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Sample records for valve timing vvt

  1. A study of applying variable valve timing to highly rated diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, C R; Leonard, H J [comps.; Brunel Univ., Uxbridge (United Kingdom); Charlton, S J [comp.; Bath Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1992-10-01

    The main objective of the research was to use Simulation Program for Internal Combustion Engines (SPICE) to quantify the potential offered by Variable Valve Timing (VVT) in improving engine performance. A model has been constructed of a particular engine using SPICE. The model has been validated with experimental data, and it has been shown that accurate predictions are made when the valve timing is changed. (author)

  2. Modeling and Investigation of Electromechanical Valve Train Actuator at simulated Pressure conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habib, Tufail

    2012-01-01

    In an electromechanical valve actuated engine, the valves are driven by solenoid-type actuators and cam-shaft is eliminated. Control of each valve provides flexibility in valve timings over all engine conditions and achieves the benefits of variable valve timing(VVT). This paper is about investig...

  3. Investigation of a rotary valving system with variable valve timing for internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Paul C.; Hansen, Craig N.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of the program was to provide a functional demonstration of the Hansen Rotary Valving System with Variable Valve Timing (HRVS/VVT), capable of throttleless inlet charge control, as an alternative to conventional poppet-valves for use in spark ignited internal combustion engines. The goal of this new technology is to secure benefits in fuel economy, broadened torque band, vibration reduction, and overhaul accessibility. Additionally, use of the variable valve timing capability to vary the effective compression ratio is expected to improve multifuel tolerance and efficiency. Efforts directed at the design of HRVS components proved to be far more extensive than had been anticipated, ultimately requiring that proof-trial design/development work be performed. Although both time and funds were exhausted before optical or ion-probe types of in-cylinder investigation could be undertaken, a great deal of laboratory data was acquired during the course of the design/development work. This laboratory data is the basis for the information presented in this final report.

  4. The new Toyota variable valve timing and lift system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, K.; Fuwa, N.; Yoshihara, Y. [Toyota Motor Corporation (Japan); Hori, K. [Toyota Boshoku Corporation (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    A continuously variable valve timing (duration and phase) and lift system was developed. This system was applied to the valvetrain of a new 2.0L L4 engine (3ZRFAE) for the Japanese market. The system has rocker arms, which allow continuously variable timing and lift, situated between a conventional roller-rocker arm and the camshaft, an electromotor actuator to drive it and a phase mechanism for intake and exhaust camshafts (Dual VVT-i). The rocking center of the rocker arm is stationary, and the axial linear motion of a helical spline changes the initial phase of the rocker arm which varies the timing and lift. The linear motion mechanism uses an original planetary roller screw and is driven by a brushless motor with a built-in electric control unit. Since the rocking center and the linear motion helical spline center coincide, a compact cylinder head design was possible, and the cylinder head is a common design with a conventional engine. Since the ECU controls intake valve duration and timing, a fuel economy gain of maximum 10% (depending on driving condition) is obtained by reducing light to medium load pumping losses. Also intake efficiency was maximized throughout the speed range, resulting in a power gain of 10%. Further, HC emissions were reduced due to increased air speed at low valve lift. (orig.)

  5. Modelling a variable valve timing spark ignition engine using different neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beham, M. [BMW AG, Munich (Germany); Yu, D.L. [John Moores University, Liverpool (United Kingdom). Control Systems Research Group

    2004-10-01

    In this paper different neural networks (NN) are compared for modelling a variable valve timing spark-ignition (VVT SI) engine. The overall system is divided for each output into five neural multi-input single output (MISO) subsystems. Three kinds of NN, multilayer Perceptron (MLP), pseudo-linear radial basis function (PLRBF), and local linear model tree (LOLIMOT) networks, are used to model each subsystem. Real data were collected when the engine was under different operating conditions and these data are used in training and validation of the developed neural models. The obtained models are finally tested in a real-time online model configuration on the test bench. The neural models run independently of the engine in parallel mode. The model outputs are compared with process output and compared among different models. These models performed well and can be used in the model-based engine control and optimization, and for hardware in the loop systems. (author)

  6. A study of fluid flow and combustion with variable valve timing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederberg, F

    1998-10-01

    The effects of variable valve timing (VVT) were examined by in-cylinder Laser Doppler Velocimetry flow measurements and heat-release calculations. A single-cylinder Volvo B5254 engine was used for all experiments and the valve timing was altered by phasing or exchanging the camshaft. Special cam lobes were developed for simulation of throttle-less operation. With the standard double camshaft, a tumbling flow was generated and with valve deactivation, a swirling flow was generated. The turbulence was increased with valve deactivation. This increased the combustion rate making lean burn possible. The standard camshaft with inlet valve deactivation and late cam phasing had a faster combustion at {lambda} = 1.8 than the standard camshaft with normal cam phasing at {lambda} = 1.0. Early and late inlet valve closing was used for enabling throttle-less operation. Early inlet valve closing (EIVC) generated a very slow tumble with low turbulence. Late inlet valve closing generated both very high and low turbulence. The net indicated efficiency was improved with up to 10%. Some reduction was observed for the gross indicated efficiency, due to a too large reduction in effective compression ratio. A very stable combustion was obtained for EIVC with gasoline, possibly due to a sheering flow over the inlet valves resulting in improved fuel-air preparation. Wavelet analysis was used for dividing LDV flow measurements into time and frequency resolved information. The technique rendered the same flow results as the moving window technique, but with a separation of the turbulence into different frequencies. The choice of wavelet was shown not to be crucial. The frequency resolved turbulence was studied for tumble and swirl. A tumbling flow had a larger transfer of energy from low frequency turbulence into high frequency turbulence than a swirling flow. This is caused by the tumble breakdown. A correlation against heat-release indicated that high frequency turbulence have a larger

  7. Weinig VVT-instellingen met VAR : onderzoek naar VAR's in Nederland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corina de Feijter; Pieterbas Lalleman

    V&VN is op zoek gegaan naar alle actieve Verpleegkundige en/of Verzorgende Adviesraden (VAR) in Nederland. Het blijkt dat in totaal 144 zorginstellingen (24%) een VAR hebben. Vooral in de VVT-sector is het aantal VAR’s laag: 13%.

  8. Gasoline New Timing and Flux Adjustable Rotary Valve Design (Hereinafter: Rotary Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du huiqi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional gasoline engine with an umbrella valve control cylinder intake and exhaust, in order to achieve sealing effect, the valve is driven by the spring force; at the same time, when the cam opens the valve to overcome the spring force acting. Sealing the better, the more power consumed in the engine mechanical losses, the valve mechanism consumes about 30%, which is not a small loss! This article describes a new type of rotary valve is to significantly reduce mechanical losses, so as to achieve energy saving purposes.

  9. Motor operated valve stroke timing; is there value?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, K.; Rosch, F. Jr.; Neckowicz, T.

    1990-01-01

    Both ASME Section XI, Subsection IWV and ASME/ANSI OMa-1988, Part 10 require stroke timing of certain power operated valves. This requirement is intended to detect valve degradation and subsequent maintenance, repair or replacement needs. However, the adequacy of stroke timing, especially for motor operated valves, has met much skepticism in the industry. This paper will demonstrate that stroke timing for ac motor operated valves is inadequate and provide a non-intrusive testing alternative. It will also discuss the value of stroke timing for dc motor operated valves

  10. Leaving Moderate Tricuspid Valve Regurgitation Alone at the Time of Pulmonary Valve Replacement: A Worthwhile Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogon, Brian; Mori, Makoto; Alsoufi, Bahaaldin; Kanter, Kirk; Oster, Matt

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary valve disruption in patients with tetralogy of Fallot and congenital pulmonary stenosis often results in pulmonary insufficiency, right ventricular dilation, and tricuspid valve regurgitation. Management of functional tricuspid regurgitation at the time of subsequent pulmonary valve replacement remains controversial. Our aims were to (1) analyze tricuspid valve function after pulmonary valve replacement through midterm follow-up and (2) determine the benefits, if any, of concomitant tricuspid annuloplasty. Thirty-five patients with tetralogy of Fallot or congenital pulmonary stenosis were analyzed. All patients had been palliated in childhood by disrupting the pulmonary valve, and all patients had at least moderate tricuspid valve regurgitation at the time of subsequent pulmonary valve replacement. Preoperative and serial postoperative echocardiograms were analyzed. Pulmonary and tricuspid regurgitation, along with right ventricular dilation and dysfunction were scored as 0 (none), 1 (mild), 2 (moderate), and 3 (severe). Right ventricular volume and area were also calculated. Comparisons were made between patients who underwent pulmonary valve replacement alone and those who underwent concomitant tricuspid valve annuloplasty. At 1 month after pulmonary valve replacement, there were significant reductions in pulmonary valve regurgitation (mean 3 vs 0.39, p tricuspid valve regurgitation (mean 2.33 vs 1.3, p tricuspid regurgitation 1 month postoperatively between patients who underwent concomitant tricuspid annuloplasty and those who underwent pulmonary valve replacement alone (mean 1.31 vs 1.29, p = 0.81). However, at latest follow-up (mean 7.0 ± 2.8 years), the degree of tricuspid regurgitation was significantly higher in the concomitant annuloplasty group (mean 1.87 vs 1.12, p = 0.005). In patients with at least moderate tricuspid valve regurgitation, significant improvement in tricuspid valve function and right ventricular size occurs in the first

  11. Real-Time Prognostics of a Rotary Valve Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Valves are used in many domains and often have system-critical functions. As such, it is important to monitor the health of valves and their actuators and predict remaining useful life. In this work, we develop a model-based prognostics approach for a rotary valve actuator. Due to limited observability of the component with multiple failure modes, a lumped damage approach is proposed for estimation and prediction of damage progression. In order to support the goal of real-time prognostics, an approach to prediction is developed that does not require online simulation to compute remaining life, rather, a function mapping the damage state to remaining useful life is found offline so that predictions can be made quickly online with a single function evaluation. Simulation results demonstrate the overall methodology, validating the lumped damage approach and demonstrating real-time prognostics.

  12. Effects of valve timing, valve lift and exhaust backpressure on performance and gas exchanging of a two-stroke GDI engine with overhead valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla Nora, Macklini; Lanzanova, Thompson Diórdinis Metzka; Zhao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Two-stroke operation was achieved in a four-valve direct injection gasoline engine. • Shorter valve opening durations improved torque at lower engine speeds. • The longer the valve opening duration, the lower was the air trapping efficiency. • Higher exhaust backpressure and lower valve lift reduced the compressor work. - Abstract: The current demand for fuel efficient and lightweight powertrains, particularly for application in downsized and hybrid electric vehicles, has renewed the interest in two-stroke engines. In this framework, an overhead four-valve spark-ignition gasoline engine was modified to run in the two-stroke cycle. The scavenging process took place during a long valve overlap period around bottom dead centre at each crankshaft revolution. Boosted intake air was externally supplied at a constant pressure and gasoline was directly injected into the cylinder after valve closure. Intake and exhaust valve timings and lifts were independently varied through an electrohydraulic valve train, so their effects on engine performance and gas exchanging were investigated at 800 rpm and 2000 rpm. Different exhaust backpressures were also evaluated by means of exhaust throttling. Air trapping efficiency, charging efficiency and scavenge ratio were calculated based on air and fuel flow rates, and exhaust oxygen concentration at fuel rich conditions. The results indicated that longer intake and exhaust valve opening durations increased the charge purity and hence torque at higher engine speeds. At lower speeds, although, shorter valve opening durations increased air trapping efficiency and reduced the estimated supercharger power consumption due to lower air short-circuiting. A strong correlation was found between torque and charging efficiency, while air trapping efficiency was more associated to exhaust valve opening duration. The application of exhaust backpressure, as well as lower intake/exhaust valve lifts, made it possible to increase

  13. A modelling study into the effects of variable valve timing on the gas exchange process and performance of a 4-valve DI homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahrous, A-F.M.; Potrzebowski, A.; Wyszynski, M.L.; Xu, H.M.; Tsolakis, A.; Luszcz, P.

    2009-01-01

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion mode is a relatively new combustion technology that can be achieved by using specially designed cams with reduced lift and duration. The auto-ignition in HCCI engine can be facilitated by adjusting the timing of the exhaust-valve-closing and, to some extent, the timing of the intake-valve-opening so as to capture a proportion of the hot exhaust gases in the engine cylinder during the gas exchange process. The effects of variable valve timing strategy on the gas exchange process and performance of a 4-valve direct injection HCCI engine were computationally investigated using a 1D fluid-dynamic engine cycle simulation code. A non-typical intake valve strategy was examined; whereby the intake valves were assumed to be independently actuated with the same valve-lift profile but at different timings. Using such an intake valves strategy, the obtained results showed that the operating range of the exhaust-valve-timing within which the HCCI combustion can be facilitated and maintained becomes much wider than that of the typical intake-valve-timing case. Also it was found that the engine parameters such as load and volumetric efficiency are significantly modified with the use of the non-typical intake-valve-timing. Additionally, the results demonstrated the potential of the non-typical intake-valve strategy in achieving and maintaining the HCCI combustion at much lower loads within a wide range of valve timings. Minimizing the pumping work penalty, and consequently improving the fuel economy, was shown as an advantage of using the non-typical intake-valve-timing with the timing of the early intake valve coupled with a symmetric degree of exhaust-valve-closing timing

  14. A modelling study into the effects of variable valve timing on the gas exchange process and performance of a 4-valve DI homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahrous, A-F.M. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lecturer at the Department of Mechanical Power Engineering, Faculty of Engineering (Shebin El-Kom), Menoufiya University, Shebin El-Kom (Egypt); Potrzebowski, A.; Wyszynski, M.L.; Xu, H.M.; Tsolakis, A.; Luszcz, P. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion mode is a relatively new combustion technology that can be achieved by using specially designed cams with reduced lift and duration. The auto-ignition in HCCI engine can be facilitated by adjusting the timing of the exhaust-valve-closing and, to some extent, the timing of the intake-valve-opening so as to capture a proportion of the hot exhaust gases in the engine cylinder during the gas exchange process. The effects of variable valve timing strategy on the gas exchange process and performance of a 4-valve direct injection HCCI engine were computationally investigated using a 1D fluid-dynamic engine cycle simulation code. A non-typical intake valve strategy was examined; whereby the intake valves were assumed to be independently actuated with the same valve-lift profile but at different timings. Using such an intake valves strategy, the obtained results showed that the operating range of the exhaust-valve-timing within which the HCCI combustion can be facilitated and maintained becomes much wider than that of the typical intake-valve-timing case. Also it was found that the engine parameters such as load and volumetric efficiency are significantly modified with the use of the non-typical intake-valve-timing. Additionally, the results demonstrated the potential of the non-typical intake-valve strategy in achieving and maintaining the HCCI combustion at much lower loads within a wide range of valve timings. Minimizing the pumping work penalty, and consequently improving the fuel economy, was shown as an advantage of using the non-typical intake-valve-timing with the timing of the early intake valve coupled with a symmetric degree of exhaust-valve-closing timing. (author)

  15. The Otto-Atkinson engine. A study of fluid flow and combustion with early and late inlet valve closing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haakansson, Henrik

    1999-10-01

    This report contains results of measurements on an Otto engine. The purpose for this work has been to do measurements of the flow in the cylinder but also measurements of the cylinder pressure have been performed. The flow measurements are made with the method Laser Doppler Velocimetry, LDV. The reason why these measurements are made at all are the pump losses that implies a lower efficiency for the Otto engine at part load. In this work two alternative ways that highly reduces the pump losses are examined. These are early inlet valve closing and late inlet valve closing. To further increase the efficiency at part load an increased compression ratio has been used together with the different valve strategies. With these two ways of operation, at a part load of about 4 - 5 IMEP{sub net}, increases of about 20% of the net indicated efficiency has been obtained. Additionally this report contains a chapter about the possible use of a variable valve actuation or timing system, VVA or VVT. Many conditions for the Otto cycle can be improved by the use of a variable valve actuation and in this chapter it is dealt with the most important ones.

  16. Investigation on the Effects of Internal EGR by Variable Exhaust Valve Actuation with Post Injection on Auto-ignited Combustion and Emission Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insu Cho

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Variable valve mechanisms are usually applied to a gasoline combustion engine to improve its power performance by controlling the amount of intake air according to the operating load. These mechanisms offer one possibility of resolving the conflict of objectives between a further reduction of raw emissions and an improvement in fuel efficiency. In recent years, variable valve control systems have become extremely important in the diesel combustion engine. Importantly, it has been shown that there are several potential benefits of applying variable valve timing (VVT to a compression ignition engine. Valve train variability could offer one option to achieve the reduction goals of engine-out emissions and fuel consumption. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects on part load combustion and emission performance of internal exhaust gas recirculation (EGR by variable exhaust valve lift actuation using a cam-in-cam system, which is an electronically variable valve device with a variable inside cam retarded to about 30 degrees. Numerical simulation based on GT-POWER has been performed to predict the NOx reduction strategy at the part load operating point of 1200 rpm in a four-valve diesel engine. A GT-POWER model of a common-rail direct injection engine with internal EGR was built and verified with experimental data. As a result, large potential for reducing NOx emissions through the use of exhaust valve control has been identified. Namely, it is possible to utilize heat efficiently as recompression of retarded post injection with downscaled specification of the exhaust valve rather than the intake valve, even if the CIC V1 condition with a reduction of the exhaust valve has a higher internal EGR rate of about 2% compared to that of the CIC V2 condition.

  17. Variable valve timing in a homogenous charge compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Keith E.; Faletti, James J.; Funke, Steven J.; Maloney, Ronald P.

    2004-08-03

    The present invention relates generally to the field of homogenous charge compression ignition engines, in which fuel is injected when the cylinder piston is relatively close to the bottom dead center position for its compression stroke. The fuel mixes with air in the cylinder during the compression stroke to create a relatively lean homogeneous mixture that preferably ignites when the piston is relatively close to the top dead center position. However, if the ignition event occurs either earlier or later than desired, lowered performance, engine misfire, or even engine damage, can result. The present invention utilizes internal exhaust gas recirculation and/or compression ratio control to control the timing of ignition events and combustion duration in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. Thus, at least one electro-hydraulic assist actuator is provided that is capable of mechanically engaging at least one cam actuated intake and/or exhaust valve.

  18. Developing an optimal valve closing rule curve for real-time pressure control in pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazarganlari, Mohammad Reza; Afshar, Hossein [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kerachian, Reza [University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bashiazghadi, Seyyed Nasser [Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Sudden valve closure in pipeline systems can cause high pressures that may lead to serious damages. Using an optimal valve closing rule can play an important role in managing extreme pressures in sudden valve closure. In this paper, an optimal closing rule curve is developed using a multi-objective optimization model and Bayesian networks (BNs) for controlling water pressure in valve closure instead of traditional step functions or single linear functions. The method of characteristics is used to simulate transient flow caused by valve closure. Non-dominated sorting genetic algorithms-II is also used to develop a Pareto front among three objectives related to maximum and minimum water pressures, and the amount of water passes through the valve during the valve-closing process. Simulation and optimization processes are usually time-consuming, thus results of the optimization model are used for training the BN. The trained BN is capable of determining optimal real-time closing rules without running costly simulation and optimization models. To demonstrate its efficiency, the proposed methodology is applied to a reservoir-pipe-valve system and the optimal closing rule curve is calculated for the valve. The results of the linear and BN-based valve closure rules show that the latter can significantly reduce the range of variations in water hammer pressures.

  19. Study on a new type variable valve lift timing mechanism with a three dimensional cam; Sanjigen cam ni yoru shinkahen valve lift timing kiko ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogura, M; Song, C [Nippon Institute of Technology, Saitama (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The variable valve timing mechanism was invented to get a torque band at wide engine speed, and to reduce a compression job and pumping loss by a miler cycle at partial load. In this paper, the new type variable valve timing mechanism applying a three dimensional cam was proposed. Also, the feature of mechanism and the control system was done obviously. Further, about a miler cycle, a thermodynamics -like consideration was described. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  20. ASME XI stroke time testing of solenoid valves at Connecticut Yankee Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, C.W.

    1996-12-01

    Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company has developed the capability of measuring the stroke times of AC and DC solenoid valves. This allows the station to measure the stroke time of any solenoid valve in the plant, even those valves which do not have valve stem position indicators. Connecticut Yankee has adapted the ITI MOVATS Checkmate 3 system, using a signal input from a Bruel and Kjaer (B&K) Model 4382 acoustic accelerometer and the Schaumberg Campbell Associates (SCA) Model SCA-1148 dual sensor, which is a combined accelerometer and gaussmeter.

  1. ASME XI stroke time testing of solenoid valves at Connecticut Yankee Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company has developed the capability of measuring the stroke times of AC and DC solenoid valves. This allows the station to measure the stroke time of any solenoid valve in the plant, even those valves which do not have valve stem position indicators. Connecticut Yankee has adapted the ITI MOVATS Checkmate 3 system, using a signal input from a Bruel and Kjaer (B ampersand K) Model 4382 acoustic accelerometer and the Schaumberg Campbell Associates (SCA) Model SCA-1148 dual sensor, which is a combined accelerometer and gaussmeter

  2. Real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in valve disease: comparison with surgical findings and evaluation of prosthetic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugeng, Lissa; Shernan, Stanton K; Weinert, Lynn; Shook, Doug; Raman, Jai; Jeevanandam, Valluvan; DuPont, Frank; Fox, John; Mor-Avi, Victor; Lang, Roberto M

    2008-12-01

    Recently, a novel real-time 3-dimensional (3D) matrix-array transesophageal echocardiographic (3D-MTEE) probe was found to be highly effective in the evaluation of native mitral valves (MVs) and other intracardiac structures, including the interatrial septum and left atrial appendage. However, the ability to visualize prosthetic valves using this transducer has not been evaluated. Moreover, the diagnostic accuracy of this new technology has never been validated against surgical findings. This study was designed to (1) assess the quality of 3D-MTEE images of prosthetic valves and (2) determine the potential value of 3D-MTEE imaging in the preoperative assessment of valvular pathology by comparing images with surgical findings. Eighty-seven patients undergoing clinically indicated transesophageal echocardiography were studied. In 40 patients, 3D-MTEE images of prosthetic MVs, aortic valves (AVs), and tricuspid valves (TVs) were scored for the quality of visualization. For both MVs and AVs, mechanical and bioprosthetic valves, the rings and leaflets were scored individually. In 47 additional patients, intraoperative 3D-MTEE diagnoses of MV pathology obtained before initiating cardiopulmonary bypass were compared with surgical findings. For the visualization of prosthetic MVs and annuloplasty rings, quality was superior compared with AV and TV prostheses. In addition, 3D-MTEE imaging had 96% agreement with surgical findings. Three-dimensional matrix-array transesophageal echocardiographic imaging provides superb imaging and accurate presurgical evaluation of native MV pathology and prostheses. However, the current technology is less accurate for the clinical assessment of AVs and TVs. Fast acquisition and immediate online display will make this the modality of choice for MV surgical planning and postsurgical follow-up.

  3. Internal combustion engine with rotary valve assembly having variable intake valve timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Craig N.; Cross, Paul C.

    1995-01-01

    An internal combustion engine has rotary valves associated with movable shutters operable to vary the closing of intake air/fuel port sections to obtain peak volumetric efficiency over the entire range of speed of the engine. The shutters are moved automatically by a control mechanism that is responsive to the RPM of the engine. A foot-operated lever associated with the control mechanism is also used to move the shutters between their open and closed positions.

  4. Timing tests: automatic valve closure for tritium leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanel, S.

    1976-01-01

    How fast can an automotive valve be closed after a tritium leak occurs in a system. Tests described found that a valve can be closed within fifteen seconds of leakage. In one practical example considered, this delay would limit loss of tritium from a plumbing leak in a tritium system to 1 1 / 4 g. The tests were made in a typical LLL air-flush hood in which a tritium handling system had been installed. Incidental observations suggest that further study be made of a possible leak-actuated recovery system for an entire tritium facility

  5. Spatiotemporal Segmentation and Modeling of the Mitral Valve in Real-Time 3D Echocardiographic Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouch, Alison M; Aly, Ahmed H; Lai, Eric K; Yushkevich, Natalie; Stoffers, Rutger H; Gorman, Joseph H; Cheung, Albert T; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C; Yushkevich, Paul A

    2017-09-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography is the primary imaging modality for preoperative assessment of mitral valves with ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR). While there are well known echocardiographic insights into the 3D morphology of mitral valves with IMR, such as annular dilation and leaflet tethering, less is understood about how quantification of valve dynamics can inform surgical treatment of IMR or predict short-term recurrence of the disease. As a step towards filling this knowledge gap, we present a novel framework for 4D segmentation and geometric modeling of the mitral valve in real-time 3D echocardiography (rt-3DE). The framework integrates multi-atlas label fusion and template-based medial modeling to generate quantitatively descriptive models of valve dynamics. The novelty of this work is that temporal consistency in the rt-3DE segmentations is enforced during both the segmentation and modeling stages with the use of groupwise label fusion and Kalman filtering. The algorithm is evaluated on rt-3DE data series from 10 patients: five with normal mitral valve morphology and five with severe IMR. In these 10 data series that total 207 individual 3DE images, each 3DE segmentation is validated against manual tracing and temporal consistency between segmentations is demonstrated. The ultimate goal is to generate accurate and consistent representations of valve dynamics that can both visually and quantitatively provide insight into normal and pathological valve function.

  6. AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECTS OF VARIABLE VALVE TIMING ON THE PERFORMANCE IN SPARK IGNITION ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali AKBAŞ

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an alternative prototype has been designed and constructed for variable valve timing systems which are used in spark ignition engines. The effects of intake valve timing and lift changing on engine performance have been investigated without changing the opening duration of the valves. A four stroke, single cylinder, spark ignition engine has been used for these experiments.

  7. Application of several variable-valve-timing concepts to an LHR engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, T.; Keribar, R.; Sawlivala, M.; Hakim, N.

    1987-01-01

    The paper discusses advantages provided by electronically controlled hydraulically activated valves (ECVs) when applied to low heat rejection (LHR) engines. The ECV concept provides additional engine control flexibility by allowing for a variable valve timing as a function of speed and load, or for a given transient condition. The results of a study carried out to assess the benefits that this flexibility can offer to an LHR engine indicated that, when judged on the benefits to BSFC, volumetric efficiency, and peak firing pressure, ECVs would provide only modest benefits in comparison to conventional valve profiles. It is noted, however, that once installed on the engine, the ECVs would permit a whole range of certain more sophisticated variable valve timing strategies not otherwise possible, such as high compression cranking, engine braking, cylinder cutouts, and volumetric efficiency timing with engine speed.

  8. Real-time 3D visualization of cellular rearrangements during cardiac valve formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestel, Jenny; Ramadass, Radhan; Gauvrit, Sebastien; Helker, Christian; Herzog, Wiebke; Stainier, Didier Y R

    2016-06-15

    During cardiac valve development, the single-layered endocardial sheet at the atrioventricular canal (AVC) is remodeled into multilayered immature valve leaflets. Most of our knowledge about this process comes from examining fixed samples that do not allow a real-time appreciation of the intricacies of valve formation. Here, we exploit non-invasive in vivo imaging techniques to identify the dynamic cell behaviors that lead to the formation of the immature valve leaflets. We find that in zebrafish, the valve leaflets consist of two sets of endocardial cells at the luminal and abluminal side, which we refer to as luminal cells (LCs) and abluminal cells (ALCs), respectively. By analyzing cellular rearrangements during valve formation, we observed that the LCs and ALCs originate from the atrium and ventricle, respectively. Furthermore, we utilized Wnt/β-catenin and Notch signaling reporter lines to distinguish between the LCs and ALCs, and also found that cardiac contractility and/or blood flow is necessary for the endocardial expression of these signaling reporters. Thus, our 3D analyses of cardiac valve formation in zebrafish provide fundamental insights into the cellular rearrangements underlying this process. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. On-line diagnostic techniques for air-operated control valves based on time series analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kenji; Matsuoka, Yoshinori; Minamikawa, Shigeru; Komatsu, Yasuki; Satoh, Takeshi.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to study the feasibility of applying on-line diagnostic techniques based on time series analysis to air-operated control valves - numerous valves of the type which are used in PWR plants. Generally the techniques can detect anomalies by failures in the initial stages for which detection is difficult by conventional surveillance of process parameters measured directly. However, the effectiveness of these techniques depends on the system being diagnosed. The difficulties in applying diagnostic techniques to air-operated control valves seem to come from the reduced sensitivity of their response as compared with hydraulic control systems, as well as the need to identify anomalies in low level signals that fluctuate only slightly but continuously. In this research, simulation tests were performed by setting various kinds of failure modes for a test valve with the same specifications as of a valve actually used in the plants. Actual control signals recorded from an operating plant were then used as input signals for simulation. The results of the tests confirmed the feasibility of applying on-line diagnostic techniques based on time series analysis to air-operated control valves. (author)

  10. Optimal timing of valve replacement in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Emine; Ipek, Gökürk; Ayhan, Huseyin; Nacar, Alper Bugra; Kasapkara, Haci Ahmet; Sani, Cenk; Basbug, Serdar; Kurt, Mustafa; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-09-01

    Patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) constitute a heterogeneous group which includes not only certain cases who are at high risk of sudden death and valve-related heart failure, but also those at low risk for these events. Degenerative AS, which includes a majority of patients with AS, is characterized by stricture of the valve, increased arterial stiffness, and diverse left ventricular response to the valvular plus arterial vascular load. In addition to using traditional primary parameters, the severity of AS and the total left ventricular load should be assessed using new measures such as energy loss index and valvulo-arterial impedance. Natriuretic peptide levels and global longitudinal strain imaging may also be used as secondary parameters to obtain information about left ventricular systolic function, although these parameters do not correlate with the severity of AS. Exercise stress testing and exercise echocardiography are also beneficial when assessing the patient if they are symptomatic, and for determining valvular and left ventricular contractile reserves. The aim of this review was to emphasize the importance of risk stratifications in asymptomatic severe AS cases, and to assess the severity of AS using not only conventional methods but also new methods on which much emphasis has been placed during recent years.

  11. Prosthetic mitral valve obstruction: role of real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Arun; Jahan, Kahroba; Lotun, Kapildeo; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2015-09-21

    Acute prosthetic valve thrombosis is a potentially serious complication with an incidence as high as 6% per patient-year for prostheses in the mitral position. Accurate diagnosis of the degree of obstruction and differentiation of pannus versus thrombus is critical in determination of the best mode of therapy. We discuss a case of a patient with multiple comorbidities who presented with mechanical mitral valve obstruction where both transthoracic and two-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) were limited in making an accurate diagnosis regarding the mechanism of obstruction. Real-time 3D-TEE (RT-3DTEE) was critical in identifying a partial thrombus on the mechanical valve and guided the choice of thrombolysis as the most appropriate intervention, thus avoiding high-risk surgery in this patient with significant multiple comorbidities. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. SULIVAN: Remote Manual Valve Monitoring System Real-Time Transmission of Valve Positions to Reduce Alignment Errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denis, J.C.; Mace, J.R.; Perisse, J.

    2015-07-01

    Every year, a number of plants worldwide face valve misalignment issues that can lead to damaged components and unplanned extended outage. By installing valve monitoring solutions, the plant can expect a reduction of the risk of valve misalignment events. Over the past years, AREVA has developed Wireless communication solutions and Smart sensor expertise at its own facilities and has carried out tests in nuclear power plants. This paper presents AREVA Wireless studies and Solutions that could be implemented in a nuclear plant. These solutions are mainly based on IoT technologies as MEMs and Low Power Wide Area Network, LPWAN. (Author)

  13. SULIVAN: Remote Manual Valve Monitoring System Real-Time Transmission of Valve Positions to Reduce Alignment Errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, J.C.; Mace, J.R.; Perisse, J.

    2015-01-01

    Every year, a number of plants worldwide face valve misalignment issues that can lead to damaged components and unplanned extended outage. By installing valve monitoring solutions, the plant can expect a reduction of the risk of valve misalignment events. Over the past years, AREVA has developed Wireless communication solutions and Smart sensor expertise at its own facilities and has carried out tests in nuclear power plants. This paper presents AREVA Wireless studies and Solutions that could be implemented in a nuclear plant. These solutions are mainly based on IoT technologies as MEMs and Low Power Wide Area Network, LPWAN. (Author)

  14. A microfluidic timer for timed valving and pumping in centrifugal microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, F; Zehnle, S; Mark, D; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2015-03-21

    Accurate timing of microfluidic operations is essential for the automation of complex laboratory workflows, in particular for the supply of sample and reagents. Here we present a new unit operation for timed valving and pumping in centrifugal microfluidics. It is based on temporary storage of pneumatic energy and time delayed sudden release of said energy. The timer is loaded at a relatively higher spinning frequency. The countdown is started by reducing to a relatively lower release frequency, at which the timer is released after a pre-defined delay time. We demonstrate timing for 1) the sequential release of 4 liquids at times of 2.7 s ± 0.2 s, 14.0 s ± 0.5 s, 43.4 s ± 1.0 s and 133.8 s ± 2.3 s, 2) timed valving of typical assay reagents (contact angles 36-78°, viscosities 0.9-5.6 mPa s) and 3) on demand valving of liquids from 4 inlet chambers in any user defined sequence controlled by the spinning protocol. The microfluidic timer is compatible to all wetting properties and viscosities of common assay reagents and does neither require assistive equipment, nor coatings. It can be monolithically integrated into a microfluidic test carrier and is compatible to scalable fabrication technologies such as thermoforming or injection molding.

  15. Time-Resolved Micro PIV in the Pivoting Area of the Triflo Mechanical Heart Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennemann, Bernhard M; Rösgen, Thomas; Carrel, Thierry P; Obrist, Dominik

    2016-09-01

    The Lapeyre-Triflo FURTIVA valve aims at combining the favorable hemodynamics of bioprosthetic heart valves with the durability of mechanical heart valves (MHVs). The pivoting region of MHVs is hemodynamically of special interest as it may be a region of high shear stresses, combined with areas of flow stagnation. Here, platelets can be activated and may form a thrombus which in the most severe case can compromise leaflet mobility. In this study we set up an experiment to replicate the pulsatile flow in the aortic root and to study the flow in the pivoting region under physiological hemodynamic conditions (CO = 4.5 L/min / CO = 3.0 L/min, f = 60 BPM). It was found that the flow velocity in the pivoting region could reach values close to that of the bulk flow during systole. At the onset of diastole the three valve leaflets closed in a very synchronous manner within an average closing time of 55 ms which is much slower than what has been measured for traditional bileaflet MHVs. Hot spots for elevated viscous shear stresses were found at the flanges of the housing and the tips of the leaflet ears. Systolic VSS was maximal during mid-systole and reached levels of up to 40 Pa.

  16. Real-time numerical evaluation of dynamic tests with sudden closing of valves in piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geidel, W.; Leimbach, K.R.

    1979-01-01

    The sudden closing of a valve in a piping system causes a build-up of pressure which, in turn, causes severe vibrations of the structural system. The licensing procedure calls for on-site tests to determine the dynamic effects of such closing of valves, and to check the stresses and displacements against the allowable ones. The measurements include time histories of displacements, accelerations and internal pressure. The computer program KWUROHR for the static and dynamic analysis of piping systems has been used by KWU and several subcontractors during the past four vears. This program has been extended by adding a subroutine package which computes time histories of displacements, accelerations and stresses resulting from the input of measured time histories of internal pressures at selected locations. The computer algorithm establishes the topological connectivity between the internal pressure measuring locations, to set up a logic for linear pressure interpolation between these points and pressure steps at reducers and valves. A minimum number of input points is required to give realistic results. (orig.)

  17. Effects of various intake valve timings and spark timings on combustion, cyclic THC and NOX emissions during cold start phase with idle operation in CVVT engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kwan Hee; Lee, Hyung Min; Hwang, In Goo; Myung, Cha Lee; Park, Sim Soo

    2008-01-01

    In a gasoline SI engine, valve events and spark timings put forth a major influence on overall efficiency, fuel economy, and exhaust emissions. Residual gases controlled by the valve overlap can be used to reduce NOx emissions and the spark retardation technique can be used to improve raw THC emissions and catalyst light-off performance during the cold start phase. This paper investigated the behaviors of the engine and its combustion characteristics with various intake valve timings and spark timings during the fast idle condition and cold start. And cyclic THC and NOx emissions were measured at the exhaust port and their formation mechanisms were examined with fast response gas analyzers. As a result, THCs and NOx were reduced by 35% and 23% with optimizing valve overlap and spark advance during the cold transient start phase. Consequently, the valve events and ignition timings were found to significantly affect combustion phenomena and cold-start emissions

  18. Factors associated with the development of aortic valve regurgitation over time after two different techniques of valve-sparing aortic root surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Thorsten; Charitos, Efstratios I; Stierle, Ulrich; Robinson, Derek; Gorski, Armin; Sievers, Hans-H; Misfeld, Martin

    2009-02-01

    Early results after aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction are excellent. Longer-term follow-up, especially with regard to aortic valve function, is required for further judgment of these techniques. Between July of 1993 and September of 2006, 108 consecutive patients (mean age 53.0 +/- 15.8 years) underwent the Yacoub operation (group Y) and 83 patients underwent the David operation (group D). Innovative multilevel hierarchic modeling methods were used to analyze aortic regurgitation over time. In general, aortic regurgitation increased with time in both groups. Factors associated with the development of a significant increase in aortic regurgitation were Marfan syndrome, concomitant cusp intervention, and preoperative aortic anulus dimension. In Marfan syndrome, the initial aortic regurgitation was higher in group Y versus group D (0.56 aortic regurgitation vs 0.29 aortic regurgitation, P = .049), whereas the mean annual progression rate of aortic regurgitation was marginally higher in group Y (0.132 aortic regurgitation vs 0.075 aortic regurgitation, P = .1). Concomitant cusp intervention was associated with a significant aortic regurgitation increase in both groups (P Marfan syndrome and a large preoperative aortic annulus diameter were better treated with the reimplantation technique, whereas those with a smaller diameter were better treated with the remodeling technique. Concomitant free-edge plication of prolapsing cusps was disadvantageous in both groups. Considering these factors may serve to improve the aortic valve longevity after valve-sparing aortic root surgery.

  19. A funnel shaped pannus formation above the mitral prosthetic valve diagnosed with real time three-dimensional echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezgi Polat Ocaklı

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic valve obstruction due to pannus formation can be a life-threatening complication. We showed that real time three dimensional echocardiography has incremental value in diagnosing pannus localization and extent.

  20. The Analysis of Loop Seal Purge Time for the KHNP Pressurizer Safety Valve Test Facility Using the GOTHIC Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Ae; Kim, Chang Hyun; Kweon, Gab Joo; Park, Jong Woon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    The pressurizer safety valves (PSV) in Pressurized Water Reactors are required to provide the overpressure protection for the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) during the overpressure transients. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company (KHNP) plans to build the PSV test facility for the purpose of providing the PSV pop-up characteristics and the loop seal dynamics for the new safety analysis. When the pressurizer safety valve is mounted in a loop seal configuration, the valve must initially pass the loop seal water prior to popping open on steam. The loop seal in the upstream of PSV prevents leakage of hydrogen gas or steam through the safety valve seat. This paper studies on the loop seal clearing dynamics using GOTHIC-7.2a code to verify the effects of loop seal purge time on the reactor coolant system overpressure.

  1. Obstructed bi-leaflet prosthetic mitral valve imaging with real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimbo, Mai; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Shunsuke; Terada, Mai; Iino, Takako; Iino, Kenji; Ito, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (RT3D-TEE) can provide unique visualization and better understanding of the relationship among cardiac structures. Here, we report the case of an 85-year-old woman with an obstructed mitral prosthetic valve diagnosed promptly by RT3D-TEE, which clearly showed a leaflet stuck in the closed position. The opening and closing angles of the valve leaflets measured by RT3D-TEE were compatible with those measured by fluoroscopy. Moreover, RT3D-TEE revealed, in the ring of the prosthetic valve, thrombi that were not visible on fluoroscopy. RT3D-TEE might be a valuable diagnostic technique for prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Spin-resolved electron waiting times in a quantum-dot spin valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gaomin; Xu, Fuming; Mi, Shuo; Wang, Jian

    2018-04-01

    We study the electronic waiting-time distributions (WTDs) in a noninteracting quantum-dot spin valve by varying spin polarization and the noncollinear angle between the magnetizations of the leads using the scattering matrix approach. Since the quantum-dot spin valve involves two channels (spin up and down) in both the incoming and outgoing channels, we study three different kinds of WTDs, which are two-channel WTD, spin-resolved single-channel WTD, and cross-channel WTD. We analyze the behaviors of WTDs in short times, correlated with the current behaviors for different spin polarizations and noncollinear angles. Cross-channel WTD reflects the correlation between two spin channels and can be used to characterize the spin-transfer torque process. We study the influence of the earlier detection on the subsequent detection from the perspective of cross-channel WTD, and define the influence degree quantity as the cumulative absolute difference between cross-channel WTDs and first-passage time distributions to quantitatively characterize the spin-flip process. We observe that influence degree versus spin-transfer torque for different noncollinear angles as well as different polarizations collapse into a single curve showing universal behaviors. This demonstrates that cross-channel WTDs can be a pathway to characterize spin correlation in spintronics system.

  3. Towards real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance guided transarterial CoreValve implantation: in vivo evaluation in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance (rtCMR) is considered attractive for guiding TAVI. Owing to an unlimited scan plane orientation and an unsurpassed soft-tissue contrast with simultaneous device visualization, rtCMR is presumed to allow safe device navigation and to offer optimal orientation for precise axial positioning. We sought to evaluate the preclinical feasibility of rtCMR-guided transarterial aortic valve implatation (TAVI) using the nitinol-based Medtronic CoreValve bioprosthesis. Methods rtCMR-guided transfemoral (n = 2) and transsubclavian (n = 6) TAVI was performed in 8 swine using the original CoreValve prosthesis and a modified, CMR-compatible delivery catheter without ferromagnetic components. Results rtCMR using TrueFISP sequences provided reliable imaging guidance during TAVI, which was successful in 6 swine. One transfemoral attempt failed due to unsuccessful aortic arch passage and one pericardial tamponade with subsequent death occurred as a result of ventricular perforation by the device tip due to an operating error, this complication being detected without delay by rtCMR. rtCMR allowed for a detailed, simultaneous visualization of the delivery system with the mounted stent-valve and the surrounding anatomy, resulting in improved visualization during navigation through the vasculature, passage of the aortic valve, and during placement and deployment of the stent-valve. Post-interventional success could be confirmed using ECG-triggered time-resolved cine-TrueFISP and flow-sensitive phase-contrast sequences. Intended valve position was confirmed by ex-vivo histology. Conclusions Our study shows that rtCMR-guided TAVI using the commercial CoreValve prosthesis in conjunction with a modified delivery system is feasible in swine, allowing improved procedural guidance including immediate detection of complications and direct functional assessment with reduction of radiation and omission of contrast media. PMID:22453050

  4. Towards real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance guided transarterial CoreValve implantation: in vivo evaluation in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlert, Philipp; Parohl, Nina; Albert, Juliane; Schäfer, Lena; Reinhardt, Renate; Kaiser, Gernot M; McDougall, Ian; Decker, Brad; Plicht, Björn; Erbel, Raimund; Eggebrecht, Holger; Ladd, Mark E; Quick, Harald H

    2012-03-27

    Real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance (rtCMR) is considered attractive for guiding TAVI. Owing to an unlimited scan plane orientation and an unsurpassed soft-tissue contrast with simultaneous device visualization, rtCMR is presumed to allow safe device navigation and to offer optimal orientation for precise axial positioning. We sought to evaluate the preclinical feasibility of rtCMR-guided transarterial aortic valve implatation (TAVI) using the nitinol-based Medtronic CoreValve bioprosthesis. rtCMR-guided transfemoral (n = 2) and transsubclavian (n = 6) TAVI was performed in 8 swine using the original CoreValve prosthesis and a modified, CMR-compatible delivery catheter without ferromagnetic components. rtCMR using TrueFISP sequences provided reliable imaging guidance during TAVI, which was successful in 6 swine. One transfemoral attempt failed due to unsuccessful aortic arch passage and one pericardial tamponade with subsequent death occurred as a result of ventricular perforation by the device tip due to an operating error, this complication being detected without delay by rtCMR. rtCMR allowed for a detailed, simultaneous visualization of the delivery system with the mounted stent-valve and the surrounding anatomy, resulting in improved visualization during navigation through the vasculature, passage of the aortic valve, and during placement and deployment of the stent-valve. Post-interventional success could be confirmed using ECG-triggered time-resolved cine-TrueFISP and flow-sensitive phase-contrast sequences. Intended valve position was confirmed by ex-vivo histology. Our study shows that rtCMR-guided TAVI using the commercial CoreValve prosthesis in conjunction with a modified delivery system is feasible in swine, allowing improved procedural guidance including immediate detection of complications and direct functional assessment with reduction of radiation and omission of contrast media.

  5. Towards real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance guided transarterial CoreValve implantation: in vivo evaluation in swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahlert Philipp

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance (rtCMR is considered attractive for guiding TAVI. Owing to an unlimited scan plane orientation and an unsurpassed soft-tissue contrast with simultaneous device visualization, rtCMR is presumed to allow safe device navigation and to offer optimal orientation for precise axial positioning. We sought to evaluate the preclinical feasibility of rtCMR-guided transarterial aortic valve implatation (TAVI using the nitinol-based Medtronic CoreValve bioprosthesis. Methods rtCMR-guided transfemoral (n = 2 and transsubclavian (n = 6 TAVI was performed in 8 swine using the original CoreValve prosthesis and a modified, CMR-compatible delivery catheter without ferromagnetic components. Results rtCMR using TrueFISP sequences provided reliable imaging guidance during TAVI, which was successful in 6 swine. One transfemoral attempt failed due to unsuccessful aortic arch passage and one pericardial tamponade with subsequent death occurred as a result of ventricular perforation by the device tip due to an operating error, this complication being detected without delay by rtCMR. rtCMR allowed for a detailed, simultaneous visualization of the delivery system with the mounted stent-valve and the surrounding anatomy, resulting in improved visualization during navigation through the vasculature, passage of the aortic valve, and during placement and deployment of the stent-valve. Post-interventional success could be confirmed using ECG-triggered time-resolved cine-TrueFISP and flow-sensitive phase-contrast sequences. Intended valve position was confirmed by ex-vivo histology. Conclusions Our study shows that rtCMR-guided TAVI using the commercial CoreValve prosthesis in conjunction with a modified delivery system is feasible in swine, allowing improved procedural guidance including immediate detection of complications and direct functional assessment with reduction of radiation and omission of contrast media.

  6. VALIDATION OF SPRING OPERATED PRESSURE RELIEF VALVE TIME TO FAILURE AND THE IMPORTANCE OF STATISTICALLY SUPPORTED MAINTENANCE INTERVALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, R; Stephen Harris, S

    2009-02-18

    The Savannah River Site operates a Relief Valve Repair Shop certified by the National Board of Pressure Vessel Inspectors to NB-23, The National Board Inspection Code. Local maintenance forces perform inspection, testing, and repair of approximately 1200 spring-operated relief valves (SORV) each year as the valves are cycled in from the field. The Site now has over 7000 certified test records in the Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS); a summary of that data is presented in this paper. In previous papers, several statistical techniques were used to investigate failure on demand and failure rates including a quantal response method for predicting the failure probability as a function of time in service. The non-conservative failure mode for SORV is commonly termed 'stuck shut'; industry defined as the valve opening at greater than or equal to 1.5 times the cold set pressure. Actual time to failure is typically not known, only that failure occurred some time since the last proof test (censored data). This paper attempts to validate the assumptions underlying the statistical lifetime prediction results using Monte Carlo simulation. It employs an aging model for lift pressure as a function of set pressure, valve manufacturer, and a time-related aging effect. This paper attempts to answer two questions: (1) what is the predicted failure rate over the chosen maintenance/ inspection interval; and do we understand aging sufficient enough to estimate risk when basing proof test intervals on proof test results?

  7. Is the time-dependent behaviour of the aortic valve intrinsically quasi-linear?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anssari-Benam, Afshin

    2014-05-01

    The widely popular quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) theory has been employed extensively in the literature for characterising the time-dependent behaviour of many biological tissues, including the aortic valve (AV). However, in contrast to other tissues, application of QLV to AV data has been met with varying success, with studies reporting discrepancies in the values of the associated quantified parameters for data collected from different timescales in experiments. Furthermore, some studies investigating the stress-relaxation phenomenon in valvular tissues have suggested discrete relaxation spectra, as an alternative to the continuous spectrum proposed by the QLV. These indications put forward a more fundamental question: Is the time-dependent behaviour of the aortic valve intrinsically quasi-linear? In other words, can the inherent characteristics of the tissue that govern its biomechanical behaviour facilitate a quasi-linear time-dependent behaviour? This paper attempts to address these questions by presenting a mathematical analysis to derive the expressions for the stress-relaxation G( t) and creep J( t) functions for the AV tissue within the QLV theory. The principal inherent characteristic of the tissue is incorporated into the QLV formulation in the form of the well-established gradual fibre recruitment model, and the corresponding expressions for G( t) and J( t) are derived. The outcomes indicate that the resulting stress-relaxation and creep functions do not appear to voluntarily follow the observed experimental trends reported in previous studies. These results highlight that the time-dependent behaviour of the AV may not be quasi-linear, and more suitable theoretical criteria and models may be required to explain the phenomenon based on tissue's microstructure, and for more accurate estimation of the associated material parameters. In general, these results may further be applicable to other planar soft tissues of the same class, i.e. with the same

  8. Problem: Mitral Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... each time the left ventricle contracts. Watch an animation of mitral valve regurgitation A leaking mitral valve ... Not Alone Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  9. Time-resolved PIV technique for high temporal resolution measurement of mechanical prosthetic aortic valve fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, R; Morbiducci, U; Rossi, M; Scalise, L; Verdonck, P; Grigioni, M

    2007-02-01

    Prosthetic heart valves (PHVs) have been used to replace diseased native valves for more than five decades. Among these, mechanical PHVs are the most frequently implanted. Unfortunately, these devices still do not achieve ideal behavior and lead to many complications, many of which are related to fluid mechanics. The fluid dynamics of mechanical PHVs are particularly complex and the fine-scale characteristics of such flows call for very accurate experimental techniques. Adequate temporal resolution can be reached by applying time-resolved PIV, a high-resolution dynamic technique which is able to capture detailed chronological changes in the velocity field. The aim of this experimental study is to investigate the evolution of the flow field in a detailed time domain of a commercial bileaflet PHV in a mock-loop mimicking unsteady conditions, by means of time-resolved 2D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The investigated flow field corresponded to the region immediately downstream of the valve plane. Spatial resolution as in "standard" PIV analysis of prosthetic valve fluid dynamics was used. The combination of a Nd:YLF high-repetition-rate double-cavity laser with a high frame rate CMOS camera allowed a detailed, highly temporally resolved acquisition (up to 10000 fps depending on the resolution) of the flow downstream of the PHV. Features that were observed include the non-homogeneity and unsteadiness of the phenomenon and the presence of large-scale vortices within the field, especially in the wake of the valve leaflets. Furthermore, we observed that highly temporally cycle-resolved analysis allowed the different behaviors exhibited by the bileaflet valve at closure to be captured in different acquired cardiac cycles. By accurately capturing hemodynamically relevant time scales of motion, time-resolved PIV characterization can realistically be expected to help designers in improving PHV performance and in furnishing comprehensive validation with experimental data

  10. Cerebrovascular accidents complicating transcatheter aortic valve implantation: frequency, timing and impact on outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stortecky, Stefan; Windecker, Stephan; Pilgrim, Thomas; Heg, Dik; Buellesfeld, Lutz; Khattab, Ahmed A; Huber, Christoph; Gloekler, Steffen; Nietlispach, Fabian; Mattle, Heinrich; Jüni, Peter; Wenaweser, Peter

    2012-05-15

    Cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) are considered among the most serious adverse events after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the frequency and timing of CVA after TAVI and to investigate the impact on clinical outcomes within 30 days of the procedure. Between August 2007 and October 2011, 389 high-risk elderly patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis underwent TAVI via transfemoral, transapical or subclavian access. A total of 14 patients (3.6%) experienced at least one CVA within 30 days of follow-up and most events (74%) occurred within the first day of the procedure. Patients with CVA had an increased risk of all-cause (42.3% vs. 5.1%, ORadjusted 11.7, 95% CI 3.4-40.3, pCerebrovascular accidents among patients undergoing TAVI occur predominantly during the periprocedural period, are associated with multiple implantation attempts of the bioprosthesis and significantly impair prognosis.

  11. System for detecting operating errors in a variable valve timing engine using pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Matthew A.; Marriot, Craig D

    2013-07-02

    A method and control module includes a pressure sensor data comparison module that compares measured pressure volume signal segments to ideal pressure volume segments. A valve actuation hardware remedy module performs a hardware remedy in response to comparing the measured pressure volume signal segments to the ideal pressure volume segments when a valve actuation hardware failure is detected.

  12. Evaluation of prosthetic heart valves by transesophageal echocardiography: problems, pitfalls, and timing of echocardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brink, Renee B. A.

    2006-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is especially suitable for examination of prosthetic valves because of the proximity of the esophagus to the heart and absence of interference with lungs and ribs. This article reviews normal and abnormal morphologic characteristics of prosthetic valves such as

  13. Diagnosis of the prosthetic heart valve pannus formation with real-time three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Mehmet; Gündüz, Sabahattin; Yildiz, Mustafa; Duran, Nilüfer Eksi

    2010-05-01

    Prosthetic heart valve obstruction (PHVO) caused by pannus formation is an uncommon but serious complication. Although two-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (2D-TEE) is the method of choice in the evaluation of PHVO, visualization of pannus is almost impossible with 2D-TEE. While demonstrating the precise aetiology of PHVO is essential for guiding the therapy, either thrombolysis for valve thrombosis or surgery for pannus formation, more sophisticated imaging techniques are needed in patients with suspected pannus formation. We present real-time 3D-TEE imaging in a patient with mechanical mitral PHVO, clearly demonstrating pannus overgrowth.

  14. Mitral Valve Prolapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) occurs when one of your heart's valves doesn't work properly. The flaps of the valve are "floppy" and ... to run in families. Most of the time, MVP doesn't cause any problems. Rarely, blood can ...

  15. Variable valve trains for internal combustion engines to control the valve height and the opening time; Variable Ventiltriebe fuer Verbrennungsmotoren zur Veraenderung von Ventilhub und Oeffnungsdauer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Gunther [ThyssenKrupp Presta TecCenter AG, Eschen (Liechtenstein). R and D Projects

    2009-11-15

    The PDVC (Presta Delta Valve Control) continuously variable valve lift system is a mechanical system of valve control for achieving optimum performance and resulting in improved fuel consumption and reduced emissions across the entire operating range of the combustion engine. The continuous variability allows for engine load control by adjusting the valve height and therefore can also be used to replace the traditional throttle. The advantages are lower fuel consumption, reduction in emissions, quicker engine response, higher torque during the low speed range as well as more stable idling. The PSVC (Presta Shiftable Valve Control) is a 3 step shiftable valve lift system that offers the possibility to achieve a major part of these performance and associated consumption benefits with a simpler and therefore more cost-effective system. (orig.)

  16. Heart valve surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... replacement; Valve repair; Heart valve prosthesis; Mechanical valves; Prosthetic valves ... surgery. Your heart valve has been damaged by infection ( endocarditis ). You have received a new heart valve ...

  17. Optimal timing of aortic valve replacement in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marumoto, Akira; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Kishimoto, Yuichiro; Saiki, Munehiro; Nishimura, Motonobu

    2014-01-01

    The elderly population with severe aortic stenosis (AS) requiring aortic valve replacement (AVR) is increasing. The optimal timing of AVR in these patients has been under discussion. We retrospectively reviewed the data from severe AS patients (n = 84) who underwent AVR with/without concomitant procedures from 2005 to 2010. The symptom status, preoperative data, operative outcome, late survival and freedom from cardiac events were compared between elderly patients (age ≥80 years [n = 31]) and younger patients (age <80 years [n = 53]). The operative mortality in elderly patients (3.2 %) and younger patients (3.8 %) was comparable. The symptoms in elderly patients were more severe and hospitalized heart failure (HF) was more frequently noted as the primary symptom (p = 0.017). Patients with and without hospitalized HF differed significantly in late survival and freedom from cardiac events (p = 0.001), but advanced age had no significant effect. The results of a Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed that hospitalized HF was a significant predictor for cardiac events after AVR, irrespective of age (hazard ratio 6.93, 95 % confidence interval 1.83-26.26, p < 0.004). In elderly patients with severe AS, surgery should be recommended even in the presence of minimal symptoms and should be performed before the onset of life-threatening HF.

  18. Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood. There are 4 valves in the heart: tricuspid, pulmonary, mitral, and aortic. Two types of problems can disrupt blood flow through the valves: regurgitation or stenosis. Regurgitation is also called insufficiency or incompetence. Regurgitation happens when a valve doesn’ ...

  19. Impact of timing and surgical approach on outcomes after mitral valve regurgitation operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Louis-Mathieu; Rodriguez, Evelio; Lehr, Eric J; Kindell, Linda C; Nifong, L Wiley; Ferguson, T Bruce; Chitwood, W Randolph

    2012-05-01

    This study investigated whether the timing of mitral valve (MV) repair or surgical approach affects outcomes in patients with MV regurgitation. Between 1992 and 2009, 2,255 patients underwent MV operations, including 1,305 with isolated MV regurgitation operations (1,054 repairs, 251 replacements). Surgical approaches were sternotomy in 377, video-assisted right minithoracotomy in 481, or robot-assisted in 447. Mean follow-up was 6.4±4.5 years (maximum, 19 years). Sternotomy MV repairs decreased during the study while minimally invasive MV repairs increased. Robotic MV repair patients were younger, with fewer women, had better left ventricular ejection fractions, and were more likely to have myxomatous degeneration (all p<0.001). The robotic approach led to a higher MV repair rate and increased use of leaflet/chordal procedures but had longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times (all p<0.001). The 30-day mortality for isolated MV repair was similar for all approaches (p=0.409). Fewer neurological events were observed in the videoscopic and robotic groups (p=0.013). Adjusted survival was similar for all approaches (p=0.357). Survival in patients in New York Heart Association class I to II with myxomatous degeneration or annular dilatation was similar to a matched population but was worse for patients in class III to IV or undergoing MV replacement. MV repair in patients with severe MV regurgitation should be performed before New York Heart Association class III to IV symptoms develop. Minimally invasive MV repair techniques render similar outcomes as the sternotomy approach. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Relief valve testing study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BROMM, R.D.

