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Sample records for valve libman-sacks endocarditis

  1. Molecular imaging in Libman-Sacks endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders; Schaadt, Bente K; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric

    2015-01-01

    cardiothoracic surgery and pathologic examinations showed characteristic morphology of Libman-Sacks vegetations. All microbiological examinations including blood cultures, microscopy, culture and 16s PCR of the valve were negative and the diagnosis of Libman-Sacks endocarditis was convincing. It is difficult...... to distinguish Libman-Sacks endocarditis from culture-negative infective endocarditis (IE). Molecular imaging techniques are being used increasingly in cases of suspected IE but no studies have previously reported the use in patients with Libman-Sacks endocarditis. In the present case, (18)F-FDG-PET-CT clearly...

  2. Double-valve Libman-Sacks endocarditis causing ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanawuttiwat, Tanyanan; Dia, Muhyaldeen; Hanif, Tabassum; Mihailescu, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    Libman-Sacks endocarditis is a well-known and rather common cardiac manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. Transesophageal and transthoracic echocardiography are the definitive imaging methods used to evaluate cardiac valvular involvement in this disease. Valvular masses (vegetations) and valvular thickening are 2 common morphologic echocardiographic patterns. Libman-Sacks lesions are typically characterized by single-valve involvement and their small size of 1 to 4 mm.Herein, we present the unusual case of a 22-year-old woman with newly diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus who had large, sterile vegetations of Libman-Sacks endocarditis that involved the mitral and aortic valves. This compromised coronary blood flow and resulted in ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest. The vegetations were surgically excised, and the patient's cardiac function recovered. We discuss the treatment of the patient and that of Libman-Sacks endocarditis.

  3. Endocarditis de Libman-Sacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Saldarriaga

    2015-05-01

    Se reporta el caso de un paciente de género masculino, de 63 años, quien manifestó signos y síntomas compatibles con endocarditis infecciosa, y cuyos diferentes estudios demostraron una endocarditis de Libman-Sacks que respondió de forma favorable al tratamiento inmunosupresor.

  4. Mitral valve surgery for mitral regurgitation caused by Libman-Sacks endocarditis : a report of four cases and a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Wobbe; Klinkenberg, Theo J.; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; Wijdh-den Hamer, Inez J.; Erasmus, Michiel E.; Bijl, Marc; Suurmeijer, Albert J. H.; Zijlstra, Felix; Mariani, Massimo A.

    2010-01-01

    Libman-Sacks endocarditis of the mitral valve was first described by Libman and Sacks in 1924. Currently, the sterile verrucous vegetative lesions seen in Libman-Sacks endocarditis are regarded as a cardiac manifestation of both systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the antiphospholipid syndrome

  5. Unusual location of the Libman-Sacks endocarditis in a teenager: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wałdoch, Anna; Kwiatkowska, Joanna; Dorniak, Karolina

    2016-02-01

    Libman-Sacks endocarditis may be the first manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. The risk of its occurrence increases with the co-existence of the anti-phospholipid syndrome. Changes usually involve the mitral valve and the aortic valve. In this report, we present a case of Libman-Sacks endocarditis of the tricuspid valve in a teenage girl.

  6. Reparación valvular mitral en un caso de endocarditis de Libman-Sacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Bernabeu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available La endocarditis de Libman-Sacks es una forma de endocarditis no bacteriana asociada a los pacientes con lupus eritematoso sistémico (LES. Aunque con frecuencia cursa de forma asintomática, en ocasiones es causa de insuficiencia cardíaca grave. Presentamos un caso de reparación valvular mitral en una paciente aquejada de esta infrecuente entidad, que debutó clínicamente con un edema agudo de pulmón secundario a insuficiencia mitral masiva. La reparación valvular mitral puede ser un procedimiento eficaz y seguro, que permite evitar el riesgo adicional asociado al uso de prótesis valvulares en estos pacientes con riesgo trombótico elevado.

  7. ENDOCARDITIS IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMEL Harzallah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Endocarditis is one of the most prevalent forms of cardiac involvement in patients with lupus, as it is considered as one a life-threatening complication. Libman-Sacks endocarditis is common. Infective endocarditis can also cause complications within immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study is to determine particularities of endocarditis in patients with lupus and to look for distinguishing features between infectious or immunological origin. A retrospective study was conducted on patients with lupus presenting endocarditis. Lupus was diagnosed according to the American college of rheumatology criteria. The diagnosis of endocarditis was made based on the modified Duke criteria. The present case report studies seven cases of endocarditis. Six of these patients are women and the other one is a man. They are aged meanly of 29.4 years (extremes: 20-36. Fever was present in all the cases with a new cardiac murmur in six cases and a modification of its intensity in one case. Biologic inflammatory syndrome was present in six cases. Cardiac ultrasound performed in six cases made the diagnosis of endocarditis which involved the left heart valves in five cases and the right heart valves in one case. Valvular insufficiency was identified in six patients. The valve involvement was mitral in two cases, mitro-aortic in two others, aortic in the fifth one and tricuspid in the sixth one. Endocarditis was infectious in 4 cases, thanks to positive blood culture. The germs identified were gram negative bacilli in two cases, anaerobic organism in one case and gram positive cocci in one case. Candida albicans was isolated in one case. Libman-Sacks endocarditis was objectified in three cases. A combination of Libman-Sacks endocarditis with infectious endocarditis was diagnosed in one case. The treatment consisted of antibiotics in four cases with surgery in two cases. The outcome was favorable in five cases and fatal in the two others. Endocarditis in lupus

  8. Endocarditis trombótica no bacteriana (Libman-Sacks

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    Antonio García-Valentín

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Mujer de 47 años ingresada en 2002 por ictus. Se diagnosticó masa valvular aórtica. Se intervino realizándose exéresis de trombo no bacteriano (Fig 1a, b. Durante el estudio de trombofilia fue diagnosticada de síndrome antifosfolípido primario (SAP, inciándose anticoagulación. Hasta la fecha, ha padecido múltiples accidentes cerebrovasculares, isquémicos y hemorrágicos. Está en diálisis peritoneal con probable origen en SAP. SAP es un trastorno autoinmune caracterizado por fenómenos trombóticos iterativos y alargamiento de tiempos de coagulación. La cirugía cardiaca conlleva morbimortalidad por tromboembolias, suponiendo un reto en el manejo de la circulación extracorpórea. Las complicaciones tromboembólicas son frecuentes durante el seguimiento.

  9. Infective endocarditis: a history of the development of its understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Geller

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation of the inner layer of the heart, especially the valvular endothelium, chordae tendinae and mural endocardium was first recognized almost 350 years ago. Over the years it has had many names, but is now generally designated infective endocarditis (IE and has an associated infectious agent. A sterile vegetative process can also affect the valves and is usually referred to as Libman-Sacks endocarditis. The developments of medical science that allowed for our understanding of this entity included refinement of the autopsy, medical microscopy, microbiology, and in recent years, molecular studies. Some observations were misleading but clarification particularly followed the reports of Morgagni, Osler and Libman. As understanding of the pathobiology of infective endocarditis grew so did the effectiveness of therapy. This paper provides a detailed history of the development of the concept of Infective endocarditis citing many key morphological observations and concludes with brief comments about current concepts of pathogenesis as well as a few remarks about therapy.

  10. Isolated Pulmonary Valve Endocarditis

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    Mohammad Ali Hatamizadeh

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis is one of the most severe complications of parenteral drug abuse. The outstanding clinical feature of infective endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers is the high incidence of right-sided valve infection, and the tricuspid valve is involved in 60% to 70% of the cases. We herein report a case of isolated pulmonic valve infective endocarditis with a native pulmonary valve.

  11. Aerococcus viridans Native Valve Endocarditis

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    Wenwan Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerococcus viridans is an infrequent human pathogen and few cases of infective endocarditis have been reported. A case involving a 69-year-old man with colon cancer and hemicolectomy 14 years previously, without recurrence, is reported. A diagnosis of native mitral valve endocarditis was established on the basis of clinical presentation, characteristic echocardiographic findings and pathological specimen examination after urgent valve replacement. A viridans endocarditis appears to be particularly virulent, requiring a surgical approach in four of 10 cases reported and death in one of nine. Given the aggressive nature of A viridans endocarditis and the variable time to diagnosis (a few days to seven months, prompt recognition of symptoms and echocardiography, in addition to blood cultures, should be performed when symptoms persist.

  12. Infective endocarditis following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheung, Gary; Vejlstrup, Niels; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2013-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement (PPVR) with the Melody valve is rarely reported. Furthermore, there are challenges in this diagnosis; especially echocardiographic evidence of vegetation within the prosthesis may be difficult.......Infective endocarditis (IE) following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement (PPVR) with the Melody valve is rarely reported. Furthermore, there are challenges in this diagnosis; especially echocardiographic evidence of vegetation within the prosthesis may be difficult....

  13. Prosthetic valve endocarditis after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Thue; De Backer, Ole; Thyregod, Hans G H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an advancing mode of treatment for inoperable or high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) after TAVI is a serious complication, but only limited data exist on its incidence, outcome, and procedural...

  14. Infective endocarditis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement-

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loh, Poay Huan; Bundgaard, Henning; S�ndergaard, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) can improve the symptoms and prognosis of patients with severe aortic stenosis who, due to a high expected operative risk, would not have otherwise been treated surgically. If these patients develop prosthetic valve endocarditis, their presentations m...... treated medically, discuss the challenges in the diagnosis and management of such patients, and review available literature on the incidence and outcome of the condition. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  15. Native valve Escherichia coli endocarditis following urosepsis

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    D Rangarajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gram-negative organisms are a rare cause of infective endocarditis. Escherichia coli, the most common cause of urinary tract infection and gram-negative septicemia involves endocardium rarely. In this case report, we describe infection of native mitral valve by E. coli following septicemia of urinary tract origin in a diabetic male; subsequently, he required prosthetic tissue valve replacement indicated by persistent sepsis and congestive cardiac failure.

  16. Native valve Escherichia coli endocarditis following urosepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Rangarajan, D.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Patro, K. C.; Devaraj, S.; Krishnamurthy, V.; Kothari, Y.; Satyaki, N.

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative organisms are a rare cause of infective endocarditis. Escherichia coli, the most common cause of urinary tract infection and gram-negative septicemia involves endocardium rarely. In this case report, we describe infection of native mitral valve by E. coli following septicemia of urinary tract origin in a diabetic male; subsequently, he required prosthetic tissue valve replacement indicated by persistent sepsis and congestive cardiac failure.

  17. Mitral valve aneurysm associated with aortic valve endocarditis and regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Amish N; Menkis, Alan H; Boughner, Derek R

    2002-01-01

    Mitral valve aneurysms are rare complications occurring most commonly in association with aortic valve infective endocarditis. [Decroly 1989, Chua 1990, Northridge 1991, Karalis 1992, Roguin 1996, Mollod 1997, Vilacosta 1997, Cai 1999, Vilacosta 1999, Teskey 1999, Chan 2000, Goh 2000, Marcos- Alberca 2000] While the mechanism of the development of this lesion is unclear, complications such as perforation can occur and lead to significant mitral regurgitation. [Decroly 1989, Karalis 1992, Teskey 1999, Vilacosta 1999]; The case of a 69-year-old male with Streptococcus Sanguis aortic valve endocarditis and associated anterior mitral leaflet aneurysm is presented. Following surgery, tissue pathology of the excised lesion revealed myxomatous degeneration and no active endocarditis or inflammatory cells. This may add support to the hypothesis that physical stress due to severe aortic insufficiency and structural weakening, without infection of the anterior mitral leaflet, can lead to the development of this lesion.

  18. Tricuspid valve endocarditis caused by Eikenella corrodens

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    Martin Tretjak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground. Infectious endocarditis of the tricuspid valve is rare in non-intravenous drug users and patients without central venous devices. The most frequent causative agents are staphylococci, rarely other bacteria.Methods. We describe a case of a 57-year-old patient without history of drug abuse that was admitted to our hospital because of fever with chills, dry cough, loss of appetite and wasting lasting for a few months. He had a venous ulcer on the right foot and interdigital inflammation on both feet. Eikenella corrodens was isolated from blood cultures. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a large vegetation on the anterior leaflet of tricuspid valve. CT scan oh the thorax showed probable septic emboli. The patient was treated conservatively with prolonged double antibiotic regimen. During the treatment there were no further complications.Conclusions. In our patients a rare form of tricuspid valve endocarditis was confirmed, caused by Eikenella corrodens. The possibility of infectious endocarditis should always be considered in patients with prolonged fever, especially when a possible causative agent is isolated from blood cultures.

  19. Native Pulmonic Valve Endocarditis due to Mycobacterium fortuitum: A Case Report and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mulhall, Aaron M.; Hebbeler-Clark, Renee S.

    2015-01-01

    Endocarditis secondary to Mycobacterium fortuitum is a rare entity often involving prosthetic valves and rarely native valves. Pulmonic valve endocarditis secondary to any organism is rare. We report the first case of native pulmonic valve endocarditis secondary to M. fortuitum and a literature review of native valve M. fortuitum endocarditis.

  20. Native Pulmonic Valve Endocarditis due to Mycobacterium fortuitum: A Case Report and Literature Review

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    Aaron M. Mulhall

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocarditis secondary to Mycobacterium fortuitum is a rare entity often involving prosthetic valves and rarely native valves. Pulmonic valve endocarditis secondary to any organism is rare. We report the first case of native pulmonic valve endocarditis secondary to M. fortuitum and a literature review of native valve M. fortuitum endocarditis.

  1. Isolated tricuspid valve infective endocarditis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-07-07

    Jul 7, 1990 ... Case 2. Initial chest radiograph showing rounded shadows with cavitation. Fig. 2. Case 2. Chest radiograph showing progression to effusion. nuc/eacum was Isolated from repeated blood cultures. Two- dimensional echocardiography revealed vegetations on the tricuspid valve (Fig. 3). The patient was now ...

  2. Left-sided native valve Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slabbekoorn, M.; Horlings, H. M.; van der Meer, J. T. M.; Windhausen, A.; Van der Sloot, J. A. P.; Lagrand, W. K.

    2010-01-01

    Despite improved diagnostic tools and expanded treatment options, left-sided native valve endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection remains a serious and destructive disease. The high morbidity and mortality, however, can be reduced by early recognition, correct diagnosis, and

  3. Isolated Native Tricuspid Valve Endocarditis Caused by Viridans Streptococcus

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    John Swiston

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes a case of native tricuspid valve endocarditis caused by viridans group streptococcus in a 43-year-old man who had recently undergone dental extraction. The patient had no history of intravenous drug use, heart disease or right heart catheterization. Although there have been scattered reports of unusual organisms, to the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of viridans group streptococcal endocarditis involving only the tricuspid valve after dental manipulation.

  4. Comparison of heart valve culture between two Danish endocarditis centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldstedlund, Marianne; Fuursted, Kurt; Bruun, Niels Eske

    2012-01-01

    The degree to which the results of valve culture depend on different laboratory procedures as well as other factors is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the results of heart valve culture at 2 different endocarditis centres in order to clarify this.......The degree to which the results of valve culture depend on different laboratory procedures as well as other factors is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the results of heart valve culture at 2 different endocarditis centres in order to clarify this....

  5. Corynebacterium CDC group G native and prosthetic valve endocarditis

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    Adil Sattar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We report the first case of native and recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis with Corynebacterium CDC group G, a rarely reported cause of infective endocarditis (IE. Previously, there have been only two cases reported for prosthetic valve IE caused by these organisms. A 69-year-old female with a known history of mitral valve regurgitation presented with a 3-day history of high-grade fever, pleuritic chest pain and cough. Echocardiography confirmed findings of mitral valve thickening consistent with endocarditis, which subsequently progressed to become large and mobile vegetations. Both sets of blood cultures taken on admission were positive for Corynebacterium CDC group G. Despite removal of a long-term venous access port, the patient’s presumed source of line associated bacteremia, mitral valve replacement, and aggressive antibiotic therapy, the patient had recurrence of vegetations on the prosthetic valve. She underwent replacement of her prosthetic mitral valve in the subsequent 2 weeks, before she progressed to disseminated intravascular coagulation and expired. Although they are typically considered contaminants, corynebacteria, in the appropriate clinical setting, should be recognized, identified, and treated as potentially life-threatening infections, particularly in the case of line-associated bacteremias, and native and prosthetic valve endocarditis.

  6. Corynebacterium CDC Group G Native and Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Adil; Yu, Siegfried; Koirala, Janak

    2015-08-11

    We report the first case of native and recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis with Corynebacterium CDC group G, a rarely reported cause of infective endocarditis (IE). Previously, there have been only two cases reported for prosthetic valve IE caused by these organisms. A 69-year-old female with a known history of mitral valve regurgitation presented with a 3-day history of high-grade fever, pleuritic chest pain and cough. Echocardiography confirmed findings of mitral valve thickening consistent with endocarditis, which subsequently progressed to become large and mobile vegetations. Both sets of blood cultures taken on admission were positive for Corynebacterium CDC group G. Despite removal of a long-term venous access port, the patient's presumed source of line associated bacteremia, mitral valve replacement, and aggressive antibiotic therapy, the patient had recurrence of vegetations on the prosthetic valve. She underwent replacement of her prosthetic mitral valve in the subsequent 2 weeks, before she progressed to disseminated intravascular coagulation and expired. Although they are typically considered contaminants, corynebacteria, in the appropriate clinical setting, should be recognized, identified, and treated as potentially life-threatening infections, particularly in the case of line-associated bacteremias, and native and prosthetic valve endocarditis.

  7. Nosocomial valve endocarditis due to corynebacterium striatum: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marull, Jorge; Casares, Pablo A

    2008-12-12

    Staphylococcus aureus, Coagulase-negative staphylococci, and Enterococci sp. are the usual pathogens involved in nosocomial bacterial endocarditis. Corynebacterium species isolation in blood specimens is usually considered to be a contaminant. We present an interesting case of native mitral valve endocarditis in a 73 year old African American female that was diagnosed days after she was discharged from our institution. The infection was cleared with medical therapy alone.

  8. Nosocomial valve endocarditis due to corynebacterium striatum: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Marull, Jorge; Casares, Pablo A

    2008-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, Coagulase-negative staphylococci, and Enterococci sp. are the usual pathogens involved in nosocomial bacterial endocarditis. Corynebacterium species isolation in blood specimens is usually considered to be a contaminant. We present an interesting case of native mitral valve endocarditis in a 73 year old African American female that was diagnosed days after she was discharged from our institution. The infection was cleared with medical therapy alone.

  9. Surgical Management of Multiple Valve Endocarditis Associated with Dialysis Catheter

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    R. Zea-Vera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocarditis associated with dialysis catheter is a disease that must be suspected in every patient with hemodialysis who develops fever. Multiple valve disease is a severe complication of endocarditis that needs to be managed in a different way. There is very limited data for treatment and every case must be considered individually. We present a patient with this complication and describe the medical treatment and surgical management. We report the case of a 15-year-old patient with acute renal failure that develops trivalvular endocarditis after the hemodialysis catheter was placed, with multiple positive blood culture for Staphylococcus aureus. Transesophageal echocardiography was done and aortic and tricuspid valvular vegetations and mitral insufficiency were reported. Patient was successfully treated by surgery on the three valves, including aortic valve replacement. There is limited data about the appropriate treatment for multiple valvular endocarditis; it is important to consider this complication in the setting of hemodialysis patients that develop endocarditis and, despite the appropriate treatment, have a torpid evolution. In countries where endovenous drug abuse is uncommon, right sided endocarditis is commonly associated with vascular catheters. Aggressive surgical management should be the treatment of choice in these kinds of patients.

  10. Isolated pulmonic valve endocarditis presenting as neck pain

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    Aditya Goud

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a unique case of a 52-year-old man with no history of intravenous drug use or dental procedures who presented with neck pain, 2 weeks of fevers, chills, night sweats, cough, and dyspnea found to have isolated pulmonic valve (PV endocarditis. The patient did not have an associated murmur, which is commonly seen in right-sided infectious endocarditis. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed a thickened PV leaflet, with subsequent transesophageal echocardiogram showing a PV mass. Speciation of blood cultures revealed Streptococcus oralis. In right-sided infective endocarditis, usually the tricuspid valve is involved; however, in our case the tricuspid valve was free of any mass or vegetation. The patient did meet Duke criteria and was thus started on long-term intravenous antibiotics for infectious endocarditis. The patient's symptoms quickly improved with antibiotics. A careful history and evaluating the patient's risk factors are key in earlier detection of infective endocarditis (IE. Because of early detection and a high index of suspicion, the patient had no further complications and did not require any surgery. In conclusion, clinical suspicion of right-sided IE should be high in patients who present with persistent fevers and pulmonary symptoms in order to reduce the risk of complications, and to improve outcomes.

  11. Isolated tricuspid valve infective endocarditis - A report of 6 cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Six cases of isolated tricuspid valve endocarditis in young women are described. Preceding genital sepsis was a predisposing factor in 4 patients. Cardiac signs are unusual at presentation, rendering the diagnosis difficult. Pleuropulmonary manifestations are the predominant findings, while overt signs of tricuspid ...

  12. Native valve endocarditis due to Candida parapsilosis in an adult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We describe a case of Candida parapsilosis endocarditis in an HIV-positive patient with pre-existing mitral valve disease and renal failure on haemodialysis. ... Blood cultures were positive for C. parapsilosis. β-D-glucan assay levels were elevated. .... presence of negative blood cultures suggests that this test is not reliable.

  13. Surgical treatment of aortic valve endocarditis: a 26-year experience

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    Taylan Adademir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We have retrospectively analyzed the results of the operations made for aortic valve endocarditis in a single center in 26 years. Methods: From June 1985 to January 2011, 174 patients were operated for aortic valve endocarditis. One hundred and thirty-eight (79.3% patients were male and the mean age was 39.3±14.4 (9-77 years. Twenty-seven (15.5% patients had prosthetic valve endocarditis. The mean duration of follow-up was 7.3±4.2 years (0.1-18.2 adding up to a total of 1030.8 patient/years. Results: Two hundred and eighty-two procedures were performed. The most frequently performed procedure was aortic valve replacement with mechanical prosthesis (81.6%. In-hospital mortality occurred in 27 (15.5% cases. Postoperatively, 25 (14.4% patients had low cardiac output and 17 (9.8% heart block. The actuarial survival rates for 10 and 15 years were 74.6±3.7% and 61.1±10.3%, respectively. In-hospital mortality was found to be associated with female gender, emergency operation, postoperative renal failure and low cardiac output. The long term mortality was significantly associated with mitral valve involvement. Male gender was found to be a significant risk factor for recurrence in the follow-up. Conclusion: Surgery for aortic valve endocarditis has significant mortality. Emergency operation, female gender, postoperative renal failure and low cardiac output are significant risk factors. Risk for recurrence and need for reoperation is low.

  14. Aortic valve endocarditis complicated by ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Benjamin E; Almanaseer, Yassar

    2014-12-01

    Infective endocarditis complicated by abscess formation and coronary artery compression is a rare clinical event with a high mortality rate, and diagnosis requires a heightened degree of suspicion. We present the clinical, angiographic, and echocardiographic features of a 73-year-old woman who presented with dyspnea and was found to have right coronary artery compression that was secondary to abscess formation resulting from diffuse infectious endocarditis. We discuss the patient's case and briefly review the relevant medical literature. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of abscess formation involving a native aortic valve and the right coronary artery.

  15. Anterior mitral valve aneurysm perforation secondary to aortic valve endocarditis detected by Doppler colour flow mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decroly, P; Vandenbossche, J L; Englert, M

    1989-02-01

    We report a case of mitral valve aneurysm formation and perforation, secondary to Streptococcus sanguis endocarditis of the aortic valve. Aneurysm formation was documented by cross-sectional echocardiography and its perforation was established by Doppler colour flow mapping, and subsequently confirmed at surgery.

  16. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia prosthetic valve endocarditis: a case report

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    Bayle Sophie

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an environmental bacterium increasingly involved in nosocomial infections and resistant to most antibiotics. It is important to recognize and efficiently treat infections with this bacterium as soon as possible. Case presentation We present a case of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia prosthetic valve endocarditis secondary to an indwelling catheter infection. The patient was cured without surgery. We review other cases of S. maltophilia endocarditis from the literature and describe the peculiarities of this case. Conclusion S. maltophilia endocarditis is a rare disease that is often hospital-acquired and related to an indwelling catheter infection. The high lethality is likely related to the intrinsic resistance of nosocomial bloodstream infections to commonly prescribed antibiotics.

  17. Prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Bordetella holmesii, an Acinetobacter lookalike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheere, Stijn; De Baere, Thierry; Schroeyers, Pascal; Soetens, Oriane; De Bel, Annelies; Surmont, Ignace

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of fulminant endocarditis on a prosthetic homograft aortic valve caused by Bordetella holmesii, which was successfully managed by surgical valve replacement and antibiotic treatment. B. holmesii, a strictly aerobic, small, Gram-negative coccobacillus, has been implicated as an infrequent cause of a pertussis-like syndrome and other respiratory illnesses. However, B. holmesii is also a rare cause of septicaemia and infective endocarditis, mostly in immunocompromised patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report of B. holmesii endocarditis on a prosthetic aortic valve. Routine laboratory testing initially misidentified the strain as Acinetobacter sp. Correct identification was achieved by 16S rRNA gene and outer-membrane protein A (ompA) gene sequencing. Interestingly, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry also produced an accurate species-level identification. Subsequent susceptibility testing and review of the literature revealed ceftazidime, cefepime, carbapenems, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, piperacillin/tazobactam, tigecycline and colistin as possible candidates to treat infections caused by B. holmesii.

  18. Anterior mitral valve aneurysm: a rare sequelae of aortic valve endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Janardhanan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In intravenous drug abusers, infective endocarditis usually involves right-sided valves, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common etiologic agent. We present a patient who is an intravenous drug abuser with left-sided (aortic valve endocarditis caused by Enterococcus faecalis who subsequently developed an anterior mitral valve aneurysm, which is an exceedingly rare complication. A systematic literature search was conducted which identified only five reported cases in the literature of mitral valve aneurysmal rupture in the setting of E. faecalis endocarditis. Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography was critical in making an accurate diagnosis leading to timely intervention. Learning objectives: • Early recognition of a mitral valve aneurysm (MVA is important because it may rupture and produce catastrophic mitral regurgitation (MR in an already seriously ill patient requiring emergency surgery, or it may be overlooked at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR. • Real-time 3D-transesophageal echocardiography (RT-3DTEE is much more advanced and accurate than transthoracic echocardiography for the diagnosis and management of MVA.

  19. Nuclear Medicine in Diagnosis of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Maria; Petrosillo, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades cardiovascular disease management has been substantially improved by the increasing introduction of medical devices as prosthetic valves. The yearly rate of infective endocarditis (IE) in patient with a prosthetic valve is approximately 3 cases per 1,000 patients. The fatality rate of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) remains stable over the years, in part due to the aging of the population. The diagnostic value of echocardiography in diagnosis is operator-dependent and its sensitivity can decrease in presence of intracardiac devices and valvular prosthesis. The modified Duke criteria are considered the gold standard for diagnosing IE; their sensibility is 80%, but in clinical practice their diagnostic accuracy in PVE is lower, resulting inconclusively in nearly 30% of cases. In the last years, these new imaging modalities have gained an increasing attention because they make it possible to diagnose an IE earlier than the structural alterations occurring. Several studies have been conducted in order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of various nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis of PVE. We performed a review of the literature to assess the available evidence on the role of nuclear medicine techniques in the diagnosis of PVE. PMID:25695043

  20. Mycobacterium goodii endocarditis following mitral valve ring annuloplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Rohan B; Grant, Matthew

    2017-03-21

    Mycobacterium goodii is an infrequent human pathogen which has been implicated in prosthesis related infections and penetrating injuries. It is often initially misidentified as a gram-positive rod by clinical microbiologic laboratories and should be considered in the differential diagnosis. We describe here the second reported case of M. goodii endocarditis. Species level identification was performed by 16S rDNA (ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid) gene sequencing. The patient was successfully treated with mitral valve replacement and a prolonged combination of ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Confirmation of the diagnosis utilizing molecular techniques and drug susceptibility testing allowed for successful treatment of this prosthetic infection.

  1. THE RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF TRICUSPID VALVE INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS USING VALVE REPAIR AND VALVE REPLACEMENT OPERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Kovalev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate in-hospital and long-term results of surgical treatment of patients with infective endocarditis of the tricuspid valve, to compare the effectiveness of valve repair and valve replacement techniques, and to identify risk factors of mortality and reoperations. Materials and methods. 31 surgical patients with tricuspid valve infective endocarditis were evaluated. Patients were divided into 2 groups. In Group 1 (n = 14 repairs of the tricuspid valve were performed, in Group 2 (n = 17 patients had undergone tricuspid valve replacements. Epidemiological, clinical, microbiological and echocardiographic data were studied. Methods of comparative analysis, the Kaplan–Meier method, and Cox risk models were applied. Results. The most common complication of in-hospital stay was atrioventricular block (17.7% of cases in Group 2. In Group 1, this type of complication was not found. Hospital mortality was 7.14% in Group 1, and 0% in Group 2. Long-term results have shown the significant reduction of heart failure in general cohort and in both groups. In Group 1 the severity of heart failure in the long term was less than in Group 2. No significant differences in the severity of tricuspid regurgitation were found between the groups. In 7-year follow up no cases of death were registered in Group 1. Cumulative survival rate in Group 2 within 60 months was 67.3 ± 16.2%. No reoperations were performed in patients from Group 1. In Group 2, the freedom from reoperation within 60 months was 70.9 ± 15.3%. Combined intervention was found as predictor of postoperative mortality. Prosthetic valve endocarditis was identified as risk factor for reoperation. Conclusion. Valve repair and valve replacement techniques of surgical treatment of tricuspid valve endocarditis can provide satisfactory hospital and long-term results. Tricuspid valve repair techniques allowed reducing the incidence of postoperative atrioventricular block. In the long-term, patients

  2. Successful salvage treatment of native valve Enterococcus faecalis infective endocarditis with telavancin: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mickala M; Hassoun, Ali

    2017-07-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) one-year mortality rates approach 40%. Here, we report two native valve Enterococcus faecalis IE cases in patients successfully treated with telavancin. An 88-year-old with mitral valve endocarditis and a penicillin allergy, initially treated with intravenous vancomycin, was switched to telavancin. A 69-year-old, who previously received amoxicillin and intravenous vancomycin for presumed enterococcal bacteraemia, was diagnosed with dual valve endocarditis for which he received telavancin. Both received six weeks of telavancin. Neither had telavancin-related adverse events, evidence of infection at six months, nor required telavancin dosing adjustments. Documented use of novel treatments for serious enterococcal infections is needed.

  3. Capnocytophaga canimorsus endocarditis with root abscess in a patient with a bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle Hamon

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis caused by a zoonotic micro organism is a rare clinical condition. Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a commensal bacterium living in the saliva of dogs and cats which produces rarely reported endocarditis whose incidence may be underestimated, considering its failure to grow on standard media. We reported the case of a 65-year-old man with bicuspid aortic valve endocarditis and multiple abscesses of the aortic wall caused by the canine bacteria C. canimorsus.

  4. Echocardiographic findings predict in-hospital and 1-year mortality in left-sided native valve Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Trine K.; Park, Lawrence; Tong, Steven Y C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus left-sided native valve infective endocarditis (LNVIE) has higher complication and mortality rates compared with endocarditis from other pathogens. Whether echocardiographic variables can predict prognosis in S aureus LNVIE is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Consec...

  5. Tricuspid valve endocarditis caused by Haemophilus parainfluenzae: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaohiri, Nnamdi; Urban, Carl; Gluck, Jason; Ahluwalia, Maneesha; Wehbeh, Wehbeh

    2009-06-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a Gram-negative bacterium that is often difficult to isolate and identify. We report a rare case of tricuspid valve and pacemaker endocarditis caused by this organism and explore factors related to etiopathogenesis, prevention, and treatment.

  6. Association Between Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement and Subsequent Infective Endocarditis and In-Hospital Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regueiro, Ander; Linke, Axel; Latib, Azeem

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Limited data exist on clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients who had infective endocarditis after undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). OBJECTIVE: To determine the associated factors, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of patients who had infective e...

  7. Quadricuspid aortic valve complicated with infective endocarditis: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Hiroki; Sakaki, Masayuki; Inoue, Kazushige; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Iwata, Takashi; Suehiro, Yasuo; Miura, Takuya

    2014-12-01

    Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve is a rare cardiac malformation with an unknown risk of infective endocarditis. We report a case of quadricuspid aortic valve complicated with infective endocarditis. A 53-year-old Japanese woman was hospitalized with leg edema and a fever of unknown origin. Corynebacterium striatum was detected in the blood culture. Echocardiography demonstrated a quadricuspid aortic valve with vegetation and severe functional regurgitation. The condition was diagnosed as a quadricuspid aortic valve with infective endocarditis, for which surgery was performed. The quadricuspid aortic valve had three equal-sized cusps and one smaller cusp (type B according to Hurwitz classification). We dissected the vegetation and infectious focus and implanted a mechanical valve. Following the case report, we review the literature.

  8. [Isolated infectious endocarditis of the pulmonary valve: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrudka, Jan; Grussmannová, Monika; Mandys, Václav

    2017-01-01

    Isolated infectious endocarditis of the pulmonary valve is a rare condition and represents 1,5-2% of all cases of infectious endocarditis. We present a case of a 37year-old woman without any relevant medical history. The woman was hospitalized with hallmarks of severe sepsis and bilateral pneumonia; she died several hours after admission with progressive multiorgan failure and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. Microbiologic examination approved Staphylococcus aureus as the etiological agent. The autopsy showed isolated endocarditis of the pulmonary valve, without any known predisposing factor. Literary data refer single cases or small groups of patients with isolated pulmonary infectious endocarditis. The clinical suspicion of this rare disease in differential diagnosis of febrile conditions is an essential factor in prognosis of afflicted persons. The crucial diagnostic methods for infectious endocarditis are echocardiography and CT examination.

  9. Health care-associated native valve endocarditis: importance of non-nosocomial acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benito, Natividad; Miró, José M.; de Lazzari, Elisa; Cabell, Christopher H.; del Río, Ana; Altclas, Javier; Commerford, Patrick; Delahaye, Francois; Dragulescu, Stefan; Giamarellou, Helen; Habib, Gilbert; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Kumar, A. Sampath; Nacinovich, Francisco M.; Suter, Fredy; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Venugopal, Krishnan; Moreno, Asuncion; Fowler, Vance G.; Gordon, David; Devi, Uma; Spelman, Denis; van der Meer, Jan T. M.; Kauffman, Carol; Bradley, Suzanne; Armstrong, William; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Lerakis, Stamatios; Mestres, Carlos A.; Pare, Carlos; de la Maria, Cristina Garcia; Marco, Francesc; Gatell, Jose M.; Almela, Manuel; Azqueta, Manuel; Jiménez-Expósito, Maria Jesús; Sitges, Marta; Claramonte, Xavier; Armero, Yolanda; Cervera, Carlos; Falces, Carlos; Heras, Magda; Miro, José M.; Fernandez-Hidalgo, Nuria; de Vera, Pablo Rodriguez; Tornos, Pilar; Falco, Vicente; Sidani, Nisreen; Kanj-Sharara, Souha; Kanafani, Zeina; Raglio, Annibale; Goglio, Antonio; Gnecchi, Fabrizio; Valsecchi, Grazia; Rizzi, Marco; Ravasio, Veronica; Hoen, Bruno; Chirouze, Catherine; Giannitsiot, Efthymia; Leroy, Joel; Plesiat, Patrick; Bernard, Yvette; Casey, Anna; Lambert, Peter; Watkin, Richard; Elliott, Tom; Baddley, John; Patel, Mukesh; Dismukes, William; Caros, Giampiero; Mathiron, Amel Brahim; Goissen, Thomas; Delahaye, Armelle; Delahaye, François; Vandenesch, François; Vizzotti, Carla; Marin, Marcelo; Trivi, Marcelo; Lombardero, Martin; Cortes, Claudia; Casabe, José Horacio; Kogan, Silvia; Clara, Liliana; Sanchez, Marisa; Commerford, Anita; Hansa, Cass; Deetlefs, Eduan; Ntsekhe, Mpiko; Wray, Dannah; Steed, Lisa L.; Church, Preston; Cantey, Robert; Morris, Arthur; Holland, David; Murdoch, David; Chambers, Stephen; Read, Kerry; Raymond, Nigel; Lang, Selwyn; Kotsanas, Despina; Korman, Tony M.; Peterson, Gail; Southern, Paul M.; Shah, Manisha; Bedimo, Roger; Reddy, Arjun; Levine, Donald; Dhar, Gaurav; Hanlon-Feeney, Alanna; Hannan, Margaret; Kelly, Sinead; Wang, Andrew; Woods, Christopher W.; Sexton, Daniel J.; Corey, Ralph; Drew, Laura; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Chu, Vivian H.; Mazaheri, Bahram; Neuerburg, Carl; Naber, Christoph; Athan, Eugene; Henry, Margaret; Harris, Owen; Alestig, Eric; Olaison, Lars; Wikstrom, Lotta; Snygg-Martin, Ulrika; Francis, Johnson; Nair, Lathi; Thomas, Vinod; Chaiworramukkun, Jaruwan; Pachirat, Orathai; Chetchotisakd, Ploenchan; Suwanich, Tewan; Tamin, Syahidah Syed; Premru, Manica Mueller; Logar, Mateja; Lejko-Zupanc, Tatjana; Orezzi, Christina; Klein, John; Bouza, Emilio; Moreno, Mar; Rodríguez-Créixems, Marta; Marín, Mercedes; Fernández, Miguel; Muñoz, Patricia; Fernández, Rocío; Ramallo, Victor; Raoult, Didier; Thuny, Franck; Casalta, Jean-Paul; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Chipigina, Natalia; Kirill, Ozerecky; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Kulichenko, Vadim P.; Butkevich, O. M.; Lion, Christine; Selton-Suty, Christine; Alla, François; Coyard, Hélène; Doco-Lecompte, Thanh; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Ragone, Enrico; Dialetto, Giovanni; Tripodi, Marie Françoise; Utili, Riccardo; Casillo, Roberta; Sharma, Gautam; Dickerman, Stuart A.; Street, Alan; Eisen, Damon Peter; McBryde, Emma Sue; Grigg, Leeanne; Abrutyn, Elias; Michelet, Christian; Tattevin, Pierre; Donnio, Pierre Yves; Fortes, Claudio Querido; Edathodu, Jameela; Al-Hegelan, Mashael; Font, Bernat; Anguera, Ignasi; Guma, Joan Raimon; Cereceda, M.; Oyonarte, Miguel J.; Mella, Rodrigo Montagna; Garcia, Patricia; Jones, Sandra Braun; de Oliveira Ramos, Auristela Isabel; Paiva, Marcelo Goulart; de Medeiros Tranchesi, Regina Aparecida; Woon, Lok Ley; Lum, Luh-Nah; Tan, Ru-San; Rees, David; Kornecny, Pam; Lawrence, Richard; Dever, Robyn; Post, Jeffrey; Jones, Phillip; Ryan, Suzanne; Harkness, John; Feneley, Michael; Rubinstein, Ethan; Strahilewitz, Jacob; Ionac, Adina; Mornos, Cristian; Forno, Davide; Cecchi, Enrico; de Rosa, Francesco; Imazio, Massimo; Trinchero, Rita; Wiesbauer, Franz; Gattringer, Rainer; Deans, Greg; Andrasevic, Arjana Tambic; Barsic, Bruno; Klinar, Igor; Vincelj, Josip; Bukovski, Suzana; Krajinovic, Vladimir; Corey, G. Ralph; Stafford, Judy; Baloch, Khaula; Redick, Thomas; Harding, Tina; Karchmer, A. W.; Bayer, Arnie; Durack, David T.; Moreillon, Phillipe; Eykyn, Susannah

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical profile and outcome of nosocomial and non-nosocomial health care-associated native valve endocarditis are not well defined. OBJECTIVE: To compare the characteristics and outcomes of community-associated and nosocomial and non-nosocomial health care-associated native valve

  10. Rapidly Progrediating Aortic Valve Infective Endocarditis in an Intravenous Drug User Treated by Antibiotics and Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malkia S. Swedi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 22-year old male, a self-confessed recreational drug user who developed cardiogenic shock because of severe destruction of the aortic valve by rapidly progressive aortic valve endocarditis. The disease progression was acute; in a matter of days, the clinical manifestations were life-threatening necessitating urgent aortic valve replacement surgery. Cultivation revealed Streptococcus viridans as the microbial agent. Subsequent recovery with antibiotic treatment was without complication. This case report shows that immediately performed transoesophageal echocardiography and early consultation with a cardiac surgeon has fundamental importance in diagnosis and management of acute infective endocarditis in haemodynamically instable patients.

  11. Tricuspid valve endocarditis following central venous cannulation: The increasing problem of catheter related infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Babu Kale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A central venous catheter (CVC is inserted for measurement of haemodynamic variables, delivery of nutritional supplements and drugs and access for haemodialysis and haemofiltration. Catheterization and maintenance are common practices and there is more to the technique than routine placement as evident when a procedure-related complication occurs. More than 15% of the patients who receive CVC placement have some complications and infectious endocarditis involving the tricuspid valve is a rare and serious complication with high morbidity and mortality. Overenthusiastic and deep insertion of the guide wire and forceful injection through the CVC may lead to injury of the tricuspid valve and predispose to bacterial deposition and endocarditis. We report a case of tricuspid valve endocarditis, probably secondary to injury of the anterior tricuspid leaflet by the guide wire or the CVC that required open heart surgery with vegetectomy and repair of the tricuspid valve.

  12. Impact of Early Valve Surgery on Outcome of Staphylococcus aureus Prosthetic Valve Infective Endocarditis: Analysis in the International Collaboration of Endocarditis–Prospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Chirouze, Catherine; Alla, François; Fowler, Vance G.; Sexton, Daniel J.; Corey, G. Ralph; Chu, Vivian H.; Wang, Andrew; Erpelding, Marie-Line; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Hannan, Margaret M.; Lejko-Zupanc, Tatjana; Miró, José M.; Muñoz, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Using appropriate analytical methods to examine data from the International Collaboration on Endocarditis–Prospective Cohort Study, we found that early valve surgery was not associated with reduced 1-year mortality in Staphylococcus aureus prosthetic valve infective endocarditis.

  13. Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: Early Outcome following Medical or Surgical Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banafsheh Alinejad

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE is an important cause of morbidity and mortality associated with heart valve replacement surgery. The aim of the present study was to describe the early outcome of treatment in patients with PVE in a single center. Methods: The data of all the episodes of PVE registered at our institution between 2002 and 2007 were collected and analyzed retrospectively. The patients were assessed using clinical criteria defined by Durack and colleagues (Duke criteria. The analysis included a detailed study of hospital records. The continuous variables were expressed as mean ± standard deviation, and the discrete variables were presented as percentages.Results: Thirteen patients with PVE were diagnosed and treated at our center during the study period. In all the cases, mechanical prostheses were utilized. The patients' mean age was 46.9±12.8 years. Women made up 53.8% of all the cases. Early PVE was detected in 6 (46.2% patients, and late PVE occurred in 7 (53.8 %. Eleven (84.6% patients were treated with intravenous antimicrobial therapy, and the other two (15.4% required surgical removal and replacement of the infected prosthesis in addition to antibiotic therapy. Blood cultures became positive in 46.2% of the patients. Mortality rate was 15.4% (2 patients. Conclusion: It seems that in selected cases with PVE, i.e. in those who remain clinically stable and respond well to antimicrobial therapy, a cure could be achieved by antimicrobial treatment alone with acceptable morbidity and mortality risk.

  14. Successful treatment of mitral valve endocarditis in a dog associated with 'Actinomyces canis-like' infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, N; Alexander, K; Keene, B; Kolluru, S; Fauls, M L; Rawdon, I; Breitschwerdt, E B

    2016-09-01

    Infective endocarditis, an inflammation of the endocardial surface due to invasion by an infectious agent, is more common in middle sized to large breed dogs. We herein report a case of mitral valve endocarditis in a 9-year-old male-castrated Weimaraner caused by an Actinomyces canis-like bacterium, not previously reported in association with infection in dogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mitral regurgitation jet around neoannulus: Mitral valve replacement in erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Basu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old male presented with erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae (ER endocarditis of the mitral valve, severe mitral regurgitation, and heart failure. The ER endocarditis destroyed the native mitral annulus therefore a new annulus was created for the suspension of the mitral bioprosthesis. Postoperative neoannulus dehiscence and leak prompted to redo surgery where transesophageal echocardiography (TEE played an important role in pointing out the exact location of perineoannular leaks for repair.

  16. Coagulase-negative staphylococcal prosthetic valve endocarditis--a contemporary update based on the International Collaboration on Endocarditis: prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chu, V. H.; Miro, J. M.; Hoen, B.; Cabell, C. H.; Pappas, P. A.; Jones, P.; Stryjewski, M. E.; Anguera, I.; Braun, S.; Muñoz, P.; Commerford, P.; Tornos, P.; Francis, J.; Oyonarte, M.; Selton-Suty, C.; Morris, A. J.; Habib, G.; Almirante, B.; Sexton, D. J.; Corey, G. R.; Fowler, V. G.; Gordon, David; Devi, Uma; Spelman, Denis; van der Meer, Jan T. M.; Kauffman, Carol; Bradley, Suzanne; Armstrong, William; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Giamarellou, Helen; Lerakis, Stamatios; del Rio, Ana; Moreno, Asuncion; Mestres, Carlos A.; Pare, Carlos; Garcia de la Maria, Cristina; Claramonte, Xavier; Armero, Yolanda; de Lazzario, Elisa; Marco, Francesc; Gatell, Jose M.; Miro, José M.; Almela, Manel; Azqueta, Manuel; Jiménez-Expósito, Maria Jesús; de Benito, Natividad; Ramirez, Jose; Perez, Noel; Almirante, Benito; Fernandez-Hidalgo, Nuria; Rodriguez de Vera, Pablo; Tornos, Pilar; Falcó, Vicente; Sidani, Nisreen; Kanj-Sharara, Souha; Kanafani, Zeina; Raglio, Annibale; Goglio, Antonio; Gnecchi, Fabrizio; Suter, Fredy; Valsecchi, Grazia; Rizzi, Marco; Ravasio, Veronica; Hoen, Bruno; Chirouze, Catherine; Leroy, Joel; Plesiat, Patrick; Bernard, Yvette; Casey, Anna; Lambert, Peter; Watkin, Richard; Elliott, Tom; Patel, Mukesh; Dismukes, William; Pan, Angelo; Caros, Giampiero; Tribouilloy, Amel Brahim Mathiron Christophe; Goissen, Thomas; Delahaye, Armelle; Delahaye, Francois; Vandenesch, Francois; Vizzotti, Carla; Nacinovich, Francisco M.; Marin, Marcelo; Trivi, Marcelo; Lombardero, Martin; Cortes, Claudia; Casabe, José Horacio; Altclas, Javier; Kogan, Silvia; Clara, Liliana; Sanchez, Marisa; Commerford, Anita; Hansa, Cass; Deetlefs, Eduan; Ntsekhe, Mpiko; Commerford, Patrick; Wray, Dannah; Steed, Lisa L.; Church, Preston; Cantey, Robert; Morris, Arthur; Holland, David; Murdoch, David; Read, Kerry; Raymond, Nigel; Lang, Selwyn; Chambers, Stephen; Kotsanas, Despina; Korman, Tony M.; Peterson, Gail; Purcell, Jon; Southern, Paul M.; Shah, Manisha; Bedimo, Roger; Reddy, Arjun; Levine, Donald; Dhar, Gaurav; Hanlon-Feeney, Alanna; Hannan, Margaret; Kelly, Sinead; Wang, Andrew; Cabell, Christopher H.; Woods, Christopher W.; Sexton, Daniel J.; Benjamin, Danny; Corey, G. Ralph; McDonald, Jay R.; Federspiel, Jeff; Engemann, John J.; Reller, L. Barth; Drew, Laura; Caram, L. B.; Stryjewski, Martin; Morpeth, Susan; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Fowler, Vance; Chu, Vivian; Mazaheri, Bahram; Neuerburg, Carl; Naber, Christoph; Athan, Eugene; Henry, Margaret; Harris, Owen; Alestig, Eric; Olaison, Lars; Wikstrom, Lotta; Snygg-Martin, Ulrika; Francis, Johnson; Venugopal, K.; Nair, Lathi; Thomas, Vinod; Chaiworramukkun, Jaruwan; Pachirat, Orathai; Chetchotisakd, Ploenchan; Suwanich, Tewan; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tamin, Syahidah Syed; Premru, Manica Mueller; Logar, Mateja; Lejko-Zupanc, Tatjana; Orezzi, Christina; Klein, John; Bouza, Emilio; Moreno, Mar; Rodríguez-Créixems, Marta; Marín, Mercedes; Fernández, Miguel; Muñoz, Patricia; Fernández, Rocío; Ramallo, Victor; Raoult, Didier; Thuny, Franck; Habib, Gilbert; Casalta, Jean-Paul; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Chipigina, Natalia; Kirill, Ozerecky; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Kulichenko, Vadim P.; Butkevich, O. M.; Lion, Christine; Selton-Suty, Christine; Alla, Francois; Coyard, Hélène; Doco-Lecompte, Thanh; Iarussi, Diana; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Ragone, Enrico; Dialetto, Giovanni; Tripodi, Marie Françoise; Utili, Riccardo; Casillo, Roberta; Kumar, A. Sampath; Sharma, Gautam; Dickerman, Stuart A.; Street, Alan; Eisen, Damon Peter; Grigg, Leeanne; Abrutyn, Elias; Michelet, Christian; Tattevin, Pierre; Donnio, Pierre Yves; Fortes, Claudio Querido; Edathodu, Jameela; Al-Hegelan, Mashael; Font, Bernat; Anguera, Ignasi; Guma, Joan Raimon; Cereceda, M.; Oyonarte, Miguel J.; Mella, Rodrigo Montagna; Garcia, Patricia; Jones, Sandra Braun; Ramos, Auristela Isabel de Oliveira; Paiva, Marcelo Goulart; Tranchesi, Regina Aparecida de Medeiros; Woon, Lok Ley; Lum, Luh-Nah; Tan, Ru-San; Rees, David; Kornecny, Pam; Lawrence, Richard; Dever, Robyn; Post, Jeffrey; Jones, Phillip; Ryan, Suzanne; Harkness, John; Feneley, Michael; Rubinstein, Ethan; Strahilewitz, Jacob; Ionac, Adina; Mornos, Cristian; Dragulescu, Stefan; Forno, Davide; Cecchi, Enrico; de Rosa, Francesco; Imazio, Massimo; Trinchero, Rita; Wiesbauer, Franz; Gattringer, Rainer; Deans, Greg; Andrasevic, Arjana Tambic; Barsic, Bruno; Klinar, Igor; Vincelj, Josip; Bukovski, Suzana; Krajinovic, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the contemporary features of coagulase-negative staphylococcal (CoNS) prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE). DESIGN: Observational study of prospectively collected data from a multinational cohort of patients with infective endocarditis. Patients with CoNS PVE were compared to

  17. Infective endocarditis causing mitral valve stenosis - a rare but deadly complication: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael A; Shroff, Gautam R

    2017-02-17

    Infective endocarditis rarely causes mitral valve stenosis. When present, it has the potential to cause severe hemodynamic decompensation and death. There are only 15 reported cases in the literature of mitral prosthetic valve bacterial endocarditis causing stenosis by obstruction. This case is even more unusual due to the mechanism by which functional mitral stenosis occurred. We report a case of a 23-year-old white woman with a history of intravenous drug abuse who presented with acute heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiography failed to show valvular vegetation, but high clinical suspicion led to transesophageal imaging that demonstrated infiltrative prosthetic valve endocarditis causing severe mitral stenosis. Despite extensive efforts from a multidisciplinary team, she died as a result of her critical illness. The discussion of this case highlights endocarditis physiology, the notable absence of stenosis in modified Duke criteria, and the utility of transesophageal echocardiography in clinching a diagnosis. It advances our knowledge of how endocarditis manifests, and serves as a valuable lesson for clinicians treating similar patients who present with stenosis but no regurgitation on transthoracic imaging, as a decision to forego a transesophageal echocardiography could cause this serious complication of endocarditis to be missed.

  18. Outcomes of Reoperative Valve Replacement in Patients with Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: A 20-Year Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Woong Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE is a serious complication of cardiac valve replacement, and many p atients with P VE r equire r eoperation. The aim of t his study was to r eview our institutional 2 0 -year experience of surgical reoperative valve replacement in patients with PVE. Methods: A retrospective study was performed on 84 patients (mean age, 54.8±12.7 years; 51 males who were diagnosed with PVE and underwent reoperative valve replacement from January 1995 to December 2016. Results: PVE was found in 1 valve in 61 cases (72.6%, and in 2 or more valves in 23 cases (27.4%. The median follow-up duration was 47.3 months (range, 0 to 250 months. Postoperative complications occurred in 39 patients (46.4%. Reinfection occurred in 6 cases, all within 1 year. The freedom from reinfection rate at 5 years was 91.0%±3.5%. The overall survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 64.4%±5.8% and 54.3%±7.3%, respectively. In stepwise multivariable Cox proportional hazard models, older age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05 to 2.10; p=0.027 and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB time (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.0 1; p =0 . 0 33 e merged a s independent risk f actors f or d eath. Conclusion: Older age and a longer CPB time were associated with an increased risk of overall mortality in PVE patients.

  19. [A case with tricuspid valve brucella endocarditis presenting with acute right heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazıcı, Hüseyin Uğur; Mert, Kadir Uğur; Senol, Utku; Ulus, Taner

    2012-06-01

    Although the presence of brucella endocarditis is encountered rarely, it is the most fetal complication of brucellosis, which is shown to affect the aortic valve primarily and the mitral valve secondarily. Involvement of the tricuspid valve is extremely rare. A 62-year-old female was admitted with complaints of fever, fatigue, difficulty in breathing, and swellings in her legs. A transthoracic echocardiogram was performed since acute right heart failure was considered due to her symptoms. The echocardiogram showed enlarged right heart chambers, serious tricuspid valve insufficiency, and a mass on the tricuspid valve compatible with a vegetation moving in and out of the right ventricle. Although no growths were observed in the blood culture, antibody titration for brucellosis was found to be 1/640 (+) in the serological examination. The patient was diagnosed with brucella endocarditis and placed on doxycycline, rifampicin, and ceftriaxone treatment for eight weeks. At the end of the eight-week treatment, the symptoms of right heart failure receded and the patient recovered from the endocarditis. Tricuspid valve brucella endocarditis should be considered in patients suffering from acute right heart failure accompanied by systemic infection findings since brucellosis is presently endemic in Turkey.

  20. Austrian syndrome in the context of a fulminant pneumococcal native valve endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Wilbring

    Full Text Available This is the case of a young male suffering from Austrian syndrome, which is the triad of endocarditis, meningitis, and pneumonia due to invasive S. pneumoniae infection. He reported recurrent fever for six months without any antibiotic treatment, which may have determined the further course of the syndrome. Echocardiography revealed massive native valve endocarditis, and the patient was considered for ultima-ratio cardiac surgery. Intraoperative aspect presented extensive affection of the aortic root with full destruction of aortic valve, mitral valve, and aortomitral continuity. The myocardium showed a phlegmonlike infiltration. Microbiologic testing of intraoperatively collected specimens identified penicillin-sensitive Streptococcus pneumoniae. S. pneumoniae is a very uncommon cause for infective infiltrative endocarditis and is associated with severe clinical courses. Austrian syndrome is even more rare, with only a few reported cases worldwide. In those patients, only early diagnosis, immediate antibiotic treatment, and emergent cardiac surgery can save lives.

  1. Endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus warneri on a normal aortic valve following vasectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, M; Marien, G J; Goldsand, G

    1984-08-01

    Endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus warneri and necessitating valve replacement occurred in a previously healthy 32-year-old patient following vasectomy. No sign of an underlying valvular defect was noted during the operation. S. warneri is a recently identified species of coagulase-negative staphylococci. Endocarditis caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci is uncommon in young, healthy patients with normal heart valves and has not previously been described as a complication of vasectomy. Similarly, infections caused by S. warneri have not previously been described in humans.

  2. Endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... recommends preventive antibiotics for people at risk for infectious endocarditis, such as those with: Certain birth defects of ... 26373316 . Fowler VG Jr, Scheld WM, Bayer AS. Endocarditis and ... of Infectious Diseases . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  3. Gallium-SPECT in the detection of prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic ring abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, K.; Barnes, D.; Martin, R.H.; Rae, J.R. (Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Victoria General Hospital Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada))

    1991-09-01

    A 52-yr-old man who had a bioprosthetic aortic valve developed Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy he had persistent pyrexia and developed new conduction system disturbances. Echocardiography did not demonstrate vegetations on the valve or an abscess, but gallium scintigraphy using SPECT clearly identified a focus of intense activity in the region of the aortic valve. The presence of valvular vegetations and a septal abscess was confirmed at autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy, using SPECT, provided a useful noninvasive method for the demonstration of endocarditis and the associated valve ring abscess.

  4. Imaging experimental infective endocarditis with indium-111-labeled blood cellular components. [Rabbits, aortic valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riba, A.L.; Thakur, M.L.; Gottschalk, A.; Andriole, V.T.; Zaret, B.L.

    1979-02-01

    The capability of radionuclide imaging to detect experimental aortic valve infective endocarditis was assessed with indium-111 (/sup 111/In)-labeled blood cells. Sequential cardiac imaging and tissue distribution studies were obtained in 17 rabbits with infective endocarditis after administration of /sup 111/In-platelets and in five after /sup 111/In-polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Forty-eight to 72 hours after platelet administration, in vivo imaging demonstrated abnormal /sup 111/In uptake in all animals in the region of the aortic valve in an anatomically distinct pattern. Images of the excised heart showed discrete cardiac uptake conforming to the in vivo image and gross pathological examination. /sup 111/In-platelet uptake in vegetations from the 17 animals averaged 240 +- 41 times greater than that in normal myocardium and 99 +- 15 times greater uptake in blood. In contrast, /sup 111/In-leukocyte cardiac imaging showed no abnormal aortic valve uptake 24 hours after tracer administration and the lesion myocardium activity ratio was only 5 +- 2 (3 +- 1 for lesion/blood activity). Four normal rabbits demonstrated neither positive /sup 111/In-platelet scintigraphs nor abnormal cardiac tissue uptake. Likewise, noncellular /sup 111/In was not concentrated to any significant extent in three animals with infective endocarditis. This study demonstrates that /sup 111/In-platelet, but not leukocyte cardiac imaging, is a sensitive technique for detecting experimental infective endocarditis. The imaging data conform to the cellular pathology of the infective endocarditis vegetation.

  5. 'Streptococcus milleri' aortic valve endocarditis and hepatic abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Rashid M; Salah, Wajeeh; Parada, Jorge P

    2007-02-01

    Although well-recognized animal pathogens, group C streptococci are relatively rare causes of human infection. The phenotypically small-colony group C 'Streptococcus milleri' are typically associated with suppurative disease of soft tissue and organs, including liver abscesses, while bacteraemia and endocarditis are distinctly less common. Herein, a case of 'S. milleri' causing both endocarditis and liver abscess in the same patient is reported.

  6. Aortic allografts in treatment of aortic valve and ascending aorta prosthetic endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Spiridonov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim – to assess short- and long-term results of aortic root replacement using aortic allografts in patients with prosthetic endocarditis. Materials and methods. Since February 2009 until June 2016 aortic valve and ascending aorta replacement using aortic allografts was performed in 26 patients with prosthetic endocarditis. In 50 % of cases at initial operation aortic valve replacement was performed, in another 50 % of cases – aortic valve and ascending aorta replacement. Echocardiography was performed 10 days, 3, 6 and 12 months, 2, 3 and 5 years after surgery. Analysis of long-term results included all cases of deaths, prosthesis-related complications and recurrence of endocarditis. Results. 30-day mortality was 23.1 %. Extracorporeal membranous oxygenation (ECMO was used only in 5 patients (19.2 %. Four patients were weaned from ECMO. We did not observe any allograft-related complications. During follow-up period there were no cases of reoperation due to structural allograft failure. Relapse of infection occurred in 1 patient (3.8 % four years after the operation and led to lethal outcome. Conclusion. Reoperations using allografts are an effective surgical treatment of prosthetic endocarditis. In majority of cases prosthetic endocarditis was caused by gram-positive cocci (Staphylococcus. In 84.6 % of cases it was associated with destruction of paravalvular structures and abscesses formation. Heart failure was a causative factor of different complications in these patients, which required ECMO in 19.2 % of patients. In 80 % of cases patients were weaned from ECMO. Allografts using for the treatment of prosthetic endocarditis is associated with high resistance to infection and with a significant rate of freedom from recurrence of endocarditis within 3 years after surgery.

  7. Modified Surgical Intervention for Extensive Mitral Valve Endocarditis and Posterior Mitral Annular Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwan Sic Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The concomitant presence of posterior mitral annular calcification and infectious mitral valve lesions poses a technical challenge with considerable perioperative risk when using previously proposed techniques for mitral valve surgery. Herein, we report a case of the use of a modified surgical technique to successfully treat a patient with mitral infective endocarditis complicated by a subendocardial abscess and extensive posterior mitral annular calcification.

  8. Cardiac computed tomography angiography results in diagnostic and therapeutic change in prosthetic heart valve endocarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, Jesse; Tanis, Wilco; van Herwerden, Lex A.; van den Brink, Renee B. A.; Mali, Willem P. Th M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Chamuleau, Steven A. J.; Budde, Ricardo P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Echocardiography may miss prosthetic heart valve (PHV) endocarditis which advocates for novel imaging techniques to improve diagnostic accuracy and patient outcome. The purpose of this study was to determine the complementary diagnostic value of cardiac computed tomography angiography (CTA) to the

  9. Involvement of Kytococcus schroeteri in a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella D’Andria

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a fourth case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by the newly described micrococcal species: Kytococcus schroeteri. A 38-year old male was admitted to our hospital with suspected prosthetic valve endocarditis. In three blood cultures and in the prosthetic heart valve culture grew the same type of microrganism, initially identified as Micrococcus luteus. Presuntive assignment to the genus Kytococcus was suggested by the arginina dihydrolase activity and by the resistence to penicillin, oxacillin and methicillin, characteristics which are not shared by other micrococci. Further biochemical tests confirmed that the isolates belonged to the genus Kytococcus (negative reaction for oxydase, esculin and urease, positive for catalase and arginine dihydrolase species schroeteri (alpha-glucosidase positive. The patient was treated with vancomycin, gentamicin and rifampicin. After the valve replacement, on the 20th day of hospitalization, the patient’s biological parameters returned to normal values, and after one mounth the resolution of the disease was completed. The diagnosis of four cases by K. schroeteri endocarditis, described within a short period of time (2003-2006, might indicate a specific pathogenicity of this new species. In case of endocarditis diagnosis, the suspect of the genus Kytococcus involvement should be considered each time the aerobic Gram positive cocci, with arginina dihidrolase activiy and the resistence to penicillin, oxacillin and methicillin, are isolated by significative biological samples.

