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Sample records for valley millimeter array

  1. The Owens Valley Millimeter Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padin, S.; Scott, S.L.; Woody, D.P.; Scoville, N.Z.; Seling, T.V.

    1991-01-01

    The telescopes and signal processing systems of the Owens Valley Millimeter Array are considered, and improvements in the sensitivity and stability of the instrument are characterized. The instrument can be applied to map sources in the 85 to 115 GHz and 218 to 265 GHz bands with a resolution of about 1 arcsec in the higher frequency band. The operation of the array is fully automated. The current scientific programs for the array encompass high-resolution imaging of protoplanetary/protostellar disk structures, observations of molecular cloud complexes associated with spiral structure in nearby galaxies, and observations of molecular structures in the nuclei of spiral and luminous IRAS galaxies. 9 refs

  2. An Ultra-Wideband Millimeter-Wave Phased Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Markus H.; Miranda, Felix A.; Volakis, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Wideband millimeter-wave arrays are of increasing importance due to their growing use in high data rate systems, including 5G communication networks. In this paper, we present a new class of ultra-wideband millimeter wave arrays that operate from nearly 20 GHz to 90 GHz. The array is based on tightly coupled dipoles. Feeding designs and fabrication challenges are presented, and a method for suppressing feed resonances is provided.

  3. The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is the new name [2] for a giant millimeter-wavelength telescope project. As described in the accompanying joint press release by ESO and the U.S. National Science Foundation , the present design and development phase is now a Europe-U.S. collaboration, and may soon include Japan. ALMA may become the largest ground-based astronomy project of the next decade after VLT/VLTI, and one of the major new facilities for world astronomy. ALMA will make it possible to study the origins of galaxies, stars and planets. As presently envisaged, ALMA will be comprised of up to 64 12-meter diameter antennas distributed over an area 10 km across. ESO PR Photo 24a/99 shows an artist's concept of a portion of the array in a compact configuration. ESO PR Video Clip 03/99 illustrates how all the antennas will move in unison to point to a single astronomical object and follow it as it traverses the sky. In this way the combined telescope will produce astronomical images of great sharpness and sensitivity [3]. An exceptional site For such observations to be possible the atmosphere above the telescope must be transparent at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. This requires a site that is high and dry, and a high plateau in the Atacama desert of Chile, probably the world's driest, is ideal - the next best thing to outer space for these observations. ESO PR Photo 24b/99 shows the location of the chosen site at Chajnantor, at 5000 meters altitude and 60 kilometers east of the village of San Pedro de Atacama, as seen from the Space Shuttle during a servicing mission of the Hubble Space Telescope. ESO PR Photo 24c/99 and ESO PR Photo 24d/99 show a satellite image of the immediate vicinity and the site marked on a map of northern Chile. ALMA will be the highest continuously operated observatory in the world. The stark nature of this extreme site is well illustrated by the panoramic view in ESO PR Photo 24e/99. High sensitivity and sharp images ALMA

  4. Compressive Sensing for Millimeter Wave Antenna Array Diagnosis

    KAUST Repository

    Eltayeb, Mohammed E.

    2018-01-08

    The radiation pattern of an antenna array depends on the excitation weights and the geometry of the array. Due to wind and atmospheric conditions, outdoor millimeter wave antenna elements are subject to full or partial blockages from a plethora of particles like dirt, salt, ice, and water droplets. Handheld devices are also subject to blockages from random finger placement and/or finger prints. These blockages cause absorption and scattering to the signal incident on the array, modify the array geometry, and distort the far-field radiation pattern of the array. This paper studies the effects of blockages on the far-field radiation pattern of linear arrays and proposes several array diagnosis techniques for millimeter wave antenna arrays. The proposed techniques jointly estimate the locations of the blocked antennas and the induced attenuation and phase-shifts given knowledge of the angles of arrival/departure. Numerical results show that the proposed techniques provide satisfactory results in terms of fault detection with reduced number of measurements (diagnosis time) provided that the number of blockages is small compared to the array size.

  5. Far infrared through millimeter backshort-under-grid arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christine A.; Abrahams, John; Benford, Dominic J.; Chervenak, James A.; Chuss, David T.; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Miller, Timothy M.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2006-06-01

    We are developing a large-format, versatile, bolometer array for a wide range of infrared through millimeter astronomical applications. The array design consists of three key components - superconducting transition edge sensor bolometer arrays, quarter-wave reflective backshort grids, and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) multiplexer readouts. The detector array is a filled, square grid of bolometers with superconducting sensors. The backshort arrays are fabricated separately and are positioned in the etch cavities behind the detector grid. The grids have unique three-dimensional interlocking features micromachined into the walls for positioning and mechanical stability. The ultimate goal of the program is to produce large-format arrays with background-limited sensitivity, suitable for a wide range of wavelengths and applications. Large-format (kilopixel) arrays will be directly indium bump bonded to a SQUID multiplexer circuit. We have produced and tested 8×8 arrays of 1 mm detectors to demonstrate proof of concept. 8×16 arrays of 2 mm detectors are being produced for a new Goddard Space Flight Center instrument. We have also produced models of a kilopixel detector grid and dummy multiplexer chip for bump bonding development. We present detector design overview, several unique fabrication highlights, and assembly technologies.

  6. Hierarchical sinuous-antenna phased array for millimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukierman, Ari; Lee, Adrian T.; Raum, Christopher; Suzuki, Aritoki; Westbrook, Benjamin

    2018-03-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and measured performance of a hierarchical sinuous-antenna phased array coupled to superconducting transition-edge-sensor (TES) bolometers for millimeter wavelengths. The architecture allows for dual-polarization wideband sensitivity with a beam width that is approximately frequency-independent. We report on measurements of a prototype device, which uses three levels of triangular phased arrays to synthesize beams that are approximately constant in width across three frequency bands covering a 3:1 bandwidth. The array element is a lens-coupled sinuous antenna. The device consists of an array of hemispherical lenses coupled to a lithographed wafer, which integrates TESs, planar sinuous antennas, and microwave circuitry including band-defining filters. The approximately frequency-independent beam widths improve coupling to telescope optics and keep the sensitivity of an experiment close to optimal across a broad frequency range. The design can be straightforwardly modified for use with non-TES lithographed cryogenic detectors such as kinetic inductance detectors. Additionally, we report on the design and measurements of a broadband 180° hybrid that can simplify the design of future multichroic focal planes including but not limited to hierarchical phased arrays.

  7. Astronomers Break Ground on Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) - World's Largest Millimeter Wavelength Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Scientists and dignitaries from Europe, North America and Chile are breaking ground today (Thursday, November 6, 2003) on what will be the world's largest, most sensitive radio telescope operating at millimeter wavelengths . ALMA - the "Atacama Large Millimeter Array" - will be a single instrument composed of 64 high-precision antennas located in the II Region of Chile, in the District of San Pedro de Atacama, at the Chajnantor altiplano, 5,000 metres above sea level. ALMA 's primary function will be to observe and image with unprecedented clarity the enigmatic cold regions of the Universe, which are optically dark, yet shine brightly in the millimetre portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is an international astronomy facility. ALMA is an equal partnership between Europe and North America, in cooperation with the Republic of Chile, and is funded in North America by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) in cooperation with the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), and in Europe by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and Spain. ALMA construction and operations are led on behalf of North America by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), which is managed by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), and on behalf of Europe by ESO. " ALMA will be a giant leap forward for our studies of this relatively little explored spectral window towards the Universe" , said Dr. Catherine Cesarsky , Director General of ESO. "With ESO leading the European part of this ambitious and forward-looking project, the impact of ALMA will be felt in wide circles on our continent. Together with our partners in North America and Chile, we are all looking forward to the truly outstanding opportunities that will be offered by ALMA , also to young scientists and engineers" . " The U.S. National Science Foundation joins today with our North American partner, Canada, and with the European Southern Observatory, Spain, and Chile to prepare

  8. Compressive Sensing for Millimeter Wave Antenna Array Diagnosis

    KAUST Repository

    Eltayeb, Mohammed E.; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.; Heath, Robert W.

    2018-01-01

    of particles like dirt, salt, ice, and water droplets. Handheld devices are also subject to blockages from random finger placement and/or finger prints. These blockages cause absorption and scattering to the signal incident on the array, modify the array

  9. Passive Frequency Selective Surface Array as a Diffuser for Destroying Millimeter Wave Coherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiful Islam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design, construction, and testing of grounded frequency selective surface (FSS array as a diffuser for destroying millimeter wave coherence which is used to eliminate speckle in active millimeter wave imaging. To create stochastically independent illumination patterns, we proposed a diffuser based on random-phase distributions obtained by changing the incident frequency. The random-phase diffuser was obtained by mixing up the phase relations between the cells of a deterministic function (e.g., beam splitter. The slot length of FSS is the main design parameter used to optimize the phase shifting properties of the array. The critical parameters of the diffuser array design, such as phase relation with slot lengths, losses, and bandwidth, are discussed. We designed the FSS arrays with finite integral technique (FIT, fabricated by etching technique, and characterized the S-parameters with a free-space MVNA, and measured the radiation patterns with a BWO in motorized setup.

  10. Optical Techniques for Millimeter-Wave Phased Array Communications Antennas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edge, Colin

    1998-01-01

    The scope of this program was to study the application of optical techniques to signal distribution and beamforming networks in phased array antennas for Army mobile tactical communications systems...

  11. Testing and assembly of the detectors for the Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera on ACT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriage, T.A.; Chervenak, J.A.; Doriese, W.B.

    2006-01-01

    The Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera (MBAC) for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope consists of three Transition Edge Sensor (TES) arrays to make simultaneous observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background in three frequency bands. MBAC TESs are NASA Goddard Pop-Up Detectors (PUD) which are read-out by NIST time-domain multiplexers. MBAC is constructed by stacking 1x32 TES columns to form the 32x32 element arrays. The arrays are modular (connectorized) at the 1x32 column level such that array assembly is reversible and camera repair possible. Prior to assembly, each column is tested in a quick (2h) cycling 4 He/ 3 He adsorption refrigerator. Tests include measurements of TES current-voltage curves and TES complex impedance

  12. Testing and assembly of the detectors for the Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera on ACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriage, T.A. [Physics Department, Princeton University, Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)]. E-mail: marriage@princeton.edu; Chervenak, J.A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Doriese, W.B. [National Institute of Standards, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    The Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera (MBAC) for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope consists of three Transition Edge Sensor (TES) arrays to make simultaneous observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background in three frequency bands. MBAC TESs are NASA Goddard Pop-Up Detectors (PUD) which are read-out by NIST time-domain multiplexers. MBAC is constructed by stacking 1x32 TES columns to form the 32x32 element arrays. The arrays are modular (connectorized) at the 1x32 column level such that array assembly is reversible and camera repair possible. Prior to assembly, each column is tested in a quick (2h) cycling {sup 4}He/{sup 3}He adsorption refrigerator. Tests include measurements of TES current-voltage curves and TES complex impedance.

  13. Three-channel phase meters based on the AD8302 and field programmable gate arrays for heterodyne millimeter wave interferometer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Varavin, A.V.; Ermak, G.P.; Vasiliev, A.S.; Fateev, A.V.; Varavin, Mykyta; Žáček, František; Zajac, Jaromír

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 11 (2016), s. 1009-1025 ISSN 0040-2508 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : AD8302 * Interferometer * Millimeter wave * Phase meter * Programmable gate array * Tokamak Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  14. Compressive Sensing for Blockage Detection in Vehicular Millimeter Wave Antenna Arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Eltayeb, Mohammed E.; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.; Heath, Robert W.

    2017-01-01

    The radiation pattern of an antenna array depends on the excitation weights and the geometry of the array. Due to mobility, some vehicular antenna elements might be subjected to full or partial blockages from a plethora of particles like dirt, salt, ice, and water droplets. These particles cause absorption and scattering to the signal incident on the array, and as a result, change the array geometry. This distorts the radiation pattern of the array mostly with an increase in the sidelobe level and decrease in gain. In this paper, we propose a blockage detection technique for millimeter wave vehicular antenna arrays that jointly estimates the locations of the blocked antennas and the attenuation and phase-shifts that result from the suspended particles. The proposed technique does not require the antenna array to be physically removed from the vehicle and permits real-time array diagnosis. Numerical results show that the proposed technique provides satisfactory results in terms of block detection with low detection time provided that the number of blockages is small compared to the array size.

  15. Compressive Sensing for Blockage Detection in Vehicular Millimeter Wave Antenna Arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Eltayeb, Mohammed E.

    2017-02-07

    The radiation pattern of an antenna array depends on the excitation weights and the geometry of the array. Due to mobility, some vehicular antenna elements might be subjected to full or partial blockages from a plethora of particles like dirt, salt, ice, and water droplets. These particles cause absorption and scattering to the signal incident on the array, and as a result, change the array geometry. This distorts the radiation pattern of the array mostly with an increase in the sidelobe level and decrease in gain. In this paper, we propose a blockage detection technique for millimeter wave vehicular antenna arrays that jointly estimates the locations of the blocked antennas and the attenuation and phase-shifts that result from the suspended particles. The proposed technique does not require the antenna array to be physically removed from the vehicle and permits real-time array diagnosis. Numerical results show that the proposed technique provides satisfactory results in terms of block detection with low detection time provided that the number of blockages is small compared to the array size.

  16. Centralized operations and maintenance planning at the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Bernhard; Whyborn, Nicholas D.; Guniat, Serge; Hernandez, Octavio; Gairing, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is a joint project between astronomical organizations in Europe, North America, and East Asia, in collaboration with the Republic of Chile. ALMA consists of 54 twelve-meter antennas and 12 seven-meter antennas operating as an aperture synthesis array in the (sub)millimeter wavelength range. Since the inauguration of the observatory back in March 2013 there has been a continuous effort to establish solid operations processes for effective and efficient management of technical and administrative tasks on site. Here a key aspect had been the centralized maintenance and operations planning: input is collected from science stakeholders, the computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) and from the technical teams spread around the world, then this information is analyzed and consolidated based on the established maintenance strategy, the observatory long-term plan and the short-term priorities definitions. This paper presents the high-level process that has been developed for the planning and scheduling of planned- and unplanned maintenance tasks, and for site operations like the telescope array reconfiguration campaigns. We focus on the centralized planning approach by presenting its genesis, its current implementation for the observatory operations including related planning products, and we explore the necessary next steps in order to fully achieve a comprehensive centralized planning approach for ALMA in steady-state operations.

  17. Multilevel photonic modules for millimeter-wave phased-array antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolella, Arthur C.; Bauerle, Athena; Joshi, Abhay M.; Wright, James G.; Coryell, Louis A.

    2000-09-01

    Millimeter wave phased array systems have antenna element sizes and spacings similar to MMIC chip dimensions by virtue of the operating wavelength. Designing modules in traditional planar packaing techniques are therefore difficult to implement. An advantageous way to maintain a small module footprint compatible with Ka-Band and high frequency systems is to take advantage of two leading edge technologies, opto- electronic integrated circuits (OEICs) and multilevel packaging technology. Under a Phase II SBIR these technologies are combined to form photonic modules for optically controlled millimeter wave phased array antennas. The proposed module, consisting of an OEIC integrated with a planar antenna array will operate on the 40GHz region. The OEIC consists of an InP based dual-depletion PIN photodetector and distributed amplifier. The multi-level module will be fabricated using an enhanced circuit processing thick film process. Since the modules are batch fabricated using an enhanced circuit processing thick film process. Since the modules are batch fabricated, using standard commercial processes, it has the potential to be low cost while maintaining high performance, impacting both military and commercial communications systems.

