study. Stool specimens were obtained from outpatients at risk of VRE, hospital inpatients and from healthy community-based children. VRE colonization was eradicated from the inpatient unit within 11 months, but in outpatients, 16 months after the outbreak, 4 of 137 (2.9 %) attending oncology outpatients, 5 of 65 (7.7%) with cystic fibrosis and 1 of 12 (8.3 %) with liver disease were found to be colonized with VRE. The isolates were all Enterococcus faecium, Van A phenotype except one E. casseliflavus of the Van C phenotype. All were unique in SmaI DNA macrorestriction patterns with the exception of two isolates, which were similar to the original outbreak strain and three further isolates of a single strain but which differed from the outbreak strain. Of 315 hospital inpatients, 2.5 % were colonized with VRE of the Van C resistance phenotype but VRE was not detected in 116 healthy, community-based children. We conclude that effective strategies can successfully control spread of VRE but despite a low prevalence of VRE colonization in hospital patients and in community-based children, outbreaks can occur when infection control practices are not optimal. Continued vigilance to detect VRE and limit spread within hospitals is therefore necessary.

  20. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium clinical isolates from two hospitals in Mexico: First detection of VanB phenotype-vanA genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocanegra-Ibarias, Paola; Flores-Treviño, Samantha; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; Morfin-Otero, Rayo; Villarreal-Treviño, Licet; Llaca-Díaz, Jorge; Martínez-Landeros, Erik Alan; Rodríguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Calzada-Güereca, Andrés; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor Jesús; Garza-González, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium has emerged as a multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen involved in outbreaks worldwide. Our aim was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility, biofilm production, and clonal relatedness of vancomycin-resistant E. faecium (VREF) clinical isolates from two hospitals in Mexico. Consecutive clinical isolates (n=56) were collected in two tertiary care hospitals in Mexico from 2011 to 2014. VREF isolates were characterized by phenotypic and molecular methods including pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). VREF isolates were highly resistant to vancomycin, erythromycin, norfloxacin, high-level streptomycin, and teicoplanin, and showed lower resistance to tetracycline, nitrofurantoin and quinupristin-dalfopristin. None of the isolates were resistant to linezolid. The vanA gene was detected in all isolates. Two VanB phenotype-vanA genotype isolates, highly resistant to vancomycin and susceptible to teicoplanin, were detected. Furthermore, 17.9% of the isolates were classified as biofilm producers, and the espfm gene was found in 98.2% of the isolates. A total of 37 distinct PFGE patterns and 6 clones (25% of the isolates as clone A, 5.4% as clone B, and 3.6% each as clone C, D, E, and F) were detected. Clone A was detected in 5 different wards of the same hospital during 14 months of surveillance. The high resistance to most antimicrobial agents and the moderate cross-transmission of VREF detected accentuates the need for continuous surveillance of E. faecium in the hospital setting. This is also the first reported incidence of the E. faecium VanB phenotype-vanA genotype in the Americas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  1. Treatment of a lower urinary tract infection in a cat caused by a multi-drug methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomba, Constança; Couto, Natasha; Moodley, Arshnee

    2010-10-01

    Staphylococci and enterococci are common causes of urinary tract infections in cats. However, both species are rarely implicated together as causes of lower urinary tract infections associated with urethral obstruction. This report describes the first case of a multi-drug methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius belonging to spa type t06 and Enterococcus faecalis urinary infection in a cat with pre-existing and recurrent urethral obstruction. Both species were isolated at >10(5)CFU/ml from a cystocentesis urine specimen. Clinical and ultrasound features, results from urinalysis, urine culture, molecular typing and susceptibility testing by minimal inhibitory concentrations determination are described. Oral treatment with nitrofurantoin, the only antimicrobial agent that constituted a viable therapeutic option, had a positive outcome. Copyright © 2010 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. RNA-seq and Tn-seq reveal fitness determinants of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium during growth in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinglin; de Maat, Vincent; Guzmán Prieto, Ana M; Prajsnar, Tomasz K; Bayjanov, Jumamurat R; de Been, Mark; Rogers, Malbert R C; Bonten, Marc J M; Mesnage, Stéphane; Willems, Rob J L; van Schaik, Willem

    2017-11-21

    The Gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecium is a commensal of the human gastrointestinal tract and a frequent cause of bloodstream infections in hospitalized patients. The mechanisms by which E. faecium can survive and grow in blood during an infection have not yet been characterized. Here, we identify genes that contribute to growth of E. faecium in human serum through transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) and a high-throughput transposon mutant library sequencing approach (Tn-seq). We first sequenced the genome of E. faecium E745, a vancomycin-resistant clinical isolate, using a combination of short- and long read sequencing, revealing a 2,765,010 nt chromosome and 6 plasmids, with sizes ranging between 9.3 kbp and 223.7 kbp. We then compared the transcriptome of E. faecium E745 during exponential growth in rich medium and in human serum by RNA-seq. This analysis revealed that 27.8% of genes on the E. faecium E745 genome were differentially expressed in these two conditions. A gene cluster with a role in purine biosynthesis was among the most upregulated genes in E. faecium E745 upon growth in serum. The E. faecium E745 transposon mutant library was then used to identify genes that were specifically required for growth of E. faecium in serum. Genes involved in de novo nucleotide biosynthesis (including pyrK_2, pyrF, purD, purH) and a gene encoding a phosphotransferase system subunit (manY_2) were thus identified to be contributing to E. faecium growth in human serum. Transposon mutants in pyrK_2, pyrF, purD, purH and manY_2 were isolated from the library and their impaired growth in human serum was confirmed. In addition, the pyrK_2 and manY_2 mutants were tested for their virulence in an intravenous zebrafish infection model and exhibited significantly attenuated virulence compared to E. faecium E745. Genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and nucleotide biosynthesis of E. faecium are essential for growth in human serum and contribute to the pathogenesis of

  3. Human and Swine Hosts Share Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium CC17 and CC5 and Enterococcus faecalis CC2 Clonal Clusters Harboring Tn1546 on Indistinguishable Plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freitas, Ana R.; Coque, Teresa M.; Novais, Carla

    2011-01-01

    clonally related Enterococcus faecium clonal complex 5 (CC5) isolates (17 sequence type 6 [ST6], 6 ST5, 5 ST185, 1 ST147, and 1 ST493) were obtained from feces of swine and healthy humans. This collection included isolates widespread among pigs of European Union (EU) countries since the mid-1990s. Each ST...... resistance to vancomycin) and tcrB (coding for resistance to copper) were consistently located on 150- to 190-kb plasmids (rep(pLG1)). E. faecium CC17 (ST132) isolates from pig manure and two clinical samples showed identical PFGE profiles and contained a 60-kb mosaic plasmid (rep(Inc18) plus rep...... (rep(pRE25) plus rep(pCF10)) containing the whole Tn1546 backbone. The results indicate a current intra- and international spread of E. faecium and E. faecalis clones and their plasmids among swine and humans...

  4. Biotechnological Methods for Precise Diagnosis of Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aija Zilevica

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance is one of the most urgent problems in medicine nowadays. The purpose of the study was to investigate the microorganisms resistant to first-line antimicrobials, including gram-positive cocci, particularly the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci, the major agents of nosocomial infections. Owing to the multi-resistance of these agents, precise diagnosis of the methicillin resistance of Staphylococci is of greatest clinical importance. It is not enough to use only conventional microbiological diagnostic methods. Biotechnological methods should be also involved. In our studies, the following methicillin resistance identification methods were used: the disk diffusion method, detection of the mecA gene by PCR, E-test and Slidex MRSA test. For molecular typing, PFGL, RAPD tests and detection of the coa gene were used. All the MRS strains were multiresistant to antibacterials. No vancomycine resistance was registered.

  5. Molecular characterization of van genes found in vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp. isolated from Hospital das Clínicas, FMUSP, São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.H. Caiaffa Filho

    Full Text Available Vancomycin-resistant enterococci strains (VRE is an important pathogen related with hospital infections in many countries, presenting limited or no therapeutic options for treating serious infections. VRE has presented some different genotypes been VanA and VanB considered to be the most important in hospital environments. In the present study the authors investigated the prevalence of van genes (A, B an C among clinical isolates of VRE in a five month period at a large tertiary hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The results showed the presence of vanA, but not vanB or vanC in all 43 strains of E. faecalis and five E. faecium studied. The results bring an important issue, due to the possibility of resistance spread of vanA genes, to be monitored and solved by the hospital infection control team and the microbiology and molecular biology laboratories at tertiary Hospitals.

  6. Total synthesis of (±)-naphthacemycin A9, possessing both antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and circumventing effect of β-lactam resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Tomoyasu; Kojima, Yasuhiro; Matsui, Hidehito; Hanaki, Hideaki; Iwatsuki, Masato; Shiomi, Kazuro; Ōmura, Satoshi; Sunazuka, Toshiaki

    2017-05-01

    The total synthesis of KB-3346-5A 9 , named naphthacemycin A 9 , has been accomplished by combining the Dötz reaction and Suzuki-Miyaura cross coupling as well as employing Friedel-Crafts reaction with dienone-phenol rearrangement as key steps. We also describe the preparation of the simplified tetarimycin A and naphthacemycin A analogs as a model study, which coincidentally reveal unique properties of naturally occurring naphthacene-5,6,11(12H)-trione framework. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) to elucidate their structure-activity relationships (SARs), the results of which agreed with a previously reported preliminary SAR study of tetarimycin A.

  7. Where is the difference between an epidemic and a high endemic level with respect to nosocomial infection control measures? An analysis based on the example of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium in hematology and oncology departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Nikos; Gastmeier, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Some infection control recommendations distinguish epidemic and endemic levels for infection control. However, it is often difficult to separate long lasting outbreaks from high endemic levels and it remains open, if this distinction is really useful. Aim: To compare infection control measures in endemic and epidemic outbreaks. Methods: The example of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium outbreaks in haematology or oncology departments was used to analyse differences in infection control measures between outbreaks and high endemic levels. The outbreak database and PubMed, including long lasting outbreaks, were used for this analysis. Two time limits were used for separation: 6 and 12 months. In addition, monoclonal and polyclonal outbreaks were distinguished. Findings: A total of 36 outbreaks were included. 13 outbreaks lasted 6 months or less, 9 outbreaks more than 6 months but at maximum 12 months and 9 more than 12 months. For the remaining outbreaks, no information about their duration was available. Altogether, 11 outbreaks were monoclonal and 20 polyclonal. Considering infection control measures, there were almost no differences between the different groups compared. Patient screening was given up in 37.5% of long lasting outbreaks (>12 months) and hand hygiene not reported in the majority of polyclonal outbreaks (77.8%). Conclusion: Despite many institutions trying to add further infection control measures in case of an outbreak, evidence based infection control measures should be implemented in endemic and epidemic situations. The crucial aspect is probably the degree of implementation and its control in both situations.

  8. Avoparcin used as a growth promoter is associated with the occurrence of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium on Danish poultry and pig farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Flemming; Madsen, M.; Christensen, J.

    1997-01-01

    We determined the association between the use of the glycopeptide antibiotic avoparcin as a growth promoter and the occurrence of Enterococcus faecium (VREF) with high-level resistance to vancomycin (MIC greater than or equal to 64 mu g ml(-1)) on poultry and pig farms. The investigations were...

  9. RNA-seq and Tn-seq reveal fitness determinants of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium during growth in human serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Xinglin; de Maat, Vincent; Guzmán Prieto, Ana M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413649903; Prajsnar, Tomasz K; Bayjanov, Jumamurat R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313070555; de Been, Mark; Rogers, Malbert R.C.; Bonten, Marc J.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337; Mesnage, Stéphane; Willems, Rob J.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/106866370; van Schaik, Willem|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/279958846

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecium is a commensal of the human gastrointestinal tract and a frequent cause of bloodstream infections in hospitalized patients. The mechanisms by which E. faecium can survive and grow in blood during an infection have not yet been

  10. Prevalence of Methicillin and Vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in nasopharynx; Amir-Alam hospital, 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasibi M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of nosocomial infections with high morbidity and mortality rate. Traditionally, methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus has been considered a major nosocomial pathogen in healthcare facilities, but in the past decade, it has been observed emerging in the community as well. Informations regarding hospital microbial colonization could be an important step for prevention of nosocomial infections. Our objective was clarifying the prevalence of methicillin resistant and vancomycin resistant staphylococcus aureus colonization in nasopharynx. Methods: A descriptive cross sectional study was carried on 106 patients and nursing staff of surgery and hemodialysis wards in Amir-Alam hospital from April 2005 to July 2005. The samples were collected from nasal region of cases using cotton swab by two experienced technician and were sent to laboratory for culture and antibiogram. Results: Twenty six (29.5% out of 106 cases were nasopharyngeal carriers of staphylococcus aureus. Eight cases (7.5% had methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus. The most frequent colonization rate was seen in hemodialysis nursing staff and in all of them methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus was reported. Carrier rates in hemodialysis patients were twice compared to surgery ward patients. The interesting point was that no sample of vancomycin resistant staphylococcus aureus was isolated. Conclusion: Prevalence of methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus colonization seems to be increased; therefore proper management for controlling this problem is mandatory. The results of the present study suggest that the prevalence of methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus infections is higher than was expected in Iran and vigorous preventive strategies should therefore be taken to stop the growth of this major health problem.

  11. Bactericidal activities of two daptomycin regimens against clinical strains of glycopeptide intermediate-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates in an in vitro pharmacodynamic model with simulated endocardial vegetations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Akins, R L; Rybak, M J

    2001-01-01

    .... The mechanism of action is unique, resulting in interference with cell membrane transport. The bactericidal activity of daptomycin was evaluated against glycopeptide-intermediate susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (GISA...

  12. Methicillin and vancomycin resistant S. aureus in hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Sood Loomba

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available S. aureus is the major bacterial cause of skin, soft tissue and bone infections, and one of the commonest causes of healthcare-associated bacteremia. Hospital-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA carriage is associated with an increased risk of infection, morbidity and mortality. Screening of high-risk patients at the time of hospital admission and decolonization has proved to be an important factor in an effort to reduce nosocomial transmission. The electronic database Pub Med was searched for all the articles on "Establishment of MRSA and the emergence of vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA." The search included case reports, case series and reviews. All the articles were cross-referenced to search for any more available articles. A total of 88 references were obtained. The studies showed a steady increase in the number of vancomycin-intermediate and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus. Extensive use of vancomycin creates a selective pressure that favors the outgrowth of rare, vancomycin-resistant clones leading to heterogenous vancomycin intermediate S. aureus hVISA clones, and eventually, with continued exposure, to a uniform population of vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA clones. However, the criteria for identifying hVISA strains have not been standardized, complicating any determination of their clinical significance and role in treatment failures. The spread of MRSA from the hospital to the community, coupled with the emergence of VISA and VRSA, has become major concern among healthcare providers. Infection-control measures, reliable laboratory screening for resistance, appropriate antibiotic prescribing practices and avoidance of blanket treatment can prevent long-term emergence of resistance.

  13. Vancomycin resistant enterococci in urine cultures: Antibiotic susceptibility trends over a decade at a tertiary hospital in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam Toner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Enterococci are a common cause of urinary tract infection and vancomycin-resistant strains are more difficult to treat. The purpose of this surveillance program was to assess the prevalence of and determine the risk factors for vancomycin resistance in adults among urinary isolates of Enterococcus sp. and to detail the antibiotic susceptibility profile, which can be used to guide empirical treatment. Materials and Methods: From 2005 to 2014 we retrospectively reviewed 5,528 positive Enterococcus sp. urine cultures recorded in a computerized laboratory results database at a tertiary teaching hospital in Cambridge, United Kingdom. Results: Of these cultures, 542 (9.8% were vancomycin resistant. No longitudinal trend was observed in the proportion of vancomycin- resistant strains over the course of the study. We observed emerging resistance to nitrofurantoin with rates climbing from near zero to 40%. Ampicillin resistance fluctuated between 50% and 90%. Low resistance was observed for linezolid and quinupristin/ dalfopristin. Female sex and inpatient status were identified as risk factors for vancomycin resistance. Conclusions: The incidence of vancomycin resistance among urinary isolates was stable over the last decade. Although resistance to nitrofurantoin has increased, it still serves as an appropriate first choice in uncomplicated urinary tract infection caused by vancomycin- resistant Enterococcus sp.

  14. Clinical impact of vancomycin-resistant enterococci

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robin Patel

    2003-01-01

    In humans, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) most commonly result in intestinal colonization, which does not result in symptoms, may persist for a long time and serves as a reservoir for transmission of VRE to other patients...

  15. Vancomycin-resistant enterococcal infections: epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and optimal management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Driscoll T

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Tristan O’Driscoll,1 Christopher W Crank2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, Chicago College of Pharmacy, Downers Grove, IL, USA; 2Pharmacy Services, Rush-Copley Medical Center, Aurora, IL, USA Abstract: Since its discovery in England and France in 1986, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus has increasingly become a major nosocomial pathogen worldwide. Enterococci are prolific colonizers, with tremendous genome plasticity and a propensity for persistence in hospital environments, allowing for increased transmission and the dissemination of resistance elements. Infections typically present in immunosuppressed patients who have received multiple courses of antibiotics in the past. Virulence is variable, and typical clinical manifestations include bacteremia, endocarditis, intra-abdominal and pelvic infections, urinary tract infections, skin and skin structure infections, and, rarely, central nervous system infections. As enterococci are common colonizers, careful consideration is needed before initiating targeted therapy, and source control is first priority. Current treatment options including linezolid, daptomycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, and tigecycline have shown favorable activity against various vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus infections, but there is a lack of randomized controlled trials assessing their efficacy. Clearer distinctions in preferred therapies can be made based on adverse effects, drug interactions, and pharmacokinetic profiles. Although combination therapies and newer agents such as tedizolid, telavancin, dalbavancin, and oritavancin hold promise for the future treatment of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus infections, further studies are needed to assess their possible clinical impact, especially in the treatment of serious infections. Keywords: Gram-positive, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, VRE, antibiotic resistance, multidrug resistance

  16. METHICILLIN RESISTANCE IN STAPHYLOCOCCAL ISOLATES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed the importance of Staphylococcus aureus as a urinary pathogen and the incidence of multidrug resistant (MDR), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A total of 86 staphylococcal isolates made up of 50 clinical isolates from urine samples submitted to the Medical Microbiology Laboratory ...

  17. Where is the difference between an epidemic and a high endemic level with respect to nosocomial infection control measures? An analysis based on the example of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium in hematology and oncology departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich, Nikos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Some infection control recommendations distinguish epidemic and endemic levels for infection control. However, it is often difficult to separate long lasting outbreaks from high endemic levels and it remains open, if this distinction is really useful.Aim: To compare infection control measures in endemic and epidemic outbreaks.Methods: The example of vancomycin-resistant outbreaks in haematology or oncology departments was used to analyse differences in infection control measures between outbreaks and high endemic levels. The outbreak database and PubMed, including long lasting outbreaks, were used for this analysis. Two time limits were used for separation: 6 and 12 months. In addition, monoclonal and polyclonal outbreaks were distinguished. Findings: A total of 36 outbreaks were included. 13 outbreaks lasted 6 months or less, 9 outbreaks more than 6 months but at maximum 12 months and 9 more than 12 months. For the remaining outbreaks, no information about their duration was available. Altogether, 11 outbreaks were monoclonal and 20 polyclonal. ri infection control measures, there were almost no differences between the different groups compared. Patient screening was given up in 37.5% of long lasting outbreaks (>12 months and hand hygiene not reported in the majority of polyclonal outbreaks (77.8%.Conclusion: Despite many institutions trying to add further infection control measures in case of an outbreak, evidence based infection control measures should be implemented in endemic and epidemic situations. The crucial aspect is probably the degree of implementation and its control in both situations.

  18. Annual Surveillance Summary: Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Infections in the Military Health System (MHS), 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    species have been identified, two are responsible for the majority of human infections, Enterococcus faecium or E. faecalis. Almost all nosocomial...antibiotic for drug- resistant E. faecium .3 In 1988, the first VRE outbreak was reported in Europe. Within a decade of identification, the emerging...with vancomycin resistance reportedly as high as 28.0% among E. faecium isolates.11 Experts believe that the continued, widespread use of

  19. Emergence of VanB phenotype-vanA genotype in vancomycin-resistant enterococci in Brazilian hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanella Rosemeire Cobo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE have been reported as nosocomial pathogens since 1998. Recently, in a VRE surveillance in a hospital, we detected two Enterococcus faecalis isolates with vanA genotype and susceptible to teicoplanin. This is the first report of VanB phenotype-vanA genotype enterococci isolated from humans in Brazil.

  20. Vancomycin-resistant enterococcal infections: epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and optimal management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Tristan; Crank, Christopher W

    2015-01-01

    Since its discovery in England and France in 1986, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus has increasingly become a major nosocomial pathogen worldwide. Enterococci are prolific colonizers, with tremendous genome plasticity and a propensity for persistence in hospital environments, allowing for increased transmission and the dissemination of resistance elements. Infections typically present in immunosuppressed patients who have received multiple courses of antibiotics in the past. Virulence is variable, and typical clinical manifestations include bacteremia, endocarditis, intra-abdominal and pelvic infections, urinary tract infections, skin and skin structure infections, and, rarely, central nervous system infections. As enterococci are common colonizers, careful consideration is needed before initiating targeted therapy, and source control is first priority. Current treatment options including linezolid, daptomycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, and tigecycline have shown favorable activity against various vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus infections, but there is a lack of randomized controlled trials assessing their efficacy. Clearer distinctions in preferred therapies can be made based on adverse effects, drug interactions, and pharmacokinetic profiles. Although combination therapies and newer agents such as tedizolid, telavancin, dalbavancin, and oritavancin hold promise for the future treatment of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus infections, further studies are needed to assess their possible clinical impact, especially in the treatment of serious infections.

  1. Enterococcus faecalis as multidrug resistance strains in clinical isolates in Imam Reza Hospital in Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, F; Ghafourian, S; Mohebi, R; Taherikalani, M; Pakzad, I; Valadbeigi, H; Hatami, V; Sadeghifard, N

    2015-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the prevalence of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus in E. faecalis and E. faecium and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, then dominant genes responsible for vancomycin resistance were determined. For this propose, 180 clinical isolates of Enterococcus were subjected for identification and antibiotic susceptibility assay. Then, the gene responsible vancomycin resistant strains were determined. The results demonstrated the E. faecalis as a dominant Enterococcus. Resistance to erythromycin was dominant and multidrug resistance strains observed in E. faecalis. vanA was responsible for vancomycin resistance. In conclusion, a high rate of resistance to antibiotics in Enterococcus is clearly problematic, and a novel strategy is needed to decrease resistance in Enterococcus.

  2. First Report on Vancomycin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Bovine and Caprine Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Debaraj; Banerjee, Jaydeep; Bandyopadhyay, Samiran; Mondal, Bimalendu; Nanda, Pramod K; Samanta, Indranil; Mahanti, Achintya; Das, Arun K; Das, Gunjan; Dandapat, Premanshu; Bandyopadhyay, Subhasish

    2016-12-01

    The present investigation was carried out to study the vancomycin resistance pattern of Staphylococcus aureus isolates (n = 274) obtained from 352 milk samples of bovine (269) and caprine (63) clinical and subclinical mastitis from different districts of West Bengal, India. Of them, seven isolates (vancomycin-resistant S. aureus [VRSA] 1-7) exhibited resistance to vancomycin. Minimum inhibitory concentration of vancomycin (MICvan) for VRSA2 and VRSA3 was ≥16 μg/ml; thus categorized as VRSA. For rest of the isolates, MICvan was 8 μg/ml and they were grouped as vancomycin intermediate S. aureus (VISA). Even though all the isolates were resistant to cefoxitin and oxacillin and possessed mecA gene, none of them carried vancomycin resistance gene. Furthermore, all the seven isolates were subjected to Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, Staphylococcal protein A (spa) typing, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus polymerase chain reaction. All the isolates except VRSA3 and VRSA4 from Kolkata district exhibited diverse genetic lineage, irrespective of their host and antibiotic resistance pattern. These two isolates showed clonal similarity (MRSA-SCCmec-V-spa t267) with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains previously reported in human and animal infection. Isolation of VRSA and VISA could probably be due to intensive use of vancomycin in healthcare premises, which might have led to the development of glycopeptide-resistant strains and thereafter, further disseminated in the environment, including livestock farms. Detection of VRSA in milk is a serious concern as it may further cause health problems in the consumers. This is the first ever report of VRSA in food animals, even though the pathogen is otherwise prevalent in humans.

  3. Vancomycin-Resistance Enterococci Infections in the Department of the Defense: Annual Report 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-22

    resistant organism (MDRO), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), as well as the common use of prophylactic vancomycin for surgical and...17. Muto CA, et al. SHEA guideline for preventing nosocomial transmission of multidrug- resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus...VRE initially emerged in 1987 in Europe. Within a decade of identification , it spread and became a pathogen of concern in US hospitals

  4. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant staphylococci isolated from different biological samples at Policlinico Umberto I of Rome: correlation with vancomycin susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Mascellino

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The methicillin-resistance is increasing all over the world in the last decade. It is more frequent among coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS; infact the 52% of S. epidermidis strains results to be resistant to methicillin.The methicillin-resistant strains also show a reduced sensitivity towards the first-line agents such as glycopeptides and other antibiotics commonly used in therapy such as trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, imipenem, gentamycin, fosfomycin and chlarytromicin. Unlike MRSA (Methicillin-resistant S. aureus, MRCoNS resistance to glycopeptides generally concerns teicoplanin. Although vancomycin resistance is rare in Staphylococcus isolates, the detected shift towards higher values of MICs might affect patient’s clinical outcome.

  5. Molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surveillance study for MRSA was undertaken. One hundred and forty seven Staphylococcus aureus isolates from clinical specimens were screened for methicillin resistance at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital between J anuary and December 2001. Fifty one (34.7 %) methicillin resistant strains recovered were.

  6. Persistence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in broiler houses after the avoparcin ban

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuer, Ole Eske; Pedersen, Karl; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    2002-01-01

    The glycopeptide growth promoter avoparcin was banned from animal production in the EU in 1997 due to concern for the spread of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) from food animals to humans. In recent Norwegian and Danish studies, extensive occurrence of VRE on broiler farms and in broiler......, and disinfection of the houses between rotations, and two consecutive broiler flocks from each house were sampled by taking cloacal swabs from the broilers at the time of slaughter. A total of 69 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates obtained from broiler flocks and broiler houses were subjected......-isolates from different broiler houses and from flocks reared in different houses appeared to be genetically unrelated. These findings indicated that VRE was transmitted between consecutive broiler flocks by clones of resistant. bacteria surviving in the broiler houses despite cleaning and disinfection between...

  7. Performance of Vitek 2 for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus spp. and Enterococcus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobenchik, April M; Hindler, Janet A; Giltner, Carmen L; Saeki, Sandra; Humphries, Romney M

    2014-02-01

    Vitek 2 (bioMérieux, Inc., Durham, NC) is a widely used commercial antimicrobial susceptibility testing system. We compared MIC results obtained by Vitek 2 to those obtained by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth microdilution (BMD) reference method for 134 staphylococcal and 84 enterococcal clinical isolates. Nineteen agents were evaluated, including all those available on Vitek 2 for testing staphylococci and enterococci. The resistance phenotypes tested included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (n = 58), S. aureus with inducible clindamycin resistance (ICR) (n = 30), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant MRSA (n = 10), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (n = 37), high-level gentamicin-resistant Enterococcus (n = 15), linezolid-resistant Enterococcus (n = 5), and daptomycin-nonsusceptible Enterococcus faecalis (n = 6). For the staphylococci, there was 98.9% categorical agreement (CA). There was one very major error (VME) for gentamicin in a Staphylococcus hominis isolate, six VMEs for inducible clindamycin in S. aureus isolates, and two major errors (ME) for daptomycin in an S. aureus and a Staphylococcus epidermidis isolate. For enterococci, there was 97.3% CA. Two VMEs were observed for daptomycin in isolates of E. faecalis and 2 ME, 1 for high-level gentamicin resistance and 1 for nitrofurantoin, in E. faecium isolates. Overall, there was 98.3% CA and 99% essential agreement for the testing of staphylococci and enterococci by the Vitek 2. With the exception of detecting ICR in S. aureus, Vitek 2 performed reliably for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of staphylococci and enterococci.

  8. Vancomycin-resistant enterococcal infections in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J M; Song, Y G

    1998-12-01

    Enterococci recently became the second-to-third most commonly isolated organism from nosocomial infections. Enterococci are intrinsically more resistant to many antimicrobial agents and often show acquired resistance to many antimicrobial agents including high-level aminoglycosides. With the increased use of vancomycin, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) has become an important nosocomial pathogen. In Korea, the proportion of VRE among all enterococcal of VRE is no longer low in some settings and recent observations of a sudden increase of VRE isolation in several hospitals in Korea suggests that VRE infection may become a serious problem in the near future. The most important considerations are that vancomycin-resistant genes may spread to other highly virulent genera, such as MRSA, and that there are no approved and convincingly effective antibiotics for the treatment of VRE. Therefore, current efforts have concentrated on limiting the spread of these organisms within the hospital environment. Prudent use of antimicrobial agents and strict adherence to preventive measures such as aggressive communication, education, and infection control practices are essential to control the spread of this organism. However, hospital infection control protocols and the laboratory support they require are costly in terms of space and supplies, as well as in personnel resources. These factors add further pressure to already stretched hospital budgets. Nevertheless, policies or programs defining and managing VRE infection or colonization should be established and now is the time to enforce an overall management strategy against VRE.

  9. In vitro antimicrobial activity of linezolid tested against vancomycin-resistant enterococci isolated in Brazilian hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reis Adriana O.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE has been described recently in Brazil. This is in contrast to the USA and Europe, where the VRE appeared in the late 1980s. The progressive increase in VRE isolation poses important problems in the antimicrobial therapy of nosocomial infections. Treatment options and effective antimicrobial agents for VRE are often limited and the possibility of transfer of vancomycin genes to other Gram-positive microorganisms continues. In the search for antimicrobial agents for multiresistant Gram-positive cocci, compounds such as linezolid and quinupristin/dalfopristin have been evaluated. The present study was conducted to evaluate the in vitro activity of the oxazolidinone linezolid and 10 other antimicrobial agents, including quinupristin-dalfopristin, against multiresistant enterococci isolated in Brazilian hospitals. Thirty-three vancomycin resistant isolates (17 Enterococcus faecium and 16 E. faecalis, were analyzed. Strains were isolated from patients at São Paulo Hospital, Oswaldo Cruz Hospital, Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual, Santa Marcelina Hospital, Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo, and Hospital de Clínicas do Paraná. The samples were tested by a broth microdilution method following the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS recommendations. All isolates were molecular typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. Linezolid was the most active compound against these multiresistant enterococci, showing 100% inhibition at the susceptible breakpoints. Quinupristin/dalfopristin and teicoplanin showed poor activity against both species. The molecular typing results suggest that there has been interhospital spread of vancomycin resistant E. faecium and E. faecalis among Brazilian hospitals. The results of this study indicate that linezolid is an appropriate therapeutic option for the treatment of vancomycin-resistant enterococci infections in Brazil.

  10. Glycyrrhizic Acid Decreases Gentamicin-Resistance in Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Heymann, Kerstin; Melzig, Matthias F; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M

    2016-12-01

    The resistance of commensal bacteria against first and second line antibiotics has reached an alarming level in many parts of the world and endangers the effective treatment of infectious diseases. Particularly vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium represents an increasing clinical problem in the treatment of infectious diseases and hinders adequate antibiotic stewardship. In consideration of the lack of novel antibiotic compounds, the development of resistance-modifying agents, however, can mitigate the spread of bacterial drug resistance and might possibly extend the useful application indices of an existing licensed antibiotic. Given that saponins modify the local chemical environment at cell membranes and might modify the uptake or mode of action of antibiotics in bacteria, we investigated the influence of the triterpenoid saponin glycyrrhizic acid of Glycyrrhiza glabra on the susceptibility of vancomycin-resistant enterococci against the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin in 47 clinical isolates by applying the checkerboard method. The fractional inhibitory concentration indices values were determined between 0.016 and ≤ 0.5 (synergy is accepted with values ≤ 0.5). Glycyrrhizic acid at the subinhibitory concentration of 2.4 mM was found to reduce the minimal inhibitory concentration of gentamicin in intrinsically resistant E. faecium strains down to 6.25 % of the minimal inhibitory concentration of gentamicin alone, whereas relatively low concentrations of glycyrrhizic acid (18 µM) resulted in increased susceptibilities for some E. faecium isolates to gentamicin. In conclusion, our study points towards a therapeutic potential of glycyrrhizic acid in co-application with gentamicin for defined local bacterial infections caused by vancomycin resistant Enterococcus strains. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. American crows as carriers of vancomycin-resistant enterococci with vanA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravcova, Veronika; Zurek, Ludek; Townsend, Andrea; Clark, Anne B; Ellis, Julie C; Cizek, Alois; Literak, Ivan

    2014-04-01

    We studied the vanA-carrying vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) isolated from American crows in the United States during the winter 2011/2012. Faecal samples from crows were cultured selectively for VRE and characterized. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used to examine epidemiological relationships of vanA-containing VRE. Isolates were tested in vitro for their ability to horizontally transfer the vancomycin resistance trait. VRE with the vanA gene were found in 15 (2.5%) of 590 crows samples, from which we obtained 22 different isolates. Enterococcal species were Enterococcus faecium (14) and E. faecalis (8). One, two and 19 isolates originated from Kansas, New York State and Massachusetts, respectively. Based on MLST analysis, E. faecium isolates were grouped as ST18 (6 isolates), ST555 (2), and novel types ST749 (1), ST750 (3), ST751 (1), ST752 (1). Enterococcus faecalis isolates belonged to ST6 (1), ST16 (3) and ST179 (4). All isolates were able to transfer the vancomycin resistance trait via filter mating with very high transfer range. Clinically important enterococci with the vanA gene occur in faeces of wild American crows throughout the United States. These migrating birds may contribute to the dissemination of VRE in environment over large distances. [Correction added after first online publication on 06 August 2013: The number of E. faecium ST752 isolate is now amended to '1', consistent with that shown in the 'Results' section and Figure 2.]. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Nasal carriage of methicillin resistant staphylococci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faria, Nuno A; Conceição, Teresa; Miragaia, Maria

    2014-01-01

    . A total of 54 patients (80%) were colonized with staphylococci that included nine different species identified by internal transcribed spacer PCR (ITS-PCR) and 16S RNA sequencing. The highest rates of colonization were found for S. epidermidis (58%) and S. aureus (39%). Methicillin resistance was present......%). Carriage of multiple species was detected in 20 patients (30%), 16 of whom were colonized with both S. aureus and S. epidermidis. In two cases, simultaneous carriage of different methicillin resistant species was detected. However, the strains carried different SCCmec types. Additional studies in the same...

  13. Detection of vancomycin resistances in enterococci within 3 1/2 hours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, U. -Ch.; Beleites, C.; Assmann, C.; Glaser, U.; Hübner, U.; Pfister, W.; Fritzsche, W.; Popp, J.; Neugebauer, U.

    2015-02-01

    Vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) constitute a challenging problem in health care institutions worldwide. Novel methods to rapidly identify resistances are highly required to ensure an early start of tailored therapy and to prevent further spread of the bacteria. Here, a spectroscopy-based rapid test is presented that reveals resistances of enterococci towards vancomycin within 3.5 hours. Without any specific knowledge on the strain, VRE can be recognized with high accuracy in two different enterococci species. By means of dielectrophoresis, bacteria are directly captured from dilute suspensions, making sample preparation very easy. Raman spectroscopic analysis of the trapped bacteria over a time span of two hours in absence and presence of antibiotics reveals characteristic differences in the molecular response of sensitive as well as resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Furthermore, the spectroscopic fingerprints provide an indication on the mechanisms of induced resistance in VRE.

  14. Molecular genotyping of methicillin resistant and susceptible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) which causes nosocomial infections is among the most important multi-resistant pathogens worldwide. Investigations of MRSA outbreaks in nosocomial settings often require strain-typing data to verify effectively that the isolates belong to the outbreak strain, ...

  15. Relative prevalence of methicilline resistant Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In our region, although methicillin resistance increased in S. aureus strains, because of the unavailability and the high cost of alternative antibiotics, gentamycin is still suggested as an alternative for treatment of S. aureus infections. These results however indicate that vancomycin seemed to be the only antimicrobial agent ...

  16. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococci in companion animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baptiste, Keith Edward; Williams, Kerry; Williams, Nicola J.

    2005-01-01

    We determined the molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant staphylococci from animals and staff at a small animal and equine hospital. Methicillin-restistant Staphylococcus aureus identical to human EMRSA-15 was found in dogs and hospitalstaff. In contrast, 5 distinct MRSA strains were...

  17. Molecular Identification of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial resistance has become a great public health problem worldwide and multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus has been widely reported. Methods: The presence or absence of methicillin resistance gene (mecA) in 48 clinical wound isolates of S. aureus was examined by the polymerase chain reaction ...

  18. METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS (MRSA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nosocomial infections caused by methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus often pose therapeutic dilemma to the clinicians because of the multi resistant nature of these strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Outbreaks of both nosocomial and community acquired infections are also frequent and difficult to control.

  19. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Leif Percival; Nielsen, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Even though methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common cause of nosocomial infections, it may often be difficult to evaluate the exact route of transmission. METHODS: In this study, we describe four cases of nosocomial transmission of MRSA in a hospital with a low...

  20. Nasal Carriage of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major causes of community and hospital acquired infections. The emergence of methicillin resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus in the hospitals and the community is a serious health problem. The aim of this study was to determine the nasal carriage and ...

  1. 2. PREVALENCE AND PATTERN OF METHICILLIN RESISTANT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RICHY

    Prevalence and Pattern of Methicillin Resistant. Staphylococcus Aureus in a Tertiary Healthcare. Facility in Nigeria. 7. Medical Journal of Zambia, Vol. 42, No. 1: 7-11 (2015). *E. O. Yusuf, L. U. Airauhi. Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. *Corresponding author: E.O. Yusuf.

  2. The current susceptibility pattern of methicillin resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from in-patients and out-patients at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH) was studied. Fifty, S. aureus organisms were isolated from routine clinical specimens such as high vaginal, wound, urethral and ear ...

  3. Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been recognized as important nosocomial pathogens worldwide. S aureus may induce clinically manifested diseases, or the host may remain completely asymptomatic. Methods: a cross-sectional hospital-based study was conducted from October 2012 ...

  4. Prevalence and Pattern of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence and pattern of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) in clinical specimens sent to clinical microbiology laboratory for analysis and to determine the vancomycin sensitivity of the MRSA isolates. Design: The study was conducted at the University of Benin Teaching ...

  5. Prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in the studied population. Clinical isolates of S. aureus strains were collected from Medical Microbiology Unit of University College Hospital, Ibadan between May and October, 2012. The isolates were confirmed through growth on Mannitol Salt Agar (MSA) and tube coagulase test.

  6. WEST AFRICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Methicillin Resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user1

    2012-07-04

    Jul 4, 2012 ... Disposition to Screening among Healthcare Workers in Critical Care Units of a. Nigerian Hospital ... Abbreviations: HCW, Healthcare workers; HCGs, Healthcare Givers; MRSA, Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus; UITH, University of Ilorin ..... a decade ago, close to half (48.0%) of the. HCW in this ...

  7. Endocarditis due to vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus raffinosus successfully treated with linezolid: case report and review of literature Endocarditis por Enterococcus raffinosus resistente a vancomicina exitosamente tratada con linezolid: caso clínico y revisión de la literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jasovich

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Enterococcus raffinosus is scarcely found in clinical samples and even less frequently as etiologic agent of endocarditis. We are herein presenting one case of mitral prosthetic-valve endocarditis in a 77-y-o male due to a vancomycinresistant Enterococcus raffinosus isolate, successfully treated with 6 weeks of linezolid, and a two-year follow up.Enterococcus raffinosus es una especie poco frecuente en materiales clínicos y menos aún como agente etiológico de endocarditis. En este trabajo se presenta un caso de endocarditis de válvula mitral protésica en un paciente de 77 años debida a Enterococcus raffinosus resistente a vancomicina y que fue exitosamente tratada con linezolid durante 6 semanas, con un seguimiento de 2 años.

  8. Our experiences with vancomycin-resistant enterococci in Jesenice General hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Ribič

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE present a great problem in health care, especially because of their resistance to many groups of antibiotics and because of the way of their spreading in health care and long-term care institutions. Genes responsible for resistance to vancomycin can be transmitted to other species of enterococci and also to other grampositive cocci, for example Staphylococcus aureus. Experts anticipate that failure to control methicilin-resistant S. aureus and VRE may make control of vancomycin-resistant S. aureus impossible.Methods: In the medical microbiology laboratory of Institute Public Health Kranj we perform microbiology diagnosis for Jesenice General Hospital, where surveillance culturing for VRE started in May 2007. Until 15th June, 364 surveillance samples for VRE were taken from 92 patients. We also analysed the results of enterococci that were isolated in our laboratory during routine work in the period from 2004 to 2006.Results: In the three-year period we isolated 1593 strains of enterococci and among them 7 strains were VRE. In the Jesenice General Hospital, the first strain of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium was isolated in May 2007 in a patient, treated in internal intensive care unit. Nine strains of VRE with the same resistance type in nine patients followed the first case. The first four patients with VRE were moved from the same hospital. Among next six patients the common risk factor was contact with VRE positive patient.Conclusions: Control of VRE strains claims for intensive action. Active surveillance of colonised and infected patients, contact precautions with barrier isolation, intensive hand hygiene measures, aggressive environmental decontamination and prudent use of antimicrobials are needed.

  9. Phage therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in dental root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leron Khalifa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem faced by all major sectors of health care, including dentistry. Recurrent infections related to multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE in hospitals are untreatable and question the effectiveness of notable drugs. Two major reasons for these recurrent infections are acquired antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm formation. None of the traditionally known effective techniques have been able to efficiently resolve these issues. Hence, development of a highly effective antibacterial practice has become inevitable. One example of a hard-to-eradicate pathogen in dentistry is Enterococcus faecalis, which is one of the most common threats observed in recurrent root canal treatment failures, of which the most problematic to treat are its biofilm-forming VRE strains. An effective response against such infections could be the use of bacteriophages (phages. Phage therapy was found to be highly effective against biofilm and multidrug-resistant bacteria and has other advantages like ease of isolation and possibilities for genetic manipulations. The potential of phage therapy in dentistry, in particular against E. faecalis biofilms in root canals, is almost unexplored. Here we review the efforts to develop phage therapy against biofilms. We also focus on the phages isolated against E. faecalis and discuss the possibility of using phages against E. faecalis biofilm in root canals.

  10. Phage therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in dental root canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Leron; Shlezinger, Mor; Beyth, Shaul; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Beyth, Nurit; Hazan, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem faced by all major sectors of health care, including dentistry. Recurrent infections related to multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in hospitals are untreatable and question the effectiveness of notable drugs. Two major reasons for these recurrent infections are acquired antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm formation. None of the traditionally known effective techniques have been able to efficiently resolve these issues. Hence, development of a highly effective antibacterial practice has become inevitable. One example of a hard-to-eradicate pathogen in dentistry is Enterococcus faecalis, which is one of the most common threats observed in recurrent root canal treatment failures, of which the most problematic to treat are its biofilm-forming VRE strains. An effective response against such infections could be the use of bacteriophages (phages). Phage therapy was found to be highly effective against biofilm and multidrug-resistant bacteria and has other advantages like ease of isolation and possibilities for genetic manipulations. The potential of phage therapy in dentistry, in particular against E. faecalis biofilms in root canals, is almost unexplored. Here we review the efforts to develop phage therapy against biofilms. We also focus on the phages isolated against E. faecalis and discuss the possibility of using phages against E. faecalis biofilm in root canals. PMID:27640530

  11. Inducible expression eliminates the fitness cost of vancomycin resistance in enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, Marie-Laure; Depardieu, Florence; Courvalin, Patrice; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2010-09-28

    Inducible vancomycin resistance in enterococci is due to a sophisticated mechanism that combines synthesis of cell wall peptidoglycan precursors with low affinity for glycopeptides and elimination of the normal target precursors. Although this dual mechanism, which involves seven genes organized in two operons, is predicted to have a high fitness cost, resistant enterococci have disseminated worldwide. We have evaluated the biological cost of VanB-type resistance due to acquisition of conjugative transposon Tn1549 in Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis. Because fitness was dependent on the integration site of Tn1549, an isogenic set of E. faecalis was constructed to determine the cost of inducible or constitutive expression of resistance or of carriage of Tn1549. A luciferase gene was inserted in the integrase gene of the transposon to allow differential quantification of the strains in cocultures and in the digestive tract of gnotobiotic mice. Both in vitro and in vivo, carriage of inactivated or inducible Tn1549 had no cost for the host in the absence of induction by vancomycin. In contrast, induced or constitutively resistant strains not only had reduced fitness but were severely impaired in colonization ability and dissemination among mice. These data indicate that tight regulation of resistance expression drastically reduces the biological cost associated with vancomycin resistance in Enterococcus spp. and accounts for the widespread dissemination of these strains. Our findings are in agreement with the observation that regulation of expression is common in horizontally acquired resistance and represents an efficient evolutionary pathway for resistance determinants to become selectively neutral.