    2001-01-01

    Reclosing pressure-actuated valves, commonly called relief valves, are designed to relieve system pressure once it reaches the set point of the valve. They generally operate either proportional to the differential between their set pressure and the system pressure (gradual lift) or by rapidly opening fully when the set pressure is reached (pop action). A pop action valve allows the maximum fluid flow through the valve when the set pressure is reached. A gradual lift valve allows fluid flow in proportion to how much the system pressure has exceeded the set pressure of the valve (in the case of pressure relief) or has decreased below the set pressure (vacuum relief). These valves are used to protect systems from over and under pressurization. They are used on boilers, pressure vessels, piping systems and vacuum systems to prevent catastrophic failures of these systems, which can happen if they are under or over pressurized beyond the material tolerances. The construction of these valves ranges from extreme precision of less than a psi tolerance and a very short lifetime to extremely robust construction such as those used on historic railroad steam engines that are designed operate many times a day without changing their set pressure when the engines are operating. Relief valves can be designed to be immune to the effects of back pressure or to be vulnerable to it. Which type of valve to use depends upon the design requirements of the system

  1. Towards real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance-guided transarterial aortic valve implantation: In vitro evaluation and modification of existing devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladd Mark E

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is considered an attractive alternative for guiding transarterial aortic valve implantation (TAVI featuring unlimited scan plane orientation and unsurpassed soft-tissue contrast with simultaneous device visualization. We sought to evaluate the CMR characteristics of both currently commercially available transcatheter heart valves (Edwards SAPIEN™, Medtronic CoreValve® including their dedicated delivery devices and of a custom-built, CMR-compatible delivery device for the Medtronic CoreValve® prosthesis as an initial step towards real-time CMR-guided TAVI. Methods The devices were systematically examined in phantom models on a 1.5-Tesla scanner using high-resolution T1-weighted 3D FLASH, real-time TrueFISP and flow-sensitive phase-contrast sequences. Images were analyzed for device visualization quality, device-related susceptibility artifacts, and radiofrequency signal shielding. Results CMR revealed major susceptibility artifacts for the two commercial delivery devices caused by considerable metal braiding and precluding in vivo application. The stainless steel-based Edwards SAPIEN™ prosthesis was also regarded not suitable for CMR-guided TAVI due to susceptibility artifacts exceeding the valve's dimensions and hindering an exact placement. In contrast, the nitinol-based Medtronic CoreValve® prosthesis was excellently visualized with delineation even of small details and, thus, regarded suitable for CMR-guided TAVI, particularly since reengineering of its delivery device toward CMR-compatibility resulted in artifact elimination and excellent visualization during catheter movement and valve deployment on real-time TrueFISP imaging. Reliable flow measurements could be performed for both stent-valves after deployment using phase-contrast sequences. Conclusions The present study shows that the Medtronic CoreValve® prosthesis is potentially suited for real-time CMR-guided placement

  2. Tight valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedj, F.

    1987-01-01

    This sealed valve is made with a valve seat, an axial valve with a rod fixed to its upper end, a thick bell surrounding the rod and welded by a thin join on the valve casing, a threated ring screwed onto the upper end of the rod and a magnet or electromagnet rotating the ring outside the bell [fr

  3. Outcomes of pulmonary valve replacement in 170 patients with chronic pulmonary regurgitation after relief of right ventricular outflow tract obstruction: implications for optimal timing of pulmonary valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheul; Kim, Yang Min; Lee, Chang-Ha; Kwak, Jae Gun; Park, Chun Soo; Song, Jin Young; Shim, Woo-Sup; Choi, Eun Young; Lee, Sang Yun; Baek, Jae Suk

    2012-09-11

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate outcomes of pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) in patients with chronic pulmonary regurgitation (PR) and to better define the optimal timing of PVR. Although PVR is effective in reducing right ventricular (RV) volume overload in patients with chronic PR, the optimal timing of PVR is not well defined. A total of 170 patients who underwent PVR between January 1998 and March 2011 for chronic PR were retrospectively analyzed. To define the optimal timing of PVR, pre-operative and post-operative cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data (n = 67) were analyzed. The median age at the time of PVR was 16.7 years. Follow-up completeness was 95%, and the median follow-up duration was 5.9 years. Overall and event-free survival at 10 years was 98% and 70%, respectively. Post-operative MRI showed significant reduction in RV volumes and significant improvement in biventricular function. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis revealed a cutoff value of 168 ml/m(2) for non-normalization of RV end-diastolic volume index (EDVI) and 80 ml/m(2) for RV end-systolic volume index (ESVI). Cutoff values for optimal outcome (normalized RV volumes and function) were 163 ml/m(2) for RV EDVI and 80 ml/m(2) for RV ESVI. Higher pre-operative RV ESVI was identified as a sole independent risk factor for suboptimal outcome. Midterm outcomes of PVR in patients with chronic PR were acceptable. PVR should be considered before RV EDVI exceeds 163 ml/m(2) or RV ESVI exceeds 80 ml/m(2), with more attention to RV ESVI. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An Analysis of the Impact of Valve Closure Time on the Course of Water Hammer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodura, Apoloniusz

    2016-06-01

    The knowledge of transient flow in pressure pipelines is very important for the designing and describing of pressure networks. The water hammer is the most common example of transient flow in pressure pipelines. During this phenomenon, the transformation of kinetic energy into pressure energy causes significant changes in pressure, which can lead to serious problems in the management of pressure networks. The phenomenon is very complex, and a large number of different factors influence its course. In the case of a water hammer caused by valve closing, the characteristic of gate closure is one of the most important factors. However, this factor is rarely investigated. In this paper, the results of physical experiments with water hammer in steel and PE pipelines are described and analyzed. For each water hammer, characteristics of pressure change and valve closing were recorded. The measurements were compared with the results of calculations perfomed by common methods used by engineers - Michaud's equation and Wood and Jones's method. The comparison revealed very significant differences between the results of calculations and the results of experiments. In addition, it was shown that, the characteristic of butterfly valve closure has a significant influence on water hammer, which should be taken into account in analyzing this phenomenon. Comparison of the results of experiments with the results of calculations? may lead to new, improved calculation methods and to new methods to describe transient flow.

  5. Check valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, H.A.; Garcia, P.

    1999-08-24

    A check valve for use in a GDCS of a nuclear reactor and having a motor driven disk including a rotatable armature for rotating the check valve disk over its entire range of motion is described. In one embodiment, the check valve includes a valve body having a coolant flow channel extending therethrough. The coolant flow channel includes an inlet end and an outlet end. A valve body seat is located on an inner surface of the valve body. The check valve further includes a disk assembly, sometimes referred to as the motor driven disc, having a counterweight and a disk shaped valve. The disk valve includes a disk base having a seat for seating with the valve body seat. The disk assembly further includes a first hinge pin member which extends at least partially through the disk assembly and is engaged to the disk. The disk valve is rotatable relative to the first hinge pin member. The check valve also includes a motor having a stator frame with a stator bore therein. An armature is rotatably positioned within the stator bore and the armature is coupled to the disk valve to cause the disk valve to rotate about its full range of motion. 5 figs.

  6. Check valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upton, H.A.; Garcia, P.

    1999-01-01

    A check valve for use in a GDCS of a nuclear reactor and having a motor driven disk including a rotatable armature for rotating the check valve disk over its entire range of motion is described. In one embodiment, the check valve includes a valve body having a coolant flow channel extending therethrough. The coolant flow channel includes an inlet end and an outlet end. A valve body seat is located on an inner surface of the valve body. The check valve further includes a disk assembly, sometimes referred to as the motor driven disc, having a counterweight and a disk shaped valve. The disk valve includes a disk base having a seat for seating with the valve body seat. The disk assembly further includes a first hinge pin member which extends at least partially through the disk assembly and is engaged to the disk. The disk valve is rotatable relative to the first hinge pin member. The check valve also includes a motor having a stator frame with a stator bore therein. An armature is rotatably positioned within the stator bore and the armature is coupled to the disk valve to cause the disk valve to rotate about its full range of motion. 5 figs

  7. Control Valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Wayne R.

    2018-03-20

    A control valve includes a first conduit having a first inlet and a first outlet and defining a first passage; a second conduit having a second inlet and a second outlet and defining a second passage, the second conduit extending into the first passage such that the second inlet is located within the first passage; and a valve plate disposed pivotably within the first passage, the valve plate defining a valve plate surface. Pivoting of the valve plate within the first passage varies flow from the first inlet to the first outlet and the valve plate is pivotal between a first position and a second position such that in the first position the valve plate substantially prevents fluid communication between the first passage and the second passage and such that in the second position the valve plate permits fluid communication between the first passage and the second passage.

  8. Valve assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandling, M.

    1981-01-01

    An improved valve assembly, used for controlling the flow of radioactive slurry, is described. Radioactive contamination of the air during removal or replacement of the valve is prevented by sucking air from the atmosphere through a portion of the structure above the valve housing. (U.K.)

  9. Real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in the assessment of mechanical prosthetic mitral valve ring thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Mehmet; Gürsoy, Ozan Mustafa; Astarcıoğlu, Mehmet Ali; Gündüz, Sabahattin; Cakal, Beytullah; Karakoyun, Süleyman; Kalçık, Macit; Kahveci, Gökhan; Duran, Nilüfer Ekşi; Yıldız, Mustafa; Cevik, Cihan

    2013-10-01

    Although 2-dimensional (2D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is the gold standard for the diagnosis of prosthetic valve thrombosis, nonobstructive clots located on mitral valve rings can be missed. Real-time 3-dimensional (3D) TEE has incremental value in the visualization of mitral prosthesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of real-time 3D TEE in the diagnosis of mitral prosthetic ring thrombosis. The clinical outcomes of these patients in relation to real-time 3D transesophageal echocardiographic findings were analyzed. Of 1,263 patients who underwent echocardiographic studies, 174 patients (37 men, 137 women) with mitral ring thrombosis detected by real-time 3D TEE constituted the main study population. Patients were followed prospectively on oral anticoagulation for 25 ± 7 months. Eighty-nine patients (51%) had thrombi that were missed on 2D TEE and depicted only on real-time 3D TEE. The remaining cases were partially visualized with 2D TEE but completely visualized with real-time 3D TEE. Thirty-seven patients (21%) had thromboembolism. The mean thickness of the ring thrombosis in patients with thromboembolism was greater than that in patients without thromboembolism (3.8 ± 0.9 vs 2.8 ± 0.7 mm, p 3D TEE during follow-up. There were no thrombi in 39 patients (25%); 45 (29%) had regression of thrombi, and there was no change in thrombus size in 68 patients (44%). Thrombus size increased in 3 patients (2%). Thrombosis was confirmed surgically and histopathologically in 12 patients (7%). In conclusion, real-time 3D TEE can detect prosthetic mitral ring thrombosis that could be missed on 2D TEE and cause thromboembolic events. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Study on gasoline HCCI engine equipped with electromagnetic variable valve timing system; Untersuchung an einem HCCI Verbrennungsmotor mit elektromagnetisch variablem Ventiltriebsystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Y.; Awasaka, M.; Takanashi, J.; Kimura, N. [Honda R and D Co., Ltd. (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    First, this paper describes a study on the technology behind the electromagnetic variable valve timing system. This system provides highly efficient and stable valve opening/closing control. At first, the main purposes of this mechanism were nonthrottling technology that is expected to a reduction in fuel consumption and improving the engine torque with optimal valve timing on stichomythic spark ignited engine. In resent years, increasing attention has been paid to a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). We also used this mechanism on HCCI study with controlling the amount of internal EGR and intake air. Schemes to extend the operational region of gasoline compression ignition were explored using single (optical) and 4-cylinder 4-stroke engines equipped with an electromagnetic variable valve timing system. This paper focuses mainly on the use of direct fuel injection devices (multi-hole and pintle types), exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) through valve timing, and their effects on the compression ignition operating ranges, and emissions. Also considered is charge boost HCCI using a mechanical supercharger. (orig.)

  11. Identification of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real Time PCR Assays in Aortic Tissue of Syrian Hamsters with Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Martínez, Carmen; Fernández, M Carmen; Soto-Navarrete, María Teresa; Jiménez-Navarro, Manuel; Durán, Ana Carmen; Fernández, Borja

    2016-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most frequent congenital cardiac malformation in humans, and appears frequently associated with dilatation of the ascending aorta. This association is likely the result of a common aetiology. Currently, a Syrian hamster strain with a relatively high (∼40%) incidence of BAV constitutes the only spontaneous animal model of BAV disease. The characterization of molecular alterations in the aorta of hamsters with BAV may serve to identify pathophysiological mechanisms and molecular markers of disease in humans. In this report, we evaluate the expression of ten candidate reference genes in aortic tissue of hamsters in order to identify housekeeping genes for normalization using quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR) assays. A total of 51 adult (180-240 days old) and 56 old (300-440 days old) animals were used. They belonged to a control strain of hamsters with normal, tricuspid aortic valve (TAV; n = 30), or to the affected strain of hamsters with TAV (n = 45) or BAV (n = 32). The expression stability of the candidate reference genes was determined by RT-qPCR using three statistical algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper. The expression analyses showed that the most stable reference genes for the three algorithms employed were Cdkn1β, G3pdh and Polr2a. We propose the use of Cdkn1β, or both Cdkn1β and G3pdh as reference genes for mRNA expression analyses in Syrian hamster aorta.

  12. Identification of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real Time PCR Assays in Aortic Tissue of Syrian Hamsters with Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Rueda-Martínez

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is the most frequent congenital cardiac malformation in humans, and appears frequently associated with dilatation of the ascending aorta. This association is likely the result of a common aetiology. Currently, a Syrian hamster strain with a relatively high (∼40% incidence of BAV constitutes the only spontaneous animal model of BAV disease. The characterization of molecular alterations in the aorta of hamsters with BAV may serve to identify pathophysiological mechanisms and molecular markers of disease in humans. In this report, we evaluate the expression of ten candidate reference genes in aortic tissue of hamsters in order to identify housekeeping genes for normalization using quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR assays. A total of 51 adult (180-240 days old and 56 old (300-440 days old animals were used. They belonged to a control strain of hamsters with normal, tricuspid aortic valve (TAV; n = 30, or to the affected strain of hamsters with TAV (n = 45 or BAV (n = 32. The expression stability of the candidate reference genes was determined by RT-qPCR using three statistical algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper. The expression analyses showed that the most stable reference genes for the three algorithms employed were Cdkn1β, G3pdh and Polr2a. We propose the use of Cdkn1β, or both Cdkn1β and G3pdh as reference genes for mRNA expression analyses in Syrian hamster aorta.

  13. Modelling and multi-objective optimization of a variable valve-timing spark-ignition engine using polynomial neural networks and evolutionary algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atashkari, K.; Nariman-Zadeh, N.; Goelcue, M.; Khalkhali, A.; Jamali, A.

    2007-01-01

    The main reason for the efficiency decrease at part load conditions for four-stroke spark-ignition (SI) engines is the flow restriction at the cross-sectional area of the intake system. Traditionally, valve-timing has been designed to optimize operation at high engine-speed and wide open throttle conditions. Several investigations have demonstrated that improvements at part load conditions in engine performance can be accomplished if the valve-timing is variable. Controlling valve-timing can be used to improve the torque and power curve as well as to reduce fuel consumption and emissions. In this paper, a group method of data handling (GMDH) type neural network and evolutionary algorithms (EAs) are firstly used for modelling the effects of intake valve-timing (V t ) and engine speed (N) of a spark-ignition engine on both developed engine torque (T) and fuel consumption (Fc) using some experimentally obtained training and test data. Using such obtained polynomial neural network models, a multi-objective EA (non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm, NSGA-II) with a new diversity preserving mechanism are secondly used for Pareto based optimization of the variable valve-timing engine considering two conflicting objectives such as torque (T) and fuel consumption (Fc). The comparison results demonstrate the superiority of the GMDH type models over feedforward neural network models in terms of the statistical measures in the training data, testing data and the number of hidden neurons. Further, it is shown that some interesting and important relationships, as useful optimal design principles, involved in the performance of the variable valve-timing four-stroke spark-ignition engine can be discovered by the Pareto based multi-objective optimization of the polynomial models. Such important optimal principles would not have been obtained without the use of both the GMDH type neural network modelling and the multi-objective Pareto optimization approach

  14. Timing of Conduction Abnormalities Leading to Permanent Pacemaker Insertion After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation-A Single-Centre Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozier, Daniel; Zivkovic, Nevena; Elbaz-Greener, Gabby; Singh, Sheldon M; Wijeysundera, Harindra C

    2017-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is the preferred alternative to traditional surgical aortic valve replacement; however, it remains expensive. One potential driver of cost is the need for postprocedural monitoring for conduction abnormalities after TAVI. Given the paucity of literature on the optimal length of monitoring, we aimed to determine when clinically significant conduction abnormalities leading to permanent pacemaker (PPM) insertion after TAVI were first identified. We identified all patients in the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre TAVI registry (Toronto, Canada) who underwent TAVI between 2009 and 2016, excluding those with pre-existing PPMs or those who underwent emergency open heart surgery. Through dedicated chart review, the timing and type of conduction abnormalities leading to PPM were recorded. Patients were divided according to the timing of conduction abnormality: during the procedure vs after the procedure. The overall PPM insertion rate was 15.6% (80 of 512 cases), with all but 1 patient receiving a PPM for class I indications. PPMs were inserted for complete heart block/high-grade atrioventricular block (91.3%), severe sinus node dysfunction (3.8%), and alternating bundle branch block (3.8%). Of these conduction abnormalities, 55.0% occurred during the procedure (intraprocedure; n = 44 patients). The mean time to the development of a conduction abnormality necessitating PPM was 1.2 days (interquartile range, 0-2 days), with 88.8% occurring within 72 hours of the procedure (n = 71 patients). In the entire TAVI cohort, leading to PPM. The majority of conduction abnormalities leading to PPM insertion after TAVI occur in the very early periprocedural period, suggesting that early mobilization and discharge will be safe from a conduction standpoint. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ventricular arrhythmia risk stratification in patients with tetralogy of Fallot at the time of pulmonary valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabate Rotes, Anna; Connolly, Heidi M; Warnes, Carole A; Ammash, Naser M; Phillips, Sabrina D; Dearani, Joseph A; Schaff, Hartzell V; Burkhart, Harold M; Hodge, David O; Asirvatham, Samuel J; McLeod, Christopher J

    2015-02-01

    Most patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot require pulmonary valve replacement (PVR), but the evaluation for and management of ventricular arrhythmia remain unclear. This study is aimed at clarifying the optimal approach to this potentially life-threatening issue at the time of PVR. A retrospective analysis was performed on 205 patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot undergoing PVR at our institution between 1988 and 2010. Median age was 32.9 (range, 25.6) years. Previous ventricular tachycardia occurred in 16 patients (8%) and 37 (16%) had left ventricular dysfunction, defined as left ventricular ejection fraction tetralogy of Fallot undergoing PVR with history of ventricular tachycardia or left ventricular dysfunction appear to be associated with a higher risk of arrhythmic events after operation. Events in the first year after PVR are rare, and in select high-risk patients, surgical cryoablation does not seem to increase arrhythmic events and may be protective. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. An evaluation of the effects of long term cryopreservation, cause of death, and time between death and donation on heart valve leaflet viability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, K.

    1999-01-01

    The protocol for cryopreservation of allograft heart valves at the Donor Tissue Bank of Victoria was based on validation studies on the viability of the heart valve leaflets at the time of processing. The heart block is removed within 24 hours of death and the aor-tic and pulmonary valves trimmed immediately following retrieval. Following this processing, the valves are incubated in antibiotics at 30 degree C for 6 to 8 hours before being frozen in 10% DMSO at a controlled rate. A sample of tricuspid valve leaflet is placed in Krebs solution at the time of trimfning and is used for viability studies. Leaflet viability studies have been perfon-ned on all heart valves retrieved from 1993 to the present day at the Donor Tissue Bank of Victoria. Viability involves a qualitative assessment of the cellular outgrowth by leaflet fibroblasts, this assessment ranging from '-' for no outgrowth to '++++' for maximum outgrowth. Surgeons do not request valves with any particular viability and will use them whether they are viable or not. This evaluation was to determine the effects of long-term cryopreservation, cause of death, and also time lapse of heart removal following death on the viability of the retrieved leaflets. The aim of investigating the effects of long-term cryopreservation was to determine whether there was any correlation between initial viability and viability following storage for several months to several years. It was also decided to investigate whether there was any correlation between time length between death and heart retrieval and the viability. It was also thought that the cause of death may have had an effect on the viability, for example, did death by carbon monoxide poisoning have an effect on the viability of heart valve cells. Heart valves, which had been cryopreserved but could not be transplanted for various reasons were used to study the effects of cryopreservation in this study. These were thawed according to protocol and a sample of the valve

  17. Valve thrombosis following transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Soriano, Juan G; Puri, Rishi; Amat-Santos, Ignacio; Ribeiro, Henrique B; Abdul-Jawad Altisent, Omar; del Trigo, María; Paradis, Jean-Michel; Dumont, Eric; Urena, Marina; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2015-03-01

    Despite the rapid global uptake of transcatheter aortic valve implantation, valve trombosis has yet to be systematically evaluated in this field. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics, diagnostic criteria, and treatment outcomes of patients diagnosed with valve thrombosis following transcatheter aortic valve implantation through a systematic review of published data. Literature published between 2002 and 2012 on valve thrombosis as a complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation was identified through a systematic electronic search. A total of 11 publications were identified, describing 16 patients (mean age, 80 [5] years, 65% men). All but 1 patient (94%) received a balloon-expandable valve. All patients received dual antiplatelet therapy immediately following the procedure and continued to take either mono- or dual antiplatelet therapy at the time of valve thrombosis diagnosis. Valve thrombosis was diagnosed at a median of 6 months post-procedure, with progressive dyspnea being the most common symptom. A significant increase in transvalvular gradient (from 10 [4] to 40 [12] mmHg) was the most common echocardiographic feature, in addition to leaflet thickening. Thrombus was not directly visualized with echocardiography. Three patients underwent valve explantation, and the remaining received warfarin, which effectively restored the mean transvalvular gradient to baseline within 2 months. Systemic embolism was not a feature of valve thrombosis post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Although a rare, yet likely under-reported complication of post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation, progressive dyspnea coupled with an increasing transvalvular gradient on echocardiography within the months following the intervention likely signifies valve thrombosis. While direct thrombus visualization appears difficult, prompt initiation of oral anticoagulation therapy effectively restores baseline valve function. Copyright © 2014

  18. Evaluating the effect of three-dimensional visualization on force application and performance time during robotics-assisted mitral valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Maria E; Trejos, Ana Luisa; Rayman, Reiza; Chu, Michael W A; Patel, Rajni; Peters, Terry; Kiaii, Bob B

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of three-dimensional (3D) binocular, stereoscopic, and two-dimensional (2D) monocular visualization on robotics-assisted mitral valve annuloplasty versus conventional techniques in an ex vivo animal model. In addition, we sought to determine whether these effects were consistent between novices and experts in robotics-assisted cardiac surgery. A cardiac surgery test-bed was constructed to measure forces applied during mitral valve annuloplasty. Sutures were passed through the porcine mitral valve annulus by the participants with different levels of experience in robotics-assisted surgery and tied in place using both robotics-assisted and conventional surgery techniques. The mean time for both the experts and the novices using 3D visualization was significantly less than that required using 2D vision (P robotic system with either 2D or 3D vision (P robotics-assisted mitral valve annuloplasty than during conventional open mitral valve annuloplasty. This finding suggests that 3D visualization does not fully compensate for the absence of haptic feedback in robotics-assisted cardiac surgery.

  19. Mitral Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for mitral valve replacement—mechanical valves (metal) or biological valves (tissue). The principal advantage of mechanical valves ... small risk of stroke due to blood clotting. Biological valves usually are made from animal tissue. Biological ...

  20. Coanda effect in valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uruba Václav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coanda effect takes place in flow within valves diffuser for certain conditions. The valve plug in half-closed position forms wall-jet, which could be stable or instable, depending on geometry and other conditions. This phenomenon was subject of experimental study using time-resolved PIV technique. For the acquired data analysis the special spatio-temporal methods have been used.

  1. Flow and mixing of gas in cylinder of a stratified charge engine with two intake valves. Effects of late closing valve timing and intake port configurations; Kyuki nibenshiki sojo kyuki engine no cylinder nai gas ryudo to kongo. Osotoji valve timing oyobi port keijo ni yoru eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charoenphonphanich, C; Niwa, H; Ennoji, H; Iijima, T [Tokai University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    A numerical analysis of the flow and mixing of rich mixture and air inducted into the cylinder through each of the two intake ports of a stratified charge engine have been carried out. Numerical calculations were performed by finite volume method for three types of the intake port configurations: inverse V type, parallel type and V type and two types of valve timing; conventional and late closing (Miller cycle). Velocity field, turbulent kinetic energy and distribution of mixture concentration in the cylinder were examined. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Impact of tricuspid valve surgery at the time of left ventricular assist device insertion on postoperative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlay, Shannon M; Deo, Salil V; Park, Soon J

    2015-01-01

    Tricuspid regurgitation (TR) is common in patients with heart failure undergoing left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. Whether the TR should be surgically managed at the time of LVAD surgery is controversial. We searched SCOPUS, Web of Science, Ovid EMBASE, and Ovid MEDLINE (through May 10, 2014) for randomized controlled trials and observational studies comparing postoperative outcomes in patients treated with LVAD with concomitant tricuspid valve surgery (TVS) compared with LVAD alone. Six observational studies including 3,249 patients compared outcomes following LVAD + TVS versus LVAD. Four studies were single-center and most did not adjust for potential confounders. Addition of TVS prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass times by an average of 31 minutes (three studies, 95% CI 20-42). There was no difference in need for right ventricular assist device (six studies, HR 1.42, 95% CI 0.54-3.76), acute renal failure (four studies, HR 1.07, 95% CI 0.55-2.10), or early mortality (six studies, HR 1.28, 95% CI 0.78-2.08) in patients treated with LVAD + TVS versus LVAD alone. TVS prolongs cardiopulmonary bypass times, but available data demonstrate no significant association with early postoperative outcomes. However, differences in baseline risk of patients treated with TVS versus not limit our ability to draw conclusions.

  3. Development of an effective valve packing program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, K.A.

    1996-12-01

    Current data now shows that graphite valve packing installed within the guidance of a controlled program produces not only reliable stem sealing but predictable running loads. By utilizing recent technological developments in valve performance monitoring for both MOV`s and AOV`s, valve packing performance can be enhanced while reducing maintenance costs. Once known, values are established for acceptable valve packing loads, the measurement of actual valve running loads via the current MOV/AOV diagnostic techniques can provide indication of future valve stem sealing problems, improper valve packing installation or identify the opportunity for valve packing program improvements. At times the full benefit of these advances in material and predictive technology remain under utilized due to simple past misconceptions associated with valve packing. This paper will explore the basis for these misconceptions, provide general insight into the current understanding of valve packing and demonstrate how with this new understanding and current valve diagnostic equipment the key aspects required to develop an effective, quality valve packing program fit together. The cost and operational benefits provided by this approach can be significant impact by the: elimination of periodic valve repacking, reduction of maintenance costs, benefits of leak-free valve operation, justification for reduced Post Maintenance Test Requirements, reduced radiation exposure, improved plant appearance.

  4. Influence of Actively Controlled Heat Release Timing on the Performance and Operational Characteristics of a Rotary Valve, Acoustically Resonant Pulse Combustor

    KAUST Repository

    Lisanti, Joel; Roberts, William L.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of heat release timing on the performance and operational characteristics of a rotary valve, acoustically resonant pulse combustor is investigated both experimentally and numerically. Simulation results are obtained by solving the quasi-1D Navier-Stokes equations with forced volumetric heat addition. Experimental efforts modify heat release timing through modulated fuel injection and modification of the fluid dynamic mixing. Results indicate that the heat release timing has a profound effect on the operation and efficiency of the pulse combustor and that this timing can be difficult to control experimentally.

  5. Influence of Actively Controlled Heat Release Timing on the Performance and Operational Characteristics of a Rotary Valve, Acoustically Resonant Pulse Combustor

    KAUST Repository

    Lisanti, Joel

    2017-01-05

    The influence of heat release timing on the performance and operational characteristics of a rotary valve, acoustically resonant pulse combustor is investigated both experimentally and numerically. Simulation results are obtained by solving the quasi-1D Navier-Stokes equations with forced volumetric heat addition. Experimental efforts modify heat release timing through modulated fuel injection and modification of the fluid dynamic mixing. Results indicate that the heat release timing has a profound effect on the operation and efficiency of the pulse combustor and that this timing can be difficult to control experimentally.

  6. Piezoelectric valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Serhiy Fedorovich

    2013-01-15

    A motorized valve has a housing having an inlet and an outlet to be connected to a pipeline, a saddle connected with the housing, a turn plug having a rod, the turn plug cooperating with the saddle, and a drive for turning the valve body and formed as a piezoelectric drive, the piezoelectric drive including a piezoelectric generator of radially directed standing acoustic waves, which is connected with the housing and is connectable with a pulse current source, and a rotor operatively connected with the piezoelectric generator and kinematically connected with the rod of the turn plug so as to turn the turn plug when the rotor is actuated by the piezoelectric generator.

  7. Butterfly valve of all rubber lining type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Shosaku; Nakatsuma, Sumiya; Sasaki, Iwao; Aoki, Naoshi.

    1982-01-01

    The valves used for the circulating water pipes for condensers in nuclear and thermal power stations have become large with the increase of power output, and their specifications have become strict. The materials for the valves change from cast iron to steel plate construction. To cope with sea water corrosion, rubber lining has been applied to the internal surfaces of valve boxes, and the build-up welding of stainless steel has been made on the edges of valves. However, recently it is desired to develop butterfly valves, of which the whole valve disks are lined with hard rubber. For the purpose of confirming the performance of large bore valves, a 2600 mm bore butterfly valve of all rubber lining type was used, and the opening and closing test of 1100 times was carried out by applying thermal cycle and pressure difference and using artifical sea water. Also the bending test of hard rubber lining was performed with test pieces. Thus, it was confirmed that the butterfly valves of all rubber lining type have the performance exceeding that of the valves with build-up welding. The course of development of the valves of all rubber lining type, the construction and the items of confirmation by tests of these valves, and the tests of the valve and the hard rubber lining described above are reported. (Kako, I.)

  8. Thermostatic Radiator Valve Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dentz, Jordan [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Ansanelli, Eric [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A large stock of multifamily buildings in the Northeast and Midwest are heated by steam distribution systems. Losses from these systems are typically high and a significant number of apartments are overheated much of the time. Thermostatically controlled radiator valves (TRVs) are one potential strategy to combat this problem, but have not been widely accepted by the residential retrofit market.

  9. Force measuring valve assemblies, systems including such valve assemblies and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWall, Kevin George [Pocatello, ID; Garcia, Humberto Enrique [Idaho Falls, ID; McKellar, Michael George [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-04-17

    Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include stroking a valve member and measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke. Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include measuring a force acting on a valve member in the presence of fluid flow over a period of time and evaluating at least one of the frequency of changes in the measured force over the period of time and the magnitude of the changes in the measured force over the period of time to identify the presence of an anomaly in a fluid flow and, optionally, its estimated location. Methods of evaluating a valve condition may include directing a fluid flow through a valve while stroking a valve member, measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke, and comparing the measured force to a reference force. Valve assemblies and related systems are also disclosed.

  10. Water hammer caused by closure of turbine safety spherical valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadžić, U.; Bergant, A.; Vukoslavčević, P.

    2010-08-01

    This paper investigates water hammer effects caused by closure of spherical valves against the discharge. During the first phase of modernisation of Perućica high-head hydropower plant (HPP), Montenegro, safety spherical valves (inlet turbine valves) have been refurbished on the first two Pelton turbine units. The valve closure is controlled by the valve actuator (hydraulic servomotor). Because the torque acting on the valve body is dependent on flow conditions the valve closing time may vary significantly for different flow velocities (passive valve). For the passive valve the torques acting on the valve body should be considered in the valve model. The valve closing time results from numerical simulation. On the contrary, for the active valve the valve closing time is assumed prior to simulation. The spherical valve boundary condition is incorporated into the method of characteristics (MOC) algorithm. The staggered (diamond) grid in applying the MOC is used in this paper. The passive valve boundary condition is described by the water hammer equations, the valve equation that relates discharge to pressure head drop and the dynamic equation of the valve body motion (torque equation). The active valve boundary condition is described by the first two equations, respectively. Standard quasi-steady friction model is used for estimating friction losses in plant's tunnel and penstocks. Numerical results using both the active and the passive spherical valve models are compared with results of measurements. It has been found that the influence of flow conditions on the spherical valve closing time is minor for the cases considered. Computed and measured results agree reasonably well.

  11. Water hammer caused by closure of turbine safety spherical valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadzic, U; Vukoslavcevic, P; Bergant, A

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates water hammer effects caused by closure of spherical valves against the discharge. During the first phase of modernisation of Perucica high-head hydropower plant (HPP), Montenegro, safety spherical valves (inlet turbine valves) have been refurbished on the first two Pelton turbine units. The valve closure is controlled by the valve actuator (hydraulic servomotor). Because the torque acting on the valve body is dependent on flow conditions the valve closing time may vary significantly for different flow velocities (passive valve). For the passive valve the torques acting on the valve body should be considered in the valve model. The valve closing time results from numerical simulation. On the contrary, for the active valve the valve closing time is assumed prior to simulation. The spherical valve boundary condition is incorporated into the method of characteristics (MOC) algorithm. The staggered (diamond) grid in applying the MOC is used in this paper. The passive valve boundary condition is described by the water hammer equations, the valve equation that relates discharge to pressure head drop and the dynamic equation of the valve body motion (torque equation). The active valve boundary condition is described by the first two equations, respectively. Standard quasi-steady friction model is used for estimating friction losses in plant's tunnel and penstocks. Numerical results using both the active and the passive spherical valve models are compared with results of measurements. It has been found that the influence of flow conditions on the spherical valve closing time is minor for the cases considered. Computed and measured results agree reasonably well.

  12. Water hammer caused by closure of turbine safety spherical valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadzic, U; Vukoslavcevic, P [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Montenegro Dzordza Vasingtona nn, Podgorica, 81000 (Montenegro); Bergant, A, E-mail: uros.karadzic@ac.m [LitostrojPower d.o.o., Litostrojska 50, Ljubljana, 1000 (Slovenia)

    2010-08-15

    This paper investigates water hammer effects caused by closure of spherical valves against the discharge. During the first phase of modernisation of Perucica high-head hydropower plant (HPP), Montenegro, safety spherical valves (inlet turbine valves) have been refurbished on the first two Pelton turbine units. The valve closure is controlled by the valve actuator (hydraulic servomotor). Because the torque acting on the valve body is dependent on flow conditions the valve closing time may vary significantly for different flow velocities (passive valve). For the passive valve the torques acting on the valve body should be considered in the valve model. The valve closing time results from numerical simulation. On the contrary, for the active valve the valve closing time is assumed prior to simulation. The spherical valve boundary condition is incorporated into the method of characteristics (MOC) algorithm. The staggered (diamond) grid in applying the MOC is used in this paper. The passive valve boundary condition is described by the water hammer equations, the valve equation that relates discharge to pressure head drop and the dynamic equation of the valve body motion (torque equation). The active valve boundary condition is described by the first two equations, respectively. Standard quasi-steady friction model is used for estimating friction losses in plant's tunnel and penstocks. Numerical results using both the active and the passive spherical valve models are compared with results of measurements. It has been found that the influence of flow conditions on the spherical valve closing time is minor for the cases considered. Computed and measured results agree reasonably well.

  13. Aortic valve bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). ...

  14. Effects of thermal barrier coating on gas emissions and performance of a LHR engine with different injection timings and valve adjustments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueyuekkaya, Ekrem; Engin, Tahsin; Cerit, Muhammet

    2006-01-01

    Tests were performed on a six cylinder, direct injection, turbocharged Diesel engine whose pistons were coated with a 350 μm thickness of MgZrO 3 over a 150 μm thickness of NiCrAl bond coat. CaZrO 3 was employed as the coating material for the cylinder head and valves. The working conditions for the standard engine (uncovered) and low heat rejection (LHR) engine were kept exactly the same to ensure a realistic comparison between the two configurations of the engine. Comparisons between the standard engine and its LHR version were made based on engine performance, exhaust gas emissions, injection timing and valve adjustment. The results showed that 1-8% reduction in brake specific fuel consumption could be achieved by the combined effect of the thermal barrier coating (TBC) and injection timing. On the other hand, NO x emissions were obtained below those of the base engine by 11% for 18 o BTDC injection timing

  15. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007684.htm Transcatheter aortic valve replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is surgery to replace the aortic valve. ...

  16. Impact of valve failures on the safety and reliability of light water nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riddington, J.W.; Reyer, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the causes of, and solutions for, recurrent valve failures has been performed. The frequency and root causes of valve problems were identified from licensee event reports and meetings with utility, NSSS, and valve manufacturer personnel. Three generic problems (stem leakage, seat leakage, and inadequate specification) and four valve specific problems were identified. The four valve specific problems and their principal causes are: (1) BWR pilot operated safety relief valves (pilot valve leakage); (2) spring loaded safety relief valves (water solid and two-phase flow behavior); (3) PWR feedwater regulating valves (trim degradation and packing failures); and (4) air operated solenoid valves (jamming due to foreign matter in service air). The first two valve specific problems are the subject of current industry programs. Programs intended to address stem leakage, seat leakage, timely exchange of valve failure information, testing of valves, and adequate specification, selection, and maintenance of valves will be outlined

  17. Acoustic valve leak detection in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimmick, J.G.; Dickey, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Internal valve leakage is a hidden energy loss and can cause or prolong a forced outage. Recent advances in acoustic detection of internal valve leakage have reduced piping system maintenance costs, unnecessary downtime, and energy waste. Extremely short payback periods have been reported by plants applying this technology to preventive maintenance, troubleshooting, energy conservation and outage planning. Sensors temporarily attached to the outside of valves and connected to the instruments detect ultrasonic acoustic emissions which are characteristic of internal valve leakage. Since the sensors are attached to the outside of the valves, the time and expense of dismantling the valves or removing them from the systems are eliminated. This paper describes the instrumentation and specific applications to nuclear plant valves, including independent verification of initial findings. Guidelines for potential users, including instrumentation selection, training requirements, application planning, and the choice of in-house versus contract services are discussed

  18. Magnetically operated check valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brian G.; Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1994-06-01

    A magnetically operated check valve is disclosed. The valve is comprised of a valve body and a movable poppet disposed therein. A magnet attracts the poppet to hold the valve shut until the force of fluid flow through the valve overcomes the magnetic attraction and moves the poppet to an unseated, open position. The poppet and magnet are configured and disposed to trap a magnetically attracted particulate and prevent it from flowing to a valve seating region.

  19. Valve for closing a steam line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.; Potrykus, G.

    1976-01-01

    Instead of several control elements, the quick-closing valve, especially in the main-steam line between steam generator and turbine of a power station has the valve cone itself as the only movable part, acting with its inner surface as a piston within a second cylinder space. The valve shaft is at the same time a piston rod with a stepped piston at the upper end. This piston is loaded in a cylinder at the upspace below the valve cover on one hand by a spring, on the other hand by its own medium. Two non-return valves, one of it in a bore of the valve cone, connect the first-mentioned cylinder space with the steam-loaded inlet resp. outlet side of the valve. For controlling the valve, a magnet valve is sufficient. By automatic control of the valve cone coupled with several pistons several control lines can be omitted. There are also no pressurized control lines outside the valve which could be damaged by exterior influences. (ERA) [de

  20. What Is Heart Valve Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... working correctly. Most valve replacements involve the aortic Tricuspid valve and mitral valves. The aortic valve separates ... where it shouldn’t. This is called incompetence, insufficiency or regurgitation. • Prolapse — mitral valve flaps don’t ...

  1. What Is Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and replacing it with a man-made or biological valve. Biological valves are made from pig, cow, or human ... the valve. Man-made valves last longer than biological valves and usually don’t have to be ...

  2. Tricuspid valve endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Syed T.; Witten, James; Shrestha, Nabin K.; Blackstone, Eugene H.

    2017-01-01

    Right-sided infective endocarditis (RSIE) is less common than left-sided infective endocarditis (IE), encompassing only 5–10% of cases of IE. Ninety percent of RSIE involves the tricuspid valve (TV). Given the relatively small numbers of TVIE cases operated on at most institutions, the purpose of this review is to highlight and discuss the current understanding of IE involving the TV. RSIE and TVIE are strongly associated with intravenous drug use (IVDU), although pacemaker leads, defibrillator leads and vascular access for dialysis are also major risk factors. Staphylococcus aureus is the predominant causative organism in TVIE. Most patients with TVIE are successfully treated with antibiotics, however, 5–16% of RSIE cases eventually require surgical intervention. Indications and timing for surgery are less clear than for left-sided IE; surgery is primarily considered for failed medical therapy, large vegetations and septic pulmonary embolism, and less often for TV regurgitation and heart failure. Most patients with an infected prosthetic TV will require surgery. Concomitant left-sided IE has its own surgical indications. Earlier surgical intervention may potentially prevent further destruction of leaflet tissue and increase the likelihood of TV repair. Fortunately, TV debridement and repair can be accomplished in most cases, even those with extensive valve destruction, using a variety of techniques. Valve repair is advocated over replacement, particularly in IVDUs patients who are young, non-compliant and have a higher risk of recurrent infection and reoperation with valve replacement. Excising the valve without replacing, it is not advocated; it has been reported previously, but these patients are likely to be symptomatic, particularly in cases with septic pulmonary embolism and increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Patients with concomitant left-sided involvement have worse prognosis than those with RSIE alone, due predominantly to greater likelihood of

  3. Finite-element-method (FEM model generation of time-resolved 3D echocardiographic geometry data for mitral-valve volumetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikinis Ron

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Mitral Valve (MV 3D structural data can be easily obtained using standard transesophageal echocardiography (TEE devices but quantitative pre- and intraoperative volume analysis of the MV is presently not feasible in the cardiac operation room (OR. Finite element method (FEM modelling is necessary to carry out precise and individual volume analysis and in the future will form the basis for simulation of cardiac interventions. Method With the present retrospective pilot study we describe a method to transfer MV geometric data to 3D Slicer 2 software, an open-source medical visualization and analysis software package. A newly developed software program (ROIExtract allowed selection of a region-of-interest (ROI from the TEE data and data transformation for use in 3D Slicer. FEM models for quantitative volumetric studies were generated. Results ROI selection permitted the visualization and calculations required to create a sequence of volume rendered models of the MV allowing time-based visualization of regional deformation. Quantitation of tissue volume, especially important in myxomatous degeneration can be carried out. Rendered volumes are shown in 3D as well as in time-resolved 4D animations. Conclusion The visualization of the segmented MV may significantly enhance clinical interpretation. This method provides an infrastructure for the study of image guided assessment of clinical findings and surgical planning. For complete pre- and intraoperative 3D MV FEM analysis, three input elements are necessary: 1. time-gated, reality-based structural information, 2. continuous MV pressure and 3. instantaneous tissue elastance. The present process makes the first of these elements available. Volume defect analysis is essential to fully understand functional and geometrical dysfunction of but not limited to the valve. 3D Slicer was used for semi-automatic valve border detection and volume-rendering of clinical 3D echocardiographic

  4. Real-time optical correlator using computer-generated holographic filter on a liquid crystal light valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Yu, Jeffrey

    1990-01-01

    Limitations associated with the binary phase-only filter often used in optical correlators are presently circumvented in the writing of complex-valued data on a gray-scale spatial light modulator through the use of a computer-generated hologram (CGH) algorithm. The CGH encodes complex-valued data into nonnegative real CGH data in such a way that it may be encoded in any of the available gray-scale spatial light modulators. A CdS liquid-crystal light valve is used for the complex-valued CGH encoding; computer simulations and experimental results are compared, and the use of such a CGH filter as the synapse hologram in a holographic optical neural net is discussed.

  5. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Kjaergard, Henrik K

    2009-01-01

    In this descriptive prospective study, we evaluate the outcomes of surgery in 98 patients who were scheduled to undergo minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. These patients were compared with a group of 50 patients who underwent scheduled aortic valve replacement through a full sternotomy...... operations were completed as mini-sternotomies, 4 died later of noncardiac causes. The aortic cross-clamp and perfusion times were significantly different across all groups (P replacement...... is an excellent operation in selected patients, but its true advantages over conventional aortic valve replacement (other than a smaller scar) await evaluation by means of randomized clinical trial. The "extended mini-aortic valve replacement" operation, on the other hand, is a risky procedure that should...

  6. Microfluidic sieve valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quake, Stephen R; Marcus, Joshua S; Hansen, Carl L

    2015-01-13

    Sieve valves for use in microfluidic device are provided. The valves are useful for impeding the flow of particles, such as chromatography beads or cells, in a microfluidic channel while allowing liquid solution to pass through the valve. The valves find particular use in making microfluidic chromatography modules.

  7. Rotary pneumatic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardee, Harry C.

    1991-01-01

    A rotary pneumatic valve which is thrust balanced and the pneumatic pressure developed produces only radial loads on the valve cylinder producing negligible resistance and thus minimal torque on the bearings of the valve. The valve is multiplexed such that at least two complete switching cycles occur for each revolution of the cylinder spindle.

  8. Mitral Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the left ventricle from flowing backward. A defective heart valve fails to either open or close fully. Risk factors Mitral valve stenosis is less common today than it once was because the most common cause, ... other heart valve problems, mitral valve stenosis can strain your ...

  9. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most cases, doctors don't know why a heart valve fails to develop properly, so it isn't something you could have prevented. Calcium buildup on the valve. With age, heart valves may accumulate deposits of calcium (aortic valve ...

  10. Remote actuated valve implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  11. Direct comparasion of an engine working under Otto, Miller end Diesel cycles : thermodynamic analysis and real engine performance

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Bernardo Sousa; Martins, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    One of the ways to improve thermodynamic efficiency of Spark Ignition engines is by the optimisation of valve timing and lift and compression ratio. The throttleless engine and the Miller cycle engine are proven concepts for efficiency improvements of such engines. This paper reports on an engine with variable valve timing (VVT) and variable compression ratio (VCR) in order to fulfill such an enhancement of efficiency. Engine load is controlled by the valve opening per...

  12. Scissor thrust valve actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWall, Kevin G.; Watkins, John C; Nitzel, Michael E.

    2006-08-29

    Apparatus for actuating a valve includes a support frame and at least one valve driving linkage arm, one end of which is rotatably connected to a valve stem of the valve and the other end of which is rotatably connected to a screw block. A motor connected to the frame is operatively connected to a motor driven shaft which is in threaded screw driving relationship with the screw block. The motor rotates the motor driven shaft which drives translational movement of the screw block which drives rotatable movement of the valve driving linkage arm which drives translational movement of the valve stem. The valve actuator may further include a sensory control element disposed in operative relationship with the valve stem, the sensory control element being adapted to provide control over the position of the valve stem by at least sensing the travel and/or position of the valve stem.

  13. Traumatic Mitral Valve and Pericardial Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nissar Shaikh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac injury after blunt trauma is common but underreported. Common cardiac trauma after the blunt chest injury (BCI is cardiac contusion; it is very rare to have cardiac valve injury. The mitral valve injury during chest trauma occurs when extreme pressure is applied at early systole during the isovolumic contraction between the closure of the mitral valve and the opening of the aortic valve. Traumatic mitral valve injury can involve valve leaflet, chordae tendineae, or papillary muscles. For the diagnosis of mitral valve injury, a high index of suspicion is required, as in polytrauma patients, other obvious severe injuries will divert the attention of the treating physician. Clinical picture of patients with mitral valve injury may vary from none to cardiogenic shock. The echocardiogram is the main diagnostic modality of mitral valve injuries. Patient’s clinical condition will dictate the timing and type of surgery or medical therapy. We report a case of mitral valve and pericardial injury in a polytrauma patient, successfully treated in our intensive care unit.

  14. The value of real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in the assessment of paravalvular leak origin following prosthetic mitral valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Mustafa; Duran, Nilüfer Ekşi; Gökdeniz, Tayyar; Kaya, Hasan; Ozkan, Mehmet

    2009-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) echocardiographic approaches are not sufficient to determine the origin of paravalvular leak (PVL) that occurs after prosthetic mitral valve replacement (MVR). In this study, we investigated the role of real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (RT-3D TEE) in detecting the origin and size of PVL occurring after prosthetic MVR. The study included 13 patients (7 females; 6 males; mean age 56+/-10 years; range 37 to 71 years) who developed PVL within a mean of 8.3+/-3.8 years following mechanical prosthetic MVR. Nine patients (69.2%) had atrial fibrillation, and four patients (30.8%) had normal sinus rhythm. Four patients (30.8%) had hemolysis. Paravalvular leak was mild, moderate, and severe in two, six, and five patients, respectively. Real-time 3D TEE was performed using a 3D matrix-array TEE transducer immediately after detection of PVL on 2D TEE examination. Localization of PVL was made using a clock-wise format in relation to the aortic valve and the size of dehiscence was measured. The mean PVL width measured by 2D TEE was 3.00+/-0.92 mm. The mean length of dehiscence was 13.6+/-8.8 mm, and the mean width was 3.88+/-2.04 mm on RT-3D TEE. The PVLs were mainly localized in the posterior and anterior annular positions between 12 to 03 hours (n=7) and 06 to 09 hours (n=3) on RT-3D TEE, respectively, which corresponded to the posteromedial or anterolateral sectors of the posterior annulus. Considering that only the width of the PVL defect can be assessed by 2D TEE, delineation by RT-3D TEE includes the localization of PVL together with the length and width of the defect.

  15. Anterior Urethral Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyadhar P. Mali

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the clinical presentation and management of four patients with anterior urethral valves; a rare cause of urethral obstruction in male children. One patient presented antenatally with oligohydramnios, bilateral hydronephrosis and bladder thickening suggestive of an infravesical obstruction. Two other patients presented postnatally at 1 and 2 years of age, respectively, with poor stream of urine since birth. The fourth patient presented at 9 years with frequency and dysuria. Diagnosis was established on either micturating cystourethrogram (MCU (in 2 or on cystoscopy (in 2. All patients had cystoscopic ablation of the valves. One patient developed a postablation stricture that was resected with an end-to-end urethroplasty. He had an associated bilateral vesicoureteric junction (VUJ obstruction for which a bilateral ureteric reimplantation was done at the same time. On long-term follow-up, all patients demonstrated a good stream of urine. The renal function is normal. Patients are continent and free of urinary infections. Anterior urethral valves are rare obstructive lesions in male children. The degree of obstruction is variable, and so they may present with mild micturition difficulty or severe obstruction with hydroureteronephrosis and renal impairment. Hence, it is important to evaluate the anterior urethra in any male child with suspected infravesical obstruction. The diagnosis is established by MCU or cystoscopy and the treatment is always surgical, either a transurethral ablation or an open resection. The long-term prognosis is good.

  16. Which valve is which?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Saxena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old man presented with a history of breathlessness for the past 2 years. He had a history of operation for Tetralogy of Fallot at the age of 5 years and history suggestive of Rheumatic fever at the age of 7 years. On echocardiographic examination, all his heart valves were severely regurgitating. Morphologically, all the valves were irreparable. The ejection fraction was 35%. He underwent quadruple valve replacement. The aortic and mitral valves were replaced by metallic valve and the tricuspid and pulmonary by tissue valve.

  17. Bioprosthetic Valve Fracture Improves the Hemodynamic Results of Valve-in-Valve Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatriwalla, Adnan K; Allen, Keith B; Saxon, John T; Cohen, David J; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Hart, Anthony J; Baron, Suzanne J; Dvir, Danny; Borkon, A Michael

    2017-07-01

    Valve-in-valve (VIV) transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) may be less effective in small surgical valves because of patient/prosthesis mismatch. Bioprosthetic valve fracture (BVF) using a high-pressure balloon can be performed to facilitate VIV TAVR. We report data from 20 consecutive clinical cases in which BVF was successfully performed before or after VIV TAVR by inflation of a high-pressure balloon positioned across the valve ring during rapid ventricular pacing. Hemodynamic measurements and calculation of the valve effective orifice area were performed at baseline, immediately after VIV TAVR, and after BVF. BVF was successfully performed in 20 patients undergoing VIV TAVR with balloon-expandable (n=8) or self-expanding (n=12) transcatheter valves in Mitroflow, Carpentier-Edwards Perimount, Magna and Magna Ease, Biocor Epic and Biocor Epic Supra, and Mosaic surgical valves. Successful fracture was noted fluoroscopically when the waist of the balloon released and by a sudden drop in inflation pressure, often accompanied by an audible snap. BVF resulted in a reduction in the mean transvalvular gradient (from 20.5±7.4 to 6.7±3.7 mm Hg, P valve effective orifice area (from 1.0±0.4 to 1.8±0.6 cm 2 , P valves to facilitate VIV TAVR with either balloon-expandable or self-expanding transcatheter valves and results in reduced residual transvalvular gradients and increased valve effective orifice area. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. MDCT evaluation of aortic root and aortic valve prior to TAVI. What is the optimal imaging time point in the cardiac cycle?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurencak, Tomas; Turek, Jakub; Nijssen, Estelle C. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P. Debyelaan 25, P.O. Box 5800, AZ, Maastricht (Netherlands); Kietselaer, Bastiaan L.J.H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P. Debyelaan 25, P.O. Box 5800, AZ, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, CARIM School for Cardiovascular Diseases, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Mihl, Casper; Kok, Madeleine; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Das, Marco [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P. Debyelaan 25, P.O. Box 5800, AZ, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, CARIM School for Cardiovascular Diseases, Maastricht (Netherlands); Ommen, Vincent G.V.A. van [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Garsse, Leen A.F.M. van [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-07-15

    To determine the optimal imaging time point for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) therapy planning by comprehensive evaluation of the aortic root. Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) examination with retrospective ECG gating was retrospectively performed in 64 consecutive patients referred for pre-TAVI assessment. Eighteen different parameters of the aortic root were evaluated at 11 different time points in the cardiac cycle. Time points at which maximal (or minimal) sizes were determined, and dimension differences to other time points were evaluated. Theoretical prosthesis sizing based on different measurements was compared. Largest dimensions were found between 10 and 20 % of the cardiac cycle for annular short diameter (10 %); mean diameter (10 %); effective diameter and circumference-derived diameter (20 %); distance from the annulus to right coronary artery ostium (10 %); aortic root at the left coronary artery level (20 %); aortic root at the widest portion of coronary sinuses (20 %); and right leaflet length (20 %). Prosthesis size selection differed depending on the chosen measurements in 25-75 % of cases. Significant changes in anatomical structures of the aortic root during the cardiac cycle are crucial for TAVI planning. Imaging in systole is mandatory to obtain maximal dimensions. (orig.)

  19. Mitral Valve Prolapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... valve syndrome . What happens during MVP? Watch an animation of mitral valve prolapse When the heart pumps ( ... our brochures Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  20. Problem: Heart Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... should be completely closed For example: Watch an animation of mitral valve regurgitation A leaking mitral valve ... Not Alone Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  1. Aortic valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007408.htm Aortic valve surgery - open To use the sharing features on this page, ... separates the heart and aorta. The aortic valve opens so blood can flow out. It then closes ...

  2. Corrosion of valve metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draley, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A general survey related to the corrosion of valve metals or film-forming metals. The way these metals corrode with some general examples is described. Valve metals form relatively perfect oxide films with little breakdown or leakage when anodized

  3. Mitral valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Taking warfarin (Coumadin) References Otto CM, Bonow RO. Valvular heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow ... A.M. Editorial team. Heart Surgery Read more Heart Valve Diseases Read more Mitral Valve Prolapse Read more A. ...

  4. Swing check valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eminger, H.E.

    1977-01-01

    A swing check valve which includes a valve body having an inlet and outlet is described. A recess in the valve body designed to hold a seal ring and a check valve disc swingable between open and closed positions. The disc is supported by a high strength wire secured at one end in a support spacer pinned through bearing blocks fixed to the valve body and at its other end in a groove formed on the outer peripheral surface of the disc. The parts are designed and chosen such to provide a lightweight valve disc which is held open by minimum velocity of fluid flowing through the valve which thus reduces oscillations and accompanying wear of bearings supporting the valve operating parts. (Auth.)

  5. Aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A

    2008-01-01

    mortality were collected. Group analysis by patient geographic distribution and by annular diameter of the prosthesis utilized was conducted. Patients with a manufacturer's labeled prosthesis size > or = 21 mm were assigned to the 'large' aortic size subset, while those with a prosthesis size ... differences in the distribution of either gender or BSA. In the multivariable model, south European patients were seven times more likely to receive a smaller-sized aortic valve (OR = 6.5, 95% CI = 4.82-8.83, p

  6. Intraoperative Assessment of Tricuspid Valve Function After Conservative Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revuelta, J.M.; Gomez-Duran, C.; Garcia-Rinaldi, R.; Gallagher, M.W.

    1982-01-01

    It is desirable to repair coexistent tricuspid valve pathology at the time of mitral valve corrections. Conservative tricuspid repair may consist of commissurotomy, annuloplasty, or both. It is important that the repair be appropriate or tricuspid valve replacement may be necessary. A simple reproducible method of intraoperative testing for tricuspid valve insufficiency has been developed and used in 25 patients. Fifteen patients have been recatheterized, and the correlation between the intraoperative and postoperative findings has been consistent. PMID:15226931

  7. Intraoperative Assessment of Tricuspid Valve Function After Conservative Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Revuelta, J.M.; Gomez-Duran, C.; Garcia-Rinaldi, R.; Gallagher, M.W.

    1982-01-01

    It is desirable to repair coexistent tricuspid valve pathology at the time of mitral valve corrections. Conservative tricuspid repair may consist of commissurotomy, annuloplasty, or both. It is important that the repair be appropriate or tricuspid valve replacement may be necessary. A simple reproducible method of intraoperative testing for tricuspid valve insufficiency has been developed and used in 25 patients. Fifteen patients have been recatheterized, and the correlation between the intra...

  8. Overflow control valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessinger, B.A.; Hundal, R.; Parlak, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    An overflow control valve for use in a liquid sodium coolant pump tank which can be remotely engaged with and disengaged from the pump tank wall to thereby permit valve removal. An actuating shaft for controlling the valve also has means for operating a sliding cylinder against a spring to retract the cylinder from sealing contact with the pump tank nozzle. (author)

  9. Fluid control valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, J.

    1980-01-01

    A fluid control valve is described in which it is not necessary to insert a hand or a tool into the housing to remove the valve seat. Such a valve is particularly suitable for the control of radioactive fluids since maintenance by remote control is possible. (UK)

  10. A remote control valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cachard, Maurice de; Dumont, Maurice.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns a remote control valve for shutting off or distributing a fluid flowing at a high rate and low pressure. Among the different valves at present in use, electric valves are the most recommended for remote control but their reliability is uncertain and they soon become costly when large diameter valves are used. The valve described in this invention does away with this drawback owing to its simplicity and the small number of moving parts, this makes it particularly reliable. It mainly includes: a tubular body fitted with at least one side opening; at least one valve wedge for this opening, coaxial with the body, and mobile; a mobile piston integral with this wedge. Several valves to the specifications of this invention can be fitted in series (a shut-off valve can be used in conjunction with one or more distribution valves). The fitting and maintenance of the valve is very simple owing to its design. It can be fabricated in any material such as metals, alloys, plastics and concrete. The structure of the valve prevents the flowing fluid from coming into contact with the outside environment, thereby making it particularly suitable in the handling of dangerous or corrosive fluids. Finally, the opening and shutting of the valve occurs slowly, thereby doing away with the water hammer effect so frequent in large bore pipes [fr

  11. Heart Valve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  12. Survey of industrial coal conversion equipment capabilities: valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, W. A.; Slade, E. C.