  10. Persistent immune thrombocytopenia heralds the diagnosis of Mycobacterium chimaera prosthetic valve endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith A. Sacco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 63 year old female was admitted for investigation of worsening renal insufficiency. During hospitalization she developed persistent immune thrombocytopenia refractory to supportive or immunosuppressive treatment. She was diagnosed with Mycobacterium chimaera prosthetic valve endocarditis and thrombocytopenia resolved with anti-mycobacterial therapy.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis of the tricuspid valve after septic abortion: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson López-Garzón

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a female patient, 22 years old, with a diagnosis of tricuspid valve endocarditis by S. aureus following septic abortion. The diagnosis was established by the Duke University criteria and it was confirmed by the echocardiographic findings.

  12. Native Valve Endocarditis due to Ralstonia pickettii: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Joseph; Rivera-Bonilla, Tomas; Loli, Akil; Blattman, Negin N

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia pickettii is a rare pathogen and even more rare in healthy individuals. Here we report a case of R. pickettii bacteremia leading to aortic valve abscess and complete heart block. To our knowledge this is the first case report of Ralstonia species causing infective endocarditis with perivalvular abscess.

  13. Native Valve Endocarditis due to Ralstonia pickettii: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Orme

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ralstonia pickettii is a rare pathogen and even more rare in healthy individuals. Here we report a case of R. pickettii bacteremia leading to aortic valve abscess and complete heart block. To our knowledge this is the first case report of Ralstonia species causing infective endocarditis with perivalvular abscess.

  14. Native aortic valve endocarditis caused by Brevibacterium epidermidis in an immunocompetent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manetos, Christos M; Pavlidis, Antonios N; Kallistratos, Manolis S; Tsoukas, Athanasios S; Chamodraka, Eytixia S; Levantakis, Ioannis; Manolis, Athanasios J

    2011-09-01

    Although Brevibacterium species used to be considered as nonpathogenic microorganisms until recently, it seems that they can cause a wide variety of clinical diseases by acting mostly as opportunistic pathogens. The present case is the second reported case of infective endocarditis by Brevibacterium species; however, it is the first reported infected native aortic valve in an immunocompetent patient.

  15. Apparent culture-negative prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Peptostreptococcus magnus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vorm, E. R.; Dondorp, A. M.; van Ketel, R. J.; Dankert, J.

    2000-01-01

    In two patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis due to Peptostreptococcus magnus, blood cultures in the BacT/Alert and BACTEC 9240 systems were signal negative. The capability of the BacT/Alert system to detect various Peptostreptococcus species was assessed. P. magnus and P. anaerobius could not

  16. Achromobacter xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxidans prosthetic aortic valve infective endocarditis and aortic root abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hal, S; Stark, D; Marriott, D; Harkness, J

    2008-04-01

    We report a case of prosthetic valve infective endocarditis and aortic root abscesses caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxidans. The patient was an intravenous drug user and had injected amphetamines using 'duck pond water' as a diluent. After surgical intervention and 6 weeks of intravenous meropenem therapy, the patient made an uneventful recovery.

  17. Linezolid in prophylaxis against experimental aortic valve endocarditis due to Streptococcus oralis or Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassopoulos, George; Pefanis, Angelos; Sakka, Vissaria; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Perrea, Despina; Giamarellou, Helen

    2006-02-01

    There are no experimental studies regarding the prophylactic efficacy of linezolid against infective endocarditis. Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis of the aortic valve was induced in rabbits by the insertion of a polyethylene catheter. Twenty-four hours later, animals were randomly assigned to a control group, and groups receiving either ampicillin (two doses of 40 mg/kg of body weight each, given intravenously, 2 h apart) or linezolid (a single per os dose of 75 mg/kg). The first dose of ampicillin and the single dose of linezolid were administered 0.5 and 1 h, respectively, prior to the intravenous inoculation of approximately 10(7) CFU of Streptococcus oralis or Enterococcus faecalis. Linezolid peak levels in rabbit serum were similar to the peak serum levels in humans following a 600-mg oral dose of linezolid. Linezolid prevented endocarditis in 87% of S. oralis-challenged rabbits (P faecalis, linezolid prevented endocarditis in 73% (P = 0.003 versus controls; P = 0.049 versus ampicillin). Ampicillin prevented endocarditis due to S. oralis or due to E. faecalis in 47% (P = 0.005 versus controls) and in 30% (P = not significant versus controls) of the challenged animals, respectively. In conclusion, linezolid was effective as prophylaxis against endocarditis caused by a strain of S. oralis and to a lesser degree against that caused by a strain of E. faecalis. Its prophylactic efficacy was superior to that of ampicillin.

  18. [Aorto-right ventricular fistula associated with aortic valve endocarditis: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszuk-Kazberuk, Anna; Sobkowicz, Bozena; Hirnle, Tomasz; Adamczuk, Anna; Sawicki, Robert; Krynicki, Romuald; Knapp, Małgorzata; Musiał, Włodzimierz J

    2006-06-01

    A case of a 42-year old man with aortic valve endocarditis with peri-anular multi-chamber abscess formation and fistulous communication between right sinus of Valsalva and right ventricle, is presented. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed abnormal flow through the fistula confirmed at surgery. Intraoperatively the aortic valve was severely damaged with massive calcifications on the leaflets, anulus, right sinus of Valsalva and interventricular septum surrounded by fresh vegetations. Surgical procedure consisted of removal of calcification and infected tissues, followed by reconstruction of interventricular septum and aorta with pericardial patch and aortic valve replacement. Postoperative course was uneventful.

  19. Two-stage operation for isolated pulmonary valve infectious endocarditis with Candida parapsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Wataru; Hirate, Yuichi; Ito, Hideki; Kawaguchi, Osamu

    2013-08-01

    We report a case of isolated pulmonary infectious endocarditis (IE) with Candida parapsilosis. A 66-year-old man presented with fever and cough. Echocardiography showed severe pulmonary regurgitation and vegetations on the pulmonary valves. Initially, antibiotics were prescribed against bacterial IE, and the vegetations disappeared; however, the pulmonary vegetations relapsed, and C. parapsilosis was grown from blood cultures. We performed a debridement without a pulmonary valve replacement. There was no recurrence of IE for 3 years, and then the patient developed right ventricular enlargement and severe tricuspid regurgitation due to severe pulmonary regurgitation. Pulmonary valve replacement was performed. Now the patient is free from infection.

  20. Initial Experience with Sutureless Sorin Perceval S Aortic Prosthesis for the Treatment of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, Antonio; Miceli, Antonio; Solinas, Marco; Glauber, Mattia

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate results of the initial experience with sutureless Perceval S for active prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE). From October 2012 to April 2014, f: ve patients underwent surgery for aortic PVE with Perceval S bioprosthesis. There was one in-hospital death (20%). Echocardiography performed at discharge showed excellent hemodynamic performance of Perceval S bioprosthesis. Aortic valve replacement with Perceval S sutureless valve in patients with PVE is a feasible and safe procedure, associated with low in-hospital mortality and good hemodynamic performance of the prosthesis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Warfarin therapy and incidence of cerebrovascular complications in left-sided native valve endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snygg-Martin, U; Rasmussen, Rasmus Vedby; Hassager, C

    2011-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy has been anticipated to increase the risk of cerebrovascular complications (CVC) in native valve endocarditis (NVE). This study investigates the relationship between ongoing oral anticoagulant therapy and the incidence of symptomatic CVC in left-sided NVE. In a prospective...... factors for CVC, while warfarin on admission (aOR 0.26, 95% CI 0.07-0.94), history of congestive heart failure (adjusted OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.1-0.52) and previous endocarditis (aOR 0.1, 95% CI 0.01-0.79) correlated with lower CVC frequency....

  2. Severe Tricuspid Valve Endocarditis Related to Tunneled Catheters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Hemodialysis (HD) patients are predisposed to infective endocarditis (IE) mainly due to repeated manipulation of the vascular access. However, catheter seeding and IE may also result from a distant infection site. Case series: A diabetic patient who was maintained on regular HD through a permanent catheter ...

  3. Reconstruction of aorto-mitral continuity with a handmade aorto-mitral bioprosthetic valve for extensive bivalvular endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedoriya, Takeo; Hirota, Masanori; Ishikawa, Noboru; Omoto, Tadashi

    2013-03-01

    Surgical treatment is effective to exclude all infected tissue in patients with infective endocarditis. Although various techniques have been reported, it has remained a great challenge for patients with extensive infected regions. A patient with extensive bivalvular endocarditis including the aortic and mitral valve and aorto-mitral continuity is described. A handmade aorto-mitral bioprosthetic valve was created to reconstruct the defect after extensive debridement. The patient was discharged on the 30th postoperative day without inflammatory signs.

  4. Association Between Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement and Subsequent Infective Endocarditis and In-Hospital Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro, Ander; Linke, Axel; Latib, Azeem; Ihlemann, Nikolaj; Urena, Marina; Walther, Thomas; Husser, Oliver; Herrmann, Howard C; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Cheema, Asim N; Le Breton, Hervé; Stortecky, Stefan; Kapadia, Samir; Bartorelli, Antonio L; Sinning, Jan Malte; Amat-Santos, Ignacio; Munoz-Garcia, Antonio; Lerakis, Stamatios; Gutiérrez-Ibanes, Enrique; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed; Tchetche, Didier; Testa, Luca; Eltchaninoff, Helene; Livi, Ugolino; Castillo, Juan Carlos; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Webb, John G; Barbanti, Marco; Kodali, Susheel; de Brito, Fabio S; Ribeiro, Henrique B; Miceli, Antonio; Fiorina, Claudia; Dato, Guglielmo Mario Actis; Rosato, Francesco; Serra, Vicenç; Masson, Jean-Bernard; Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Mangione, Jose A; Ferreira, Maria-Cristina; Lima, Valter C; Carvalho, Luiz A; Abizaid, Alexandre; Marino, Marcos A; Esteves, Vinicius; Andrea, Julio C M; Giannini, Francesco; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Himbert, Dominique; Kim, Won-Keun; Pellegrini, Costanza; Auffret, Vincent; Nietlispach, Fabian; Pilgrim, Thomas; Durand, Eric; Lisko, John; Makkar, Raj R; Lemos, Pedro A; Leon, Martin B; Puri, Rishi; San Roman, Alberto; Vahanian, Alec; Søndergaard, Lars; Mangner, Norman; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2016-09-13

    Limited data exist on clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients who had infective endocarditis after undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). To determine the associated factors, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of patients who had infective endocarditis after TAVR. The Infectious Endocarditis after TAVR International Registry included patients with definite infective endocarditis after TAVR from 47 centers from Europe, North America, and South America between June 2005 and October 2015. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement for incidence of infective endocarditis and infective endocarditis for in-hospital mortality. Infective endocarditis and in-hospital mortality after infective endocarditis. A total of 250 cases of infective endocarditis occurred in 20 006 patients after TAVR (incidence, 1.1% per person-year; 95% CI, 1.1%-1.4%; median age, 80 years; 64% men). Median time from TAVR to infective endocarditis was 5.3 months (interquartile range [IQR], 1.5-13.4 months). The characteristics associated with higher risk of progressing to infective endocarditis after TAVR was younger age (78.9 years vs 81.8 years; hazard ratio [HR], 0.97 per year; 95% CI, 0.94-0.99), male sex (62.0% vs 49.7%; HR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.13-2.52), diabetes mellitus (41.7% vs 30.0%; HR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.02-2.29), and moderate to severe aortic regurgitation (22.4% vs 14.7%; HR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.28-3.28). Health care-associated infective endocarditis was present in 52.8% (95% CI, 46.6%-59.0%) of patients. Enterococci species and Staphylococcus aureus were the most frequently isolated microorganisms (24.6%; 95% CI, 19.1%-30.1% and 23.3%; 95% CI, 17.9%-28.7%, respectively). The in-hospital mortality rate was 36% (95% CI, 30.0%-41.9%; 90 deaths; 160 survivors), and surgery was performed in 14.8% (95% CI, 10.4%-19.2%) of patients during the infective endocarditis episode. In-hospital mortality was associated with a higher logistic EuroSCORE (23.1% vs 18.6%; odds ratio

  5. Daptomycin-Vancomycin–Resistant Enterococcus faecium Native Valve Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khandakar Hussain MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant enterococcal nosocomial invasive infections are a rising concern faced by the medical community. Not many options are available to treat these highly virulent organisms. Risk factors for developing these highly resistant organisms include prolonged hospital stay, previous antibiotic use, and immunosuppression. In this article, we report a case of daptomycin-resistant enterococcal native infective endocarditis treated with off-label use of quinupristin-dalfopristin.

  6. Surgical treatment of late aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis: 19 years' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayla, Tuncer Eylem; Taylan, Adademir; Serpil, Tas; Bal, Polat Ebru; Antal, Dönmez Arzu; Adnan, Ak; Mustafa, Akbulut; Bulbul, Serhat; Aksut, Mehmet; Altug, Tuncer

    2014-06-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the results of operations conducted for aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis in a single center over 19 years. From February 1992 to January 2011, we performed operations on 27 patients with aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis. Seventeen patients (63.0%) were male, and the mean age was 39.1 ± 14.2 (16-67) years. Blood cultures were positive in 11 patients (40.7%), and the most commonly identified microorganism was Streptococcus (7 patients, 25.9%). The mean duration of follow-up was 8.6 ± 4.7 years (0.5-18.2), adding up to a total of 136.9 patient/years. Forty procedures were performed on these 27 patients. The most commonly performed procedure was aortic valve replacement with a prosthetic valve - 16 patients (59.3%). Fifteen patients were operated on during the active phase of infection. In-hospital mortality was observed in 11 patients (40.7%). Postoperatively, 12 patients (44.4%) had low cardiac output, 3 (11.1%) suffered from a heart block; none of them required permanent pacemaker implantation. The actuarial survival for 1 and 5 years was 55.6 ± 9.6% and 47.6 ± 9.7%, respectively. Prosthetic valve endocarditis of the aortic valve is a challenging situation for the surgeon. The surgical treatment carries a high mortality rate and long-term survival is low. Among the survivors, however, recurrence and the need for reoperation are unlikely.

  7. Surgical treatment of late aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis: 19 years’ experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayla, Tuncer Eylem; Serpil, Tas; Bal, Polat Ebru; Antal, Dönmez Arzu; Adnan, Ak; Mustafa, Akbulut; Bulbul, Serhat; Aksut, Mehmet; Altug, Tuncer

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study We retrospectively analyzed the results of operations conducted for aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis in a single center over 19 years. Material and methods From February 1992 to January 2011, we performed operations on 27 patients with aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis. Seventeen patients (63.0%) were male, and the mean age was 39.1 ± 14.2 (16-67) years. Blood cultures were positive in 11 patients (40.7%), and the most commonly identified microorganism was Streptococcus (7 patients, 25.9%). The mean duration of follow-up was 8.6 ± 4.7 years (0.5-18.2), adding up to a total of 136.9 patient/years. Results Forty procedures were performed on these 27 patients. The most commonly performed procedure was aortic valve replacement with a prosthetic valve – 16 patients (59.3%). Fifteen patients were operated on during the active phase of infection. In-hospital mortality was observed in 11 patients (40.7%). Postoperatively, 12 patients (44.4%) had low cardiac output, 3 (11.1%) suffered from a heart block; none of them required permanent pacemaker implantation. The actuarial survival for 1 and 5 years was 55.6 ± 9.6% and 47.6 ± 9.7%, respectively. Conclusions Prosthetic valve endocarditis of the aortic valve is a challenging situation for the surgeon. The surgical treatment carries a high mortality rate and long-term survival is low. Among the survivors, however, recurrence and the need for reoperation are unlikely. PMID:26336408

  8. Metastatic Calcinosis of Aortic Valve Secondary to Renal Failure Mimicking Infective Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noman Ahmed Jang Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available End stage renal disease has a list of consequences, cardiovascular being the most common. Inefficient dialysis can cause significant deposition of calcium all over the body, including heart valves making heart function impaired. We illustrate a case of 38-year-old female with end stage renal disease on peritoneal dialysis. The patient had been complaining of pain and swelling of the right hand for the last few months and had been seen by hand surgeon and was admitted electively for the biopsy of hand lesions. Before her planned surgery, she developed severe shortness of breath. Urgent echocardiogram revealed severe aortic regurgitation and large vegetation on the aortic valve. Infective endocarditis was suspected but blood cultures were negative for any microorganism and the patient did not meet the Duke criteria. Because of her hemodynamic instability immediate mechanical valve replacement surgery was performed. The pathology report showed extensive calcification and myxoid degeneration. No infectious agent was found. Later on, biopsy of her hand lesions showed extensive calcification with macrophages and giant cells. No atypia or malignancy was identified. This is a rare case of the metastatic calcinosis of aortic valve secondary to renal failure mimicking aortic valve infective endocarditis.

  9. Paediatric Melody® mitral valve replacement in acute endocarditis - alternative surgical-hybrid technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haponiuk, Ireneusz; Chojnicki, Maciej; Jaworski, Radosław; Steffens, Mariusz; Paczkowski, Konrad; Szofer-Sendrowska, Aneta; Paśko-Majewska, Marta; Gierat-Haponiuk, Katarzyna; Romanowicz, Anna; Szymanowicz, Wiktor

    2017-01-01

    Acute endocarditis (AE) is still rare disease in the paediatric population; nevertheless, the children suffering from AE usually need heart valve repair or replacement in emergency settings. We present a case of emergency mitral valve replacement with the use of Melody balloon expandable stented bioprosthesis in a two-year-old patient with AE and subsequent mitral (bicuspid) valve incompetence after aggressive infective destruction with the symptoms of critical multi-organ failure. The patient, with a history of rapid deterioration after two-week-long septicaemia in the course of AE, was operated urgently after initial antibiotic treatment because of huge vegetations into the mitral valve orifice. A Melody TVP 22 valve was expanded over a 16-mm TyShak balloon and implanted into a mitral position (Melody-MVR) with good result. Based on current knowledge concerning heart valve reconstructions and institutional experience, we conclude that infected mitral valve in children should be primarily repaired; nevertheless, the Melody valve could be reasonably con-sidered as a mitral prosthesis in such conditions.

  10. Real-world outcomes of surgery for native mitral valve endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Nana; Itagaki, Shinobu; Egorova, Natalia N; Tannous, Henry; Anyanwu, Anelechi C; El-Eshmawi, Ahmed; Adams, David H; Chikwe, Joanna

    2017-12-01

    Consensus guidelines recommend repair over replacement for the surgical treatment of active native mitral valve infective endocarditis. However, contemporary practice and long-term outcome data are limited. Multivariable Cox regression was used to compare outcomes of 1970 patients undergoing isolated primary mitral valve repair (n = 367, 19%) or replacement (n = 1603, 81%) for active infective endocarditis between 1998 and 2010 in New York and California states. The primary outcome was long-term survival. Secondary outcomes were recurrent endocarditis and mitral reoperation. Median follow-up time was 6.6 years (range 0-12), and last follow-up date was December 31, 2015. Mitral valve repair rates increased from 10.7% to 19.4% over the study period (P < .001). Patients undergoing mitral repair were younger (55 ± 15 vs 57 ± 15 years, P = .005), less likely to have congestive heart failure (46.3% vs 57.1%, P < .001), and less likely to have staphylococcal infections (21.3% vs 32.0%, P < .001). Twelve-year survival was 68.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 62.5%-74.3%) after mitral repair, versus 53.5% (95% CI, 50.6%-56.4%) after replacement (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.57-0.88; P = .002). Mitral repair was associated with lower rate of recurrent endocarditis at 12 years than replacement (4.7% [95% CI, 2.8%-7.2%] vs 9.5% [95% CI, 8.0-11.1%]; P = .03), and similar rate of reoperation (9.1% [95% CI, 6.2%-12.8%] vs 8.6% [95% CI, 7.1%-10.4%]; P = .12). In active endocarditis, mitral valve repair is associated with better survival and lower risk of recurrent infection compared with valve replacement and should be the surgery of choice when feasible. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Kodamaea ohmeri tricuspid valve endocarditis with right ventricular inflow obstruction in a neonate with structurally normal heart

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    Sundaram Ponnusamy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Kodamaea (Pichia ohmeri is a rare human pathogen with infrequent report of neonatal infection. Native valve endocarditis by Kodamaea ohmeri is extremely rare. The current case report describes a case of fatal nosocomial native valve endocarditis without any structural heart defects in a 40dayold baby. The patient was referred to our institute after having ICU stay of 18 days in another hospital for necrotizing enterocolitis and was found to have obstructive tricuspid valve mass and fungemia with Kodamaea ohmeri. In spite of the treatment, patient developed sepsis with disseminated intravascular coagulation and could not be revived.

  12. Bartonella native valve endocarditis: the first brazilian case alive and well

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    C. Lamas

    Full Text Available Bartonella is an important cause of blood culture-negative endocarditis in recent studies. Seroprevalence studies in the States of Minas Gerais and Rio de Janeiro have shown Bartonella IgG positivity around 14% in healthy adults and 40% in HIV seropositive adults, respectively. A case report of a 46-year-old white male with moderate aortic regurgitation (AR due to rheumatic heart disease (RHD, admitted due to worsening heart failure, is presented. Clinical features were apyrexia, anemia, polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia, hematuria and splenomegaly. He was submitted to surgery due to worsening AR. Histopathology of the excised valve showed active bacterial endocarditis and underlying RHD. Routine blood cultures were negative. Indirect immunofluorescence (IFI assays for Coxiella burnetii were non-reactive. Bartonella henselae IgG titer was 1:4096 prior to antibiotics and 1:512 14 months after treatment. History of close contact with a young cat during the months preceding his admission was elicited.

  13. Early and late results of surgical treatment for isolated active native mitral valve infective endocarditis.

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    Tomšic, Anton; Versteegh, Michel I M; Ajmone Marsan, Nina; van Brakel, Thomas J; Klautz, Robert J M; Palmen, Meindert

    2017-12-18

    Native mitral valve infective endocarditis (IE) is a complicated disease with high mortality and morbidity rates. Mitral valve repair (MVRep) is feasible when limited valve destruction is present. However, recurrent valve dysfunction and reintervention are common. Between January 2000 and March 2016, 83 patients underwent surgery for isolated active native mitral valve IE. We applied an early surgery, MVRep-oriented approach with progressive utilization of patch techniques to secure a durable repair; MVRep was attempted in 67% of patients. Fifty-one (61%) patients underwent MVRep (including full-ring annuloplasty in 94%) and 32 (39%) patients underwent mitral valve replacement. Early mortality was 13%. No cases of early recurrent IE occurred. Predischarge echocardiography demonstrated good MVRep function in all, except 1 patient with residual (Grade 2+) regurgitation. The mean duration of follow-up was 3.7 years (interquartile range 1.5-8.4). For hospital survivors, 8-year overall survival rates were 92.4% (95% confidence interval 84.0-100%) and 74.2% (95% confidence interval 53.8-94.6%) for the MVRep and mitral valve replacement groups, respectively. Propensity score-adjusted Cox regression analysis revealed no significant difference in survival between the 2 groups (hazard ratio 0.359, 95% confidence interval 0.107-1.200; P = 0.096). Four reinterventions occurred, 2 in each group. Echocardiographic follow-up demonstrated excellent MVRep durability; no cases of mitral regurgitation and 1 case of mitral valve stenosis were seen. Native mitral valve IE is linked to high mortality and morbidity rates. A durable MVRep is feasible in most patients and provides excellent mid-term durability. Mitral valve replacement is a reasonable alternative when a durable repair is not likely.

  14. Mitral valve replacement in a patient with infective endocarditis and aneurysm of the cerebral artery: A case report

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    Senka Mesihović-Dinarević

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Endocarditis can have profound and devastating neurological consequences, with the vast majority of these complications in patients with left-sided valvular disease. The approach to the acute management of stroke in children with infective endocarditis is limited by the inadequacy of published data on their clinical course and outcome. Case report. This case report presents a 12 year old girl with diagnosed endocarditis, complicated with intracranial hemorrhage, due to the rupture of an aneurysm of the peripheral branch medial cerebral artery and gradient therapeutic approach, with an excellent final result. Conclusion. Congestive heart failure resulting from valvular insufficiency required mitral valve replacement, after cerebral aneurysm clipping.

  15. Native valve endocarditis caused by an organism resembling Corynebacterium striatum.

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    Markowitz, S M; Coudron, P E

    1990-01-01

    An organism resembling Corynebacterium striatum was isolated from the blood of a patient with acute aortic valvular insufficiency and no history of valvular heart disease. At autopsy, histopathologic examination of the aortic valve revealed pleomorphic gram-positive bacilli and destruction of valvular tissue. Our isolate differed from other nondiphtherial corynebacteria, including the type strain of C. striatum (ATCC 6940), in its ability to reduce nitrite. Nitrite reduction may be useful for...

  16. Native valve endocarditis due to Candida parapsilosis in an adult patient

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    Krishnee Moodley

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Candida endocarditis is rare, but associated with a high mortality. The most common species implicated is Candida albicans. The epidemiology of invasive Candida infections is changing, with a predominance of non-albicans species causing invasive disease. We describe a case of Candida parapsilosis endocarditis in an HIV-positive patient with pre-existing mitral valve disease and renal failure on haemodialysis. The patient presented with fever and malaise. Clinical examination revealed pulmonary oedema and severe mitral regurgitation. Blood cultures were positive for C. parapsilosis. β-D-glucan assay levels were elevated. An echocardiogram showed large, friable vegetations on the mitral valve. C. parapsilosis was cultured from the haemodialysis tip and the vegetations. The patient responded well to mitral valve replacement and antifungal therapy. A high index of suspicion and aggressive diagnostic modalities and therapy are essential in patients with candidaemia, to decrease mortality due to this condition.

  17. Native triple-valve endocarditis caused by penicillin-resistant Streptococcus sanguis.

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    Bavunoglu, Isil; Sahin, Serap; Yilmaz, Mesut; Toptas, Tayfur; Tabak, Fehmi; Tunckale, Aydin

    2007-06-01

    A 26-year-old man with known but untreated ventricular septal defect was admitted to the emergency ward with abdominal pain, fever and weight loss. Transthoracic echocardiography showed multiple vegetations on the anterior mitral leaflet, a mobile vegetation on the surface of the aortic noncoronary cusp and another on the tricuspid valve. His blood cultures grew Streptococcus sanguis with a penicillin minimum inhibitory concentration of 3 microg/ml. Physical examination, echocardiography, blood cultures, minimal inhibitory concentration detection. Multivalvular infective endocarditis caused by S. sanguis with a high penicillin resistance. A combination of intravenous vancomycin and gentamicin, followed by early surgery.

  18. Endocarditis fatal con localización mitral producida por Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae Fatal mitral valve endocarditis by Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae

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    G.V. Vallespi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Se describe un caso fatal de endocarditis en válvula mitral por Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, en un paciente varón de 45 años con antecedentes de etilismo crónico y sin contacto previo con animales. Presentaba un síndrome febril prolongado con poliartralgias, pérdida de peso y dolor en región lumbar y miembros inferiores. Los hemocultivos (2/2 fueron positivos a las 48 hs. de incubación y en el examen directo se observaron bacilos gram-positivos pleomórficos. En el subcultivo en agar sangre ovina al 5% desarrollaron colonias puntiformes con alfa hemólisis, catalasa y oxidasa negativas, PYR y LAP positivas y con producción de H2S en medio TSI. La cepa aislada fue identificada como E. rhusiopathiae de acuerdo a la metodología convencional y confirmada con API Coryne. El cuadro se asumió como una probable endocarditis demostrada mediante un ecocardiograma transtorácico. Se comenzó el tratamiento endovenoso con ampicilina y gentamicina. El paciente evolucionó favorablemente y se tornó afebril, sin embargo falleció a los 19 días de internación por edema agudo de pulmón. La prueba de sensibilidad por E-test demostró resistencia a vancomicina y gentamicina y sensibilidad a penicilina y cefotaxima. Es importante valorar los aislamientos de bacilos gram-positivos pleomórficos, catalasa y oxidasa negativos y realizar la prueba de producción de SH2 en el medio TSI. La resistencia a vancomicina ayuda a la identificación y permite establecer una correcta terapia antimicrobiana. Si bien se considera que las infecciones por E. rhusiopathiae son de carácter ocupacional, el contacto con cerdos u otros animales puede no ser evidente.A fatal case of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae mitral valve endocarditis is described in a 45 years old male, with a history of chronic alcohol abuse and without animals contact. He presented intermittent fever, polyarthralgia, weight loss, and low back pain. In blood cultures (2 bottles, gram

  19. Legionella cardiaca sp. nov., isolated from a case of native valve endocarditis in a human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Meghan M; Theodoropoulos, Nicole; Mandel, Mark J; Brown, Ellen; Reed, Kurt D; Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2012-12-01

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium, designated H63(T), was isolated from aortic valve tissue of a patient with native valve endocarditis. 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that H63(T) belongs to the genus Legionella, with its closest neighbours being the type strains of Legionella brunensis (98.8% similarity), L. londiniensis (97.0%), L. jordanis (96.8%), L. erythra (96.2%), L. dresdenensis (96.0%) and L. rubrilucens, L. feeleii, L. pneumophila and L. birminghamensis (95.7%). DNA-DNA hybridization studies yielded values of cardiaca sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is H63(T) ( = ATCC BAA-2315(T)  = DSM 25049(T)  = JCM 17854(T)).

  20. First report of Sneathia sanguinegens together with Mycoplasma hominis in postpartum prosthetic valve infective endocarditis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaskova, Iva; Nemec, Petr; Vanerkova, Martina; Malisova, Barbora; Tejkalova, Renata; Orban, Marek; Zampachova, Vita; Freiberger, Tomas

    2017-08-14

    The presence of more than one bacterial agent is relatively rare in infective endocarditis, although more common in prosthetic cases. Molecular diagnosis from a removed heart tissue is considered a quick and effective way to diagnose fastidious or intracellular agents. Here we describe the case of postpartum polymicrobial prosthetic valve endocarditis in a young woman. Sneathia sanguinegens and Mycoplasma hominis were simultaneously detected from the heart valve sample using broad range 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by sequencing while culture remained negative. Results were confirmed by independent PCR combined with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Before the final agent identification, the highly non-compliant patient left from the hospital against medical advice on empirical intravenous treatment with aminopenicillins, clavulanate and gentamicin switched to oral amoxycillin and clavulanate. Four months after surgery, no signs of inflammation were present despite new regurgitation and valve leaflet flail was detected. However, after another 5 months the patient died from sepsis and recurrent infective endocarditis of unclarified etiology. Mycoplasma hominis is a rare causative agent of infective endocarditis. To the best of our knowledge, presented case is the first report of Sneathia sanguinegens detected in this condition. Molecular techniques were shown to be useful even in polymicrobial infective endocarditis samples.

  1. [Left-sided native valve endocarditis by coagulase-negative staphylococci: an emerging disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Juan Luis; Lomas, José M; Plata, Antonio; Ruiz, Josefa; Gálvez, Juan; de la Torre, Javier; Hidalgo-Tenorio, Carmen; Reguera, José M; Márquez, Manuel; Martínez-Marcos, Francisco; de Alarcón, Arístides

    2008-05-01

    To describe the epidemiological, clinical, and prognostic characteristics of patients with left-sided native valve endocarditis (LNVE) caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). Prospective multicenter study of endocarditis cases reported in the Andalusian Cohort for the Study of Cardiovascular Infections between 1984 and 2005. Among 470 cases of LNVE, 39 (8.3%) were caused by CoNS, a number indicating a 30% increase in the incidence of this infection over the last decade. The mean age of affected patients was 58.32 +/- 15 years and 27 (69.2%) were men. Twenty-one patients (53.8%) had previous known valve disease and half the episodes were considered nosocomial (90% of them from vascular procedures). Median time interval from the onset of symptoms to diagnosis was 14 days (range: 1-120). Renal failure (21 cases, 53.8%), intracardiac damage (11 cases, 28.2%), and central nervous system involvement (10 cases, 25.6%) were the most frequent complications. There were only 3 cases (7.7%) of septic shock. Surgery was performed in 18 patients (46.2%). Nine patients (23.1%) died, overall. Factors associated with higher mortality in the univariate analysis were acute renal failure (P = 0.023), left-sided ventricular failure (P = 0.047), and time prior to diagnosis less than 21 days (P = 0.018). As compared to LNVE due to other microorganisms, the patients were older (P = 0.018), had experienced previous nosocomial manipulation as the source of bacteremia (P < 0.001), and developed acute renal failure more frequently (P = 0.001). Mortality of LNVE due to CoNS was lower than mortality in Staphylococcus aureus infection, but higher than in Streptococcus viridans infection. Left-sided native valve endocarditis due to CoNS is now increasing because of the ageing of the population. This implies more frequent invasive procedures (mainly vascular) as a consequence of the concomitant disease. Nonetheless, the mortality associated with LNVE due to CoNS does not seem to be

  2. New insights into valve-related intramural and intracellular bacterial diversity in infective endocarditis.

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    Andreas Oberbach

    Full Text Available In infective endocarditis (IE, a severe inflammatory disease of the endocardium with an unchanged incidence and mortality rate over the past decades, only 1% of the cases have been described as polymicrobial infections based on microbiological approaches. The aim of this study was to identify potential biodiversity of bacterial species from infected native and prosthetic valves. Furthermore, we compared the ultrastructural micro-environments to detect the localization and distribution patterns of pathogens in IE.Using next-generation sequencing (NGS of 16S rDNA, which allows analysis of the entire bacterial community within a single sample, we investigated the biodiversity of infectious bacterial species from resected native and prosthetic valves in a clinical cohort of 8 IE patients. Furthermore, we investigated the ultrastructural infected valve micro-environment by focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM.Biodiversity was detected in 7 of 8 resected heart valves. This comprised 13 bacterial genera and 16 species. In addition to 11 pathogens already described as being IE related, 5 bacterial species were identified as having a novel association. In contrast, valve and blood culture-based diagnosis revealed only 4 species from 3 bacterial genera and did not show any relevant antibiotic resistance. The antibiotics chosen on this basis for treatment, however, did not cover the bacterial spectra identified by our amplicon sequencing analysis in 4 of 8 cases. In addition to intramural distribution patterns of infective bacteria, intracellular localization with evidence of bacterial immune escape mechanisms was identified.The high frequency of polymicrobial infections, pathogen diversity, and intracellular persistence of common IE-causing bacteria may provide clues to help explain the persistent and devastating mortality rate observed for IE. Improved bacterial diagnosis by 16S rDNA NGS that increases the ability to tailor antibiotic

  3. New insights into valve-related intramural and intracellular bacterial diversity in infective endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, Stefan; Lehmann, Stefanie; Kullnick, Yvonne; Buschmann, Tilo; Blumert, Conny; Horn, Friedemann; Neuhaus, Jochen; Neujahr, Ralph; Bagaev, Erik; Hagl, Christian; Pichlmaier, Maximilian; Rodloff, Arne Christian; Gräber, Sandra; Kirsch, Katharina; Sandri, Marcus; Kumbhari, Vivek; Behzadi, Armirhossein; Behzadi, Amirali; Correia, Joao Carlos; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm

    2017-01-01

    Aims In infective endocarditis (IE), a severe inflammatory disease of the endocardium with an unchanged incidence and mortality rate over the past decades, only 1% of the cases have been described as polymicrobial infections based on microbiological approaches. The aim of this study was to identify potential biodiversity of bacterial species from infected native and prosthetic valves. Furthermore, we compared the ultrastructural micro-environments to detect the localization and distribution patterns of pathogens in IE. Material and methods Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) of 16S rDNA, which allows analysis of the entire bacterial community within a single sample, we investigated the biodiversity of infectious bacterial species from resected native and prosthetic valves in a clinical cohort of 8 IE patients. Furthermore, we investigated the ultrastructural infected valve micro-environment by focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM). Results Biodiversity was detected in 7 of 8 resected heart valves. This comprised 13 bacterial genera and 16 species. In addition to 11 pathogens already described as being IE related, 5 bacterial species were identified as having a novel association. In contrast, valve and blood culture-based diagnosis revealed only 4 species from 3 bacterial genera and did not show any relevant antibiotic resistance. The antibiotics chosen on this basis for treatment, however, did not cover the bacterial spectra identified by our amplicon sequencing analysis in 4 of 8 cases. In addition to intramural distribution patterns of infective bacteria, intracellular localization with evidence of bacterial immune escape mechanisms was identified. Conclusion The high frequency of polymicrobial infections, pathogen diversity, and intracellular persistence of common IE-causing bacteria may provide clues to help explain the persistent and devastating mortality rate observed for IE. Improved bacterial diagnosis by 16S rDNA NGS that increases the

  4. Perforated giant mycotic aneurysm of mitral valve in a drug-addicted young man: Rare complication of infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavanco, Vincenzo; Curzi, Mirko; Giustiniano, Enrico; Raspante, Donatella; Di Lisi, Daniela; Bragato, Renato Maria

    2018-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) affects patients at high clinical risk and may present as an acute and rapidly progressive, subacute or chronic infection. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography represent the key diagnostic method in IE diagnosis. In particular, three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography represents the imaging technique that allows to establish with adequate accuracy dimensions, shape, and localization of endocarditis vegetations. In our case, we show a huge vermiform mycotic aneurysm in an immunodeficient young drug-addicted man with severe mitral valve regurgitation and the additive value of three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in this specific clinical setting. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Daptomycin for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis native-valve endocarditis: a case report

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    Duah Marylene

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS have been increasing in importance as a cause of native valve endocarditis (NVE. Most cases of NVE caused by CoNS are attributable to Staphylococcus epidermidis. NVE caused by CoNS acquired in a nosocomial setting may differ from cases acquired in the community in several ways. It may be associated with hemodialysis, the presence of a long-term indwelling central catheter or pacemaker, or a recent invasive procedure; nosocomial cases may have a higher rate of methicillin resistance among CoNS isolates, and so be more likely to be treated with vancomycin. Unfortunately, NVE caused by methicillin-resistant CoNS has been associated with significantly higher rates of persistent bacteremia and in-hospital mortality than methicillin-susceptible isolates. The poor outcomes in these cases point to the need for alternative therapies with potent activity against methicillin-resistant CoNS. In our medical center, a 76-year-old man presented with native-valve endocarditis and positive blood cultures for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE. During each of three 6-week courses of treatment with vancomycin, blood cultures were negative, but they once again became positive for MRSE when vancomycin was discontinued. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the MRSE isolates for vancomycin remained stable at 2 μg/mL. Eventually, treatment with daptomycin was initiated (500 mg [7 mg/kg] 3 times/week for 6 weeks. Over the following year, no positive cultures for MRSE were detected.

  6. Multiresistant-MRSA tricuspid valve infective endocarditis with ancient osteomyelitis locus

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    Gambarati Gianpaolo

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA with low susceptibility to glycopeptides is uncommon. Case presentation The case of a 50-year-old non-drug addict patient presenting with tricuspid valve infective endocarditis (IE by MRSA resistant to vancomycin and linezolid is presented. There was response only to quinupristin/dalfopristin. He had a motorcycling accident four years before undergoing right above-the-knee amputation and orthopaedic fixation of the left limb. There were multiple episodes of left MRSA-osteomyelitis controlled after surgery and vancomycin therapy. MRSA isolated from the blood at the time of IE presented with the same profile than the isolated four years earlier. Sequential treatment with teicoplanin-cotrimoxazole and Linezolid associated to vancomycin – rifampicin – cotrimoxazole had no improvement. Infection was controlled after 28 days of therapy with quinupristin/dalfopristin. Conclusion The literature presents only a few cases of MRSA IE not susceptible to glycopeptides in not drug addicted patients. This case shows the comparison of a highly-resistant MRSA after previous S. aureus osteomyelitis treated with glycopeptides. This is the first description of successful treatment of resistant-MRSA IE of the tricuspid valve complicated by multiple pulmonary septic infarction with quinupristin/dalfopristin

  7. [Mitral valve repair in the course of active infectious endocarditis. Study of four patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Alonso, Carlos J; Ferrer, Elena; Vallejo, Nuria; Delgado, Luis; Pedro-Botet, María Luisa; Ruyra, Xavier; Bayés-Genis, Antoni

    2013-06-04

    Mitral valve (MV) repair is the preferred surgical treatment for degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR). However, questions remain about the efficacy of MV repair when performed for MR caused by infective endocarditis (IE), particularly during its active phase. Although several observational studies have suggested the superiority of MV repair over replacement in patients undergoing surgery for IE, many centres are still opting for valve replacement because of its technical feasibility and reproducibility. In the following document we expose the experience of our hospital. We present a series of 4 patients who recently underwent surgery for IE during its active phase. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics are discussed. All patients underwent different MV repair techniques. No relapse or reinfection has been reported. All patients present MR grades 0 or iI/ivIV at follow up. Even during the active phase of IE, MV repair is a feasible technique with good postoperatory results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Cardiac Tamponade following Mitral Valve Replacement for Active Infective Endocarditis with Ring Abscess

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    R. Ranjan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Periannular extension and abscess formation are rare but deadly complications of infective endocarditis (IE with high mortality. Multimodality cardiac imaging, invasive and noninvasive, is needed to accurately define the extent of the disease. Debridement, reconstruction, and valve replacement, often performed in an emergent setting, remain the treatment of choice. Here we present a case of severe IE in a 29-year-old intravenous drug user who after undergoing debridement of the abscess, annular reconstruction, and mitral valve replacement (MVR presented with recurrence of shortness of breath and pedal edema. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE showed a 6.2×5.5 cm cavity, posterior to and communicating with the left ventricle through a 3 cm wide fistulous opening, in proximity of the reconstructed mitral annulus. The patient underwent a redo MVR with patch closure of the fistulous opening, with good clinical outcome. This case highlights the classic TTE findings and the necessity for close follow-up in the perioperative period in patients undergoing surgery for periannular extension of infection. A cardiac magnetic resonance imaging can be considered, preoperatively, in such cases to identify the extent of myocardial involvement and surgical planning.

  9. Legionella cardiaca sp. nov., isolated from a case of native valve endocarditis in a human heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Meghan M.; Theodoropoulos, Nicole; Mandel, Mark J.; Brown, Ellen; Reed, Kurt D.

    2012-01-01

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium, designated H63T, was isolated from aortic valve tissue of a patient with native valve endocarditis. 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that H63T belongs to the genus Legionella, with its closest neighbours being the type strains of Legionella brunensis (98.8 % similarity), L. londiniensis (97.0 %), L. jordanis (96.8 %), L. erythra (96.2 %), L. dresdenensis (96.0 %) and L. rubrilucens, L. feeleii, L. pneumophila and L. birminghamensis (95.7 %). DNA–DNA hybridization studies yielded values of Legionella. H63T was distinguishable from its neighbours based on it being positive for hippurate hydrolysis. H63T was further differentiated by its inability to grow on BCYE agar at 17 °C, its poor growth on low-iron medium and the absence of sliding motility. Also, H63T did not react with antisera generated from type strains of Legionella species. H63T replicated within macrophages. It also grew in mouse lungs, inducing histopathological evidence of pneumonia and dissemination to the spleen. Together, these results confirm that H63T represents a novel, pathogenic Legionella species, for which the name Legionella cardiaca sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is H63T ( = ATCC BAA-2315T  = DSM 25049T  = JCM 17854T). PMID:22286905

  10. Isolated native tricuspid valve endocarditis presenting as PUO in a young adult male without any risk factors

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    Piyush Ranjan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 28-year-old male presented to our hospital with high-grade fever and weight loss for 4 months. Clinical examination was non-contributory and there was no history of any high-risk behavior or prolonged skin or dental infections. Native tricuspid-valve endocarditis may rarely present in these settings and high index of suspicion is essential for early diagnosis.

  11. Molecular characterization of Streptococcus mutans strains isolated from the heart valve of an infective endocarditis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Hirotoshi; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Nomura, Ryota; Ooshima, Takashi

    2008-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans, known to be an aetiological agent of dental caries, is occasionally isolated from patients with infective endocarditis (IE). S. mutans strains with a defect in all three types of glucosyltransferase (GTF) obtained from an infected heart valve extirpated from an IE patient have been reported previously. In this study, molecular analyses of strains detected in heart valve (strain V1) and dental plaque (strain P1) samples taken from the same patient were performed. Complete nucleotide alignments of the gtfB, gtfC and gtfD regions in strains V1 and P1, as well as in the reference strain MT8148, were determined, which revealed the existence of alignments with a high similarity to erythromycin- and spectinomycin-resistance genes in the middle of the gtfB-gtfC and gtfD genes, respectively, of V1. Strain V1 also showed a higher MIC for these two antibiotics compared with strain P1. Next, primers to detect the specific sequences of the antibiotic-resistance genes in strain V1 were constructed and PCR amplification was performed with template DNA from dental plaque and infected valve tissue samples taken from the patient. Attenuated expression of GTFs in V1 caused a significantly lower susceptibility to phagocytosis by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes compared with the reference strain. These results suggest that the blood isolate V1 found in the oral cavity invaded and survived in the bloodstream for a long duration and that this was related to its virulence in IE in our patient.

  12. Extensive infective endocarditis of the aortic root and the aortic-mitral continuity: a mitral valve sparing approach†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomšic, Anton; Schneider, Adriaan W; Palmen, Meindert; van Brakel, Thomas J; Versteegh, Michel I M; Klautz, Robert J M

    2017-06-01

    Severe cases of infective endocarditis (IE) of the aortic valve can cause aortic root destruction and affect the surrounding structures, including the aortic-mitral continuity, the anterior mitral valve leaflet and the roof of the left atrium. Reconstruction after resection of all infected tissue remains challenging. We describe our surgical approach and the mid-term results. Between January 2004 and December 2015, 35 patients underwent surgery for extensive IE of the aortic valve with destruction of the aortic root, the aortic-mitral continuity and the mitral valve. Mean age was 60.4 ± 13.7; 26/35 (74%) patients had prosthetic valve endocarditis. Four patients were in critical preoperative state. Median EuroSCORE II was 18.0% [interquartile range (IQR) 11.0-26.7]. Aortic root replacement was performed in 32 (91%) patients. The remaining patients underwent aortic valve replacement. Reconstruction of the aortic-mitral continuity and the roof of the left atrium were performed using a folded pericardial patch. In 28 patients (80%), mitral valve repair was performed. Postoperative mechanical circulatory support, acute kidney failure and surgical re-exploration were seen in 5 (16%), 10 (31%) and 4 (13%) patients, respectively. Early survival rate was 77% (27 patients). During a median follow-up of 29.8 months (IQR 6.4-62.9), 7 (26%) patients required reintervention (3-42 months after surgery); 4 were due to mitral incompetence, early in our experience. Extensive IE of the aortic root with destruction of the surrounding tissues remains a complex disease with high morbidity and mortality rates. Our technique allows native mitral valve preservation but is technically challenging.

  13. Successful treatment of Candida parapsilosis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection using medical and surgical management in an injecting drug user with mitral and aortic valve endocarditis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daas Hanady

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Polymicrobial endocarditis is a well-recognized problem in intravenous drug users and it accounts for 1 to 3% of endocarditis cases overall and up to 9% in other series. The most common combinations of organisms include Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae followed by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Candida parapsilosis endocarditis carries a mortality rate of 45%, and each infection with Candida or Pseudomonas endocarditis per se carries a very high mortality rate approaching 85% and 80%, respectively. The combination of P. aeruginosa and C. parapsilosis has never been encountered and there have been no earlier reports of the combination of C. parapsilosis and P. aeruginosa in adult intravenous drug users as a cause of endocarditis. Case presentation We present a 49-year-old man with bivalvular endocarditis with P. aeruginosa and C. parapsilosis. He had a prior bivalvular replacement in 2005 that became infected with the above microorganisms and he was treated with intravenous antibiotics. Because of ongoing intravenous drug use, a second valve replacement was denied. A few days later, the patient presented with septic shock secondary to P. aeruginosa and C. parapsilosis recurrent endocarditis. The infection was cured with a second bivalvular replacement and extended therapy with antibiotics and antifungals. Conclusion This is the first time a patient has presented with P. aeruginosa and C. parapsilosis endocarditis. Relapsing polymicrobial endocarditis can be cured with medical and surgical therapy.

  14. Infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, José M; Fonseca, Ana Catarina

    2014-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a serious disease of the endocardium of the heart and cardiac valves, caused by a variety of infectious agents, ranging from streptococci to rickettsia. The proportion of cases associated with rheumatic valvulopathy and dental surgery has decreased in recent years, while endocarditis associated with intravenous drug abuse, prosthetic valves, degenerative valve disease, implanted cardiac devices, and iatrogenic or nosocomial infections has emerged. Endocarditis causes constitutional, cardiac and multiorgan symptoms and signs. The central nervous system can be affected in the form of meningitis, cerebritis, encephalopathy, seizures, brain abscess, ischemic embolic stroke, mycotic aneurysm, and subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage. Stroke in endocarditis is an ominous prognostic sign. Treatment of endocarditis includes prolonged appropriate antimicrobial therapy and in selected cases, cardiac surgery. In ischemic stroke associated with infective endocarditis there is no indication to start antithrombotic drugs. In previously anticoagulated patients with an ischemic stroke, oral anticoagulants should be replaced by unfractionated heparin, while in intracranial hemorrhage, all anticoagulation should be interrupted. The majority of unruptured mycotic aneurysms can be treated by antibiotics, but for ruptured aneurysms, endovascular or neurosurgical therapy is indicated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. ECG-gated computed tomography: a new role for patients with suspected aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagman, Erika; Flinck, Agneta; Lamm, Carl [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Perrotta, Sossio [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery and Anaesthesia, Gothenburg (Sweden); Bech-Hanssen, Odd [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Olaison, Lars [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Infectious Diseases, Gothenburg (Sweden); Svensson, Gunnar [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery and Anaesthesia, Gothenburg (Sweden); The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-11-15

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the agreement in findings between ECG-gated CT and transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in patients with aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE). Twenty-seven consecutive patients with PVE underwent 64-slice ECG-gated CT and TEE and the results were compared. Imaging was compared with surgical findings (surgery was performed in 16 patients). TEE suggested the presence of PVE in all patients [thickened aortic wall (n = 17), vegetation (n = 13), abscess (n = 16), valvular dehiscence (n = 10)]. ECG-gated CT was positive in 25 patients (93 %) [thickened aortic wall (n = 19), vegetation (n = 7), abscess (n = 18), valvular dehiscence (n = 7)]. The strength of agreement [kappa (95 % CI)] between ECG-gated CT and TEE was very good for thickened wall [0.83 (0.62-1.0)], good for abscess [0.68 (0.40-0.97)] and dehiscence [0.75 (0.48-1.0)], and moderate for vegetation [0.55 (0.26-0.88)]. The agreement was good between surgical findings (abscess, vegetation and dehiscence) and imaging for ECG-gated CT [0.66 (0.49-0.87)] and TEE [0.79 (0.62-0.96)] and very good for the combination of ECG-gated CT and TEE [0.88 (0.74-1.0)]. Our results indicate that ECG-gated CT has comparable diagnostic performance to TEE and may be a valuable complement in the preoperative evaluation of patients with aortic PVE. (orig.)

  16. Rothia aeria endocarditis in a patient with a bicuspid aortic valve: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Nicodemo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rothia aeria is an uncommon pathogen mainly associated with endocarditis in case reports. In previous reports, endocarditis by R. aeria was complicated by central nervous system embolization. In the case we report herein, endocarditis by R. aeria was diagnosed after acute self-limited diarrhea. In addition to the common translocation of R. aeria from the oral cavity, we hypothesize the possibility of intestinal translocation. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and genetic sequencing are important tools that can contribute to early and more accurate etiologic diagnosis of severe infections caused by Gram-positive rods.

  17. 18-Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography: an additional tool in the diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Alessandra; Sordillo, Pasquale; Ceccarelli, Laura; Maffongelli, Gaetano; Calisti, Giorgio; Di Pietro, Barbara; Caracciolo, Cristiana Ragano; Schillaci, Orazio; Pellegrino, Antonio; Chiariello, Luigi; Andreoni, Massimo; Sarmati, Loredana

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the role of 18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET-CT) in the diagnosis of infectious endocarditis (IE). We retrospectively examined 27 consecutive patients who were admitted to the Infectious Diseases Department of Tor Vergata University Hospital between 2009 and 2013 with a suspicion of IE. The final IE diagnosis was defined according to the modified Duke criteria, and the microbiological and diagnostic results were collected for each patient. Twenty out of 27 patients had a suspected prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) and seven had a suspected native valve endocarditis (NVE). Twenty-five out of 27 patients (92%) had a confirmed diagnosis of IE (18/25 PVE and 7/25 NVE); 16 had a positive echocardiography evaluation and 16 had positive (18)F-FDG-PET-CT findings. Echocardiography showed a higher sensitivity as a diagnostic tool for the detection of IE compared to (18)F-FDG-PET-CT (80% vs. 55%). However, a greater number of PVE had positive (18)F-FDG-PET-CT results compared to those with positive echocardiography findings (11/13 vs. 9/13), and overall 89% (16/18) of confirmed PVE resulted (18)F-FDG-PET-CT positive. Analyzing only the cases who underwent transoesophageal echocardiography, (18)F-FDG-PET-CT showed a sensitivity of 85% in PVE (vs. 69% for echocardiography and 77% for the Duke criteria). All seven patients with NVE had a positive echocardiography and negative (18)F-FDG-PET-CT findings (p<0.001). The results of this study further highlight the limitations of echocardiography in the diagnosis of PVE and the potential advantages of (18)F-FDG-PET-CT in these cases.

  18. An angry cat causing Pasteurella multocida endocarditis and aortic valve replacement—A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Ahlsson

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Cat bites are often deep, and in rare circumstances can lead to life-threatening endocarditis. Proper surgical revision, antibiotic treatment, and patient compliance are necessary components in patient care to avoid this complication.

  19. Extension of antimicrobial treatment in patients with left-sided native valve endocarditis based on elevated C-reactive protein values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, D. W. M.; Hermanides, J.; Korevaar, J. C.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; van den Brink, R. B. A.; Speelman, P.; van der Meer, J. T. M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this non-randomized study was to investigate whether there is any benefit in the extension of antimicrobial treatment in patients with left-sided native valve endocarditis in whom C-reactive protein levels are still elevated after a standard course of therapy. There was no statistically

  20. Viridans streptococcal (Streptococcus intermedius) mitral valve subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE) in a patient with mitral valve prolapse after a dental procedure: the importance of antibiotic prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A; D'Elia, Alexis A; Pawar, Neha; Schoch, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE) is an infection of the heart involving damaged valves or endothelium. The most common organisms causing SBE are the viridans streptococci. Viridans streptococci differ in their propensity to cause SBE, which is related to the ability to adhere to damaged heart valves and endothelium, which is a function of extracellular matrix production. Streptococcus intermedius is a member of the S. anginosus group. S. intermedius is one of the many strains of viridans streptococci and a rare cause of SBE. SBE may result following a high-grade, sustained veridans streptococcal bacteremia in patients with predisposing cardiac lesions. Because viridans streptococci are relatively avirulent pathogens in normal hosts, they usually present as SBE. Some strains of viridans streptococci are inherently more virulent (eg, S. intermedius) and clinically resemble S. lugdunensis or S. aureus. We report a case of S. intermedius SBE in a patient with mitral valve prolapse (MVP). Throughout the patient's life, she received antibiotic prophylaxis for dental procedures and never developed SBE. Because of changes in endocarditis prophylaxis guidelines in 2007, recommending no prophylaxis for dental procedures in patients with MVP, she did not receive prophylaxis for a dental procedure 3 months before admission. The change in prophylaxis recommendations was based on the relatively low incidence of endocarditis with certain cardiac lesions. The recommendations were also based on concern for antibiotic resistance from widespread antibiotic use for antibiotic prophylaxis. There has been no appreciable increase in penicillin resistance, and antimicrobial resistance is not an important consideration among the viridans streptococci. The incidence of SBE is not high after dental procedures in patients with MVP, but if SBE occurs, it may result in serious consequence for the patient. In this case, the patient developed S. intermedius, mitral valve SBE complicated by a

  1. The impact of preoperative neurological events in patients suffering from native infective valve endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbring, Manuel; Irmscher, Linda; Alexiou, Konstantin; Matschke, Klaus; Tugtekin, Sems-Malte

    2014-06-01

    Infective native valve endocarditis (NVE) complicated by a preoperative neurological event still remains a surgical challenge. Particularly, great uncertainty exists with regard to the optimal timing of surgery. We call for a multidisciplinary team approach for individualized risk estimation and analysed our experience obtained over the past decade. Between 1997 and 2012, a total of 495 patients underwent valve surgery for the treatment of NVE. Of these, 70 (14.1%) patients suffered from NVE complicated by an acute neurological event and formed the study group. The remaining 425 (85.9%) patients served as the control group. The mean age of the predominantly male (80.0%) study population was 54 ± 14 years. EuroSCORE and EuroSCORE II predicted a high surgical risk (24.9 ± 6.8 and 10.8 ± 8.1%, respectively). The mean follow-up time was 4.0 ± 3.1 years, ranging up to 15.6 years with an interquartile range from 1.7 to 5.4 years. An interdisciplinary team consisting of a cardiac surgeon, a cardiologist and a neurologist made the decision for surgery. Observed neurological deficits mainly consisted of ischaemic stroke (75.7%), meningoencephalitis (12.9%) and intracerebral haemorrhage (8.6%). The mean time interval between the neurological event and surgery was 8.7 ± 10.3 days for all patients, 8.0 ± 7.0 days for ischaemic stroke and 17 ± 24 days for intracerebral haemorrhage. Postoperatively, most of the patients experienced no change (22.9%) or even improvement (67.1%) of their neurological symptoms. Only 10.0% showed further deterioration of their neurological status. This was particularly true for patients suffering from intracerebral haemorrhage, with 33.3% experiencing further neurological impairment. The presence of a preoperative neurological event was identified as an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality (OR 2.66; 95% CI: 1.02-6.78; P = 0.046) but not for mortality during further follow-up (P = 0.257). The hospital mortality rate was 17.2%; and

  2. Chest pain with ST segment elevation in a patient with prosthetic aortic valve infective endocarditis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamma Reto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction secondary to atherosclerotic plaque rupture is a common medical emergency. This condition is effectively managed with percutaneous coronary intervention or thrombolysis. We report a rare case of acute myocardial infarction secondary to coronary embolisation of valvular vegetation in a patient with infective endocarditis, and we highlight how the management of this phenomenon may not be the same. Case presentation A 73-year-old British Caucasian man with previous tissue aortic valve replacement was diagnosed with and treated for infective endocarditis of his native mitral valve. His condition deteriorated in hospital and repeat echocardiography revealed migration of vegetation to his aortic valve. Whilst waiting for surgery, our patient developed severe central crushing chest pain with associated anterior ST segment elevation on his electrocardiogram. Our patient had no history or risk factors for ischaemic heart disease. It was likely that coronary embolisation of part of the vegetation had occurred. Thrombolysis or percutaneous coronary intervention treatments were not performed in this setting and a plan was made for urgent surgical intervention. However, our patient deteriorated rapidly and unfortunately died. Conclusion Clinicians need to be aware that atherosclerotic plaque rupture is not the only cause of acute myocardial infarction. In the case of septic vegetation embolisation, case report evidence reveals that adopting the current strategies used in the treatment of myocardial infarction can be dangerous. Thrombolysis risks intra-cerebral hemorrhage from mycotic aneurysm rupture. Percutaneous coronary intervention risks coronary mycotic aneurysm formation, stent infections as well as distal septic embolisation. As yet, there remains no defined treatment modality and we feel all cases should be referred to specialist cardiac centers to consider how best to proceed.

  3. Q Fever Presenting as Recurrent, Culture-Negative Endocarditis with Aortic Prosthetic Valve Failure: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Abeer N AlShukairi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes a case of recurrent, culture-negative endocarditis presenting with aortic prosthetic valve dysfunction in a 62-year-old man who required four valve replacement surgeries. On each occasion, he presented with valve failure. Fever was only documented during his first presentation. Furthermore, no vegetations were detectable on his aortic valve at transesophageal echocardiography. On the occasion of his most recent presentation, a detailed history of animal exposure -- including hunting and skinning deer, moose and other large animals with his bare hands -- was the only clue to his diagnosis. Serum antibodies against Coxiella burnetii were strongly positive, and C burnetii DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction from his resected aortic valve tissue. Q fever is a worldwide zoonotic infection with diverse reservoirs. This diagnosis should be considered when evaluating unexplained prosthetic valve dysfunction, particularly in the setting of animal exposure.

  4. The impact of cardiac surgery in native valve infective endocarditis: Can euroSCORE guide patient selection?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Bruun, Louise E; Lund, Jens

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Decision making regarding surgical intervention in native valve endocarditis (NVE) is often complex and surgery is withheld in a number of patients either because medical treatment is considered the best treatment or because the risk of operation is considered too high. The objective...... of this study was to investigate the outcome of surgical treatment and to validate the ability of euroSCORE to predict operative mortality in NVE patients. METHODS: Prospective cohort study including 323 consecutive NVE patients. Patients were divided into 3 groups based on treatment strategy and indication....../contraindication for surgery. The additive and logistic euroSCORE was calculated and the observed and predicted mortality was compared. RESULTS: Cardiac surgery was associated with a good prognosis, in-hospital and after 12months, compared to conservative treatment. After adjustment for confounders surgery was associated...

  5. Klebsiella oxytoca Endocarditis With Complete Heart Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Ullah MD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gram-negative bacterial endocarditis causes 5% of all bacterial endocarditis. Among gram-negative bacteria, Klebsiella species are rare causes of native valve endocarditis. Klebsiella oxytoca is an extremely rare subspecies that can infrequently cause endocarditis and is associated with poor outcome. We report a case of Klebsiella oxytoca endocarditis in an elderly man who initially presented with stroke but later developed sepsis and heart block secondary to endocarditis.

  6. Native-valve endocarditis due to Neisseria sicca: case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiddal, S; Sverrisson, J T; Yngvason, F E; Cariglia, N; Kristinsson, K G

    1993-05-01

    Many species of the Neisseria, gram-negative diplococci that are frequent respiratory commensals in humans, have been regarded as being nonpathogenic or as causing disease in only immunocompromised hosts; in contrast, gram-negative diplococci such as Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are known pathogens. We report a case in which Neisseria sicca was the cause of serious infection (with catastrophic consequences) in an immunocompetent patient and review the world literature on endocarditis due to N. sicca.