  12. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci: validation of susceptibility testing and in vitro activity of novel antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathe, Mathias; Lise, Kristensen,; Ellermann-Eriksen, Svend

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci: validation of susceptibility testing and in vitro activity of novel antibiotics......Vancomycin-resistant enterococci: validation of susceptibility testing and in vitro activity of novel antibiotics...

  13. A Research of nasal methicillin resistant/sensitive Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Research of nasal methicillin resistant/sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and pharyngeal beta-haemolytic Streptococcus carriage in midwifery students in Kahramanmaras, Eastern Mediterranean Region of Turkey.

  14. Misidentification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in hospitals in Tripoli, Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed O. Ahmed

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a nosocomial (hospital-acquired pathogen of exceptional concern. It is responsible for life-threatening infections in both the hospital and the community. Aims: To determine the frequency of MRSA misidentification in hospitals in Tripoli, Libya using current testing methods. Methods: One hundred and seventy S. aureus isolates previously identified as MRSA were obtained from three hospitals in Tripoli. All isolates were reidentified by culturing on mannitol salt agar, API 20 Staph System and retested for resistance to methicillin using the cefoxitin disk diffusion susceptibility test and PBP2a. D-tests and vancomycin E-tests (Van-E-tests were also performed for vancomycin-resistant isolates. Results: Of the 170 isolates examined, 86 (51% were confirmed as MRSA (i.e. 49% were misidentified as MRSA. Fifteen (17% of the confirmed MRSA strains exhibited inducible clindamycin resistance. Of the 86 confirmed MRSA isolates, 13 (15% were resistant to mupirocin, 53 (62% were resistant to ciprofloxacin, 41 (48% were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and none were resistant to linezolid. Although disc-diffusion testing indicated that 23 (27% of the isolates were resistant to vancomycin, none of the isolates were vancomycin-resistant by Van-E-test. Conclusions: Misidentification of nosocomial S. aureus as MRSA is a serious problem in Libyan hospitals. There is an urgent need for the proper training of microbiology laboratory technicians in standard antimicrobial susceptibility procedures and the implementation of quality control programs in microbiology laboratories of Libyan hospitals.

  15. Misidentification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitals in Tripoli, Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohamed O.; Abuzweda, Abdulbaset R.; Alghazali, Mohamed H.; Elramalli, Asma K.; Amri, Samira G.; Aghila, Ezzeddin Sh.; Abouzeed, Yousef M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a nosocomial (hospital-acquired) pathogen of exceptional concern. It is responsible for life-threatening infections in both the hospital and the community. Aims To determine the frequency of MRSA misidentification in hospitals in Tripoli, Libya using current testing methods. Methods One hundred and seventy S. aureus isolates previously identified as MRSA were obtained from three hospitals in Tripoli. All isolates were reidentified by culturing on mannitol salt agar, API 20 Staph System and retested for resistance to methicillin using the cefoxitin disk diffusion susceptibility test and PBP2a. D-tests and vancomycin E-tests (Van-E-tests) were also performed for vancomycin-resistant isolates. Results Of the 170 isolates examined, 86 (51%) were confirmed as MRSA (i.e. 49% were misidentified as MRSA). Fifteen (17%) of the confirmed MRSA strains exhibited inducible clindamycin resistance. Of the 86 confirmed MRSA isolates, 13 (15%) were resistant to mupirocin, 53 (62%) were resistant to ciprofloxacin, 41 (48%) were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and none were resistant to linezolid. Although disc-diffusion testing indicated that 23 (27%) of the isolates were resistant to vancomycin, none of the isolates were vancomycin-resistant by Van-E-test. Conclusions Misidentification of nosocomial S. aureus as MRSA is a serious problem in Libyan hospitals. There is an urgent need for the proper training of microbiology laboratory technicians in standard antimicrobial susceptibility procedures and the implementation of quality control programs in microbiology laboratories of Libyan hospitals. PMID:21483574

  16. Phage therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in dental root canals

    OpenAIRE

    Khalifa, Leron; Shlezinger, Mor; Beyth, Shaul; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Beyth, Nurit; Hazan, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem faced by all major sectors of health care, including dentistry. Recurrent infections related to multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in hospitals are untreatable and question the effectiveness of notable drugs. Two major reasons for these recurrent infections are acquired antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm format...

  17. Comparison of eight methods to detect vancomycin resistance in enterococci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P. Endtz (Hubert); N.P.W.C.J. van den Braak (Nicole); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); W.H.F. Goessens (Wil); D. Kreft; A.B. Stroebel; H.A. Verbrugh (Henri)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractA collection of genetically unrelated vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) including 50 vanA, 15 vanB, 50 vanC1, and 30 vanC2 VRE were used to evaluate the accuracy of eight currently available susceptibility test methods (agar dilution, disk diffusion,

  18. Multidrug and vancomycin resistance among clinical isolates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Backgrounds: Staphylococcus aureus has emerged as a major public health concern because of the occurrence of multi-drug resistant strains. This study aimed at investigating the multi-drug and vancomycin resistance profile of S. aureus from different infection sites in some teaching hospitals in Nigeria. Methods: Swabs ...

  19. Multidrug and vancomycin resistance among clinical isolates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-03

    Sep 3, 2017 ... Rebiahi S, Abdelouahid D, Rahmoun M, Abdelali S,. Azzaoui H. Emergence of vancomycin-resistant Staphylo- coccus aureus identified in the Tlemcen University Hospital. (North-West Algeria). Médecine et maladies infectieuses. 2011; 41:646–651. 68. Manfredi R. Update on the appropriate use of linezol-.

  20. Infection caused by vancomycin-resistant Streptococcus sanguis II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlaes, D M; Marino, J; Jacobs, M R

    1984-01-01

    A patient with bacteremia caused by vancomycin-resistant Streptococcus sanguis II is presented. This rare occurrence suggests that vancomycin may not be a completely reliable antibiotic in the treatment of infections due to viridans species of the genus Streptococcus. Gram-positive isolates from blood and otherwise sterile body fluids should be tested for susceptibility to vancomycin. PMID:6732222

  1. Molecular analysis and susceptibility patterns of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains causing community- and health care-associated infections in the northern region of Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adwan, Kamel; Jarrar, Naser; Abu-Hijleh, Awni; Adwan, Ghaleb; Awwad, Elena; Salameh, Yousef

    2013-03-01

    Community acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is a major global problem. This study attempted to investigate the prevalence of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains among 360 healthy university students at An-Najah National University, Palestine. For the purpose of comparing the staphylococcal cassette chromosome methicillin resistant determinant (SCCmec) type of MRSA, 46 clinical MRSA isolates were also included in this study. Susceptibility testing was performed by the disc diffusion method. The genetic association of MRSA isolates was investigated by SCCmec typing. A selected number of isolates were also used to amplify and sequence mecA. Nasal carriage of S aureus was found in 86 of 360 students (24%). MRSA accounted for 9% of S aureus isolates. All 86 strains of S aureus were sensitive to vancomycin. Resistance to penicillin G, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and clindamycin was found in 98%, 93%, 33%, 23%, and 12% of the isolates, respectively. Resistance rates of the MRSA isolates were as follows: 100% resistant to penicillin G and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, 96% to ethromycin, 52% to clindamycin, and 48% to ciprofloxacin. No vancomycin-resistant isolates were identified. In our study, nearly half (52%) of the MRSA isolates belonged to SCCmec types IVa and V. However, SCCmec types II and III are represented by 48%, whereas SCCmec type I was completely absent. The findings of this study indicate the existence of SCCmec type IVa in both student nasal carriers and health care settings. This emphasizes the need for implementation of a revised set of control measures in both settings. Moreover, the rational prescription of appropriate antibiotics should also be considered. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Report-Isolation identification and control of vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaqat, Fakhra; Sheikh, Ali Ahmad; Nazir, Jawad; Hussain, Tanveer; Rabbani, Masood; Shaheen, Arfat Yousaf; Muhammad, Javed

    2015-05-01

    Vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) has been reported from many parts of the world including Asian countries. Hence, main objective of study was to evaluate the possible occurrence of VRSA in hospitals of Lahore city and to ensure the effectiveness of various substitute therapeutic options. A total of 150 samples of pus/wounds were collected from three hospitals of the city and VRSA were isolated and confirmed through recommended method of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Out of 51 (49.04%) methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates, 5 (9.8%) were found resistant to vancomycin. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Linezolid (LZD), Moxifloxacin (MFX) and Clindamycin (CD) were calculated against VRSA isolates by broth microdilution test. All 5 (100%) isolates were susceptible to Linezolid and Clindamycin, while 4 (80%) were susceptible to Moxifloxacin. Ethanolic extracts of Turmeric, Mint, Coriander, Garlic, Kalonji, Cinnamon and Cloves illustrate average MIC values of 140.8 μg/mL, 563.2 μg/mL, 486.4 μg/mL, 614.4 μg/mL, 409.6 μg/mL, 281.6 μg/mL and 64 μg/mL, respectively against 5 VRSA strains. Concentration dependent increase in growth inhibition zones of ethanolic plant extract was recorded by agar well diffusion test. This study was helpful to find out the effective antibiotic against VRSA. Plant extracts encompass anti-staphylococcal activity and this finding demands necessity of further exploration of potential found in these natural herb.

  3. Identification of putative drug targets in Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) using computer aided protein data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md Anayet; Khan, Md Arif; Sharmin, Tahmina; Hasan Mazumder, Md Habibul; Chowdhury, Afrin Sultana

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) is a Gram-positive, facultative aerobic bacterium which is evolved from the extensive exposure of Vancomycin to Methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) that had become the most common cause of hospital and community-acquired infections. Due to the emergence of different antibiotic resistance strains, there is an exigency to develop novel drug targets to address the provocation of multidrug-resistant bacteria. In this study, in-silico genome subtraction methodology was used to design potential and pathogen specific drug targets against VRSA. Our study divulged 1987 proteins from the proteome of 34,549 proteins, which have no homologues in human genome after sequential analysis through CD-HIT and BLASTp. The high stringency analysis of the remaining proteins against database of essential genes (DEG) resulted in 169 proteins which are essential for S. aureus. Metabolic pathway analysis of human host and pathogen by KAAS at the KEGG server sorted out 19 proteins involved in unique metabolic pathways. 26 human non-homologous membrane-bound essential proteins including 4 which were also involved in unique metabolic pathway were deduced through PSORTb, CELLO v.2.5, ngLOC. Functional classification of uncharacterized proteins through SVMprot derived 7 human non-homologous membrane-bound hypothetical essential proteins. Study of potential drug target against Drug Bank revealed pbpA-penicillin-binding protein 1 and hypothetical protein MQW_01796 as the best drug target candidate. 2D structure was predicted by PRED-TMBB, 3D structure and functional analysis was also performed. Protein-protein interaction network of potential drug target proteins was analyzed by using STRING. The identified drug targets are expected to have great potential for designing novel drugs against VRSA infections and further screening of the compounds against these new targets may result in the discovery of novel therapeutic compounds that can be

  4. Evaluation of a protocol to control methicillin-resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major health care problem in intensive care units. Purpose. To evaluate how nurses implement the methicillin-resistant S. aureus protocol (MRSAP) in a surgical cardiac intensive care unit (SCICU), and to evaluate the change in MRSA infection rates after ...

  5. Prevalence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in apparently healthy ... Keywords: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Nasal swabs, Multidrug resistance, Rational chemotherapy .... Figure 2: Antibiotic resistance profile of the MRSA isolates. Key: AM-amoxicillin ...

  6. Bacteriological profiling of diphenylureas as a novel class of antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroon Mohammad

    Full Text Available Bacterial resistance to antibiotics remains an imposing global public health challenge. Of the most serious pathogens, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is problematic given strains have emerged that exhibit resistance to several antibiotic classes including β-lactams and agents of last resort such as vancomycin. New antibacterial agents composed of unique chemical scaffolds are needed to counter this public health challenge. The present study examines two synthetic diphenylurea compounds 1 and 2 that inhibit growth of clinically-relevant isolates of MRSA at concentrations as low as 4 µg/mL and are non-toxic to human colorectal cells at concentrations up to 128 μg/mL. Both compounds exhibit rapid bactericidal activity, completely eliminating a high inoculum of MRSA within four hours. MRSA mutants exhibiting resistance to 1 and 2 could not be isolated, indicating a low likelihood of rapid resistance emerging to these compounds. Bacterial cytological profiling revealed the diphenylureas exert their antibacterial activity by targeting bacterial cell wall synthesis. Both compounds demonstrate the ability to resensitize vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to the effect of vancomycin. The present study lays the foundation for further investigation and development of diphenylurea compounds as a new class of antibacterial agents.

  7. Prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA] colonization or carriage among health-care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathare, Nirmal A; Asogan, Harshini; Tejani, Sara; Al Mahruqi, Gaitha; Al Fakhri, Salma; Zafarulla, Roshna; Pathare, Anil V

    2016-01-01

    In Oman, the prevalence of health care associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus [HA-MRSA] is unknown. Therefore, to estimate the prevalence of HA-MRSA, we collected nasal swabs and swabs from cell phones on sterile polyester swabs and immediately inoculated on the mannitol salt agar containing oxacillin from medical students and hospital health care providers. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of the isolates was then performed using the Kirby Bauer's disc diffusion method. Additionally, a brief survey questionnaire was used to acquire demographic data. Amongst the 311 participants enrolled, nasal colonization with HA-MRSA was found in 47 individuals (15.1%, 95% confidence interval [CI]=11.1%, 19.1%). HA-MRSA was also isolated from the cell phone surfaces in 28 participants (9.0%, 95% CI=8.6%, 9.3%). 5 participants (1.6%) showed positive results both from their nasal swabs and from their cell phones. Antibiotic resistance to erythromycin [48%] and clindamycin [29%] was relatively high. 9.3% HA-MRSA isolates were vancomycin resistant [6.6% nasal carriage]. There was no statistically significant correlation between HA-MRSA isolates and the demographic characteristics or the risk factors namely gender, underlying co-morbidities like diabetes, hypertension, skin/soft tissue infections, skin ulcers/wounds, recent exposure to antibiotics, or hospital visits (p>0.05, Chi-square test). Copyright © 2015 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a finger felon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, B; Johnstone, F; Gerlinger, T; Puttler, E

    2000-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is an increasingly prevalent nosocomial pathogen that presents therapeutic challenges. We report an incidence of methicillin-resistant S aureus in a felon. The biochemical and clinical characteristics of methicillin-resistant S aureus are reviewed. The alarming increase of this organism in various types of infections demands the attention of all surgeons and emphasizes the importance of early surgical drainage and culture of pus in all cases of infection. (J Hand Surg 2000; 25A:173-175. Copyright 2000 by the American Society for Surgery of the Hand.).

  9. Characterization and risk factors of vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) among animal-affiliated workers in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getachew, Y; Hassan, L; Zakaria, Z; Zaid, C Z M; Yardi, A; Shukor, R A; Marawin, L T; Embong, F; Aziz, S A

    2012-11-01

    This study determined the risk factors and characteristics of vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) among individuals working with animals in Malaysia. Targeted cross-sectional studies accompanied with laboratory analysis for the identification and characterization of resistance and virulence genes and with genotype of VRE were performed. VRE were detected in 9·4% (95% CI: 6·46-13·12) of the sampled populations. Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus gallinarum were isolated, and vanA was detected in 70% of the isolates. Enterococcus faecalis with vanB was obtained from one foreign poultry worker. At least one virulence gene was detected in >50% of Ent. faecium and Ent. faecalis isolates. The esp and gelE genes were common among Ent. faecium (58·3%) and Ent. faecalis (78%), respectively. The VRE species showed diverse RAPD profiles with some clustering of strains based on the individual's background. However, the risk factors found to be significantly associated with the prevalence of VRE were age (OR: 5·39, 95% CI: 1·98-14·61) and previous hospitalization (OR: 4·06, 95% CI: 1·33-12·35). VRE species isolated from individuals in this study have high level of vancomycin resistance, were genetically diverse and possessed the virulence traits. Age of individuals and history of hospitalization rather than occupational background determined VRE colonization. This study provides comprehensive findings on the epidemiological and molecular features of VRE among healthy individuals working with animals. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Intestinal carriage of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in a community setting in Casablanca, Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannaoui, Imane; Barguigua, Abouddihaj; Serray, Bahija; El Mdaghri, Naima; Timinouni, Mohammed; Ait Chaoui, Ahmed; El Azhari, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the rate of intestinal carriage of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and to perform a phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of VRE isolates in the community in Casablanca, Morocco. During 6 months in 2014, 113 faecal samples were examined for the presence of enterococci. Antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates was determined by the disk diffusion method. Phenotypic and genotypic species identification was performed, and the vanA, vanB and vanC genes were detected by PCR. Each bacterial isolate resistant to vancomycin was subjected to amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. In total, 100 strains were collected from a community population of 80 persons; 55% of the isolates were identified as Enterococcus faecium and 45% as Enterococcus faecalis. The resistance profile showed that 88% of the strains were multiresistant. The rate of faecal carriage of VRE was 21% (n=21), among which 8 strains were E. faecalis (17.8% of all E. faecalis) and 13 strains were E. faecium (23.6% of all E. faecium). PCR analysis revealed that all of the strains were resistant to vancomycin owing to possession of the vanA gene. The emergence of VRE and the high rate of colonisation by multiresistant enterococci are alarming. Strict measures are required to control the further spread of these strains in the Moroccan community. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evolution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus towards increasing resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strommenger, Birgit; Bartels, Mette Damkjær; Kurt, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate the evolutionary history of Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex (CC) 8, which encompasses several globally distributed epidemic lineages, including hospital-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and the highly prevalent community-associated MRSA clone USA300....

  12. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a neonatal alpaca

    OpenAIRE

    Stull, Jason W.; Kenney, Daniel G.; Slavić, Durda; Weese, J Scott

    2012-01-01

    A 6-hour-old alpaca was presented for evaluation of respiratory difficulty. As part of routine surveillance, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was identified from a nasal swab taken upon admission to the hospital. No signs of MRSA infection were noted. The MRSA strain recovered was a human epidemic clone that has been associated with horses. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization can occur in camelids, and the potential animal and public health risks require consideration.

  13. Typing of vancomycin-resistant enterococci from Danish hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lester, Camilla H.; Olsen, Stefan S.; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl

    2009-01-01

    complex 17 (CC17) has been associated with nosocomial outbreaks in five continents. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the molecular epidemiology of VRE in Denmark. Methods: From January 2005 through October 2008, 61 vancomycin resistant enterococcal isolates causing invasive as well as non......-invasive infections were referred by seven of the 15 Danish departments of clinical microbiology to Statens Serum Institut. All isolates were identified to species level by PCR, MICs of vancomycin were determined (Trek Diagnostic Systems, UK), and the presence of vanA, vanB and vanC genes were detected by PCR. Multi...

  14. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis pyelonephritis in a child: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Hiroaki; Sato, Hiroki; Takei, Yoshichika

    2014-12-09

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is currently the most frequent pathogen of opportunistic and nosocomial infections worldwide. Most cases of Staphylococcus epidermidis infections are associated with indwelling medical devices and/or immunocompromised conditions. Community-acquired urinary tract infections are rare, particularly among pediatric populations, and clinicians often do not consider Staphylococcus epidermidis as a uropathogen. A previously healthy Japanese boy developed pyelonephritis caused by Enterococcus faecalis at 10 months of age. Subsequently, he was diagnosed with severe bilateral vesicoureteral reflux (right side grade V, left side grade III), and was administered trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole as the prophylaxis. At 18 months of age, he presented with fever. Gram staining of urine obtained through catheterization revealed gram-positive cocci. We suspected pyelonephritis caused by enterococci, and administered oral fluoroquinolone empirically. The fever promptly resolved, and eventually, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis was detected at significant levels in the urine. Thus, our final diagnosis was pyelonephritis caused by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis. Our case indicated that even immunocompetent children without a urinary catheter can develop Staphylococcus epidermidis pyelonephritis. Staphylococcus epidermidis can be underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed as sample contamination in community-acquired urinary tract infections. Therefore, when Gram staining of appropriately obtained urine samples reveals gram-positive cocci, clinicians should take into consideration not only the possibility of enterococci but also staphylococci, including Staphylococcus epidermidis, particularly in children with urinary abnormalities and/or those receiving continuous antibiotic prophylaxis.

  15. Curcumin Reverse Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Hyun Mun

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic flavonoid extracted from the rhizome of Curcuma longa L., was shown to possess superior potency to resensitize methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA to antibiotics. Previous studies have shown the synergistic activity of curcumin with β-lactam and quinolone antibiotics. Further, to understand the anti-MRSA mechanism of curcumin, we investigated the potentiated effect of curcumin by its interaction in diverse conditions. The mechanism of anti-MRSA action of curcumin was analyzed by the viability assay in the presence of detergents, ATPase inhibitors and peptidoglycan (PGN from S. aureus, and the PBP2a protein level was analyzed by western blotting. The morphological changes in the curcumin-treated MRSA strains were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. We analyzed increased susceptibility to MRSA isolates in the presence of curcumin. The optical densities at 600 nm (OD600 of the suspensions treated with the combinations of curcumin with triton X-100 and Tris were reduced to 63% and 59%, respectively, compared to curcumin without treatment. N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD and sodium azide (NaN3 were reduced to 94% and 55%, respectively. When peptidoglycan (PGN from S. aureus was combined with curcumin, PGN (0–125 μg/mL gradually blocked the antibacterial activity of curcumin (125 μg/mL; however, at a concentration of 125 µg/mL PGN, it did not completely block curcumin. Curcumin has a significant effect on the protein level of PBP2a. The TEM images of MRSA showed damage of the cell wall, disruption of the cytoplasmic contents, broken cell membrane and cell lysis after the treatment of curcumin. These data indicate a remarkable antibacterial effect of curcumin, with membrane permeability enhancers and ATPase inhibitors, and curcumin did not directly bind to PGN on the cell wall. Further, the antimicrobial action of curcumin involved in the PBP2a-mediated resistance mechanism was

  16. Resistance to Antibiotics in Strains of Staphylococcus spp., Enterococcus spp. and Escherichia coli Isolated from Rectal Swabs of Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kolář

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at determining the level of resistance of selected bacterial species (Staphylococcus spp., Enterococcus spp., Escherichia coli isolated from rectal swabs of pigs to antimicrobial agents. The tested strains were isolated from piglets aged 7 to 30 days. Bacterial species were identified by standard microbiological techniques and susceptibility to antibiotics was determined quantitatively by the standard microdilution method. Resistance of the Staphylococcus aureus strain to oxacillin was confirmed by detection of the mecA gene and PBP2a. A total of 115 Staphylococcus spp. isolates were collected. In the case of Staphylococcus aureus, the methicillin-resistant strain (MRSA was identified. Moreover, higher frequency of coagulase-negative staphylococci with minimum inhibitory concentration of oxacillin ≥ 0.5 mg/l was noticed. Inducible resistance to clindamycin in the Staphylococcus hominis strain was also detected. The strains of Enterococcus spp. (61 isolates exhibited high resistance to tetracycline (98.5%, erythromycin (86.8% and chloramphenicol (54.4%. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci were not isolated. In the case of Escherichia coli strains (111 isolates, higher frequency of resistant strains to tetracycline (81.1% and ampicillin (62.2% was documented. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and production of broad-spectrum β-lactamases was not noticed. The presented study may be considered as a pilot project assessing the prevalence of resistant bacteria in piglets kept on a single farm. It demonstrated the presence of resistant strains of Staphylococcus spp., including one MRSA strain, Enterococcus spp. and Escherichia coli. These strains may be present as a result of postnatal colonization with both bacterial microflora of dams and environmental microflora.

  17. Emergence of vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA from a tertiary care hospital from northern part of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Malay

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycopeptides such as vancomycin are frequently the antibiotics of choice for the treatment of infections caused by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. For the last 7 years incidence of vancomycin intermediate S. aureus and vancomycin resistant S. aureus (VISA and VRSA respectively has been increasing in various parts of the world. The present study was carried out to find out the presence of VISA and VRSA in the northern part of India. Methods A total 1681 staphylococcal isolates consisting of 783 S. aureus and 898 coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS were isolated from different clinical specimens from various outpatient departments and wards. All S. aureus and 93 CoNS were subjected to MIC testing (against vancomycin, teicolplanin and oxacillin; Brain Heart Infusion (BHI vancomycin screen agar test; disc diffusion testing, and PCR for mecA, vanA and vanB genes detection. Results Out of 783 S. aureus two S. aureus strains were found to be vancomycin and teicoplanin resistant (one strain with MIC 32 μg/ml and the other strain with MIC 64 μg/ml; six strains of S. aureus have shown to be vancomycin intermediate (two strains with MIC 16 μg/ml and four strains with MIC 8 μg/ml; and two strains with teicoplanin intermediate (MIC 16 μg/ml. One CoNS strain was resistant to vancomycin and teicoplanin (MIC 32 μg/ml, and two CoNS strains were intermediate to vancomycin and teicoplanin (MIC 16 μg/ml. All VRSA, VISA and vancomycin resistant CoNS had shown growth on BHI vancomycin screen agar (vancomycin 6 μg/ml and were mecA PCR positive. None of these isolates have demonstrated vanA/vanB gene by PCR. Conclusion The present study reveals for the first time emergence of VISA/VRSA from this part of world and indicates the magnitude of antibiotic resistance in and around the study area. The major cause of this may be unawareness and indiscriminate use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  18. Characterization of SCCmec and spa types of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from health-care and community-acquired infections in Kerman, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasihi, Yaser; Kiaei, Somayeh; Kalantar-Neyestanaki, Davood

    2017-12-01

    Spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates is a worldwide problem. Molecular typing is a useful tool to understand MRSA epidemiology. Herein, we determined vancomycin-resistant, SCCmec and spa types among MRSA isolates recovered from healthcare and community-acquired infections in Kerman, Iran. A total of 170 S. aureus isolates were collected from different patients who were admitted to affiliated hospitals of Kerman University of Medical science. MRSA and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) isolates were detected by phenotypic methods. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used for detection of mecA, vanA and vanB genes. Staphylococcal cassette chromosomemec (SCCmec) and spa typing were used for molecular typing of among MRSA isolates. Overall, 53% of isolates were considered as MRSA. Two MRSA isolates were resistant to vancomycin and vanA was detected in only one of VRSA isolates. SCCmec type III belonged to spa types t030 and t459 which they were the dominant spa types among community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) and healthcare-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) isolates. Our findings showed that the SCCmec type I and III spread from hospital settings to community, although the SCCmec type IV spread from community to healthcare systems. We have also reported VRSA isolates from hospitalized patients, therefore, appropriate policies should be enforced in order to prevent the spread of antibiotic resistance isolates in hospitals settings. Copyright © 2017 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lactobacillus-derived extracellular vesicles enhance host immune responses against vancomycin-resistant enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Lee, Kiho; Hsu, Min; Nau, Gerard; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Ramratnam, Bharat

    2017-03-14

    Probiotic bacteria are known to modulate host immune responses against various pathogens. Recently, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have emerged as potentially important mediators of host-pathogen interactions. In this study, we explored the role of L. plantarum derived EVs in modulating host responses to vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) using both Caenorhabditis elegans and human cells. Our previous work has shown that probiotic conditioning C. elegans with L. acidophilus NCFM prolongs the survival of nematodes exposed to VRE. Similarly, L. plantarum WCFS1 derived extracellular vesicles (LDEVs) also significantly protected the worms against VRE infection. To dissect the molecular mechanisms of this EV-induced protection, we found that treatment of C. elegans with LDEVs significantly increased the transcription of host defense genes, cpr-1 and clec-60. Both cpr-1 and clec-60 have been previously reported to have protective roles against bacterial infections. Incubating human colon-derived Caco-2 cells with fluorescent dye-labeled LDEVs confirmed that LDEVs could be transported into the mammalian cells. Furthermore, LDEV uptake was associated with significant upregulation of CTSB, a human homologous gene of cpr-1, and REG3G, a human gene that has similar functions to clec-60. We have found that EVs produced from L. plantarum WCFS1 up-regulate the expression of host defense genes and provide protective effects on hosts. Using probiotic-derived EVs instead of probiotic bacteria themselves, this study provides a new direction to treat antimicrobial resistant pathogens, such as VRE.

  20. Molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from patients with bacteremia based on MLST, SCCmec, spa, and agr locus types analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat; Nasiri, Mohammad Javad; Goudarzi, Hossein; Sajadi Nia, Raheleh; Dabiri, Hossein

    2017-03-01

    The widespread emergence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, as a common cause of nosocomial infections, is becoming a serious concern in global public health. The objective of the present study was to investigate antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, frequency of virulence genes and molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from patients with bacteremia. A total of 128 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates were collected during February 2015 to January 2016. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates was assessed using the disk diffusion method. Conventional PCR was performed for the detection of adhesion (can, bbp, ebp, fnbB, fnbA, clfB, clfA) and toxin (etb, eta, pvl, tst) encoding genes, determining the agr type, SCCmec, MLST and spa typing of the isolates. All the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates were found to be sensitive to linezolid, teicoplanin, and vancomycin. Resistance to the tested antibiotics varied from 97.7% for penicillin to 24.2% for mupirocin. The rate of multi drug resistance (MDR) in the present study was 97.7%. The most commonly detected toxin and adhesion genes were tst (58.6%), and clfB (100%), respectively. The majority of SCCmec III isolates were found in agr group I while SCCmec IV and II isolates were distributed among agr group III. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) of the MRSA isolates showed five different sequence types: ST239 (43%), ST22 (39.8%), ST585 (10.9%), ST45 (3.9%) and ST240 (2.3%). All of the pvl positive strains belonged to ST22-SCCmec IV/t790 clone and were MDR. Among different 7 spa types, the most common were t790 (27.3%), t037 (21.9%), and t030 (14.1%). spa types t016, t924 and spa type t383 were reported for the first time from Asia and Iran, respectively. It was shown that spa types circulating in the studied hospitals varied which support the need to perform future surveillance studies in order to understand

  1. Detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE in stool specimens submitted for Clostridium difficile toxin testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevim Özsoy

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the association between Clostridium difficile (C. difficile and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE and efficacy of screening stools submitted for C. difficile toxin assay for prevalence of VRE. Between April 2012 and February 2014, 158 stool samples submitted for C. difficile toxin to the Marmara University Microbiology Laboratory, were included in the study. Stool samples were analyzed by enzyme immuno assay test; VIDAS (bioMerieux, France for Toxin A&B. Samples were inoculated on chromID VRE (bioMerieux, France and incubated 24 h at 37 °C. Manuel tests and API20 STREP (bioMerieux, France test were used to identify the Enterococci species. After the species identification, vancomycin and teicoplanin MIC's were performed by E test and molecular resistance genes for vanA vs vanB were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Of the 158 stool samples, 88 were toxin positive. The prevalence of VRE was 17%(n:19 in toxin positives however, 11.4% in toxin negatives(n:70. All VRE isolates were identified as Enterococcus faecium. These results were evaluated according to Fischer's exact chi-square test and p value between VRE colonization and C. difficile toxin positivity was detected 0.047 (p < 0.05. PPV and NPV were 79% and 47% respectively. In our study, the presence of VRE in C. difficile toxin positives is statistically significant compared with toxin negatives (p < 0.05. Screening for VRE is both additional cost and work load for the laboratories. Therefore VRE screening among C. difficile toxin positive samples, will be cost effective for determination of high risk patients in the hospitals especially for developing countries.

  2. Structures of new phenolics isolated from licorice, and the effectiveness of licorice phenolics on vancomycin-resistant Enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eerdunbayaer; Orabi, Mohamed A A; Aoyama, Hiroe; Kuroda, Teruo; Hatano, Tsutomu

    2014-08-25

    Licorice, which is the underground part of Glycyrrhiza species, has been used widely in Asian and Western countries as a traditional medicine and as a food additive. Our continuous investigation on the constituents of roots and stolons of Glycyrrhiza uralensis led to the isolation of two new phenolics, in addition to 14 known compounds. Structural studies including spectroscopic and simple chemical derivatizations revealed that both of the new compounds had 2-aryl-3-methylbenzofuran structures. An examination of the effectiveness of licorice phenolics obtained in this study on vancomycin-resistant strains Enterococcus faecium FN-1 and Enterococcus faecalis NCTC12201 revealed that licoricidin showed the most potent antibacterial effects against both of E. faecalis and E. faecium with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 1.9 × 10-5 M. 8-(γ,γ-Dimethylallyl)-wighteone, isoangustone A, 3'-(γ,γ-dimethylallyl)-kievitone, glyasperin C, and one of the new 3-methyl-2-phenylbenzofuran named neoglycybenzofuran also showed potent anti-vancomycin-resistant Enterococci effects (MIC 1.9 × 10-5-4.5 × 10-5 M for E. faecium and E. faecalis). The HPLC condition for simultaneous detection of the phenolics in the extract was investigated to assess the quality control of the natural antibacterial resource, and quantitative estimation of several major phenolics in the extract with the established HPLC condition was also performed. The results showed individual contents of 0.08%-0.57% w/w of EtOAc extract for the major phenolics in the materials examined.

  3. Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. isolated from US West Coast public marine beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soge, Olusegun O; Meschke, John S; No, David B; Roberts, Marilyn C

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. (MRCoNS) from marine water and intertidal beach sand from public beaches in Washington State, USA. Fifty-one staphylococci from Washington State beaches were characterized using antimicrobial susceptibility testing, carriage of acquired tetracycline and/or macrolide resistance genes, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, the BBL Crystal Gram-Positive ID System and/or 16S rRNA sequencing, coagulase test and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for MRSA. Five multidrug-resistant MRSA SCCmec type I, of which three were MLST type ST45, one ST59 and one a new MLST type, ST1405, plus one susceptible non-typeable (NT) MRSA ST30 were characterized. Thirty-three MRCoNS isolates, representing 21 strains from 9 Staphylococcus spp., carried a range of SCCmec types [I (2), II (6), III (3), V (2), I/II (1) and NT (7)] and varied in their antibiotic susceptibility to other antibiotic classes and carriage of acquired tetracycline/macrolide resistance gene(s). MRSA and MRCoNS donors co-transferred tet(M) and erm(A) genes to an Enterococcus faecalis recipient at a frequency of 10(-8). This is the first report of MRSA and MRCoNS isolated from marine water and intertidal beach sand. The MLST types and antibiotic carriage of five MRSA isolates were similar to hospital MRSA isolates rather than US community-acquired MRSA isolates. Our results suggest that public marine beaches may be a reservoir for transmission of MRSA to beach visitors as well as an ecosystem for exchange of antibiotic resistance genes among staphylococci and related genera.

  4. Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci: Epidemiology, Infection Prevention, and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Katherine; Bardossy, Ana Cecilia; Zervos, Marcus

    2016-12-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) infections have acquired prominence as a leading cause of health care-associated infections. Understanding VRE epidemiology, transmission modes in health care settings, risk factors for colonization, and infection is essential to prevention and control of VRE infections. Infection control strategies are pivotal in management of VRE infections and should be based on patient characteristics, hospital needs, and available resources. Hand hygiene is basic to decrease acquisition of VRE. The effectiveness of surveillance and contact precautions is variable and controversial in endemic settings, but important during VRE outbreak investigations and control. Environmental cleaning, chlorhexidine bathing, and antimicrobial stewardship are vital in VRE prevention and control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of epidemics of vancomycin-resistant Enterococci in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleyman Durmaz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The first cases with vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE isolation were reported in 1988 throughout the world, and in 1998 in Turkey. The number of the papers conducted on cases or epidemics in which VRE was isolated is in increase. In this study, it was aimed to evaluate some studies at this topic. In conclusion, it was observed that the VRE strains isolated in the same clinic within a short period had a high probability to be the same clone, that there was need for extra investigation for teicoplanin resistance in VRE strains in terms of vanB expression, that VRE colonisation was more common in patients with long term intensive care unit stay, and that eradication of VRE could be made with more strict precautions in comparison to other epidemic bacteria.

  6. Modified PAP method to detect heteroresistance to vancomycin among methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates at a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was an attempt at developing, establishing, validating and comparing the modified PAP method for detection of hetero-vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (h-VRSA with the routine antimicrobial susceptibility testing (using the BSAC standardized disc diffusion method, minimum inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin using standard E-test methodology and the Hiramatsu′s screening method. A total of 50 methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus obtained from various clinical specimens, along with the Mu 3 and Mu 50 strains as controls, were studied. No VRSA isolates were obtained. However, four of the test strains were positive by the Hiramatsu′s screening method, of which only one isolate could be confirmed by the modified PAP analysis method. This isolate was a coloniser from the drain fluid of a liver transplant recipient. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and the overall efficiency of the Hiramatsu′s screening method with the modified PAP analysis as the gold standard were found to be 100, 93.8, 25 and 94%, respectively. It is very essential for clinical laboratories to screen for h-VRSA, given the increasing use of glycopeptide antibiotics in therapy and the potential for failed therapy in patients infected with these strains.

  7. Prevalence and risk factors for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and risk factors for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage among emergency department workers and bacterial contamination on touch ... There were two (1.9%) mobile phone positivities for S. aureus, one of them was MRSA, and a computer keyboard contamination for MRSA was also detected.

  8. Prevalence and risk factors for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-24

    Jun 24, 2014 ... Abstract. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) nasal car- riage among emergency department (ED) workers, and bacterial contamination on hand-touch surfaces at ED. Methods: This single-centered study enrolled 105 ED ...

  9. Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus: mechanisms and modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Paul D; Taylor, Peter W

    2002-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen both within hospitals and in the community. Methicillin, a beta-lactam antibiotic, acts by inhibiting penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) that are involved in the synthesis of peptidoglycan, an essential mesh-like polymer that surrounds the cell. S. aureus can become resistant to methicillin and other beta-lactam antibiotics through the expression of a foreign PBP, PBP2a, that is resistant to the action of methicillin but which can perform the functions of the host PBPs. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates are often resistant to other classes of antibiotics (through different mechanisms) making treatment options limited, and this has led to the search for new compounds active against these strains. An understanding of the mechanism of methicillin resistance has led to the discovery of accessory factors that influence the level and nature of methicillin resistance. Accessory factors, such as Fem factors, provide possible new targets, while compounds that modulate methicillin resistance such as epicatechin gallate, derived from green tea, and corilagin, provide possible lead compounds for development of inhibitors.

  10. Can mupirocin prevent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.F.L. Wertheim (Heiman); M.C. Vos (Margreet)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractIn a retrospective study, Dr Muller and colleagues have assessed the efficacy of mupirocin nasal ointment alongside hygienic measures in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-positive patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Their findings, which suggest that

  11. Global trend of Methicillin-resistant Staphlococcus aureus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Following its first recognition in early 1960s, the increasing incidence of nosocomial and community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections has become a global problem. The emergence of multiple-drug resistant MRSA strains and dissemination of epidemic antibiotic clones ...

  12. Absence of meca gene in methicillin-resistant staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has emerged as a serious threat to public health, causing both hospital and community-associated infections. The gold standard for MRSA detection is the amplification of the mecA gene that codes for the production of the altered penicillin-binding protein (PBP2a) responsible for ...

  13. 1 original article molecular identification of methicillin-resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    We use the molecular techniques of PCR and PFGE to identify MRSA from clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus causing infections ... Keywords: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA, PFGE, PCR, molecular techniques. INTRODUCTION ..... in primary skin infections and pneumonia. Clin. Infect. Dis. 1999 ...

  14. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Geneva, Switzerland, 1993–2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbarth, Stephan; Huyghe, Antoine; Renzi, Gesuele; Bento, Manuela; Gervaix, Alain; Pittet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Molecular characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains different from those of an endemic healthcare-associated clone was conducted over 13 years in Geneva, Switzerland. We demonstrated strain diversity, including clones rarely found in Europe. Local epidemiology of community-associated MRSA is diverse and is evolving by importation and transmission of new strains. PMID:18258126

  15. Evaluation of a protocol to control methicillin-resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-10-08

    Oct 8, 2010 ... Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major health care problem related to morbidity and mortality in intensive care units.1 Nosocomial infections (such as MRSA), also termed health care associated/acquired infections (HAI), occur as a result of hospital or health care treatment and are ...

  16. Rapid detection of methicillin-resistant staphylococci by multiplex PCR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A rapid and sensitive method for excluding the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in clinical samples was developed. The combination of MRSA detection by mecA coaA PCR with prior enrichment in selective broth was tested for 300 swabs. PCR identified 26 MRSApositive samples, ...

  17. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wound colonization by microorganisms is most frequently polymicrobial and incidences of high level resistance among bacterial isolates from wounds have been reported. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and extendedspectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Gram-negative bacteria both constitute ...

  18. Isolation and identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a nosocomial pathogen of increasing risk on community. This study aims at determining the risk of MRSA transfer from coins as silent and underestimated reservoir in community. One hundred swabs from coins were collected from college students in Malaysia. A series ...

  19. Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus : a review of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Despite the volume of knowledge, enhanced surveillance and infection control measures adopted by health care institutions to address the endemicity and frequent disease outbreaks by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitals and health care facilities worldwide, infections due to ...

  20. Public transport as a reservoir of methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanović, S; Cirković, I; Djukić, S; Vuković, D; Svabić-Vlahović, M

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the occurrence of methicillin-resistant staphylococci in a large urban public transport system. Samples were taken from hand rails, which passengers hold onto when they are standing. In total, 1400 swabs taken from 55 vehicles (trolleybuses, trams and buses) were examined. As many as 30.1% samples were positive for the presence of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS), but none for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRCoNS were isolated from all 55 vehicles. Nearly 50% of MRCoNS isolates displayed resistance not only to beta-lactams, but at least to two or more other classes of antimicrobials as well. This study demonstrated widespread occurrence of MRCoNS on hand rails in public transport vehicles. MRSA was not detected. The recovery of methicillin-resistant staphylococci from public transport system implies a potential risk for transmission of these bacteria in an out-hospital environment.

  1. Rapid detection of methicillin-resistant staphylococci by multiplex PCR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2010-11-08

    Nov 8, 2010 ... Deletion screening of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus via multiplex DNA amplification. Nucleic Acids Res. 16: 11141-11156. Fang H, Hedin G (2003). Rapid screening and identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from clinical samples by selective-broth and real-time PCR assay.

  2. Screening cultures for detection of methicillin-resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-26

    Nov 26, 2013 ... This retrospective study analysed the diagnostic yield of single-site, two-site, and three-site anatomical surveillance cultures in a population of 4,769 patients at high risk for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. (MRSA) colonisation. Cultures of seven anatomical sites were used as the gold standard ...