    1978-06-01

    A survey of the industrial capabilities of the valve and valve-actuator industry to supply large, high-pressure stop valves for the future coal conversion industry is presented in this report. Also discussed are development and testing capabilities of valve and valve-actuator manufacturers and anticipated lead times required to manufacture advanced design valves for the most stringent service applications. Results indicate that the valve and valve-actuator industry is capable of manufacturing in quantity equipment of the size and for the pressure and temperature ranges which would be required in the coal conversion industry. Valve manufacturers do not, however, have sufficient product application experience to predict the continuing functional ability of valves used for lock-hopper feeders, slurry feeders, and slag-char letdown service. Developmental and testing efforts to modify existing valve designs or to develop new valve concepts for these applications were estimated to range from 1 to 6 years. A testing facility to simulate actuation of critical valves under service conditions would be beneficial.

  13. Prosthetic Mitral Valve Leaflet Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Darae; Hun, Sin Sang; Cho, In-Jeong; Shim, Chi-Young; Ha, Jong-Won; Chung, Namsik; Ju, Hyun Chul; Sohn, Jang Won

    2013-01-01

    Leaflet escape of prosthetic valve is rare but potentially life threatening. It is essential to make timely diagnosis in order to avoid mortality. Transesophageal echocardiography and cinefluoroscopy is usually diagnostic and the location of the missing leaflet can be identified by computed tomography (CT). Emergent surgical correction is mandatory. We report a case of fractured escape of Edward-Duromedics mitral valve 27 years after the surgery. The patient presented with symptoms of acute decompensated heart failure and cardiogenic shock. She was instantly intubated and mechanically ventilated. After prompt evaluation including transthoracic echocardiography and CT, the escape of the leaflet was confirmed. The patient underwent emergent surgery for replacement of the damaged prosthetic valves immediately. Eleven days after the surgery, the dislodged leaflet in iliac artery was removed safely and the patient recovered well. PMID:23837121

  14. Evaluation of mispositioned ECCS valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.A.; O'Brien, J.F.; McIntire, D.C.; Barlow, R.T.

    1977-09-01

    In October of 1975, Westinghouse submitted NS-CE-787, dated October 17, 1975, to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and entered into discussions with them concerning the spurious movement of certain motor-operated valves (MOV's) in the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) to a position defeating the ECCS function at a time when this function is required. On November 25, 1975, the discussion turned to the possible movement of a manually controlled, motor-operated valve due to a fault in its electrical circuitry and the NRC staff expressed concerns about other possible failure modes that might lead to such a valve movement. The NRC meeting minutes document these concerns. This report is an item-by-item response to the concerns expressed by the NRC staff at that meeting and incorporates the original electrical fault analysis

  15. Resurgery for recurrent heart valve diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-lei REN

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the experience with resurgery for recurrent valvular heart diseases. Methods From June 2004 to June 2015, 28 patients (15 males and 13 females with ages ranging from 44 to 67 years (55.6±6.5 years with recurrent heart valve disease underwent resurgery. The reasons for resurgery included perivalvular leakage (7 cases, bioprosthetic valve decline (6 cases in mitral valve and 3 in tricuspid valve, mechanical prostheses dysfunction (2cases, infective endocarditis after valve replacement (2 cases, restenosis of repaired native valve (1 case, and severe tricuspid insufficiency after left-side valve surgery (7 cases. Resurgery included mitral valve replacement in 18 patients and tricuspid valve replacement in 10. All the patients underwent third or fourth or even fifth cardiac surgery for valve replacement. Results There were 2 hospital deaths with a mortality of 7.1% (2/28. The main causes of early-stage deaths were low cardiac output syndrome. The main postoperative complications were respiratory failure in 3, low cardiac output syndrome in 2, reexploration for bleeding in 2 and serious infectious shock in 1. All the patients were found with the great improvement in heart function and the re-implanted prostheses worked well during follow-up. Conclusions Although resurgery for recurrent heart valve disease poses a continuing challenge to cardiac surgeon, it could be performed with the satisfactory results. The keys to a successful cardiac resurgery include appropriate operational timing, refined surgical technique and reasonable perioperative managements. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.01.11

  16. Heavy gas valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steier, L [Vereinigte Armaturen Gesellschaft m.b.H., Mannheim (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-01-01

    Heavy gas valves must comply with special requirements. Apart from absolute safety in operation there are stringent requirements for material, sealing and ease of operation even in the most difficult conditions. Ball valves and single plate pipe gate valves lateral sealing rings have a dual, double sided sealing effect according to the GROVE sealing system. Single plate gate valves with lateral protective plates are suitable preferably for highly contaminated media. Soft sealing gate valves made of cast iron are used for low pressure applications.

  17. Effect of pimobendan or benazepril hydrochloride on survival times in dogs with congestive heart failure caused by naturally occurring myxomatous mitral valve disease: the QUEST study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggström, J; Boswood, A; O'Grady, M; Jöns, O; Smith, S; Swift, S; Borgarelli, M; Gavaghan, B; Kresken, J-G; Patteson, M; Ablad, B; Bussadori, C M; Glaus, T; Kovacević, A; Rapp, M; Santilli, R A; Tidholm, A; Eriksson, A; Belanger, M C; Deinert, M; Little, C J L; Kvart, C; French, A; Rønn-Landbo, M; Wess, G; Eggertsdottir, A V; O'Sullivan, M L; Schneider, M; Lombard, C W; Dukes-McEwan, J; Willis, R; Louvet, A; DiFruscia, R

    2008-01-01

    Myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) continues to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality in geriatric dogs despite conventional therapy. Pimobendan in addition to conventional therapy will extend time to sudden cardiac death, euthanasia for cardiac reasons, or treatment failure when compared with conventional therapy plus benazepril in dogs with congestive heart failure (CHF) attributable to MMVD. Two hundred and sixty client-owned dogs in CHF caused by MMVD were recruited from 28 centers in Europe, Canada, and Australia. A prospective single-blinded study with dogs randomized to PO receive pimobendan (0.4-0.6 mg/kg/d) or benazepril hydrochloride (0.25-1.0 mg/kg/d). The primary endpoint was a composite of cardiac death, euthanized for heart failure, or treatment failure. Eight dogs were excluded from analysis. One hundred and twenty-four dogs were randomized to pimobendan and 128 to benazepril. One hundred and ninety dogs reached the primary endpoint; the median time was 188 days (267 days for pimobendan, 140 days for benazepril hazard ratio = 0.688, 95% confidence limits [CL]=0.516-0.916, P= .0099). The benefit of pimobendan persisted after adjusting for all baseline variables. A longer time to reach the endpoint was also associated with being a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, requiring a lower furosemide dose, and having a higher creatinine concentration. Increases in several indicators of cardiac enlargement (left atrial to aortic root ratio, vertebral heart scale, and percentage increase in left ventricular internal diameter in systole) were associated with a shorter time to endpoint, as was a worse tolerance for exercise. Pimobendan plus conventional therapy prolongs time to sudden death, euthanasia for cardiac reasons, or treatment failure in dogs with CHF caused by MMVD compared with benazepril plus conventional therapy.

  18. Impact of Tricuspid Valve Surgery at the Time of Left Ventricular Assist Device Insertion on Postoperative Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Dunlay, Shannon M.; Deo, Salil V.; Park, Soon J.

    2015-01-01

    Tricuspid regurgitation (TR) is common in patients with heart failure undergoing left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. Whether the TR should be surgically managed at the time of LVAD surgery is controversial.

  19. How to insure quality valve remanufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, C.F.

    1991-01-01

    The importance of quality valve repair for the power generation industry is an obvious need for both the owner as well as the consumer. Whether valves are repaired in-line, on-site, or at a valve remanufacturing facility, the selection of a vendor is vital to meeting not only stringent quality requirements, but also to meet start-up schedules and budgets. In the past, the rule of thumb was that repair of a valve could cost approximately 50% of the cost of a new valve and still represent a significant savings to the end user. For power generation facilities, the fact that many valves are welded in not only makes repair more economical, but even vital to continuing normal operations. For those items not welded in, long lead times and higher prices for these normally exotic alloys make remanufactured valves even more attractive. However, even as these advantages of remanufacturing are obvious, some repair organizations continue to cut corners to meet profit demands. The result is suspect quality in some valves. This can lead to premature failures, possible reduced generating capacity, unscheduled outages, and even catastrophic results. Therefore, the choice of a repair organization must be made with care. As the author has said, repair is an obvious option, but the procurement should definitely involve more than just price comparisons. Evaluation must place the emphasis on quality and reliability. Several aspects should be thoroughly investigated and documented in the selection process. These include: personnel; equipment/facilities; procedures; and credentials

  20. Experimental validation of the fluid–structure interaction simulation of a bioprosthetic aortic heart valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, I.; Dellimore, K.; Rodriguez, R.; Scheffer, C.; Blaine, D.; Weich, H.; Doubell, A.

    2013-01-01

    Experiments performed on a 19 mm diameter bioprosthetic valve were used to successfully validate the fluid–structure interaction (FSI) simulation of an aortic valve at 72 bpm. The FSI simulation was initialized via a novel approach utilizing a Doppler sonogram of the experimentally tested valve. Using this approach very close quantitative agreement (≤12.5 %) between the numerical predictions and experimental values for several key valve performance parameters, including the peak systolic transvalvular pressure gradient, rapid valve opening time and rapid valve closing time, was obtained. The predicted valve leaflet kinematics during opening and closing were also in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  1. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve treatment of degenerative stentless supra-annular Freedom Solo valves: A single centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, James; Dooley, Maureen; Parker, Jessica; Hill, Andrew; Hutchinson, Nevil; de Belder, Adam; Trivedi, Uday; Hildick-Smith, David

    2017-02-15

    Redo surgery for degenerative bioprosthetic aortic valves is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Report results of valve-in-valve therapy (ViV-TAVI) in failed supra-annular stentless Freedom Solo (FS) bioprostheses, which are the highest risk for coronary occlusion. Six patients with FS valves (mean age 78.5 years, 50% males). Five had valvular restenosis (peak gradient 87.2 mm Hg, valve area 0.63 cm 2 ), one had severe regurgitation (AR). Median time to failure was 7 years. Patients were high risk (mean STS/Logistic EuroScore 10.6 15.8, respectively). FS valves ranged from 21 to 25 mm. Successful ViV-TAVI was achieved in 4/6 patients (67%). Of the unsuccessful cases, (patient 1 and 2 of series) patient 1 underwent BAV with simultaneous aortography which revealed left main stem occlusion. The procedure was stopped and the patient went forward for repeat surgery. Patient 2 underwent successful ViV-TAVI with a 26-mm CoreValve with a guide catheter in the left main, but on removal coronary obstruction occurred, necessitating valve snaring into the aorta. Among the successful cases, (patients 3, 4, 5, 6) the TAVIs used were CoreValve Evolut R 23 mm (n = 3), and Lotus 23 mm (n = 1). In the successful cases the peak gradient fell from 83.0 to 38.3 mm Hg. No patient was left with >1+ AR. One patient had a stroke on Day 2, with full neurological recovery. Two patients underwent semi-elective pacing for LBBB and PR >280 ms. ViV-TAVI in stentless Freedom Solo valves is high risk. The risk of coronary occlusion is high. The smallest possible prosthesis (1:1 sizing) should be used, and strategies to protect the coronary vessels must be considered. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Guide to prosthetic cardiac valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morse, D.; Steiner, R.M.; Fernandez, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The development of artificial heart valves: Introduction and historical perspective; The radiology of prosthetic heart valves; The evaluation of patients for prosthetic valve implantation; Pathology of cardiac valve replacement; and Bioengineering of mechanical and biological heart valve substitutes

  3. Long-term follow-up in repaired tetralogy of fallot: can deformation imaging help identify optimal timing of pulmonary valve replacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabate Rotes, Anna; Bonnichsen, Crystal R; Reece, Chelsea L; Connolly, Heidi M; Burkhart, Harold M; Dearani, Joseph A; Eidem, Benjamin W

    2014-12-01

    Novel echocardiographic techniques based on myocardial deformation have not been extensively evaluated to assess right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) response after pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot. Between 2003 and 2012, 133 patients undergoing first-time PVR after tetralogy of Fallot repair underwent echocardiographic assessment at Mayo Clinic. The last echocardiogram before PVR and 1 year after surgery were retrospectively analyzed with Velocity Vector Imaging. Mean age at PVR was 35.5 ± 16.2 years (54% women). Longitudinal peak systolic strain and strain rate before PVR were low: for the left ventricle, -14.8 ± 3.5% and -0.8 ± 0.2 sec(-1), and for the right ventricle, -16.2 ± 4.1% and -0.9 ± 0.3 sec(-1), respectively. There was no significant change in either parameter after surgery. A close correlation between LV and RV deformational parameters was found before PVR and was maintained after surgery. In the multivariate analysis, patients with better LV and RV peak systolic strain preoperatively were found to have better LV and RV peak systolic strain after surgery (P = .004 and P = .006, respectively). However, patients with the most improvement in deformation were those with worse RV function preoperatively (P = .002). Mean New York Heart Association class at early follow-up improved from 2.2 ± 0.8 to 1.2 ± 0.6 (P tetralogy of Fallot undergoing PVR, and there was no significant change after surgery. However, preoperative systolic deformational parameters were predictive of postoperative ventricular function and New York Heart Association class after PVR and may be helpful to identify optimal timing for surgical intervention in this cohort. Copyright © 2014 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Intelligent Flow Control Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Anthony R (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is an intelligent flow control valve which may be inserted into the flow coming out of a pipe and activated to provide a method to stop, measure, and meter flow coming from the open or possibly broken pipe. The intelligent flow control valve may be used to stop the flow while repairs are made. Once repairs have been made, the valve may be removed or used as a control valve to meter the amount of flow from inside the pipe. With the addition of instrumentation, the valve may also be used as a variable area flow meter and flow controller programmed based upon flowing conditions. With robotic additions, the valve may be configured to crawl into a desired pipe location, anchor itself, and activate flow control or metering remotely.

  5. Nuclear valves latest development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaac, F.; Monier, M.

    1993-01-01

    In the frame of Nuclear Power Plant upgrade (Emergency Power Supply and Emergency Core Cooling), Westinghouse had to face a new valve design philosophy specially for motor operated valves. The valves have to been designed to resist any operating conditions, postulated accident or loss of control. The requirements for motor operated valves are listed and the selected model and related upgrading explained. As part of plant upgrade and valves replacement, Westinghouse has sponsored alternative hardfacing research programme. Two types of materials have been investigated: nickel base alloys and iron base alloys. Programme requirements and test results are given. A new globe valve model (On-Off or regulating) is described developed by Alsthom Velan permitting the seat replacement in less than 10 min. (Z.S.) 2 figs

  6. Cryogenic Cam Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Kenneth J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A cryogenic cam butterfly valve has a body that includes an axially extending fluid conduit formed there through. A disc lug is connected to a back side of a valve disc and has a circular bore that receives and is larger than a cam of a cam shaft. The valve disc is rotatable for a quarter turn within the body about a lug axis that is offset from the shaft axis. Actuating the cam shaft in the closing rotational direction first causes the camming side of the cam of the cam shaft to rotate the disc lug and the valve disc a quarter turn from the open position to the closed position. Further actuating causes the camming side of the cam shaft to translate the valve disc into sealed contact with the valve seat. Opening rotational direction of the cam shaft reverses these motions.

  7. Low noise control valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    Noise is one of the problems associated with the use of any type of control valve in systems involving the flow of fluids. The advent of OSHA standards has prompted control valve manufacturers to design valves with special trim to lower the sound pressure level to meet these standards. However, these levels are in some cases too high, particularly when a valve must be located in or near an area where people are working at tasks requiring a high degree of concentration. Such locations are found around and near research devices and in laboratory-office areas. This paper describes a type of fluid control device presently being used at PPL as a bypass control valve in deionized water systems and designed to reduce sound pressure levels considerably below OSHA standards. Details of the design and construction of this constant pressure drop variable flow control valve are contained in the text and are shown in photographs and drawings. Test data taken are included

  8. Annular dynamics after mitral valve repair with different prosthetic rings: A real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Hiroyuki; Toda, Koichi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Kawamura, Masashi; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Saito, Tetsuya; Ueno, Takayoshi; Kuratani, Toru; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2016-09-01

    We assessed the effects of different types of prosthetic rings on mitral annular dynamics using real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE). RT3DE was performed in 44 patients, including patients undergoing mitral annuloplasty using the Cosgrove-Edwards flexible band (Group A, n = 10), the semi-rigid Sorin Memo 3D ring (Group B, n = 17), the semi-rigid Edwards Physio II ring (Group C, n = 7) and ten control subjects. Various annular diameters were measured throughout the cardiac cycle. We observed flexible anterior annulus motion in all of the groups except Group C. A flexible posterior annulus was only observed in Group B and the Control group. The mitral annular area changed during the cardiac cycle by 8.4 ± 3.2, 6.3 ± 2.0, 3.2 ± 1.3, and 11.6 ± 5.0 % in Group A, Group B, Group C, and the Control group, respectively. The dynamic diastolic to systolic change in mitral annular diameters was lost in Group C, while it was maintained in Group A, and to a good degree in Group B. In comparison to the Control group, the mitral annulus shape was more ellipsoid in Group B and Group C, and more circular in Group A. Although mitral regurgitation was well controlled by all of the types of rings that were utilized in the present study, we demonstrated that the annulus motion and annulus shape differed according to the type of prosthetic ring that was used, which might provide important information for the selection of an appropriate prosthetic ring.

  9. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  10. Magnetic Check Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brian G.; Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Poppet in proposed check valve restored to closed condition by magnetic attraction instead of spring force. Oscillations suppressed, with consequent reduction of wear. Stationary magnetic disk mounted just upstream of poppet, also containing magnet. Valve body nonmagnetic. Forward pressure or flow would push poppet away from stationary magnetic disk so fluid flows easily around poppet. Stop in valve body prevents poppet from being swept away. When flow stopped or started to reverse, magnetic attraction draws poppet back to disk. Poppet then engages floating O-ring, thereby closing valve and preventing reverse flow. Floating O-ring facilitates sealing at low loads.

  11. Butterfly valves for seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Katsuto

    1991-01-01

    Recently in thermal and nuclear power stations and chemical plants which have become large capacity, large quantity of cooling water is required, and mostly seawater is utilized. In these cooling water systems, considering thermal efficiency and economy, the pipings become complex, and various control functions are demanded. For the purpose, the installation of shut-off valves and control valves for pipings is necessary. The various types of valves have been employed, and in particular, butterfly valves have many merits in their function, size, structure, operation, maintenance, usable period, price and so on. The corrosion behavior of seawater is complicated due to the pollution of seawater, therefore, the environment of the valves used for seawater became severe. The structure and the features of the butterfly valves for seawater, the change of the structure of the butterfly valves for seawater and the checkup of the butterfly valves for seawater are reported. The corrosion of metallic materials is complicatedly different due to the locating condition of plants, the state of pipings and the condition of use. The corrosion countermeasures for butterfly valves must be examined from the synthetic viewpoints. (K.I.)

  12. Redo mitral valve surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redoy Ranjan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is based on the findings of a single surgeon’s practice of mitral valve replacement of 167 patients from April 2005 to June 2017 who developed symptomatic mitral restenosis after closed or open mitral commisurotomy. Both clinical and color doppler echocardiographic data of peri-operative and six months follow-up period were evaluated and compared to assess the early outcome of the redo mitral valve surgery. With male-female ratio of 1: 2.2 and after a duration of 6 to 22 years symptom free interval between the redo procedures, the selected patients with mitral valve restenosis undergone valve replacement with either mechanical valve in 62% cases and also tissue valve in 38% cases. Particular emphasis was given to separate the adhered pericardium from the heart completely to ameliorate base to apex and global contraction of the heart. Besides favorable post-operative clinical outcome, the echocardiographic findings were also encouraging as there was statistically significant increase in the mitral valve area and ejection fraction with significant decrease in the left atrial diameter, pressure gradient across the mitral valve and pulmonary artery systolic pressure. Therefore, in case of inevitable mitral restenosis after closed or open commisurotomy, mitral valve replacement is a promising treatment modality.

  13. Diseases of the Tricuspid Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stenosis. Tricuspid Regurgitation Tricuspid regurgitation is also called tricuspid insufficiency or tricuspid incompetence. It means there is a ... require valve surgery. Tags: heart valves , tricuspid incompetence , ... tricuspid regurgitation , tricuspid stenosis , valve disease Related Links ...

  14. Using Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing as a Key Component of the Value Platform: A Pilot Analysis of Colonoscopy, Aortic Valve Replacement and Carpal Tunnel Release Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jacob A; Mayhew, Christopher R; Morris, Amanda J; Bader, Angela M; Tsai, Mitchell H; Urman, Richard D

    2018-04-01

    Time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) is a methodology that calculates the costs of healthcare resources consumed as a patient moves along a care process. Limited data exist on the application of TDABC from the perspective of an anesthesia provider. We describe the use of TDABC, a bottom-up costing strategy and financial outcomes for three different medical-surgical procedures. In each case, a multi-disciplinary team created process maps describing the care delivery cycle for a patient encounter using the TDABC methodology. Each step in a process map delineated an activity required for delivery of patient care. The resources (personnel, equipment and supplies) associated with each step were identified. A per minute cost for each resource expended was generated, known as the capacity cost rate, and multiplied by its time requirement. The total cost for an episode of care was obtained by adding the cost of each individual resource consumed as the patient moved along a clinical pathway. We built process maps for colonoscopy in the gastroenterology suite, calculated costs of an aortic valve replacement by comparing surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) techniques, and determined the cost of carpal tunnel release in an operating room versus an ambulatory procedure room. TDABC is central to the value-based healthcare platform. Application of TDABC provides a framework to identify process improvements for health care delivery. The first case demonstrates cost-savings and improved wait times by shifting some of the colonoscopies scheduled with an anesthesiologist from the main hospital to the ambulatory facility. In the second case, we show that the deployment of an aortic valve via the transcatheter route front loads the costs compared to traditional, surgical replacement. The last case demonstrates significant cost savings to the healthcare system associated with re-organization of staff required to execute a

  15. Using Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing as a Key Component of the Value Platform: A Pilot Analysis of Colonoscopy, Aortic Valve Replacement and Carpal Tunnel Release Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jacob A.; Mayhew, Christopher R.; Morris, Amanda J.; Bader, Angela M.; Tsai, Mitchell H.; Urman, Richard D.

    2018-01-01

    Background Time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) is a methodology that calculates the costs of healthcare resources consumed as a patient moves along a care process. Limited data exist on the application of TDABC from the perspective of an anesthesia provider. We describe the use of TDABC, a bottom-up costing strategy and financial outcomes for three different medical-surgical procedures. Methods In each case, a multi-disciplinary team created process maps describing the care delivery cycle for a patient encounter using the TDABC methodology. Each step in a process map delineated an activity required for delivery of patient care. The resources (personnel, equipment and supplies) associated with each step were identified. A per minute cost for each resource expended was generated, known as the capacity cost rate, and multiplied by its time requirement. The total cost for an episode of care was obtained by adding the cost of each individual resource consumed as the patient moved along a clinical pathway. Results We built process maps for colonoscopy in the gastroenterology suite, calculated costs of an aortic valve replacement by comparing surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) techniques, and determined the cost of carpal tunnel release in an operating room versus an ambulatory procedure room. Conclusions TDABC is central to the value-based healthcare platform. Application of TDABC provides a framework to identify process improvements for health care delivery. The first case demonstrates cost-savings and improved wait times by shifting some of the colonoscopies scheduled with an anesthesiologist from the main hospital to the ambulatory facility. In the second case, we show that the deployment of an aortic valve via the transcatheter route front loads the costs compared to traditional, surgical replacement. The last case demonstrates significant cost savings to the healthcare system associated with re

  16. Thermostatic Radiator Valve Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dentz, J. [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative (ARIES), New York, NY (United States); Ansanelli, E. [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative (ARIES), New York, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A large stock of multifamily buildings in the Northeast and Midwest are heated by steam distribution systems. Losses from these systems are typically high and a significant number of apartments are overheated much of the time. Thermostatically controlled radiator valves (TRVs) are one potential strategy to combat this problem, but have not been widely accepted by the residential retrofit market. In this project, the ARIES team sought to better understand the current usage of TRVs by key market players in steam and hot water heating and to conduct limited experiments on the effectiveness of new and old TRVs as a means of controlling space temperatures and reducing heating fuel consumption. The project included a survey of industry professionals, a field experiment comparing old and new TRVs, and cost-benefit modeling analysis using BEopt™ (Building Energy Optimization software).

  17. Flowfield Analysis of a Pneumatic Solenoid Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheam-Chyun Lin

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatic solenoid valve has been widely used in the vehicle control systems for meeting the rapid-reaction demand triggered by the dynamic conditions encountered during the driving course of vehicle. For ensuring the safety of human being, the reliable and effective solenoid valve is in great demand to shorten the reaction time and thus becomes the topic of this research. This numerical study chooses a commercial 3/2-way solenoid valve as the reference valve for analysing its performance. At first, CFD software Fluent is adopted to simulate the flow field associated with the valve configuration. Then, the comprehensive flow visualization is implemented to identify the locations of adverse flow patterns. Accordingly, it is found that a high-pressure region exists in the zone between the nozzle exit and the top of iron core. Thereafter, the nozzle diameter and the distance between nozzle and spool are identified as the important design parameters for improving the pressure response characteristics of valve. In conclusion, this work establishes a rigorous and systematic CFD scheme to evaluate the performance of pneumatic solenoid valve.

  18. Factors influencing mortality after bioprosthetic valve replacement; a midterm outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadzadegan, Hassan; Javadzadegan, Amir; Mehdizadeh Baghbani, Jafar

    2013-01-01

    Although valve repair is applied routinely nowadays, particularly for mitral regurgitation (MR) or tricuspid regurgitation (TR), valve replacement using prosthetic valves is also common especially in adults. Unfortunately the valve with ideal hemodynamic performance and long-term durability without increasing the risk of bleeding due to long-term anticoagulant therapy has not been introduced. Therefore, patients and physicians must choose either bioprosthetic or mechanical valves. Currently, there is an increasing clinical trend of using bioprosthetic valves instead of mechanical valves even in young patients apparently because of their advantages. Seventy patients undergone valvular replacement using bioprosthetic valves were evaluated by ECG and Echocardiography to assess the rhythm and ejection fracture. Mean follow-up time was 33 months (min 9, max 92). Mortality rate was 25.9% (n=18) within 8 years of follow-up. Statistical analysis showed a significant relation between atrial fibrillation rhythm and mortality (P=0.02). Morbidities occurred in 30 patients (42.8%). Significant statistical relation was found between the morbidities and age over 65 years old (P=0.005). In follow-up period, 4 cases (5.7%) underwent re-operation due to global valve dysfunction. Our study shows that using biprosthetic valve could reduce the risk of morbidity occurrence in patient who needs valve replacement. However, if medical treatments fail, patients should be referred for surgery. This would reduce the risk of mortality because of lower incident of complications such as atrial fibrillation and morbidities due to younger patients' population.

  19. Danfos: Thermostatic Radiator Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Oliver, James; Hjorth, Poul G.

    2000-01-01

    This problem deals with modelling the flow through a typical Danfoss thermostatic radiator valve.Danfoss is able to employ Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in calculations of the capacity of valves, but an experienced engineer can often by rules of thumb "guess" the capacity, with a precision...

  20. DIAGNOSTICS AND TREATMENT OF MITRAL VALVE PROLAPSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Kuzhel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitral valve prolapse (MVP is one of the most inconsistent diagnose. In the most cases patients with MVP have the good long-term prognosis, and therapy is aimed at reduction in psychovegetative dysfunction. Careful follow-up and timely cardiosurgical correction should be performed, if necessary, in patients with classical MPV. The choice method in these cases is the mitral valve plasty.

  1. Bioprinting a cardiac valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Soumen; Lerman, Amir

    2015-12-01

    Heart valve tissue engineering could be a possible solution for the limitations of mechanical and biological prostheses, which are commonly used for heart valve replacement. In tissue engineering, cells are seeded into a 3-dimensional platform, termed the scaffold, to make the engineered tissue construct. However, mimicking the mechanical and spatial heterogeneity of a heart valve structure in a fabricated scaffold with uniform cell distribution is daunting when approached conventionally. Bioprinting is an emerging technique that can produce biological products containing matrix and cells, together or separately with morphological, structural and mechanical diversity. This advance increases the possibility of fabricating the structure of a heart valve in vitro and using it as a functional tissue construct for implantation. This review describes the use of bioprinting technology in heart valve tissue engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Space Vehicle Valve System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Lindner, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is a space vehicle valve system which controls the internal pressure of a space vehicle and the flow rate of purged gases at a given internal pressure and aperture site. A plurality of quasi-unique variable dimension peaked valve structures cover the purge apertures on a space vehicle. Interchangeable sheet guards configured to cover valve apertures on the peaked valve structure contain a pressure-activated surface on the inner surface. Sheet guards move outwardly from the peaked valve structure when in structural contact with a purge gas stream flowing through the apertures on the space vehicle. Changing the properties of the sheet guards changes the response of the sheet guards at a given internal pressure, providing control of the flow rate at a given aperture site.

  3. Multiple-port valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doody, T.J.

    1978-01-01

    A multiple-port valve assembly is designed to direct flow from a primary conduit into any one of a plurality of secondary conduits as well as to direct a reverse flow. The valve includes two mating hemispherical sockets that rotatably receive a spherical valve plug. The valve plug is attached to the primary conduit and includes diverging passageways from that conduit to a plurality of ports. Each of the ports is alignable with one or more of a plurality of secondary conduits fitting into one of the hemispherical sockets. The other hemispherical socket includes a slot for the primary conduit such that the conduit's motion along that slot with rotation of the spherical plug about various axes will position the valve-plug ports in respect to the secondary conduits

  4. NRC perspective and experience on valve testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eapen, P.K.

    1990-01-01

    Testing of safety related valves is one of the major activities at commercial nuclear power plants. In addition to Technical Specification, valve testing is required in 10 CFR 50.55a and 10 CFR 50 Appendix J. NRC inspectors (both resident and specialists) spend a considerable amount of time in following the valve test activities as part of their routine business. In the past, depending on a licensee's organizational structure, a valve could be tested more than three times to verify conformance with Technical Specifications, 10 CFR 50.55a, and 10 CFR 50 Appendix J. The regulatory reviewers were isolated from each other. Licensee test personnel were also not communicating among themselves. As a result, NRC inspectors found that certain valves in the IST program were inadequately tested. The typical licensee response was to say that this valve is exempted from testing under Appendix J. Others would say that the technical specification does not require fast closure of a valve in question. In addition to the above, the inspectors had to deal with exemption requests that were not dispositioned by the NRC. In the seventies there was a gentlemen's agreement to allow the licensee to do the testing in accordance with the exception, without waiting for the NRC approval. Needless to say when the new NRC inspection procedure was issued in March 1989 for implementation, the Regional inspectors had extremely difficult time to cope with the gray areas of valve testing. In August 1987, NRC Region I was reorganized and the special test program section was established to perform inspections in the IST area. This section was chartered to optimize resources and develop a meaningful inspection plan. The perspectives and insights used in the development of a detailed inspection plan is discussed below

  5. Preliminary assessment of valve IST effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grove, E.; DiBiasio, A.; Carbonaro, J.

    1994-01-01

    A preliminary review of inservice testing effectiveness for Code Class 1,2, and 3 valves at nuclear power plants was performed. These requirements are specified by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI, and the Operations and Maintenance Standard. The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) database was used to provide failure reports for these components for 1988 to 1992. This time period coincides with the issuance of Generic Letter 89-04, which resulted in a more consistent application of the requirements by the licensees. For this time period, 8,593 valve failures were identified. From the review of the NPRDS database, the primary failure causes and failure modes for motor-operated valves (MOV), air-operated valves (AOV), and check valves (CV) were identified. Solenoid-operated valves were not reviewed in this study. Plant testing programs were effective in identifying approximately 60% of the CV failures, 46% of the AOV failures, and 44% of the MOV failures

  6. Gate valve performance prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, D.H.; Damerell, P.S.; Wang, J.K.; Kalsi, M.S.; Wolfe, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute is carrying out a program to improve the performance prediction methods for motor-operated valves. As part of this program, an analytical method to predict the stem thrust required to stroke a gate valve has been developed and has been assessed against data from gate valve tests. The method accounts for the loads applied to the disc by fluid flow and for the detailed mechanical interaction of the stem, disc, guides, and seats. To support development of the method, two separate-effects test programs were carried out. One test program determined friction coefficients for contacts between gate valve parts by using material specimens in controlled environments. The other test program investigated the interaction of the stem, disc, guides, and seat using a special fixture with full-sized gate valve parts. The method has been assessed against flow-loop and in-plant test data. These tests include valve sizes from 3 to 18 in. and cover a considerable range of flow, temperature, and differential pressure. Stem thrust predictions for the method bound measured results. In some cases, the bounding predictions are substantially higher than the stem loads required for valve operation, as a result of the bounding nature of the friction coefficients in the method

  7. Modeling valve leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, S.R.; Rohrscheib, R.

    1994-01-01

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code requires individual valve leakage testing for Category A valves. Although the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) has recognized that it is more appropriate to test containment isolation valves in groups, as allowed by 10 CFR 50, Appendix J, a utility seeking relief from these Code requirements must provide technical justification for the relief and establish a conservative alternate acceptance criteria. In order to provide technical justification for group testing of containment isolation valves, Illinois Power developed a calculation (model) for determining the size of a leakage pathway in a valve disc or seat for a given leakage rate. The model was verified experimentally by machining leakage pathways of known size and then measuring the leakage and comparing this value to the calculated value. For the range of values typical of leakage rate testing, the correlation between the experimental values and calculated values was quote good. Based upon these results, Illinois Power established a conservative acceptance criteria for all valves in the inservice testing (IST) program and was granted relief by the USNRC from the individual leakage testing requirements of the ASME Code. This paper presents the results of Illinois Power's work in the area of valve leakage rate testing

  8. Simulation of proportional control of hydraulic actuator using digital hydraulic valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuraman, D. R. S.; Senthil Kumar, S.; Kalaiarasan, G.

    2017-11-01

    Fluid power systems using oil hydraulics in earth moving and construction equipment have been using proportional and servo control valves for a long time to achieve precise and accurate position control backed by system performance. Such valves are having feedback control in them and exhibit good response, sensitivity and fine control of the actuators. Servo valves and proportional valves are possessing less hysteresis when compared to on-off type valves, but when the servo valve spools get stuck in one position, a high frequency called as jitter is employed to bring the spool back, whereas in on-off type valves it requires lesser technology to retract the spool. Hence on-off type valves are used in a technology known as digital valve technology, which caters to precise control on slow moving loads with fast switching times and with good flow and pressure control mimicking the performance of an equivalent “proportional valve” or “servo valve”.

  9. Face-Sealing Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervo, John N.

    1992-01-01

    Valve plate made to translate as well as rotate. Valve opened and closed by turning shaft and lever. Interactions among lever, spring, valve plate, and face seal cause plate to undergo combination of translation and rotation so valve plate clears seal during parts of opening and closing motions.

  10. Modification and performance evaluation of a mono-valve engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Justin W.

    A four-stroke engine utilizing one tappet valve for both the intake and exhaust gas exchange processes has been built and evaluated. The engine operates under its own power, but has a reduced power capacity than the conventional 2-valve engine. The reduction in power is traced to higher than expected amounts of exhaust gases flowing back into the intake system. Design changes to the cylinder head will fix the back flow problems, but the future capacity of mono-valve engine technology cannot be estimated. The back flow of exhaust gases increases the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate and deteriorates combustion. Intake pressure data shows the mono-valve engine requires an advanced intake valve closing (IVC) time to prevent back flow of charge air. A single actuation camshaft with advanced IVC was tested in the mono-valve engine, and was found to improve exhaust scavenging at TDC and nearly eliminated all charge air back flow at IVC. The optimum IVC timing is shown to be approximately 30 crank angle degrees after BDC. The mono-valve cylinder head utilizes a rotary valve positioned above the tappet valve. The open spaces inside the rotary valveand between the rotary valve and tappet valve represent a common volume that needs to be reduced in order to reduce the base EGR rate. Multiple rotary valve configurations were tested, and the size of the common volume was found to have no effect on back flow but a direct effect on the EGR rate and engine performance. The position of the rotary valve with respect to crank angle has a direct effect on the scavenging process. Optimum scavenging occurs when the intake port is opened just after TDC.

  11. GIANT PROSTHETIC VALVE THROMBUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical prosthetic valves are predisposed to bleeding, thrombosis & thromboembolic complications. Overall incidence of thromboembolic complications is 1% per year who are on oral anticoagulants, whereas bleeding complications incidence is 0.5% to 6.6% per year. 1, 2 Minimization of Scylla of thromboembolic & Charybdis of bleeding complication needs a balancing act of optimal antithrombotic therapy. We are reporting a case of middle aged male patient with prosthetic mitral valve presenting in heart failure. Patient had discontinued anticoagulants, as he had subdural hematoma in the past. He presented to our institute with a giant prosthetic valve thrombus.

  12. Aerococcus viridans Native Valve Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwan Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerococcus viridans is an infrequent human pathogen and few cases of infective endocarditis have been reported. A case involving a 69-year-old man with colon cancer and hemicolectomy 14 years previously, without recurrence, is reported. A diagnosis of native mitral valve endocarditis was established on the basis of clinical presentation, characteristic echocardiographic findings and pathological specimen examination after urgent valve replacement. A viridans endocarditis appears to be particularly virulent, requiring a surgical approach in four of 10 cases reported and death in one of nine. Given the aggressive nature of A viridans endocarditis and the variable time to diagnosis (a few days to seven months, prompt recognition of symptoms and echocardiography, in addition to blood cultures, should be performed when symptoms persist.

  13. Valve monitoring ITI-MOVATS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moureau, S.

    1993-01-01

    ITI-MOVATS provides a wide range of test devices to monitor the performance of valves: motor operated gate or globe valve, butterfly valve, air operated valve, and check valve. The ITI-MOVATS testing equipment is used in the following three areas: actuator setup/baseline testing, periodic/post-maintenance testing, and differential pressure testing. The parameters typically measured with the MOVATS diagnostic system as well as the devices used to measure them are described. (Z.S.)

  14. Bioprosthetic Valve Fracture to Facilitate Transcatheter Valve-in-Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Keith B; Chhatriwalla, Adnan K; Cohen, David J; Saxon, John T; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Hart, Anthony; Baron, Suzanne; Davis, J Russell; Pak, Alex F; Dvir, Danny; Borkon, A Michael

    2017-11-01

    Valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve replacement is less effective in small surgical bioprostheses. We evaluated the feasibility of bioprosthetic valve fracture with a high-pressure balloon to facilitate valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve replacement. In vitro bench testing on aortic tissue valves was performed on 19-mm and 21-mm Mitroflow (Sorin, Milan, Italy), Magna and Magna Ease (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA), Trifecta and Biocor Epic (St. Jude Medical, Minneapolis, MN), and Hancock II and Mosaic (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN). High-pressure balloons Tru Dilation, Atlas Gold, and Dorado (C.R. Bard, Murray Hill, NJ) were used to determine which valves could be fractured and at what pressure fracture occurred. Mitroflow, Magna, Magna Ease, Mosaic, and Biocor Epic surgical valves were successfully fractured using high-pressures balloon 1 mm larger than the labeled valve size whereas Trifecta and Hancock II surgical valves could not be fractured. Only the internal valve frame was fractured, and the sewing cuff was never disrupted. Manufacturer's rated burst pressures for balloons were exceeded, with fracture pressures ranging from 8 to 24 atmospheres depending on the surgical valve. Testing further demonstrated that fracture facilitated the expansion of previously constrained, underexpanded transcatheter valves (both balloon and self-expanding) to the manufacturer's recommended size. Bench testing demonstrates that the frame of most, but not all, bioprosthetic surgical aortic valves can be fractured using high-pressure balloons. The safety of bioprosthetic valve fracture to optimize valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve replacement in small surgical valves requires further clinical investigation. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fairchild Stratos Division's Type II prototype lockhopper valve: METC Prototype Test Valve No. F-1 prototype lockhopper valve-testing and development project. Static test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, D. R.; Cutright, R. L.; Griffith, R. A.; Loomis, R. B.; Maxfield, D. A.; Moritz, R. S.

    1981-10-01

    METC Prototype Test Valve No. F-1 is a hybrid design, based on a segmented ball termed a visor valve, developed and manufactured by Fairchild Stratos Division under contract to the Department of Energy. The valve uses a visor arm that rotates into position and then translates to seal. This valve conditionally completed static testing at METC with clean gas to pressures of 1600 psig and internal valve temperatures to 600/sup 0/F. External leakage was excessive due to leakage through the stuffing box, purge fittings, external bolts, and other assemblies. The stuffing box was repacked several times and redesigned midway through the testing, but external leakage was still excessive. Internal leakage through the seats, except for a few anomalies, was very low throughout the 2409 cycles of testing. As shown by the low internal leakage, the visor valve concept appears to have potential for lock-hopper valve applications. The problems that are present with METC Prototype Test Valve No. F-1 are in the seals, which are equivalent to the shaft and bonnet seals in standard valve designs. The operating conditions at these seals are well within the capabilities of available seal designs and materials. Further engineering and minor modifications should be able to resolve the problems identified during static testing.

  16. BWR control rod drive scram pilot valve monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soden, R.A.; Kelly, V.

    1984-01-01

    The control rod drive system in a Boiling Water Reactor is the most important safety system in the power plant. All components of the system can be verified except the solenoid operated, scram pilot valves without scramming a rod. The pilot valve mechancial works is the weak link to the control rod drive system. These pilot valves control the hydraulic system which applies pressure to the ''insert'' side of the control rod piston and vents the ''withdraw'' side of the piston causing the rods to insert during a scam. The only verification that the valve is operating properly is to scram the rod. The concern for this portion of the system is demonstrated by the high number of redundant components and complete periodic testing of the electrical circuits. The pilot valve can become hung-up through wear, fracture of internal components, mechanical binding, foreign material or chemicals left in the valve during maintenance, etc. If the valve becomes hung-up the electrical tests performed will not indicate this condition and scramming the rod is in jeopardy. Only an attempt to scram a rod will indicate the hung-up valve. While this condition exists the rod is considered inoperative. This paper describes a system developed at a nuclear power plant that monitors the pilot valves on the control rod drive system. This system utilizes pattern recognition to assure proper internal workings of the scram pilot valves to plant operators. The system is totally automatic such that each time the valve is operated on a ''half scram'', a printout is available to the operator along with light indication that each of the 370 valves (on one unit of a BWR) is operating properly. With this monitoring system installed, all components of the control rod drive system including the solenoid pilot valves can be verified as operational without scramming any rods

  17. BWR control rod drive scram pilot valve monitoring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soden, R.A.; Kelly, V.

    1986-01-01

    The control rod drive system in a Boiling Water Reactor is the most important safety system in the power plant. All components of the system can be verified except the solenoid operated, scram pilot valves without scramming a rod. The pilot valve mechanical works is the weak link to the control rod drive system. These pilot valves control the hydraulic system which applies pressure to the insert side of the control rod piston and vents the withdraw side of the piston causing the rods to insert during a scram. The only verification that the valve is operating properly is to scram the rod. The concern for this portion of the system is demonstrated by the high number of redundant components and complete periodic testing of the electrical circuits. The pilot valve can become hung-up through wear, fracture of internal components, mechanical binding, foreign material or chemicals left in the valve during maintenance, etc. If the valve becomes hung-up the electrical tests performed will not indicate this condition and scramming the rod is in jeopardy. Only an attempt to scram a rod will indicate the hung-up valve. While this condition exists the rod is considered inoperative. This paper describes a system developed at a nuclear power plant that monitors the pilot valves on the control rod drive system. This system utilizes pattern recognition to assure proper internal workings of the scram pilot valves to plant operators. The system is totally automatic such that each time the valve is operated on a half scram, a printout is available to the operator along with light indication that each of the 370 valves (on one unit of a BWR) is operating properly. With this monitoring system installed, all components of the control rod drive system including the solenoid pilot valves can be verified as operational without scramming any rods

  18. The Klinger hot gas double axial valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruschik, J.; Hiltgen, H.

    1984-01-01

    The Klinger hot gas valve is a medium controlled double axial valve with advanced design features and safety function. It was first proposed by Klinger early in 1976 for the PNP-Project as a containment shut-off for hot helium (918 deg. C and 42 bar), because a market research has shown that such a valve is not state of present techniques. In the first stage of development a feasibility study had to be made by detailed design, calculation and by basic experiments for key components in close collaboration with Interatom/GHT. This was the basis for further design, calculation, construction and experimental work for such a valve prototype within the new development contract. The stage of knowledge to that time revealed the following key priority development areas: Finite element stress analysis for the highly stressed high temperature main components; development of an insulation layout; Detailed experimental tests of functionally important structural components or units of the valve, partly at Klingers (gasstatic bearings, flexible metallic sealing element, aerodynamic and thermohydraulic tests), partly at Interatom (actuator unit and also gasstatic bearings), partly at HRB in Juelich (flexible metallic sealing system, aerodynamic and thermohydraulic tests); Design of a test valve for experimental work in the KVK (test circuit at Interatom) for evaluation of temperature distribution and reliability of operation; Design of a prototype and extensive testing in the KVK

  19. Pulmonary valve stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery - discharge Images Heart valves References Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ... Saunders; 2016:chap 69. Otto CM, Bownow RO. Valvular heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow ...

  20. Mitral valve regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and dentist if you have a history of heart valve disease or congenital heart disease before treatment. Some people ... the middle Heart, front view References Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  1. Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... team will discuss with you the advantages and disadvantages of both valve types. Regardless of which type ... Diagnosis and Treatment Options Recovery Questions for Your Doctor Will my condition ever get better without treatment? ...

  2. Dry product valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greaves, James D.

    1984-01-01

    This invention provides a system for delivering particulate radioactive or other toxic wastes to a container in which they can be solidified. The system includes a set of valves that prevent the escape of dusty materials to the atmosphere

  3. Ball check valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, F.

    1978-01-01

    A pressurized nuclear reactor having an instrument assembly sheathed in a metallic tube which is extended vertically upward into the reactor core by traversing a metallic guide tube which is welded to the wall of the vessel is described. Sensors in each instrument assembly are connected to instruments outside the vessel to manifest the conditions within the core. Each instrument assembly probe is moved into position within a metallic guide channel. The guide channel penetrates the wall of the vessel and forms part of the barrier to the environment within the pressure vessel. Each channel includes a ball check valve which is opened by the instrument assembly probe when the probe passes through the valve. A ball valve element is moved from its seat by the probe to a position lateral of the bore of the channel and is guided to its seat along a sloped path within the valve body when the probe is removed. 5 claims, 3 figures

  4. Valve for gas centrifuges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahs, Charles A.; Burbage, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  5. Stent valve implantation in conventional redo aortic valve surgery to prevent patient-prosthesis mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Enrico; Franciosi, Giorgio; Clivio, Sara; Faletra, Francesco; Moccetti, Marco; Moccetti, Tiziano; Pedrazzini, Giovanni; Demertzis, Stefanos

    2017-03-01

    The goal was to show the technical details, feasibility and clinical results of balloon-expandable stent valve implantation in the aortic position during conventional redo open-heart surgery in selected obese patients with a small aortic prosthesis and severe patient-prosthesis mismatch. Two symptomatic overweight patients (body mass index of 31 and 38), each with a small aortic prosthesis (a 4-year-old, 21-mm Hancock II biological valve and a 29-year-old, 23-mm Duromedic mechanical valve), increased transvalvular gradients (59/31 and 74/44 mmHg) and a reduced indexed effective orifice area (0.50 and 0.43 cm 2 /m 2 ) underwent implantation of two 26-mm balloon-expandable Sapien 3 valves during standard on-pump redo valve surgery. Using full re-sternotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest, the two balloon-expandable stent valves were implanted under direct view using a standard aortotomy, after prosthesis removal and without annulus enlargement. Aortic cross-clamp times were 162 and 126 min; cardiopulmonary bypass times were 178 and 180 min; total surgical times were 360 and 318 min. At discharge, echocardiograms showed transvalvular peak and mean gradients of 13/9 and 23/13 mmHg and indexed effective orifice areas of 0.64 and 1.08 cm 2 /m 2 . The 3-month echocardiographic follow-up showed transvalvular peak and mean gradients of 18/9 and 19/11 mmHg and indexed effective orifice areas of 0.78 cm 2 /m 2 and 0.84 cm 2 /m 2 , with improved symptoms (New York Heart Association class 1). Implantation of a balloon-expandable stent valve during redo aortic valve surgery is feasible in selected cases and prevents patient-prosthesis mismatch in obese patients without need for aortic annulus enlargement. Moreover, in the case of stent valve degeneration, this approach permits additional valve-in-valve procedures with large stent valves and prevents re-redo surgery. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  6. Mechanisms of mechanical heart valve cavitation: investigation using a tilting disk valve model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z; Xi, B; Zhu, K; Hwang, N H

    2001-09-01

    The induction of mechanical heart valve (MHV) cavitation was investigated using a 27 mm Medtronic Hall (MH27) tilting disk valve. The MH27 valve was mounted in the mitral position of a simulating pulse flow system, and stroboscopic lighting used to visualize cavitation bubbles on the occluder inflow surface at the instant of valve closure. MHV cavitation was monitored using a digital camera with 0.04 mm/pixel resolution sufficient to render the tiny bubbles clearly visible on the computer monitor screen. Cavitation on MH27 valve was classified as five types according to the time, site and shape of the cavitation bubbles. Valve cavitation occurred at the instant of occluder impact with the valve seat at closing. The impact motion was subdivided into three temporal phases: (i) squeezing flow; (ii) elastic collision; and (iii) leaflet rebound. MHV cavitation caused by vortices was found to be initiated by the squeezing jet and/or by the transvalvular leakage jets. By using a tension wave which swept across the occluder surface immediately upon elastic impact, nuclei in the vortex core were expanded to form cavitation bubbles. Analysis of the shape and location of the cavitation bubbles permitted a better understanding of MHV cavitation mechanisms, based on the fluid dynamics of jet vortex and tension wave propagations.

  7. Comparison of 3D Echocardiogram-Derived 3D Printed Valve Models to Molded Models for Simulated Repair of Pediatric Atrioventricular Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Adam B; Nguyen, Alex V; Ilina, Anna; Lasso, Andras; Cripe, Linnea; Jegatheeswaran, Anusha; Silvestro, Elizabeth; McGowan, Francis X; Mascio, Christopher E; Fuller, Stephanie; Spray, Thomas L; Cohen, Meryl S; Fichtinger, Gabor; Jolley, Matthew A

    2018-03-01

    Mastering the technical skills required to perform pediatric cardiac valve surgery is challenging in part due to limited opportunity for practice. Transformation of 3D echocardiographic (echo) images of congenitally abnormal heart valves to realistic physical models could allow patient-specific simulation of surgical valve repair. We compared materials, processes, and costs for 3D printing and molding of patient-specific models for visualization and surgical simulation of congenitally abnormal heart valves. Pediatric atrioventricular valves (mitral, tricuspid, and common atrioventricular valve) were modeled from transthoracic 3D echo images using semi-automated methods implemented as custom modules in 3D Slicer. Valve models were then both 3D printed in soft materials and molded in silicone using 3D printed "negative" molds. Using pre-defined assessment criteria, valve models were evaluated by congenital cardiac surgeons to determine suitability for simulation. Surgeon assessment indicated that the molded valves had superior material properties for the purposes of simulation compared to directly printed valves (p 3D echo-derived molded valves are a step toward realistic simulation of complex valve repairs but require more time and labor to create than directly printed models. Patient-specific simulation of valve repair in children using such models may be useful for surgical training and simulation of complex congenital cases.

  8. The safety relief valve handbook design and use of process safety valves to ASME and International codes and standards

    CERN Document Server

    Hellemans, Marc

    2009-01-01

    The Safety Valve Handbook is a professional reference for design, process, instrumentation, plant and maintenance engineers who work with fluid flow and transportation systems in the process industries, which covers the chemical, oil and gas, water, paper and pulp, food and bio products and energy sectors. It meets the need of engineers who have responsibilities for specifying, installing, inspecting or maintaining safety valves and flow control systems. It will also be an important reference for process safety and loss prevention engineers, environmental engineers, and plant and process designers who need to understand the operation of safety valves in a wider equipment or plant design context. . No other publication is dedicated to safety valves or to the extensive codes and standards that govern their installation and use. A single source means users save time in searching for specific information about safety valves. . The Safety Valve Handbook contains all of the vital technical and standards informat...

  9. Anterior mitral valve aneurysm: a rare sequelae of aortic valve endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Janardhanan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In intravenous drug abusers, infective endocarditis usually involves right-sided valves, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common etiologic agent. We present a patient who is an intravenous drug abuser with left-sided (aortic valve endocarditis caused by Enterococcus faecalis who subsequently developed an anterior mitral valve aneurysm, which is an exceedingly rare complication. A systematic literature search was conducted which identified only five reported cases in the literature of mitral valve aneurysmal rupture in the setting of E. faecalis endocarditis. Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography was critical in making an accurate diagnosis leading to timely intervention. Learning objectives: • Early recognition of a mitral valve aneurysm (MVA is important because it may rupture and produce catastrophic mitral regurgitation (MR in an already seriously ill patient requiring emergency surgery, or it may be overlooked at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR. • Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography (RT-3DTEE is much more advanced and accurate than transthoracic echocardiography for the diagnosis and management of MVA.

  10. Anterior mitral valve aneurysm: a rare sequelae of aortic valve endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhanan, Rajesh; Kamal, Muhammad Umar; Riaz, Irbaz Bin; Smith, M Cristy

    2016-03-01

    SummaryIn intravenous drug abusers, infective endocarditis usually involves right-sided valves, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common etiologic agent. We present a patient who is an intravenous drug abuser with left-sided (aortic valve) endocarditis caused by Enterococcus faecalis who subsequently developed an anterior mitral valve aneurysm, which is an exceedingly rare complication. A systematic literature search was conducted which identified only five reported cases in the literature of mitral valve aneurysmal rupture in the setting of E. faecalis endocarditis. Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography was critical in making an accurate diagnosis leading to timely intervention. Early recognition of a mitral valve aneurysm (MVA) is important because it may rupture and produce catastrophic mitral regurgitation (MR) in an already seriously ill patient requiring emergency surgery, or it may be overlooked at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR).Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography (RT-3DTEE) is much more advanced and accurate than transthoracic echocardiography for the diagnosis and management of MVA. © 2016 The authors.

  11. THE PROGNOSIS IN TRANSCATHETER AORTIC VALVE IMPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Imaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI, performed by different types of prostheses and various surgical access, on the prognosis of patients with critical aortic stenosis and comorbidities.Material and methods. Patients (n=130 that had consistently performed 80 TAVI by Edwards valve transfemoral (n=50 and transapical (n=30 access, as well as 50 transcatheter aortic valve replacement by CoreValve system were included into the study. Complications including perioperative mortality, total 30-day mortality, as well as post-hospital mortality were registered during aortic valve replacement, immediately after surgery, before the expiry of 30 days. Mean follow-up was 2.2 years (range 0.2 to 5.2 years.Results. Hospital mortality was on average 6.9%. 121 patients had been discharged from the department after the surgery. The number of deaths in the post-hospital period was 14.8%. Valve type and the type of access had no effect on post-hospital mortality. Men died more than 2.5 times often than women, regardless of age. Atrioventricular block, pacemaker implantation, and history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were the most significant prognostic factors. An important role of minor stroke and renal failure should be noted. Mortality did not depend on the surgical access or valve type. All parameters characterizing the intervention were significantly associated with mortality, both during and after surgery. The proportion of survivors at the end of the first year of observation using Corvalve system was 86.9%, Edwards valve by transfemoral access - 88% and Edwards valve by transapical access – 85.4% (insignificant differences for all groups, p>0.05. Two-year survival was 77.5%, 82.5% and 82.7%, respectively (also insignificant differences for all groups, p>0.05.Conclusion. TAVI is the method of choice, reasonable alternative approach for surgical valve replacement in patients with high surgical risk, although

  12. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Degenerative Bioprosthetic Surgical Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvir, Danny; Webb, John; Brecker, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is an emerging therapeutic alternative for patients with a failed surgical bioprosthesis and may obviate the need for reoperation. We evaluated the clinical results of this technique using a large, worldwide registry....

  13. NRC valve performance test program - check valve testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanmougin, N.M.

    1987-01-01

    The Valve Performance Test Program addresses the current requirements for testing of pressure isolation valves (PIVs) in light water reactors. Leak rate monitoring is the current method used by operating commercial power plants to survey the condition of their PIVs. ETEC testing of three check valves (4-inch, 6-inch, and 12-inch nominal diameters) indicates that leak rate testing is not a reliable method for detecting impending valve failure. Acoustic emission monitoring of check valves shows promise as a method of detecting loosened internals damage. Future efforts will focus on evaluation of acoustic emission monitoring as a technique for determining check valve condition. Three gate valves also will be tested to evaluate whether the check valve results are applicable to gate type PIVs

  14. A high performance magnetorheological valve with a meandering flow path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaduddin, Fitrian; Amri Mazlan, Saiful; Azizi Abdul Rahman, Mohd; Zamzuri, Hairi; Ubaidillah; Ichwan, Burhanuddin

    2014-01-01

    The huge developments in the field of magnetorheological (MR) fluid-based devices will have a great influence on the future of mechatronic applications due to the ease of interfacing between electronic controls and the mechanical components that they provide. Among various MR fluid-based devices, an MR valve would be particularly significant for the development of other devices, if it could be successfully achieved. One of the most challenging obstacles to MR valve development is the difficulty of achieving device miniaturization while, at the same time, improving the achievable performance. This study demonstrates a novel design for an MR valve, using the meandering flow path approach in order to increase the effective area so that the MR fluid can be regulated within a small-sized valve. The meandering flow path is formed by combining multiple annular, radial and orifice flow channels. In order to analyze the valve performance, a mathematical model of the proposed MR valve is derived and combined with numerical simulation using the finite element method, with the intention of predicting the achievable pressure drop that can be generated by the valve. The predicted MR valve performances are then experimentally evaluated using an oscillation-disturbed bypass hydraulic cylinder. The simulation results show that the proposed MR valve design could yield substantial pressure drop improvement, which is confirmed by the experiment

  15. Sliding pressure control valve for pneumatic hammer drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsky, Yarom [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-08-30

    A pneumatic device control apparatus and method comprising a ported valve slidably fitted over a feed tube of the pneumatic device, and using a compliant biasing device to constrain motion of the valve to provide asymmetric timing for extended pressurization of a power chamber and reduced pressurization of a return chamber of the pneumatic device. The pneumatic device can be a pneumatic hammer drill.