  18. Study on Millimeter-Wave Vivaldi Rectenna and Arrays with High Conversion Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Nan Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel Vivaldi rectenna operated at 35 GHz with high millimeter wave to direct current (MMW-to-DC conversion efficiency is presented and the arrays are investigated. The measured conversion efficiency is 51.6% at 35 GHz and the efficiency higher than 30% is from 33.2 GHz to 36.6 GHz when the input MMW power is 79.4 mW. The receiving Vivaldi antenna loaded with metamaterial units has a high gain of 10.4 dBi at 35 GHz. A SIW- (substrate integrated waveguide- to-microstrip transition is designed not only to integrate the antenna with the rectifying circuit directly but also to provide the DC bypass for the rectifying circuit. When the power density is 8.7 mW/cm2, the received MMW power of the antenna is 5.6 mW, and the maximum conversion efficiency of the rectenna element is 31.5%. The output DC voltage of the element is nearly the same as that of the parallel array and is about half of the series array. The DC power obtained by the 1 × 2 rectenna arrays is about two times as much as that of the element. The conversion efficiencies of the arrays are very close to that of the element. Large scale arrays could be expended for collecting more DC power.

  19. Ultra-Wideband Phased Array for Millimeter-Wave 5G and ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Markus H.; Volakis, John L.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2016-01-01

    Growing mobile data consumption has prompted the exploration of the millimeter-wave spectrum for large bandwidth, high speed communications. However, the allocated bands are spread across a wide swath of spectrum: fifth generation mobile architecture (5G): 28, 38, 39, 64-71 GHz, as well as Industrial, Scientific, and Medical bands (ISM): 24 and 60 GHz. Moreover, high gain phased arrays are required to overcome the significant path loss associated with these frequencies. Further, it is necessary to incorporate several of these applications in a single, small size and low cost platform. To this end, we have developed a scanning, Ultra-Wideband (UWB) array which covers all 5G, ISM, and other mm-W bands from 24-72 GHz. Critically, this is accomplished using mass-production Printed Circuit Board (PCB) fabrication.

  20. Ultra-Wideband Array in PCB for Millimeter-Wave 5G and ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Markus H.; Volakis, John L.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2017-01-01

    Growing mobile data consumption has prompted the exploration of the millimeter-wave spectrum for large bandwidth, high speed communications. However, the allocated bands are spread across a wide swath of spectrum: Fifth generation mobile architecture (5G): 28, 38, 39, 6471 GHz; Industrial, Scientific, and Medical bands (ISM): 24, 60 GHz. Moreover, high gain phased arrays are required to overcome the significant path loss associated with these frequencies. Further, it is necessary to incorporate several of these applications in a single, small size and low cost platform. To this end, we have developed a scanning, Ultra-Wideband (UWB) array which covers all 5G, ISM, and other mm-W bands from 2472 GHz. Critically, this is accomplished using mass-production Printed Circuit Board (PCB) fabrication. The results of this work are presented in this poster.

  1. Synthesis and Investigation of Millimeter-Scale Vertically Aligned Boron Nitride Nanotube Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Roland; Li, Hongling; Tsang, Siu Hon; Jing, Lin; Tan, Dunlin; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have shown potential in a wide range of applications due to their superior properties such as exceptionally high mechanical strength, excellent chemical and thermal stabilities. However, previously reported methods to date only produced BNNTs with limited length/density and insufficient yield at high temperatures. Here we present a facile and effective two-step synthesis route involving template-assisted chemical vapor deposition at a relatively low temperature of 900 degree C and subsequent annealing process to fabricate vertically aligned (VA) BN coated carbon nanotube (VA-BN/CNT) and VA-BNNT arrays. By using this method, we achieve the longest VA-BN/CNTs and VA-BNNTs to date with lengths of over millimeters (exceeding two orders of magnitude longer than the previously reported length of VA-BNNTs). In addition, the morphology, chemical composition and microstructure of the resulting products, as well as the mechanism of coating process are systematically investigated. This versatile BN coating technique and the synthesis of millimeter-scale BN/CNT and BNNT arrays pave a way for new applications especially where the aligned geometry of the NTs is essential such as for field-emission, interconnects and thermal management.

  2. Demonstration of Millimeter Wave 5G Setup Employing High-Gain Vivaldi Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Tariq Sethi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a 4 × 4 slot-coupled Vivaldi antenna (SCVA array unit cell, which offers wide bandwidth and high gain (~23 dBi at the millimeter wave (mmW frequencies of 28 GHz and 38 GHz. A single SCVA element is first presented, which has a bandwidth of 25–40 GHz with an average gain of ~13 dBi at the frequencies of interest. This antenna element is then used to design a 1 × 4 linear SCVA array matched to a 50 Ω impedance via a modified Wilkinson power divider (WPD. Next, the 1 × 4 linear array is used to construct a 4 × 4 antenna array unit cell. The proposed 4 × 4 antenna array unit cell is fabricated, and the characteristics of its elements (i.e., the single SCVA, 1 × 4 linear array, and WPD are thoroughly investigated. Further, the 4 × 4 array is tested for signal reception of various digital modulation formats at lab environment using high-speed digital signal oscilloscope. In particular, a 2.5 Gbps data rate is successfully transmitted achieving receiver sensitivity of −50 dBm at 2 × 10−3 bit error rate (BER for 32 quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM with a system baud rate of 500 MHz. The wide bandwidth and high gain along with the excellent performance of the proposed 4 × 4 antenna array unit cell makes it an excellent candidate for future 5G wireless communication applications.

  3. Monolithic millimeter-wave diode array beam controllers: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, L. B.; Liu, H.-X. L.; Wang, F.; Liu, T.; Wu, W.; Qin, X.-H.; Chung, E.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Maserjian, J.

    1992-01-01

    In the current work, multi-function beam control arrays have been fabricated and have successfully demonstrated amplitude control of transmitted beams in the W and D bands (75-170 GHz). While these arrays are designed to provide beam control under DC bias operation, new designs for high-speed electronic and optical control are under development. These arrays will fill a need for high-speed watt-level beam switches in pulsed reflectometer systems under development for magnetic fusion plasma diagnostics. A second experimental accomplishment of the current work is the demonstration in the 100-170 GHz (D band) frequency range of a new technique for the measurement of the transmission phase as well as amplitude. Transmission data can serve as a means to extract ('de-embed') the grid parameters; phase information provides more complete data to assist in this process. Additional functions of the array beam controller yet to be tested include electronically controlled steering and focusing of a reflected beam. These have application in the areas of millimeter-wave electronic scanning radar and reflectometry, respectively.

  4. Science with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array A New Era for Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Bachiller, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    Currently under construction in the Andean Altiplano, Northern Chile, the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is the most ambitious astronomy facility under construction. ALMA is a radio interferometer composed of 54 antennas of 12 m diameter, and twelve 7 m antennas with about 6600 square meters of total collecting area. Initially covering the most interesting spectral wavelength ranges from 3 to 0.3 mm, ALMA will be a revolutionary telescope aimed to unveil the details of star and planet formation and to provide astronomy with the first exhaustive view of the dark and youngest objects of the Universe. This book describes the enormous capabilities of ALMA, the state of the project, and most notably the scientific prospects with such a unique facility. The book includes comprehensive reviews and recent results on most hot topics of modern Astronomy (the formation and evolution of galaxies, the physics and chemistry of the interstellar medium, and the processes of star and planet formation) with prospects to...

  5. The Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) - A Successful Three-Way International Partnership Without a Majority Stakeholder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanden Bout, Paul A.

    2013-04-01

    The Atacama Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) is the largest ground-based astronomical facility built to date. It's size and challenging site required an international effort. This talk presents the partnership structure, management challenges, current status, and examples of early scientific successes.

  6. Performance evaluation of a sub-millimeter spatial resolution PET detector module using a digital silicon photomultiplier coupled LGSO array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leem, Hyun Tae [Molecular Imaging Research & Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong, E-mail: ychoi@sogang.ac.kr [Molecular Imaging Research & Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyu Bom; Lee, Sangwon [Molecular Imaging Research & Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yamamoto, Seiichi [Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Yeom, Jung-Yeol, E-mail: jungyeol@korea.ac.kr [School of Biomedical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-21

    In positron emission tomography (PET) for breast, brain and small animal imaging, the spatial resolution of a PET detector is crucial to obtain high quality PET images. In this study, a PET detector for sub-millimeter spatial resolution imaging purpose was assembled using 4×4 pixels of a digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM, DPC-3200-22-44, Philips) coupled with a 15×15 LGSO array with BaSO{sub 4} reflector, and a 1 mm thick acrylic light guide for light distribution between the dSiPM pixels. The active area of each dSiPM pixel was 3.2×3.9 mm{sup 2} and the size of each LGSO scintillator element was 0.7×0.7×6 mm{sup 3}. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrated the performance of the PET detector by measuring the energy resolution, 2D flood map, peak to valley (P/V) ratio, and coincidence resolving time (CRT). All measurements were performed at a temperature of 10±1 ℃. The average energy resolution was 15.6% (without correcting for saturation effects) at 511 keV and the best CRT was 242±5 ps. The 2D flood map obtained with an energy window of 400–600 keV demonstrated clear identification of all pixels, and the average P/V ratio of the X- and Y-directions were 7.31 and 7.81, respectively. This study demonstrated that the PET detector could be suitable for application in high resolution PET while achieving good timing resolution.

  7. A sub-millimeter resolution PET detector module using a multi-pixel photon counter array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tae Yong; Wu Heyu; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan; Siegel, Stefan B

    2010-01-01

    A PET block detector module using an array of sub-millimeter lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystals read out by an array of surface-mount, semiconductor photosensors has been developed. The detector consists of a LSO array, a custom acrylic light guide, a 3 x 3 multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) array (S10362-11-050P, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan) and a readout board with a charge division resistor network. The LSO array consists of 100 crystals, each measuring 0.8 x 0.8 x 3 mm 3 and arranged in 0.86 mm pitches. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to aid the design and fabrication of a custom light guide to control distribution of scintillation light over the surface of the MPPC array. The output signals of the nine MPPC are multiplexed by a charge division resistor network to generate four position-encoded analog outputs. Flood image, energy resolution and timing resolution measurements were performed using standard NIM electronics. The linearity of the detector response was investigated using gamma-ray sources of different energies. The 10 x 10 array of 0.8 mm LSO crystals was clearly resolved in the flood image. The average energy resolution and standard deviation were 20.0% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) and ±5.0%, respectively, at 511 keV. The timing resolution of a single MPPC coupled to a LSO crystal was found to be 857 ps FWHM, and the value for the central region of detector module was 1182 ps FWHM when ±10% energy window was applied. The nonlinear response of a single MPPC when used to read out a single LSO was observed among the corner crystals of the proposed detector module. However, the central region of the detector module exhibits significantly less nonlinearity (6.5% for 511 keV). These results demonstrate that (1) a charge-sharing resistor network can effectively multiplex MPPC signals and reduce the number of output signals without significantly degrading the performance of a PET detector and (2) a custom light guide to permit light sharing

  8. A Tutorial on Optical Feeding of Millimeter-Wave Phased Array Antennas for Communication Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Aldaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the interference avoidance capacity, high gain, and dynamical reconfigurability, phased array antennas (PAAs have emerged as a key enabling technology for future broadband mobile applications. This is especially important at millimeter-wave (mm-wave frequencies, where the high power consumption and significant path loss impose serious range constraints. However, at mm-wave frequencies the phase and amplitude control of the feeding currents of the PAA elements is not a trivial issue because electrical beamforming requires bulky devices and exhibits relatively narrow bandwidth. In order to overcome these limitations, different optical beamforming architectures have been presented. In this paper we review the basic principles of phased arrays and identify the main challenges, that is, integration of high-speed photodetectors with antenna elements and the efficient optical control of both amplitude and phase of the feeding current. After presenting the most important solutions found in the literature, we analyze the impact of the different noise sources on the PAA performance, giving some guidelines for the design of optically fed PAAs.

  9. Science with the Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nita, Gelu M.; Gary, Dale E.; Fleishman, Gregory D.; Chen, Bin; White, Stephen M.; Hurford, Gordon J.; McTiernan, James; Hickish, Jack; Yu, Sijie; Nelin, Kjell B.

    2017-08-01

    The Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array (EOVSA) is a solar-dedicated radio array that makes images and spectra of the full Sun on a daily basis. Our main science goals are to understand the basic physics of solar activity, such as how the Sun releases stored magnetic energy on timescales of seconds, and how that solar activity, in the form of solar flares and coronal mass ejections, influences the Earth and near-Earth space environment, through disruptions of communication and navigation systems, and effects on satellites and systems on the ground. The array, which is composed out of thirteen 2.1 m dishes and two 27 m dishes (used only for calibration), has a footprint of 1.1 km EW x 1.2 km NS and it is capable of producing, every second, microwave images at two polarizations and 500 science channels spanning the 1-18 GHz frequency range. Such ability to make multi-frequency images of the Sun in this broad range of frequencies, with a frequency dependent resolution ranging from ˜53” at 1 GHz to ˜3”at 18 GHz, is unique in the world. Here we present an overview of the EOVSA instrument and a first set of science-quality active region and solar flare images produced from data taken during April 2017.This research is supported by NSF grant AST-1615807 and NASA grant NNX14AK66G to New Jersey Institute of Technology.

  10. Millimeter-wave pseudomorphic HEMT MMIC phased array components for space communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, G. L.; Pao, C. K.; Wu, C. S.; Mandolia, G.; Hu, M.; Yuan, S.; Leonard, Regis

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in pseudomorphic HEMT MMIC (PMHEMT/MMIC) technology have made it the preferred candidate for high performance millimeter-wave components for phased array applications. This paper describes the development of PMHEMT/MMIC components at Ka-band and V-band. Specifically, the following PMHEMT/MMIC components will be described: power amplifiers at Ka-band; power amplifiers at V-band; and four-bit phase shifters at V-band. For the Ka-band amplifier, 125 mW output power with 5.5 dB gain and 21 percent power added efficiency at 2 dB compression point has been achieved. For the V-band amplifier, 112 mW output power with 6 dB gain and 26 percent power added efficiency has been achieved. And, for the V-band phase shifter, four-bit (45 deg steps) phase shifters with less than 8 dB insertion loss from 61 GHz to 63 GHz will be described.

  11. Development of optics and microwave multiplexers for far-IR and millimeter detector arrays

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The future of experimental cosmology and astrophysics is intimately tied to the progress of remote sensing technology of millimeter and far-IR instruments. I will...

  12. Millimeter-Wave Microstrip Antenna Array Design and an Adaptive Algorithm for Future 5G Wireless Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Nan Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a high gain millimeter-wave (mmW low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC microstrip antenna array with a compact, simple, and low-profile structure. Incorporating minimum mean square error (MMSE adaptive algorithms with the proposed 64-element microstrip antenna array, the numerical investigation reveals substantial improvements in interference reduction. A prototype is presented with a simple design for mass production. As an experiment, HFSS was used to simulate an antenna with a width of 1 mm and a length of 1.23 mm, resonating at 38 GHz. Two identical mmW LTCC microstrip antenna arrays were built for measurement, and the center element was excited. The results demonstrated a return loss better than 15 dB and a peak gain higher than 6.5 dBi at frequencies of interest, which verified the feasibility of the design concept.