  3. Faster and economical screening for vancomycin-resistant enterococci by sequential use of chromogenic agar and real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Thean Yen; Jiang, Boran; Ng, Lily Siew Yong

    2017-08-01

    Screening for vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) by culture takes days to generate results, while polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing directly from clinical specimens lacks specificity. The aims of this study were to develop a real-time PCR to detect and identify Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and vanA and vanB genes, and to evaluate the impact of this PCR on test-reporting times when performing it directly from suspect VRE isolates present on screening chromogenic media. The tetraplex PCR primers were designed to amplify E. faecium, E. faecalis, and vanA and vanB genes, with melt-curve analysis of PCR products. Following analytical and clinical validation of the molecular assay, PCR testing was performed for target colonies present on VRE chromogenic media. PCR results were evaluated against conventional phenotypic identification and susceptibility testing, with the time to result being monitored for both modalities. A total of 519 colonies from clinical specimens were tested concurrently by real-time PCR and phenotypic methods. In all, 223 isolates were identified with phenotypic vancomycin resistance (vanA, n = 108; vanB, n = 105; non-vanA/vanB = 10), with complete agreement between PCR and phenotypic testing for vancomycin-resistant E. faecium and E. faecalis. The majority (88.6%) of PCR results were reported, on average, 24.8 hours earlier than those of phenotypic testing, with 68% reduction in total costs. The use of culture on selective media, followed by direct colony PCR confirmation allows faster and economical VRE screening. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Novel Structure of Enterococcus faecium-Originated ermB-Positive Tn1546-Like Element in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Tsai-Wen; Hung, Wei-Chun; Tsai, Jui-Chang; Lin, Yu-Tzu; Lee, Hao; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Lee, Tai-Fen; Teng, Lee-Jene

    2016-10-01

    We determined the resistance determinants in 274 erythromycin-resistant methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) isolates during a 13-year period, 2000 to 2012. The resistance phenotypes, inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (iMLS), constitutive MLS (cMLS), and macrolide-streptogramin (MS) resistance phenotypes, were examined by a double-disk diffusion D test. The ermB gene was more frequent (35%; 97/274) than ermC (27%; 75/274) or ermA (21%; 58/274). All 97 ermB-positive isolates harbored Tn551 and IS1216V The majority (89/97) of ermB-positive isolates displayed the cMLS phenotype and carried mobile element structure (MES)-like structures, which has been previously reported in sequence type 59 (ST59) methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The remaining 8 ermB-carrying isolates, belonging to ST7 (n = 4), ST5 (n = 3), and ST59 (n = 1), were sasK intact and did not carry MES-like structures. Unlike a MES-like structure that was located on the chromosome, the ermB elements on sasK-intact isolates were located on plasmids by S1 nuclease pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis and conjugation tests. Sequence data for the ermB-containing region (14,566 bp) from ST59 NTUH_3874 revealed that the best match was a Tn1546-like element in plasmid pMCCL2 DNA (GenBank accession number AP009486) of Macrococcus caseolyticus Tn1546 is recognized as an enterococcal transposon and was known from the vancomycin resistance gene cluster in vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE). So far, acquisitions of Tn1546 in S. aureus have occurred in clonal complex 5 (CC5) MRSA, but not in MSSA. This is the first report that MSSA harbors an Enterococcus faecium-originated ermB-positive Tn1546-like element located on a plasmid. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus hominis endophthalmitis following cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won JY

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Jun Yeon Won,1 Moosang Kim21Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Korea; 2Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, KoreaAbstract: We report a case of acute postoperative endophthalmitis caused by vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus hominis, treated at our hospital. An 80-year-old male presented 2 days after uncomplicated phacoemulsification and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation, with a 24-hour history of progressive visual loss and redness in the operated (right eye. On examination, best corrected visual acuity was counting fingers. Anterior segment examination revealed conjunctival injection, chemosis, corneal edema, and hypopyon. B-scan ultrasonography showed vitreous opacification, but no retinal detachment. Acute postoperative endophthalmitis was diagnosed. We performed vitrectomy with vancomycin in the irrigating solution, intraocular lens removal, and silicone oil tamponade. Culture of the vitreous grew Staphylococcus hominis. Antibiotic susceptibility testing showed the isolate was sensitive to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and teicoplanin but resistant to ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, cefazolin, and vancomycin. At 3 months, the visual acuity of the silicone oil-treated eye was 20/400.Keywords: endophthalmitis, Staphylococcus hominis, vancomycin

  6. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in a university hospital of southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Liguori

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: In the last decades vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE have emerged as important pathogens responsible for hospital-acquired infections. To analyze the spread and clonal relatedness of VRE, a two-year study of isolates was carried out in the hospital of the University “Federico II” in Naples.

    Methods: Enterococcus species were identified by using API-2 Strep and antibiotic susceptibility was determined through the use of four tests: disk diffusion, broth dilution methods, Etest and Vitek 2. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR was used to analyse glycopeptide resistance. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and arbitrarily primed (AP-polymerase chain reaction were used for molecular typing of the strains.

    Results: Thirty-two isolates of enterococci (18 E. faecium and 14 E. faecalis showed resistance to vancomycin and teicoplanin and all the strains were vanA-positive. AP-PCR showed a unique clone of E. faecium, as well as for E. faecalis isolates. Identical results were obtained by PFGE for E. faecalis isolates, while three different PFGE patterns emerged for E. faecium.

    Conclusions: The low degree of genetic diversity among the isolates strongly suggests a clonal spread of antibiotic-resistant strains among hospitalized patients in high-risk wards. This report represents the first step to understanding VRE spread in our hospital as well as contributing to the comparison among different antibiotic susceptibility tests and molecular typing methods.

  7. Graphene oxide-silver nanocomposite as a promising biocidal agent against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Ana Carolina Mazarin; Lima, Bruna Araujo; de Faria, Andreia Fonseca; Brocchi, Marcelo; Alves, Oswaldo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been responsible for serious hospital infections worldwide. Nanomaterials are an alternative to conventional antibiotic compounds, because bacteria are unlikely to develop microbial resistance against nanomaterials. In the past decade, graphene oxide (GO) has emerged as a material that is often used to support and stabilize silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for the preparation of novel antibacterial nanocomposites. In this work, we report the synthesis of the graphene-oxide silver nanocomposite (GO-Ag) and its antibacterial activity against relevant microorganisms in medicine. GO-Ag nanocomposite was synthesized through the reduction of silver ions (Ag(+)) by sodium citrate in an aqueous GO dispersion, and was extensively characterized using ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by microdilution assays and time-kill experiments. The morphology of bacterial cells treated with GO-Ag was investigated via transmission electron microscopy. AgNPs were well distributed throughout GO sheets, with an average size of 9.4±2.8 nm. The GO-Ag nanocomposite exhibited an excellent antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, Enterococcus faecalis, and Escherichia coli. All (100%) MRSA cells were inactivated after 4 hours of exposure to GO-Ag sheets. In addition, no toxicity was found for either pristine GO or bare AgNPs within the tested concentration range. Transmission electronic microscopy images offered insights into how GO-Ag nanosheets interacted with bacterial cells. Our results indicate that the GO-Ag nanocomposite is a promising antibacterial agent against common nosocomial bacteria, particularly antibiotic-resistant MRSA. Morphological injuries on MRSA cells revealed a likely loss of viability as a result of the

  8. Impetigo update: new challenges in the era of methicillin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geria, Aanand N; Schwartz, Robert A

    2010-02-01

    Impetigo is a bacterial infection of the superficial epidermis most commonly seen in infants and children. It is clinically characterized by crusted erosions or ulcers that may arise as a primary infection in which bacterial invasion occurs through minor breaks in the cutaneous surface or a secondary infection of a preexisting dermatosis or infestation. Impetigo occurs in 2 forms: bullous and nonbullous. Staphylococcus aureus currently is the most common overall cause of impetigo, but Streptococcus pyogenes remains an important cause in developing nations. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S aureus (CA-MRSA) poses a challenge because of its enhanced virulence and increasing prevalence in children. For limited uncomplicated impetigo, either topical mupirocin or fusidic acid is as effective if not more effective than systemic antibiotics. For extensive or complicated impetigo, systemic antibiotics may be warranted, but beta-lactam antibiotics should be avoided if methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) is suspected.

  9. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in the obstetric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriebs, Jan M

    2008-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an increasingly prevalent pathogen, both in the community and in hospitalized patients. The virulence of MRSA, coupled with its resistance to many frequently prescribed antibiotics, requires increased vigilance in the assessment and diagnosis of skin and soft tissue infections. This article reviews the epidemiology of MRSA and focuses on treatment of MRSA when it is diagnosed during pregnancy.

  10. A Rare Presentation of Community Acquired Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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    J. Docekal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostatic abscess is a rarely described condition and is commonly caused by gram-negative organisms such as enterobacteria. However, as the prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA increases in the community, unusual infections due to this organism have been recently published. In this report, we describe a patient with diabetes mellitus type 2, who presents with diabetic ketoacidosis—later found to be due to a prostatic abscess from which MRSA was cultured.

  11. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Xiu-jun; Fang, Yong; Yao, Min

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most common multidrug resistant bacteria both in hospitals and in the community. In the last two decades, there has been growing concern about the increasing resistance to MRSA of the most potent antibiotic glycopeptides. MRSA infection poses a serious problem for physicians and their patients. Photosensitizer-mediated antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) appears to be a promising and innovative approach for treatin...

  12. [Relatedness of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogiel, Tomasz; Mikucka, Agnieszka; Deptuła, Aleksander; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2009-01-01

    Many identification and relatedness studies methods had been commonly used for epidemiological studies in microbiological laboratories. Apart from phenotypic methods, genotypic are also often used. The aim of this study was to compare, obtained by PFGE chromosomal DNA patterns of methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis strains isolated from clinical material. 46 methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis strains were included in this study. Most of them were isolated from wound swabs (65.2%) and catheters (19.6%) from different surgical clinics (76.1%). To identify strains and receive biochemical profiles, ID 32 Staph tests and GPI cards of Vitek 1 system were used. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Tenover et al. interpretation were used to compare chromosomal DNA patterns of examined strains. 44 and 42 PFGE patterns of chromosomal DNA were received, using visual interpretation classifying two pairs of strains as the same, two pairs as closely related and three pairs as probably related. Strains classified as identical and similar in visual evaluation were indistinguishable in Molecular Analyst DST interpretation, probably due to tolerance in bands location pattern. Strains probably related in visual interpretation represent at least 96% similarity in Molecular Analyst DST but different susceptibility and biochemical profiles obtained by ID 32 Staph and Vitek 1. PFGE analysis had foremost capacity to distinguish methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis strains using visual interpretation and Molecular Analyst DST (Bio-Rad) program and seems to be useful method in epidemiological studies. Strains with the same PFGE pattern, had different susceptibility and biochemical profiles.

  13. Citral, a monoterpenoid aldehyde interacts synergistically with norfloxacin against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Priyanka; Patel, Dinesh Kumar; Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Pal, Anirban; Tandon, Sudeep; Darokar, M P

    2017-10-15

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA), is a major human pathogen causing wide range of clinical infections, which has been further complicated by drug resistance like methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA), vancomycin intermediate S. aureus (VISA)/vancomycin resistant S. aureus (VRSA), etc. The present study was aimed at determining anti-staphylococcal potential of citral against drug resistant clinical isolates alone and in combination with antibiotics. To assess the potential of citral in combination with norfloxacin in treating drug resistant infections of SA. In the present study, synergistic interaction of citral and norfloxacin against drug resistant SA strains was evaluated. Further the efficacy and possible mechanism of action of the combination was also evaluated using in vitro and in vivo assays. The anti-staphylococcal activity of each of the monoterpene and the antibiotic was determined in terms of MIC and the effective concentration of both compounds in combination was obtained by checkerboard assay. In vivo efficacy and oral acute toxicity was evaluated in Swiss albino mice model. To understand the mechanism of action, time-kill curve, bacteriolysis, leakage, membrane depolarization, salt tolerance and ethidium bromide efflux assays were performed. Citral was found effective against clinical isolates of SA with MIC values ranging from 75 to 150 µg ml-1 exhibiting bacteriostatic activity. Citral interacted synergistically, reducing MIC of norfloxacin up to 32-folds with FICI ≤ 0.50. Citral did not affect cell wall, but could damage cell membrane, inhibit efflux pump and affect the membrane potential. Citral could reduce the staphylococcal load of spleen and liver tissues in a dose-dependent manner which was further reduced when used in combination with norfloxacin. Citral did not exhibit any mortality or morbidity up to 500 mg kg-1 body weight and found to prolong the post-antibiotic effect of norfloxacin. Based on these observations, citral could be a

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterococcus faecium Commensal Isolate E1002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, Hanne; Douillard, F.P.; Laine, P.K.; Paulin, L.; Willems, R.J.L.; Vos, de W.M.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) has been associated with an increase in multidrug-resistant nosocomial infections. Here, we report the 2.614-Mb genome sequence of the Enterococcus faecium commensal isolate E1002, which will be instrumental in further understanding the

  15. Intestinal Enterococcus faecium Colonization Improves Host Defense during Polymicrobial Peritonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leendertse, Masja; Willems, Rob J. L.; Oei, G. Anneke; Florquin, Sandrine; Bonten, Marc J. M.; van der Poll, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Background. Vancomycin-resistant (VR) Enterococcus faecium is increasingly found to colonize and infect hospitalized patients. Enterococci are frequently isolated from polymicrobial infections originating from the intestines. The impact of VR E. faecium on these infections and vice versa is not

  16. Prevalence and Removal Efficiency of Enterococcal Species and Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci of a Hospital Wastewater Treatment Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Karimi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous presence of various antibiotics and bacteria in hospital wastewaters creates a suitable environment, in which the bacteria, such as ‎enterococci become resistant to the antibiotics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of different units of the hospital wastewater treatment plant (HWTP to remove Enterococcus spp and Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE. The study was performed on the 27 samples collected from HWTP in Hamedan, Iran during December 2014 to August 2015. Enterococcus spp and VRE were identified by biochemical tests and then the isolates were confirmed by PCR. Finally, the antibiotic susceptibility test was performed using disk diffusion methods. Of the 27 samples examined, 315 a total of enterococcal isolates were obtained. Of the 315 isolates of enterococci investigated, 162 (51.42% were identified as E. faecium, 87 (27.61% as E. hirae, 35 (11.11% as E. faecalis, 11 (3.5% as E. gallinarum, 7 (2.22% as E. casseliflavus, 4 (1.26% E. avium, and 9 (2.85% isolates VR E. faecium.The results of antibiotic susceptibility testing showed that of the total 315 isolates, 146 (46.34% were resistance to tetracycline, 9 (2.85% were resistance to vancomycin and Teicoplanin. Lower antibiotic resistance was seen with Nitrofurantoin 2 (1.26%. This study indicates a high prevalence of multidrug resistance among E. faecium isolated from HWTP, thus, it could be considered as a threat to the health and safety of ‎wastewater workers and even public health.

  17. Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome in a premature newborn caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: case report

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    Andreas Hörner

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome is an exfoliative skin disease. Reports of this syndrome in newborns caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are rare but, when present, rapid diagnosis and treatment is required in order to decrease morbidity and mortality. CASE REPORT: A premature newly born girl weighing 1,520 g, born with a gestational age of 29 weeks and 4 days, developed staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome on the fifth day of life. Cultures on blood samples collected on the first and fourth days were negative, but Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus sp. (vancomycin-sensitive developed in blood cultures performed on the day of death (seventh day, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens were identified in cultures on nasopharyngeal, buttock and abdominal secretions. In addition to these two Gram-negative bacilli, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in a culture on the umbilical stump (seventh day. The diagnosis of staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome was based on clinical criteria.

  18. Minimum inhibitory concentration of vancomycin to methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from different clinical samples at a tertiary care hospital in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshetry, Arjun Ojha; Pant, Narayan Dutt; Bhandari, Raju; Khatri, Sabita; Shrestha, Krishma Laxmi; Upadhaya, Shambhu Kumar; Poudel, Asia; Lekhak, Binod; Raghubanshi, Bijendra R

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has evolved as a serious threat to public health. It has capability to cause infections not only in health care settings but also in community. Due to the multidrug resistance shown by MRSA, there are limited treatment options for the infections caused by this superbug. Vancomycin is used as the drug of choice for the treatment of infections caused by MRSA. Different studies from all around the world have documented the emergence of strains of S. aureus those are intermediate sensitive or resistant to vancomycin. And recently, there have been reports of reduced susceptibility of MRSA to vancomycin, from Nepal also. So the main purpose of this study was to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin to methicillin resistant S. aureus isolated from different clinical specimens. Total 125 strains of S. aureus isolated from different clinical samples at KIST Medical College and Teaching Hospital, Lalitpur, Nepal from Nov 2012 to June 2013, were subjected to MRSA detection by cefoxitin disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin to confirmed MRSA strains were determined by agar dilution method. Yellow colored colonies in mannitol salt agar, which were gram positive cocci, catalase positive and coagulase positive were confirmed to be S. aureus. Among, total 125 S. aureus strains isolated; 47(37.6%) were MRSA. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin to the strains of MRSA ranged from 0.125 μg/ml to 1 μg/ml. From our findings we concluded that the rate of isolation of MRSA among all the strains of S. aureus isolated from clinical samples was very high. However, none of the MRSA strains were found to be vancomycin intermediate-sensitive or vancomycin-resistant.

  19. Minimum inhibitory concentration of vancomycin to methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from different clinical samples at a tertiary care hospital in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Ojha Kshetry

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has evolved as a serious threat to public health. It has capability to cause infections not only in health care settings but also in community. Due to the multidrug resistance shown by MRSA, there are limited treatment options for the infections caused by this superbug. Vancomycin is used as the drug of choice for the treatment of infections caused by MRSA. Different studies from all around the world have documented the emergence of strains of S. aureus those are intermediate sensitive or resistant to vancomycin. And recently, there have been reports of reduced susceptibility of MRSA to vancomycin, from Nepal also. So the main purpose of this study was to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of vancomycin to methicillin resistant S. aureus isolated from different clinical specimens. Methods Total 125 strains of S. aureus isolated from different clinical samples at KIST Medical College and Teaching Hospital, Lalitpur, Nepal from Nov 2012 to June 2013, were subjected to MRSA detection by cefoxitin disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin to confirmed MRSA strains were determined by agar dilution method. Yellow colored colonies in mannitol salt agar, which were gram positive cocci, catalase positive and coagulase positive were confirmed to be S. aureus. Results Among, total 125 S. aureus strains isolated; 47(37.6% were MRSA. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin to the strains of MRSA ranged from 0.125 μg/ml to 1 μg/ml. Conclusion From our findings we concluded that the rate of isolation of MRSA among all the strains of S. aureus isolated from clinical samples was very high. However, none of the MRSA strains were found to be vancomycin intermediate-sensitive or vancomycin-resistant.

  20. Genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, isolated on three different geography locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojić, Maja; Hukić, Mirsada

    2015-08-04

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Increased frequency of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitalized patients and possibility of vancomycin resistance requires rapid and reliable characterization of isolates and control of MRSA spread in hospitals. Typing of isolates helps to understand the route of a hospital pathogen spread. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of MRSA samples on three different geography locations. In addition, our aim was to evaluate three different methods of MRSA typing: spa-typing, agr-typing and GenoType MRSA.  We included 104 samples of MRSA, isolated in 3 different geographical locations in clinical hospitals in Zagreb, Mostar, and Heidelberg, during the period of six months. Genotyping and phenotyping were done by spa-typing, agr-typing and dipstick assay GenoType MRSA. We failed to type all our samples by spa-typing.  The most common spa-type in clinical hospital Zagreb was t041, in Mostar t001, and in Heidelberg t003.We analyzed 102/104 of our samples by agr-typing method. We did not find any agr-type IV in our locations. We analyzed all our samples by the dipstick assay GenoType MRSA. All isolates in our study were MRSA strains. In Zagreb there were no positive strains to PVL gene. In Mostar we have found 5/25 positive strains to PVL gene, in Heidelberg there was 1/49. PVL positive isolates were associated with spa-type t008 and agr-type I, thus, genetically, they were community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). Dipstick assay GenoType MRSA has demonstrated sufficient specificity, sensibility, simple performance and low cost, so we could introduce it to work in smaller laboratories. Using this method may expedite MRSA screening, thus preventing its spread in hospitals.

  1. Reducing the spread of antimicrobial-resistant microorganisms. Control of vancomycin-resistant enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, D K; Goldmann, D A; Jarvis, W R

    1995-06-01

    Strategies to reduce the spread of hospital-acquired microorganisms resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents are discussed. Because hospitals have experienced a rapid increase in the incidence of infection and colonization with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in the past 5 years, the Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued recommendations for preventing the spread of vancomycin resistance. Controlling VRE dissemination in pediatric patients requires prompt detection of VRE by microbiology laboratories, education of staff and families about VRE, use of infection control measures to prevent person-to-person VRE transmission, and prudent vancomycin use.

  2. Toxin Mediates Sepsis Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial sepsis is a major killer in hospitalized patients. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS with the leading species Staphylococcus epidermidis are the most frequent causes of nosocomial sepsis, with most infectious isolates being methicillin-resistant. However, which bacterial factors underlie the pathogenesis of CNS sepsis is unknown. While it has been commonly believed that invariant structures on the surface of CNS trigger sepsis by causing an over-reaction of the immune system, we show here that sepsis caused by methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis is to a large extent mediated by the methicillin resistance island-encoded peptide toxin, PSM-mec. PSM-mec contributed to bacterial survival in whole human blood and resistance to neutrophil-mediated killing, and caused significantly increased mortality and cytokine expression in a mouse sepsis model. Furthermore, we show that the PSM-mec peptide itself, rather than the regulatory RNA in which its gene is embedded, is responsible for the observed virulence phenotype. This finding is of particular importance given the contrasting roles of the psm-mec locus that have been reported in S. aureus strains, inasmuch as our findings suggest that the psm-mec locus may exert effects in the background of S. aureus strains that differ from its original role in the CNS environment due to originally "unintended" interferences. Notably, while toxins have never been clearly implied in CNS infections, our tissue culture and mouse infection model data indicate that an important type of infection caused by the predominant CNS species is mediated to a large extent by a toxin. These findings suggest that CNS infections may be amenable to virulence-targeted drug development approaches.

  3. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: an overview for manual therapists☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Bart N.; Johnson, Claire D.; Egan, Jonathon Todd; Rosenthal, Michael; Griffith, Erin A.; Evans, Marion Willard

    2012-01-01

    Objective Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is associated with difficult-to-treat infections and high levels of morbidity. Manual practitioners work in environments where MRSA is a common acquired infection. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical overview of MRSA as it applies to the manual therapy professions (eg, physical and occupational therapy, athletic training, chiropractic, osteopathy, massage, sports medicine) and to discuss how to identify and prevent MRSA infections in manual therapy work environments. Methods PubMed and CINAHL were searched from the beginning of their respective indexing years through June 2011 using the search terms MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus aureus. Texts and authoritative Web sites were also reviewed. Pertinent articles from the authors' libraries were included if they were not already identified in the literature search. Articles were included if they were applicable to ambulatory health care environments in which manual therapists work or if the content of the article related to the clinical management of MRSA. Results Following information extraction, 95 citations were included in this review, to include 76 peer-reviewed journal articles, 16 government Web sites, and 3 textbooks. Information was organized into 10 clinically relevant categories for presentation. Information was organized into the following clinically relevant categories: microbiology, development of MRSA, risk factors for infection, clinical presentation, diagnostic tests, screening tests, reporting, treatment, prevention for patients and athletes, and prevention for health care workers. Conclusion Methicillin-resistant S aureus is a health risk in the community and to patients and athletes treated by manual therapists. Manual practitioners can play an essential role in recognizing MRSA infections and helping to control its transmission in the health care environment and the community

  4. Epidemic Increase in Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, Henrik; Boye, Kit; Bartels, Mette Damkjær

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We have found an epidemic increase in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Copenhagen. The increase has a complex background and involves hospitals, nursing homes and persons nursed in their own home. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We found 33 MRSA patients in 2003 and 121...... in 2004. All isolates have been spa-typed and epidemiologic information collected. RESULTS: The number of MRSA cases has a doubling time of about six months. The epidemic has been caused by many different MRSA types and 31 staphylococcus protein A genotypes (spa types). MRSA has caused several hospital...

  5. Molecular mechanisms of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, M A; Liñares, J; Martín, R

    1997-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are among the most common nosocomial pathogens. The most significant mechanism of resistance to methicillin in this-species is the acquisition of a genetic determinant (mecA gene). However, resistance seems to have a more complex molecular basis, since additional chromosomal material is involved in such resistance. Besides, overproduction of penicillinase and/or alterations in the PBPs can contribute to the formation of resistance phenotypes. Genetic and environmental factors leading to MRSA are reviewed.

  6. Evaluation of BD MAX Staph SR Assay for Differentiating Between Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci and Determining Methicillin Resistance Directly From Positive Blood Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewoong; Park, Yeon Joon; Park, Dong Jin; Park, Kang Gyun; Lee, Hae Kyung

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of the BD MAX StaphSR Assay (SR assay; BD, USA) for direct detection of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistance not only in S. aureus but also in coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CNS) from positive blood cultures. From 228 blood culture bottles, 103 S. aureus [45 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), 55 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), 3 mixed infections (1 MRSA+Enterococcus faecalis, 1 MSSA+MRCNS, 1 MSSA+MSCNS)], and 125 CNS (102 MRCNS, 23 MSCNS) were identified by Vitek 2. For further analysis, we obtained the cycle threshold (Ct) values from the BD MAX system software to determine an appropriate cutoff value. For discrepancy analysis, conventional mecA/mecC PCR and oxacillin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined. Compared to Vitek 2, the SR assay identified all 103 S. aureus isolates correctly but failed to detect methicillin resistance in three MRSA isolates. All 55 MSSA isolates were correctly identified by the SR assay. In the concordant cases, the highest Ct values for nuc, mecA, and mec right-extremity junction (MREJ) were 25.6, 22, and 22.2, respectively. Therefore, we selected Ct values from 0-27 as a range of positivity, and applying this cutoff, the sensitivity/specificity of the SR assay were 100%/100% for detecting S. aureus, and 97.9%/98.1% and 99.0%/95.8% for detecting methicillin resistance in S. aureus and CNS, respectively. We propose a Ct cutoff value for nuc/mec assay without considering MREJ because mixed cultures of MSSA and MRCNS were very rare (0.4%) in the positive blood cultures.

  7. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus causing orbital cellulitis in Australian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaska, Vikram L; Grimwood, Keith; Gole, Glen A; Nimmo, Graeme R; Paterson, David L; Nissen, Michael D

    2011-11-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has only emerged recently as a cause of serious ocular infections in several different countries. At a tertiary pediatric hospital in Brisbane, Australia, community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus orbital cellulitis was first noted in 2009. Since then, it has caused 4 of 9 such infections.

  8. Disruption of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms with Enzymatic Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-29

    NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH UNIT SAN ANTONIO Disruption of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms with Enzymatic...Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus MSSA Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus OD Optical density PBS Phosphate-buffered saline SEM... Staphylococcus aureus biofilm model that mimics wound-like conditions and employ this model to evaluate the anti-biofilm activity of four enzymatic compounds

  9. Patients with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Infection – 21st Century Lepers

    OpenAIRE

    Mozzillo, Kristin L.; Ortiz, Nancy; Miller, Loren G.

    2010-01-01

    In the recent past, there has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, especially community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) infections. Many media descriptions of MRSA are sensational and focus on its potential for severe disease and contagiousness.

  10. Concurrent infectious mononucleosis and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li Jun; Du, Xiao Qin; Nyirimigabo, Eric; Shou, Song Tao

    2014-04-01

    It is rare to see a concurrent infection with infectious mononucleosis and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Tianjin, China. Until now, there is still no any single recorded case of concurrent infectious mononucleosis and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

  11. Frequency of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Rahimi-Alang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is one of the most important pathogen in hospitals. Healthcare personnel are the main source of nosocomial infections and identification and control of MRSA carriers can reduce incidence of infections. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of MRSA and their antibiotic susceptibility profile among healthcare workers in Gorgan.Materials and Method: 333 healthcare workers were participated in this cross-sectional study in 2009. Samples were taken with sterile cotton swabs from both anterior nares and hands. Swabs were plated immediately on to the mannitol salt agar. Suspected colonies were confirmed as S. aureus by Gram staining, catalase, coagulase and DNase tests. Minimum inhibition concentration by micro dilution broth method was used to determine methicillin resistant strains. Antimicrobial susceptibility to other antibiotics was performed according to NCCLS guidelines by disc diffusion method.Result: Frequency of S.aureus and MRSA carriers among healthcare workers was 24% and 3% respectively. The highest rate of S. aureus and MRSA carriers were observed in operating room staff. Resistance to penicillin was seen in 97.5% of isolates and all strains were sensitive to vancomycin.Conclusions: Frequency of S. aureus and MRSA in healthcare workers was median and rather low respectively. Continual monitoring and control of carriers can reduce distribution of this organism and their infections

  12. METHICILLIN - RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS IN PIG PRODUCTION CHAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Conter

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were (i to estimate the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus (S.a in pig farm environments; (ii to evaluate the presence of S.a in pork processing environments (iii to detect the presence of methicillin-resistant (MRSA among isolated strains. Samples of pig stool, farm environment and pork processing environment were collected. These samples were submitted to detection of S.a following the international method: UNI EN ISO 6888-2 and the Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC tests were performed by using the automated VITEK 2 system. In addition, a PCR for the detection of the mecA gene was applied. Overall, S. aureus were more frequently detected from pig farms than from pork processing environments. Among the n.51 isolated strains, n. 49 (96% were methicillin resistant (MRSA and only n.2 strains were methicillin sensitive (MSSA. The results of the present study highlighted that further studies are needed to elucidate transmission routes of MRSA in pig production chain.

  13. Outbreaks caused by vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium in hematology and oncology departments: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Ulrich

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: A rational use of antibiotics in hematology and oncology units is recommended in order to reduce selection pressure on resistant pathogens such as VRE. In addition the importance of hand hygiene should be stressed to all staff whenever possible.

  14. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in broiler flocks 5 years after the avoparcin ban

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuer, Ole Eske; Pedersen, Karl; Andersen, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    The glycopeptide growth promoter avoparcin was banned from animal production in Denmark in 1995. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in broiler flocks in the absence of the selective pressure exerted by the use of avoparcin. One hundred sixty...

  15. Annual Surveillance Summary: Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Infections in the Military Health System (MHS), 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Annual Surveillance Summary: Vancomycin- Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Infections in the Military Health ...VRE) incidence and prevalence among all beneficiaries seeking care within the Military Health System (MHS). This report describes demographics...sources were linked to assess descriptive and clinical factors related to VRE. Health Level 7 (HL7)-formatted Composite Health Care System (CHCS

  16. vanG element insertions within a conserved chromosomal site conferring vancomycin resistance to Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus anginosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Velusamy; Metcalf, Benjamin J; Knipe, Kristen M; Ouattara, Mahamoudou; McGee, Lesley; Shewmaker, Patricia L; Glennen, Anita; Nichols, Megin; Harris, Carol; Brimmage, Mary; Ostrowsky, Belinda; Park, Connie J; Schrag, Stephanie J; Frace, Michael A; Sammons, Scott A; Beall, Bernard

    2014-07-22

    Three vancomycin-resistant streptococcal strains carrying vanG elements (two invasive Streptococcus agalactiae isolates [GBS-NY and GBS-NM, both serotype II and multilocus sequence type 22] and one Streptococcus anginosus [Sa]) were examined. The 45,585-bp elements found within Sa and GBS-NY were nearly identical (together designated vanG-1) and shared near-identity over an ~15-kb overlap with a previously described vanG element from Enterococcus faecalis. Unexpectedly, vanG-1 shared much less homology with the 49,321-bp vanG-2 element from GBS-NM, with widely different levels (50% to 99%) of sequence identity shared among 44 related open reading frames. Immediately adjacent to both vanG-1 and vanG-2 were 44,670-bp and 44,680-bp integrative conjugative element (ICE)-like sequences, designated ICE-r, that were nearly identical in the two group B streptococcal (GBS) strains. The dual vanG and ICE-r elements from both GBS strains were inserted at the same position, between bases 1328 and 1329, within the identical RNA methyltransferase (rumA) genes. A GenBank search revealed that although most GBS strains contained insertions within this specific site, only sequence type 22 (ST22) GBS strains contained highly related ICE-r derivatives. The vanG-1 element in Sa was also inserted within this position corresponding to its rumA homolog adjacent to an ICE-r derivative. vanG-1 insertions were previously reported within the same relative position in the E. faecalis rumA homolog. An ICE-r sequence perfectly conserved with respect to its counterpart in GBS-NY was apparent within the same site of the rumA homolog of a Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis strain. Additionally, homologous vanG-like elements within the conserved rumA target site were evident in Roseburia intestinalis. Importance: These three streptococcal strains represent the first known vancomycin-resistant strains of their species. The collective observations made from these strains reveal a specific

  17. CLINICAL ISOLATES OF MECA, METHICILLIN, VANCOMYCIN RESISTANCE S. AUREUS; ESBLs PRODUCING K.PNEUMONIA, E.COLI, P. AUREGENOSA FROM VARIOUS CLINICAL SOURCE AND ITS ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE PATTERNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Mahmud Ali, Amirthalingam R

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Antimicrobial resistance has turned into a key medical and public health crisis globally since the injudicious use of magic bullets (drugs. Aim of this study is focused on the clinical isolate and their percentages of resistant to antibiotics in gram positive bacteria such as MRSA, VRSA, and MSSA are common causes of nosocomical, skin structure infections, bacteremia and infection of other systems; ESBLs producing Enterobacteriaceae (E. coli, Klebsiella spp. is common agent of urinary tract, bloodstream, pulmonary and intra-abdominal infections and carbapenem resistant P. aeruginosa with its complete antimicrobial patterns which are currently practiced in this population. Methods: There are one hundred and fourteen (114 various clinical isolates, isolated from various clinical samples like throat swab, urine, pus, sputum, and blood culture, identified as specific isolate with resistance patterns were analyzed by BD phoenix-100 the auto analyzer. Results: Off 114 clinical isolate, 6 mecA-mediated resistance (cefoxitin>8mgc/ml, 11 methicillin resistance, 18 β lactam/βlactamase inhibitor, 12 methicillin sensitive and 3 vancomycin (>16µg/ml resistance S. aureus have been isolated from overall 50 isolate of S.aureus. In addition, there are 27 P.aeruginosa, 15 ESBLs from overall of 25 K. pneumoniae and 7 ESBLs out of 12 Escherichia coli species have been isolated. The resistance and susceptibility pattern percentages have been graphically represented for each isolates. Conclusion: Current study revealed that the drug classes of β lactam/βlactamase inhibitor having high resistance rate with S.aureus, P.aureginosa, K. pneumoniae and E. coli isolate. Also, some of other drug classes such as cepham and tetracycline having higher resistance rate with P.aureginosa and K.pneumoniae. In addition, the vancomycin resistances S. aureus have been isolated and reported as first time in this population.

  18. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay for d-Ala-d-Lac: a key intermediate for vancomycin resistance in vancomycin-resistant enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putty, Sandeep; Vemula, Harika; Bobba, Sudheer; Gutheil, William G

    2013-11-15

    Vancomycin exerts its antibacterial activity by binding to d-Ala-d-Ala in bacterial cell wall precursors. Vancomycin resistance in vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) is due to an alternative cell wall biosynthesis pathway in which d-Ala-d-Ala is replaced, most commonly by d-Ala-d-Lac. In this study, we extend our recently developed Marfey's derivatization-based liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay for l-Ala, d-Ala, and d-Ala-d-Ala to d-Ala-d-Lac and apply it to the quantitation of these metabolites in VRE. The first step in this effort was the development of an effective washing method for removing medium components from VRE cells. Mar-d-Ala-d-Lac was well resolved chromatographically from Mar-d-Ala-d-Ala, a prerequisite for MS/MS quantitation of d-Ala-d-Ala and d-Ala-d-Lac. Mar-d-Ala-d-Lac gave similar detection parameters, sensitivity, and linearity as Mar-d-Ala-d-Ala. l-Ala, d-Ala, d-Ala-d-Ala, and d-Ala-d-Lac levels in VRE were then determined in the presence of variable vancomycin levels. Exposure to vancomycin resulted in a dramatic reduction of d-Ala-d-Ala, with a response midpoint at approximately 0.06μg/ml vancomycin and with a broad response profile up to 128μg/ml vancomycin. In contrast, d-Ala-d-Lac was present in the absence of vancomycin, with its level constant up to 128μg/ml vancomycin. This method will be useful for the discovery, characterization, and refinement of new agents targeting vancomycin resistance in VRE. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Spontaneous methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus epidural abscess in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connealy, Brendan D; Lovgren, Todd R; Tomich, Paul G; Smith, Carl V; Berg, Teresa G

    2010-08-01

    Epidural abscess is a rare complication of regional anesthesia, and spontaneous formation is even more uncommon. Diabetes mellitus, concomitant infection, intravenous drug use, and immune suppression are risk factors for spontaneous epidural abscess. A 29-year-old white woman presented at 28 weeks of estimated gestational age reporting an intermittent headache. She had Horner syndrome and was hospitalized. A cervicothoracic epidural abscess was diagnosed. Surgical decompression and parenteral antibiotics resulted in complete resolution of neurologic symptoms. Cultures were positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureous. Spontaneous epidural abscess is a rare condition and diagnosis is often delayed. The finding of Horner syndrome led to imaging of the cervical spine and diagnosis of epidural abscess. Early intervention resulted in resolution of neurologic symptoms and a successful pregnancy outcome.

  20. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in human milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FR Novak

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We collected and analyzed 500 samples of human milk, from five Brazilian cities (100 from each to detect methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA producing enterotoxins. We found 57 strains of MRSA, and the mecA gene, responsible for resistance, was detected in all of them using a specific molecular probe. We examined 40 strains for the presence of four enterotoxins, after selecting a subset that included all strains from each region, except for the largest sample, from which 10 were randomly selected. Among these two presented enterotoxin B, and growth in human colostrum and trypicase soy broth. After 5 h of incubation at 37°C, population sizes were already higher than 9.4 x 105 UFC/ml and enterotoxin was released into culture medium and colostrum. Our results stress the importance of hygiene, sanitary measures, and appropriate preservation conditions to avoid the proliferation of S. aureus in human milk.

  1. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a primer for dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klevens, R Monina; Gorwitz, Rachel J; Collins, Amy S

    2008-10-01

    In 2005 in the United States, an estimated 94,370 new, invasive infections and 18,650 deaths were associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); most of these infections were in people with exposures in health care settings. MRSA also has emerged as a community-based pathogen, causing primarily skin infections that are not life-threatening, but occasionally causing more severe and invasive infections. The authors describe the history of MRSA; identify populations at greatest risk of experiencing MRSA colonization and infection; compare characteristics of MRSA infections occurring in health care and community settings; and summarize strategies, based on U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations and the literature, to prevent transmission of MRSA in dental offices. Standard infection control precautions should be enforced strictly in all ambulatory care settings, including dental offices, to prevent facility-based transmission of MRSA and other infectious agents.

  2. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowash, Madeleine G.; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has changed the landscape of S. aureus infections around the globe. Initially recognized for its ability to cause disease in young and healthy individuals without healthcare exposures as well as for its distinct genotype and phenotype, this original description no longer fully encompasses the diversity of CA-MRSA as it continues to expand its niche. Using four case studies, we highlight a wide range of the clinical presentations and challenges of CA-MRSA. Based on these cases we further explore the globally polygenetic background of CA-MRSA with a special emphasis on generally less characterized populations. PMID:24085688

  3. Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Sequence Type 398

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mette Theilgaard

    . aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have been associated with hospitals, but during the past decades MRSA has emerged in the community and now a new branch of MRSA has been found in association with livestock (LA-MRSA). A specific lineage (multilocus sequence type 398 (ST398......Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the nares and skin surfaces of several animal species, including man. S. aureus can cause a wide variety of infections ranging from superficial soft tissue and skin infections to severe and deadly systemic infections. Traditionally S...... for LA-MRSA ST398 survival on porcine skin and nasal epithelium ex vivo were identified. These genes could represent targets for de-colonization, which could help prevent further spread and adaption of LA-MRSA ST398. Manuscript III describes the construction of the S. aureus VirulenceFinder database...

  4. Epidemic Increase in Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, Henrik; Boye, Kit; Bartels, Mette Damkjær

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We have found an epidemic increase in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Copenhagen. The increase has a complex background and involves hospitals, nursing homes and persons nursed in their own home. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We found 33 MRSA patients in 2003 and 121...... in 2004. All isolates have been spa-typed and epidemiologic information collected. RESULTS: The number of MRSA cases has a doubling time of about six months. The epidemic has been caused by many different MRSA types and 31 staphylococcus protein A genotypes (spa types). MRSA has caused several hospital...... outbreaks and is endemic in 10 nursing homes. Five staff members from nursing homes have been infected with MRSA. MRSA commonly causes skin and soft tissue infections (76%), but serious infections such as septicaemia and pneumonia are also found. CONCLUSION: Treatment of MRSA-infected patients is costly due...

  5. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-jun Fu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is one of the most common multidrug resistant bacteria both in hospitals and in the community. In the last two decades, there has been growing concern about the increasing resistance to MRSA of the most potent antibiotic glycopeptides. MRSA infection poses a serious problem for physicians and their patients. Photosensitizer-mediated antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT appears to be a promising and innovative approach for treating multidrug resistant infection. In spite of encouraging reports of the use of antimicrobial PDT to inactivate MRSA in large in vitro studies, there are only few in vivo studies. Therefore, applying PDT in the clinic for MRSA infection is still a long way off.

  6. Pseudomembranous colitis secondary to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressly, Kalynn B; Hill, Emilie; Shah, Kairav J

    2016-05-10

    A 37-year-old woman with a history of type II diabetes and Crohn's disease, status postcholecystectomy, presented with a >2-week history of cramping abdominal pain, nausea, non-bloody/non-bilious emesis and, later, diarrhoea. A flexible sigmoidoscopy was performed, revealing that 'a segmental pseudomembrane was found from rectum to sigmoid colon'. Clostridium difficile PCR on the stool was repeated twice and resulted negative both times. A food history prior to onset of symptoms was consistent with Staphylococcal food poisoning and a stool culture was positive for heavy growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and the absence of enteric flora. The patient was successfully treated with oral vancomycin. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  7. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus adaptation to human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Grace; Paulino, Franklin; Wachtel, Sarah; Parker, Dane; Wickersham, Matthew; Zhang, Dongni; Brown, Armand; Lauren, Christine; Dowd, Margaret; West, Emily; Horst, Basil; Planet, Paul; Prince, Alice

    2015-04-21

    Skin is the most common site of Staphylococcus aureus infection. While most of these infections are self-limited, recurrent infections are common. Keratinocytes and recruited immune cells participate in skin defense against infection. We postulated that S. aureus is able to adapt to the milieu within human keratinocytes to avoid keratinocyte-mediated clearance. From a collection of S. aureus isolated from chronically infected patients with atopic dermatitis, we noted 22% had an agr mutant-like phenotype. Using several models of human skin infection, we demonstrate that toxin-deficient, agr mutants of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) USA300 are able to persist within keratinocytes by stimulating autophagy and evading caspase-1 and inflammasome activation. MRSA infection induced keratinocyte autophagy, as evidenced by galectin-8 and LC3 accumulation. Autophagy promoted the degradation of inflammasome components and facilitated staphylococcal survival. The recovery of more than 58% agr or RNAIII mutants (P Soong et al.

  8. Molecular and epidemiological analysis of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus otorrhoea: hospital- or community-acquired?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassif, R G; Soliman, R; Edwards, D H; Kara, N; Hussain, S S M

    2010-12-01

    (1) To identify newly diagnosed cases of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ear infection in our local population; (2) to determine the risk factors involved in these patients' clinical courses, and (3) to type the bacterial strains isolated and thus identify whether they were hospital- or community-acquired. Retrospective review of case notes, together with laboratory-based molecular studies in the departments of otolaryngology and medical microbiology in a university teaching hospital in Scotland, UK. Over a two-year period, 35 patients were identified with ear swabs positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. These cases came from both hospital and community settings. (1) Identification of primary methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus otorrhoea in patients with no previously documented colonisation; and (2) molecular typing of the strains isolated, using spa technology, to identify whether they were hospital- or community-acquired. Of the 35 positive patients, 27 were previously known carriers of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The eight patients with newly diagnosed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus otorrhoea presented initially in the community. All of these patients had had contact with hospital staff (as in-patients or out-patients) in the weeks preceding development of their ear infection. Using the spa technique for molecular typing, we identified hospital-acquired ('epidemic') methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus type 15 in all eight patients' isolates. All were sensitive to topical gentamicin. In our cohort, hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus type 15 was the commonest cause of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus otorrhoea, despite the fact that these patients all first presented in the community. We believe that contact with hospital staff or health care workers is a risk factor for acquiring methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus otorrhoea in the

  9. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in India: Prevalence & susceptibility pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indian Network for Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance (INSAR group, India

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is endemic in India and is a dangerous pathogen for hospital acquired infections. This study was conducted in 15 Indian tertiary care centres during a two year period from January 2008 to December 2009 to determine the prevalence of MRSA and susceptibility pattern of S. aureus isolates in India. Methods: All S. aureus isolates obtained during the study period in the participating centres were included in the study. Each centre compiled their data in a predefined template which included data of the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, location of the patient and specimen type. The data in the submitted templates were collated and analysed. Results: A total of 26310 isolates were included in the study. The overall prevalence of methicillin resistance during the study period was 41 per cent. Isolation rates for MRSA from outpatients, ward inpatients and ICU were 28, 42 and 43 per cent, respectively in 2008 and 27, 49 and 47 per cent, respectively in 2009. The majority of S. aureus isolates was obtained from patients with skin and soft tissue infections followed by those suffering from blood stream infections and respiratory infections. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was low in both MSSA (53% and MRSA (21%. MSSA isolates showed a higher susceptibility to gentamicin, co-trimoxazole, erythromycin and clindamycin as compared to MRSA isolates. No isolate was found resistant to vancomycin or linezolid. Interpretation & conclusions: The study showed a high level of MRSA in our country. There is a need to study epidemiology of such infections. Robust antimicrobial stewardship and strengthened infection control measures are required to prevent spread and reduce emergence of resistance.