  16. Check valves aging assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, H.D.

    1991-01-01

    In support of the NRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has carried out an assessment of several check value diagnostic monitoring methods, in particular, those based on measurements of acoustic emission, ultrasonics, and magnetic flux. The evaluations have focussed on the capabilities of each method to provide information useful in determining check valve aging and service wear effects, check valve failures, and undesirable operating modes. This paper describes the benefits and limitations associated with each method and includes recent laboratory and field test data, including data obtained from the vendors who recently participated in a comprehensive series of tests directed by a nuclear industry users group. In addition, as part of the ORNL Advanced Diagnostic Engineering Research and Development Center (ADEC), two novel nonintrusive monitoring methods were developed that provide several unique capabilities. These methods, based on external ac- an dc-magnetic monitoring are also described. None of the examined methods could, by themselves, monitor both the instantaneous position and motion of check valve internals and valve leakage; however, the combination of acoustic emission monitoring with one of the other methods provides the means to determine vital check valve operational information

  17. Calculation of Mitral Valve Area in Mitral Stenosis: Comparison of Continuity Equation and Pressure Half Time With Two-Dimensional Planimetry in Patients With and Without Associated Aortic or Mitral Regurgitation or Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Sattarzadeh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of Mitral Valve Area (MVA is essential to determining the Mitral Stenosis (MS severity and to achieving the best management strategies for this disease. The goal of the present study is to compare mitral valve area (MVA measurement by Continuity Equation (CE and Pressure Half-Time (PHT methods with that of 2D-Planimetry (PL in patients with moderate to severe mitral stenosis (MS. This comparison also was performed in subgroups of patients with significant Aortic Insufficiency (AI, Mitral Regurgitation (MR and Atrial Fibrillation (AF. We studied 70 patients with moderate to severe MS who were referred to echocardiography clinic. MVA was determined by PL, CE and PHT methods. The agreement and correlations between MVA’s obtained from various methods were determined by kappa index, Bland-Altman analysis, and linear regression analysis. The mean values for MVA calculated by CE was 0.81 cm (±0.27 and showed good correlation with those calculated by PL (0.95 cm, ±0.26 in whole population (r=0.771, P<0.001 and MR subgroup (r=0.763, P<0.001 and normal sinus rhythm and normal valve subgroups (r=0.858, P<0.001 and r=0.867, P<0.001, respectively. But CE methods didn’t show any correlation in AF and AI subgroups. MVA measured by PHT had a good correlation with that measured by PL in whole population (r=0.770, P<0.001 and also in NSR (r=0.814, P<0.001 and normal valve subgroup (r=0.781, P<0.001. Subgroup with significant AI and those with significant MR showed moderate correlation (r=0.625, P=0.017 and r=0.595, P=0.041, respectively. Bland Altman Analysis showed that CE would estimate MVA smaller in comparison with PL in the whole population and all subgroups and PHT would estimate MVA larger in comparison with PL in the whole population and all subgroups. The mean bias for CE and PHT are 0.14 cm and -0.06 cm respectively. In patients with moderate to severe mitral stenosis, in the absence of concomitant AF, AI or MR, the accuracy

  18. Aortic valve replacement and the stentless Freedom SOLO valve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wollersheim, L.W.L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis has become the most prevalent valvular heart disease in Europe and North America, and is generally caused by age-related calcification of the aortic valve. For most patients, severe symptomatic aortic stenosis needs effective mechanical relief in the form of valve replacement

  19. Design And Analysis Of A Camless Valve Mechanism For I.C Engines Using Rotary Disc Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Jitendra Panchal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available It is the object of the presented paper to provide an electromechanical rotary valve actuating system for opening and closing valves of an internal combustion engine capable of separately controlling both the inlet and exhaust valve operations of each individual cylinder in a multi-cylinder engine. This indicates that only one valve will be required for each cylinder of the engine. Previously published versions of this concept require a separate valve for intake and exhaust in each cylinder. The system provides an alternative to the camshaft assembly in an attempt to overcome the limitations and inadequacies inevitably posed by a fully mechanical system. The prototype development is approached in a theoretical manner beginning with the conceptualization and design of a rotating disk with a notches and corresponding closure surfaces to open and close the flow path. The actuated disk and notch design is then refined and followed by the design of an inlet and exhaust manifold to correspond to the valve design and the theorizing and design of a sealing gasket. The rotating speed of the valve is determined by a general idling speed and can be varied to provide variable valve timing with the motor. The final assembly eliminates a majority of the moving parts currently used in camshaft systems like the cam camshaft rocker arm push rod and springs and results in a significantly lighter valve actuation system. By eliminating the translatory motion of valves the problem of valves slamming on the valve seats at high velocities is eliminated thus greatly reducing engine wear.

  20. Late complications in patients with Björk-Shiley and St. Jude Medical heart valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstkotte, D; Körfer, R; Seipel, L; Bircks, W; Loogen, F

    1983-09-01

    Valve-related complications after Björk-Shiley mitral valve implantation (n = 475), aortic valve implantation (n = 424), or mitral-aortic valve implantation (n = 119) were compared with those after St. Jude Medical mitral valve replacement (n = 173), aortic valve replacement (n = 152), or mitral-aortic valve replacement (n = 69). All patients were placed on anticoagulant therapy with phenprocoumon early after operation. All patients had a comparable follow-up time of approximately 23 months, which showed that cumulative thromboembolic rates were significantly higher after St. Jude valve implantation than after Björk-Shiley valve implantation. Reoperations were necessary because of valve thrombosis (0.46%), perivalvular leakage (2.2%), or prosthetic valve endocarditis with perivalvular regurgitation (0.46%). One Björk-Shiley mitral valve prosthesis had to be replaced because of fracture of the outlet strut. Without significant intergroup differences, hemorrhage due to anticoagulant treatment was the most frequent complication. Thromboembolic complications were significantly more frequent after Björk-Shiley mitral, aortic, and double valve replacements than after St. Jude valve implantation. This may lead to consideration of changes in the prophylaxis of thrombus formations in the St. Jude valve, especially in aortic valve replacements, in patients with sinus rhythm.

  1. Comparative study of Butterfly valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galmes Belmonte, F.B.

    1998-01-01

    This work tries to justify the hydrodynamic butterfly valves performance, using the EPRI tests, results carried out in laboratory and in situ. This justification will be possible if: - The valves to study are similar - Their performance is calculated using EPRI's methodology Looking for this objective, the elements of the present work are: 1. Brief EPRI butterfly valve description it wild provide the factors which are necessary to define the butterfly valves similarity. 2. EPRI tests description and range of validation against test data definition. 3. Description of the spanish butterfly analyzed valves, and comparison with the EPRI performance results, to prove that this valves are similar to the EPRI test valves. In this way, it will not be necessary to carry out particular dynamic tests on the spanish valves to describe their hydrodynamic performance. (Author)

  2. A symmetric safety valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtraw, Dallas; Palmer, Karen; Kahn, Danny

    2010-01-01

    How to set policy in the presence of uncertainty has been central in debates over climate policy. Concern about costs has motivated the proposal for a cap-and-trade program for carbon dioxide, with a 'safety valve' that would mitigate against spikes in the cost of emission reductions by introducing additional emission allowances into the market when marginal costs rise above the specified allowance price level. We find two significant problems, both stemming from the asymmetry of an instrument that mitigates only against a price increase. One is that most important examples of price volatility in cap-and-trade programs have occurred not when prices spiked, but instead when allowance prices collapsed. Second, a single-sided safety valve may have unintended consequences for investment. We illustrate that a symmetric safety valve provides environmental and welfare improvements relative to the conventional one-sided approach.

  3. A new one-step procedure for pulmonary valve implantation of the melody valve: Simultaneous prestenting and valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjemline, Younes

    2018-01-01

    To describe a new modification, the one-step procedure, that allows interventionists to pre-stent and implant a Melody valve simultaneously. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation (PPVI) is the standard of care for managing patients with dysfunctional right ventricular outflow tract, and the approach is standardized. Patients undergoing PPVI using the one-step procedure were identified in our database. Procedural data and radiation exposure were compared to those in a matched group of patients who underwent PPVI using the conventional two-step procedure. Between January 2016 and January 2017, PPVI was performed in 27 patients (median age/range, 19.1/10-55 years) using the one-step procedure involving manual crimping of one to three bare metal stents over the Melody valve. The stent and Melody valve were delivered successfully using the Ensemble delivery system. No complications occurred. All patients had excellent hemodynamic results (median/range post-PPVI right ventricular to pulmonary artery gradient, 9/0-20 mmHg). Valve function was excellent. Median procedural and fluoroscopic times were 56 and 10.2 min, respectively, which significantly differed from those of the two-step procedure group. Similarly, the dose area product (DAP), and radiation time were statistically lower in the one-step group than in the two-step group (P step procedure is a safe modification that allows interventionists to prestent and implants the Melody valve simultaneously. It significantly reduces procedural and fluoroscopic times, and radiation exposure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Allowable outage analysis for the LOFT CIS and reflood assist bypass valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trainer, J.E.; Matthews, S.D.

    1977-06-01

    To determine the outage time allowable for a typical 1 of 2 redundant valve configuration, a Markov model was created to analyze the various operating states for the valves. Since no performance criteria have been specified, an availability model was constructed with regard to the valve outage

  5. Nuclear reactor steam depressurization valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes improvement in a nuclear reactor plant, an improved steam depressurization valve positioned intermediate along a steam discharge pipe for controlling the venting of steam pressure from the reactor through the pipe. The improvement comprises: a housing including a domed cover forming a chamber and having a partition plate dividing the chamber into a fluid pressure activation compartment and a steam flow control compartment, the valve housing being provided with an inlet connection and an outlet connection in the steam flow control compartment, and a fluid duct in communication with a source of fluid pressure for operating the valve; a valve set mounted within the fluid flow control compartment comprising a cylindrical section surrounding the inlet connection with one end adjoining the connection and having a radially projecting flange at the other end with a contoured extended valve sealing flange provided with an annular valve sealing member, and a valve cylinder traversing the partition plate and reciprocally movable within an opening in the partition plate with one terminal and extending into the fluid pressure activation compartment and the other terminal end extending into the steam flow control compartment coaxially aligned with the valve seat surrounding the inlet connection, the valve cylinder being surrounded by two bellow fluid seals and provided with guides to inhibit lateral movement, an end of the valve cylinder extending into the fluid flow control compartment having a radially projecting flange substantially conterminous with the valve seat flange and having a contoured surface facing and complimentary to the contoured valve seating surface whereby the two contoured valve surfaces can meet in matching relationship, thus providing a pressure actuated reciprocatable valve member for making closing contact with the valve seat and withdrawing therefrom for opening fluid flow through the valve

  6. Valve spindle gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burda, Z.; Harazim, A.; Kerlin, K.

    1979-01-01

    A gland is proposed of the valve spindle designed for radioactive or otherwise harmful media, such as in nuclear power plant primary circuits. The gland is installed in the valve cover and consists of a primary and a secondary part and of a gland case partitioning the gland space into two chambers. The bottom face of the gland case is provided with a double-sided collar for controlling the elements of the bottom primary gland while the top face is provided with a removable flange. (M.S.)

  7. Building valve amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Morgan

    2013-01-01

    Building Valve Amplifiers is a unique hands-on guide for anyone working with tube audio equipment--as an electronics hobbyist, audiophile or audio engineer. This 2nd Edition builds on the success of the first with technology and technique revisions throughout and, significantly, a major new self-build project, worked through step-by-step, which puts into practice the principles and techniques introduced throughout the book. Particular attention has been paid to answering questions commonly asked by newcomers to the world of the valve, whether audio enthusiasts tackling their first build or

  8. Cavitation problems in sodium valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elie, X.

    1976-01-01

    Cavitation poses few problems for sodium valves, in spite of the fact that the loops are not pressurized. This is no doubt due to the low flow velocities in the pipes. For auxiliary loop valves we are attempting to standardize performances with respect to cavitation. For economic reasons cavitation thresholds are approached with large diameter valves. (author)

  9. Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement in Octogenarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Tasoglu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study analyzes the long-term outcomes of mechanical aortic valve replacement in octogenarian patients. Material and Method: A retrospective review was performed on 23 octogenarian patients who underwent mechanical aortic valve replacement. Hospital mortality, postoperative intensive care unit stay, hospital stay and long-term results was examined. Estimates of the cumulative event mortality rate were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The mean age of all patients was 82.9±2.3 years and most were men (65.22%. The median ejection fraction was 45%. 73.91% of patients were in New York Heart Association class III-IV. Thirteen patients (56.52% in this study underwent combined procedure, the remaining 10 (43.48% patients underwent isolated aortic valve replacement. The most common valve size was 23 mm. The mean intensive care unit stay was 1.76±1.14 days. The mean hospital stay was 9.33±5.06 days. No complications were observed in 56.52% patients during their hospital stay. The overall hospital mortality was 8.7%. Follow-up was completed for all 23 patients. Median follow-up time was 33 months (1-108 months. Actuarial survival among discharged from hospital was 59% at 5 years. Discussion: Mechanical aortic valve replacement is a safe procedure in octogenarian patients and can be performed safely even in combined procedure.

  10. Swirling flow in bileaflet mechanical heart valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gataulin, Yakov A.; Khorobrov, Svyatoslav V.; Yukhnev, Andrey D.

    2018-05-01

    Bileaflet mechanical valves are most commonly used for heart valve replacement. Nowadays swirling blood flow is registered in different parts of the cardiovascular system: left ventricle, aorta, arteries and veins. In present contribution for the first time the physiological swirling flow inlet conditions are used for numerical simulation of aortic bileaflet mechanical heart valve hemodynamics. Steady 3-dimensional continuity and RANS equations are employed to describe blood motion. The Menter SST model is used to simulate turbulence effects. Boundary conditions are corresponded to systolic peak flow. The domain was discretized into hybrid tetrahedral and hexahedral mesh with an emphasis on wall boundary layer. A system of equations was solved in Ansys Fluent finite-volume package. Noticeable changes in the flow structure caused by inlet swirl are shown. The swirling flow interaction with the valve leaflets is analyzed. A central orifice jet changes its cross-section shape, which leads to redistribution of wall shear stress on the leaflets. Transvalvular pressure gradient and area-averaged leaflet wall shear stress increase. Physiological swirl intensity noticeably reduces downstream of the valve.

  11. Radiographic detection of single-leg fracture in Björk-Shiley Convexo-Concave prosthetic valves: a phantom model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, I C; Cardella, J F; Fox, P S; Pae, W E; el-Ghamry Sabe, A A; Landis, J R; Localio, A R; Kunselman, A R; Hopper, K D

    1997-02-01

    Cineradiography can identify patients with single-leg fractured Björk-Shiley Convexo-Concave valves, although little is known about the sensitivity and specificity of this technique. We evaluated three normal and six (0 microm gap) single-leg fractured Björk-Shiley valves that were placed in a working phantom model. Valves were randomly imaged a total of 33 times and duplicated into a 120-valve series with a 1:9 ratio of abnormal/normal valves. Six reviewers independently graded each valve and demonstrated markedly different rates of identifying the fractured valves. Average sensitivity at the grade that clinically results in valve explanation was 47%. Among the normal valves, a correct identification was made 96% (range 91% to 99%) of the time. Present radiographic technology may have significant difficulty in identifying true single-leg fracture in Björk-Shiley valves with limb separations that are common among clinically explanted valves.

  12. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in failed bioprosthetic surgical valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvir, Danny; Webb, John G; Bleiziffer, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    for patients with structural valve deterioration; however, a comprehensive evaluation of survival after the procedure has not yet been performed. OBJECTIVE: To determine the survival of patients after transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation inside failed surgical bioprosthetic valves. DESIGN, SETTING......, stroke, and New York Heart Association functional class. RESULTS: Modes of bioprosthesis failure were stenosis (n = 181 [39.4%]), regurgitation (n = 139 [30.3%]), and combined (n = 139 [30.3%]). The stenosis group had a higher percentage of small valves (37% vs 20.9% and 26.6% in the regurgitation...... and combined groups, respectively; P = .005). Within 1 month following valve-in-valve implantation, 35 (7.6%) patients died, 8 (1.7%) had major stroke, and 313 (92.6%) of surviving patients had good functional status (New York Heart Association class I/II). The overall 1-year Kaplan-Meier survival rate was 83...

  13. Dynamic load effects on gate valve operability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, R. Jr.; MacDonald, P.E.; Arendts, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) participated in an internationally sponsored seismic research program conducted at the decommissioned Heissdampfreaktor (HDR) located in the Federal Republic of Germany. An existing piping system was modified by installation of an 8-in., naturally aged, motor-operated gate valve from a US nuclear power plant and a piping support system of US design. Six other piping support systems of varying flexibility from stiff to flexible were also installed at various times during the tests. Additional valve loadings included internal hydraulic loads and, during one block of tests, elevated temperature. The operability and integrity of the aged gate valve and the dynamic response of the various piping support system were measured during 25 representative seismic events

  14. Training aids: the motor operator valve trainer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, B.

    1987-01-01

    The spectrum of training aids used in the nuclear industry runs the gamut from the very basic (i.e., valve training aids - gate, globe, check) to the highly complex (i.e., nuclear full scope simulator). Designing and purchasing the best training aids take much time, detailed investigation, and good understanding of plant operations. The training aid that has given the New York Power Authority the best results has been the motor operator valve (MOV) trainer. Some of the items that make the MOV trainer a good choice are: (1) large number of MOVs in the plant, (2) importance of MOVs to safe plant operation, (3) detailed MOV procedures used by the plant, (4) history of MOV problems, and (5) ability to demonstrate important concepts and operation - hammer blow effect, torque and limit switch adjustment and functions, and actual sequence of operation of the limitorque valve operator

  15. Multimodality Imaging of Heart Valve Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajani, Ronak; Khattar, Rajdeep; Chiribiri, Amedeo; Victor, Kelly; Chambers, John

    2014-01-01

    Unidentified heart valve disease is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. It has therefore become important to accurately identify, assess and monitor patients with this condition in order that appropriate and timely intervention can occur. Although echocardiography has emerged as the predominant imaging modality for this purpose, recent advances in cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography indicate that they may have an important contribution to make. The current review describes the assessment of regurgitant and stenotic heart valves by multimodality imaging (echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance) and discusses their relative strengths and weaknesses

  16. Multimodality Imaging of Heart Valve Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajani, Ronak, E-mail: Dr.R.Rajani@gmail.com [Department of Cardiology, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Khattar, Rajdeep [Department of Cardiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Chiribiri, Amedeo [Divisions of Imaging Sciences, The Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Victor, Kelly; Chambers, John [Department of Cardiology, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    Unidentified heart valve disease is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. It has therefore become important to accurately identify, assess and monitor patients with this condition in order that appropriate and timely intervention can occur. Although echocardiography has emerged as the predominant imaging modality for this purpose, recent advances in cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography indicate that they may have an important contribution to make. The current review describes the assessment of regurgitant and stenotic heart valves by multimodality imaging (echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance) and discusses their relative strengths and weaknesses.

  17. Experimental research of flow servo-valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takosoglu Jakub

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Positional control of pneumatic drives is particularly important in pneumatic systems. Some methods of positioning pneumatic cylinders for changeover and tracking control are known. Choking method is the most development-oriented and has the greatest potential. An optimal and effective method, particularly when applied to pneumatic drives, has been searched for a long time. Sophisticated control systems with algorithms utilizing artificial intelligence methods are designed therefor. In order to design the control algorithm, knowledge about real parameters of servo-valves used in control systems of electro-pneumatic servo-drives is required. The paper presents the experimental research of flow servo-valve.

  18. Experimental research of flow servo-valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takosoglu, Jakub

    Positional control of pneumatic drives is particularly important in pneumatic systems. Some methods of positioning pneumatic cylinders for changeover and tracking control are known. Choking method is the most development-oriented and has the greatest potential. An optimal and effective method, particularly when applied to pneumatic drives, has been searched for a long time. Sophisticated control systems with algorithms utilizing artificial intelligence methods are designed therefor. In order to design the control algorithm, knowledge about real parameters of servo-valves used in control systems of electro-pneumatic servo-drives is required. The paper presents the experimental research of flow servo-valve.

  19. SAFETY SHUTOFF VALVE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    It is disclosed a shut-off valve which acts automatically and has a fully mechanical performance with respect to the loosing of the tower-shape part balance under the effect of the special acceleration Which is arisen from the quakes waves or serious vibrations, while such vibrations are mainly r...

  20. Heart valve surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: executive summary: a report of the American College ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Surgery Heart Valve Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  1. Poppet valve tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellier, G. F.

    1973-01-01

    Tester investigates fundamental factors affecting cyclic life and sealing performance of valve seats and poppets. Tester provides for varying impact loading of poppet against seat and rate of cycling, and controls amount and type of relative motion between sealing faces of seat and poppet. Relative motion between seat and poppet can be varied in three modes.

  2. Blocked Urethral Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if any damage has occurred to the upper urinary tract. Your pediatrician will consult with a pediatric nephrologist (kidney specialist) or nurologist, who may recommend surgery to remove the obstructing valves and prevent further infection or damage to the kidneys or urinary system. ...

  3. Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kesteren, F.; Wiegerinck, E. M. A.; Rizzo, S.; Baan, J.; Planken, R. N.; von der Thüsen, J. H.; Niessen, H. W. M.; van Oosterhout, M. F. M.; Pucci, A.; Thiene, G.; Basso, C.; Sheppard, M. N.; Wassilew, K.; van der Wal, A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new field of interest in cardiovascular pathology. To identify the cause of death, it is important to be familiar with specific findings related to the time interval between the procedure and death. We aimed to provide an overview of

  4. Mechanical valve obstruction: Review of diagnostic and treatment strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Jason; Munoz-Mendoza, Jerson; Liebelt, Jared J; Taub, Cynthia C

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic valve obstruction (PVO) is a rare but feared complication of mechanical valve replacement. Diagnostic evaluation should focus on differentiating prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT) from pannus formation, as their treatment options differ. History of sub-optimal anti-coagulation and post-op time course to development of PVO are useful clinical characteristics in differentiating thrombus from pannus formation. Treatment of PVT is influenced by the patient’s symptoms, valve location, degree of obstruction and thrombus size and may include thrombolysis or surgical intervention. Alternatively, pannus formation requires surgical intervention. The purpose of this article is to review the pathophysiology, epidemiology, diagnostic approach and treatment options for aortic and mitral valve PVO. PMID:26730292

  5. Classification of heart valve condition using acoustic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Prosthetic heart valves and the many great strides in valve design have been responsible for extending the life spans of many people with serious heart conditions. Even though the prosthetic valves are extremely reliable, they are eventually susceptible to long-term fatigue and structural failure effects expected from mechanical devices operating over long periods of time. The purpose of our work is to classify the condition of in vivo Bjork-Shiley Convexo-Concave (BSCC) heart valves by processing acoustic measurements of heart valve sounds. The structural failures of interest for Bscc valves is called single leg separation (SLS). SLS can occur if the outlet strut cracks and separates from the main structure of the valve. We measure acoustic opening and closing sounds (waveforms) using high sensitivity contact microphones on the patient`s thorax. For our analysis, we focus our processing and classification efforts on the opening sounds because they yield direct information about outlet strut condition with minimal distortion caused by energy radiated from the valve disc.

  6. Torque characteristics of a 122-centimeter butterfly valve with a hydro/pneumatic actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, F. N.; Moore, W. I.; Lundy, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    Actuating torque data from field testing of a 122-centimeter (48 in.) butterfly valve with a hydro/pneumatic actuator is presented. The hydraulic cylinder functions as either a forward or a reverse brake. Its resistance torque increases when the valve speeds up and decreases when the valve slows down. A reduction of flow resistance in the hydraulic flow path from one end of the hydraulic cylinder to the other will effectively reduce the hydraulic resistance torque and hence increase the actuating torque. The sum of hydrodynamic and friction torques (combined resistance torque) of a butterfly valve is a function of valve opening time. An increase in the pneumatic actuating pressure will result in a decrease in both the combined resistance torque and the actuator opening torque; however, it does shorten the valve opening time. As the pneumatic pressure increases, the valve opening time for a given configuration approaches an asymptotical value.

  7. [Reoperative valve replacement in patients undergoing cardiac reoperation: a report of 104 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Liang-jian; Xu, Zhi-yun; Wang, Zhi-nong; Lang, Xi-long; Han, Lin; Lu, Fang-lin; Xu, Ji-bin; Tang, Hao; Ji, Guang-yu; Wang, Er-song; Wang, Jun; Qu, Yi

    2010-08-15

    To review the experience of reoperative valve replacement for 104 patients. From January 2002 to December 2009, 104 patients underwent heart valve replacement in reoperations, accounting for 2.92% of the total patient population (3557 cases) who had valve replacement during this period. In this group, 53 male and 51 female patients were included with a median age of 46 years (ranged from 13 to 72 years). The reasons of reoperation included 28 cases suffered from another valve lesion after valve replacement, 10 cases suffered from valve lesion after mitral valvuloplasty, 19 cases suffered from perivalvular leakage after valve replacement, 18 cases suffered from valve lesion after previous correction of congenital heart defect, 7 cases suffered from bioprosthetic valve decline, 10 cases suffered from prosthetic valve endocarditis, 9 cases suffered from dysfunction of machine valve, and 3 cases suffered from other causes. The re-operations were mitral and aortic valve replacement in 2 cases, mitral valve replacement in 59 cases, aortic valve replacement in 24 cases, tricuspid valve replacement in 16 cases, and Bentall's operation in 3 cases. The interval from first operation to next operation was 1 month-19 years. There were 8 early deaths from heart failure, renal failure and multiple organ failure (early mortality 7.69%). Major complications were intraoperative hemorrhage in 2 cases, re-exploration for mediastinal bleeding in 2 cases and sternotomy surgical site infection in 1 case. Complete follow-up (3 months-7 years and 2 months) was available for all patients. Two patients died, one patient died of intracranial hemorrhage, and another cause was unknown. Satisfactory short-term and long-term results can be obtained in reoperative valve replacement with appropriate timing of operation control, satisfactory myocardial protection, accurate surgical procedure and suitable perioperative treatment.

  8. Fate of remnant sinuses of Valsalva in patients with bicuspid and trileaflet valves undergoing aortic valve, ascending aorta, and aortic arch replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Rita Karianna; Habertheuer, Andreas; Bavaria, Joseph E; Siki, Mary; Szeto, Wilson Y; Krause, Eric; Korutla, Varun; Desai, Nimesh D; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth

    2017-08-01

    In patients presenting with aortic valvulopathy with concomitant ascending aortic aneurysm, surgical management of the sinus of Valsalva segment remains undefined, especially for moderately dilated aortic roots. In patients with this pathology undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, we assessed the fate of the remnant preserved sinus of Valsalva segment stratified by aortic valve morphology and pathology. From 2002 to 2015, 428 patients underwent elective aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement. Patients were stratified on the basis of valvular morphology (bicuspid aortic valve [n = 254] and tricuspid aortic valve [n = 174]), valvular pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 178], bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 76], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 61], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 113]), and preoperative sinus of Valsalva dimensions (45 mm). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed no significant difference in freedom from reoperation in tricuspid aortic valve versus bicuspid aortic valve (P = .576). Multivariable Cox regression model performed with sinus of Valsalva dimensions at baseline and follow-up as time-varying covariates did not adversely affect survival. A repeated-measure, mixed-effects model constructed to assess longitudinal sinus of Valsalva trends revealed that the retained sinus of Valsalva dimensions remain stable over long-term follow-up (discharge to ≥10 years), irrespective of valvular morphology/pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis) and preoperative sinus of Valsalva groups (45 mm). In patients with nonaneurysmal sinuses of Valsalva undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, the sinus segment can be preserved irrespective of

  9. Construction and characterization of valve for fast gas injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, M.; Rossi, J.O.; Aso, Y.; Mangueira, L.S.; Pereira, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    An electromagnetic valve for fast gas injection was built and characterized. This type of gas injection valve has been routinely applied to various plasma experiments: in magnetic confinement devices as TOKAMAK, RFP and Compact Toroids as well as intense ion beam and neutral particle generators. The valve is capable of injecting gas pulses with up to 80 m Torr peak pressure, rising time < 400 μs and duration time of 40 ms, in the present experimental set-up. It is easy to build and its components can be totally acquired in the country. (author)

  10. Fixation and mounting of porcine aortic valves for use in mock circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlöglhofer, Thomas; Aigner, Philipp; Stoiber, Martin; Schima, Heinrich

    2013-10-01

    Investigations of the circulatory system in vitro use mock circuits that require valves to mimic the cardiac situation. Whereas mechanical valves increase water hammer effects due to inherent stiffness and do not allow the use of pressure lines or catheters, bioprosthetic valves are expensive and of limited durability in test fluids. Therefore, we developed a cheap, fast, alternative method to mount valves obtained from the slaughterhouse in mock circuits. Porcine aortic roots were obtained from the abattoir and used either in native condition or after fixation. Fixation was performed at a constant retrograde pressure to ensure closed valve position. Fixation time was 4 h in a 0.5%-glutaraldehyde phosphate buffer. The fixed valves were molded into a modular mock circulation connector using a fast curing silicone. Valve functionality was evaluated in a pulsatile setting (cardiac output = 4.7 l/min, heart rate = 80 beats/min) and compared before and after fixation. Leaflet motion was recorded with a high-speed camera and valve insufficiency was quantified by leakage flow under steady pressure application (80 mmHg). Under physiological conditions the aortic valves showed almost equal leaflet motion in native and fixed conditions. However, the leaflets of the native valves showed lower stiffness and more fluttering during systole than the fixed specimens. Under retrograde pressure, fresh and fixed valves showed small leakage flows of <30 ml/min. The new mounting and fixation procedure is a fast method to fabricate low cost biologic valves for the use in mock circuits.

  11. Cyclonic valve test: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Andre Sampaio; Moraes, Carlos Alberto C.; Marins, Luiz Philipe M.; Soares, Fabricio; Oliveira, Dennis; Lima, Fabio Soares de; Airao, Vinicius [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ton, Tijmen [Twister BV, Rijswijk (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01

    For many years, the petroleum industry has been developing a valve that input less shear to the flow for a given required pressure drop and this can be done using the cyclonic concept. This paper presents a comparison between the performances of a cyclonic valve (low shear) and a conventional globe valve. The aim of this work is to show the advantages of using a cyclonic low shear valve instead of the commonly used in the primary separation process by PETROBRAS. Tests were performed at PETROBRAS Experimental Center (NUEX) in Aracaju/SE varying some parameters: water cut; pressure loss (from 4 kgf/cm2 to 10 kgf/cm2); flow rates (30 m3/h and 45 m3/h). Results indicates a better performance of the cyclonic valve, if compared with a conventional one, and also that the difference of the performance, is a function of several parameters (emulsion stability, water content free, and oil properties). The cyclonic valve tested can be applied as a choke valve, as a valve between separation stages (for pressure drop), or for controlling the level of vessels. We must emphasize the importance to avoid the high shear imposed by conventional valves, because once the emulsion is created, it becomes more difficult to break it. New tests are being planned to occur in 2012, but PETROBRAS is also analyzing real cases where the applications could increase the primary process efficiency. In the same way, the future installations are also being designed considering the cyclonic valve usage. (author)

  12. Minimising life cycle costs of automated valves in offshore platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yli-Petays, Juha [Metso Automation do Brasil Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Niemela, Ismo [Metso Automation, Imatra (Finland)

    2012-07-01

    Automated process valves play an essential role in offshore platforms operation. If you are able to optimize their operation and maintenance activities you can receive extensive operational savings with minimal investment. Valves used in offshore platforms doesn't differentiate that much from the valves used in downstream but there are certain specialties, which makes the operations more challenging in offshore: Process valves are more difficult to access and maintain because of space limitations. Also spare part inventories and deliveries are challenging because of offshore platform's remote location. To overcome these challenges usage of digital positioners with diagnostic features has become more common because predictive maintenance capabilities enable possibilities to plan the maintenance activities and this way optimise the spare part orders regarding to valves. There are intelligent controllers available for control valves, automated on/off valves as well as ESD-valves and whole network of automated valves on platforms can be controlled by intelligent valve controllers. This creates many new opportunities in regards of optimized process performance or predictive maintenance point-of-view. By means of intelligent valve controllers and predictive diagnostics, condition monitoring and maintenance planning can also be performed remotely from an onshore location. Thus, intelligent valve controllers provide good way to minimize spending related to total cost of ownership of automated process valves. When purchase value of control valve represent 20% of TCO, intelligent positioner and predictive maintenance methods can enable as high as 30% savings over the life cycle of asset so basically it benefit savings higher than whole investment of monitored asset over its life cycle. This is mainly achieved through the optimized maintenance activities since real life examples has shown that with time based maintenance (preventive maintenance) approach 70% of

  13. Optimal Control of the Valve Based on Traveling Wave Method in the Water Hammer Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, H. Z.; Wang, F.; Feng, J. L.; Tan, H. P.

    2011-09-01

    Valve regulation is an effective method for process control during the water hammer. The principle of d'Alembert traveling wave theory was used in this paper to construct the exact analytical solution of the water hammer, and the optimal speed law of the valve that can reduce the water hammer pressure in the maximum extent was obtained. Combining this law with the valve characteristic curve, the principle corresponding to the valve opening changing with time was obtained, which can be used to guide the process of valve closing and to reduce the water hammer pressure in the maximum extent.

  14. Prosthetic Aortic Valve Fixation Study: 48 Replacement Valves Analyzed Using Digital Pressure Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Candice Y; Wong, Joshua K; Ross, Ronald E; Liu, David C; Khabbaz, Kamal R; Martellaro, Angelo J; Gorea, Heather R; Sauer, Jude S; Knight, Peter A

    Prostheses attachment is critical in aortic valve replacement surgery, yet reliable prosthetic security remains a challenge. Accurate techniques to analyze prosthetic fixation pressures may enable the use of fewer sutures while reducing the risk of paravalvular leaks (PVL). Customized digital thin film pressure transducers were sutured between aortic annulus models and 21-mm bioprosthetic valves with 15 × 4-mm, 12 × 4-mm, or 9 × 6-mm-wide pledgeted mattress sutures. Simulating open and minimally invasive access, 4 surgeons, blinded to data acquisition, each secured 12 valves using manual knot-tying (hand-tied [HT] or knot-pusher [KP]) or automated titanium fasteners (TFs). Real-time pressure measurements and times were recorded. Two-dimensional (2D) and 3D pressure maps were generated for all valves. Pressures less than 80 mm Hg were considered at risk for PVL. Pressures under each knot (intrasuture) fell less than 80 mm Hg for 12 of 144 manual knots (5/144 HT, 7/144 KP) versus 0 of 288 TF (P prosthetic valve security.

  15. Posterior Urethral Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve J. Hodges

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common cause of lower urinary tract obstruction in male infants is posterior urethral valves. Although the incidence has remained stable, the neonatal mortality for this disorder has improved due to early diagnosis and intensive neonatal care, thanks in part to the widespread use of prenatal ultrasound evaluations. In fact, the most common reason for the diagnosis of posterior urethral valves presently is the evaluation of infants for prenatal hydronephrosis. Since these children are often diagnosed early, the urethral obstruction can be alleviated rapidly through catheter insertion and eventual surgery, and their metabolic derangements can be normalized without delay, avoiding preventable infant mortality. Of the children that survive, however, early diagnosis has not had much effect on their long-term prognosis, as 30% still develop renal insufficiency before adolescence. A better understanding of the exact cause of the congenital obstruction of the male posterior urethra, prevention of postnatal bladder and renal injury, and the development of safe methods to treat urethral obstruction prenatally (and thereby avoiding the bladder and renal damage due to obstructive uropathy are the goals for the care of children with posterior urethral valves[1].

  16. Is valve choice a significant determinant of paravalular leak post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Katie E; Gough, Aideen; Segurado, Ricardo; Barry, Mitchel; Sugrue, Declan; Hurley, John

    2014-05-01

    Paravalvular regurgitation (PVR) following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is associated with poor survival. The two main valve delivery systems used to date differ significantly in both structure and deployment technique. The primary objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies identifying PVR in patients post-TAVI using Medtronic CoreValve (MCV) and Edward Sapien (ES) valves in order to identify whether a significant difference exists between valve types. The secondary objective was to identify additional factors predisposing to PVR to provide an overview of the other associated considerations. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the current literature to identify PVR rate in patients with MCV and ES valves was performed. We also sought to examine other factors predisposing to PVR. A total of 5910 patients were identified from 9 studies. PVR rates for MCV and ES were analysed. MCV was associated with a higher PVR rate of 15.75% [95% confidence interval (CI) 12.48-19.32] compared with ES 3.93% [95% CI 1.05-8.38]. We separately reviewed predisposing factors associated with PVR. A formal comparison of the MCV and ES valve leakage rates by mixed-effects meta-regression with a fixed-effect moderator variable for valve type (MCV or ES) suggested a statistically significant difference in leakage rate between the two valve types (P = 0.0002). Unfavourable anatomical and pathological factors as well as valve choice have an impact on rates of PVR. Additionally, certain anatomical features dictate valve choice. A direct comparison of all the predisposing factors at this time is not possible and will require prospective multivariate analysis. There is, however, a significant difference in the PVR rates between valves based on the published observational data available to date. The ES valve associated with a lower incidence of PVR overall; therefore, we conclude that valve choice is indeed a significant

  17. Valve-sparing and valve-replacing techniques for aortic root replacement in patients with Marfan syndrome: Analysis of early outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volguina, Irina V; Miller, D Craig; LeMaire, Scott A; Palmero, Laura C; Wang, Xing Li; Connolly, Heidi M; Sundt, Thoralf M; Bavaria, Joseph E; Dietz, Harry C; Milewicz, Dianna M; Coselli, Joseph S

    2009-05-01

    A prospective, international registry study was initiated to provide contemporary comparative data on short-term clinical outcomes after aortic valve-sparing and aortic valve-replacing root operations in patients with Marfan syndrome. The purpose of this initial report is to describe the study design and to compare early outcomes in the first 151 enrolled patients. We assessed 30-day outcomes in 151 patients who met strict Ghent diagnostic criteria for Marfan syndrome and underwent aortic root replacement with either valve-replacing (n = 46) or valve-sparing techniques (n = 105) at one of 18 participating centers. In the valve replacement group, a mechanical composite valve graft was used in 39 (85%) patients and a bioprosthetic valve in 7 (15%). In the valve-sparing group, David V procedures were performed in 57 (54%) patients, David I in 38 (36%), David IV in 8 (8%), Florida sleeve in 1 (1%), and Yacoub remodeling in 1 (1%). No in-hospital or 30-day deaths occurred. Despite longer crossclamp and cardiopulmonary bypass times in the valve-sparing group, there were no significant between-group differences in postoperative complications. Thirty-day valve-related complications occurred in 2 (4%) patients undergoing valve replacement and in 3 (3%) undergoing valve-sparing procedures (P = .6). The analysis of early outcomes revealed that valve-sparing techniques were the most common approach to root replacement in patients with Marfan syndrome in these centers. The complexity of valve-sparing root replacement did not translate into any demonstrable adverse early outcomes. Subsequent analysis will compare the 3-year durability of these two surgical approaches.

  18. Fracturing mechanics before valve-in-valve therapy of small aortic bioprosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Peter; Engholt, Henrik; Tang, Mariann; Nybo, Rasmus F; Rasmussen, Per D; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik

    2017-10-13

    Patients with degraded bioprosthetic heart valves (BHV) who are not candidates for valve replacement may benefit from transcatheter valve-in-valve (VIV) therapy. However, in smaller-sized surgical BHV the resultant orifice may become too narrow. To overcome this, the valve frame can be fractured by a high-pressure balloon prior to VIV. However, knowledge on fracture pressures and mechanics are prerequisites. The aim of this study was to identify the fracture pressures needed in BHV, and to describe the fracture mechanics. Commonly used BHV of small sizes were mounted on a high-pressure balloon situated in a biplane fluoroscopic system with a high-speed camera. The instant of fracture was captured along with the balloon pressure. The valves were inspected for material protrusion and later dissected for fracture zone investigation and description. The valves with a polymer frame fractured at a lower pressure (8-10 atm) than those with a metal stent (19-26 atm). None of the fractured valves had elements protruding. VIV procedures in small-sized BHV may be performed after prior fracture of the valve frame by high-pressure balloon dilatation. This study provides tentative guidelines for expected balloon sizes and pressures for valve fracturing.

  19. The dilemma of complicated shunt valves: How to identify patients with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage who will benefit from a simple valve?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian von der Brelie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sophisticated shunt valves provide the possibility of pressure adjustment and antisiphon control but have a higher probability of valve dysfunction especially in a posthemorrhagic setting. The aim of the present study is to analyze the clinical outcome of patients with shunt dependent posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in order to identify patients who would benefit from a simple differential pressure valve. Methods: From 2000 to 2013, 547 patients with aneurysmatic SAH were treated at our institution, 114 underwent ventricular shunt placement (21.1%. 47 patients with available pre- and post-operative computed tomography scans, and an available follow-up of minimum 6 months were included. In order to measure the survival time which a nonprogrammable differential pressure valve would have had in an individual patient we defined the initial equalized shunt survival time (IESS. IESS is the time until surgical revisions of fixed differential pressure or flow-regulated valves for the treatment of over- or under-drainage as well as re-programming of adjustable valves due to over- or under-drainage. Results: Twenty patients were treated with fixed differential pressure valves, 15 patients were treated with flow-regulated valves, and 12 underwent ventriculoperitoneal (VP shunt placement with differential pressure valves assisted by a gravitational unit. Patients who reacted with remarkable changes of the ventricular width after the insertion of external ventricular drainage (EVD, before shunt placement, showed a significantly longer IESS. Conclusions: Decline of the ventricular width after EVD placement was a predictor for successful VP shunt therapy in the later course of disease. Possibly, this could allow identifying patients who benefit from a simple differential pressure valve or a flow-regulated valve, and thus could possibly avoid valve-associated complications of a programmable valve in the

  20. Actuation and Control of a Micro Electrohydraulic Digital Servo Valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Z Q; Hu, M J; Pei, X; Ruan, J [MOE Key Laboratory of Mechanical Manufacture and Automation Zhejiang University of Technology, 310014 (China)

    2006-10-15

    Structure of the micro digital servo valve is given. A micro stepper motor is used as electrical-to-mechanical interface of the valve. A special mechanical device is designed to convert the rotation of the stepper motor into the linear motion of the spool. This moving conversion device functions through an eccentric ball head rigidly connected to the axis of the stepper motor and plugged into a slot at the central spool land. While the stepper motor rotates, the eccentric ball head will actuate the spool to make a linear motion. Unlike conventional servo or proportional valves, in which the spool is forced to central position by a spring force, when the current supply is switched off, the digital valve has a program to control the spool to its central position each time the electrical power supply is switched on or off. The two end screws are used to adjust the position of the sleeve to sustain a mechanical central position coincided with electrical central position given by the stepper motor after initialization. The adjustment has to be carried once before the first time the servo valve is put into service. This paper presents theoretical analysis and experimental study of dynamic characteristics of the proposed micro digital servo valve. Experimental results demonstrated that the valve takes the advantage of high accuracy and fast response.

  1. Actuation and Control of a Micro Electrohydraulic Digital Servo Valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Z Q; Hu, M J; Pei, X; Ruan, J

    2006-01-01

    Structure of the micro digital servo valve is given. A micro stepper motor is used as electrical-to-mechanical interface of the valve. A special mechanical device is designed to convert the rotation of the stepper motor into the linear motion of the spool. This moving conversion device functions through an eccentric ball head rigidly connected to the axis of the stepper motor and plugged into a slot at the central spool land. While the stepper motor rotates, the eccentric ball head will actuate the spool to make a linear motion. Unlike conventional servo or proportional valves, in which the spool is forced to central position by a spring force, when the current supply is switched off, the digital valve has a program to control the spool to its central position each time the electrical power supply is switched on or off. The two end screws are used to adjust the position of the sleeve to sustain a mechanical central position coincided with electrical central position given by the stepper motor after initialization. The adjustment has to be carried once before the first time the servo valve is put into service. This paper presents theoretical analysis and experimental study of dynamic characteristics of the proposed micro digital servo valve. Experimental results demonstrated that the valve takes the advantage of high accuracy and fast response

  2. Automatic fire hydrant valve development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drumheller, K.

    1976-01-01

    The development of a remotely-controlled valve to operate a fire hydrant is described. Assembled from off-the-shelf components, the prototype illustrates that a valve light enough to be handled by one man is possible. However, it does not have the ruggedness or reliability needed for actual fire-fighting operations. Preliminary testing by City of Tacoma fire department personnel indicates that the valve may indeed contribute significantly to fire-fighting efficiency

  3. [Ahmed valve in glaucoma surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikbov, M M; Khusnitdinov, I I

    This is a review on Ahmed valve application in glaucoma surgery. It contains, in particular, data on the Ahmed valve efficiency, results of experimental and histological studies of filtering bleb encapsulation, examines the use of antimetabolites and anti-VEGF agents, and discusses implantation techniques. The current appraisal of antimetabolites delivery systems integrated into the Ahmed valve is presented. Various complications encountered in practice and preventive measures are also covered.

  4. Thermal fatigue behavior of valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moinereau, D.; Scliffet, L.; Capion, J.C.; Genette, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that valves of pressurized water reactors are exposed to thermal shocks during transient operations. The numerous thermal shock tests performed on valves on the EDF test facilities have shown the sensibility of fillets and geometrical discontinuities to thermal fatigue: cracks can appear in those areas and grow through the valve body. Valves systems designated as level 1 must be designed to withstand fatigue up to the second isolation valve: the relevant rule is specified in the paragraph B 3500 of the French RCCM code. It is a simplified method which doesn't require finite element calculations. Many valve systems have been designed according to this rule and have been operated without accident. However, in one case, important cracks were found in the fillet of a check-valve after numerous thermal shocks. Calculation of the valve's behavior according to the RCCM code to estimate the fatigue damage resulting from thermal shocks led to a low damage factor, which doesn't agree with the experimental results. This was confirmed by new testings and showed the inadequacy of B 3500 rule for thermal transients. On this base a new rule is proposed to estimate fatigue damage resulting from thermal shocks. An experimental program has been realized to validate this rule. Axisymetrical analytical mock-ups with different geometries and one check-valve in austenitic stainless steel 316 L have been submitted to hot thermal shocks of 210 degrees C magnitude

  5. Latest design of gate valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurzhofer, U.; Stolte, J.; Weyand, M.

    1996-12-01

    Babcock Sempell, one of the most important valve manufacturers in Europe, has delivered valves for the nuclear power industry since the beginning of the peaceful application of nuclear power in the 1960s. The latest innovation by Babcock Sempell is a gate valve that meets all recent technical requirements of the nuclear power technology. At the moment in the United States, Germany, Sweden, and many other countries, motor-operated gate and globe valves are judged very critically. Besides the absolute control of the so-called {open_quotes}trip failure,{close_quotes} the integrity of all valve parts submitted to operational forces must be maintained. In case of failure of the limit and torque switches, all valve designs have been tested with respect to the quality of guidance of the gate. The guidances (i.e., guides) shall avoid a tilting of the gate during the closing procedure. The gate valve newly designed by Babcock Sempell fulfills all these characteristic criteria. In addition, the valve has cobalt-free seat hardfacing, the suitability of which has been proven by friction tests as well as full-scale blowdown tests at the GAP of Siemens in Karlstein, West Germany. Babcock Sempell was to deliver more than 30 gate valves of this type for 5 Swedish nuclear power stations by autumn 1995. In the presentation, the author will report on the testing performed, qualifications, and sizing criteria which led to the new technical design.

  6. Fluid mechanics of heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganathan, Ajit P; He, Zhaoming; Casey Jones, S

    2004-01-01

    Valvular heart disease is a life-threatening disease that afflicts millions of people worldwide and leads to approximately 250,000 valve repairs and/or replacements each year. Malfunction of a native valve impairs its efficient fluid mechanic/hemodynamic performance. Artificial heart valves have been used since 1960 to replace diseased native valves and have saved millions of lives. Unfortunately, despite four decades of use, these devices are less than ideal and lead to many complications. Many of these complications/problems are directly related to the fluid mechanics associated with the various mechanical and bioprosthetic valve designs. This review focuses on the state-of-the-art experimental and computational fluid mechanics of native and prosthetic heart valves in current clinical use. The fluid dynamic performance characteristics of caged-ball, tilting-disc, bileaflet mechanical valves and porcine and pericardial stented and nonstented bioprostheic valves are reviewed. Other issues related to heart valve performance, such as biomaterials, solid mechanics, tissue mechanics, and durability, are not addressed in this review.

  7. Double-disc gate valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheatley, S.J.

    1979-01-01

    The invention relates to an improvement in a conventional double-disc gate valve having a vertically movable gate assembly including a wedge, spreaders slidably engaged therewith, a valve disc carried by the spreaders. When the gate assembly is lowered to a selected point in the valve casing, the valve discs are moved transversely outward to close inlet and outlet ports in the casing. The valve includes hold-down means for guiding the disc-and-spreader assemblies as they are moved transversely outward and inward. If such valves are operated at relatively high differential pressures, they sometimes jam during opening. Such jamming has been a problem for many years in gate valves used in gaseous diffusion plants for the separation of uranium isotopes. The invention is based on the finding that the above-mentioned jamming results when the outlet disc tilts about its horizontal axis in a certain way during opening of the valve. In accordance with the invention, tilting of the outlet disc is maintained at a tolerable value by providing the disc with a rigid downwardly extending member and by providing the casing with a stop for limiting inward arcuate movement of the member to a preselected value during opening of the valve

  8. Surge-damping vacuum valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, J.C.; Kelley, B.E.

    1977-01-01

    A valve for damping out flow surges in a vacuum system is described. The surge-damping mechanism consists of a slotted, spring-loaded disk adjacent to the valve's vacuum port (the flow passage to the vacuum roughing pump). Under flow surge conditions, the differential pressure forces the disk into a sealing engagement with the vacuum port, thereby restricting the gas flow path to narrow slots in the disk's periphery. The increased flow damps out the flow surge. When pressure is equalized on both sides of the valve, the spring load moves the disk away from the port to restore full flow conductance through the valve

  9. Prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus capitis: report of 4 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada Yuko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although Staphylococcus capitis is considered to be a rare causative organism for prosthetic valve endocarditis, we report 4 such cases that were encountered at our hospital over the past 2 years. Case 1 was a 79-year-old woman who underwent aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthetic valve and presented with fever 24 days later. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed an annular abscess in the aorto-mitral continuity and mild perivalvular regurgitation. We performed emergency surgery 5 days after the diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis was made. Case 2 was a 79-year-old woman presenting with fever 40 days after aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis. Transesophageal echocardiography showed vegetation on the valve, and she underwent urgent surgery 2 days after prosthetic valve endocarditis was diagnosed. In case 3, a 76-year-old man presented with fever 53 days after aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis. Vegetation on the prosthetic leaflet could be seen by transesophageal echocardiography. He underwent emergency surgery 2 days after the diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis was made. Case 4 was a 68-year-old woman who collapsed at her home 106 days after aortic and mitral valve replacement with bioprosthetic valves. Percutaneous cardiopulmonary support was started immediately after massive mitral regurgitation due to prosthetic valve detachment was revealed by transesophageal echocardiography. She was transferred to our hospital by helicopter and received surgery immediately on arrival. In all cases, we re-implanted another bioprosthesis after removal of the infected valve and annular debridement. All patients recovered without severe complications after 2 months of antibiotic treatment, and none experienced re-infection during 163 to 630 days of observation. Since the time interval between diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis and valve re-replacement ranged from 0 to 5 days, early surgical removal

  10. Development of main steam safety valve set pressure evaluating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oketani, Koichiro; Manabe, Yoshihisa.

    1991-01-01

    A main steam safety valve set pressure test is conducted for all valves during every refueling outage in Japan's PWRs. Almost all operations of the test are manually conducted by a skilled worker. In order to obtain further reliability and reduce the test time, an automatic test system using a personnel computer has been developed in accordance with system concept. Quality assurance was investigated to fix system specifications. The prototype of the system was manufactured to confirm the system reliability. The results revealed that this system had high accuracy measurement and no adverse influence on the safety valve. This system was concluded to be applicable for actual use. (author)

  11. Heart Valve Surgery Recovery and Follow Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guide: Understanding Your Heart Valve Problem | Spanish Symptom Tracker | Spanish Pre-surgery Checklist | Spanish What Is Heart ... Heart Valves • Heart Valve Problems and Causes • Risks, Signs and Symptoms • Accurate Diagnosis • Treatment Options • Recovery and ...

  12. Fuzzy Pattern Classification Based Detection of Faulty Electronic Fuel Control (EFC Valves Used in Diesel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Tugsal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we develop mathematical models of a rotary Electronic Fuel Control (EFC valve used in a Diesel engine based on dynamic performance test data and system identification methodology in order to detect the faulty EFC valves. The model takes into account the dynamics of the electrical and mechanical portions of the EFC valves. A recursive least squares (RLS type system identification methodology has been utilized to determine the transfer functions of the different types of EFC valves that were investigated in this study. Both in frequency domain and time domain methods have been utilized for this purpose. Based on the characteristic patterns exhibited by the EFC valves, a fuzzy logic based pattern classification method was utilized to evaluate the residuals and identify faulty EFC valves from good ones. The developed methodology has been shown to provide robust diagnostics for a wide range of EFC valves.

  13. Surgical pathology of excised heart valves in a referral hospital in iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaghoubi, A.R.; Raeesi, K.

    2007-01-01

    Assessment of surgical pathology of excised heart valves in a referral hospital in Iran in a five years period. This retrospective descriptive study was done from 2002 to 2005 in Rajaie heart center in Tehran, Iran. Surgery and pathology records of patients who underwent valve replacement or repair surgery were reviewed. Of 1563 patients 738 (47.2%) underwent mitral, 565 (36.1%) aortic, and 215 (14%) multivalve operation. Most common pathology of mitral valve was rheumatic (68%), while degenerative calcific pathology was dominant in aortic valve (52%). Rheumatic involvement was 46%, and degenerative pathology was common in tricuspid and pulmonary valves (50% and 67%, respectively). Time trend analysis shows no significant variation in excised valves pathology or pattern from 2002 to 2005 (p=0.112). Rheumatic pathology in excised heart valves is still common in this referral heart center in Iran, and no obvious change in this pattern was found during a 5 years period. (author)

  14. Early Outcomes of Sutureless Aortic Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Onur Hanedan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In elderly high-risk surgical patients, sutureless aortic valve replacement (AVR should be an alternative to standard AVR. The potential advantages of sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamping and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB time and facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, while maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low rates of paravalvular leakage. The current study reports our single-center experience regarding the early outcomes of sutureless aortic valve implantation. Methods: Between October 2012 and June 2015, 65 patients scheduled for surgical valve replacement with symptomatic aortic valve disease and New York Heart Association function of class II or higher were included to this study. Perceval S (Sorin Biomedica Cardio Srl, Sallugia, Italy and Edwards Intuity (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA valves were used. Results: The mean age of the patients was 71.15±8.60 years. Forty-four patients (67.7% were female. The average preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction was 56.9±9.93. The CPB time was 96.51±41.27 minutes and the cross-clamping time was 60.85±27.08 minutes. The intubation time was 8.95±4.19 hours, and the intensive care unit and hospital stays were 2.89±1.42 days and 7.86±1.42 days, respectively. The mean quantity of drainage from chest tubes was 407.69±149.28 mL. The hospital mortality rate was 3.1%. A total of five patients (7.69% died during follow-up. The mean follow-up time was 687.24±24.76 days. The one-year survival rate was over 90%. Conclusion: In the last few years, several models of valvular sutureless bioprostheses have been developed. The present study evaluating the single-center early outcomes of sutureless aortic valve implantation presents the results of an innovative surgical technique, finding that it resulted in appropriate hemodynamic conditions with acceptable ischemic time.

  15. Early Outcomes of Sutureless Aortic Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanedan, Muhammet Onur; Mataracı, İlker; Yürük, Mehmet Ali; Özer, Tanıl; Sayar, Ufuk; Arslan, Ali Kemal; Ziyrek, Uğur; Yücel, Murat

    2016-06-01

    In elderly high-risk surgical patients, sutureless aortic valve replacement (AVR) should be an alternative to standard AVR. The potential advantages of sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamping and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time and facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, while maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low rates of paravalvular leakage. The current study reports our single-center experience regarding the early outcomes of sutureless aortic valve implantation. Between October 2012 and June 2015, 65 patients scheduled for surgical valve replacement with symptomatic aortic valve disease and New York Heart Association function of class II or higher were included to this study. Perceval S (Sorin Biomedica Cardio Srl, Sallugia, Italy) and Edwards Intuity (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) valves were used. The mean age of the patients was 71.15±8.60 years. Forty-four patients (67.7%) were female. The average preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction was 56.9±9.93. The CPB time was 96.51±41.27 minutes and the cross-clamping time was 60.85±27.08 minutes. The intubation time was 8.95±4.19 hours, and the intensive care unit and hospital stays were 2.89±1.42 days and 7.86±1.42 days, respectively. The mean quantity of drainage from chest tubes was 407.69±149.28 mL. The hospital mortality rate was 3.1%. A total of five patients (7.69%) died during follow-up. The mean follow-up time was 687.24±24.76 days. The one-year survival rate was over 90%. In the last few years, several models of valvular sutureless bioprostheses have been developed. The present study evaluating the single-center early outcomes of sutureless aortic valve implantation presents the results of an innovative surgical technique, finding that it resulted in appropriate hemodynamic conditions with acceptable ischemic time.

  16. Supra-annular Valve-in-Valve implantation reduces blood stasis on the transcatheter aortic valve leaflets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Azadani, Ali N

    2017-06-14

    Leaflet thrombosis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) and Valve-in-Valve (ViV) procedures has been increasingly recognized. This study aimed to investigate the effect of positioning of the transcatheter aortic valve (TAV) in ViV setting on the flow dynamics aspect of post-ViV thrombosis by quantifying the blood stasis in the intra-annular and supra-annular settings. To that end, two idealized computational models, representing ViV intra-annular and supra-annular positioning of a TAV were developed in a patient-specific geometry. Three-dimensional flow fields were then obtained via fluid-solid interaction modeling to study the difference in blood residence time (BRT) on the TAV leaflets in the two settings. At the end of diastole, a strip of high BRT (⩾1.2s) region was observed on the TAV leaflets in the ViV intra-annular positioning at the fixed boundary where the leaflets are attached to the frame. Such a high BRT region was absent on the TAV leaflets in the supra-annular positioning. The maximum value of BRT on the surface of non-, right, and left coronary leaflets of the TAV in the supra-annular positioning were 53%, 11%, and 27% smaller compared to the intra-annular positioning, respectively. It was concluded that the geometric confinement of TAV by the leaflets of the failed bioprosthetic valve in ViV intra-annular positioning increases the BRT on the leaflets and may act as a permissive factor in valvular thrombosis. The absence of such a geometric confinement in the ViV supra-annular positioning leads to smaller BRT and subsequently less likelihood of leaflet thrombosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. DISCHARGE VALVE FOR GRANULAR MATERIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoughton, L.D.; Robinson, S.T.