  13. Conformal atomic layer deposition of alumina on millimeter tall, vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Kelly L; Carroll, Murphy; Padbury, Richard; McCord, Marian; Jur, Jesse S; Bradford, Philip D

    2014-11-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to coat high aspect ratio and high surface area substrates with conformal and precisely controlled thin films. Vertically aligned arrays of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with lengths up to 1.5 mm were conformally coated with alumina from base to tip. The nucleation and growth behaviors of Al2O3 ALD precursors on the MWCNTs were studied as a function of CNT surface chemistry. CNT surfaces were modified through a series of post-treatments including pyrolytic carbon deposition, high temperature thermal annealing, and oxygen plasma functionalization. Conformal coatings were achieved where post-treatments resulted in increased defect density as well as the extent of functionalization, as characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using thermogravimetric analysis, it was determined that MWCNTs treated with pyrolytic carbon and plasma functionalization prior to ALD coating were more stable to thermal oxidation than pristine ALD coated samples. Functionalized and ALD coated arrays had a compressive modulus more than two times higher than a pristine array coated for the same number of cycles. Cross-sectional energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed that Al2O3 could be uniformly deposited through the entire thickness of the vertically aligned MWCNT array by manipulating sample orientation and mounting techniques. Following the ALD coating, the MWCNT arrays demonstrated hydrophilic wetting behavior and also exhibited foam-like recovery following compressive strain.

  14. A VIRTUAL SKY WITH EXTRAGALACTIC H I AND CO LINES FOR THE SQUARE KILOMETRE ARRAY AND THE ATACAMA LARGE MILLIMETER/SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obreschkow, D.; Kloeckner, H.-R.; Heywood, I.; Rawlings, S.; Levrier, F.

    2009-01-01

    We present a sky simulation of the atomic H I-emission line and the first 10 12 C 16 O rotational emission lines of molecular gas in galaxies beyond the Milky Way. The simulated sky field has a comoving diameter of 500 h -1 Mpc; hence, the actual field of view depends on the (user-defined) maximal redshift z max ; e.g., for z max = 10, the field of view yields ∼4 x 4 deg 2 . For all galaxies, we estimate the line fluxes, line profiles, and angular sizes of the H I and CO-emission lines. The galaxy sample is complete for galaxies with cold hydrogen masses above 10 8 M sun . This sky simulation builds on a semi-analytic model of the cosmic evolution of galaxies in a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology. The evolving CDM distribution was adopted from the Millennium Simulation, an N-body CDM simulation in a cubic box with a side length of 500 h -1 Mpc. This side length limits the coherence scale of our sky simulation: it is long enough to allow the extraction of the baryon acoustic oscillations in the galaxy power spectrum, yet the position and amplitude of the first acoustic peak will be imperfectly defined. This sky simulation is a tangible aid to the design and operation of future telescopes, such as the Square Kilometre Array, Large Millimeter Telescope, and Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array. The results presented in this paper have been restricted to a graphical representation of the simulated sky and fundamental dN/dz analyses for peak flux density limited and total flux limited surveys of H I and CO. A key prediction is that H I will be harder to detect at redshifts z ∼> 2 than predicted by a no-evolution model. The future verification or falsification of this prediction will allow us to qualify the semi-analytic models.

  15. Dense arrays of millimeter-sized glass lenses fabricated at wafer-level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albero, Jorge; Perrin, Stéphane; Bargiel, Sylwester; Passilly, Nicolas; Baranski, Maciej; Gauthier-Manuel, Ludovic; Bernard, Florent; Lullin, Justine; Froehly, Luc; Krauter, Johann; Osten, Wolfgang; Gorecki, Christophe

    2015-05-04

    This paper presents the study of a fabrication technique of lenses arrays based on the reflow of glass inside cylindrical silicon cavities. Lenses whose sizes are out of the microfabrication standards are considered. In particular, the case of high fill factor arrays is discussed in detail since the proximity between lenses generates undesired effects. These effects, not experienced when lenses are sufficiently separated so that they can be considered as single items, are corrected by properly designing the silicon cavities. Complete topographic as well as optical characterizations are reported. The compatibility of materials with Micro-Opto-Electromechanical Systems (MOEMS) integration processes makes this technology attractive for the miniaturization of inspection systems, especially those devoted to imaging.

  16. Measuring Millimeter Wave of Cold Atmospheric Plasma Array by a Novel Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryon Eckert

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An unexplained repulsive force occasionally observed during non-thermal plasma treatment of large infections may point the way to an efficient mechanism for characterizing biofield energy. Ambient pressure air plasma in non-thermal equilibrium creates areas of localized population inversion, causing spontaneous emission at magnetic dipole rotational resonance lines. For O2, many of these lines occur in the 60 GHz frequency range. This experiment examines a possible link between the fine resonance frequencies of oxygen in the 60 GHz region, and the therapeutic frequencies used in Russian non-thermal EHF therapy. This paper also explores the feasibility of using a plasma array for biological torsion field characterization. An array of several hundred non-thermal plasma plumes are placed directly in front of a circular horn. A switchable circular polarizer is used to select left hand circular, linear or right hand circular polarization. A low noise frequency converter allows a noise temperature of less than 1150 K. A frequency scan and averaging algorithm is developed to characterize noise temperature versus frequency, comparing signal and noise levels between plasma on and plasma off, and switching polarization sense. An experimental setup is proposed as a proof of concept for detecting signals from the plasma array, while a practical laboratory tool is also proposed.

  17. A Series-Fed Linear Substrate-Integrated Dielectric Resonator Antenna Array for Millimeter-Wave Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Gong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A series-fed linear substrate-integrated dielectric resonator antenna array (SIDRAA is presented for millimeter-wave applications, in which the substrate-integrated dielectric resonator antenna (SIDRA elements and the feeding structure can be codesigned and fabricated using the same planar process. A prototype 4 × 1 SIDRAA is designed at Ka-band and fabricated with a two-layer printed circuit board (PCB technology. Four SIDRAs are implemented in the Rogers RT6010 substrate using the perforation technique and fed by a compact substrate-integrated waveguide (SIW through four longitudinal coupling slots within the Rogers RT5880 substrate. The return loss, radiation patterns, and antenna gain were experimentally studied, and good agreement between the measured and simulated results is observed. The SIDRAA example provides a bandwidth of about 10% around 34.5 GHz for 10 dB return loss and stable broadside radiation patterns with the peak gain of 10.5–11.5 dBi across the band.

  18. A millimeter-wave connected antenna array for 5G applications

    KAUST Repository

    Ikram, Muhammad; Sharawi, Mohammad S.; Shamim, Atif

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a beam switched antenna system based on a planar connected antenna array (CAA) is proposed at 28 GHz for 5G applications. The antenna system consists of a 4 × 4 connected slot antenna elements. It is covering frequency band from 27.4 GHz to 28.23 GHz with at least −10dB bandwidth of 830 MHz. It is modeled on a commercially available RO3003 substrate with ∊r equal to 3.3. The dimensions of the board are equal to 61×54×0.13 mm3. The proposed design is compact and low profile. A Butler matrix based feed network is used to steer the beam at different locations.

  19. A millimeter-wave connected antenna array for 5G applications

    KAUST Repository

    Ikram, Muhammad

    2017-10-25

    In this work, a beam switched antenna system based on a planar connected antenna array (CAA) is proposed at 28 GHz for 5G applications. The antenna system consists of a 4 × 4 connected slot antenna elements. It is covering frequency band from 27.4 GHz to 28.23 GHz with at least −10dB bandwidth of 830 MHz. It is modeled on a commercially available RO3003 substrate with ∊r equal to 3.3. The dimensions of the board are equal to 61×54×0.13 mm3. The proposed design is compact and low profile. A Butler matrix based feed network is used to steer the beam at different locations.

  20. Sparse interferometric millimeter-wave array for centimeter-level 100-m standoff imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Jonathan Y.; Lubin, Philip M.; Solomon, Steven L.; Ginn, Robert P.

    2013-05-01

    We present work on the development of a long range standoff concealed weapons detection system capable of imaging under very heavy clothing at distances exceeding 100 m with a cm resolution. The system is based off a combination of phased array technologies used in radio astronomy and SAR radar by using a coherent, multi-frequency reconstruction algorithm which can run at up to 1000 Hz frame rates and high SNR with a multi-tone transceiver. We show the flexible design space of our system as well as algorithm development, predicted system performance and impairments, and simulated reconstructed images. The system can be used for a variety of purposes including portal applications, crowd scanning and tactical situations. Additional uses include seeing through dust and fog.

  1. A switched-beam millimeter-wave array with MIMO configuration for 5G applications

    KAUST Repository

    Ikram, Muhammad

    2018-03-08

    In this work, a switched-beam 2-element multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) antenna system is proposed at mm-wave bands for 5G applications. The antenna system consists of a 4 × 4 connected slot antennas for each MIMO element forming the connected antenna array (CAA). A feed network based on a Butler matrix is used to excite the CAA, in addition to steer the beam at different locations which enhance the diversity performances. The mm-wave MIMO antenna system operates at 28 GHz with at least −10 dB measured bandwidth of 830 MHz (27.4 GHZ–28.23 GHz). It is fabricated on a commercially available RO3003 substrate with dielectric constant of 3.3 and height of 0.13 mm, respectively. The dimensions of the board are equal to 150 mm3 × 100 mm3 × 0.13 mm3. The proposed design is compact, low profile, and suitable for future 5G-enabled tablet PCs.

  2. DIRECT DETECTION OF PRECURSORS OF GAS GIANTS FORMED BY GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY WITH THE ATACAMA LARGE MILLIMETER/SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Lucio [Center for Theoretical Astrophysics and Cosmology, Institute for Computational Science, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Peters, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pineda, Jaime E. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Wadsley James; Rogers, Patrick, E-mail: p.rogers@marianopolis.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)

    2016-06-01

    Phases of gravitational instability are expected in the early phases of disk evolution, when the disk mass is still a substantial fraction of the mass of the star. Disk fragmentation into sub-stellar objects could occur in the cold exterior part of the disk. Direct detection of massive gaseous clumps on their way to collapse into gas giant planets would offer an unprecedented test of the disk instability model. Here we use state-of-the-art 3D radiation-hydro simulations of disks undergoing fragmentation into massive gas giants, post-processed with RADMC-3D to produce dust continuum emission maps. These are then fed into the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) ALMA simulator. The synthetic maps show that both overdense spiral arms and actual clumps at different stages of collapse can be detected with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the full configuration at the distance of the Ophiuchus star forming region (125 pc). The detection of clumps is particularly effective at shorter wavelengths (690 GHz) combining two resolutions with multi-scale clean. Furthermore, we show that a flux-based estimate of the mass of a protoplanetary clump can be comparable to a factor of three higher than the gravitationally bound clump mass. The estimated mass depends on the assumed opacity, and on the gas temperature, which should be set using the input of radiation-hydro simulations. We conclude that ALMA has the capability to detect “smoking gun” systems that are a signpost of the disk instability model for gas giant planet formation.

  3. Observing the Sun with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA): Fast-Scan Single-Dish Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S. M.; Iwai, K.; Phillips, N. M.; Hills, R. E.; Hirota, A.; Yagoubov, P.; Siringo, G.; Shimojo, M.; Bastian, T. S.; Hales, A. S.; Sawada, T.; Asayama, S.; Sugimoto, M.; Marson, R. G.; Kawasaki, W.; Muller, E.; Nakazato, T.; Sugimoto, K.; Brajša, R.; Skokić, I.; Bárta, M.; Kim, S.; Remijan, A. J.; de Gregorio, I.; Corder, S. A.; Hudson, H. S.; Loukitcheva, M.; Chen, B.; De Pontieu, B.; Fleishmann, G. D.; Gary, D. E.; Kobelski, A.; Wedemeyer, S.; Yan, Y.

    2017-07-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) radio telescope has commenced science observations of the Sun starting in late 2016. Since the Sun is much larger than the field of view of individual ALMA dishes, the ALMA interferometer is unable to measure the background level of solar emission when observing the solar disk. The absolute temperature scale is a critical measurement for much of ALMA solar science, including the understanding of energy transfer through the solar atmosphere, the properties of prominences, and the study of shock heating in the chromosphere. In order to provide an absolute temperature scale, ALMA solar observing will take advantage of the remarkable fast-scanning capabilities of the ALMA 12 m dishes to make single-dish maps of the full Sun. This article reports on the results of an extensive commissioning effort to optimize the mapping procedure, and it describes the nature of the resulting data. Amplitude calibration is discussed in detail: a path that uses the two loads in the ALMA calibration system as well as sky measurements is described and applied to commissioning data. Inspection of a large number of single-dish datasets shows significant variation in the resulting temperatures, and based on the temperature distributions, we derive quiet-Sun values at disk center of 7300 K at λ = 3 mm and 5900 K at λ = 1.3 mm. These values have statistical uncertainties of about 100 K, but systematic uncertainties in the temperature scale that may be significantly larger. Example images are presented from two periods with very different levels of solar activity. At a resolution of about 25'', the 1.3 mm wavelength images show temperatures on the disk that vary over about a 2000 K range. Active regions and plages are among the hotter features, while a large sunspot umbra shows up as a depression, and filament channels are relatively cool. Prominences above the solar limb are a common feature of the single-dish images.

  4. Observing the Sun with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA): Fast-Scan Single-Dish Mapping

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    White, S.M.; Iwai, N.; Phillips, N.; Hills, R.E.; Hirota, A.; Yagoubov, P.; Siringo, G.; Shimojo, M.; Bastian, T.S.; Hales, A.S.; Sawada, T.; Asayama, S.; Sugimoto, M.; Marson, R.; Kawasaki, W.; Muller, E.; Nakazato, T.; Sugimoto, K.; Brajsa, R.; Skokić, Ivica; Bárta, Miroslav; Kim, S.; Remijan, A.; de Gregorio, I.; Corder, S.; Hudson, H. S.; Loukitcheva, M.; Chen, B.; de Pontieu, B.; Fleishmann, G. D.; Gary, D. E.; Kobelski, A.; Wedemeyer, S.; Yan, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 292, č. 7 (2017), 88/1-88/28 ISSN 0038-0938 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015067 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : millimeter wavelengths * solar atmosphere * radiometric standard Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 2.682, year: 2016

  5. A New Velocity Field from a Dense GPS Array in the Southernmost Longitudinal Valley, Southeastern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horng-Yue Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the southernmost Longitudinal Valley (LV, Taiwan, we analyzed a dense GPS array composed of 10 continuous stations and 86 campaign-mode stations. By removing the effects of the four major earthquakes (one regional and three local occurred during the 1992 - 2010 observation period, we derived a new horizontal velocity field in this area, which then allows better locating the surface traces of the major active faults, including the Longitudinal Valley Fault (LVF system and the Central Range Fault, and characterizing the slip behaviors along the faults. Note that LVF reveals two sub-parallel strands in the study area: the Luyeh Fault to the west and the Lichi Fault to the east. Based on the results of strain analyses, including dilatation and shear strain, and projected vectors of station velocities across the major faults, we came to the following geological interpretations. During the inter-seismic periods, the surface deformation of the southernmost LV is mainly accommodated by the faulting on the two branches of the LVF; there is very little surface deformation on the Central Range Fault. The Luyeh River appears to act as a boundary to divide the LVF to behave differently to its northern and southern sides. The Lichi Fault reveals a change of slip kinematics from an oblique shearing/thrusting in the north to a nearly pure shearing with minor extension to the south. Regarding the slip behavior of the Luyeh Fault, it exhibits a creeping behavior in the north and a partially near-surface-locked faulting behavior in the south. We interpret that the two strands of the LVF merge together in the northern Taitung alluvial plain and turns to E-W trend toward the offshore area.