  10. Disc-diffusion and PCR detection of methicillin resistance in environmental airborne strains of Staphylococcus spp..

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolny-Koładka, Katarzyna; Lenart-Boroń, Anna; Kasprowicz, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the species composition of airborne Staphylococcus spp. in public premises, to determine the methicillin resistance of the isolates and the prevalence of mecA gene, determining resistance to β-lactams. In total 65 Staphylococcus strains were isolated from 54 sites. Four strains exhibited phenotypic methicillin resistance, while the presence of mecA gene was found in 11 strains. The results of both assays were compared, showing that the phenotypic tests revealed methicillin resistance only in 36% of the examined samples. This study revealed high species diversity among airborne Staphylococcus spp. population, which consists of multidrug resistant strains.

  11. Characterization of fecal vancomycin-resistant enterococci with acquired and intrinsic resistance mechanisms in wild animals, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Carmen; Gonzalez-Barrio, David; Camacho, Maria Cruz; Lima-Barbero, Jose Francisco; de la Puente, Javier; Höfle, Ursula; Torres, Carmen

    2016-11-01

    The objectives were to evaluate the presence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci with acquired (VRE-a) and intrinsic (VRE-i) resistance mechanisms in fecal samples from different wild animals, and analyze their phenotypes and genotypes of antimicrobial resistance. A total of 348 cloacal/rectal samples from red-legged partridges (127), white storks (81), red kites (59), and wild boars (81) (June 2014/February 2015) were inoculated in Slanetz-Bartley agar supplemented with vancomycin (4 μg/mL). We investigated the susceptibility to 12 antimicrobials and the presence of 19 antimicrobial resistance and five virulence genes. In addition, we performed multilocus sequence typing, detection of IS16 and studied Tn1546 structure. One VRE-a isolate was identified in one wild boar. This isolate was identified as Enterococcus faecium, harbored vanA gene included into Tn1546 (truncated with IS1542/IS1216), and belonged to the new ST993. This isolate contained the erm(A), erm(B), tet(M), dfrG, and dfrK genes. Neither element IS16 nor the studied virulence genes were detected. Ninety-six VRE-i isolates were identified (89 Enterococcus gallinarum and seven Enterococcus casseliflavus), with the following prevalence: red kites (71.2 %), white storks (46.9 %), red-legged partridges (7.9 %), and wild boars (4.9 %). Most E. gallinarum isolates showed resistance to tetracycline (66.3 %) and/or erythromycin (46.1 %). High-level resistance to aminoglycosides was present among our VRE-i isolates: kanamycin (22.9 %), streptomycin (11.5 %), and gentamicin (9.4 %). In general, VRE-i isolates of red kites showed higher rates of resistance for non-glycopeptide agents than those of other animal species. The dissemination of acquired resistance mechanisms in natural environments could have implications in the global spread of resistance with public health implications.

  12. Comparative Analysis of the First Complete Enterococcus faecium Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Margaret M. C.; Seemann, Torsten; Bulach, Dieter M.; Gladman, Simon L.; Chen, Honglei; Haring, Volker; Moore, Robert J.; Ballard, Susan; Grayson, M. Lindsay; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Howden, Benjamin P.

    2012-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections in health care facilities around the globe. In particular, infections caused by vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium are becoming increasingly common. Comparative and functional genomic studies of E. faecium isolates have so far been limited owing to the lack of a fully assembled E. faecium genome sequence. Here we address this issue and report the complete 3.0-Mb genome sequence of the multilocus sequence type 17 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium strain Aus0004, isolated from the bloodstream of a patient in Melbourne, Australia, in 1998. The genome comprises a 2.9-Mb circular chromosome and three circular plasmids. The chromosome harbors putative E. faecium virulence factors such as enterococcal surface protein, hemolysin, and collagen-binding adhesin. Aus0004 has a very large accessory genome (38%) that includes three prophage and two genomic islands absent among 22 other E. faecium genomes. One of the prophage was present as inverted 50-kb repeats that appear to have facilitated a 683-kb chromosomal inversion across the replication terminus, resulting in a striking replichore imbalance. Other distinctive features include 76 insertion sequence elements and a single chromosomal copy of Tn1549 containing the vanB vancomycin resistance element. A complete E. faecium genome will be a useful resource to assist our understanding of this emerging nosocomial pathogen. PMID:22366422

  13. The effect of antibiotic use on prevalence of nosocomial vancomycin-resistant enterococci- an ecologic study

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelius Remschmidt; Michael Behnke; Axel Kola; Luis A. Peña Diaz; Rohde, Anna M.; Petra Gastmeier; Frank Schwab

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are among the most common antimicrobial-resistant pathogens causing nosocomial infections. Although antibiotic use has been identified as a risk factor for VRE, it remains unclear which antimicrobial agents particularly facilitate VRE selection. Here, we assessed whether use of specific antimicrobial agents is independently associated with healthcare-associated (HA) VRE rates in a university hospital setting in Berlin, Germany. Method...

  14. Cecal ligation and puncture induced sepsis impairs host defense against Enterococcus faecium peritonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leendertse, M.; Willems, R.J.; Giebelen, I.A.; Florquin, S.; van den Pangaart, P.S.; Bonten, M.J.; van der Poll, T.

    2009-01-01

    Multiresistant and vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) can cause serious infections in hospitalized patients with various co-morbid diseases. We investigated the course of VRE peritonitis after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis and compared this to sham operated mice. Mice

  15. Failure of vancomycin treatment for meningitis caused by vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Overbeek, Ellen C.; Janknegt, Rob; Ter Berg, Hans W. M.; Top, Janetta; Sportel, Esther; Heddema, Edou R.

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes a nosocomial vancomycin-sensitive Enterococcus faecium meningitis with poor response to vancomycin. E. faecium infections continue to represent a therapeutic challenge in Europe, even in countries where vancomycin resistance is still rare. In the case of

  16. Molecular epidemiology of Enterococcus faecium: from commensal to hospital adapted pathogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Top, J.

    2007-01-01

    For many years Enterococcus faecium was considered a commensal of the digestive tract, which only sporadically caused opportunistic infections in severely ill patients. Over the last two decades, vancomycin resistant E. faecium (VREF) has emerged worldwide as an important cause of nosocomial

  17. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Outcompetes Enterococcus faecium via Mucus-Binding Pili

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, Hanne L.P.; Douillard, François P.; Reunanen, Justus; Rasinkangas, Pia; Hendrickx, Antoni P.A.; Laine, Pia K.; Paulin, Lars; Satokari, Reetta; Vos, de Willem M.

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have become a major nosocomial threat. Enterococcus faecium is of special concern, as it can easily acquire new antibiotic resistances and is an excellent colonizer of the human intestinal tract. Several clinical studies have explored the potential use of

  18. Effects of ionophores on Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium growth in pure and mixed ruminal culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enterococcus faecalis and faecium are Gram-positive human pathogens that can live in the gastrointestinal tract of food animals. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are an increasing threat to humans as a nosocomial infection, as well as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes. Ionophores ar...

  19. Investigation of chitosan's antibacterial activity against vancomycin resistant microorganisms and their biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Eduardo M; Silva, Sara; Veiga, Mariana; Vicente, Sandra; Tavaria, Freni K; Pintado, Manuela E

    2017-10-15

    Vancomycin-resistant microorganisms are a hurdle that traditional antibiotics struggle to overcome. These difficulties have led to search for new solutions based on natural products. Chitosan has been recognized as an effective antibacterial agent against a vast array of microorganisms including antibiotic resistant ones. As such, this work aimed to evaluate chitosan as an alternative to traditional antibiotics in the management/control of two vancomycin-resistant microorganisms, VRSA and VREF, in planktonic and sessile settings. The results obtained showed that chitosan was highly effective in inhibiting VRSA and VREF planktonic growth and reduced VREF viable counts by 6 log CFU in 30min. Additionally, chitosan was active upon several phases of VRSA and VREF sessile growth inhibiting adhesion, biofilm formation and dual-species biofilms at concentrations as low as 0.0125mg/mL. In lieu of these results chitosan shows great potential as a possible alternative for the control of vancomycin-resistant microorganisms in recalcitrant wound infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Novel Chimeric Endolysin with Antibacterial Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Haddad Kashani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine/histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP and amidase are known as catalytic domains of the bacteriophage-derived endolysin LysK and were previously reported to show lytic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. In the current study, the in silico design and analysis of chimeric CHAP-amidase model was applied to enhance the stability and solubility of protein, which was achieved through improving the properties of primary, secondary and tertiary structures. The coding gene sequence of the chimeric CHAP-amidase was synthesized and subcloned into the pET-22(+ expression vector, and the recombinant protein was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3 strain. Subsequent affinity-based purification yielded ~12 mg soluble protein per liter of E. coli culture. Statistical analysis indicated that concentrations of ≥1 μg/mL of the purified protein have significant antibacterial activity against S. aureus MRSA252 cells. The engineered chimeric CHAP-amidase exhibited 3.2 log reduction of MRSA252 cell counts at the concentration of 10 μg/mL. A synergistic interaction between CHAP-amidase and vancomycin was detected by using checkerboard assay and calculating the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC index. This synergistic effect was shown by 8-fold reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentration of vancomycin. The chimeric CHAP-amidase displayed strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and enterococcus. However, it did not indicate any significant antibacterial activity against E. coli and Lactococcus lactis. Taken together, these findings suggest that our chimeric CHAP-amidase might represent potential to be used for the development of efficient antibacterial therapies targeting MRSA and certain Gram-positive bacteria.

  1. A Novel Chimeric Endolysin with Antibacterial Activity against Methicillin-ResistantStaphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad Kashani, Hamed; Fahimi, Hossein; Dasteh Goli, Yasaman; Moniri, Rezvan

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine/histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP) and amidase are known as catalytic domains of the bacteriophage-derived endolysin LysK and were previously reported to show lytic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In the current study, the in silico design and analysis of chimeric CHAP-amidase model was applied to enhance the stability and solubility of protein, which was achieved through improving the properties of primary, secondary and tertiary structures. The coding gene sequence of the chimeric CHAP-amidase was synthesized and subcloned into the pET-22(+) expression vector, and the recombinant protein was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) strain. Subsequent affinity-based purification yielded ~12 mg soluble protein per liter of E. coli culture. Statistical analysis indicated that concentrations of ≥1 μg/mL of the purified protein have significant antibacterial activity against S. aureus MRSA 252 cells. The engineered chimeric CHAP-amidase exhibited 3.2 log reduction of MRSA 252 cell counts at the concentration of 10 μg/mL. A synergistic interaction between CHAP-amidase and vancomycin was detected by using checkerboard assay and calculating the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index. This synergistic effect was shown by 8-fold reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentration of vancomycin. The chimeric CHAP-amidase displayed strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus, S. epidermidis , and enterococcus . However, it did not indicate any significant antibacterial activity against E. coli and Lactococcus lactis . Taken together, these findings suggest that our chimeric CHAP-amidase might represent potential to be used for the development of efficient antibacterial therapies targeting MRSA and certain Gram-positive bacteria.

  2. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis

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    Sian Yik Lim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We investigated the clinical characteristics, treatment patterns and outcomes of community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA septic arthritis. Methods: This was a retrospective chart review of CA-MRSA septic arthritis in a tertiary care hospital from 2000-2013. We compared CA-MRSA septic arthritis cases with HA-MRSA septic arthritis cases to identify important differences between the two groups. Results: We identified 11 cases of CA-MRSA septic arthritis and 34 cases of hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant SA (HA-MRSA septic arthritis. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus caused 25% of the MRSA septic arthritis cases. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis occurred in younger patients with fewer comorbidities or risk factors. There was no difference in initial presentation between CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus patients were less likely to be treated with appropriate antibiotics initially. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis was associated with increased morbidity with a high percentage of patients developing poor joint outcomes or osteomyelitis complications.  Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis was also associated with increased utilization of health care resources due to long hospital stays, high readmissions rates, and increased requirements for rehabilitation facility placement and home health support. There was no difference in mortality, poor joint outcome, readmissions, and osteomyelitis complications between CA-MRSA septic arthritis and HA-MRSA septic arthritis. Conclusions: Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis is associated with increased morbidity and health care resource utilization. Increased awareness into CA-MRSA as a cause of septic

  3. Impact of Colonization Pressure and Strain Type on Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Transmission in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Popoola, Victor O.; Carroll, Karen C.; Ross, Tracy; Reich, Nicholas G.; Perl, Trish M.; Milstone, Aaron M.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the transmissibility of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) and healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (HA-MRSA) strains and the association of MRSA colonization pressure and MRSA transmission in critically ill children. Importantly, we found that in hospitalized children MRSA colonization pressure above 10% increases the risk of MRSA transmission 3-fold, and CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA strains have similar transmission dynamics.

  4. Methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus infection among children

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    Renata Tavares Gomes

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has emerged as a pathogen associated with community-acquired infections worldwide. We report the spectrum of community-acquired S. aureus infections and compare the patients infected with methicillin-susceptible or methicillin-resistant strains among patients aged <20 years. Overall, 90 cases of community acquired S. aureus were detected in an 11-year period. Clinical and microbiological data were registered. Fifty-nine (66% patients were male and the median age was two years. The majority (87% of the patients were hospitalized and chronic underlying illnesses were detected in 27 (30% cases. Overall, 34 (37.8% patients had skin/soft tissue infections and 56 (62.2% patients had deep-seated infection. Four (5.1% patients were transferred to the intensive care unit and two (2.6% died. Complications were detected in 17 (18.9% cases, such as pleural effusion (41.2%, osteomyelitis (23.5%, and sepsis (17.6%. Six (6.7% methicillin-resistant strains were detected. Patients infected with methicillin-susceptible or methicillin-resistant strains had similar baseline characteristics and treatment outcomes. Approximately 93% of the cases received systemic antibiotics, out of which 59 (65.5% used oxacillin or cefalotin. Both methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains resulted in morbidity and death among children in this setting where methicillin-resistant strains are infrequent.

  5. Colonization with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE in intensive care unit patients in Cordoba City: Argentina Colonización con enterococos vancomicina-resistentes (EVR en una unidad de cuidados intensivos en la Ciudad de Córdoba: Argentina

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    A. M. Littvik

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of colonization with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE among intensive care unit (ICU patients in a hospital in Córdoba, Argentina. We collected 235 rectal swab specimens from 147 ICU patients. Resistance to vancomycin was screened with the disk diffusion method, and MICs were determined with the E-test method. Vancomycin-resistant genotypes were determined by PCR. The VRE strains were isolated from 18/147 patients (12.2%. The isolates were identified as Enterococcus faecium (94.4%, and Enterococcus gallinarum (5.6%. PCR showed that the E. faecium strains carried the vanAgene, and the E. gallinarum strain carried the vanC1gene. Our study indicated that at least 12.2% of ICU patients were VRE carriers.El propósito de este estudio fue determinar la prevalencia de colonización con EVR en pacientes de una unidad de cuidados intensivos (UCI en un hospital de la Ciudad de Córdoba, Argentina. Se recolectaron 235 muestras por hisopado rectal de 147 pacientes. La resistencia a vancomicina fue estudiada por el método de difusión con discos y las CIMs fueron determinadas por E-test. Los genotipos de resistencia fueron determinados por PCR. Se aislaron cepas de EVR en 18/147 pacientes (12,2 %. Los aislamientos fueron identificados como Enterococcus faecium (94,4% y Enterococcus gallinarum (5,6%. Todas las cepas de E. faecium fueron portadoras del gen vanA y la cepa de E. gallinarum del gen vanC1 de resistencia intrínseca. Este estudio mostró que el 12,2% de los pacientes internados en la UCI fueron portadores de EVR.

  6. Prevalence of Methicillin and Vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in nasopharynx; Amir-Alam hospital, 2005

    OpenAIRE

    Hasibi M.; Iravani BM

    2007-01-01

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of nosocomial infections with high morbidity and mortality rate. Traditionally, methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus has been considered a major nosocomial pathogen in healthcare facilities, but in the past decade, it has been observed emerging in the community as well. Informations regarding hospital microbial colonization could be an important step for prevention of nosocomial infections. Our objective was clarifying ...

  7. [The development and testing of reagents kit for detection and qualitative evaluation of DNA of methicillin sensitive and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and also methicillin resistant coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. applying technique of polymerase chain reaction in "real time" mode].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skachkova, T S; Shipulina, O Iu; Domonova, É A; Subbotovskaia, A I; Kozyreva, V S; Il'ina, V N; Shipulin, G A

    2013-06-01

    The reagents kit is developed to identify and quantitatively detect DNA of methicillin sensitive and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin resistant coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. in biological material using technique of polymerase chain reaction with hybridizational fluorescent detection and having higher analytical and diagnostic characteristics. The application of the given reagents kit makes it possible to optimize the epidemiologic monitoring of propagation of methicillin resistant strains of Staphylococcus spp. Significantly decreasing duration and laboriousness of study.

  8. Clinical implications of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Richard H

    2011-04-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become an increasingly aggressive and prevalent pathogen in medicine. This pattern has also been noted in obstetrics. This review will delineate the epidemiology and clinical implications of MRSA during pregnancy. Investigations have focused on prevalence of MRSA colonization in obstetrics and the associated morbidity. In addition, some attention has been focused on the neonatal implications of maternal colonization. Overall, the rates of maternal MRSA colonization noted in the United States have been low, in the range of 0.5-4%. The clinical impact of MRSA colonization among pregnant women has also been estimated to be modest. Roughly 357 invasive MRSA infections per 100,000 live births in the United States occur on an annual basis. It is however important to note that published estimates likely underestimate the full scope of MRSA in pregnancy given the lack of formal reporting, importance of related neonatal colonization and morbidity, the complicated treatment implications in pregnant women, the recognized high pathogenicity of MRSA infections, and propensity for recurrent infections among community-acquired MRSA strains. MRSA is an increasingly important pathogen in modern healthcare and in the obstetric population. Continued surveillance and research remains a top priority.

  9. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among animals: current overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires-de-Sousa, M

    2017-06-01

    Currently, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a universal threat. After being well established in the healthcare setting, it has emerged in the community among people with no risk factors for MRSA acquisition, therefore imposing a new threat. The subsequent detection of MRSA colonizing or infecting animals as well as in food of animal origin was of major concern, revealing new reservoirs for MRSA. The major MRSA clonal lineages circulating in the different settings, i.e. in hospitals, in the community and among animals, are described here, differentiating between clones colonizing companion and food-chain animals. Particular attention is given to the widely spread livestock-associated MRSA clonal complex (CC) 398, which is mainly associated with professional exposure but may be of high pathogenicity. The recent detection of a mecA homologue, designated mecC, with a wide geographical distribution in Europe, and including a large diversity of hosts (food-chain, companion and wildlife animals and also detected in water samples) adds to the threat. Domestication as well as globalization of the livestock industry have intensified exchanges between human and animal bacteria. We report here several cases of transmission of MRSA between companion or food-chain animals and humans, as well as some MRSA clones of human origin that have adapted to new animal hosts eventually by losing useless virulence factors or acquiring new mobile genetic elements. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Typing of Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A technical review

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    P L Mehndiratta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing prevalence of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA worldwide is a growing public health concern. MRSA typing is an essential component of an effective surveillance system to describe epidemiological trends and infection control strategies. Current challenges for MRSA typing are focused on selecting the most appropriate technique in terms of efficiency, reliability, ease of performance and cost involved. This review summarises the available information on application, potential and problems of various typing techniques in discriminating the strains and understanding the epidemiology of MRSA strains. The phenotypic methods in general are easier to perform, easier to interpret, cost effective and are widely available, however less discriminatory. The genotypic methods are expensive and technically demanding, however more discriminatory. Newer technologies involving sequencing of various genes are coming up as broadly applicable and high throughput typing systems. Still there is no consensus regarding the single best method for typing of MRSA strains. Phage typing is recommended as first line approach in epidemiological investigation of MRSA strains. PFGE remains the gold standard for characterisation of outbreak strains. DNA sequencing methods including MLST, spa typing, SCCmec typing and toxin gene profile typing are more practical methods for detecting evolutionary changes and transmission events. The choice of typing technique further depends on the purpose of the study, the facilities available and the utility of data generated to answer a desirable research question. A need for harmonisation of typing techniques by following standard protocols is emphasised to establish surveillance networks and facilitate global MRSA control.

  11. Disruption of methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureusprotein synthesis by tannins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Siti-Noor-Adnalizawati; Ibrahim, Nazlina; Yaacob, Wan Ahmad

    2017-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a worldwide public health threat, displaying multiple antibiotic resistance that causes morbidity and mortality. Management of multidrug-resistant (MDR) MRSA infections is extremely difficult due to their inherent resistance to currently used antibiotics. New antibiotics are needed to combat the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The in vitro effect of tannins was studied against MRSA reference strain (ATCC 43300) and MRSA clinical strains utilizing antimicrobial assays in conjunction with both scanning and transmission electron microscopy. To reveal the influence of tannins in MRSA protein synthesis disruption, we utilized next-generation sequencing (NGS) to provide further insight into the novel protein synthesis transcriptional response of MRSA exposed to these compounds. Tannins possessed both bacteriostatic and bactericidal activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 0.78 and 1.56 mg/mL, respectively, against all tested MRSA. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of MRSA treated with tannins showed decrease in cellular volume, indicating disruption of protein synthesis. Analysis of a genome-wide transcriptional profile of the reference strain ATCC 43300 MRSA in response to tannins has led to the finding that tannins induced significant modulation in essential ribosome pathways, which caused a reduction in the translation processes that lead to inhibition of protein synthesis and obviation of bacterial growth. These findings highlight the potential of tannins as new promising anti-MRSA agents in clinical application such as body wash and topical cream or ointments.

  12. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Iberian pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porrero, M C; Wassenaar, T M; Gómez-Barrero, S; García, M; Bárcena, C; Alvarez, J; Sáez-Llorente, J L; Fernández-Garayzábal, J F; Moreno, M A; Domínguez, L

    2012-04-01

    Iberian pigs are bred in Spain for the production of high-value dry-cured products, whose export volumes are increasing. Animals are typically reared outdoors, although indoor farming is becoming popular. We compared carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Iberian pigs, raised indoors and outdoors, with intensively farmed Standard White pigs. From June 2007 to February 2008, 106 skin swabs were taken from Iberian pigs and 157 samples from SWP at slaughterhouses in Spain. We found that Iberian pigs carried MRSA, although with a significantly lower prevalence (30/106; 28%) than SWP (130/157; 83%). A higher prevalence of indoor Iberian pigs compared with animals reared under outdoor conditions was not significant; however, all but one positive indoor Iberian pig samples were detected from one slaughterhouse. Overall, 16 different spa types were identified, with t011 predominating in all three animal populations. A subset of isolates was characterized by MLST. Most of these belonged to ST398. MRSA isolates from Iberian pigs presented a higher susceptibility to antibiotics than those isolated from SWP. Despite limited contact with humans, pigs raised outdoors are colonized by an MRSA population that genetically overlaps with that of intensively farmed pigs, although antimicrobial resistance is lower. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of MRSA in food animals raised in free-range conditions. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Contamination of X-ray cassettes with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus in a radiology department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Seok; Kim, Han-Sung; Park, Ji-Young; Koo, Hyun-Sook; Choi, Chul-Sun; Song, Wonkeun; Cho, Hyoun Chan; Lee, Kyu Man

    2012-05-01

    We performed surveillance cultures of the surfaces of X-ray cassettes to assess contamination with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The surfaces of 37 X-ray cassettes stored in a radiology department were cultured using mannitol salt agar containing 6 µg/mL oxacillin. Suspected methicillin-resistant staphylococcal colonies were isolated and identified by biochemical testing. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis was performed to determine the clonal relationships of the contaminants. Six X-ray cassettes (16.2%) were contaminated with MRSA. During the isolation procedure, we also detected 19 X-ray cassettes (51.4%) contaminated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus (MRSH), identified as yellow colonies resembling MRSA on mannitol salt agar. PFGE analysis of the MRSA and MRSH isolates revealed that most isolates of each organism were identical or closely related to each other, suggesting a common source of contamination. X-ray cassettes, which are commonly in direct contact with patients, were contaminated with MRSA and MRSH. In hospital environments, contaminated X-ray cassettes may serve as fomites for methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

  14. Isolation and Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococci in Healthy Broilers in Nsukka Southeast, Nigeria

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    Ifeoma Chinyere UGWU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to isolate and detect methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS in healthy broilers in Nsukka Southeast, Nigeria and determine the antibiogram of the isolates. Cloacal and skin swabs were collected from each of 101 randomly sampled broilers meant for slaughter. The samples were processed for isolation and identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus species, following standard methods. Confirmation of methicillin-resistance by the isolates was done using penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP2a kit. Phenotypic resistance of the isolates to antimicrobial agents was determined using disc diffusion method. Out of 202 samples processed, 200 (99.01% yielded positive growth of staphylococci on oxacillin-supplemented oxacillin-resistance staphylococcal agar base (ORSAB. A total of 200 methicillin-resistant staphylococcal isolates were obtained. Of these, 91 (45.5% were identified as methicillin-resistant coagulase-positive Staphylococcus (MRCoPS, while 109 (54.5% were identified as methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species (MRCoNS. Out of the 91 MRCoPS, 53 (58.2% were identified as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Resistance of the isolates was 99.5% to erythromycin and chloramphenicol, 100% to oxacillin, 76.5% to gentamicin, 96.5% to clindamycin, 92.5% to ciprofloxacin, 99% to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim and tetracycline, and 98.5% to streptomycin and cefoxitin. All the isolates were multidrug resistant. This study has shown that healthy broilers reared and slaughtered in Nsukka Southeast, Nigeria harbour multidrug-resistant MRS and thus serve as their reservoirs.

  15. Chlorhexidine Induces VanA-Type Vancomycin Resistance Genes in Enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Pooja; Ziegler, Elizabeth; Palmer, Kelli L

    2016-04-01

    Chlorhexidine is a bisbiguanide antiseptic used for infection control. Vancomycin-resistantE. faecium(VREfm) is among the leading causes of hospital-acquired infections. VREfm may be exposed to chlorhexidine at supra- and subinhibitory concentrations as a result of chlorhexidine bathing and chlorhexidine-impregnated central venous catheter use. We used RNA sequencing to investigate how VREfm responds to chlorhexidine gluconate exposure. Among the 35 genes upregulated ≥10-fold after 15 min of exposure to the MIC of chlorhexidine gluconate were those encoding VanA-type vancomycin resistance (vanHAX) and those associated with reduced daptomycin susceptibility (liaXYZ). We confirmed thatvanAupregulation was not strain or species specific by querying other VanA-type VRE. VanB-type genes were not induced. ThevanHpromoter was found to be responsive to subinhibitory chlorhexidine gluconate in VREfm, as was production of the VanX protein. UsingvanHreporter experiments withBacillus subtilisand deletion analysis in VREfm, we found that this phenomenon is VanR dependent. Deletion ofvanRdid not result in increased chlorhexidine susceptibility, demonstrating thatvanHAXinduction is not protective against chlorhexidine. As expected, VanA-type VRE is more susceptible to ceftriaxone in the presence of sub-MIC chlorhexidine. Unexpectedly, VREfm is also more susceptible to vancomycin in the presence of subinhibitory chlorhexidine, suggesting that chlorhexidine-induced gene expression changes lead to additional alterations in cell wall synthesis. We conclude that chlorhexidine induces expression of VanA-type vancomycin resistance genes and genes associated with daptomycin nonsusceptibility. Overall, our results indicate that the impacts of subinhibitory chlorhexidine exposure on hospital-associated pathogens should be further investigated in laboratory studies. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Chlorhexidine Induces VanA-Type Vancomycin Resistance Genes in Enterococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Pooja; Ziegler, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Chlorhexidine is a bisbiguanide antiseptic used for infection control. Vancomycin-resistant E. faecium (VREfm) is among the leading causes of hospital-acquired infections. VREfm may be exposed to chlorhexidine at supra- and subinhibitory concentrations as a result of chlorhexidine bathing and chlorhexidine-impregnated central venous catheter use. We used RNA sequencing to investigate how VREfm responds to chlorhexidine gluconate exposure. Among the 35 genes upregulated ≥10-fold after 15 min of exposure to the MIC of chlorhexidine gluconate were those encoding VanA-type vancomycin resistance (vanHAX) and those associated with reduced daptomycin susceptibility (liaXYZ). We confirmed that vanA upregulation was not strain or species specific by querying other VanA-type VRE. VanB-type genes were not induced. The vanH promoter was found to be responsive to subinhibitory chlorhexidine gluconate in VREfm, as was production of the VanX protein. Using vanH reporter experiments with Bacillus subtilis and deletion analysis in VREfm, we found that this phenomenon is VanR dependent. Deletion of vanR did not result in increased chlorhexidine susceptibility, demonstrating that vanHAX induction is not protective against chlorhexidine. As expected, VanA-type VRE is more susceptible to ceftriaxone in the presence of sub-MIC chlorhexidine. Unexpectedly, VREfm is also more susceptible to vancomycin in the presence of subinhibitory chlorhexidine, suggesting that chlorhexidine-induced gene expression changes lead to additional alterations in cell wall synthesis. We conclude that chlorhexidine induces expression of VanA-type vancomycin resistance genes and genes associated with daptomycin nonsusceptibility. Overall, our results indicate that the impacts of subinhibitory chlorhexidine exposure on hospital-associated pathogens should be further investigated in laboratory studies. PMID:26810654

  17. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a new zoonotic agent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Burkhard; Orendi, Ulrike; Much, Peter; Höger, Gerda; Ruppitsch, Werner; Krziwanek, Karina; Metz-Gercek, Sigrid; Mittermayer, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of infection in hospitals and the community. One third of the general population is colonized by the bacterium, constituting a risk factor for acquisition of infection with this pathogen. Worldwide, the increasing antibiotic resistance of S. aureus complicates treatment of infection and control measures. Soon after the introduction of methicillin, the first isolates resistant to this antibiotic were reported and named methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). During the past decade a major change in MRSA epidemiology has been observed: whereas in the past MRSA was almost exclusively regarded a hospital pathogen, the advent of community-acquired MRSA has led to infections in people without hospital-related risk factors. Recent evidence has also identified a link between colonization of livestock and MRSA carriage and infections in people who work with animals. Screening of pigs and pig farmers in the Netherlands revealed high prevalence of MRSA sequence type (ST) 398 and it has become clear that the emergence of ST398 is not just a Dutch problem, as reports on livestock colonization and human infections are appearing worldwide. In Austria, the ST398 lineage has been detected in dust samples from pig breeding facilities and in food samples. Since the first Austrian detection of this emerging lineage in 2006, 21 human isolates, partially associated with infections, have been observed. MRSA has to be regarded as a new emerging zoonotic agent and livestock may constitute a growing reservoir of the ST398 lineage. More information is needed so that control measures to reduce the impact of the emerging MRSA ST398 lineage on public health can be developed and implemented.

  18. Prevention and control of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphreys, H

    2009-02-01

    Recent efforts to combat infections have focused on pharmaceutical interventions. However, the global spread of antimicrobial resistance calls for the reappraisal of personal and institutional hygiene. Hygiene embodies behavioural and procedural rules that prevent bacterial transmission. Consequently, the chance of spreading bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is significantly reduced. Hygiene is part of the primacy and totality of patient care, ensuring that no harm is done. Any prevention and control strategy must be underpinned by changes in attitude, embraced by all. The major components of preventing and controlling MRSA include hand and environmental hygiene (as part of standard precautions), patient isolation, and patient\\/staff decolonization. Improving hand hygiene practice is especially important where the risk of infection is highest, e.g. in intensive care. Physical isolation has two advantages: the physical barrier interrupts transmission, and this barrier emphasizes that precautions are required. With limited isolation facilities, risk assessment should be conducted to indicate which patients should be isolated. Environmental hygiene, although important, has a lower priority than standard precautions. When a patient is ready for discharge (home) or transfer (to another healthcare facility), the overall interests of the patient should take priority. All patients should be informed of their MRSA-positive status as soon as possible. Because of increased mupirocin resistance, a selective approach to decolonization should be taken. When MRSA-positive staff are identified, restricting their professional activity will depend on the nature of their work. Finally, politicians and others need to commit to providing the necessary resources to maximize MRSA prevention and control.

  19. Characterization of pig-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Jiang, Nansong; Ke, Yuebin; Feßler, Andrea T; Wang, Yang; Schwarz, Stefan; Wu, Congming

    2017-03-01

    Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) have been reported in various countries worldwide. However, although China is one of the biggest pig and pork producers, large-scale studies on pig-associated LA-MRSA from China are scarce. The aims of this study were to analyze 2420 non-duplicate samples collected from pigs at swine farms and slaughterhouses in different regions in China during 2014 for the prevalence of pig-associated MRSA and to determine the antimicrobial resistance pheno- and genotypes of the respective isolates. MRSA isolates were identified in 270 (11.2%) samples. The isolates were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and screening for resistance genes. All MRSA isolates belonged to the clonal complex 9 and spa type t899, but showed variable PFGE patterns. All isolates were non-susceptible to oxacillin, cefoxitin, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, florfenicol, ciprofloxacin, and valnemulin. High rates of resistance were also observed for tetracycline (99.6%), erythromycin (97.0%), quinupristin-dalfopristin (97.0%), and gentamicin (80.4%). Three linezolid-non-susceptible isolates containing the multi-resistance gene cfr and nine rifampicin-non-susceptible isolates with mutations in rpoB were detected. Resistance to β-lactams was exclusively associated with mecA, while phenicol resistance was mainly attributable to fexA, except in the three cfr-positive isolates. The pleuromutilin-lincosamide-streptogramin A resistance gene lsa(E) was identified in all MRSA isolates, and no other pleuromutilin resistance genes, except cfr in three isolates, were detected. Pigs are the most important hosts of LA-MRSA in China. Screening for pig-associated MRSA is necessary to monitor changes in epidemiology and characteristics of these important pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in North-east Croatia

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    Tajana Pastuović

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this 5-year study was to determine the frequency and antibiotic susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA-related infections at Osijek Clinical Hospital. Materials and methods. A total of 1987 staphylococci-infected clinical isolates were collected and analysed at the Microbiology Department of the Public Health Institute of Osijek-Baranja County. Results. Between 2008 and 2012, the average rate of MRSA-related infections in staphylococci-infected patients was 27.4%. The proportion of MRSArelated infections on all Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus isolates from clinical specimens showed a decreasing trend, from 32.6% in 2008 to 25.5% in 2012. MRSA-related infections were mostly detected in wound swabs (50.6% and aspirates (28.8% of patients hospitalized in the surgical (49.8% and intensive care units (27.9%. MRSA-related infection showed an increase compared to S. aureus-infections in samples of wounds and aspirates in 2011 and 2012 (57.9%/34.9% and 35.2%/16.3%, respectively. The majority of strains of MRSA-related infections were resistant to several antibiotics, including erythromycin and clindamycin, where susceptibility were less than 10%. All MRSA isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid. Therefore, antibiotic therapies for MRSA infections include vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid, but microbiological diagnostics need to be performed in order to know when the use of glycopeptides and oxazolidinones is indicated. Conclusion. Our results suggest that appropriate prevention measures, combined with the more rational use of antibiotics are crucial to reduce the spread of MRSA-related infection in healthcare settings. Further monitoring is necessary of the incidence and antibiotic susceptibility of MRSA-related infections in our community.

  1. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Foot Osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashong, Chester N; Raheem, Shazia A; Hunter, Andrew S; Mindru, Cezarina; Barshes, Neal R

    Conflicting studies exist regarding the impact of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on increased time to wound healing, future need for surgical procedures, and likelihood of treatment failure in patients with diabetic foot osteomyelitis. The purpose of this study is to determine the overall significance of MRSA in predicting treatment failure in bone infections of the foot and to determine an appropriate pre-operative and empiric post-operative antibiotic regimen. Patients presenting with an initial episode of "probable" or "definite" foot osteomyelitis were included for review and analysis if the following criteria were met: (1) Osteomyelitis occurred in the foot (i.e., distal to the malleoli of the ankle); episodes occurring above the ankle were excluded. (2) Patients received either no antibiotics or only oral antibiotics for long-term treatment; episodes managed with long-term parenteral antibiotics were excluded. (3) The infection was managed initially with medical therapy or conservative surgical therapy; episodes managed with major (above-ankle) amputation as the initial treatment were excluded. The primary objective of this study was to assess whether episodes of foot osteomyelitis associated with MRSA resulted in treatment failure more frequently than not. Of 178 episodes included in the study, 50 (28.1%) episodes had treatment failure. Median time-to-treatment failure was 60 days (range 7-598 days). In 28.1% (9/32 episodes) in which treatment failure occurred and 39.0% (41/105) episodes in which no treatment failure occurred, MRSA was present. The presence of MRSA was not significantly associated with treatment failure (p = 0.99). The presence of MRSA in bone culture and whether antibiotic use had anti-MRSA activity was not associated with increased treatment failure of diabetic foot osteomyelitis in our institution. Empiric antibiotic coverage of MRSA may not be necessary for many patients presenting with foot osteomyelitis.

  2. Response of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to amicoumacin A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Lama

    Full Text Available Amicoumacin A exhibits strong antimicrobial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, hence we sought to uncover its mechanism of action. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of S. aureus COL in response to amicoumacin A showed alteration in transcription of genes specifying several cellular processes including cell envelope turnover, cross-membrane transport, virulence, metabolism, and general stress response. The most highly induced gene was lrgA, encoding an antiholin-like product, which is induced in cells undergoing a collapse of Δψ. Consistent with the notion that LrgA modulates murein hydrolase activity, COL grown in the presence of amicoumacin A showed reduced autolysis, which was primarily caused by lower hydrolase activity. To gain further insight into the mechanism of action of amicoumacin A, a whole genome comparison of wild-type COL and amicoumacin A-resistant mutants isolated by a serial passage method was carried out. Single point mutations generating codon substitutions were uncovered in ksgA (encoding RNA dimethyltransferase, fusA (elongation factor G, dnaG (primase, lacD (tagatose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, and SACOL0611 (a putative glycosyl transferase. The codon substitutions in EF-G that cause amicoumacin A resistance and fusidic acid resistance reside in separate domains and do not bring about cross resistance. Taken together, these results suggest that amicoumacin A might cause perturbation of the cell membrane and lead to energy dissipation. Decreased rates of cellular metabolism including protein synthesis and DNA replication in resistant strains might allow cells to compensate for membrane dysfunction and thus increase cell survivability.

  3. Longitudinal study on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in households.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Laarhoven

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP is an emerging pathogen in dogs and has been found in Europe, Asia and North America. To date most studies are one-point prevalence studies and therefore little is known about the dynamics of MRSP in dogs and their surrounding. In this longitudinal study MRSP colonization in dogs and the transmission of MRSP to humans, contact animals and the environment was investigated. Sixteen dogs with a recent clinical MRSP infection were included. The index dogs, contact animals, owners and environments were sampled once a month for six months. Samples taken from the nose, perineum and infection site (if present of the index cases and contact animals, and the nares of the owners were cultured using pre-enrichment. Index cases were found positive for prolonged periods of time, in two cases during all six samplings. In five of the 12 households that were sampled during six months, the index case was intermittently found MRSP-positive. Contact animals and the environment were also found MRSP-positive, most often in combination with a MRSP-positive index dog. In four households positive environmental samples were found while no animals or humans were MRSP-positive, indicating survival of MRSP in the environment for prolonged periods of time. Genotyping revealed that generally similar or indistinguishable MRSP isolates were found in patients, contact animals and environmental samples within the same household. Within two households, however, genetically distinct MRSP isolates were found. These results show that veterinarians should stay alert with (former MRSP patients, even after repeated MRSP-negative cultures or after the disappearance of the clinical infection. There is a considerable risk of transmission of MRSP to animals in close contact with MRSP patients. Humans were rarely MRSP-positive and never tested MRSP-positive more than once suggesting occasional contamination or rapid elimination of

  4. Gastrointestinal Colonization with Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci in Hospitalized and Outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Trajkovska-Dokic

    2015-10-01

    CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of vancomycin resistant enterococci in Republic of Macedonia was 2-fold higher in hospitalized than in outpatients. VanA genotype was dominant in isolates of E. faecium and it was highly associated with the MIC values above the 256 mg/ml. Since most of the enterococcal infections are endogenous, there is a need for screening the colonization of patient’s intestinal flora with VRE at the hospital entry. Identification and genotyping of faecal enterococci, together with their susceptibility testing to vancomycin, could be useful marker for the infection control.

  5. Multiple hospital outbreaks of vanA Enterococcus faecium in Denmark, 2012-13, investigated by WGS, MLST and PFGE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, Mette; Larner-Svensson, Hanna; Littauer, Pia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In Denmark, the incidence of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREfm) has increased since 2012. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology and clonal relatedness of VREfm isolates in Danish hospitals in 2012-13 using WGS. The second aim was to evaluate if WGS...

  6. Molecular analysis of Tn1546 in Enterococcus faecium isolated from animals and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Bogø; Ahrens, Peter; Dons, L.

    1998-01-01

    The internal areas and the position of integration of the glycopeptide resistance element Tn1546 were characterized by using PCR fragment length polymorphism, sequencing, and DNA hybridization techniques with 38 high-level vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates of human and animal...... from the reference strain, BM4147. For type 2, 11 isolates of human and animal origins were found, Six human isolates from England were all of type 3. Two human isolates from the United States, indistinguishable from each other, were type 9. These results showed that vancomycin-resistant E. faecium...... of animal and human origins can contain indistinguishable genetic elements coding for vancomycin resistance, indicating either horizontal gene transfer between E. faecium organisms of human and animal origins or the existence of a common reservoir for glycopeptide resistance....

  7. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus sp. colonizing health care workers of a cancer hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane de Melo Costa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze epidemiological and microbiological aspects of oral colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus of health care workers in a cancer hospital. Interview and saliva sampling were performed with 149 health care workers. Antimicrobial resistance was determined by disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration. Polymerase Chain Reaction, Internal Transcribed Spacer-Polymerase Chain Reaction and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis were performed for genotypic characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus. Risk factors were determined by logistic regression. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus colonization prevalence was 19.5%, denture wearing (p = 0.03, habit of nail biting (p = 0.04 and preparation and administration of antimicrobial (p = 0.04 were risk factors identified. All methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus were S. epidermidis, 94.4% of them had mecA gene. Closely related and indistinguishable methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis were detected. These results highlight that HCWs which have contact with patient at high risk for developing infections were identified as colonized by MRSE in the oral cavity, reinforcing this cavity as a reservoir of these bacteria and the risk to themselves and patients safety, because these microorganisms may be spread by coughing and talking.