  7. Mitral restenosis in the early postoperative period of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pomerantzeff Pablo Maria Alberto

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A forty eight year old woman, who had undergone mitral comissurotomy and subsequently developed early restenosis, presented with major comissural fusion and verrucous lesions on the cuspid edges of the mitral valve, with normal subvalvar apparatus. Patient did well for the first six months after surgery when she began to present dyspnea on light exertion. A clinical diagnosis of restenosis was made, which was confirmed by an echocardiogram and cardiac catheterization. She underwent surgery, and a stenotic mitral valve with verrucous lesions suggesting Libman-Sacks' endocarditis was found. Because the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE had not been confirmed at that time, a bovine pericardium bioprosthesis (FISICS-INCOR was implanted. The patient did well in the late follow-up and is now in NYHA Class I .

  8. Impact of Early Valve Surgery on Outcome of Staphylococcus aureus Prosthetic Valve Infective Endocarditis: Analysis in the International Collaboration of Endocarditis–Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirouze, Catherine; Alla, François; Fowler, Vance G.; Sexton, Daniel J.; Corey, G. Ralph; Chu, Vivian H.; Wang, Andrew; Erpelding, Marie-Line; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Hannan, Margaret M.; Lejko-Zupanc, Tatjana; Miró, José M.; Muñoz, Patricia; Murdoch, David R.; Tattevin, Pierre; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Hoen, Bruno; Clara, Liliana; Sanchez, Marisa; Nacinovich, Francisco; Oses, Pablo Fernandez; Ronderos, Ricardo; Sucari, Adriana; Thierer, Jorge; Casabé, José; Cortes, Claudia; Altclas, Javier; Kogan, Silvia; Spelman, Denis; Athan, Eugene; Harris, Owen; Kennedy, Karina; Tan, Ren; Gordon, David; Papanicolas, Lito; Eisen, Damon; Grigg, Leeanne; Street, Alan; Korman, Tony; Kotsanas, Despina; Dever, Robyn; Jones, Phillip; Konecny, Pam; Lawrence, Richard; Rees, David; Ryan, Suzanne; Feneley, Michael P.; Harkness, John; Jones, Phillip; Ryan, Suzanne; Jones, Phillip; Ryan, Suzanne; Jones, Phillip; Post, Jeffrey; Reinbott, Porl; Ryan, Suzanne; Gattringer, Rainer; Wiesbauer, Franz; Andrade, Adriana Ribas; de Brito, Ana Cláudia Passos; Guimarães, Armenio Costa; Grinberg, Max; Mansur, Alfredo José; Siciliano, Rinaldo Focaccia; Strabelli, Tania Mara Varejao; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; de Medeiros Tranchesi, Regina Aparecida; Paiva, Marcelo Goulart; Fortes, Claudio Querido; de Oliveira Ramos, Auristela; Ferraiuoli, Giovanna; Golebiovski, Wilma; Lamas, Cristiane; Santos, Marisa; Weksler, Clara; Karlowsky, James A.; Keynan, Yoav; Morris, Andrew M.; Rubinstein, Ethan; Jones, Sandra Braun; Garcia, Patricia; Cereceda, M; Fica, Alberto; Mella, Rodrigo Montagna; Barsic, Bruno; Bukovski, Suzana; Krajinovic, Vladimir; Pangercic, Ana; Rudez, Igor; Vincelj, Josip; Freiberger, Tomas; Pol, Jiri; Zaloudikova, Barbora; Ashour, Zainab; El Kholy, Amani; Mishaal, Marwa; Rizk, Hussien; Aissa, Neijla; Alauzet, Corentine; Alla, Francois; Campagnac, Catherine; Doco-Lecompte, Thanh; Selton-Suty, Christine; Casalta, Jean-Paul; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Habib, Gilbert; Raoult, Didier; Thuny, Franck; Delahaye, François; Delahaye, Armelle; Vandenesch, Francois; Donal, Erwan; Donnio, Pierre Yves; Michelet, Christian; Revest, Matthieu; Tattevin, Pierre; Violette, Jérémie; Chevalier, Florent; Jeu, Antoine; Sorel, Claire; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Bernard, Yvette; Chirouze, Catherine; Hoen, Bruno; Leroy, Joel; Plesiat, Patrick; Naber, Christoph; Neuerburg, Carl; Mazaheri, Bahram; Naber, Christoph; Neuerburg, Carl; Athanasia, Sofia; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Mylona, Elena; Paniara, Olga; Papanicolaou, Konstantinos; Pyros, John; Skoutelis, Athanasios; Sharma, Gautam; Francis, Johnson; Nair, Lathi; Thomas, Vinod; Venugopal, Krishnan; Hannan, Margaret; Hurley, John; Gilon, Dan; Israel, Sarah; Korem, Maya; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Rubinstein, Ethan; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Casillo, Roberta; Cuccurullo, Susanna; Dialetto, Giovanni; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Irene, Mattucci; Ragone, Enrico; Tripodi, Marie Françoise; Utili, Riccardo; Cecchi, Enrico; De Rosa, Francesco; Forno, Davide; Imazio, Massimo; Trinchero, Rita; Tebini, Alessandro; Grossi, Paolo; Lattanzio, Mariangela; Toniolo, Antonio; Goglio, Antonio; Raglio, Annibale; Ravasio, Veronica; Rizzi, Marco; Suter, Fredy; Carosi, Giampiero; Magri, Silvia; Signorini, Liana; Baban, Tania; Kanafani, Zeina; Kanj, Souha S.; Yasmine, Mohamad; Abidin, Imran; Tamin, Syahidah Syed; Martínez, Eduardo Rivera; Soto Nieto, Gabriel Israel; van der Meer, Jan T.M.; Chambers, Stephen; Holland, David; Morris, Arthur; Raymond, Nigel; Read, Kerry; Murdoch, David R.; Dragulescu, Stefan; Ionac, Adina; Mornos, Cristian; Butkevich, O.M.; Chipigina, Natalia; Kirill, Ozerecky; Vadim, Kulichenko; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Edathodu, Jameela; Halim, Magid; Lum, Luh-Nah; Tan, Ru-San; Lejko-Zupanc, Tatjana; Logar, Mateja; Mueller-Premru, Manica; Commerford, Patrick; Commerford, Anita; Deetlefs, Eduan; Hansa, Cass; Ntsekhe, Mpiko; Almela, Manuel; Armero, Yolanda; Azqueta, Manuel; Castañeda, Ximena; Cervera, Carlos; del Rio, Ana; Falces, Carlos; Garcia-de-la-Maria, Cristina; Fita, Guillermina; Gatell, Jose M.; Marco, Francesc; Mestres, Carlos A.; Miró, José M.; Moreno, Asuncion; Ninot, Salvador; Paré, Carlos; Pericas, Joan; Ramirez, Jose; Rovira, Irene; Sitges, Marta; Anguera, Ignasi; Font, Bernat; Guma, Joan Raimon; Bermejo, Javier; Bouza, Emilio; Fernández, Miguel Angel Garcia; Gonzalez-Ramallo, Victor; Marín, Mercedes; Muñoz, Patricia; Pedromingo, Miguel; Roda, Jorge; Rodríguez-Créixems, Marta; Solis, Jorge; Almirante, Benito; Fernandez-Hidalgo, Nuria; Tornos, Pilar; de Alarcón, Arístides; Parra, Ricardo; Alestig, Eric; Johansson, Magnus; Olaison, Lars; Snygg-Martin, Ulrika; Pachirat, Orathai; Pachirat, Pimchitra; Pussadhamma, Burabha; Senthong, Vichai; Casey, Anna; Elliott, Tom; Lambert, Peter; Watkin, Richard; Eyton, Christina; Klein, John L.; Bradley, Suzanne; Kauffman, Carol; Bedimo, Roger; Chu, Vivian H.; Corey, G. Ralph; Crowley, Anna Lisa; Douglas, Pamela; Drew, Laura; Fowler, Vance G.; Holland, Thomas; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Mudrick, Daniel; Samad, Zaniab; Sexton, Daniel; Stryjewski, Martin; Wang, Andrew; Woods, Christopher W.; Lerakis, Stamatios; Cantey, Robert; Steed, Lisa; Wray, Dannah; Dickerman, Stuart A.; Bonilla, Hector; DiPersio, Joseph; Salstrom, Sara-Jane; Baddley, John; Patel, Mukesh; Peterson, Gail; Stancoven, Amy; Afonso, Luis; Kulman, Theresa; Levine, Donald; Rybak, Michael; Cabell, Christopher H.; Baloch, Khaula; Chu, Vivian H.; Corey, G. Ralph; Dixon, Christy C.; Fowler, Vance G.; Harding, Tina; Jones-Richmond, Marian; Pappas, Paul; Park, Lawrence P.; Redick, Thomas; Stafford, Judy; Anstrom, Kevin; Athan, Eugene; Bayer, Arnold S.; Cabell, Christopher H.; Chu, Vivian H.; Corey, G. Ralph; Fowler, Vance G.; Hoen, Bruno; Karchmer, A. W.; Miró, José M.; Murdoch, David R.; Sexton, Daniel J.; Wang, Andrew; Bayer, Arnold S.; Cabell, Christopher H.; Chu, Vivian; Corey, G. Ralph; Durack, David T.; Eykyn, Susannah; Fowler, Vance G.; Hoen, Bruno; Miró, José M.; Moreillon, Phillipe; Olaison, Lars; Raoult, Didier; Rubinstein, Ethan; Sexton, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The impact of early valve surgery (EVS) on the outcome of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) prosthetic valve infective endocarditis (PVIE) is unresolved. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between EVS, performed within the first 60 days of hospitalization, and outcome of SA PVIE within the International Collaboration on Endocarditis–Prospective Cohort Study. Methods. Participants were enrolled between June 2000 and December 2006. Cox proportional hazards modeling that included surgery as a time-dependent covariate and propensity adjustment for likelihood to receive cardiac surgery was used to evaluate the impact of EVS and 1-year all-cause mortality on patients with definite left-sided S. aureus PVIE and no history of injection drug use. Results. EVS was performed in 74 of the 168 (44.3%) patients. One-year mortality was significantly higher among patients with S. aureus PVIE than in patients with non–S. aureus PVIE (48.2% vs 32.9%; P = .003). Staphylococcus aureus PVIE patients who underwent EVS had a significantly lower 1-year mortality rate (33.8% vs 59.1%; P = .001). In multivariate, propensity-adjusted models, EVS was not associated with 1-year mortality (risk ratio, 0.67 [95% confidence interval, .39–1.15]; P = .15). Conclusions. In this prospective, multinational cohort of patients with S. aureus PVIE, EVS was not associated with reduced 1-year mortality. The decision to pursue EVS should be individualized for each patient, based upon infection-specific characteristics rather than solely upon the microbiology of the infection causing PVIE. PMID:25389255

  9. Lactococcus garvieae endocarditis in a native valve identified by MALDI-TOF MS and PCR-based 16s rRNA in Spain: A case report

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    V. Heras Cañas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus garvieae is a Gram-positive, catalase negative coccus arranged in pairs or short chains, well-known as a fish pathogen. We report a case of Infective Endocarditis (IE by L. garvieae in a native valve from a 68-year-old male with unknown history of contact with raw fish and an extensive history of heart disease. This case highlights the reliability of MALDI-TOF MS compared to conventional methods in the identification of rare microorganisms like this.

  10. ENDOCARDITIS WITH AN UNCOMMON GERM

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    M. Gharouni

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Enterococci are normal inhabitants of gastrointestinal tract, being responsible for 5 to 18% of infective endocarditis and the incidence appears to be increasing. Eleven patients with enterococcal endocarditis were studied. In a case series group, 10 men (average 57 years and one woman (37 years were studied. Two patients had rheumatic heart disease, 5 patients arteriosclerotic disease and one patient chronic renal failure on hemodialysis. Ten patients were treated with ampicillin and gentamycin. Valve replacement was performed in 3 patients with aortic valve endocarditis, one on 8th day and two at the end of the treatment. Overall clinical cure was achieved in 9 patients. Two relapses occurred and 2 patients died as a result of refractory congestive heart failure and cerebral emboli. All of the enterococcal endocarditis cases were community acquired. In conclusion, infective endocarditis in patients with preexistent valvular heart disease, community acquisition and non specific symptoms with bacteriuria should be considered as enterococcal endocarditis.

  11. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in a blast-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patient with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae tricuspid valve endocarditis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarcioglu, Bulent; Bekoz, Huseyin Saffet; Olgun, Fatih Erkam; Cakal, Beytullah; Arkan, Burak; Turkoglu, Halil; Mert, Ali; Sargin, Deniz

    2016-10-01

    In chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), the occurrence of blastic transformation is rare. Treatment outcome is generally poor. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is the only potentially curative treatment option for advanced-phase CML. Infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) isolates are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, particularly in patients with haematological malignancies. Infection and colonization by these multiresistant bacteria may represent a challenge in SCT recipients for the management of post-transplantation complications, as well as for the eligibility to receive a transplant in patients who acquire the pathogen prior to the procedure. We herein report the case of a blast-phase CML patient with a highly resistant, CRKP-associated tricuspid valve endocarditis, who was treated with a combination of systemic antimicrobial therapy and surgical valve repair, and subsequently underwent a successful allo-SCT.

  12. Aneurisma infectado de artéria braquial após endocardite infecciosa de valva mitral Infected aneurysm of brachial artery after mitral valve infective endocarditis

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    Heraldo Guedis Lobo Filho

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Apresentamos um caso de aneurisma infectado de artéria braquial em paciente com endocardite infecciosa por Streptococcus bovis. Homem de 49 anos de idade se apresentou com febre, dispnéia e sopro regurgitativo em foco mitral com irradiação para axila. O ecocardiograma demonstrou vegetação em valva mitral nativa. Após troca valvar mitral com implante de prótese biológica, observou-se massa pulsátil de cinco centímetros de diâmetro em fossa antecubital direita. Foi feito o diagnóstico de aneurisma infectado de artéria braquial, e o tratamento cirúrgico foi realizado com sucesso. O objetivo desse relato de caso é apresentar uma complicação pouco comum após endocardite infecciosa.We present a case of brachial artery infected aneurysm in a patient with infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus bovis. A 49-year-old man presented with fever dyspnea and a pansystolic murmur with irradiation to axilla. The echocardiogram revealed vegetation in native mitral valve. After mitral valve replacement with bioprosthesis, it was observed pulsatile mass of five centimeters in diameter at antecubital fossa of right upper limb. It was made the diagnosis of infected aneurysm of the brachial artery, and the surgery was performed successfully. The aim of this case report is to show a rare complication after infective endocarditis.

  13. Using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry as a rapid and accurate diagnostic tool in infective endocarditis: a case report of a patient with mitral valve infective endocarditis caused by Abiotrophia defectiva

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Jon Gitz; Pedersen, Line; Calum, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    A case of infective endocarditis caused by Abiotrophia defectiva is presented. The use of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry as a rapid and accurate diagnostic tool in infective endocarditis is discussed.......A case of infective endocarditis caused by Abiotrophia defectiva is presented. The use of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry as a rapid and accurate diagnostic tool in infective endocarditis is discussed....

  14. [Eikenella corrodens infective endocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Juliano Novaes; Ochiai, Marcelo Eidi; Oliveira, Múcio T; Morgado, Paulo; Munhoz, Robinson; Andretto, Fernanda E; Mansur, Alfredo José; Barretto, Antonio Carlos Pereira

    2005-07-01

    The HACEK microorganisms (Haemophilus spp, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae) account for 3% of the cases of endocarditis. They have the following similar clinical and microbiological properties: are Gram-negative bacilli, more easily isolated in aerobic media; their cultures require prolonged incubation time for growing (mean, 3.3 days); and may be considered part of normal flora of upper respiratory tract and oropharynx. The following characteristics have been identified in endocarditis caused by the HACEK microorganisms: insidious clinical findings; difficult diagnosis due to the fastidious nature of the microorganisms; and negative cultures. The Eikenella corrodens endocarditis was first described in 1972. That microorganism continues to be a rare etiological agent. We report the case of a female patient with native valve, who had Eikenella corrodens infective endocarditis.

  15. AngioVac System Used for Vegetation Debulking in a Patient with Tricuspid Valve Endocarditis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Hossam Abubakar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available AngioVac is a vacuum-based device approved in 2014 for percutaneous removal of undesirable materials from the intravascular system. Although numerous reports exist with regard to the use of the AngioVac device in aspiration of iliocaval, pulmonary, upper extremity, and right-sided heart chamber thrombi, very few data are present demonstrating its use in treatment of right-sided endocarditis. In this case report, we describe the novel device used in debulking a large right-sided tricuspid valve vegetation reducing the occurrence of septic embolisation and enhancing the efficacy of antibiotics in clearance of bloodstream infection. Further research is needed in larger RSIE patient populations to confirm the benefits and the potential of improved outcomes associated with the AngioVac device as well as identify its potential complications.

  16. Gemella morbillorum Endocarditis

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    Serap Ural

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis caused by Gemella morbillorum is a rare disease. In this report 67-year-old male patient with G. morbillorum endocarditis was presented. The patient was hospitalized as he had a fever of unknown origin and in the two of the three sets of blood cultures taken at the first day of hospitalization G. morbillorum was identified. The transthoracic echogram revealed 14 × 10 mm vegetation on the aortic noncoronary cuspis. After 4 weeks of antibiotic therapy, the case was referred to the clinic of cardiovascular surgery for valve surgery.

  17. Efficacy of cardiac surgery in endocarditis

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    Moradmand S

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available 2 factors changed the clinical course of infective endocarditis dramatically: 1 The discovery and evolution of techniques for identifying and treating its microbiologic causes and 2 Valvular surgery. We retrospectively evaluated 43 (33.5% patients (8 female, 35 male from 4 to 65 years old of 128 patients with infective endocarditis who underwent surgical intervention. Indication for surgery were: Refractory congestive heart failure 14 (32.5%, prosthetic valves 10 (23.2%, large vegetation 6 (13.9%, recurrent endocarditis 4 (9.3%, ring abscess 4 (9.3%, brucella endocarditis 2 (4.6%, staph aureus endocarditis 3 (6.9% and recurrent emboli 2 (4.6%. 30 to 50% of patients with infective endocarditis are operated during the active phase of the disease, this percentage is higher in case of aortic valve endocarditis, prosthetic valve endocarditis, some microorganisms such as staph aureus, gram negative bacilli, fungus and brucella. We suggest that internists refer patients for surgical intervention with infective endocarditis as early as possible in the active stage of infection.

  18. [Letal endocarditis due to Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Parra, Santiago; Peña, Alejandro; Blanca, Enrique; García, Federico

    2016-04-01

    We present a case report of a infective endocarditis by Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum in a young patient eight years old with bicuspid aortic valve that led to a severe neurological embolism and death. Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum is part of the nasopharyngeal and skin flora. However, there are cases reported of endocarditis usually associated with immunocompromised patients that mostly presented a poor clinical outcome.

  19. Native Valve Streptococcus bovis Endocarditis and Refractory Transfusion Dependent Iron Deficiency Anaemia Associated with Concomitant Carcinoma of the Colon: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Abdul Azeez Ahamed Riyaaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus bovis is found as a commensal organism in human gut and may become opportunistically pathogenic. Infective endocarditis is one of the commonest modes of presentation of this infection. The association between Streptococcus bovis endocarditis and colorectal cancer is well recognized. We report a case of Streptococcus bovis endocarditis along with a refractory iron deficiency anaemia associated with concomitant carcinoma of ascending colon in a 63-year-old male. Cooccurrence of these two conditions may cause a challenge in the management. Considering the strong association of colon cancer with Streptococcus bovis endocarditis, a detailed screening colonoscopy is mandatory following the diagnosis of the latter.

  20. Tratamento cirúrgico da endocardite em prótese valvular cardíaca Surgical treatment of endocarditis in prosthetic valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo M. A Pomerantzeff

    1989-04-01

    Full Text Available No período de janeiro de 1983 a março de 1988, 1.512 pacientes foram submetidos a substituição valvar, no Instituto do Coração, sendo 28 (1,85% deles por endocardite em prótese valvular. Dezessete doentes eram do sexo masculino e a idade variou de 18 a 67 anbs, com média e desvio padrão de 36,7 ± 12,9. A avaliação da classe funcional (CF. revelou 11 pacientes em CF. IV, 12 em C. F. III e 5 em CF . II. Oito (28,5% pacientes foram operados em condições de emergência. Um paciente era portador e válvula mecânica e 27, de válvula biológica. As hemoculturas foram positivas em 14 (50% pacientes; o agente mais encontrado foi o Streptococcus viridans em 5 casos. O ecocardiograma realizado no pré-operatório em 27 pacientes mostrou correlação com os achados cirúrgicos em 26 (96,2%. Na cirurgia, 17 doentes apresentavam vegetação na prótese e 11, abscesso no anel. Na retroca, foram utilizadas biopróteses em 27 (96,4% pacientes. A mortalidade imediata foi de 28,5% (8 doentes, ocorrendo 1 óbito tardio. A análise da associação óbito e tempo de aparecimento da endocardite, condição cirúrgica e resultado da cultura foi feita pelo teste de Qui-Quadrado (χ2. Podemos concluir que as condições clínicas pré-operatórias interferem, decisivamente, no resultado cirúrgico; a cirurgia de emergência tem resultados piores, devido às condições mais críticas dos doentes; as endocardites mais precoces são mais graves; a manipulação de focos infecciosos em pacientes com prótese valvular deve ser cuidadosa e precedida de antibioticoterapia e, nos doentes sobreviventes à operação, a evolução a longo prazo apresenta melhora significativa da classe funcional.From January/1983 to March/1988, 1512 patients were submitted to valve replacement in the Instituto do Coração, Of these, 28 (1.8% presented endocarditis in a valvular prosthesis. Seventeen patients were males, their ages varying from 18 to 67 years, with an average and

  1. Achromobacter species endocarditis: A Case Report and Literature Review

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    Catherine Derber

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocarditis due to Achromobacter species is a rare, yet serious, endovascular infection. Achromobacter species infective endocarditis is associated with underlying immunodeficiencies or prosthetic heart valves and devices. A case of prosthetic pulmonary valve endocarditis secondary to Achromobacter xylosoxidans subspecies denitrificans is described in the present report. This life-threatening infection was successfully treated with combined valve replacement and prolonged antibiotic therapy. A Medline/PubMed literature review of Achromobacter endocarditis was also performed. Achromobacter species are an uncommon, yet important, cause of nosocomial endocarditis. Given the significant associated morbidity and mortality, along with a high degree of intrinsic antibiotic resistance, Achromobacter species infective endocarditis remains a clinical treatment challenge.

  2. Tratamento clínico de endocardite em prótese valvar complicada por abscesso para-protético Successful medical management of prosthetic-valve endocarditis complicated by perivalvular abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Pereira Nunes

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo relata o caso de um paciente do sexo masculino, 44 anos, com endocardite em prótese aórtica complicada por abscesso para-protético. Evoluiu com melhora do processo infeccioso apenas com o tratamento clínico. História prévia de doença reumática, submetido a três cirurgias cardíacas para troca valvar por disfunção de prótese e endocardite prévia. Neste relato de caso, discutiremos as características principais do abscesso para-protético como complicação de endocarditeWe present a case of a 44-year-old man with prosthetic aortic endocarditis complicated by a perivalvular abscess. He evolved with improvement of the infectious process only under clinical treatment. The patient presented a prior history of rheumatic fever and had previously been undergone three valve replacements due to prosthesis dysfunction and previous endocarditis. In this case report we discuss the main features of perivalvular abscess complicating infective endocarditis

  3. Polymicrobial infective endocarditis caused by Neisseria sicca and Haemophilus parainfluenzae

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    Nikoloz Koshkelashvili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis is a common clinical problem in industrialized countries. Risk factors include abnormal cardiac valves, a history of endocarditis, intracardiac devices, prosthetic valves and intravenous drug use. We report a case of polymicrobial infective endocarditis in a 33 year-old female with a history chronic heroin use caused by Neisseria sicca and Haemophilus parainfluenzae. We believe the patient was exposed to these microbes by cleansing her skin with saliva prior to injection. Pairing a detailed history with the consideration of atypical agents is crucial in the proper diagnosis and management of endocarditis in patients with high-risk injection behaviors.

  4. A misinterpreted case of aorta prosthesis endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Christian Johann; Haugan, Ketil Jørgen; Reimers, Jesper Irving

    2013-01-01

    A 17-year-old male with a history of newly implanted mechanical valve at the aortic position, presented with fever, rigors, and painful cutaneous abscesses on his lower extremities and was suspected for infective endocarditis. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) showed a vegetation-like structur...... following the movement of the mechanical heart valve (MHV), which eventually proved to be a product of degassing microbubbles (MB).......A 17-year-old male with a history of newly implanted mechanical valve at the aortic position, presented with fever, rigors, and painful cutaneous abscesses on his lower extremities and was suspected for infective endocarditis. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) showed a vegetation-like structure...

  5. Endocarditis - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 111. Starke JR. Infective endocarditis. In: Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach WJ, Hotez PJ, eds. Feigin and Cherry's Textbook of Pediatric Infectious Diseases. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014: ...

  6. Streptococcus sanguis endocarditis associated with colonic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Dubrey, Simon William

    2010-01-01

    Infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus bovis is known to be associated with colorectal malignancy. Other less common streptococci, specifically Streptococcus sanguis, can be similarly associated with gastrointestinal carcinoma. We present a case of disseminated colorectal carcinoma occurring after a confirmed S sanguis endocarditis, that required mitral valve surgery. There may be a need for gastrointestinal surveillance in patients presenting with bacteraemia caused by less common streptococci.

  7. Are novel non-invasive imaging techniques needed in patients with suspected prosthetic heart valve endocarditis? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habets, Jesse; Mali, Willem P.T.M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Tanis, Wilco [Haga Teaching Hospital, Department of Cardiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Reitsma, Johannes B. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Brink, Renee B.A. van den [Academic Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Chamuleau, Steven A.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-07-15

    Multimodal non-invasive imaging plays a key role in establishing a diagnosis of PHV endocarditis. The objective of this study was to provide a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of TTE, TEE, and MDCT in patients with (suspected) PHV endocarditis. Studies published between 1985 and 2013 were identified via search and cross-reference of PubMed/Embase databases. Studies were included if (1) they reported on the non-invasive index tests TTE, TEE, or MDCT; (2) data was provided on PHV endocarditis as the condition of interest; and (3) imaging results were verified against either surgical inspection/autopsy or clinical follow-up reference standards, thereby enabling the extraction of 2-by-2 tables. Twenty articles (including 496 patients) met the inclusion criteria for PHV endocarditis. TTE, TEE, and MDCT + TEE had a pooled sensitivity/specificity for vegetations of 29/100 %; 82/95 %, and 88/94 %, respectively. The pooled sensitivity/specificity of TTE, TEE, and MDCT + TEE for periannular complications was 36/93 %, 86/98 %, and 100/94 %, respectively. TEE showed good sensitivity and specificity for establishing a diagnosis of PHV endocarditis. Although MDCT data are limited, this review showed that MDCT in addition to TEE may improve sensitivity in detecting life-threatening periannular complications. (orig.)

  8. [INFECTIOUS ENDOCARDITIS IN PREGNANT WOMEN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mravyan, S R; Shuginin, I O; Pronina, V P; Budykina, T S; Mikhailova, I S; Popov, V V; Khorikova, E N; Stepanova, E A

    2015-01-01

    A case of primary infectious endocarditis with the lesion of mitral valve in a pregnant woman is reported The diseases was caused by meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Special attention is given to inefficiency of beta-lactame antibiotics against this infection and beneficial effect of daptomycin therapy. This observation confirms literature data about high frequency of thromboembolic complications of S aureus-induced infectious endocarditis due to the production of various coagulases and von Willebrand factor-binding protein by these microorganisms. An increase of coagulation caused by S. aureus is mediated through activation of prothrombin, factor XIII, and fibrin-binding fibronectin. It requires prescription of direct thrombin inhibitor pradax that proved to yield good results in the treatment of our patient. It is concluded that infectious endocarditis in pregnant women is characterized by an atypical clinical picture due to impaired immunity associated with rapid progression of the process after delivery, high frequency of thromboembolic and DIC syndromes.

  9. Listeria Endocarditis: A Diagnostic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelmina J. A. R. M. Valckx MD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A 74-year-old hemodialysis patient with a history of an atrial septum defect closure, coronary bypass surgery, and a St. Jude aortic prosthetic valve was diagnosed with pneumonia and volume overload. Blood cultures were positive for Listeria monocytogenes, and amoxicillin was given for 2 weeks. Immediately after discontinuation of amoxicillin, fever relapsed. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography showed no sign of endocarditis. Given the fever relapse and 3 positive minor Duke criteria, an 18F-FDG PET-CT scan (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was performed. This scan showed activity at the aortic root, proximal ascending aorta, and inferior wall of the heart, making Listeria monocytogenes endocarditis a likely explanation. Amoxicillin was given for 6 weeks with good clinical result. Diagnosing a life-threatening Listeria monocytogenes endocarditis can be challenging and an 18F-FDG PET-CT scan can be helpful.

  10. Subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE due to Streptococcus gordonii

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    Raffaella Battista

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Endocarditis is an inflammatory state of the endothelium that promotes thrombus formation and tissue damage on the surface of heart valves. Recent studies have reported endocarditis mortality rates ranging from 12% to 46% (2008. The Streptococcus gordonii is a normal inhabitant of the human oral cavity. It is a component of the microbial communities responsible of plaque formation, associated with dental caries and also regarded as the main causative agent in the development of subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE.

  11. Chronic endocarditis due to Legionella anisa: a first case difficult to diagnose

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    F. Compain

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Endocarditis due to Legionella spp. is uncommon but presumably underestimated given the prevalence of Legionellae in the environment. We report a first and unusual case of chronic native valve endocarditis due to L. anisa and advocate that the diagnosis of endocarditis be made collaboratively between the cardiologist, surgeon, microbiologist and pathologist.

  12. In vitro Assays of Staphylococcus epidermidis Characteristics and Outcome in an Endocarditis Model

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    Betty Herndon

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Staphylococcus epidermidis adherence to indwelling polymers is important in prosthetic valve endocarditis. Earlier studies have related streptococcal endocarditis to isolates with high levels of cell-associated hexoses. The objective of the present study was to determine if a relationship exists between an S epidermidis isolate assay score and production/severity of experimental endocarditis.

  13. Dual Infection by Burkholderia Cepaciaand Pseudomonas Putida in an Infective Endocarditis Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Maria; Lalani, Farida Khurram; Ikram, Aamer; Zaman, Gohar; Ahmed, Parvez

    2017-06-01

    Infective endocarditis is rarely caused by Burkholderia cepacia. Pseudomonas putidahas not been reported to cause infective endocarditis so far. This is the first case of infective endocarditis being reported, that is caused by Pseudomonas putidaand Burkholderia cepaciain an immunocompetent host with no predisposing factors. Aortic valve replacement surgery was carried out and antibiotics were given, to which the patient responded well and recovered.

  14. Spondylodiscitis and endocarditis caused by S. vestibularis

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    Muge Aydin Tufan

    Full Text Available Streptococcus vestibularis is a recently described member of the viridans group that was first isolated from the vestibular mucosa of the human oral cavity and described as a new species in 1988. It has been rarely associated with human infections. In few papers, it has been reported as a causal agent of systemic infection in immunosupressed adults and in those with other severe underlying diseases, like coronary valve diseases. A 65-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital with complaints of fever for three months, general malaise, effort dyspnea, weight loss, back pain and myalgia. Both native aortic valve endocarditis and spondylodiscitis due to Streptococcus vestibularis were detected. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous potassium penicillin G and gentamicin for six weeks, followed by oral amoxicillin for three months, in addition to aortic valve replacement. In all patients with spondylodiscitis, infective endocarditis should be considered, particularly in patients with heart valve disease history, since spondylodiscitis may be the presenting sign of an infective endocarditis. Cardiac valve replacement surgery should be performed if the course of fever and inflammatory syndrome is unfavorable after appropriate antibiotic treatment. We report the first case with both native aortic valve endocarditis and spondylodiscitis due to Streptococcus vestibularis.

  15. Infectious endocarditis: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Deborah; Calkins, Bethany C; Thornton, Kristen

    2012-05-15

    Infectious endocarditis results from bacterial or fungal infection of the endocardial surface of the heart and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Risk factors include the presence of a prosthetic heart valve, structural or congenital heart disease, intravenous drug use, and a recent history of invasive procedures. Endocarditis should be suspected in patients with unexplained fevers, night sweats, or signs of systemic illness. Diagnosis is made using the Duke criteria, which include clinical, laboratory, and echocardiographic findings. Antibiotic treatment of infectious endocarditis depends on whether the involved valve is native or prosthetic, as well as the causative microorganism and its antibiotic susceptibilities. Common blood culture isolates include Staphylococcus aureus, viridans Streptococcus, enterococci, and coagulase-negative staphylococci. Valvular structural and functional integrity may be adversely affected in infectious endocarditis, and surgical consultation is warranted in patients with aggressive or persistent infections, emboli, and valvular compromise or rupture. After completion of antibiotic therapy, patients should be educated about the importance of daily dental hygiene, regular visits to the dentist, and the need for antibiotic prophylaxis before certain procedures.

  16. Infectious endocarditis with five localisations--case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Alina-Costina; Iordache, C

    2014-01-01

    Infectious endocarditis is defined as an infection of the endocardial surface area of the heart which can include one or more cardiac valves, mural endocardium or a septal defect. We present the case of a patient, aged 8, hospitalized in Hemato-Oncology Department with pontine glioma, who was also diagnosed with infectious endocarditis in five locations.

  17. Staphylococcus endocarditis associated with infectious vasculitis and recurrent cerebral hemorrhages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Rabinstein, Alejandro A.; Peters, Steve G.; Cloft, Harry; Wijdicks, Eelco F. M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with infectious endocarditis, who do not respond to conservative medical therapy usually need rapid valve surgery. This poses a difficult dilemma in patients with intracranial aneurysms and hemorrhage, although endovascular treatment of infectious aneurysms might be an advantage

  18. Diagnostic value of imaging in infective endocarditis : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes, Anna; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Touw, Daan J; van Melle, Joost P; Willems, Tineke P; Maass, Alexander H; Natour, Ehsan; Prakken, Niek H J; Borra, Ronald J H; van Geel, Peter Paul; Slart, Riemer H J A; van Assen, Sander; Sinha, Bhanu

    Sensitivity and specificity of the modified Duke criteria for native valve endocarditis are both suboptimal, at approximately 80%. Diagnostic accuracy for intracardiac prosthetic material-related infection is even lower. Non-invasive imaging modalities could potentially improve diagnosis of

  19. Are novel non-invasive imaging techniques needed in patients with suspected prosthetic heart valve endocarditis? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Habets; W. Tanis (Wilco); J.B. Reitsma (Johannes B.); R.B.A. van den Brink (Renee); W.P. Mali (Willem); S.A.J. Chamuleau (Steven); R.P.J. Budde (Ricardo)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: Multimodal non-invasive imaging plays a key role in establishing a diagnosis of PHV endocarditis. The objective of this study was to provide a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of TTE, TEE, and MDCT in patients with (suspected)

  20. Endocarditis due to Chryseobacterium meningosepticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bomb K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chryseobacterium meningosepticum is a gram negative rod widely distributed in nature. It is known to cause meningitis in neonates and premature infants. Adult infections are not common and are usually nosocomially acquired. We report an unusual case of native valve endocarditis in a 58-year-old man due to this organism. A high degree of suspicion and correct identification and sensitivity testing is required to diagnose infections by this rare isolate.

  1. Isolated tricuspid valve infective endocarditis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-07-07

    Jul 7, 1990 ... Cenainly, the administration of freeze-dried plasma to both the patients reponed here failed to prevent spontaneous haemorrhage although it could be argued that not enough was given. However, the defmitive treatment is afforded by specific boom- slang antivenin, which neutralises the procoagulant effect ...

  2. Haemophilus parainfluenzae Endocarditis Associated With Maxillary Sinusitis and Complicated by Cerebral Emboli in a Young Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzenli, Anthony E; Dwyer, John; Carey, Jeanne

    2017-01-01

    HACEK endocarditis is often difficult to diagnose given the slow-growing characteristics of the organisms involved. Haemophilus parainfluenzae, one of the HACEK organisms, is an uncommon cause of endocarditis. We describe a case of a previously healthy young man with H parainfluenzae endocarditis that was associated with maxillary sinusitis and severe systemic complications, including septic cerebral emboli and mitral valve perforation. Previously reported cases have also described a predilection for younger people, cardiac valve pathology, and a high prevalence of stroke.

  3. Brucella Endocarditis as a Late Onset Complication of Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Andriopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucella endocarditis (BE is a rare but life threatening complication of brucellosis. We present a case report of a patient with relapsing brucellosis complicated with aortic valve endocarditis. The patient underwent valve replacement and required prolonged antibiotic treatment because of rupture of the noncoronary leaflet and development of congestive heart failure. Since the onset of endocarditis in patients with brucellosis is not known, proper follow-up is required in order to identify any late onset complications, especially in endemic areas.

  4. Mycobacterium abscessus Endocarditis: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chung Tsai

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis owing to Mycobacterium abscessus infection is rarely reported. Most cases of infective endocarditis caused by Mycobacterium abscessus are seen in patients after valve replacement. Although early surgical intervention is recommended and medical treatment with antibiotics according to the susceptibility to the pathogen, such as amikacin, imipenem, cefoxitin, quinolones and macrolides, are applied, the course of such endocarditis is usually subacute and often has fatal outcomes. The present case was a 29-year-old male patient who was an intravenous drug user who had recurrent endocarditis caused by Mycobacterium abscessus. Unusually, our reported case was infected on his native valve. However, we experienced recurrence despite antimicrobial therapy. For culture-negative endocarditis, physicians should consider the possibility of Mycobacterium abscessus infection and related treatment difficulties.

  5. Indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphic detection of myocardial abscess formation in patients with endocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerqueira, M.D.; Jacobson, A.F.

    1989-05-01

    Myocardial abscess formation in patients with bacterial endocarditis in most clinical settings, especially in patients with prosthetic valves, is a primary indicator for surgical valve replacement. We report the detection of myocardial abscesses using /sup 111/In leukocyte scintigraphy in three patients with prosthetic or native valve endocarditis and nondiagnostic echocardiograms. Leukocyte scintigraphy may allow identification of myocardial abscess formation earlier than other imaging modalities.

  6. Second Fatal Case of Infective Endocarditis caused by Gemella bergeriae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aijan Ukudeeva

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Our case illustrates a fatal course of infection with Gemella bergeriae endocarditis that was complicated by cardiogenic shock due to perforation of the mitral valve with severe mitral regurgitation, extension of infection into the myocardium adjacent to the mitral valve, and coronary sinus thrombosis.

  7. Biodegradable materials for surgical management of infective endocarditis: new solution or a dead end street?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Patrick O; Cikirikcioglu, Mustafa; Kalangos, Afksendiyos

    2014-08-03

    One third of patients with infective endocarditis will require operative intervention. Given the superiority of valve repair over valve replacement in many indications other than endocarditis, there has been increasing interest and an increasing number of reports of excellent results of valve repair in acute infective endocarditis. The theoretically ideal material for valve repair in this setting is non-permanent, "vanishing" material, not at risk of seeding or colonization. The goal of this contribution is to review currently available data on biodegradable materials for valve repair in infective endocarditis. Rigorous electronic and manual literature searches were conducted to identify reports of biodegradable materials for valve repair in infective endocarditis. Articles were identified in electronic database searches of Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library, using a predetermined search strategy. 49 manuscripts were included in the review. Prosthetic materials needed for valve repair can be summarized into annuloplasty rings to remodel the mitral or tricuspid annulus, and patch materials to replace resected valvar tissue. The commercially available biodegradable annuloplasty ring has shown interesting clinical results in a single-center experience; however further data is required for validation and longer follow-up. Unmodified extra-cellular matrix patches, such as small intestinal submucosa, have had promising initial experimental and clinical results in non-infected valve repair, although in valve repair for endocarditis has been reported in only one patient, and concerns have been raised regarding their mechanical stability in an infected field. These evolving biodegradable devices offer the potential for valve repair with degradable materials replaced with autologous tissue, which could further improve the results of valve repair for infective endocarditis. This is an evolving field with promising experimental or initial clinical results, however long

  8. Aspergillus endocarditis presenting as acute right lower limb pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Ghosh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Corrigendum: On 31/10/2013 the name of the author K. Shah was corrected to read K. Saha.Aspergillus endocarditis is an 2nd most common cause of endocarditis having poor prognosis. We report a rare case of fungal endocarditis following cardiac valve replacement presenting as acute pain in the right lower limb. Embolism and endocarditis were primarily detected by CT angiography and echocardiography respectively. Diagnosis was established by histopathology and culture of the emboli and was confirmed later by isolation of the Aspergillus species from the resected valve tissue. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v3i6.9002   Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2013 Vol. 3, 502-504

  9. Fatal myocarditis-associated Bartonella quintana endocarditis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montcriol Ambroise

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bartonella spp. infection is not rare and must be considered with great care in patients with suspected infective endocarditis, particularly if regular blood cultures remain sterile. Management of these infections requires knowledge of the identification and treatment of these bacteria. Case presentation A 50-year-old Senegalese man was admitted to our Department of Cardiac Surgery with a culture-negative endocarditis. Despite valvular surgery and adequate antibiotic treatment, recurrence of the endocarditis was observed on the prosthetic mitral valve. Heart failure required circulatory support. Weaning off the circulatory support could not be attempted owing to the absence of heart recovery. Bacteriological diagnosis of Bartonella quintana endocarditis was performed by molecular methods retrospectively after the death of the patient. Conclusions This case report underlines the severity and difficulty of the diagnosis of Bartonella quintana endocarditis. The clinical picture suggested possible Bartonella quintana associated myocarditis, a feature that should be considered in new cases.

  10. Enterococcus faecalis infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders; Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Bundgaard, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Because of the nephrotoxic effects of aminoglycosides, the Danish guidelines on infective endocarditis were changed in January 2007, reducing gentamicin treatment in enterococcal infective endocarditis from 4 to 6 weeks to only 2 weeks. In this pilot study, we compare outcomes in patients with En...... with Enterococcus faecalis infective endocarditis treated in the years before and after endorsement of these new recommendations....

  11. Valvular Heart Disease in Adults: Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zubair A; Hollenberg, Steven M

    2017-06-01

    A variety of microorganisms can cause infective endocarditis (IE) in patients with native valves. Staphylococci and streptococci are most common in community-acquired IE; staphylococci are most common in nosocomial IE. Microbiology of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) depends on timing. Early-onset PVE (ie, 60 days or fewer postsurgery) typically is nosocomial, with Staphylococcus aureus infection being most common. Intermediate-onset PVE (ie, 60 to 365 days postsurgery) typically involves a mix of nosocomial and non-nosocomial organisms. PVE that develops more than 1 year after surgery has microbiology similar to that of native valve endocarditis. Fever is the most common symptom; others include dyspnea, pleuritic pain, anorexia, and myalgias. The Modified Duke Criteria is the standard for diagnosis, with blood cultures being the most important test. If patients are in stable condition, three sets of blood cultures should be obtained more than 6 hours apart and from separate sites before starting antibiotics. Echocardiography aids in diagnosis and can identify conditions best managed with surgery. For empiric therapy for native valve IE, most patients should receive vancomycin. For PVE, vancomycin and gentamicin should be prescribed, plus cefepime or an antipseudomonal carbapenem. Treatment typically continues for 6 weeks after blood culture results are negative. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  12. Streptococcus dysgalactiae endocarditis presenting as acute endophthalmitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelina Su-Min Yong

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous endophthalmitis is a rare ocular infection affecting the vitreous and/or aqueous humours. It is associated with poor visual prognosis and its commonest endogenous aetiology is infective endocarditis. The causative organisms of endogenous endophthalmitis complicating endocarditis are mainly Group A or B streptococci. The identification of Group C and G streptococci such as Streptococcus dysgalactiae is comparatively uncommon and has only been reported in a few case reports or series. We therefore report a case of infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus dysgalactiae first presenting with endogenous endophthalmitis, the most likely source being bilateral feet osteomyelitis in a patient with type I diabetes. The patient was treated with a course of intravenous benzylpenicillin, intravitreal antibiotics, bilateral below knee amputations and mitral valve replacement. She survived all surgical procedures and regained partial visual acuity in the affected eye.

  13. The first reported case of Bartonella endocarditis in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orathai Pachirat

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Bartonella species have been shown to cause acute, undifferentiated fever in Thailand. A study to identify causes of endocarditis that were blood culture-negative using routine methods led to the first reported case in Thailand of Bartonella endocarditis A 57 year-old male with underlying rheumatic heart disease presented with severe congestive heart failure and suspected infective endocarditis. The patient underwent aortic and mitral valve replacement. Routine hospital blood cultures were negative but B. henselae was identified by serology, PCR, immunohistochemistry and specific culture techniques.

  14. A severe infective endocarditis successfully treated with linezolid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziano Antonio Minafra

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant improvements in surgical and medical therapy, prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge and is often associated with a severe prognosis. We report a case of a 59-year-old woman, with  PVE and bacterial endocarditis (Streptococcus bovis successfully treated with linezolid. Linezolid is a bacteriostatic oxazolidinone antibiotic that has been proven to be effective for the treatment of patients with pneumonia, skin and soft tissue infections, and infections due to Gram-positive cocci. Linezolid is not yet recognised as a standard therapy for infective endocarditis, but its use becomes a necessity when infection is due to multidrug-resistant microorganisms.

  15. The surgical approach to infective endocarditis: 10 year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrah, Rabin; Rudis, Ehud; Elami, Amir; Milgalter, Eli; Izhar, Uzi; Merin, Gideon

    2003-09-01

    About 40% of patients with infective endocarditis will require surgical treatment. The guidelines for such treatment were formulated by the American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association in 1998. To examine our experience with surgical treatment of infective endocarditis in light of these guidelines. Surgery was performed in 59 patients with infective endocarditis between 1990 and 1999. The patients' mean age was 48 years (range 13-80). The indications for surgery were hemodynamic instability, uncontrolled infection, and peripheral embolic events. The surgical treatment was based on elimination of infection foci and correction of the hemodynamic derangement. These objectives were met with valve replacement in the majority of patients. Whenever conservative surgery was possible, resection of vegetation and subsequent valve repair were performed and the native valve was preserved. Six patients (10%) died perioperatively from overwhelming sepsis (n = 3), low cardiac output (n = 2) and multiogran failure (n = 1). The mean hospital stay was 15.6 days. Of 59 patients, 47 (80%) underwent valve replacement and in 11 (19%) the surgical treatment was based on valve repair. After 1 year of follow-up there was no re-infection. The new guidelines for surgical treatment of infective endocarditis allow better selection of patients and timing of surgery for this aggressive disease, which consequently decreases the mortality rate. Valve repair is feasible and is preferred whenever possible. According to the new guidelines, patients with neurologic deficit in our series would not have been operated upon, potentially decreasing the operative mortality to 7%.

  16. Fatal bacterial endocarditis as a complication of permanent indwelling catheters. Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, J; Wing, E J; Talamo, T S; Stanko, R

    1986-07-01

    Two cases of endocarditis secondary to permanent indwelling catheters are described. In both cases, the catheters were used for parenteral nutrition and became infected with Staphylococci. Secondary endocarditis developed on the tricuspid and aortic valves. Despite removal of the catheters and appropriate antibiotics, both patients died.

  17. Molecular Methods for Diagnosis of Infective Endocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    Moter, Annette; Musci, Michele; Schmiedel, Dinah

    2002-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a life-threatening disease associated with high mortality. Conventional microbiologic diagnosis is based mainly on culture-dependent methods that often fail because of previous antibiotic therapy or the involvement of fastidious or slowly growing microorganisms. In recent years, molecular techniques entered the field of routine diagnostics. Amplification-based methods proved useful for detection of microorganisms in heart valve tissue. More recently, they were a...

  18. Endocarditis in burn patients: clinical and diagnostic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regules, Jason A; Glasser, Jessie S; Wolf, Steven E; Hospenthal, Duane R; Murray, Clinton K

    2008-08-01

    Burned patients are at high risk for invasive procedures, bacteremia, and other infectious complications. Previous publications describe high incidence, delayed diagnosis, and high mortality for endocarditis in burned patients, but do not address use of contemporary diagnostic criteria. Further analysis of the clinical presentation and diagnosis may aid in the earlier recognition and decreased mortality of endocarditis in burned patients. At a 40 bed burn center, during the period from 1 January 2003 to 1 August 2006, blood culture, electronic inpatient, echocardiographic, and autopsy records were reviewed for cases of endocarditis and persistent bacteremia (blood culture positivity for the same organism separated by 24h). In addition, we reviewed cases of burn-related bacterial endocarditis published in the English language. We compared the clinical and diagnostic aspects of our identified cases with those in the published literature. There were 90 episodes of persistent bacteremia or fungemia in 56 of 1250 patients admitted during the study period. Echocardiography was performed on 19, identifying 4 cases of endocarditis. One additional case of endocarditis was identified post-mortem. Time until echocardiography ranged from 6 to 176 days after onset of bacteremia. Case patient age ranged from 31 to 64 years, and total burn surface area ranged from 34 to 80%. Endocarditis occurred in 0.4% of burn unit admissions and in 8.9% of these patients with persistent bacteremia. Sites involved included the mitral valve (3), tricuspid valve (2), aortic valve (1), and pulmonic valve (1). Pathogens included Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and one case of Enterococcus faecium. Diagnostic clues were minimal. Case mortality was 100%. A literature review revealed 17 publications describing confirmed bacterial endocarditis in burned patients. These cases revealed a predilection for infection by S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, a relative paucity of diagnostic clues prior

  19. First Reported Case of Bacterial Endocarditis Attributable to Actinomyces meyeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Moffatt

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A 48-year-old man presented to the Victoria General Hospital, Halifax, Nova Scotia in severe congestive heart failure. Echocardiographic studies revealed significant aortic valve insufficiency. Two anaerobic blood cultures performed two weeks apart were both positive for Actinomyces meyeri. The patient was treated with high dose intravenous penicillin. Three weeks after antibiotics were begun, he underwent aortic valve replacement. Intraoperative cultures were negative. Histopathological examination revealed findings in keeping with subacute bacterial endocarditis. The patient completed a six-week course of penicillin and was doing well three months after surgery. This is the first case of endocarditis attributable to A meyeri reported in the literature.

  20. Mitral valve repair versus replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavamurthy, Suresh; Gillinov, A. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative, ischemic, rheumatic and infectious (endocarditis) processes are responsible for mitral valve disease in adults. Mitral valve repair has been widely regarded as the optimal surgical procedure to treat mitral valve dysfunction of all etiologies. The supporting evidence for repair over replacement is strongest in degenerative mitral regurgitation. The aim of the present review is to summarize the data in each category of mitral insufficiency and to provide recommendations based upon this data. PMID:26309824

  1. Delayed diagnosis of Q fever endocarditis in a rheumatoid arthritis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailee Y. Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Q fever caused by Coxiella burnetii is uncommon in the United States and is most often associated with infective endocarditis. We present a 52-year-old woman with a history of aortic valve replacement and rheumatoid arthritis treated with Etanercept with chronic Q fever manifesting as prosthetic valve infective endocarditis. Explanted valve tissue showed organisms confirmed to be C. burnetii by PCR (polymerase chain reaction sequencing. She subsequently reported consumption of unpasteurized cow milk which was the likely source of C. burnetii. She continues to do well 6 months after valve replacement on oral doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine.

  2. Infective Endocarditis: A Review of the Past and Present, and a Look into the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric I-Hun Jeng, MD, MBA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis is a lethal and challenging multifaceted disease that can involve any vascularized system. We believe that multimodality imaging is invaluable to provide a comprehensive diagnosis. Our management approach to infective endocarditis adheres to a combination of the AHA, ACC, STS, and ESC guidelines. With the rapidly increasing transcatheter valve population, we expect an increased caseload of infective endocarditis. Beyond patients with hemorrhagic strokes, we advocate for early surgery if medical management has failed. Furthermore, a multidisciplinary team approach is imperative in infective endocarditis, and clear communication reduces the time to diagnosis and definitive treatment for this patient population.

  3. Shewanella putrefaciens infective endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Constant

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella putrefaciens rarely causes infection in humans. In the last few decades a growing number of cases have been described. The following report outlines the case of a 40-year-old immunocompetent white man with S. putrefaciens infective endocarditis. This is the first known case of infective endocarditis due to an apparently monomicrobial S. putrefaciens infection, and the second known case of S. putrefaciens-related infective endocarditis worldwide.

  4. An Unusual Presentation of Lupus in a Pediatric Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vimal Master Sankar Raj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease causing inflammatory tissue damage. Multiple organ damage can ensue with renal and neurological involvement carrying the worse prognosis. In this case report we present a 10-year-old African American girl who presented with abnormal choreiform movements, headache, weight loss, and fatigue. Detailed clinical examination with laboratory and imaging studies clinched the diagnosis of SLE. Echocardiogram revealed the presence of Libman-sacks endocarditis. Patient showed rapid resolution of symptoms with steroid therapy. A brief discussion on childhood onset lupus along with the varied clinical presentation is discussed.

  5. Haemophilus parainfluenzae Endocarditis Associated With Maxillary Sinusitis and Complicated by Cerebral Emboli in a Young Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony E. Duzenli MD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available HACEK endocarditis is often difficult to diagnose given the slow-growing characteristics of the organisms involved. Haemophilus parainfluenzae, one of the HACEK organisms, is an uncommon cause of endocarditis. We describe a case of a previously healthy young man with H parainfluenzae endocarditis that was associated with maxillary sinusitis and severe systemic complications, including septic cerebral emboli and mitral valve perforation. Previously reported cases have also described a predilection for younger people, cardiac valve pathology, and a high prevalence of stroke.

  6. Infective endocarditis: diagnostic and therapeutic approach in emergency medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Previati

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The infective endocarditis is an uncommon disease in the Emergency Department. Anyway, the emergency physician may be in front of the complications of this disease. A case of a patient with fever, laboratory signs of infection and an acute heart failure is described in this article. The final diagnosis was infective endocarditis with vegetations on the aortic valve and severe valvular regurgitation. The definition of infective endocarditis according to the major and minor criteria for the diagnosis is discussed. The echocardiography is central in the diagnosis and management of patients with infective endocarditis in the emergency setting, even if the clinical suspicion is very important. The main available therapeutic options in according to the Internation Guidelines are evaluated. The possible complications are also discussed. Several clinical and echocardiographic features identify patients at high risk for a complicated course or with a need for surgery.

  7. [Case of infective endocarditis diagnosed with renal infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Takayuki; Yokoyama, Minato; Saito, Kazutaka; Takenaka, Shunsuke; Kubo, Yuichi; Iimura, Yasumasa; Numao, Noboru; Sakai, Yasuyuki; Koga, Fumitaka; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kawakami, Satoru; Kihara, Kazunori

    2009-03-01

    A 46-year-old woman with sudden on set strong right flank pain was transferred to our hospital with the diagnosis of right renal infarction. Cardiac ultrasonography revealed a vegetation on the posterior cusp of the mitral valve, and the renal infarction was thought to be caused by renal artery embolism from infective endocarditis. Since the vegetation remained after antimicrobial therapy as conservative management, the patient was surgically treated by mitral annuloplasty. It has been known that infective endocarditis can cause renal infarction. Infective endocarditis requires immediate and adequate treatment because of high mortality. Therefore, the appropriate diagnosis of infective endocarditis is needed for patients with renal infarction without any other disorder causing renal infarction.

  8. NEW POSSIBILITIES FOR THE TREATMENT OF ENTEROCOCCAL INFECTIOUS ENDOCARDITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyurin, V P; Gudynovich, V G; Volkova, V L; Gvozdkov, A L; Zharkov, O B; Zhirova, L G; Mezenova, T V; Gusaim, T A

    This study was designed to analyze results of daptomycin therapy in 7 patients with enterococcal infectious endocarditis caused by Enterococcus faecium in two of them. Mean duration of therapy was 36.7 days. 70% of the strains proved resistant to gentamycin, 40% showed resistance to penicillin antibiotics, and 14.3% to vancomycin. Three patients suffered prosthetic valve endocarditis, six had elevated presepsin level (up to 768.8 pg/ml). 28,6% of the patients underwent valve prosthetic surgery. Hospital lethality was 14,3%. The effectiveness of ampicillin plus ceftriaxone treatment of gentanycin-resistant enterococci is discussed. Recommendation for the antibacterial treatment of enterococcal infectious endocarditis (ESC 2015) are provided.

  9. Legionella longbeachae and Endocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    Leggieri, Nicola; Gouriet, Frédérique; Thuny, Frank; Habib, Gilbert; Raoult, Didier; Casalta, Jean-Paul

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of infectious endocarditis attributable to Legionella longbeachae. L. longbeachae is usually associated with lung infections. It is commonly found in composted waste wood products. L. longbeachae should be regarded as an agent of infectious endocarditis, notably in the context of gardening involving handling of potting soils.

  10. [Infectious endocarditis in the intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Montero, S; Rodríguez-Esteban, M; Alvarez-Acosta, L; Lubillo-Montenegro, S; Pérez-Hernández, H; Llorens-León, R

    2012-10-01

    To study the characteristics, evolution and prognosis of patients with infectious endocarditis requiring treatment in the Intensive Care Unit. A prospective, observational cohort study of patients admitted due to infectious endocarditis. Nuestra Señora de Candelaria University Hospital, a third - level center with a recruitment population of 493,145. All patients consecutively diagnosed with infectious endocarditis in our center according to the Duke criteria, between 1 January 2005 and 31 July 2011. Demographic data, clinical severity scores, microbiological and echocardiographic data, hospital mortality and complications. Out of 102 patients diagnosed with endocarditis, 38 (37%) were admitted to Intensive Care. Compared with those patients not admitted to the ICU, these subjects suffered more frequent mitral valve alterations (OR= 7.13; 95%CI: 2.12-24; p= 0.002) and cerebral embolism (OR= 3.89; 95%CI: 1.06-14.3; p= 0.041). In turn, mortality was greater (42.1% vs 18.8%, p= 0.011), as was the proportion of emergency surgeries (45.8% vs 5.9%, pendocarditis require admission to the Intensive Care Unit, presenting a much poorer prognosis. Staphylococcus aureus infection, heart failure, cerebral embolism and SAPS II scores are independent predictors of hospital mortality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  11. A case of infectious endocarditis due to BCG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Fournier

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG disease following instillation for bladder cancer is commonly documented. The intravesical administration of BCG is generally safe, but may present severe complications. A fatal case of native aortic valve infectious endocarditis with septicemia due to BCG in a patient treated with intravesical instillation is reported herein.

  12. Infective endocarditis - the effect of liposomes as carrier substance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infective endocarditis has a high mortality and morbidity rate despite all available treatment. Little attention has been paid to the possible role of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in damage to the heart valves. It was postulated that if the elastases set free from these leucocytes could be neutralised, this would prevent damage ...

  13. Dentigenous infectious foci - a risk factor of infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewska-Spychala, Beata; Sokalski, Jerzy; Grajek, Stefan; Jemielity, Marek; Trojnarska, Olga; Choroszy-Krol, Irena; Sójka, Anna; Maksymiuk, Tomasz

    2012-02-01

    Dentigenous, infectious foci are frequently associated with the development of various diseases. The role of such foci in the evolution of endocarditis still remains unclear. This article presents the concluding results of an interdisciplinary study verifying the influence of dentigenous, infectious foci on the development of infective endocarditis. The study subjects were 60 adult patients with history of infective endocarditis and coexistent acquired heart disease, along with the presence at least 2 odontogenic infectious foci (ie, 2 or more teeth with gangrenous pulp and periodontitis). The group had earlier been qualified for the procedure of heart valve replacement. Swabs of removed heart valve tissue with inflammatory lesions and blood were then examined microbiologically. Swabs of root canals and their periapical areas, of periodontal pockets, and of heart valves were also collected. Microbial flora, cultured from intradental foci, blood and heart valves, fully corresponded in 14 patients. This was accompanied in almost all cases by more advanced periodontitis (2nd degree, Scandinavian classification), irrespective of the bacterial co-occurrence mentioned. In the remaining patients, such consistency was not found. Among various dentigenous, infectious foci, the intradental foci appear to constitute a risk factor for infective endocarditis.

  14. Endocarditis caused by Abiotrophia defectiva | Al-Jasser | Libyan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A diagnosis of infective endocarditis (IE) due to A.defectiva was made. Treatment, with penicillin and gentamicin, was administered for 4 weeks. Mechanical valve replacement was required few days after starting the antibiotic therapy. The patient had a favorable outcome on follow up. Although A.defectiva is an uncommon ...

  15. Dentigenous infectious foci – a risk factor of infective endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewska-Spychala, Beata; Sokalski, Jerzy; Grajek, Stefan; Jemielity, Marek; Trojnarska, Olga; Choroszy-Król, Irena; Sójka, Anna; Maksymiuk, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Dentigenous, infectious foci are frequently associated with the development of various diseases. The role of such foci in the evolution of endocarditis still remains unclear. This article presents the concluding results of an interdisciplinary study verifying the influence of dentigenous, infectious foci on the development of infective endocarditis. Material/Methods The study subjects were 60 adult patients with history of infective endocarditis and coexistent acquired heart disease, along with the presence at least 2 odontogenic infectious foci (ie, 2 or more teeth with gangrenous pulp and periodontitis). The group had earlier been qualified for the procedure of heart valve replacement. Swabs of removed heart valve tissue with inflammatory lesions and blood were then examined microbiologically. Swabs of root canals and their periapical areas, of periodontal pockets, and of heart valves were also collected. Results Microbial flora, cultured from intradental foci, blood and heart valves, fully corresponded in 14 patients. This was accompanied in almost all cases by more advanced periodontitis (2nd degree, Scandinavian classification), irrespective of the bacterial co-occurrence mentioned. In the remaining patients, such consistency was not found. Conclusions Among various dentigenous, infectious foci, the intradental foci appear to constitute a risk factor for infective endocarditis. PMID:22293883

  16. [Analysis of 112 cases of infectious endocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shengping; Chen, Yahua; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Zhenkang; Wang, Wujun

    2013-02-01

    To analyze the clinical manifestations, epidemiological features, pathogens, treatment and outcomes of 112 patients with infectious endocarditis. The clinical data were reviewed for all the patients with the diagnosis of infectious endocarditis in Nanfang Hospital over the period from 2002 to 2012. The average age of disease onset was 46∓17.1 years among these cases. Seventy patients (62.5%) had underlying cardiac conditions, including, in the order of frequency, rheumatic heart disease, congenital cardiovascular anomalies, and senile valve degeneration. Clinically the patients presented with fever, anemia, congestive heart failure, and embolism events, etc. Echocardiography found endocardial neoplasms in 105 cases, and the mitral valve was often involved. Blood culture yielded positive results in 61 cases, and the most common causative bacteria were Streptococcus (20.5%), Staphylococcus (19.6%) and Enterococcus (5.4%). Surgical intervention was performed in 78 cases. Ninety-one patients were cured or improved after comprehensive treatment, and 10 discontinued treatment for financial reasons; 11 died of cardiac failure (8 cases), pulmonary embolism (2 cases) and central nervous system events (1 case). Infectious endocarditis shows a significant change in the clinical profiles and its mortality remains high despite improved diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.