  6. Infrared and millimeter waves v.14 millimeter components and techniques, pt.V

    CERN Document Server

    Button, Kenneth J

    1985-01-01

    Infrared and Millimeter Waves, Volume 14: Millimeter Components and Techniques, Part V is concerned with millimeter-wave guided propagation and integrated circuits. In addition to millimeter-wave planar integrated circuits and subsystems, this book covers transducer configurations and integrated-circuit techniques, antenna arrays, optoelectronic devices, and tunable gyrotrons. Millimeter-wave gallium arsenide (GaAs) IMPATT diodes are also discussed. This monograph is comprised of six chapters and begins with a description of millimeter-wave integrated-circuit transducers, focusing on vario

  7. Observing the Sun with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA): High-Resolution Interferometric Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shimojo, M.; Bastian, T.S.; Hales, A.S.; White, S. M.; Iwai, N.; Hills, R.E.; Hirota, A.; Phillips, N.; Sawada, T.; Yagoubov, P.; Siringo, G.; Asayama, S.; Sugimoto, M.; Brajša, R.; Skokić, Ivica; Bárta, Miroslav; Kim, S.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Corder, S.; Hudson, H. S.; Wedemeyer, S.; Gary, D. E.; de Pontieu, B.; Loukitcheva, M.; Fleishman, G.; Chen, B.; Kobelski, A.; Yan, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 292, č. 7 (2017), 87/1-87/28 ISSN 0038-0938 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E13003; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015067 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 312495 - SOLARNET Grant - others:European Commission - EC(XE) 682462 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : compact array * correlator * field Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 2.682, year: 2016

  8. Self-Anchored Catalyst Interface Enables Ordered Via Array Formation from Submicrometer to Millimeter Scale for Polycrystalline and Single-Crystalline Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Dong; Kim, Munho; Kong, Lingyu; Mohseni, Parsian K; Ranganathan, Srikanth; Pachamuthu, Jayavel; Chim, Wai Kin; Chiam, Sing Yang; Coleman, James J; Li, Xiuling

    2018-03-14

    Defying text definitions of wet etching, metal-assisted chemical etching (MacEtch), a solution-based, damage-free semiconductor etching method, is directional, where the metal catalyst film sinks with the semiconductor etching front, producing 3D semiconductor structures that are complementary to the metal catalyst film pattern. The same recipe that works perfectly to produce ordered array of nanostructures for single-crystalline Si (c-Si) fails completely when applied to polycrystalline Si (poly-Si) with the same doping type and level. Another long-standing challenge for MacEtch is the difficulty of uniformly etching across feature sizes larger than a few micrometers because of the nature of lateral etching. The issue of interface control between the catalyst and the semiconductor in both lateral and vertical directions over time and over distance needs to be systematically addressed. Here, we present a self-anchored catalyst (SAC) MacEtch method, where a nanoporous catalyst film is used to produce nanowires through the pinholes, which in turn physically anchor the catalyst film from detouring as it descends. The systematic vertical etch rate study as a function of porous catalyst diameter from 200 to 900 nm shows that the SAC-MacEtch not only confines the etching direction but also enhances the etch rate due to the increased liquid access path, significantly delaying the onset of the mass-transport-limited critical diameter compared to nonporous catalyst c-Si counterpart. With this enhanced mass transport approach, vias on multistacks of poly-Si/SiO 2 are also formed with excellent vertical registry through the polystack, even though they are separated by SiO 2 which is readily removed by HF alone with no anisotropy. In addition, 320 μm square through-Si-via (TSV) arrays in 550 μm thick c-Si are realized. The ability of SAC-MacEtch to etch through poly/oxide/poly stack as well as more than half millimeter thick silicon with excellent site specificity for a wide

  9. Analysis of seismic waves crossing the Santa Clara Valley using the three-component MUSIQUE array algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobiger, Manuel; Cornou, Cécile; Bard, Pierre-Yves; Le Bihan, Nicolas; Imperatori, Walter

    2016-10-01

    We introduce the MUSIQUE algorithm and apply it to seismic wavefield recordings in California. The algorithm is designed to analyse seismic signals recorded by arrays of three-component seismic sensors. It is based on the MUSIC and the quaternion-MUSIC algorithms. In a first step, the MUSIC algorithm is applied in order to estimate the backazimuth and velocity of incident seismic waves and to discriminate between Love and possible Rayleigh waves. In a second step, the polarization parameters of possible Rayleigh waves are analysed using quaternion-MUSIC, distinguishing retrograde and prograde Rayleigh waves and determining their ellipticity. In this study, we apply the MUSIQUE algorithm to seismic wavefield recordings of the San Jose Dense Seismic Array. This array has been installed in 1999 in the Evergreen Basin, a sedimentary basin in the Eastern Santa Clara Valley. The analysis includes 22 regional earthquakes with epicentres between 40 and 600 km distant from the array and covering different backazimuths with respect to the array. The azimuthal distribution and the energy partition of the different surface wave types are analysed. Love waves dominate the wavefield for the vast majority of the events. For close events in the north, the wavefield is dominated by the first harmonic mode of Love waves, for farther events, the fundamental mode dominates. The energy distribution is different for earthquakes occurring northwest and southeast of the array. In both cases, the waves crossing the array are mostly arriving from the respective hemicycle. However, scattered Love waves arriving from the south can be seen for all earthquakes. Combining the information of all events, it is possible to retrieve the Love wave dispersion curves of the fundamental and the first harmonic mode. The particle motion of the fundamental mode of Rayleigh waves is retrograde and for the first harmonic mode, it is prograde. For both modes, we can also retrieve dispersion and ellipticity

  10. Dexterous ultrasonic levitation of millimeter-sized objects in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Sue Ann; Drinkwater, Bruce W; Carter, Tom; Malkin, Rob; Subramanian, Sriram

    2014-07-01

    Acoustic levitation in air has applications in contactless handling and processing. Here a first-order Bessel function-shaped acoustic field, generated using an 8-element circular array operating at 40 kHz, traps millimeter-sized objects against gravity. The device can manipulate objects in a vertical plane over a few millimeters with an accuracy of ± 0.09 mm.

  11. Advanced microwave/millimeter-wave imaging technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Zuowei; Yang, Lu; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Millimeter wave technology advances have made possible active and passive millimeter wave imaging for a variety of applications including advanced plasma diagnostics, radio astronomy, atmospheric radiometry, concealed weapon detection, all-weather aircraft landing, contraband goods detection, harbor navigation/surveillance in fog, highway traffic monitoring in fog, helicopter and automotive collision avoidance in fog, and environmental remote sensing data associated with weather, pollution, soil moisture, oil spill detection, and monitoring of forest fires, to name but a few. The primary focus of this paper is on technology advances which have made possible advanced imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations and microturbulence in fusion plasmas. Topics of particular emphasis include frequency selective surfaces, planar Schottky diode mixer arrays, electronically controlled beam shaping/steering arrays, and high power millimeter wave local oscillator and probe sources. (author)

  12. Next generation sub-millimeter wave focal plane array coupling concepts: an ESA TRP project to develop multichroic focal plane pixels for future CMB polarization experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, N.; Bucher, M.; De Bernardis, P.; Delabrouille, J.; Deo, P.; DePetris, M.; Doherty, S.; Ghribi, A.; Gradziel, M.; Kuzmin, L.; Maffei, B.; Mahashabde, S.; Masi, S.; Murphy, J. A.; Noviello, F.; O'Sullivan, C.; Pagano, L.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Robinson, M.; Stompor, R.; Tartari, A.; van der Vorst, M.; Verhoeve, P.

    2016-07-01

    The main objective of this activity is to develop new focal plane coupling array concepts and technologies that optimise the coupling from reflector optics to the large number of detectors for next generation sub millimetre wave telescopes particularly targeting measurement of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). In this 18 month TRP programme the consortium are tasked with developing, manufacturing and experimentally verifying a prototype multichroic pixel which would be suitable for the large focal plane arrays which will be demanded to reach the required sensitivity of future CMB polarization missions. One major development was to have multichroic operation to potentially reduce the required focal plane size of a CMB mission. After research in the optimum telescope design and definition of requirements based on a stringent science case review, a number of compact focal plane architecture concepts were investigated before a pixel demonstrator consisting of a planar mesh lens feeding a backend Resonant Cold Electron Bolometer RCEB for filtering and detection of the dual frequency signal was planned for manufacture and test. In this demonstrator the frequencies of the channels was chosen to be 75 and 105 GHz in the w band close to the peak CMB signal. In the next year the prototype breadboards will be developed to test the beams produced by the manufactured flat lenses fed by a variety of antenna configurations and the spectral response of the RCEBs will also be verified.

  13. MAPPING THE RELEASE OF VOLATILES IN THE INNER COMAE OF COMETS C/2012 F6 (LEMMON) AND C/2012 S1 (ISON) USING THE ATACAMA LARGE MILLIMETER/SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Milam, S. N.; Mumma, M. J.; Charnley, S. B.; Paganini, L.; Villanueva, G. [Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Remijan, A. J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Boissier, J. [IRAM, 300 Rue de la Piscine, F-38406 Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Biver, N.; Crovisier, J. [LEISA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Université Paris-Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Kuan, Y.-J.; Chuang, Y.-L. [National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Lis, D. C. [Sorbonne Universités, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris 6, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, UMR 8112, LERMA, F-75014 Paris (France); Minniti, D. [Pontifica Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Coulson, I. M., E-mail: martin.cordiner@nasa.gov [Joint Astronomy Centre, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Results are presented from the first cometary observations using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA), including measurements of the spatially resolved distributions of HCN, HNC, H{sub 2}CO, and dust within the comae of two comets: C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) and C/2012 S1 (ISON), observed at heliocentric distances of 1.5 AU and 0.54 AU, respectively. These observations (with angular resolution ≈0.''5), reveal an unprecedented level of detail in the distributions of these fundamental cometary molecules, and demonstrate the power of ALMA for quantitative measurements of the distributions of molecules and dust in the inner comae of typical bright comets. In both comets, HCN is found to originate from (or within a few hundred kilometers of) the nucleus, with a spatial distribution largely consistent with spherically symmetric, uniform outflow. By contrast, the HNC distributions are clumpy and asymmetrical, with peaks at cometocentric radii ∼500-1000 km, consistent with release of HNC in collimated outflow(s). Compared to HCN, the H{sub 2}CO distribution in comet Lemmon is very extended. The interferometric visibility amplitudes are consistent with coma production of H{sub 2}CO and HNC from unidentified precursor material(s) in both comets. Adopting a Haser model, the H{sub 2}CO parent scale length is found to be a few thousand kilometers in Lemmon and only a few hundred kilometers in ISON, consistent with the destruction of the precursor by photolysis or thermal degradation at a rate that scales in proportion to the solar radiation flux.

  14. Millimeter radiometer system technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, W. J.; Swanson, P. N.

    1989-07-01

    JPL has had a large amount of experience with spaceborne microwave/millimeter wave radiometers for remote sensing. All of the instruments use filled aperture antenna systems from 5 cm diameter for the microwave Sounder Units (MSU), 16 m for the microwave limb sounder (MLS) to 20 m for the large deployable reflector (LDR). The advantages of filled aperture antenna systems are presented. The requirements of the 10 m Geoplat antenna system, 10 m multified antenna, and the MLS are briefly discussed.

  15. Monolithic millimeter-wave and picosecond electronic technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talley, W.K.; Luhmann, N.C.

    1996-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies into monolithic millimeter-wave and picosecond electronic technologies have been undertaken as a collaborative project between the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California Department of Applied Science Coherent Millimeter-Wave Group under the auspices of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL. The work involves the design and fabrication of monolithic frequency multiplier, beam control, and imaging arrays for millimeter-wave imaging and radar, as well as the development of high speed nonlinear transmission lines for ultra-wideband radar imaging, time domain materials characterization and magnetic fusion plasma applications. In addition, the Coherent Millimeter-Wave Group is involved in the fabrication of a state-of-the-art X-band (∼8-11 GHz) RF photoinjector source aimed at producing psec high brightness electron bunches for advanced accelerator and coherent radiation generation studies

  16. Millimeter waves: acoustic and electromagnetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziskin, Marvin C

    2013-01-01

    This article is the presentation I gave at the D'Arsonval Award Ceremony on June 14, 2011 at the Bioelectromagnetics Society Annual Meeting in Halifax, Nova Scotia. It summarizes my research activities in acoustic and electromagnetic millimeter waves over the past 47 years. My earliest research involved acoustic millimeter waves, with a special interest in diagnostic ultrasound imaging and its safety. For the last 21 years my research expanded to include electromagnetic millimeter waves, with a special interest in the mechanisms underlying millimeter wave therapy. Millimeter wave therapy has been widely used in the former Soviet Union with great reported success for many diseases, but is virtually unknown to Western physicians. I and the very capable members of my laboratory were able to demonstrate that the local exposure of skin to low intensity millimeter waves caused the release of endogenous opioids, and the transport of these agents by blood flow to all parts of the body resulted in pain relief and other beneficial effects. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Compact Radiative Control Structures for Millimeter Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ari D.; Chuss, David T.; Chervenak, James A.; Henry, Ross M.; Moseley, s. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested compact radiative control structures, including antireflection coatings and resonant absorbers, for millimeter through submillimeter wave astronomy. The antireflection coatings consist of micromachined single crystal silicon dielectric sub-wavelength honeycombs. The effective dielectric constant of the structures is set by the honeycomb cell geometry. The resonant absorbers consist of pieces of solid single crystal silicon substrate and thin phosphorus implanted regions whose sheet resistance is tailored to maximize absorption by the structure. We present an implantation model that can be used to predict the ion energy and dose required for obtaining a target implant layer sheet resistance. A neutral density filter, a hybrid of a silicon dielectric honeycomb with an implanted region, has also been fabricated with this basic approach. These radiative control structures are scalable and compatible for use large focal plane detector arrays.

  18. Topics in millimeter wave technology

    CERN Document Server

    Button, Kenneth

    1988-01-01

    Topics in Millimeter Wave Technology, Volume 1 presents topics related to millimeter wave technology, including fin-lines and passive components realized in fin-lines, suspended striplines, suspended substrate microstrips, and modal power exchange in multimode fibers. A miniaturized monopulse assembly constructed in planar waveguide with multimode scalar horn feeds is also described. This volume is comprised of five chapters; the first of which deals with the analysis and synthesis techniques for fin-lines as well as the various passive components realized in fin-line. Tapers, discontinuities,

  19. Millimeter-wave active probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi-Ahy, Gholamreza; Bloom, David M.

    1991-01-01

    A millimeter-wave active probe for use in injecting signals with frequencies above 50GHz to millimeter-wave and ultrafast devices and integrated circuits including a substrate upon which a frequency multiplier consisting of filter sections and impedance matching sections are fabricated in uniplanar transmission line format. A coaxial input and uniplanar 50 ohm transmission line couple an approximately 20 GHz input signal to a low pass filter which rolls off at approximately 25 GHz. An input impedance matching section couples the energy from the low pass filter to a pair of matched, antiparallel beam lead diodes. These diodes generate odd-numberd harmonics which are coupled out of the diodes by an output impedance matching network and bandpass filter which suppresses the fundamental and third harmonics and selects the fifth harmonic for presentation at an output.

  20. Millimeter-wave Instrumentation Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Millimeter-wave Instrumentation Test Facility conducts basic research in propagation phenomena, remote sensing, and target signatures. The facility has a breadth...

  1. Millimeter Wave Modulators Using Quantum Dots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prather, Dennis W

    2008-01-01

    In this effort electro-optic modulators for millimeter wave sensing and imaging were developed and demonstrated via design, fabrication, and experimental characterization of multi layer quantum dot...

  2. On-chip photonic integrated circuit structures for millimeter and terahertz wave signal generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordón, C.; Guzmán, R. C.; Corral, V.; Carpintero, G.; Leijtens, X.