  8. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus sp. colonizing health care workers of a cancer hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Dayane de Melo; Kipnis, André; Leão-Vasconcelos, Lara Stefânia Netto de Oliveira; Rocha-Vilefort, Larissa Oliveira; Telles, Sheila Araújo; André, Maria Cláudia Dantas Porfírio Borges; Tipple, Anaclara Ferreira Veiga; Lima, Ana Beatriz Mori; Ribeiro, Nádia Ferreira Gonçalves; Pereira, Mayara Regina; Prado-Palos, Marinésia Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze epidemiological and microbiological aspects of oral colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus of health care workers in a cancer hospital. Interview and saliva sampling were performed with 149 health care workers. Antimicrobial resistance was determined by disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration. Polymerase Chain Reaction, Internal Transcribed Spacer-Polymerase Chain Reaction and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis were performed for genotypic characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus. Risk factors were determined by logistic regression. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus colonization prevalence was 19.5%, denture wearing (p = 0.03), habit of nail biting (p = 0.04) and preparation and administration of antimicrobial (p = 0.04) were risk factors identified. All methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus were S. epidermidis, 94.4% of them had mecA gene. Closely related and indistinguishable methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis were detected. These results highlight that HCWs which have contact with patient at high risk for developing infections were identified as colonized by MRSE in the oral cavity, reinforcing this cavity as a reservoir of these bacteria and the risk to themselves and patients safety, because these microorganisms may be spread by coughing and talking. PMID:25477910

  9. Study of vancomycin resistance in faecal enterococci from healthy humans and dogs in Spain a decade after the avoparcin ban in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, M; Tenorio, C; Torres, C

    2013-03-01

    One hundred and 26 faecal samples from healthy dogs (2009) and 157 faecal samples from healthy humans (2007) from La Rioja region (Spain) were tested to know the carriage of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). VRE with intrinsic resistance (vanC) were found in 12% of healthy dogs and humans (29 Enterococcus gallinarum and four Enterococcus casseliflavus). Nevertheless, VRE with acquired mechanism of resistance were not detected among these samples. Four Enterococcus faecalis isolates with vancomycin MIC of 8-16 mg L(-1) were recovered in human samples, but no single organism with known mechanism of acquired resistance could be identified. These 37 VRE isolates (33 E. gallinarum/E. casseliflavus and four E. faecalis) of dog and human origin were further characterized (PCR detection of antibiotic resistance, virulence and bacteriocin genes). High prevalence of tetracycline resistance was identified (70%), especially among dog isolates harbouring tet(M) ± tet(L) genes; erythromycin resistance was also higher among isolates from dogs and they harboured the erm(B) gene, associated with erm(A) gene in one case. Virulence genes were only identified among E. faecalis isolates of human origin (agg, cpd and/or gelE) and never among E. gallinarum/E. casseliflavus of human or dog origin. Five E. gallinarum isolates of dog and three E. faecalis of human origin expressed bacteriocin activity; among them, only one E. faecalis presented activity against Listeria monocytogenes. The bacteriocin structural gene ef1097 was identified in 3 bacteriocin-producing E. faecalis isolates, associated with ent1071 in one of them. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Nasal Carriage Rate of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus among Health Care Workers at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, S; Pant, N D; Bhandari, R; Shrestha, K L; Shrestha, C D; Adhikari, N; Poudel, A

    2017-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of nosocomial infections. Due to its multidrug resistant nature; infections due to Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are often very difficult to treat. Colonized health care workers are the important sources of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The objectives of this study were to determine the nasal carriage rate of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among health care workers at Kathmandu Medical College and Teaching Hospital, Nepal and to assess their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. A cross sectional study was conducted among 252 health care workers from July to November 2013. Mannitol salt agar was used to culture the nasal swabs. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains were confirmed by using cefoxitin disc and by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration of oxacillin by agar dilution method. Of 252 healthcare workers, 46(18.3%) were positive for Staphylococcus aureus among which 19(41.3%) were Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriers. Overall rate of nasal carriage of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was 7.5% (19/252).The higher percentages of lab personnel were nasal carriers of S. aureus (31.6%) and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (10.5%).The percentages of nasal carriage of S. aureus (35.7%) and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (14.3%) were highest in the health care workers from post operative department. Higher percentage of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were susceptible toward amikacin (100%) and vancomycin (100%) followed by cotrimoxazole (84.2%). High rates of nasal carriage of S. aureus and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were observed among the healthcare workers, which indicate the need of

  11. Carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in small animal veterinarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, Narayan Chandra; Moodley, Arshnee; Ghibaudo, G.

    2011-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) is increasingly reported in small animals and cases of human infections have already been described despite its recent emergence in veterinary practice. We investigated the prevalence of MRSP and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus...... aureus (MRSA) among small animal dermatologists attending a national veterinary conference in Italy. Nasal swabs were obtained from 128 veterinarians, seven of which harboured MRSP (n = 5; 3.9%) or MRSA (n = 2; 1.6%). A follow-up study of two carriers revealed that MRSP persisted for at least 1 month...... by spa typing. Methicillin-resistant isolates were further typed by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, SCCmec and multi-locus sequence typing. Two lineages previously associated with pets were identified among the five MRSP isolates; the European epidemic clone ST71-SCCmec II-III and ST106-SCCmec IV...

  12. Recommendations for preventing the spread of vancomycin resistance. Recommendations of the Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-22

    Since 1989, a rapid increase in the incidence of infection and colonization with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) has been reported by U.S. hospitals. This increase poses important problems, including a) the lack of available antimicrobial therapy for VRE infections, because most VRE are also resistant to drugs previously used to treat such infections (e.g., aminoglycosides and ampicillin), and b) the possibility that the vancomycin-resistant genes present in VRE can be transferred to other gram-positive microorganisms (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus). An increased risk for VRE infection and colonization has been associated with previous vancomycin and/or multiantimicrobial therapy, severe underlying disease or immunosuppression, and intraabdominal surgery. Because enterococci can be found in the normal gastrointestinal and female genital tracts, most enterococcal infections have been attributed to endogenous sources within the individual patient. However, recent reports of outbreaks and endemic infections caused by enterococci, including VRE, have indicated that patient-to-patient transmission of the microorganisms can occur either through direct contact or through indirect contact via a) the hands of personnel or b) contaminated patient-care equipment or environmental surfaces. This report presents recommendations of the Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee for preventing and controlling the spread of vancomycin resistance, with a special focus on VRE. Preventing and controlling the spread of vancomycin resistance will require coordinated, concerted efforts from all involved hospital departments and can be achieved only if each of the following elements is addressed: a) prudent vancomycin use by clinicians, b) education of hospital staff regarding the problem of vancomycin resistance, c) early detection and prompt reporting of vancomycin resistance in enterococci and other gram-positive microorganisms by the hospital microbiology laboratory

  13. Coagulase-positive staphylococci isolated from chicken meat: pathogenic potential and vancomycin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Paula Dalcin; de Almeida, Taiana Trindade; Basso, Ana Paula; de Moura, Tiane Martin; Frazzon, Jeverson; Tondo, Eduardo César; Frazzon, Ana Paula Guedes

    2013-09-01

    Coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS) cause staphylococcal food poisoning. Recently, these bacteria have received increasing attention due to their potential role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance markers. The present study aimed to evaluate coagulase-positive staphylococci counts, species distribution, enterotoxin genes prevalence, and the antibiotic resistance profile of CPS isolated from in natura chicken meat. Fifteen frozen and 15 chilled industrialized, uncooked chicken parts or entire carcasses were used. Staphylococcal counts revealed that frozen chicken meat samples displayed the lowest CPS count compared with chilled chicken meat samples (pStaphylococcus aureus (62%) was the most common species, followed by S. intermedius, S. delphini, and S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans (10% each) and S. hyicus (8%). The polymerase chain reaction identification of sea, seb, sec, sed, and see genes revealed that 70% of the isolates harbored at least one enterotoxin gene, with sea and sed being the most frequently encountered ones. Two of the 50 investigated strains harbored three different enterotoxin genes. A high frequency of isolates resistant to penicillin, teicoplanin, oxacillin, and clindamycin was observed, and 80% of CPS were found to be resistant to at least one of the 11 tested antimicrobials. Vancomycin-resistant S. aureus and S. intermedius showed minimum inhibitory concentrations of 512 and 64 μg/mL, respectively. These isolates might indicate the dissemination of vancomycin resistance in the community and imply food safety hazards.

  14. Zinc resistance within swine associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates in the USA is associated with MLST lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc resistance in livestock-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) is mediated by the czrC gene co-located with the mecA gene, encoding methicillin resistance, on the type V SCCmec element. Since the czrC gene and the mecA gene are co-located on the SCCmec element, it has ...

  15. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Liza; Coffin, Susan; Leckerman, Kateri Heydon; Gelfand, Joel M; Honig, Paul J; Yan, Albert C

    2008-01-01

    Children with atopic dermatitis are more frequently colonized with Staphylococcus aureus than children without atopic dermatitis. However, little epidemiological data exist regarding the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus among children with atopic dermatitis. Recent studies have revealed an increasing prevalence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus among patients presenting to hospitals with serious bacterial infections, particularly those with cutaneous and soft tissue infections. As many atopic dermatitis patients are treated empirically with antibiotics for secondary skin infections, an understanding of the epidemiology of bacterial colonization and superinfection is essential for directing proper treatment in the atopic patient population. This study investigates the prevalence of risk factors for community-associated, methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization among pediatric atopic dermatitis patients encountered at an academic pediatric dermatology clinic. An observational cross-sectional study was conducted at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in which 54 patients previously diagnosed with atopic dermatitis were enrolled. A detailed patient questionnaire, a complete cutaneous examination, and an evaluation of eczema severity according to the Eczema Area and Severity Index were completed at the time of enrollment. Bacterial cultures from the skin and nares were obtained to determine the frequency of colonization with either methicillin-sensitive S. aureus or methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Although most atopic dermatitis patients studied were colonized with S. aureus (43/54 [80%]), methicillin-resistant S. aureus was isolated from only seven atopic dermatitis patients (7/43 [16%]). Patients colonized with S. aureus were more likely to be male, to have been previously hospitalized, to have used a topical calcineurin inhibitor in combination with a topical steroid, and less likely to have used topical antibiotics

  16. [Evaluation of the usefulness of selective chromogenic agar medium (chromID VRE) and multiplex PCR method for the detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hoon; Lee, Jae-Hee; Ha, Jung-Sook; Ryoo, Nam-Hee; Jeon, Dong-Seok; Kim, Jae-Ryong

    2010-12-01

    Accurate and early detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) is critical for controlling nosocomial infection. In this study, we evaluated the usefulness of a selective chromogenic agar medium and of multiplex PCR for detection of VRE, and both these techniques were compared with the conventional culture method for VRE detection. We performed the following 3 methods for detecting VRE infection in stool specimens: the routine culture method, culturing in selective chromogenic agar medium (chromID VRE, bioMérieux, France), and multiplex PCR using the Seeplex® VRE ACE Detection kit (Seegene Inc., Korea) with additional PCR for vanC genes. We isolated 109 VRE strains from 100 stool specimens by the routine culture method. In chromID VRE, all the isolates showed purple colonies, including Enterococcus gallinarum and E. raffinosus, which were later identified using the Vitek card. All VRE isolates were identified by the multiplex PCR method; 100 were vanA-positive E. faecium, 8 were vanA- and vanC-1-positive E. gallinarum, and 1 was vanA-positive E. raffinosus. For VRE surveillance, culturing the isolates in chromID VRE after broth enrichment appears to be an accurate, rapid, and easy method for routine screening test. Multiplex PCR is relatively expensive and needs skilled techniques for detecting VRE, but it can be an auxiliary tool for rapid detection of genotype during a VRE outbreak.

  17. Economic burden of nosocomial infections caused by vancomycin-resistant enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchter, Laura; Chaberny, Iris Freya; Schwab, Frank; Vonberg, Ralf-Peter; Bange, Franz-Christoph; Ebadi, Ella

    2018-01-01

    Nosocomial infections due to vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have become a major problem during the last years. The purpose of this study was to investigate the economic burden of nosocomial VRE infections in a European university hospital. A retrospective matched case-control study was performed including patients who acquired nosocomial infection with either VRE or vancomycin-susceptible enterococci (VSE) within a time period of 3 years. 42 cases with VRE infections and 42 controls with VSE infections were matched for age, gender, admission and discharge within the same year, time at risk for infection, Charlson comorbidity index (±1), stay on intensive care units and non-intensive care units as well as for the type of infection, using criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The median overall costs per case were significantly higher than for controls (EUR 57,675 vs. EUR 38,344; p  = 0.030). Costs were similar between cases and controls before onset of infection (EUR 17,893 vs. EUR 16,600; p  = 0.386), but higher after onset of infection (EUR 37,971 vs. EUR 23,025; p  = 0.049). The median attributable costs per case for vancomycin-resistance were EUR 13,157 ( p  = 0.036). The most significant differences in costs between cases and controls turned out to be for pharmaceuticals (EUR 6030 vs. EUR 2801; p  = 0.008) followed by nursing staff (EUR 8956 vs. EUR 4621; p  = 0.032), medical products (EUR 3312 vs. EUR 1838; p  = 0.020), and for assistant medical technicians (EUR 3766 vs. EUR 2474; p  = 0.023). Furthermore, multivariate analysis revealed that costs were driven independently by vancomycin-resistance (1.4 fold; p  = 0.034). This analysis suggested that nosocomial VRE infections significantly increases hospital costs compared with VSE infections. Therefore, hospital personal should implement control measures to prevent VRE transmission.

  18. Risk factors for intestinal colonization with vancomycin resistant enterococci' A prospective study in a level III pediatric intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Amberpet

    2018-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Routine surveillance and isolation of patients found to be VRE colonized may not be possible in tertiary care hospitals; however, educating health-care workers, promoting handwashing with antiseptic soaps or solutions, and antibiotic Stewardship policy may help in the reduction of vancomycin resistance and VRE colonization.

  19. Prevalence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Canadian Inner-City Shelter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom A Szakacs

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA colonization is increasingly of concern in community settings. However, despite a recent outbreak in Calgary, Alberta, data on the prevalence of MRSA in Canadian communities are lacking. Globally, few studies have been performed in high-risk groups such as inner-city populations.

  20. Anti-Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Activity and Optimal Culture Condition of Streptomyces sp. SUK 25

    OpenAIRE

    Siti Junaidah, Ahmad; Suhaini, Sudi; Mohd Sidek, Hasidah; Basri, Dayang Fredalina; Zin,Noraziah Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Background: The potential of secondary metabolites extracted from Streptomyces sp. to treat bacterial infections including infections with Staphylococcus aureus is previously documented. The current study showed significant antimicrobial activities associated with endophytic Streptomyces sp. isolated from medicinal plants in Peninsular Malaysia. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine anti-methicillin-resistant-Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) activities of Streptomyces sp. isolates. Mat...

  1. Comparative molecular analysis substantiates zoonotic potential of equine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walther, Birgit; Monecke, Stefan; Ruscher, Claudia; Friedrich, Alexander W; Ehricht, Ralf; Slickers, Peter; Soba, Alexandra; Wleklinski, Claus-G; Wieler, Lothar H; Lübke-Becker, Antina

    Despite the increasing importance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in veterinary medicine, knowledge about the epidemiology of the pathogen in horses is still poor. The phylogenetic relationship of strains of human and equine origins has been addressed before, usually by

  2. Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. isolated from dogs in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yunho; Bae, Dong hwa; Cho, Jae-Keun; Bahk, Gyung Jin; Lim, Suk-Kyung; Lee, Young Ju

    2014-11-01

    Staphylococci were isolated from dogs in animal hospitals, animal shelters, and the Daegu PET EXPO to investigate the characteristics of circulating methicillin-resistant Staphylococcal (MRS) strains in companion animals in Korea. A total of 36/157 isolates were classified as MRS, and subdivided as follows: 1 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), 4 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis, 2 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus, and 29 MRS spp. Among the 36 MRS isolates tested, 100% were resistant to oxacillin and penicillin, and at least 50% were resistant to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (69.4%), erythromycin (63.9%), tetracycline (58.3%), cefoxitin (55.6%), clindamycin (50.0%) or pirlimycin (50.0%). Additionally, 34/36 MRS isolates (94.4%) were mecA positive, 15 of which were further classified as SCCmec type V, 6 isolates as type I, 4 isolates as type IIIb, 1 isolate as type IVa, 1 isolate as type IV, with 7 isolates being non-classifiable. The results of multilocus sequence typing and spa typing for the one MRSA strain were ST 72 (1-4-1-8-4-4-3) and spa t148. Our results provide evidence that companion animals like dogs may be MRS carriers, and that continued surveillance of MRS in companion animals is required to prevent increased incidences in humans.

  3. The clinical impact of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on morbidity, mortality and burden of disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerlaan, H.S.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304815470

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate the clinical impact of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA] infections on the total burden of disease. A guideline on empirical antimicrobial eradication of MRSA in carriers was developed based on a systematic review of literature. A distinction

  4. Eradication of carriage with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: determinants of treatment failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerlaan, Heidi S. M.; Kluytmans, Jan A. J. W.; Berkhout, Hanneke; Buiting, Anton; de Brauwer, Els I. G. B.; van den Broek, Peterhans J.; van Gelderen, Paula; Leenders, Sander A. C. A. P.; Ott, Alewijn; Richter, Clemens; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Spijkerman, Ingrid J. B.; van Tiel, Frank H.; Voorn, G. Paul; Wulf, Mireille W. H.; van Zeijl, Jan; Troelstra, Annet; Bonten, Marc J. M.; van de Berg, C. M. F.; Bosman, J.; Bremer, A.; Bril, W.; Commeren, D.; van Essen, G.; Gigengack-Baars, A.; van Kasteren, M. M. E.; Lommerse, E. J. M.; Mascini, E.; Renders, N. H. M.; van Rijen, M.; Schellekens, J.; Smeets, E.; Sprangers, T.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C. M. J. E.; Verbon, A.; Verduin, K.; Wagenvoort, J. H. T.; van Wijngaarden, P.

    2011-01-01

    Using data from an observational study in which the effectiveness of a guideline for eradication of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage was evaluated, we identified variables that were associated with treatment failure. A multivariate logistic regression model was performed

  5. Long-term carriage, and transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus after discharge from hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. M. Frenay; C.M.J.E. Vandenbroucke-Grauls (Christina); M. J. Molkenboer; J. Verhoef

    1992-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this study was to determine whether patients who become carriers of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) during their stay in hospital, remain colonized after discharge. Thirty-six patients colonized with MRSA during one of three outbreaks at Utrecht

  6. The Costs and Consequences of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection Treatments in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Rosner

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A multinational randomized controlled trial has shown a trend toward early discharge of patients taking oral linezolid versus intravenous vancomycin (IV in the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections. Infection treatments resulting in shorter hospitalization durations are associated with cost savings from the hospital perspective.

  7. An Outbreak of Community-Acquired Foodborne Illness Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Timothy F.; Kellum, Molly E.; Porter, Susan S.; Bell, Michael; Schaffner, William

    2002-01-01

    Infections with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are increasingly community acquired. We investigated an outbreak in which a food handler, food specimen, and three ill patrons were culture positive for the same toxin-producing strain of MRSA. This is the first report of an outbreak of gastrointestinal illness caused by community-acquired MRSA.

  8. Diabetes and early postpartum methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in US hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parriott, Andrea M.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in postpartum women is not well characterized. Because diabetes is a risk factor for some infections, we sought to characterize the relationship between diabetes and invasive MRSA infections in women admitted to US

  9. Food-initiated outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus analyzed by pheno- and genotyping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.J.W. Kluytmans (Jan); R. Hollis; S. Messer; L. Herwaldt; J. Bruining (Hans); M. Heck; J. Rost; N. van Leeuwen; W.H.F. Goessens (Wil); W.B. van Leeuwen (Willem)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractAn outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) involving 27 patients and 14 health-care workers (HCW) was studied. The outbreak started in the hematology unit of the University Hospital Rotterdam, Dijkzigt, The Netherlands, and spread to

  10. European ST80 community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus orbital cellulitis in a neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsironi Evangelia E

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a serious cause of morbidity and mortality in hospital environment, but also, lately, in the community. This case report is, to our knowledge, the first detailed description of a community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus ST80 orbital cellulitis in a previously healthy neonate. Possible predisposing factors of microbial acquisition and treatment selection are also discussed. Case presentation A 28-day-old Caucasian boy was referred to our hospital with the diagnosis of right orbital cellulitis. His symptoms included right eye proptosis, periocular edema and redness. Empirical therapy of intravenous daptomycin, rifampin and ceftriaxone was initiated. The culture of pus yielded a methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolate and the molecular analysis revealed that it was a Panton-Valentine leukocidine-positive ST80 strain. The combination antimicrobial therapy was continued for 42days and the infection was successfully controlled. Conclusions Clinicians should be aware that young infants, even without any predisposing condition, are susceptible to orbital cellulitis caused by community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Prompt initiation of the appropriate empirical therapy, according to the local epidemiology, should successfully address the infection, preventing ocular and systemic complications.

  11. Nosocomial transmission of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Danish Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetem, David J; Westh, Henrik; Boye, Kit

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has changed the epidemiology of MRSA infections worldwide. In contrast to hospital-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA), CA-MRSA more frequently affects healthy individuals, both with and without recent healthcare...

  12. Simplified screening in an emergency department detected methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Christian Backer; Kjældgaard, Poul; Jensen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: All patients admitted to Danish hospitals are screened for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by a questionnaire consisting of 19 questions issued by the Danish Health and Medicines Authority (DHMA). This study aimed to evaluate which of the questions were most useful...

  13. Frequent emergence and limited geographic dispersal of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nübel, Ulrich; Roumagnac, Philippe; Feldkamp, Mirjam

    2008-01-01

    A small number of clonal lineages dominates the global population structure of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), resulting in the concept that MRSA has emerged on a few occasions after penicillinase-stable beta-lactam antibiotics were introduced to clinical practice, followed...

  14. Global transcriptional response of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to thioridazine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mette; Jacobsen, Kirstine; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    Few drugs are available against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and decreased susceptibility among staphylococci to newly introduced agents such as linezolid, daptomycin, and tigecycline has been observed [1-3]. Consequently, new treatment strategies are urgently needed. Thioridazine is a...

  15. Nasal carriage of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among healthy population of Kashmir, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B A Fomda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nasal colonisation with community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA is being increasingly reported, especially in places where people are in close contact and where hygiene is compromised. The aim of this study was to find out prevalence of methicillin resistant S.aureus (MRSA colonising anterior nares of healthy subjects. Materials and Methods: Nasal swabs of healthy subjects were collected aseptically and cultured using standard microbiological protocols. Antibiotic susceptibility was done by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method according to CLSI guidelines. Methicillin resistance was detected by cefoxitin disc diffusion method and confirmed by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and amplification of mecA gene by PCR. Strain typing of MRSA strains was done by PFGE. Results: Out of 820 samples, S.aureus was isolated from 229 (27.92% subjects. Of the 229 isolates, 15 were methicillin resistant. All S. aureus isolates were susceptible to vancomycin. Nasal carriage of MRSA was found to be 1.83% among healthy population. The isolates were found to be polyclonal by PFGE analysis. Conclusion: High prevalence of MRSA is a cause of concern and strategies to interrupt transmission should be implemented.

  16. Methicillin-resistant and -susceptible Staphylococcus aureus from retail meat in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Yuanyue; Larsen, Jesper; Kjeldgaard, Jette

    2017-01-01

    Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) is increasingly related to human infections. Farmers and veterinarians have the highest risk, but infections have also occurred in individuals without prior contact to livestock. Clonal complex (CC) 398 is the predominant LA...

  17. Community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in south Florida hospital and recreational environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strains of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a frequent human pathogen, may also be found in the flora of healthy persons and in the environments that they frequent. Strains of MRSA circulating in the community classified as USA 300 are now found not only in the community but also...

  18. Heterogeneity among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Italian pig finishing holdings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battisti, A.; Franco, A.; Merialdi, G.

    2010-01-01

    A survey for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in finishing pig holdings was carried out in Italy in 2008. MRSA isolates were characterised by spa-. SCCmec- and antimicrobial susceptibility typing. A prevalence of 38% (45/118, 95% CI 29.4-46.9%) positive holdings was observed...

  19. Rapid increase of genetically diverse methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Mette Damkjaer; Boye, Kit; Rhod Larsen, Anders

    2007-01-01

    In Copenhagen, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) accounted for ... by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, Staphylococcus protein A (spa) typing, multilocus sequence typing, staphylococcal chromosome cassette (SCC) mec typing, and detection of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes. Seventy-one percent of cases were community-onset MRSA (CO-MRSA); of these, 36% had...

  20. Pig-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Family transmission and severe pneumonia in a newborn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmeyer, Gitte Nyvang; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente; Skov, Robert L

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Carriage of pig-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is known to occur in pig farmers. Zoonotic lineages of MRSA have been considered of low virulence and with limited capacity for inter-human spread. We present a case of family transmission of pig-associated MRSA...

  1. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among veterinarians: an international study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wulf, M.W.H.; Sorum, M.; Nes, A. van; Skov, R.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Klaassen, C.H.W.; Voss, A.

    2008-01-01

    Pig farmers and veterinarians in contact with livestock in The Netherlands have a higher risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage than the general population. The objective of this study was to investigate whether this is also true for other professionals in contact with

  2. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 from Human Patients, Upper Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz-Gercek, Sigrid; Mittermayer, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal type ST398 is usually associated with animals. We examined 1,098 confirmed MRSA samples from human patients and found that 21 were MRSA ST398. Most (16) patients were farmers. Increasing prevalence from 1.3% (2006) to 2.5% (2008) shows emergence of MRSA ST398 in humans in Austria. PMID:19402964

  3. Performance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus protocols in Dutch hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.; Hendrix, M.G.R.; van der Palen, J.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Schellens, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Although numerous studies have stressed the importance of compliance with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) protocols with regard to cost reduction and a safer environment for health care workers and patients, an evaluation of the usability of the protocols themselves is

  4. Phylogeographic variation in recombination rates within a global clone of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo-Ramirez, Santiago; Corander, Jukka; Marttinen, Pekka

    2012-01-01

    by employing a recently developed Bayesian approach, BRATNextGen, for detecting recombination on an expanded NGS dataset of the globally disseminated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clone ST239. RESULTS: The data confirm strong geographical clustering at continental, national and city scales...

  5. Thioridazine affects transcription of genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mette; Højland, Dorte Heidi; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    2011-01-01

    The antipsychotic drug thioridazine is a candidate drug for an alternative treatment of infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in combination with the β-lactam antibiotic oxacillin. The drug has been shown to have the capability to resensitize MRSA to oxacillin. We...

  6. Transmissibility of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ST398) in Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassenberg, M. W. M.; Bootsma, M. C. J.; Troelstra, A.; Kluytmans, J. A. J. W.; Bonten, M. J. M.

    P>We quantified nosocomial transmission rates of sequence type (ST) 398 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (an emerging livestock-associated MRSA clone) and non-ST398 MRSA isolates in patients hospitalized without infection control measures in 51 Dutch hospitals. Identification of

  7. The molecular evolution of hospital- and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurenberg, Ruud H; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause a wide variety of infections, ranging from minor skin infections to post-operative wound infections. Its adaptive power to antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in the beginning of the 1960s. Resistance to methicillin and

  8. Emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in different animal species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuny, Christiane; Friedrich, Alexander; Kozytska, Svetlana; Layer, Franziska; Nübel, Ulrich; Ohlsen, Knut; Strommenger, Birgit; Walther, Birgit; Wieler, Lothar; Witte, Wolfgang

    The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in animals such as horses, pet animals and productive livestock has raised questions of a probable human origin and in more general of host specificity of S. aureus. Particular clonal lineages are obviously specific for humans (e.g.

  9. Risk Factors for Nosocomial Bacterremia Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pujol (Miquel); C. Pena; R. Pallares (Roman); J. Ayats (Josefina); J. Ariza (Javier); F. Gudiol (Francesc)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn a prospective surveillance study (February 1990–December 1991) performed at a 1000-bed teaching hospital to identify risk factors for nosocomial methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia, 309 patients were found to be colonized (n=103; 33 %) or infected (n=206; 67

  10. A case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) pyoderma in a Labrador retriever dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jennifer

    2014-11-01

    An 8-year-old, neutered male Labrador retriever dog with generalized pruritis had a history of recurring atopic dermatitis and superficial pyoderma. Cocci and yeast were found on cytology and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was cultured. A regimen of marbofloxacin, dexamethasone, ketoconazole, and cyclosporine in addition to bathing with 2% chlorhexidine shampoo resulted in marked improvement.

  11. A case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) pyoderma in a Labrador retriever dog

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    An 8-year-old, neutered male Labrador retriever dog with generalized pruritis had a history of recurring atopic dermatitis and superficial pyoderma. Cocci and yeast were found on cytology and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was cultured. A regimen of marbofloxacin, dexamethasone, ketoconazole, and cyclosporine in addition to bathing with 2% chlorhexidine shampoo resulted in marked improvement.

  12. Nosocomial transmission of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Danish Hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hetem, D.J.; Westh, H.; Boye, K.; Jarlov, J.O.; Bonten, M.J.M.; Bootsma, M.C.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830305

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has changed the epidemiology of MRSA infections worldwide. In contrast to hospital-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA), CA-MRSA more frequently affects healthy individuals, both with and without recent

  13. The Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeck, Robin; Mellmann, Alexander; Schaumburg, Frieder; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Kipp, Frank; Becker, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    Background: For decades, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been a major cause of infection in hospitals and nursing homes (health care-associated MRSA, HA-MRSA). Beginning in the late 1990s, many countries have also experienced a rising incidence of MRSA infection outside of the

  14. Detection of vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A comparative study of three different phenotypic screening methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhateja P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate screening methodologies, to detect Staphylococcus aureus strains with decreased susceptibility to vancomycin. Three methods were used to screen 160 Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates along with ATCC quality control strains. Subsequently, MIC of all these 160 strains were determined by NCCLS methodology. The MIC of all the 160 clinical isolates was < 4µg/mL and were classified as vancomycin susceptible by NCCLS criteria but 23 strains were positive by Hiramatshu method, two grew on MHA (5µg/mL vancomycin while CDC method correctly identified no vancomycin intermediate S.aureus (VISA or vancomycin resistant S.aureus (VRSA strains with reference to there MIC. CDC method was found to be the most appropriate screening methodology for detection of VISA or VRSA for diagnostic laboratories.

  15. Genome Sequence of the Multiantibiotic-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Strain C68 and Insights on the pLRM23 Colonization Plasmid

    OpenAIRE

    Garc?a-Solache, M?nica; Rice, Louis B.

    2016-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium infections are a rising concern in hospital settings. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci colonize the gastrointestinal tract and replace nonresistant strains, complicating the treatment of debilitated patients. Here, we present a polished genome of the multiantibiotic-resistant strain C68, which was obtained as a clinical isolate and is a useful experimental strain.

  16. Linezolid limits burden of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in biofilm of tracheal tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Barat, Laia; Ferrer, Miquel; Sierra, Josep Maria; Soy, Dolors; Guerrero, Laura; Vila, Jordi; Li Bassi, Gianluigi; Cortadellas, Núria; Martínez-Olondris, Pilar; Rigol, Montserrat; Esperatti, Mariano; Luque, Néstor; Saucedo, Lina María; Agustí, Carlos; Torres, Antoni

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of systemic treatment with linezolid compared with vancomycin on biofilm formation in mechanically ventilated pigs with severe methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-induced pneumonia. Prospective randomized animal study. Departments of Pneumology, Microbiology, and Pharmacy of the Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, and Scientific and Technological Services of the University of Barcelona. We prospectively analyzed 70 endotracheal tube samples. Endotracheal tubes were obtained from pigs either untreated (controls, n=20), or treated with vancomycin (n=32) or linezolid (n=18). The endotracheal tubes were obtained from a previous randomized study in tracheally intubated pigs with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus severe pneumonia, and mechanically ventilated for 69±16 hrs. Distal and medial hemisections of the endotracheal tube were assessed to quantify methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus burden, antibiotic biofilm concentration by high-performance liquid chromatography or bioassay, and biofilm thickness through scanning electron microscopy. We found a trend toward a significant variation in biofilm methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus burden (log colony-forming unit/mL) among groups (p=.057), and the lowest bacterial burden was found in endotracheal tubes treated with linezolid (1.98±1.68) in comparison with untreated endotracheal tubes (3.72±2.20, p=.045) or those treated with vancomycin (2.97±2.43, p=.286). Biofilm linezolid concentration was 19-fold above the linezolid minimum inhibitory concentration, whereas biofilm vancomycin concentration (1.60±0.91 µg/mL) was consistently below or close to the vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration. Biofilm was thicker in the vancomycin group (p=.077). Systemic treatment with linezolid limits endotracheal tube biofilm development and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus burden. The potential clinical usefulness of linezolid in decreasing the risk of biofilm

  17. Experiences of nursing staff caring for patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, H; Andreassen Gleissman, S; Lindholm, C; Fossum, B

    2016-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a resistant variant of S. aureus and can cause pneumonia, septicaemia and, in some cases, death. Caring for patients with antibiotic resistant bacteria is a challenge for healthcare personnel. There is a risk of spreading the bacteria among patients and of healthcare personnel being infected themselves. To describe nursing staffs' experiences of caring for patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus in Sweden. A descriptive qualitative approach was used and 15 nurses from different hospitals and care units, including emergency and geriatric wards and nursing homes in Stockholm, were interviewed. All nurses had been involved in the care of patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus, but not on a regular basis. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Three themes emerged from the data: feeling ignorant, afraid and insecure, feeling competent and secure and feeling stressed and overworked. The more knowledge the nurses acquired about methicillin-resistant S. aureus, the more positive was their attitude to caring for these patients. Caring for patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus without adequate knowledge of how to protect oneself and other patients against transmission may provoke anxiety among personnel. Guidelines, memos and adequate information at the right time are of central importance. Healthcare personnel must feel safe in their role as caregivers. All patients have the right to have the same quality of care regardless of the diagnosis and a lack of knowledge influences the level of care given. This study demonstrates the importance of education when caring for patients with infectious diseases. Hopefully, knowledge gained from our study can provide guidance for future health care when new diseases and infections occur. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  18. Identification and primary characterization of a plant antimicrobial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clear and remarkable zones of inhibition in a region corresponding to peptides slightly larger than 6 kDa were recorded for Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) strains and yeast but a smaller inhibition zone with several colonies for tested Gram ...

  19. The Role of Antiseptic in Infection Control. | Gibson | Journal of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The suspension test, an in vitro method, has proved that many resistant bacteria, such as methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin- resistant Enterococcus faecalis, are killed within 5 minutes by antiseptics such as Dettol and Beta dine. The more relevant surface and skin tests proved the good activity of ...

  20. A novel method “CHROMagar” for screening vancomycin-resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Susceptibility tests were performed by disk diffusion method as recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute. We also used E-test minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for confirmation of VRE isolates. Total isolation rate was 22.19% of the tested specimens. Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis ...

  1. Methicillin resistant staphylococci associated with bovine mastitis and their zoonotic importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vishnupriya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted to determine the zoonotic importance of methicillin resistant staphylococci associated with bovine mastitis and their potential role in transmission to animal handlers. Materials and Methods: A total of 158 milk samples from bovine mastitis cases and 126 nasal swabs from the animal handlers were sampled in and around Pondicherry (Southern India. The Presence of Staphylococcal organism was confirmed by PCR amplification using the genus specific primers and among the isolated Staphylococci; methicillin resistance was identified by genetic amplification of mec A methicillin resistant gene. Then the amplified gene from the bacteria expressing the mecA gene (PBP2a (~2kb fragment was further sequenced using four sets of primer pairs and aligned for determining their genetic relatedness between the sequences. Both phenotypic and genotypic analysis was carried out for the six MRS isolates (three bovine and three human in this study. Results: Out of 158 mastitis milk samples; 96 and 19 bovine isolates were found to be positive for Staphylococcal genus specific PCR and methicillin resistant (mecA gene PCR, respectively. Similarly, Out of 126 human nasal swabs, 64 and 13 human isolates were found to be positive for Staphylococcal genus specific PCR and mec A gene PCR, respectively. Among the 160 staphylococcal isolates (Bovine and Human origin; 51 were identified as coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS and remaining as coagulase-negative staphylococci (CONS. The results obtained in this study revealed the presence of many species of Staphylococci but the predominant species were Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis. The Sequence analysis of the mec A gene of human isolates obtained in this study had a maximum identity (99% -100% with the bovine isolates. Conclusion: The phenotypic and genotypic analysis carried out for the six MRS (Methicillin Resistant Staphylococci isolates in this study were indistinguishable

  2. Performance of the EUCAST disk diffusion method, the CLSI agar screen method, and the Vitek 2 automated antimicrobial susceptibility testing system for detection of clinical isolates of Enterococci with low- and medium-level VanB-type vancomycin resistance: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegstad, Kristin; Giske, Christian G; Haldorsen, Bjørg; Matuschek, Erika; Schønning, Kristian; Leegaard, Truls M; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn

    2014-05-01

    Different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods to detect low-level vancomycin resistance in enterococci were evaluated in a Scandinavian multicenter study (n=28). A phenotypically and genotypically well-characterized diverse collection of Enterococcus faecalis (n=12) and Enterococcus faecium (n=18) strains with and without nonsusceptibility to vancomycin was examined blindly in Danish (n=5), Norwegian (n=13), and Swedish (n=10) laboratories using the EUCAST disk diffusion method (n=28) and the CLSI agar screen (n=18) or the Vitek 2 system (bioMérieux) (n=5). The EUCAST disk diffusion method (very major error [VME] rate, 7.0%; sensitivity, 0.93; major error [ME] rate, 2.4%; specificity, 0.98) and CLSI agar screen (VME rate, 6.6%; sensitivity, 0.93; ME rate, 5.6%; specificity, 0.94) performed significantly better (P=0.02) than the Vitek 2 system (VME rate, 13%; sensitivity, 0.87; ME rate, 0%; specificity, 1). The performance of the EUCAST disk diffusion method was challenged by differences in vancomycin inhibition zone sizes as well as the experience of the personnel in interpreting fuzzy zone edges as an indication of vancomycin resistance. Laboratories using Oxoid agar (PCLSI agar screen performed significantly better (P=0.017) than did those using Oxoid BHI agar. In conclusion, both the EUCAST disk diffusion and CLSI agar screening methods performed acceptably (sensitivity, 0.93; specificity, 0.94 to 0.98) in the detection of VanB-type vancomycin-resistant enterococci with low-level resistance. Importantly, use of the CLSI agar screen requires careful monitoring of the vancomycin concentration in the plates. Moreover, disk diffusion methodology requires that personnel be trained in interpreting zone edges.

  3. Performance of the EUCAST Disk Diffusion Method, the CLSI Agar Screen Method, and the Vitek 2 Automated Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing System for Detection of Clinical Isolates of Enterococci with Low- and Medium-Level VanB-Type Vancomycin Resistance: a Multicenter Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giske, Christian G.; Haldorsen, Bjørg; Matuschek, Erika; Schønning, Kristian; Leegaard, Truls M.; Kahlmeter, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods to detect low-level vancomycin resistance in enterococci were evaluated in a Scandinavian multicenter study (n = 28). A phenotypically and genotypically well-characterized diverse collection of Enterococcus faecalis (n = 12) and Enterococcus faecium (n = 18) strains with and without nonsusceptibility to vancomycin was examined blindly in Danish (n = 5), Norwegian (n = 13), and Swedish (n = 10) laboratories using the EUCAST disk diffusion method (n = 28) and the CLSI agar screen (n = 18) or the Vitek 2 system (bioMérieux) (n = 5). The EUCAST disk diffusion method (very major error [VME] rate, 7.0%; sensitivity, 0.93; major error [ME] rate, 2.4%; specificity, 0.98) and CLSI agar screen (VME rate, 6.6%; sensitivity, 0.93; ME rate, 5.6%; specificity, 0.94) performed significantly better (P = 0.02) than the Vitek 2 system (VME rate, 13%; sensitivity, 0.87; ME rate, 0%; specificity, 1). The performance of the EUCAST disk diffusion method was challenged by differences in vancomycin inhibition zone sizes as well as the experience of the personnel in interpreting fuzzy zone edges as an indication of vancomycin resistance. Laboratories using Oxoid agar (P agar (P = 0.027) for the disk diffusion assay performed significantly better than did laboratories using BBL MH II medium. Laboratories using Difco brain heart infusion (BHI) agar for the CLSI agar screen performed significantly better (P = 0.017) than did those using Oxoid BHI agar. In conclusion, both the EUCAST disk diffusion and CLSI agar screening methods performed acceptably (sensitivity, 0.93; specificity, 0.94 to 0.98) in the detection of VanB-type vancomycin-resistant enterococci with low-level resistance. Importantly, use of the CLSI agar screen requires careful monitoring of the vancomycin concentration in the plates. Moreover, disk diffusion methodology requires that personnel be trained in interpreting zone edges. PMID:24599985

  4. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium Isolated from Poultry Flocks in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasjost, J; Mühldorfer, K; Cortez de Jäckel S; Hafez, H M

    2015-03-01

    Between 2010 and 2011, 145 Enterococcus isolates (Enterococcus faecalis, n = 127; Enterococcus faecium, n = 18) were collected during routine bacteriologic diagnostics from broilers, layers, and fattening turkeys in Germany showing various clinical signs. The susceptibility to 24 antimicrobial agents was investigated by broth microdilution test to determine minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). All E. faecalis isolates (n = 127) were susceptible to the beta-lactam antibiotics ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, and penicillin. Corresponding MIC with 50% inhibition (MIC50) and MIC with 90% inhibition (MIC90) values of these antimicrobial agents were at the lower end of the test range (≤ 4 μg/ml). In addition, no vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) were found. High resistance rates were identified in both Enterococcus species for lincomycin (72%-99%) and tetracycline (67%-82%). Half or more than half of Enterococcus isolates were resistant to gentamicin (54%-72%) and the macrolide antibiotics erythromycin (44%-61%) and tylosin-tartate (44%-56%). Enterococcus faecalis isolated from fattening turkeys showed the highest prevalence of antimicrobial resistance compared to other poultry production systems. Eighty-nine out of 145 Enterococcus isolates were resistant to three or more antimicrobial classes. Again, turkeys stood out with 42 (8 1%) multiresistant isolates. The most-frequent resistance patterns of E. faecalis were gentamicin, lincomycin, and tetracycline in all poultry production systems.

  5. Inactivating Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Other Pathogens by Bacteriocins OR-7 and E 50-52.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worldwide, reports document the increasing frequency of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. Other human pathogens are recognized as unresponsive to antibiotics of last resort. These previously treatable infections now account for increased numbers of human disease and de...

  6. Changes in the population of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant phenotypes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duim, Birgitta; Verstappen, Koen M.; Broens, E.M.; Laarhoven, Laura M.; Duijkeren, Van Engeline; Hordijk, Joost; Heus, De Phebe; Spaninks, Mirlin; Timmerman, Arjen J.; Wagenaar, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP), which is often multidrug resistant (MDR), has recently emerged as a threat to canine health worldwide. Knowledge of the temporal distribution of specific MRSP lineages, their antimicrobial resistance phenotypes, and their association

  7. Changes in the population of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant phenotypes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duim, Birgitta; Verstappen, Koen M.; Broens, Els M.; Laarhoven, Laura M.; Van Duijkeren, Engeline; Hordijk, Joost; De Heus, Phebe; Spaninks, Mirlin; Timmerman, Arjen J.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP), which is often multidrug resistant (MDR), has recently emerged as a threat to canine health worldwide. Knowledge of the temporal distribution of specific MRSP lineages, their antimicrobial resistance phenotypes, and their association with

  8. Genetically divergent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and sec-dependent mastitis of dairy goats in Taiwan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chu, Chishih; Yu, Changyou; Lee, Yanhaui; Su, Yaochi

    2012-01-01

    ...-S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates collected from goats in 2008 to elucidate the appearance of MRSA in goats and the mastitis associated staphylococcus enterotoxin (SE) types...

  9. Outbreak of Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infections Among a Collegiate Football Team

    OpenAIRE

    Romano, Russ; Lu, Doanh; Holtom, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Context: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was once primarily a hospital-acquired organism, but now community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) is causing outbreaks among otherwise healthy sport participants.

  10. Detection of Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus Aureus by Polymerase Chain Reaction and Conventional Methods: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju M Pillai

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: This study recommends advocating PCR for mecA gene on a regular basis for detecting methicillin resistance in S. aureus isolates isolated from sterile body fluids or from special units such as intensive care units.

  11. Use of Triplex PCR for Rapid Detection of PVL and Differentiation of MRSA from Methicillin Resistant Coagulase Negative Staphylococci

    OpenAIRE

    Abimanyu, Nagarajan; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Murugesan, Saravanan; Subramanian G, Kaushik; Gurumurthy, Sivakumar; Krishnan, Padma

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become a major public health problem in both hospitals and communities. Panton – Valentine Leucocidin (PVL) has been reported to be an important marker for the highly pathogenic community acquired S. aureus infections. A rapid detection of these MRSA is very important for its treatment. The specific detection of MRSA is always a problem due to the prevalence of methicillin resistance among the coagulase negative Staphylococc...

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Staphylococcus aureus AMRF1 (ST22) and AMRF2 (ST672), Ocular Methicillin-Resistant Isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Velusamy, Nithya

    2014-03-20

    Sequence type 22 (ST22) and ST672 are the two major emerging clones of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in India. ST672 strains were found to cause severe ocular infections. We report the draft genome sequences of two emerging strains of methicillin-resistant S. aureus, AMRF1 (ST22) and AMRF2 (ST672), isolated from patients with ocular infections.

  13. Comparison of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in Healthy Community Hospital Visitors [CA-MRSA] and Hospital Staff [HA-MRSA

    OpenAIRE

    Pathare, Nirmal A.; Anil Pathare

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [CA-MRSA] is unknown in Oman. Methods Nasal and cell phones swabs were collected from hospital visitors and health-care workers on sterile polyester swabs and directly inoculated onto a mannitol salt agar containing oxacillin, allowing growth of methicillin-resistant microorganisms. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using Kirby Bauer?s disc diffusion method on the isolates. Minimum inhib...