  17. Surgical Management of Active Infective Endocarditis During 1996-06 in Tabriz, Northwestern Iran

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    Azin Alizadehasl1,

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Surgical treatment of active infective endocarditis (IE requires not only homodynamic repair, but also, special emphasis on the eradiation of the infection to prevent recurrence. This study was undertaken to examine the outcome of surgery for active infective endocarditis in a cohort of patients.Patients and Methods: One hundred and sixty-four consecutive patients underwent valve surgery for active IE in Madani heart centre (Tabriz, Iran from 1996 to 2006. The patients with diagnosis of IE (according to Duke Criteria were eligible for the study.Results: The mean age of patients was 36.3 ± 16 years, with 34.6±17.5 yrs for native valve endocarditis and 38.6±15.2 yrs for prosthetic valve endocarditis (p= 0.169. Ninety-one (55.5% of patients were males. The infected valve was native in 112 (68.3% of patients and prosthetic in 52 (31.7%. There was no predisposing heart disease in 61 (37% of patients. The aortic valve was infected in 78(47.6%, the mitral valve in 69 (42.1%, and multiple valves in 17 (10.3% of patients. Active culture-positive endocarditis was present in 81 (49.4% whereas 83(50.6% patients had culture-negative endocarditis. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common isolated microorganism. Ninety patients (54.8% were in NYHA classes III and IV. Mechanical valves were implantedin 69 patients (42.1% and bioprostheses in 95 (57.9%, including homograft in 19 (11.5% cases. There were 16 (9% operation-related deaths, but only 1 death in patients undergoing aortic homograft replacement. Reoperation was required in 18 (10.9% cases.Based on multivariate logistic regression analysis, Staphylococcus aureus infection (p= 0.008, prosthetic valve endocarditis (p=0.01, paravalvular abscess (p=0.001 and left ventricular ejection fraction less than 40% (p=0.04 were independent predictors of hospital mortality.Conclusions: Surgery for infective endocarditis continues to be challenging and associated with high operation-related mortality and

  18. Aortocavitary fistula as a complication of infective endocarditis and subsequent complete heart block in a patient with severe anemia

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    Jose N. Galeas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis has different presentations depending on the involvement of valvular and perivalvular structures, and it is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Aortocavitary fistula is a rare complication. We introduce the case of a 48-year-old female with native valve endocarditis, complicated by aortocavitary fistula to the right atrium, and consequently presented with syncope.

  19. Rarity of invasiveness in right-sided infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Syed T; Shrestha, Nabin K; Witten, James; Gordon, Steven M; Houghtaling, Penny L; Tingleff, Jens; Navia, José L; Blackstone, Eugene H; Pettersson, Gösta B

    2018-01-01

    The rarity of invasiveness of right-sided infective endocarditis (IE) compared with left-sided has not been well recognized and evaluated. Thus, we compared invasiveness of right- versus left-sided IE in surgically treated patients. From January 2002 to January 2015, 1292 patients underwent surgery for active IE, 138 right-sided and 1224 left-sided. Among patients with right-sided IE, 131 had tricuspid and 7 pulmonary valve IE; 12% had prosthetic valve endocarditis. Endocarditis-related invasiveness was based on echocardiographic and operative findings. Invasive disease was rare on the right side, occurring in 1 patient (0.72%; 95% confidence interval 0.02%-4.0%); rather, it was limited to valve cusps/leaflets or was superficial. In contrast, IE was invasive in 408 of 633 patients with aortic valve (AV) IE (65%), 113 of 369 with mitral valve (MV) IE (31%), and 148 of 222 with AV and MV IE (67%). Staphylococcus aureus was a more predominant organism in right-sided than left-sided IE (right 40%, AV 19%, MV 29%), yet invasion was observed almost exclusively on the left side of the heart, which was more common and more severe with AV than MV IE and more common with prosthetic valve endocarditis than native valve IE. Rarity of right-sided invasion even when caused by S aureus suggests that invasion and development of cavities/"abscesses" in patients with IE may be driven more by chamber pressure than organism, along with other reported host-microbial interactions. The lesser invasiveness of MV compared with AV IE suggests a similar mechanism: decompression of MV annulus invasion site(s) toward the left atrium. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Infectious endocarditis caused by Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Trine Kiilerich; Arpi, Magnus; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    -spectrum intravenous antibiotics. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography revealed a severe mitral endocarditis. E. coli DNA was identified from the mitral valve and the vegetation, and no other pathogen was found. The case was further complicated by spondylodiscitis and bilateral endophthalmitis. Extra-intestinal...... pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) are able to colonize tissue outside the gastrointestinal tract and contain a variety of virulence factors that may enable the pathogens to invade and induce infections in the cardiac endothelia. In these cases echocardiography as the imaging technology is of paramount importance......Although Escherichia coli is among the most common causes of Gram-negative bacteraemia, infectious endocarditis (IE) due to this pathogen is rare. A 67-y-old male without a previous medical history presented with a new mitral regurgitation murmur and persisting E. coli bacteraemia in spite of broad...

  1. Infectious endocarditis caused by Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauridsen, Trine Kiilerich; Arpi, Magnus; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Bruun, Niels Eske

    2011-07-01

    Although Escherichia coli is among the most common causes of Gram-negative bacteraemia, infectious endocarditis (IE) due to this pathogen is rare. A 67-y-old male without a previous medical history presented with a new mitral regurgitation murmur and persisting E. coli bacteraemia in spite of broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography revealed a severe mitral endocarditis. E. coli DNA was identified from the mitral valve and the vegetation, and no other pathogen was found. The case was further complicated by spondylodiscitis and bilateral endophthalmitis. Extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) are able to colonize tissue outside the gastrointestinal tract and contain a variety of virulence factors that may enable the pathogens to invade and induce infections in the cardiac endothelia. In these cases echocardiography as the imaging technology is of paramount importance for the correct diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Infectious endocarditis caused by Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Trine Kiilerich; Arpi, Magnus; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli is among the most common causes of Gram-negative bacteraemia, infectious endocarditis (IE) due to this pathogen is rare. A 67-y-old male without a previous medical history presented with a new mitral regurgitation murmur and persisting E. coli bacteraemia in spite of broad......-spectrum intravenous antibiotics. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography revealed a severe mitral endocarditis. E. coli DNA was identified from the mitral valve and the vegetation, and no other pathogen was found. The case was further complicated by spondylodiscitis and bilateral endophthalmitis. Extra......-intestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) are able to colonize tissue outside the gastrointestinal tract and contain a variety of virulence factors that may enable the pathogens to invade and induce infections in the cardiac endothelia. In these cases echocardiography as the imaging technology is of paramount importance...

  3. Ruptured mycotic aneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery secondary to bacterial endocarditis in a 6-year-old-girl

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    Christophe, C.; Spehl, M.; Cogaert, C.; Perlmutter, N.; Burniat, W.; Biarent, D.; Delaet, F.; Amalou, N.

    1985-02-01

    By non-invasive examination we demonstrated as false mycotic aneurysm on a branch of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). It suddenly ruptured but was managed successfully. The patient had mitral valve disease and probably bacterial endocarditis also.

  4. Diagnostic value of imaging in infective endocarditis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Anna; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Touw, Daan J; van Melle, Joost P; Willems, Tineke P; Maass, Alexander H; Natour, Ehsan; Prakken, Niek H J; Borra, Ronald J H; van Geel, Peter Paul; Slart, Riemer H J A; van Assen, Sander; Sinha, Bhanu

    2017-01-01

    Sensitivity and specificity of the modified Duke criteria for native valve endocarditis are both suboptimal, at approximately 80%. Diagnostic accuracy for intracardiac prosthetic material-related infection is even lower. Non-invasive imaging modalities could potentially improve diagnosis of infective endocarditis; however, their diagnostic value is unclear. We did a systematic literature review to critically appraise the evidence for the diagnostic performance of these imaging modalities, according to PRISMA and GRADE criteria. We searched PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases. 31 studies were included that presented original data on the performance of electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated multidetector CT angiography (MDCTA), ECG-gated MRI, 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET/CT, and leucocyte scintigraphy in diagnosis of native valve endocarditis, intracardiac prosthetic material-related infection, and extracardiac foci in adults. We consistently found positive albeit weak evidence for the diagnostic benefit of 18 F-FDG PET/CT and MDCTA. We conclude that additional imaging techniques should be considered if infective endocarditis is suspected. We propose an evidence-based diagnostic work-up for infective endocarditis including these non-invasive techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Histologic and bacteriologic findings in valvular endocarditis of slaughter-age pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik E.; Gyllensten, Johanna; Hofman, Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Endocarditis lesions from 117 slaughter pigs were examined pathologically and etiologically in addition to 90 control hearts with cardiac valves. Lesions were located on the valves; however, the lesions had extended to the walls in 21 cases (18%). Lesions predominated on the mitral valve (59....... The propensity for streptococci to be localized on more than 1 valve in single hearts may be because S. suis-infected pigs tend to have been infected for a longer period compared with E. rhusiopathiae. Mineralization of endocarditis lesions was significantly associated with infection by streptococci...... to dystrophic mineralization. Local proliferation of valvular endothelial cells, found in 9 hearts in the current study, may increase the risk of developing thrombosing endocarditis in pigs....

  6. Enterococcus faecalis infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders; Bruun, Niels Eske

    2013-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis infective endocarditis (IE) is a disease of increasing importance, with more patients infected, increasing frequency of health-care associated infections and increasing incidence of antimicrobial resistances. The typical clinical presentation is a subacute course with fever...

  7. Axillary artery thrombus and infective endocarditis in lupus

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    Shi-Min Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease, often associated with severe infection. A female patient was referred for surgical treatment of infective endocarditis after being treated for systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis. She developed symptoms of left axillary artery occlusion before heart operation. Bulky fungal hyphae were noted on pathological examination of the surgically removed thrombi. The patient had an uncomplicated recovery after receiving high doses of antibiotics and subsequent mitral valve replacement. Either infective endocarditis or fungal thrombi may be secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus and impaired renal function.

  8. Medtronic Freestyle Aortic Root Bioprosthesis Implantation for the Infective Endocarditis on Aortic Root

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    Zekeriya Arslan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available    Infective endocarditis and periannular abscess formation are serious problems in cardiac valve surgery, requiring extensive surgical debridement and reconstruction of the aortic annulus. We aimed to report two cases which were successfully treated with bioprosthetic valve implantation for infective endocarditis. Transosephageal echocardiography were performed for the diagnosis of one prosthetic and one native destructive aortic valve endocarditis in association with congestive heart failure (NYHA class-VI and abscess formation. Medtronic Freestyle stentless aortic root bioprosthesis was implanted into the left ventricular outflow tract after surgical radical aortic root debridement for each patient followed with medical treatment, which was extended to six weeks. Neither early nor late mortality was detected. One patient required prolonged ventilatory support (two days and permanent DDD-R pacing. Echocardiography showed no signs of valve dysfunction or recurrent endocarditis for both patients in 10 months follow up.Medtronic Freestyle stentless aortic root bioprosthesis may be a good alternative way of treatment to aortic valve and root endocarditis instead of homograft.

  9. Imaging endocarditis with Tc-99m-labeled antibody--an experimental study: concise communication

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    Wong, D.W.; Dhawan, V.K.; Tanaka, T.; Mishkin, F.S.; Reese, I.C.; Thadepalli, H.

    1982-03-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of Tc-99m-labeled antibacterial antibody (Tc-99m Ab) for detecting bacterial endocarditis were evaluated in an experimental model. Rabbit-produced antistaphylococcal antibody was extracted using Rivanol and chemically labeled with Tc-99m. This Tc-99m Ab was injected intravenously in New Zealand rabbits 24 hr after producing Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis of the aortic valve. Imaging and tissue analyses were performed on the following day. All 11 animals developed S. aureus aortic-valve vegetations and showed increased uptake of Tc-99m Ab at the aortic valve, 118 times higher than at the uninfected tricuspid valve. Although high hepatic radioactivity and anatomic uncertainties interfered with in vivo delineation of these lesions, images of the excised hearts showed all affected valves. Two rabbits inoculated with Escherichia coli did not develop endocarditis and had little uptake of Tc-99m Ab, while six rabbits with enterococcal endocarditis had no uptake of the Tc-99m Ab in their vegetations. The findings suggest potential value of Tc-99m Ab on the rapid diagnosis of endocarditis.

  10. The bacteremia of dental origin and its implications in the appearance of bacterial endocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    Mang de la Rosa, María Rocío; Castellanos Cosano, Lizett; Romero Perez, María Jesús; Cutando Soriano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Numerous systemic diseases may affect the oral cavity and vice versa,in particular severe diseases that involve the heart valve. In these cases, additional measures or a modification to our dental treatment need to be taken. We are aware of various diseases that can cause the emergence of bacterial endocarditis (BE), such as; rheumatic fever, valve lesions due to intravenous drug use, Kawasaki disease and valve surgery, among others. Due to its severity when it is not taken into account in de...

  11. Is there a need for bacterial endocarditis prophylaxis in patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, Salvatore

    2014-04-01

    Heart valve repair or replacement is a serious problem. Patients can benefit from an open dialogue between both cardiologists and gastroenterologists for the optimal effective patients care. The focused update on infective endocarditis of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2008 (ACC/AHA guidelines) and guidelines on the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of infective endocarditis (new version 2009) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC guidelines) describe prophylaxis against infective endocarditis (IE) as not recommended for gastroscopy and colonoscopy in the absence of active infection but increasing evidence suggests that the role of IE antibiotic prophylaxis remains a dark side of the cardio-oncology prevention. New evidences concerning infective endocarditis due to Streptococcus bovis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus durans, and new findings indicate that there is a need for bacterial endocarditis prophylaxis in patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy especially in elderly patients and in cancer and immunocompromised patients, to avoid serious consequences.

  12. Infectious Endocarditis from Enterococcus faecalis Associated with Tubular Adenoma of the Sigmoid Colon

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    Emilly Caroline de Freitas Silva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis, a constituent of the gut microbiota, can be associated with both colonic lesions and endocarditis. Since this microorganism is one of the endocarditis etiological agents, there is a need for greater study in regard to the association with endocarditis and colonic lesions. Case Presentation. This is the case description of a 53-year-old man with history of prolapse of the anterior mitral valve leaflet who was diagnosed with endocarditis by E. faecalis and treated with ampicillin and gentamicin. Upon investigation by colonoscopy, he was found to have a tubular adenoma with low grade dysplasia. Conclusion. There are a few descriptions in scientific literature of an association between endocarditis by E. faecalis and colonic lesions. However, further studies with significant correlation between the two pathologies are required, so that proper measures can be implemented in clinical practice.

  13. Right-Sided Endocarditis due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis: First Reported Case

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    CL Cooper

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase-negative organism first identified in 1988. It is often incorrectly identified as Staphylococcus aureus, and has been isolated as the etiological agent in over 20 cases of left-sided endocarditis. This report describes the first documented case of right-sided endocarditis caused by S lugdunensis. This experience suggests that S lugdunensis can infect native valves in the absence of any predisposing risk factors such as injection drug use.

  14. Usefulness of a partial median sternotomy for acute infectious endocarditis in patients with tracheostoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Toshio; Saga, Toshihiko; Nishino, Takako; Fujii, Kohsuke; Shintaro, Yukami

    2011-01-01

    Infectious endocarditis patients occasionally need emergency cardiac surgery even if they have a tracheostoma. However, a median full-sternotomy approach carries increased risk for sternal infection and lethal mediastinitis in cardiac surgery for patients with tracheostomas. We successfully performed valve replacement procedures using a lower partial median sternotomy approach in 6 infectious endocarditis patients with tracheostomas. There were neither operative deaths nor complications related to wound infection in these cases. The partial sternotomy approach represents a safe alternative in cardiac surgery for acute infectious endocarditis patients with tracheostomas who need emergent surgery.

  15. Gemella Species Endocarditis in a Child

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    Laura K Purcell

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Organisms of the genus Gemella can, on occasion, cause serious systemic illness. The present paper reports a successfully treated case of endocarditis in a 12-year-old girl with congenital heart disease caused by species of Gemella. The child presented with cough, fatigue and decreased appetite without fever. Echocardiogram demonstrated marked mitral insufficiency with flail posterior mitral valve leaflet, mitral valve vegetations, and an enlarged left atrium and ventricle. While being treated with vancomycin, the child initially had persistent bacteremia, which resolved after the addition of gentamycin; the course of therapy was completed with penicillin G and gentamycin once antimicrobial susceptibilities were available. Attempts to identify the species of Gemella were unsuccessful in the local laboratory, and at reference laboratories in Canada and the United States. The isolate is undergoing further evaluation to determine its taxonomic status.

  16. Emerging infectious endocarditis due to Scedosporium prolificans: a model of therapeutic complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Guerrero, M L; Askari, E; Prieto, E; Gadea, I; Román, A

    2011-11-01

    Scedosporium prolificans is an emerging agent for severe infections. Although among the dematiaceous fungi Scedosporium is the most frequently isolated in blood cultures, Scedosporium endocarditis is rarely reported. We show herein a patient with acute leukaemia who developed S. prolificans endocarditis. Twelve cases were found in an extensive review of the English literature. In six cases (46%), there was predisposing heart conditions such as a prosthetic valve or an intracavitary device. Only 4 patients (31%) were immunocompromised hosts with haematologic neoplasia, solid-organ transplantation or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Exposure to Scedosporium was observed in immunocompetent patients who developed infection while in the community. Scedosporium endocarditis occurred on both sides of the heart. Systemic and pulmonary emboli and other metastatic complications were seen in all of these patients. The overall mortality was 77% and, specifically, all of the immunocompromised hosts and 6 out of 7 patients with mitral or aortic valve endocarditis died. Patients with right-sided endocarditis associated with a removable intracardiac device exhibited a better prognosis. Scedosporium endocarditis, although still rare, is an emerging infection with an ominous prognosis. At the present time, valve replacement or the removal of cardiac devices plus combined antifungal treatment may offer the best possibility of cure.

  17. Surgical management of left heart endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defraigne, J O; Dalem, A M; Demoulin, J C; Limet, R

    1989-01-01

    Between 1981 and 1987, 29 patients (20 men and 9 women, mean age 46 +/- 15) underwent a valvular replacement for endocarditis (19 aortic and 10 mitral). There were 25 native and 4 prosthetic valves. In 85% of cases, underlying valvular lesions were present. The oropharyngeal and the respiratory tracts were the most common sources of infection. In 81%, the infecting microorganism was gram-positive. In 21% of cases, a gram-negative was detected, always mixed with a gram-positive. One infection was caused by a Candida. Indications for surgery were severe valvular insufficiency or cardiac failure (90%), refractory sepsis (21%), thromboembolic events (11%). In 22%, multiple factors were present. A biologic valve was chosen in 12 cases (40%). Simultaneously with the valvular replacement, 4 ventricular septal perforations were occluded and 3 valvular annulus abscesses debrided. The operative mortality was 10% (3/29). The one-year survival is 96%. Two patients required reoperation at 6 months and 2 years, for partial dehiscence, with good subsequent evolution. The authors concluded that surgical operation is the most suitable treatment for unstable or complicated endocarditis, in case of cardiac failure, iterative thromboembolic events or refractory sepsis.

  18. Haemophilus segnis endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Tvede, M; Skinhøj, P

    1988-01-01

    Haemophilus segnis is a rarely recognised commensal in the oropharynx. We wish to report the first published case of endocarditis caused by H. segnis. The patient, a 76-year-old female did not recover until after 2 courses of ampicillin given for a total of 57 days. In the second course of treatm......Haemophilus segnis is a rarely recognised commensal in the oropharynx. We wish to report the first published case of endocarditis caused by H. segnis. The patient, a 76-year-old female did not recover until after 2 courses of ampicillin given for a total of 57 days. In the second course...

  19. Infective endocarditis: a consumptive disease among the elderly

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    Vilma Takayasu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The clinical presentation of infective endocarditis varies according to theetiologic agent and the host. In elderly individuals, infective endocarditis canbe difficult to diagnose and poses a challenge for the physician. The course ofsubacute infective endocarditis is indolent, and the onset of cardiac structurallesion is slow and gradual. In elderly patients, anemia and weight loss areoccasionally the only or the most striking symptoms. In such cases, the clinicalreasoning process leads to a hypothesis of wasting syndrome or neoplasticdisease, especially when there is no fever. We report the case of an elderlypatient who had mitral insufficiency due to degenerative valve disease andpresented with bacterial endocarditis due to Streptococcus mitis. The patientwas not treated, because the diagnosis was not established in a timely manner.It is of note that the patient presented with marked weight loss and no fever.The autopsy revealed impairment of the mitral valve and left atrium due toendocarditis, as well as lung involvement due to chronic inhalation of smokefrom biomass burning, such as that produced by wood-burning stoves.

  20. Trends in Infective Endocarditis in California and New York State, 1998-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Nana; Chikwe, Joanna; Itagaki, Shinobu; Gelijns, Annetine C; Adams, David H; Egorova, Natalia N

    2017-04-25

    Prophylaxis and treatment guidelines for infective endocarditis have changed substantially over the past decade. In the United States, few population-based studies have explored the contemporary epidemiology and outcomes of endocarditis. To quantify trends in the incidence and etiologies of infective endocarditis in the United States. Retrospective population epidemiology study of patients hospitalized with a first episode of endocarditis identified from mandatory state databases in California and New York State between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2013. Infective endocarditis. Outcomes were crude and standardized incidence of endocarditis and trends in patient characteristics and disease etiology. Trends in acquisition mode, organism, and mortality were analyzed. Among 75 829 patients with first episodes of endocarditis (mean [SD] age, 62.3 [18.9] years; 59.1% male), the standardized annual incidence was stable between 7.6 (95% CI, 7.4 to 7.9) and 7.8 (95% CI, 7.6 to 8.0) cases per 100 000 persons (annual percentage change [APC], -0.06%; 95% CI, -0.3% to 0.2%; P = .59). From 1998 through 2013, the proportion of patients with native-valve endocarditis decreased (from 74.5% to 68.4%; APC, -0.7%; 95% CI, -0.9% to -0.5%; P 1998 through 2013, with changes in patient characteristics and etiology over this time.

  1. Aorto-right ventricular fistula: a rare complication of Abiotrophia Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Mohammed, Aasim; Mizrahi, Eddy

    2017-07-01

    A 41-year-old African male presented with worsening dyspnea and cachexia concerning for congestive heart failure. Transesophageal echocardiogram revealed a large mass attached to the aortic valve leaflet, mass attached to the flail anterior mitral valve leaflet, severe pulmonary hypertension and dilatation of the aortic root along with fistula between the right coronary aortic cusp and the right ventricular (RV) outflow tract. Blood cultures grew Abiotrophia Defectiva (AD) sensitive to vancomycin. Patient underwent emergent surgical closure of aorto RV fistula and aortic root replacement along with pulmonary and mitral valve replacement. Endocarditis caused by AD has been reported to result in heart failure, septic embolization and destruction of the valve despite use of appropriate antibiotics. To our knowledge, this is the only case of AD endocarditis without any identified entrance route; requiring replacement of pulmonary, mitral and aortic valve due to extensive valvular damage and large vegetations.

  2. [Brucella abortus endocarditis: survival of a 74 year old patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olea M, Pilar

    2010-02-01

    Brucellosis is not frequent in Chile but it may present with life threatening complications like endocarditis. The case reported refers to a 74 year old man admitted to the Infectious Diseases Hospital Dr. Lucio Córdova in Santiago. He had been febrile for 3 months with no specific symptoms. The trans-esophageal echocardiography confirmed multiple large vegetations and important involvement of the aortic valve. Blood cultures yielded Brucella abortus. The patient required cardiac surgery, along with antibiotics, and he had a satisfactory outcome, being alive at the moment of this report???. Brucellosis can be the responsible for prolonged fever of unknown origin. It is necessary to take in mind brucellosis to obtain the specific laboratory tests. For a best prognosis an early treatment with associated antibiotics for at least 4 a 6 weeks is important. If endocarditis is present valve replacement is often necessary.

  3. Bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis associated with infective endocarditis: case report

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    Enyr Saran Arcieri

    Full Text Available Bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis is a rare condition initiated by infection by microbes in the bloodstream, such as those arising from a foci of infective endocarditis. We report a case and discuss the diagnostic aspects and the clinical outcome of a patient with characteristic findings of the disease. The patient was a 49 year old white male who had a metallic aortic valve implanted 7 months previously, and who presented to the hospital with 10 days of fever, cough and dyspnea, then diarrhea and mental confusion. On the second day of hospitalization, he experienced sudden loss of vision in both eyes. A Gram-positive coccobacillus was isolated from the bloodstream, he was treated with fluoroquinolone with disappearance of fever, decreased ocular inflammation, and improvement in his vision to light perception. He later underwent valve replacement surgery but died during the procedure. We review the occurrence of ocular signs and symptoms and their importance in patients with endocarditis.

  4. Forward angiography in the identification of vegetations in tricuspid endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, C N; Dunne, E F; Farinha, J B; Zubiate, P; Kay, J H; Kaplan, M A

    1977-02-01

    A patient with staphylococcal endocarditis of unknown valvular location and resistant to antibiotic therapy was studied in order to localize the site of infection prior to cardiac surger. The injection of contrast material into the right atrium visualized tricuspid vegetations which were confirmed at surgery. In such situations, forward angiographic studies constitute a safe, simple, and potentially diagnostic procedure which avoids the hazards of advancing a catheter across an infected valve.

  5. Mycobacterium abscessus: Causing fatal endocarditis after cardiac catheterization

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    S Mahajan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium abscessus is an unusual cause of infection in immunocompetent patients. The intrinsic and acquired resistance of this organism to multiple antibiotics is a major issue in planning treatment regimens. We report a case of M. abscessus endocarditis of the native aortic valve in an immunocompetent patient following coronary angiography with a fatal outcome. The case highlights an unfortunate intervention - related nosocomial infection and the difficulties in chemotherapeutic options for this organism, particularly in the presence of renal failure.

  6. Blood culture negative endocarditis: analysis of 63 cases presenting over 25 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, C C; Eykyn, S J

    2003-03-01

    To analyse cases of blood culture negative endocarditis (BCNE) seen at St Thomas' Hospital, London, between 1975 and 2000. Data on all episodes of endocarditis with negative blood cultures seen at St Thomas' Hospital between 1975 and 2000 were collected prospectively and analysed retrospectively. Sixty three patients with BCNE were seen during the study period: 48 (76%) with native and 15 (24%) prosthetic valve infection. BCNE accounted for 12.2% of the 516 cases of endocarditis seen at St Thomas' Hospital. The diagnosis of endocarditis was clinically definite by the Duke criteria in only 21% (7 of 34) of cases of pathologically proven native valve endocarditis but in 62% (21 of 34) of cases by the St Thomas' modifications of the criteria. Comparable figures for the 11 cases of pathologically proven prosthetic valve endocarditis were 45% and 73%. Despite negative blood cultures a causative organism was identified in 31 (49%) of the 63 cases: in 15 by serology (8 Coxiella burnetii, 6 Bartonella species, and 1 Chlamydia psittaci); in 9 cases by culture of the excised valve; in 3 by microscopy of the excised valve, on which large numbers of Gram positive cocci were seen although the culture was sterile; and in the other 4 by isolation from a site other than the excised valve (2 respiratory specimens, 1 from the pacemaker tip, and 1 from an excised embolus). In addition 5 of the 6 cases of Bartonella infection were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction study of the excised valve. Two thirds of the 32 patients for whom no pathogen was identified had received antibiotics before blood was cultured. Thus truly "negative" endocarditis was very uncommon (6% of the cases). If blood cultures are negative in definite or suspected endocarditis, serum should be analysed for Bartonella, Coxiella, and Chlamydia species antibodies, and the excised valve or (rarely) embolus should be analysed by microscopy, culture, histology, and relevant polymerase chain reaction. Other specimens

  7. Contribution of Sialic Acid-Binding Adhesin to Pathogenesis of Experimental Endocarditis Caused by Streptococcus gordonii DL1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yukihiro; Takashima, Eizo; Shimazu, Kisaki; Yagishita, Hisao; Aoba, Takaaki; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    An insertional mutation in hsa, the gene encoding the sialic acid-binding adhesin of Streptococcus gordonii DL1, resulted in a significant reduction of the infection rate of the organism and an inflammatory reaction in the rat aortic valve with experimental endocarditis, suggesting that the adhesin contributes to the infectivity of the organism for heart valves. PMID:16369032

  8. The value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in diagnosing infectious endocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouijzer, Ilse J.E. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vos, Fidel J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Janssen, Marcel J.R. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Dijk, Arie P.J. van [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Cardiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen Institute for Infection, Inflammation and Immunity (N4i), Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen Institute for Infection, Inflammation and Immunity (N4i), Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    Early detection of infectious endocarditis is challenging. For diagnosing infectious endocarditis, the revised Duke criteria are the gold standard. Evidence of endocardial involvement on echocardiography is a major criterion, but sensitivity and specificity of echocardiography are not optimal. Here we investigated the utility of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) to diagnose infectious endocarditis in patients with gram-positive bacteraemia. Seventy-two patients with gram-positive bacteraemia were prospectively included. Patients with a positive blood culture growing Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus species or Enterococcus species were eligible when a risk factor for developing metastatic infectious foci was present. Infectious endocarditis was defined according to the revised Duke criteria. All patients underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and echocardiography. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was evaluated independently by two nuclear medicine physicians. Sensitivity for diagnosing infectious endocarditis with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was 39 % and specificity was 93 %. The positive predictive value was 64 % and negative predictive value was 82 %. The mortality rate in patients without infectious endocarditis and without increased {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was 18 %, and in patients without infectious endocarditis but with high {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves the mortality rate was 50 % (p = 0.181). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is currently not sufficiently adequate for the diagnosis of infectious endocarditis because of its low sensitivity. Improvements such as patient preparation with low carbohydrate-fat allowed diet and technical advances in the newest PET/CT scanners may increase sensitivity in future studies. (orig.)

  9. The value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in diagnosing infectious endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouijzer, Ilse J E; Vos, Fidel J; Janssen, Marcel J R; van Dijk, Arie P J; Oyen, Wim J G; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P

    2013-07-01

    Early detection of infectious endocarditis is challenging. For diagnosing infectious endocarditis, the revised Duke criteria are the gold standard. Evidence of endocardial involvement on echocardiography is a major criterion, but sensitivity and specificity of echocardiography are not optimal. Here we investigated the utility of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) to diagnose infectious endocarditis in patients with gram-positive bacteraemia. Seventy-two patients with gram-positive bacteraemia were prospectively included. Patients with a positive blood culture growing Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus species or Enterococcus species were eligible when a risk factor for developing metastatic infectious foci was present. Infectious endocarditis was defined according to the revised Duke criteria. All patients underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT and echocardiography. (18)F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was evaluated independently by two nuclear medicine physicians. Sensitivity for diagnosing infectious endocarditis with (18)F-FDG PET/CT was 39% and specificity was 93%. The positive predictive value was 64% and negative predictive value was 82%. The mortality rate in patients without infectious endocarditis and without increased (18)F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was 18%, and in patients without infectious endocarditis but with high (18)F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves the mortality rate was 50% (p = 0.181). (18)F-FDG PET/CT is currently not sufficiently adequate for the diagnosis of infectious endocarditis because of its low sensitivity. Improvements such as patient preparation with low carbohydrate-fat allowed diet and technical advances in the newest PET/CT scanners may increase sensitivity in future studies.

  10. Veillonella montpellierensis Endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovery, Clarisse; Etienne, Anne; Foucault, Cédric; Berger, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Veillonella spp. rarely cause infections in humans. We report a case of Veillonella endocarditis documented by isolating a slow-growing, gram-negative microbe in blood cultures. This microbe was identified as the newly recognized species Veillonella montpellierensis (100% homology) by 16S RNA gene sequence analysis. PMID:16022792

  11. Prophylaxis of endocarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, J. T. M.

    2002-01-01

    For a long time it has been known that bacteraemias caused by medical or dental procedures may cause endocarditis in patients with specific types of congenital or acquired heart disease. In the 1940s it was thought that the administration of antibiotics before such procedures would prevent

  12. Candida infective endocarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baddley, J. W.; Benjamin, D. K.; Patel, M.; Miró, J.; Athan, E.; Barsic, B.; Bouza, E.; Clara, L.; Elliott, T.; Kanafani, Z.; Klein, J.; Lerakis, S.; Levine, D.; Spelman, D.; Rubinstein, E.; Tornos, P.; Morris, A. J.; Pappas, P.; Fowler, V. G.; Chu, V. H.; Cabell, C.; DraGordon, David; Devi, Uma; Spelman, Denis; van der Meer, Jan T. M.; Kauffman, Carol; Bradley, Suzanne; Armstrong, William; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Giamarellou, Helen; Lerakis, Stamatios; del Rio, Ana; Moreno, Asuncio; Mestres, Carlos A.; Pare, Carlos; Garcia de la Maria, Cristina; de Lazzario, Elisa; Marco, Francesc; Gatell, Jose M.; Miro, Jose M.; Almela, Manel; Azqueta, Manuel; Jimenez-Exposito, Maria Jesus; de Benito, Natividad; Perez, Noel; Almirante, Benito; Fernandez-Hidalgo, Nuria; de Vera, Pablo Rodriguez; Tornos, Pilar; Falco, Vicente; Claramonte, Xavier; Armero, Yolanda; Sidani, Nisreen; Kanj-Sharara, Souha; Kanafani, Zeina; Raglio, Annibale; Goglio, Antonio; Gnecchi, Fabrizio; Suter, Fredy; Valsecchi, Grazia; Rizzi, Marco; Ravasio, Veronica; Hoen, Bruno; Chirouze, Catherine; Leroy, Joel; Plesiat, Patrick; Bernard, Yvette; Casey, Anna; Lambert, Peter; Watkin, Richard; Elliot, Tom; Patel, Mukesh; Dismukes, William; Pan, Angelo; Caros, Giampiero; Tribouilloy, Amel Brahim Mathiron Christophe; Goissen, Thomas; Delahaye, Armelle; Delahaye, Francois; Vandenesch, Francois; Vizzotti, Carla; Nacinovich, Francisco M.; Marin, Marcelo; Trivi, Marcelo; Lombardero, Martin; Cortes, Claudia; Casabe, Jose Horacio; Altclas, Javier; Kogan, Silvia; Clara, Liliana; Sanchez, Marisa; Commerford, Anita; Hansa, Cass; Deetlefs, Eduan; Ntsekhe, Mpiko; Commerford, Patrick; Wray, Dannah; Steed, Lisa L.; Cantey, Robert; Morris, Arthur; Holland, David; Murdoch, David; Graham, Katherine; Read, Kerry; Raymond, Nigel; Bridgman, Paul; Troughton, Richard; Lang, Selwyn; Chambers, Stephen; Kotsanas, Despina; Korman, Tony M.; Peterson, Gail; Purcell, Jon; Southern, Paul M.; Shah, Manisha; Bedimo, Roger; Reddy, Arjun; Levine, Donald; Dhar, Gaurav; Hanlon-Feeney, Alanna; Hannan, Margaret; Kelly, Sinead; Wang, Andrew; Cabell, Christopher; Woods, Christopher; Sexton, Daniel J.; Benjamin, Danny; Corey, G. Ralph; McDonald, Jay R.; Federspiel, Jeff; Engemann, John J.; Barth Reller, L.; Drew, Laura; Caram, L. B.; Stryjewski, Martin; Morpeth, Susan; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Fowler, Vance; Chu, Vivian; Mazaheri, Bahram; Neuerburg, Carl; Naber, Christoph; Athan, Eugene; Henry, Margaret; Harris, Owen; Alestig, Eric; Olaison, Lars; Wikstrom, Lotta; Snygg-Martin, Ulrika; Francis, Johnson; Venugopal, K.; Nair, Lathi; Thomas, Vinod; Chaiworramukkun, Jaruwan; Pachirat, Orathai; Chetchotisakd, Ploenchan; Suwanich, Tewan; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tamin, Syahidah Syed; Premru, Manica Muella; Logar, Mateja; Lejko-Zupanc, Tatjana; Orezzi, Christina; Klein, John; Bouza, Emilio; Moreno, Mar; Rodriguez-Creixems, Marta; Marin, Mercedes; Fernandez, Miguel; Munoz, Patricia; Fernandez, Rocio; Ramallo, Victor; Raoult, Didier; Thuny, Franck; Habib, Gilbert; Casalta, Jean-Paul; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Chipigina, Natalia; Kirill, Ozerecky; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Kulichenko, Vadim P.; Butkevich, O. M.; Lion, Christine; Selton-Suty, Christine; Alla, Francois; Coyard, Helene; Doco-Lecompte, Thanh; Larussi, Diana; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Francoise Tripodi, Marie; Utili, Riccardo; Sampath Kumar, A.; Sharma, Gautam; Dickerman, Stuart A.; Street, Alan; Eisen, Damon Peter; McBryde, Emma Sue; Grigg, Leeanne; Abrutyn, Elias; Michelet, Christian; Tattevin, Pierre; Yves Donnio, Pierre; Fortes, Claudio Querido; Edathodu, Jameela; Al-Hegelan, Mashael; Font, Bernat; Raimon Guma, Joan; Cereceda, M.; Oyonarte, Miguel J.; Mella, Rodrigo Montagna; Garcia, Patricia; Braun Jones, Sandra; Isabel de Oliveira Ramos, Auristela; Ley Woon, Lok; Lum, Luh-Nah; Tan, Ru-San; Rees, David; Kornecny, Pam; Lawrence, Richard; Dever, Robyn; Post, Jeffey; Jones, Phillip; Ryan, Suzzane; Harkness, John; Fenely, Michael; Rubinstein, Ethan; Strahilewitz, Jacob; Ionac, Adina; Mornos, Cristian; Dragulescu, Stefan; Forno, Davide; Cecchi, Enrico; de Rosa, Francesco; Imazio, Massimo; Trinchero, Rita; Wiesbauer, Franz; Gattringer, Rainer; Deans, Greg; Andrasevic, Arjana Tambic; Barsic, Bruno; Klinar, Igor; Vincelj, Josip; Bukovski, Suzana; Krajinovic, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Candida infective endocarditis (IE) is uncommon but often fatal. Most epidemiologic data are derived from small case series or case reports. This study was conducted to explore the epidemiology, treatment patterns, and outcomes of patients with Candida IE. We compared 33 Candida IE cases to 2,716

  13. Endocarditis in adults with bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas, Marjolein J.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2013-01-01

    Endocarditis may precede or complicate bacterial meningitis, but the incidence and impact of endocarditis in bacterial meningitis are unknown. We assessed the incidence and clinical characteristics of patients with meningitis and endocarditis from a nationwide cohort study of adults with

  14. Acquired ventricular septal defect due to infective endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi E Durden

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired intracardiac left-to-right shunts are rare occurrences. Chest trauma and myocardial infection are well-known causes of acquired ventricular septal defect (VSD. There have been several case reports describing left ventricle to right atrium shunt after infective endocarditis (IE. We present here a patient found to have an acquired VSD secondary to IE of the aortic and tricuspid valves in the setting of a known bicuspid aortic valve. This is the first case reported of acquired VSD in a pediatric patient in the setting of IE along with literature review of acquired left-to-right shunts.

  15. Rarity of invasiveness in right-sided infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Syed T; Shrestha, Nabin K; Witten, James

    2018-01-01

    , 1292 patients underwent surgery for active IE, 138 right-sided and 1224 left-sided. Among patients with right-sided IE, 131 had tricuspid and 7 pulmonary valve IE; 12% had prosthetic valve endocarditis. Endocarditis-related invasiveness was based on echocardiographic and operative findings. RESULTS......: Invasive disease was rare on the right side, occurring in 1 patient (0.72%; 95% confidence interval 0.02%-4.0%); rather, it was limited to valve cusps/leaflets or was superficial. In contrast, IE was invasive in 408 of 633 patients with aortic valve (AV) IE (65%), 113 of 369 with mitral valve (MV) IE (31......%), and 148 of 222 with AV and MV IE (67%). Staphylococcus aureus was a more predominant organism in right-sided than left-sided IE (right 40%, AV 19%, MV 29%), yet invasion was observed almost exclusively on the left side of the heart, which was more common and more severe with AV than MV IE and more common...

  16. Tropheryma whipplei tricuspid endocarditis: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greub Gilbert

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The main clinical manifestations of Whipple's disease are weight loss, arthropathy, diarrhea and abdominal pain. Cardiac involvement is frequently described. However, endocarditis is rare and is not usually the initial presentation of the disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a patient with Tropheryma whipplei tricuspid endocarditis without any other valve involved and not presenting signs of arthralgia and abdominal involvement. Case presentation We report a case of a 50-year-old Caucasian man with tricuspid endocarditis caused by Tropheryma whipplei, showing signs of severe shock and an absence of other more classic clinical signs of Whipple's disease, such as arthralgia, abdominal pain and diarrhea. Tropheryma whipplei was documented by polymerase chain reaction of the blood and pleural fluid. The infection was treated with a combined treatment of doxycycline, hydroxychloroquine and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim for one year. Conclusion Tropheryma whipplei infectious endocarditis should always be considered when facing a blood-culture negative endocarditis particularly in right-sided valves. Although not standardized yet, treatment of Tropheryma whipplei endocarditis should probably include a bactericidal antibiotic (such as doxycycline and should be given over a prolonged period of time (a minimum of one year.

  17. Imaging experimental infective endocarditis with indium-111-labeled blood cellular components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riba, A.L.; Thakur, M.L.; Gottschalk, A.; Andriole, V.T.; Zaret, B.L.

    1979-02-01

    The capability of radionuclide imaging to detect experimental aortic valve infective endocarditis was assessed with indium-111 (/sup 111/In)-labeled blood cells. Sequential cardiac imaging and tissue distribution studies were obtained in 17 rabbits with infective endocarditis after administration of /sup 111/-In-platelets and in five after /sup 111/In-polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Forty-eight to 72 hours after platelet administration, in vivo imaging demonstrated abnormal /sup 111/In uptake in all animals in the region of the aortic valve in an anatomically distinct pattern. Images of the excised heart showed discrete cardiac uptake conforming to the in vivo image and gross pathological examination. /sup 111/In platelet uptake in vegetations from the 17 animals averaged 240 +- 41 times greater than that in normal myocardium and 99 +- 15 times greater uptake in blood. In contrast, /sup 111/In-leukocyte cardiac imaging showed no abnormal aortic valve uptake 24 hours after tracer administration and the lesion myocardium activity ratio was only 5 +- 2 (3 +- 1 for lesion/blood activity). Four normal rabbits demonstrated neither positive /sup 111/In platelet scintigraphs nor abnormal cardiac tissue uptake. Likewise, noncellular /sup 111/In was not concentrated to any significant extent in three animals with infective endocarditis.This study demonstrates that /sup 111/In platelet, but not leukocyte cardiac imaging, is a sensitive technique for detecting experimental infective endocarditis. The imaging data conform to the cellular pathology of the infective endocarditis vegetation.

  18. Prognostic criteria for the development of infective endocarditis in children with heart pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porokhnya N.G.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available To determine the most informative prognostic signs of infectious endocarditis development in children with heart pathology on the background of bacterial infections clinical course of 15 cases of infective endocarditis in children aged from 1 month to 17 years was performed. The comparison group consisted of 40 children aged 5 - 17 years with mitral valve prolapse. Of 19 analyzed clinical-anamnestic predictive diagnostic features for the development of infective endocarditis in children, presence of febrile fever during infusion therapy, the operated congenital heart disease, treatment in an intensive therapy unit with mechanical ventilation, intravenous infusions through a catheter lasting more than three days, a positive blood culture during the disease course, diagnostic catheterization of large vessels were of high informative value. In a positive prognosis of infective endocarditis development with a probability of 95% and more, children underwent complex of therapeutic measures with the following observation of pediatric cardio-rheumatologist.

  19. Characteristics and prognosis of pneumococcal endocarditis: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daudin, M; Tattevin, P; Lelong, B; Flecher, E; Lavoué, S; Piau, C; Ingels, A; Chapron, A; Daubert, J-C; Revest, M

    2016-06-01

    Case series have suggested that pneumococcal endocarditis is a rare disease, mostly reported in patients with co-morbidities but no underlying valve disease, with a rapid progression to heart failure, and high mortality. We performed a case-control study of 28 patients with pneumococcal endocarditis (cases), and 56 patients with non-pneumococcal endocarditis (controls), not matched for sex and age, during the years 1991-2013, in one referral centre. Alcoholism (39.3% versus 10.7%; p endocarditis. Cardiac surgery was required in 64.3% of patients with pneumococcal endocarditis, much earlier than in patients with non-pneumococcal endocarditis (mean time from symptom onset, 14.1 ± 18.2 versus 69.0 ± 61.1 days). In-hospital mortality rates were similar (7.1% versus 12.5%). Streptococcus pneumoniae causes rapidly progressive endocarditis requiring life-saving early cardiac surgery in most cases. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Risk of infective endocarditis in patients with end stage kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaudry, Mavish S; Carlson, Nicholas; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Endocarditis is a serious complication in patients treated with RRT. The study aimed to examine incidence and risk factors of endocarditis in patients with ESRD. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: The Danish National Registry on Regular Dialysis and Transpla......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Endocarditis is a serious complication in patients treated with RRT. The study aimed to examine incidence and risk factors of endocarditis in patients with ESRD. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: The Danish National Registry on Regular Dialysis...... and Transplantation contains data on all Danish patients receiving renal replacement (hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, or kidney transplantation) for ESRD. Incidence of endocarditis was estimated for each RRT modality. Independent risk factors of endocarditis were identified in multivariable Cox regression models....... RESULTS: From January 1st, 1996 to December 31st, 2012, 10,612 patients (mean age 63 years, 36% female) initiated RRT (7233 hemodialysis, 3056 peritoneal dialysis, 323 pre-emptive kidney transplantation). Endocarditis developed in 267 (2.5%); of these 31 (12%) underwent valve surgery. The overall...

  1. Hepatic Artery Mycotic Aneurysm Associated with Staphylococcal Endocarditis with Successful Treatment: Case Report with Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhara Chaudhari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycotic hepatic artery aneurysm is a vascular pathology associated with bacterial endocarditis. It is rare in occurrence after the introduction of effective antibiotics. We present a young patient with injection drug abuse associated staphylococcal endocarditis which was successfully treated with antibiotics and valve replacement who presented with abdominal pain. He was found to have mycotic aneurysm of hepatic artery which was successfully treated with coil embolization.

  2. Potentially fatal tricuspid valve aspergilloma detected after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potentially fatal tricuspid valve aspergilloma detected after laparoscopic abdominal surgery. ... Aspergillus endocarditis is usually associated with high morbidity and mortality. ... The patient was successfully managed with emergency open-heart surgery and systemic antifungal agents in the postoperative period. Keywords: ...

  3. Particularities in diagnosis and treatment for infectious endocarditis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Alina Costina; Begezsan, Isabela Ioana; Iordache, C

    2012-01-01

    Infectious endocarditis (IE) represents a rare pathology in children, but with lethal potential. The goal of the therapy is fast and total eradication of the infection. To study particularities in diagnosis and treatment for infectious endocarditis in children. Children with infectious endocarditis hospitalized between January 2007 - February 2012 in the Cardiology Department of the ,,Sfânta Maria" Children Emergency Hospital of lasi have been included in the study. The patients are aged between 23 days and 16 years, the average age being 4 years old. At approximately 88% of the patients (14 cases), the endocardial damage appeared in the pre-existent valvular lesions, specially mitral and aortal. As associated congenital malformations, the patients prevailingly presented ventricular septal defect, mitral valve prolapse, arterial canal persistence, aortic stenosis, coarctation of the aorta. Blood cultures were collected and the most frequent identified etiological agents were: Staphylococcus coagulase-positive, Streptococcus mitis, Staphylococcus speciae coagulase-negative, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Streptococcus bovis, Escherichia coli, for which the antibiogram showed sensitivity for beta-lactam, cephalosporins, glycopeptides, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, rifampicin, quinolone, lincosamides, oxazolidinones, and thus specific treatment was set up according to the antibiogram. The infectious endocarditis is a serious disease that affects young age too, leading towards exitus in some cases. Diagnostic imaging and early blood cultures are of relevance in order to intervene promptly. The treatment must be targeted and applied as fast as possible.

  4. Libman–Sacks endocarditis, and other echocardiographic findings in systemic lupus erythematosus: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Atef Hamza

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Case report of a 19 year-old female patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE who was presented to Ain Shams University Hospital complaining of dyspnea on moderate exertion. Echocardiography showed the presence of sterile vegetation on the mitral valve, Libman–Sacks endocarditis (LSE.

  5. HACEK Infective Endocarditis: Characteristics and Outcomes from a Large, Multi-National Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Stephen T.; Murdoch, David; Morris, Arthur; Holland, David; Pappas, Paul; Almela, Manel; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Almirante, Benito; Bouza, Emilio; Forno, Davide; del Rio, Ana; Hannan, Margaret M.; Harkness, John; Kanafani, Zeina A.; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Lang, Selwyn; Raymond, Nigel; Read, Kerry; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Woods, Christopher W.; Wray, Dannah; Corey, G. Ralph; Chu, Vivian H.

    2013-01-01

    The HACEK organisms (Haemophilus species, Aggregatibacter species, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella species) are rare causes of infective endocarditis (IE). The objective of this study is to describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with HACEK endocarditis (HE) in a large multi-national cohort. Patients hospitalized with definite or possible infective endocarditis by the International Collaboration on Endocarditis Prospective Cohort Study in 64 hospitals from 28 countries were included and characteristics of HE patients compared with IE due to other pathogens. Of 5591 patients enrolled, 77 (1.4%) had HE. HE was associated with a younger age (47 vs. 61 years; pendocarditis was more common in HE (35%) than non-HE (24%). The outcome of prosthetic valve and native valve HE was excellent whether treated medically or with surgery. Current treatment is very successful for the management of both native valve prosthetic valve HE but further studies are needed to determine why HE has a predilection for younger people and to cause stroke. The small number of patients and observational design limit inferences on treatment strategies. Self selection of study sites limits epidemiological inferences. PMID:23690995

  6. Technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate imaging of experimental infective endocarditis. [Rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riba, A.L.; Downs, J.; Thakur, M.L.; Gottschalk, A.; Andriole, V.T.; Zaret, B.L.

    1978-07-01

    Technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate (/sup 99m/Tc-PYP) cardiac scintigraphy was performed in 15 rabbits with experimental Streptococcus sanguis aortic-valve infective endocarditis. The animals were imaged five to seven days after the administration of bacteria, and in each case abnormal accumulation of the tracer was visualized in the region of the aortic valve. Three types of cardiac scintigraphic patterns were demonstrated: focal, multifocal, and extensive, each correlating well with the anatomical extent of the lesion as defined by gross pathology. Tissue distribution studies demonstrated a 30 +- 5.3 (mean +- SEM) fold excess of radionuclide uptake in the infective endocarditis lesion compared with that of normal myocardium. Imaging of excised hearts from four animals showed an excellent correlation with in vivo imaging as well as gross pathology. Five animals with nonbacterial thrombotic aortic valve endocarditis demonstrated similar scintigraphic and tissue distribution results. In contrast, four normal animals failed to demonstrate abnormal /sup 99m/Tc-PYP cardiac scintigrams or tissue uptake. This study demonstrates that /sup 99m/Tc-PYP cardiac scintigraphy is a sensitive technique to detect experimental aortic valve endocarditis.

  7. Osteomyelitis and possible endocarditis secondary to Lactococcus garvieae: a first case report

    OpenAIRE

    James, P.; Hardman, S; Patterson, D

    2000-01-01

    Although osteomyelitis is commonly caused by staphylococcal infection, the first case of a lumbar osteomyelitis secondary to Lactococcus garvieae is reported. The case was complicated by possible endocarditis of an aortic valve prosthesis.


Keywords: Lactococcus garvieae; osteomyelitis

  8. Septic sacroiliitis revealing an infectious endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Hariz, Anis; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 43-year-old man admitted for right hip ache and fever. Physical examination revealed a fever, an ache at the manipulation of the sacroiliac joint and a limitation of abduction and external rotation of the right hip. There was no murmur in cardiac auscultation. No anomaly was found at the conventional radiographs of the sacroiliac joint, while the pelvic MRI confirmed a right sacroiliitis. A sacroiliac puncture with a study of synovial fluid demonstrated the presence of Streptococcus viridans. The blood culture revealed the same germ. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography confirmed infectious endocarditis with vegetation in the mitral valve. He received penicillin G and gentamicin relayed by pristinamycin because of an allergy to penicillin G with a total duration of treatment of 40 days. His symptoms and the laboratory and radiological tests abnormalities resolved totally with no recurrence. PMID:25123569

  9. Septic sacroiliitis revealing an infectious endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Hariz, Anis; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2014-08-14

    We report the case of a 43-year-old man admitted for right hip ache and fever. Physical examination revealed a fever, an ache at the manipulation of the sacroiliac joint and a limitation of abduction and external rotation of the right hip. There was no murmur in cardiac auscultation. No anomaly was found at the conventional radiographs of the sacroiliac joint, while the pelvic MRI confirmed a right sacroiliitis. A sacroiliac puncture with a study of synovial fluid demonstrated the presence of Streptococcus viridans. The blood culture revealed the same germ. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography confirmed infectious endocarditis with vegetation in the mitral valve. He received penicillin G and gentamicin relayed by pristinamycin because of an allergy to penicillin G with a total duration of treatment of 40 days. His symptoms and the laboratory and radiological tests abnormalities resolved totally with no recurrence. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. Tricuspid valve mycetoma in an infant successfully treated by excision and complex tricuspid valve repair followed by fluconazole therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil Kumar, V; Francis, Edwin; Sreehari, Sreekala; Raj, Benedict

    2014-04-01

    Fungal valve endocarditis in children is an uncommon and lethal disease. The risk increases with use of central venous catheters (CVC), total parenteral nutrition (TPN), and use of broad-spectrum antibiotics during the neonatal period. Due to high mortality, a combination of surgery and antifungal therapy is usually recommended for treatment. Case report and review of the literature. We present a case of an asymptomatic infant with multiple Candida tricuspid valve mycetomas. Complete cure was achieved by combined tricuspid valve repair and fluconazole therapy. We also review 26 cases of tricuspid valve Candida endocarditis in children published in the literature. From being uniformly fatal five decades ago to a current survival rate of 64% to 100%, the prognosis of Candida endocarditis has changed dramatically with the use of antifungal therapy alone or in combination with surgery. Our case re-emphasizes the role of valve-sparing debridement with repair of the native valve using autologous pericardium in combination with long-term antifungal therapy as a feasible option in managing tricuspid valve Candida endocarditis.

  11. Infective endocarditis due to Abiotrophia defectiva and its feared complications in an immunocompetent person: Rare, but real

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Rudrappa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abiotrophia defectiva is nutritional deficient streptococci that cannot be cultured on routine culture medias. Even though fastidious in growth requirement, it is a virulent bacterium preferentially affecting endovascular structures and is implicated in many culture-negative endocarditis cases. Unlike other organisms, it is known for heart valve destruction leading to heart failure and excessive embolization rates. It's inherent resistance to routinely used antibiotics also contributed to increased mortality and morbidity in affected individuals and warrants timely diagnosis and prompt treatment. Our patient, a previous healthy individual, acquired this rare bacterium from intravenous drug abuse and developed infective endocarditis with valve destruction, heart failure, and distal embolization to multiple organs. He underwent multiple surgeries including mitral valve replacement and embolectomy with clinical improvement. Our case reiterates the possibility of rare cause of common diseases and raises awareness of infective endocarditis caused by A. defectiva among medical professionals.

  12. Presence of Coxiella burnetii DNA in inflamed bovine cardiac valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agerholm, Jørgen S; Jensen, Tim K; Agger, Jens F; Engelsma, Marc Y; Roest, Hendrik I J

    2017-03-09

    Bacterial endocarditis is a recognised disease in humans and animals. In humans, infection with Coxiella burnetii can cause endocarditis, but this has not been investigated thoroughly in animals. Endocarditis in cattle is a common post-mortem finding in abattoirs and studies have identified Trueperella pyogenes as a major cause. Despite exposure of cattle to C. burnetii, the significance of this particular bacterium for development and progression of endocarditis has not been studied in detail. Cardiac valves of cattle affected with endocarditis (n = 100) were examined by histology, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Serum was examined for anti-C. burnetii antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Serology revealed that 70% of the cattle were positive for antibodies to C. burnetii, while PCR analysis identified 25% of endocarditis valve samples as being positive. C. burnetii was not detected by FISH, probably due to the low infection levels. Most cattle had chronic valvular vegetative endocarditis with lesions being characterised by a core of fibrous tissue covered by significant amounts of fibrin, sometimes with areas of liquefaction, and with a coagulum covering the surface. In a few cases, including the case with the highest infection level, lesions were characterized by extensive fibrosis and calcification. Histologically, bacteria other than C. burnetii were observed in most cases. The presence of C. burnetii DNA is relatively common in cattle affected with valvular endocarditis. The role of C. burnetii remains however unknown as lesions did not differ between C. burnetii infected and non-infected cattle and because T. pyogenes-like bacteria were present in the inflamed valves; a bacterium able to induce the observed lesions. Heart valves of normal cattle should be investigated to assess if C. burnetii may be present without preexisting lesions.

  13. Infective endocarditis case due to streptococcus parasanguinis presented with spondylodiscitis

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    ismail Necati Hakyemez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus parasanguinis is a natural member of oral flora. It is an opportunistic pathogen, and rarely cause systemic infections due to it's low virulence. Subacute infective endocarditis may present with various clinical manifestations (eg., spondylodiscitis. A sixty-five years old male patient from Northern Iraq has referred to our emergency service with high fever, weight loss, back pain and inability to walk. The patient was a veterinarian. He was operated three years ago for colonic carcinoma and irradiated. In magnetic resonance imaging, spondylodiscitis was detected localized in lumbar 1-2 region. Transthorasic echocardiography demonstrated aortic valve vegetation. S. parasanguinis was identified in the blood cultures. In conclusion; all in all, it's remarkable to isolate S. parasanguinis as a causal agent of infective endocarditis in a patient who is a veterinarian with history of colonic carcinoma presented with clinical manifestation of spondylodiscitis. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(3.000: 591-594

  14. First case of infectious endocarditis caused by Parvimonas micra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Carlos A; Gerber, Daniel A; Zambrano, Eduardo; Banaei, Niaz; Deresinski, Stan; Blackburn, Brian G

    2015-12-01

    P. micra is an anaerobic Gram-positive cocci, and a known commensal organism of the human oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. Although it has been classically described in association with endodontic disease and peritonsillar infection, recent reports have highlighted the role of P. micra as the primary pathogen in the setting of invasive infections. In its most recent taxonomic classification, P. micra has never been reported causing infectious endocarditis in humans. Here, we describe a 71 year-old man who developed severe native valve endocarditis complicated by aortic valvular destruction and perivalvular abscess, requiring emergent surgical intervention. Molecular sequencing enabled identification of P. micra. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Enterococcus faecalis colonisation and endocarditis in five intensive care patients as late sequelae of selective decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijpkens, Y W; Buurke, E J; Ulrich, C; van Asselt, G J

    1995-03-01

    To describe Enterococcus faecalis colonisation and endocarditis in 5 intensive care patients after treatment with selective decontamination (SDD). Intensive care unit (ICU) in a general hospital. The patients were admitted to the ICU because of adult respiratory distress syndrome, polytrauma (2 patients), abdominal aortic surgery and gastrointestinal surgery. Because these patients needed mechanical ventilation they received systemic cefotaxime and SDD (polymyxin E, amphotericin B and norfloxacin). Colonisation with E. faecalis was documented in all patients. Intravascular catheter-related infection with E. faecalis occurred in 4 patients. None of the patients received antibiotics active against, E. faecalis, because body temperature normalised after catheter removal. In the course of his ICU stay one patient died. Autopsy showed E. faecalis endocarditis. The other 4 patients recovered from their primary illness, but had to be readmitted after several months because of E. faecalis endocarditis. One of these patients died. One patient recovered of endocarditis, but one year later valve surgery was necessary. The other 2 patients needed acute valve replacement. The latter 3 patients survived. We observed 5 patients with E. faecalis endocarditis as a late and severe sequela of SDD during their ICU stay.

  16. The bacteremia of dental origin and its implications in the appearance of bacterial endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang-de la Rosa, María R.; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Romero-Perez, María J.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous systemic diseases may affect the oral cavity and vice versa,in particular severe diseases that involve the heart valve. In these cases, additional measures or a modification to our dental treatment need to be taken. We are aware of various diseases that can cause the emergence of bacterial endocarditis (BE), such as; rheumatic fever, valve lesions due to intravenous drug use, Kawasaki disease and valve surgery, among others. Due to its severity when it is not taken into account in dental treatment, we intend to show the evolution of the antimicrobial prophylaxis towards this condition. Furthermore, we intend to publish the current guidelines of institutions and societies which increasingly encourage rational antimicrobial use. In addition, we intend to examine the evidence of the possible origins of this disease during dental treatment and at the same time describe the necessary considerations that need to be taken during dental treatment. Key words:Endocarditis, antibiotic profilaxis, dental treatment. PMID:24121925

  17. Complicated Community-Acquired Staphylococcus Endocarditis and Multiple Lung Abscesses: Case Report and Review of Literature

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    Musa A. Garbati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Isolated tricuspid valve endocarditis in the absence of risk factors in the community setting is very rare and can be easily missed in patients with hitherto normal valves. Case Presentation. We present a case of a 49 year old gentleman who presented with generalized body aches, fever, and jaundice and was initial diagnosed as hepatitis. He subsequently developed recurrent episodes of panic attacks and shortness of breath and later multiple skin abscesses. Further investigations excluded pulmonary embolism but revealed multiple abscesses in the body including the lungs. Blood cultures and culture from abscesses grew S. aureus. An initial transthoracic echocardiogram was normal. A transesophageal echocardiogram subsequently confirmed endocarditis on a normal natural tricuspid valve and multiple lung abscesses. He was successfully treated with appropriate antibiotics. Conclusion. We discuss the pathogenesis of this patient's presentation highlight the need for assessment and proper evaluation of patients with unexplained bacteremia.