    1962-05-15

    A gravity-red dispenser or valve is designed for discharging the fueled spherical elements used in a pebble bed reactor. The dispenser consists of an axially movable tube terminating under a hood having side walls with openings. When the tube is moved so that its top edge is above the tops of the side openings the elements will not flow. As the tube is moved downwardly, the elements flow into the hood through the side openings and over the top edge into the tube at an increasing rate as the tube is lowered further. The tube is spaced at all times from the hood and side walls a distance greater than the diameter of the largest element to prevent damaging of the elements when the dispenser is closed to flow. (AEC)

  18. An application of the valve-leak monitoring system to the valves for the improved Korean standard nuclear power plant (KSNP+)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byeong-yeol AHN; Dae-sik CHOI; Sang-kook CHUNG

    2006-01-01

    The loss of steam due to valve leakage leads to the inefficiency of power generation at the nuclear power plants. Under the normal conditions of plant operation, it is difficult to detect valve leaks early enough to prevent consequential damages and losses. The capability of timely detection allows the plant adequate time to prepare repair plans, which would ultimately result in efficient power production. Therefore, timing of detection is one of the most important factors in dealing with valve leakage problems. The VLMS has been developed to meet such an industrial demand. It provides early detection of valve leakage by real-time monitoring through the acoustic sensors installed on the inlet and the outlet of the valve. The KSNP+ utilizes the VLMS to enhance the performance and maintenance of major valves at plants. The VLMS will enable the plant to detect the leakage of valve at an early stage. It can reduce the steam losses and save related valve maintenance cost by performing fast diagnosis of valve leakage. (authors)

  19. 241-AN-A valve pit manifold valves and position indication acceptance test procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VANDYKE, D.W.

    1999-08-25

    This document describes the method used to test design criteria for gear actuated ball valves installed in 241-AN-A Valve Pit located at 200E Tank Farms. The purpose of this procedure is to demonstrate the following: Equipment is properly installed, labeled, and documented on As-Built drawings; New Manifold Valves in the 241-AN-A Valve Pit are fully operable using the handwheel of the valve operators; New valve position indicators on the valve operators will show correct valve positions; New valve position switches will function properly; and New valve locking devices function properly.

  20. Application of artificial intelligence to motor operated valve testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogard, T.; Bednar, F.; Matty, T.; Kent, R.

    1989-01-01

    Improper valve maintenance can be a significant roadblock to successful power plant operation. There have been events during which motor operated valves failed on demand due to improper switch settings. For nuclear electric generating stations, these events have led to regulatory requirements such as NRC Bulletin 85-03 and NRC Bulletin 89-10 Safety Related Motor Operated Valve Testing and Surveillance which imposes strict testing and programmatic requirements on motor operated valves (MOV). Part of the requirements include performing diagnostic testing to verify stem thrust loads and switch settings. Diagnostic equipment must be non-intrusive, minimize valve disassembly, and reduce plant refueling critical path time for testing. In this paper an on-line diagnostic system using sensors to measure stem forces, motor current, and valve position, and a portable system employing these same sensor inputs in addition to torque, limit and torque bypass switch inputs is described. Sophisticated graphic software is employed to display data or trace information. A rule based artificial intelligence (AI) system is used to analyze sensor outputs. Objectives for valve diagnostics, sample AI rules, results of actual field testing, and system software/hardware architecture are presented

  1. Piezoelectric valve for massive gas injection in ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibon, Mathias; Neu, Rudolf [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysics, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Technical University Munich, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Herrmann, Albrecht; Mank, Klaus; Mertens, Vitus; Pautasso, Gabriella; Ploeckl, Bernhard [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysics, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    A sudden loss of plasma temperature can cause a disruption, which poses a significant problem for current Tokamaks and future fusion devices. Hence, mitigating forces and thermal loads during disruptions is important for the integrity of the vessel and first wall components. Therefore, high speed gas valves are used to deliver a pulse of noble gas onto the plasma, which irradiates the thermal energy quickly, avoiding localized heat loads and mechanical stress due to induced currents. A new design for such a valve is currently under development. The valve plate is driven by two piezoelectric stack actuators. The stroke of the actuators (0.07 mm) is amplified by a monolithic titanium frame and reaches 2 mm. The frame also serves as spring to pre-load the actuators. In the idle state, it also presses the conical valve plate into the seal, closing the gas chamber (42 cm{sup 3}). The actuators accelerate the stem and the valve plate until it is fully opened after 2 ms. The orifice of the valve has a diameter of 14 mm. This allows a peak mass flow rate of the gas up to 8 . 10{sup 4} (Pa.m)/(s) after 1.8 ms and an average mass flow rate of 2 . 10{sup 4} (Pa.m)/(s) over the evacuation time of 10 ms. Therefore, one valve would be sufficient to deliver the required amount of gas to mitigate disruptions at ASDEX Upgrade.

  2. A Systematic Review of Infective Endocarditis in Patients With Bovine Jugular Vein Valves Compared With Other Valve Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Cote, Anita T; Hosking, Martin C K; Harris, Kevin C

    2017-07-24

    The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the incidence of infective endocarditis (IE) in right ventricle-to-pulmonary artery conduits and valves, comparing bovine jugular vein (BJV) valves with all others. Recent evidence suggests that the incidence of IE is higher in patients with congenital heart disease who have undergone implantation of BJV valves in the pulmonary position compared with other valves. Systematic searches of published research were conducted using electronic databases (MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL) and citations cross-referenced current to April 2016. Included studies met the following criteria: patients had undergone right ventricle-to-pulmonary artery conduit or percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation, and investigators reported on the type of conduit or valve implanted, method of intervention (surgery or catheter based), IE incidence, and follow-up time. Fifty studies (Levels of Evidence: 2 to 4) were identified involving 7,063 patients. The median cumulative incidence of IE was higher for BJV compared with other valves (5.4% vs. 1.2%; p endocarditis with BJV valves than other types of right ventricle-to-pulmonary artery conduits. There was no difference in the incidence of endocarditis between catheter-based bovine valves and surgically implanted bovine valves, suggesting that the substrate for future infection is related to the tissue rather than the method of implantation. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Outcomes of Reoperative Valve Replacement in Patients with Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: A 20-Year Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Woong Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE is a serious complication of cardiac valve replacement, and many p atients with P VE r equire r eoperation. The aim of t his study was to r eview our institutional 2 0 -year experience of surgical reoperative valve replacement in patients with PVE. Methods: A retrospective study was performed on 84 patients (mean age, 54.8±12.7 years; 51 males who were diagnosed with PVE and underwent reoperative valve replacement from January 1995 to December 2016. Results: PVE was found in 1 valve in 61 cases (72.6%, and in 2 or more valves in 23 cases (27.4%. The median follow-up duration was 47.3 months (range, 0 to 250 months. Postoperative complications occurred in 39 patients (46.4%. Reinfection occurred in 6 cases, all within 1 year. The freedom from reinfection rate at 5 years was 91.0%±3.5%. The overall survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 64.4%±5.8% and 54.3%±7.3%, respectively. In stepwise multivariable Cox proportional hazard models, older age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05 to 2.10; p=0.027 and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB time (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.0 1; p =0 . 0 33 e merged a s independent risk f actors f or d eath. Conclusion: Older age and a longer CPB time were associated with an increased risk of overall mortality in PVE patients.

  4. Intermittent acute aortic valve regurgitation: A case report of a prosthetic valve dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Karagiannis (Stefanos); G. Karatasakis (George); K. Spargias (Konstantinos); L. Louka; D. Poldermans (Don); D.V. Cokkinos (Dennis)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractComplications of any mechanical prosthesis include thrombus or pannus formation. In our case report we demonstrate that prosthetic aortic valve regurgitation due to pannus formation may be intermittent and non-cyclic in pattern and therefore not obvious at the time of original clinical

  5. BNGS B valve packing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumming, D.

    1995-01-01

    The Bruce B Valve Packing Program began in 1987. The early history and development were presented at the 1992 International CANDU Maintenance conference. This presentation covers the evolution of the Bruce B Valve Packing Program over the period 1992 to 1995. (author)

  6. Validation of Model-Based Prognostics for Pneumatic Valves in a Demonstration Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-02

    predict end of life ( EOL ) and remaining useful life (RUL). The approach still follows the general estimation-prediction framework devel- oped in the...atmosphere, with linearly increasing leak area. kA2leak = Cleak (16) We define valve end of life ( EOL ) through open/close time limits of the valves, as in...represents end of life ( EOL ), and ∆kE represents remaining useful life (RUL). For valves, timing requirements are provided that de- fine the maximum

  7. Control of fast non linear systems - application to a turbo charged SI engine with variable valve timing; controle des systemes rapides non lineaires - application au moteur a allumage commande turbocompresse a distribution variable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colin, G.

    2006-10-15

    Spark ignition engine control has become a major issue for the compliance with emissions legislation while ensuring driving comfort. Engine down-sizing is one of the promising ways to reduce fuel consumption and resulting CO{sub 2} emissions. Combining several existing technologies such as supercharging and variable valve actuation, down-sizing is a typical example of the problems encountered in Spark Ignited (SI) engine control: nonlinear systems with saturation of actuators; numerous major physical phenomena not measurable; limited computing time; control objectives (consumption, pollution, performance) often competing. A methodology of modelling and model-based control (internal model and predictive control) for these systems is also proposed and applied to the air path of the down-sized engine. Models, physicals and generics, are built to estimate in-cylinder air mass, residual burned gases mass and air scavenged mass from the intake to the exhaust. The complete and generic engine torque control architecture for the turbo-charged SI engine with variable cam-shaft timing was tested in simulation and experimentally (on engine and vehicle). These tests show that new possibilities are offered in order to decrease pollutant emissions and optimize engine efficiency. (author)

  8. Experience with valves for PHWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, K.; Mhetre, S.G.

    1977-01-01

    Material specifications and inspection and testing requirements of the valves meant for use in nuclear reactors are mentioned. In the heavy water systems (both primary and moderator) of a PHWR type reactor, the valves used are gate valves, globe valves, diaphragm valves, butterfly valves, check valves and relief valves. Their locations and functions they perform in the Rajasthan Atomic Power Station Unit-1 are described. Experience with them is given. The major problems encountered with them have been : (1) leakage from the stem seals and body bonnet joint, (2) leakage due to failure of diaphragm and/or washout of the packing and (3) malfunctioning. Measures taken to solve these are discussed. Finally a mention has been made of improved versions of valves, namely, metal diaphragm valve and inverted relief valve. (M.G.B.)

  9. Resting multilayer 2D speckle-tracking TTE for detection of ischemic segments confirmed by invasive FFR part-2, using post-systolic-strain-index and time from aortic-valve-closure to regional peak longitudinal-strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Koya; Funabashi, Nobusada; Nishi, Takeshi; Takahara, Masayuki; Fujimoto, Yoshihide; Kamata, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2016-08-15

    This study evaluated the post-systolic strain index (PSI), and the time interval between aortic valve closure (AVC) and regional peak longitudinal strain (PLS), measured by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), for detection of left ventricular (LV) myocardial ischemic segments confirmed by invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR). 39 stable patients (32 males; 65.8±11.9years) with 46 coronary arteries at ≥50% stenosis on invasive coronary angiography underwent 2D speckle tracking TTE (Vivid E9, GE Healthcare) and invasive FFR measurements. PSI, AVC and regional PLS in each LV segment were calculated. FFR ≤0.80 was detected in 27 LV segments. There were no significant differences between segments supplied by FFR ≤0.80 and FFR >0.80 vessels in either PSI or the time interval between AVC and regional PLS. To identify LV segments±FFR ≤0.80, the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves for PSI, and the time interval between AVC and regional PLS had areas under the curve (AUC) values of 0.58 and 0.57, respectively, with best cut-off points of 12% (sensitivity 70.4%, specificity 57.9%) and 88ms (sensitivity 70.4%, specificity 52.6%), respectively, but the AUCs were not statistically significant. In stable coronary artery disease patients with ≥50% coronary artery stenosis, measurement of PSI, and the time interval between AVC and regional PLS, on resting TTE, enabled the identification of LV segments with FFR ≤0.80 using each appropriate threshold for PSI, and the time interval between AVC and regional PLS, with reasonable diagnostic accuracy. However, the AUC values were not statistically significant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. In-operation inspection technology development-4 ''development of degradation prediction technology for motor-operated valves''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuo, Takeshima; Yuichi, Higashikawa; Masahiro, Koike; Kenji, Matsumoto; Eiji, O'shima

    2001-01-01

    A method for degradation predicting technology has been proposed for motor operated valves in nuclear power plants which is based on the concept of condition monitoring for maintenance. This method (degradation prediction technology) eliminates the unnecessary overhaul of valves and realizes high reliability and economy. The degradation mechanism was clarified by long time heating experiments of gasket and gland packing and the wear test for them and stem nut to research valve parts degradation by stress (pressure, temperature, etc) during plant operation. Effective electric power measurements for motor operated valves were confirmed to be useful discovering valve part failures. The motor operated valve degradation prediction system was developed on the basis of the experiment results and mechanism. The system is able to predict the degradation of valve parts (gasket/gland packing, stem, stem nut, etc) utilizing plant data (pressure, temperature, etc) and effective power of the motor. The life of valve parts can be estimated from the experimental results. (authors)

  11. Prosthetic valve endocarditis after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Thue; De Backer, Ole; Thyregod, Hans G H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an advancing mode of treatment for inoperable or high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) after TAVI is a serious complication, but only limited data exist on its incidence, outcome, and procedural......%) were treated conservatively and 1 with surgery. Four patients (22%) died from endocarditis or complications to treatment, 2 of those (11%) during initial hospitalization for PVE. An increased risk of TAVI-PVE was seen in patients with low implanted valve position (hazard ratio, 2.8 [1.1-7.2]), moderate...

  12. Latest-Generation Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Devices and Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamandi, Chekrallah; Puri, Rishi; Rodriguez-Gabella, Tania; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a well-established treatment for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are at high or prohibitive surgical risk. More recently, TAVR has emerged as a valid alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement for treating intermediate-risk patients, and several studies are currently evaluating the role of TAVR in low-risk patients. Transcatheter heart valve (THV) technologies have evolved considerably over time, and important iterations have been implemented in many of the latest-generation devices to (1) reduce the size and improve delivery system properties; (2) improve valve deployment, repositioning, and retrievability; and (3) reduce paravalvular leaks. This article reviews the main characteristics of, and clinical results associated with, the newer-generation THVs while providing an overview of novel TAVR indications. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fast valve for the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oversluizen, T.

    1981-01-01

    A prototype fast closing, all metal, UHV-compatible valve has been built to protect the NSLS storage rings from sudden vacuum failures which may occur in the experimental beamlines. When triggered, an area of 10 x 140 mm is covered by a spring-driven, guillotine type blade, which forms a high impedance to the inrushing gas. This fast closure assures the protection of the ring vacuum from contamination before the slower UHV valve can be sealed off. Closing times on the order of 3 to 5 msec have been measured. The valve is triggered by a commercial solenoid, powered by a 16,800 μF capacitor bank at 100 volts. Because the valve is situated in a high radiation area, it is remotely resettable

  14. Diesel Engine Valve Clearance Detection Using Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathi Elamin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated, using experimental method, the suitability of acoustic emission (AE technique for the condition monitoring of diesel engine valve faults. The clearance fault was adjusted experimentally in an exhaust valve and successfully detected and diagnosed in a Ford FSD 425 four-cylinder, four-stroke, in-line OHV, direct injection diesel engine. The effect of faulty exhaust valve clearance on engine performance was monitored and the difference between the healthy and faulty engine was observed from the recorded AE signals. The measured results from this technique show that using only time domain and frequency domain analysis of acoustic emission signals can give a superior measure of engine condition. This concludes that acoustic emission is a powerful and reliable method of detection and diagnosis of the faults in diesel engines and this is considered to be a unique approach to condition monitoring of valve performance.

  15. Trabeculectomy versus Ahmed Glaucoma Valve implantation in neovascular glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Christopher C; Salim, Sarwat; Du, Haiming; Netland, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare surgical outcomes in neovascular glaucoma patients who underwent trabeculectomy with mitomycin C versus Ahmed Glaucoma Valve implantation. Patients and methods: This was a retrospective comparative case series. We reviewed 40 eyes of 39 patients with underlying diagnosis of neovascular glaucoma, divided into two groups: Ahmed Glaucoma Valve (N = 20) and trabeculectomy with mitomycin C (N = 20). Surgical success was defined as 6 mm Hg ≤ intraocular pressure ≤21 mm Hg, with or without the use of glaucoma medications, with no further glaucoma surgery, and light perception or better vision. Early postoperative hypotony was defined as intraocular pressure Ahmed Glaucoma Valve group and 25 months (6–77 months) for the trabeculectomy group. Although the mean number of postoperative intraocular pressure-lowering medications was significantly higher in the trabeculectomy group compared with the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve group at 3 and 6 month time points, there was no statistically significant difference at any other time point. There was no statistically significant difference between both groups in postoperative visual acuity and intraocular pressure. Success was 70% and 65% at 1 year and 60% and 55% at 2 years after Ahmed Glaucoma Valve and trabeculectomy, respectively. Kaplan–Meier survival curve analysis showed no significant difference in success between the two groups (P = 0.815). Hyphema was the most common complication in both groups. Conclusion: We found similar results after trabeculectomy with mitomycin C and Ahmed Glaucoma Valve implantation in eyes with neovascular glaucoma. PMID:21468334

  16. Cavitation guide for control valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tullis, J.P. [Tullis Engineering Consultants, Logan, UT (United States)

    1993-04-01

    This guide teaches the basic fundamentals of cavitation to provide the reader with an understanding of what causes cavitation, when it occurs, and the potential problems cavitation can cause to a valve and piping system. The document provides guidelines for understanding how to reduce the cavitation and/or select control valves for a cavitating system. The guide provides a method for predicting the cavitation intensity of control valves, and how the effect of cavitation on a system will vary with valve type, valve function, valve size, operating pressure, duration of operation and details of the piping installation. The guide defines six cavitation limits identifying cavitation intensities ranging from inception to the maximum intensity possible. The intensity of the cavitation at each limit Is described, including a brief discussion of how each level of cavitation influences the valve and system. Examples are included to demonstrate how to apply the method, including making both size and pressure scale effects corrections. Methods of controlling cavitation are discussed providing information on various techniques which can be used to design a new system or modify an existing one so it can operate at a desired level of cavitation.

  17. Cavitation guide for control valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tullis, J.P.

    1993-04-01

    This guide teaches the basic fundamentals of cavitation to provide the reader with an understanding of what causes cavitation, when it occurs, and the potential problems cavitation can cause to a valve and piping system. The document provides guidelines for understanding how to reduce the cavitation and/or select control valves for a cavitating system. The guide provides a method for predicting the cavitation intensity of control valves, and how the effect of cavitation on a system will vary with valve type, valve function, valve size, operating pressure, duration of operation and details of the piping installation. The guide defines six cavitation limits identifying cavitation intensities ranging from inception to the maximum intensity possible. The intensity of the cavitation at each limit Is described, including a brief discussion of how each level of cavitation influences the valve and system. Examples are included to demonstrate how to apply the method, including making both size and pressure scale effects corrections. Methods of controlling cavitation are discussed providing information on various techniques which can be used to design a new system or modify an existing one so it can operate at a desired level of cavitation

  18. Characteristic analysis of servo valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, J. H.; Ryu, D. R.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, Y. S.; Na, J. C.; Kim, D. S.

    2008-01-01

    Electro-pneumatic servo valve is an electro-mechanical device which converts electric signals into a proper pneumatic flow rate or pressure. In order to improve the overall performance of pneumatic servo systems, electro-pneumatic servo valves are required, which have fast dynamic characteristics, no air leakage at a null point, and can be fabricated at a low-cost. The first objective of this research is to design and to fabricate a new electro-pneumatic servo valve which satisfies the above-mentioned requirements. In order to design the mechanism of the servo valve optimally, the flow inside the valve depending upon the position of spool was analyzed variously, and on the basis of such analysis results, the valve mechanism, which was formed by combination of the spool and the sleeve, was designed and manufactured. And a tester for conducting an overall performance test was designed and manufactured, and as a result of conducting the flow rate test, the pressure test and the frequency test on the developed pneumatic servo valve

  19. Numerical Analysis of Combined Valve Hydrodynamic Characteristics for Turbine System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhowmik, P. K.; Shamim, J. A.; Gairola, A.; Arif, M.; Suh, Kune Y. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    precisely by the valve manufacturer. As a matter of fact, attempts were made to obtain flow characteristic curves resorting to analytical as well as numerical methods. The flow characteristic curve relates the stem lift with mass flow rate at a specific temperature and pressure. This paper focuses on computational and numerical analysis of the combined stop and control valve. Combined Airflow Regulation Analysis (CARA) is performed to check on the hydrodynamic characteristic, which is represented by flow coefficient characteristic. CATIA V.5 and ANSYS CFX are used for three-dimensional computer-aided design and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, respectively. Flow characteristic curves are plotted by calculating theoretical and numerical mass flow rate. Hydrodynamic analysis was made of the combined stop and control valve for the turbine system using ANSYS CFX. The result of the numerical study represented by the valve flow coefficient with different normalized values of valve stem movement L/D and different pressure ratios of valve outlet and inlet agrees well with the ideal case and other similar previous experimental results. This study also provided a solid understanding with versatile options for analyzing the hydrodynamics of the combined valve considering the various internal geometry, seat, plug, and the inlet plus outlet boundary conditions to improve the efficiency, performance and reliability of the turbine system of small as well as large power conversion system using the numerical analysis with minimal cost and time.

  20. Numerical Analysis of Combined Valve Hydrodynamic Characteristics for Turbine System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhowmik, P. K.; Shamim, J. A.; Gairola, A.; Arif, M.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2014-01-01

    precisely by the valve manufacturer. As a matter of fact, attempts were made to obtain flow characteristic curves resorting to analytical as well as numerical methods. The flow characteristic curve relates the stem lift with mass flow rate at a specific temperature and pressure. This paper focuses on computational and numerical analysis of the combined stop and control valve. Combined Airflow Regulation Analysis (CARA) is performed to check on the hydrodynamic characteristic, which is represented by flow coefficient characteristic. CATIA V.5 and ANSYS CFX are used for three-dimensional computer-aided design and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, respectively. Flow characteristic curves are plotted by calculating theoretical and numerical mass flow rate. Hydrodynamic analysis was made of the combined stop and control valve for the turbine system using ANSYS CFX. The result of the numerical study represented by the valve flow coefficient with different normalized values of valve stem movement L/D and different pressure ratios of valve outlet and inlet agrees well with the ideal case and other similar previous experimental results. This study also provided a solid understanding with versatile options for analyzing the hydrodynamics of the combined valve considering the various internal geometry, seat, plug, and the inlet plus outlet boundary conditions to improve the efficiency, performance and reliability of the turbine system of small as well as large power conversion system using the numerical analysis with minimal cost and time

  1. Developments in mechanical heart valve prosthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Artificial heart valves are engineered devices used for replacing diseased or damaged natural valves of the heart. Most commonly used for replacement are mechanical heart valves and biological valves. This paper briefly outlines the evolution, designs employed, materials being used,. and important factors that affect the ...

  2. Butterfly valve torque prediction methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldiwany, B.H.; Sharma, V.; Kalsi, M.S.; Wolfe, K.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the Motor-Operated Valve (MOV) Performance Prediction Program, the Electric Power Research Institute has sponsored the development of methodologies for predicting thrust and torque requirements of gate, globe, and butterfly MOVs. This paper presents the methodology that will be used by utilities to calculate the dynamic torque requirements for butterfly valves. The total dynamic torque at any disc position is the sum of the hydrodynamic torque, bearing torque (which is induced by the hydrodynamic force), as well as other small torque components (such as packing torque). The hydrodynamic torque on the valve disc, caused by the fluid flow through the valve, depends on the disc angle, flow velocity, upstream flow disturbances, disc shape, and the disc aspect ratio. The butterfly valve model provides sets of nondimensional flow and torque coefficients that can be used to predict flow rate and hydrodynamic torque throughout the disc stroke and to calculate the required actuation torque and the maximum transmitted torque throughout the opening and closing stroke. The scope of the model includes symmetric and nonsymmetric discs of different shapes and aspects ratios in compressible and incompressible fluid applications under both choked and nonchoked flow conditions. The model features were validated against test data from a comprehensive flowloop and in situ test program. These tests were designed to systematically address the effect of the following parameters on the required torque: valve size, disc shapes and disc aspect ratios, upstream elbow orientation and its proximity, and flow conditions. The applicability of the nondimensional coefficients to valves of different sizes was validated by performing tests on 42-in. valve and a precisely scaled 6-in. model. The butterfly valve model torque predictions were found to bound test data from the flow-loop and in situ testing, as shown in the examples provided in this paper

  3. Transcatheter Mitral Valve-in-Ring Implantation

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tanner, RE

    2018-05-01

    Failed surgical mitral valve repair using an annuloplasty ring has traditionally been treated with surgical valve replacement or repair1. For patients at high risk for repeat open heart surgery, placement of a trans-catheter aortic valve (i.e., TAVI valve) within the mitral ring (i.e., Mitral-Valve-in-Ring, MViR) has emerged as a novel alternative treatment strategy2-5 . We describe our experience of a failed mitral valve repair that was successfully treated with a TAVI valve delivered via the trans-septal approach, and summarise the data relating to this emerging treatment strategy.

  4. Valve leakage inspection testing and maintenance process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aikin, J.A.; Reinwald, J.W.; Kittmer, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    In valve maintenance, packing rings that prevent leakage along the valve stem must periodically be replaced, either during routine maintenance or to correct a leak or valve malfunction. Tools and procedures currently in use for valve packing removal and inspection are generally of limited value due to various access and application problems. A process has been developed by AECL Research that addresses these problems. The process, using incompressible fluid pressure, quickly and efficiently confirms the integrity of the valve backseat, extracts hard-to-remove valve packing sets, and verifies the leak tightness of the repacked valve

  5. Bireactor Electronuclear Systems with Liquid Cadmium Valve

    CERN Document Server

    Bznuni, S A; Zhamkochyan, V M; ASosnin, A N; Polanski, A; Khudaverdyan, A H

    2002-01-01

    Three main types of bireactor electronuclear systems are discussed. From the point of view of assuring high level of functional characteristics and safety bireactor electronuclear systems with booster using enriched uranium (20 %) and with a liquid cadmium valve appears to be the most effective. It is shown by means of Monte-Carlo modeling that such operation conditions can be achieved which lead to the destruction of the intermediate cadmium layer making the systems supercritical (k_{eff}>1). One can avoid the problem by using a special design of the liquid cadmium valve. In comparison with other nuclear systems (critical reactors, one-reactor electronuclear systems) cascade electronuclear systems have essential advantages allowing the decrease of the proton beam current by one order of magnitude and providing at same time the necessary level of power generation and neutron flux. Availability of both the thermal and fast cones allows one to transmute not only transuranics but also the fission products - cesi...

  6. Transcatheter, valve-in-valve transapical aortic and mitral valve implantation, in a high risk patient with aortic and mitral prosthetic valve stenoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter valve implantation continues to grow worldwide and has been used principally for the nonsurgical management of native aortic valvular disease-as a potentially less invasive method of valve replacement in high-risk and inoperable patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Given the burden of valvular heart disease in the general population and the increasing numbers of patients who have had previous valve operations, we are now seeing a growing number of high-risk patients presenting with prosthetic valve stenosis, who are not potential surgical candidates. For this high-risk subset transcatheter valve delivery may be the only option. Here, we present an inoperable patient with severe, prosthetic valve aortic and mitral stenosis who was successfully treated with a trans catheter based approach, with a valve-in-valve implantation procedure of both aortic and mitral valves.

  7. Implementing wavelet packet transform for valve failure detection using vibration and acoustic emission signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, H Y; Ramli, R; Abdullah, M A K

    2012-01-01

    The efficiency of reciprocating compressors relies heavily on the health condition of its moving components, most importantly its valves. Previous studies showed good correlation between the dynamic response and the physical condition of the valves. These can be achieved by employing vibration technique which is capable of monitoring the response of the valve, and acoustic emission technique which is capable of detecting the valves' material deformation. However, the relationship/comparison between the two techniques is rarely investigated. In this paper, the two techniques were examined using time-frequency analysis. Wavelet packet transform (WPT) was chosen as the multi-resolution analysis technique over continuous wavelet transform (CWT), and discrete wavelet transform (DWT). This is because WPT could overcome the high computational time and high redundancy problem in CWT and could provide detailed analysis of the high frequency components compared to DWT. The features of both signals can be extracted by evaluating the normalised WPT coefficients for different time window under different valve conditions. By comparing the normalised coefficients over a certain time frame and frequency range, the feature vectors revealing the condition of valves can be constructed. One way analysis of variance was employed on these feature vectors to test the significance of data under different valve conditions. It is believed that AE signals can give a better representation of the valve condition as it can detect both the fluid motion and material deformation of valves as compared to the vibration signals.

  8. Long-Term Risk for Aortic Complications After Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve Versus Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itagaki, Shinobu; Chikwe, Joanna P; Chiang, Yuting P; Egorova, Natalia N; Adams, David H

    2015-06-09

    Bicuspid aortic valves are associated with valve dysfunction, ascending aortic aneurysm and dissection. Management of the ascending aorta at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR) in these patients is controversial and has been extrapolated from experience with Marfan syndrome, despite the absence of comparative long-term outcome data. This study sought to assess whether the natural history of thoracic aortopathy after AVR in patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease is substantially different from that seen in patients with Marfan syndrome. In this retrospective comparison, outcomes of 13,205 adults (2,079 with bicuspid aortic valves, 73 with Marfan syndrome, and 11,053 control patients with acquired aortic valve disease) who underwent primary AVR without replacement of the ascending aorta in New York State between 1995 and 2010 were compared. The median follow-up time was 6.6 years. The long-term incidence of thoracic aortic dissection was significantly higher in patients with Marfan syndrome (5.5 ± 2.7%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (0.55 ± 0.21%) and control group patients (0.41 ± 0.08%, p Marfan syndrome (10.8 ± 4.4%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (4.8 ± 0.8%) and control group patients (1.4 ± 0.2%) (p Marfan syndrome were significantly more likely to undergo thoracic aortic surgery in late follow-up (10.4 ± 4.3%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (2.5 ± 0.6%) and control group patients (0.50 ± 0.09%) (p Marfan syndrome compared with those with bicuspid aortic valves confirm that operative management of patients with bicuspid aortic valves should not be extrapolated from Marfan syndrome and support discrete treatment algorithms for these different clinical entities. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Aortic root surgery in Marfan syndrome: Comparison of aortic valve-sparing reimplantation versus composite grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karck, Matthias; Kallenbach, Klaus; Hagl, Christian; Rhein, Christine; Leyh, Rainer; Haverich, Axel

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the results of aortic valve-sparing reimplantation and aortic root replacement with mechanical valve conduits in patients with Marfan syndrome undergoing operation for aortic root aneurysms. Patients and methods Between March 1979 and April 2002, 119 patients with clinical evidence of Marfan syndrome underwent composite graft replacement with mechanical valve conduits (n = 74) or aortic valve-sparing reimplantation according to David (n = 45). The underlying causes were aortic dissection type A (43 patients) and aneurysms (76 patients). Patients undergoing aortic valve reimplantation were younger compared with patients undergoing composite grafting (28 vs 35 years, P =.002) and had longer intraoperative aortic crossclamp times (125 vs 78 minutes, P valve reimplantation (P =.15). Mean follow-up was 30 months for patients undergoing aortic valve reimplantation and 114 months for patients undergoing composite grafting. Freedom from reoperation and death after 5 years postoperatively was 92% and 89% in patients undergoing composite grafting and 84% and 96% in patients undergoing aortic valve reimplantation (P =.31; P =.54), respectively. Thromboembolic complications or late postoperative bleeding occurred in 17 patients undergoing composite grafting, and an early postoperative event occurred in 1 patient undergoing aortic valve reimplantation. The results of aortic valve reimplantation and composite grafting of the aortic valve and ascending aorta with mechanical valve conduits are similar with regard to early and mid-term postoperative mortality and to the incidence of late reoperations in patients with Marfan syndrome. The low risk of thromboembolic or bleeding complications favors aortic valve reimplantation in these patients.

  10. A review of historical check valve failure data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casada, D.A.; Todd, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    Check valve operating problems in recent years have resulted in significant operating transients, increased cost, and decreased system availability. In response, additional attention has been given to check valves by utilities, as well as the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Operation and Maintenance Committee. All these organizations have the fundamental goal of ensuring reliable operation of check valves. A key ingredient of an engineering-oriented reliability improvement effort is a thorough understanding of relevant historical experience. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently conducting a detailed review of historical failure data available through the Institute of Nuclear Power Operation's Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System. The focus of the review is on check valve failures that have involved significant degradation of the valve internal parts. A variety of parameters are being considered during the review, including size, age, system of service, method of failure discovery, the affected valve parts, attributed causes, and corrective actions. This work is being carried out under the auspices of the NRC's Nuclear Plant Aging Research program. At this time, the study is approximately 50% complete. All failure records have been reviewed and categorized, and preliminary tabulation and correlation of data is underway. The bulk of the tabulation and correlation portion of the work is expected to be completed by the end of June 1992. A report draft is expected in the fall of 1992

  11. Three-dimensional echocardiographic assessment of the repaired mitral valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Andrew; Mahmood, Feroze; Poppas, Athena; Singh, Arun

    2014-02-01

    This study examined the geometric changes of the mitral valve (MV) after repair using conventional and three-dimensional echocardiography. Prospective evaluation of consecutive patients undergoing mitral valve repair. Tertiary care university hospital. Fifty consecutive patients scheduled for elective repair of the mitral valve for regurgitant disease. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Assessments of valve area (MVA) were performed using two-dimensional planimetry (2D-Plan), pressure half-time (PHT), and three-dimensional planimetry (3D-Plan). In addition, the direction of ventricular inflow was assessed from the three-dimensional imaging. Good correlations (r = 0.83) and agreement (-0.08 +/- 0.43 cm(2)) were seen between the MVA measured with 3D-Plan and PHT, and were better than either compared to 2D-Plan. MVAs were smaller after repair of functional disease repaired with an annuloplasty ring. After repair, ventricular inflow was directed toward the lateral ventricular wall. Subgroup analysis showed that the change in inflow angle was not different after repair of functional disease (168 to 171 degrees) as compared to those presenting with degenerative disease (168 to 148 degrees; p<0.0001). Three-dimensional imaging provides caregivers with a unique ability to assess changes in valve function after mitral valve repair. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Options for Heart Valve Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guide: Understanding Your Heart Valve Problem | Spanish Symptom Tracker | Spanish Pre-surgery Checklist | Spanish What Is Heart ... Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different? 7 Warning Signs of a Heart Attack 8 Low Blood Pressure - ...

  13. Analysis of Mitral Valve Replacement Outcomes is Enhanced by Meaningful Clinical Use of Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, John C; Pfeffer, Thomas; Johnstone, Shelley; Chen, Yuexin; Kiley, Mary-Lou; Richter, Richard; Lee, Hon

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Cardiac surgical mortality has improved during the last decade despite the aging of the population. An integrated US health plan developed a heart valve registry to track outcomes and complications of heart valve operations. This database was used for longitudinal evaluation of mitral valve (MV) outcomes from 1999 to 2008 at four affiliated hospitals. Methods: We identified 3130 patients in the Apollo database who underwent 3180 initial MV procedures. Internal administrative and Social Security Administration databases were merged to determine survival rates. Electronic health records were searched to ascertain demographics, comorbidities, and postoperative complications. Cox regression was used to evaluate mean survival and identify risk factors. Results: The procedures included 1160 mechanical valve replacements, 1159 tissue valve replacements, and 861 annuloplasties. The mean age of patients undergoing these procedures was 58 ± 11 years, 69 ± 12 years, and 62 ± 12 years, respectively. Mean survival was 8.9 ± 0.1 years for mechanical valve replacement, 7.0 ± 0.1 years for tissue valve replacement, and 7.7 ± 0.1 years for annuloplasty. Early in the study, there was a preference for implanting mechanical MVs. Beginning in 2003, more patients received tissue valve replacements rather than mechanical valves. Over time, there was an increasing trend of annuloplasty. Cox regression analysis identified the following risk factors for increased ten-year mortality: tissue valve implantation; advanced age; female sex; nonelective, nonisolated procedure; diabetes; postoperative use of banked blood products; previous cardiovascular intervention; dialysis; and longer perfusion time. Hospital location, reoperation, preoperative anticoagulation, and cardiogenic shock were not statistically significant risk factors. Conclusions: When controlling for other risk factors, we observed a lower long-term survival rate for tissue valve replacement compared with

  14. Two-dimensional FSI simulation of closing dynamics of a tilting disc mechanical heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, V; Udaykumar, H S; Herbertson, L H; Deutsch, S; Manning, K B; Chandran, K B

    2010-03-01

    The fluid dynamics during valve closure resulting in high shear flows and large residence times of particles has been implicated in platelet activation and thrombus formation in mechanical heart valves. Our previous studies with bi-leaflet valves have shown that large shear stresses induced in the gap between the leaflet edge and the valve housing results in relatively high platelet activation levels whereas flow between the leaflets results in shed vortices not conducive to platelet damage. In this study we compare the result of closing dynamics of a tilting disc valve with that of a bi-leaflet valve. The two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction analysis of a tilting disc valve closure mechanics is performed with a fixed grid Cartesian mesh flow solver with local mesh refinement, and a Lagrangian particle dynamic analysis for computation of potential for platelet activation. Throughout the simulation the flow remains in the laminar regime and the flow through the gap width is marked by the development of a shear layer which separates from the leaflet downstream of the valve. Zones of re-circulation are observed in the gap between the leaflet edge and the valve housing on the major orifice region of the tilting disc valve and are seen to be migrating towards the minor orifice region. Jet flow is observed at the minor orifice region and a vortex is formed which sheds in the direction of fluid motion as observed in experiments using PIV measurements. The activation parameter computed for the tilting disc valve, at the time of closure was found to be 2.7 times greater than that of the bi-leaflet mechanical valve and was found to be in the vicinity of the minor orifice region mainly due to the migration of vortical structures from the major to the minor orifice region during the leaflet rebound of the closing phase.

  15. A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Schively, D.P.

    1983-01-01

    The valve has a first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics which are different. The valve parts are positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system. (author)

  16. The tightness of the globe valves in the exploitations practice of the gas pipe-lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrak, T.; Rudzki, Z.; Surmacz, W.

    2006-01-01

    Technological units of the Transit Gas Pipeline (i.e. Compressor Stations, Valve Stations, Stations or National Network Service Installations) have been fitted with Ball Valves as shut-off devices (block valves). Internal tightness of the valves' seat becomes major factor in securing proper service conditions during normal pipeline operation as well as for isolating of pipeline sections in emergency situations (loss of pipeline integrity or uncontrolled gas escape). Internal tightness of the valves is being inspected during scheduled maintenance of the pipeline units. Any leak revealed during inspection is being repaired, following instructions provided in the Manufacturer's Valve Manual. After a time, some cases have been identified, when repair of the revealed leak was found to be difficult, despite close following of the repair manuals. The paper presents analysis of the issue and corrective actions taken accordingly. (authors)

  17. Replacement of outboard main steam isolation valves in a boiling water reactor plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlereth, J.R.; Pennington, D.

    1996-12-01

    Most Boiling Water Reactor plants utilize wye pattern globe valves for main steam isolation valves for both inboard and outboard isolation. These valves have required a high degree of maintenance attention in order to pass the plant local leakage rate testing (LLRT) requirements at each outage. Northern States Power made a decision in 1993 to replace the outboard valves at it`s Monticello plant with double disc gate valves. The replacement of the outboard valves was completed during the fall outage in 1994. During the spring outage in April of 1996 the first LLRT testing was performed with excellent results. This presentation will address the decision process, time requirements and planning necessary to accomplish the task as well as the performance results and cost effectiveness of replacing these components.

  18. Research design and improvement of high temperature high pressure solenoid valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yongtang

    1987-12-01

    A process for development of the pilot type high temperature high pressure solenoid valve used in a PWR power plant is described. The whole development process might be divided into two phases: research design and improvement. In the former phase the questions had chiefly been approached in the following several aspects: the principle construction design, the determination of values for the constructionally key elements, the valve seal design and the solenoid actuator design, and made such valve's successful design in the main. In the latter phase an improvement had been made upon such valve against the problems during the testing use of the valve for a period of time, i.e. the unsatisfactory leak tightness, and achieved satisfactory results. The consummate success in this development not only has met the needs of the engineering project, but also made us obtain a valuable experience useful to design the similar valves

  19. Replacement of outboard main steam isolation valves in a boiling water reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlereth, J.R.; Pennington, D.

    1996-01-01

    Most Boiling Water Reactor plants utilize wye pattern globe valves for main steam isolation valves for both inboard and outboard isolation. These valves have required a high degree of maintenance attention in order to pass the plant local leakage rate testing (LLRT) requirements at each outage. Northern States Power made a decision in 1993 to replace the outboard valves at it's Monticello plant with double disc gate valves. The replacement of the outboard valves was completed during the fall outage in 1994. During the spring outage in April of 1996 the first LLRT testing was performed with excellent results. This presentation will address the decision process, time requirements and planning necessary to accomplish the task as well as the performance results and cost effectiveness of replacing these components

  20. 3D velocity field characterization of prosthetic heart valve with two different valve testers by means of stereo-PIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Avenio, Giuseppe; Grigioni, Mauro; Daniele, Carla; Morbiducci, Umberto; Hamilton, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valves can be associated to mechanical loading of blood, potentially linked to complications (hemolysis and thrombogenicity) which can be clinically relevant. In order to test such devices in pulsatile mode, pulse duplicators (PDs) have been designed and built according to different concepts. This study was carried out to compare anemometric measurements made on the same prosthetic device, with two widely used PDs. The valve (a 27-mm bileaflet valve) was mounted in the aortic section of the PD. The Sheffield University PD and the RWTH Aachen PD were selected as physical models of the circulation. These two PDs differ mainly in the vertical vs horizontal realization, and in the ventricular section, which in the RWTH PD allows for storage of potential energy in the elastic walls of the ventricle. A glassblown aorta, realized according to the geometric data of the same anatomical district in healthy individuals, was positioned downstream of the valve, obtaining 1:1 geometric similarity conditions. A NaI-glycerol-water solution of suitable kinematic viscosity and, at the same time, the proper refractive index, was selected. The flow field downstream of the valve was measured by means of the stereo-PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) technique, capable of providing the complete 3D velocity field as well as the entire Reynolds stress tensor. The measurements were carried out at the plane intersecting the valve axis. A three-jet profile was clearly found in the plane crossing the leaflets, with both PDs. The extent of the typical recirculation zone in the Valsalva sinus was much larger in the RWTH PD, on account of the different duration of the swirling motion in the ventricular chamber, caused by the elasticity of the ventricle and its geometry. The comparison of the hemodynamical behaviour of the same bileaflet valve tested in two PDs demonstrated the role of the mock loop in affecting the valve performance.

  1. Valve Repair Is Superior to Replacement in Most Patients With Coexisting Degenerative Mitral Valve and Coronary Artery Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadikasgari, Hoda; Gillinov, A Marc; Idrees, Jay J; Mihaljevic, Tomislav; Suri, Rakesh M; Raza, Sajjad; Houghtaling, Penny L; Svensson, Lars G; Navia, José L; Mick, Stephanie L; Desai, Milind Y; Sabik, Joseph F; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2017-06-01

    For mitral regurgitation (MR) from degenerative mitral disease in patients with coexisting coronary artery disease, the appropriate surgical strategy remains controversial. From 1985 to 2011, 1,071 adults (age 70 ± 9.3 years, 77% men) underwent combined coronary artery bypass grafting and either mitral valve repair (n = 872, 81%) or replacement (n=199, 19%) for degenerative MR. Propensity matching (177 patient pairs, 89% of possible matches) was used to compare early outcomes and time-related recurrence of MR after mitral valve repair, mitral valve reoperation, and mortality. Risk factors for death were identified with multivariable, multiphase hazard-function analysis. Patients undergoing valve replacement were older, with more valve calcification and a higher prevalence of preoperative atrial fibrillation and heart failure (all p < .0001). Among matched pairs, mitral replacement versus repair was associated with higher hospital mortality (5.0% vs 1.0%, p = .0001) and more postoperative renal failure (7.0% vs 3.2%, p = .01), reexplorations for bleeding (6.0% vs 3.1%, p = .05), and respiratory failure (14% vs 4.7%, p < .0001). Of matched patients undergoing repair, 18% had MR above 3+ by 5 years. Mitral valve durability was similar between matched groups, but survival at 15 years was 18% after replacement versus 52% after repair. Nomograms from the multivariable equation revealed that in 94% of cases, 10-year survival was calculated to be higher after repair than after replacement. In patients with coexisting degenerative mitral valve and coronary artery diseases, mitral valve repair is expected to confer a long-term survival advantage over replacement despite some recurrence of MR. When feasible, it is the procedure of choice for these patients. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Platelet thrombosis in cardiac-valve prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewanjee, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution of platelets and clotting factors in thrombosis on cardiovascular prostheses had been quantified with several tracers. Thrombus formation in vivo could be measured semiquantitatively in animal models and patients with indium-111, Technetium-99m labeled platelets, iodine-123, iodine-131 labeled fibrinogen, and In-111 and Tc-99m labeled antibody to the fibrinogen-receptor on the platelet- membrane, or fibrin. The early studies demonstrated that certain platelet-inhibitors, e.g. sulfinpyrazone, aspirin or aspirin- persantine increased platelet survival time with mechanical valves implanted in the baboon model and patients. Thrombus localization by imaging is possible for large thrombus on thrombogenic surface of prosthesis in the acute phase. The majority of thrombus was found in the sewing ring (Dacron) in the acute phase in both the mechanical and tissue valves. The amount of retained thrombus in both mechanical and tissue valves in our one-day study in the dog model was similar (< 1% if injected In-111 platelets = 5 billion platelets). As the fibrous ingrowth covered the sewing ring, the thrombus formation decreased significantly. Only a small amount of thrombus was found on the leaflets at one month in both the dog and calf models. 38 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Platelet thrombosis in cardiac-valve prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewanjee, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution of platelets and clotting factors in thrombosis on cardiovascular prostheses had been quantified with several tracers. Thrombus formation in vivo could be measured semiquantitatively in animal models and patients with indium-111, Technetium-99m labeled platelets, iodine-123, iodine-131 labeled fibrinogen, and In-111 and Tc-99m labeled antibody to the fibrinogen-receptor on the platelet- membrane, or fibrin. The early studies demonstrated that certain platelet-inhibitors, e.g. sulfinpyrazone, aspirin or aspirin- persantine increased platelet survival time with mechanical valves implanted in the baboon model and patients. Thrombus localization by imaging is possible for large thrombus on thrombogenic surface of prosthesis in the acute phase. The majority of thrombus was found in the sewing ring (Dacron) in the acute phase in both the mechanical and tissue valves. The amount of retained thrombus in both mechanical and tissue valves in our one-day study in the dog model was similar (< 1% if injected In-111 platelets = 5 billion platelets). As the fibrous ingrowth covered the sewing ring, the thrombus formation decreased significantly. Only a small amount of thrombus was found on the leaflets at one month in both the dog and calf models. 38 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Outcomes in nonagenarians after heart valve replacement operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Maria-Benedicta; Taylor, Kenneth M

    2003-03-01

    Changes in the age profile of the United Kingdom population and improvements in preoperative and postoperative care have resulted in increasing numbers of very elderly patients undergoing heart valve replacement (HVR) operations. Although HVR operations in nonagenarians are relatively uncommon, the demand for cardiac operations in this age group may increase over time. Outcomes after HVR operations in nonagenarians have not been well described yet. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine outcomes in terms of early mortality and long-term survival in 35 nonagenarians after HVR operation. Data from the United Kingdom Heart Valve Registry were analyzed and nonagenarian patients were identified. Additional analyzed data include gender, valve position, valve type, valve size, operative priority, follow-up time, and date and cause of death. Kaplan-Meier actuarial curves were calculated to determine accurate 30-day mortality and long-term survival. On average five HVR operations are performed annually in the United Kingdom in nonagenarians with equal numbers of males and females. Aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthetic valve was the most common operation and 86% were elective admissions. Fourteen patients died within the review period; mean time to death was 402 days. Overall 30-day mortality was 17%, which was higher for males compared with females; females also displayed better long-term survival. HVR operations in nonagenarians carry a significantly higher risk of early mortality and reduced long-term survival. Despite increases in the age profile of the population, elective HVR operation with patients aged 90 years or older is likely to remain an infrequent surgical procedure reserved for very carefully selected patients.

  5. AVARIS. An innovative procedure to repair seal seats surfaces in gate and check valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzing, Karl-Heinz; Breitenberger, Ulf; Grieser, Armin

    2011-01-01

    AVARIS (AREVA Valve Repair In-Situ) saves the plant operators time and money, as complete exchanges of valves and all related elaborate consequences become dispensable. AVARIS is of high interest in the worldwide maintenance market, as it can be applied in both nuclear and conventional power plants. Moreover, AVARIS retrofits valves in the secondary and primary circuit which even saves complex nuclear transports. AVARIS fulfils the quality requirements of third party authorities in national and international markets. Valves repaired with AVARIS correspond to their original condition concerning sealing function. (orig.)

  6. Efficiency of aortic valve commissurotomy for congenital aortic valve stenosis in pediatric population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. А. Лукьянов

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was designed to evaluate short-term and long-term outcomes after open aortic valve commissurotomy in the pediatric patients at our center over a period of 10 years. Methods. A retrospective study of 94 patients who underwent open surgical commissurotomy because of aortic valve stenosis between 2003 and 2013 is presented. Follow-up time was in the range of 1 to 7 years. Results. The open aortic valve commissurotomy combined with debridement of leaflet free edge 36.1 %, LVOT myectomy 11.7%, leaflet suture plastic 7.4%, modified Konno procedure 6.3%, Brom's aortoplasty 4.2% was performed for all patients. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 59.2 30.7 min. Median aortic cross-clamping time was 31.52 15.1 min. Hospital complications were observed in 38.2% of cases. ICU time was in the range of 1 to 31 (mean 3.2 5.1 day. Artificial lung ventilation time varied from 2 to 76 (mean 15.3 18.3 hours. Inotropic support was needed in 26.5% of cases. Mean hospital stay time was 17.1 7.3 days. At follow-up between 2 and 7 years, reoperations were required for 3 patients who underwent a Ross procedure. Conclusions. The results evidence that open surgical commissurotomy is an effective way of treatment for aortic valve stenosis, considering the accuracy of plasty and additional techniques of leaflet correction. The best children age group for this type of operation is from first to five years of life.

  7. Intraoperative application of geometric three-dimensional mitral valve assessment package: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Feroze; Karthik, Swaminathan; Subramaniam, Balachundhar; Panzica, Peter J; Mitchell, John; Lerner, Adam B; Jervis, Karinne; Maslow, Andrew D

    2008-04-01

    To study the feasibility of using 3-dimensional (3D) echocardiography in the operating room for mitral valve repair or replacement surgery. To perform geometric analysis of the mitral valve before and after repair. Prospective observational study. Academic, tertiary care hospital. Consecutive patients scheduled for mitral valve surgery. Intraoperative reconstruction of 3D images of the mitral valve. One hundred and two patients had 3D analysis of their mitral valve. Successful image reconstruction was performed in 93 patients-8 patients had arrhythmias or a dilated mitral valve annulus resulting in significant artifacts. Time from acquisition to reconstruction and analysis was less than 5 minutes. Surgeon identification of mitral valve anatomy was 100% accurate. The study confirms the feasibility of performing intraoperative 3D reconstruction of the mitral valve. This data can be used for confirmation and communication of 2-dimensional data to the surgeons by obtaining a surgical view of the mitral valve. The incorporation of color-flow Doppler into these 3D images helps in identification of the commissural or perivalvular location of regurgitant orifice. With improvements in the processing power of the current generation of echocardiography equipment, it is possible to quickly acquire, reconstruct, and manipulate images to help with timely diagnosis and surgical planning.

  8. Piezoelectric and Sensitivity Evaluation of Acoustic Emission Sensors for Nuclear Power Plant Valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-Guk; Lee, Sun-Ki; Park, Sung-Keun; Kim, Myung-Ki

    2008-01-01

    A lot of valves are used in the power plant. The operation safety test and the valve inside leak detection are implemented on the valve which has a great impact on the safe operation of the plant. While input and output pressure measurement using a pressure gauge, temperature change and the humidity measurement, and pressure-resistant test are used for the valve leak detection, there are many problems such as the difficulty of the real time measurement at the minute leak situation, complexity of the pressure gauge correction and the process of the pressure measurement, and the reliability of the measured value. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the valve leak detection system using the acoustic emission (AE) method which is fast and accurate, and allows the real time measurement and evaluation of the minute leak situation. The valve leak detection method using the AE method is a convenient way to detect the sound of the leak outside the valve in case of existing leak inside of the valve, and the research is in progress recently to apply the method to the power plant valve

  9. Small sodium valve design and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramson, R.; Elie, X.; Vercasson, M.; Nedelec, J.

    1974-01-01

    Conventionally, valves for sodium pipes smaller than 125 mm in diameter are called ''small sodium valves''. However, this limit should rather be considered as the lower limit o ''large sodium valves''. In fact, both the largest sizes of small valves and the smallest of large valves can be found in the range of 125-300 mm in diameter. Thus what is said about small valves also applies, for a few valve types, above the 125 mm limit. Sodium valves are described here in a general manner, with no manufacturing details except when necessary for understanding valve behavior. Operating experience is pointed out wherever possible. Finally, some information is given about ongoing or proposed development plans. (U.S.)

  10. Design of the Modular Pneumatic Valve Terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub E. TAKOSOGLU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents design of the modular pneumatic valve terminal, which was made on the basis of the patent application No A1 402905 „A valve for controlling fluid power drives, specially for pneumatic actuators, and the control system for fluid power drives valves”. The authors describe a method of operation of the system with double-acting valve and 5/2 (five ways and two position valve. Functions of the valve, and an example of application of the valve terminal in the production process were presented. 3D solid models of all the components of the valve were made. The paper presents a complete 3D model of the valve in various configurations. Using CAD-embedded SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation computational fluid dynamics CFD analysis was also carried out of compressed air flow in the ways of the valve elements

  11. Soft valves in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Keunhwan; Tixier, Aude; Christensen, Anneline; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Sif; Zwieniecki, Maciej; Jensen, Kaare

    2017-11-01

    Water and minerals flow from plant roots to leaves in the xylem, an interconnected network of vascular conduits that spans the full length of the organism. When a plant is subjected to drought stress, air pockets can spread inside the xylem, threatening the survival of the plant. Many plants prevent propagation of air by using hydrophobic nano-membranes in the ``pit'' pores that link adjacent xylem cells. This adds considerable resistance to flow. Interestingly, torus-margo pit pores in conifers are open and offer less resistance. To prevent propagation of air, conifers use a soft gating mechanism, which relies on hydrodynamic interactions between the xylem liquid and the elastic pit. However, it is unknown exactly how it is able to combine the seemingly antagonist functions of high permeability and resistance to propagation of air. We conduct experiments on biomimetic pores to elucidate the flow regulation mechanism. The design of plant valves is compared to other natural systems and optimal strategies are discussed. This work was supported by a research Grant (13166) from VILLUM FONDEN.

  12. Annular flow diverter valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rider, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    A valve is described for diverting flow from the center of two concentric tubes to the annulus between the tubes or, operating in the reverse direction, for mixing fluids from concentric tubes into a common tube and for controlling the volume ratio of said flow. It consists of a toroidal baffle disposed in sliding engagement with the interior of the inner tube downstream of a plurality of ports in the inner tube, a plurality of gates in sliding engagement with the interior of the inner tube attached to the baffle for movement therewith, a servomotor having a bullet-shaped plug on the downstream end thereof, and drive rods connecting the servomotor to the toroidal baffle. The sevomotor is adapted to move the baffle into mating engagement with the bullet-shaped plug and simultaneously move the gates away from the ports in the inner tube and to move the baffle away from the bullet-shaped plug and simultaneously move the gates to cover the ports in the inner tube

  13. Aortic Annular Enlargement during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selman Dumani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the surgery of aortic valve replacement is always attempted, as much as possible, to implant the larger prosthesis with the mains goals to enhance the potential benefits, to minimise transvalvular gradient, decrease left ventricular size and avoid the phenomenon of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Implantation of an ideal prosthesis often it is not possible, due to a small aortic annulus. A variety of aortic annulus enlargement techniques is reported to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch. We present the case that has submitted four three times open heart surgery. We used Manouguian technique to enlarge aortic anulus with excellent results during the fourth time of surgery.

  14. Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kesteren, F; Wiegerinck, E M A; Rizzo, S

    2017-01-01

    Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new field of interest in cardiovascular pathology. To identify the cause of death, it is important to be familiar with specific findings related to the time interval between the procedure and death. We aimed to provide an overview...... different cause of death as was clinically determined. Autopsy on patients who underwent TAVI reveals specific patterns of cardiovascular pathology that clearly relate to the time interval between TAVI and death and significantly adds to the clinical diagnosis. Our data support the role of autopsy including...

  15. Bioprosthetic Valve Fracture During Valve-in-valve TAVR: Bench to Bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxon, John T; Allen, Keith B; Cohen, David J; Chhatriwalla, Adnan K

    2018-01-01

    Valve-in-valve (VIV) transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been established as a safe and effective means of treating failed surgical bioprosthetic valves (BPVs) in patients at high risk for complications related to reoperation. Patients who undergo VIV TAVR are at risk of patient-prosthesis mismatch, as the transcatheter heart valve (THV) is implanted within the ring of the existing BPV, limiting full expansion and reducing the maximum achievable effective orifice area of the THV. Importantly, patient-prosthesis mismatch and high residual transvalvular gradients are associated with reduced survival following VIV TAVR. Bioprosthetic valve fracture (BVF) is as a novel technique to address this problem. During BPV, a non-compliant valvuloplasty balloon is positioned within the BPV frame, and a highpressure balloon inflation is performed to fracture the surgical sewing ring of the BPV. This allows for further expansion of the BPV as well as the implanted THV, thus increasing the maximum effective orifice area that can be achieved after VIV TAVR. This review focuses on the current evidence base for BVF to facilitate VIV TAVR, including initial bench testing, procedural technique, clinical experience and future directions.

  16. LOFT pressurizer safety: relief valve reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, E.S.

    1978-01-01

    The LOFT pressurizer self-actuating safety-relief valves are constructed to the present state-of-the-art and should have reliability equivalent to the valves in use on PWR plants in the U.S. There have been no NRC incident reports on valve failures to lift that would challenge the Technical Specification Safety Limit. Fourteen valves have been reported as lifting a few percentage points outside the +-1% Tech. Spec. surveillance tolerance (9 valves tested over and 5 valves tested under specification). There have been no incident reports on failures to reseat. The LOFT surveillance program for assuring reliability is equivalent to nuclear industry practice

  17. Valve system incorporating single failure protection logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Rodger; Timmerman, Walter J. H.