  14. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. in the conjunctival sac of healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouney, Meredith C; Stiles, Jean; Townsend, Wendy M; Guptill, Lynn; Weese, J Scott

    2015-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of selected coagulase-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRS) in the conjunctival sac in a group of healthy dogs and to compare the prevalence of ocular MRS colonization with colonization of typically assessed body sites including the nasal cavity and rectum. 123 healthy dogs were used in the prevalence study: 40 dogs from a shelter and 83 privately owned dogs. The sampling procedure included culturing three separate sites per subject in the following order: the lower conjunctival fornices, the nares, and rectum. A low prevalence of 1.6% (2/123) of MRS was detected in healthy dogs. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was isolated from two dogs, one from a conjunctival swab and the other from a rectal swab. The survey data indicate the ocular surface is a potential site of MRS colonization, although the prevalence was low in healthy dogs. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  15. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection risks from companion animals: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petinaki E

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Efthimia Petinaki,1 Iris Spiliopoulou21Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, University of Thessalia, Larissa, 2Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Patras, GreeceAbstract: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA remains one of the most virulent human pathogens and has also recently been recognized as such in the veterinary settings. Companion animals, including dogs, cats, horses, small exotic animals, wildlife animals, and livestock, may constitute a reservoir for MRSA transmission to humans and vice versa. The evolution, emergence, and risk factors for MRSA transmission among colonized or infected animals are reviewed in the present paper, and infection control practices are discussed.Keywords: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, companion animals, close contacts

  16. Antimicrobial resistance in methicillin susceptible and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius of canine origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moodley, Arshnee; Damborg, Peter Panduro; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a commensal and a common opportunistic pathogen causing mainly infections of the integumentary system in dogs. The recent emergence of multidrug-resistant S. pseudintermedius isolates, in particular methicillin-resistant strains (MRSP) is a threat to small animal...... health and highlights the need for antimicrobial resistance surveillance to detect trends and potentially perform timeous interventions. We systematically reviewed 202 published articles to investigate temporal changes in antimicrobial resistance in clinical and commensal S. pseudintermedius isolated...... from dogs in 27 countries between 1980 and 2013. Resistance to the most common antimicrobials tested for in published studies and important for the treatment of staphylococcal infections in dogs were assessed separately for methicillin resistant (MRSP) and methicillin susceptible (MSSP) isolates...

  17. Livestock Origin for a Human Pandemic Clone of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spoor, Laura E.; McAdam, Paul R.; Weinert, Lucy A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The importance of livestock as a source of bacterial pathogens with the potential for epidemic spread in human populations is unclear. In recent years, there has been a global increase in community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections of healthy...... of emergent clones of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) that originated in livestock and switched to humans, followed by host-adaptive evolution and epidemic spread in global human populations. Our findings demonstrate that livestock can act as a reservoir for the emergence of new human...... humans, but an understanding of the different evolutionary origins of CA-MRSA clones and the basis for their recent expansion is lacking. Here, using a high-resolution phylogenetic approach, we report the discovery of two emergent clones of human epidemic CA-MRSA which resulted from independent livestock...

  18. Susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and enterococci to teicoplanin in Pakistan: the MRSET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Altaf; Hussain, Shagufta; Ijaz, Tayyaba; Hashemy, Irfan

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the susceptibility pattern of S. aureus and enterococci to teicoplanin using an in vitro method. Between February and November 2011, valid bacteriological samples were collected at three hospitals in three cities in Pakistan and the organism was isolated. Only samples containing S. aureus or enterococci were tested for their sensitivity to teicoplanin and various other standard antimicrobials in therapy, using the disc diffusion testing by the Kirby-Bauer method. SPSS 18 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 401 isolates collected, a majority 293 (59.6%) were methicillin-sensitive S. aureus, while 136 (33.9%) were methicillin-resistant S. aureus; and 26 (6.5%) were enterococci. All isolates were sensitive to teicoplanin and vancomycin. Teicoplanin had the same in vitro sensitivity as vancomycin against methicillin-sensitive S. aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus and enterococci in clinical isolates.

  19. Mannitol Salt Agar-Cefoxitin Combination as a Screening Medium for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, R. W.; Kahlmeter, Gunnar

    2005-01-01

    In disk diffusion tests, cefoxitin is now considered a better indicator than oxacillin for the presence of the mecA gene in Staphylococcus aureus. A logical extension of this work is the incorporation of cefoxitin into media selective for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). This paper describes the development and subsequent testing of mannitol salt agar containing 4 mg/liter cefoxitin with a unique collection of well-characterized MRSA strains, including low-level methicillin-resistant strains and an equal number of known mecA-negative S. aureus strains. The agar supported the growth of 96.6% of the mecA-positive strains in the collection and inhibited the growth of 100% of the mecA-negative strains. These results suggest that selective media based on cefoxitin are superior to those based on oxacillin for the detection of MRSA. PMID:16081913

  20. Antibacterial activity of extracts of Acacia aroma against methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Mattana

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Antibacterial activity of organic and aqueous extracts of Acacia aroma was evaluated against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis. Inhibition of bacterial growth was determined using agar diffusion and bioautographic methods. Among all assayed organic extracts only ethanolic and ethyl acetate extracts presented highest activities against all tested Staphylococcus strains with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC values ranging from 2.5 to 10 mg/ml and from 2.5 to 5 mg/ml respectively. The aqueous extracts show little antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus strains. The bioautography assay demonstrated well-defined growth inhibition zones against S. aureus in correspondence with flavonoids and saponins. A. aroma would be an interesting topic for further study and possibly for an alternative treatment for skin infections.

  1. Vancomycin-gentamicin synergism revisited: effect of gentamicin susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Mulazimoglu, L; Drenning, S D; Muder, R R

    1996-01-01

    Vancomycin monotherapy of deep-seated staphylococcal infection may be associated with poor bacteriological response. We evaluated 24 unique patient isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) for vancomycin-gentamicin synergism by determining time-kill curves for vancomycin at 10 micrograms/ml and gentamicin at 1 microgram/ml. Nine MRSA strains showed high-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) (MIC, > 500 micrograms/ml), and 15 did not. Vancomycin-gentamicin demonstrated syner...

  2. Prevalence of ST9 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus among Pigs and Pig Handlers in Malaysia▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neela, Vasanthakumari; Mohd Zafrul, Arif; Mariana, Nor Shamsudin; van Belkum, Alex; Liew, Yun Khoon; Rad, Ehsanollah Ghaznavi

    2009-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) of sequence type 398 (ST398) has frequently been detected in pigs and pig handlers. However, in Malaysia, sampling 360 pigs and 90 pig handlers from 30 farms identified novel ST9-spa type t4358-staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type V MRSA strains that were found to transiently colonize more than 1% of pigs and 5.5% of pig handlers. PMID:19812280

  3. Prevalence and risk factors for isolation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus in dogs with keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPinto, Alexander J; Mohammed, Hussni O; Ledbetter, Eric C

    2015-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of, and risk factors for, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (MRS) isolation in dogs with naturally acquired bacterial keratitis. All Staphylococcus spp. isolated from corneal samples of dogs with keratitis during a 2-year period were evaluated for methicillin resistance by bacteriologic methods. Each MRS isolate was subjected to in vitro susceptibility testing for systemic and ocular antimicrobials. Nasal swabs for culture were collected from all dogs with MRS corneal isolation to evaluate for nasal carrier status. Potential risk factors for MRS isolation were investigated by medical record review and administration of an epidemiological survey to dog owners. Collected information characterizing animal, client, and environmental variables was analyzed for association with MRS isolation. Seventy-one Staphylococcus spp. were isolated from seventy individual dogs with keratitis during the study period. Seventeen of the Staphylococcus isolates (23.9%) were methicillin resistant. The MRS isolates included Staphylococcus epidermidis (n = 10), Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (n = 6), and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 1). The MRS corneal isolates displayed extensive antimicrobial resistance. Four dogs (23.5%) with MRS corneal isolates had positive nasal cultures for MRS. Client occupation was significantly (P = 0.01) associated with MRS isolation, and dogs belonging to owners employed in veterinary or human healthcare fields were four times more likely to have MRS keratitis than dogs owned by clients with different professions. There were no significant associations between the other evaluated animal, client, and environmental factors. Methicillin resistance is relatively common in Staphylococcus isolates from dogs with corneal infections, particularly among dogs belonging to healthcare workers. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  4. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus sp. colonizing health care workers of a cancer hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Dayane de Melo Costa; André Kipnis; Lara Stefânia Netto de Oliveira Leão-Vasconcelos; Larissa Oliveira Rocha-Vilefort; Sheila Araújo Telles; Maria Cláudia Dantas Porfírio Borges André; Anaclara Ferreira Veiga Tipple; Ana Beatriz Mori Lima; Nádia Ferreira Gonçalves Ribeiro; Mayara Regina Pereira; Marinésia Aparecida Prado-Palos

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze epidemiological and microbiological aspects of oral colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus of health care workers in a cancer hospital. Interview and saliva sampling were performed with 149 health care workers. Antimicrobial resistance was determined by disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration. Polymerase Chain Reaction, Internal Transcribed Spacer-Polymerase Chain Reaction and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis were performed for gen...

  5. Rising Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections in Ear, Nose, and Throat Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeetha Thirumazhisi Sachithanandam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections (MRSA in ENT diseases is becoming a big clinical concern. Here two patients are described who developed MRSA infections presented with unusual post-FESS epistaxis and postmastoidectomy perichondrial abscess and failed treatment with broad spectrum intravenous antibiotics. Following treatment with oral linezolid combined with local mupirocin dressing both patients fully recovered.

  6. Lessons to learn with the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus control in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    de Almeida Cruz, Elaine Drehmer; Pimenta, Fabiana Cristina; Andersen,Bjorg Marit; Gir,Elucir

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Norway is low, compared to other European and American countries. The health system includes mandatory case reporting and has written guidelines for prevention and control. This communication describes the national public policies related to MRSA obtained from documents and academic experience gained during a doctoral fellowship in Oslo, Norway. The painstaking procedures used for investigating suspected cases, including ...

  7. Frequency and Possible Infection Control Implications of Gastrointestinal Colonization with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Boyce, John M.; Havill, Nancy L.; Maria, Benedicte

    2005-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of health care-associated infections. Multiple factors, including transmission from unrecognized reservoirs of MRSA, are responsible for failure to control the spread of MRSA. We conducted prospective surveillance to determine the frequency of gastrointestinal colonization with MRSA among patients and its possible impact on nosocomial transmission of MRSA. Stool specimens submitted for Clostridium difficile toxin A/B assays w...

  8. Gold Nanoparticle-Assisted Laser Therapy for the Disruption of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-28

    use of gold nanoparticle (GNP)-assisted pulsed laser therapy to disperse in vitro methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) biofilms...includes an Nd:YAG 8-ns pulsed laser, was configured to allow optimal irradiation of biofilms grown in 96-well microtiter plates and reduce...2.2 mJ/ pulse . Over a range of varying number of pulses delivered to different wells of an empty 96-well microtiter plate , the mean ± SD of Page

  9. Daptomycin-Nonsusceptible, Vancomycin-Intermediate, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Yu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the emergence of Staphylococcus aureus with reduced vancomycin susceptibility, newer antibiotics, including daptomycin, have been used to treat methicillin-resistant S aureus infections. Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide that is approved to treat S aureus bacteremia and right-sided endocarditis, and reports of S aureus with reduced susceptibility to daptomycin are infrequent. To our knowledge, the present report describes the first Canadian case of daptomycin-nonsusceptible, vancomycin-intermediate S aureus infection.

  10. Are toilet seats a vector for transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Mary Anne; Nance, Donna; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2010-01-01

    We studied the bacterial burden on toilet seats in a children's cancer hospital to validate a policy requesting that immunocompromised children use alcohol wipes on the seats prior to use of the toilets. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was recovered from 3.3% of hospital toilets when wipes were not in use. Use of wipes resulted in a 50-fold reduction in mean daily bacterial counts and eliminated MRSA. PMID:19243856

  11. Mannitol-negative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from nasal swab specimens in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    dos Santos, Danielle Caldeira Martins; da Costa, Thaina Miranda; Rabello, Renata Fernandes; Alves, F?bio Aguiar; de Mondino, Silvia Susana Bona

    2015-01-01

    The isolation of mannitol-negative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from nasal swabs is reported. Among the 59 isolates, 9 (15%) isolates were mannitol-negative; all of these isolates were categorized as staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IVa. This report emphasizes that mannitol fermentation on mannitol salt agar should not be used as the sole criterion when screening nasal swab specimens for S. aureus.

  12. Mannitol-negative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from nasal swab specimens in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Caldeira Martins dos Santos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The isolation of mannitol-negative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from nasal swabs is reported. Among the 59 isolates, 9 (15% isolates were mannitol-negative; all of these isolates were categorized as staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec type IVa. This report emphasizes that mannitol fermentation on mannitol salt agar should not be used as the sole criterion when screening nasal swab specimens for S. aureus.

  13. Evaluation of a New Chromogenic Medium, MRSA Select, for Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Louie, Lisa; Soares, Deirdre; Meaney, Helen; Vearncombe, Mary; Simor, Andrew E.

    2006-01-01

    We compared MRSA Select to mannitol-salt agar with 8 μg/ml cefoxitin for the detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from 6,199 clinical samples submitted for MRSA screening. The sensitivities and specificities of MRSA Select and mannitol-salt agar with cefoxitin were 98% and 92% versus 90% and 78%, respectively (P < 0.0001). Most (96%) MRSA were detected after overnight incubation using MRSA Select.

  14. Laboratory evaluation of phenotypic detection methods of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Arunava Kali; Selvaraj Stephen; Sivaraman Umadevi

    2014-01-01

    Although conventional antibiotic susceptibility tests are most commonly performed for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the results of these phenotypic tests are dependent on the standardization of the culture conditions. The aim of the study was to evaluate the conventional phenotypic screening tests in comparison to the mecA gene polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One hundred and two clinical isolates of MRSA identified by the oxacillin disk diffusion were subjected to PCR f...

  15. A Survey of Staphylococcus sp and its Methicillin Resistance aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassinger, V. J.; Fontenot, S. L.; Castro, V. A.; Ott, C.; Healy, M.; Pierson, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Within the past few years, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has emerged in environments with susceptible hosts in close proximity, such as hospitals and nursing homes. As the International Space Station (ISS) represents a semi-closed environment with a high level of crewmember interaction, an evaluation of isolates of clinical and environmental Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative Staphylococcus was performed to determine if this trend was also present in astronauts occupying ISS or on surfaces of the space station itself. Methods: Identification of isolates was completed using VITEK (GPI cards, BioMerieux), 16S ribosomal DNA analysis (MicroSeq 500, ABI), and Rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting (Divemilab, Bacterial Barcodes). Susceptibility tests were performed using VITEK (GPS-105 cards, BioMerieux) and resistance characteristics were evaluated by testing for the presence of the mecA gene (PBP2' MRSA test kit, Oxoid). Results: Rep-PCR analysis indicated the transfer of S. aureus between crewmembers and between crewmembers and ISS surfaces. While a variety of S. aureus were identified from both the crewmembers and environment, evaluations of the microbial population indicated minimal methicillin resistance. Results of this study indicated that within the semi-closed ISS environment, transfer of bacteria between crewmembers and their environment has been occurring, although there was no indication of a high concentration of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus species. Conclusions: While this study suggests that the spread of methicillin resistant S. aureus is not currently a concern aboard ISS, the increasing incidence of Earth-based antibiotic resistance indicates a need for continued clinical and environmental monitoring.

  16. Identification of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus inhibitory compound isolated from Serratia marcescens

    OpenAIRE

    Kadouri, Daniel E.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we identified an antimicrobial compound produced by the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens. Colonies of S. marcescens inhibited the growth of nine different methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates and several other tested Gram-positive bacterial species, but not Gram-negative bacteria. Genetic analysis revealed the requirement for the swrW gene which codes for a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase that generates the cyclodepsipeptide antibiotic serrata...

  17. Daptomycin for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis native-valve endocarditis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duah Marylene

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS have been increasing in importance as a cause of native valve endocarditis (NVE. Most cases of NVE caused by CoNS are attributable to Staphylococcus epidermidis. NVE caused by CoNS acquired in a nosocomial setting may differ from cases acquired in the community in several ways. It may be associated with hemodialysis, the presence of a long-term indwelling central catheter or pacemaker, or a recent invasive procedure; nosocomial cases may have a higher rate of methicillin resistance among CoNS isolates, and so be more likely to be treated with vancomycin. Unfortunately, NVE caused by methicillin-resistant CoNS has been associated with significantly higher rates of persistent bacteremia and in-hospital mortality than methicillin-susceptible isolates. The poor outcomes in these cases point to the need for alternative therapies with potent activity against methicillin-resistant CoNS. In our medical center, a 76-year-old man presented with native-valve endocarditis and positive blood cultures for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE. During each of three 6-week courses of treatment with vancomycin, blood cultures were negative, but they once again became positive for MRSE when vancomycin was discontinued. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the MRSE isolates for vancomycin remained stable at 2 μg/mL. Eventually, treatment with daptomycin was initiated (500 mg [7 mg/kg] 3 times/week for 6 weeks. Over the following year, no positive cultures for MRSE were detected.

  18. Variable performance of models for predicting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage in European surgical wards

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Andie S; Pan, Angelo; Harbarth, Stephan; Patroni, Andrea; Chalfine, Annie; Daikos, George L; Garilli, Silvia; Mart?nez, Jos? Antonio; Cooper, Ben S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Predictive models to identify unknown methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage on admission may optimise targeted MRSA screening and efficient use of resources. However, common approaches to model selection can result in overconfident estimates and poor predictive performance. We aimed to compare the performance of various models to predict previously unknown MRSA carriage on admission to surgical wards. METHODS: The study analysed data collected during a prospe...

  19. Frequency of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage in healthy children

    OpenAIRE

    Nikfar, Roya; Shamsizadeh, Ahmad; Ziaei Kajbaf, Tahereh; Kamali Panah, Mohammad; Khaghani, Soheila; Moghddam, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: The prevalence of community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is increasing around the world. It involves healthy people and causes a variety of diseases.Material and Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted from September 2010 - June 2011 on children less than 14 years of Ahvaz, southwest Iran. The participants were selected with two staged cluster sampling. A sterile cotton nasal swab was used to collect the samples from the 86...

  20. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus pada Penderita Dermatitis Atopik dan Sensitivitasnya terhadap Mupirosin Dibandingkan dengan Gentamisin

    OpenAIRE

    Keni Istasaputri M.; Endang Sutedja; Oki Suwarsa; Sunarjati Sudigdoadi

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is found in moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (AD) and is multiresistant against topical antibiotic. Gentamycin is widely used while mupirocin is the first line therapy to eliminate MRSA. This research is intended to observe the colonization of MSRA case in AD patients and its sensitivity to mupirocin compared to gentamycin in Dermato-venereology Clinic Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. An analytical cross sectional survey was in...

  1. Mannitol-negative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from nasal swab specimens in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Danielle Caldeira Martins; da Costa, Thaina Miranda; Rabello, Renata Fernandes; Alves, Fábio Aguiar; de Mondino, Silvia Susana Bona

    2015-06-01

    The isolation of mannitol-negative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from nasal swabs is reported. Among the 59 isolates, 9 (15%) isolates were mannitol-negative; all of these isolates were categorized as staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IVa. This report emphasizes that mannitol fermentation on mannitol salt agar should not be used as the sole criterion when screening nasal swab specimens for S. aureus.

  2. Isolation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. from ready-to-eat fish products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergelidis, D; Abrahim, A; Papadopoulos, T; Soultos, N; Martziou, E; Koulourida, V; Govaris, A; Pexara, A; Zdragas, A; Papa, A

    2014-11-01

    A hundred samples from ready-to-eat (RTE) fish products were examined for the presence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus spp. Staphylococci were isolated from 43% of these samples (n = 100). The identified species in the samples were Staphylococcus aureus (7%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (13%), Staphylococcus xylosus (12%), Staphylococcus sciuri (4%), Staphylococcus warneri (3%), Staphylococcus saprophyticus (2%), Staphylococcus schleiferi (1%) and Staphylococcus auricularis (1%). Two Staph. aureus (MRSA) isolates, three Staph. epidermidis (MRSE), five Staph. xylosus, four Staph. sciuri, one Staph. schleiferi and one Staph. saprophyticus isolates were resistant to oxacillin and all of them carried the mecA gene. The two MRSA isolates belonged to the spa types t316 (ST359) and t548 (ST5) and none of them was able to produce enterotoxins. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis for Staph. aureus and Staph. epidermidis isolates revealed 6 and 11 distinct PFGE types, respectively, reflecting diversity. The presence of methicillin-resistant staphylococci, especially MRSA and MRSE, in RTE fish products may constitute a potential health risk for consumers. This study provides the first data on the occurrence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci in salted and smoked fish products in Greece. These results are important and useful for Staphylococcus spp. risk assessment and management programmes for ready-to-eat fish products. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in poultry meat in Qena, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Karmi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the prevalence of pathogenic coagulase positive, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in poultry meat and its products. Materials and Methods: A total of 125 poultry samples were collected during 2012 in Qena governorate for presence of pathogenic coagulase positive, methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Samples were taken from freshly slaughtered whole chicken carcasses (25/125, chicken portions (25/125, chicken luncheon (25/125, chicken sausages (25/125 and chicken burgers (25/125.Results: It was observed that 44% (11/25, 52% (13/25, 40% (10/25, 24% (6/25 and 44% (11/25 of bacterial isolates were positive for methicillin-resistance tests for freshly slaughtered whole chicken carcasses, chicken portions, chicken luncheon, chicken sausages and chicken burgers respectively. Higher contamination rate of MRSA was found in raw poultry meat and the lower rate in poultry meat products subjected to heat treatment and preservatives. Conclusion: Poultry meat and its products were considered as an important source of spreading of MRSA in humans. Hence, strict hygienic measures should be taken in poultry slaughter houses and in food preparing establishments.

  4. Prevalence and Molecular Characterization of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Foods of Animal Origin, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siiriken, Belgin; Yildirim, Tuba; Güney, Akif Koray; Erol, Irfan; Durupinar, Belma

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, 175 coagulase-positive Staphylococcus (CPS) isolates recovered from samples of beef (n = 110), raw milk n = 56), and fish (n = 9) were analyzed for methicillin resistance using MIC and PCR assays. Methicillin-resistant (MR) Staphylococcus aureus (SA) isolates were then characterized using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). According to findings, 62 (35.4%) of the isolates (44 from beef, 9 from milk, and 9 from fish) were identified as S. aureus based on the presence of the nuc gene. MRCPS was detected in 18 (10.3%) of 175 CPS isolates based on the presence of the mecA gene. Among these isolates, 15 (24.2%) were MRSA: 4 (26.7%) from beef, 2 (13.3%) from milk, and 9 (60%) from fish. However, based on the MIC assay, 21 (12.0%) of the CPS isolates (1 from beef, 15 from milk, and 5 from fish) were MRCPS, indicating a discrepancy between the results of these two methods. The PFGE results indicated genetic heterogeneity of the isolates; six PFGE clusters were found. These results confirm that MRSA is present in foods of animal origin, which is a concern to human health, and indicate the importance of method selection for determination of methicillin resistance. The identity of MR isolates should be verified by PCR to obtain more reliable results.

  5. Laboratory evaluation of phenotypic detection methods of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kali, Arunava; Stephen, Selvaraj; Umadevi, Sivaraman

    2014-01-01

    Although conventional antibiotic susceptibility tests are most commonly performed for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the results of these phenotypic tests are dependent on the standardization of the culture conditions. The aim of the study was to evaluate the conventional phenotypic screening tests in comparison to the mecA gene polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One hundred and two clinical isolates of MRSA identified by the oxacillin disk diffusion were subjected to PCR for the mecA gene and by the cefoxitin disk diffusion test and culture on oxacillin screen agar, mannitol salt agar, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Agar (MeReSA) selective medium, for MRSA. Although all 102 isolates were resistant in oxacillin and cefoxitin disk diffusion, 92 (90.1%) isolates were positive for the mecA gene. The sensitivities of the mannitol salt agar, MeReSA agar, and oxacillin screen agar were 89.13, 97.82, and 98.91%, respectively. The oxacillin screen agar may be recommended for confirming methicillin resistance in the disk diffusion test in resource-poor settings, where molecular methods are not available.

  6. Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci from healthy dogs in Nsukka, Nigeria

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    Kennedy F. Chah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence, resistance phenotype and molecular mechanisms of resistance of methicillin-resistant staphylococci from groin swabs of 109 clinically healthy dogs in Nsukka, Nigeria were investigated. The groin swab samples were cultured on mannitol salt agar supplemented with 10 µgof cloxacillin. Sixteen methicillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci (MRCoNS, all harbouring the mecA gene were isolated from 14 (12.8% of the 109 dogs studied. The MRCoNS isolated were: S. sciuri subspecies rodentium, S. lentus, S. haemolyticus, and S. simulans with S. sciuri subspecies rodentium (62.5% being the predominant species. Thirteen (81.3% of the MRCoNS were resistant to tetracycline while 12 (75% and 10 (62.5% were resistant to kanamycin and trimthoprim-sulphamethoxazole respectively. None of the isolates was resistant to fusidic acid, linezolid and vancomycin. Thirteen (81.3% of the MRCoNS were multi-drug resistance (MDR. Other antimicrobial genes detected were: blaZ, tet(K, tet(M, tet(L, erm(B, lnu(A, aacA-aphD, aphA3, str, dfr(G, cat pC221,and cat pC223. Methicillin-resistant staphylococci are common colonizers of healthy dogs in Nigeria with a major species detected being S. sciuri subsp. rodentium.

  7. Laboratory evaluation of phenotypic detection methods of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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    Arunava Kali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Although conventional antibiotic susceptibility tests are most commonly performed for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, the results of these phenotypic tests are dependent on the standardization of the culture conditions. The aim of the study was to evaluate the conventional phenotypic screening tests in comparison to the mecA gene polymerase chain reaction (PCR. One hundred and two clinical isolates of MRSA identified by the oxacillin disk diffusion were subjected to PCR for the mecA gene and by the cefoxitin disk diffusion test and culture on oxacillin screen agar, mannitol salt agar, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Agar (MeReSA selective medium, for MRSA. Although all 102 isolates were resistant in oxacillin and cefoxitin disk diffusion, 92 (90.1% isolates were positive for the mecA gene. The sensitivities of the mannitol salt agar, MeReSA agar, and oxacillin screen agar were 89.13, 97.82, and 98.91%, respectively. The oxacillin screen agar may be recommended for confirming methicillin resistance in the disk diffusion test in resource-poor settings, where molecular methods are not available.

  8. [Comparison of chosen methods for identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Agnieszka; Budzyńska, Anna; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate effectiveness of methicillin-resistant S. aureus identification using screening method with oxacillin (6 microg/ml), latex agglutination test--Slidex MRSA Detection and a chromogenic agar medium--MRSA ID. The investigation were carried out on 120 S. aureus strains isolated from clinical materials of patients hospitalized in the University Hospital at the L. Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, University of Nicolaus Copernicus in Torún. Consistency of results between chromogenic medium and latex agglutination test amounted 97.5%, chromogenic medium and screening method--96.7%. Identical correspondence of results took a stand in case screening method and latex agglutination test. Results consistency of detecting methicillin resistance in S. aureus strains between this three methods concerned 95.8% strains. Our investigation demonstrated 96.7% sensitivity and 100% specificity for MRSA ID medium for the detection of methicillin resistance. The sensitivity of MRSA-Screen was 95.0% and its specificity reached 100%. The sensitivity and specificity of screening method amounted 96.7%.

  9. Molecular Characteristics of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis on the Abdominal Skin of Females before Laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pin-Jia; Xie, Cheng-Bin; Sun, Feng-Hui; Guo, Li-Juan; Dai, Min; Cheng, Xi; Ma, Yong-Xin

    2016-06-22

    Staphylococcus epidermidis, especially methicillin-resistant strains, may be the source of surgical site infections and may be a reservoir of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) for S. aureus. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) on the abdominal skin of females before laparotomy and determine the molecular characteristics and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of these isolates. MRSE was found in 54 of 157 isolates based on mecA gene detection, and there was no difference in icaA gene carriage rate between MRSE and methicillin-susceptible S. epidermidis (MSSE) isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were determined by broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing according to the latest CLSI manuals. All MRSE isolates had unfavorable antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Twenty-three MRSE strains (42.6%) were multi-drug resistant. SCCmec typing and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing was performed. Thirty-nine (72.2%) had a single SCCmec type, whereas 1.9% had two types. Fourteen strains (25.9%) were non-typeable (NT). The most frequent MRSE genotype was SCCmec type IVa. High diversity with PFGE patterns was obtained for MRSE, and there were no isolates exhibiting identical pulsotype. The results confirm that methicillin-resistant strains are frequently present among S. epidermidis on the abdominal skin of females before laparotomy. Moreover, resistance profiles seem to have no association with the SCCmec types or PFGE types for most common antibiotics.

  10. Controlling for endogeneity in attributable costs of vancomycin-resistant enterococci from a Canadian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Smith, Patrick

    2017-12-01

    Decisions regarding the optimal provision of infection prevention and control resources depend on accurate estimates of the attributable costs of health care-associated infections. This is challenging given the skewed nature of health care cost data and the endogeneity of health care-associated infections. The objective of this study is to determine the hospital costs attributable to vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) while accounting for endogeneity. This study builds on an attributable cost model conducted by a retrospective cohort study including 1,292 patients admitted to an urban hospital in Vancouver, Canada. Attributable hospital costs were estimated with multivariate generalized linear models (GLMs). To account for endogeneity, a control function approach was used. The analysis sample included 217 patients with health care-associated VRE. In the standard GLM, the costs attributable to VRE are $17,949 (SEM, $2,993). However, accounting for endogeneity, the attributable costs were estimated to range from $14,706 (SEM, $7,612) to $42,101 (SEM, $15,533). Across all model specifications, attributable costs are 76% higher on average when controlling for endogeneity. VRE was independently associated with increased hospital costs, and controlling for endogeneity lead to higher attributable cost estimates. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ability of Candida albicans Mutants To Induce Staphylococcus aureus Vancomycin Resistance during Polymicrobial Biofilm Formation▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriott, Melphine M.; Noverr, Mairi C.

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus form vigorous polymicrobial biofilms in serum, which may serve as the source of coinfection in patients. More importantly, S. aureus is highly resistant to vancomycin during polymicrobial biofilm formation, with no decreases in bacterial viability observed with up to 1,600 μg/ml drug. In these mixed-species biofilms, S. aureus preferentially associates with C. albicans hyphae, which express a variety of unique adhesins. We tested C. albicans mutants deficient in transcriptional regulators of morphogenesis (CPH1 and EFG1) and biofilm formation (BCR1) to investigate the role of hyphae in mediating polymicrobial biofilm formation. These mutants also have reduced expression of hypha-specific adhesins. The ability to form polymicrobial biofilms correlated with the ability to form hyphae in these mutants. However, only mutants that could adhere to the abiotic surface could induce S. aureus vancomycin resistance, regardless of the presence of hyphae. In examining factors that may mediate interspecies adhesion, we found that the C. albicans ALS family of adhesins (Als1 to Als7 and Als9) was not involved, and neither was the hypha-specific adhesin Hwp1. Therefore, polymicrobial biofilm formation and subsequent antibiotic resistance is a multifactorial process that may require a unique combination of fungal and/or bacterial adhesins. PMID:20566760

  12. Heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate susceptibility in a community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus epidemic clone, in a case of Infective Endocarditis in Argentina

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    Vindel Ana

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-Associated Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA has traditionally been related to skin and soft tissue infections in healthy young patients. However, it has now emerged as responsible for severe infections worldwide, for which vancomycin is one of the mainstays of treatment. Infective endocarditis (IE due to CA-MRSA with heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate susceptibility-(h-VISA has been recently reported, associated to an epidemic USA 300 CA-MRSA clone. Case Presentation We describe the occurrence of h-VISA phenotype in a case of IE caused by a strain belonging to an epidemic CA-MRSA clone, distinct from USA300, for the first time in Argentina. The isolate h-VISA (SaB2 was recovered from a patient with persistent bacteraemia after a 7-day therapy with vancomycin, which evolved to fatal case of IE complicated with brain abscesses. The initial isolate-(SaB1 was fully vancomycin susceptible (VSSA. Although MRSA SaB2 was vancomycin susceptible (≤2 μg/ml by MIC (agar and broth dilution, E-test and VITEK 2, a slight increase of MIC values between SaB1 and SaB2 isolates was detected by the four MIC methods, particularly for teicoplanin. Moreover, Sab2 was classified as h-VISA by three different screening methods [MHA5T-screening agar, Macromethod-E-test-(MET and by GRD E-test] and confirmed by population analysis profile-(PAP. In addition, a significant increase in cell-wall thickness was revealed for SaB2 by electron microscopy. Molecular typing showed that both strains, SaB1 and SaB2, belonged to ST5 lineage, carried SCCmecIV, lacked Panton-Valentine leukocidin-(PVL genes and had indistinguishable PFGE patterns (subtype I2, thereby confirming their isogenic nature. In addition, they were clonally related to the epidemic CA-MRSA clone (pulsotype I detected in our country. Conclusions This report demonstrates the ability of this epidemic CA-MRSA clone, disseminated in some regions of Argentina, to

  13. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical samples at Yekatit 12 Hospital Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilnessa, Tebelay; Bitew, Adane

    2016-08-09

    Staphylococcus aureus particularly MRSA strains are one of the major causes of community and hospital acquired bacterial infections. They are also becoming increasingly multi-drug resistant and have recently developed resistance to vancomycin, which has been used successfully to treat MRSA for many years. In-vitro determination of drug resistance patterns of S. aureus is critical for the selection of effective drugs for the treatment of staphylococci infections. The main aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of methicillin resistant S. aureus strains from different clinical specimens from patients referred for routine culture and sensitivity testing. A cross sectional study was conducted among 1360 participants at Yekatit 12 Hospital Medical College in Ethiopia from September 2013 to April 2014. Clinical samples from various anatomical sites of study participants were cultured on blood agar and mannitol salt agar and identified to be S. aureus by using catalase, coagulase and DNAse tests. S. aureus isolates then were screened for MRSA using 30 μg cefoxitin disc and other 11 antimicrobial drugs by disc diffusion procedure, and agar dilution and E tests for vancomycin. All S. aureus isolates examined for beta-lactamase production by employing nitrocefin. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 software and logistic regressions were applied to assess any association between dependent and independent variables. Of 1360 clinical specimens analyzed S. aureus was recovered from (194, 14.3 %). Rate of isolation of S. aureus with regard to clinical specimens was the highest in pus (118, 55.4 %).No S. aureus was isolated from CSF and urethral discharge. Out of 194 S. aureus isolates, (34, 17.5 %) were found out to be MRSA and the remaining (160, 82.5 %) were MSSA. Ninety eight (50.5 %) S. aureus were multi drug resistant and the highest isolates were resistant to penicillin (187, 96.4 %) and least resistant for clindamycin (23, 11.9 %) and vancomycin

  14. Occurrence and characteristics of methicillin-resistant and -susceptible Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci from Japanese retail ready-to-eat raw fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Ahmed M; Watanabe, Wataru; Fujii, Tomoko; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2012-06-01

    Staphylococci are not part of the normal fish microflora. The presence of staphylococci on fish is an indication of (a) post-harvest contamination due to poor personnel hygiene, or (b) disease in fish. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, molecular genetic characteristics, antibiotic resistance and virulence factors of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CoNS) isolated from 200 samples of retail ready-to-eat raw fish (sashimi) collected from the Japanese prefecture of Hiroshima. We characterized 180 staphylococcal strains. A majority of the grocery stores surveyed (92%, 23/25) contained fish contaminated with Staphylococcus species. We recovered 175 S. aureus isolates from 174 (87%, 174/200) samples, with 170 isolates of MSSA. For the MRSA and MR-CoNS, 10 isolates were obtained from 10 samples (5%, 10/200) collected from 10 shops (40%, 10/25) belonging to four supermarket chains. SCCmec typing revealed the presence of a type IV.1 SCCmec cassette in S. warneri isolates, a type II.1 SCCmec cassette in S. haemolyticus isolates and a cassette in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates that could not be typed. Molecular typing of two MRSA isolates by spa sequencing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) identified t1767 and ST8, respectively. Antibiotic resistance genes that confer resistance to aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, β-lactams, macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B (MLS(B)) antibiotics were detected. Genes encoding one or more of the following virulence factors: staphylococcal enterotoxins (seb, and sed), toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (tst), exfoliative toxin (etaA) were detected in 14.2% (25/175) of S. aureus isolates. The accessory gene regulator (agr) typing of S. aureus isolates revealed that agr type 1 was most prevalent (96.5%, 169/175) followed by type 2 (2.2%, 4/175) and type 3 (1.1%, 2/175). None of

  15. Rapid control of a methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak in a medical surgical intensive care unit (ICU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Anjum; Lampitoc, Marianita; Salaripour, Maryam; McKernan, Patricia; Devlin, Roslyn; Muller, Matthew P

    2009-01-01

    Outbreaks of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the intensive care unit setting can be prolonged and difficult to control. This report describes the rapid control of an outbreak of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a 24-bed open-concept medical surgical intensive care unit with a baseline methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus acquisition rate of 1.5 cases per 1000 patient days. This institution's infection control policy mandates an outbreak investigation if two cases of hospital-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization or infection are identified in an intensive care unit within a four-week period. In July 2007, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was identified in the sputum of two patients within a one-week period. Screening of all patients in the intensive care unit identified one additional case and a fourth case was identified from a clinical specimen before control measures were implemented. Initial control measures included healthcare worker education, enhanced surveillance, patient cohorting, and enhanced environmental cleaning. Despite these measures, three more cases occurred. All patients were then placed in contact isolation, healthcare workers were screened, and the nursing staff was cohorted. After two weeks without a case, two additional cases were identified. Decolonization of all positive patients was initiated. No further cases occurred over a five-week period and the outbreak was declared over. The outbreak resulted in nine cases of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization (n = 8) or infection (n = 1) over an 11-week period. Only one of 175 healthcare workers was colonized and it was not the outbreak strain. Early detection and the stepwise addition of infection control measures resulted in the rapid control of an outbreak of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a medical surgical intensive care unit without unit closure. A low threshold of suspicion and

  16. A Novel Topical Combination Ointment with Antimicrobial Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Streptococcus aureus, Gram-Negative Superbugs, Yeasts, and Dermatophytic Fungi

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomson, Kenneth S; Thomson, Gina K; Biehle, John; Deeb, Andrew; Crawford, Jamaal; Herrera, R

    2016-01-01

    .... One hundred eighty-four bacterial and fungal isolates from culture collections that included multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa...

  17. Successful prevention of the transmission of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in a Brazilian public teaching hospital

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    Flávia Alves Ferreira Rossini

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE can colonize or cause infections in high-risk patients and contaminate the environment. Our objective was to describe theepidemiological investigation of an outbreak of VRE, the interventions made, and their impact on its control. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, descriptive, non-comparative study by reviewing the charts of patients with a VRE-positive culture in the University Hospital of Campinas State University, comprising 380 beds, 40 of which were in intensive care units (ICUs, who were admitted from February 2008-January 2009. Interventions were divided into educational activity, reviewing the workflow processes, engineering measures, and administrative procedures. RESULTS: There were 150 patients, 139 (92.7% colonized and 11 (7.3% infected. Seventy-three percent were cared for in non-ICUs (p = 0.028. Infection was more frequent in patients with a central-line (p = 0.043, mechanical ventilation (p = 0.013, urinary catheter (p = 0.049, or surgical drain (p = 0.049. Vancomycin, metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and third-generation cephalosporin were previously used by 47 (31.3%, 31 (20.7%, 24 (16%, and 24 (16% patients, respectively. Death was more frequent in infected (73% than in colonized (17% patients (p < 0.001. After the interventions, the attack rate fell from 1.49 to 0.33 (p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Classical risk factors for VRE colonization or infection, e.g., being cared for in an ICU and previous use of vancomycin, were not found in this study. The conjunction of an educational program, strict adhesion to contact precautions, and reinforcement of environmental cleaning were able to prevent the dissemination of VRE.

  18. Surveillance and endemic vancomycin-resistant enterococci: some success in control is possible.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morris-Downes, M

    2010-07-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are prevalent in many Irish hospitals. We analysed surveillance data from 2001 to 2008 in a centre where VRE is endemic. All clinically significant enterococci were tested for susceptibility to vancomycin. All intensive care unit admissions were screened on admission and weekly thereafter. Interventions included isolating\\/cohorting VRE patients, monthly prevalence surveys of VRE patients, the introduction of an electronic alert system, programmes to improve hand and environmental hygiene, and the appointment of an antibiotic pharmacist. There was a significant increase in the number of positive VRE screening samples from 2001 (1.96 patients with positive VRE screens per 10 000 bed-days) to 2006 (4.98 per 10 000 bed-days) (P < or = 0.001) with a decrease in 2007 (3.18 per 10 000 bed-days) (P < or = 0.01). The number of VRE bloodstream infections (BSI) increased from 0.09 BSI per 10 000 bed-days in 2001 to 0.78 per 10 000 bed-days in 2005 (P < or = 0.001) but decreased subsequently. Linear regression analysis indicated a significant association between new cases of VRE and non-isolated VRE patients, especially between May 2005 and December 2006 [P=0.009; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.08-0.46] and between May 2005 and December 2008 (P = 0.008; 95% CI: 0.06-0.46). Routine surveillance for VRE together with other measures can control VRE BSI and colonisation, even where VRE is endemic, and where facilities are constrained.

  19. Oxacillin sensitization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius by antisense peptide nucleic acids in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Shan; Loeffler, Anette; Lloyd, David H; Nair, Sean P; Good, Liam

    2015-11-11

    Antibiotic resistance genes can be targeted by antisense agents, which can reduce their expression and thus restore cellular susceptibility to existing antibiotics. Antisense inhibitors can be gene and pathogen specific, or designed to inhibit a group of bacteria having conserved sequences within resistance genes. Here, we aimed to develop antisense peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) that could be used to effectively restore susceptibility to β-lactams in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP). Antisense PNAs specific for conserved regions of the mobilisable gene mecA, and the growth essential gene, ftsZ, were designed. Clinical MRSA and MRSP strains of high oxacillin resistance were treated with PNAs and assayed for reduction in colony forming units on oxacillin plates, reduction in target gene mRNA levels, and cell size. Anti-mecA PNA at 7.5 and 2.5 μM reduced mecA mRNA in MRSA and MRSP (p < 0.05). At these PNA concentrations, 66 % of MRSA and 92 % of MRSP cells were killed by oxacillin (p < 0.01). Anti-ftsZ PNA at 7.5 and 2.5 μM reduced ftsZ mRNA in MRSA and MRSP, respectively (p ≤ 0.05). At these PNA concentrations, 86 % of MRSA cells and 95 % of MRSP cells were killed by oxacillin (p < 0.05). Anti-ftsZ PNAs resulted in swelling of bacterial cells. Scrambled PNA controls did not affect MRSA but sensitized MRSP moderately to oxacillin without affecting mRNA levels. The antisense PNAs effects observed provide in vitro proof of concept that this approach can be used to reverse β-lactam resistance in staphylococci. Further studies are warranted as clinical treatment alternatives are needed.

  20. Correlation of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration Breakpoints and Methicillin Resistance Gene Carriage in Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis

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    Fereshteh Eftekhar,

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus epidermidis is the most important member of coagulase negative staphylococci responsible for community and hospital acquired infections. Most clinical isolates of S. epidermidis are resistant to methicillin making these infections difficult to treat. In this study, correlation of methicillin resistance phenotype was compared with methicillin resistance (mecA gene carriage in 55 clinical isolates of S. epidermidis. Susceptibility was measured by disc diffusion using methicillin discs, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC were measured using broth microdilution. Methicillin resistance gene (MecA gene carriage was detected by specific primers and PCR. Disc susceptibility results showed 90.9% resistance to methicillin. Considering a MIC of 4 µg/ml, 78.1% of the isolates were methicillin resistant, 76.36% of which carried the mecA gene. On the other hand, when a breakpoint of 0.5 µg/ml was used, 89.09% were methicillin resistant, of which 93.75% were mecA positive. There was a better correlation between MIC of 0.5 µg/ml with disc diffusion results and mecA gene carriage. The findings suggest that despite the usefulness of molecular methods for rapid diagnosis of virulence genes, gene carriage does not necessarily account for virulence phenotype. Ultimately, gene expression, which is controlled by the environment, would determine the outcome

  1. Comparison of antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and resistance genes in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium from humans in the community, broilers and pigs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Agersø, Yvonne; Gerner-Smidt, P.