  18. [Bacillus cereus endocarditis and a probable cutaneous gateway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudet, S; Becquart, C; Dezoteux, F; Faure, K; Staumont-Salle, D; Delaporte, E

    2017-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous telluric organism. B. cereus endocarditis is a rare condition seen mostly in prosthetic heart valves and among intravenous drug users. We report a new case of a patient without risk factors and with a good clinical outcome not requiring valve replacement. In October 2014, a 50-year-old woman was referred to the dermatology department of Lille University Hospital for lower-limb wounds developing 6 months earlier. She presented fever without clinical signs of infection, except for the lower-limbs wounds. Blood cultures revealed the presence of B. cereus. Transesophageal echocardiography was performed and revealed two foci of aortic valve vegetation with a diameter of 5mm. After bacterial sensitivity testing, rifampicin and levofloxacin treatment was given for six weeks, with complete remission. A skin graft was performed and good improvement was seen. Nineteen cases of B. cereus endocarditis have been described previously, only one of which was without risk factors. We described a case of complete remission after a 6-week course of antibiotics. Our case demonstrates that BC should not be considered as a blood culture contamination, and that treatment may be complex due to antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Osteomyelitis complicating Streptococcus milleri endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barham, N. J.; Flint, E. J.; Mifsud, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    A patient with osteomyelitis of the spine complicating bacterial endocarditis due to Streptococcus milleri is discussed. To our knowledge, this is the first time this organism has been associated with this complication. Images Figure 1 PMID:2385559

  20. Enterococcus faecalis Endogenous Endophthalmitis from Valvular Endocarditis

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    Sidnei Barge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 74-year-old female, with a mitral heart valve, who presented with pain and blurred vision in the right eye for 2 days. Her visual acuity was light perception (LP in the right eye and 20/40 in the left eye. Slit lamp examination showed corneal edema and hypopyon, and a view of the right fundus was impossible. Echography showed vitreous condensation. One day after presentation, the patient developed acute lung edema requiring hospitalization, so she was not submitted to vitreous tap and intravitreal treatment. The cardiac and systemic evaluations revealed a mitral endocarditis secondary to Enterococcus faecalis. The patient improved systemically with treatment with gentamicin, vancomycin, and linezolid. Her visual acuity remained as no LP, and her intraocular pressure (IOP has been controlled with brimonidine bid despite developing a total cataract with 360° posterior synechia. A cardiac source for endogenous endophthalmitis should be considered in the presence of a prosthetic cardiac valve. The treatment and followup must be made in cooperation with a cardiologist specialist, but the ophthalmologist can play a key role in the diagnosis.

  1. Midterm Results of Aortic Valve Replacement with Cryopreserved Homografts

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    Emre Özker

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the midterm clinical results of aortic valve replacement with cryopreserved homografts.Materials and Methods: Aortic valve replacement was performed in 40 patients with cryopreserved homograft. The indications were aortic valve endocarditis in 20 patients (50%, truncus arteriosus in 6 patients (15%, and re-stenosis or regurtitation after aortic valve reconstruction in 14 (35% patients. The valve sizes ranged from 10 to 27mm. A full root replacement technique was used for homograft replacement in all patients.Results: The 30-day postoperative mortality rate was 12.5% (5 patients. There were four late deaths. Only one of them was related to cardiac events. Overall mortality was 22.5%. Thirty-three patients were followed up for 67±26 months. Two patients needed reoperation due to aortic aneurysm caused by endocarditis. The mean transvalvular gradient significantly decreased after valve replacement (p<0.003. The last follow up showed that the 27 (82% patients had a normal left ventricular function.Conclusion: Cryopreserved homografts are safe alternatives to mechanical valves that can be used when there are proper indications. Although it has a high perioperative mortality rate, cryopreserved homograft implantation is an alternative for valve replacement, particularly in younger patients and for complex surgical problems such as endocarditis that must be minimalized.

  2. Infective endocarditis caused by Cellulomonas spp. in an intravenous drug user: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logar, Mateja; Lejko-Zupanc, Tatjana

    2013-06-01

    Cellulomonas spp. are often believed to be of low virulence. There are only a few reports of human infections. We report the first case of endocarditis caused by Cellulomonas in an intravenous drug abuser. The diagnosis of infective endocarditis (IE) in this case was definite using the Duke criteria. The course of the disease was complicated with a heart failure and possible mycotic aneurysm in the left leg. After the end of antimicrobial therapy aortic valve replacement was done because of severe heart failure.

  3. Risk Factors of Endocarditis in Patients with Enterococcus faecalis Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders; Lauridsen, Trine K; Arpi, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  The NOVA score is a recently developed diagnostic tool to identify patients with increased risk of infective endocarditis (IE) among patients with Enterococcus faecalis (EF) bacteremia. We aim to validate an adapted version of the NOVA score and to identify risk factors for IE...... in a sensitivity of 97%, specificity of 23%, a negative predictive value of 95% and a positive predictive value of 38%. CONCLUSION:  Monomicrobial EF bacteremia, community acquisition, prosthetic heart valve and male sex are associated with increased risk of IE. In our retrospective cohort, the adapted NOVA score...

  4. Tricuspid endocarditis in hyper-IgE syndrome

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    Gupta S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyper-IgE syndrome is a congenitally acquired primary immune deficiency condition. We report a case of possible hyper-IgE syndrome who presented with multiple cold skin abscesses and chest infection due to Staphylococcus aureus and hyper-IgE findings. Patient also had tricuspid valve acute bacterial endocarditis with purulent pericarditis which is very rare. This case is presented to highlight that early diagnosis and treatment in such cases decreases the mortality and morbidity in phagocytic disorders.

  5. Reconstruction of aorto-mitral continuity with a handmade aorto-mitral bioprosthetic valve for extensive bivalvular endocarditis†

    OpenAIRE

    Tedoriya, Takeo; Hirota, Masanori; Ishikawa, Noboru; Omoto, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Surgical treatment is effective to exclude all infected tissue in patients with infective endocarditis. Although various techniques have been reported, it has remained a great challenge for patients with extensive infected regions. A patient with extensive bivalvular endocarditis including the aortic and mitral valve and aorto-mitral continuity is described. A handmade aorto-mitral bioprosthetic valve was created to reconstruct the defect after extensive debridement. The patient was discharge...

  6. Reconstruction of aorto-mitral continuity with a handmade aorto-mitral bioprosthetic valve for extensive bivalvular endocarditis†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedoriya, Takeo; Hirota, Masanori; Ishikawa, Noboru; Omoto, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment is effective to exclude all infected tissue in patients with infective endocarditis. Although various techniques have been reported, it has remained a great challenge for patients with extensive infected regions. A patient with extensive bivalvular endocarditis including the aortic and mitral valve and aorto-mitral continuity is described. A handmade aorto-mitral bioprosthetic valve was created to reconstruct the defect after extensive debridement. The patient was discharged on the 30th postoperative day without inflammatory signs. PMID:23169876

  7. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 is up-regulated in bacterial endocarditis and binds to components of vegetations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Hanna; Renner, Marcus; Helmke, Burkhard M

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Bacterial endocarditis is a frequent infectious cardiac disease, especially in patients with congenital or acquired heart defects. It is characterized by bacterial colonization of the heart valves and the appearance of vegetations consisting of fibrin, blood cells, and bacteria....... The glycoprotein Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 is a scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein with functions in innate immunity and epithelial differentiation. Because of the aggregating capacity of Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1, we hypothesized that an up-regulation in bacterial endocarditis may...... be linked to the development of vegetations. METHODS: Heart tissue of 19 patients with bacterial endocarditis and 10 controls without bacterial endocarditis was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The effect of human recombinant Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 on erythrocyte aggregation was measured using...

  8. Pacemaker Lead Endocarditis Due to Trichosporon Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Pratap Chandra; Purohit, Bharat Vijay; Agrawal, Binod; Reddy, Krupal; Nutankavala, Lavanya; Narreddy, Suneetha; Reddy, Mallikkarjun; Abu Salim, Md

    2015-04-01

    Pacemaker-related fungal endocarditis is an uncommon and unexpected complication. It is associated with high mortality rates. Due to nonspecific clinical symptoms, negative blood culture and delays in obtaining appropriate imaging studies; late diagnosis is common with fungal endocarditis. Hereby we are reporting a rare case of pacemaker lead endocarditis due to Trichosporon species. In literature we did not find any case of pacemaker-related endocarditis due to Trichosporon species.

  9. A study of infectious endocarditis in Ribeirão Preto, SP - Brazil. Analysis of cases occurring between 1992 and 1997

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    Everaldo Ruiz Jr

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical aspects causes and evolution of infectious endocarditis. METHODS: The patients analyzed were treated at the University Hospital of the Faculdade de Medicina of Ribeirão Preto-USP and had a diagnosis of infectious endocarditis defined by Duke's criteria, which classifies infectious endocarditis as native, prosthetic valve or that occurring in intravenous drug users. RESULTS: One hundred and eighty episodes of infectious endocarditis in 168 patients were observed. Echocardiograms in 132 (73.3% provided a diagnosis of infectious endocarditis in 111 (84% patients; mitral valves were affected in 55 (30.5%, tricuspid valves in 30 (16.6% and the aortic valve in 28 (15.5% patients. Hemocultures were performed in 148 (93.8% episodes of IE. The most commonly isolated infectious organisms were Staphylococcus aureus in 46 (27.2% patients and Streptococcus viridans in 27 (15.9%. Complications occurred in 116 (64.4% patients and 73 (40.5% of the patients died. CONCLUSION: The general profile of the observed infectious endocarditis was similar to that reported in studies performed in other countries and included users of intravenous drugs. The high degree of mortality observed is not compatible with progress in diagnosis and treatment of infectious endocarditis and is probably due to the absence of diagnostic suspicion. The high frequency of fatal cases of septicemia (45.1% of deaths in the patients studied indicates that unnoticed cases of infectious endocarditis had only been diagnosed at necropsy.

  10. A case of culture-negative endocarditis due to Streptococcus tigurinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Hajime; Kakuta, Risako; Yano, Hisakazu; Suzuki, Tomoyuki; Gu, Yoshiaki; Oe, Chihiro; Inomata, Shinya; Aoyagi, Tetsuji; Hatta, Masumitsu; Endo, Shiro; Tokuda, Koichi; Weber, David J; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Saiki, Yoshikatsu; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2015-02-01

    Culture-negative endocarditis remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge despite recent medical advances. Streptococcus tigurinus, a novel member of the Streptococcus mitis group, was first identified in Zurich. S. tigurinus possesses virulence determinants and causes invasive infections. We report a case of culture-negative endocarditis with serious complications due to S. tigurinus, which was identified by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence analysis of excised valve tissue specimens. This technique is useful for identification of the causative microorganism in patients with culture-negative endocarditis and may facilitate early diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial treatment. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental reproduction of endocarditis with Pasteurella gallinarum in mature leghorn chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjahjowati, G; Orr, J P; Chirino-Trejo, M; Mills, J H

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenicity of Pasteurella gallinarum for mature leghorn chickens was investigated by inoculating thirty 52-week-old chickens intravenously with live P. gallinarum. Each chicken was inoculated once daily for 5 days at one of three different dosage levels with either the type strain ATCC 13361 or a field isolate from a chicken with endocarditis. Chickens were necropsied after death or euthanasia. Valvular endocarditis was present in seven chickens given the field isolate and five chickens given the type strain. Other lesions detected were myocarditis, hepatic and splenic infarcts, nephritis, pneumonia, and encephalitis. At necropsy, P. gallinarum was reisolated from hearts, livers, spleens, lungs, kidneys, and blood. Controls injected with sterile broth had no lesions of endocarditis, nor was P. gallinarum isolated from them. The results confirm the pathogenicity of P. gallinarum for the heart valves of mature chickens.

  12. Multiorgan Involvement Confounding the Diagnosis of Bartonella henselae Infective Endocarditis in Children With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette, Christopher P; Joshi, Sarita; Texter, Karen; Jaggi, Preeti

    2017-05-01

    Two children with congenital heart disease status post surgical correction presented with prolonged constitutional symptoms, hepatosplenomegaly and pancytopenia. Concern for malignancy prompted bone marrow biopsies that were without evidence thereof. In case 1, echocardiography identified a multilobulated vegetation on the conduit valve. In case 2, transthoracic, transesophageal and intracardiac echocardiography were performed and were without evidence of cardiac vegetations; however, pulmonic emboli raised concern for infective endocarditis. Both patients underwent surgical resection of the infected material and had histopathologic evidence of infective endocarditis. Further diagnostics identified elevated cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and antiproteinase 3 antibodies in addition to acute kidney injury with crescentic glomerulonephritis on renal biopsy. Serologic evidence of infection with Bartonella henselae was observed in both patients. These 2 cases highlight the potential multiorgan involvement that may confound the diagnosis of culture-negative infective endocarditis caused by B. henselae.

  13. Subacute Staphylococcus epidermidis Bacterial Endocarditis Complicated by Mitral-Aortic Intervalvular Fibrosa Pseudoaneurysm

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    Diane Elegino-Steffens

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The patient is a 75-year-old man with a history significant for hypertension and congestive heart failure who underwent a bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement secondary to acute onset of aortic insufficiency. Cultures of the native valve were positive for Staphylococcus epidermidis sensitive to nafcillin and intravenous cefazolin was initiated. On postoperative day 24, he developed acute decompensated heart failure. A transesophageal echocardiogram demonstrated a structurally abnormal mitral valve with severe regurgitation, anterior and posterior leaflet vegetations, and scallop prolapse. There was also evidence of a mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa pseudoaneurysm (P-MAIF with systolic expansion and flow within the aneurysm. Antibiotic treatment was changed from cefazolin to vancomycin for presumed development of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus. He subsequently underwent a bioprosthetic mitral valve replacement and has restoration of health without sequella. This case highlights the development of a P-MAIF as a rare complication of both aortic or mitral valve replacement and infective endocarditis.

  14. Isolation of Stomatococcus mucilaginosus from drug user with endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudron, P E; Markowitz, S M; Mohanty, L B; Schatzki, P F; Payne, J M

    1987-01-01

    Stomatococcus mucilaginosus was isolated from the blood of a patient with endocarditis and a past history of drug abuse and aortic valve replacement. At autopsy, Gram stain of the aortic valve revealed gram-positive cocci. Our isolate was atypical for S. mucilaginosus in that colonies were nonmucoid and nonadherent to agar surfaces. Cellular capsules were demonstrated by light and electron microscopy. Phenotypic characteristics identified by conventional methods as well as profile numbers obtained by using two commercial identification systems for staphylococci, the API Staph-Ident and the dms Staph Trac, are presented. Practical tests that differentiate S. mucilaginosus from the genera Micrococcus and Staphylococcus include growth on nutrient agar containing salt and lysostaphin susceptibility. Additional tests that helped differentiate our isolate from group D streptococci included hydrolysis of L-pyrrolidonyl-beta-naphthylamide and streptococcal serogrouping. Images PMID:3624435

  15. Infective endocarditis- (a survey of the past 50 years

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    Mehta Ajita

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available Autopsy incidence of infective endocarditis during the past 50 years was analysed to review the changes in the clinico-pathologic pattern if any. 185 cases were recorded in a total of 39931 autopsies giving an average incidence of 0.46%. The cases were classified into groups I, II & III depending upon whether the endocarditis super-vened on normal hearts, diseased hearts or followed surgery, re-spectively. The fifty year period could be divided into three phases on incidence. First phase (1927-41 represented pre-antibiotic era in which group I cases predominated and causative organisms in 801" o f cases were virulent cocci such as staphylococci, haemolytic streptococci and pneumococci. In the second phase (1948-66 the general incidence was reduced by 50%. Group II cases predominat-ed and the most common etiologic agent was streptococcus viridans (40%. In the third phase (1967-76 the general incidence has reached again to preantibiotic level with coagulase positive staphy-lococci, Gram negative bacilli and fungi accounting for 90% of cases. Group III contributed significantly in this phase. The changes in incidence are primarily due to fall and rise in Group I cases. Incidence of rheumatic heart disease with endocar-ditis which mainly forms Group II is declining steadily in post-antibiotic era. There is no shift in the peak age incidence which remains in the 3rd decade. Males with rheumatic heart disease are more prone to infective endocarditis than similarly affected females. There was no change in frequency of involvement of various valves or sites of embolization.

  16. Endocarditis lenta-patient survived septic shock: a case report

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    Amra Macić Džanković

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis is defi ned as an infection of the endocardial surface of the heart. Its intracardiac effects include severe valvular insuffi ciency, which may lead to intractable congestive heart failure and myocardialabscesses. This disease still carries a poor prognosis and a high mortality.A severe case of infective endocarditis with its complications is presented. A man with aortic prosthetic valve due to earlier aortic stenosis and corrected aortal coarctation and implanted pacemaker presentedwith prolonged unexplained fever, malaise, sweating, weight loss (15 kg/4 months and lumbar pain. He was treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics prior IE diagnosis was considered. Echocardiogram showedaortic vegetations and possible periaortal abscess formation. Nonspecifi c infl ammation parameters were high positive. Cultures were constantly negative. His condition had deteriorated suddenly, and he had presentedwith worsening of cutaneous vasculitis, subacute glomerulonephritis and subsequent acute respiratory distress syndrome and septic shock. This patient survived with residual bilateral necrosis of the feet andtoxic peroneal paresis. At the end transthoracic echocardiogram showed enlarged heart chambers, LV mild dilated and concentric hypertrophy with ejection fraction about 40%, degenerative postinfl ammatory mitralvalve changes, mild mitral regurgitation and tricuspid regurgitation, postinfl ammatory aortic root fi brosis and moderate aortic valve stenosis (AVPG max 50,9 mmHg, AVPG mean 24 mmHg with no pericardial effusion. Initial suspicion of Q fever was defi nitely excluded by serological testing showing nonspecifi c IgM positivity,probably rheumatoid factor related.

  17. Pure Motor Aphasia Developed After Cerebral Vasculitis Due To Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Murat Terzi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a complex multisystem disease that may involve the central and peripheral nervous systems. Common clinical findings include seizures, depression, psychosis, aseptic meningitis, headache, cranial and peripheral neuropathies. The incidence of stroke as a neurological involvement in patients with SLE is between 3-20%. Possible reasons for the development of stroke are suggested as hypercoagulability and thrombosis due to antiphospholipid antibodies, cerebral vasculitis, cerebral embolus due to Libman Sacks endocarditis and hypertension due to the disease itself or long term corticosteroid use. We present clinical, laboratory and radiological imaging findings that confirm cerebral vasculitis of a SLE case with the clinical presentation of acute stroke in this study.

  18. Infective endocarditis: call for education of adults with CHD: review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Laura H

    2016-03-01

    Advanced surgical repair procedures have resulted in the increased survival rate to adulthood of patients with CHD. The resulting new chronic conditions population is greater than one million in the United States of America and >1.2 million in Europe. This review describes the risks and effects of infective endocarditis - a systemic infectious process with high morbidity and mortality - on this population and examines the evidence to determine whether greater patient education on recognition of symptoms and preventative measures is warranted. The literature search included the terms "infective endocarditis" and "adult congenital heart disease". Search refinement, the addition of articles cited by included articles, as well as addition of supporting articles, resulted in utilisation of 24 articles. Infective endocarditis, defined by the modified Duke Criteria, occurs at a significantly higher rate in the CHD population due to congenitally or surgically altered cardiac anatomies and placement of prosthetic valves. This literature review returned no studies in the past five years assessing knowledge of the definition, recognition of symptoms, and preventative measures of infective endocarditis in the adult CHD population. Existing data are more than 15 years old and show significant knowledge deficits. Studies have consistently shown the need for improved CHD patient knowledge with regard to infective endocarditis, and there is no recent evidence that these knowledge deficits have decreased. It is important to address and decrease knowledge deficits in order to improve patient outcomes and decrease healthcare utilisation and costs.

  19. Contribution of the Enterococcal Surface Protein Esp to pathogenesis of Enterococcus faecium endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikens, Esther; Singh, Kavindra V.; Jacques-Palaz, Karen D.; van Luit-Asbroek, Miranda; Oostdijk, Evelien A. N.; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Murray, Barbara E.; Willems, Rob J. L.

    2011-01-01

    The enterococcal surface protein Esp, specifically linked to nosocomial Enterococcus faecium, is involved in biofilm formation. To assess the role of Esp in endocarditis, a biofilm-associated infection, an Esp-expressing E. faecium strain (E1162) or its Esp-deficient mutant (E1162Δesp) were inoculated through a catheter into the left ventricle of rats. After 24 hours, less E1162Δesp than E1162 were recovered from heart valve vegetations. In addition, anti-Esp antibodies were detected in Esp-positive E. faecium bacteremia and endocarditis patient sera. In conclusion, Esp contributes to colonization of E. faecium at the heart valves. Furthermore, systemic infection elicits an Esp-specific antibody response in humans. PMID:21911077

  20. Contribution of the enterococcal surface protein Esp to pathogenesis of Enterococcus faecium endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikens, Esther; Singh, Kavindra V; Jacques-Palaz, Karen D; van Luit-Asbroek, Miranda; Oostdijk, Evelien A N; Bonten, Marc J M; Murray, Barbara E; Willems, Rob J L

    2011-12-01

    The enterococcal surface protein Esp, specifically linked to nosocomial Enterococcus faecium, is involved in biofilm formation. To assess the role of Esp in endocarditis, a biofilm-associated infection, an Esp-expressing E. faecium strain (E1162) or its Esp-deficient mutant (E1162Δesp) were inoculated through a catheter into the left ventricle of rats. After 24 h, less E1162Δesp than E1162 were recovered from heart valve vegetations. In addition, anti-Esp antibodies were detected in Esp-positive E. faecium bacteremia and endocarditis patient sera. In conclusion, Esp contributes to colonization of E. faecium at the heart valves. Furthermore, systemic infection elicits an Esp-specific antibody response in humans. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. All rights reserved.

  1. Presence of Coxiella burnetii DNA in inflamed bovine cardiac valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Jørgen S.; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Agger, Jens F.

    2017-01-01

    is relatively common in cattle affected with valvular endocarditis. The role of C. burnetii remains however unknown as lesions did not differ between C. burnetii infected and non-infected cattle and because T. pyogenes-like bacteria were present in the inflamed valves; a bacterium able to induce the observed...

  2. A mycotic pulmonary artery aneurysm associated with candida endocarditis: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Jin Il; Lee, Ji Won; Jeong, Yeon Joo; Song, Seung Hwan [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    We report a case of a mycotic pulmonary aneurysm associated with Candida endocarditis in a 53-year-old male with lymphoma. The initial diagnosis was a pulmonary artery aneurysm attributable to vasculitis, such as that associated with Behcet's disease, but a mycotic pulmonary artery aneurysm was later considered as a differential diagnosis. Identification of valve vegetation on the chest CT was helpful in this regard. We review the literature on the disease etiology, radiological findings, and management options.

  3. Hybrid approach to the management of infective endocarditis complicated by coronary artery embolism: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Amy G; Schutt, Robert C; Greenhouse, David; Stone, James; Sundt, Thoralf M; Sakhuja, Rahul

    2017-06-01

    Septic coronary embolization in a patient with endocarditis is a rare and can be a devastating complication. The management of this clinical problem in the current era may be best served with a multi-modality approach. We present an interesting case of a patient with septic coronary embolization managed with the combined use of aspiration thrombectomy followed by surgical management of the infected valve.

  4. An Unusual Cause of Infective Endocarditis: Proteus mirabilis Bacteremia from an Infected Pressure Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hao Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Proteus species is a common cause of urinary tract and wound infections in humans. We herein present the case of a 71-year-old male who had fever, a new-onset heart murmur, bacteremia, and a vegetation over his native aortic valve in echocardiography. This rare case demonstrated that infective endocarditis could be caused by Proteus mirabilis from an infected pressure ulcer.

  5. The use of a new glycopeptide antibiotic, teicoplanin, in the treatment of bacterial endocarditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, A.; Wilson, A. P.; Williams, A. H.; Treasure, T.; Grüneberg, R. N.

    1987-01-01

    Teicoplanin, a new glycopeptide antibiotic, has been used to treat twelve patients with bacterial endocarditis due to Gram-positive organisms. Teicoplanin has activity against Gram-positive bacteria similar to vancomycin but therapeutic levels are maintained by a single daily dose, given as an intravenous bolus. Of six patients with native valve infections, two cases, due to viridans streptococci, were successfully treated with teicoplanin alone and two others, caused by Streptococcus faecali...

  6. Infective Endocarditis in 60 Years Old Man at Dr. Kariadi Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Ridha Wahyutomo

    2013-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is an infection of the lining of the heart, particularly the cusps of valves characterized by fever and heart murmur, with or without malaise and fatigue. Clinical features can be divided into early manifestations of infection, embolic events, and late complications of sepsis and inflammation. It was reported that 60 years old man was brought to Kariadi hospital with prolong febris as his chief complaint. Patient has history of high grade fever and accompanied by weight...

  7. Left-Sided Endocarditis Associated with Multi-Drug Resistance Acinetobacter Lwoffii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghmeh Moshtaghi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter lwoffii, an important nosocomial pathogen, is a gram-negative aerobic bacillus that is a component of the normal flora on the skin, oropharynx, and perineum of about 20-25% of healthy individuals. We herein present a case of a 66-year-old man with combined mitral and aortic valve endocarditis associated with multi-drug resistance acinetobacter lowffii bacteremia.

  8. Staphylococcal endocarditis in rabbits treated with a low dose of cloxacillin.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorian, V; Zak, O; Kunz, S.; Vaxelaire, J.

    1984-01-01

    Rabbits with established staphylococcal endocarditis, injected twice at an interval of 2 h with either 0.5 mg of cloxacillin per kg or saline, were sacrificed 2.5 h after the second injection. Vegetations were excised, weighed, and cultured, and ultrathin sections were prepared and examined by light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Several affected valves were examined histologically. Concentrations of cloxacillin in serum were determined 1 and 3...

  9. Non-nosocomial healthcare-associated left-sided Pseudomonas aeruginosa endocarditis: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiya, Hideharu; Tanaka, Takeshi; Takimoto, Kohei; Yoshida, Hisao; Yamamoto, Norihisa; Akeda, Yukihiro; Tomono, Kazunori

    2016-08-20

    With the development of invasive medical procedures, an increasing number of healthcare-associated infective endocarditis cases have been reported. In particular, non-nosocomial healthcare-associated infective endocarditis in outpatients with recent medical intervention has been increasingly identified. A 66-year-old man with diabetes mellitus and a recent history of intermittent urethral self-catheterization was admitted due to a high fever. Repeated blood cultures identified Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and transesophageal echocardiography uncovered a new-onset severe aortic regurgitation along with a vegetative valvular structure. The patient underwent emergency aortic valve replacement surgery and was successfully treated with 6 weeks of high-dose meropenem and tobramycin. Historically, most cases of P. aeruginosa endocarditis have occurred in the right side of the heart and in outpatients with a history of intravenous drug abuse. In the case presented, the repeated manipulations of the urethra may have triggered the infection. Our literature review for left-sided P. aeruginosa endocarditis showed that non-nosocomial infection accounted for nearly half of the cases and resulted in fatal outcomes as often as nosocomial cases. A combination therapy with anti-pseudomonal beta-lactams or carbapenems and aminoglycosides may be the preferable treatment. Medical treatment alone may be effective, and surgical treatment should be carefully considered. We presented a rare case of native aortic valve endocarditis caused by P. aeruginosa. This case illustrates the importance of identifying the causative pathogen(s), especially for outpatients with a recent history of medical procedures.

  10. [Infectious endocarditis in drug addicts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasanov, A B

    2006-01-01

    Clinicomorphological features of infectious endocarditis (IE) were studied on autopsy material from chronic drug addicts. Of special interest were morphological changes in the lymphoid organs. The experience of the author and literature data suggest that IE in drug addicts is a manifestation of secondary immunodeficiency syndrome on the background of chronic narcotic intoxication.

  11. Cardiac imaging in infectious endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruun, Niels Eske; Habib, Gilbert; Thuny, Franck; Sogaard, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Infectious endocarditis remains both a diagnostic and a treatment challenge. A positive outcome depends on a rapid diagnosis, accurate risk stratification, and a thorough follow-up. Imaging plays a key role in each of these steps and echocardiography remains the cornerstone of the methods in use. The technique of both transthoracic echocardiography and transoesophageal echocardiography has been markedly improved across the last decades and most recently three-dimensional real-time echocardiography has been introduced in the management of endocarditis patients. Echocardiography depicts structural changes and abnormalities in the heart, but it does not uncover the underlying pathophysiological processes at the cellular or molecular level. This problem is addressed with introduction of new molecular imaging methods as (18)F-fluorodesoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET-CT and single photon emission computed tomography fused with conventional CT (SPECT/CT). Of these methods, (18)F-FDG PET-CT carries the best promise for a future role in endocarditis. But there are distinct limitations with both SPECT/CT and (18)F-FDG PET-CT which should not be neglected. MRI and spiral CT are methods primarily used in the search for extra cardial infectious foci. A flowchart for the use of imaging in both left-sided and right-sided endocarditis is suggested.

  12. Laboratory diagnosis of infective endocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    Auckenthaler, R. W.

    2017-01-01

    The diagnosis of infective endocarditis is based on positive blood cultures. Modern microbiological techniques can isolate the aetiological agent in 90-95% of cases. The rapidity of detection has been improved by inoculation of 10 ml of blood, adequate dilution and media and systematic subcultures. Lysis-centrifugation has yreatly improved the detection of fungi in blood

  13. Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... See also on this site: Diseases of the Mitral Valve Diseases of the Aortic Valve Diseases of the Tricuspid ... most invasive option for the treatment of valve disease. During surgery, ... defects of the mitral valve. Replacement is used to treat any diseased ...

  14. HACEK infective endocarditis: characteristics and outcomes from a large, multi-national cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T Chambers

    Full Text Available The HACEK organisms (Haemophilus species, Aggregatibacter species, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella species are rare causes of infective endocarditis (IE. The objective of this study is to describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with HACEK endocarditis (HE in a large multi-national cohort. Patients hospitalized with definite or possible infective endocarditis by the International Collaboration on Endocarditis Prospective Cohort Study in 64 hospitals from 28 countries were included and characteristics of HE patients compared with IE due to other pathogens. Of 5591 patients enrolled, 77 (1.4% had HE. HE was associated with a younger age (47 vs. 61 years; p<0.001, a higher prevalence of immunologic/vascular manifestations (32% vs. 20%; p<0.008 and stroke (25% vs. 17% p = 0.05 but a lower prevalence of congestive heart failure (15% vs. 30%; p = 0.004, death in-hospital (4% vs. 18%; p = 0.001 or after 1 year follow-up (6% vs. 20%; p = 0.01 than IE due to other pathogens (n = 5514. On multivariable analysis, stroke was associated with mitral valve vegetations (OR 3.60; CI 1.34-9.65; p<0.01 and younger age (OR 0.62; CI 0.49-0.90; p<0.01. The overall outcome of HE was excellent with the in-hospital mortality (4% significantly better than for non-HE (18%; p<0.001. Prosthetic valve endocarditis was more common in HE (35% than non-HE (24%. The outcome of prosthetic valve and native valve HE was excellent whether treated medically or with surgery. Current treatment is very successful for the management of both native valve prosthetic valve HE but further studies are needed to determine why HE has a predilection for younger people and to cause stroke. The small number of patients and observational design limit inferences on treatment strategies. Self selection of study sites limits epidemiological inferences.

  15. Report of a case with polymicrobial endocarditis related to multiresistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocazeybek, Bekir; Ozder, Ayşe; Kucukoglu, Serdar; Kucukates, Emine; Yuksel, Husniye; Olga, Rustem

    2002-01-01

    We present a patient with polymicrobial endocarditis who had been operated on previously for a mycotic aneurysm and was seen at the cardiology clinic because of palpitations related to effort. A transesophageal echocardiogram revealed a 15-mm vegetation on his aortic valve. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Corynebacterium striatum were isolated from the blood cultures. Both strains were multiresistant (susceptible to 3 antibiotics at most) against chemotherapy in vitro. Microbiological eradication was not achieved from blood cultures even after applying antimicrobial therapy with effective antibiotics as determined with an antibiotic susceptibility test. For this reason, the patient underwent valve replacement. He was discharged from hospital in fairly good health. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  16. Valvular Heart Disease in Adults: Management of Prosthetic Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, John F; Hollenberg, Steven M

    2017-06-01

    Patients undergoing cardiac valve replacement may receive mechanical or bioprosthetic valves. Mechanical valves require lifelong anticoagulation but are durable and the need for a second surgery is up to eightfold times less than with bioprosthetic valves. Bioprosthetic valves do not require lifelong anticoagulation and thus are associated with fewer bleeding complications but they are less durable and associated with higher morbidity and mortality rates, particularly in younger patients. Anticoagulation with mechanical valves is achieved using warfarin; use of direct-acting oral anticoagulants is not indicated. Concomitant low-dose aspirin is recommended for patients with mechanical valves and as sole thromboembolism prophylaxis for patients receiving aortic or mitral bioprosthetic valves. If a patient taking warfarin is to undergo a surgical procedure that requires interruption of anticoagulation, bridging therapy with heparin is indicated if the patient has a mechanical aortic valve and any risk of thromboembolism, an older-generation mechanical aortic valve, or a mechanical mitral valve. Warfarin is teratogenic; pregnant women should take heparin. Patients with mechanical or bioprosthetic valves should receive antibiotic prophylaxis before some dental and surgical procedures to prevent endocarditis. Thrombolytic therapy should be considered in patients who develop a thrombus on a valve that does not resolve with heparin. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  17. Quadruple valve replacement with mechanical valves: an 11-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yukun; Gu, Chunhu; Sun, Guocheng; Yu, Shiqiang; Wang, Hongbing; Yi, Dinghua

    2012-06-01

    We performed the first quadruple valve replacement with mechanical valves, combined with the correction of complex congenital heart disease on November 17, 1999. We report here the 11-year follow-up study. A 47-year-old man with subacute rheumatic endocarditis, a ventricular septal defect, and an obstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract required replacement of the aortic, mitral, tricuspid, and pulmonary valves; repair of the ventricular septal defect; and relief of the obstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract. The surgery was done on November 17, 1999, after careful systemic preparation of the patient. Warfarin therapy with a target international normalized ratio (INR) range of 1.5 to 2.0 was used. Follow-up included monitoring the INR, recording the incidences of thromboembolic and bleeding events, electrocardiography, radiography, and echocardiography evaluations. The patient's INR was maintained between 1.5 and 2.0. All 4 mechanical prosthetic heart valves worked well. He is in generally good health without any thromboembolic or bleeding complications. Long-term management is challenging for patients who have experienced quadruple valve replacement with mechanical valves; however, promising results could mean that replacement of all 4 heart valves in 1 operation is feasible in patients with quadruple valve disease, and an INR of 1.5 to 2.0 could be appropriate for Chinese patients with undergoing valve replacement with mechanical valves.

  18. Propionibacterium endocarditis: a case series from the International Collaboration on Endocarditis Merged Database and Prospective Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalani, Tahaniyat; Person, Anna K.; Hedayati, Susan S.; Moore, Laura; Murdoch, David R.; Hoen, Bruno; Peterson, Gail; Shahbaz, Hasan; Raoult, Didier; Miro, Jose M.; Olaison, Lars; Snygg-Martino, Ulrika; Suter, Fredy; Spelman, Dennis; Eykyn, Susannah; Strahilevitz, Jacob; van der Meer, Jan T.; Verhagen, Dominique; Baloch, Khaula; Abrutyn, Elias; Cabell, Christopher H.

    2007-01-01

    Propionibacterium species are occasionally associated with serious systemic infections such as infective endocarditis. In this study, we examined the clinical features, complications and outcome of 15 patients with Propionibacterium endocarditis using the International Collaboration on Endocarditis

  19. Multiple Embolism in a Female Patient with Infective Endocarditis: Low Back Pain and Hematuria as the Initial Clinical Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieira Marcelo Luiz Campos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old female patient with mitral valve prolapse and a previous history of lumbosacral spondyloarthrosis and lumbar disk hernia had an episode of infective endocarditis due to Streptococcus viridans, which evolved with peripheral embolism to the left kidney, spleen, and left iliac artery, and intraventricular cerebral hemorrhage. Her clinical manifestations were low back pain and hematuria, which were initially attributed to an osteoarticular condition. Infective endocarditis is a severe polymorphic disease with multiple clinical manifestations and it should always be included in the differential diagnosis by clinicians.

  20. Are new recommendations on the prevention of infective endocarditis applicable in our environment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović Branislava

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Over half a century ago the process of prevention of infective endocarditis in patients with predisposed cardiac diseases was started. The application of prevention has been based on the fact that infective endocarditis is preceded by bacteraemia, which can be caused by some invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and whose development can be prevented by applying antibiotics before an intervention. According to the latest guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology published this year, prevention is recommended only in high risk patients with previous infective endocarditis, prosthetic valves, cyanotic congenital heart diseases without surgical repair or with residual defects, palliative shunts or conduits, congenital heart diseases with complete repair with prosthetic material up to six months after the procedure (surgery or percutaneous intervention, and when the residual defect persists at the site of implantation of a prosthetic material. In addition, antibiotic prophylaxis is limited to dental procedures with the manipulation of gingival or periapical region of the teeth or perforation of the oral mucosa. Objective. The aim of this testing was to confirm whether these novelties in recommendations were applicable in our environment. Methods. Fifty-seven patients (44 men and 13 women with infective endocarditis were included in the testing. Infective endocarditis was diagnosed in 68% of patients based on two major criteria and in 32% based on one major and three minor criteria. Results. In 54.4% of patients the entry site of infection could be determined. Twenty-one percent of patients developed infection after a dental intervention, 17.5% of patients the infection occurred after a skin/soft tissue lesion, whereas urinary infection preceded infective endocarditis in 14% of patients and bowel diverticulosis was a possible cause in of 1.75% of patients. In all cases with infective endocarditis preceded by the dental

  1. Infective Endocarditis in 60 Years Old Man at Dr. Kariadi Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridha Wahyutomo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis is an infection of the lining of the heart, particularly the cusps of valves characterized by fever and heart murmur, with or without malaise and fatigue. Clinical features can be divided into early manifestations of infection, embolic events, and late complications of sepsis and inflammation. It was reported that 60 years old man was brought to Kariadi hospital with prolong febris as his chief complaint. Patient has history of high grade fever and accompanied by weight loss, 3 kilograms for about 2 months. From physical examination result, in internal ward, we found he looked moderate ill. Heart systolic bruit at triscupidal valve and lungs were within normal limit. The result of blood culture from 3 different sites and throat swab culture were possitive, lead to the performance Streptococcus b haemolyticus’s colonies. From the result of the ASTO, Echocardiography and physical examination show infective endocarditis’s sign. The theraphy was Ceftriaxone 2 gram daily. Having obtained the results of negative cultures, and show an improvement of symptoms, finally the patient was getting improvement clinically and then treat as an outpatient. Patient was programmed to get Ceftriaxone 2 gram daily for 4 weeks. The decision of treatment not only from clinical manifestation but also from microbiology examination on the first admission in emergency unit. Blood culture with 3 bottles, interval 30 minutes is important for infective endocarditis. Furthermore, swab of throat area were taken to confirm for endocarditis cultures too. Finally there is no growth in culture until eighth day hospitalizasition. Spesific method on blood culture sampling is important to confirm the diagnostic of infective endocarditis and very useful for the clinicians to do the right clinical management for it. Subsequently, the role of clinical microbiologist in this case not only to support the clinical diagnostic but also the treatment in

  2. [Left-sided endocarditis due to gram-negative bacilli: epidemiology and clinical characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureddine, Mariam; de la Torre, Javier; Ivanova, Radka; Martínez, Francisco José; Lomas, Jose María; Plata, Antonio; Gálvez, Juan; Reguera, Jose María; Ruiz, Josefa; Hidalgo, Carmen; Luque, Rafael; García-López, María Victoria; de Alarcón, Arístides

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the epidemiological, clinical characteristics, and outcome of patients with left-side endocarditis caused by gram-negative bacteria. Prospective multicenter study of left-sided infective endocarditis reported in the Andalusian Cohort for the Study of Cardiovascular Infections between 1984 and 2008. Among the 961 endocarditis, 24 (2.5%) were caused by gram-negative bacilli. The most common pathogens were Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella enterica. Native valves (85.7%) were mainly affected, most of them with previous valve damage (57%). Comorbidity was greater (90% vs 39%; P=.05) than in endocarditis due to other microorganism, the most frequent being, diabetes, hepatic cirrhosis and neoplasm. A previous manipulation was found in 47.6% of the cases, and 37% were considered hospital-acquired. Renal failure (41%), central nervous system involvement (33%) and ventricular dysfunction (45%) were the most frequent complications. Five cases (21%) required cardiac surgery, mostly due to ventricular dysfunction. More than 50% of cases were treated with aminoglycosides, but this did not lead to a better outcome or prognosis. Mortality (10 patients) was higher than that reported with other microorganisms (41% vs 35%; P=.05). Left-sided endocarditis due to gram-negative bacilli is a rare disease, which affects patients with major morbidities and often with a previous history of hospital manipulations. Cardiac, neurological and renal complications are frequent and associated with a high mortality. The association of aminoglycosides in the antimicrobial treatment did not involve a better outcome or prognosis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Partial oral treatment of endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kasper; Høst, Nis; Bruun, Niels Eske

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for the treatment of left-sided infective endocarditis (IE) recommend 4 to 6 weeks of intravenous antibiotics. Conversion from intravenous to oral antibiotics in clinically stabilized patients could reduce the side effects associated with intravenous treatment and shorten the length...... of hospital stay. Evidence supporting partial oral therapy as an alternative to the routinely recommended continued parenteral therapy is scarce, although observational data suggest that this strategy may be safe and effective....

  4. Cardiac imaging in infectious endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Niels Eske; Habib, Gilbert; Thuny, Franck

    2014-01-01

    and abnormalities in the heart, but it does not uncover the underlying pathophysiological processes at the cellular or molecular level. This problem is addressed with introduction of new molecular imaging methods as (18)F-fluorodesoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET-CT and single photon emission computed tomography fused...... infectious foci. A flowchart for the use of imaging in both left-sided and right-sided endocarditis is suggested....

  5. Concomitant mitral valve surgery with aortic valve replacement: a 21-year experience with a single mechanical prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidhu Pushpinder

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-term survival for combined aortic and mitral valve replacement appears to be determined by the mitral valve prosthesis from our previous studies. This 21-year retrospective study assess long-term outcome and durability of aortic valve replacement (AVR with either concomitant mitral valve replacement (MVR or mitral valve repair (MVrep. We consider only a single mechanical prosthesis. Methods Three hundred and sixteen patients underwent double valve replacement (DVR (n = 273 or AVR+MVrep (n = 43, in the period 1977 to 1997. Follow up of 100% was achieved via telephone questionnaire and review of patients' medical records. Actuarial analysis of long-term survival was determined by Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox regression model was used to evaluate potential predictors of mortality. Results There were seventeen cases (5.4% of early mortality and ninety-six cases of late mortality. Fifteen-year survival was similar in both groups at 44% and 57% for DVR and AVR+MVrep respectively. There were no significant differences in valve related deaths, anticoagulation related complications, or prosthetic valve endocarditis between the groups. There were 6 cases of periprosthetic leak in the DVR group. Sex, pre-operative mitral and aortic valve pathology or previous cardiac surgery did not significantly affect outcome. Conclusion The mitral valve appears to be the determinant of survival following double valve surgery and survival is not significantly influenced by mitral valve repair.

  6. Infective endocarditis in chronic hemodialysis patients: Experience from Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Montasser

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1960s, regular hemodialysis (HD was recognized as a risk factor for the development of infective endocarditis (IE, particularly at vascular access sites. The present report describes our experience at the Etat Major General Agadir, Morocco, of taking care of IE in patients on regular dialysis. A retrospective analysis was made of five cases of IE in patients receiving re-gular HD having arteriovenous fistula as vascular access. They were sent from four private centers and admitted in our formation between January 2004 and March 2009. Infective endocarditis was detected after 34.5 months following initiation of dialysis. The causative organisms included Sta-phylococcus and Enterococcus in two cases each and negative blood culture in one case. A recent history of infection (<3 months of the vascular access was found in three cases. Peripheric embolic phenomena were noted in two cases. A pre-existing heart disease was common and contributed to heart failure. Mortality was frequent due to valvular perforations and congestive heart failure, making the medical treatment alone unsatisfactory. Two patients survived and three of our patients received a prosthetic valve replacement, with a median survival after surgery of 10.3 months/person. The clinical diagnosis of infective endocarditis in regularly dialyzed patients remains difficult, with the presence of vascular calcification as a common risk factor. The vascular catheter infections are the cardinal gateway of pathogenic organisms, which are mainly Staphlococcus. The prognosis is bad and the mortality is significant, whereas medical and surgical treatments are often established in these patients who have many factors of comorbidity.

  7. Heart valve surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valve replacement; Valve repair; Heart valve prosthesis; Mechanical valves; Prosthetic valves ... can relieve your symptoms and prolong your life. Mechanical heart valves do not often fail. However, blood clots can ...

  8. High readmission rate after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibilitz, K L; Berg, S K; Thygesen, Lau Caspar

    2015-01-01

    age (hazard ratio (95% CI): 1.3 (1.0-1.6)), male sex (1.2 (1.0-1.5)), mitral valve surgery (1.3 (1.0-1.6)), and infective endocarditis after surgery (1.8 (1.1-3.0), p: 0.01) predicted readmission, whereas higher age (2.3 (1.0-5.4)), higher comorbidity score (3.2 (1.8-6.0)), and infective endocarditis......BACKGROUND: After heart valve surgery, knowledge on long-term self-reported health status and readmission is lacking. Thus, the optimal strategy for out-patient management after surgery remains unclear. METHODS: Using a nationwide survey with linkage to Danish registers with one year follow-up, we...... included all adults 6-12 months after heart valve surgery irrespective of valve procedure, during Jan-June 2011 (n = 867). Participants completed a questionnaire regarding health-status (n = 742), and answers were compared with age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Readmission rates and mortality were...

  9. Antibiotic prophylaxis in infective endocarditis: Use or abuse?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Thakur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The American Heart Association (AHA recommendations for antimicrobial prophylaxis for infective endocarditis (IE are controversial. According to the new guidelines released by the AHA now, the only patients to receive antibiotics will be those at highest risk, i.e. those with a prosthetic heart valve, a history of endocarditis, certain forms of congenital heart disease or valvulopathy after heart transplantation, and only before certain dental procedures. Unfortunately, these guidelines are still based largely on expert opinion, with very little hard evidence to show that antibiotic therapy actually prevents IE. The Hypothesis: The reported incidence of bacteremia during dental intervention ranges from 10% to 100% and, with daily brushing and flossing, from 20% to 68%. Because bacteremia also occurs during brushing and flossing of teeth, why give prophylaxis just for dental procedures? Moreover, the risks of causing adverse or anaphylactic reactions from antibiotics as well as contributing to the nationwide antibiotic resistance problem are issues not to be taken lightly. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: The hypothesis discusses the AHA recommendations for antimicrobial prophylaxis for IE, indicating some inherent limitations associated with it, and stresses upon the fact that these recommendation should also be updated, if not completely changed, to cope up with the advancements in the proper treatment plan.

  10. Marvelous but Morbid: Infective endocarditis due to Serratia marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadke, Varun K.; Jacob, Jesse T.

    2016-01-01

    A 46-year-old man with HIV infection and active intravenous drug use presented with approximately two weeks of fevers and body aches. On physical examination he was somnolent, had a new systolic murmur, bilateral conjunctival hemorrhages, diffuse petechiae, and left-sided arm weakness. Echocardiography revealed a large mitral valve vegetation and brain imaging demonstrated numerous embolic infarctions. Blood cultures grew Serratia marcescens. Despite aggressive treatment with meropenem the patient died due to intracranial hemorrhage complicated by herniation. Serratia marcescens is an uncommon cause of infective endocarditis. While this disease has historically been associated with intravenous drug use, more recent reports suggest that it is now largely a consequence of opportunistic infections of the chronically ill. Our case highlights several characteristic features of this infection, including isolation of a non-pigmented strain of the organism, an antibiotic susceptibility profile suggestive of AmpC β-lactamase production, and rapid clinical deterioration with multiple embolic complications resulting in death. In this review we discuss the history, epidemiology, and management of endovascular infections due to Serratia spp., emphasizing the continued importance of considering this organism in the differential diagnosis of endocarditis among intravenous drug users and as a potential indication for surgical therapy. PMID:27346925

  11. Resurgery for recurrent heart valve diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-lei REN

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the experience with resurgery for recurrent valvular heart diseases. Methods From June 2004 to June 2015, 28 patients (15 males and 13 females with ages ranging from 44 to 67 years (55.6±6.5 years with recurrent heart valve disease underwent resurgery. The reasons for resurgery included perivalvular leakage (7 cases, bioprosthetic valve decline (6 cases in mitral valve and 3 in tricuspid valve, mechanical prostheses dysfunction (2cases, infective endocarditis after valve replacement (2 cases, restenosis of repaired native valve (1 case, and severe tricuspid insufficiency after left-side valve surgery (7 cases. Resurgery included mitral valve replacement in 18 patients and tricuspid valve replacement in 10. All the patients underwent third or fourth or even fifth cardiac surgery for valve replacement. Results There were 2 hospital deaths with a mortality of 7.1% (2/28. The main causes of early-stage deaths were low cardiac output syndrome. The main postoperative complications were respiratory failure in 3, low cardiac output syndrome in 2, reexploration for bleeding in 2 and serious infectious shock in 1. All the patients were found with the great improvement in heart function and the re-implanted prostheses worked well during follow-up. Conclusions Although resurgery for recurrent heart valve disease poses a continuing challenge to cardiac surgeon, it could be performed with the satisfactory results. The keys to a successful cardiac resurgery include appropriate operational timing, refined surgical technique and reasonable perioperative managements. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.01.11

  12. The epidemiology and outcomes of infective endocarditis in a tertiary care hospital in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Abri, Seif Salem; Zahedi, Faisal Iqbal; Kurup, Padmamohan J; Al-Jardani, Amina K; Beeching, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    We undertook this study to describe the epidemiological and clinical features of infective endocarditis (IE) and to study the complications and management of IE in a tertiary care hospital in Oman. This is a retrospective study of 58 adult patients (>13 years of age) admitted to the Royal Hospital with IE from June 2006 to June 2011. Of the 58 patients, 40 (69%) were males, and 18 (31%) were females (ratio 2.2). The median age was 43.6 years (range: 14-85). Forty-eight cases (82.7%) had native valves, nine patients (15.6%) had prosthetic valves, and one case (1.7%) had a pacemaker. The most commonly involved valves were mitral (33, 56.9%) and aortic (23, 39.7%). The blood cultures were positive in 47 (81%) patients, and the most commonly isolated organisms were Streptococci spp., which were found in 20 (34.5%) patients, and Staphylococci spp., which were found in 19 (32.8%) patients. The complication rate was 21%. A total of 15 (25.9%) patients underwent surgical intervention, and the in-hospital mortality rate was 27.6%. Native-valve IE is the predominant type of endocarditis and is more of an acute disease. The prevalence of Staphylococci spp. IE is similar to that of Streptococci spp. IE, and its associated mortality remains high. Copyright © 2014 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The prevalence of mitral valve prolapse in patients with Down's syndrome: implications for dental management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, M L; Friedman, D; Kastner, T

    1988-10-01

    Eighty-three noninstitutionalized patients with Down's syndrome, aged 9 to 55 years, were randomly selected to receive echocardiograms. Forty-one patients had echocardiographic findings indicative of mitral valve prolapse, and 15 of these patients lacked associated auscultatory findings. Because mitral valve prolapse can predispose patients to bacterial endocarditis after bacteremia-producing dental procedures, these findings suggest that if auscultatory findings alone are used, a significant number of patients with Down's syndrome who are at risk for endocarditis may not be currently identified in the course of routine clinical practice.

  14. [Extensive burns complicated with infective endocarditis and septic pulmonary embolism: case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T S; Qi, Y; Wang, Y; Wang, Y X; Liu, F Y; Dai, L; Xia, G G

    2016-10-12

    Objective: To improve the clinical recognition of infective endocarditis (IE) and septic pulmonary embolism (SPE) in patients with extensive burns. Methods: A case of large area burn complicated with IE and SPE confirmed by blood cultures and echocardiography was described. A literature review was performed with "burn" and "infective endocarditis" as the Chinese key words in Wanfang database; with "burn" and "infective endocarditis" as Mesh terms in PubMed. Results: The patient was a 37-year-old male with large area burn, who presented with fever and hemoptysis. Blood cultures were positive for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Echocardiography disclosed vegetations located in the tricuspid valve. Multiple wedge-shaped lesions were found on chest CT. From January 1978 to December 2015, 26 related articles were retrieved and 134 burned patients complicated with endocarditis were reported, of which, 97 cases were IE and 1 case with SPE. Of the 134 cases, 120 cases were dead, 12 cases cured and 2 cases unknown. The mortality was 89.6%. Conclusions: There was a high mortality of burned patients complicated with IE. SPE should be considered for patients with multiple peripheral nodules in both lungs and a positive blood culture. Combination and prolonged anti-infective therapy may increase the treatment success and reduce the risk of recurrence.

  15. The platelet interactivity phenotype of Streptococcus sanguis influences the course of experimental endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, M C; MacFarlane, G D; Gong, K; Armstrong, N N; Witt, A R; Erickson, P R; Meyer, M W

    1992-01-01

    A strain of Streptococcus sanguis that induced rabbit platelets to aggregate in vitro (Agg+ phenotype) was hypothesized to be a more virulent pathogen than an Agg- strain in experimental endocarditis in rabbits. A left ventricular catheter was implanted, and then an Agg+ or Agg- strain was inoculated intravenously. Vegetations formed on the aortic semilunar valves but were unaffected by the duration of implantation of the catheter. Vegetations enlarged by accumulating platelets and their mass increased directly with the duration of endocarditis. Inoculation of the Agg+ strain consistently caused endocarditis with significantly larger vegetations, a more severe clinical course (including febrile episodes, hematological changes, and signs of myocardial ischemia), more gross lesions in major organs, and greater mortality than inoculation with the Agg- strain, saline, or the Agg+ strain pretreated with monospecific rabbit immunoglobulin G or Fab fragments against its platelet aggregation-associated protein (PAAP; class II). In experimental endocarditis, PAAP expressed by Agg+ S. sanguis appeared to be an important virulence factor. Images PMID:1398992

  16. First Report of Granulicatella sp. Endocarditis in a Kidney Transplant Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Jota de Paula

    Full Text Available Abstract Granulicatella and Abiotrophia are genera of fastidious Gram-positive cocci commensal of the oral, genitourinary, and intestinal flora. We report the first case of infective endocarditis caused by Granulicatella sp. in a kidney transplant recipient. A 67-year-old male kidney transplant recipient was admitted to the hospital for investigation of fever, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. On physical examination, he was dehydrated. Laboratory tests identified impaired renal function (creatinine level of 15.5 mg/dl; reference, 3.0 mg/dl, metabolic acidosis, and electrolyte disturbances. Cryptosporidium sp. was identified as the cause of the diarrhea, and the infection was treated with nitazoxanide. On admission, cultures of blood, urine, and stool samples were negative. Echocardiography results were normal. Despite the antimicrobial treatment, the fever persisted. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed infective endocarditis of the mitral valve, and Granulicatella spp. were isolated in blood cultures. Although the patient was treated with penicillin and amikacin, he evolved to septic shock of pulmonary origin and died. Infective endocarditis caused by Granulicatella sp. should be suspected in cases of culture-negative endocarditis.

  17. A randomised clinical trial of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients treated for infective endocarditis--the CopenHeartIE trial protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Trine Bernholdt; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Sibilitz, Kirstine Lærum

    2012-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is among the most serious infectious diseases in the western world. Treatment requires lengthy hospitalisation, high-dosage antibiotic therapy and possible valve replacement surgery. Despite advances in treatment, the 1-year mortality remains at 20-40%. Studies indicate...

  18. High readmission rates and mental distress after infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Trine Bernholdt; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Thygesen, Lau Caspar

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infective endocarditis (IE) is a severe disease requiring lengthy hospitalisation. Little is known about patients' recovery after IE. The aims of this study in IE patients were; (i) to describe mortality, readmission, self-reported health and rehabilitation up to 1year post-discharge,......-off score of 8. Almost half (47%) had not been offered cardiac rehabilitation (CR). CONCLUSIONS: After IE, mortality and readmission rates were high and self-reported physical and mental health poor. These findings call for changes in in-hospital and post-discharge management....... in a questionnaire survey (responders n=122). Responses were compared with those of a background reference population and a heart valve surgery population. Mortality and readmission data from registers 12months post-discharge were investigated. RESULTS: Patients discharged after treatment for IE had a mortality...

  19. Infective Endocarditis Presenting as Bilateral Orbital Cellulitis: An Unusual Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Talal; Hasan, Badar; Ukani, Rehman; Pauly, Rebecca R

    2017-06-14

    Orbital cellulitis is a severe and sight-threatening infection of orbital tissues posterior to the orbital septum. The most common causes of orbital cellulitis are rhinosinusitis, orbital trauma, and surgery. Infective endocarditis (IE) is a systemic infection that begins on cardiac valves and spreads by means of the bloodstream to peripheral organs. Septic emboli can spread to any organ including the eyes and can cause focal or diffuse ophthalmic infection. Ocular complications of IE classically include Roth's spots, subconjunctival hemorrhages, chorioretinitis, and endophthalmitis. IE as a cause of orbital cellulitis has been described by only one author in the literature. Here, we present a very rare case of bilateral orbital cellulitis caused by IE. Through this case, we aim to create awareness of the potential for serious ocular complications in IE and provide an overview of the management.

  20. Staphylococcus simulans associated with endocarditis in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stępień-Pyśniak, D; Wilczyński, J; Marek, A; Śmiech, A; Kosikowska, U; Hauschild, T

    2017-02-01

    This report suggests a strong association between coagulase-negative Staphylococcus simulans and endocarditis in broiler chickens of a single flock. Clinical signs included increased mortality and lameness, and some dead chickens were found on their backs. Lesions included cauliflower-like, fibrinous vegetative lesions on the left atrioventricular valve; cream-coloured, necrotic foci of varying size in the liver; and necrosis of the femoral head. Histopathological examination of the heart revealed multifocal conglomerates of bacterial colonies attached to the valvular endocardium, threads of fibrin, and inflammatory cells with the presence of heterophils. S. simulans strains were first identified by API ID32, and then confirmed with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry and by partial sequencing of the rpoB and dnaJ genes. These bacteria were resistant to methicillin but sensitive to vancomycin and characterized by slime production and protease activity.

  1. Infective Endocarditis with Uveitis: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Chun Lee

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 51-year-old diabetic male who presented with a complaint of intermittent chills and fever that he had experienced for 10 days. No obvious respiratory tract, genitourinary tract, gastrointestinal tract, or skin lesions were observed. Blood culture data were positive for group B β-streptococcus. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography revealed vegetation in the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve. The patient was diagnosed with infective endocarditis (IE and prescribed a parenteral antibiotic. Three days after admission, the patient complained of progressively blurred vision. Slit lamp examination found fine keratic precipitates and aqueous cells in the anterior chambers in both eyes, implying that the patient had uveitis. He was then prescribed a topical steroid for 4 months, and his vision improved gradually. This case is an important reminder that uveitis, not only endophthalmitis, can occur with IE. Treatment for one condition, if misapplied, may worsen the other.

  2. Predicting the occurrence of embolic events: an analysis of 1456 episodes of infective endocarditis from the Italian Study on Endocarditis (SEI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Embolic events are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with infective endocarditis. We analyzed the database of the prospective cohort study SEI in order to identify factors associated with the occurrence of embolic events and to develop a scoring system for the assessment of the risk of embolism. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 1456 episodes of infective endocarditis from the multicenter study SEI. Predictors of embolism were identified. Risk factors identified at multivariate analysis as predictive of embolism in left-sided endocarditis, were used for the development of a risk score: 1 point was assigned to each risk factor (total risk score range: minimum 0 points; maximum 2 points). Three categories were defined by the score: low (0 points), intermediate (1 point), or high risk (2 points); the probability of embolic events per risk category was calculated for each day on treatment (day 0 through day 30). Results There were 499 episodes of infective endocarditis (34%) that were complicated by ≥ 1 embolic event. Most embolic events occurred early in the clinical course (first week of therapy: 15.5 episodes per 1000 patient days; second week: 3.7 episodes per 1000 patient days). In the total cohort, the factors associated with the occurrence of embolism at multivariate analysis were prosthetic valve localization (odds ratio, 1.84), right-sided endocarditis (odds ratio, 3.93), Staphylococcus aureus etiology (odds ratio, 2.23) and vegetation size ≥ 13 mm (odds ratio, 1.86). In left-sided endocarditis, Staphylococcus aureus etiology (odds ratio, 2.1) and vegetation size ≥ 13 mm (odds ratio, 2.1) were independently associated with embolic events; the 30-day cumulative incidence of embolism varied with risk score category (low risk, 12%; intermediate risk, 25%; high risk, 38%; p endocarditis, a simple scoring system, which combines etiology and vegetation size with time on antimicrobials, might contribute to a

  3. Native valve endocarditis due to Candida parapsilosis in an adult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    glucan test after clearance of candidemia in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Clin Vaccine Immunol 2011;18(3):518-519. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/ · CVI.00513-10]. 11. Kanda H, Kubo K, Hamasaki K, et al. Influence of various hemodialysis membranes on the plasma (1,3)-beta-D-glucan level. Kidney Int 2001 ...

  4. Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: Early Outcome following Medical or Surgical Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Salehi Omran

    2008-12-01

    Results: Thirteen patients with PVE were diagnosed and treated at our center during the study period. In all the cases, mechanical prostheses were utilized. The patients' mean age was 46.9±12.8 years. Women made up 53.8% of all the cases.  Early PVE was detected in 6 (46.2% patients, and late PVE occurred in 7 (53.8 %. Eleven (84.6% patients were treated with intravenous antimicrobial therapy, and the other two (15.4% required surgical removal and replacement of the infected prosthesis in addition to antibiotic therapy. Blood cultures became positive in 46.2% of the patients. Mortality rate was 15.4% (2 patients. Conclusion: It seems that in selected cases with PVE, i.e. in those who remain clinically stable and respond well to antimicrobial therapy, a cure could be achieved by antimicrobial treatment alone with acceptable morbidity and mortality risk.