    2015-01-01

    We present two different on-chip photonic integrated circuit (PIC) structures for continuous-wave generation of millimeter and terahertz waves, each one using a different approach. One approach is the optical heterodyne method, using an on-chip arrayed waveguide grating laser (OC-AWGL) which is

  3. Combination of RNAseq and SNP nanofluidic array reveals the center of genetic diversity of cacao pathogen Moniliophthora roreri in the upper Magdalena Valley of Colombia and its clonality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin S Ali

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Moniliophthora roreri is the fungal pathogen that causes frosty pod rot (FPR disease of Theobroma cacao L., the source of chocolate. FPR occurs in most of the cacao producing countries in the Western Hemisphere, causing yield losses up to 80%. Genetic diversity within the FPR pathogen population may allow the population to adapt to changing environmental conditions and adapt to enhanced resistance in the host plant. The present study developed SNP markers from RNASeq results for 13 M. roreri isolates and validated the markers for their ability to reveal genetic diversity in an international M. roreri collection. The SNP resources reported herein represent the first study of RNASeq-derived SNP validation in M. roreri and demonstrates the utility of RNASeq as an approach for de novo SNP identification in M. roreri. A total of 88 polymorphic SNPs were used to evaluate the genetic diversity of 172 M. roreri cacao isolates resulting in 37 distinct genotypes (including 14 synonymous groups. Absence of heterozygosity for the 88 SNP markers indicates reproduction in M. roreri is clonal and likely due to a homothallic life style. The upper Magdalena Valley of Colombia showed the highest levels of genetic diversity with 20 distinct genotypes of which 13 were limited to this region, and indicates this region as the possible center of origin for M. roreri.

  4. Combination of RNAseq and SNP nanofluidic array reveals the center of genetic diversity of cacao pathogen Moniliophthora roreri in the upper Magdalena Valley of Colombia and its clonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shahin S; Shao, Jonathan; Strem, Mary D; Phillips-Mora, Wilberth; Zhang, Dapeng; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Bailey, Bryan A

    2015-01-01

    Moniliophthora roreri is the fungal pathogen that causes frosty pod rot (FPR) disease of Theobroma cacao L., the source of chocolate. FPR occurs in most of the cacao producing countries in the Western Hemisphere, causing yield losses up to 80%. Genetic diversity within the FPR pathogen population may allow the population to adapt to changing environmental conditions and adapt to enhanced resistance in the host plant. The present study developed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers from RNASeq results for 13 M. roreri isolates and validated the markers for their ability to reveal genetic diversity in an international M. roreri collection. The SNP resources reported herein represent the first study of RNA sequencing (RNASeq)-derived SNP validation in M. roreri and demonstrates the utility of RNASeq as an approach for de novo SNP identification in M. roreri. A total of 88 polymorphic SNPs were used to evaluate the genetic diversity of 172 M. roreri cacao isolates resulting in 37 distinct genotypes (including 14 synonymous groups). Absence of heterozygosity for the 88 SNP markers indicates reproduction in M. roreri is clonal and likely due to a homothallic life style. The upper Magdalena Valley of Colombia showed the highest levels of genetic diversity with 20 distinct genotypes of which 13 were limited to this region, and indicates this region as the possible center of origin for M. roreri.

  5. Infrared and millimeter waves v.15 millimeter components and techniques, pt.VI

    CERN Document Server

    Button, Kenneth J

    1986-01-01

    Infrared and Millimeter Waves, Volume 15: Millimeter Components and Techniques, Part VI is concerned with millimeter-wave guided propagation and integrated circuits. This book covers low-noise receiver technology for near-millimeter wavelengths; dielectric image-line antennas; EHF satellite communications (SATCOM) terminal antennas; and semiconductor antennas for millimeter-wave integrated circuits. A scanning airborne radiometer for 30 and 90 GHz and a self-oscillating mixer are also described. This monograph is comprised of six chapters and begins with a discussion on the design of low-n

  6. Limits on Arcminute Scale Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy with the BIMA Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzapfel, W. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Grego, L.; Holder, G. P.; Joy, M. K.; Reese, E. D.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have used the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland-Association (BIMA) millimeter array outfitted with sensitive cm-wave receivers to search for Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies on arcminute scales. The interferometer was placed in a compact configuration which produces high brightness sensitivity, while providing discrimination against point sources. Operating at a frequency of 28.5 GHz, the FWHM primary beam of the instrument is 6.6 arcminutes. We have made sensitive images of seven fields, five of which where chosen specifically to have low IR dust contrast and be free of bright radio sources. Additional observations with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) millimeter array were used to assist in the location and removal of radio point sources. Applying a Bayesian analysis to the raw visibility data, we place limits on CMB anisotropy flat-band power Q_flat = 5.6 (+3.0, -5.6) uK and Q_flat < 14.1 uK at 68% and 95% confidence. The sensitivity of this experiment to flat band power peaks at a multipole of l = 5470, which corresponds to an angular scale of approximately 2 arcminutes The most likely value of Q_flat is similar to the level of the expected secondary anisotropies.

  7. Submillimeter Array (SMA) Newsletter August 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Blundell, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    Submillimeter Array (SMA) Newsletter August 2011 Blundell, Raymond Submillimeter Array Newsletter | Number 12 | August 2011 CONTENTS 1 From the Director SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS: 2 Faint Submillimeter Sources behind Massive Lensing Clusters 5 Millimeter Imaging of the β Pictoris Debris Disk: Evidence for a Planetesimal Belt 7 Physical Properties of the Circumnuclear Starburst Ring in the Barred Galaxy NGC1097 TECHNICAL HIGHLIGHTS: 9 ...

  8. Millimeter-wave power amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    du Preez, Jaco

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a detailed review of millimeter-wave power amplifiers, discussing design issues and performance limitations commonly encountered in light of the latest research. Power amplifiers, which are able to provide high levels of output power and linearity while being easily integrated with surrounding circuitry, are a crucial component in wireless microwave systems. The book is divided into three parts, the first of which introduces readers to mm-wave wireless systems and power amplifiers. In turn, the second focuses on design principles and EDA concepts, while the third discusses future trends in power amplifier research. The book provides essential information on mm-wave power amplifier theory, as well as the implementation options and technologies involved in their effective design, equipping researchers, circuit designers and practicing engineers to design, model, analyze, test and implement high-performance, spectrally clean and energy-efficient mm-wave systems.

  9. RESOLVED MILLIMETER-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF DEBRIS DISKS AROUND SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, Amy; Hughes, A. Meredith [Department of Astronomy, Van Vleck Observatory, Wesleyan University, 96 Foss Hill Drive, Middletown, CT, 06459 (United States); Carpenter, John [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, MC249-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ricarte, Angelo [J. W. Gibbs Laboratory, Department of Astronomy, Yale University, 260 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, MS-42, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Chiang, Eugene, E-mail: asteele@wesleyan.edu [Department of Astronomy, 501 Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The presence of debris disks around young main-sequence stars hints at the existence and structure of planetary systems. Millimeter-wavelength observations probe large grains that trace the location of planetesimal belts. The Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems Spitzer Legacy survey of nearby young solar analogues yielded a sample of five debris disk-hosting stars with millimeter flux suitable for interferometric follow-up. We present observations with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy at ∼2″ resolution that spatially resolve the debris disks around these nearby (d ∼ 50 pc) stars. Two of the five disks (HD 377, HD 8907) are spatially resolved for the first time and one (HD 104860) is resolved at millimeter wavelengths for the first time. We combine our new observations with archival SMA and Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array data to enable a uniform analysis of the full five-object sample. We simultaneously model the broadband photometric data and resolved millimeter visibilities to constrain the dust temperatures and disk morphologies, and perform a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis to fit for basic structural parameters. We find that the radii and widths of the cold outer belts exhibit properties consistent with scaled-up versions of the Solar System's Kuiper Belt. All the disks exhibit characteristic grain sizes comparable to the blowout size, and all the resolved observations of emission from large dust grains are consistent with an axisymmetric dust distribution to within the uncertainties. These results are consistent with comparable studies carried out at infrared wavelengths.

  10. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (alma): Early Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootten, Alwyn

    2012-06-01

    New radioastronomical instruments, such as ALMA or the Jansky VLA, have increased spectral throughput by orders of magnitude over previously available capabilities. ALMA brings orders of magnitude increases in spectral sensitivity and spatial resolution over what has previously been available. These increased capabilities open new possibilities for studies of complex molecules in the interstellar medium. Complex interstellar molecules may form on the surfaces of interstellar grains, after which they may be liberated into the gas phase by shocks, radiation, or other external influences. Emission from complex molecules may be diluted owing to the large number of transitions large molecules may undergo, particularly in warm regions of interstellar clouds. High sensitivity and spatial resolution are necessary to explore the distributions and relationships of these molecules. Of particular interest are the distributions of large organic molecules. Observations which establish the relationships between various large molecules are now emerging from these new instruments and will be discussed.

  11. Valley Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... valley fever. These fungi are commonly found in soil in specific regions. The fungi's spores can be stirred into the air by ... species have a complex life cycle. In the soil, they grow as a mold with long filaments that break off into airborne ...

  12. Large-scale transmission-type multifunctional anisotropic coding metasurfaces in millimeter-wave frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Tie Jun; Wu, Rui Yuan; Wu, Wei; Shi, Chuan Bo; Li, Yun Bo

    2017-10-01

    We propose fast and accurate designs to large-scale and low-profile transmission-type anisotropic coding metasurfaces with multiple functions in the millimeter-wave frequencies based on the antenna-array method. The numerical simulation of an anisotropic coding metasurface with the size of 30λ × 30λ by the proposed method takes only 20 min, which however cannot be realized by commercial software due to huge memory usage in personal computers. To inspect the performance of coding metasurfaces in the millimeter-wave band, the working frequency is chosen as 60 GHz. Based on the convolution operations and holographic theory, the proposed multifunctional anisotropic coding metasurface exhibits different effects excited by y-polarized and x-polarized incidences. This study extends the frequency range of coding metasurfaces, filling the gap between microwave and terahertz bands, and implying promising applications in millimeter-wave communication and imaging.

  13. Millimeter wave spectrum of nitromethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyushin, Vadim

    2018-03-01

    A new study of the millimeter wave spectrum of nitromethane, CH3NO2, is reported. The new measurements covering the frequency range from 49 GHz to 237 GHz have been carried out using the spectrometer in IRA NASU (Ukraine). Transitions belonging to the |m| ≤ 8 torsional states have been analyzed using the Rho-axis-method and the RAM36 program, which has been modified for this study to take into account the quadrupole hyperfine structure due to presence of the nitrogen atom. A data set consisting of 5925 microwave line frequencies and including transitions with J up to 55 was fit using a model consisting of 97 parameters, and a weighted root-mean-square deviation of 0.84 was achieved. The analysis of the spectrum covers the m torsional states lying below the lowest small amplitude vibration in nitromethane molecule, which is the NO2 in plane rock at 475 cm-1. It serves as a preparatory step in further studies of intervibrational interactions in this molecule.

  14. Millimeter-wave Camera, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Traditional SAR imaging at millimeter wave frequencies can provide excellent, high SNR, 3D images of features inside dielectric solids. However, imaging at these...

  15. Millimeter-wave antennas configurations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    du Preez, Jaco

    2016-01-01

    This book comprehensively reviews the state of the art in millimeter-wave antennas, traces important recent developments and provides information on a wide range of antenna configurations and applications. While fundamental theoretical aspects are discussed whenever necessary, the book primarily focuses on design principles and concepts, manufacture, measurement techniques, and practical results. Each of the various antenna types scalable to millimeter-wave dimensions is considered individually, with coverage of leaky-wave and surface-wave antennas, printed antennas, integrated antennas, and reflector and lens systems. The final two chapters address the subject from a systems perspective, providing an overview of supporting circuitry and examining in detail diverse millimeter-wave applications, including high-speed wireless communications, radio astronomy, and radar. The vast amount of information now available on millimeter-wave systems can be daunting for researchers and designers entering the field. This b...

  16. Millimeter-Wave Polarimeters Using Kinetic Inductance Detectors for TolTEC and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austermann, J. E.; Beall, J. A.; Bryan, S. A.; Dober, B.; Gao, J.; Hilton, G.; Hubmayr, J.; Mauskopf, P.; McKenney, C. M.; Simon, S. M.; Ullom, J. N.; Vissers, M. R.; Wilson, G. W.

    2018-05-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) provide a compelling path forward to the large-format polarimeter, imaging, and spectrometer arrays needed for next-generation experiments in millimeter-wave cosmology and astronomy. We describe the development of feedhorn-coupled MKID detectors for the TolTEC millimeter-wave imaging polarimeter being constructed for the 50-m Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT). Observations with TolTEC are planned to begin in early 2019. TolTEC will comprise ˜ 7000 polarization-sensitive MKIDs and will represent the first MKID arrays fabricated and deployed on monolithic 150 mm diameter silicon wafers—a critical step toward future large-scale experiments with over 10^5 detectors. TolTEC will operate in observational bands at 1.1, 1.4, and 2.0 mm and will use dichroic filters to define a physically independent focal plane for each passband, thus allowing the polarimeters to use simple, direct-absorption inductive structures that are impedance matched to incident radiation. This work is part of a larger program at NIST-Boulder to develop MKID-based detector technologies for use over a wide range of photon energies spanning millimeter-waves to X-rays. We present the detailed pixel layout and describe the methods, tools, and flexible design parameters that allow this solution to be optimized for use anywhere in the millimeter and sub-millimeter bands. We also present measurements of prototype devices operating in the 1.1 mm band and compare the observed optical performance to that predicted from models and simulations.

  17. 24-71 GHz PCB Array for 5G ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Markus H.; Volakis, John L.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2017-01-01

    Millimeter-wave 5G mobile architectures need to consolidate disparate frequency bands into a single, multifunctional array. Existing arrays are either narrow-band, prohibitively expensive or cannot be scaled to these frequencies. In this paper, we present the first ultra-wideband millimeter wave array to operate across six 5G and ISM bands spanning 24-71 GHz. Importantly, the array is realized using low-cost PCB. The paper presents the design and optimized layout, and discusses fabrication and measurements.

  18. High-Sensitivity AGN Polarimetry at Sub-Millimeter Wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Martí-Vidal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The innermost regions of radio loud Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN jets are heavily affected by synchrotron self-absorption, due to the strong magnetic fields and high particle densities in these extreme zones. The only way to overcome this absorption is to observe at sub-millimeter wavelengths, although polarimetric observations at such frequencies have so far been limited by sensitivity and calibration accuracy. However, new generation instruments such as the Atacama Large mm/sub-mm Array (ALMA overcome these limitations and are starting to deliver revolutionary results in the observational studies of AGN polarimetry. Here we present an overview of our state-of-the-art interferometric mm/sub-mm polarization observations of AGN jets with ALMA (in particular, the gravitationally-lensed sources PKS 1830−211 and B0218+359, which allow us to probe the magneto-ionic conditions at the regions closest to the central black holes.