    1980-01-01

    A valve system incorporating single failure protective logic. The system consists of a valve combination or composite valve which allows actuation or de-actuation of a device such as a hydraulic cylinder or other mechanism, integral with or separate from the valve assembly, by means of three independent input signals combined in a function commonly known as two-out-of-three logic. Using the input signals as independent and redundant actuation/de-actuation signals, a single signal failure, or failure of the corresponding valve or valve set, will neither prevent the desired action, nor cause the undesired action of the mechanism.

  18. LOFT pressurizer safety: relief valve reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, E.S.

    1978-01-18

    The LOFT pressurizer self-actuating safety-relief valves are constructed to the present state-of-the-art and should have reliability equivalent to the valves in use on PWR plants in the U.S. There have been no NRC incident reports on valve failures to lift that would challenge the Technical Specification Safety Limit. Fourteen valves have been reported as lifting a few percentage points outside the +-1% Tech. Spec. surveillance tolerance (9 valves tested over and 5 valves tested under specification). There have been no incident reports on failures to reseat. The LOFT surveillance program for assuring reliability is equivalent to nuclear industry practice.

  19. 盘阀在Shell煤气化中的应用%Application of Disk Valve at Shell Coal Gasification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付荣申; 安铁夫

    2012-01-01

    Shell煤气化(SCGP)技术中采用进口球阀作为锁煤、锁渣、锁灰阀(锁斗阀)及平衡阀,存在易卡死、易磨损、寿命短等缺点,不能长周期运行,直接影响了整个煤气化装置的可靠性及经济效益。锁斗阀和平衡阀的另一种选择——盘阀,在以往煤气化项目中作为进口球阀的备阀被局部应用,取得了令人满意的效果。详细阐述了盘阀的工作原理、结构及特点,介绍了盘阀在甲醇项目中的具体应用情况。%Due to the disadvantage of easily blocked off, easy abrasion, short life and etc. of the adopted ball valve as lock coal valve, lock cinder valve and lock ash valve (lock hopper valve) and balance valve in SCGP, the valve can't work for a long time, and directly impact the reliability and economic benefit of whole coal gasification set. Disk valve is another choice instead of lock hopper valve and balance valve. Disk valves were used as the spare valve of ball valve in coal gasification projects in the past with positive result. The working principle, structure and characteristic of disk valve are expatiated in detail, and the application of disk valve at Methanol project is further disclosed.

  20. Robotic Mitral Valve Repair: The Learning Curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Avi; Koprivanac, Marijan; Kelava, Marta; Mick, Stephanie L; Gillinov, A Marc; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Brzezinski, Anna; Blackstone, Eugene H; Mihaljevic, Tomislav

    Adoption of robotic mitral valve surgery has been slow, likely in part because of its perceived technical complexity and a poorly understood learning curve. We sought to correlate changes in technical performance and outcome with surgeon experience in the "learning curve" part of our series. From 2006 to 2011, two surgeons undertook robotically assisted mitral valve repair in 458 patients (intent-to-treat); 404 procedures were completed entirely robotically (as-treated). Learning curves were constructed by modeling surgical sequence number semiparametrically with flexible penalized spline smoothing best-fit curves. Operative efficiency, reflecting technical performance, improved for (1) operating room time for case 1 to cases 200 (early experience) and 400 (later experience), from 414 to 364 to 321 minutes (12% and 22% decrease, respectively), (2) cardiopulmonary bypass time, from 148 to 102 to 91 minutes (31% and 39% decrease), and (3) myocardial ischemic time, from 119 to 75 to 68 minutes (37% and 43% decrease). Composite postoperative complications, reflecting safety, decreased from 17% to 6% to 2% (63% and 85% decrease). Intensive care unit stay decreased from 32 to 28 to 24 hours (13% and 25% decrease). Postoperative stay fell from 5.2 to 4.5 to 3.8 days (13% and 27% decrease). There were no in-hospital deaths. Predischarge mitral regurgitation of less than 2+, reflecting effectiveness, was achieved in 395 (97.8%), without correlation to experience; return-to-work times did not change substantially with experience. Technical efficiency of robotic mitral valve repair improves with experience and permits its safe and effective conduct.

  1. Risk-adjusted survival after tissue versus mechanical aortic valve replacement: a 23-year assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaca, Jeffrey G; Clare, Robert M; Rankin, J Scott; Daneshmand, Mani A; Milano, Carmelo A; Hughes, G Chad; Wolfe, Walter G; Glower, Donald D; Smith, Peter K

    2013-11-01

    Detailed analyses of risk-adjusted outcomes after mitral valve surgery have documented significant survival decrements with tissue valves at any age. Several recent studies of prosthetic aortic valve replacement (AVR) also have suggested a poorer performance of tissue valves, although analyses have been limited to small matched series. The study aim was to test the hypothesis that AVR with tissue valves is associated with a lower risk-adjusted survival, as compared to mechanical valves. Between 1986 and 2009, primary isolated AVR, with or without coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), was performed with currently available valve types in 2148 patients (1108 tissue valves, 1040 mechanical). Patients were selected for tissue valves to be used primarily in the elderly. Baseline and operative characteristics were documented prospectively with a consistent variable set over the entire 23-year period. Follow up was obtained with mailed questionnaires, supplemented by National Death Index searches. The average time to death or follow up was seven years, and follow up for survival was 96.2% complete. Risk-adjusted survival characteristics for the two groups were evaluated using a Cox proportional hazards model with stepwise selection of candidate variables. Differences in baseline characteristics between groups were (tissue versus mechanical): median age 73 versus 61 years; non-elective surgery 32% versus 28%; CABG 45% versus 35%; median ejection fraction 55% versus 55%; renal failure 6% versus 1%; diabetes 18% versus 7% (pvalves; however, after risk adjustment for the adverse profiles of tissue valve patients, no significant difference was observed in survival after tissue or mechanical AVR. Thus, the hypothesis did not hold, and risk-adjusted survival was equivalent, of course qualified by the fact that selection bias was evident. With selection criteria that employed tissue AVR more frequently in elderly patients, tissue and mechanical valves achieved similar survival

  2. Survey of valve operator-related events occurring during 1978, 1979 and 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, E.J.; Ashe, F.S.

    1983-01-01

    The survey approach was to analyze several events and identify trends or patterns. The primary data source was licensee event reports (LERs) and consisted of 444 total valve operator events with 193 motor operator events which served as the basis for this study. The investigation revealed that motor-operated events could be grouped in three major categories which are torque switches, limit switches, and motors. The major findings are: (1) Torque switches do not appear to be a dominant cause of valve assembly inoperability. The reported information suggests torque switch events are an indication of symptomatic change with time in valve operability characteristics rather than a root cause of valve inoperability. (2) Repetitive problems are occurring with valve operators. It may occur on the same valve, a valve in similar service in a similar system, or a valve in similar service in a redundant train of the same system. (3) The plant operating staff objective appears to be a mode of finding measures to return inoperable equipment to operational status rather than to determine root causes of inoperability. (4) Motor burnout of valve motor operators has occurred quite frequently in High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) and Reactor Core Isolation Cooling (RCIC) systems of BWR units. (orig./GL)

  3. A Study of System Pressure Transients Generated by Isolation Valve Open/Closure in Orifice Manifold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M. [KEPCO, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, S. W.; Kim, J. I.; Park, S. J. [KHNP, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, we explore the effects of pressure transients on peak and minimal pressures caused by the actuation of isolation valve and control valve reacting to the combined orifice operation of orifice manifold with motor-operated valve installed in the rear of the orifice. We then use the collected data to direct our effort towards cause analysis and propose improvements to efficiency and safety of operation. This formation is used to by domestic and foreign nuclear power plants as a mean to control flow rate, producing required flow rate jointly together by combination of the orifices. No significant impacts on the internals of manifold orifice due to peak pressure has been observed, although chance of cavitation at the outlet of control valve is significant. Considering the peak pressure, as well as minimum pressure occurs in low flow rate conditions, the pressure transient is more so affected by the characteristics (modified equal percentage) of control valve. Isolation valve of the orifice and control valve operate organically, therefore stroke time for valves need to be applied in order for both valves to cooperatively formulate an optimized operation.

  4. Door valve for fuel handling path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makishima, Katsuhiko.

    1969-01-01

    A door valve is provided which seals cover gas from a liquid metal cooled reactor without leakage therefrom. A threaded shaft is screwed into a heavy box press which is packed with lead. The shaft is adapted to be rotated by an electric motor or a manually operated wheel which is disposed outside of the door valve. A valve plate is suspended from the box press by four guide wheels mounted thereon. The guide wheels are fitted into inclined guide grooves formed at the valve plate and into grooved formed in the inner wall of a valve casing. A locking ball is provided at each side of the valve plate. In operation the shaft rotates and travels to permit the box press and the valve plate to move into the door valve casing, thus releasing the locking balls. The valve plate does not contact the bottom of the casing. When the box press reaches the home position, the valve plate is carried on the valve opening, and the box press presses the valve plate to increase the tightness. The valve plate does not suffer wear as it does not slide over other parts. (Yamaguchi, T.)

  5. Sequential transcatheter aortic valve implantation due to valve dislodgement - a Portico valve implanted over a CoreValve bioprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campante Teles, Rui; Costa, Cátia; Almeida, Manuel; Brito, João; Sondergaard, Lars; Neves, José P; Abecasis, João; M Gabriel, Henrique

    2017-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an important treatment in high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), whose complications need to be managed promptly. The authors report the case of an 86-year-old woman presenting with severe symptomatic AS, rejected for surgery due to advanced age and comorbidities. The patient underwent a first TAVI, with implantation of a Medtronic CoreValve ® , which became dislodged and migrated to the ascending aorta. Due to the previous balloon valvuloplasty, the patient's AS became moderate, and her symptoms improved. After several months, she required another intervention, performed with a St. Jude Portico ® repositionable self-expanding transcatheter aortic valve. There was a good clinical response that was maintained at one-year follow-up. The use of a self-expanding transcatheter bioprosthesis with repositioning features is a solution in cases of valve dislocation to avoid suboptimal positioning of a second implant, especially when the two valves have to be positioned overlapping or partially overlapping each other. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Cavitation noise from butterfly valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmeyer, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    Cavitation in valves can produce levels of intense noise. It is possible to mathematically express a limit for a design level of cavitation noise in terms of the cavitation parameter sigma. Using the cavitation parameter or limit, it is then possible to calculate the flow conditions at which a design level of cavitation noise will occur. However, the intensity of cavitation increases with the upstream pressure and valve size at a constant sigma. Therefore, it is necessary to derive equations to correct or scale the cavitation limit for the effects of different upstream pressures and valve sizes. The following paper discusses and presents experimental data for the caviation noise limit as well as the cavitation limits of incipient, critical, incipient damage, and choking cavitation for butterfly valves. The main emphasis is on the design limit of caviation noise, and a noise level of 85 decibels was selected as the noise limit. Tables of data and scaling exponents are included for applying the design limits for the effects of upstream pressure and valve size. (orig.)

  7. Plunger with simple retention valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fekete, A.V.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a positive displacement retention valve apparatus in which the actual flow equals the theoretical maximum flow through the retention valve. The apparatus includes, in combination, a confined fluid flow conduit, a piston adapted for reciprocal movement within the fluid flow conduit between upstream and downstream limit positions, piston reciprocating means, and pressure responsive check valve means located upstream with respect to the piston in the fluid flow conduit. The pressure responsive check valve means operable to permit fluid flow therethrough in a downstream direction toward the piston, and to preclude fluid flow therethrough in an opposite direction. The piston is composed of parts which are relatively movable with respect to one another. The piston includes a simple retention valve consisting of a plug means, a cylinder having a minimum and a maximum internal cross section flow area therein and being reciprocal within the confined fluid flow conduit, and a seat on the cylinder for the plug means. The piston reciprocating means are operatively connected to the plug means

  8. Structural valve deterioration in the Mitroflow biological heart valve prosthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issa, Issa Farah; Poulsen, Steen Hvitfeldt; Waziri, Farhad

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Concern has been raised regarding the long-term durability of the Mitroflow biological heart valve prosthesis. Our aim was to assess the incidence of structural valve degeneration (SVD) for the Mitroflow bioprosthesis in a nationwide study in Denmark including all patients alive......: A total of 173 patients were diagnosed with SVD by echocardiography. Of these, 64 (11%) patients had severe SVD and 109 (19%) patients moderate SVD. Severe SVD was associated with the age of the prosthesis and small prosthesis size [Size 21: hazard ratio (95% confidence interval, CI) 2.72 (0.97-8.56), P...

  9. Development of a control system for compression and expansion cycles of critical valve for high vacuum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Jyoti, E-mail: jagarwal@ipr.res.in; Sharma, H.; Patel, Haresh; Gangradey, R.; Lambade, Vrushabh

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Control system with feedback loop of pressure gauge is developed for measuring the life cycle of vacuum isolation valve. • GUI based software developed for easy use and handling of control system. • Control system tested with an experiment showcasing the capability of the control system. • Control system can operate valve based on pressure inside the chamber, which helps to know the degradation of sealing capabilities of valve. • Control system can monitor the total closing and opening time of valve, cycles and pressure inside the vessel. - Abstract: A control system with feedback loop is designed, developed and tested to monitor the life cycles of the axial valve and bellows used in vacuum valves. The control system monitors number of compression cycles of any bellow or closing and opening cycle of a valve. It also interfaces vacuum gauges or pressure gauges to get pressure values inside the system. To find life cycle of valve, the developed control and monitoring system is integrated with an axial valve experimental test set up. In this system, feedback from the vacuum gauge attached to valve enclosure, is given and the life cycle test is automated. This paper describes the control and monitoring system in details and briefs the experiment carried out for valve life cycle. The same system can be used for life cycle estimate for bellows. A suitable GUI is also developed to control the function of the components and resister the number of cycles.

  10. Surgical outcomes in native valve infectious endocarditis: the experience of the Cardiovascular Surgery Department - Cluj-Napoca Heart Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Adrian; Muresan, Ioan; Trifan, Catalin; Pop, Dana; Sacui, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of Duke's criteria and the improvement of imaging methods has lead to an earlier and a more accurate diagnosis of infectious endocarditis (IE). The options for the best therapeutic approach and the timing of surgery are still a matter of debate and require a close colaboration between the cardiologist, the infectionist and the cardiac surgeon. We undertook a retrospective, descriptive study, spanning over a period of five years (from January 1st, 2007 to December 31st, 2012), on 100 patients who underwent surgery for native valve infectious endocarditis in our unit. The patients' age varied between 13 and 77 years (with a mean of 54 years), of which 85 were males (85%). The main microorganisms responsible for IE were: Streptococcus Spp. (21 cases - 21%), Staphylococcus Spp. (15 cases - 15%), and Enterococcus Spp. (9 cases - 9%). The potential source of infection was identified in 26 patients (26%), with most cases being in the dental area (16 cases - 16%). The lesions caused by IE were situated in the left heart in 96 patients (96%), mostly on the aortic valve (50 cases - 50%). In most cases (82%) we found preexisting endocardial lesions which predisposed to the development of IE, most of them being degenerative valvular lesions (38 cases - 38%). We performed the following surgical procedures: surgery on a single valve - aortic valve replacement (40 cases), mitral valve replacement (19 cases), mitral valve repair (1 case), surgery on more than one valve - mitral and aortic valve replacement (20 cases), aortic and tricuspid valve replacement (1 case), aortic valve replacement with a mechanical valve associated with mitral valve repair (5 cases), aortic valve replacement with a biological valve associated with mitral valve repair (2 cases), and mitral valve replacement with a mechanical valve combined with De Vega procedure on the tricuspid valve (1 case). In 5 patients (5%) the bacteriological examination of valve pieces excised during surgery was

  11. Surgical outcomes in native valve infectious endocarditis: the experience of the Cardiovascular Surgery Department – Cluj-Napoca Heart Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOLNAR, ADRIAN; MURESAN, IOAN; TRIFAN, CATALIN; POP, DANA; SACUI, DIANA

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims The introduction of Duke’s criteria and the improvement of imaging methods has lead to an earlier and a more accurate diagnosis of infectious endocarditis (IE). The options for the best therapeutic approach and the timing of surgery are still a matter of debate and require a close colaboration between the cardiologist, the infectionist and the cardiac surgeon. Methods We undertook a retrospective, descriptive study, spanning over a period of five years (from January 1st, 2007 to December 31st, 2012), on 100 patients who underwent surgery for native valve infectious endocarditis in our unit. Results The patients’ age varied between 13 and 77 years (with a mean of 54 years), of which 85 were males (85%). The main microorganisms responsible for IE were: Streptococcus Spp. (21 cases – 21%), Staphylococcus Spp. (15 cases – 15%), and Enterococcus Spp. (9 cases – 9%). The potential source of infection was identified in 26 patients (26%), with most cases being in the dental area (16 cases – 16%). The lesions caused by IE were situated in the left heart in 96 patients (96%), mostly on the aortic valve (50 cases – 50%). In most cases (82%) we found preexisting endocardial lesions which predisposed to the development of IE, most of them being degenerative valvular lesions (38 cases – 38%). We performed the following surgical procedures: surgery on a single valve - aortic valve replacement (40 cases), mitral valve replacement (19 cases), mitral valve repair (1 case), surgery on more than one valve – mitral and aortic valve replacement (20 cases), aortic and tricuspid valve replacement (1 case), aortic valve replacement with a mechanical valve associated with mitral valve repair (5 cases), aortic valve replacement with a biological valve associated with mitral valve repair (2 cases), and mitral valve replacement with a mechanical valve combined with De Vega procedure on the tricuspid valve (1 case). In 5 patients (5%) the bacteriological

  12. Bicuspid Aortic Valve Disease: A Comprehensive Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mordi, Ify; Tzemos, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the commonest congenital cardiac abnormality in the general population. This paper article will discuss our current knowledge of the anatomy, pathophysiology, genetics, and clinical aspects of bicuspid aortic valve disease.

  13. Echocardiographic evaluation of heart valve prosthetic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy Ivaniv

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients with replaced heart valve submitted to echocardiographic examination may have symptoms related either to valvular malfunction or ventricular dysfunction from different causes. Clinical examination is not reliable in a prosthetic valve evaluation and the main information regarding its function could be obtained using different cardiac ultrasound modalities. This review provides a description of echocardiographic and Doppler techniques useful in evaluation of prosthetic heart valves. For the interpretation of echocardiography there is a need in special knowledge of prosthesis types and possible reasons of prosthetic function deterioration. Echocardiography allows to reveal valve thrombosis, pannus formation, vegetation and such complications of infective endocarditis as valve ring abscess or dehiscence. Transthoracic echocardiography requires different section plane angles and unconventional views. Transesophageal echocardiography is more often used than in native valve examination due to better visualization of prosthetic valve structure and function. Three-dimensional echocardiography could provide more detailed visual information especially in the assessment of paravalvular regurgitation or valve obstruction.

  14. Bistable fluidic valve is electrically switched

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiet, O.; Salvinski, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    Bistable control valve is selectively switched by direct application of an electrical field to divert fluid from one output channel to another. Valve is inexpensive, has no moving parts, and operates on fluids which are relatively poor electrical conductors.

  15. Comparative study between CardiaMed valves (freely floating valve leaflets versus St. Jude Medical (fixed valve leaflets in mitral valve replacement surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Ahmed

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: CardiaMed freely floating leaflet prostheses showed good hemodynamic characteristics. The prosthesis adequately corrects hemodynamics and is safe and no worse than the St. Jude Medical valve in the mitral valve position.

  16. Active combustion flow modulation valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, John Peter; Black, Nathaniel; Thorton, Jimmy Dean; Vipperman, Jeffrey Stuart; Lambeth, David N; Clark, William W

    2013-09-24

    A flow modulation valve has a slidably translating hollow armature with at least one energizable coil wound around and fixably attached to the hollow armature. The energizable coil or coils are influenced by at least one permanent magnet surrounding the hollow armature and supported by an outer casing. Lorentz forces on the energizable coils which are translated to the hollow armature, increase or decrease the flow area to provide flow throttling action. The extent of hollow armature translation depends on the value of current supplied and the direction of translation depends on the direction of current flow. The compact nature of the flow modulation valve combined with the high forces afforded by the actuator design provide a flow modulation valve which is highly responsive to high-rate input control signals.

  17. Statins for aortic valve stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Thiago

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of valvular heart disease in the USA and Europe. Aortic valve stenosis is considered similar to atherosclerotic disease. Some studies have evaluated statins for aortic valve stenosis. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of statins in aortic valve stenosis. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS - IBECS, Web of Science and CINAHL Plus. These databases were searched from their inception to 24 November 2015. We also searched trials in registers for ongoing trials. We used no language restrictions. Selection criteria: Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs comparing statins alone or in association with other systemic drugs to reduce cholesterol levels versus placebo or usual care. Data collection and analysis: Primary outcomes were severity of aortic valve stenosis (evaluated by echocardiographic criteria: mean pressure gradient, valve area and aortic jet velocity, freedom from valve replacement and death from cardiovascular cause. Secondary outcomes were hospitalization for any reason, overall mortality, adverse events and patient quality of life. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The GRADE methodology was employed to assess the quality of result findings and the GRADE profiler (GRADEPRO was used to import data from Review Manager 5.3 to create a 'Summary of findings' table. MAIN RESULTS: We included four RCTs with 2360 participants comparing statins (1185 participants with placebo (1175 participants. We found low-quality evidence for our primary outcome of severity of aortic valve stenosis, evaluated by mean pressure gradient (mean difference (MD -0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI -1.88 to 0.80; participants = 1935; studies = 2, valve area (MD -0.07, 95% CI -0.28 to 0.14; participants = 127; studies = 2

  18. Statins for aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiago, Luciana; Tsuji, Selma Rumiko; Nyong, Jonathan; Puga, Maria Eduarda Dos Santos; Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira de; Macedo, Cristiane Rufino; Valente, Orsine; Atallah, Álvaro Nagib

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of valvular heart disease in the USA and Europe. Aortic valve stenosis is considered similar to atherosclerotic disease. Some studies have evaluated statins for aortic valve stenosis. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of statins in aortic valve stenosis. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS - IBECS, Web of Science and CINAHL Plus. These databases were searched from their inception to 24 November 2015. We also searched trials in registers for ongoing trials. We used no language restrictions.Selection criteria: Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) comparing statins alone or in association with other systemic drugs to reduce cholesterol levels versus placebo or usual care. Data collection and analysis: Primary outcomes were severity of aortic valve stenosis (evaluated by echocardiographic criteria: mean pressure gradient, valve area and aortic jet velocity), freedom from valve replacement and death from cardiovascular cause. Secondary outcomes were hospitalization for any reason, overall mortality, adverse events and patient quality of life.Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The GRADE methodology was employed to assess the quality of result findings and the GRADE profiler (GRADEPRO) was used to import data from Review Manager 5.3 to create a 'Summary of findings' table. We included four RCTs with 2360 participants comparing statins (1185 participants) with placebo (1175 participants). We found low-quality evidence for our primary outcome of severity of aortic valve stenosis, evaluated by mean pressure gradient (mean difference (MD) -0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.88 to 0.80; participants = 1935; studies = 2), valve area (MD -0.07, 95% CI -0.28 to 0.14; participants = 127; studies = 2), and aortic jet velocity (MD -0.06, 95% CI -0.26 to 0

  19. Novel Active Combustion Control Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspermeyer, Matt

    2014-01-01

    This project presents an innovative solution for active combustion control. Relative to the state of the art, this concept provides frequency modulation (greater than 1,000 Hz) in combination with high-amplitude modulation (in excess of 30 percent flow) and can be adapted to a large range of fuel injector sizes. Existing valves often have low flow modulation strength. To achieve higher flow modulation requires excessively large valves or too much electrical power to be practical. This active combustion control valve (ACCV) has high-frequency and -amplitude modulation, consumes low electrical power, is closely coupled with the fuel injector for modulation strength, and is practical in size and weight. By mitigating combustion instabilities at higher frequencies than have been previously achieved (approximately 1,000 Hz), this new technology enables gas turbines to run at operating points that produce lower emissions and higher performance.

  20. Pannus Formation Leads to Valve Malfunction in the Tricuspid Position 19 Years after Triple Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alskaf, Ebraham; McConkey, Hannah; Laskar, Nabila; Kardos, Attila

    2016-06-20

    The Medtronic ATS Open Pivot mechanical valve has been successfully used in heart valve surgery for more than two decades. We present the case of a patient who, 19 years following a tricuspid valve replacement with an ATS prosthesis as part of a triple valve operation following infective endocarditis, developed severe tricuspid regurgitation due to pannus formation.

  1. The nordic aortic valve intervention (NOTION) trial comparing transcatheter versus surgical valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Søndergaard, Lars; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative aortic valve (AV) stenosis is the most prevalent heart valve disease in the western world. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) has until recently been the standard of treatment for patients with severe AV stenosis. Whether transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can...

  2. Early clinical outcome of aortic transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihlberg, Leo; Nissen, Henrik Hoffmann; Nielsen, Niels Erik

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation has emerged as an option, in addition to reoperative surgical aortic valve replacement, to treat failed biologic heart valve substitutes. However, the clinical experience with this approach is still limited. We report the comprehensive experience...

  3. Intro to Valve Guide Reconditioning. Automotive Mechanics. Valves. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, W.

    This instructional package, one in a series of individualized instructional units on tools and techniques for repairing worn valve guides in motor vehicles, provides practical experience for students in working on cylinder heads. Covered in the module are reaming valve guides that are oversized to match a new oversized valve, reaming valve guides…

  4. Infective Endocarditis of the Aortic Valve with Anterior Mitral Valve Leaflet Aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomsic, Anton; Li, Wilson W. L.; van Paridon, Marieke; Bindraban, Navin R.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mitral valve leaflet aneurysm is a rare and potentially devastating complication of aortic valve endocarditis. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had endocarditis of the native aortic valve and a concomitant aneurysm of the anterior mitral valve leaflet. Severe mitral regurgitation occurred

  5. [Late complications following Björk-Shiley and St. Jude Medical heart valve replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstkotte, D; Körfer, R; Budde, T; Haerten, K; Schulte, H D; Bircks, W; Loogen, F

    1983-05-01

    Valve-related complications after Björk-Shiley mitral (n = 475), aortic (n = 424), or mitral-aortic implantation (n = 119) were compared to complications after St. Jude mitral (n = 173), aortic (n = 152), and St. Jude mitral and aortic (n = 63) replacements. The 1,018 consecutive patients with Björk-Shiley valves had been operated upon between 1974 and 1982, those with St. Jude valves between 1978 and 1982. All patients were placed on anticoagulant therapy with phenprocoumon early after operation and no significant intergroup differences in the effectiveness of the anticoagulant therapy were found. At a comparable follow-up time of approximately 23 months, 24 major thromboembolic episodes were observed after Björk-Shiley mitral (BSM) and 3 after St. Jude mitral valve implantation (SJM), corresponding to a thromboembolic rate of 2.82/100 patient years with BSM and 0.93/100 patient years with SJM. After aortic valve replacements, 1.93 events in 100 patient years occurred after Björk-Shiley aortic (BSA) and 0.73 after St. Jude aortic implantation (SJA). In patients with double valve replacements, these rates were 3.2 (BSM + BSA) and 0.88 (SJM + SJA), respectively. The cerebral vessels were involved in 52% and the arteries of the extremities in 22% of these major events. Six Björk-Shiley prostheses had to be replaced because of valve thrombosis. The overall incidence of severe hemorrhagic complications was 2.94/100 patient years in BSM and 1.79 in SJM. After aortic valve replacement, we found rates of 1.80/100 patient years (BSA) and 2.57/100 patient years (SJA), respectively. Intravascular hemolysis no longer seems to be a significant clinical problem. However, indications of red cell damage after heart valve replacement were significantly greater in patients with perivalvular leakage, valve thrombosis, or dysfunction than in those with normally functioning prostheses. Reoperations were necessary because of valve thrombosis (0.46%), perivalvular leakage (2

  6. Simulation for transthoracic echocardiography of aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Navin C.; Kapur, K. K.; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Simulation allows interactive transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) learning using a virtual three-dimensional model of the heart and may aid in the acquisition of the cognitive and technical skills needed to perform TTE. The ability to link probe manipulation, cardiac anatomy, and echocardiographic images using a simulator has been shown to be an effective model for training anesthesiology residents in transesophageal echocardiography. A proposed alternative to real-time reality patient-based learning is simulation-based training that allows anesthesiologists to learn complex concepts and procedures, especially for specific structures such as aortic valve. PMID:27397455

  7. Small sodium valve design and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGough, C.B.

    1974-01-01

    The United States Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor program (LMFBR) includes an extensive program devoted to the development of small sodium valves. This program is now focused on the development and production of valves for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) now under construction near Richland, Washington. Other AEC support facilities, such as various test loops located at the Liquid Metal Engineering Center (LMEC), Los Angeles, California, and at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL), Richland, Washington, also have significant requirements for small sodium valves, and valves similar in design to the FFTF valves are being supplied to these AEC laboratories for use in their critical test installations. A principal motivation for these valve programs, beyond the immediate need to provide high-reliability valves for FFTF and the support facilities, is the necessity to develop small valve technology for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP). FFTF small sodium valve design and development experience will be directly applied to the CRBRP program. Various test programs have been, and are being, conducted to verify the performance and integrity of the FFTF valves, and to uncover any potential problems so that they can be corrected before the valves are placed in service in FFTF. The principal small sodium valve designs being utilized in current U.S. programs, the test and operational experience obtained to date on them, problems uncovered, and future development and testing efforts being planned are reviewed. The standards and requirements to which the valves are being designed and fabricated, the valve designs in current use, valve operators, test and operating experience, and future valve development plans are summarized. (U.S.)

  8. Promising results after percutaneous mitral valve repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihlemann, Nikolaj; Franzen, Olaf; Jørgensen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Mitral valve regurgitation (MR) is the secondmost frequent valve disease in Europe. Untreated MR causes considerable morbidity and mortality. In the elderly, as many as half of these patients are denied surgery because of an estimated high surgical risk. Percutaneous mitral valve repair with the ...... with the MitraClip system resembles the Alfieristitch where a clip is used to connect the tip of the mitral valve leaflets....

  9. Infective endocarditis following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheung, Gary; Vejlstrup, Niels; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2013-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement (PPVR) with the Melody valve is rarely reported. Furthermore, there are challenges in this diagnosis; especially echocardiographic evidence of vegetation within the prosthesis may be difficult.......Infective endocarditis (IE) following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement (PPVR) with the Melody valve is rarely reported. Furthermore, there are challenges in this diagnosis; especially echocardiographic evidence of vegetation within the prosthesis may be difficult....

  10. Fast-acting valve actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nakwon

    1980-01-01

    A fast-acting valve actuator utilizes a spring driven pneumatically loaded piston to drive a valve gate. Rapid exhaust of pressurized gas from the pneumatically loaded side of the piston facilitates an extremely rapid piston stroke. A flexible selector diaphragm opens and closes an exhaust port in response to pressure differentials created by energizing and de-energizing a solenoid which controls the pneumatic input to the actuator as well as selectively providing a venting action to one side of the selector diaphragm.

  11. Effects of the blockage ratio of a valve disk on loss coefficient in a butterfly valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Hyung Joon; Lee, Jee Keun; Choi, Hee Joo

    2008-01-01

    The loss coefficient of the butterfly valve which allows partial opening of the valve at closed position and is applicable to the small-sized pipe system with the diameter of 1 inch was measured for the variation of the valve disk blockage ratio. Two different types of the valve disk configuration to adjust the blockage ratio were considered. One was the solid type valve disk of which the diameter was changed into the smaller size rather than the pipe diameter, and the other was the perforate type valve disk on which some holes were perforated. The results from two types of valve disk were compared to identify their characteristics in the loss coefficient distributions. The loss coefficient and the controllable angle of the valve disk were decreased exponentially with the decrease of the blockage ratio. In addition, the perforate valve disk had the effect on the higher loss coefficient rather than the solid type valve disk

  12. Intraoperative assessment of mitral valve area after mitral valve repair: comparison of different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Andrew; Gemignani, Anthony; Singh, Arun; Mahmood, Feroze; Poppas, Athena

    2011-04-01

    In the present study, 3 different methods to measure the mitral valve area (MVA) after mitral valve repair (MVRep) were studied. Data obtained immediately after repair were compared with postoperative data. The objective was to determine the feasibility and correlation between intraoperative and postoperative MVA data. A prospective study. A tertiary care medical center. Twenty-five elective adult surgical patients scheduled for MVRep. Echocardiographic data included MVAs obtained using the pressure half-time (PHT), 2-dimensional planimetry (2D-PLAN), and the continuity equation (CE). These data were obtained immediately after cardiopulmonary bypass and were compared with data obtained before hospital discharge (transthoracic echocardiogram 1) and 6 to 12 months after surgery (transthoracic echocardiogram 2). Intraoperative care was guided by hemodynamic goals designed to optimize cardiac function. The data show good agreement and correlation between MVA obtained with PHT and 2D-PLAN within and between each time period. MVA data obtained with the CE in the postoperative period were lower than and did not correlate or agree as well with other MVA data. The MVA recorded immediately after valve repair, using PHT, correlated and agreed with MVA data obtained in the postoperative period. These results contrast with previously published data and could highlight the impact of hemodynamic function during the assessment of MVA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Computational fluid dynamic simulation of pressurizer safety valve loop seal purge phenomena in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Woon

    2012-01-01

    In Korean 3 Loop plants a water loop seal pipe is installed containing condensed water upstream of a pressurizer safety valve to protect the valve disk from the hot steam environment. The loop seal water purge time is a key parameter in safety analyses for overpressure transients, because it delays valve opening. The loop seal purge time is uncertain to measure by test and thus 3-dimensional realistic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed in this paper to predict the seal water purge time before full opening of the valve which is driven by steam after water purge. The CFD model for a typical pressurizer safety valve with a loop seal pipe is developed using the computer code of ANSYS CFX 11. Steady-state simulations are performed for full discharge of steam at the valve full opening. Transient simulations are performed for the loop seal dynamics and to estimate the loop seal purge time. A sudden pressure drop higher than 2,000 psia at the tip of the upper nozzle ring is expected from the steady-state calculation. Through the transient simulation, almost loop seal water is discharged within 1.2 second through the narrow opening between the disk and the nozzle of the valve. It can be expected that the valve fully opens at least before 1.2 second because constant valve opening is assumed in this CFX simulation, which is conservative because the valve opens fully before the loop seal water is completely discharged. The predicted loop seal purge time is compared with previous correlation. (orig.)

  14. Computational fluid dynamic simulation of pressurizer safety valve loop seal purge phenomena in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Woon [Dongguk Univ., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of). Nuclear and Energy Engineering Dept.

    2012-11-15

    In Korean 3 Loop plants a water loop seal pipe is installed containing condensed water upstream of a pressurizer safety valve to protect the valve disk from the hot steam environment. The loop seal water purge time is a key parameter in safety analyses for overpressure transients, because it delays valve opening. The loop seal purge time is uncertain to measure by test and thus 3-dimensional realistic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed in this paper to predict the seal water purge time before full opening of the valve which is driven by steam after water purge. The CFD model for a typical pressurizer safety valve with a loop seal pipe is developed using the computer code of ANSYS CFX 11. Steady-state simulations are performed for full discharge of steam at the valve full opening. Transient simulations are performed for the loop seal dynamics and to estimate the loop seal purge time. A sudden pressure drop higher than 2,000 psia at the tip of the upper nozzle ring is expected from the steady-state calculation. Through the transient simulation, almost loop seal water is discharged within 1.2 second through the narrow opening between the disk and the nozzle of the valve. It can be expected that the valve fully opens at least before 1.2 second because constant valve opening is assumed in this CFX simulation, which is conservative because the valve opens fully before the loop seal water is completely discharged. The predicted loop seal purge time is compared with previous correlation. (orig.)

  15. 49 CFR 195.260 - Valves: Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valves: Location. 195.260 Section 195.260... PIPELINE Construction § 195.260 Valves: Location. A valve must be installed at each of the following locations: (a) On the suction end and the discharge end of a pump station in a manner that permits isolation...

  16. Porcine Tricuspid Valve Anatomy and Human Compatibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waziri, Farhad; Lyager Nielsen, Sten; Hasenkam, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    before clinical use. The study aim was to evaluate and compare the tricuspid valve anatomy of porcine and human hearts. METHODS: The anatomy of the tricuspid valve and the surrounding structures that affect the valve during a cardiac cycle were examined in detail in 100 fresh and 19 formalin...

  17. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement†

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolbergen, David R.; Manshanden, Johan S. J.; Bouma, Berto J.; Blom, Nico A.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Hazekamp, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate our results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement and associated (multiple) valve repair. From September 2003 to September 2013, 97 patients had valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedures. Patient records and preoperative, postoperative and recent echocardiograms were reviewed.

  18. Solving the problem of valve stem leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.F.

    1976-01-01

    Engineering solutions to valve stem leakage, in systems carrying expensive heavy water under pressure, have progressed from changing packing brands (failure) to leak collection (partial success) to elimination of small packed valves and an improved valve packing strategy involving stable packing materials, live Belleville spring-loading of packing, and issuance of a detailed stuffing box specification (success). (E.C.B.)

  19. 49 CFR 229.109 - Safety valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Safety valves. 229.109 Section 229.109..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.109 Safety valves. Every steam generator shall be equipped with at least two safety valves that have a...

  20. Miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keville, Robert F.; Dietrich, Daniel D.

    1998-03-24

    A miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve having a fast pulse rate and is battery operated with variable flow capability. The low power (piezo electric valves which require preloading of the crystal drive mechanism and 120 Vac, thus the valve of the present invention is smaller by a factor of three.

  1. Valve Corporation: Strategy Tipping Points and Thresholds

    OpenAIRE

    Teppo Felin

    2015-01-01

    Valve Corporation represents an intriguing case study of flat structure and self organization (Puranam & Håkonsson, 2015; Valve, 2012).  The structures and practices of Valve of course are not new. But the company provides an interesting experiment and illustration that powerfully highlights how organizational design can impact individual and collective behavior, strategy and performance.

  2. Valve Corporation: Strategy Tipping Points and Thresholds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teppo Felin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Valve Corporation represents an intriguing case study of flat structure and self organization (Puranam & Håkonsson, 2015; Valve, 2012.  The structures and practices of Valve of course are not new. But the company provides an interesting experiment and illustration that powerfully highlights how organizational design can impact individual and collective behavior, strategy and performance.

  3. Door valve for fuel handling path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makishima, Katsuhiko.

    1969-01-01

    A door valve is provided which seals cover gas from a liquid metal cooled reactor without leakage therefrom. A threaded shaft is screwed into a heavy box press which is packed with lead. The shaft is adapted to be rotated by an electric motor or a manually operated wheel which is disposed outside of the door valve. From the box press a valve plate is suspended by four linkage bars, one for each corner. Each linkage bar is provided with two wheels which are respectively mounted at the connections with the box press and the valve plate. The wheels are carried on the horizontal grooves formed in a door valve casing. In operation the shaft rotates and travels to permit the box press and the valve plate to move into the door valve casing while the valve plate does not contact the casing. When the box press reaches the home position, the wheels drop into the recesses which are disposed at the ends of the grooves, the valve plate is carried on the valve opening, and the box press presses the valve plate to increase the tightness. The valve plate does not suffer wear as it does not over other parts. (Yamaguchi, T.)

  4. Sequential transcatheter aortic valve implantation due to valve dislodgement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campante Teles, Rui; Costa, Cátia; Almeida, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an important treatment in high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), whose complications need to be managed promptly. The authors report the case of an 86-year-old woman presenting with severe symptomatic AS, rejected...

  5. Heart valve bioprosthesis durability: a challenge to the new generation of porcine valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, M; Minarini, M; Maizza, A F; Bortolotti, U; Thiene, G

    1992-01-01

    Long-term experience with first generation porcine valve xenografts enabled identification of the major limitations to their durability: (1) prosthetic-ventricular mismatch due to the high profile of the stent in patients with mitral stenosis and a small left ventricle; (2) high-pressure fixation with loss of natural collagen crimping in the fibrosa, and wash-out of proteoglycans in the spongiosa; (3) xenograft tissue autolysis, due to the long interval between animal slaughter and aortic valve removal fixation; (4) muscle shelf in the right coronary cusp, which created a gradient and could undergo accelerated calcification and/or spontaneous perforation with time; (5) a flexible polypropylene stent, which could creep or even fracture with consequent inward bending of the stent; (6) progressive time-related dystrophic calcification; (7) host fibrous tissue ingrowth. An awareness of these limitations stimulated technical modifications, which frequently brought about distinct improvements: (1) the reduction of the stent profile eliminated the problem of mismatch, but resulted in a higher tendency towards cusp prolapse and earlier commissural tearing; (2) natural collagen waviness, proteoglycans and cusp extensibility were preserved by employing low or even zero pressure during the fixation process; (3) earlier valve fixation enabled preservation of cell integrity; (4) a new orifice for small valves was designed by replacing the right muscular cusp, thus achieving less gradient and avoiding muscle-shelf-related complications; (5) polypropylene was replaced by Delrin as stent material; (6) calcium-retarding agents like T6 and toluidine blue were applied during commercial processing and storage in order to mitigate tissue mineralization.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. The Impact of Vacuum Gate Valves on the LHC Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Appleby, R B; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Mauri, M; Vlachoudis, V

    2009-01-01

    The LHC vacuum sector valves are located in the straight sections of the LHC ring, and designed to sectorize the LHC vacuum. The valves are interlocked and should trigger a beam dump request if they close on a circulating beam. This report studies the impact on the machine if this request is not made and the valve scrapes the LHC beam halo. Cascade calculations are made using a model of IR7, with several different valve locations, to calculate the downstream energy deposition in superconducting magnet coils and the corresponding signal in beam loss monitors at the quench level. The calculations are done at 7, 5, and 3.5 TeV. It is found that when a downstream magnet reaches the quench level, the neighbouring BLMs see a signal well above the detection threshold. Furthermore, the BLM signal is consistent with the BLM applied threshold settings and a signal is seen in the time domain before the quench level is reached. Therefore the report concludes that the BLMs can see the closing valve and trigger a beam dump...

  7. Mitral valve repair: an echocardiographic review: Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Echocardiographic imaging of the mitral valve before and immediately after repair is crucial to the immediate and long-term outcome. Prior to mitral valve repair, echocardiographic imaging helps determine the feasibility and method of repair. After the repair, echocardiographic imaging displays the new baseline anatomy, assesses function, and determines whether or not further management is necessary. Three-dimensional imaging has improved the assessment of the mitral valve and facilitates communication with the surgeon by providing the surgeon with an image that he/she might see upon opening up the atrium. Further advancements in imaging will continue to improve the understanding of the function and dysfunction of the mitral valve both before and after repair. This information will improve treatment options, timing of invasive therapies, and advancements of repair techniques to yield better short- and long-term patient outcomes. The purpose of this review was to connect the echocardiographic evaluation with the surgical procedure. Bridging the pre- and post-CPB imaging with the surgical procedure allows a greater understanding of mitral valve repair.

  8. Supra-annular valve strategy for an early degenerated transcatheter balloon-expandable heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamioka, Norihiko; Caughron, Hope; Corrigan, Frank; Block, Peter; Babaliaros, Vasilis

    2018-01-23

    Currently, there are no recommendations regarding the selection of valve type for a transcatheter heart valve (THV)-in-THV procedure. A supra-annular valve design may be superior in that it results in a larger effective orifice area and may have a lower chance of valve thrombosis after THV-in-THV. In this report, we describe the use of a supra-annular valve strategy for an early degenerated THV. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Aortic valve insufficiency in the teenager and young adult: the role of prosthetic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Scott M

    2013-10-01

    The contents of this article were presented in the session "Aortic insufficiency in the teenager" at the congenital parallel symposium of the 2013 Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) annual meeting. The accompanying articles detail the approaches of aortic valve repair and the Ross procedure.(1,2) The current article focuses on prosthetic valve replacement. For many young patients requiring aortic valve surgery, either aortic valve repair or a Ross procedure provides a good option. The advantages include avoidance of anticoagulation and potential for growth. In other patients, a prosthetic valve is an appropriate alternative. This article discusses the current state of knowledge regarding mechanical and bioprosthetic valve prostheses and their specific advantages relative to valve repair or a Ross procedure. In current practice, young patients requiring aortic valve surgery frequently undergo valve replacement with a prosthetic valve. In STS adult cardiac database, among patients ≤30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 34% had placement of a mechanical valve, 51% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 9% had aortic valve repair, and 2% had a Ross procedure. In the STS congenital database, among patients 12 to 30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 21% had placement of a mechanical valve, 18% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 30% had aortic valve repair, and 24% had a Ross procedure. In the future, the balance among these options may be altered by design improvements in prosthetic valves, alternatives to warfarin, the development of new patch materials for valve repair, and techniques to avoid Ross autograft failure.

  10. The role of annular dimension and annuloplasty in tricuspid aortic valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kerchove, Laurent; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Boodhwani, Munir; Astarci, Parla; Rubay, Jean; Poncelet, Alain; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2016-02-01

    reimplantation was superior to subcommissural annuloplasty (P = 0.04). Despite similar intraoperative reduction in basal ring size in subcommissural annuloplasty and valve sparing reimplantation, patients with subcommissural annuloplasty exhibited greater increase in basal ring size during the follow-up compared with the valve sparing reimplantation group (P tricuspid aortic valve undergoing repair with the subcommissural annuloplasty technique. This recurrence is caused by basal ring dilatation over time after subcommissural annuloplasty. With the valve sparing reimplantation technique, large basal ring did not predict aortic regurgitation recurrence, as prosthetic-based circumferential annuloplasty displayed better stability over time. Stable circumferential annuloplasty is recommended in tricuspid aortic valve repair whenever the basal ring size is ≥28 mm. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  11. Full-root aortic valve replacement with stentless xenograft achieves superior regression of left ventricular hypertrophy compared to pericardial stented aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Reza; Auf der Maur, Christoph; Mueller, Xavier; Schläpfer, Reinhard; Jamshidi, Peiman; Daubeuf, François; Frossard, Nelly

    2015-02-03

    Full-root aortic valve replacement with stentless xenografts has potentially superior hemodynamic performance compared to stented valves. However, a number of cardiac surgeons are reluctant to transform a classical stented aortic valve replacement into a technically more demanding full-root stentless aortic valve replacement. Here we describe our technique of full-root stentless aortic xenograft implantation and compare the early clinical and midterm hemodynamic outcomes to those after aortic valve replacement with stented valves. We retrospectively compared the pre-operative characteristics of 180 consecutive patients who underwent full-root replacement with stentless aortic xenografts with those of 80 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with stented valves. In subgroups presenting with aortic stenosis, we further analyzed the intra-operative data, early postoperative outcomes and mid-term regression of left ventricular mass index. Patients in the stentless group were younger (62.6 ± 13 vs. 70.3 ± 11.8 years, p regression of the left ventricular mass index in the stentless (p replacement can be performed without adversely affecting the early morbidity or mortality in patients operated on for aortic valve stenosis provided that the coronary ostia are not heavily calcified. The additional time necessary for the full-root stentless compared to the classical stented aortic valve replacement is therefore not detrimental to the early clinical outcomes and is largely rewarded in patients with aortic stenosis by lower transvalvular gradients at mid-term and a better regression of their left ventricular mass index.

  12. The German Aortic Valve Registry (GARY): a nationwide registry for patients undergoing invasive therapy for severe aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, A; Hamm, C; Figulla, H R; Cremer, J; Kuck, K H; Lange, R; Zahn, R; Sack, S; Schuler, G C; Walther, T; Beyersdorf, F; Böhm, M; Heusch, G; Funkat, A K; Meinertz, T; Neumann, T; Papoutsis, K; Schneider, S; Welz, A; Mohr, F W

    2012-07-01

    Background The increasing prevalence of severe aortic valve defects correlates with the increase of life expectancy. For decades, surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR), under the use of extracorporeal circulation, has been the gold standard for treatment of severe aortic valve diseases. In Germany ~12,000 patients receive isolated aortic valve surgery per year. For some time, percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty has been used as a palliative therapeutic option for very few patients. Currently, alternatives for the established surgical procedures such as transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have become available, but there are only limited data from randomized studies or low-volume registries concerning long-time outcome. In Germany, the implementation of this new technology into hospital care increased rapidly in the past few years. Therefore, the German Aortic Valve Registry (GARY) was founded in July 2010 including all available therapeutic options and providing data from a large quantity of patients.Methods The GARY is assembled as a complete survey for all invasive therapies in patients with relevant aortic valve diseases. It evaluates the new therapeutic options and compares them to surgical AVR. The model for data acquisition is based on three data sources: source I, the mandatory German database for external performance measurement; source II, a specific registry dataset; and source III, a follow-up data sheet (generated by phone interview). Various procedures will be compared concerning observed complications, mortality, and quality of life up to 5 years after the initial procedure. Furthermore, the registry will enable a compilation of evidence-based indication criteria and, in addition, also a comparison of all approved operative procedures, such as Ross or David procedures, and the use of different mechanical or biological aortic valve prostheses.Results Since the launch of data acquisition in July 2010, almost all institutions performing

  13. Aortic valve function after bicuspidization of the unicuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aicher, Diana; Bewarder, Moritz; Kindermann, Michael; Abdul-Khalique, Hashim; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim

    2013-05-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) anatomy leads to dysfunction of the valve in young individuals. We introduced a reconstructive technique of bicuspidizing the UAV. Initially we copied the typical asymmetry of a normal bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) (I), later we created a symmetric BAV (II). This study compared the hemodynamic function of the two designs of a bicuspidized UAV. Aortic valve function was studied at rest and during exercise in 28 patients after repair of UAV (group I, n = 8; group II, n = 20). There were no differences among the groups I and II with respect to gender, age, body size, or weight. All patients were in New York Heart Association class I. Six healthy adults served as control individuals. All patients were studied with transthoracic echocardiography between 4 and 65 months postoperatively. Systolic gradients were assessed by continuous wave Doppler while patients were at rest and exercising on a bicycle ergometer. Aortic regurgitation was grade I or less in all patients. Resting gradients were significantly elevated in group I compared with group II and control individuals (group I, peak 33.8 ± 7.8 mm Hg; mean 19.1 ± 5.4 mm Hg; group II, peak 15.8 ± 5.4, mean 8.2 ± 2.8 mm Hg; control individuals, peak 6.0 ± 1.6, mean 3.2 ± 0.8 mm Hg; p competence. A symmetric repair design leads to improved systolic aortic valve function at rest and during exercise. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Biological and mechanical evaluation of a Bio-Hybrid scaffold for autologous valve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnavi, S; Saravanan, U; Arthi, N; Bhuvaneshwar, G S; Kumary, T V; Rajan, S; Verma, R S

    2017-04-01

    Major challenge in heart valve tissue engineering for paediatric patients is the development of an autologous valve with regenerative capacity. Hybrid tissue engineering approach is recently gaining popularity to design scaffolds with desired biological and mechanical properties that can remodel post implantation. In this study, we fabricated aligned nanofibrous Bio-Hybrid scaffold made of decellularized bovine pericardium: polycaprolactone-chitosan with optimized polymer thickness to yield the desired biological and mechanical properties. CD44 + , αSMA + , Vimentin + and CD105 - human valve interstitial cells were isolated and seeded on these Bio-Hybrid scaffolds. Subsequent biological evaluation revealed interstitial cell proliferation with dense extra cellular matrix deposition that indicated the viability for growth and proliferation of seeded cells on the scaffolds. Uniaxial mechanical tests along axial direction showed that the Bio-Hybrid scaffolds has at least 20 times the strength of the native valves and its stiffness is nearly 3 times more than that of native valves. Biaxial and uniaxial mechanical studies on valve interstitial cells cultured Bio-Hybrid scaffolds revealed that the response along the axial and circumferential direction was different, similar to native valves. Overall, our findings suggest that Bio-Hybrid scaffold is a promising material for future development of regenerative heart valve constructs in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of Algorithms for the Optimal Location of Control Valves for Leakage Reduction in WDNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Creaco

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the comparison of two different algorithms for the optimal location of control valves for leakage reduction in water distribution networks (WDNs. The former is based on the sequential addition (SA of control valves. At the generic step Nval of SA, the search for the optimal combination of Nval valves is carried out, while containing the optimal combination of Nval − 1 valves found at the previous step. Therefore, only one new valve location is searched for at each step of SA, among all the remaining available locations. The latter algorithm consists of a multi-objective genetic algorithm (GA, in which valve locations are encoded inside individual genes. For the sake of consistency, the same embedded algorithm, based on iterated linear programming (LP, was used inside SA and GA, to search for the optimal valve settings at various time slots in the day. The results of applications to two WDNs show that SA and GA yield identical results for small values of Nval. When this number grows, the limitations of SA, related to its reduced exploration of the research space, emerge. In fact, for higher values of Nval, SA tends to produce less beneficial valve locations in terms of leakage abatement. However, the smaller computation time of SA may make this algorithm preferable in the case of large WDNs, for which the application of GA would be overly burdensome.

  16. In-operation inspection technology development-4 ''development of degradation prediction technology for motor-operated valves''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuo, Takeshima; Yuichi, Higashikawa [Hitachi Engineering and Production Div., Nuclear Systems Div., Hitachi, Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan); Masahiro, Koike [Power and Industrial Systems R and D Lab., Hitachi, Ltd., (Japan); Kenji, Matsumoto [Tokyo Research and Development Center, Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corp. (Japan); Eiji, O' shima [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A method for degradation predicting technology has been proposed for motor operated valves in nuclear power plants which is based on the concept of condition monitoring for maintenance. This method (degradation prediction technology) eliminates the unnecessary overhaul of valves and realizes high reliability and economy. The degradation mechanism was clarified by long time heating experiments of gasket and gland packing and the wear test for them and stem nut to research valve parts degradation by stress (pressure, temperature, etc) during plant operation. Effective electric power measurements for motor operated valves were confirmed to be useful discovering valve part failures. The motor operated valve degradation prediction system was developed on the basis of the experiment results and mechanism. The system is able to predict the degradation of valve parts (gasket/gland packing, stem, stem nut, etc) utilizing plant data (pressure, temperature, etc) and effective power of the motor. The life of valve parts can be estimated from the experimental results. (authors)

  17. The effect of an Ahmed glaucoma valve implant on corneal endothelial cell density in children with glaucoma secondary to uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinina Ayuso, Viera; Scheerlinck, Laura M; de Boer, Joke H

    2013-03-01

    To assess the effect of Ahmed glaucoma valve implants on corneal endothelial cell density (ECD) in children with uveitic glaucoma. Cross-sectional study. setting: Institutional. patientpopulation: Eighty eyes from 42 patients diagnosed with uveitis before the age of 16. Twenty-eight eyes had an Ahmed glaucoma valve implant because of secondary glaucoma. Fifty-two eyes without an implant served as controls. intervention orobservationprocedure(s): Corneal ECD was examined cross-sectionally using a noncontact specular microscope. Univariate and multivariate generalized estimating equations analyses with correction for paired eyes were performed. mainoutcomemeasure(s): Correlation of ECD with the presence of an Ahmed glaucoma valve implant and with the time following implantation. ECD was significantly lower in the Ahmed glaucoma valve group than in controls (2359 and 3088 cells/mm(2), respectively; P Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation. Presence of an Ahmed glaucoma valve implant, previous intraocular surgery, age, duration of uveitis, and history of corneal touch by the implant tube were all significantly associated with decreased ECD. Following a multivariate analysis, presence of an Ahmed glaucoma valve implant (B = -340; adjusted P Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation was highly correlated with decreased ECD (B = -558, P Ahmed glaucoma valve implants in children with uveitic glaucoma are independently associated with decreased ECD, and this effect is associated with the time interval following Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Early outcome of mini aortic valve replacement surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawky Fareed

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery (MIAVS has evolved into a well-tolerated, efficient surgical treatment option in experienced centers, providing greater patient satisfaction and lower complication rates. Potential advantages of MIAVR arise from the concept that patient morbidity and potential mortality could be reduced without compromising the excellent results of the conventional procedure which include improved cosmetic results, safer access in the case of reoperation, less postoperative bleeding, lower intensive care unit (ICU and in-hospital stays, as well as the absence of sternal wound infection. These results were achievable also in high-risk patients. Reduced pain and hospital length of stay, decreased time until return to full activity and decreased blood product use have also been demonstrated. Methods: Sixty patients with aortic valve disease randomized into two equal groups; group “A” underwent aortic valve surgery through a minimally invasive limited upper sternotomy. Group “B” underwent aortic valve surgery through a full median sternotomy. The Pain was evaluated on 2nd, 3rd day post-operatively and at the 3rd, 6th month after discharge. Echocardiographic data were performed preoperatively and at the 3rd, 6th month after discharge in all patients. Standard aortic and bicaval cannulation with cold antegrade crystalloid cardioplegia was adopted in group“B”, while in group “A” femoral vein with ascending aortic cannulation was adopted with antegrade blood cardioplegia. Results: There was no statistical difference between the two groups preoperatively regarding their age, sex, NYHA class, EF%, LA dimension, spirometric study. There was no operative mortality in both groups but few postoperative complications occurred in both groups. Total hospital stay, ICU stay, postoperative bleeding, inotropic requirement, ventilatory support, blood transfusion was less in group “A”, with better cosmetic

  19. Aortic valve replacement with the Biocor PSB stentless xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, P; Luciani, G B; Vecchi, B; Pugliese, P; Mazzucco, A

    1998-08-01

    The midterm clinical results after aortic valve replacement with the Biocor PSB stentless xenograft on all patients operated between October 1992 and October 1996 were reviewed. One hundred six patients, aged 70+/-6 years, had aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis (67%), regurgitation (11%), or both (22%). Associated procedures were done in 49 patients (46%), including coronary artery bypass in 30 patients, mitral valve repair/replacement in 16, and ascending aorta replacement in 5 patients. Aortic cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass times were 96+/-24 and 129+/-31 minutes, respectively. There were 3 (3%) early deaths due to low output (2 patients) and cerebrovascular accident (1 patient). Follow-up of survivors ranged from 6 to 66 months (mean, 39+/-14 months). Survival was 94%+/-2% and 90%+/-3% at 1 and 5 years. There were 5 late deaths due to cardiac cause (2), cancer (2), and pulmonary embolism (1 patient). No patient had structural valve deterioration, whereas 100% and 95%+/-3% were free from valve-related events at 1 and 5 years. There were two reoperations due to narrowing of the left coronary ostium and endocarditis, with an actuarial freedom from reoperation of 99%+/-1% and 98+/-1% at 1 and 5 years, respectively. Functional results demonstrated a mean peak transprosthetic gradient of 16+/-12 mm Hg, with only 1 patient (1%) with a 55 mm Hg gradient. No cases of valve regurgitation greater than mild were recorded at follow-up. Assessment of New York Heart Association functional class demonstrated a significant improvement (2.9+/-0.6 versus 1.4+/-0.7; p=0.01). All patients were free from anticoagulation. Aortic valve replacement using the Biocor PSB stentless xenograft offers excellent midterm survival, negligible valve deterioration, and a very low rate of valve-related events, which are comparable to estimates reported with other models of stentless xenografts and currently available stented xenografts. Hemodynamic performance is favorable and

  20. Heart valve prostheses: who protects our patients, and from what?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, A C

    1977-01-01

    Phenomenal advances in the development of cardiac valve prostheses have taken place in less than two decades. However, the currently prevailing atmosphere of consumer protectionism in existence 20 years ago probably would have made such developments impossible. Recent passage of the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (P.L. 94-295) will not only make future development extremely difficult, but also may force the field of cardiac valve replacement back into the era of the 1950s. Regulations implementing this legislation may be even more disastrous. It is time for someone to protect patients from their so-called protectors.