  5. First Japanese case of infectious endocarditis due to Enterococcus faecalis small-colony variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, Shinji; Saito, Ryoichi; Sawabe, Etsuko; Hagihara, Michio; Tohda, Shuji

    2016-10-01

    A male patient was admitted to our hospital due to infectious endocarditis. He had been treated with levofloxacin for 6 weeks, sulbactam/cefoperazone for 4 weeks, and benzylpenicillin for 2 days prior to valve replacement surgery. Gram-positive cocci, with morphology consistent with γ-Streptococcus, were detected in blood cultures obtained at admission, as well as in vegetation obtained from the aortic valve. However, the strain could not be identified using biochemical methods. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that the culture was a small-colony variant of Enterococcus faecalis. This is the first case in Japan of infectious endocarditis due to E. faecalis small-colony variants. Small-colony variants are subpopulations of bacteria with slow growth, reduced sugar fermentation, and unstable phenotype. As a result, these strains tend to be misidentified. Further, small-colony variants are associated with recurrent and persistent infections such as prosthetic joint infection and infectious endocarditis. These strains are found in various bacterial species, including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but rarely in Enterococcus species. The case highlights the need to be vigilant of E. faecalis small-colony variants, especially in patients who received long-term courses of antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Management of Septic emboli in patients with infectious endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalaei-Andabili, Seyed Hossein; Martin, Tomas; Hess, Phillip; Hoh, Brian; Anderson, Meshka; Klodell, Charles T; Beaver, Thomas M

    2017-05-01

    Septic emboli (SE) associated with infectious endocarditis (IE) can result in splenic abscesses and infectious intracranial aneurysms (IIA). We investigated the impact of SE on patient outcomes following surgery for IE. From January-2000 to October-2015, all patients with surgical IE (n = 437) were evaluated for incidence and management of SE. Overall SE was found in 46/437 (10.52%) patients (n = 17 spleen, 13 brain, and 16 both). No mortality was seen in the brain emboli groups, but in the splenic abscess group the in-hospital mortality was 8.69% (n = 4); and was associated with Age >35 (OR = 2.63, 1.65-4.20) and congestive heart failure (OR = 14.40, 1.23-168.50). Patients with splenic emboli had excellent mid-term outcome following discharge (100% survival at 4-years). Splenic emboli requiring splenectomy was predicted by a >20 mm valve vegetation (OR = 1.37, 1.056-1.77) and WBC >12000 cells/mm (OR = 5.58, 1.2-26.3). No patient with streptococcus-viridians infection had a nonviable spleen (OR = 0.67, 0.53-0.85). Postoperative acute-kidney-injury was higher in the splenectomy group (45.45% vs 9%) (p = 0.027). There were 6 patients with symptomatic IIAs that required coiling/clipping which was associated with age endocarditis patients. Patients with high preoperative WBC level and large valve vegetations require CT imaging of the spleen. Both spleen and brain interventions in the setting of IE can be performed safely with excellent early and mid-term outcomes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Endocarditis due to vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus raffinosus successfully treated with linezolid: case report and review of literature Endocarditis por Enterococcus raffinosus resistente a vancomicina exitosamente tratada con linezolid: caso clínico y revisión de la literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jasovich

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Enterococcus raffinosus is scarcely found in clinical samples and even less frequently as etiologic agent of endocarditis. We are herein presenting one case of mitral prosthetic-valve endocarditis in a 77-y-o male due to a vancomycinresistant Enterococcus raffinosus isolate, successfully treated with 6 weeks of linezolid, and a two-year follow up.Enterococcus raffinosus es una especie poco frecuente en materiales clínicos y menos aún como agente etiológico de endocarditis. En este trabajo se presenta un caso de endocarditis de válvula mitral protésica en un paciente de 77 años debida a Enterococcus raffinosus resistente a vancomicina y que fue exitosamente tratada con linezolid durante 6 semanas, con un seguimiento de 2 años.

  8. Endocarditis in Greenland with special reference to endocarditis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Rasmus Gaarde; Ladefoged, Karin; Kjaergaard, Jens Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the incidence and outcome of infectious endocarditis in Greenland with an emphasis on pneumococcal endocarditis. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective, non-interventional study. METHODS: Review of files and medical history of all patients...... with infectious endocarditis from the Patient Registry in Greenland in the 11-year period 1995-2005. RESULTS: There were 25 cases of endocarditis, giving an incidence rate of 4.0/100,000 per year. Twenty-four percent of these cases were caused by Streptoccous pneumonia, which is significantly more frequent than...... in studies on Caucasian populations, where pneumococcal infection was seen in 1-3% of endocarditis cases. The overall mortality rate was 12%. Pneumococcal endocarditis (PE) had the clinical characteristics of fulminant disease with frequent heart failure, complications and need for surgery. Among cases...

  9. Streptococcus agalactiae endocarditis presenting as acalculous cholecystitis in a previously well woman.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brewer, Linda

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes the unusual presentation of a previously very well woman with Streptococcus agalactiae endocarditis in the emergency department. History, examination and preliminary laboratory and radiological investigations supported a diagnosis of acalculous cholecystitis, for which she was given intravenous broad spectrum antimicrobial therapy. One day following admission, the patient deteriorated and became unresponsive. Subsequent MRI of the brain revealed multiple bihemispheric cerebral emboli and a large, mobile mitral valve thrombus was visualised on her transoesophageal echocardiogram. S agalactiae was cultured from venous blood samples and her antimicrobial cover was adjusted accordingly. Despite her presumed guarded prognosis, this patient made a remarkable recovery. To our knowledge, the association of S agalactiae endocarditis with acalculous cholecystitis has not been previously described.

  10. Healthcare-Associated Infective Endocarditis: a Case Series in a Referral Hospital from 2006 to 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francischetto, Oslan; da Silva, Luciana Almenara Pereira; Senna, Katia Marie Simões e; Vasques, Marcia Regina; Barbosa, Giovanna Ferraiuoli; Weksler, Clara; Ramos, Rosana Grandelle; Golebiovski, Wilma Felix; Lamas, Cristiane da Cruz

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare-associated infective endocarditis (HCA-IE), a severe complication of medical care, shows a growing incidence in literature. Objective To evaluate epidemiology, etiology, risk factors for acquisition, complications, surgical treatment, and outcome of HCA-IE. Methods Observational prospective case series study (2006-2011) in a public hospital in Rio de Janeiro. Results Fifty-three patients with HCA-IE from a total of 151 cases of infective endocarditis (IE) were included. There were 26 (49%) males (mean age of 47 ± 18.7 years), 27 (51%) females (mean age of 42 ± 20.1 years). IE was acute in 37 (70%) cases and subacute in 16 (30%) cases. The mitral valve was affected in 19 (36%) patients and the aortic valve in 12 (36%); prosthetic valves were affected in 23 (43%) patients and native valves in 30 (57%). Deep intravenous access was used in 43 (81%) cases. Negative blood cultures were observed in 11 (21%) patients, Enterococcus faecalis in 10 (19%), Staphylococcus aureus in 9 (17%), and Candida sp. in 7 (13%). Fever was present in 49 (92%) patients, splenomegaly in 12 (23%), new regurgitation murmur in 31 (58%), and elevated C-reactive protein in 44/53 (83%). Echocardiograms showed major criteria in 46 (87%) patients, and 34 (64%) patients were submitted to cardiac surgery. Overall mortality was 17/53 (32%). Conclusion In Brazil HCA-IE affected young subjects. Patients with prosthetic and native valves were affected in a similar proportion, and non-cardiac surgery was an infrequent predisposing factor, whereas intravenous access was a common one. S. aureus was significantly frequent in native valve HCA-IE, and overall mortality was high. PMID:25352503

  11. Low mortality but increasing incidence of Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis in people who inject drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgeirsson, Hilmir; Thalme, Anders; Weiland, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of infective endocarditis in people who inject drugs (PWID). The management of S aureus endocarditis (SAE) in PWID can be problematic. The objective of this retrospective observational study was to assess the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and mortality of S aureus endocarditis (SAE) in PWID in Stockholm, Sweden. The Department of Infectious Diseases at the Karolinska University Hospital serves as a regional referral center for drug users with severe infections. Patients with active intravenous drug use treated for SAE at the department between January 2004 and December 2013 were retrospectively identified. Clinical and microbiological data were obtained from medical records and the diagnosis verified according to the modified Duke criteria. In total, 120 SAE episodes related to intravenous drug use were identified. Its incidence in Stockholm was 0.76/100,000 adult person-years for the entire period, increasing from 0.52/100,000 person-years in 2004 to 2008 to 0.99 in 2009 to 2013 (P = 0.02). The SAE incidence among PWID specifically was 249 (range 153–649) /100,000 person-years. Forty-two (35%) episodes were left-sided, and multiple valves were involved in 26 (22%). Cardiac valve surgery was performed in 10 (8%) episodes, all left-sided. The in-hospital and 1-year mortality rates were 2.5% (3 deaths) and 8.0% (9 deaths), respectively. We noted a high and increasing incidence over time of SAE related to intravenous drug use in Stockholm. The increased incidence partly reflects a rising number of PWID during the study period. The low mortality noted, despite a substantial proportion with left-sided endocarditis, probably in part reflects the quality of care obtained at a large and specialized referral center for drug users with severe infections. PMID:27930590

  12. Technetium 99m-labeled annexin v scintigraphy of platelet activation in vegetations of experimental endocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouzet, F.; Sarda-Mantel, L.; Le Guludec, D. [Nucl Med Serv, Grp Hosp Bichat Claude Bernard, AP-HP, Paris (France); Rouzet, F.; Sarda-Mantel, L.; LeGuludec, D. [Univ Denis Diderot Paris 7, UMR S773, Paris (France); Rouzet, F.; Sarda-Mantel, L.; Le Guludec, D. [INSERM, U773, Paris (France); Hernandez, M.D.; Louedec, L.; Michel, J.B. [Univ Paris 07, CHU Xavier Bichat, INSERM, U698, Paris (France); Hervatin, F. [CEA, DSV, DRM, SHFJ, Orsay (France); Lefort, A.; Fantin, B. [Univ Denis Diderot Paris 7, EA 3964, Paris (France); Duval, X. [Univ Denis Diderot Paris 7, INSERM, CIC 007, Paris (France); Duval, X. [Univ Denis Diderot Paris 7, AP-HP, Grp Hosp Bichat Claude Bernard, Ctr Invest Clin, Paris (France); Hernandez, M.D. [Univ Guadalajara, DeptPathol, Guadalajara 44430, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    Background: The pathophysiology of infective endocarditis involves a pathogen/host tissue interaction, leading to formation of infected thrombotic vegetations. Annexin V is a ligand of phosphatidyl-serines exposed by activated platelets and apoptotic cells. Because vegetations are platelet-fibrin clots in which platelet pro-aggregant activity is enhanced by bacterial colonization, we investigated the ability of annexin V labeled with technetium {sup 99m}Tc ({sup 99m}Tc-ANX) to provide functional imaging of these vegetations in experimental models of infective endocarditis. This ability was assessed in rabbits and rats because of the different interest of these 2 species in preclinical analysis. Methods and Results: Non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis was induced with the use of a catheter left indwelling through the aortic or tricuspid valve, and animals were injected with either a bacterial inoculum or saline. Scintigraphic investigations were performed 5 days later and showed a higher {sup 99m}Tc-ANX uptake by vegetations in infected versus non-infected animals (ratio,1.3 for in vivo acquisitions and 2 for autoradiography; P {<=} 0.0001 for all), whereas no significant uptake was present in controls. Right-sided endocarditis was associated with pulmonary uptake foci corresponding to emboli. Histological analysis of vegetations showed a specific uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-ANX at the interface between circulating blood and vegetation. In parallel, underlying myocardial tissue showed myocyte apoptosis and mucoid degeneration, without extracellular matrix degradation at this stage. Conclusions: {sup 99m}Tc-ANX is suitable for functional imaging of platelet-fibrin vegetations in endocarditis, as well as embolic events. {sup 99m}Tc-ANX uptake reflects mainly platelet activation in the luminal layer of vegetations. This uptake is enhanced by bacterial colonization. (authors)

  13. Edwardsiella tarda Endocarditis Confirmed by Indium-111 White Blood Cell Scan: An Unusual Pathogen and Diagnostic Modality

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    Kayleigh M. Litton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Edwardsiella tarda is a freshwater marine member of the family Enterobacteriaceae which often colonizes fish, lizards, snakes, and turtles but is an infrequent human pathogen. Indium-111- (111In- labeled white blood cell (WBC scintigraphy is an imaging modality which has a wide range of reported sensitivity and specificity (from 60 to 100% and from 68 to 92%, resp. for diagnosing acute and chronic infection. We describe a case of suspected E. tarda prosthetic aortic valve and mitral valve endocarditis with probable vegetations and new mitral regurgitation on transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiograms which was supported with the use of 111In-labeled WBC scintigraphy.

  14. Endocarditis infecciosa activa: 152 casos Active infective endocarditis: 152 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía R. Kazelian

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available La endocarditis infecciosa es una enfermedad de baja incidencia que en las últimas décadas mostró modificaciones respecto de su presentación, posibilidad diagnóstica y tratamiento. A pesar de estos avances, la mortalidad hospitalaria sigue siendo muy elevada. Nuestro objetivo fue analizar las características de los pacientes con endocarditis infecciosa activa y su relación con la mortalidad hospitalaria a lo largo de 16 años. Se realizó un registro prospectivo entre 1994 y 2010 de pacientes ingresados con endocarditis. Se analizaron características clínicas, evolución y tratamiento y se registraron los eventos intrahospitalarios. Ingresaron 152 pacientes, 64.5% varones, edad 45 ± 16 años, las causas más frecuentes de cardiopatía de base fueron: congénita 32 (21% y reumática 20 (13.2%. Los motivos de internación fueron síndrome febril 116 (76.3% e insuficiencia cardíaca 61 (40.1%. Se identificó el agente infeccioso en 106 (69.7% de los casos, el más frecuente fue Streptococcus viridans. El ecocardiograma mostró vegetaciones en 123 (80.9% de los pacientes y 88 (57.8% presentaron complicaciones durante su internación, siendo la más frecuente la insuficiencia cardíaca. Se indicó tratamiento quirúrgico en 96 (63.1% de los casos, fundamentalmente por insuficiencia cardíaca en 66. La mortalidad hospitalaria global fue 46 (30.2%. El desarrollo de complicaciones en la internación, la indicación de cirugía y la presencia de insuficiencia cardíaca refractaria al tratamiento fueron predictores independientes de mortalidad hospitalaria, mientras que la presencia de vegetaciones resultó un predictor independiente de mejor supervivencia. La identificación temprana de estos predictores descriptos podría ayudar a mejorar los resultados.Active infective endocarditis (IE is a disease of low incidence that has showed changes in presentation, diagnosis and treatment options during the past decades. Despite these advances

  15. A multicenter study on experience of 13 tertiary hospitals in Turkey in patients with infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbey, Mehmet Ali; Akdağ, Serkan; Kalkan, Mehmet Emin; Kaya, Mehmet G; Sayın, M Raşit; Karapınar, Hekim; Bulur, Serkan; Ulus, Taner; Akıl, M Ata; Elbey, Hatice Köprü; Akyüz, Abdurrahman

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective multicenter study was to investigate the clinical manifestations, microbiological profile, echocardiographic findings and management strategies of infective endocarditis (IE) in Turkey. The study population consisted of 248 Turkish patients with IE treated at 13 major hospitals in Turkey from 2005 to 2012 retrospectively. All hospitals are tertiary referral centers, which receive patients from surrounding hospitals. Data were collected from the medical files of all patients hospitalized with IE diagnosed according to modified Duke Criteria. One hundred thirty seven of the patients were males. Native valves were involved in 158 patients while in 75 participants there was prosthetic valve endocarditis. Vegetations were detected in 223 patients (89%) and 52 patients had multiple vegetations. Mitral valve was the most common site of vegetation (43%). The most common valvular pathology was mitral regurgitation. The most common predisposing factor was rheumatic valvular disease (28%). Positive culture rate was 65%. Staphylococci were the most frequent causative microorganisms isolated (29%) followed by enterococci (11%). In-hospital mortality rate was 33%. Compared to IE in developed countries younger age, higher prevalence of rheumatic heart disease, more frequent enterococci infection and higher rates of culture negativity were other important aspects of IE epidemiology in Turkey.

  16. Can infectious endocarditis during pregnancy be cured with only drug treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliskan, Serhat; Besli, Feyzullah; Sag, Saim; Gungoren, Fatih; Baran, Ibrahim

    2015-02-27

    During pregnancy, infective endocarditis (IE) is quite rare but has a high mortality rate in terms of the mother and the fetus. In this article, a 24-year-old patient with a history of mitral valve prolapse (MVP) who was hospitalized due to IE and treated successfully is presented. On echocardiography, severe mitral valve prolapse, severe mitral regurgitation, and vegetation on the posterior leaflet of mitral valve were observed. Streptococcus mitis was subsequently isolated from four sets of blood cultures. The patient was diagnosed with IE. After 6 weeks of antibiotic therapy, the patient was cured completely without surgical treatment. At 40-weeks of pregnancy, the patient gave birth via a normal vaginal delivery. There were no problems with the 3,800-gram baby born. In current guidelines, there is very limited advice on treatment options for patients who develop IE during pregnancy. Therefore, evaluation of patient-based treatment options would be appropriate. In addition, IE prophylaxis for MVP is not recommended in current guidelines. However, in MVP patients with mitral regurgitation, prior to procedures associated with a high risk of infective endocarditis, IE prophylaxis may be rational.

  17. Proteus endocarditis in an intravenous drug user.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Rohan; Sekar, Baskar; Payne, Mark N

    2015-11-26

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a life-threatening condition with adverse consequences and increased mortality, despite improvements in treatment options. Diagnosed patients usually require a prolonged course of antibiotics, with up to 40-50% requiring surgery during initial hospital admission. We report a case of a 42-year-old intravenous drug user who presented feeling generally unwell, with lethargy, rigours, confusion and a painful swollen right leg. He was subsequently diagnosed with Proteus mirabilis endocarditis (fulfilling modified Duke criteria for possible IE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT). He was successfully treated with single antibiotic therapy without needing surgical intervention or requiring anticoagulation for his DVT. Proteus endocarditis is extremely uncommon, with a limited number of case reports available in the literature. This case illustrates how blood cultures are invaluable in the diagnosis of IE, especially that due to unusual microorganisms. Our case also highlights how single antibiotic therapy can be effective in treating Proteus endocarditis. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Endocarditis and Presumed Osteomyelitis

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    Marc Romney

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is known to cause infections in humans following exposure to decaying organic matter or animals colonized with the organism, such as swine and fish. Invasive infections with this organism are unusual and are manifested primarily as infective endocarditis. The present report is believed to be the first to report a case of E rhusiopathiae endocarditis and presumptive osteomyelitis. E rhusiopathiae appears to have intrinsic resistance to vancomycin. Because vancomycin is often used empirically for the treatment of endocarditis, rapid differentiation of E rhusiopathiae> from other Gram-positive organisms is critical. In patients with endocarditis caused by a Gram-positive bacillus and epidemiological risk factors for E rhusiopathiae exposure, empirical treatment with vancomycin should be reconsidered.

  19. INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS IN INTRAVENOUS DRUGS ABUSED PATIENT

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    E. Y. Ponomareva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-year observation of acute tricuspid infective endocarditis in intravenous drug abused patient: diagnosis, clinical features, visceral lesions, the possibility of cardiac surgery and conservative treatment, outcome.

  20. INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS IN INTRAVENOUS DRUGS ABUSED PATIENT

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    E. Y. Ponomareva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Three-year observation of acute tricuspid infective endocarditis in intravenous drug abused patient: diagnosis, clinical features, visceral lesions, the possibility of cardiac surgery and conservative treatment, outcome.

  1. Prevention of Infective (Bacterial) Endocarditis: Wallet Card

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AHA guideline. Members of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines and the American Heart Association’s Rheumatic Fever, Endocarditis, ...

  2. Infective Endocarditis in the U.S., 1998–2009: A Nationwide Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, David H.; Woolhandler, Steffie; Nardin, Rachel; Brusch, John; Himmelstein, David U.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies based on local case series estimated the annual incidence of endocarditis in the U.S. at about 4 per 100,000 population. Small-scale studies elsewhere have reported similar incidence rates. However, no nationally-representative population-based studies have verified these estimates. Methods and Findings Using the 1998–2009 Nationwide Inpatient Sample, which provides diagnoses from about 8 million U.S. hospitalizations annually, we examined endocarditis hospitalizations, bacteriology, co-morbidities, outcomes and costs. Hospital admissions for endocarditis rose from 25,511 in 1998 to 38, 976 in 2009 (12.7 per 100,000 population in 2009). The age-adjusted endocarditis admission rate increased 2.4% annually. The proportion of patients with intra-cardiac devices rose from 13.3% to 18.9%, while the share with drug use and/or HIV fell. Mortality remained stable at about 14.5%, as did cardiac valve replacement (9.6%). Other serious complications increased; 13.3% of patients in 2009 suffered a stroke or CNS infection, and 5.5% suffered myocardial infarction. Amongst cases with identified pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus was the most common, increasing from 37.6% in 1998 to 49.3% in 2009, 53.3% of which were MRSA. Streptococci were mentioned in 24.7% of cases, gram-negatives in 5.6% and Candida species in 1.0%. We detected no inflection in hospitalization rates after changes in prophylaxis recommendations in 2007. Mean age rose from 58.6 to 60.8 years; elderly patients suffered higher rates of myocardial infarction and death, but slightly lower rates of Staphylococcus aureus infections and neurologic complications. Our study relied on clinically diagnosed cases of endocarditis that may not meet strict criteria. Moreover, since some patients are discharged and readmitted during a single episode of endocarditis, our hospitalization figures probably slightly overstate the true incidence of this illness. Conclusions Endocarditis is more common in

  3. Infective endocarditis in the U.S., 1998-2009: a nationwide study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H Bor

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies based on local case series estimated the annual incidence of endocarditis in the U.S. at about 4 per 100,000 population. Small-scale studies elsewhere have reported similar incidence rates. However, no nationally-representative population-based studies have verified these estimates. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using the 1998-2009 Nationwide Inpatient Sample, which provides diagnoses from about 8 million U.S. hospitalizations annually, we examined endocarditis hospitalizations, bacteriology, co-morbidities, outcomes and costs. Hospital admissions for endocarditis rose from 25,511 in 1998 to 38, 976 in 2009 (12.7 per 100,000 population in 2009. The age-adjusted endocarditis admission rate increased 2.4% annually. The proportion of patients with intra-cardiac devices rose from 13.3% to 18.9%, while the share with drug use and/or HIV fell. Mortality remained stable at about 14.5%, as did cardiac valve replacement (9.6%. Other serious complications increased; 13.3% of patients in 2009 suffered a stroke or CNS infection, and 5.5% suffered myocardial infarction. Amongst cases with identified pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus was the most common, increasing from 37.6% in 1998 to 49.3% in 2009, 53.3% of which were MRSA. Streptococci were mentioned in 24.7% of cases, gram-negatives in 5.6% and Candida species in 1.0%. We detected no inflection in hospitalization rates after changes in prophylaxis recommendations in 2007. Mean age rose from 58.6 to 60.8 years; elderly patients suffered higher rates of myocardial infarction and death, but slightly lower rates of Staphylococcus aureus infections and neurologic complications. Our study relied on clinically diagnosed cases of endocarditis that may not meet strict criteria. Moreover, since some patients are discharged and readmitted during a single episode of endocarditis, our hospitalization figures probably slightly overstate the true incidence of this illness. CONCLUSIONS: Endocarditis

  4. Phonocardiography-based mitral valve prolapse detection using an artificial neural network

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanović, Vesna; Božić, Ivan; Gavrovska, Ana; Stojić, Vladislava; Jakovljević, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is the most common valve anomaly and the most frequent cause of isolated mitral insufficiency. MVP has a mostly benign course and prognosis in childhood; however, complications, such as severe mitral regurgitation, infectious endocarditis, pulmonary embolism, arrhythmia and sudden death, occur more often in elderly people, demonstrating the need for prompt diagnostics and prevention. Due to its frequent occurrence, failures in diagnosing MVP and the clinical import...

  5. Bilateral Macular Roth Spots as a Manifestation of Subacute Endocarditis

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    Karolina Ceglowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old man presented with a 2-day history of impaired vision in the right eye (OD. The best corrected visual acuity (BCVA (LogMAR was 1.1 for the right eye and 0.0 for the left eye (OS. Fundus examination revealed white-centered hemorrhages resembling Roth spots in both macular regions. The spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT showed intraretinal pseudocysts and hyperreflective deposits in the areas corresponding to the Roth spots. Conducted blood tests revealed elevated D-dimer concentration, increased total number of neutrophils, high C-reactive protein concentration, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Procalcitonin concentration, platelet count, and body temperature were within normal ranges. A blood culture was ordered and yielded Streptococcus mitis and intravenous antibiotics were started immediately. The patient started complaining of chest and left calf pain. The systemic examination revealed infective endocarditis accompanied by bicuspid aortic valve and paravalvular abscess formation. The patient underwent cardiac surgery with mechanical aortic valve implantation. After recovery, the patient’s visual acuities improved fully. Control ophthalmic examination, including SD-OCT, showed no abnormalities.

  6. Endocarditis infecciosa activa: 152 casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía R. Kazelian

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available La endocarditis infecciosa es una enfermedad de baja incidencia que en las últimas décadas mostró modificaciones respecto de su presentación, posibilidad diagnóstica y tratamiento. A pesar de estos avances, la mortalidad hospitalaria sigue siendo muy elevada. Nuestro objetivo fue analizar las características de los pacientes con endocarditis infecciosa activa y su relación con la mortalidad hospitalaria a lo largo de 16 años. Se realizó un registro prospectivo entre 1994 y 2010 de pacientes ingresados con endocarditis. Se analizaron características clínicas, evolución y tratamiento y se registraron los eventos intrahospitalarios. Ingresaron 152 pacientes, 64.5% varones, edad 45 ± 16 años, las causas más frecuentes de cardiopatía de base fueron: congénita 32 (21% y reumática 20 (13.2%. Los motivos de internación fueron síndrome febril 116 (76.3% e insuficiencia cardíaca 61 (40.1%. Se identificó el agente infeccioso en 106 (69.7% de los casos, el más frecuente fue Streptococcus viridans. El ecocardiograma mostró vegetaciones en 123 (80.9% de los pacientes y 88 (57.8% presentaron complicaciones durante su internación, siendo la más frecuente la insuficiencia cardíaca. Se indicó tratamiento quirúrgico en 96 (63.1% de los casos, fundamentalmente por insuficiencia cardíaca en 66. La mortalidad hospitalaria global fue 46 (30.2%. El desarrollo de complicaciones en la internación, la indicación de cirugía y la presencia de insuficiencia cardíaca refractaria al tratamiento fueron predictores independientes de mortalidad hospitalaria, mientras que la presencia de vegetaciones resultó un predictor independiente de mejor supervivencia. La identificación temprana de estos predictores descriptos podría ayudar a mejorar los resultados.

  7. Brucella Endocarditis Caused By Brucella Melitensis

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    Suzan Saçar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease endemically seen in Turkey, which occurs with various clinical findings. It can lead to complications affecting many systems. Endocarditis is an infrequent, but serious complication of brucellosis.The aim of this case presentation is to remind that endocarditis can be a complication of brucellosis and if is undiagnosed or misdiagnosed, progresses fatal in a high rate.

  8. Infective endocarditis and cancer in the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Albéniz, Xabier; Hsu, John; Lipsitch, Marc; Logan, Roger W.; Hernández-Díaz, Sonia; Hernán, Miguel A

    2017-01-01

    Background Little is known about the magnitude of the association between infective endocarditis and cancer, and about the natural history of cancer patients with concomitant diagnosis of infective endocarditis. Methods We used the SEER-Medicare linked database to identify individuals aged 65 years or more diagnosed with colorectal, lung, breast, or prostate cancer, and without any cancer diagnosis (5% random Medicare sample from SEER areas) between 1992–2009. We identified infective endocarditis from the ICD-9 diagnosis of each admission recorded in the Medpar file and its incidence rate 90 days around cancer diagnosis. We also estimated the overall survival and CRC-specific survival after a concomitant diagnosis of infective endocarditis. Results The peri-diagnostic incidence of infective endocarditis was 19.8 cases per 100,000 person-months for CRC, 5.7 cases per 100,000 person-months for lung cancer, 1.9 cases per 100,000 person-months for breast cancer, 4.1 cases per 100,000 person-months for prostate cancer and 2.4 cases per 100,000 person-months for individuals without cancer. Two-year overall survival was 46.4% (95% CI 39.5, 54.5%) for stage I–III CRC patients with concomitant endocarditis and 73.1% (95% CI 72.9, 73.3%) for those without it. Conclusion In this elderly population, the incidence of infective endocarditis around CRC diagnosis was substantially higher than around the diagnosis of lung, breast and prostate cancers. A concomitant diagnosis of infective endocarditis in patients with CRC diagnosis is associated with shorter survival. PMID:26683995

  9. Ampicillin, gentamicin and teicoplanin as antimicrobial therapy for recurrent Streptococcus agalactiae and Enterococcus faecalis endocarditis in an intravenous drug abuser with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calza, Leonardo; Manfredi, Roberto; Marinacci, Ginevra; Fortunato, Lorenza; Chiodo, Francesco

    2003-07-01

    Infective endocarditis associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection occurs almost exclusively in intravenous (i.v.) drug users and usually involves the tricuspid valve, with an increased mortality rate among patients with a severe degree of immunosuppression. The first reported case of recurrent tricuspid endocarditis sustained by Streptococcus agalactiae and Enterococcus faecalis in an i.v. drug addict during HIV infection is presented. Antimicrobial therapy with i.v. ampicillin, gentamicin and teicoplanin led to complete clinical and echocardiographical recovery. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. Bartonella Endocarditis and Pauci-Immune Glomerulonephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, Jillian E.; Raybould, Alison L.; Morales, Megan K.; Zaheer, Misbah; Lipkowitz, Michael S.; Timpone, Joseph G.; Kumar, Princy N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Among culture-negative endocarditis in the United States, Bartonella species are the most common cause, with Bartonella henselae and Bartonella quintana comprising the majority of cases. Kidney manifestations, particularly glomerulonephritis, are common sequelae of infectious endocarditis, with nearly half of all Bartonella patients demonstrating renal involvement. Although a pauci-immune pattern is a frequent finding in infectious endocarditis–associated glomerulonephritis, it is rarely reported in Bartonella endocarditis. Anti–neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) positivity can be seen with many pathogens causing endocarditis and has been previously reported with Bartonella species. In addition, ANCA-associated vasculitis can also present with renal and cardiac involvement, including noninfectious valvular vegetations and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis. Given the overlap in their clinical presentation, it is difficult to differentiate between Bartonella endocarditis and ANCA-associated vasculitis but imperative to do so to guide management decisions. We present a case of ANCA-positive Bartonella endocarditis with associated pauci-immune glomerulonephritis that was successfully treated with medical management alone. PMID:27885316

  11. Scintigraphic detection of acute experimental endocarditis with the technetium-99m labelled glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor antagonist DMP444

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    Oyen, W.J.G.; Boerman, O.C.; Corstens, F.H.M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Brouwers, F.M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Barrett, J.A. [DuPont Pharmaceutical Company, Radiopharmaceutical Division, North Billerica, MA (United States); Verheugt, F.W.A. [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Ruiter, D.J. [Department of Pathology, University Hospital Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meer, J.W.M. van der [Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2000-04-01

    Bacterial endocarditis is an important clinical problem that may result in persistent bacteraemia and irreversible cardiac damage. Since endocarditis is characterized by aggregation of activated platelets, fibrin and bacteria, we studied DMP444, a technetium-99m labelled high-affinity antagonist of the GP IIb/IIIa receptor that is expressed on activated platelets. In seven Beagle dogs (11-15 kg), the left ventricle was catheterized via the right carotid artery. One hour later, 5 x 10{sup 7} colony forming units of Staphylococcus aureus were injected intracardially. Half an hour later, the catheter was removed. Two extra dogs underwent a complete sham procedure. One day after the intervention, five infected and the two non-infected dogs were injected with 37 MBq/kg {sup 99m}Tc-DMP444 and two infected dogs with 37 MBq/kg {sup 99m}Tc-IgG (used as a non-specific control agent) and imaged up to 4 h after injection. Samples were obtained for tissue counting, microbiology and histology. From 1 to 2 h post injection onward, there was clear focal accumulation of DMP444 in the aortic valve region when endocarditis was present, and this accumulation increased with time. The non-infected and the {sup 99m}Tc-IgG injected dogs showed only persisting blood pool activity without any focal abnormality. At 4 h post injection, the in vivo valve-to-blood pool ratios were 1.87{+-}0.18 in endocarditis, 1.01{+-}0.05 in non-infected controls and 1.09{+-}0.02 in {sup 99m}Tc-IgG injected dogs (P<0.05). It is concluded that targeting activated platelets with the {sup 99m}Tc-labelled GP IIb/IIIa antagonist DMP444 allows a final diagnosis of experimental bacterial endocarditis within 4 h owing to high, specific and fast in vivo uptake. (orig.)

  12. Endocarditis trombótica no bacteriana bivalvular asociada a cáncer y ecocardiograma transesofágico Bivalvular non bacterial thrombotic endocarditis associated with cancer and transesophageal echocardiography

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    Marcelo Zylberman

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available La endocarditis trombótica no bacteriana es la causa más frecuente de accidente cerebrovascular isquémico en pacientes con cáncer. En estos pacientes se hallaron vegetaciones valvulares hasta en el 9% de las autopsias. Sin embargo, la afección bivalvular es poco frecuente, observándose en el 9% de las endocarditis trombóticas. Se presenta una paciente con cáncer de ovario que presentó afasia e imágenes compatibles con isquemia cerebral. El ecocardiograma transtorácico fue normal. El ecocardiograma transesofágico evidenció vegetaciones en las válvulas aórtica y mitral. Se enfatiza la importancia de sospechar endocarditis trombótica no bacteriana en enfermos con cáncer y embolismo sistémico y en la escasa frecuencia de afección bivalvular.Non bacterial thrombotic endocarditis is the most frequent cause of ischemic stroke in cancer patients. Up to 9% of autopsies of cancer patients show non infectious valvular masses. However, bivalvular involvement is not frequently occurring in 9% of non bacterial thrombotic endocarditis. We report a patient with ovarian cancer who presented aphasia. The MRI was compatible with cerebral ischemia. The transthoracic echocardiogram was normal and a transesophageal echocardiogram showed vegetations in aortic and mitral valves. We emphasize the importance of suspecting non bacterial thrombotic endocarditis in patients with cancer and systemic embolism and the low frequency of bivalvular involvement.

  13. [Infectious endocarditis complicated with preoperative infectious intracranial aneurysm;report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezure, Masahiko; Kaneko, Tatsuo; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Kimura, Chieri; Okada, Shuichi; Okonogi, Shuichi; Takihara, Hitomi; Naito, Noritsugu

    2015-02-01

    A 44-year-old man was admitted with the diagnosis of active infective endocarditis( IE) due to Streptococcus mitis, complicated with infectious intracranial aneurysm. Preoperative echocardiography showed mobile vegetation on the mitral leaflet, size of which was 20 mm. The magnetic resonance imaging( MRI) demonstrated that the size of aneurysm was increasing, and infectious intracranial aneurysm was treated surgically. Twenty one days after the operation, the mitral valve plasty was performed. He was discharged on foot without any neurological findings. The duration between the brain surgery and the cardiac surgery was thought to be important to prevent the new neurological complication.

  14. Endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that infections in your mouth from poor oral hygiene might increase the risk of germs entering your bloodstream. In addition to brushing and flossing, regular dental exams are an important part of maintaining good oral health. By Mayo Clinic Staff . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms Any ...

  15. Endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bloodstream through: Everyday oral activities. Activities such as brushing your teeth, or other activities that could cause your gums ... of germs entering your bloodstream. In addition to brushing and flossing, regular dental exams are an important part of maintaining good ...

  16. Endocardite por brucelose: relato de caso Brucella endocarditis: case report

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    Desanka Dragosavac

    2007-09-01

    cases can be cured with antibiotic treatment only, with antibiotics such as doxiciclin, rifampicin, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin and tetracycline. We present a case report of a patient with brucellose endocarditis. CASE REPORT: Fifty one year old male patient, a farmer, was admitted with clinical history of fever and weight loss. Echocardiography showed thickening and vegetation on the aortic valve and blood culture was positive for Staphylococcus epidermidis. The treatment with crystal penicillin and garamycin was initiated with no improval during three weeks. Endocarditis caused by human brucellosis was suspected and a new treatment with rifampicin and ciprofloxacin, associated with vancomycin because of the first blood culture, was initiated. Agglutination sorology was positive for brucellosis, with titers of 1:360. The patient got better with new treatment and was dismissed from the intensive care unit clinically stable, taking ciprofloxacin and gentamicin. CONCLUSIONS: Endocarditis caused by human brucellosis is rare; however it should always be considered when conservative antibiotic treatment fails, especially in patients that have contact with animals and dairy products.

  17. Is hyperbaric oxygen or ozone effective in experimental endocarditis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Muhammed Turgut Alper; Vural, Ahmet; Çiçek, Ömer Faruk; Yener, Ali Ümit; Özcan, Sedat; Toman, Hüseyin; Ünver, Ahmet; Saçar, Mustafa

    2016-05-01

    Infective endocarditis, a disease with high mortality and morbidity, is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus; mortality and morbidity further increase in the presence of methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus. Linezolid is the first of the oxazolidinones, a new antibiotic group that has been approved for the treatment of infections caused by gram-positive cocci. Linezolid reduces the quantity of microorganisms in vegetation to some extent; in addition, the use of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) and ozone (O3) therapies is likely to improve targeted antibacterial effect. Fifty-six adult male Wistar rats weighing 300-350 g were used. The subjects were divided into groups as follows: Group 1 (n = 8): control group that was not inoculated with microorganisms and was untreated; Group 2 (n = 8): control group that was inoculated with microorganisms but was untreated; Group 3 (n = 8): linezolid treatment group; Group 4 (n = 8): O3 therapy group; Group 5 (n = 8): HBO therapy group; Group 6 (n = 8): linezolid + O3 therapy group; Group 7 (n = 8): linezolid + HBO therapy group. In terms of reducing the number of colonies in the aortic valve, linezolid + HBO therapy was found to be the most effective treatment. Then, respectively linezolid + O3, linezolid, HBO, and O3 were found to be effective. We found that linezolid significantly reduced the number of bacteria in the vegetation in the experimental endocarditis model, and HBO therapy increases the effectiveness of linezolid and makes this better than O3. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tissue Heart Valve Replacement at BSMMU- Initial Experience with Two Cases

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    Rezwanul Hoque

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Research on prosthesis to replace diseased heart valves began almost simultaneously with mechanical valves which aredurable but with inherent thromboembolic complication requiring life-long anticoagulant therapy and tissue valves whichare more prone to structural failure but free from thromboembolic complication. Tissue valves are more useful in females ofreproductive age desiring a child, male patients older than 60 years of age and female patients over 55 years of age, patientshaving chronic liver disease, history of stroke, bleeding disorder and in presence of infective endocarditis. Gluteraldehydefixation at low pressure with removal of maximal amount of phospholipid have increased the durability of tissue valves inrecent years. Considering the better quality of life with tissue valve the trend is shifting towards using it more frequentlyaround the world. Recently two heart valve replacement operations using bovine perimount pericardial valve were done inthe department of cardiac surgery, BSMMU, one in aortic position another in mitral position, both in females of reproductiveage desiring children.The operations were technically demanding but the outcomes were uneventful. Tissue heart valvereplacement is a safe procedure and can be useful in female of child bearing age desiring children.Key Words: Tissue heart valve replacement; Aortic valve; Mitral valve; Bioprosthetic heart valves; Bovine perimountpericardial valve.DOI: 10.3329/bsmmuj.v3i1.5511BSMMU J 2010; 3(1: 27-30

  19. Treatment of endocarditis due to Proteus species: a literature review.

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    Kalra, Ankur; Cooley, Christine; Tsigrelis, Constantine

    2011-04-01

    Endocarditis due to Proteus species is very rare. We report a case of endocarditis due to Proteus mirabilis that was successfully treated with ampicillin and gentamicin, and review the treatment regimens of previously published cases of Proteus endocarditis. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Abiotrophia spp. and Staphylococcus epidermidis Endocarditis Treated with Daptomycin

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    E. Bishburg

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocarditis due to Abiotrophia spp. occurs in about 5% of endocarditis cases. Most of the cases respond to a combination of penicillin and gentamicin, or vancomycin. We describe a case of Staphylococcus epidermidis (CONS and Abiotrophia spp. endocarditis that failed vancomycin treatment, but responded to daptomycin and rifampin.

  1. Cardiobacterium hominis Endocarditis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Andrew Walkty

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The present case report describes the clinical course of a patient who presented with Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis. A review of the literature follows the case presentation. C hominis, a fastidious Gram-negative bacillus, is a member of the HACEK group of microorganisms (Haemophilus species, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, C hominis, Eikenella corrodens and Kingella kingae. Endocarditis caused by C hominis is uncommon and generally follows a subacute course. Patients may present with constitutional symptoms, symptoms related to valvular destruction or symptoms secondary to embolic events. Diagnosis requires identification of the pathogen from blood or vegetation by either culture or molecular techniques. Blood cultures may require prolonged incubation, highlighting the importance of incubating blood cultures for at least two to three weeks in patients with suspected endocarditis. In the past, C hominis was generally sensitive to penicillin. However, reports of beta-lactamase-producing C hominis have appeared in the literature over the past decade. The current recommendation for first-line treatment is a third-generation cephalosporin (ceftriaxone for four weeks (six weeks if a prosthetic valve is in place.

  2. Physiopathological approach to infective endocarditis in chronic hemodialysis patients: left heart versus right heart involvement.

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    Bentata, Yassamine

    2017-11-01

    Infectious endocarditis (IE), a complication that is both cardiac and infectious, occurs frequently and is associated with a heavy burden of morbidity and mortality in chronic hemodialysis patients (CHD). About 2-6% of chronic hemodialysis patients develop IE and the incidence is 50-60 times higher among CHD patients than in the general population. The left heart is the most frequent location of IE in CHD and the different published series report a prevalence of left valve involvement varying from 80% to 100%. Valvular and perivalvular abnormalities, alteration of the immune system, and bacteremia associated with repeated manipulation of the vascular access, particularly central venous catheters, comprise the main factors explaining the left heart IE in CHD patients. While left-sided IE develops in altered valves in a high-pressure system, right-sided IE on the contrary, generally develops in healthy valves in a low-pressure system. Right-sided IE is rare, with its incidence varying from 0% to 26% depending on the study, and the tricuspid valve is the main location. Might the massive influx of pathogenic and virulent germs via the central venous catheter to the right heart, with the tricuspid being the first contact valve, have a role in the physiopathology of IE in CHD, thus facilitating bacterial adhesion? While the physiopathology of left-sided IE entails multiple and convincing mechanisms, it is not the case for right-sided IE, for which the physiopathological mechanism is only partially understood and remains shrouded in mystery.

  3. [Clinical and morphological aspects of infectious endocarditis].

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    Fedorova, T A; Tazina, S Ia; Kakturskiĭ, L V; Kanareĭtseva, T D; Burtsev, V I; Rusanov, N I; Semenenko, N A

    2014-01-01

    Comparative analysis of anamnestic, clinical, laboratory and instrumental data involved 106 patients with infectious endocarditis treated in S.P. Botkin City Clinical Hospital in 2000-2011 and 92 ones admitted in 1985-1977. The results give evidence of ongoing pathomorphosis of infectious endocarditis as is apparent from the growing number of male patients, increased frequency of primary cases and previous invasive or intravascular manipulations, thromboembolic complications including pulmonary thromboembolism, right heart chamber endocarditis. Over half of the patients are socially unadapted C-peptide level is of diagnostic value for the assessment of inflammation activity, precursors of natriuretic peptide can be used to detect preclinical and clinical stages of cardiac failure related to infectious endocarditis. There is correlation between severity of inflammation and myocardial dysfunction. Early surgical intervention in the absence of effect of combined antibacterial therapy improves prognosis. Morphological studies of inflammation-related changes in myocardium, destruction of cardiomyocytes, dystrophic processes, and fibrosis play an important role in the development of cardiac insufficiency and prognosis of infectious endocarditis.

  4. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of an endocarditis valvularis in a Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus) with pneumonia.

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    Schroff, Sandra; Schmidt, Volker; Kiefer, Ingmar; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Pees, Michael

    2010-12-01

    An 11-yr-old Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus) was presented with a history of respiratory symptoms. Computed tomography and an endoscopic examination of the left lung were performed and revealed severe pneumonia. Microbiologic examination of a tracheal wash sample and an endoscopy-guided sample from the lung confirmed infection with Salmonella enterica ssp. IV, Enterobacter cloacae, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Computed tomographic examination demonstrated a hyperattenuated structure within the heart. Echocardiographic examination revealed a hyperechoic mass at the pulmonic valve as well as a dilated truncus pulmonalis. As therapy for pneumonia was ineffective, the snake was euthanized. Postmortem examination confirmed pneumonia and infective endocarditis of the pulmonic valve caused by septicemia with Salmonella enterica ssp. IV. Focal arteriosclerosis of the pulmonary trunk was also diagnosed. The case presented here demonstrates the possible connection between respiratory and cardiovascular diseases in snakes.

  5. Splenic and kidney infarct: Sequelae of subacute Streptococcus mitis bacterial endocarditis

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    Sushilkumar Satish Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis (IE is caused due to the vegetation on the heart valves, myocardium wall, or the pacemaker leads. Vegetation is a lesion that appears as a consequence of successive deposition of platelets and fibrin on the endothelial surface of the heart. Colonies of microbes can be usually found under the vegetation. Heart valves are involved more frequently as compared to other places. Streptococcus miti s, formerly known as S. mitior, is a commensal of the oral flora, however, if there of loss of integrity of the mucous membrane, the infection may disseminate to the blood flow. We describe here a rare presentation of S. mitis, causing IE and its complications in an immunocompetent patient.

  6. A rare case of aortic sinuses of valsalva fistula to multiple cardiac chambers secondary to periannular aortic abscess formation from underlying Brucella endocarditis

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    Sabzi, Feridoun

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The concomitant presence of abnormal connection from three aortic valsalva sinuses to cardiac chambers is a rare complication of native aortic endocarditis. This case report presents a 37-year-old Iranian female patient who had native aortic valve endocarditis complicated by periannular abscess formation and subsequent perforation to multi-cardiac chambers associated with congestive heart failure and left bundle branch block. Multiple aorto-cavitary fistulas to right atrium, main pulmonary artery, and formation of a pocket over left atrial roof were detected by transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE. She had received a full course of antibiotics therapy in a local hospital and was referred to our center for further surgery. TTE not only detected multiple aorto-cavitary fistulas but also revealed large vegetation in aortic and mitral valve leaflets and also small vegetation in the entrance of fistula to right atrium. However, the tricuspid valve was not involved in infective endocarditis. She underwent open cardiac surgery with double valve replacement with biologic valves and reconstruction of left sinus of valsalva fistula to supra left atrial pocket by pericardial patch repair. The two other fistulas to main pulmonary artery and right atrium were closed via related chambers. The post-operative course was complicated by renal failure and prolonged dependency to ventilator that was managed accordingly with peritoneal dialysis and tracheostomy. The patient was discharged on the 25 day after admission in relatively good condition. The TTE follow-up one year after discharge revealed mild paravalvular leakage in aortic valve position, but the function of mitral valve was normal and no residual fistulas were detected.

  7. Endocarditis infecciosa, experiencia de diez años en un centro de referencia nacional Infectious endocarditis, 10 years of experience in a national reference center

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    Elsa Fleitas Ruisánchez

    2011-12-01

    well as the surgical medical treatment of patients admitted diagnosed with infectious endocarditis to deepen in its study and to contribute to a better treatment for these patients. Methods: twenty four patients from whole country, discharged with the diagnosis of infectious endocarditis. Data were collect from the medical records of the "William Soler" Children Hospital files and from the database of surgery service of heart center. The frequency of different manifestations of infectious endocarditis was determined according to: age groups, risk factors and the more frequent clinical, laboratory and microbiologic data. Also, the predominant valvular take, the etiology and the response to antibiotics were determined. Results: the more involved age group was between 5 and 18 years; the previous heart disease was the more predominant factor; the more frequent symptoms and signs were: fever, anorexia and weight loss. The heart failure and the pulmonary embolism were frequent complications. Most of patients had an accelerated erythrosedimentation and the fourth of cases had negative blood cultures. The aortic and mitral valves were the more involved and the predominant clinical course was the subacute. In almost the half of patients the infection had a nosocomial origin. The more used antimicrobial agents were amikacin, vancomycin and ceftriaxone. Conclusions: the infectious endocarditis is uncommon in our institution occurs more often in relation to congenital heart diseases. The more constant clinical facts were fever and a history of previous heart disease.

  8. [Enterococcal endocarditis: a multicenter study of 76 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Marcos, Francisco Javier; Lomas-Cabezas, José Manuel; Hidalgo-Tenorio, Carmen; de la Torre-Lima, Javier; Plata-Ciézar, Antonio; Reguera-Iglesias, José María; Ruiz-Morales, Josefa; Márquez-Solero, Manuel; Gálvez-Acebal, Juan; de Alarcón-González, Arístides

    2009-12-01

    Although enterococci occupy the third position among microorganisms producing infectious endocarditis (IE) following streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus, few multicenter studies have provided an in-depth analysis of enterococcal IE. Description of the characteristics of 76 cases of enterococcal left-sided infectious endocarditis (LSIE) (native: 59, prosthetic: 17) retrieved from the database of the Cardiovascular Infections Study Group of the Andalusian Society of Infectious Diseases, with emphasis on the comparison with non-enterococcal LSIE. Enterococci were the causal agent in 76 of the 696 episodes of LSIE (11%). Compared with non-enterococcal LSIE, enterococcal LSIE was more commonly seen in patients older than 65 (47.4% vs. 27.6%, P<0.0005), and those with chronic diseases (75% vs. 54.6%, P<0.001), calcified valves (18.6% vs. 10%, P<0.05), and previous urinary (30.3% vs. 2.1%, P<0.00001) or abdominal (10.5% vs. 3.1%, P<0.01) infections, and produced a higher rate of relapses (6.6% vs. 2.3%, P<0.05). Enterococcal LSIE was associated with fewer peripheral vascular or skin manifestations (14.5% vs. 27.1%, P<0.05) and fewer immunological phenomena (10.5% vs. 24%, P<0.01). Among the total of patients with enterococcal LSIE, 36.8% underwent valve surgery during hospitalization. In-hospital mortality was 32.9% for enterococcal LSIE, 9.3% for viridans group streptococci (VGS) LSIE and 48.6% for S. aureus LSIE (enterococci vs VGS: P<0.0001; enterococci vs S. aureus: P=0.02). Enterococcal LSIE patients treated with the combination of a penicillin or vancomycin plus an aminoglycoside (n=60) and those treated with ampicillin plus ceftriaxone (n=6) showed similar in-hospital mortality (26.7% vs 33.3%, P=0.66). High-level resistance to gentamicin was detected in 5 of 38 episodes of enterococcal LSIE (13.1%). Enterococcal LSIE appears in patients with well-defined clinical characteristics, and causes few peripheral vascular or skin manifestations and few immunological

  9. Infective endocarditis complicated by aortic graft infection and osteomyelitis: case report and review of literature

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    Zouein E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Elie Zouein,1 Robert Wetz,1 Neville Mobarakai,1 Samer Hassan,1 Iris Tong21Department of Medicine, Staten Island University Hospital, New York, NY USA; 2Department of Medicine, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Primary aortic graft infection early after aortic graft insertion is well described in the literature. Here, we present a unique case of late aortic graft infection 5 years after insertion secondary to mitral valve endocarditis, resulting from cellulitis in a patient with severe venous varicosities. A 63-year-old male presented for severe low back pain, constipation, and low-grade fever. An abdominal computed tomography scan with oral and intravenous contrast showed a normal spine and urinary tract. Blood and urine cultures, done at the same time, grew Staphylococcus aureus. A transesophageal echocardiogram confirmed the diagnosis of endocarditis. Subsequently, a gallium scan showed increased uptake in the vertebral bodies, aortic graft, left patella, and left ankle. After 3 months of antibiotic therapy, the patient's low back pain resolved with normalization of his laboratory values. He remained free of infection at a 2-year follow-up. We reviewed the literature concerning the atypical presentation of infective endocarditis, with a focus on distant metastases at initial presentation, such as osteomyelitis and aortic graft infection, as well as the different treatment modalities. This report describes successful medical treatment with intravenous followed by oral antibiotics for an infected endovascular graft without any surgical intervention.Keywords: endocarditis, osteomyelitis, aortic graft infection, septic emboli, endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR

  10. FEATURES OF AN INFECTIOUS ENDOCARDITIS IN INJECTION «SALT» ADDICTS

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    M. V. Stolbova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was studying of features of clinic, course, medical tactics and outcomes of infectious endocarditis in 25 patients suffering from “salt” drug addiction. Materials and methods: we examined 25 patients with infectious endocarditis, the host “salt” intravenously. To verify the diagnosis in addition to standard studies of blood, urine, sputum, was performed transthoracic EchoCG, x-ray study of the chest (twice, at admission and before discharge of the patient from the hospital. For certain indications used diagnostic fiber-optic bronchoscopy and computed tomography of the lungs, consulted a neurologist, cardiologist, infectious disease. Results and discussion: 84% of patients diagnosed with HIV. The acute course of the disease and presence of accompanying pathology of organs and systems was observed in the majority of patients, with a predominance of neurological changes (88%. Typical meager cardiac symptoms (noise in the region of the heart were heard in 12% of patients, frequent lung as a result of pulmonary embolism (64%. Identified infectious agents (in most cases Staphylococcus aureus -32%, the defeat of the heart valves according to the EchoCG (in 72% of patients vegetation on tricuspid valve with varying degrees of regurgitation. The choice of antimicrobial medicines was optimized (cephalosporins I-III generation, aminoglycosides, vancomycin. The positive outcome of a disease was observed in 84% of patients, mortality was 16%. Conclusions: for infectious endocarditis injecting a “salt” of the drug revealed the following: acute disease; pronounced General symptoms, atypical clinical picture, involvement of the heart valves, lungs result in pulmonary embolism, early development of multiple organ failure, high mortality. In comparison with injection drug users who inject other drugs, “salt” addicts are characterized by the frequent development of infectious endocarditis, which is apparently

  11. [Subcutaneous teicoplanin for children with infectious endocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, E; Roméo, B; El Samad, Y; Geslin-Lichtenberger, L; Maingourd, Y; Tourneux, P

    2013-07-01

    Infectious endocarditis in children requires prolonged antibiotic therapy. In adults, antibiotics administrated subcutaneously such as teicoplanin are an alternative to intravenous treatment. We report the use of subcutaneous teicoplanin, after an initial antibiotic treatment administrated intravenously, for 2 children treated for infectious endocarditis following an initial cardiac surgery. Serum concentrations of teicoplanin were within the target range after the adaptation in the teicoplanin subcutaneous dosages. The treatment was effective for both cases. No specific side effects related to the treatment were reported. Subcutaneous administration could be used for prolonged antibiotic therapy for the treatment of infectious endocarditis in children, after an initial intravenous treatment. Variability of the bioavailability of antibiotics administrated subcutaneously requires regular testing. Prospective, randomized trials comparing intravenous and subcutaneous administration of teicoplanin should be conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of this treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Endocarditis por Brucella canis: primer caso documentado en un paciente adulto en Argentina Brucella canis endocarditis: first documented case in Argentina

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    Valeria Manias

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Se describe el primer caso documentado de endocarditis por Brucella canis en Argentina. El paciente fue un varón adulto que consultó por edemas en miembros inferiores, registros febriles aislados de 2 meses de evolución y dolor precordial opresivo que irradiaba a brazo izquierdo. Negaba contacto con animales de cría o consumo de productos sin pasteurización. Estudios cardiológicos constataron endocarditis infecciosa. Se resuelve cirugía de recambio valvular ante fracaso terapéutico empírico con cefalotina, ampicilina y gentamicina. Los hemocultivos fueron positivos (4 de 4 muestras con bacilos gram negativos. Se realizó la identificación con técnica API 20 NE (bioMérieux, el método automatizado Phoenix (BD y las pruebas bioquímicas convencionales, sin concluir género ni especie. Se derivó la cepa al departamento de Bacteriología Especial INEI-ANLIS "Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán" donde se identificó al aislamiento como Brucella canis. Se rotó el esquema terapéutico a doxiciclina, rifampicina y trimetoprima-sulfametoxazol con buena evolución. La importancia del caso radica en la posible falla del tratamiento antimicrobiano empírico administrado para endocarditis, ya que B. canis no responde a los antimicrobianos convencionales para esta patología.We herein present the case of an adult male patient who consulted for lower extremity edema, a 2- month history of fever and oppressive chest pain radiating to the left arm. He referred neither contact with breeding animals nor consumption of unpasteurized dairy products. A diagnosis of endocarditis was confirmed by cardiac studies. Since the empirical treatment with cephalotin, ampicillin and gentamicin failed, the patient underwent aortic valve replacement. A total of four blood cultures were positive with a gram-negative rod. Bacterial identification was performed using the API 20 NE technique (bioMerieux, the Phoenix automated method (BD and conventional biochemical tests which were

  13. "Streptococcus milleri" endocarditis caused by Streptococcus anginosus.

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    Woo, Patrick C Y; Tse, Herman; Chan, Kai-ming; Lau, Susanna K P; Fung, Ami M Y; Yip, Kam-tong; Tam, Dorothy M W; Ng, Kenneth H L; Que, Tak-lun; Yuen, Kwok-yung

    2004-02-01

    Unlike other viridans streptococci, members of the "Streptococcus milleri group" are often associated with abscess formation, but are only rare causes of infective endocarditis. Although it has been shown that almost all S. intermedius isolates and most S. constellatus isolates, but only 19% of S. anginosus isolates, were associated with abscess formation, no report has addressed the relative importance of the 3 species of the "S. milleri group" in infective endocarditis. During a 5-year period (April 1997 through March 2002), 6 cases of "S. milleri" endocarditis (out of 377 cases of infective endocarditis), that fulfil the Duke's criteria for the diagnosis of infective endocarditis, were encountered. All 6 "S. milleri" isolates were identified as S. anginosus by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing. Three patients had underlying chronic rheumatic heart disease and 1 was an IV drug abuser. Five had monomicrobial bacteremia, and 1 had polymicrobial (S. anginosus, S. mitis, Granulicatella adiacens, and Slackia exigua) bacteremia. Two patients died. None of the 6 isolates were identified by the Vitek system (GPI) or the API system (20 STREP) at >95% confidence. All 6 isolates were sensitive to penicillin G (MIC 0.008-0.064 microg/mL), cefalothin, erythromycin, clindamycin, and vancomycin. Accurate identification to the species level, by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, in cases of bacteremia caused by members of the "S. milleri group", would have direct implication on the underlying disease process, hence guiding diagnosis and treatment. Infective endocarditis should be actively looked for in cases of monomicrobial S. anginosus bacteremia, especially if the organism is recovered in multiple blood cultures.

  14. Repair of a Mycotic Coronary Artery Aneurysm with an Intact Prosthetic Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Mitsugu; Bell, David; Marshman, David

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 75-year-old man with a mycotic right coronary artery aneurysm without evidence of prosthetic valve endocarditis. Eight years previously he had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery and aortic valve replacement. He presented with methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus septicaemia after a prolonged hospital admission. Further investigation revealed a large mycotic right coronary artery aneurysm prompting urgent surgical repair. This case, of a mycotic coronary artery aneurysm in an atherosclerotic native coronary artery, is an extremely rare entity, which is further complicated by the presence of a prosthetic aortic valve. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Double valve replacement for acute spontaneous left chordal rupture secondary to chronic aortic incompetence

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    McLenachan Jim

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 54 years old male with undiagnosed chronic calcific degenerative aortic valve incompetence presented with acute left anterior chordae tendinae rupture resulting in severe left heart failure and cardiogenic shock. He was successfully treated with emergency double valve replacement using mechanical valves. The pathogenesis of acute rupture of the anterior chordae tendinae, without any evidence of infective endocarditis or ischemic heart disease seems to have been attrition of the subvalvular mitral apparatus by the chronic regurgitant jet of aortic incompetence with chronic volume overload. We review the literature with specific focus on the occurrence of this unusual event.

  16. Timing for Pacing after Acquired Conduction Disease in the Setting of Endocarditis

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    Daniel Brancheau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 53-year-old gentleman with a history of a mechanical aortic valve presented to the emergency department complaining of a sudden right-sided abdominal pain. He was found to have atrioventricular dissociation on his initial electrocardiogram and his blood cultures grew Streptococcus viridans. The suspicion for endocarditis with periaortic abscess was high so a transthoracic echocardiogram was performed and showed a mass in the left ventricular outflow tract. For better visualization, a transesophageal echocardiogram was recommended and revealed a bileaflet mechanical aortic valve with perivalvular abscess and valvular vegetation as well as severe eccentric paravalvular aortic regurgitation. After sterilization, the patient underwent a successful surgery. Postoperatively, he remained in complete heart block and a permanent pacemaker placement was performed after complete sterilization. He tolerated the procedure well and was discharged home in a stable condition. Perivalvular abscess is one of the most common cardiac complications of infective endocarditis and is associated with an increased risk of mortality. It is imperative to have appropriate treatment guidelines established. However, because of the relative nature of the disease process and the acuity at which intervention needs to be done, a true assessment of the duration of antibiotic therapy prior to surgical intervention, timing of pacemaker placement, and the type of pacemaker is controversial.

  17. Gerbode defect following endocarditis and misinterpreted as severe pulmonary arterial hypertension

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    Allajbeu Iris

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A Gerbode -type defect is a ventricular septal defect communicating directly between the left ventricle and right atrium. It is usually congenital, but rarely is acquired, as a complication of endocarditis. This can be anatomically possible because the normal tricuspid valve is more apically displaced than the mitral valve. However, identification of an actual communication is often extremely difficult, so a careful and meticulous echocardiogram should be done in order to prevent echocardiographic misinterpretation of this defect as pulmonary arterial hypertension. The large systolic pressure gradient between the left ventricle and the right atrium would expectedly result in a high velocity systolic Doppler flow signal in right atrium and it can be sometimes mistakably diagnosed as tricuspid regurgitant jet simulating pulmonary arterial hypertension. We present a rare case of young woman, with endocarditis who presented with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. The preoperative diagnosis of left ventricle to right atrial communication (acquired Gerbode defect was suspected initially by echocardiogram and confirmed at the time of the surgery. A point of interest, apart from the diagnostic problem, was the explanation for its mechanism and presentation. The probability of a bacterial etiology of the defect is high in this case.

  18. Gerbode defect following endocarditis and misinterpreted as severe pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xhabija, Nereida; Prifti, Edvin; Allajbeu, Iris; Sula, Fatmir

    2010-09-30

    A Gerbode-type defect is a ventricular septal defect communicating directly between the left ventricle and right atrium. It is usually congenital, but rarely is acquired, as a complication of endocarditis. This can be anatomically possible because the normal tricuspid valve is more apically displaced than the mitral valve. However, identification of an actual communication is often extremely difficult, so a careful and meticulous echocardiogram should be done in order to prevent echocardiographic misinterpretation of this defect as pulmonary arterial hypertension. The large systolic pressure gradient between the left ventricle and the right atrium would expectedly result in a high velocity systolic Doppler flow signal in right atrium and it can be sometimes mistakably diagnosed as tricuspid regurgitant jet simulating pulmonary arterial hypertension. We present a rare case of young woman, with endocarditis who presented with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. The preoperative diagnosis of left ventricle to right atrial communication (acquired Gerbode defect) was suspected initially by echocardiogram and confirmed at the time of the surgery. A point of interest, apart from the diagnostic problem, was the explanation for its mechanism and presentation. The probability of a bacterial etiology of the defect is high in this case.