  19. Advanced Integration Techniques on Broadband Millimeter-Wave Beam Steering for 5G Wireless Networks and Beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Zizheng; Ma, Qian; Smolders, Bart; Jiao, Yuqing; Wale, Mike; Oh, Joanne; wu, hequan; Koonen, Ton

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the desired very high throughput of 5G wireless networks drives millimeter-wave (mm-wave) communication into practical applications. A phased array technique is required to increase the effective antenna aperture at mm-wave frequency. Integrated solutions of beamforming/beam steering are

  20. Injurious effects of millimeter waves: current status of research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zaifu; Qian Huanwen

    2005-01-01

    Millimeter waves refer to extremely high-frequency (30-300 GHz) electromagnetic oscillations. The wide application of millimeter techniques to military affairs and medicine, especially the success of non-lethal millimeter weapon gives rise to serious concern about millimeter wave damage and protection against it. Millimeter wave radiation can cause circulatory failure and subsequent death when irradiated systemically, while it can only cause direct injury to cornea and skin because of its poor penetrability (less than 1 mm into biological tissue). In this paper a brief review of cornea and skin damage and lethal effect caused by millimeter wave radiation is given. (authors)

  1. Millimeter emission lines in Orion A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovas, F.J.; Johnson, D.R.; Buhl, D.; Snyder, L.E.

    1976-01-01

    During the course of a search of Orion A for signals from three large, organic molecules, several millimeter wave lines from known interstellar molecules were observed. Results of observations on methanol (CH 3 OH), methyl cyanide (CH 3 CN), methyl acetylene (CH 3 CCH), acetaldehyde (CH 3 CHO) and 29 SiO are reported here. Emission signals from two hydrogen recombination lines (H41α and H42α) detected from the H II region of Orion A are also reported. Negative results were obtained for several millimeter wave transitions of ethylene oxide (CH 2 OCH 2 ), acetone [(CH 3 ) 2 CO], and cyclopropenone (HCCOCH)

  2. Millimeter-wave receiver design for plasma diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leipold, Frank; Hansen, S. K.; Jacobsen, Asger Schou

    2016-01-01

    Scattered millimeter waves entering from the collective Thomson scattering diagnostic at ASDEX Upgrade fusion device are generally elliptically polarized. In order to convert the millimeter waves to linearly polarized waves (required for the detector), birefringent window assemblies (sapphire) ha...

  3. Millimeter Wave Technology for Armament Applications .

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. Bains; Deepak Singh; R. P. Dixit

    1997-01-01

    Use of millimeter wave (MMW) technology in armament systems imposes many restrictions on the size, volume and compactness of these systems in addition to ruggedness and reliable functioning in battlefield environment. This paper discusses the related design and technological issues, particularly in, the context of the sensors developed for smart ammunition and active armour protection systems.

  4. Untuned resonators for near millimeter waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebbie, H. A.; Llewellyn-Jones, D. T.

    1981-03-01

    A brief account is given of the reasons for revitalizing an old technique for near millimeter wave measurements. The principles of the method are outlined and the scope of its application indicated. The potential importance of the technique for liquid phase and biological material studies is illustrated.

  5. Wide-band Millimeter and Sub-Millimeter Wave Radiometer Instrument to Measure Tropospheric Water and Cloud ICE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop, fabricate and test a new, multi-frequency millimeter and sub-millimeter-wave radiometer instrument to provide critically-needed measurements...

  6. The structure of protostellar dense cores: a millimeter continuum study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motte, Frederique

    1998-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical scenario explains low-mass star formation and describes the gravitational collapse of an isolated 'ideal' dense core. The major aim of this thesis is to check the standard model predictions on the structure of protostellar dense cores (or envelopes). The earliest stages of star formation remain poorly known because the protostars are still deeply embedded in massive, opaque circumstellar cocoons. On the one hand, sensitive bolometer arrays very recently allow us to measure the millimeter continuum emission arising from dense cores. Such observations are a powerful tool to constrain the density structure of proto-stellar dense cores (on large length scale). In particular, we studied the structure of isolated proto-stellar envelopes in Taurus and protostars in the ρ Ophiuchi cluster. In order to accurately derive their envelope density power law, we simulated the observation of several envelope models. Then we show that most of the Taurus protostars present a density structure consistent with the standard model predictions. In contrast, dense cores in ρ Ophiuchi main cloud are highly fragmented and protostellar envelope have finite size. Moreover fragmentation appears to be essential in determining the final stellar mass of ρ Oph forming stars. In clusters, fragmentation may thus be at the origin of the stellar initial mass function (IMF). On the other hand, our interferometric millimeter continuum observations are tracing (with higher angular resolution) the inner part of protostellar envelopes. Our study show that disks during protostellar stages are not yet massive and thus do not perturb the analysis of envelope density structure. (author) [fr

  7. MIMIC For Millimeter Wave Integrated Circuit Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seashore, C. R.

    1987-09-01

    A significant program is currently underway in the U.S. to investigate, develop and produce a variety of GaAs analog circuits for use in microwave and millimeter wave sensors and systems. This represents a "new wave" of RF technology which promises to significantly change system engineering thinking relative to RF Architectures. At millimeter wave frequencies, we look forward to a relatively high level of critical component integration based on MESFET and HEMT device implementations. These designs will spawn more compact RF front ends with colocated antenna/transceiver functions and innovative packaging concepts which will survive and function in a typical military operational environment which includes challenging temperature, shock and special handling requirements.

  8. 3D-Printed Millimeter Wave Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    demonstrates the resolution of the printer with a 10 micron nozzle. Figure 2: Measured loss tangent of SEBS and SBS samples. 3D - Printed Millimeter... 3D printing of styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) and styrene ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) is used to demonstrate the feasibility of 3D - printed ...Additionally, a dielectric lens is printed which improves the antenna gain of an open-ended WR-28 waveguide from 7 to 8.5 dBi. Keywords: 3D printing

  9. Millimeter wave therapy in hypertonic disease treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotenko К.V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Millimeter wave therapy in hypertonic disease treatment promotes disappearance of negative clinical symptoms, normalization of arterial pressure indicators, improvement of system and cerebral hemodynamic. In spite of active using of wideband equipment in treatment for cardiovascular diseases, particularly hypertonic disease, the procedures generalizing experience in their use are not enough. Thus further investigation, searching of new treatment methods using up-to-date physiotherapy technology seem to be actual.

  10. On the Security of Millimeter Wave Vehicular Communication Systems Using Random Antenna Subsets

    KAUST Repository

    Eltayeb, Mohammed E.

    2017-03-20

    Millimeter wave (mmWave) vehicular communication systems have the potential to improve traffic efficiency and safety. Lack of secure communication links, however, may lead to a formidable set of abuses and attacks. To secure communication links, a physical layer precoding technique for mmWave vehicular communication systems is proposed in this paper. The proposed technique exploits the large dimensional antenna arrays available at mmWave systems to produce direction dependent transmission. This results in coherent transmission to the legitimate receiver and artificial noise that jams eavesdroppers with sensitive receivers. Theoretical and numerical results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the proposed technique and show that the proposed technique provides high secrecy throughput when compared to conventional array and switched array transmission techniques.

  11. On the Security of Millimeter Wave Vehicular Communication Systems Using Random Antenna Subsets

    KAUST Repository

    Eltayeb, Mohammed E.; Choi, Junil; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.; Heath, Robert W.

    2017-01-01

    Millimeter wave (mmWave) vehicular communication systems have the potential to improve traffic efficiency and safety. Lack of secure communication links, however, may lead to a formidable set of abuses and attacks. To secure communication links, a physical layer precoding technique for mmWave vehicular communication systems is proposed in this paper. The proposed technique exploits the large dimensional antenna arrays available at mmWave systems to produce direction dependent transmission. This results in coherent transmission to the legitimate receiver and artificial noise that jams eavesdroppers with sensitive receivers. Theoretical and numerical results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the proposed technique and show that the proposed technique provides high secrecy throughput when compared to conventional array and switched array transmission techniques.

  12. Submillimeter and millimeter observations of solar system objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhleman, D.O.

    1988-01-01

    Planetary atmospheres and satellite surfaces are observed with the three element array at Caltech's Owens Valley Radio Observatory, Caltech's submillimeter telescope on Mauna Kea and at the 12-meter telescope at Kitt Peak. Researchers are primarily interested in spectroscopy of the atmospheres of Venus, Mars and Titan and the continuum structure of Saturn Rings, Galilean satellites, Neptune and Uranus. During the last year researchers completed a supersynthesis of the Saturn system at 2.8 mm with spatial resolution of 3 arc sec. They just completed a 4-confuguration synthesis of Venus in the CO absorption line. They hope to recover the wind patterns in the altitude range from 60 to 100 km where winds have never been measured. Two important questions are being investigated: (1) how high in the Venus atmosphere do 4-day winds extend, and (2) can we produce experiment proof (or disproof) of the subsolar-to-anti-solar flow (Dickenson winds) predicted by general circulation models

  13. Lunar laser ranging: the millimeter challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, T W

    2013-01-01

    Lunar laser ranging has provided many of the best tests of gravitation since the first Apollo astronauts landed on the Moon. The march to higher precision continues to this day, now entering the millimeter regime, and promising continued improvement in scientific results. This review introduces key aspects of the technique, details the motivations, observables, and results for a variety of science objectives, summarizes the current state of the art, highlights new developments in the field, describes the modeling challenges, and looks to the future of the enterprise. (review article)

  14. Supplementary report: millimeter wave study program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jory, H.R.; Symons, R.S.

    1976-02-01

    This report describes work done during the months of December 1975 and January 1976, following the writing of the final report on the millimeter wave study program for generation of 100 kW or more power at 120 GHz. The work has been directed to three areas for application to gyrotron devices, small signal analysis, electron beam simulation, and microwave measurements on cavity coupling. A small signal analysis is presented, which allows determination of beam loading in cavities. The results are similar to previous published work, but contain a higher order relativistic correction. The electron beam simulations include two magnetron type guns and one based on electrostatic lenses

  15. Depressed collectors for millimeter wave gyrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.; Granatstein, V.L.

    1992-01-01

    The main issues relating to design of depressed collectors for millimeter wave gyrotrons are discussed. A flow diagram is presented and the interlinking steps are outlined. Design studies are given for two kinds of gyrotrons on which severe constraints on the maximum radii of the collectors had been imposed; namely, for a cavity type and a quasi-optical gyrotron. A collector efficiency of the order of 70 percent is shown to be feasible for either case using careful tailoring of magnetic field profiles. A code has been developed to assist in doing this. A general approach toward initial placement of collectors has been indicated

  16. Millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, D.; Oka, T.; Tanaka, K.; Matsumura, S.; Miura, K.; Takekawa, S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado Nebula (G357.7-0.1), which is a bright radio source behind the Galactic center region. A 15' × 15' area was mapped in the J = 1-0 lines of CO, 13 CO, and HCO + with the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope. The Very Large Array archival data of OH at 1720 MHz were also reanalyzed. We found two molecular clouds with separate velocities, V LSR = –14 km s –1 and +5 km s –1 . These clouds show rough spatial anti-correlation. Both clouds are associated with OH 1720 MHz emissions in the area overlapping with the Tornado Nebula. The spatial and velocity coincidence indicates violent interaction between the clouds and the Tornado Nebula. Modestly excited gas prefers the position of the Tornado 'head' in the –14 km s –1 cloud, also suggesting the interaction. Virial analysis shows that the +5 km s –1 cloud is more tightly bound by self-gravity than the –14 km s –1 cloud. We propose a formation scenario for the Tornado Nebula; the +5 km s –1 cloud collided into the –14 km s –1 cloud, generating a high-density layer behind the shock front, which activates a putative compact object by Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion to eject a pair of bipolar jets.

  17. High-performance packaging for monolithic microwave and millimeter-wave integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalkhauser, K. A.; Li, K.; Shih, Y. C.

    1992-01-01

    Packaging schemes are developed that provide low-loss, hermetic enclosure for enhanced monolithic microwave and millimeter-wave integrated circuits. These package schemes are based on a fused quartz substrate material offering improved RF performance through 44 GHz. The small size and weight of the packages make them useful for a number of applications, including phased array antenna systems. As part of the packaging effort, a test fixture was developed to interface the single chip packages to conventional laboratory instrumentation for characterization of the packaged devices.

  18. Millimeter and submillimeter observations from the Atacama plateau and high altitude balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Mark

    2002-05-01

    A new generation of ground-based and sub-orbital platforms will be operational in the next few years. These telescopes will operate from high sites in Chile and Antarctica, and airborne platforms where the atmosphere is transparent enough to allow sensitive measurements in the millimeter and submillimeter bands. The telescopes will employ state-of-the-art instrumentation including large format bolometer arrays and spectrometers. I will discuss the results of our observations in the Atacama region of Chile (MAT/TOCO), our future observations on the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) now under construction, and our proposed Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). .

  19. Advances in real-time millimeter-wave imaging radiometers for avionic synthetic vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovberg, John A.; Chou, Ri-Chee; Martin, Christopher A.; Galliano, Joseph A., Jr.

    1995-06-01

    Millimeter-wave imaging has advantages over conventional visible or infrared imaging for many applications because millimeter-wave signals can travel through fog, snow, dust, and clouds with much less attenuation than infrared or visible light waves. Additionally, passive imaging systems avoid many problems associated with active radar imaging systems, such as radar clutter, glint, and multi-path return. ThermoTrex Corporation previously reported on its development of a passive imaging radiometer that uses an array of frequency-scanned antennas coupled to a multichannel acousto-optic spectrum analyzer (Bragg-cell) to form visible images of a scene through the acquisition of thermal blackbody radiation in the millimeter-wave spectrum. The output from the Bragg cell is imaged by a standard video camera and passed to a computer for normalization and display at real-time frame rates. An application of this system is its incorporation as part of an enhanced vision system to provide pilots with a synthetic view of a runway in fog and during other adverse weather conditions. Ongoing improvements to a 94 GHz imaging system and examples of recent images taken with this system will be presented. Additionally, the development of dielectric antennas and an electro- optic-based processor for improved system performance, and the development of an `ultra- compact' 220 GHz imaging system will be discussed.

  20. A dual-polarized broadband planar antenna and channelizing filter bank for millimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brient, Roger; Ade, Peter; Arnold, Kam; Edwards, Jennifer; Engargiola, Greg; Holzapfel, William L.; Lee, Adrian T.; Myers, Michael J.; Quealy, Erin; Rebeiz, Gabriel; Richards, Paul; Suzuki, Aritoki

    2013-02-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of a broadband log-periodic antenna coupled to multiple cryogenic bolometers. This detector architecture, optimized here for astrophysical observations, simultaneously receives two linear polarizations with two octaves of bandwidth at millimeter wavelengths. The broad bandwidth signal received by the antenna is divided into sub-bands with integrated in-line frequency-selective filters. We demonstrate two such filter banks: a diplexer with two sub-bands and a log-periodic channelizer with seven contiguous sub-bands. These detectors have receiver efficiencies of 20%-40% and percent level polarization isolation. Superconducting transition-edge sensor bolometers detect the power in each sub-band and polarization. We demonstrate circularly symmetric beam patterns, high polarization isolation, accurately positioned bands, and high optical efficiency. The pixel design is applicable to astronomical observations of intensity and polarization at millimeter through sub-millimeter wavelengths. As compared with an imaging array of pixels measuring only one band, simultaneous measurements of multiple bands in each pixel has the potential to result in a higher signal-to-noise measurement while also providing spectral information. This development facilitates compact systems with high mapping speeds for observations that require information in multiple frequency bands.