  1. Sutureless implantation of the perceval s aortic valve prosthesis through right anterior minithoracotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmanov, Daniyar; Miceli, Antonio; Bevilacqua, Stefano; Farneti, Pierandrea; Solinas, Marco; Ferrarini, Matteo; Glauber, Mattia

    2013-12-01

    Many new, less invasive strategies are proposed for aortic valve operation in elderly patients. Rapid deployment sutureless aortic valve prosthesis has been recently introduced. We analyzed our experience with a sutureless valve implanted through a minimally invasive approach. A retrospective observational study with prospectively registered data was conducted on 137 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy. Between April 2011 and January 2013, 137 consecutive patients underwent aortic valve replacement with a recently introduced, rapid deployment, sutureless pericardial valve in minithoracotomy access (47 men; mean age, 76.6 ± 7.1 years). There were 35 obese patients with a body mass index of more than 30 kg/m(2). Mean logistic EuroSCORE I was 10.0; 74 (54%) patients were in New York Heart Association functional class III and IV. In all, 19 (13.9%), 45 (32.8%), and 73 (53.3%) patients received 21-, 23-, and 25-mm valve prostheses, respectively. The mean aortic cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass times were 59.3 ± 19 min and 92.3 ± 27 min, respectively. No operative mortality occurred. Median stay in the intensive care unit was 1 day, with assisted ventilation necessary for a median of 6 hours. Three cases of postoperative ischemic stroke were observed (1 patient with a previous history of an ischemic cerebral event). Median hospital length of stay was 6 days. A sutureless valve for minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is a feasible, effective, and safe tool. Ultimately amplifying indications for less invasive aortic valve replacement in a high surgical risk subset of patients, it can become a valid alternative for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel self-expandable, stent-based transcatheter pulmonic valve: a preclinical animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gi Beom; Lim, Hong-Gook; Kim, Yong Jin; Choi, Eun Young; Kwon, Bo Sang; Jeong, Saeromi

    2014-04-15

    Because transcatheter implantation of pulmonary valve is indicated for limited-size dysfunctional right ventricular outflow tract only as a balloon-expandable stent, we investigated the feasibility of a large-diameter self-expandable valved stent and the durability of the valve after >6 months. We made a nitinol-wire-based, self-expandable valved stent with leaflets made from porcine pericardium. The porcine pericardium was treated with α-galactosidase, glutaraldehyde, and glycine after decellularization. After cutting the inguinal or cervical area, we implanted a valved stent in 12 sheep through the femoral or jugular vein by using an 18-Fr delivery catheter, controlling the catheter handles and hook block under fluoroscopic and echocardiographic guidance. The mean body weight of sheep was 43.9 kg. We successfully implanted valved stents (diameter: 24 mm in 7 sheep, 26 mm in 5 sheep) in good position in 8 sheep, in the main pulmonary artery (PA) in 2 sheep, and in the right ventricular outlet tract (RVOT) in 2 sheep. We sacrificed 8 sheep (6 sheep in good position, 1 sheep in the main PA, and 1 sheep in the RVOT) after >6 months. Five of the 6 sheep implanted in good position showed well-preserved valve morphology at the time of sacrifice. Histologic findings after routine sacrifice showed well-maintained collagen wave structure and no visible calcification in all explanted valve leaflets. Transcatheter implantation of a nitinol-wire-based, self-expandable valved stent in the pulmonic valve was feasible, and stents implanted in good position showed well-preserved valve leaflets with functional competence in the mid-term results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Optothermally actuated capillary burst valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Johan; Bilenberg, Brian; Kristensen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    be burst by raising the temperature due to the temperature dependence of the fluid surface tension. We address individual valves by using a local heating platform based on a thin film of near infrared absorber dye embedded in the lid used to seal the microfluidic device [L. H. Thamdrup et al., Nano Lett...

  4. Spring valve for well completion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorbatov, P T

    1966-07-22

    A spring-loaded valve for well completion consists of a housing with a spring-loaded closing element. In order to protect the closing element from corrosion which might lower the pressure drop, the closing element is made in the form of a piston. It is tightly connected with sealing elements. The housing has orifices, overlapping the piston in the initial position.

  5. Hydraulic servo control spool valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Donald M.

    1983-01-01

    A servo operated spool valve having a fixed sleeve and axially movable spool. The sleeve is machined in two halves to form a long, narrow tapered orifice slot across which a transverse wall of the spool is positioned. The axial position of the spool wall along the slot regulates the open orifice area with extreme precision.

  6. Guidelines for valves in tritium service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, W.W.

    1994-01-01

    Some undesirable practices and misapplications that caused valve-related failures are examined, and future courses of action are recommended to avoid repetition of these events. Desirable valve characteristics and practices that should be considered when selecting valves for use in tritium service are also discussed. Supporting logic for the desirability of these features is presented by discussing the mechanisms of valve degradation followed by examples of related events. Desirable valve and system features and operational actions are grouped into two categories: strongly recommended and recommended. 13 refs., 1 fig

  7. Valve assembly having remotely replaceable bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.R.; Tanner, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    A valve assembly having remotely replaceable bearings is disclosed wherein a valve disc is supported within a flow duct for rotation about a pair of axially aligned bearings, one of which is carried by a spindle received within a diametral bore in the valve disc, and the other of which is carried by a bearing support block releasably mounted on the duct circumferentially of an annular collar on the valve disc coaxial with its diametrical bore. The spindle and bearing support block are adapted for remote removal to facilitate servicing or replacement of the valve disc support bearings

  8. Multifunctional four-port directional control valve constructed from logic valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisowski, E.; Czyżycki, W.; Rajda, J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Directional valve with standard ISO 440-08 has been constructed from logic valves. • Only one innovative valve may replace whole family of the standard valves. • CFD analysis and bench tests of the innovative valve has been carried. • Parameters of the innovative valve are equaling or surpassing the standard ones. • The innovative valve has additional possibilities of pressure and flow control. - Abstract: The paper refers to four-port solenoid pilot operated valves, which are subplate mounted in a hydraulic system in accordance with the ISO 4401 standard. Their widespread use in many machines and devices causes a continuing interest in the development of their design by both the scientific centers and the industry. This paper presents an innovative directional control valve based on the use of logic valves and a methodology followed for the design of it by using Solid Edge CAD and ANSYS/Fluent CFD software. The valve design methodology takes into account the need to seek solutions that minimize flow resistance through the valve. For this purpose, the flow paths are prepared by means of CAD software and pressure-flow curves are determined as a result of CFD analysis. The obtained curves are compared with the curves available in the catalogs of spool type directional control valves. The new solution allows to replace the whole family of spool type four-port directional control valves by one valve built of logic valves. In addition, the innovative directional control valve provides leak-proof shutting the flow paths off and also it can control flow rate and even pressure of working liquid. A prototype of the valve designed by the presented method has been made and tested on the test bench. The results quoted in the paper confirm that the developed logic type directional control valve is able to meet all designed connection configurations, and the obtained pressure-flow curves show very good conformity with the results of CFD analysis

  9. Postoperative Outcomes of Mitral Valve Repair for Mitral Restenosis after Percutaneous Balloon Mitral Valvotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: There have been a number of studies on mitral valve replacement and repeated percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy for mitral valve restenosis after percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy. However, studies on mitral valve repair for these patients are rare. In this study, we analyzed postoperative outcomes of mitral valve repair for mitral valve restenosis after percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy. Methods: In this study, we assessed 15 patients (mean age, 47.7±9.7 years; 11 female and 4 male who underwent mitral valve repair between August 2008 and March 2013 for symptomatic mitral valve restenosis after percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy. The mean interval between the initial percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy and the mitral valve repair was 13.5±7 years. The mean preoperative Wilkins score was 9.4±2.6. Results: The mean mitral valve area obtained using planimetry increased from 1.16±0.16 cm2 to 1.62±0.34 cm2 (p=0.0001. The mean pressure half time obtained using Doppler ultrasound decreased from 202.4±58.6 ms to 152±50.2 ms (p=0.0001. The mean pressure gradient obtained using Doppler ultrasound decreased from 9.4±4.0 mmHg to 5.8±1.5 mmHg (p=0.0021. There were no early or late deaths. Thromboembolic events or infective endocarditis did not occur. Reoperations such as mitral valve repair or mitral valve replacement were not performed during the follow-up period (39±16 months. The 5-year event-free survival was 56.16% (95% confidence interval, 47.467–64.866. Conclusion: On the basis of these results, we could not conclude that mitral valve repair could be an alternative for patients with mitral valve restenosis after percutaneous balloon mitral valvotomy. However, some patients presented with results similar to those of mitral valve replacement. Further studies including more patients with long-term follow-up are necessary to determine the possibility of this application of mitral valve repair.

  10. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation of the direct flow medical aortic valve with minimal or no contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latib, Azeem, E-mail: alatib@gmail.com [Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute and EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy); Maisano, Francesco; Colombo, Antonio [Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute and EMO-GVM Centro Cuore Columbus, Milan (Italy); Klugmann, Silvio [Azienda Ospedaliera Niguarda Ca Granda, Piazza Ospedale Maggiore 3, Milan (Italy); Low, Reginald; Smith, Thomas [University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Davidson, Charles [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Harreld, John H. [Clinical Imaging Analytics, Guerneville, CA (United States); Bruschi, Giuseppe; DeMarco, Federico [Azienda Ospedaliera Niguarda Ca Granda, Piazza Ospedale Maggiore 3, Milan (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    The 18F Direct Flow Medical (DFM) THV has conformable sealing rings, which minimizes aortic regurgitation and permits full hemodynamic assessment of valve performance prior to permanent implantation. During the DISCOVER trial, three patients who were at risk for receiving contrast media, two due to severe CKD and one due to a recent hyperthyroid reaction to contrast, underwent DFM implantation under fluoroscopic and transesophageal guidance without aortography during either positioning or to confirm the final position. Valve positioning was based on the optimal angiographic projection as calculated by the pre-procedural multislice CT scan. Precise optimization of valve position was performed to minimize transvalve gradient and aortic regurgitation. Prior to final implantation, transvalve hemodynamics were assessed invasively and by TEE. The post-procedure mean gradients were 7, 10, 11 mm Hg. The final AVA by echo was 1.70, 1.40 and 1.68 cm{sup 2}. Total aortic regurgitation post-procedure was none or trace in all three patients. Total positioning and assessment of valve performance time was 4, 6, and 12 minutes. Contrast was only used to confirm successful percutaneous closure of the femoral access site. The total contrast dose was 5, 8, 12 cc. Baseline eGFR and creatinine was 28, 22, 74 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2} and 2.35, 2.98, and 1.03 mg/dL, respectively. Renal function was unchanged post-procedure: eGFR = 25, 35, and 96 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2} and creatinine = 2.58, 1.99, and 1.03 mg/dL, respectively. In conclusion, the DFM THV provides the ability to perform TAVI with minimal or no contrast. The precise and predictable implantation technique can be performed with fluoro and echo guidance.

  11. Simple versus complex degenerative mitral valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadikasgari, Hoda; Mihaljevic, Tomislav; Suri, Rakesh M; Svensson, Lars G; Navia, Jose L; Wang, Robert Z; Tappuni, Bassman; Lowry, Ashley M; McCurry, Kenneth R; Blackstone, Eugene H; Desai, Milind Y; Mick, Stephanie L; Gillinov, A Marc

    2018-07-01

    At a center where surgeons favor mitral valve (MV) repair for all subsets of leaflet prolapse, we compared results of patients undergoing repair for simple versus complex degenerative MV disease. From January 1985 to January 2016, 6153 patients underwent primary isolated MV repair for degenerative disease, 3101 patients underwent primary isolated MV repair for simple disease (posterior prolapse), and 3052 patients underwent primary isolated MV repair for complex disease (anterior or bileaflet prolapse), based on preoperative echocardiographic images. Logistic regression analysis was used to generate propensity scores for risk-adjusted comparisons (n = 2065 matched pairs). Durability was assessed by longitudinal recurrence of mitral regurgitation and reoperation. Compared with patients with simple disease, those undergoing repair of complex pathology were more likely to be younger and female (both P values < .0001) but with similar symptoms (P = .3). The most common repair technique was ring/band annuloplasty (3055/99% simple vs 3000/98% complex; P = .5), followed by leaflet resection (2802/90% simple vs 2249/74% complex; P < .0001). Among propensity-matched patients, recurrence of severe mitral regurgitation 10 years after repair was 6.2% for simple pathology versus 11% for complex pathology (P = .007), reoperation at 18 years was 6.3% for simple pathology versus 11% for complex pathology, and 20-year survival was 62% for simple pathology versus 61% for complex pathology (P = .6). Early surgical intervention has become more common in patients with degenerative MV disease, regardless of valve prolapse complexity or symptom status. Valve repair was associated with similarly low operative risk and time-related survival but less durability in complex disease. Lifelong annual echocardiographic surveillance after MV repair is recommended, particularly in patients with complex disease. Copyright © 2018 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery

  12. Trabeculectomy With Mitomycin C or Ahmed Valve Implantation in Eyes With Uveitic Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettis, Daniel I; Morshedi, Richard G; Chaya, Craig; Goldsmith, Jason; Crandall, Alan; Zabriskie, Norm

    2015-01-01

    To report and compare the results of trabeculectomy with mitomycin C (MMC) and Ahmed valve implantation in the management of uveitic glaucoma. The records of 41 eyes of 29 patients who underwent trabeculectomy with MMC or Ahmed valve implantation for uveitic glaucoma were retrospectively reviewed. Seventeen eyes underwent trabeculectomy with MMC, and 24 eyes underwent Ahmed valve implantation. Outcomes included postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP), percent reduction from preoperative IOP, postoperative number of medications, time to failure, and complications. Mean follow-up was 21.2 months in the trabeculectomy group and 23.8 months in the valve group (P=0.06). Mean IOP was reduced from 29.2 to 18.4 mm Hg in the trabeculectomy group (31.3%), compared with a reduction from 33.4 to 15.5 mm Hg in the Ahmed valve group (42.7%, P=0.53). Postoperatively, 1.76 medications were used in the trabeculectomy group, compared with 1.83 medications in the Ahmed valve group (P=0.89). Cumulative success at 1 year was 66.7% in the trabeculectomy group, compared with 100% in the Ahmed valve group (P=0.02). Mean time to failure was 8.36 months with trabeculectomy, and 21.8 months with Ahmed valve (P=0.02). Complications in both groups were typically rare and self-limited, with recurrent inflammation being most common. Although both trabeculectomy with MMC and Ahmed valve implantation are reasonable surgical options in the management of uncontrolled uveitic glaucoma, Ahmed valve implantation was associated with higher cumulative success rate at 1 year and a longer mean time to failure.

  13. [Tricuspid valve insufficiency: what should be done?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Segesser, L K; Stauffer, J C; Delabays, A; Chassot, P G

    1998-12-01

    Tricuspid regurgitation is relatively common. Due to the progress made in echocardiography, its diagnosis is in general made readily and in reliable fashion. Basically one has to distinguish between functional tricuspid valve regurgitation due to volume and/or pressure overload of the right ventricle with intact valve structures versus tricuspid valve regurgitation due to pathologic valve structures. The clear identification of the regurgitation mechanism is of prime importance for the treatment. Functional tricuspid valve regurgitation can often be improved by medical treatment of heart failure, and eventually a tricuspid valve plasty can solve the problem. However, the presence of pathologic tricuspid valve structures makes in general more specific plastic surgical procedures and even prosthetic valve replacements necessary. A typical example for a structural tricuspid valve regurgitation is the case of a traumatic papillary muscle rupture. Due to the sudden onset, this pathology is not well tolerated and requires in general surgical reinsertion of the papillary muscle. In contrast, tricuspid valve regurgitation resulting from chronic pulmonary embolism with pulmonary artery hypertension, can be improved by pulmonary artery thrombendarteriectomy and even completely cured with an additional tricuspid annuloplasty. However, tricuspid regurgitations due to terminal heart failure are not be addressed with surgery directed to tricuspid valve repair or replacement. Heart transplantation, dynamic cardiomyoplasty or mechanical circulatory support should be evaluated instead.

  14. Mechanical versus bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Stuart J; Çelik, Mevlüt; Kappetein, A Pieter

    2017-07-21

    Mechanical valves used for aortic valve replacement (AVR) continue to be associated with bleeding risks because of anticoagulation therapy, while bioprosthetic valves are at risk of structural valve deterioration requiring reoperation. This risk/benefit ratio of mechanical and bioprosthetic valves has led American and European guidelines on valvular heart disease to be consistent in recommending the use of mechanical prostheses in patients younger than 60 years of age. Despite these recommendations, the use of bioprosthetic valves has significantly increased over the last decades in all age groups. A systematic review of manuscripts applying propensity-matching or multivariable analysis to compare the usage of mechanical vs. bioprosthetic valves found either similar outcomes between the two types of valves or favourable outcomes with mechanical prostheses, particularly in younger patients. The risk/benefit ratio and choice of valves will be impacted by developments in valve designs, anticoagulation therapy, reducing the required international normalized ratio, and transcatheter and minimally invasive procedures. However, there is currently no evidence to support lowering the age threshold for implanting a bioprosthesis. Physicians in the Heart Team and patients should be cautious in pursuing more bioprosthetic valve use until its benefit is clearly proven in middle-aged patients. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Design of Over Center Valves Based on Predictable Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.R.; Andersen, T.O.; Pedersen, P.

    2004-01-01

    A typical oil hydraulic over center valve system and a time domain simulation model is introduced together with a hypothesis that flow force compensation should reduce the inherent oscillatory behavior of such hydraulic systems. A few results are shown from a parameter study that confirms...

  16. Tricuspid valve dysplasia: A retrospective study of clinical features ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dogs were most frequently referred for investigation of heart murmur. The most common arrhythmia was atrial fibrillation (n=3). Median survival time from diagnosis of tricuspid valve dysplasia was 2775 days (range 1-3696 days; 95% CI 1542.41-4007.59) and from onset of right-sided congestive heart failure was 181 days ...

  17. Pipe cracking due to thermal stresses produced by valve opening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Sarmiento, G.

    1982-01-01

    The thermal stresses produced in a tube whose internal surface is abrupt cooled during a valve opening so that the water volume increases linearly with time are studied. A general solution for these stresses and its stress intensity factors in terms of non-dimensional parameters is presented. (E.G.) [pt

  18. Brookhaven Lab and Argonne Lab scientists invent a plasma valve

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory have received U.S. patent number 6,528,948 for a device that shuts off airflow into a vacuum about one million times faster than mechanical valves or shutters that are currently in use (1 page).

  19. On the feasibility of detecting flaws in artificial heart valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lepelaars, E.S.A.M.; Ooijen, van W.D.R.; Tijhuis, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the feasibility of detecting defects in certain artificial heart valves by determining the electromagnetic behavior of some simple models with the aid of thin-wire integral equations. The idea is to use the stationary current that occurs at late times after the excitation of a closed

  20. The effect of varying degrees of stenosis on the characteristics of turbulent pulsatile flow through heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestein, D; Einav, S

    1995-08-01

    Many problems and complications associated with heart valves are related to the dynamic behavior of the valve and the resultant unsteady flow patterns. An accurate depiction of the spatial and temporal velocity and rms distributions imparts better understanding of flow related valve complications, and may be used as a guideline in valve design. While the generalized correlation between increased turbulence level and the severity of the stenosis is well established, few studies addressed the issue of the intermittent nature of turbulence and its timing in the cardiac cycle, and almost none assessed the effect of a progressive stenosis on the flow characteristics through heart valves. In this experimental work we simulated the type of flow which is present in normal and stenosed valves and conducted a comprehensive investigation of valve hemodynamics, valvular turbulence and morphology under varying degrees of stenosis. The characteristics of valves and stenoses were simulated closely, to achieve the flow conditions that initiate turbulent flow conditions. Laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements were carried out in a pulse duplicator system distal to trileaflet polyurethane prosthetic heart valves, installed at mitral and aortic positions. The effect of the degree of the stenosis was comparatively studied through the structure of the turbulent jets emerging from normal and stenotic heart valves. Maximum turbulence level was achieved during the decelerating phase and correlated to the severity of the stenosis, followed by relaminarization of the flow during the acceleration phase. The intermittent nature of the turbulence emphasized the importance of realizing the timing of the turbulence production and its spatial location for optimizing current valve designs. The plug flow through the normal aortic valve prosthesis was replaced by jet like behavior for a 65% stenosis, with the jet becoming narrower and stronger for a 90% stenosis. The morphology of the velocity

  1. Rare early prosthesis obstruction after mitral valve replacement: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Jun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As a dreadful complication after the mechanical heart valve replacement, prosthetic valve obstruction caused by pannus formation occurs increasingly with time. The authors here present a case of 42-year-old woman who was urgently admitted to hospital with acute heart failure symptoms due to the mechanical mitral valve failure only 3 months after surgery. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated that the bileaflet of the mitral prosthesis were completely immobilized with only a small transvalvular jet remained. During the reoperation, the reason of the prosthetic valve obstruction was attributed to the noncircular pannus ingrowth extending from the atrioventricular side. For a better understanding of the prosthetic valve dysfunction caused by pannus formation, the authors then compile a literature review to briefly discuss the status quo of the clinical characteristics of this uncommon complication.

  2. A self-regulating valve for single-phase liquid cooling of microelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donose, Radu; De Volder, Michaël; Peirs, Jan; Reynaerts, Dominiek

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the design, optimization and testing of a self-regulating valve for single-phase liquid cooling of microelectronics. Its purpose is to maintain the integrated circuit (IC) at constant temperature and to reduce power consumption by diminishing flow generated by the pump as a function of the cooling requirements. It uses a thermopneumatic actuation principle that combines the advantages of zero power consumption and small size in combination with a high flow rate and low manufacturing costs. The valve actuation is provided by the thermal expansion of a liquid (actuation fluid) which, at the same time, actuates the valve and provides feed-back sensing. A maximum flow rate of 38 kg h −1 passes through the valve for a heat load up to 500 W. The valve is able to reduce the pumping power by up to 60% and it has the capability to maintain the IC at a more uniform temperature.

  3. Design Method for Fast Switching Seat Valves for Digital Displacement Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Pedersen, Henrik C.

    2014-01-01

    corresponding to the piston movement, which has been shown to facilitate superior part load efficiency combined with high bandwidth compared to traditional displacement machines. However, DD machines need fast switching on-off valves with low pressure loss for efficient operation, especially in fast rotating......Digital Displacement (DD) machines are upcoming technology where the displacement of each pressure chamber is controlled electronically by use of two fast switching seat valves. The effective displacement and operation type (pumping/motoring) may be controlled by manipulating the seat valves...... method for DD seat valves are presented, taking into account the significant aspects related to obtaining efficient DD valves with basis in a given DD machine specifications. The seat area is minimized and the stroke length is minimized to obtain fast switching times while considering the pressure loss...

  4. Valve testing for UK PWR safety applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, P.T.; Bryant, S.

    1989-01-01

    Extensive testing and development has been done by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) to support the design, construction and operation of Sizewell B, the UK's first PWR. A Blowdown Rig for the Assessment of Valve Operability - (BRAVO) has been constructed at the CEGB Marchwood Engineering Laboratory to reproduce PWR Pressurizer fluid conditions for the full scale testing of Pressurizer Relief System (PRS) valves. A full size tandem pair of Pilot Operated Safety Relief Valves (POSRVs) is being tested under the full range of pressurizer fluid conditions. Tests to date have produced important data on the performance of the valve in its Cold Overpressure protection mode of operation and on methods for the in-service testing of the valve. Also, a full size pressurizer safety valve has been tested under full PRS fluid conditions to develop a methodology for the pre-service testing of the Sizewell valves. Further work will be carried out to develop procedures for the in-service testing of the valve. In the Main Steam Safety Valve test program carried out at the Siemens-KWU Test Facilities, a single MSSV from three potential suppliers was tested under full secondary system conditions. The test results have been analyzed and are reflected in the CEGB's arrangements for the pre-service and in-service testing of the Sizewell MSSVs. Valves required to interrupt pipebreak flow must be qualified for this duty by testing or a combination of testing and analysis. To obtain guidance on the performance of such tests gate and globe valves have been subjected to simulated pipebreaks under PWR primary circuit conditions. In the light of problems encountered with gate valve closure under these conditions, further tests are currently being carried out on the BRAVO facility on a gate valve, in preparation for the full scale flow interruption qualification testing of the Sizewell main steam isolation valve

  5. Left ventricular mass regression after porcine versus bovine aortic valve replacement: a randomized comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Rakesh M; Zehr, Kenton J; Sundt, Thoralf M; Dearani, Joseph A; Daly, Richard C; Oh, Jae K; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2009-10-01

    It is unclear whether small differences in transprosthetic gradient between porcine and bovine biologic aortic valves translate into improved regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy after aortic valve replacement. We investigated transprosthetic gradient, aortic valve orifice area, and LV mass in patients randomized to aortic valve replacement with either the Medtronic Mosaic (MM) porcine or an Edwards Perimount (EP) bovine pericardial bioprosthesis. One hundred fifty-two patients with aortic valve disease were randomly assigned to receive either the MM (n = 76) or an EP prosthesis. There were 89 men (59%), and the mean age was 76 years. Echocardiograms from preoperative, postoperative, predismissal, and 1-year time points were analyzed. Baseline characteristics and preoperative echocardiograms were similar between the two groups. The median implant size was 23 mm for both. There were no early deaths, and 10 patients (7%) died after dismissal. One hundred seven of 137 patients (78%) had a 1-year echocardiogram, and none required aortic valve reoperation. The mean aortic valve gradient at dismissal was 19.4 mm Hg (MM) versus13.5 mm Hg (EP; p regression of LV mass index (MM, -32.4 g/m(2) versus EP, -27.0 g/m(2); p = 0.40). Greater preoperative LV mass index was the sole independent predictor of greater LV mass regression after surgery (p regression of LV mass during the first year after aortic valve replacement.

  6. Detection circuit of solenoid valve operation and control rod drive mechanism utilizing the circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Takehiko.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To detect the operation of a plunger and detect opening and closing operations of a solenoid valve driving device due to change in impedance of a coil for driving the solenoid valve to judge normality and abnormality of the solenoid valve, thereby increasing reliance and safety of drive and control apparatus of control rods. Structure: An arrangement comprises a drive and operation detector section wherein the operation of a solenoid driving device for controlling power supply to a coil for driving the solenoid valve to control opening and closing of the solenoid valve, and a plunger operation detector section for detecting change in impedance of the drive coil to detect that the plunger of the solenoid valve is either in the opening direction or closing direction, whereby a predetermined low voltage such as not to activate the solenoid valve even when the solenoid valve is open or closed is applied to detect a current flowing into the coil at that time, thus detecting an operating state of the plunger. (Yoshino, Y.)

  7. Space Shuttle Orbital Maneuvering Subsystem (OMS) Engine Propellant Leakage Ball-Valve Shaft Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueders, Kathy; Buntain, Nick; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Evidence of propellant leakage across ball-valve shaft seals has been noted during the disassembly of five flight engines and one test engine at the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, White Sands Test Facility. Based on data collected during the disassembly of these five engines, the consequences of propellant leakage across the ball-valve shaft seals can be divided into four primary areas of concern: Damage to the ball-valve pinion shafts, damage to sleeved bearings inside the ball-valve and actuator assemblies, degradation of the synthetic rubber o-rings used in the actuator assemblies, and corrosion and degradation to the interior of the actuator assemblies. The exact time at which leakage across the ball-valve shaft seals occurs has not been determined, however, the leakage most likely occurs during engine firings when, depending on the specification used, ball-valve cavity pressures range as high as 453 to 550 psia. This potential pressure range for the ball-valve cavities greatly exceeds the acceptance leakage test pressure of 332 psia. Since redesign and replacement of the ball-valve shaft seals is unlikely, the near term solution to prevent damage that occurs from shaft-seal leakage is to implement a routine overhaul and maintenance program for engines in the fleet. Recommended repair, verification, and possible preventative maintenance measures are discussed in the paper.

  8. Experimental study on the effect of an artificial cardiac valve on the left ventricular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, JiangSheng; Gao, Qi; Wei, RunJie; Wang, JinJun

    2017-09-01

    The use of artificial valves to replace diseased human heart valves is currently the main solution to address the malfunctioning of these valves. However, the effect of artificial valves on the ventricular flow still needs to be understood in flow physics. The left ventricular flow downstream of a St. Jude Medical (SJM) bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV), which is a widely implanted mechanical bileaflet valve, is investigated with time-resolved particle image velocimetry in the current work. A tilting-disk valve is installed on the aortic orifice to guarantee unidirectional flow. Several post-processing tools are applied to provide combined analyses of the physics involved in the ventricular flow. The triple jet pattern that is closely related to the characteristics of the bileaflet valve is discussed in detail from both Eulerian and Lagrangian views. The effects of large-scale vortices on the transportation of blood are revealed by the combined analysis of the tracking of Lagrangian coherent structures, the Eulerian monitoring of the shear stresses, and virtual dye visualization. It is found that the utilization of the SJM BMHV complicates the ventricular flow and could reduce the efficiency of blood transportation. In addition, the kinematics of the bileaflets is presented to explore the effects of flow structures on their motion. These combined analyses could elucidate the properties of SJM BMHV. Furthermore, they could provide new insights into the understanding of other complex blood flows.

  9. Performance evaluation of a piezoactuator-based single-stage valve system subjected to high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Juncheol; Han, Chulhee; Chung, Jye Ung; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel single-stage valve system activated by a piezostack actuator is proposed and experimentally evaluated at both room temperature (20 °C) and high temperature (100 °C) conditions. A hinge-lever displacement amplifier is adopted in the valve system to magnify the displacement generated from the piezostack actuator. After explaining the operating principle of the proposed piezostack-driven single-stage valve system, the geometric dimensions and mechanical properties of the valve components are discussed in details. An experimental apparatus is then manufactured to evaluate the performances of the valve system such as flow rate. The experimental apparatus consists of a heat chamber, which can regulate the temperature of the valve system and oil, pneumatic-hydraulic cylinders, a hydraulic circuit, a pneumatic circuit, electronic devices, an interface card, and a high voltage amplifier. The pneumatic-hydraulic cylinder transforms the pneumatic pressure into hydraulic pressure. The performances of the valve system regarding spool response, pressure drop, and flow rate are evaluated and presented. In addition, the performance of the valve system under high temperature condition is compared with that under room temperature condition. The experimental results are plotted in both frequency and time domains.

  10. Performance evaluation of a piezoactuator-based single-stage valve system subjected to high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Juncheol; Han, Chulhee; Ung Chung, Jye; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel single-stage valve system activated by a piezostack actuator is proposed and experimentally evaluated at both room temperature (20 °C) and high temperature (100 °C) conditions. A hinge-lever displacement amplifier is adopted in the valve system to magnify the displacement generated from the piezostack actuator. After explaining the operating principle of the proposed piezostack-driven single-stage valve system, the geometric dimensions and mechanical properties of the valve components are discussed in details. An experimental apparatus is then manufactured to evaluate the performances of the valve system such as flow rate. The experimental apparatus consists of a heat chamber, which can regulate the temperature of the valve system and oil, pneumatic-hydraulic cylinders, a hydraulic circuit, a pneumatic circuit, electronic devices, an interface card, and a high voltage amplifier. The pneumatic-hydraulic cylinder transforms the pneumatic pressure into hydraulic pressure. The performances of the valve system regarding spool response, pressure drop, and flow rate are evaluated and presented. In addition, the performance of the valve system under high temperature condition is compared with that under room temperature condition. The experimental results are plotted in both frequency and time domains. (paper)

  11. Three-dimentional simulation of flow-induced platelet activation in artificial heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-11-01

    Since the advent of heart valve, several valve types such as mechanical and bio-prosthetic valves have been designed. Mechanical Heart Valves (MHV) are durable but suffer from thromboembolic complications that caused by shear-induced platelet activation near the valve region. Bio-prosthetic Heart Valves (BHV) are known for better hemodynamics. However, they usually have a short average life time. Realistic simulations of heart valves in combination with platelet activation models can lead to a better understanding of the potential risk of thrombus formation in such devices. In this study, an Eulerian approach is developed to calculate the platelet activation in three-dimensional simulations of flow through MHV and BHV using a parallel overset-curvilinear immersed boundary technique. A curvilinear body-fitted grid is used for the flow simulation through the anatomic aorta, while the sharp-interface immersed boundary method is used for simulation of the Left Ventricle (LV) with prescribed motion. In addition, dynamics of valves were calculated numerically using under-relaxed strong-coupling algorithm. Finally, the platelet activation results for BMV and MHV are compared with each other.

  12. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacemen....... We report the first case of surgical valve replacement in a patient with a dysfunctional transcatheter-implanted aortic valve prosthesis 4 months after implantation....

  13. Surgery of the aortic root: should we go for the valve-sparing root reconstruction or the composite graft-valve replacement is still the first choice of treatment for these patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamana, Fernando de Azevedo; Dias, Ricardo Ribeiro; Duncan, Jose Augusto; Faria, Leandro Batisti de; Malbouisson, Luiz Marcelo Sa; Borges, Luciano de Figueiredo; Mady, Charles; Jatene, Fábio Biscegli

    2015-01-01

    To compare the results of the root reconstruction with the aortic valve-sparing operation versus composite graft-valve replacement. From January 2002 to October 2013, 324 patients underwent aortic root reconstruction. They were 263 composite graft-valve replacement and 61 aortic valve-sparing operation (43 reimplantation and 18 remodeling). Twenty-six percent of the patients were NYHA functional class III and IV; 9.6% had Marfan syndrome, and 12% had bicuspid aortic valve. There was a predominance of aneurysms over dissections (81% vs. 19%), with 7% being acute dissections. The complete follow-up of 100% of the patients was performed with median follow-up time of 902 days for patients undergoing composite graft-valve replacement and 1492 for those undergoing aortic valve-sparing operation. In-hospital mortality was 6.7% and 4.9%, respectively for composite graft-valve replacement and aortic valve-sparing operation (ns). During the late follow-up period, there was 0% moderate and 15.4% severe aortic regurgitation, and NYHA functional class I and II were 89.4% and 94%, respectively for composite graft-valve replacement and aortic valve-sparing operation (ns). Root reconstruction with aortic valve-sparing operation showed lower late mortality (P=0.001) and lower bleeding complications (P=0.006). There was no difference for thromboembolism, endocarditis, and need of reoperation. The aortic root reconstruction with preservation of the valve should be the operation being performed for presenting lower late mortality and survival free of bleeding events.

  14. A review of digital radiography technology for valve inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoev, K.; Guerout, F.M.; Horn, D.

    2008-01-01

    There are thousands of valves in a nuclear power plant (NPP) used for control, safety and checks in various plant systems, so there is a well-identified need for fast and reliable inspection and diagnostics of valves. Digital radiography can provide considerable improvements to the inspection and testing procedures for valves in comparison to classical film radiography. These improvements can lead to significant financial advantages by providing real-time inspection results, significantly reduced inspection and decision-making time, and reduced operational cost. Digital image processing, including digital image enhancement, digital archiving, and digital communication of the images and the results, is also a considerable advantage over classical film radiography technology. Another advantage of digital radiography technology is the improved safety and the reduced environmental impact due to reduced exposure/test times, use of smaller exclusion zones, elimination of chemical processing, and absence of disposable materials. This paper reviews the existing technology and evaluates the potential of digital radiography for inspection and diagnostics of valves. Station needs and requirements are assessed, and the safety, environmental and economical constraints of digital radiography techniques estimated. The advantages and disadvantages of different digital radiography equipment are compared, and their limitations and characteristics studied. (author)

  15. Biological and mechanical evaluation of a Bio-Hybrid scaffold for autologous valve tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahnavi, S [Stem Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India); Tissue Culture Laboratory, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojappura, Trivandrum, Kerala 695012 (India); Saravanan, U [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India); Arthi, N [Stem Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India); Bhuvaneshwar, G S [Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India); Kumary, T V [Tissue Culture Laboratory, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojappura, Trivandrum, Kerala 695012 (India); Rajan, S [Madras Medical Mission, Institute of Cardio-Vascular Diseases, Mogappair, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600037 (India); Verma, R S, E-mail: vermars@iitm.ac.in [Stem Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India)

    2017-04-01

    Major challenge in heart valve tissue engineering for paediatric patients is the development of an autologous valve with regenerative capacity. Hybrid tissue engineering approach is recently gaining popularity to design scaffolds with desired biological and mechanical properties that can remodel post implantation. In this study, we fabricated aligned nanofibrous Bio-Hybrid scaffold made of decellularized bovine pericardium: polycaprolactone-chitosan with optimized polymer thickness to yield the desired biological and mechanical properties. CD44{sup +}, αSMA{sup +}, Vimentin{sup +} and CD105{sup −} human valve interstitial cells were isolated and seeded on these Bio-Hybrid scaffolds. Subsequent biological evaluation revealed interstitial cell proliferation with dense extra cellular matrix deposition that indicated the viability for growth and proliferation of seeded cells on the scaffolds. Uniaxial mechanical tests along axial direction showed that the Bio-Hybrid scaffolds has at least 20 times the strength of the native valves and its stiffness is nearly 3 times more than that of native valves. Biaxial and uniaxial mechanical studies on valve interstitial cells cultured Bio-Hybrid scaffolds revealed that the response along the axial and circumferential direction was different, similar to native valves. Overall, our findings suggest that Bio-Hybrid scaffold is a promising material for future development of regenerative heart valve constructs in children. - Highlights: • We report detailed biological and mechanical investigations of a Bio-Hybrid scaffold. • Optimized polymer thickness yielded desired biological and mechanical properties. • Bio-Hybrid scaffold revealed hVIC proliferation with dense ECM deposition. • Biaxial testing indicated that Bio-Hybrid scaffolds are mechanically stronger than native valves. • Bio-Hybrid scaffold is a promising material for autologous valve tissue engineering.

  16. Durability of central aortic valve closure in patients with continuous flow left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, Stephen H; Deo, Salil; Daly, Richard C; Durham, Lucian A; Joyce, Lyle D; Stulak, John M; Park, Soon J

    2014-01-01

    A competent aortic valve is essential to providing effective left ventricular assist device support. We have adopted a practice of central aortic valve closure by placing a simple coaptation stitch at left ventricular assist device implantation in patients with significant aortic insufficiency. We conducted a follow-up study to evaluate the efficacy and durability of this procedure. The study included patients who had undergone continuous flow left ventricular assist device implantation. The patients were divided into 2 groups, those who did not require any aortic procedure because the valve was competent and those who underwent central aortic valve closure for mild or greater aortic regurgitation. The clinical endpoints were mortality, progression or recurrence of aortic insufficiency, and reoperation for aortic valve pathologic features. Aortic insufficiency was measured qualitatively from mild to severe on a scale of 0 to 5. A total of 123 patients received continuous flow left ventricular assist devices from February 2007 to August 2011. Of those, 18 (15%) underwent central aortic valve closure at left ventricular assist device implantation because of significant aortic insufficiency (1.8 ± 1.4) and 105 who did not (competent aortic valve, 0.15 ± 0.43; P assist device-supported patients, with follow-up extending into 2 years. Although aortic insufficiency progressed over time in those with minimal native valve regurgitation initially, no such progression was noted in those with central aortic valve closure. Additional investigation is needed to evaluate whether prophylactic central aortic valve closure should be performed at left ventricular assist device implantation to avoid problematic aortic regurgitation developing over time, in particular in patients undergoing left ventricular assist device implantation for life-long (destination therapy) support. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  17. Transient flow analysis of integrated valve opening process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xinming; Qin, Benke; Bo, Hanliang, E-mail: bohl@tsinghua.edu.cn; Xu, Xingxing

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • The control rod hydraulic driving system (CRHDS) is a new type of built-in control rod drive technology and the integrated valve (IV) is the key control component. • The transient flow experiment induced by IV is conducted and the test results are analyzed to get its working mechanism. • The theoretical model of IV opening process is established and applied to get the changing rule of the transient flow characteristic parameters. - Abstract: The control rod hydraulic driving system (CRHDS) is a new type of built-in control rod drive technology and the IV is the key control component. The working principle of integrated valve (IV) is analyzed and the IV hydraulic experiment is conducted. There is transient flow phenomenon in the valve opening process. The theoretical model of IV opening process is established by the loop system control equations and boundary conditions. The valve opening boundary condition equation is established based on the IV three dimensional flow field analysis results and the dynamic analysis of the valve core movement. The model calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental results. On this basis, the model is used to analyze the transient flow under high temperature condition. The peak pressure head is consistent with the one under room temperature and the pressure fluctuation period is longer than the one under room temperature. Furthermore, the changing rule of pressure transients with the fluid and loop structure parameters is analyzed. The peak pressure increases with the flow rate and the peak pressure decreases with the increase of the valve opening time. The pressure fluctuation period increases with the loop pipe length and the fluctuation amplitude remains largely unchanged under different equilibrium pressure conditions. The research results lay the base for the vibration reduction analysis of the CRHDS.

  18. Anterior urethral valves: not such a benign condition…

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar eCruz-Diaz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Anterior urethral valves (AUV is an unusual cause of congenital obstruction of the male urethra, being 15 to 30 times less common than posterior urethral valves (PUV. It has been suggested that patients with congenital anterior urethral obstruction have a better prognosis than those with PUV.The long term prognosis of anterior urethral valves is not clear in the literature. In this report we describe our experience and long-term follow up of patients with AUV.Materials and methods: We retrospectively identified 13 patients who presented with the diagnosis of AUV in our institutions between 1994 and 2012. From the 11 patients included, we evaluated the gestational age, ultrasound and voiding cystourethrogram findings, age upon valve ablation, micturition pattern, creatinine and clinical follow up.Results: Between 1994 and 2012 we evaluated 150 patients with the diagnosis of urethral valves, where 11 patients (7.3% had AUV and an adequate follow up. Mean follow up is 6.3 years. 5 patients (45.4% had pre-natal diagnosis of AUV. The most common prenatal ultrasonographic finding was bilateral hydronephrosis and distended bladder.The mean gestational age was 37.6 weeks. Postnatally, 90% had trabeculated bladder, 80% hydronephrosis and 40% renal dysplasia. The most common clinical presentation was urinary tract infection in 5 patients (45.4%.7 patients (63.6% had primary transurethral valve resection or laser ablation and 3 patients (27.2% had primary vesicostomies. One boy (9.1% had urethrostomy with urethral diverticulum excision. 2 patients (18.2% developed end-stage renal disease (ESRD.Conclusions: Early urinary tract obstruction resulted in ESRD in 18% of our patient population. In our series, the complication rate and the evolution to renal failure are high and similar to patients with PUV. In patients with AUV we recommend long-term follow up and close evaluation of patient’s bladder and renal function.

  19. Application of ceramics to the sliding seat of valve bridge; Valve bridge yodobu eno ceramics tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, T; Ono, T [Mitsubishi Motors Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    For use in the valve train, using an OHV (over head valve) configuration. of a 4 valve diesel engine for trucks and buses; we developed a valve bridge, a component of a valve train, with a ceramic head that is made of silicon nitride(Si3N4) in contact with a rocker arm in order to reduce cost and improve wear resistance for further diesel engine emissions regulations. In order to evaluate the effect of this valve bridge, RIG tests and durability tests on actual engines were carried out. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Comparison of the CoaguChek XS handheld coagulation analyzer and conventional laboratory methods measuring international normalised ratio (INR) values during the time to therapeutic range after mechanical valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardakci, Hasmet; Altıntaş, Garip; Çiçek, Omer Faruk; Kervan, Umit; Yilmaz, Sevinc; Kaplan, Sadi; Birincioglu, Cemal Levent

    2013-05-01

    To compare the international normalised ratio (INR) value of patients evaluated using the CoaguChek XS versus conventional laboratory methods, in the period after open-heart surgery for mechanical valve replacement until a therapeutic range is achieved using vitamin K antagonists (VKA) together with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). One hundred and five patients undergoing open-heart surgery for mechanical valve replacement were enrolled. Blood samples were collected from patients before surgery, and on the second and fifth postoperative days, simultaneously for both the point of care device and conventional laboratory techniques. Patients were administered VKA together with LMWH at therapeutic doses (enoxaparin 100 IU/kg twice daily) subcutaneously, until an effective range was achieved on approximately the fifth day after surgery. The mean INR values using the CoaguChek XS preoperatively and on the second and fifth days postoperatively were 1.20 (SD ± 0.09), 1.82 (SD ± 0.45), and 2.55 (SD ± 0.55), respectively. Corresponding results obtained using conventional laboratory techniques were 1.18 (SD ± 0.1), 1.81 (SD ± 0.43), and 2.51 (SD ± 0.58). The correlation coefficient was r = 0.77 preoperatively, r = 0.981 on postoperative day 2, and r = 0.983 on postoperative day 5. Results using the CoaguChek XS Handheld Coagulation Analyzer correlated strongly with conventional laboratory methods, in the bridging period between open-heart surgery for mechanical valve replacement and the achievement of a therapeutic range on warfarin and LMWH. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The safety valve and climate policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacoby, Henry D.; Ellerman, A.D.

    2004-01-01

    The 'safety valve' is a possible addition to a cap-and-trade system of emissions regulation whereby the authority offers to sell permits in unlimited amount at a pre-set price. In this way the cost of meeting the cap can be limited. It was proposed in the US as a way to control perceived high costs of the Kyoto Protocol, and possibly as a way to shift the focus of policy from the quantity targets of the Protocol to emissions price. In international discussions, the idea emerged as a proposal for a compliance penalty. The usefulness of the safety valve depends on the conditions under which it might be introduced. For a time it might tame an overly stringent emissions target. It also can help control the price volatility during the introduction of gradually tightening one, although permit banking can ultimately serve the same function. It is unlikely to serve as a long-term feature of a cap-and-trade system, however, because of the complexity of coordinating price and quantity instruments and because it will interfere with the development of systems of international emissions trade

  2. Cine MR imaging in mitral valve prolapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumai, Toshihiko

    1993-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the ability of cine MR imaging to evaluate the direction, timing, and severity of mitral regurgitation in patients with mitral valve prolapse (MVP). The population of this study was 33 patients with MVP diagnosed by two-dimensional echocardiography and 10 patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease (MSR) for comparison. 7 patients with MVP and 5 with MSR had atrial fibrillation and/or history of congestive heart failure as complications. Mitral regurgitation was graded for severity by color Doppler flow imaging in all patients. Direction and size of systolic flow void in the left atrium were analyzed by contiguous multilevel cine MR images and the maximum volumes of flow void and left atrium were measured. Although flow void was found at the center of the left atrium in most of MSR, it was often directed along the postero-caudal atrial wall in anterior leaflet prolapse and along the anterocranial atrial wall in posterior leaflet prolapse. In MVP, the maximum volume of flow void was often seen in late systole. The maximum volume of flow void and that of left atrium were significantly larger in patients with atrial fibrillation and/or history of congestive heart failure. The length and volume of flow void were increased with clinical severity and degree of regurgitation determined by color Doppler flow imaging. Thus cine MR imaging provides a useful means for detection and semiquantitative evaluation of mitral regurgitation in subjects with MVP. (author)

  3. Performance of balanced bellows safety relief valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Y.S.

    1992-01-01

    By the nature of its design, the set point and lift of a conventional spring loaded safety relief valve are sensitive to back pressure. One way to reduce the adverse effects of the back pressure on the safety relief valve function is to install a balanced bellows in a safety relief valve. The metallic bellows has a rather wide range of manufacturing tolerance which makes the design of the bellows safety relief valve very complicated. The state-of-the-art balanced bellows safety relief valve can only substantially minimize, but cannot totally eliminate the back pressure effects on its set point and relieving capacity. Set point change is a linear function of the back pressure to the set pressure ratio. Depending on the valve design, the set point correction factor can be either greater or smaller than unity. There exists an allowable back pressure and critical back pressure for each safety relief valve. When total back pressure exceeds the R a , the relieving capacity will be reduced mainly resulting from the valve lift being reduced by the back pressure and the capacity reduction factor should be applied in valve sizing. Once the R c is exceeded, the safety relief valve becomes unstable and loses its over pressure protection capability. The capacity reduction factor is a function of system overpressure, but their relationship is non-linear in nature. (orig.)

  4. Simple Check Valves for Microfluidic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Peter A.; Greer, Harold F.; Smith, J. Anthony

    2010-01-01

    A simple design concept for check valves has been adopted for microfluidic devices that consist mostly of (1) deformable fluorocarbon polymer membranes sandwiched between (2) borosilicate float glass wafers into which channels, valve seats, and holes have been etched. The first microfluidic devices in which these check valves are intended to be used are micro-capillary electrophoresis (microCE) devices undergoing development for use on Mars in detecting compounds indicative of life. In this application, it will be necessary to store some liquid samples in reservoirs in the devices for subsequent laboratory analysis, and check valves are needed to prevent cross-contamination of the samples. The simple check-valve design concept is also applicable to other microfluidic devices and to fluidic devices in general. These check valves are simplified microscopic versions of conventional rubber- flap check valves that are parts of numerous industrial and consumer products. These check valves are fabricated, not as separate components, but as integral parts of microfluidic devices. A check valve according to this concept consists of suitably shaped portions of a deformable membrane and the two glass wafers between which the membrane is sandwiched (see figure). The valve flap is formed by making an approximately semicircular cut in the membrane. The flap is centered over a hole in the lower glass wafer, through which hole the liquid in question is intended to flow upward into a wider hole, channel, or reservoir in the upper glass wafer. The radius of the cut exceeds the radius of the hole by an amount large enough to prevent settling of the flap into the hole. As in a conventional rubber-flap check valve, back pressure in the liquid pushes the flap against the valve seat (in this case, the valve seat is the adjacent surface of the lower glass wafer), thereby forming a seal that prevents backflow.

  5. Fibrin glue on an aortic cusp detected by transesophageal echocardiography after valve-sparing aortic valve replacement: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahira, Junko; Ishii, Hisanari; Sawai, Toshiyuki; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-03-07

    Fibrin glue is used commonly during cardiac surgery but can behave as an intracardiac abnormal foreign body following surgery. There have been few such cases reported, and they were typically noticed only because of the resulting catastrophic cardiac conditions, such as valvular malfunction. We report a case where, for the first time, transesophageal echocardiography was used to detected fibrin glue that was adherent to the ventricular side of a patient's aortic valve immediately after aortic declamping. A 45-year-old Japanese man with Marfan syndrome underwent an aortic valve-sparing operation to treat moderate aortic valve regurgitation resulting from enlargement of his right coronary cusp. Fibrin glue was lightly applied to the suture line between the previous and new grafts. Transesophageal echocardiography performed prior to weaning from the cardiopulmonary bypass revealed mild aortic valve regurgitation in addition to a mobile membranous structure attached to the ventricular side of his aortic valve. It was identified as fibrin glue. We resolved the regurgitation by removing the fibrin glue and repeating the aortic cusp plication. The patient had no complications during recovery. Fibrin glue can act as an intracardiac foreign body and lead to a potentially fatal embolism. We demonstrated the use of transesophageal echocardiography to detect a fibrin glue-derived intracardiac abnormal foreign body and to confirm its removal. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case where fibrin glue adherent to the aortic valve was detected by transesophageal echocardiography. These findings demonstrate the importance of using transesophageal echocardiography during cardiac surgery that involves using biological glues.

  6. Quantitative assessment of an aortic and pulmonary valve function according to valve fenestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirkhani, S.H.; Golestani, M.G.; Hosini, M.; Kazemian, A.

    1999-01-01

    There are some reasons for malfunction of aortic and pulmonary valve like fibrosis, calcification, and atheroma. Although, in some papers fenestration were known as a pathologic sign, but it is not generally accepted, while this matter is important in choosing suitable Homograft Heart Valve. In this paper fenestrations and its size, numbers and situation effect was studied. We collected 98 hearts, the donors died because of accident, we excluded valves with atheroma, calcification, fibrosis and unequal cusps, 91 aortic and 93 pulmonary valves were given further consideration. We classified valves according to situation, number and size of fenestration. Each valve was tested with 104 cm of non-nal saline column pressure which is equal to 76 mm Hg. Valve efficacy was detected by fluid flow assay. With study of 184 valves, 95 had no fenestration, 64 had less than 2 fenestration and 25 had more than 2 fenestration. Valve efficacy in condition of less than 2 fenestration was more than others (p <0.01). Malfunction effects of fenestration increased in larger valve and it will be decreased if their situation would be marginal (free margin of cusp). In the comparison of aortic and pulmonary valve we saw that malfunction effect of fenestration in pulmonary valve was more than aortic valve. Our experience in Immam Khomeini Homograft Valve Bank has shown that a great deal of valves is fenestrated. It seems that fenestration must be considered as a quality criterion in homograft valve preparation, especially in pulmonary and large aortic valves; but complementary studies is necessary

  7. Organic evaporator steam valve failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Technical has requested an analysis of the capacity of the Organic Evaporator (OE) condenser (OEC) be performed to determine its capability in the case where the OE steam flow control valve fails open. Calculations of the OE boilup and the OEC heat transfer coefficient indicate the OEC will have more than enough capacity to remove the heat at maximum OE boilup. In fact, the Salt Cell Vent Condenser (SCVC) should also have sufficient capacity to handle the maximum OE boilup. Therefore, it would require simultaneous loss of OEC and/or SCVC condensing capacity for the steam valve failure to cause high benzene in the Process Vessel Vent System (PVVS)

  8. Development of Long-Lifetime Pulsed Gas Valves for Pulsed Electric Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Wendel M.; Crapuchettes, John M.; Addona, Brad M.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2015-01-01

    It is advantageous for gas-fed pulsed electric thrusters to employ pulsed valves so propellant is only flowing to the device during operation. The propellant utilization of the thruster will be maximized when all the gas injected into the thruster is acted upon by the fields produced by the electrical pulse. Gas that is injected too early will diffuse away from the thruster before the electrical pulse can act to accelerate the propellant. Gas that is injected too late will miss being accelerated by the already-completed electrical pulse. As a consequence, the valve must open quickly and close equally quickly, only remaining open for a short duration. In addition, the valve must have only a small amount of volume between the sealing body and the thruster so the front and back ends of the pulse are as coincident as possible with the valve cycling, with very little latent propellant remaining in the feed lines after the valve is closed. For a real mission of interest, a pulsed thruster can be expected to pulse at least 10(exp 10) - 10(exp 11) times, setting the range for the number of times a valve must open and close. The valves described in this paper have been fabricated and tested for operation in an inductive pulsed plasma thruster (IPPT) for in-space propulsion. In general, an IPPT is an electrodeless space propulsion device where a capacitor is charged to an initial voltage and then discharged, producing a high-current pulse through a coil. The field produced by this pulse ionizes propellant, inductively driving current in a plasma located near the face of the coil. Once the plasma is formed, it can be accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity by the electromagnetic Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the induced plasma current and the magnetic field produced by the current in the coil. The valve characteristics needed for the IPPT application require a fast-acting valve capable of a minimum of 10(exp 10) valve actuation cycles. Since

  9. Initial data collection efforts of CREDO. Sodium valve failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bott, T.F.; Haas, P.M.

    1978-01-01

    The Centralized Reliability Data organisation (CREDO) has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to define, develop, and maintain a reliability data analysis center for use in advanced reactor safety and licensing. Its primary functions are collection, reduction, evaluation, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of reliability/maintainability data. Data-collection efforts have been initiated at several test loops, at the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II and at the Fast Flux Test Facility. Top priority is being given to collection data on safety and safety-related systems, primarily for sodium-cooled reactors. Sufficient operating time has been accumulated on sodium valves at test facilities to provide quantitative estimates of reliability characteristics with a reasonable degree of confidence. Sodium-valve failures have been categorized according to seat design, size, seal type, and actuator type. Attempts have been made to establish the variation of failure rate with time and duty. Estimates of failure rates for sodium valves have been compared to those for water valves and appear to be of the same order of magnitude. (author)

  10. Effects of dynamic loading of motor-operated valve actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damerell, P.S.; Daubresse, S.; Wolfe, K.J.; Dogan, T.; Gleeson, J.

    1994-01-01

    Experience has shown that valves with rising, nonrotating stems that are operated using electro-motor driven actuators can be susceptible to changes in output thrust at a constant torque switch setting as a result of changes in stem load time history. This effect is a concern because tests on these types of valves to verify thrust achieved at torque switch trip are often performed in situ under load conditions different from the required performance conditions. As part of a motor-operated valve research program being carried out by the Electric Power Research Institute, tests of typical electric motor actuators used with nuclear services valves have been performed. The test results show that changes in output thrust with load time history occur o varying degrees on different stem and stem nut combinations. When the effect exists, there is generally an increase in thrust at torque switch trip when load is developed rapidly from low initial loads, compared to when load is developed slowly. The effect is mainly a result of changes in the coefficient of friction at the stem-stem nut interface. The coefficient of friction is temporarily reduced under rapid loading conditions from low initial load, leading to increased thrust. The root cause is hypothesized to be a open-quotes squeeze-filmclose quotes effect, whereby mixed-mode lubrication (hydrodynamic plus boundary) temporarily replaces boundary lubrication. This paper describes the results of tests performed to better understand the phenomenon

  11. Bistable diverter valve in microfluidics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tesař, Václav; Bandulasena, H.C.H.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 5 (2011), s. 1225-1233 ISSN 0723-4864 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/07/1499; GA AV ČR IAA200760705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : fluidics * bistable diverter valves * pressure-driven microfluidics Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.735, year: 2011 http://www.springerlink.com/content/x4907p1908151522/

  12. Control valve friction operational experience at Darlington NGD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speer, B.

    1995-01-01

    Proper installation of valve packing is an important part of ensuring that control valves operate as intended. Darlington NGD has developed a Valve Packing Program. This program combined with valve diagnostics has enabled the station to ensure that the operability of control valves is maintained after repacking. This paper outlines the process that is used for this. (author)

  13. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacemen...

  14. Initial Surgical Experience with Aortic Valve Repair: Clinical and Echocardiographic Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Diniz Affonso da Costa

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Due to late complications associated with the use of conventional prosthetic heart valves, several centers have advocated aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root replacement for patients with aortic valve insufficiency, in order to enhance late survival and minimize adverse postoperative events. Methods: From March/2012 thru March 2015, 37 patients consecutively underwent conservative operations of the aortic valve and/or aortic root. Mean age was 48±16 years and 81% were males. The aortic valve was bicuspid in 54% and tricuspid in the remaining. All were operated with the aid of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Surgical techniques consisted of replacing the aortic root with a Dacron graft whenever it was dilated or aneurysmatic, using either the remodeling or the reimplantation technique, besides correcting leaflet prolapse when present. Patients were sequentially evaluated with clinical and echocardiographic studies and mean follow-up time was 16±5 months. Results: Thirty-day mortality was 2.7%. In addition there were two late deaths, with late survival being 85% (CI 95% - 68%-95% at two years. Two patients were reoperated due to primary structural valve failure. Freedom from reoperation or from primary structural valve failure was 90% (CI 95% - 66%-97% and 91% (CI 95% - 69%-97% at 2 years, respectively. During clinical follow-up up to 3 years, there were no cases of thromboembolism, hemorrhage or endocarditis. Conclusions: Although this represents an initial series, these data demonstrates that aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root surgery can be performed with satisfactory immediate and short-term results.