    2000-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium isolated from humans in the community (98 and 65 isolates), broilers (126 and 122), and pigs (102 and 88) during 1998 were tested for susceptibility to 12 different antimicrobial agents and for the presence of selected genes encoding resistance using PCR....... Furthermore, the presence of vancomycin resistant enterococci was examined in 38 human stool samples using selective enrichment. Widespread resistance to chloramphenicol, macrolides, kanamycin, streptomycin, and tetracycline was found among isolates from all three sources. All E. faecium isolates from humans...... and pigs were susceptible to avilamycin, whereas 35% of isolates from broilers were resistant. All E. faecium isolates from humans were susceptible to vancomycin, whereas 10% and 17% of isolates from broilers and pigs, respectively, were resistant. A vancomycin resistant E. faecium isolate was found in one...

  2. Detection of Methicillin Resistance and Various Virulence Factors in Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Nasal Carriers

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    Hatice Türk Dağı

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococus aureus can be found as a commensal on skin and nasal flora or it may cause local and invasive infections. S. aureus has a large number of virulence factors. Aims: To investigate the methicillin resistance and frequency of various virulence factors in S. aureus nasal isolates. Study Design: Descriptive study. Methods: Nasal samples collected from university students were cultured in media. S. aureus was identified by conventional methods and the Staphyloslide latex test (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, USA. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were conducted, and the methicillin resistance was determined. The mecA, nuc, pvl and staphylococcal toxin genes were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: S. aureus was isolated in 104 of 600 (17.3% nasal samples. In total, 101 (97.1% S. aureus isolates were methicillin-sensitive and the remaining 3 (2.9% were methicillin-resistant. Furthermore, all but five isolates carried at least one staphylococcal enterotoxin gene, with seg being predominant. The tst and eta genes were determined in 29 (27.9%, and 3 (2.9% isolates, respectively. None of the S. aureus isolates harbored see, etb, and pvl genes. Conclusion: A moderate rate of S. aureus carriage and low frequency of MRSA were detected in healthy students. S. aureus isolates had a high prevalence of staphylococcal enterotoxin genes and the tst gene. In this study, a large number of virulence factors were examined in S. aureus nasal isolates, and the data obtained from this study can be used for monitoring the prevalence of virulence genes in S. aureus strains isolated from nasal carriers.

  3. Community Acquisition of Gentamicin-Sensitive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Southeast Queensland, Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Nimmo, Graeme R.; Schooneveldt, Jacqueline; O'Kane, Gabrielle; McCall, Brad; Vickery, Alison

    2000-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) susceptible to gentamicin has been reported in a number of countries in the 1990s. To study the acquisition of gentamicin-sensitive MRSA (GS-MRSA) in southeast Queensland and the relatedness of GS-MRSA to other strains of MRSA, 35 cases of infection due to GS-MRSA from October 1997 through September 1998 were examined retrospectively to determine the mode of acquisition and risk factors for MRSA acquisition. Thirty-one isol...

  4. Antibacterial Modification of Kirschner Wires with Polyluteolin toward Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA

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    Jialiang Zhu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study we report antibacterial modification of Kirschner wires (K-wires with polyluteolin (PL toward methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. K-wires were modified by immersing them in the luteolin-containing aqueous solution for 24 h. Characterizations using scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical methods confirmed the presence of the PL coatings on the K-wires. The PL-coated K-wires were further found to show antibacterial activity toward MRSA and remained unimpaired antibacterial activity even after the steam sterilization treatment.

  5. Biofilm synthesis and its relationship with genetic characteristics in clinical methicillin-resistant staphylococci

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    Nikolaos Giormezis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus can cause a broad range of infections, including skin infections, pneumonia and bacteraemia. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS, mainly S. epidermidis, have also emerged as important pathogens, especially in immunocompromised patients or those with prosthetic devices, such as intravascular catheters or biomaterials. Of great importance in the initiation of these infections is the ability of staphylococci to adhere to various surfaces, such as host tissues and prosthetic devices and to form biofilm. The staphylococcal adhesins are encoded by a number of genes such as fnbA (S. aureus fibronectin binding protein A, sasG (S. aureus surface protein G, aap (S. epidermidis accumulation associated protein, bhp (Bap homologue protein and fbe (fibrinogen binding protein epidermidis. In this study, 106 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, 145 methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE and 70 non-epidermidis methicillin-resistant CNS (MR-CNS; 58 S. haemolyticus, 10 S. hominis and two S. lugdunensis were compared in terms of biofilm formation, antimicrobial resistance, clonal distribution and adhesin genes carriage. Isolates were classified into pulsotypes by PFGE and assigned to sequence types by MLST. In total, 121/321 isolates (37.7% produced biofilm and 219 (68.2% carried ica operon. The majority was multidrug resistant (94.7% and carried one or more adhesin genes. MRSE and all other MR-CNS prevailed in biofilm formation (P < 0.001 and antimicrobial resistance (P < 0.05 as compared to MRSA. MRSE also prevailed in ica carriage compared to the other methicillin-resistant staphylococci (P ≤ 0.007 Among MRSE, isolates from bacteraemias prevailed in biofilm formation (P = 0.031, whereas, strains from prosthetic device-associated infections carried more frequently aap (P = 0.003. Even though PFGE showed genetic diversity among MRSE, MLST revealed three major clones (ST2, ST5, ST16. MRSA isolates were less diverse, with five PFGE

  6. Prevention and Control of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Acute Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andie S; Huttner, Benedikt; Harbarth, Stephan

    2016-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a leading cause of health care-associated infections worldwide. Controversies with regard to the effectiveness of various MRSA control strategies have contributed to varying approaches to the control of this pathogen in different settings. However, new evidence from large-scale studies has emerged, particularly with regards to MRSA screening and decolonization strategies, which will inform future control practices. The implementation as well as outcomes of control measures in the real world is not only influenced by scientific evidence but also depends on economic, administrative, governmental, and political influences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Lessons to learn with the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus control in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Drehmer de Almeida Cruz

    Full Text Available The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in Norway is low, compared to other European and American countries. The health system includes mandatory case reporting and has written guidelines for prevention and control. This communication describes the national public policies related to MRSA obtained from documents and academic experience gained during a doctoral fellowship in Oslo, Norway. The painstaking procedures used for investigating suspected cases, including health professionals, decolonization and case monitoring, could be important tools to be used by countries with a high prevalence of MRSA.

  8. Assessment of three rapid methods for the detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Maria João; Soares, Carlos; Mendes, Ana Constança; Guimarães, Maria Luís; Cabeda, José Manuel; Amorim, José Manuel

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated three rapid methods to detect methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and compared them with PCR amplification of mecA. A total of 103 S. aureus strains were studied by MRSA-Screen, BBL Crystal, Velogene Genomic and mecA PCR. All the methods detected the 61 MRSA strains having the mecA gene, showing 100% sensitivity and specificity. Despite the correlation between all the rapid methods and PCR, the ease of use and shorter turnaround time of MRSA-Screen were important factors leading to the selection of this method as the routine screening technique for MRSA.

  9. The use of molecular methods for the detection and identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvonen, Jari J

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major pathogen in many hospitals and long-term care facilities as well as in the community. To limit the spread of MRSA, early detection and proper treatment are essential. Because conventional culture as gold standard is time consuming, new techniques such as PCR-based and hybridization assays have emerged for the rapid detection of MRSA. This review will focus on the currently available molecular-based assays and on their utility and performance for detection of S. aureus, of its virulence factors and of the markers for acquired resistance.

  10. Inducible clindamycin and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a tertiary care hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, R P; Shrestha, S; Barakoti, A; Amatya, R

    2017-07-11

    Staphylococcus aureus, an important nosocomial pathogen, is frequently associated with infections in human. The management of the infections by it especially methicillin resistant ones is often difficult because methicillin resistant S. aureus is usually resistant to multiple antibiotics. Macrolide-lincosamide streptogramin B family of antibiotics is commonly used to treat such infections as an alternative to vancomycin. This study was conducted over the period of one and half year from November 2013-April 2015 in Microbiology laboratory of Nepal Medical College and Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal to find the incidence of different phenotypes of MLS B resistance among S. aureus from clinical samples and their association with methicillin resistance. Two hundred seventy isolates of S. aureus were included in the study. Methicillin resistance was detected by cefoxitin disc diffusion method and inducible clindamycin resistance by erythromycin and clindamycin disc approximation test (D-test). Of the 270 clinical isolates of S. aureus, 25.1% (68/270) were MRSA. Erythromycin and clindamycin resistance was seen in 54.4% (147/270) and 41.8% (113/270) isolates respectively. Resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin were higher in MRSA as compared to MSSA (erythromycin-resistance: 88.2% Vs 39.1% and clindamycin-resistance: 79.4% Vs 41.8%). The overall prevalence of i MLS B and c MLS B phenotype was 11.48% (31/270) and 29.25% (79/270) respectively. Both i MLS B and c MLS B phenotypes predominated in MRSA strains. Detection rate of MRSA in our study shows the necessity to improve in healthcare practices and to formulate new policy for the control of MRSA infections. Clindamycin resistance in the form of i MLS B and c MLS B especially among MRSA emphasizes the need of D-test to be performed routinely in our set up while using clindamycin as an alternative choice to anti-staphylococcal antibiotics like vancomycin and linezolid in the treatment of staphylococcal infections.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus CC398: host adaptation and emergence of methicillin resistance in livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Lance B; Stegger, Marc; Hasman, Henrik; Aziz, Maliha; Larsen, Jesper; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Pearson, Talima; Waters, Andrew E; Foster, Jeffrey T; Schupp, James; Gillece, John; Driebe, Elizabeth; Liu, Cindy M; Springer, Burkhard; Zdovc, Irena; Battisti, Antonio; Franco, Alessia; Zmudzki, Jacek; Schwarz, Stefan; Butaye, Patrick; Jouy, Eric; Pomba, Constanca; Porrero, M Concepción; Ruimy, Raymond; Smith, Tara C; Robinson, D Ashley; Weese, J Scott; Arriola, Carmen Sofia; Yu, Fangyou; Laurent, Frederic; Keim, Paul; Skov, Robert; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2012-01-01

    Since its discovery in the early 2000s, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 398 (CC398) has become a rapidly emerging cause of human infections, most often associated with livestock exposure. We applied whole-genome sequence typing to characterize a diverse collection of CC398 isolates (n = 89), including MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) from animals and humans spanning 19 countries and four continents. We identified 4,238 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among the 89 core genomes. Minimal homoplasy (consistency index = 0.9591) was detected among parsimony-informative SNPs, allowing for the generation of a highly accurate phylogenetic reconstruction of the CC398 clonal lineage. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that MSSA from humans formed the most ancestral clades. The most derived lineages were composed predominantly of livestock-associated MRSA possessing three different staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmec) types (IV, V, and VII-like) including nine subtypes. The human-associated isolates from the basal clades carried phages encoding human innate immune modulators that were largely missing among the livestock-associated isolates. Our results strongly suggest that livestock-associated MRSA CC398 originated in humans as MSSA. The lineage appears to have undergone a rapid radiation in conjunction with the jump from humans to livestock, where it subsequently acquired tetracycline and methicillin resistance. Further analyses are required to estimate the number of independent genetic events leading to the methicillin-resistant sublineages, but the diversity of SCCmec subtypes is suggestive of strong and diverse antimicrobial selection associated with food animal production. Modern food animal production is characterized by densely concentrated animals and routine antibiotic use, which may facilitate the emergence of novel antibiotic-resistant zoonotic pathogens. Our findings strongly support the idea

  12. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus emerged long before the introduction of methicillin into clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkins, Catriona P; Pichon, Bruno; Doumith, Michel

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The spread of drug-resistant bacterial pathogens poses a major threat to global health. It is widely recognised that the widespread use of antibiotics has generated selective pressures that have driven the emergence of resistant strains. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA...... at which this early MRSA lineage arose and when SCCmec was acquired. MRSA emerged in the mid-1940s, following the acquisition of an ancestral type I SCCmec element, some 14 years before the first therapeutic use of methicillin. CONCLUSIONS: Methicillin use was not the original driving factor...

  13. Presence of virulence factors in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium susceptible and resistant to vancomycin

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    Carolina Baldisserotto Comerlato

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing importance of Enterococcus as opportunistic pathogens, their virulence factors are still poorly understood. This study determines the frequency of virulence factors in clinical and commensal Enterococcus isolates from inpatients in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Fifty Enterococcus isolates were analysed and the presence of the gelE, asa1 and esp genes was determined. Gelatinase activity and biofilm formation were also tested. The clonal relationships among the isolates were evaluated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The asa1, gelE and esp genes were identified in 38%, 60% and 76% of all isolates, respectively. The first two genes were more prevalent in Enterococcus faecalis than in Enterococcus faecium, as was biofilm formation, which was associated with gelE and asa1 genes, but not with the esp gene. The presence of gelE and the activity of gelatinase were not fully concordant. No relationship was observed among any virulence factors and specific subclones of E. faecalis or E. faecium resistant to vancomycin. In conclusion, E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates showed significantly different patterns of virulence determinants. Neither the source of isolation nor the clonal relationship or vancomycin resistance influenced their distribution.

  14. The effect of antibiotic use on prevalence of nosocomial vancomycin-resistant enterococci- an ecologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remschmidt, Cornelius; Behnke, Michael; Kola, Axel; Peña Diaz, Luis A; Rohde, Anna M; Gastmeier, Petra; Schwab, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are among the most common antimicrobial-resistant pathogens causing nosocomial infections. Although antibiotic use has been identified as a risk factor for VRE, it remains unclear which antimicrobial agents particularly facilitate VRE selection. Here, we assessed whether use of specific antimicrobial agents is independently associated with healthcare-associated (HA) VRE rates in a university hospital setting in Berlin, Germany. We conducted the study between January 2014 and December 2015 at the Charité-university hospital of Berlin, Germany. From the hospital pharmacy, we extracted data for all antibacterials for systemic use (anatomical therapeutic chemical (ATC)-classification J01) and calculated ward specific antibiotic consumption in defined daily doses (DDDs) per 100 patient-days (PD). We used the microbiology laboratory database to identify all patients with isolation of invasive or non-invasive VRE and calculated HA-VRE incidence as nosocomial VRE-cases per 100 patients and HA-VRE incidence density as nosocomial VRE-cases per 1000 PD. We defined VRE isolates as hospital-acquired if they were identified three days or later after hospital admission and otherwise as community-acquired (CA-VRE). We performed univariable and multivariable regression analyses to estimate the association of the frequency of HA-VRE per month with antibiotic use and other parameters such as length of stay, type of ward or presence of at least one CA-VRE on ward. In a second analysis, we considered only patients with VRE infections. We included data from 204,054 patients with 948,380 PD from 61 wards. Overall, 1430 VRE-cases were identified of which 409 (28.6%) were considered hospital-acquired (HA). We found that carbapenem use in the current month and prior-month use of glycopeptides increased the risk for HA-VRE by 1% per 1 DDD/100 PD and 3% per 1 DDD/100 PD, respectively. However, when only VRE from clinical samples were considered, only

  15. The effect of antibiotic use on prevalence of nosocomial vancomycin-resistant enterococci- an ecologic study

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    Cornelius Remschmidt

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE are among the most common antimicrobial-resistant pathogens causing nosocomial infections. Although antibiotic use has been identified as a risk factor for VRE, it remains unclear which antimicrobial agents particularly facilitate VRE selection. Here, we assessed whether use of specific antimicrobial agents is independently associated with healthcare-associated (HA VRE rates in a university hospital setting in Berlin, Germany. Methods We conducted the study between January 2014 and December 2015 at the Charité-university hospital of Berlin, Germany. From the hospital pharmacy, we extracted data for all antibacterials for systemic use (anatomical therapeutic chemical (ATC-classification J01 and calculated ward specific antibiotic consumption in defined daily doses (DDDs per 100 patient-days (PD. We used the microbiology laboratory database to identify all patients with isolation of invasive or non-invasive VRE and calculated HA-VRE incidence as nosocomial VRE-cases per 100 patients and HA-VRE incidence density as nosocomial VRE-cases per 1000 PD. We defined VRE isolates as hospital-acquired if they were identified three days or later after hospital admission and otherwise as community-acquired (CA-VRE. We performed univariable and multivariable regression analyses to estimate the association of the frequency of HA-VRE per month with antibiotic use and other parameters such as length of stay, type of ward or presence of at least one CA-VRE on ward. In a second analysis, we considered only patients with VRE infections. Results We included data from 204,054 patients with 948,380 PD from 61 wards. Overall, 1430 VRE-cases were identified of which 409 (28.6% were considered hospital-acquired (HA. We found that carbapenem use in the current month and prior-month use of glycopeptides increased the risk for HA-VRE by 1% per 1 DDD/100 PD and 3% per 1 DDD/100 PD, respectively. However, when only VRE

  16. Complete genome sequence of Staphylococcus aureus strain M1, a unique t024-ST8-IVa Danish methicillin-resistant i>S.> aureus clone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larner-Svensson, Hanna; Worning, Peder; Bartels, Mette

    2013-01-01

    We report the genome sequence, in five contigs, of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolate designated M1. This clinical isolate was from the index patient of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak in Copenhagen, Denmark, that started in 2003. This strain is se...

  17. Synthetic analogs of anoplin show improved antimicrobial activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Jens; Uggerhøj, Lars Erik; Poulsen, Tanja Juul

    2013-01-01

    We present the antimicrobial and hemolytic activities of the decapeptide anoplin and 19 analogs thereof tested against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 33591 (MRSA), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (ATCC...... that increasing the charge and/or hydrophobicity improves antimicrobial activity and increases hemolytic activity. For each strain tested, we identify at least six anoplin analogs with an improved therapeutic index compared with anoplin, the only exception being Enterococcus faecium, against which only few...

  18. Detection of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Human and Animals in Basra Province / Iraq

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    Basil A. Abbas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available During the period from October 2010 to March 2011, two hundred eighty-five specimens were collected from AL-Basra province and surveyed for the occurrence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Depending on the source of collection, specimen was divided into 6 groups (124 samples of cow milk, 25 samples of cow nasal swabs, 56 samples of sheep nasal swabs, 20 samples of goat nasal swabs, 33 samples of human nasal swabs (obtained from nosocomial infection and 27 samples of environmental swabs. Totally, S. aureus were identified from 72 samples, these consisted of 35/72 (48.61% isolates from cow milk, 1/72 (1.38% isolate from cow nasal swabs, 7/72(9.72% isolates from sheep nasal swabs, 1/72 (1.38% isolate from goat nasal swabs, 19/72(26.38% isolates from human nasal swabs and 9/72(12.5% isolates from environmental swabs, depending on morphological, cultural, microscopical characterization and biochemical tests. The 72 S. aureus isolates showed variability in its susceptibility to 18 different antibiotics. In conclusion, this study investigated the presence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in animals and human samples.

  19. The Pleiotropic Antibacterial Mechanisms of Ursolic Acid against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Min Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Several triterpenoids were found to act synergistically with classes of antibiotic, indicating that plant-derived chemicals have potential to be used as therapeutics to enhance the activity of antibiotics against multidrug-resistant pathogens. However, the mode of action of triterpenoids against bacterial pathogens remains unclear. The objective of this study is to evaluate the interaction between ursolic acid against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; (2 Methods: The ability of ursolic acid to damage mammalian and bacterial membranes was examined. The proteomic response of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in ursolic acid treatment was investigated using two-dimensional (2D proteomic analysis; (3 Results: Ursolic acid caused the loss of staphylococcal membrane integrity without hemolytic activity. The comparison of the protein pattern of ursolic acid–treated and normal MRSA cells revealed that ursolic acid affected a variety of proteins involved in the translation process with translational accuracy, ribonuclease and chaperon subunits, glycolysis and oxidative responses; (4 Conclusion: The mode of action of ursolic acid appears to be the influence on the integrity of the bacterial membrane initially, followed by inhibition of protein synthesis and the metabolic pathway. These findings reflect that the pleiotropic effects of ursolic acid against MRSA make it a promising antibacterial agent in pharmaceutical research.

  20. Evidence based approach to the treatment of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Peppard

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available William J Peppard1, Anne Daniels1, Lynne Fehrenbacher2, Jamie Winner31Froedtert Hospital Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA; 2Aurora St Luke’s Medical Center Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA; 3Clement J Zablocki VA Medical Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USAAbstract: Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA infections have increased dramatically over the last two decades. The types of infections can range from complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSI to pneumonia and endocarditis. Oral antimicrobial therapy, such as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, clindamycin, long-acting tetracyclines, or linezolid may provide enhanced benefit to those with uncomplicated cutaneous lesions when used in conjunction with incision and drainage in an outpatient setting. However, resistance, susceptibilities, patient-specific circumstances, and adverse effects can impact a healthcare professional’s choice of antibiotics. In patients with complicated infections requiring hospitalization or parenteral treatment, vancomycin remains the drug of choice, even though increased resistance and decreased efficacy have crept into clinical practice. Linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, daptomycin, and tigecycline are alternative intravenous agents for the treatment of CA-MRSA. Investigational agents such as dalbavancin, telavancin, oritivancin, iclaprim, ceftobiprole, ceftaroline, and others may expand our therapeutic armamentarium for the treatment of infections caused by CA-MRSA in the future.Keywords: community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, CA-MRSA, complicated skin and skin structure infections, cSSSI, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, PVL, in vitro activity

  1. DAYA HAMBAT SARI TANAMAN OBAT TERHADAP PERTUMBUHAN BAKTERI STRAIN Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA

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    Dwi Hilda Putri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus infection can be treated with Methicilin, β lactam class of antibiotics that have drug targets in the cell wall. Bacteria S. aureus that is resistant to methicillin called methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. One alternative that can be used in strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that have this is to use medicinal plants. This study aimed to know the ability of medicinal plant extracts inhibit the growth of bacterial strains of MRSA. This kind of research is experimental research. Medicinal plants tested were Garlic, Turmeric, Aloe Vera, Daun Salam, Curcuma, Ginger, Betel Leaf and Alpinia galanga. As a control, which is used Amphicillin, β lactam antibiotic class. The method used to determine the diameter of inhibition area of medicinal plant extracts is paper diffusion method. The results showed that all medicinal plants can inhibit bacterial growth of MRSA strains characterized by the inhibition zone formed on each treatment. The ability of garlic and turmeric extract better than Amphicillin and other medicinal plants to inhibit bacterial growth of MRSA strains. Kata kunci: inhibit,  growth, bacteria, methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA

  2. [Antimicrobial spectrum of ceftaroline. In vitro activity against methicillin-resistant staphylococci].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercenado, Emilia; Morosini, María Isabel

    2014-03-01

    Because of the increase in bacterial resistance, there is a need for new antimicrobial agents. In particular, Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent cause of severe infections and has an extraordinary capacity to develop antibiotic multiresistance, including resistance to glycopeptides, linezolid, and daptomycin. Although the incidence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) seems to have stabilized in the last few years, its wide dissemination in healthcare settings and in the community is a cause of concern. Ceftaroline is a new broad-spectrum cephalosporin with bactericidal activity against Gram-positive bacteria, including MRSA and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. In addition, this drug is active against staphylococci showing resistance to glycopeptides, linezolid, and daptomycin. The ceftaroline MIC90 against MRSA ranges from 0.5-2mg/L and that against methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci is 0.5mg/L. Ceftaroline has also good activity against respiratory pathogens including Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis. Although this drug is active against Enterobacteriaceae, it does not retain activity when these isolates produce extended-spectrum beta-lactamases, carbapenemases or hyperproduce AmpC. Ceftaroline is not active against nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli. Ceftaroline is an interesting addition to the therapeutic armamentarium against MRSA and constitutes an important option for the treatment of polymicrobial infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-positive microorganisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Detection of methicillin resistant and toxin-associated genes in Staphylococcus aureus

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    Cajethan Ezeamagu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a problem in both healthcare institutions and community settings. This is due to its multi-drug resistant challenges. Hence, this study assessed the prevalence of methicillin resistant gene (mecA, exfoliative toxin (eta and etb and toxic shock syndrome (tsst-1 genes in S. aureus isolated from clinical samples. A total of 120 clinical samples of patients (urine, high vagina swab (HVS, semen, wound swab, sputum and urethral swab from a hospital laboratory were obtained. S. aureus was isolated and then identified with API-staph kit. Antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates was determined by agar diffusion while PCR was used to detect the presence of mecA and toxin-associated genes. Fifty S. aureus isolates were obtained at frequencies of 26(52%, 12(24%, 4(8%, 3(6%, 3(6% and 2(4% from the HVS, urine, semen, wound, sputum and urethral swab samples respectively. All the isolates of S. aureus were resistant to the antibiotics used in this study. MecA, tsst-1, eta and etb were detected in 19(38%, 7(14%, 3(6% and 2(4% of the isolates respectively. The prevalence of MRSA and its resistance pattern observed in this study was a signal that the health-care workers and the general public are at risk.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) at ambient freshwater beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Lisa R.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Johnson, Heather E.; Brennan, Angela K.; Isaacs, Natasha M.; Spencer, Chelsea

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are a threat to human health worldwide, and although detected at marine beaches, they have been largely unstudied at freshwater beaches. Genes indicating S. aureus (SA; femA) and methicillin resistance (mecA) were detected at 11 and 12 of 13 US Great Lakes beaches and in 18% or 27% of 287 recreational water samples, respectively. Eight beaches had mecA + femA (potential MRSA) detections. During an intensive study, higher bather numbers, staphylococci concentrations, and femA detections were found in samples collected after noon than before noon. Local population density, beach cloud cover, and beach wave height were significantly correlated with SA or MRSA detection frequency. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene, associated with community-acquired MRSA, was detected in 12 out of 27 potential MRSA samples. The femA gene was detected less frequently at beaches that met US enterococci criteria or EU enterococci ‘excellent’ recreational water quality, but was not related to Escherichia coli-defined criteria. Escherichia coli is often the only indicator used to determine water quality at US beaches, given the economic and healthcare burden that can be associated with infections caused by SA and MRSA, monitoring of recreational waters for non-fecal bacteria such as staphylococci and/or SA may be warranted.

  5. Frequency and treatment of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in obstetric and gynaecological sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Iffat Javed; Khan, Saba; Butt, Sobia; Bhutta, Shereen

    2013-10-01

    To perform culture and sensitivity for pathogens causing puerperal and postoperative wound sepsis and determine the frequency of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in such infections. Observational study. Obstetrics and Gynaecology Ward, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from December 2008 to May 2010. All patients presenting with puerperal sepsis or postoperative wound infection were enrolled. Pus was collected for culture and sensitivity using standard technique. Two samples were taken from each patient; one before starting the treatment and one at the end of treatment. Ames transport medium was used. Empirical treatment with triple regimen (Ampicillin, Metronidazole and Gentamicin) was started immediately to cover Gram positive as well as negative bacteria in addition to anaerobic infection. After receiving the sensitivity report, antimicrobial agent were changed accordingly. Samples from ward and theater staff and environment were also taken to look for possible mode of transmission. Data was recorded on a proforma. Discrete variables are expressed as percentages. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent organism isolated in 34.6% cases. Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus was seen in 20% cases and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was seen in 14.6%. Out of these 14.6% MRSA, (17) 77% was associated with puerperal sepsis and rest (5) 23% was associated with postoperative wound infection. It showed best sensitivity to vancomycin. Staphylococcus aureus and E. coli were common causative agent of postoperative infections and puerperal sepsis.

  6. The changing face of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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    P Kale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is an important cause of infection, both in hospitalised patients with significant healthcare exposure and in patients without healthcare risk factors. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA are known for their rapid community transmission and propensity to cause aggressive skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired pneumonia. The distinction between the healthcare-associated (HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA is gradually fading owing to the acquisition of multiple virulence factors and genetic elements. The movement of CA-MRSA strains into the nosocomial setting limits the utility of using clinical risk factors alone to designate community or HA status. Identification of unique genetic characteristics and genotyping are valuable tools for MRSA epidemiological studies. Although the optimum pharmacotherapy for CA-MRSA infections has not been determined, many CA-MRSA strains remain broadly susceptible to several non-β-lactam antibacterial agents. This review aimed at illuminating the characteristic features of CA-MRSA, virulence factors, changing clinical settings and molecular epidemiology, insurgence into the hospital settings and therapy with drug resistance.

  7. [Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus methicillin-resistant (MRSA) among health care workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenga, C; Foti, M; Daidone, A; Sturniolo, G; Maviglia, P; Di Nola, C; Polito, I; Mondello, P

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) is a type of Staphylococcus that is resistant to certain antibiotics. These antibiotics include methicillin and other more common antibiotics such as oxacillin, penicillin and amoxicillin. Staphylococcus infections, including MRSA, occur most frequently among persons in hospitals and healthcare facilities. The present study was performed to investigate the in vitro activity of oxacillin and other antimicrobial agents against S. aureus strains obtained from nursing personnel. The study included 56 hospital personnel of Universitary Policlinic of Messina. S. aureus strain was isolated in 14 samples (25%); resistent patterns have been studied and results have demonstrated: none methicillin resistant, while 14% oxacillin and tetraciclin resistant. The incidence of methicillin sensitive was 100%, while 86% proved to be sensitive to oxacillin and tetraciclin. In conclusion, the usually hygienic methods (disposable gowns, hygienic hand disinfection after each patients contact, masks use when is a risk of aerosolization of MRSA) are indicate for significantly reducing of these strains. Continuing education programmes can help to increase awareness among hospital staff.

  8. Daptomycin approved in Japan for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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    Mori T

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Mao Hagihara1, Takumi Umemura1, Takeshi Mori1,2, Hiroshige Mikamo11Department of Infection Control and Prevention, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi, Japan; 2Division of Pharmaceutical Science, Faculty of Pharmacy, Meijo University, Nagoya, Aichi, JapanAbstract: Daptomycin is a lipoglycopeptide antibacterial drug that is rapidly bactericidal for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection and has antibiotic activity against a wide range of Gram-positive organisms. It has been approved by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare in Japan for the treatment for bacteremia, right-sided endocarditis, and skin and skin-structure infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, due to MRSA on the basis of a Phase III trial conducted in Japan since July, 2011. In Japanese Phase I and III trials, daptomycin therapy given at 4 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg once per day was well tolerated and effective as standard therapy for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections and bacteremia caused by MRSA, but side effects remain to be evaluated in large-scale trials.Keywords: daptomycin, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, Japan

  9. The Pleiotropic Antibacterial Mechanisms of Ursolic Acid against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Min; Jhan, Yun-Lian; Tsai, Shang-Jie; Chou, Chang-Hung

    2016-07-07

    (1) BACKGROUND: Several triterpenoids were found to act synergistically with classes of antibiotic, indicating that plant-derived chemicals have potential to be used as therapeutics to enhance the activity of antibiotics against multidrug-resistant pathogens. However, the mode of action of triterpenoids against bacterial pathogens remains unclear. The objective of this study is to evaluate the interaction between ursolic acid against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); (2) METHODS: The ability of ursolic acid to damage mammalian and bacterial membranes was examined. The proteomic response of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in ursolic acid treatment was investigated using two-dimensional (2D) proteomic analysis; (3) RESULTS: Ursolic acid caused the loss of staphylococcal membrane integrity without hemolytic activity. The comparison of the protein pattern of ursolic acid-treated and normal MRSA cells revealed that ursolic acid affected a variety of proteins involved in the translation process with translational accuracy, ribonuclease and chaperon subunits, glycolysis and oxidative responses; (4) CONCLUSION: The mode of action of ursolic acid appears to be the influence on the integrity of the bacterial membrane initially, followed by inhibition of protein synthesis and the metabolic pathway. These findings reflect that the pleiotropic effects of ursolic acid against MRSA make it a promising antibacterial agent in pharmaceutical research.

  10. PARTIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A LYTIC METHICILLIN RESISTANT-STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS BACTERIOPHAGE

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    Sulaiman Al-Yousef

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A marked increase in the infection incidence caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains has been noted in medical practice in recent years. This study was conducted to study the biological and characterize of MRSA-phage. Methicillin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus was detected and confirmed by determining of the MIC of oxacillin by the standard agar dilution method. Phage was biologically purified using single plaque technique, then phage characterization were studied using host range, adsorption time, particle morphology and its structural protein. MRSA phage showing lytic nature was purified by repeated plating after picking of single isolated plaques. This phage is active against all 11 isolates either of S. aureus or MRSA tested as hosts. Phage produced clear plaques indicating their lytic nature. This phage was concentrated employing polyethylene glycol (PEG-NaCl precipitation method. Morphologically, MRSA Phage has a hexagonal head having a long non-contractile tail, indicating his icosahedral nature. Adsorption studies showed 100% adsorption of MRSA-Phage after 35 minutes of exposure. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE experimentation indicated that the phage particles contain one major structural protein (about 30 Kda.

  11. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using the NanoLantern Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohsahl, Christopher M.; Miller, Benjamin L.; Krauss, Todd D.

    2009-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of human illness, and has developed the remarkable ability to resist the bactericidal capabilities of many of the world's leading antibiotics (i.e. MRSA). In an effort to enable rapid detection and treatment of MRSA infections, we have developed a DNA detection technology termed the NanoLantern(TM). The NanoLantern(TM) biosensor technology is based on the simple immobilization of a fluorophore-terminated DNA hairpin onto a gold chip. This produces a label-free sensor that allows for a positive response to be obtained without extensive processing of the sample, saving cost and increasing accuracy. We will also discuss a newly developed method of partial gene analysis, used to develop a DNA hairpin probe that is capable of detecting the presence of the mecR gene, a gene necessary for methicillin resistance to be present in S. aureus, with 100% sequence specificity. The successful incorporation of this probe into the NanoLantern(TM) platform, along with the concomitant development of the paired PCR assay has allowed for the successful detection of methicillin-resistance directly from a culture of S. aureus. These results represent an important step forward in terms of developing the ability to rapidly and effectively detect the presence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial infections.

  12. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius with commercially available selective media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, C; Mueller, R S; Straubinger, R K; Werckenthin, C

    2012-01-01

    Commercially available selective media for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were tested for the detection and isolation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP). Five different screening agars [mannitol salt agar with oxacillin and BD BBL™ Chromagar™ MRSA (BD Diagnostics); chromID™ MRSA agar (bioMérieux); Oxacillin resistance screening agar base (ORSAB); and Brilliance MRSA agar (Oxoid)] were analysed for the detection of MRSP. Bacteria that may be isolated together with MRSP and may grow on the screening agars were included in the study to determine possible interference with the growth of MRSP. MRSP grew well on all selective media except on BD BBL™ Chromagar™ MRSA (BD Diagnostics) and chromID™ MRSA agar (bioMérieux), on which a low to moderate growth rate was noted. ORSAB (Oxoid) and Brilliance MRSA agar (Oxoid) are most suitable for the detection and isolation of MRSP from clinical material. The importance of MRSP in veterinary medicine is increasing. Diagnostic systems are needed to detect MRSP carrier as soon as possible. This study provides information about selected MRSA screening agars for the detection of MRSP to the clinical microbiologists. © 2011 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Marinopyrrole Derivatives as Potential Antibiotic Agents against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongshi Li

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA continues to be a major problem, causing severe and intractable infections worldwide. MRSA is resistant to all beta-lactam antibiotics, and alternative treatments are limited. A very limited number of new antibiotics have been discovered over the last half-century, novel agents for the treatment of MRSA infections are urgently needed. Marinopyrrole A was reported to show antibiotic activity against MRSA in 2008. After we reported the first total synthesis of (±-marinopyrrole A, we designed and synthesized a series of marinopyrrole derivatives. Our structure activity relationship (SAR studies of these novel derivatives against a panel of Gram-positive pathogens in antibacterial assays have revealed that a para-trifluoromethyl analog (33 of marinopyrrole A is ≥63-, 8-, and 4-fold more potent than vancomycin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE, methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA, respectively. The results provide valuable information in the search for new-generation antibiotics.

  14. High-level gentamicin resistance and vancomycin resistance in clinical isolates of enterococci in a tertiary care hospital in eastern Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepal, H P; Khanal, B; Acharya, A; Gyawali, N; Jha, P K; Paudel, R

    2012-03-01

    High-level gentamicin resistance and vancomycin resistance in enterococci, a family of important opportunistic pathogens, have emerged as a significant clinical problem over recent years. The present study was conducted to determine the high-level gentamicin and vancomycin resistance among the clinical isolates of enterococci. A total of 110 phenotypically identified enterococcal isolates were subjected to determination of high-level gentamicin resistance (by disk diffusion and agar dilution methods) and vancomycin resistance (by agar screening and agar dilution methods). About 36% of the isolates were found to have high-level gentamicin resistance, which indicates that gentamicin no longer remains an appropriate choice for inclusion in combination therapy with cell wall-active agents. Ten percent isolates exhibited resisance to vancomycin during screening. However, agar dilution confirmed that the isolates did not have resistance to vancomycin but had reduced susceptibility to it, which indicates their impending emergence of resistance to vancomycin.

  15. In vitro transfer of methicillin resistance determinants mecA from methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitrus, Asinamai Athliamai; Zunita, Zakaria; Bejo, Siti Khairani; Othman, Sarah; Nadzir, Nur Adilah Ahmad

    2017-04-04

    Staphylococcus aureus more than any other human pathogen is a better model for the study of the adaptive evolution of bacterial resistance to antibiotics, as it has demonstrated a remarkable ability in its response to new antibiotics. This study was designed to investigate the in vitro transfer of mecA gene from methicillin resistant S. aureus to methicillin susceptible S. aureus. The recipient transconjugants were resistant to erythromycin, cefpodoxime and were mecA positive. PCR amplification of mecA after mix culture plating on Luria Bertani agar containing 100 μg/mL showed that 75% of the donor and 58.3% of the recipient transconjugants were mecA positive. Additionally, 61.5% of both the donor cells and recipient transconjugants were mecA positive, while 46.2% and 41.75% of both donor and recipient transconjugants were mecA positive on LB agar containing 50 μg/mL and 30 μg/mL respectively. In this study, the direction of transfer of phenotypic resistance as well as mecA was observed to have occurred from the donor to the recipient strains. This study affirmed the importance of horizontal transfer events in the dissemination of antibiotics resistance among different strains of MRSA.

  16. Seven-year experience with a surveillance program to reduce methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Mary Lucia; Eichenwald, Eric C; Puopolo, Karen M

    2009-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence rates of neonatal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection after the implementation of a NICU methicillin-resistant S aureus surveillance and isolation program and to describe the characteristics of infants with methicillin-resistant S aureus colonization and invasive disease. From August 2000 through August 2007, all infants admitted to the study NICU were screened for methicillin-resistant S aureus colonization with weekly nasal/rectal swabs; colonized or infected infants were isolated and cared for as a cohort. The annual incidence rates of methicillin-resistant S aureus colonization and infection were monitored, and characteristics of methicillin-resistant S aureus-colonized and -infected infants were compared. Data were collected from infant, maternal, and hospital laboratory records. During the study period, 7997 infants were admitted to the NICU and 102 methicillin-resistant S aureus-colonized or -infected infants (1.3%) were identified. The incidence of methicillin-resistant S aureus decreased progressively from 1.79 cases per 1000 patient-days in 2000 to 0.15 cases per 1000 patient-days in 2005, but the incidence then increased to 1.26 cases per 1000 patient-days in 2007. Fifteen of the 102 case infants (14.7%) had invasive infections; no significant differences between infected and colonized infants were identified. Methicillin-resistant S aureus isolates with 14 different antibiograms were found during the study period. There was a shift from isolates predominantly likely to be hospital-associated in 2000-2004 to those likely to be community-associated in 2006-2007. A continuous program of weekly methicillin-resistant S aureus surveillance cultures and isolation of affected infants was associated with a variable incidence of methicillin-resistant S aureus colonization over a 7-year study period. Methicillin-resistant S aureus was not eradicated from this tertiary

  17. Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) isolates of swine origin form robust biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization of livestock animals is common and prevalence rates for pigs have been reported to be as high as 49%. One hypothesis to explain the high prevalence of MRSA in swine herds is the ability of these organisms to exist as biofilms. To invest...

  18. Replacement of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clones in Hungary over time : a 10-year surveillance study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conceicao, T.; Aires-de-Sousa, M.; Fuzi, M.; Toth, A.; Paszti, J.; Ungvari, E.; van Leeuwen, W. B.; van Belkum, A.; Grundmann, H.; de Lencastre, H.

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Hungary has been increasing and is now close to 20% among invasive isolates of S. aureus. In order to understand the evolution of MRSA in Hungary, two collections of isolates were studied: 22 representatives of a collection of

  19. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections in Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Case Series

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    R Sztramko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of the present study was to describe the clinical characteristics and management of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA infections among a cohort of men who have sex with men.

  20. What’s in a Name? Is Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Just Another S aureus When Treated with Vancomycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    aureus When Treated With Vancomycin? Albert T. McManus, PhD; Arthur D. Mason, Jr, MD; William F. McManus, MD; Basil A. Pruitt, Jr, MD 9 Msethicllln...sensitivity. Methicillin-resistant SA strains were isolated 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 from 319 of the colonized patients. A comparison of the antibi

  1. Rapid detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus isolates by the MRSA-screen latex agglutination test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.B. van Leeuwen (Willem); C. van Pelt (Cindy); A. Luijendijk (Ad); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); W.H.F. Goessens (Wil)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe slide agglutination test MRSA-Screen (Denka Seiken Co., Niigata, Japan) was compared with the mecA PCR ("gold standard") for the detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. The MRSA-Screen test detected the penicillin-binding protein 2a

  2. A timescale for evolution, population expansion, and spatial spread of an emerging clone of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nübel, Ulrich; Dordel, Janina; Kurt, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    or antibiotic resistance, together with the forces driving pathogen spread. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common cause of hospital-acquired infections. We have investigated an MRSA strain (ST225) that is highly prevalent in hospitals in Central Europe. By using mutation discovery...

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strain LC33 Isolated from Human Breast Milk

    OpenAIRE

    de Almeida, J?ssica B.; de Carvalho, Suzi P.; de Freitas, Leandro M.; Guimar?es, Ana Marcia S.; do Nascimento, Na?la C.; dos Santos, Andrea P.; Messick, Joanne B.; Timenetsky, Jorge; Marques, Lucas M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Staphylococcus aureus strain LC33, isolated from human breast milk in Brazil. This microorganism has been typed as ST1/t127/sccmecV. To our knowledge, this is the first draft genome sequence of a methicillin-resistant S.?aureus strain isolated from human breast milk.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strain LC33 Isolated from Human Breast Milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Jéssica B.; de Carvalho, Suzi P.; de Freitas, Leandro M.; Guimarães, Ana Marcia S.; do Nascimento, Naíla C.; dos Santos, Andrea P.; Messick, Joanne B.; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Staphylococcus aureus strain LC33, isolated from human breast milk in Brazil. This microorganism has been typed as ST1/t127/sccmecV. To our knowledge, this is the first draft genome sequence of a methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain isolated from human breast milk. PMID:28408673

  5. Evaluation of a modular multiplex-PCR methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus detection assay adapted for mecC detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, Karsten; Larsen, Anders R; Skov, Robert L; Paterson, Gavin K; Holmes, Mark A; Sabat, Artur J; Friedrich, Alexander W; Köck, Robin; Peters, Georg; Kriegeskorte, André

    A mecC (mecA(LGA251))-adapted multiplex PCR-based methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) detection assay was evaluated using an international, spa-typed Staphylococcus aureus collection comprising 51 mecC-positive MRSA, 240 mecA-positive MRSA, and 50 mecA-and mecC-negative

  6. Cost-effectiveness of strategies to prevent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission and infection in an intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Gidengil, CA; Gay, C; Huang, SS; Platt, R; Yokoe, D; Lee, GM

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved. Objective. Tocreateanationalpolicymodeltoevaluatetheprojectedcost-effectivenessofmultiplehospital-basedstrategiestoprevent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission and infection Design. Cost-effectiveness analysis using a Markov microsimulation model that simulates the natural history of MRSA acquisition and infection Patients and Setting. Hypothetical cohort of 10,000 adult patients admi...

  7. Introduction of plasmid DNA into an ST398 livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRS926 is a livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain of sequence type (ST) 398. In order to facilitate in vitro and in vivo studies of this strain, we sought to tag it with a fluorescent marker. We cloned a codon-optimized gene for TurboGFP into a shuttle vector...

  8. Nasal Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage among college student athletes in northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Kai Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Of 259 college students in northern Taiwan surveyed, nasal carriage rate of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA was 22.4% and 1.54%, respectively and no significant difference was found between athlete students and non-athlete students. Three of four MRSA isolates belonged to sequence type 59, the endemic community clone.