  1. ALMA SCIENCE VERIFICATION DATA: MILLIMETER CONTINUUM POLARIMETRY OF THE BRIGHT RADIO QUASAR 3C 286

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, H.; Nakanishi, K.; Hada, K. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Paladino, R. [INAF-Osservatorio di Radioastronomia, Via P. Gobetti, 101 I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Hull, C. L. H. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Cortes, P.; Fomalont, E. [Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura 763 0355, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Moellenbrock, G. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Asada, K., E-mail: hiroshi.nagai@nao.ac.jp [The Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, AS/NTU. No.1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Rd, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, R.O.C (China)

    2016-06-20

    We present full-polarization observations of the compact, steep-spectrum radio quasar 3C 286 made with the Atacama Large Millimeter and Submillimeter Array (ALMA) at 1.3 mm. These are the first full-polarization ALMA observations, which were obtained in the framework of Science Verification. A bright core and a south–west component are detected in the total intensity image, similar to previous centimeter images. Polarized emission is also detected toward both components. The fractional polarization of the core is about 17%; this is higher than the fractional polarization at centimeter wavelengths, suggesting that the magnetic field is even more ordered in the millimeter radio core than it is further downstream in the jet. The observed polarization position angle (or electric vector position angle (EVPA)) in the core is ∼39{sup ◦}, which confirms the trend that the EVPA slowly increases from centimeter to millimeter wavelengths. With the aid of multi-frequency VLBI observations, we argue that this EVPA change is associated with the frequency-dependent core position. We also report a serendipitous detection of a sub-mJy source in the field of view, which is likely to be a submillimeter galaxy.

  2. Valley polarization in bismuth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauque, Benoit

    2013-03-01

    The electronic structure of certain crystal lattices can contain multiple degenerate valleys for their charge carriers to occupy. The principal challenge in the development of valleytronics is to lift the valley degeneracy of charge carriers in a controlled way. In bulk semi-metallic bismuth, the Fermi surface includes three cigar-shaped electron valleys lying almost perpendicular to the high symmetry axis known as the trigonal axis. The in-plane mass anisotropy of each valley exceeds 200 as a consequence of Dirac dispersion, which drastically reduces the effective mass along two out of the three orientations. According to our recent study of angle-dependent magnetoresistance in bismuth, a flow of Dirac electrons along the trigonal axis is extremely sensitive to the orientation of in-plane magnetic field. Thus, a rotatable magnetic field can be used as a valley valve to tune the contribution of each valley to the total conductivity. As a consequence of a unique combination of high mobility and extreme mass anisotropy in bismuth, the effect is visible even at room temperature in a magnetic field of 1 T. Thus, a modest magnetic field can be used as a valley valve in bismuth. The results of our recent investigation of angle-dependent magnetoresistance in other semi-metals and doped semiconductors suggest that a rotating magnetic field can behave as a valley valve in a multi-valley system with sizeable mass anisotropy.

  3. Millimeter radiation from a 3D model of the solar atmosphere. II. Chromospheric magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukitcheva, M.; White, S. M.; Solanki, S. K.; Fleishman, G. D.; Carlsson, M.

    2017-05-01

    Aims: We use state-of-the-art, three-dimensional non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the quiet solar atmosphere to carry out detailed tests of chromospheric magnetic field diagnostics from free-free radiation at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths (mm/submm). Methods: The vertical component of the magnetic field was deduced from the mm/submm brightness spectra and the degree of circular polarization synthesized at millimeter frequencies. We used the frequency bands observed by the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) as a convenient reference. The magnetic field maps obtained describe the longitudinal magnetic field at the effective formation heights of the relevant wavelengths in the solar chromosphere. Results: The comparison of the deduced and model chromospheric magnetic fields at the spatial resolution of both the model and current observations demonstrates a good correlation, but has a tendency to underestimate the model field. The systematic discrepancy of about 10% is probably due to averaging of the restored field over the heights contributing to the radiation, weighted by the strength of the contribution. On the whole, the method of probing the longitudinal component of the magnetic field with free-free emission at mm/submm wavelengths is found to be applicable to measurements of the weak quiet-Sun magnetic fields. However, successful exploitation of this technique requires very accurate measurements of the polarization properties (primary beam and receiver polarization response) of the antennas, which will be the principal factor that determines the level to which chromospheric magnetic fields can be measured. Conclusions: Consequently, high-resolution and high-precision observations of circularly polarized radiation at millimeter wavelengths can be a powerful tool for producing chromospheric longitudinal magnetograms.

  4. Design Technology Aspects of the Millimeter Waveband Phase Shifter Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Komissarova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to develop a technique, which takes into consideration the design technology aspects to create a waveguide ferrite Faradays’ phase shifter (WFFPS of the shortwave part of the millimeter wave range. Only using the calculation and analysis techniques based on the electro-dynamic high-level models for designed devices enables us to solve this task successfully.In assembling the WFFPS, its individual parts are connected by dint of glue (rod, yokes, dielectric transition transformers. Thus the layers of glue, possible air gaps, and misalignment of individual parts, obviously have effect on the WFFPS characteristics and should be taken into account at the stage of device calculation and design. Therefore, the aim is to analyze the impact of these technology features on the characteristics of WFFPS.The calculation algorithm of the waveguide transition, which matches WFFPS with the waveguide transmission line or integrated phased array antenna (PAA element radiator in view of possible air or adhesive gaps apparition is based on the solving problem of diffraction of electromagnetic waves. Eigenvalue problem solution by Galerkin method must be preceded to the electromagnetic waves diffraction on the stepped waveguide transition by method of partial areas (Trefftz method solution. As a result, a system of linear inhomogeneous equations is determined. Its solution is the basis for the algorithm to define the numerical values of complex amplitudes of waves excited in all longitudinally uniform areas with a laterally nonuniform ferritedielectric filling, into which splits the waveguide ferrite phase shifter.To take into account the effect of air or glue gap arising when assembling the phase shifter, a designed calculation model is added by the transition step from a material having the same dielectric constant as that of the material filling the gap. The paper presents numerical investigation findings concerning the influence of

  5. Electron Acceleration in Supernovae and Millimeter Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi Maeda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Supernovae launch a strong shock wave by the interaction of the expanding ejecta and surrounding circumstellar matter (CSM. At the shock, electrons are accelerated to relativistic speed, creating observed synchrotron emissions in radio wavelengths. In this paper, I suggest that SNe (i.e., < 1 year since the explosion provide a unique site to study the electron acceleration mechanism. I argue that the eciency of the acceleration at the young SN shock is much lower than conventionally assumed, and that the electrons emitting in the cm wavelengths are not fully in the Diffusive Shock Acceleration (DSA regime. Thus radio emissions from young SNe record information on the yet-unresolved 'injection' mechanism. I also present perspectives of millimeter (mm observations of SNe - this will provide opportunities to uniquely determine the shock physics and the acceleration efficiency, to test the non-linear DSA mechanism and provide a characteristic electron energy scale with which the DSA start dominating the electron acceleration.

  6. Millimeter wave spectra of carbonyl cyanide ⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bteich, S.B.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Motiyenko, R.A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    Context More than 30 cyanide derivatives of simple organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium, but only one dicarbonitrile has been found and that very recently. There is still a lack of high-resolution spectroscopic data particularly for dinitriles derivatives. The carbonyl cyanide molecule is a new and interesting candidate for astrophysical detection. It could be formed by the reaction of CO and CN radicals, or by substitution of the hydrogen atom by a cyano group in cyanoformaldehyde, HC(=O)CN, that has already been detected in the interstellar medium. Aims The available data on the rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide is limited in terms of quantum number values and frequency range, and does not allow accurate extrapolation of the spectrum into the millimeter-wave range. To provide a firm basis for astrophysical detection of carbonyl cyanide we studied its millimeter-wave spectrum. Methods The rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide was measured in the frequency range 152 - 308 GHz and analyzed using Watson’s A- and S-reduction Hamiltonians. Results The ground and first excited state of v5 vibrational mode were assigned and analyzed. More than 1100 distinct frequency lines of the ground state were fitted to produce an accurate set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants up to the eighth order. The frequency predictions based on these constants should be accurate enough for astrophysical searches in the frequency range up to 500 GHz and for transition involving energy levels with J ≤ 100 and Ka ≤ 42. Based on the results we searched for interstellar carbonyl cyanide in available observational data without success. Thus, we derived upper limits to its column density in different sources. PMID:27738349

  7. CONFIRMING THE PRIMARILY SMOOTH STRUCTURE OF THE VEGA DEBRIS DISK AT MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, A. Meredith; Plambeck, Richard; Chiang, Eugene [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Wilner, David J.; Andrews, Sean M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mason, Brian [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Carpenter, John M. [California Institute of Technology, Department of Astronomy, MC 105-24, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Chiang, Hsin-Fang [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 640 North Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Williams, Jonathan P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Hales, Antonio [Joint ALMA Observatory, Av. El Golf 40, Piso 18, Santiago (Chile); Su, Kate [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Dicker, Simon; Korngut, Phil; Devlin, Mark, E-mail: mhughes@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Clumpy structure in the debris disk around Vega has been previously reported at millimeter wavelengths and attributed to concentrations of dust grains trapped in resonances with an unseen planet. However, recent imaging at similar wavelengths with higher sensitivity has disputed the observed structure. We present three new millimeter-wavelength observations that help to resolve the puzzling and contradictory observations. We have observed the Vega system with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at a wavelength of 880 {mu}m and an angular resolution of 5''; with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) at a wavelength of 1.3 mm and an angular resolution of 5''; and with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at a wavelength of 3.3 mm and angular resolution of 10''. Despite high sensitivity and short baselines, we do not detect the Vega debris disk in either of the interferometric data sets (SMA and CARMA), which should be sensitive at high significance to clumpy structure based on previously reported observations. We obtain a marginal (3{sigma}) detection of disk emission in the GBT data; the spatial distribution of the emission is not well constrained. We analyze the observations in the context of several different models, demonstrating that the observations are consistent with a smooth, broad, axisymmetric disk with inner radius 20-100 AU and width {approx}> 50 AU. The interferometric data require that at least half of the 860 {mu}m emission detected by previous single-dish observations with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope be distributed axisymmetrically, ruling out strong contributions from flux concentrations on spatial scales of {approx}<100 AU. These observations support recent results from the Plateau de Bure Interferometer indicating that previous detections of clumpy structure in the Vega debris disk were spurious.

  8. CONFIRMING THE PRIMARILY SMOOTH STRUCTURE OF THE VEGA DEBRIS DISK AT MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, A. Meredith; Plambeck, Richard; Chiang, Eugene; Wilner, David J.; Andrews, Sean M.; Mason, Brian; Carpenter, John M.; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Williams, Jonathan P.; Hales, Antonio; Su, Kate; Dicker, Simon; Korngut, Phil; Devlin, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Clumpy structure in the debris disk around Vega has been previously reported at millimeter wavelengths and attributed to concentrations of dust grains trapped in resonances with an unseen planet. However, recent imaging at similar wavelengths with higher sensitivity has disputed the observed structure. We present three new millimeter-wavelength observations that help to resolve the puzzling and contradictory observations. We have observed the Vega system with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at a wavelength of 880 μm and an angular resolution of 5''; with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) at a wavelength of 1.3 mm and an angular resolution of 5''; and with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at a wavelength of 3.3 mm and angular resolution of 10''. Despite high sensitivity and short baselines, we do not detect the Vega debris disk in either of the interferometric data sets (SMA and CARMA), which should be sensitive at high significance to clumpy structure based on previously reported observations. We obtain a marginal (3σ) detection of disk emission in the GBT data; the spatial distribution of the emission is not well constrained. We analyze the observations in the context of several different models, demonstrating that the observations are consistent with a smooth, broad, axisymmetric disk with inner radius 20-100 AU and width ∼> 50 AU. The interferometric data require that at least half of the 860 μm emission detected by previous single-dish observations with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope be distributed axisymmetrically, ruling out strong contributions from flux concentrations on spatial scales of ∼<100 AU. These observations support recent results from the Plateau de Bure Interferometer indicating that previous detections of clumpy structure in the Vega debris disk were spurious.

  9. An Alternative Millimeter Wave Oscillator using a Dielectric Puck in the Whispering Gallery Mode, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A majority of millimeter wave based systems used for space exploration, communications and research, require a millimeter wave oscillator. These oscillators have...

  10. Greening Turner Valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byfield, M.

    2010-01-01

    This article discussed remedial activities undertaken in the Turner Valley. Remedial action in the valley must satisfy the financial concerns of engineers and investors as well as the environmental concerns of residents and regulators. Natural gas production in the Turner Valley began in 1914. The production practices were harmful and wasteful. Soil and water pollution was not considered a problem until recently. The impacts of cumulative effects and other pollution hazards are now being considered as part of many oil and gas environmental management programs. Companies know it is cheaper and safer to prevent pollutants from being released, and more efficient to clean them up quickly. Oil and gas companies are also committed to remediating historical problems. Several factors have simplified remediation plans in the Turner Valley. Area real estate values are now among the highest in Alberta. While the valley residents are generally friendly to the petroleum industry, strong communication with all stakeholders in the region is needed. 1 fig.

  11. Fabrication of an Absorber-Coupled MKID Detector and Readout for Sub-Millimeter and Far-Infrared Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ari-David; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Moseley, S. Harvey; Stevenson, Thomas R.; U-yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We have fabricated absorber-coupled microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) arrays for sub-millimeter and farinfrared astronomy. Each detector array is comprised of lambda/2 stepped impedance resonators, a 1.5µm thick silicon membrane, and 380µm thick silicon walls. The resonators consist of parallel plate aluminum transmission lines coupled to low impedance Nb microstrip traces of variable length, which set the resonant frequency of each resonator. This allows for multiplexed microwave readout and, consequently, good spatial discrimination between pixels in the array. The Al transmission lines simultaneously act to absorb optical power and are designed to have a surface impedance and filling fraction so as to match the impedance of free space. Our novel fabrication techniques demonstrate high fabrication yield of MKID arrays on large single crystal membranes and sub-micron front-to-back alignment of the microstrip circuit.

  12. Sub-millimeter science with the Heinrich-Hertz-Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumke, Michael

    The Heinrich-Hertz-Telescope on Mt. Graham, Arizona, is a state-of-the-art single-dish radio telescope for observations in the sub-millimeter wavelength range. It is operated by the Sub-Millimeter Telescope Observatory (SMTO), which is a collaboration between the University of Arizona, Tucson, and the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Bonn. In this talk I give an overview over the telescope and its instrumentation, and show some examples of forefront research performed by astronomers from both the U.S. and Europe using this instrument. The telescope is located on Mt. Graham, Arizona, at an altitude of 3178 m, which ensures sub-mm weather conditions during a significant amount of available observing time. It has a primary reflector of 10 m diameter, mounted on a carbon fiber backup structure, and is equipped with a corotating enclosure. The surface accuracy of the primary reflector is 12 microns rms, what makes the HHT the most accurate radio telescope ever built. For spectral line observations, SIS receivers covering the frequency range from 200 to 500 GHz are available. Furthermore, a Hot-Electron-Bolometer, developed at the CfA, can be used for spectral line observations above 800 GHz. The continuum receivers are a 4-color bolometer, observing at 1300, 870, 450, and 350 microns, and a 19-channel bolometer array, developed at the MPIfR, which is sensitive around 850 microns. In the last few years, the HHT has been used by several groups to perform astronomical research. The most notable result was the measurement of the CO(9--8) line in Orion at 1.037 THz with the Hot-Electron Bolometer -- the first radioastronomical observation above 1 THz from a ground-based telescope. Several galactic molecular line sources have been mapped in the CO(7--6) line at 806 GHz, and in two fine-structure lines of atomic carbon. A continuum map of the galactic center at 850 microns could be produced using the new 19-channel bolometer array. Even external galaxies, where

  13. Millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, D. [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Oka, T.; Tanaka, K.; Matsumura, S.; Miura, K.; Takekawa, S., E-mail: sakai.daisuke@nao.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Institute of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8522 (Japan)

    2014-08-10

    We report the results of millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado Nebula (G357.7-0.1), which is a bright radio source behind the Galactic center region. A 15' × 15' area was mapped in the J = 1-0 lines of CO, {sup 13}CO, and HCO{sup +} with the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope. The Very Large Array archival data of OH at 1720 MHz were also reanalyzed. We found two molecular clouds with separate velocities, V{sub LSR} = –14 km s{sup –1} and +5 km s{sup –1}. These clouds show rough spatial anti-correlation. Both clouds are associated with OH 1720 MHz emissions in the area overlapping with the Tornado Nebula. The spatial and velocity coincidence indicates violent interaction between the clouds and the Tornado Nebula. Modestly excited gas prefers the position of the Tornado 'head' in the –14 km s{sup –1} cloud, also suggesting the interaction. Virial analysis shows that the +5 km s{sup –1} cloud is more tightly bound by self-gravity than the –14 km s{sup –1} cloud. We propose a formation scenario for the Tornado Nebula; the +5 km s{sup –1} cloud collided into the –14 km s{sup –1} cloud, generating a high-density layer behind the shock front, which activates a putative compact object by Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion to eject a pair of bipolar jets.