  19. Genome-wide Screening Identifies Phosphotransferase System Permease BepA to Be Involved in Enterococcus faecium Endocarditis and Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Fernanda L; Huebner, Johannes; Singh, Kavindra V; Zhang, Xinglin; van Schaik, Willem; Wobser, Dominique; Braat, Johanna C; Murray, Barbara E; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L; Leavis, Helen L

    2016-07-15

    Enterococcus faecium is a common cause of nosocomial infections, of which infective endocarditis is associated with substantial mortality. In this study, we used a microarray-based transposon mapping (M-TraM) approach to evaluate a rat endocarditis model and identified a gene, originally annotated as "fruA" and renamed "bepA," putatively encoding a carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) permease (biofilm and endocarditis-associated permease A [BepA]), as important in infective endocarditis. This gene is highly enriched in E. faecium clinical isolates and absent in commensal isolates that are not associated with infection. Confirmation of the phenotype was established in a competition experiment of wild-type and a markerless bepA mutant in a rat endocarditis model. In addition, deletion of bepA impaired biofilm formation in vitro in the presence of 100% human serum and metabolism of β-methyl-D-glucoside. β-glucoside metabolism has been linked to the metabolism of glycosaminoglycans that are exposed on injured heart valves, where bacteria attach and form vegetations. Therefore, we propose that the PTS permease BepA is directly implicated in E. faecium pathogenesis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Variables predictoras de embolias en endocarditis infecciosa Embolism predictors of infective endocarditis

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    Alberto R. Cremona

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available El evento embólico (EE aumenta la morbi-mortalidad de la endocarditis infecciosa (EI. La prevalencia de EE oscila entre 22% y 50%, pudiendo ocasionar hasta el 25% de las muertes de los pacientes que lo presentan. El EE puede ocurrir previamente al diagnóstico, durante el tratamiento o bien posteriormente al mismo. Nuestro objetivo fue analizar las características demográficas, clínicas, microbiológicas, ecocardiográficas y terapeúticas, de pacientes con EI (con y sin embolias para tratar de establecer variables predictoras del EE. Se realizó en el Hospital Italiano de La Plata, desde marzo de 1996 hasta diciembre de 2004, un estudio descriptivo observacional de una cohorte de pacientes con diagnóstico de EI. Se analizaron en forma retrospectiva 53 pacientes con EI (35 sin EE y 18 con EE. La presencia de vegetación (en el ecocardiograma transtorácico (ETT y/o en el transesofágico (ETE al momento del diagnóstico, el tamaño ³ 10 mm y el compromiso de la válvula mitral nativa, fueron las variables en las que existió una asociación estadísticamente significativa con el EE para ser consideradas como predictoras. El tamaño ³ 10 mm fue la única variable asociada a EE en el análisis de regresión logística. Durante el tratamiento antibiótico electivo hubo una reducción de EE, no observándose a partir de la segunda semana.The embolic event (EE increases the morbidity and mortality of infective endocarditis (IE. Prevalence of EE ranges between 22% and 50%, death rates being up to 25% of patients. EE may occur prior to diagnosis, during treatment or afterwards. The objective of this study was to evaluate the demographic, clinical, microbiological, echocardiographic and therapeutic characteristics in patients suffering from IE (with or without emboli in order to determine predictors for EE. A descriptive study based on observations of patient population diagnosed with IE was conducted at the Hospital Italiano of La Plata during

  1. Piezoelectric valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Serhiy Fedorovich

    2013-01-15

    A motorized valve has a housing having an inlet and an outlet to be connected to a pipeline, a saddle connected with the housing, a turn plug having a rod, the turn plug cooperating with the saddle, and a drive for turning the valve body and formed as a piezoelectric drive, the piezoelectric drive including a piezoelectric generator of radially directed standing acoustic waves, which is connected with the housing and is connectable with a pulse current source, and a rotor operatively connected with the piezoelectric generator and kinematically connected with the rod of the turn plug so as to turn the turn plug when the rotor is actuated by the piezoelectric generator.

  2. Cytokine Signature in Infective Endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Izabella Rodrigues; Ferrari, Teresa Cristina Abreu; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Rodrigues, Luan Vieira; Guimarães Júnior, Milton Henriques; Barros, Thais Lins Souza; Gelape, Cláudio Léo; Sousa, Giovane Rodrigo; Nunes, Maria Carmo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a severe disease with high mortality rate. Cytokines participate in its pathogenesis and may contribute to early diagnosis improving the outcome. This study aimed to evaluate the cytokine profile in IE. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured by cytometric bead array (CBA) at diagnosis in 81 IE patients, and compared with 34 healthy subjects and 30 patients with non-IE infections, matched to the IE patients by age and gender. Mean age of the IE patients was 47±17 years (range, 15–80 years), and 40 (50%) were male. The IE patients had significantly higher serum concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α as compared to the healthy individuals. The median levels of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 were higher in the IE than in the non-IE infections group. TNF-α and IL-12 levels were higher in staphylococcal IE than in the non-staphylococcal IE subgroup. There was a higher proportion of both low IL-10 producers and high producers of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 in the staphylococcal IE than in the non-staphylococcal IE subgroup. This study reinforces a relationship between the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, especially IL-1β, IL-12 and TNF-α, and the pathogenesis of IE. A lower production of IL-10 and impairment in cytokine network may reflect the severity of IE and may be useful for risk stratification. PMID:26225421

  3. Not So EASE-Y: How Often do Hospitalized Infective Endocarditis Patients Meet Criteria for Early Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin Kashef, Mohammad; Atreya, Auras R; Hernandez-Montfort, Jaime; Frideric, Jennifer; Lagu, Tara

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) has historically caused significant morbidity and mortality. Valve surgery reduces systemic embolization and mortality, but the optimal timing is controversial. The EASE (Early Surgery Versus Conventional Treatment for Infective Endocarditis) trial, which employed strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, showed that early surgery could reduce the risk of embolic events for a subset of patients. The aim of the present study was to determine the proportion of adult IE patients seen in usual clinical practice at a single tertiary medical center that would meet EASE enrollment criteria. Over a four-year period, only 10 of 88 patients (11.3%) were found to meet EASE enrollment criteria. These results have important research implications, and highlight the differences between populations of patients used in clinical trials and patients seen in practice.

  4. Acceleration of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm formation by aggregation substance expression in an ex vivo model of cardiac valve colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia N Chuang-Smith

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Infectious endocarditis involves formation of a microbial biofilm in vivo. Enterococcus faecalis Aggregation Substance (Asc10 protein enhances the severity of experimental endocarditis, where it has been implicated in formation of large vegetations and in microbial persistence during infection. In the current study, we developed an ex vivo porcine heart valve adherence model to study the initial interactions between Asc10(+ and Asc10(-E. faecalis and valve tissue, and to examine formation of E. faecalis biofilms on a relevant tissue surface. Scanning electron microscopy of the infected valve tissue provided evidence for biofilm formation, including growing masses of bacterial cells and the increasing presence of exopolymeric matrix over time; accumulation of adherent biofilm populations on the cardiac valve surfaces during the first 2-4 h of incubation was over 10-fold higher than was observed on abiotic membranes incubated in the same culture medium. Asc10 expression accelerated biofilm formation via aggregation between E. faecalis cells; the results also suggested that in vivo adherence to host tissue and biofilm development by E. faecalis can proceed by Asc10-dependent or Asc10-independent pathways. Mutations in either of two Asc10 subdomains previously implicated in endocarditis virulence reduced levels of adherent bacterial populations in the ex vivo system. Interference with the molecular interactions involved in adherence and initiation of biofilm development in vivo with specific inhibitory compounds could lead to more effective treatment of infectious endocarditis.

  5. The diagnosis of microorganism involved in infective endocarditis (IE) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Reza; Behjati-Ardakani, Mostafa; Moshtaghioun, Seyed Mohammad; Kalantar, Seyed Mehdi; Namayandeh, Seyedeh Mahdieh; Soltani, Mohammadhossien; Emami, Mahmood; Zandi, Hengameh; Firoozabadi, Ali Dehghani; Kazeminasab, Mahmood; Ahmadi, Nastaran; Sarebanhassanabadi, Mohammadtaghi

    2018-02-01

    Broad-range bacterial rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by sequencing may be identified as the etiology of infective endocarditis (IE) from surgically removed valve tissue; therefore, we reviewed the value of molecular testing in identifying organisms' DNA in the studies conducted until 2016. We searched Google Scholar, Scopus, ScienceDirect, Cochrane, PubMed, and Medline electronic databases without any time limitations up to December 2016 for English studies reporting microorganisms involved in infective endocarditis microbiology using PCR and real-time PCR. Most studies were prospective. Eleven out of 12 studies used valve tissue samples and blood cultures while only 1 study used whole blood. Also, 10 studies used the molecular method of PCR while 2 studies used real-time PCR. Most studies used 16S rDNA gene as the target gene. The bacteria were identified as the most common microorganisms involved in infective endocarditis. Streptococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp. were, by far, the most predominant bacteria detected. In all studies, PCR and real-time PCR identified more pathogens than blood and tissue cultures; moreover, the sensitivity and specificity of PCR and real-time PCR were more than cultures in most of the studies. The highest sensitivity and specificity were 96% and 100%, respectively. The gram positive bacteria were the most frequent cause of infective endocarditis. The molecular methods enjoy a greater sensitivity compared to the conventional blood culture methods; yet, they are applicable only to the valve tissue of the patients undergoing cardiac valve surgery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  6. Serological diagnosis of experimental Enterococcus faecalis endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerulf, A; Espersen, F; Gutschik, E

    1998-01-01

    A modified rat model of endocarditis with catheterization for 2 days was established in female Lewis rats using different inocula of Enterococcus faecalis (strain no. EF 19) in order to measure IgG antibodies in serum during the course of infection. Increasing the inocula intravenously resulted...

  7. Blood Culture-Negative Endocarditis, Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudebouch, Najma; Sarih, M'hammed; Chakib, Abdelfattah; Fadili, Salma; Boumzebra, Drissi; Zouizra, Zahira; Mahadji, Badie Azamane; Amarouch, Hamid; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2017-11-01

    We investigated the microorganisms causing blood culture-negative endocarditis (BCNE) in Morocco. We tested 19 patients with BCNE by serologic methods, molecular methods, or both and identified Bartonella quintana, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus equi, and Streptococcus oralis in 4 patients. These results highlight the role of these zoonotic agents in BCNE in Morocco.

  8. Return to the workforce following infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butt, Jawad H.; Kragholm, Kristian; Dalager-Pedersen, Michael

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ability to return to work after infective endocarditis (IE) holds important socioeconomic consequences for both patients and society, yet data on this issue are sparse. We examined return to the workforce and associated factors in IE patients of working age. METHODS: Using Danish ...

  9. Valve's Way

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Dobrajska, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    to what extent it represents a new blueprint for organization design, despite it being consistent with an “egalitarian Zeitgeist” (Puranam, 2014). In fact, managerial authority may be of increasing importance rather than the opposite (Guadalupe, Li, & Wulf, 2015). Thus, Valve is, and will remain...

  10. Vacuum Valve

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    This valve was used in the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) to protect against the shock waves that would be caused if air were to enter the vacuum tube. Some of the ISR chambers were very fragile, with very thin walls - a design required by physicists on the lookout for new particles.

  11. Infective endocarditis in chronic hemodialysis: A transition from left heart to right heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Bentata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis (IE of the left heart is the most frequent type of IE in chronic hemodialysis (CHD (in 90% of cases whereas involvement of the right heart is rare. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical, biological, and echocardiographic characteristics, as well as the prognosis of IE in CHD. This is a retrospective study conducted at the Center of Nephrology and Hemodialysis in Oujda, Morocco. Over a period of 56 months, we compiled data on a series of 11 CHD patients with IE. Their mean age was 40.5 ± 14 years, 72% were male and 27.3% had diabetes. All patients had native valve. All patients had bacteremia preceding the episode of IE. The tricuspid valve was the site of IE in 45% of the cases. Cardiac complications were observed in 72% of the patients and mortality was observed in 72% of cases. The period from IE diagnosis to death was 9 ± 6 days. In our study, the tricuspid valve was the most affected valve of IE in CHD.

  12. Bartonella henselae endocarditis in Laos - 'the unsought will go undetected'.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayaphet Rattanavong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Both endocarditis and Bartonella infections are neglected public health problems, especially in rural Asia. Bartonella endocarditis has been described from wealthier countries in Asia, Japan, Korea, Thailand and India but there are no reports from poorer countries, such as the Lao PDR (Laos, probably because people have neglected to look.We conducted a retrospective (2006-2012, and subsequent prospective study (2012-2013, at Mahosot Hospital, Vientiane, Laos, through liaison between the microbiology laboratory and the wards. Patients aged >1 year admitted with definite or possible endocarditis according to modified Duke criteria were included. In view of the strong suspicion of infective endocarditis, acute and convalescent sera from 30 patients with culture negative endocarditis were tested for antibodies to Brucella melitensis, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Bartonella quintana, B. henselae, Coxiella burnetii and Legionella pneumophila. Western blot analysis using Bartonella species antigens enabled us to describe the first two Lao patients with known Bartonella henselae endocarditis.We argue that it is likely that Bartonella endocarditis is neglected and more widespread than appreciated, as there are few laboratories in Asia able to make the diagnosis. Considering the high prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in Asia, there is remarkably little evidence on the bacterial etiology of endocarditis. Most evidence is derived from wealthy countries and investigation of the aetiology and optimal management of endocarditis in low income countries has been neglected. Interest in Bartonella as neglected pathogens is emerging, and improved methods for the rapid diagnosis of Bartonella endocarditis are needed, as it is likely that proven Bartonella endocarditis can be treated with simpler and less expensive regimens than "conventional" endocarditis and multicenter trials to optimize treatment are required. More understanding is needed on the risk factors for

  13. Bartonella henselae endocarditis in Laos - 'the unsought will go undetected'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanavong, Sayaphet; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Chu, Vang; Frichitthavong, Khamthavy; Kesone, Pany; Mayxay, Mayfong; Mirabel, Mariana; Newton, Paul N

    2014-12-01

    Both endocarditis and Bartonella infections are neglected public health problems, especially in rural Asia. Bartonella endocarditis has been described from wealthier countries in Asia, Japan, Korea, Thailand and India but there are no reports from poorer countries, such as the Lao PDR (Laos), probably because people have neglected to look. We conducted a retrospective (2006-2012), and subsequent prospective study (2012-2013), at Mahosot Hospital, Vientiane, Laos, through liaison between the microbiology laboratory and the wards. Patients aged >1 year admitted with definite or possible endocarditis according to modified Duke criteria were included. In view of the strong suspicion of infective endocarditis, acute and convalescent sera from 30 patients with culture negative endocarditis were tested for antibodies to Brucella melitensis, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Bartonella quintana, B. henselae, Coxiella burnetii and Legionella pneumophila. Western blot analysis using Bartonella species antigens enabled us to describe the first two Lao patients with known Bartonella henselae endocarditis. We argue that it is likely that Bartonella endocarditis is neglected and more widespread than appreciated, as there are few laboratories in Asia able to make the diagnosis. Considering the high prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in Asia, there is remarkably little evidence on the bacterial etiology of endocarditis. Most evidence is derived from wealthy countries and investigation of the aetiology and optimal management of endocarditis in low income countries has been neglected. Interest in Bartonella as neglected pathogens is emerging, and improved methods for the rapid diagnosis of Bartonella endocarditis are needed, as it is likely that proven Bartonella endocarditis can be treated with simpler and less expensive regimens than "conventional" endocarditis and multicenter trials to optimize treatment are required. More understanding is needed on the risk factors for Bartonella

  14. Successful repair for a giant coronary artery aneurysm with coronary arteriovenous fistula complicated by both right- and left-sided infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezu, Kentaro; Hanayama, Naoji; Toyama, Akihiko; Hobo, Kyoko; Takazawa, Arifumi

    2009-10-01

    We report a rare case of a 65-year-old woman who underwent an emergent lifesaving heart operation for an undiagnosed right coronary artery aneurysm with a coronary arteriovenous fistula complicated by active infective endocarditis, which affected the aortic valve, mitral valve, and coronary sinus. We performed direct closure of the coronary arteriovenous fistula, ligation of the right coronary artery aneurysm, double coronary artery bypass grafting, and double valvular replacement. Five years after the operation, she had no sign of congestive heart failure or infection, and was not receiving antibiotics.

  15. Allogenic heart valve bank in the Department of Cardiovascular Surgery and Transplantology of Jagiellonian University in Cracow - 23 years experience in the treatment of aortic valve or aortic root diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoliński, J; Marek, G; Marcinkowska, Z; Jaskier, M; Barecka, D; Bartuś, K; Kapelak, B; Sadowski, J; Dziatkowiak, A

    2006-01-01

    Allogenic aortic valves are widely used in case of native aortic valve or root disease as well as failed prosthetic valves with great success. At the Department of Cardiovascular Surgery and Transplantology of the Jagiellonian University in Cracow, aortic valve or aortic root replacement with allogenic aortic valve has been performed for 23 years. Allogenic heart valve bank was founded in 1980. In the bank we prepare both aortic allografts for adult cardiac surgical procedures and pulmonary allografts that are mostly used for repair of congenital heart disease.Allogenic aortic valves implantation was usually considered in our clinic for older patients, patients with infective endocarditis of the native or prosthetic valve, young women in reproductive age and patients with Marfan syndrome. Allografts exhibit excellent clinical performance and acceptable durability with no early failure if properly inserted. Between 1980 and 1992, allografts were obtained only from cadavers during routine autopsies. More than 10% of prepared allografts were exported to other cardiac surgery centres in Poland and foreign countries. Aortic valve replacement using allogenic aortic valves can be performed with acceptable mortality and good long-term results. The procedure although surgically more challenging has the advantage of not requiring anticoagulation therapy, hemodynamic performance of the allogenic valve is excellent, it demonstrates freedom from thromboembolism and infective endocarditis. We would like to emphasize the importance and advantages of the fact that allogenic heart valve bank is placed in the department of cardiovascular surgery and it is able to supply the department in heart valve allografts 24 h a day.

  16. Butterfly valve. Spjeldventil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupedo, D.J.

    1984-02-06

    Butterfly valve comprising a body and a valve seat arranged therein, on which a valve member is supported. The valve member comprises an operating rod and the assembly of valve member and operating rod has a fixed pivot point at the bottom of the body. The operating rod can be moved by means of pins movable in grooves and slots in such a manner that when the valve is opened the valve member first pivots about the pivot point to lift the valve member from the seat and subsequently rotates about the pivot point to fully open the valve. 12 drawings.

  17. Aortic valve bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI...

  18. Combined aortic root replacement and mitral valve surgery: The quest to preserve both valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadikasgari, Hoda; Roselli, Eric E; Aftab, Muhammad; Suri, Rakesh M; Desai, Milind Y; Khosravi, Mitra; Cikach, Frank; Isabella, Monica; Idrees, Jay J; Raza, Sajjad; Tappuni, Bassman; Griffin, Brian P; Svensson, Lars G; Gillinov, A Marc

    2017-05-01

    Coexisting aortic root and mitral valve pathology is increasingly recognized among patients undergoing surgery. We characterized the pathology and surgical outcomes of patients with combined aortic root and mitral disease. From 1987 to 2016, 118 patients (age 52.40 ± 17.71 years) underwent concomitant aortic root and mitral procedures (excluding aortic stenosis, endocarditis, and reoperations). Aortic root pathologies included degenerative aneurysm (94%) and aortic dissection (6%). The aortic valve was bicuspid in 15% of patients and had normally functioning tricuspid leaflets in 23% of patients. Marfan syndrome was present in 34 patients (29%). Degenerative mitral disease predominated (78%). Mitral procedures were repair (86%) and replacement (14%), and root procedures were valve-preserving root reimplantation (36%), Bentall procedure (47%), and homograft root replacement (17%). In the last 10 years, the combination of valve-preserving root reimplantation and mitral repair has increased to 50%. Kaplan-Meier and competing risk analyses were used to estimate survival and reoperation. There were 2 (1.7%) operative deaths with survival of 79% and 71% at 10 and 15 years, respectively, and reoperation rates of 4.7% and 12% after 5 and 10 years, respectively. There were no operative deaths in patients with combined valve-preserving root reimplantation and mitral repair, with survival of 89% and reoperation rate of 7.8% at 10 years. Among patients with Bentall/homograft and mitral operation, survival was 73% and reoperation was 9.8% at 10 years. In patients with aortic root and mitral pathology, combined surgical risk is low and valve durability is high. When possible, valve-preserving root reimplantation and mitral repair should be considered to avoid prosthesis degeneration, anticoagulation, and lifestyle limitations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rapid, fluttering heartbeat Not eating enough (mainly in children with aortic valve stenosis) Not gaining enough weight (mainly in children with aortic valve stenosis) The heart-weakening effects of aortic valve stenosis ...

  20. CARDIAC VALVE PROSTHESIS «MEDENG-2»: 10 YEARS EXPERIENCE OF CLINICAL APPLICATION Vavilov P.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Vavilov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In our department from December 1998 to 2009 have been performed 1028 operations with use of prosthesises «MedEng-2»: aortic valve replacement (AVR – 494, mitral valve replacement (MVR – 351 and double valves mitral and aortic replacement (DVR – 183. Remote results are tracked at 76% (719 patients. The 10-years survival rate has made 4532 patient-years of them 3146 pats.-years (86,4% for AVR, 2530 (82,4% for MVR and 836 (82,9% for DVR. Mechanical dysfunctions of artificial valves were not. Freedom from a thrombosis, endocarditis and reoperations at AVR has made 98,7; 97,6; 97,1% accordingly. From embolism complications – 97,5%. For MVR freedom from thrombosis – 96,9%, endocarditis – 97,7%, from reoperations and embolism complications of 99,1 and 91,2%. Freedom from throm- bosis and endocarditis at DVR 100 and 97,4% accordingly. From embolism complications and reoperations – 97,5%. The analysis of 10-years results of replacements prosthetics valves «MedEng-2» has shown its good haemody- namic qualities and satisfactory results both in the nearest, and in the remote terms after operation. 

  1. Infectious endocarditis caused by Helcococcus kunzii in a vascular patient: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotte, Romain; Lotte, Laurène; Degand, Nicolas; Gaudart, Alice; Gabriel, Sylvie; Ben H'dech, Mouna; Blois, Mathilde; Rinaldi, Jean-Paul; Ruimy, Raymond

    2015-06-23

    Helcococcus kunzii is a facultative anaerobic bacterium that was first described by Collins et al. in 1993, and was initially considered as a commensal of the human skin, in particular of lower extremities. Human infections caused by H. kunzii remain rare with only a few cases published in the pubmed database. Nevertheless recent reports indicate that this microorganism has to be considered as an opportunistic pathogen that can be involved in severe infections in human. To the best of our knowledge, we describe here the first known case of infectious endocarditis caused by H. kunzii. A 79 year-old man reporting severe polyvascular medical history attended the emergency ward for rapid deterioration of his general state of health. After physical examination and paraclinical investigations, the diagnosis of infectious endocarditis on native mitral valve caused by Helcococcus kunzii was established based on Dukes criteria. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and 16S rDNA sequencing allowed an accurate identification to the species level of Helcococcus kunzii. The patient was successfully treated by a medico-surgical approach. The treatment consisted in intravenous amoxicillin during four weeks and mitral valve replacement with a bioprosthestic valve. After an in depth review of patient's medical file, the origin of infection remained unknown. However, a cutaneous portal of entry cannot be excluded as the patient and his General Practitioner reported chronic ulcerations of both feet. We describe here the first case of endocarditis caused by H. kunzii in an elderly patient with polyvascular disease. This report along with previous data found in the literature emphasizes the invasive potential of this bacterial species as an opportunistic pathogen, in particular for patient with polyvascular diseases. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and 16S rDNA sequencing are reliable tools for H. kunzii identification. We also sequenced in this work H.kunzii type strain 103932T CIP and deposited in

  2. Takayasu Arteritis Initially Mimicking Infective Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytekin Alcelik

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Takayasu’s arteritis (TA is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects large vessels, predominantly the aorta and main branches, leading to vessel wall thickening, fibrosis and stenosis. Cardiac and vascular symptoms are also commonly present at disease onset. In TA with thoracic or abdominal involvement, although murmur can be present as a physical examination finding, the pulse difference may be absent. Here, we mention a case of TA who initially looked like infective endocarditis and had widespread thoracic murmur.

  3. What Is Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Valves Sometimes heart valves can’t be repaired and must be replaced. This surgery involves removing the faulty valve and replacing it with a man-made or biological valve. Biological valves are made ...

  4. Complicaciones neurológicas de la endocarditis infecciosa: controversias Neurological complications of infective endocarditis: controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico A Silva

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available En la endocarditis infecciosa aguda se describen complicaciones neurológicas entre 20% y 40% de los casos, lo cual representa un importante factor que predice morbimortalidad, secuelas y discapacidad. Esta entidad se caracteriza por un amplio espectro clínico debido a su compleja fisiopatología, que involucra entre otros, fenómenos inflamatorios, inmunes, infecciosos y embólicos. A pesar de la notable frecuencia de las complicaciones neurológicas en la endocarditis infecciosa, dadas especialmente por enfermedad cerebrovascular y neuroinfecciones, aun existen controversias acerca de algunos aspectos diagnósticos y terapéuticos, en parte por la poca evidencia disponible, las cuales se discuten a continuación, a partir de una serie de casos atendidos en la Fundación Cardiovascular de Colombia.Neurological complications of acute infective endocarditis are described in 20%-40% of cases, representing an important predictive factor of morbidity, mortality, sequels and disability. Acute endocarditis is characterized by a wide clinical spectrum due to its complex physiopathology that involves inflammatory, immune, infectious and embolic phenomena. Despite the remarkable frequency of neurological complications in the infective endocarditis especially by cerebrovascular disease and neuroinfections, there are still some controversies about some diagnostic and therapeutic aspects, partly because of the little evidence available. This paper describes a number of cases seen in the Fundación Cardiovascular de Colombia and discusses some aspects related with the diagnosis and treatment of the neurological complications of acute endocarditis.

  5. [Infectious endocarditis in intensive care patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, S; Lemm, H; Raaz, U; Werdan, K; Buerke, M

    2012-02-01

    Infectious endocarditis is a rare disease with high mortality. Epidemiological changes in recent years, the emergence of new risk factors, and the increasing use of intravasal prosthetic materials has led to changes in not only the clinical appearance of this disease but also in its diagnosis and treatment. Early diagnosis of infectious endocarditis is crucial. However, the often unspecific symptoms and the changes in its epidemiologic profile pose a challenge for the treating physician. This is especially true since the incidence of hospital-acquired, "nosocomial" cases of infectious endocarditis is increasing and often affects severely ill patients in intensive care units (ICU). There are diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms to guide the physician from an early diagnosis to an adequate treatment of the disease. In some critically ill patients, only surgery in combination with antimicrobial treatment may lead to complete eradication of the infectious disease. This review aims to subsume the guidelines, paying special attention to aspects that are important for intensive care and emergency doctors.

  6. Characteristics and Outcome of Streptococcus pneumoniae Endocarditis in the XXI Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Egea, Viviana; Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela; de Alarcón, Arístides; Lepe, José Antonio; Miró, José M.; Gálvez-Acebal, Juan; García-Pavía, Pablo; Navas, Enrique; Goenaga, Miguel Angel; Fariñas, María Carmen; Vázquez, Elisa García; Marín, Mercedes; Bouza, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Streptococcus pneumoniae is an infrequent cause of severe infectious endocarditis (IE). The aim of our study was to describe the epidemiology, clinical and microbiological characteristics, and outcome of a series of cases of S. pneumoniae IE diagnosed in Spain and in a series of cases published since 2000 in the medical literature. We prospectively collected all cases of IE diagnosed in a multicenter cohort of patients from 27 Spanish hospitals (n = 2539). We also performed a systematic review of the literature since 2000 and retrieved all cases with complete clinical data using a pre-established protocol. Predictors of mortality were identified using a logistic regression model. We collected 111 cases of pneumococcal IE: 24 patients from the Spanish cohort and 87 cases from the literature review. Median age was 51 years, and 23 patients (20.7%) were under 15 years. Men accounted for 64% of patients, and infection was community-acquired in 96.4% of cases. The most important underlying conditions were liver disease (27.9%) and immunosuppression (10.8%). A predisposing heart condition was present in only 18 patients (16.2%). Pneumococcal IE affected a native valve in 93.7% of patients. Left-sided endocarditis predominated (aortic valve 53.2% and mitral valve 40.5%). The microbiological diagnosis was obtained from blood cultures in 84.7% of cases. In the Spanish cohort, nonsusceptibility to penicillin was detected in 4.2%. The most common clinical manifestations included fever (71.2%), a new heart murmur (55%), pneumonia (45.9%), meningitis (40.5%), and Austrian syndrome (26.1%). Cardiac surgery was performed in 47.7% of patients. The in-hospital mortality rate was 20.7%. The multivariate analysis revealed the independent risk factors for mortality to be meningitis (OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 1.4–12.9; P < 0.01). Valve surgery was protective (OR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.04–0.4; P < 0.01). Streptococcus pneumoniae IE is a community-acquired disease that mainly

  7. MRI visualization of Staphyloccocus aureus-induced infective endocarditis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Ring

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis (IE is a severe and often fatal disease, lacking a fast and reliable diagnostic procedure. The purpose of this study was to establish a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus-induced IE and to develop a MRI technology to characterize and diagnose IE. To establish the mouse model of hematogenous IE, aortic valve damage was induced by placing a permanent catheter into right carotid artery. 24 h after surgery, mice were injected intravenously with either iron particle-labeled or unlabeled S. aureus (strain 6850. To distinguish the effect of IE from mere tissue injury or recruited macrophages, subgroups of mice received sham surgery prior to infection (n = 17, received surgery without infection (n = 8, or obtained additionally injection of free iron particles to label macrophages (n = 17. Cardiac MRI was performed 48 h after surgery using a self-gated ultra-short echo time (UTE sequence (TR/TE, 5/0.31 ms; in-plane/slice, 0.125/1 mm; duration, 12∶08 min to obtain high-resolution, artifact-free cinematographic images of the valves. After MRI, valves were either homogenized and plated on blood agar plates for determination of bacterial titers, or sectioned and stained for histology. In the animal model, both severity of the disease and mortality increased with bacterial numbers. Infection with 105 S. aureus bacteria reliably caused endocarditis with vegetations on the valves. Cinematographic UTE MRI visualised the aortic valve over the cardiac cycle and allowed for detection of bacterial vegetations, while mere tissue trauma or labeled macrophages were not detected. Iron labeling of S. aureus was not required for detection. MRI results were consistent with histology and microbial assessment. These data showed that S. aureus-induced IE in mice can be detected by MRI. The established mouse model allows for investigation of the pathophysiology of IE, testing of novel drugs and may serve for the development of a clinical

  8. Impact of routine cerebral CT angiography on treatment decisions in infective endocarditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Sayed Meshaal

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis (IE is commonly complicated by cerebral embolization and hemorrhage secondary to intracranial mycotic aneurysms (ICMAs. These complications are associated with poor outcome and may require diagnostic and therapeutic plans to be modified. However, routine screening by brain CT and CT angiography (CTA is not standard practice. We aimed to study the impact of routine cerebral CTA on treatment decisions for patients with IE.From July 2007 to December 2012, we prospectively recruited 81 consecutive patients with definite left-sided IE according to modified Duke's criteria. All patients had routine brain CTA conducted within one week of admission. All patients with ICMA underwent four-vessel conventional angiography. Invasive treatment was performed for ruptured aneurysms, aneurysms ≥ 5 mm, and persistent aneurysms despite appropriate therapy. Surgical clipping was performed for leaking aneurysms if not amenable to intervention.The mean age was 30.43 ± 8.8 years and 60.5% were males. Staph aureus was the most common organism (32.3%. Among the patients, 37% had underlying rheumatic heart disease, 26% had prosthetic valves, 23.5% developed IE on top of a structurally normal heart and 8.6% had underlying congenital heart disease. Brain CT/CTA revealed that 51 patients had evidence of cerebral embolization, of them 17 were clinically silent. Twenty-six patients (32% had ICMA, of whom 15 were clinically silent. Among the patients with ICMAs, 11 underwent endovascular treatment and 2 underwent neurovascular surgery. The brain CTA findings prompted different treatment choices in 21 patients (25.6%. The choices were aneurysm treatment before cardiac surgery rather than at follow-up, valve replacement by biological valve instead of mechanical valve, and withholding anticoagulation in patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis for fear of aneurysm rupture.Routine brain CT/CTA resulted in changes in the treatment plan in a significant

  9. Complicaciones posoperatorias y mortalidad en pacientes operados por endocarditis infecciosa Postoperative complications and mortality observed in patients operated on from infective endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Gómez Armando Gonga

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: describir las causas de morbilidad y mortalidad perioperatorias en los pacientes afectos de endocarditis infecciosa activa y significar cómo pueden ser disminuidas. Métodos: se realizó un estudio retrospectivo de las complicaciones posoperatorias y mortalidad en 139 pacientes operados por presentar endocarditis infecciosa en un período de 16 años. Se efectuaron 147 operaciones a los 139 pacientes de las cuales 83 (57,1 % fueron electivas y 64 (42,9 % fueron de urgencia. El 24 % de los pacientes fueron remitidos de otros centros en los que habían sido sometidos a tratamiento médico no exitoso por más de 4 semanas. Resultados: las operaciones efectuadas fueron: Sustituciones valvulares aórticas,mitrales y tricuspídeas 75 (41,1 %, extracción de electrodos de marcapasos o desfibriladores automáticos implantables del ventrículo derecho 57 (41 % , otras operaciones en número de 7 (4,9 %y 8 reintervenciones. La complicación más frecuente fue la sepsis generalizada (10,07 % pObjective: To describe the causes of perioperative morbidity and mortality of patients suffering active infectious endocarditis and to explain how both aspects can be reduced. Methods: A retrospective study of postoperative complications and mortality observed in 139 patients operated on from infectious endocarditis in 16 years. One hundred forty seven surgeries were performed, of which 83 (57.1 % were elective and 64 (42.9 % were emergency surgeries. In this group, 24 % had been referred from other medical centers where they had been unsuccessfully treated for 4 weeks. Results: The performed surgeries comprised 15 aortic, mitral and tricuspid valve replacements, 57 (41 % removals of pacemaker electrodes or of implanted automatic defibrillators in the right ventricle, seven other types of surgeries and 8 reoperations. The most frequent complication was generalized sepsis ((10.07 % p< 0.01, followed by the low heart output and postoperative bleeding. The

  10. Evaluation of epidemiological, clinical, and microbiological features of definite infective endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraji, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infective endocarditis (IE is a microbial infection of heart valves and its endothelial lining which is considered as a life-threatening disorder. This study evaluated the epidemiological, clinical, and microbiological features of IE at the Cardiovascular Research Center in Yazd, Iran. Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted on 20 patients diagnosed with definite IE on the basis of Duke’s criteria hospitalized for one year in the Cardiovascular Research Center in Yazd, Iran, from January 2015 to December 2015. Demographic information, clinical, laboratory, and microbiological findings, and also trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE of each patient were recorded and assessed. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 16. Results: The mean age of the patients under study was 45±16 years with most of the afflicted patients (60% being male. Most cases (70% of IE were observed in the warm seasons (spring and summer. The most common clinical sign (80% was fever. TEE was positive for all (100% patients, and vegetation was seen in all patients. The nosocomial mortality rate was zero. However, 14 (70% patients underwent surgical treatment. The valves afflicted with IE were: the mitral valve (40%, the aortic valve (35%, and the tricuspid valve (25%, respectively. 4 patients (20% had a positive history of IE. Blood culture test was positive only in 1 case and the isolated microorganism belonged to the viridans group streptococci. Conclusion: Despite the one-year high prevalence of IE in this study, the nosocomial mortality rate was not high and was reported to be nil under surgical and antimicrobial therapy.

  11. The Relationship of the Lipoprotein SsaB, Manganese, and Superoxide Dismutase in Streptococcus sanguinis Virulence for Endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Katie E.; Bainbridge, Brian; Brusko, Sarah; Turner, Lauren S.; Ge, Xiuchun; Stone, Victoria; Xu, Ping; Kitten, Todd

    2014-01-01

    Summary Streptococcus sanguinis colonizes teeth and is an important cause of infective endocarditis. Our prior work showed that the lipoprotein SsaB is critical for S. sanguinis virulence for endocarditis and belongs to the LraI family of conserved metal transporters. In this study, we demonstrated that an ssaB mutant accumulates less manganese and iron than its parent. A mutant lacking the manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase, SodA, was significantly less virulent than wild-type in a rabbit model of endocarditis, but significantly more virulent than the ssaB mutant. Neither the ssaB nor the sodA mutation affected sensitivity to phagocytic killing or efficiency of heart valve colonization. Animal virulence results for all strains could be reproduced by growing bacteria in serum under physiological levels of O2. SodA activity was reduced, but not eliminated in the ssaB mutant in serum and in rabbits. Growth of the ssaB mutant in serum was restored upon addition of Mn2+ or removal of O2. Antioxidant supplementation experiments suggested that superoxide and hydroxyl radicals were together responsible for the ssaB mutant’s growth defect. We conclude that manganese accumulation mediated by the SsaB transport system imparts virulence by enabling cell growth in oxygen through SodA-dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:24750294

  12. Infective Endocarditis Complicated by Septic Pulmonary Emboli in a Case of a Ventricular Septal Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roodpeyma

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Infective endocarditis (IE causes serious complications in patients. Congenital heart disease (CHD is an important underlying condition in children. Septic pulmonary embolism is an uncommon syndrome, and pulmonary valve IE is rare. The current study presented a case of right-sided IE with pulmonary valve involvement and its complications as pulmonary septic emboli in a child with CHD. Case Presentation A 6-year-old girl with a ventricular septal defect (VSD was presented. Echocardiography revealed large vegetation in the right ventricular outflow tract near the pulmonary valve. The patient showed clinical symptoms of lung involvement, and radiologic investigation was compatible with a diagnosis of septic pulmonary emboli. She had good response to antibacterial therapy and underwent a successful surgical closure of the heart defect. Conclusions Children with CHD are at risk of severe complications with the involvement of other organs. long-term febrile illness should be taken seriously in these children. They need hospitalization and careful evaluation.

  13. Bacterial endocarditis due to eikenella corrodens: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahapatra A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Of all the causes of bacterial endocarditis, HACEK group consisting of Haemophilus, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella Kingae are rare causative agents. We report a case of bacterial endocarditis by E. corrodens, which is one of the members of the HACEK group.

  14. [Aspergillus fumigatus endocarditis in a patient with a biventricular pacemaker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, José M; Fariñas, María C; Rodilla, Irene G; Salesa, Ricardo; de Berrazueta, José R

    2005-05-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus endocarditis is one of the rarest and severest complications in cardiological patients. We describe a patient with an intracardial pacemaker who was diagnosed as having Aspergillus fumigatus endocarditis. Postmortem examination showed a large, Aspergillus-infected thrombus encased in the right ventricle, pulmonary trunk and main pulmonary branches.

  15. Enterococcal endocarditis - a case treated with teicoplanin and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enterococcal endocarditis - a case treated with teicoplanin and amoxycillin. P L Botha, M C Struwig, W de Vries, J Hough, L J Chalkley. Abstract. The study aimed to determine the antibacterial therapy effective in the cure of endocarditis caused by Enterococcus faecalis resistant to clinically achievable levels of vancomycin.

  16. Infective endocarditis in Ethiopian children: A hospital based review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: infective endocarditis is an infection of the endocardial lining of the heart mainly associated with congenital and rheumatic heart disease. Although it is a rare disease in children, it is associated with high morbidity and mortality; death due to infective endocarditis has been reported to be as high as 26% in ...

  17. [Sylvian and mesenteric arteries aneurysm revealing infective endocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalem, Amine; Laachach, Houssam; Fliti, Alaa; Elyandouzi, Abdelmalek; Elkasimi, Abdelwahab; Ismaili, Nabila; El Ouafi, Noha

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is an emergency condition usually diagnosed in the context of an infectious syndrome associated with heart murmur. It can lead to life-threatening complications. We report the case of a patient with endocarditis presenting as neuro-abdominal manifestations associated with sylvian and mesenteric arteries mycotic aneurysm. Evolution was favorable under medical-surgical treatment.

  18. Fungal endocarditis with right ventricular candidal mycetoma in a premature neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayashree Purkayastha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Fungal mycetoma or endocarditis is rare in premature neonates and it is often associated with high mortality. In the majority of the cases diagnosis is made postmortem. Here we report a 0-week-old preterm neonate who developed Candida albicans blood stream infection complicated by endocarditis and subsequent mycetoma. Initially, this neonate had Klebsiella sepsis requiring multiple antibiotic courses. A peripherally inserted central venous catheter was used to give total parenteral nutrition. On day 24 of life, he developed candidemia, treated with 14 day course of fluconazole and shown improvement. Further, on day 60 of life he developed cholestasis, deranged liver function tests and persistent thrombocytopenia along with apnea, bradycardia and desaturations. Blood culture again grew again C. albicansEchocardiography showed large fungal vegetation on tricuspid valve with a mycetoma filling the right ventricle. He was treated with intravenous amphotericin B, fluconazole and upportive measures, but he deteriorated and succumbed after two weeks. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2015;5(3: 142-145

  19. [Infective endocarditis caused by Chlamydia pneumoniae after liver transplantation. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    P Szabó, Réka; Kertész, Attila; Szerafin, Tamás; Fehérvári, Imre; Zsom, Lajos; Balla, József; Nemes, Balázs

    2015-05-31

    The incidence of infective endocarditis is underestimated in solid organ transplant recipients. The spectrum of pathogens is different from the general population. The authors report the successful treatment of a 58-year-old woman with infective endocarditis caused by atypical microorganism and presented with atypical manifestations. Past history of the patient included alcoholic liver cirrhosis and cadaver liver transplantation in February 2000. One year after liver transplantation hepatitis B virus infection was diagnosed and treated with antiviral agents. In July 2007 hemodialysis was started due to progressive chronic kidney disease caused by calcineurin toxicity. In November 2013 the patient presented with transient aphasia. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed vegetation in the aortic valve and brain embolization was identified on magnetic resonance images. Initial treatment consisted of a 4-week regimen with ceftriaxone (2 g daily) and gentamycin (60 mg after hemodialysis). Blood cultures were all negative while serology revealed high titre of antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae. Moxifloxacin was added as an anti-chlamydial agent, but neurologic symptoms returned. After coronarography, valvular surgery and coronary artery bypass surgery were performed which resulted in full clinical recovery of the patient.

  20. [Succesful case of open heart surgery in a dialysis patient with infectious endocarditis and severe bone marrow suppression: report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Taichi; Hirota, Jun; Kondo, Shunichi; Yamabe, Tsuyoshi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi

    2013-08-01

    We report a case of infectious endocarditis due to Corynebacterium species. The patient was 71-yearold man, who was on dialysis and had tracheostomy preoperatively. He went to the hospital complaining of dyspnea. He was diagnosed with congestive heart failure and treated after admission. His respiratory condition was exacerbated and he was intubated. Respiratory management prolonged over 2 weeks. Tracheostomy was performed. One month after admission, cardiac echo showed massive aortic valve regurgitation and vegetation of aortic valve. The patient was transferred to our hospital to undergo operation for aortic valve regurgitation and infectious endocarditis. In our hospital, labo data showed severe bone marrow suppresssion with white blood cell(WBC)1,700/µl, red blood cell(RBC)259×104/µl, platelet(PLT) 5.0×104/µl. Aortic valve replacement was performed. Because the patient had tracheostomy, we incised sternal bone in a T shape to avoid mediastinitis. After operation, patient recovered well and left hospital 48th day after the operation.

  1. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for early detection of embolism and metastatic infection in patients with infective endocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riet, Jelle van; Gheysens, Olivier; Mortelmans, Luc [University Hospital KU Leuven, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Hill, Evelyn E.; Herregods, Marie-Christine [University Hospital KU Leuven, Department of Cardiology, Leuven (Belgium); Dymarkowski, Steven [University Hospital KU Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Herijgers, Paul [University Hospital KU Leuven, Department of Cardiac Surgery, Leuven (Belgium); Peetermans, Willy E. [University Hospital KU Leuven, Department of Internal Medicine, Leuven (Belgium)

    2010-06-15

    In the acute setting of endocarditis it is very important to assess both the vegetation itself, as well as potential life-threatening complications, in order to decide whether antibiotic therapy will be sufficient or urgent surgery is indicated. A single whole-body scan investigating inflammatory changes could be very helpful to achieve a swift and efficient assessment. In this study we assessed whether {sup 18}F-FDG can be used to detect and localize peripheral embolism or distant infection. Twenty-four patients with 25 episodes of endocarditis, enrolled between March 2006 and February 2008, underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging on a dedicated PET/CT scanner. PET/CT imaging revealed a focus of peripheral embolization and/or metastatic infection in 11 episodes (44%). One episode had a positive PET/CT scan result for both embolism and metastatic infection. PET/CT detected seven positive cases (28%) in which there was no clinical suspicion. Valve involvement of endocarditis was seen only in three patients (12%). PET/CT may be an important diagnostic tool for tracing peripheral embolism and metastatic infection in the acute setting of infective endocarditis, since a PET/CT scan detected a clinically occult focus in nearly one third of episodes. (orig.)

  2. Pontine abscess with initial treatment failure following infectious endocarditis with Streptococcus salivarius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudtzen, Fredrikke Christie; Lynge, Maja; Gaini, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 65-year-old man admitted to the department of infectious diseases on suspicion of meningitis with headache, fever and double vision. A cerebral MRI revealed a 17×30 mm pontine abscess with surrounding oedema. The patient had, 2 months prior to admission, been treated...... for Streptococcus salivarius aortic valve endocarditis. The abscess was not suitable for surgery, and the patient received multidrug antibiotic treatment for 4 weeks. The patient initially responded well clinically, but was readmitted 4 weeks after discontinuation of treatment, with headache and dizziness. A new...... cerebral MRI showed progression of the abscess. He received an additional 8 weeks of broad spectrum antibiotic treatment, followed by 12 weeks of oral treatment with pivampicillin. His symptoms resolved and a cerebral MRI at discontinuation of treatment showed regression of the abscess to 7.5 mm....

  3. [Infective endocarditis in sub-Saharan african children, cross-sectional study about 19 cases in Ouagadougou at Burkina Faso].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yameogo, N V; Kologo, K J; Yameogo, A A; Yonaba, C; Millogo, G R C; Kissou, S A; Toguyeni, B J Y; Samadoulougou, A K; Pignatelli, S; Simpore, J; Zabsonre, P

    2014-02-01

    Infective endocarditis is a transplant of a microorganism on a most often injured endocardium. It is rare in children. This work aimed to determine the frequency of endocarditis of the child, to describe clinical presentation, data from echocardiography, microbiological profile and clinical course. From May 1 2010 to April 30 2011, we consecutively included children received for infective endocarditis in two medical centers in the city of Ouagadougou: Saint-Camille medical center and teaching hospital Yalgado-Ouedraogo. We investigated the functional and general signs and treatment already received. The physical examination looking for an infectious syndrome, pneumonia, heart failure and entrance doors. Blood cultures, blood count, creatinine, blood chemistry, HIV status, electrocardiogram, chest radiography and cardiac Doppler ultrasound were systematic. The diagnosis of the disease was based on Duke criteria. Nineteen endocarditis in children were reported, that is 1.7% of admissions. The average age was 4.7 ± 2.6 years (extremes: 1 and 14). The sex ratio was 1.7 for girls. The clinical presentation was a common infectious syndrome. Impaired general condition and congestive heart failure were present on admission in six cases, respectively. The front door was dental in nine cases (47.4%), skin in four cases (21%) and ENT in three cases (15.8%). A peripheral vein was implicated in one case. In the two other cases, no front door had been found. HIV serology was positive in four cases. As for the blood cultures, they were positive in 13 cases. The germs found were Streptococcus in 10 cases and staphylococcus in three cases. Echocardiography had revealed vegetations in 18 cases. These vegetations were localized on the mitral in nine cases. Multiple locations were found in four cases. Underlying heart disease was dominated by rheumatic valve disease (68.4%), healthy heart forms were found in two cases. Treatment consisted of antibiotics, antipyretic treatment and

  4. Remote actuated valve implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  5. Remote actuated valve implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKnight, Timothy E.; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Kenneth J.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S.; Wilgen, John B.; Evans, Boyd Mccutchen

    2016-05-10

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  6. Mitral valve regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... around the valve. You are at risk for mitral valve regurgitation if you have: Coronary heart disease and high blood pressure Infection of the heart valves Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) Rare conditions, such as untreated syphilis or Marfan ... heart disease. This is a complication of untreated strep throat ...

  7. Tissue engineered aortic valve

    OpenAIRE

    Dohmen, P M

    2012-01-01

    Several prostheses are available to replace degenerative diseased aortic valves with unique advantages and disadvantages. Bioprotheses show excellent hemodynamic behavior and low risk of thromboembolic complications, but are limited by tissue deterioration. Mechanical heart valves have extended durability, but permanent anticoagulation is mandatory. Tissue engineering created a new generation heart valve, which overcome limitations of biological and mechanical heart valves due to remodelling,...

  8. Compression of the right coronary artery by an aortic pseudoaneurysm after infective endocarditis: an unusual case of myocardial ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacalzada-Almeida J

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Juan Lacalzada-Almeida,1 Alejandro De la Rosa-Hernández,1 María Manuela Izquierdo-Gómez,1 Javier García-Niebla,2 Iván Hernández-Betancor,1 Juan Alfonso Bonilla-Arjona,3 Antonio Barragán-Acea,1 Ignacio Laynez-Cerdeña1 1Cardiology Department, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, Tenerife, 2Health services from the Health Area of El Hierro, Valle del Golfo Health Center, El Hierro, 3Radiology Department, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, Tenerife, Spain Abstract: A 61-year-old male with a prosthetic St Jude aortic valve size 24 presented with heart failure symptoms and minimal-effort angina. Eleven months earlier, the patient had undergone cardiac surgery because of an aortic root dilatation and bicuspid aortic valve with severe regurgitation secondary to infectious endocarditis by Coxiela burnetii and coronary artery disease in the left circumflex coronary artery. Then, a prosthesis valve and a saphenous bypass graft to the left circumflex coronary artery were placed. The patient was admitted to the Cardiology Department of Hospital Universitario de Canarias, Tenerife, Spain and a transthoracic echocardiography was performed that showed severe paraprosthetic aortic regurgitation and an aortic pseudoaneurysm. The 64-slice multidetector computed tomography confirmed the pseudoaneurysm, originating from the right sinus of Valsalva, with a compression of the native right coronary artery and a normal saphenous bypass graft. On the basis of these findings, we performed surgical treatment with a favorable postoperative evolution. In our case, results from complementary cardiac imaging techniques were crucial for patient management. The multidetector computed tomography allowed for a confident diagnosis of an unusual mechanism of coronary ischemia. Keywords: pseudoaneurysm, infective endocarditis, myocardial ischemia, aortic valve prosthesis

  9. Simultaneous dual-isotope solid-state detector SPECT for improved tracking of white blood cells in suspected endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caobelli, Federico; Wollenweber, Tim; Bavendiek, Udo; Kühn, Christian; Schütze, Christian; Geworski, Lilli; Thackeray, James T; Bauersachs, Johann; Haverich, Axel; Bengel, Frank M

    2017-02-07

    High-energy resolution and sensitivity of novel cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detector equipped SPECT systems facilitate simultaneous imaging of multiple isotopes and may enhance the detection of molecular/cellular signals. This may refine the detection of endocarditis. This study was designed to determine the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of simultaneous imaging of inflammation with 111In-labeled white blood cells (WBCs) and myocardial perfusion with 99mTc-sestamibi, for localization of WBCs relative to the valve plane in suspected endocarditis. A dedicated cardiac CZT camera (Discovery 530c, GE Healthcare) was employed. Anthropomorphic thorax phantom studies were followed by clinical studies in 34 patients with suspected infection of native valves (n = 12) or implants (n = 22). Simultaneous 111In-WBC/99mTc perfusion imaging was performed, and compared with standard 111In-WBC planar scintigraphy and SPECT-CT. Phantom studies ruled out significant radioisotope crosstalk. Downscatter on 99mTc images was not observed for 111In activity as high as 2.5*99mTc activity. In patients, image quality was superior for CZT imaging vs. conventional SPECT-CT and planar scintigraphy (P < 0.01). Cadmium-zinc-telluride dual isotope imaging improved reader confidence for detection of inflammatory foci. Diagnostic accuracy based on surgery or Duke Criteria during follow-up was highest for CZT imaging (P < 0.001). Novel CZT SPECT technology improves the accuracy of molecular/cellular cardiac imaging. Simultaneous multi-isotope imaging with 111In and 99mTc is feasible and aids in the workup of suspected endocarditis.

  10. Sutureless, rapid deployment valves and stented bioprosthesis in aortic valve replacement: recommendations of an International Expert Consensus Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersak, Borut; Fischlein, Theodor; Folliguet, Thierry A; Meuris, Bart; Teoh, Kevin H T; Moten, Simon C; Solinas, Marco; Miceli, Antonio; Oberwalder, Peter J; Rambaldini, Manfredo; Bhatnagar, Gopal; Borger, Michael A; Bouchard, Denis; Bouchot, Olivier; Clark, Stephen C; Dapunt, Otto E; Ferrarini, Matteo; Laufer, Guenther; Mignosa, Carmelo; Millner, Russell; Noirhomme, Philippe; Pfeiffer, Steffen; Ruyra-Baliarda, Xavier; Shrestha, Malakh; Suri, Rakesh M; Troise, Giovanni; Diegeler, Anno; Laborde, Francois; Laskar, Marc; Najm, Hani K; Glauber, Mattia

    2016-03-01

    After a panel process, recommendations on the use of sutureless and rapid deployment valves in aortic valve replacement were given with special respect as an alternative to stented valves. Thirty-one international experts in both sutureless, rapid deployment valves and stented bioprostheses constituted the panel. After a thorough literature review, evidence-based recommendations were rated in a three-step modified Delphi approach by the experts. Literature research could identify 67 clinical trials, 4 guidelines and 10 systematic reviews for detailed text analysis to obtain a total of 28 recommendations. After rating by the experts, 12 recommendations were identified and degree of consensus for each was determined. Proctoring and education are necessary for the introduction of sutureless valves on an institutional basis as well as for the individual training of surgeons. Sutureless and rapid deployment should be considered as the valve prosthesis of first choice for isolated procedures in patients with comorbidities, old age, delicate aortic wall conditions such as calcified root, porcelain aorta or prior implantation of aortic homograft and stentless valves as well as for concomitant procedures and small aortic roots to reduce cross-clamp time. Intraoperative transoesophageal echocardiography is highly recommended, and in case of right anterior thoracotomy, preoperative computer tomography is strongly recommended. Suitable annular sizes are 19-27 mm. There is a contraindication for bicuspid valves only for Type 0 and for annular abscess or destruction due to infective endocarditis. Careful but complete decalcification of the aortic root is recommended to avoid paravalvular leakage; extensive decalcification should be avoided not to create annular defects. Proximal anastomoses of concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting should be placed during a single aortic cross-clamp period or alternatively with careful side clamping. Available evidence suggests that the use

  11. Long-Term Clinical Outcomes of Silzone Era St. Jude Medical Mechanical Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, J Matthew; Zhao, Yue; Williams, Judson; O'Brien, Sean; Dokholyan, Rachel; Gammie, James; Edwards, Fred; Loyo-Berrios, Nilsa; Canos, Daniel; Gross, Thomas; Marinac-Dabic, Danica; Peterson, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Since the voluntary recall of St. Jude Medical (SJM) Silzone impregnated heart valves, no large-scale study has examined their long-term outcomes. Using Medicare-linked records from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database (1993-2004), the clinical outcomes were evaluated through eight years among those patients who received SJM mechanical heart valves during the Silzone era (March 1998 to December 1999; n = 3,775), relative to those in both the pre-Silzone era (January 1993 to February 1998; n = 13,570) and the post-Silzone era (January 2000 to December 2004; n = 6,882). An inverse probability weighting was used to balance the observed differences in case mix. During the Silzone era, 79% of all implanted mechanical heart valves were manufactured by SJM. By eight years post-implantation, the most common adverse events in this Medicare-linked cohort (median age 71 years) were death (43.5%) and thromboembolism (14.7%), while valve reoperation (1.7%) and endocarditis (1.4%) were less common. Patients treated during the Silzone era experienced a lower associated risk of mortality to eight years than those in both the pre-Silzone era (adjusted hazards ratio (HR) 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.88-0.98) and post-Silzone era (adjusted HR 0.92, CI 0.67-0.98), while the adjusted eight-year risks of reoperation, thromboembolism and endocarditis were similar across the three eras for the overall cohort and among both aortic valve and mitral valve patients. Medicare patients who received SJM mechanical heart valves during the Silzone era experienced similar clinical outcomes as those treated before or after the Silzone era. These data do not substantiate continued public health concerns associated with Silzone era valve prostheses among older individuals.

  12. Infective endocarditis detected by 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in a patient with occult infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Lu Yeh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Integrated 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT has been clinically used to detect infectious lesions. We present a case with pyrexia and bacteremia of unknown origin. Whole body FDG PET/CT was arranged to look for an occult source of infection and it revealed a focal lesion with increased FDG uptake in the mitral valve area. Under suspicion of infective endocarditis, transthoracic echocardiography was repeated and then the presence of linear vegetation over the calcified mitral annulus was confirmed. Ultimately, definite infective endocarditis was diagnosed according to the Duke criteria. The patient recovered after the antibiotic therapy. In our case, FDG PET/CT can help to localize the exact site of occult infection, thereby guiding additional testing and facilitating timely definitive diagnosis and therapy.

  13. Surgery in current therapy for infective endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kappetein

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Stuart J Head1, M Mostafa Mokhles1, Ruben LJ Osnabrugge1,2, Ad JJC Bogers1, A Pieter Kappetein11Department of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 2Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The NetherlandsAbstract: The introduction of the Duke criteria and transesophageal echocardiography has improved early recognition of infective endocarditis but patients are still at high risk for severe morbidity or death. Whether an exclusively antibiotic regimen is superior to surgical intervention is subject to ongoing debate. Current guidelines indicate when surgery is the preferred treatment, but decisions are often based on physician preferences. Surgery has shown to decrease the risk of short-term mortality in patients who present with specific symptoms or microorganisms; nevertheless even then it often remains unclear when surgery should be performed. In this review we i systematically reviewed the current literature comparing medical to surgical therapy to evaluate if surgery is the preferred option, ii performed a meta-analysis of studies reporting propensity matched analyses, and iii, briefly summarized the current indications for surgery.Keywords: endocarditis, surgery, antibiotics, review, meta-analysis, propensity analysis, mortality, complications

  14. Cerebral ischemia caused by Streptococcus bovis aortic endocarditis: case report Isquemia cerebral causada por endocardite aórtica pelo Streptococcus bovis: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldo Santos-Neto

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemic processes associated with infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus bovis are rare; only 2 cases having been reported. Here we report a case of a 50-year-old man with S. bovis endocarditis who presented signs of frontal, parietal and occipital lobe cerebral ischemia. This is the first case reported in which the presence of hemianopsia preceded the endocarditis diagnosis. Initially, the clinical manifestations suggested a systemic vasculitis. Later, vegetating lesions were identified in the aortic valve and S. bovis grew in blood cultures. Antibiotic use and aortic valve replacement eliminated the infection and ceased thromboembolic events. A videocolonoscopy examination revealed no mucosal lesions as a portal of entry in this case, although such lesions have been encountered in up to 70% of reported cases of S. bovis endocarditis.A associação de isquemia cerebral e endocardite por Streptococcus bovis é um evento raro, tendo sido publicados apenas 2 casos anteriormente. Nós relatamos o caso de um homem de 50 anos com endocardite por S. bovis que apresentou sinais isquêmicos nos lobos frontal, parietal e occipital. Este é o primeiro caso em que a hemianopsia precedeu o diagnóstico de endocardite. Inicialmente, o quadro foi confundido com vasculite. Posteriormente, foi confirmada a presença de vegetações na válvula aórtica e a hemocultura identificou S. bovis. Os eventos tromboembólicos foram controlados com o uso de antibióticos e a troca da válvula aórtica. Estudo videocolonoscópico não identificou nenhuma lesão, apesar de lesões colônicas serem descritas em até 70% dos casos de indivíduos com endocardite por S. bovis.

  15. SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS AND INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS: CLINICAL AND DIAGNOSTIC PARALLELS AND IMAGINARY MIMICRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Filonenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study – draw attention to the differential diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and infective endocarditis.Materials and methods. Patient A., 44 years old, was admitted to the cardiologic department of Ryazan Regional Clinical Cardiology Clinic diagnosed with probable infective subacute endocarditis, glomerulonephritis, with complaints of weakness, fatigue, increase in body temperature up to 37.7 °C preferably in the evening, dry cough, shortness of breath on mild exertion, swelling of legs and feet. In early October 2015, the patient's body temperature increased up to 37.8 °C, there was a dry cough. Patient was treated on an outpatient basis for acute respiratory viral infections with antibiotics, decreased body temperature. Acute deterioration of the condition was observed in mid-October: severe shortness of breath even on mild physical exertion, heart rate increased, as well as lower limb edema, blood pressure (BP increased up to 240/140 mmHg. The patient was hospitalized in the therapeutic department. Against the background of the treatment (antibiotics, antihypertensive agents, diuretics, digoxin patient’s condition was improved: shortness of breath decreased, as well as the heart rate, limb edema, blood pressure down to 180/110–190/120 mmHg. However, there was persistent proteinuria (0.33–1.65–3.3 g/L, low grade fever persisting in the evening. On admission to the cardiological department of Ryazan Regional Clinical Cardiology Clinic patient underwent the following survey: assessment of lab parameters in dynamics, electrocardiography, heart echocardiography, computed tomography (CT of lungs.Results. We revealed left ventricular hypertrophy on heart ultrasonography; an increase in the volume of left atrium, right ventricle, right atrium; mitral, aortic, tricuspid valve insufficiency (grade II regurgitation; pulmonary hypertension; on lung CT – the picture of hydrothorax on the right side, hydropericardium

  16. Risks for Heart Valve Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Risks for Heart Valve Problems Updated:Jan 18,2017 Who is at risk ... content was last reviewed May 2016. Heart Valve Problems and Disease • Home • About Heart Valves • Heart Valve ...

  17. Living with Heart Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as well as surgery for adults who have aortic valve stenosis. Doctors often use balloon valvuloplasty to repair valve stenosis in infants and children. Replacing Heart Valves Sometimes heart valves can’t ...

  18. What Causes Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as well as surgery for adults who have aortic valve stenosis. Doctors often use balloon valvuloplasty to repair valve stenosis in infants and children. Replacing Heart Valves Sometimes heart valves can’t ...