  15. Rapid 3D printing of anatomically accurate and mechanically heterogeneous aortic valve hydrogel scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hockaday, L A; Kang, K H; Colangelo, N W; Cheung, P Y C; Duan, B; Wu, J; Bonassar, L J; Butcher, J T; Malone, E; Lipson, H; Girardi, L N; Chu, C C

    2012-01-01

    The aortic valve exhibits complex three-dimensional (3D) anatomy and heterogeneity essential for the long-term efficient biomechanical function. These are, however, challenging to mimic in de novo engineered living tissue valve strategies. We present a novel simultaneous 3D printing/photocrosslinking technique for rapidly engineering complex, heterogeneous aortic valve scaffolds. Native anatomic and axisymmetric aortic valve geometries (root wall and tri-leaflets) with 12–22 mm inner diameters (ID) were 3D printed with poly-ethylene glycol-diacrylate (PEG-DA) hydrogels (700 or 8000 MW) supplemented with alginate. 3D printing geometric accuracy was quantified and compared using Micro-CT. Porcine aortic valve interstitial cells (PAVIC) seeded scaffolds were cultured for up to 21 days. Results showed that blended PEG-DA scaffolds could achieve over tenfold range in elastic modulus (5.3±0.9 to 74.6±1.5 kPa). 3D printing times for valve conduits with mechanically contrasting hydrogels were optimized to 14 to 45 min, increasing linearly with conduit diameter. Larger printed valves had greater shape fidelity (93.3±2.6, 85.1±2.0 and 73.3±5.2% for 22, 17 and 12 mm ID porcine valves; 89.1±4.0, 84.1±5.6 and 66.6±5.2% for simplified valves). PAVIC seeded scaffolds maintained near 100% viability over 21 days. These results demonstrate that 3D hydrogel printing with controlled photocrosslinking can rapidly fabricate anatomical heterogeneous valve conduits that support cell engraftment. (paper)

  16. Outcomes of Solo Smart valve in a single-center experience of 270 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Khani-Hanjani, Abbas; Yang, Siyuan; Wang, Wei; Sidhu, Surita; Mullen, John; Modry, Dennis; Wang, Shaohua

    2018-04-03

    The Solo Smart pericardial aortic valve has been widely used in Europe as an option for aortic valve replacement (AVR). We are reporting early and midterm clinical outcomes of AVR with the Solo Smart valve in a single North America center. This is a retrospective study of 270 consecutive patients who had AVR at Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute from February 2011 to March 2015. Follow-up and echocardiographic data were collected retrospectively from electronic and paper charts. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to evaluate the results. The mean age was 71.2±10.0 years, 67.4% were male, and 79.3% had combined procedures. Mean STS Score was 4.18±3.91. Early mortality was 3.7% for the entire group and 0% for isolated aortic valve replacement group. Mean cross-clamp time for isolated AVR and AVR with concomitant procedure was 70.8±12.7min and 117.0±45.0min, respectively. Permanent pacemaker implantation was necessary in 2.2% of patients. Echocardiography demonstrated a reduction in mean gradients from 40.8±17.4mmHg to 7.6±3.7 mmHg and peak gradient from 72.5 ± 48.8 mmHg to 15.5±7.5 mmHg. The 1-, 3-, and 5- year overall survival was 93.0%, 86.5% and 75.9%, respectively. At 5 years, freedom from valve-related death was 92.4%, freedom from structural valve deterioration and freedom from aortic valve reoperation were 96.4% and 98%, respectively. The Solo Smart valve is safe and has excellent hemodynamic performance. Aortic valve reoperation and rates of valve-related adverse events during midterm follow-up were low.

  17. Study on the Fluid Leak Diagnosis for Steam Valve in Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-Guk; Park, Jong-Hyuck; Yoo, Keun-Bae; Lee, Sun-Ki; Hong, Sung-Yull

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to estimate the applicability of acoustic emission(AE) method for the internal fluid leak from the valves. In this study, 4 inch gate steam valve leak tests were performed in order to analyze AE properties when leaks arise in valve seat. As a result of leak test for valve seat in a secondary system of power plant, we conformed that leak sound level increased in proportion to the increase of leak rate, and leak rates were compared to simulated tests. The resulting plots of leak rate versus peak frequency and AE signal level were the primary basis for determining the feasibility of quantifying leak acoustically. Previously, the large amount of data attained also allowed a favorable investigation of the effects of different leak paths, leak rates, pressure differentials through simulated test. All results of application tests are compared with results of simulated test. From the application tests, it was suggested that the AE method for diagnosis of steam leak was applicable. This paper presents quantitative measurements of fluid valve leak conditions by the analysis of AE parameter, FFT(fast fourier transform) and RMS(root mean square) level. Test apparatus were fabricated to accept a variety of leaking steam valves in order to determine what characteristics of AE signal change with leak conditions. The data for each valve were generated by varying the leak rate and recording the averaged RMS level versus time and frequency versus amplitude(FFT). Leak rates were varied by the valve differential pressure and valve size and leaking valves were observed in service. Most of the data analysis involved plotting the leak rate versus RMS level at a specific frequency to determine how well the two variables correlate in terms of accuracy, resolution, and repeatability

  18. Pivot design in bileaflet valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallana, F; Rinaldi, S; Galletti, P M; Nguyen, A; Piwnica, A

    1992-01-01

    The design criteria leading to the development of a new bileaflet valve (Sorin Bicarbon) were derived from the analysis of functional requirements, the performance of existing prostheses, and the availability of an advanced carbon coating technology (Carbofilm). The hinge is the critical element affecting fluid dynamics, durability, and thrombus formation in bileaflet valves. A comparative study of three existing models led to a new hinge design that was based on coupling two spheric surfaces with different radii of curvature (leaflet pivot and hinge recess) and obtained by electroerosion into a Carbofilm-coated metallic housing. In this valve, the point of contact moves continuously by rolling, not sliding. This minimizes friction and wear and allows uninterrupted washing of the blood exposed surfaces even during diastole (a finding established in patients using transesophageal echocardiography). Tricuspid implantation without anticoagulation in 33 sheep did not lead to thrombotic events (follow-up, 40-400 days). In the first 36 clinical implants observed for 15 months (mitral position, size 29; two unrelated deaths), the mean diastolic gradient by echo Doppler was 4 +/- 1.25 mmHg; the functional area was 3.2 +/- 0.6 cm2. No leaflet fracture and no thrombotic or embolic complications were observed clinically using a standard anticoagulant regimen.

  19. Design and performance characteristic analysis of servo valve-type water hydraulic poppet valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Hwan

    2009-01-01

    For water hydraulic system control, the flow or pressure control using high-speed solenoid valve controlled by PWM control method could be a good solution for prevention of internal leakage. However, since the PWM control of on-off valves cause extensive flow and pressure fluctuation, it is difficult to control the water hydraulic actuators precisely. In this study, the servo valve-type water hydraulic valve using proportional poppet as the main valve is designed and the performance characteristics of the servo valve-type water hydraulic valve are analyzed. Furthermore, it is demonstrated through experiments that a decline in control chamber pressure that follows the change of pilot flow is caused by the occurrence of cavitation around the proportional poppet, and that fundamental characteristics of the developed valve remain unaffected by the occurrence of cavitation

  20. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Keating

    Full Text Available We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics.

  1. The radiology of prosthetic heart valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, R.M.; Flicker, S.

    1985-01-01

    The development of prosthetic heart valves in the late 1950s ushered in a new era in the treatment of heart disease. The radiologist has an important role to play preoperatively in the diagnosis of valvular heart disease. Radiology is valuable in identification of the implanted prosthetic valve and recognition of complications associated with valve implantation. Radiologists must be familiar with the imaging techniques best suited to evaluate the function of the valve prosthesis in question. In this chapter the authors discuss the radiographic approach to the evaluation of the status of patients for valve replacement and the imaging problems peculiar to the types of valves in current use. The relative value of plain-film radiography, fluoroscopy, videorecording and cinerecording, and aortography is addressed, as well as the potential value of magnetic resonance imaging and subsecond dynamic computed tomography

  2. Textile for heart valve prostheses: fabric long-term durability testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Frederic; Durand, Bernard; Chakfe, Nabil

    2010-01-01

    The rapid developments and success in percutaneous vascular surgery over the last two decades with the now common stent grafts implantation, make the noninvasive surgery technique today attractive even for heart valve replacement. Less traumatic for the patient and also less time consuming, percutaneous heart valve replacement is however at its beginning and restricted to end of life patients. The noninvasive procedure expects from the heart valve prosthesis material to be resistant and adapted to folding requirements of the implantation process (catheter). Polyester fabric could be a suited material for heart valve implanted percutaneously. Highly flexible and resistant, polyester fabric proved to be well adapted to the dynamic behavior of a valve and polyester (Dacron) is also widely used for vascular grafts implantation and shows good biocompatibility and durability. However, today there's no data available on long-term durability of fabric used as heart valve material. The purpose of this work is to study the long term behavior of a microdenier polyester fabric construction under combined in vitro flexure and tension fatigue stress. In the novel in vitro testing technique presented, a fabric specimen was subjected to combined flexural and tensile fatigue generated by fluid flow under physiological pressure conditions. The results obtained show how flexural properties change with fatigue time, which reflects directly on the suitability of a fabric in such devices. It was also observed that these fabric structural changes directly influence the in vitro behavior of the textile heart valve prosthesis. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Fault Diagnosis of Internal Combustion Engine Valve Clearance Using the Impact Commencement Detection Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhinong; Wang, Zijia; Zhang, Jinjie

    2017-01-01

    Internal combustion engines (ICEs) are widely used in many important fields. The valve train clearance of an ICE usually exceeds the normal value due to wear or faulty adjustment. This work aims at diagnosing the valve clearance fault based on the vibration signals measured on the engine cylinder heads. The non-stationarity of the ICE operating condition makes it difficult to obtain the nominal baseline, which is always an awkward problem for fault diagnosis. This paper overcomes the problem by inspecting the timing of valve closing impacts, of which the referenced baseline can be obtained by referencing design parameters rather than extraction during healthy conditions. To accurately detect the timing of valve closing impact from vibration signals, we carry out a new method to detect and extract the commencement of the impacts. The results of experiments conducted on a twelve-cylinder ICE test rig show that the approach is capable of extracting the commencement of valve closing impact accurately and using only one feature can give a superior monitoring of valve clearance. With the help of this technique, the valve clearance fault becomes detectable even without the comparison to the baseline, and the changing trend of the clearance could be trackable. PMID:29244722

  4. Fault Diagnosis of Internal Combustion Engine Valve Clearance Using the Impact Commencement Detection Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhinong; Mao, Zhiwei; Wang, Zijia; Zhang, Jinjie

    2017-12-15

    Internal combustion engines (ICEs) are widely used in many important fields. The valve train clearance of an ICE usually exceeds the normal value due to wear or faulty adjustment. This work aims at diagnosing the valve clearance fault based on the vibration signals measured on the engine cylinder heads. The non-stationarity of the ICE operating condition makes it difficult to obtain the nominal baseline, which is always an awkward problem for fault diagnosis. This paper overcomes the problem by inspecting the timing of valve closing impacts, of which the referenced baseline can be obtained by referencing design parameters rather than extraction during healthy conditions. To accurately detect the timing of valve closing impact from vibration signals, we carry out a new method to detect and extract the commencement of the impacts. The results of experiments conducted on a twelve-cylinder ICE test rig show that the approach is capable of extracting the commencement of valve closing impact accurately and using only one feature can give a superior monitoring of valve clearance. With the help of this technique, the valve clearance fault becomes detectable even without the comparison to the baseline, and the changing trend of the clearance could be trackable.

  5. Trans-apical aortic valve implantation in a patient with stentless valve degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; MacCarthy, Philip; Monaghan, Mark; Wendler, Olaf

    2011-06-01

    Trans-apical valve-in-valve trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has successfully been performed in selected, high-risk patients, who suffered prosthetic degeneration after aortic valve replacement using stented xenografts. We report the case of a 79-year-old male patient who underwent one of the first successful TAVIs in a failing stentless bioprosthesis. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimal valve location in long oil pipelines

    OpenAIRE

    Grigoriev, A.; Grigorieva, N.V.

    2007-01-01

    We address the valve location problem, one of the basic problems in design of long oil pipelines. Whenever a pipeline is depressurized, the shutoff valves block the oil flow and seal the damaged part of the pipeline. Thus, the quantity of oil possibly contaminating the area around the pipeline is determined by the volume of the damaged section of the pipeline between two consecutive valves. Then, ecologic damage can be quantified by the amount of leaked oil and the environmental characteristi...

  7. Bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, H.; Deboi, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    The design, fabrication, assembly and test of a development configuration bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve suitable for the control hydrazine and liquid fluorine to an 800 pound thrust rocket engine is described. The valve features a balanced poppet, utilizing metal bellows, a hard poppet/seat interface and a flexure support system for the internal moving components. This support system eliminates sliding surfaces, thereby rendering the valve free of self generated particles.

  8. Improved valve and dash-pot assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S.C.

    1985-04-23

    A dash-pot valve comprises a cylinder submerged in the fluid of a housing and have a piston attached to a plunger projecting into the path of closing movement of a pivotal valve member. A vortex chamber in said cylinder is provided with targentially directed inlets to generate vortex flow upon retraction of said plunger and effect increasing resistance against said piston to progressively retard the closing rate of said valve member toward its seat.

  9. Valve and dash-pot assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Chih

    1986-01-01

    A dash-pot valve comprising a cylinder submerged in the fluid of a housing and having a piston attached to a plunger projecting into the path of closing movement of a pivotal valve member. A vortex chamber in said cylinder is provided with tangentially directed inlets to generate vortex flow upon retraction of said plunger and effect increasing resistance against said piston to progressively retard the closing rate of said valve member toward its seat.

  10. Double-reed exhaust valve engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2015-06-30

    An engine based on a reciprocating piston engine that extracts work from pressurized working fluid. The engine includes a double reed outlet valve for controlling the flow of low-pressure working fluid out of the engine. The double reed provides a stronger force resisting closure of the outlet valve than the force tending to open the outlet valve. The double reed valve enables engine operation at relatively higher torque and lower efficiency at low speed, with lower torque, but higher efficiency at high speed.

  11. Fast Flux Test Facility primary sodium valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabe, G.B.; Ezra, B.C.

    1977-01-01

    The design and development of the valves used in the primary sodium coolant loop of the Fast Flux Test Facility is described. One tilting-disk check valve is used in the cold leg of the coolant loop. It is designed to limit flow reversal in the loop while maintaining a low pressure drop during forward flow. Two isolation valves are used in each coolant loop--one in the cold leg and one in the hot leg. They are of the motor-operated swinging-gate type. The design, analysis, and testing programs undertaken to develop and qualify these valves are described

  12. Advantages of butterfly valves for power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapadat, J.T.

    1977-01-01

    Butterfly valves are increasingly used in nuclear power plants. They are used in CANDU reactors for class 2 and 3 service, to provide emergency and tight shutoff valves for all inlets and outlets of heat exchangers and all calandria penetrations. Guidelines for meeting nuclear power plant valve specifications are set out in ASME Section 3, Nuclear Power Plant Components. Some details of materials of construction, type of actuator, etc., for various classes of nuclear service are tabulated in the present article. The 'fishtail' butterfly valve is an improved design with reduced drag, as is illustrated and explained. (N.D.H.)

  13. Additively Manufactured Main Fuel Valve Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddleman, David; Richard, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) was utilized to fabricate a liquid hydrogen valve housing typical of those found in rocket engines and main propulsion systems. The SLM process allowed for a valve geometry that would be difficult, if not impossible to fabricate by traditional means. Several valve bodies were built by different SLM suppliers and assembled with valve internals. The assemblies were then tested with liquid nitrogen and operated as desired. One unit was also burst tested and sectioned for materials analysis. The design, test results, and planned testing are presented herein.

  14. Safety valve opening and closing operation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Kunio; Takeshima, Ikuo; Takahashi, Kiyokazu.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable the detection of the closing of a safety valve when the internal pressure in a BWR type reactor is a value which will close the safety valve, by inputting signals from a pressure detecting device mounted directly at a reactor vessel and a safety valve discharge pressure detecting device to an AND logic circuit. Constitution: A safety valve monitor is formed of a pressure switch mounted at a reactor pressure vessel, a pressure switch mounted at the exhaust pipe of the escape safety valve and a logic circuit and the lide. When the input pressure of the safety valve is raised so that the valve and the pressure switch mounted at the exhaust pipe are operated, an alarm is indicated, and the operation of the pressure switch mounted at a pressure vessel is eliminated. If the safety valve is not reclosed when the vessel pressure is decreased lower than the pressure at which it is to be reclosed after the safety valve is operated, an alarm is generated by the logic circuit since both the pressure switches are operated. (Sekiya, K.)

  15. Outcome of pregnancy in women after pulmonary autograft valve replacement for congenital aortic valve disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yap, Sing-Chien; Drenthen, Willem; Pieper, Petronella G.; Moons, Philip; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Klieverik, Loes M.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.

    Background and aim of the study: The pulmonary autograft has been recommended as the valve of choice for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in young women contemplating pregnancy. However, current information on maternal and perinatal outcome of pregnancy in women with pulmonary autograft valve

  16. Outcome of pregnancy in women after pulmonary autograft valve replacement for congenital aortic valve disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yap, Sing-Chien; Drenthen, Willem; Pieper, Petronella G.; Moons, Philip; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Klieverik, Loes M.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.

    2007-01-01

    Background and aim of the study: The pulmonary autograft has been recommended as the valve of choice for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in young women contemplating pregnancy. However, current information on maternal and perinatal outcome of pregnancy in women with pulmonary autograft valve

  17. Outcome of pregnancy in women after pulmonary autograft valve replacement for congenital aortic valve disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yap, S.C.; Drenthen, W.; Pieper, P.G.; Moons, P.; Mulder, B.J.M.; Klieverik, L.M.; Vliegen, H.W.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Meijboom, F.J.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: The pulmonary autograft has been recommended as the valve of choice for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in young women contemplating pregnancy. However, current information on maternal and perinatal outcome of pregnancy in women with pulmonary autograft valve

  18. Transapical JenaValve in a patient with mechanical mitral valve prosthesis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O' Sullivan, Katie E

    2014-01-29

    We report the first case of transcatheter aortic valve replacement implantation using JenaValve™ in a patient with mechanical mitral valve prosthesis. We believe that the design features of this valve may be particularly suited for use in this setting. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Safety valve including a hydraulic brake and hydraulic brake that could be fitted into a valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabat-Courrede, Jean.

    1981-01-01

    Making of a safety valve that can be fitted to a containment vessel filled with a non compressible fluid, such as the water system of a nuclear power station. It includes a hydraulic brake located between the valve and the elastic means, close to the valve which completely suppresses the high frequency oscillations of the equipment [fr

  20. Small valve area index: its influence on early mortality after mitral valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yazdanbakhsh, A. P.; van den Brink, R. B.; Dekker, Egbert; de Mol, B. A.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that mitral valve prosthesis-patient mismatch increases postoperative mortality. METHODS AND RESULTS: The effect of mitral valve prosthesis-patient mismatch on survival in a cohort of consecutive patients after mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis

  1. Impact of bicuspid aortic valve on complications and death in infective endocarditis of native aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahveci, Gokhan; Bayrak, Fatih; Pala, Selcuk; Mutlu, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated the impact of bicuspid aortic valve on the prognosis of patients who had definite infective endocarditis of the native aortic valve.Of 51 patients, a bicuspid aortic valve was present in 22 (43%); the other 29 had tricuspid aortic valves. On average, the patients who had bicuspid valves were younger than those who had tricuspid valves. Patients with a tricuspid valve had larger left atrial diameters and were more likely to have severe mitral regurgitation.Periannular complications, which we detected in 19 patients (37%), were much more common in the patients who had a bicuspid valve (64% vs 17%, P = 0.001). The presence of a bicuspid valve was the only significant independent predictor of periannular complications. The in-hospital mortality rate in the bicuspid group was lower than that in the tricuspid group; however, this figure did not reach statistical significance (9% vs 24%, P = 0.15). In multivariate analysis, left atrial diameter was the only independent predictor associated with an increased risk of death (hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-4.5; P = 0.031).In our study, patients with infective endocarditis in a bicuspid aortic valve were younger and had a higher incidence of periannular complications. Although a worse prognosis has been reported previously, we found that infective endocarditis in a native bicuspid aortic valve is not likely to increase the risk of death in comparison with infective endocarditis in native tricuspid aortic valves.

  2. Surgery of the aortic root: should we go for the valve-sparing root reconstruction or the composite graft-valve replacement is still the first choice of treatment for these patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando de Azevedo Lamana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:To compare the results of the root reconstruction with the aortic valve-sparing operation versus composite graftvalve replacement.Methods:From January 2002 to October 2013, 324 patients underwent aortic root reconstruction. They were 263 composite graft-valve replacement and 61 aortic valve-sparing operation (43 reimplantation and 18 remodeling. Twenty-six percent of the patients were NYHA functional class III and IV; 9.6% had Marfan syndrome, and 12% had bicuspid aortic valve. There was a predominance of aneurysms over dissections (81% vs. 19%, with 7% being acute dissections. The complete follow-up of 100% of the patients was performed with median follow-up time of 902 days for patients undergoing composite graft-valve replacement and 1492 for those undergoing aortic valve-sparing operation.Results:In-hospital mortality was 6.7% and 4.9%, respectively for composite graft-valve replacement and aortic valve-sparing operation (ns. During the late follow-up period, there was 0% moderate and 15.4% severe aortic regurgitation, and NYHA functional class I and II were 89.4% and 94%, respectively for composite graft-valve replacement and aortic valve-sparing operation (ns. Root reconstruction with aortic valve-sparing operation showed lower late mortality (P=0.001 and lower bleeding complications (P=0.006. There was no difference for thromboembolism, endocarditis, and need of reoperation.Conclusion:The aortic root reconstruction with preservation of the valve should be the operation being performed for presenting lower late mortality and survival free of bleeding events.

  3. Design and performance of General Electric boiling water reactor main steam line isolation valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell, D.A.; van Zylstra, E.H.

    1976-08-01

    An extensive test program has been completed by the General Electric Company in cooperation with the Commonwealth Edison Company on the basic design type of large main steam line isolation valves used on General Electric Boiling Water Reactors. Based on a total of 40 tests under simulated accident conditions covering a wide range of mass flows, mixture qualities, and closing times, it was concluded that the commercially available valves of this basic type will close completely and reliably as required. Analytical methods to predict transient effects in the steam line and valve after postulated breaks were refined and confirmed by the test program

  4. Pressure Regulators as Valves for Saving Compressed Air and their Influence on System Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvořák Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure regulators in the field of pneumatic mechanisms can be used as valves for saving compressed air. For example it can be used to reduce the pressure when the piston rod is retracting unloaded and thus it is possible to save some energy. However the problem is that saving valve can significantly affect the dynamics of the pneumatic system. The lower pressure in the piston rod chamber causes extension of time for retraction of the piston rod. This article compare the air consumption experimentally determined and calculated, measured curves of pressure in cylinder chambers and piston speed when saving valve is set up differently.

  5. Pressure Regulators as Valves for Saving Compressed Air and their Influence on System Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořák, Lukáš; Fojtášek, Kamil

    2015-05-01

    Pressure regulators in the field of pneumatic mechanisms can be used as valves for saving compressed air. For example it can be used to reduce the pressure when the piston rod is retracting unloaded and thus it is possible to save some energy. However the problem is that saving valve can significantly affect the dynamics of the pneumatic system. The lower pressure in the piston rod chamber causes extension of time for retraction of the piston rod. This article compare the air consumption experimentally determined and calculated, measured curves of pressure in cylinder chambers and piston speed when saving valve is set up differently.

  6. Design Optimization of Moving Magnet Actuated Valves for Digital Displacement Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Esben Lundø; Jørgensen, Janus Martin Thastum; Nørgård, Christian

    2017-01-01

    High-efficiency hydraulic machines using digital valves are presently a topic of great focus. Digital valve performance with respect to pressure loss, closing time as well as electrical power consumption, is key to obtaining high efficiency. A recent digital seat valve design developed at Aalborg...... optimized design closes in 2.1 ms, has a pressure drop of 0.8 bar at 150 l/min and yields a digital displacement machine average chamber efficiency of 98.9%. The design is simple in construction and uses a single coil, positioned outside the pressure chamber, eliminating the need for an electrical interface...

  7. Infusion of the solid coal using pressure independent valves to regulate flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goretz, H G; Betting, K

    1979-01-01

    In order to improve infusion into the solid coal, attempts were made to effect this through several holes using a single pump; however, the regulation of the quantity of water directed into each hole by a ball-valve tap connected to the injection pump was shown to lack precision - gives the causes of this defect. Satisfactory regulation was obtained by means of pressure- independent flow valves which operate on the principle of hydrodynamic pressure balance; describes method of operation. Underground tests proved satisfactory even with large pressure variations. The problem of dirt penetration during down times was eliminated by installing a check valve. The system proves economical to run.

  8. Packaged Au-PPy valves for drug delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Han-Kuan A.; Ma, Kuo-Sheng; Zoval, Jim; Kulinsky, Lawrence; Madou, Marc

    2006-03-01

    The most common methods for the drug delivery are swallowing pills or receiving injections. However, formulations that control the rate and period of medicine (i.e., time-release medications) are still problematic. The proposed implantable devices which include batteries, sensors, telemetry, valves, and drug storage reservoirs provide an alternative method for the responsive drug delivery system [1]. Using this device, drug concentration can be precisely controlled which enhances drug efficiency and decreases the side effects. In order to achieve responsive drug delivery, a reliable release valve has to be developed. Biocompatibility, low energy consumption, and minimized leakage are the main requirements for such release method. A bilayer structure composed of Au/PPy film is fabricated as a flap to control the release valve. Optimized potentiostatic control to synthesize polypyrrole (PPy) is presented. The release of miniaturize valve is tested and showed in this paper. A novel idea to simultaneously fabricate the device reservoirs as well as protective packaging is proposed in this paper. The solution of PDMS permeability problem is also mentioned in this article.

  9. Deformation Differences between Tricuspid and Bicuspid Aortic Valves in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Kai; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2011-11-01

    It has been shown in clinical studies that patients with congenital bicuspid aortic valves (CBAVs) develop degenerative calcification of the leaflets at young ages compared to patients with the normal tricuspid aortic valves (TAVs). It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical geometry of the leaflets in CBAVs, flow shear stresses (SS), disturbed flow, and excessive strain rate levels are possible causes for the early calcification and stenosis. Central to the validation of this hypothesis is the need to quantify the differences in strain rate levels between the BAVs and TAVs. We simulate the CBAVs by surgically stitching two of the leaflets of a porcine aortic valve together. To quantify strain differences, we performed in-vitro experiments in both trileaflet and bileaflet valves by tracking the motion of small ink dots marked on each leaflet surface. We then used phase-locked stereo photogrammetry to reconstruct at each instant of time the 3D surface of the leaflets and measure the strain rates in both radial and circumferential directions during the whole cardiac cycle. Our results indicate that the total strain rate of the simulated BAVs is about 15 to 20% higher than the normal leaflets of TAVs at systole. In the BAVs' case, the fused leaflet stretches radially up to 25% higher than the reference length. The excessive stretching in both directions in the fused leaflet results in large changes in the flow patterns and associated wall SS.

  10. Thermal stability of low dose Ga+ ion irradiated spin valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Xianjin; Wang Yingang; Zhou Guanghong; Li Ziquan

    2009-01-01

    The thermal stability of low dose Ga + ion irradiated spin valves has been investigated and compared with that of the as-prepared ones. The dependences of exchange field, measured using vibrating sample magnetometer at room temperature, on magnetic field sweep rate and time spent at negative saturation of the pinned ferromagnetic layer, and training effect were explored. The training effect is observed on both the irradiated spin valves and the as-prepared ones. The magnetic field sweep rate dependence of the exchange bias field of the irradiated spin valves is nearly the same as that of the as-prepared ones. For the as-prepared structure thermal activation has been observed, which showed that holding the irradiated structure at negative saturation of the pinned ferromagnetic layer for up to 28 hours results in no change in the exchange field. The results indicate that the thermal stability of the ion irradiated spin valves is the same as or even better than the as-prepared ones.

  11. Ministernotomy: A preliminary experience in heart valve surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Pavle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The last decade of the 20th century brought up a significant development in the field of minimally invasive approaches to the valvular heart surgery. Potential benefits of this method are: good esthetic appearance, reduced pain, reduction of postoperative hemorrhage and incidence of surgical site infection, shorter postoperative intensive care units (ICU period and overall in-hospital period. Partial upper median sternotomy currently presents as a state-of-the art method for minimally invasive surgery of cardiac valves. The aim of this study was to report on initial experience in application of this surgical method in the surgery of mitral and aortic valves. Methods. The study was designed and conducted in a prospective manner and included all the patients who underwent minimally invasive cardiac valve surgery through the partial upper median sternotomy during the period November 2008 - August 2009. We analyzed the data on mean age of patients, mean extubation time, mean postoperative drainage, mean duration of hospital stay, as well as on occurance of postoperative complications (postoperative bleeding, surgical site infection and cerebrovascular insult. Results. During the observed period, in the Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of Vojvodina, Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery, 17 ministernotomies were performed, with 14 aortic valve replacements (82.35% and 3 mitral valve replacements (17.65%. Mean age of the patients was 60.78 ± 12.99 years (64.71% males, 35.29% females. Mean extubation time was 12.53 ± 8.87 hours with 23.5% of the patients extubated in less than 8 hours. Mean duration of hospital stay was 12.35 ± 10.17 days (in 29.4% of the patients less than 8 days. Mean postoperative drainage was 547.06 ± 335.2 mL. Postoperative complications included: bleeding (5.88% and cerebrovascular insult (5.88%. One patient (5.88% required conversion to full sternotomy. Conclusion. Partial upper median sternotomy represents

  12. [Ministernotomy: a preliminary experience in heart valve surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarević, Pavle; Mihajlović, Bogoljub; Velicki, Lazar; Redzek, Aleksandar; Ivanović, Vladimir; Komazec, Nikola

    2011-05-01

    The last decade of the 20th century brought up a significant development in the field of minimally invasive approaches to the valvular heart surgery. Potential benefits of this method are: good esthetic appearance, reduced pain, reduction of postoperative hemorrhage and incidence of surgical site infection, shorter postoperative intensive care units (ICU) period and overall in-hospital period. Partial upper median stemotomy currently presents as a state-of-the art method for minimally invasive surgery of cardiac valves. The aim of this study was to report on initial experience in application of this surgical method in the surgery of mitral and aortic valves. The study was designed and conducted in a prospective manner and included all the patients who underwent minimally invasive cardiac valve surgery through the partial upper median stemotomy during the period November 2008 - August 2009. We analyzed the data on mean age of patients, mean extubation time, mean postoperative drainage, mean duration of hospital stay, as well as on occurance of postoperative complications (postoperative bleeding, surgical site infection and cerebrovascular insult). During the observed period, in the Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of Vojvodina, Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery, 17 ministernotomies were performed, with 14 aortic valve replacements (82.35%) and 3 mitral valve replacements (17.65%). Mean age of the patients was 60.78 +/- 12.99 years (64.71% males, 35.29% females). Mean extubation time was 12.53 +/- 8.87 hours with 23.5% of the patients extubated in less than 8 hours. Mean duration of hospital stay was 12.35 +/- 10.17 days (in 29.4% of the patients less than 8 days). Mean postoperative drainage was 547.06 +/- 335.2 mL. Postoperative complications included: bleeding (5.88%) and cerebrovascular insult (5.88%). One patient (5.88%) required conversion to full stemotomy. Partial upper median sternotomy represents the optimal surgical method for the interventions on the

  13. Hydraulic engine valve actuation system including independent feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Craig D

    2013-06-04

    A hydraulic valve actuation assembly may include a housing, a piston, a supply control valve, a closing control valve, and an opening control valve. The housing may define a first fluid chamber, a second fluid chamber, and a third fluid chamber. The piston may be axially secured to an engine valve and located within the first, second and third fluid chambers. The supply control valve may control a hydraulic fluid supply to the piston. The closing control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the second fluid chamber to the supply control valve. The opening control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the supply control valve to the second fluid chamber.

  14. A shut-off valve for flexible tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyburn, W. W.

    1972-01-01

    Design of light weight valve for flexible tubing is described. Valve is hand operated and provides positive sealing in normally closed position. Diagram is provided to show construction of valve. Principles of operation are explained.

  15. Theoretical study of a novel refrigeration compressor - Part II: Performance of a rotating discharge valve in the revolving vane (RV) compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teh, Y.L.; Ooi, K.T. [Thermal and Fluids Engineering Division, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, S639798 (Singapore); Djamari, D. Wibowo [Engineering Mechanics Division, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, S639798 (Singapore)

    2009-08-15

    A new refrigeration compressor, named 'Revolving Vane (RV) compressor', has been introduced in Part I of this paper series. For a first time in refrigeration compressors, a rotating discharge valve is employed in the RV compressor mainly due to the rotation of the entire cylinder. This paper presents a theoretical investigation on the dynamic behavior of a reed-type discharge valve undergoing rotatory motion, with the primary objective of elucidating the applicability of such valves in refrigeration compressors. Under the application of the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, a mathematical model of the rotating valve is formulated and the transient response of the valve under centrifugal loads in addition to pressure forces is analyzed. Results have shown that under careful design considerations, the performance as well as the reliability of the rotating discharge valve can be enhanced as compared to a non-rotating valve that has been used in all refrigeration compressors currently. (author)

  16. Incidence of cerebrovascular accidents in patients undergoing minimally invasive valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPietra, Angelo; Santana, Orlando; Mihos, Christos G; DeBeer, Steven; Rosen, Gerald P; Lamas, Gervasio A; Lamelas, Joseph

    2014-07-01

    Minimally invasive valve surgery has been associated with increased cerebrovascular complications. Our objective was to evaluate the incidence of cerebrovascular accidents in patients undergoing minimally invasive valve surgery. We retrospectively reviewed all the minimally invasive valve surgery performed at our institution from January 2009 to June 2012. The operative times, lengths of stay, postoperative complications, and mortality were analyzed. A total of 1501 consecutive patients were identified. The mean age was 73 ± 13 years, and 808 patients (54%) were male. Of the 1501 patients, 206 (13.7%) had a history of a cerebrovascular accident, and 225 (15%) had undergone previous heart surgery. The procedures performed were 617 isolated aortic valve replacements (41.1%), 658 isolated mitral valve operations (43.8%), 6 tricuspid valve repairs (0.4%), 216 double valve surgery (14.4%), and 4 triple valve surgery (0.3%). Femoral cannulation was used in 1359 patients (90.5%) and central cannulation in 142 (9.5%). In 1392 patients (92.7%), the aorta was clamped, and in 109 (7.3%), the surgery was performed with the heart fibrillating. The median aortic crossclamp and cardiopulmonary bypass times were 86 minutes (interquartile range [IQR], 70-107) minutes and 116 minutes (IQR, 96-143), respectively. The median intensive care unit length of stay was 47 hours (IQR, 29-74), and the median postoperative hospital length of stay was 7 days (IQR, 5-10). A total of 23 cerebrovascular accidents (1.53%) and 38 deaths (2.53%) had occurred at 30 days postoperatively. Minimally invasive valve surgery was associated with an acceptable stroke rate, regardless of the cannulation technique. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical Implication of Transaortic Mitral Pannus Removal During Repeat Cardiac Surgery for Patients With Mechanical Mitral Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byungjoon; Sung, Kiick; Park, Pyo Won

    2018-01-25

    This study aimed to evaluate the safety and feasibility of transaortic mitral pannus removal (TMPR).Methods and Results:Between 2004 and 2016, 34 patients (median age, 57 years; 30 women) with rheumatic disease underwent pannus removal on the ventricular side of a mechanical mitral valve through the aortic valve during reoperation. The median time interval from the previous surgery was 14 years. TMPR was performed after removal of the mechanical aortic valve (n=21) or diseased native aortic valve (n=11). TMPR was performed in 2 patients through a normal aortic valve. The mitral transprosthetic mean pressure gradient (TMPG) was ≥5 mmHg in 11 patients, including 3 with prosthetic valve malfunction. Prophylactic TMPR was performed in 23 patients. There were no early deaths. Concomitant operations included 22 tricuspid valve surgeries (13 replacements, 15 repairs) and 32 aortic valve replacements (24 repeats, 8 primary). The mean gradient in patients who had mitral TMPG ≥5 mmHg was significantly decreased from 6.46±1.1 to 4.37±1.17 mmHg at discharge (Ppannus overgrowth in such valves.

  18. Thermal Aging Effect Analysis of 17-4PH Martensitic Stainless Steel Valves for Nuclear Power Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI; Bing; ZHANG; Chang-yi; TONG; Zhen-feng; YANG; Wen

    2015-01-01

    The valve stem used in the main steam system of nuclear power plant is usually martensitic stainless steel(such as 17.4ph16.4Mo etc.).When served in high temperature for a long time,the thermal aging embrittlement of valve stem will be significant,and even lead to the fracture.

  19. Intracranial Pressure-Guided Shunt Valve Adjustments with the Miethke Sensor Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antes, Sebastian; Stadie, Axel; Müller, Simon; Linsler, Stefan; Breuskin, David; Oertel, Joachim

    2018-01-01

    Telemetric intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring seems to be a promising therapy-supporting option in shunt-treated patients. Benefits become obvious when headaches are unspecific and clinical symptoms cannot be related to possible overdrainage or underdrainage. In this study, we evaluated a new telemetric device to individually adjust shunt valves according to ICP measurements. Between December 2015 and November 2016, 25 patients with suspected suboptimal shunt valve settings underwent insertion of a telemetric ICP sensor (Sensor Reservoir; Christoph Miethke, Potsdam, Germany). Over a 1-year period, a total of 183 telemetric ICP measurements and 85 shunt valve adjustments were carried out. Retrospective statistic analyses focused on valve adjustments, ICP values, and clinical outcomes. ICP-guided valve adjustments positively changed the clinical state in 18 out of 25 patients. Clinical improvement over time was associated with significant changes of the valve settings and ICP values. Interestingly, a therapeutically normalized ICP profile was not automatically associated with clinical improvement. The Sensor Reservoir is an important and valuable tool for shunt-treated patients suffering from drainage-related problems. The possibility to simultaneously recognize and solve shunt problems represents the decisive advantage. Nevertheless, measurements with the Sensor Reservoir did not allow for the determination of default valve settings or universal target ICP values. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. AVARIS. An innovative process to repair seal seat surfaces in gate and check valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzing, Karl-Heinz; Breitenberger, Ulf; Grieser, Armin

    2011-01-01

    AREVA Valve Repair in situ - AVARIS in short - is an innovative process for valve repair developed by AREVA. Its main benefit is that valves no longer need to be cut out but can be machined in situ, i.e. within the piping system. AVARIS saves the plant operators time and money, as complete exchanges of valves and the ensuing complex measures become dispensable. AVARIS is of high interest in the worldwide maintenance market, as it can be applied in both nuclear and conventional power plants. Moreover, AVARIS retrofits valves in the secondary and primary circuit which even saves complex nuclear transports. AVARIS fulfills the quality requirements of 3. party authorities in national and international markets. Valves repaired with AVARIS correspond to their original condition with regard to the sealing function. The successful first application on 2 gate valves in a German nuclear power plant proves that this repair technology is very reliable and flexible. Follow-up orders for AVARIS will be realized in several nuclear power plants in 2011. (orig.)

  1. Comparative study of encapsulated blebs following Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation and trabeculectomy with mitomycin-C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kunho; Suh, Wool; Kee, Changwon

    2012-08-01

    To compare the histopathologic and morphologic findings of encapsulated blebs following Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation and primary standard trabeculectomy with mitomycin-C. We reviewed the records of patients with otherwise uncontrollable glaucoma who had undergone Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation or trabeculectomy with mitomycin-C. Five eyes that underwent Ahmed valve implantation and three eyes that underwent trabeculectomy needed surgical revision of the initial surgery due to encapsulated bleb development with total loss of function. The surgically removed encapsulated blebs were analyzed macroscopically and microscopically. Removal of the encapsulated bleb was performed at a mean follow-up time of 26.6 ± 19.4 weeks in the Ahmed valve implantation group and 12.0 ± 11.4 weeks in the trabeculectomy group. The fibrotic wall of the encapsulated blebs had an overall thickness of 2.48 ± 0.42 mm in the Ahmed valve implantation group and 1.62 ± 0.37 mm in the trabeculectomy group. Macroscopically, the coconut flesh-like smooth surface was split into two layers, and the wall of the capsule was thicker in the Ahmed valve implantation group than in the trabeculectomy group. Histopathologically, the fibrotic capsule was composed of an inner fibrodegenerative layer and an outer fibrovascular layer, and there were no histopathological differences between the two groups. The fibrotic capsule wall was thicker in the Ahmed valve group, but there were no differences in histological findings between the two groups.

  2. Study of check valve slamming in a BWR feedwater system following a postulated pipe break

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safwat, H.H.; Arastu, A.H.; Norman, A.

    1985-01-01

    This study deals with a swing check valve slamming due to a break at relatively short distance from the valve. Under this situation, substantial flashing occurs near the valve and the result of the study are subject to what is believed to be a conservative simplifying assumption, i.e., the hydrodynamic moment acting on the valve during the transient is represented by resultant moment due to the pressure differential across the valve. It is believed that vapor voids forming at the valve would actually reduce the disk impact velocities in comparison to those predicted under this simplifying assumption. A technique used to represent a double-ended break through hypothetical valves may have some influence on the results particularly for long break opening times. The study has yielded good insight to help understand the complex problem. The study has focused on some parameters and the reader may raise questions on the effects of other parameters. Nevertheless, the present study underlines the complexity facing analysts dealing with this transient using analytical methods. Though some experimental data are available, the authors believe that an experimental study (recognizing the complexity of the experimental setup and instrumentation), would be quite useful. It can provide answers to questions facing analysts dealing with this problem and thus avoid unnecessary conservatisms due to uncertainties in input data

  3. Multidetector computed tomography sizing of bioprosthetic valves: guidelines for measurement and implications for valve-in-valve therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajani, R.; Attia, R.; Condemi, F.; Webb, J.; Woodburn, P.; Hodson, D.; Nair, A.; Preston, R.; Razavi, R.; Bapat, V.N.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To describe a technique for bioprosthetic multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) sizing and to compare MDCT-derived values against manufacturer-provided sizing. Materials and methods: Fourteen bioprosthetic stented valves commonly used in the aortic valve position were evaluated using a Philips 256 MDCT system. All valves were scanned using a dedicated cardiac CT protocol with a four-channel electrocardiography (ECG) simulator. Measurements were made of major and minor axes and the area and perimeter of the internal stent using varying reconstruction kernels and window settings. Measurements derived from MDCT (MDCT ID) were compared against the stent internal diameter (Stent ID) as provided by the valve manufacturer and the True ID (Stent ID + insertion of leaflets). All data were collected and analysed using SPSS for Mac (version 21). Results: The mean difference between the MDCT ID and Stent ID was 0.6±1.9 mm (r=0.649, p=0.012) and between MDCT ID and True ID 2.1±2 mm (r=0.71, p=0.005). There was no difference in the major (p=0.90), minor (p=0.87), area (p=0.92), or perimeter (p=0.92) measurements when sharp, standard, and detailed stent kernels were used. Similarly, the measurements remained consistent across differing windowing levels. Conclusion: Bioprosthetic stented valves may be reliably sized using MDCT in patients requiring valve-in-valve (VIV) interventions where the valve type and size are unknown. In these cases, clinicians should be aware that MDCT has a tendency to overestimate the True ID size. - Highlights: • Cardiac CT is likely to be ideally suited for bioprosthetic aortic valve sizing for valve in valve procedures. • We compared MDCT sizing for 14 varying bioprosthetic aortic valves across varying window settings and reconstruction kernels. • We provide “normal” MDCT sizing for varying valves and show their relationship to surgical sizing. • Bioprosthetic valves may be reliably sized by MDCT but require adjustment owing to

  4. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation due to severe aortic regurgitation in a degenerated aortic homograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Engstrøm, Thomas; Søndergaard, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in severe aortic stenosis has proven to be a feasible and effective treatment modality for inoperable patients. Until now, neither aortic regurgitation nor degenerated bioprostheses has been an indication for TAVI. However, this article reports...... a successful valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis through the right subclavian artery in a case of severe aortic regurgitation within a degenerated aortic homograft. The case exemplifies the possibilities of expanding the indications for TAVI, as well as other vascular access...

  5. High Reliability Cryogenic Piezoelectric Valve Actuator, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic fluid valves are subject to harsh exposure and actuators to drive these valves require robust performance and high reliability. DSM's piezoelectric...

  6. Trombosis de válvulas cardiacas biológicas. Presentación de dos casos evaluados con ecocardiografía 3D en tiempo real Thrombosis of biological valves. Report of two cases evaluated by 3D echocardiography in real time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo A Rendón

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available La trombosis de las válvulas protésicas biológicas es una complicación infrecuente, que se asocia con mortalidad elevada. En este artículo se reporta el caso de un paciente de género masculino, de 72 años de edad, con prótesis valvular biológica en posición aórtica y trombosis asociada a degeneración valvular, así como el de una paciente de género femenino de 64 años de edad, con prótesis biológica en posición mitral y trombosis de la misma en el contexto de una infección sistémica. Ambos casos se evaluaron mediante ecocardiografía transesofágica tridimensional en tiempo real.Thrombosis of biological prosthetic valves is a rare complication, associated with high mortality. We report the case of a 72 years old male patient with biological valve prosthesis in the aortic position and thrombosis associated with valvular degeneration, as well as that of a 64 years old female patient with bioprosthesis in the mitral position and thrombosis of it in the context of a systemic infection. Both cases were evaluated by three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in real time.

  7. Dikkers Valves for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Most countries have adopted the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III, as the basis of their national requirements for licensing nuclear components. This Code gives clear directives for defining design requirements coupled with a controlled manufacturing system. It has always been and still is the policy of Dikkers to manufacture high-quality products. Dikkers manufacture nuclear products in accordance with this Code, Section III; indeed many features exceed these minimum requirements. At the Nuclex Exhibition in Basel, Dikkers Valves BV will exhibit its main products for use in nuclear power plants. (Auth.)

  8. Cylinder valve packing nut studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, S.C. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The design, manufacture, and use of cylinder valve packing nuts have been studied to improve their resistance to failure from stress corrosion cracking. Stress frozen photoelastic models have been analyzed to measure the stress concentrations at observed points of failure. The load effects induced by assembly torque and thermal expansion of stem packing were observed by strain gaging nuts. The effects of finishing operations and heat treatment were studied by the strain gage hole boring and X-ray methods. Modifications of manufacturing and operation practices are reducing the frequency of stress corrosion failures.

  9. Valve Corporation: Composing Internal Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Todd R. Zenger

    2015-01-01

    Discussions of the Valve Corporation are always enlightening. The skeptic wonders how much is rhetoric and recruiting ploy and how much is real. Is there clear evidence that this organizational design actually works – that it is efficient in this setting? While revenues per employee are quite remarkable, cause and effect are unclear. Is “boss-less-ness” the cause of high sales per employee or simply the result of high sales per employee, fueled from earlier success? The same question could be...

  10. Outcomes of Aortic Valve-Sparing Operations in Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Tirone E; David, Carolyn M; Manlhiot, Cedric; Colman, Jack; Crean, Andrew M; Bradley, Timothy

    2015-09-29

    In many cardiac units, aortic valve-sparing operations have become the preferred surgical procedure to treat aortic root aneurysm in patients with Marfan syndrome, based on relatively short-term outcomes. This study examined the long-term outcomes of aortic valve-sparing operations in patients with Marfan syndrome. All patients with Marfan syndrome operated on for aortic root aneurysm from 1988 through 2012 were followed prospectively for a median of 10 years. Follow-up was 100% complete. Time-to-event analyses were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank test for comparisons. A total of 146 patients with Marfan syndrome had aortic valve-sparing operations. Reimplantation of the aortic valve was performed in 121 and remodeling of the aortic root was performed in 25 patients. Mean age was 35.7 ± 11.4 years and two-thirds were men. Nine patients had acute, 2 had chronic type A, and 3 had chronic type B aortic dissections before surgery. There were 1 operative and 6 late deaths, 5 caused by complications of dissections. Mortality rate at 15 years was 6.8 ± 2.9%, higher than the general population matched for age and sex. Five patients required reoperation on the aortic valve: 2 for endocarditis and 3 for aortic insufficiency. Three patients developed severe, 4 moderate, and 3 mild-to-moderate aortic insufficiency. Rate of aortic insufficiency at 15 years was 7.9 ± 3.3%, lower after reimplantation than remodeling. Nine patients developed new distal aortic dissections during follow-up. Rate of dissection at 15 years was 16.5 ± 3.4%. Aortic valve-sparing operations in patients with Marfan syndrome were associated with low rates of valve-related complications in long-term follow-up. Residual and new aortic dissections were the leading cause of death. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of an ITER prototype disruption mitigation valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czymek, G., E-mail: g.czymek@fz-juelich.de [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D52425 Jülich (Germany); Giesen, B., E-mail: ingenieurbuero.giesen@gmx.de [IBG, Sibertstr. 22, D-52525 Heinsberg (Germany); Charl, A.; Panin, A.; Hiller, A.; Nicolai, D.; Neubauer, O.; Koslowski, H.R.; Sandri, N. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • An ITER-DMV prototype for 100 bar, D = 80 mm, opening time 3.5 ms, is ready for fabrication. • The vacuum part is sealed against the working gas by stainless steel bellows for 110 bar. • The conical Laval gas outlet allows maximal mass flow rate. • The eddy current drive turn ratio was optimized for low tilting moment. • Polyimide is used for the head sealing, the decelerator and for the bearing of the guide tube. - Abstract: Disruptions in tokamaks seem to be unavoidable. Consequences of disruptions are (i) high heat loads on plasma-facing components, (ii) large forces on the vacuum vessel, and (iii) the generation of runaway electron beams. In ITER, the thermal energy of the plasma needs to be evenly distributed on the first wall in order to prevent melting, forces from vertical displacement events have to be minimized, and the generation of runaway electrons suppressed. Massive gas injection using fast valves is a concept for disruption mitigation which is presently being explored in many tokamaks. Fast disruption mitigation valves based on an electromagnetic eddy current drive have been developed in Jülich since the 1990s and models of various sizes have been built and are in operation in the TEXTOR, MAST, and JET tokamaks. A disruption mitigation valve for ITER is of necessity larger with an estimated injected gas volume of ∼20 kPa m{sup 3}[7] for runaway electron suppression and all materials used have to be resistant to much higher levels of neutron and gamma radiation than in existing tokamaks. During the last 5 years, the concept for an ITER prototype disruption mitigation valve has been developed up to the stage that a fully functional valve could be built and tested. Special emphasis was given to the development and functional testing of some critical items: (i) the injection chamber seal, (ii) the piston seal, (iii) the eddy current drive, and (iv) a braking mechanism to avoid too fast closure of the valve, which could damage

  12. Structural valve deterioration in a starr-edwards mitral caged-disk valve prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Shigeaki; Tayama, Kei-Ichiro; Okazaki, Teiji; Shintani, Yusuke; Kono, Michitaka; Wada, Kumiko; Kosuga, Ken-Ichi; Mori, Ryusuke; Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    The durability of the Starr-Edwards (SE) mitral caged-disk valve, model 6520, is not clearly known, and structural valve deterioration in the SE disk valve is very rare. Replacement of the SE mitral disk valve was performed in 7 patients 23-40 years after implantation. Macroscopic examination of the removed disk valves showed no structural abnormalities in 3 patients, in whom the disk valves were removed at valves excised >36 years after implantation in 4 patients. Disk fracture, a longitudinal split in the disk along its circumference at the site of incorporation of the titanium ring, was detected in the valves removed 36 and 40 years after implantation, respectively, and many cracks were also observed on the outflow aspect of the disk removed 40 years after implantation. Disk fracture and localized disk wear were found in the SE mitral disk valves implanted >36 years previously. The present results suggest that SE mitral caged-disk valves implanted >20 years previously should be carefully followed up, and that those implanted >30 years previously should be electively replaced with modern prosthetic valves

  13. Maintenance management for nuclear power plant 'Integrated valve maintenance'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerner, P.; Zanner, G.

    2001-01-01

    The deregulation of Europe's power market does force many utilities, and especially nuclear power plant operators, to introduce extensive cost-cutting measures in order to be able to compete within this new environment. The optimization of plant outages provides considerable potential for raising plant availability but can also lower operating costs by reducing e.g. expenditure on maintenance. Siemens Nuclear Power GmbH, in cooperation with plant operators, is currently implementing new and improved service concepts which can have a major effect on the way in which maintenance will be performed in the future. Innovative service packages for maintenance in nuclear power plants are available which can be used to perform a time- and cost-effective maintenance. The concepts encompass optimization of the overall sequence from planning in advance to the individual measures including reduction of the scope of maintenance activities, identification of cost cutting potential and bundling of maintenance activities. The main features of these maintenance activities are illustrated here using the examples of outage planning and integrated valve maintenance. In nuclear power plants approx. 5000 valves are periodically preventively, condition-based or breakdown-based maintained. Because of this large number of valves to be maintained a high potential of improvements and cost reductions can be achieved by performing an optimized, cost-effective maintenance based on innovative methods and tools. Siemens Nuclear Power GmbH has developed and qualified such tools which allow to reduce service costs while maintaining high standards of safety and availability. By changing from preventive to predictive (condition-based) maintenance - the number of valves to be maintained may be reduced considerably. The predictive maintenance is based on the Siemens Nuclear Power GmbH diagnostic and evaluation method (ADAM). ADAM is used to monitor the operability of valves by analytical verification of

  14. Aorta measurements are heritable and influenced by bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J Martin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Word Count 266, 1609 charactersObjectives: To determine whether the contributions of genetics and bicuspid aortic valve (BAV independently influence aortic (Ao dimensions.Background: Ao dilation is a risk factor for aneurysm, dissection, and sudden cardiac death. Frequent association of BAV with Ao dilation implicates a common underlying defect possibly due to genetic factors. Methods: Families enriched for BAV underwent standardized transthoracic echocardiography. In addition to BAV status, echocardiographic measures of Ao (annulus to descending Ao, pulmonary artery and mitral valve annulus diameters were obtained. Using variance components analysis, heritability was estimated with and without BAV status. Additionally, bivariate genetic analyses between Ao dimensions and BAV were performed.Results: Our cohort was obtained from 209 families enriched for BAV. After adjusting for age, body surface area and sex, individuals with BAV had a statistically significant increase in all echocardiographic measurements (p < 0.006 except descending Ao and mitral valve annulus. Individuals with BAV were at greater odds of having Ao dilation (OR = 4.44, 95% CI 2.93 – 6.72 than family members without BAV. All echocardiographic measurements exhibited moderate to strong heritability (0.25 to 0.53, and these estimates were not influenced by inclusion of BAV as a covariate. Bivariate genetic analyses supported that the genetic correlation between BAV and echo measures were not significantly different from zero.Conclusions: We show for the first time that echocardiographic measurements of Ao, pulmonary artery and mitral valve annulus diameters are quantitative traits that exhibit significant heritability. In addition, our results suggest the presence of BAV independently influences the proximal Ao and pulmonary artery measures but not those in the descending Ao or mitral valve annulus.

  15. Maximizing prosthetic valve size with the Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jan; Geha, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: The CarboMedics Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve allows a one-size (and often two-size) increase over the standard intra-annular valve. This advantage should minimize the risk of patient-prosthesis mismatch, where the effective prosthetic valve orifice area....... This study evaluates the authors' clinical experience with Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve size selection, and the technical aspects of implantation. METHODS: Between January 1999 and October 2005, a total of 251 consecutive patients underwent 252 aortic valve replacements with Top Hat supra...... required unplanned coronary bypass, and 30-day mortality was 2.0% (5/251), indicating a good safety profile for the valves implanted in this series. CONCLUSION: The general distribution of implant sizes in the US indicates that cardiac surgeons may be under-sizing the Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve...

  16. Anatomical challenges for transcatheter mitral valve intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Luk, Ngai H V; Søndergaard, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Following the success of transcatheter aortic and pulmonary valve implantation, there is a large interest in transcatheter mitral valve interventions to treat severe mitral regurgitation (MR). With the exception for the MitraClipTM (Abbott, Abbott Park, IL, USA) edge-to-edge leaflet plication...

  17. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylotte, Darren; Osnabrugge, Ruben L J; Windecker, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy.......The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy....

  18. Oil pipeline valve automation for spill reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohitpour, Mo; Trefanenko, Bill [Enbridge Technology Inc, Calgary (Canada); Tolmasquim, Sueli Tiomno; Kossatz, Helmut [TRANSPETRO - PETROBRAS Transporte S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    Liquid pipeline codes generally stipulate placement of block valves along liquid transmission pipelines such as on each side of major river crossings where environmental hazards could cause or are foreseen to potentially cause serious consequences. Codes, however, do not stipulate any requirement for block valve spacing for low vapour pressure petroleum transportation, nor for remote pipeline valve operations to reduce spills. A review of pipeline codes for valve requirement and spill limitation in high consequence areas is thus presented along with a criteria for an acceptable spill volume that could be caused by pipeline leak/full rupture. A technique for deciding economically and technically effective pipeline block valve automation for remote operation to reduce oil spilled and control of hazards is also provided. In this review, industry practice is highlighted and application of the criteria for maximum permissible oil spill and the technique for deciding valve automation thus developed, as applied to ORSUB pipeline is presented. ORSUB is one of the three initially selected pipelines that have been studied. These pipelines represent about 14% of the total length of petroleum transmission lines operated by PETROBRAS Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO) in Brazil. Based on the implementation of valve motorization on these three pipeline, motorization of block valves for remote operation on the remaining pipelines is intended, depending on the success of these implementations, on historical records of failure and appropriate ranking. (author)

  19. Nuclear valves and the licencing authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens-Guille, P.D.

    1977-02-01

    Valve problems relevant to licencing authorities are discussed. It is suggested that the probability of valve failure should be given more emphasis in safety analysis. Problems of stress analysis, codes, seismic effects, malfunction and leakage are discussed and programmes aimed at solving future problems are outlined

  20. The future of transcatheter mitral valve interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maisano, Francesco; Alfieri, Ottavio; Banai, Shmuel

    2015-01-01

    of transcatheter mitral valve interventions will be. The purpose of the present report is to review the current state-of-the-art of mitral valve intervention, and to identify the potential future scenarios, which might benefit most from the transcatheter repair and replacement devices under development....