  9. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Pediatric Emergency Department in Newfoundland and Labrador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Peebles

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: First-generation cephalosporins and antistaphylococcal penicillins are typically the first choice for treating skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI, but are not effective for infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. It is currently unclear what percentage of SSTIs is caused by community-associated MRSA in different regions in Canada.

  10. Microbiological evaluation of a new growth-based approach for rapid detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Eiff, Christof; Maas, Dominik; Sander, Gunnar; Friedrich, Alexander W; Peters, Georg; Becker, Karsten

    OBJECTIVES: Recently, a rapid screening tool for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been introduced that applies a novel detection technology allowing the rapid presence or absence of MRSA to be determined from an enrichment broth after only a few hours of incubation. To evaluate

  11. [Activity of vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid in methicillin resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci isolates from paediatric blood cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo Olivares, Miguel; Hidalgo Orozco, Rocío; Rodríguez Garrido, Saray; Gaona Álvarez, Cristina; Sánchez Silos, Rosa María; Hernández Rastrollo, Ramón; Martínez Tallo, Emilia; Cordero Carrasco, Juan Luis

    2012-03-01

    Coagulase-negative-Staphylococci (CNS) are the major cause of bacteraemia and sepsis in newborns. CNS methicillin resistance and its loss of sensitivity to glycopeptide antibiotics, make treatment significantly more difficult in positive cocci infections. To study MIC vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid in different species of CNS methicillin resistant isolates from blood cultures from paediatric patients. Clinically relevant CNS methicillin resistant isolates from paediatric blood cultures from different hospitalization wards were tested. The isolates were identified by biochemical tests by means in the Combo panels 31 of MicroScan (Dade Behring, Siemens). Resistance to oxacillin and susceptibility to vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid were tested by microdilution panels as cited above. We also tested teicoplanin and linezolid sensitivity using Etest. 50 methicillin resistant strains were isolated: 37 (74%)S. epidermidis, 7 (14%) S. hominis, 4 (8%) S. haemolyticus and 2 (4%) Staphylococcus spp. 26 strains were observed with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin MIC = 2 mg/L, (22 S. epidermidis, 2 S. haemolyticus and 2 Staphylococcus spp.) and 21 strains with loss of susceptibility to teicoplanin, MIC = 4-16 mg/L (20 S. epidermidis and 1 S. haemolyticus). No CNS linezolid resistant was found. There is a linear correlation between increased vancomycin MIC and teicoplanin MIC. There is a statistically significant difference (p teicoplanin in the vancomycin group = 2 mg/L with respect to the vancomycin group ≤ 1 mg/L. We also observed very low levels of linezolid MIC for all strains.

  12. Evaluation of four selective agars and two enrichment broths in screening for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böcher, S; Smyth, R; Kahlmeter, G; Kerremans, J; Vos, M C; Skov, R

    2008-09-01

    To evaluate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus detection, we tested in vitro four selective agars and two enrichment broths apart and in combination. Tryptone soya broth with salt, aztreonam, and cefoxitin appeared to be the most sensitive medium. This broth was superior to a phenol red mannitol broth with aztreonam and ceftizoxime.

  13. Predischarge postpartum methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection and group B streptococcus carriage at the individual and hospital levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parriott, Andrea M.; Brown, Joelle M.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2014-01-01

    We sought to characterize the relationship between individual group B streptococcus (GBS) colonization and pre-discharge postpartum methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in United States women delivering at term. We also sought to examine the association between hospital GBS

  14. Prospective Study of Infection, Colonization and Carriage of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in an Outbreak Affecting 990 Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Coello; J. Jimenez (Jose); M. Garcia (Melissa); P. Arroyo; D. Minguez; C. Fernandez; F. Cruzet; C. Gaspar

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn the three years between November 1989 and October 1992, an outbreak of methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA) affected 990 patients at a university hospital. The distribution of patients with carriage, colonization or infection was investigated prospectively. Nosocomial

  15. Use of quinupristin/dalfopristin in a critical patient with a methicillin-resistant Staphilococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, E; Viscidi, D; Servillo, G; Pezza, M; Piazza, O; Giuliano, C A; Tufano, R

    2004-10-01

    The growing incidence of infections due to Gram-positive multiresistant germs has stimulated research into new drugs endowed with broader activity, that are useful in case of infections unresponsive to common antibiotics. The case of a 28-year-old man infected with a methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus non responder to therapy with glycopeptide antibiotics is reported. At admission the patient presented a septic condition and required mechanical ventilation. Antibiotic therapy was immediately started with teicoplanin+meropenem. Blood culture and bronchial aspirate evidenced a methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus with high sensibility to glycopeptide antibiotics. Although this therapy produced a slight improvement in clinical condition and the patient was extubated, fever and leucocytosis associated with a BAL positive to methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, in vitro susceptible to glycopeptides, persisted. Considering the possibility of a non-responder condition of the patient to glycopeptide antibiotics, quinupristin/dalfopristin was added. The streptogramin produced a quick improvement in clinical condition with resolution of sepsis and culture sterilization. The patient improved progressively and was discharged. In conclusion, in our experience the association quinupristin/dalfopristin was effective in the resolution of a critical methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection non responder to classical treatment with glycopeptide antibiotics that showed a high sensibility in vitro.

  16. The value of nasal mupirocin in containing an outbreak of methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an orthopaedic unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.P. Barrett

    1990-01-01

    textabstractAn outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) occurred in two adjacent orthopaedic wards following the admission of a known carrier. The outbreak was not contained by ward closure or by standard infection control measures. Eventually several nasal carriers were

  17. Vancomycin-heteroresistant phenotype in invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates belonging to spa type 041

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monaco, M.; Sanchini, A.; Grundmann, H.; Pantosti, A.

    The aim of this study was to characterise invasive methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains from Italy and to investigate the presence of heteroresistant vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (h-VISA). Eighty-two MSSA and 66 MRSA strains

  18. Evidence for Human Adaptation and Foodborne Transmission of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper; Stegger, Marc; Andersen, Paal S.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the evolution and epidemiology of a novel live-stock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain, which colonizes and infects urban-dwelling Danes even without a Danish animal reservoir. Genetic evidence suggests both poultry and human adaptation, with poultry meat...

  19. Prospective Two-Center Comparison of Three Chromogenic Agars for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Screening in Hospitalized Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dodémont, Magali; Verhulst, Carlo; Nonhoff, Claire; Nagant, Carole; Denis, Olivier; Kluytmans, Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323262139

    Three chromogenic media, chromID MRSA SMART (SMART), chromID MRSA first generation (chromID), and Brilliance MRSA (OX2), were evaluated for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening using 1,220 samples. The sensitivity at 24 h was significantly better with the SMART agar (66.4%)

  20. Prevalence and molecular characteristics of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in organic pig herds in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bondt, N.; Vijver, van de L.P.L.; Tulinski, P.; Mevius, D.; Verwer, C.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among conventional pig herds in the Netherlands is high (around 71%). Nevertheless, information about the prevalence of MRSA among organic pig herds is lacking. Here, we report a study on 24 of the 49 organic pig herds in the

  1. Transmission and persistence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among veterinarians and their household members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, T; Verkade, E; van Luit, M; Landman, F; Kluytmans, J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323262139; Schouls, L M

    After the first isolation of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) in 2003, this MRSA variant quickly became the predominant MRSA obtained from humans as part of the Dutch national MRSA surveillance. Previous studies have suggested that human-to-human

  2. Prevalence and genotypic relatedness of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B A Fomda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is the most common multidrug-resistant pathogen causing nosocomial infections across the world. MRSA is not only associated with significant mortality and morbidity but also places a large economic strain on our health care system. MRSA isolates are also typically resistant to multiple, non-β-lactam antibiotics. We conducted a prospective study in a tertiary care hospital, to determine the prevalence of MRSA and to establish the clonal distribution of MRSA isolates recovered from various clinical specimens. Materials and Methods: Clinical samples were cultured and S. aureus was identified as per standard microbiological procedures. Susceptibility testing was done by agar disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC method as recommended by CLSI. Methicillin resistance was detected by phenotypic methods namely, oxacillin disc diffusion (ODD, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of oxacillin, cefoxitin disk diffusion (CDD, and MIC of cefoxitin. Amplification of mecA gene by PCR was used as gold standard for detection of methicillin resistance. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE typing was performed for MRSA isolates. Results: Out of 390 S. aureus isolates, 154 (39.48% isolates were MRSA and 236 (60.51% isolates were MSSA. Penicillin was the least effective antibacterial drug against the hospital associated S. aureus isolates with 85.64% resistance rate. All the isolates were susceptible to vancomycin. The MRSA showed a high level of resistance to all antimicrobials in general in comparison to the MSSA and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05. Multiplex PCR performed for all strains showed amplification of both the mecA and nucA genes in MRSA strains whereas MSSA strains showed amplification of only nucA gene. PFGE of these isolates showed 10 different patterns. Conclusion: Prevalence of MRSA in our hospital was 39.48%. Most of these isolates were

  3. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevalence: Current susceptibility patterns in Trinidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Land Michael

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has become one of the most widespread causes of nosocomial infections worldwide. Recently, reports have emerged that S. aureus strains recovered from community-acquired infections are also methicillin-resistant. This study was undertaken to analyze the prevalence of methicillin resistance among isolates at a regional hospital in Trinidad, and document the current resistance profile of MRSA and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA to the commonly used anti-staphylococcal agents. Methods Over a 6-year period we analyzed 2430 isolates of S. aureus strains recovered from various clinical sources, from hospital and community practices. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done according to guideline recommendations of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. Results The prevalence of MRSA from surgical/burn wounds, urine and pus/abscess were 60.1%, 15.5% and 6.6%, respectively. The major sources of MSSA were surgical/burn wounds, pus/abscess and upper respiratory tract specimens with rates of 32.9%, 17.1% and 14.3%, respectively. The greatest prevalence of resistance of MRSA was seen for erythromycin (86.7%, and clindamycin (75.3%. Resistance rates among MSSA were highest for ampicillin (70%. Resistance rates for tetracycline were similar among both MRSA (78.7% and MSSA (73.5%. The MRSA recovery rates from nosocomial sources (20.8% was significantly higher than that of previous years (12.5% (p Conclusion The prevalence of MRSA in the hospital increased from 12.5% in 1999 to 20.8% in 2004. Most isolates were associated with infected surgical/burn wounds which may have become infected via the hands of HCPs during dressing exercises. Infection control measures aimed at the proper hand hygiene procedures may interrupt the spread of MRSA. HCPs may also be carriers of MRSA in their anterior nares. Surveillance cultures of both patients and HCPs may help

  4. Characterization of methicillin-resistant and -susceptible staphylococcal isolates from bovine milk in northwestern china.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longping Li

    Full Text Available Emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CoNS in bovine milk is a major public health concern. The primary purpose of this research was to determine molecular genetic characteristics and antibiotic resistance of staphylococcal isolates recovered from milk of mastitic cows in the Shaanxi Province in Northwestern China. One hundred and thirteen methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA, one mecA-positive and phenotype-positive MRSA, seven mecA- and mecC- negative but phenotype-positive MRSA and two MR-CoNS including one oxacillin-susceptible mecA-positive Staphylococcus haemolyticus (OS-MRSH and one mecA-positive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE isolates were recovered from 214 quarter milk samples on 4 dairy farms. All above 123 isolates were subjected to antibiotic resistance profiling. S. aureus isolates were also genotyped using the spa typing and the multilocus sequence typing (MLST. Eight MRSA and 2 MR-CoNS isolates were additionally tested for SCCmec types. Resistance was common among isolates against ampicillin or penicillin (80.5%, kanamycin (68.3%, gentamicin (67.5%, tetracycline (43.9% and chloramphenicol (30.1%. However, no isolate was resistant to vancomycin or teicoplanin. Twenty, 29 and 58 isolates showed resistance to 1, 2 or more than 2 antibiotics, respectively. The predominant multidrug resistance profile was penicillin/ampicillin/kanamycin/gentamicin/tetracycline (46 isolates. Most S. aureus isolates belonged to spa types t524 (n = 63, t11772 (a new type, n = 31 and t4207 (n = 15. At the same time, MLST types ST71 (n = 67 and ST2738 (a new type, n = 45 were identified as dominant sequence types. The mecA-positive and phenotype-positive MRSA isolate had a composite genotype t524-ST71-SCCmecIVa, while 7 mecA-negative but phenotype-positive MRSA isolates were all t524-ST71. The OS-MRSH isolate contained a type V

  5. Identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus using an integrated and modular microfluidic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Soper, Steven A

    2013-02-21

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of hospital-acquired (HA-MRSA) infection worldwide. As a result, the rapid and specific detection of MRSA is crucial not only for early prevention of disease spread, but also for the effective treatment of these infections. We report here an integrated modular-based microfluidic system for MRSA identification, which can carry out the multi-step assay used for MRSA identification in a single disposable fluidic cartridge. The multi-step assay included PCR amplification of the mecA gene harboring methicillin resistance loci that can provide information on drug susceptibility, ligase detection reaction (LDR) to generate fluorescent ligation products appended with a zip-code complement that directs the ligation product to a particular address on a universal array containing zip-code probes and a universal DNA array, which consisted of a planar waveguide for evanescent excitation. The fluidic cartridge design was based on a modular format, in which certain steps of the molecular processing pipeline were poised on a module made from a thermoplastic. The cartridge was comprised of a module interconnected to a fluidic motherboard configured in a 3-dimensional network; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and was used for PCR and LDR, while the module was made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA, and contained an air-embedded waveguide serving as the support for the universal array. Fluid handling, thermal management and optical readout hardware were situated off-chip and configured into a small footprint instrument. In this work, the cartridge was used to carry out a multiplexed PCR/LDR coupled with the universal array allowed for simultaneous detection of five genes that encode for 16S ribosomal RNA (SG16S), protein A (spa), the femA protein of S. epidermidis (femA), the virulence factor of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and the gene that confers methicillin resistance (mecA). Results

  6. Methicillin resistance alters the biofilm phenotype and attenuates virulence in Staphylococcus aureus device-associated infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Pozzi

    Full Text Available Clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus can express biofilm phenotypes promoted by the major cell wall autolysin and the fibronectin-binding proteins or the icaADBC-encoded polysaccharide intercellular adhesin/poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PIA/PNAG. Biofilm production in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA strains is typically dependent on PIA/PNAG whereas methicillin-resistant isolates express an Atl/FnBP-mediated biofilm phenotype suggesting a relationship between susceptibility to β-lactam antibiotics and biofilm. By introducing the methicillin resistance gene mecA into the PNAG-producing laboratory strain 8325-4 we generated a heterogeneously resistant (HeR strain, from which a homogeneous, high-level resistant (HoR derivative was isolated following exposure to oxacillin. The HoR phenotype was associated with a R₆₀₂H substitution in the DHHA1 domain of GdpP, a recently identified c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase with roles in resistance/tolerance to β-lactam antibiotics and cell envelope stress. Transcription of icaADBC and PNAG production were impaired in the 8325-4 HoR derivative, which instead produced a proteinaceous biofilm that was significantly inhibited by antibodies against the mecA-encoded penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP2a. Conversely excision of the SCCmec element in the MRSA strain BH1CC resulted in oxacillin susceptibility and reduced biofilm production, both of which were complemented by mecA alone. Transcriptional activity of the accessory gene regulator locus was also repressed in the 8325-4 HoR strain, which in turn was accompanied by reduced protease production and significantly reduced virulence in a mouse model of device infection. Thus, homogeneous methicillin resistance has the potential to affect agr- and icaADBC-mediated phenotypes, including altered biofilm expression and virulence, which together are consistent with the adaptation of healthcare-associated MRSA strains to the antibiotic-rich hospital

  7. Evaluation of GeneXpert® system for detection of methicillin-resistant Staphyloccocus aureus in clinical samples

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    Antonella Mencacci

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphyloccocus aureus strains (MRSA have reached epidemic proportions globally, being the major cause of nosocomial infections. Rapid identification of MRSA in nasal swabs or in clinical samples is considered a useful strategy for control and treatment of these infections. GeneXpert system (Cepheid Europe,Vira-Solelch, Maurence-Scopont-France can detect by real-time PCR in approximately one hour methicillin-resistant S. aureus or coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS in clinical samples, in comparison with 24 hours for the culture or 48 hours for the antimicrobial susceptibility testing. In this study GeneXpert system was compared with traditional tests for MRSA detection in nasal swabs, bloodcultures and surgical wound swabs. Materials and methods. Eighteen nasal swabs, 23 blood-cultures and 13 surgical wound swabs were tested. The samples were cultured on blood-agar and mannitol-salt agar. Identification of isolates was carried out with traditional tests (Gram staining, catalase, coagulase and automatic Phoenix system. Methicillin-susceptibility was evaluated according to 2010 CLSI guidelines. GeneXpert system was performed according to manufacturers instructions, by using the specific kits and methicillin-resistance was detected by amplification of the genic sequences spa, SCC e mecA. Results. The results showed a 100% accordance between GeneXpert system and traditional tests for detection of methicillin-resistant staphylococci. In particular, among 18 nasal swabs, no MRSA was detected, while 1 bloodculture (4.3% and 4 surgical wound swabs (30.7% were positive for MRSA. Conclusions. GeneXpert system allows a rapid detection of MRSA in clinical samples and shows the same sensitivity and specificity as traditional tests. Therefore, it represents a further effective diagnostic method for prevention and treatment of nosocomial infections due to methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

  8. Bactericidal Kinetics of Marine-Derived Napyradiomycins against Contemporary Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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    Nina M. Haste

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need for new antibiotics to treat hospital- and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections. Previous work has indicated that both terrestrial and marine-derived members of the napyradiomycin class possess potential anti-staphylococcal activities. These compounds are unique meroterpenoids with unusual levels of halogenation. In this paper we report the evaluation of two previously described napyradiomycin derivatives, A80915A (1 and A80915B (2 produced by the marine-derived actinomycete, Streptomyces sp. strain CNQ-525, for their specific activities against contemporary and clinically relevant MRSA. Reported are studies of the in vitro kinetics of these chemical scaffolds in time-kill MRSA assays. Both napyradiomycin derivatives demonstrate potent and rapid bactericidal activity against contemporary MRSA strains. These data may help guide future development and design of analogs of the napyradiomycins that could potentially serve as useful anti-MRSA therapeutics.

  9. [Guidelines for the treatment on infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensa, J; Barberán, J; Llinares, P; Picazo, Jj; Bouza, E; Alvarez-Lerma, F; Borges, M; Serrano, R; León, C; Guirao, X; Arias, J; Carreras, E; Sanz, Ma; García-Rodríguez, Ja

    2008-12-01

    Infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have undergone important changes in the last five years that have influenced the choice of therapy: i) increase of their frequency in hospital-associated settings and, more recently, in community settings; ii) better knowledge of clinical implications of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of vancomycin; iii) improvement of current standard methods for rapid detection of MRSA in clinical samples; iv) clear evidence that vancomycin is losing efficacy against MRSA with MIC > 1 microg/mL; and v) appearance of new antibiotics suitable for use in these infections (linezolid, daptomycin, tigecyclin). Under this situation guidelines for the treatment of common infections caused by MRSA appear to be necessary to improve the efficacy and reduce the mortality.

  10. Synergistic effects of Salvia officinalis L. essential oils and antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milenković Marina T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA due to the acquisition of resistance to current antimicrobials pose a serious challenge for therapy, and new measures to treat and prevent this infectious pathogen are of crucial importance. Plant essential oils (EOs and their constituents are promising agents with antimicrobial properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antistaphylococcal effect of essential oils from Salvia officinalis using the broth-microdilution method. Essential oils of S. officinalis were isolated from the same individual, but at different life stages - young and old leaves. The effects of combinations of sub-inhibitory concentrations of oil and different antibiotics were evaluated by the checkerboard method. The results, expressed as the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC and index (FICI, indicate that the essential oil isolated from young leaves potentiated the inhibitory effect of antibiotics against tested MRSA strains. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173021

  11. Molecular epidemiology of community-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biber, A; Parizade, M; Taran, D; Jaber, H; Berla, E; Rubin, C; Rahav, G; Glikman, D; Regev-Yochay, G

    2015-08-01

    Data on community-associated (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Israel are scarce. The objective of this study was to characterize the major CA-MRSA clones in Israel. All clinical MRSA isolates detected in the community during a period of 2.5 years (2011-2013) from individuals insured by a major health maintenance organization in Israel were collected, with additional data from medical records. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns and staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) typing were determined. SCCmec IV and V isolates were further typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, and detection of a panel of toxin genes. MRSA were detected in 280 patients, mostly from skin infections. Patients with SCCmec IV (n = 120, 43 %) were younger (p Israel, approximately 20 % are typical CA-MRSA clones, mainly USA300 and a local clone, t991.

  12. Improved understanding of factors driving methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus epidemic waves

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    Chatterjee SS

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Som S Chatterjee, Michael OttoPathogen Molecular Genetics Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA remains one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections worldwide. Since the global spread of MRSA in the 1960s, MRSA strains have evolved with increased pathogenic potential. Notably, some strains are now capable of causing persistent infections not only in hospitalized patients but also in healthy individuals in the community. Furthermore, MRSA is increasingly associated with infections among livestock-associated workers, primarily because of transmission from animals to humans. Moreover, many MRSA strains have gained resistance to most available antibiotics. In this review, we will present current knowledge on MRSA epidemiology and discuss new endeavors being undertaken to understand better the molecular and epidemiological underpinnings of MRSA outbreaks.Keywords: Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA, nosocomial infection, community-associated infection

  13. Heavy metal and disinfectant resistance genes among livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argudin, Maria Angeles; Lauzat, Birgit; Kraushaar, Britta

    2016-01-01

    Livestock associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) has emerged in animal production worldwide. Most LA-MRSA in Europe belong to the clonal complex (CC)398. The reason for the LA-MRSA emergence is not fully understood. Besides antimicrobial agents used for therapy, other...... substances with antimicrobial activity applied in animal feed, including metal-containing compounds might contribute to their selection. Some of these genes have been found in various novel SCCmec cassettes. The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of metal-resistance genes among a LA-S. aureus...... collection [n = 554, including 542 MRSA and 12 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA)] isolated from livestock and food thereof. Most LA-MRSA isolates (76%) carried at least one metal-resistance gene. Among the LA-MRSA CC398 isolates (n = 456), 4.8%, 0.2%, 24.3% and 71.5% were positive for arsA (arsenic...

  14. Methicillin-Resistant Staphyloccocus aureus intracranial Epidural Abscess with Osteomyelitis During Pregnancy: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanamai, Vaya W; Seagle, Brandon-Luke L; Luo, Guoyang

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is increasing, and 0.5-4% of pregnant women are colonized. A 30-year-old pregnant woman at term presented with intractable headache 1 week after incision and drainage of a MRSA-positive axillary abscess. Imaging demonstrated a right-sided epidural abscess with midline shift and myositis of the overlying temporalis muscle. She underwent cesarean delivery followed by craniectomy of osteomyelitic bone and evacuation of the epidural abscess. Central nervous system abscess is rare but should be considered in patients with a history of MRSA infection and new neurologic signs or symptoms. Surgical evacuation and antibiotic therapy in combination with obstetrical care considering delivery timing based upon maternal stability and gestational age may produce excellent outcomes.

  15. Comparison of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius adherence to 2 canine limb salvage endoprosthesis implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarali, Alim; Singh, Ameet; Morrison, Shauna; Gibson, Thomas W G; Rousseau, Joyce; Weese, J Scott; Boston, Sarah E

    2017-09-01

    The objective of our study was to compare adhesion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) to stainless steel (SS) and to tantalum (TA) canine limb salvage endoprosthesis implants in an in vitro experimental study. The median of the mean log10 colony forming units/mL for adherent MRSP was 4.96 (range: 4.63 to 6.33) for the TA endoprosthesis and 4.31 (range: 3.86 to 5.05) for the SS endoprosthesis (P = 0.009). Although the trabecular and porous design of the TA endoprosthesis provides mechanical benefits over the SS endoprosthesis, it may increase the risk of developing infection due to higher levels of bacterial adherence.

  16. The spa typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates by High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasihi, Yasser; Fooladi, Saba; Mohammadi, Mohammad Ali; Emaneini, Mohammad; Kalantar-Neyestanaki, Davood

    2017-09-06

    Molecular typing is an important tool for control and prevention of infection. A suitable molecular typing method for epidemiological investigation must be easy to perform, highly reproducible, inexpensive, rapid and easy to interpret. In this study, two molecular typing methods including the conventional PCR-sequencing method and high resolution melting (HRM) analysis were used for staphylococcal protein A (spa) typing of 30 Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates recovered from clinical samples. Based on PCR-sequencing method results, 16 different spa types were identified among the 30 MRSA isolates. Among the 16 different spa types, 14 spa types separated by HRM method. Two spa types including t4718 and t2894 were not separated from each other. According to our results, spa typing based on HRM analysis method is very rapid, easy to perform and cost-effective, but this method must be standardized for different regions, spa types, and real-time machinery.

  17. Report - Antibacterial activity of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Abbas, Khizar; Younus, Adnan; Shaikh, Rehan Sadiq

    2016-09-01

    Objective of the present study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) berries and leaves against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by using the standard disc diffusion method. Chloroform, n-hexane and aqueous extract of the plant parts were used. Doses of 2mg/ml, 4 mg/ml and 6mg/ml were tested against the microorganism, and the zone of inhibition was compared against the standard drug vancomycin. Results indicated that n-hexane and chloroform extracts of berries and n-hexane extract leaves showed significant (p<0.05) antibacterial activity comparable with vancomycin. It was concluded from the study that extracts berries and leaves of Hippophae rhamnoides have antibacterial activity against MRSA.

  18. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among university students in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitti, Thawatchai; Boonyonying, Kamala; Sitthisak, Sutthirat

    2011-11-01

    We studied the prevalence of methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal colonization among healthy young Thai adults. MSSA nasal colonization was found in 30 of 200 subjects (15%). The prevalence of MRSAnasal carriage was 1% (2 of 200) detected by cefoxitin/oxacillin disk diffusion and oxacillin salt screening methods. These carriers were associated with health care risk factors. The two MRSA isolates were mecA positive, SCCmec type II. All S. aureus isolates were tested for antibiotic resistance. Their resistance rates to penicillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, oxacillin and cefoxitin were 96.7, 26.7, 26.7, 6.7 and 6.7%, respectively. All MSSA and MRSA isolates were susceptible to gentamicin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, rifampicin, linezolid, fusidic acid, mupirocin, ciprofloxacin and vancomycin. The results of this first study of MRSA nasal colonization among healthy young Thai adults suggests MRSA is present in the Thai community.

  19. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus containing mecC in Swedish dairy cows

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    Unnerstad Helle Ericsson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hitherto, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has not been detected in Swedish cattle. However, due to the report of mecC, a novel homologue to the mecA gene, there was reason to re-evaluate susceptibility results from strain collections of Staphylococcus aureus and test suspected isolates for the presence of mecC. Findings Bovine isolates of S. aureus with elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactams were retrospectively tested for presence of mecC. In four of the isolates mecC was detected. Conclusion In Sweden, this is the first finding of MRSA in cattle and the first detection of MRSA harbouring mecC of domestic animal origin. MRSA in animal populations has implications as a potential reservoir with risk for spread to humans. Occurrence of MRSA among Swedish cattle appears still very limited.

  20. Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from pig carcasses in Hong Kong

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ho, J.; O'Donoghue, M.; Guardabassi, Luca

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the isolation and characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from slaughtered pigs sampled from local markets in Hong Kong. The nares of 400 slaughtered pigs were cultured and MRSA isolates characterized for the presence of antibiotic......-resistance determinants, toxins and SCCmec and spa types using PCR. Clonality was investigated using PFGE and MLST. The prevalence of MRSA colonization of slaughter pigs was 39.3%, the majority (92%) harbouring SCCmec type IVb. Of the 157 samples yielding MRSA, 13 had two distinct MRSA strains present. Spa type t899....... Resistance to clindamycin (99%), ciprofloxacin(78%), quinopristin-dalfopristin (44%) and cotrimoxazole (32%) was common, but remained low for fusidic acid (4%) and rifampicin (2%). All strains were negative for PVL, exfoliative, and enterotoxins. This survey confirmed the uniformity of MRSA isolates in pigs...

  1. Enteral vancomycin and probiotic use for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus antibiotic-associated diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Elizabeth Nicole; Rivas, Kenya Maria; Valdes, Jose; Caballero, Joshua

    2012-07-27

    A geriatric patient status post intraabdominal surgery presented with persistent diarrhoea and heavy intestinal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) growth after multiple courses of antibiotic therapy. Additionally, swab cultures of the anterior nares tested positive for MRSA. In order to impede infection and prevent future complications, the patient received a 10-day course of vancomycin oral solution 250 mg every 6 h, 15-day course of Saccharomyces boulardii 250 mg orally twice daily and a 5-day course of topical mupirocin 2% twice daily intranasally. Diarrhoea ceased during therapy and repeat cultures 11 days after initiating therapy demonstrated negative MRSA growth from the stool and nares. Further repeat cultures 5 months later revealed negative MRSA growth in the stools and minimal MRSA growth in the nares. Overall, enteral vancomycin and probiotics successfully eradicated MRSA infection without intestinal recurrence. Although the results were beneficial treating MRSA diarrhoea for our patient, these agents remain highly controversial.

  2. Hospital acquired outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection initiated by a health care worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ayed, Salima; Boutiba-Ben Boubaker, Ilhem; Boukadida, Jalel; Hammami, Samia; Ben Redjeb, Saïda

    2010-03-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become an increasingly important pathogen leading to hospital acquired infections. This study was done to confirm an outbreak of MRSA suspected at Charles Nicolle Hospital. From 26 April to 11 June 2002, six patients hospitalized in the dermatologic ward at Charles Nicolle hospital of Tunisia have developed infections caused by MRSA. An investigation of the outbreak has been detected a nasal carriage nurse. This carrier received topical mupirocin treatment to decolonize the anterior nares and the outbreak was stopped without further incident. Typing of the MRSA strains by pulsed field gel electrophoresis demonstrated the same pulsotype shared by all isolates showing that MRSA isolates belonged to a single clonal type responsible of outbreak. Colonized nurse was the source of MRSA dissemination. This report illustrates the risk of nosocomial outbreak linked to cares delivered by the staff personnel. More sensibilisation and the respect of strict hygienic measures should be emphasized.

  3. A prevalence study of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in emergency department health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisaga, April; Paquette, Katherine; Sabatini, Linda; Lovell, Elise O

    2008-11-01

    Few studies of the prevalence of nasal colonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in emergency department (ED) health care workers have been conducted. To better understand the epidemiology of this pathogen, we seek to determine the MRSA nasal colonization rates in the ED health care workers in our hospital. We conducted a prospective cohort study on a convenience sample of ED health care workers, including nurses, physicians, and technicians. Nasal swabs from subjects were analyzed with a polymerase chain reaction assay for the presence of MRSA. Of the 105 ED health care workers enrolled, a total of 16 (15%, 95% confidence interval 9.6% to 23%) were MRSA positive. No significant difference was observed in colonization rates between nurses, physicians, and technicians. Our ED health care workers demonstrated a high prevalence of nasal MRSA colonization compared with individuals in recent community surveillance and other studies involving ED staff.

  4. Phytochemical constituents and inhibitory activity towards methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains of Eryngium species (Apiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Ali; Aydınlık, Nilüfer; Arslan, Idris

    2011-03-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils of Eryngium campestre, E. thorifolium, and E. creticum (Apiaceae), growing in the Aegean region of Turkey (Mount Sandras, Denizli), was determined by direct thermal desorption (DTD)-GC/MS analyses. A total of 49 components were identified in the oils, α-pinene and hexanal being the major compounds. The three essential oils were also tested for their inhibitory activity of nine different methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains by the agar disc diffusion method. The anti-MRSA activity of E. thorifolium oil, the most active of the three oils, was comparable with those of the reference antibiotic vancomycin and oregano oil, although somewhat lower. Copyright © 2011 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  5. Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is widespread in farmed mink (Neovison vison)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Julie Elvekjær; Rhod Larsen, Anders; Skov, Robert Leo

    2017-01-01

    Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) clonal complex (CC) 398 is widespread in the Danish pig production with around 90% of herds being positive. Since 2009, cases of CC398 LA-MRSA infections in Danish mink farmers have been observed. The objective of the study...... was to examine the presence of LA-MRSA in farmed mink. The investigation comprised three different sample types 1) clinical samples from carcasses submitted to the laboratory for diagnostic examination, 2) paws and pharyngeal swabs from healthy animals collected at pelting, and 3) feed samples from mink feed...... producers. In clinical samples, LA-MRSA was found in 34% of submissions and was most prevalent in samples from paws (33%) and pharynx (17%), followed by nasal and intestinal samples (each 13%), whereas it was never detected in perineal samples. LA-MRSA was found in healthy animals on 40% of the investigated...

  6. Zinc resistance of Staphylococcus aureus of animal origin is strongly associated with methicillin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaco, Lina; Hasman, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the occurrence of zinc and copper resistances in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from swine and veal calves in a global strain collection.The test population consisted of 476 porcine MRSA isolates from ten European countries, 18 porcine MRSA...... isolates from Canada and seven MRSA from China, 92 MRSA and 60 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates from veal calves in the Netherlands and 88 porcine MSSA isolates from four European countries. Most porcine MRSA (n=454) and all bovine MRSA belonged to clonal complex (CC) 398 whereas 37...... of the pig MRSA from Europe and the seven Chinese isolates belonged to other CCs and 3 isolates were not classified into a CC.All isolates were tested for susceptibility to zinc chloride and copper sulphate using agar dilution and tested by PCR for the czrC gene encoding zinc resistance.Phenotypic zinc...

  7. Control of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak in a day-care institution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Ulrik; Jensen, ET; Larsen, AR

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in two institutions for multi-handicapped children in Copenhagen. The aim of the study was to determine whether it was possible to eradicate MRSA in a setting with multi-handicapped children and staff where...... there was a high degree of physical interaction. This was a prospective interventional uncontrolled cohort study that took place from January 2003 to March 2005. All individuals in close contact with the two institutions and/or in close contact with an MRSA-colonized subject from the outbreak were included...... in the study: 38 children, 60 staff members and 12 close relatives of colonized subjects. Infection control measures included screening all individuals. When MRSA infection or colonization was found, an attempt was made to eradicate MRSA, staff education was undertaken and attempts were made to determine...

  8. Postoperative infection of an abdominal mesh due to methicillin resistant Staphylococcus Aureus - A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok R

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin resistant Stephylococcus aureus (MRSA infection has now become a major problem in hospitals. We present a case of postoperative infection MRSA where the primary source of the infection was found to be an abdominal mesh that was used to reinforce the abdominal wall. After one year of surgery, the patient developed wound dehiscence and discharge. MRSA was isolated from the wound, mesh, external nares, throat and axilla. Initially she was started on clindamycin and discharged from the hospital. After 5 months, patient came back to the hospital with infection at the same site. The patient was then treated with vancomycin and MRSA clearance. She responded to the treatment with complete healing of the wound and clearance of MRSA.

  9. Origins and Evolution of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Lineages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, AR; Westh, Henrik; Lancastre, H de

    2006-01-01

    Most methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates identified among blood isolates collected in Denmark between 1957 and 1970 belonged to either phage group III or the closely related 83A complex and had a PSTM antibiotype (resistance to penicillin [P], streptomycin [S], tetracycline...... [T], and methicillin [M]). Recently, some of these isolates were shown to have the same genetic backgrounds as contemporary epidemic MRSA isolates, and Danish methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates from the 1960s with a PST antibiotype were proposed to have been the recipients of the mec......A gene in those lineages. In this study, we investigated the genetic backgrounds of isolates from the 83A complex that were fully susceptible or resistant to penicillin only in order to try to trace the evolutionary trajectory of contemporary MRSA lineages. We also studied MSSA and MRSA isolates from...

  10. Rapid first-line discrimination of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains using MALDI-TOF MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Claus; Grønvall Kjær Hansen, Sanne; Møller, Jens K

    2015-01-01

    Fast and reliable discrimination of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates is essential in identifying an outbreak. Molecular typing methods, such as S. aureus protein A (spa) typing, multi locus sequence typing (MLST) and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) are generally...... used for this purpose. These methods are all relatively time-consuming and not performed routinely in all laboratories. The aim of this study is to examine whether MALDI-TOF MS can be used as a fast, simple and easily implemented method for first-line discrimination of MRSA isolates. Mass spectra from...... 600 clinical MRSA isolates were included in the study, representing 89 spa types, associated with 16 different known clonal complexes. All spectra were obtained directly from colony material obtained from overnight cultures without prior protein extraction. We identified 43 useful discriminatory m...

  11. Rapid Identification of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by the Vitek MS Saramis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Weiguang; Li, Jiaping; Fang, Ying; Wang, Xuan; Gu, Danxia; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, and accurate Vitek MS assay was developed to distinguish clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from clinical isolates of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) by developing an in-house knowledgebase of SuperSpectra. Three unique peaks, including peaks at 2305.6 and 3007.3 Da specific to MRSA, and 6816.7 Da specific to MSSA, were selected for differentiating MRSA and MSSA. This assay accurately identified 84 and 91% of clinical MRSA and MSSA strains out of the total 142 clinically acquired S. aureus strains that were tested. This method will greatly improve the efficiency of single clinical sample identification of MRSA, thereby facilitating a reduction in the transmission of MRSA in clinical settings.

  12. Current methodologies on genotyping for nosocomial pathogen methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jian; Chen, Lequn; Wang, Jingwen; Wang, Wenxin; Chen, Dingqiang; Li, Lin; Li, Bing; Deng, Yang; Xu, Zhenbo

    2017-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common pathogen in hospitals and the community. As the rapid spread and wide distribution of antimicrobial resistance (such as MRSA), treatment for infectious diseases caused by microorganisms has become a vital threat. Thus, early identification and genotyping are essential for further therapeutic treatment and the control of rapid expansion of MRSA. In combination with applications and data feedbacks, this review focused on the currently available molecular-based assays on their utility and performance for rapid typing of MRSA, especially on effective molecular-based methods. Besides, a common mobile element SCCmec and prevalence of HA-MRSA, LA-MRSA and CA-MRSA were introduced in this review in order to provide a more complete profile of MRSA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Frequent emergence and limited geographic dispersal of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nubel, U.; Roumagnac, P.; Feldkamp, M.

    2008-01-01

    A small number of clonal lineages dominates the global population structure of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), resulting in the concept that MRSA has emerged on a few occasions after penicillinase-stable beta-lactam antibiotics were introduced to clinical practice, followed...... by intercontinental spread of individual clones. We investigated the evolutionary history of an MRSA clone (ST5) by mutation discovery at 108 loci (46 kb) within a global collection of 135 isolates. The SNPs that were ascertained define a radial phylogenetic structure within ST5 consisting of at least 5 chains...... show that import has occurred on at least 23 occasions within this single sequence type and that the progeny of such recombinant strains usually are distributed locally rather than globally. These results provide strong evidence that geographical spread of MRSA over long distances and across cultural...

  14. Antibacterial and anti-hemolytic activity of tannins from Pimenta dioica against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reham Al-Harbi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available High rate of resistance among Staphylococcus infection initiates scientists to discover new antibiotics. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of tannins isolated from the Pimenta dioica leaves on Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant S. aureus as well as to evaluate their effect on hemolysin production. The antimicrobial activity of 4,6-(S-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-(α/β-D-glucopyranose and casuarinin, pedunculagin and nilocitin tannins from P. dioica was examined using agar diffusion method. Moreover, minimum inhibitory concentrations were evaluated by microtiter plate assay method. Pedunculagin and nilocitin exhibited antibacterial and anti-hemolytic effect against S. aureus. This will open the era for in vivo assessment of such compounds for clinical applications.

  15. [Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. Epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy, and prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeg, Peter; Schröppel, Klaus

    2009-06-15

    The increasing number of complicated soft-tissue or invasive infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a frequent reason for elaborate treatment regimens. Unidentified MRSA carriers may be the origin of endemic spread to other patients and medical staff. Recently, community-associated cMRSA with particular virulence factors were isolated from persons without the typical history of hospital contacts. Molecular tools for the timely detection of the mecA resistance gene for the identification of MRSA in medical test specimens have become a standard approach in MRSA-related diagnostic procedures. The actual therapy of MRSA infections requires consideration of both the appropriate spectrum of activity and the adequate pharmacological properties of a chosen antimicrobial. Preventive strategies rely on the consistent application of standard hygiene precautions, which have to be supplemented with increased barriers for the isolation of identified MRSA patients.

  16. Nosocomial keratitis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: case report and preventative measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braich, Puneet S; Aggarwal, Shruti; Mukhtar, Sabrina; Almeida, David Rp

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old African-American woman was admitted to the intensive care unit of our community hospital for respiratory failure secondary to severe decompensated heart failure, requiring intubation. In the ensuing days, she developed a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection of the cornea, despite no growth of MRSA in multiple blood, sputum, and urine cultures. This unexpected corneal infection complicated her hospital stay, and increased morbidity and disease-related cost. Risk factors, warning signs, and preventative measures for MRSA keratitis secondary to lagophthalmos (inability to completely close one's eyelids) are outlined in this case report. Implementing simple precautions such as taping eyelids shut or using artificial lubrication may reduce patient morbidity and disease-related costs. These recommendations are directed to non-ophthalmic clinicians who provide care to patients in settings where MRSA colonization is widespread.

  17. Nosocomial keratitis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: case report and preventative measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet S. Braich

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A 47-year-old African-American woman was admitted to the intensive care unit of our community hospital for respiratory failure secondary to severe decompensated heart failure, requiring intubation. In the ensuing days, she developed a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection of the cornea, despite no growth of MRSA in multiple blood, sputum, and urine cultures. This unexpected corneal infection complicated her hospital stay, and increased morbidity and disease-related cost. Risk factors, warning signs, and preventative measures for MRSA keratitis secondary to lagophthalmos (inability to completely close one's eyelids are outlined in this case report. Implementing simple precautions such as taping eyelids shut or using artificial lubrication may reduce patient morbidity and disease-related costs. These recommendations are directed to non-ophthalmic clinicians who provide care to patients in settings where MRSA colonization is widespread.

  18. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in college residential halls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonn, Katelynn; Ryan, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was once a predominantly hospital-acquired organism but community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) has become a concern in athletics, prisons, and other nonclinical closed populations. As such, college residential hall occupants and workers may be at elevated risk of spreading or contracting MRSA. Environmental samples were obtained to identify the occurrence of MRSA on surfaces in bathrooms of 15 university residential halls. Sterile swabs and BBL CHROMagar plates were used to sample seven categories of potentially contaminated surfaces in each location. Frequencies and descriptive statistics were prepared. All sites had at least one positive sample for MRSA, and shower floors displayed the greatest prevalence (50%). These results indicate areas for heightened sanitation, and illustrate CA-MRSA potential from such surfaces. The need for hygiene education of affected persons about skin and soft tissue infections like MRSA, and intervention opportunities for public health professionals, are discussed.

  19. Isolation and molecular characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from public transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwao, Yasuhisa; Yabe, Shizuka; Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Nishiyama, Akihito; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) not only causes disease in hospitals, but also in the community. The characteristics of MRSA transmission in the environment remain uncertain. In this study, MRSA were isolated from public transport in Tokyo and Niigata, Japan. Of 349 trains examined, eight (2.3%) were positive for MRSA. The MRSA isolated belonged to sequence types (STs) 5, 8, 88, and 89, and included community infection-associated ST8 MRSA (with novel type IV staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec) and the ST5 New York/Japan hospital clone. The data indicate that public transport could contribute to the spread of community-acquired MRSA, and awareness of this mode of transmission is necessary. © 2012 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Carriage frequency, diversity and methicillin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus in Danish small ruminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Jacob; Gongora, Carmen Espinosa; Stamphøj, Inga

    2013-01-01

    . This study provides novel data about the occurrence of S. aureus in small ruminants, revealing high carriage frequency and diversity in these animals. The finding of mecC in ovine ST130 isolates suggests that sheep may be a reservoir of this new emerging MRSA clone of suspected animal origin. Inclusion......The ecology of Staphylococcus aureus in animals has recently gained attention by the research community due to the emergence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA). We investigated carriage frequency and clonal diversity of S. aureus in 179 sheep and 17 goats in Denmark using...... spa typing and MLST. S. aureus was detected in 74 sheep (41%) and 11 goats (64%). The isolates belonged to 26 spa types (including six novel spa types) and 12 STs (including three novel STs). The most common lineage was ST133, which was found in 65% sheep and 55% goats. MRSA was found in three animals...