  19. Mitral valve prolapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mitral valve prolapse is called "mitral valve prolapse syndrome," and includes: Chest pain (not caused by coronary artery disease or a heart attack) Dizziness Fatigue Panic attacks Sensation of feeling the heart beat ( palpitations ) ...

  20. Mitral Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... valve stenosis include: Rheumatic fever. A complication of strep throat, rheumatic fever can damage the mitral valve. Rheumatic ... children see your doctor for sore throats. Untreated strep throat infections can develop into rheumatic fever. Fortunately, strep ...

  1. FORUM Prevention of infective endocarditis in developing countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , India and Sweden) ... British Antimicrobial Society report in 2006,27 and the American. Heart Association guideline of .... antimicrobial prophylaxis against infective endocarditis in adults and children undergoing interventional procedures.

  2. Subacute bacterial endocarditis: considerations for the pediatric patient

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Soxman, J A

    2000-01-01

    .... This is done to prevent bacterial endocarditis, which is a bacterial infection of the heart. Many children already take antibiotics for other conditions, such as otitis media, which is an ear infection...

  3. [Infective endocarditis : Update on prophylaxis, diagnosis, and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, S; Lemm, H; Janusch, M; Buerke, M

    2016-05-01

    The diagnosis of infective endocarditis is often delayed in clinical practice. Timely diagnosis and rapid antibiotic treatment is important. Higher age of patients, new risk factors, and increasing use of intravascular prosthetic materials resulted in changes in microbial spectrum. Nowadays, nonspecific symptoms, critically ill patients, and immunocompromised patients require a high level of diagnostic expertise.The new guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology provide various diagnostic algorithms and recommendations for antibiotic treatment. The new guidelines also recommend the formation of an endocarditis team with various medical disciplines, including a cardiac surgeon, to improve treatment because in half of all endocarditis patients, antibiotic therapy alone does not result in successful management of the infection. If complications occur, early surgical treatment should be performed.In this overview, diagnostic strategies and therapeutic approaches for the treatment of infectious endocarditis according to the current guidelines and aspects of surgical treatment are provided.

  4. Echocardiographic agreement in the diagnostic evaluation for infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Trine Kiilerich; Selton-Suty, Christine; Tong, Steven Y C

    2016-01-01

    Echocardiography is essential for the diagnosis and management of infective endocarditis (IE). However, the reproducibility for the echocardiographic assessment of variables relevant to IE is unknown. Objectives of this study were: (1) To define the reproducibility for IE echocardiographic variab...

  5. Endocarditis infecciosa de válvula pulmonar nativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Romaní R

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available La endocarditis infecciosa en válvulas derechas es predominantemente en la válvula tricuspídea, mientras la válvula pulmonar es excepcionalmente afectada (menos de 1,5%, por lo que son pocos los casos reportados en la literatura mundial. Las manifestaciones clínicas de endocarditis en válvula pulmonar no son las clásicas de endocarditis infecciosa, como son los síntomas de embolismo séptico pulmonar. La endocarditis aislada de válvula pulmonar nativa es inusual en personas que no consumen drogas intravenosas. Se presenta el caso de un paciente varón con diabetes mellitus tipo 2 y sin otro factor predisponente.

  6. Prevalence of infective endocarditis in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Høst, Ulla; Arpi, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Aims Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis (IE) is a critical medical condition associated with a high morbidity and mortality. In the present study, we prospectively evaluated the importance of screening with echocardiography in an unselected S. aureus bacteraemia (SAB) population. Methods...

  7. Infective endocarditis - the effect of liposomes as carrier substance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-05-18

    antitrypsin and ampicillin. H. S. SCHAAF, W. D. BATES, C. HANEKOM, B. F. NEITELER,. A. B. KRIEGLER, P.-L. VAN DER MERWE. Summary. Infective endocarditis has a high mortality and morbidity rate despite all available treatment ...

  8. Endocardite infecciosa: 12 anos de tratamento cirúrgico Infective endocarditis: 12 years of surgical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoninho Sanfins ARNONI

    2000-12-01

    ,2%. CONCLUSÃO: Concluímos que o tratamento cirúrgico da endocardite infecciosa representa um desafio para o cirurgião, apesar de todo o progresso adicionado ao arsenal diagnóstico e terapêutico desta patologia.BACKGROUND: Infective endocarditis is a disease of difficult and multidisciplinar treatment that frequently needs the surgical participation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Between January 1987 and January 1999, 159 patients were operated on in our Service for infective endocarditis. Male group represented 64.7%. The mean age was 39.2 yr. (2 to 78 yr. and the mean weight 57.1 kg. The aortic valve was affected most frequently (66 patients, the native valve was affected in 47 cases and the prostheses in 19 (11 bioprostheses and 8 mechanic valves. The mitral valve was affected in 53 patients, most commonly in prostheses (28 bioprostheses and 2 mechanical. Aortic and mitral valves were together affected in 28 cases. The other patients had congenital defects or definitive pacemaker. Surgical treatment was indicated in cases of heart failure, refractory to medical treatment, valvar or prosthesis dysfunction secondary to infection, leak or arrhythmia. RESULTS: Cultures revealed that Streptococcus viridans and Staphilococcus aureus were the most prevalent microorganisms. Valve repair was possible in 3 patients of mitral group and one of aortic group. For the others, prostheses were used (mechanical for aortic valve and bioprostetic for mitral valve in the majority of the cases. Reoperation was frequent. Ventricular septal defect was the most common congenital pathology (3 cases and 4 patients presented infective endocarditis in pacemaker wire. The global mortality was 16.3%. Abscess as a complication was presented in 18.2% of the patients. We used bovine pericardium for reconstruction with a surgical mortality of 17.2%. CONCLUSION: We concluded that the treatment for infective endocarditis represents a surgical challenge, in spite of the progress added to the diagnostic and

  9. A case of SAPIEN XT valve fallen into left ventricle during valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Shigeki; Ehara, Natsuhiko; Nishiya, Kenta; Koyama, Tadaaki

    2017-06-24

    Late transcatheter heart valve embolization is a rare but life-threatening complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Surgical intervention is performed for most cases, but some cases were treated by valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation. We describe a patient in whom a 29-mm Edwards SAPIEN XT valve migrated into the left ventricular outflow tract 41 days after the initial implantation. We tried to perform valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation using a transfemoral approach. As soon as the second transcatheter heart valve touched the first implanted valve, it fell into the left ventricle. Immediate surgical intervention was required. The first valve was removed, and surgical aortic valve replacement was successfully performed. In conclusion, we should choose surgical aortic valve replacement for late transcatheter heart valve embolization. Even if we need to treat by catheter intervention, transapical approach may be better.

  10. [Role of procalcitonin in the diagnosis of uncomplicated infective endocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryniewiecki, Tomasz; Sitkiewicz, Dariusz; Rawczyńska-Englert, Irena

    2002-01-01

    Infective endocarditis especially where blood culture is negative frequently causes problems in diagnosis despite of many nonspecific inflammation parameters. Procalcitonin (PCT) concentration is a new marker of severe bacterial and fungal infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of PCT concentration assessment in the diagnosis of uncomplicated infective endocarditis of bacterial etiology. The study group consisted of 30 patients with ongoing infective endocarditis in the course of acquired valvular heart disease. The diagnosis of bacterial endocarditis was established according to the Duke criteria on the basis of: clinical examination, laboratory investigations (inflammatory parameters, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography) and positive blood cultures. Patients with sepsis, concomitant infections and in an early postoperative period were excluded. Two control groups consisted of: 10 patients without endocarditis and other infections and another 10 patients without endocarditis and with an urinary tract infection. Serum procalcitonin concentrations were measured by an immunoluminometric assay (LUMItest PCT set). Mean serum PCT concentrations in patients with endocarditis (0.12 +/- 0.13, range 0-0.4 ng/ml) were significantly higher than in control group without infection (0.03 +/- 0.05, range 0-0.1 ng/ml) and higher than in control group with an urinary tract infection (0.02 +/- 0.04, range 0-0.1 ng/ml). However in 12 patients (of 30) were below sensitivity of the method and in the rest were within normal range (< 0.5 ng/ml). Serum PCT concentration assessment seems to have no value in the diagnosis of uncomplicated infective endocarditis.

  11. Actinobacillus equuli subsp. equuli associated with equine valvular endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalbæk, Bent; Østergaard, Stine; Buhl, Rikke

    2007-01-01

    Microbiological and pathological data from a case of equine valvular endocarditis are reported. Limited information is available on the pathogenic potential of equine Actinobacillus species as several strains originate from apparently healthy horses. After the establishment of two subspecies within...... this species, this seems to be the first report of an etiological association between A. equuli subsp. equuli and equine endocarditis. Furthermore, new information on some phenotypical characteristics of this subspecies are reported, compared to previous findings...

  12. Heart Valve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  13. Immediate and long term evolution of valve replacement in children less than 12 years old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atik Fernando Antibas

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was the follow-up and evaluation of valve replacement in children under 12 years of age. METHODS: Forty-four children less than 12 years old were underwent valve replacement at INCOR-HCFMUSP between January 1986 and December 1992. Forty (91% were rheumatic, 39 (88.7% were in functional classes II or IV, 19 (43.2% were operated upon on an emergency basis, and 6 (13.6% had atrial fibrillation. Biological prostheses (BP were employed in 26 patients (59.1%, and mechanical prostheses (MP in 18 (40.9%. Mitral valves were replaced in 30 (68.7%, aortic valves in 8 (18.2%, a tricuspid valve in 1 (2.3%, and double (aortic and mitral valves in 5 (11.4 of the patients. RESULTS: Hospital mortality was of 4.5% (2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 5.8 years. Re-operations occurred in 63.3% of the patients with BP and in 12.5% of those with MP (p=0.002. Infectious endocarditis was present in 26.3% of the BP, but in none of the cases of MP (p=0.049. Thrombosis occurred in 2 (12.5% and hemorrhage in one (6.5% of the patients with a MP. Delayed mortality occurred in 5 (11.9% of the patients over a mean period of 2.6 years; four had had BP and one had a MP (NS. Actuarial survival and re-operation-free curves after 10 years were respectively, 82.5±7.7 (SD% and 20.6±15.9%. CONCLUSION: Patients with MP required fewer re-operation, had less infectious endocarditis and lower late mortality rates compared with patients with bioprostheses. The former, therefore, appear to be the best valve replacement for pediatric patients.

  14. Current features of infective endocarditis in elderly patients: results of the International Collaboration on Endocarditis Prospective Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Bradley, Suzanne; Selton-Suty, Christine; Tripodi, Marie-Françoise; Barsic, Bruno; Bouza, Emilio; Cabell, Christopher H.; Ramos, Auristela Isabel de Oliveira; Fowler, Vance; Hoen, Bruno; Koneçny, Pam; Moreno, Asuncion; Murdoch, David; Pappas, Paul; Sexton, Daniel J.; Spelman, Denis; Tattevin, Pierre; Miró, José M.; van der Meer, Jan T. M.; Utili, Riccardo; Gordon, David; Devi, Uma; Kauffman, Carol; Armstrong, William; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Giamarellou, Helen; Lerakis, Stamatios; del Rio, Ana; Mestres, Carlos A.; Paré, Carlos; Garcia de la Maria, Cristina; de Lazzario, Elisa; Marco, Francesc; Gatell, Jose M.; Miró, José M.; Almela, Manel; Azqueta, Manuel; Jiménez-Expósito, Maria Jesús; de Benito, Natividad; Perez, Noel; Almirante, Benito; Fernandez-Hidalgo, Nuria; Rodriguez de Vera, Pablo; Tornos, Pilar; Falcó, Vicente; Claramonte, Xavier; Armero, Yolanda; Sidani, Nisreen; Kanj-Sharara, Souha; Kanafani, Zeina; Raglio, Annibale; Goglio, Antonio; Gnecchi, Fabrizio; Suter, Fredy; Valsecchi, Grazia; Rizzi, Marco; Ravasio, Veronica; Chirouze, Catherine; Leroy, Joel; Plesiat, Patrick; Bernard, Yvette; Casey, Anna; Lambert, Peter; Watkin, Richard; Elliott, Tom; Patel, Mukesh; Dismukes, William; Pan, Angelo; Caros, Giampiero; Tribouilloy, Amel Brahim Mathiron Christophe; Goissen, Thomas; Delahaye, Armelle; Delahaye, Francois; Vandenesch, Francois; Vizzotti, Carla; Nacinovich, Francisco M.; Marin, Marcelo; Trivi, Marcelo; Lombardero, Martin; Cortes, Claudia; Horacio Casabe, José; Altclas, Javier; Kogan, Silvia; Clara, Liliana; Sanchez, Marisa; Commerford, Anita; Hansa, Cass; Deetlefs, Eduan; Ntsekhe, Mpiko; Commerford, Patrick; Wray, Dannah; Steed, Lisa L.; Church, Preston; Cantey, Robert; Morris, Arthur; Read, Kerry; Raymond, Nigel; Lang, Selwyn; Chambers, Stephen; Kotsanas, Despina; Korman, Tony M.; Peterson, Gail; Purcell, Jon; Southern, Paul M.; Shah, Manisha; Bedimo, Roger; Reddy, Arjun; Levine, Donald; Dhar, Gaurav; Hanlon-Feeney, Alanna; Hannan, Margaret; Kelly, Sinead; Wang, Andrew; Cabell, Christopher H.; Woods, Christopher W.; Benjamin, Danny; Corey, G. Ralph; McDonald, Jay R.; Federspiel, Jeff; Engemann, John J.; Reller, L. Barth; Drew, Laura; Caram, Lauren B.; Stryjewski, Martin; Morpeth, Susan; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Chu, Vivian; Mazaheri, Bahram; Neuerburg, Carl; Naber, Christoph; Athan, Eugene; Henry, Margaret; Harris, Owen; Alestig, Eric; Olaison, Lars; Wikstrom, Lotta; Snygg-Martin, Ulrika; Francis, Johnson; Venugopal, K.; Nair, Lathi; Thomas, Vinod; Chaiworramukkun, Jaruwan; Pachirat, Orathai; Chetchotisakd, Ploenchan; Suwanich, Tewan; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tamin, Syahidah Syed; Premru, Manica Mueller; Logar, Mateja; Lejko-Zupanc, Tatjana; Orezzi, Christina; Klein, John; Moreno, Mar; Rodríguez-Créixems, Marta; Fernández, Miguel; Muñoz, Patricia; Fernández, Rocío; Ramallo, Victor; Raoult, Didier; Thuny, Franck; Habib, Gilbert; Casalta, Jean-Paul; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Chipigina, Natalia; Kirill, Ozerecky; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Kulichenko, Vadim P.; Butkevich, O. M.; Lion, Christine; Alla, Francois; Coyard, Hélène; Doco-Lecompte, Thanh; Iarussi, Diana; Ragone, Enrico; Dialetto, Giovanni; Tripodi, Marie Françoise; Casillo, Roberta; Kumar, A. Sampath; Sharma, Gautam; Dickerman, Stuart A.; Street, Alan; Eisen, Damon Peter; McBryde, Emma Sue; Grigg, Leeanne; Abrutyn, Elias; Michelet, Christian; Donnio, Pierre Yves; Fortes, Claudio Querido; Edathodu, Jameela; Al-Hegelan, Mashael; Font, Bernat; Anguera, Ignasi; Raimon Guma, Joan; Cereceda, M.; Oyonarte, Miguel J.; Montagna Mella, Rodrigo; Garcia, Patricia; Braun Jones, Sandra; de Oliveira Ramos, Auristela Isabel; Paiva, Marcelo Goulart; de Medeiros, Regina Aparecida; Woon, Lok Ley; Lum, Luh-Nah; Tan, Ru-San; Rees, David; Lawrence, Richard; Dever, Robyn; Post, Jeffrey; Jones, Phillip; Ryan, Suzanne; Harkness, John; Feneley, Michael; Rubinstein, Ethan; Strahilewitz, Jacob; Ionac, Adina; Mornos, Cristian; Dragulescu, Stefan; Forno, Davide; Cecchi, Enrico; de Rosa, Francesco; Imazio, Massimo; Trinchero, Rita; Wiesbauer, Franz; Gattringer, Rainer; Deans, Greg; Andrasevic, Arjana Tambic; Klinar, Igor; Vincelj, Josip; Bukovski, Suzana; Krajinovic, Vladimir; Cabell, Christopher; Stafford, Judy; Baloch, Khaula; Redick, Thomas; Harding, Tina; Karchmer, Adolf W.; Bayer, Arnie; Durack, David T.; Corey, Ralph; Moreillon, Phillipe; Eykynm, Susannah

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elderly patients are emerging as a population at high risk for infective endocarditis (IE). However, adequately sized prospective studies on the features of IE in elderly patients are lacking. METHODS: In this multinational, prospective, observational cohort study within the

  15. Microbiology of odontogenic bacteremia: beyond endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parahitiyawa, N B; Jin, L J; Leung, W K; Yam, W C; Samaranayake, L P

    2009-01-01

    The human gingival niche is a unique microbial habitat. In this habitat, biofilm organisms exist in harmony, attached to either enamel or cemental surfaces of the tooth as well as to the crevicular epithelium, subjacent to a rich vascular plexus underneath. Due to this extraordinary anatomical juxtaposition, plaque biofilm bacteria have a ready portal of ingress into the systemic circulation in both health and disease. Yet the frequency, magnitude, and etiology of bacteremias due to oral origin and the consequent end organ infections are not clear and have not recently been evaluated. In this comprehensive review, we address the available literature on triggering events, incidence, and diversity of odontogenic bacteremias. The nature of the infective agents and end organ infections (other than endocarditis) is also described, with an emphasis on the challenge of establishing the link between odontogenic infections and related systemic, focal infections.

  16. [Infective endocarditis in a dermatology unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinou, M-P; Valeyrie-Allanore, L; Lesprit, P; Terrazzoni, S; Ortonne, N; Roujeau, J-C; Bagot, M

    2009-12-01

    Although often clinically suspected, infectious endocarditis (IE) is frequently difficult to diagnose with certainty. Although the dermatological signs of endocarditis can vary, they must be routinely sought where there is a suspicion of IE. The aim of this study was to reveal the diversity of clinical manifestations of IE in a dermatology unit. This retrospective study was conducted between May 2006 and May 2007 and included all patients hospitalized in the dermatology unit in whom an IE was diagnosed according to the modified Duke criteria. Seven patients were included with a median age of 61 years. The reasons for hospital admission were: chronic ulcers (n=1), Sezary's syndrome (n=1), atopic dermatitis (n=1), epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (n=1) and purpura (n=1). Specific dermatological manifestations of IE included necrotic lesions on the lower limbs (n=2), purpura (n=5) and splinter haemorrhages (n=1). Blood cultures were positive in 3 cases (MSSA=2, MRSA=1). One patient had serological evidence of Coxiella burnetti IE. Cutaneous sources of IE were found in 6 cases, including acute dermohypodermitis or chronic dermatosis (3), peripheral venous catheter (n=2) and haemodialysis (n=1). Transthoracic echocardiography was negative in 6 patients, whereas transoesophageal echocardiography performed in 6 patients confirmed the diagnosis in 5 cases. The mean time to diagnosis was 21 days. Among these patients, 5 died after a mean period of 78 days. Diagnosing IE remains a clinical challenge and must be routinely considered in the presence of unusual dermatological findings such as purpura or distal necrosis, but also in patients with partially or poorly controlled chronic dermatosis, which comprise an underestimated potential source of IE. Physicians treating such patients must consider the risk of IE, especially in the event of chronic dermatosis or of an invasive cutaneous procedure involving affected skin.

  17. Clinical performance of mechanical versus bioprosthetic valves in patients aged 60-70 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-ming ZHU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To compare the mortality, valve-related morbidity and reoperation rate between mechanical prostheses and bioprostheses in patients aged 60 to 70 years. Methods The pre-operative characteristics of 119 patients who received mechanical prostheses and 181 those with bioprosthesis implantation in our department between January 2006 and December 2014 were analyzed, and their mortality, valve-related morbidity and reoperation rate were compared. Results Follow-up revealed mechanical prostheses had a lower all-cause mortality after mitral valve replacement than bioprostheses at 6 years after the operation (P=0.033, but there was no statistical difference in valve-related mortality (P=0.277. The complications after mechanical prosthesis replacement had embolism (8.4% and bleeding (5.0%, bioprosthesis' those consisted of structural valvular deterioration (2.2%, nonstructural dysfunction (1.1%, thrombosis (2.8%, embolism (5.0%, bleeding (0.6% and operated valvular endocarditis (1.1%. There was no statistically significant difference in total complication rate between the two groups (P=0.318. Biological group had 3 patients receiving reoperation in 8 years, while there was no reoperation in the mechanical group, but without statistical group difference. Conclusion Patients aged 60-70 years old could have a similar valve-related mortality, morbidity and reoperation rate after mitral valve replacement between mechanical and biological valves. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.05.19

  18. Main Oxidizer Valve Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addona, Brad; Eddleman, David

    2015-01-01

    A developmental Main Oxidizer Valve (MOV) was designed by NASA-MSFC using additive manufacturing processes. The MOV is a pneumatically actuated poppet valve to control the flow of liquid oxygen to an engine's injector. A compression spring is used to return the valve to the closed state when pneumatic pressure is removed from the valve. The valve internal parts are cylindrical in shape, which lends itself to traditional lathe and milling operations. However, the valve body represents a complicated shape and contains the majority of the mass of the valve. Additive manufacturing techniques were used to produce a part that optimized mass and allowed for design features not practical with traditional machining processes.

  19. Prevención de la Endocarditis Bacteriana :: Revisión de la Literatura

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guzmán H, Patricia R; Corte F, Sonia M; Delgado O, Mónica P

    2000-01-01

    .... La endocarditis bacteriana se refiere específicamente a la infección por agentes bacterianos. La mayoría de las personas que desarrollan la endocarditis han padecido una enfermedad cardíaca previa...

  20. Aggregatibacter aphrophilus infective endocarditis confirmed by broad-range PCR diagnosis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Hirano

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: A rare disease, Aggregatibacter aphrophilus infective endocarditis was successfully treated with surgical repair and appropriate antibiotic therapy. To avoid misdiagnosis, br-PCR testing should be performed in patients with blood culture-negative endocarditis.

  1. The value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in diagnosing infectious endocarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouijzer, I.J.; Vos, F.J.; Janssen, M.J.R.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Oyen, W.J.G.; Bleeker-Rovers, C.P.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Early detection of infectious endocarditis is challenging. For diagnosing infectious endocarditis, the revised Duke criteria are the gold standard. Evidence of endocardial involvement on echocardiography is a major criterion, but sensitivity and specificity of echocardiography are not

  2. What is the effect of penicillin dosing interval on outcomes in streptococcal infective endocarditis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoe, J A T; Patel, P A; Baig, M W; West, R

    2013-11-01

    Penicillin is an important treatment option for streptococcal infective endocarditis (IE), but its short half-life requires frequent re-dosing (4- or 6-hourly). There is a variation between the dosing regimens in different guidelines and consequent differences in the dosing interval. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between the penicillin dosing interval and outcomes in streptococcal IE. A retrospective study of cases of streptococcal IE was undertaken using the Leeds Endocarditis Service database. Cases were included if the first-line therapy had been penicillin and excluded if patients had received less than 72 h of therapy. Details of antimicrobial therapy and outcomes were collated using strict definitions. Various parameters were considered as independent variables in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Univariate analysis of categorical data was carried out using a χ(2) test, and analysis of continuous data using an unpaired t-test. Two hundred and twelve cases were included in the final analysis. Of the parameters considered, a 4-hourly dosing interval [unadjusted OR = 2.79 (95% CI 1.43-5.62)] and initial echocardiographic evidence of abscess or severe valve regurgitation [unadjusted OR = 0.30 (95% CI 0.13-0.66)] were the only statistically significant factors associated with the success or failure of penicillin therapy. The odds of a successful outcome were almost three times greater with a 4-hourly regimen than with a 6-hourly regimen. Failure of penicillin therapy had no correlation with the MIC of penicillin or the concurrent administration of gentamicin. Penicillin continues to be an effective therapy for IE. This study suggests that a 4-hourly dosing interval may be relevant in predicting the success of initial medical therapy. Further prospective studies are warranted to evaluate relationships in more detail.

  3. Characteristics and Outcome of Streptococcus pneumoniae Endocarditis in the XXI Century: A Systematic Review of 111 Cases (2000-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Egea, Viviana; Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela; de Alarcón, Arístides; Lepe, José Antonio; Miró, José M; Gálvez-Acebal, Juan; García-Pavía, Pablo; Navas, Enrique; Goenaga, Miguel Angel; Fariñas, María Carmen; Vázquez, Elisa García; Marín, Mercedes; Bouza, Emilio

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an infrequent cause of severe infectious endocarditis (IE). The aim of our study was to describe the epidemiology, clinical and microbiological characteristics, and outcome of a series of cases of S. pneumoniae IE diagnosed in Spain and in a series of cases published since 2000 in the medical literature. We prospectively collected all cases of IE diagnosed in a multicenter cohort of patients from 27 Spanish hospitals (n = 2539). We also performed a systematic review of the literature since 2000 and retrieved all cases with complete clinical data using a pre-established protocol. Predictors of mortality were identified using a logistic regression model. We collected 111 cases of pneumococcal IE: 24 patients from the Spanish cohort and 87 cases from the literature review. Median age was 51 years, and 23 patients (20.7%) were under 15 years. Men accounted for 64% of patients, and infection was community-acquired in 96.4% of cases. The most important underlying conditions were liver disease (27.9%) and immunosuppression (10.8%). A predisposing heart condition was present in only 18 patients (16.2%). Pneumococcal IE affected a native valve in 93.7% of patients. Left-sided endocarditis predominated (aortic valve 53.2% and mitral valve 40.5%). The microbiological diagnosis was obtained from blood cultures in 84.7% of cases. In the Spanish cohort, nonsusceptibility to penicillin was detected in 4.2%. The most common clinical manifestations included fever (71.2%), a new heart murmur (55%), pneumonia (45.9%), meningitis (40.5%), and Austrian syndrome (26.1%). Cardiac surgery was performed in 47.7% of patients. The in-hospital mortality rate was 20.7%. The multivariate analysis revealed the independent risk factors for mortality to be meningitis (OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 1.4-12.9; P < 0.01). Valve surgery was protective (OR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.04-0.4; P < 0.01). Streptococcus pneumoniae IE is a community-acquired disease that mainly affects native aortic

  4. Prognostic factors in left-sided endocarditis: results from the andalusian multicenter cohort

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    de la Torre-Lima Javier

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite medical advances, mortality in infective endocarditis (IE is still very high. Previous studies on prognosis in IE have observed conflicting results. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of in-hospital mortality in a large multicenter cohort of left-sided IE. Methods An observational multicenter study was conducted from January 1984 to December 2006 in seven hospitals in Andalusia, Spain. Seven hundred and five left-side IE patients were included. The main outcome measure was in-hospital mortality. Several prognostic factors were analysed by univariate tests and then by multilogistic regression model. Results The overall mortality was 29.5% (25.5% from 1984 to 1995 and 31.9% from 1996 to 2006; Odds Ratio 1.25; 95% Confidence Interval: 0.97-1.60; p = 0.07. In univariate analysis, age, comorbidity, especially chronic liver disease, prosthetic valve, virulent microorganism such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae and fungi, and complications (septic shock, severe heart failure, renal insufficiency, neurologic manifestations and perivalvular extension were related with higher mortality. Independent factors for mortality in multivariate analysis were: Charlson comorbidity score (OR: 1.2; 95% CI: 1.1-1.3, prosthetic endocarditis (OR: 1.9; CI: 1.2-3.1, Staphylococcus aureus aetiology (OR: 2.1; CI: 1.3-3.5, severe heart failure (OR: 5.4; CI: 3.3-8.8, neurologic manifestations (OR: 1.9; CI: 1.2-2.9, septic shock (OR: 4.2; CI: 2.3-7.7, perivalvular extension (OR: 2.4; CI: 1.3-4.5 and acute renal failure (OR: 1.69; CI: 1.0-2.6. Conversely, Streptococcus viridans group etiology (OR: 0.4; CI: 0.2-0.7 and surgical treatment (OR: 0.5; CI: 0.3-0.8 were protective factors. Conclusions Several characteristics of left-sided endocarditis enable selection of a patient group at higher risk of mortality. This group may benefit from more specialised attention in referral centers and should help to identify those

  5. Mitral endocarditis due to Rothia aeria with cerebral haemorrhage and femoral mycotic aneurysms, first French description

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    R. Collarino

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rothia aeria is a Rothia species from the Micrococcaceae family. We report here the first French R. aeria endocarditis complicated by brain haemorrhage and femoral mycotic aneurysms. Altogether, severity and antimicrobial susceptibility should make us consider the management of R. aeria endocarditis as Staphylococcus aureus methicillin-susceptible endocarditis.

  6. Antibiotic prophylaxis for bacterial endocarditis: A study of knowledge of guidelines among dentists participated in the 47th international congress of dentistry

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    Hashemipour M.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Infective endocarditis is a rare disease resulted in mortality and morbidity in 10-80% of patients. The purpose of present study was to investigate the knowledge of guidelines on antibiotic prophylaxis for bacterial endocarditis in a group of Iranian dentists. "nMaterials and Methods: This was a descriptive study in which the population under study was 205 who were participated in the 47th international congress of dentistry (Tehran-Spring 2007 and they were chosen by census sampling methods. Nameless questionnaires were designed and were given to the dentists to complete. The t-test, χ² and spearman with the SPSS 13.5 program were used in the data analysis. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significance. "nResults: Regarding to the prescribing of prophylactic antibiotic for patients with prosthetic cardiac valves, 94.6% of all answers were correct. Also, the most common procedures in which the prophylaxis antibiotic was distinguished to be necessary were periodontal surgery, scaling, dental extraction and using subgingival cord, respectively. More than half of the dentists (65.8% had chosen amoxicillin as a prophylactic antibiotic. Mean knowledge score was 38.77±12.4. "nConclusion: Results of the present study showed that the knowledge of dentists about prescribing antibiotics for prevention of bacterial endocarditis is relatively low. It was also found that the level of knowledge decreases by passing time from graduation.

  7. High dose of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and daptomycin as a therapeutic option for MRSA endocarditis with large vegetation complicated by embolic stroke: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carlo, Paola; D'Alessandro, Natale; Guadagnino, Giuliana; Bonura, Celestino; Mammina, Caterina; Lunetta, Monica; Novo, Salvatore; Giarratano, Antonino

    2013-03-01

    Large cardiac vegetation carries a poor prognosis and high mortality risk, especially if associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. We share our experience of a rare and complicated large cardiac vegetation which had a favourable outcome with combination antibiotic treatment alone. A 35-year-old HIV-negative, HCV-positive male patient with a previous history of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus endocarditis showed MRSA mitral valve endocarditis with large vegetation, complicated by embolic stroke. The strain was soon identified by PCR but only after culture did the patient receive efficacious antibiotics. A combination of daptomycin plus trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) was administered for six weeks, followed by a high dosage of TMP/SMX for a further six weeks. Effectiveness of the treatment was demonstrated by the patient's clinical improvement and instrumental evidence of cardiac mitral vegetation clearance. Innovative antibiotic strategies in patient management are needed to fight Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis because strains show varying antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in different geographic areas. Timely initiation of targeted antimicrobial therapy remains a crucial step to reduce morbidity and mortality but culture is crucial for appropriate fine-tuning of antibiotic therapy.

  8. Initial Surgical Experience with Aortic Valve Repair: Clinical and Echocardiographic Results

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    da Costa, Francisco Diniz Affonso; Colatusso, Daniele de Fátima Fornazari; da Costa, Ana Claudia Brenner Affonso; Balbi Filho, Eduardo Mendel; Cavicchioli, Vinicius Nesi; Lopes, Sergio Augusto Veiga; Ferreira, Andrea Dumsch de Aragon; Collatusso, Claudinei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Due to late complications associated with the use of conventional prosthetic heart valves, several centers have advocated aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root replacement for patients with aortic valve insufficiency, in order to enhance late survival and minimize adverse postoperative events. Methods From March/2012 thru March 2015, 37 patients consecutively underwent conservative operations of the aortic valve and/or aortic root. Mean age was 48±16 years and 81% were males. The aortic valve was bicuspid in 54% and tricuspid in the remaining. All were operated with the aid of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Surgical techniques consisted of replacing the aortic root with a Dacron graft whenever it was dilated or aneurysmatic, using either the remodeling or the reimplantation technique, besides correcting leaflet prolapse when present. Patients were sequentially evaluated with clinical and echocardiographic studies and mean follow-up time was 16±5 months. Results Thirty-day mortality was 2.7%. In addition there were two late deaths, with late survival being 85% (CI 95% - 68%-95%) at two years. Two patients were reoperated due to primary structural valve failure. Freedom from reoperation or from primary structural valve failure was 90% (CI 95% - 66%-97%) and 91% (CI 95% - 69%-97%) at 2 years, respectively. During clinical follow-up up to 3 years, there were no cases of thromboembolism, hemorrhage or endocarditis. Conclusions Although this represents an initial series, these data demonstrates that aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root surgery can be performed with satisfactory immediate and short-term results. PMID:27556321

  9. Further experience with the "no-react" bioprosthesis in patients with active infective endocarditis: 11-year single center results in 402 patients.

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    Musci, Michele; Amiri, Aref; Siniawski, Henryk; Stein, Julia; Weng, Yuguo; Hetzer, Roland

    2013-08-01

    We investigated early, midterm, and long-term results following valve replacement with the "No-React" bioprosthesis in patients with active infective endocarditis (AIE).Patients and Methods Between February 2000 and February 2011, a total of 402 patients (median 61 years, 17 to 91 years) received "No-React" bioprostheses due to single valve AIE in 315 (aortic valve replacement n = 158, aortic conduit n = 30, mitral valve replacement n = 116, tricuspid valve replacement n = 11) and double valve AIE in 87 cases. Prosthetic AIE was found in 105 patients (26.1%). Mean follow-up was 2.8 ± 3.2 years (1 month to 11.4 years) with 1,124 patient years, completed in 97.1%. This retrospective study analyzes both prospectively updated data (n = 255) and patients recently operated upon (n = 147). There was a highly significant difference in the survival between patients operated on urgently and patients operated on in an emergency (30-day, 1-, 5-, and 10-year survival were 80.9 ± 2.3%, 63.8 ± 2.9%, 48.3 ± 3.3%, and 39.7 ± 4.1% vs. 61.3 ± 4.5%, 45.0 ± 4.7%, 33.1 ± 4.6%, and 14.0 ± 5.1%, respectively, p native versus prosthetic AIE (p = 0.032), single versus double valve replacement (p = 0.005), and with or without abscess formation (p 60 years) and the younger patients. Our experience in the use of "No-React" bioprostheses in patients with native and prosthetic AIE shows satisfactory early, midterm, and long-term results, in particular low rates of reoperation due to recurrent endocarditis and SVD. Because these prostheses are readily available and their implantation straightforward, we strongly recommend their use in patients with AIE. Patients' survival differed significantly depending on their surgical urgency. Early mortality was independently predicted by septic shock, abscess formation, and number of implanted valves besides age per 10 years. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Endocarditis-associated Brain Lesions in Slaughter Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstrup, C.C.; Jensen, H.E.; Aalbæk, B.

    2011-01-01

    Left-sided valvular endocarditis (LSVE) is a common finding in slaughter pigs. The lesion is often associated with renal thromboembolism, but information on embolization to other organs is sparse. This study focuses on the presence and type of endocarditis-associated brain lesions (EABLs). The br......Left-sided valvular endocarditis (LSVE) is a common finding in slaughter pigs. The lesion is often associated with renal thromboembolism, but information on embolization to other organs is sparse. This study focuses on the presence and type of endocarditis-associated brain lesions (EABLs......). The brains of 20 slaughter pigs with spontaneously arising LSVE and 11 controls were examined by sectioning half of a formalin-fixed brain into 4mm slices for histological examination. The aetiology of the endocarditis was determined by bacteriological and, in some cases, by fluorescence in...... was found in eight cases. EABLs are therefore common in slaughter pigs with LSVE. The number of lesions per animal is small, which may explain the limited attention paid to this sequela of LSVE. EABLs have rarely been reported in domestic animals and mostly in patients with neurological signs. The frequent...

  11. Role of granulocytes in experimental Streptococcus sanguis endocarditis.

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    Meddens, M J; Thompson, J; Eulderink, F; Bauer, W C; Mattie, H; van Furth, R

    1982-01-01

    We investigated the role of granulocytes during the induction and course of experimental Streptococcus sanguis endocarditis in rabbits by depleting blood granulocytes with nitrogen mustard. The induction of the endocarditis was not influenced by granulocytopenia: the 50% infectious dose was 5.4 X 10(4) colony-forming units in normal and granulocytopenic rabbits. However, granulocytopenia influenced the curse of the endocarditis, as shown by a significant increase in the number of colony-forming units per gram of vegetation (P less than 0.02) from 24 to 72 h after the injection of 10(5) colony-forming units of S. sanguis. This rise did not occur in the control rabbits. Furthermore, bacteremia was significantly higher in the granulocytopenic rabbits (P less than 0.05) during the first 48 h compared with the control rabbits. This was not because of altered clearance of the streptococcus inoculum or seeding of streptococci from extracardiac bacterial foci. We concluded that granulocytes have no measurable effect on the induction of S. sanguis endocarditis, but during the course of the endocarditis, granulocytes keep the endocardial infection in check. Images PMID:7076302

  12. Current status of taxonomic groups of oral streptococci in endocarditis. Can virulence factors discriminate between endocarditis and non-endocarditis strains?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tove; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Gutschik, Ernö

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Infective endocarditis is frequently caused by oral streptococci, especially Streptococcus sanguis. In this group, many strains have recently been reclassified on the basis of new taxonomic schemes. The purpose of this study was to classify oral streptococci from patients with infective...

  13. Cryogenic Cam Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Kenneth J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A cryogenic cam butterfly valve has a body that includes an axially extending fluid conduit formed there through. A disc lug is connected to a back side of a valve disc and has a circular bore that receives and is larger than a cam of a cam shaft. The valve disc is rotatable for a quarter turn within the body about a lug axis that is offset from the shaft axis. Actuating the cam shaft in the closing rotational direction first causes the camming side of the cam of the cam shaft to rotate the disc lug and the valve disc a quarter turn from the open position to the closed position. Further actuating causes the camming side of the cam shaft to translate the valve disc into sealed contact with the valve seat. Opening rotational direction of the cam shaft reverses these motions.

  14. Intelligent Flow Control Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Anthony R (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is an intelligent flow control valve which may be inserted into the flow coming out of a pipe and activated to provide a method to stop, measure, and meter flow coming from the open or possibly broken pipe. The intelligent flow control valve may be used to stop the flow while repairs are made. Once repairs have been made, the valve may be removed or used as a control valve to meter the amount of flow from inside the pipe. With the addition of instrumentation, the valve may also be used as a variable area flow meter and flow controller programmed based upon flowing conditions. With robotic additions, the valve may be configured to crawl into a desired pipe location, anchor itself, and activate flow control or metering remotely.

  15. Tratamento cirúrgico da endocardite infecciosa Surgical treatment of infective endocarditis

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    Gustavo Roberto Hoppen

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available RAvaliaram-se as indicações, as alterações e os resultados cirúrgicos de 28 pacientes, operados por endocardite infecciosa (EI no período de 1983 a 1994. O diagnóstico clínico foi confirmado pela ecocardiografia e pela cineangiocardiografia. Dos pacientes, 65% eram do sexo masculino e 25% do feminino, com média de idades de 35,21 (14 a 67 anos. Noventa e três por cento dos pacientes estavam em classe funcional III e IV (NYHA. O tempo decorrido entre o diagnóstico e a cirurgia foi em média de quatro semanas e meia (1 a 363 dias. A hemocultura foi positiva em 25% dos casos e os germes mais freqüentemente encontrados foram estreptococos e estafilococos. A valva aórtica foi a mais acometida e as vegetações foram as lesões mais comumente encontradas. O tratamento cirúrgico utilizado foi a plastia valvar em 2 casos e a substituição valvar por prótese em 26.Complicações ocorreram em 39,28% dos casos, com 5(18% mortes. Conclui-se que, embora rara, a EI é doença grave e, se não prevenida com adequada antibiótico-profilaxia ou tratada em tempo hábil, o paciente terá conseqüências graves, podendo, até mesmo, falecer.The indication, surgical pathology and the results of surgical treatment of 28 patients operated on for infectious endocarditis between 1983 and 1994 are here evaluated. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by echocardiography and cineangiography. Seventy-five percent of the patients were male and 25% female, with the mean age of 35.2 (14 to 67 years old. Ninety three percent were in functional class III or IV (N Y H A. Elapsed time between diagnosis and surgery was around 4 weeks (1-363 days. A positive hemoculture was present in 25% of the cases and the commonest bacteria found were streptococcus and staphilococcus. The aortic valve was the one usualy affected and vegetations was the usual finding. Surgical treatment consisted of valvuloplasty in 2 cases and valve replacement in 26. Complications were present

  16. Modeling the Mitral Valve

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    Kaiser, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    The mitral valve is one of four valves in the human heart. The valve opens to allow oxygenated blood from the lungs to fill the left ventricle, and closes when the ventricle contracts to prevent backflow. The valve is composed of two fibrous leaflets which hang from a ring. These leaflets are supported like a parachute by a system of strings called chordae tendineae. In this talk, I will describe a new computational model of the mitral valve. To generate geometry, general information comes from classical anatomy texts and the author's dissection of porcine hearts. An MRI image of a human heart is used to locate the tips of the papillary muscles, which anchor the chordae tendineae, in relation to the mitral ring. The initial configurations of the valve leaflets and chordae tendineae are found by solving solving an equilibrium elasticity problem. The valve is then simulated in fluid (blood) using the immersed boundary method over multiple heart cycles in a model valve tester. We aim to identify features and mechanisms that influence or control valve function. Support from National Science Foundation, Graduate Research Fellowship Program, Grant DGE 1342536.

  17. Magnetic Check Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brian G.; Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Poppet in proposed check valve restored to closed condition by magnetic attraction instead of spring force. Oscillations suppressed, with consequent reduction of wear. Stationary magnetic disk mounted just upstream of poppet, also containing magnet. Valve body nonmagnetic. Forward pressure or flow would push poppet away from stationary magnetic disk so fluid flows easily around poppet. Stop in valve body prevents poppet from being swept away. When flow stopped or started to reverse, magnetic attraction draws poppet back to disk. Poppet then engages floating O-ring, thereby closing valve and preventing reverse flow. Floating O-ring facilitates sealing at low loads.

  18. Postoperative Outcomes of Mitral Valve Repair for Mitral Restenosis after Percutaneous Balloon Mitral Valvotomy

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    Seong Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: There have been a number of studies on mitral valve replacement and repeated percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy for mitral valve restenosis after percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy. However, studies on mitral valve repair for these patients are rare. In this study, we analyzed postoperative outcomes of mitral valve repair for mitral valve restenosis after percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy. Methods: In this study, we assessed 15 patients (mean age, 47.7±9.7 years; 11 female and 4 male who underwent mitral valve repair between August 2008 and March 2013 for symptomatic mitral valve restenosis after percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy. The mean interval between the initial percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy and the mitral valve repair was 13.5±7 years. The mean preoperative Wilkins score was 9.4±2.6. Results: The mean mitral valve area obtained using planimetry increased from 1.16±0.16 cm2 to 1.62±0.34 cm2 (p=0.0001. The mean pressure half time obtained using Doppler ultrasound decreased from 202.4±58.6 ms to 152±50.2 ms (p=0.0001. The mean pressure gradient obtained using Doppler ultrasound decreased from 9.4±4.0 mmHg to 5.8±1.5 mmHg (p=0.0021. There were no early or late deaths. Thromboembolic events or infective endocarditis did not occur. Reoperations such as mitral valve repair or mitral valve replacement were not performed during the follow-up period (39±16 months. The 5-year event-free survival was 56.16% (95% confidence interval, 47.467–64.866. Conclusion: On the basis of these results, we could not conclude that mitral valve repair could be an alternative for patients with mitral valve restenosis after percutaneous balloon mitral valvotomy. However, some patients presented with results similar to those of mitral valve replacement. Further studies including more patients with long-term follow-up are necessary to determine the possibility of this application of mitral valve repair.

  19. Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    aortic valvular disease, endocarditis, ascending aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection.1-4 There is also an association of BAV with coarctation of...for aortic aneurysm , patients with BAV appear to have additional risks for aortic disease. Nistri et al.12 reported significant aortic root...Congenital heart disease in patients with Turner’s syndrome. Italian study group for Turner syndrome (ISGTS). J Pediatr 1998; 133:688-692. 7. Schmid

  20. BRUCELLA ENDOCARDITIS IN IRANIAN PATIENTS: COMBINED MEDICAL AND SURGICAL TREATMENT

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    Ebrahim Nematipour

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available Brucella endocarditis is a Tare but serious complication ofbrucellosis and is the main cause of death reuuedto thisdisease: Itis not rare in the endemic areas and aaualiy accounts for up to 8~lO% ofendocarditis infections: We report seven adult cases of brucella endocarditis in lmam-Khorneini Hospual: Contrary to previous independent reports, female patients were not rare in this study and accountedfor three out ofseven. Four patients were cared for by combined medical and surgical treatment and were recovered Three of the patients that did not receive the combined theraPl could not he saved This report confirms the necessity of prompt combined medical and surgical treatment ofbrucella endocarditis.

  1. [Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies associated with infective endocarditis: Literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, V; Marie, I

    2017-07-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) associated with infective endocarditis are a rare disorder. The condition can mimic primary systemic vasculitis (i.e. granulomatosis with polyangiitis, microscopic polyangiitis, and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis). Thus, a wrong diagnosis of valvular involvement related to primary systemic vasculitis can be made in patients exhibiting ANCA associated with infective endocarditis. Because treatment of both conditions is different, this wrong diagnosis will lead to dramatic consequences in these latter patients. This review reports the state of knowledge and proposes an algorithm to follow when confronted to a possible case of ANCA associated with infective endocarditis. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. [Early and long term results of mechanical aortic valve replacement at the Instituto Nacional del Torax in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villavicencio, Mauricio; Turner, Eduardo; Naranjo, Lorenzo

    2005-10-01

    Mechanical aortic valve replacement (AVR) results have been published extensively in industrialized countries. To assess our immediate and late results in patients subjected to AVR. We retrospectively studied 194 patients subjected to isolated AVR between 1995 and 2003. Mean age was 57 +/- 13 years and 119 (61%) were male. One hundred thirty nine (73%) were in functional class III-IV, 20 (10%) had a previous cardiac operation and 25 (13%) were operated as an emergency. Surgical indication was stenosis in 110 (58%), regurgitation in 49 (26%) and stenosis/regurgitation in 31 (16%). Etiology was bicuspid valve 56 (29%), degenerative lesions 55 (28%), rheumatic valve disease 38 (20%) and endocarditis 27 (14%). Medtronic Hall was the most common prosthesis used in 157 patients (81%). Mean cardiopulmonary bypass time 97 +/- 29 min and mean cross clamp time was 69 +/- 21 min. Operative mortality was 4.6% (3% in elective surgery, 16% in emergency surgery and 0% in reoperations). Follow-up was complete in 100% of cases, totalizing 636 patients-year. Survival was 91 +/- 2%, 80 +/- 4% and 73 +/- 6%, at 1, 5 and 7 years, respectively. Multivariate risk analysis identified renal failure and endocarditis as predictors of early and late mortality. During follow up, the linear incidence rate for hemorrhage was 3.29% /patients-year, thromboembolism 2.04% patients-year and endocarditis 1.1% patients-year. AVR has low overall and elective mortality. Midterm survival is good but linear event rates related to anticoagulant treatment are higher than those previously published in industrialized countries. Renal failure and endocarditis were risk factors for early and late death.

  3. Audit of antibiotic therapy used in 66 cases of endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demonchy, E; Dellamonica, P; Roger, P M; Bernard, E; Cua, E; Pulcini, C

    2011-11-01

    We wanted to assess the quality of antibiotic therapy prescribed for infective endocarditis in our ward. We conducted a retrospective audit of all adult patients with endocarditis hospitalized over a 3-year period in the Infectious Diseases Unit of the Nice University Hospital, France. The quality of antibiotic therapy was assessed using the 2004 European Society of Cardiology guidelines as a reference. Antibiotic therapy was considered as appropriate only if the five following items complied with guidelines: antibiotic, dose, route, interval of administration, and duration of antibiotic treatment. Sixty-six patients were included, 63years of age on average. Antibiotic therapy complied with guidelines in 14% of the cases. The most frequent causes of inappropriate therapy were: gentamicin prescribed as a single daily dose in 55% (27/49) of the cases, unnecessary prescriptions of rifampin in 72% (18/25) of the cases, and too long duration of gentamicin course for staphylococcal endocarditis in 32% (9/28) of the cases. Antibiotic therapy was switched from intravenous to oral route in 29% of the patients (n=19), 18±9 days after starting therapy on average. These endocarditis were mainly left-sided (n=12) and/or complicated (n=15). There was no significant association between mortality and inappropriate antibiotic therapy (14% if inappropriate vs. 22%, P=0.62) or between mortality and oral switch (0% if oral switch vs. 21%, P=0.052). Infective endocarditis antibiotic treatment rarely complied with the 2004 European guidelines, but this did not have a negative impact on mortality. Switching antibiotic therapy from intravenous to oral route was common, even for complicated left-sided endocarditis, and was associated with a favorable outcome in all cases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Replaceable valve seat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Raymond W.

    1992-01-01

    A valve with an O-ring, a disk seal, and a replaceable valve seat is presented. A groove in the bottom on the valve seat flange forms an inner and outer drip ledge with the inner and outer periphery of the flange. If leakage occurs at the valve seat O-ring, fluid droplets will form on the out drip ledge. If leakage occurs at the disk seal, fluid droplets will form on the inner drip ledge. A visual inspection of these drip ledges through an access port, or by a borescope placed in an inspection port, can discriminate between a leak which originates in the O-ring and a leak which originates in the disk seal. When conventional replaceable valve seats leak, fluid droplets form at the bottom on the valve seat. In the present invention, such a valve seat is modified by machining a groove on the bottom surface of the valve seat flange. This groove and the inner and outer surfaces of the flange intersect and form drip ledges. If leakage occurs at the valve seat seal, shown as an O-ring in the preferred embodiment, fluid droplets will form on the outer drip ledge. If leakage occurs at the valve disk seal, fluid droplets will form on the inner drip ledge. The drip ledges can be inspected either through an access port or by passing a borescope through a small inspection port in the valve case. Visual inspection of the bottom on the drip ledge will positively identify the required repair action.

  5. [Which patients with infective endocarditis require emergency surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahaye, François

    2016-10-01

    Half of patients with infectious endocarditis have surgery during the active phase of infective endocarditis (before the end of antibiotic therapy). The American Heart Association and the European Society of Cardiology, independently from each other, have published guidelines in September 2015. As regards surgical indications, these guidelines are similar. The surgical indication must be a common decision of a multidisciplinary team of experts in cardiology, cardiac surgery, imaging and infectious diseases. The main indications are heart failure, non-infectious process control and prevention of embolisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Virulence Factors Associated with Enterococcus Faecalis Infective Endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian T; Skov, Marianne N; Gill, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    been associated with E. faecalis infective endocarditis. Absence of these factors entailed attenuation of strains in both mixed- and mono-bacterial infection endocarditis models as well as in in vitro and ex vivo assays when compared to their virulence factor expressing parental strains. PATHOGENESIS......: The virulence factors promote a broad spectrum of events that together allow for disease development and progression. The infection is initiated through bacterial binding to ligands present at the site of infection after which the colonization can be accelerated through inter-bacterial attachment and modulation...

  7. [The treatment of infectious endocarditis. Cefotaxime versus "traditional" medical management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipe Flores, L; León, S; Casanova, J M; Reyes, P A

    1993-01-01

    We performed an open study to compare efficacy and renal toxicity of cephotaxime versus the usual beta lactam plus aminoglucoside treatment of infectious endocarditis. Twenty cases were studied, 10 treated with cephotaxime 4 g/day per 21 days and aminoglucoside for only 10 days. Comparison group received a combination of different beta lactam antibiotic plus aminoglucoside for 21 to 50 days, these patients were under care of nonparticipant physicians. Although cephotaxime treatment was as good as conventional antimicrobial scheme for control of infectious endocarditis, the treatment cost increases, and there is only marginal benefit in regard renal toxicity.

  8. Current controversies in infective endocarditis [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Cahill

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis is a life-threatening disease caused by a focus of infection within the heart. For clinicians and scientists, it has been a moving target that has an evolving microbiology and a changing patient demographic. In the absence of an extensive evidence base to guide clinical practice, controversies abound. Here, we review three main areas of uncertainty: first, in prevention of infective endocarditis, including the role of antibiotic prophylaxis and strategies to reduce health care-associated bacteraemia; second, in diagnosis, specifically the use of multimodality imaging; third, we discuss the optimal timing of surgical intervention and the challenges posed by increasing rates of cardiac device infection.

  9. Valve reconstruction for congenital mitral valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinonez, Luis G; Del Nido, Pedro J

    2015-01-01

    The surgical treatment of mitral valve disease in children is a challenging problem. Mitral stenosis and regurgitation may occur in isolation or together. Mitral valve repair is almost always preferable to replacement. Mitral valve replacement is not an ideal alternative to repair due to limitations of size, growth, structural valve degeneration, anticoagulation and poor survival. Surgical repair of congenital mitral stenosis must address the multiple levels of obstruction, including resection of the supramitral ring, thinning of leaflets and mobilization of the subvalvular apparatus. Sometimes leaflet augmentation is required. Repair of mitral regurgitation in children may involve simple cleft closures, edge-to-edge repairs, triangular resections and annuloplasties. Techniques used in adults, such as annuloplasty bands or artificial chords, may not be appropriate for children. Overall, an imperfect mitral valve repair may be more acceptable than the negative consequences of a replacement in a child. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  10. Problem: Mitral Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) Healthy Living for Heart.org ... each time the left ventricle contracts. Watch an animation of mitral valve regurgitation A leaking mitral valve ...

  11. Problem: Heart Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) Healthy Living for Heart.org ... should be completely closed For example: Watch an animation of mitral valve regurgitation A leaking mitral valve ...

  12. Mitral Valve Prolapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) Healthy Living for Heart.org ... valve syndrome . What happens during MVP? Watch an animation of mitral valve prolapse When the heart pumps ( ...

  13. Mitral Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clots, but they also are less durable than mechanical valves and may need to be replaced in the future. Like mitral valve repair, replacement can be done minimally invasively or with traditional open heart surgery. Your medical team will discuss the advantages ...

  14. Acute aortic regurgitation due to infective endocarditis

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    Claudia M Cortés

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute aortic regurgitation (AAR due to infective endocarditis (IE is a serious disease and usually requires surgical treatment. Our study aims to compare the clinical, echocardiographic, and microbiological characteristics as well as in-hospital outcome of patients with AAR according to the severity of heart failure (HF and to evaluate predictors of in-hospital mortality in a tertiary centre. In a prospective analysis, we compared patients with NYHA functional class I-II HF (G1 vs. functional class III-IV HF (G2. From 06/92 to 07/16, 439 patients with IE were hospitalized; 86 presented AAR: (G1, 39: 45.4% y G2, 47: 54.7%. The G1 had higher prosthetic IE (43.6% vs. 17%, p 0.01. All G2 patients had dyspnoea vs. 30.8% of the G1 (p < 0.0001. There were no differences in clinical, echocardiographic and microbiological characteristics. Surgical treatment was indicated mainly due to infection extension or valvular dysfunction in G1 and HF in G2. In-hospital mortality was 15.4% vs. 27.7% (G1 and G2 respectively p NS. In multivariate analysis, health care-associated acquisition (p 0.001, negative blood cultures (p 0.004, and functional class III-IV HF (p 0.039 were in-hospital mortality predictors. One-fifth of the patients with EI had AAR. Half of them had severe HF which needed emergency surgery and the remaining needed surgery for extension of the infection and / or valvular dysfunction. Both groups remain to have high surgical and in-hospital mortality. Health care-associated acquisition, negative blood cultures and advanced HF were predictors of in-hospital mortality

  15. Mitral valve surgery in emergency for severe acute regurgitation: analysis of postoperative results from a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, Roberto; Gelsomino, Sandro; De Cicco, Giuseppe; Beghi, Cesare; Russo, Claudio; De Bonis, Michele; Colli, Andrea; Sala, Andrea

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate postoperative outcome of emergency surgery for acute severe mitral regurgitation (ASMR) from a multicentre experience. In six centres, 279 patients (mean age 62+/-14 years, 62% female) undergoing emergency surgery for ASMR from December 1986 to March 2007 were analysed and followed up. Aetiology included acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in 126 patients (group 1, 45%), degenerative mitral valve disease in 74 (group 2, 26%), and acute endocarditis (AE) in 79 (group 3, 28%). Preoperatively, all patients were in haemodynamic instability, with 185 patients in cardiogenic shock (66%), 184 (66%) intubated, and 61 (22%) on IABP, respectively. Valve repair was performed in 76 (27%), whereas 203 (73%) underwent valve replacement. Median follow-up (98% complete) was 70.8 months (inter-quartile range 59.8-86.66 months). Overall 30-day mortality was 22.5% (63/279). Early death was significantly lower in group 2 (pASMR remains a surgical challenge for high incidence of early and late cardiac-related events, particularly in patients with associated coronary artery disease and acute endocarditis. Apparently, type of mitral valve surgical approaches (repair or replacement) did not provide any influence on postoperative outcome.

  16. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for bicuspid aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Ashraf; Kornowski, Ran

    2015-08-01

    In Preprocedural CT, patients with BAV have larger aortic annulus perimeters, and more calcified valves compared with TAV. In patients with BAV, self-expandable valves were under-expand and balloon-expandable valves have a trend toward increased rates of postimplantation AR grade. Self-expandable valves have higher postprocedural gradient in BAV compared with TAV. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Mitral valve repair. Quadrangular resection of the posterior leaflet in patients with myxomatous degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Maria Alberto Pomerantzeff

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE - To analyze the immediate and late results of mitral valve repair with quadrangular resection of the posterior leaflet without the use of a prosthetic ring annuloplasty. METHODS - Using this technique, 118 patients with mitral valve prolapse who underwent mitral repair from January '84 through December '96 were studied. Age ranged from 30 to 86 (mean = 59.1±11.8 years and 62.7% were males. An associated surgery was performed in 22% of the patients, and coronary artery bypass graft was the most frequently performed surgery (15 patients - 12.7%. In 20 (16.9% patients other associated techniques of mitral valve repair were used and shortening of elongated chordae tendineae was the most frequent one (6 patients. RESULTS - Immediate mortality was 0.9% (one patient. Long-term rates for thromboembolism, endocarditis, re-operation and death in the late postoperative period were 0.4%, 0.4%, 1.7% and 2.2% patients/year, respectively. The actuarial curve of survival was 83.8±8.6% over 12 years; survival free from re-operation was 91.8±4.3%, free from endocarditis was 99.2±0.8% and free from thromboembolism was 99.2±0.8%. In the late postoperative period, 93.8% of the patients were in functional class 1 (NYHA, with a complete follow-up in 89.7% of the patients. CONCLUSION - Patients with mitral valve prolapse who undergo mitral valve repair using this technique have a satisfactory prognosis over 12 years.

  18. The role of the sewing ring in tissue healing: a pathologic study of explanted mechanical heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, Mathew V; Sabareeswaran, Arumugam; Kanchanamala, Muniraj; Balachandran, Seetharaman; Mogileswari, Dhananjayan; Subban, Vijayakumar

    2012-03-01

    Serious complications may occur after heart valve replacement, and many such patients will require reoperation. The study aim was to identify the pattern of tissue response around the sewing ring of those valves that have been explanted as a result of various valve-associated complications. A total of 51 mechanical heart valves (MHVs) was explanted from 45 patients who had undergone reoperation for valve-related complications. The examination of the valves included an analysis of the operative findings, macroscopic findings, histopathology, and dissection of the sewing ring. The extent of tissue hyperplasia was variable around the sewing rings of valves explanted for various pathologies. In pannus, the hyperplastic tissue extended into the valve orifice and produced an obstruction to flow, whereas in thrombosed valves the thrombus was attached to the tissue at the annulus. In non-infective pathologies, the histology revealed cellular infiltration that was limited to the peripheral fabric layers of the sewing ring, though the extent of infiltration was not increased with the duration of implantation. In prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE), the surrounding hyperplastic tissue was granulomatous, but cellular infiltration into the sewing ring was absent. The dissection of various models of explanted valves revealed that different types of filler and fixing mechanisms had increased the bulk of the sewing ring. Tissue hyperplasia of varying extent occurs around the sewing ring after MHV implantation. The cellular elements grow into the peripheral layers, but not the deeper layers, of the sewing ring. In PVE, there was an absence of cellular infiltration into the sewing ring.

  19. Activated Human Valvular Interstitial Cells Sustain Interleukin-17 Production To Recruit Neutrophils in Infective Endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chiou-Yueh; Shun, Chia-Tung; Kuo, Yu-Min; Jung, Chiau-Jing; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Chiu, Yen-Ling; Chen, Jeng-Wei; Hsu, Ron-Bin; Yang, Chia-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that underlie valvular inflammation in streptococcus-induced infective endocarditis (IE) remain unclear. We previously demonstrated that streptococcal glucosyltransferases (GTFs) can activate human heart valvular interstitial cells (VIC) to secrete interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine involved in T helper 17 (Th17) cell differentiation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that activated VIC can enhance neutrophil infiltration through sustained IL-17 production, leading to valvular damage. To monitor cytokine and chemokine production, leukocyte recruitment, and the induction or expansion of CD4+ CD45RA− CD25− CCR6+ Th17 cells, primary human VIC were cultured in vitro and activated by GTFs. Serum cytokine levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and neutrophils and Th17 cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in infected valves from patients with IE. The expression of IL-21, IL-23, IL-17, and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor C (Rorc) was upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which may enhance the proliferation of memory Th17 cells in an IL-6-dependent manner. Many chemokines, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), were upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which might recruit neutrophils and CD4+ T cells. Moreover, CXCL1 production in VIC was induced in a dose-dependent manner by IL-17 to enhance neutrophil chemotaxis. CXCL1-expressing VIC and infiltrating neutrophils could be detected in infected valves, and serum concentrations of IL-17, IL-21, and IL-23 were increased in patients with IE compared to healthy donors. Furthermore, elevated serum IL-21 levels have been significantly associated with severe valvular damage, including rupture of chordae tendineae, in IE patients. Our findings suggest that VIC are activated by bacterial modulins to recruit neutrophils and that such activities might be further enhanced by the production of Th17-associated cytokines. Together, these factors can amplify the

  20. 149. Reparación valvular mitral en endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rodríguez-Roda Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Conclusiones: Con la suficiente experiencia en reparación mitral, la reparación de la válvula mitral con endocarditis se puede realizar con una baja mortalidad quirúrgica además de aportar las ventajas de conservar la válvula nativa con una baja tasa de reoperación.