  14. Status of MUSIC, the MUltiwavelength Sub/millimeter Inductance Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golwala, Sunil R.; Bockstiegel, Clint; Brugger, Spencer; Czakon, Nicole G.; Day, Peter K.; Downes, Thomas P.; Duan, Ran; Gao, Jiansong; Gill, Amandeep K.; Glenn, Jason; Hollister, Matthew I.; LeDuc, Henry G.; Maloney, Philip R.; Mazin, Benjamin A.; McHugh, Sean G.; Miller, David; Noroozian, Omid; Nguyen, Hien T.; Sayers, Jack; Schlaerth, James A.; Siegel, Seth; Vayonakis, Anastasios K.; Wilson, Philip R.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2012-09-01

    We present the status of MUSIC, the MUltiwavelength Sub/millimeter Inductance Camera, a new instrument for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. MUSIC is designed to have a 14', diffraction-limited field-of-view instrumented with 2304 detectors in 576 spatial pixels and four spectral bands at 0.87, 1.04, 1.33, and 1.98 mm. MUSIC will be used to study dusty star-forming galaxies, galaxy clusters via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, and star formation in our own and nearby galaxies. MUSIC uses broadband superconducting phased-array slot-dipole antennas to form beams, lumpedelement on-chip bandpass filters to define spectral bands, and microwave kinetic inductance detectors to sense incoming light. The focal plane is fabricated in 8 tiles consisting of 72 spatial pixels each. It is coupled to the telescope via an ambient-temperature ellipsoidal mirror and a cold reimaging lens. A cold Lyot stop sits at the image of the primary mirror formed by the ellipsoidal mirror. Dielectric and metal-mesh filters are used to block thermal infrared and out-ofband radiation. The instrument uses a pulse tube cooler and 3He/ 3He/4He closed-cycle cooler to cool the focal plane to below 250 mK. A multilayer shield attenuates Earth's magnetic field. Each focal plane tile is read out by a single pair of coaxes and a HEMT amplifier. The readout system consists of 16 copies of custom-designed ADC/DAC and IF boards coupled to the CASPER ROACH platform. We focus on recent updates on the instrument design and results from the commissioning of the full camera in 2012.

  15. Quasi-optical millimeter wave rotating TE62 mode generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shaopu; Zhang Conghui; Wang Zhong; Guo Feng; Chen Hongbin; Hu Linlin; Pan Wenwu

    2011-01-01

    The design,measurement technique and experimental results of rotating TE 6 2 mode generator are presented. The source includes millimeter wave optical system and open coaxial wave guide system. The millimeter wave optical system consists of pyramid antenna, hyperbolical reflector, parabolic reflector and quasi parabolic reflector. The open coaxial wave guide system contains open coaxial wave guide cavity, cylinder wave guide and output antenna. It is tested by network analyser and millimeter wave near field pattern auto-test system, and the purity of rotating TE 6 2 mode at 96.4 GHz is about 97%. (authors)

  16. Millimeter wave spectra of carbonyl cyanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bteich, S. B.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2016-07-01

    Context. More than 30 cyanide derivatives of simple organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium, but only one dicarbonitrile has been found and that very recently. There is still a lack of high-resolution spectroscopic data particularly for dinitriles derivatives. The carbonyl cyanide molecule is a new and interesting candidate for astrophysical detection. It could be formed by the reaction of CO and CN radicals, or by substitution of the hydrogen atom by a cyano group in cyanoformaldehyde, HC(=O)CN, that has already been detected in the interstellar medium. Aims: The available data on the rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide is limited in terms of quantum number values and frequency range, and does not allow accurate extrapolation of the spectrum into the millimeter-wave range. To provide a firm basis for astrophysical detection of carbonyl cyanide we studied its millimeter-wave spectrum. Methods: The rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide was measured in the frequency range 152-308 GHz and analyzed using Watson's A- and S-reduction Hamiltonians. Results: The ground and first excited state of v5 vibrational mode were assigned and analyzed. More than 1100 distinct frequency lines of the ground state were fitted to produce an accurate set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants up to the eighth order. The frequency predictions based on these constants should be accurate enough for astrophysical searches in the frequency range up to 500 GHz and for transition involving energy levels with J ≤ 100 and Ka ≤ 42. Based on the results we searched for interstellar carbonyl cyanide in available observational data without success. Thus, we derived upper limits to its column density in different sources. This paper makes use of the following ALMA data: ADS/JAO.ALMA#2011.0.00009.SV. ALMA is a partnership of ESO (representing its member states), NSF (USA), and NINS (Japan) with NRC (Canada), NSC, and ASIAA (Taiwan), and KASI (Republic of

  17. A DUAL-BAND MILLIMETER-WAVE KINETIC INDUCTANCE CAMERA FOR THE IRAM 30 m TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monfardini, A.; Benoit, A.; Bideaud, A.; Swenson, L.; Cruciani, A.; Camus, P.; Hoffmann, C.; Desert, F. X.; Doyle, S.; Ade, P.; Mauskopf, P.; Tucker, C.; Roesch, M.; Leclercq, S.; Schuster, K. F.; Endo, A.; Baryshev, A.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Ferrari, L.; Yates, S. J. C

    2011-01-01

    The Neel IRAM KIDs Array (NIKA) is a fully integrated measurement system based on kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) currently being developed for millimeter wave astronomy. The instrument includes dual-band optics allowing simultaneous imaging at 150 GHz and 220 GHz. The imaging sensors consist of two spatially separated arrays of KIDs. The first array, mounted on the 150 GHz branch, is composed of 144 lumped-element KIDs. The second array (220 GHz) consists of 256 antenna-coupled KIDs. Each of the arrays is sensitive to a single polarization; the band splitting is achieved by using a grid polarizer. The optics and sensors are mounted in a custom dilution cryostat, with an operating temperature of ∼70 mK. Electronic readout is realized using frequency multiplexing and a transmission line geometry consisting of a coaxial cable connected in series with the sensor array and a low-noise 4 K amplifier. The dual-band NIKA was successfully tested in 2010 October at the Institute for Millimetric Radio Astronomy (IRAM) 30 m telescope at Pico Veleta, Spain, performing in-line with laboratory predictions. An optical NEP was then calculated to be around 2 x 10 -16 W Hz -1/2 (at 1 Hz) while under a background loading of approximately 4 pW pixel -1 . This improvement in comparison with a preliminary run (2009) verifies that NIKA is approaching the target sensitivity for photon-noise limited ground-based detectors. Taking advantage of the larger arrays and increased sensitivity, a number of scientifically relevant faint and extended objects were then imaged including the Galactic Center SgrB2 (FIR1), the radio galaxy Cygnus A, and the NGC1068 Seyfert galaxy. These targets were all observed simultaneously in the 150 GHz and 220 GHz atmospheric windows.

  18. Black Holes and Sub-millimeter Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Argyres, Philip C; March-Russell, John David; Argyres, Philip C.; Dimopoulos, Savas; March-Russell, John

    1998-01-01

    Recently, a new framework for solving the hierarchy problem was proposed which does not rely on low energy supersymmetry or technicolor. The fundamental Planck mass is at a TeV and the observed weakness of gravity at long distances is due the existence of new sub-millimeter spatial dimensions. In this letter, we study how the properties of black holes are altered in these theories. Small black holes---with Schwarzschild radii smaller than the size of the new spatial dimensions---are quite different. They are bigger, colder, and longer-lived than a usual $(3+1)$-dimensional black hole of the same mass. Furthermore, they primarily decay into harmless bulk graviton modes rather than standard-model degrees of freedom. We discuss the interplay of our scenario with the holographic principle. Our results also have implications for the bounds on the spectrum of primordial black holes (PBHs) derived from the photo-dissociation of primordial nucleosynthesis products, distortion of the diffuse gamma-ray spectrum, overcl...

  19. Deep millimeter spectroscopy observations toward NGC 1068

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jianjie; Wang, Junzhi; Shi, Yong; Zhang, Jiangshui; Fang, Min; Li, Fei

    2018-05-01

    Aims: We aim for a better understanding of gas properties in the circum-nuclear disk (CND) region of the nearby gas-rich Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068. We focus on line identification and the basic physical parameters estimation of molecular gas in the CND region. Methods: We used the IRAM 30 m telescope to conduct deep millimeter spectroscopy observations toward the center of NGC 1068. Results: Thirty-two lines were detected in this galaxy, 15 lines of wich were detected for the first time. With a sensitivity better by about a factor of 4 than observations in the literature for this source at 3 mm band, we detected several weak lines for the first time in this source, such as lines from CH3CCH, CH3OCH3, and HC18O+. Column densities of these molecules were estimated based on line emissions. Some marginal detections in the literature, such as HN13C (1-0), were confirmed. CH3OCH3 was detected for the first time in external galaxies. Lines from several carbon chain molecules and shock-related molecules were also detected in this source. The reduced spectrum (FITS file) is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/613/A3

  20. Development of a Millimeter-Wave Beam Position and Profile Monitor for Transmission Efficiency Improvement in an ECRH System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimozuma T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a high power Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH system, a long-distance and low-loss transmission system is required to realize effective heating of nuclear fusion-relevant plasmas. A millimeter-wave beam position and profile monitor, which can be used in a high-power, evacuated, and cooled transmission line, is proposed, designed, manufactured, and tested. The beam monitor consists of a reflector, Peltier-device array and a heat-sink. It was tested using simulated electric heater power or gyrotron output power. The data obtained from the monitor were well agreed with the heat source position and profile. The methods of data analysis and mode-content analysis of a propagating millimeter-wave in the corrugated wave-guide are proposed.

  1. Josephson junction spectrum analyzer for millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkin, S.Y.; Anischenko, S.E.; Khabayev, P.V.

    1994-01-01

    A prototype of the Josephson-effect spectrum analyzer developed for the millimeter-wave band is described. The measurement results for spectra obtained in the frequency band from 50 to 250 GHz are presented

  2. Josephson junction spectrum analyzer for millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkin, S.Y.; Anischenko, S.E.; Khabayev, P.V. [State Research Center, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1994-12-31

    A prototype of the Josephson-effect spectrum analyzer developed for the millimeter-wave band is described. The measurement results for spectra obtained in the frequency band from 50 to 250 GHz are presented.

  3. Acquisition: Competition of the 5.56-Millimeter Carbine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jolliffe, Richard B; Meling, John E; Snider, Jack D; Klein, Kevin W; Thomas, Deborah J; Rodriguez-Velazquez, Zelideth; Milner, Jillisa H

    2006-01-01

    Why You Should Read This Report: This report discusses an internal control weakness that program offices should address before releasing presolicitation notices to industry. Background: The M4 is a 5.56-millimeter (mm...

  4. New submillimeter detectors and antenna arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, H.R.; Reible, S.A.; Sollner, G.; Parker, C.D.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary investigation has been made into the use of SIS (superconductor--insulator--superconductor) diodes for possible roles in sub-millimeter imaging systems. That is, extremely low noise, millimeter wave detectors and mixers have recently been reported which depend on single-particle tunnelling between two superconducting films separated by a thin oxide layer. The combination of excellent low-frequency sensitivity and well-developed fabrication technology make the SIS mixers particularly attractive for the systems using antenna structures and arrays in millimeter and submillimeter regions. The SIS diodes of Nb-Nb 2 O 5 -Pb showed a strong video response to the radiation which could be differentiated from the regular Josephson effect since it was not affected by a magnetic field. In exploring the three-terminal devices for possible detector and source applications in submillimeter region, the authors first determined that millimeter and submillimeter radiation could be effectively coupled to and detected in high-frequency FETs. Video response was readily obtained at 800 GHz, and carcinotron radiation at 350 GHz was mixed with the 5th harmonic of a 70 GHz klystron, producing over 45 db signal-to-noise ratio in the intermediate frequency. Since FET can function as a three-terminal oscillator simultaneously detecting submillimeter radiation or optical beats, it has interesting possibility, such as self-oscillating mixers or subharmonic local oscillators. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  5. Valley Topological Phases in Bilayer Sonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiuyang; Qiu, Chunyin; Deng, Weiyin; Huang, Xueqin; Li, Feng; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Shuqi; Liu, Zhengyou

    2018-03-01

    Recently, the topological physics in artificial crystals for classical waves has become an emerging research area. In this Letter, we propose a unique bilayer design of sonic crystals that are constructed by two layers of coupled hexagonal array of triangular scatterers. Assisted by the additional layer degree of freedom, a rich topological phase diagram is achieved by simply rotating scatterers in both layers. Under a unified theoretical framework, two kinds of valley-projected topological acoustic insulators are distinguished analytically, i.e., the layer-mixed and layer-polarized topological valley Hall phases, respectively. The theory is evidently confirmed by our numerical and experimental observations of the nontrivial edge states that propagate along the interfaces separating different topological phases. Various applications such as sound communications in integrated devices can be anticipated by the intriguing acoustic edge states enriched by the layer information.

  6. Millimeter wave studies of circumstellar chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, Emily Dale

    2010-06-01

    Millimeter wave studies of molecules in circumstellar envelopes and a planetary nebula have been conducted. Using the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) on Mt. Graham, a comparative spectral survey from 215-285 GHz was carried out of the carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch star IRC +10216 and the oxygen-rich supergiant VY Canis Majoris. A total of 858 emission lines were observed in both objects, arising from 40 different molecules. In VY Canis Majoris, AlO, AlOH, and PO were detected for the first time in interstellar space. In IRC +10216, PH3 was detected for the first time beyond the solar system, and C3O, and CH2NH were found for the first time in a circumstellar envelope. Additionally, in the evolved planetary nebula, the Helix, H2CO, C2H, and cyclic-C3H2 were observed using the SMT and the Kitt Peak 12 m telescopes. The presence of these three molecules in the Helix suggests that relatively complex chemistry occurs in planetary nebulae, despite the harsh ultraviolet field. Overall, the research on molecules in circumstellar and planetary nebulae furthers our understanding of the nature of the material that is fed back into the interstellar medium from evolved stars. Besides telescope work, laboratory research was also conducted -- the rotational spectrum of ZnCl was measured and its bond length and rotational constants were determined. Lastly, in partial fulfillment of a graduate certificate in entrepreneurial chemistry, the commercial applications of terahertz spectroscopy were explored through literature research.

  7. Millimeter and Submillimeter Wave Spectroscopy of Higher Energy Conformers of 1,2-PROPANEDIOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharenko, Olena; Bossa, Jean-Baptiste; Lewen, Frank; Schlemmer, Stephan; Müller, Holger S. P.

    2017-06-01

    We have performed a study of the millimeter/submillimeter wave spectrum of four higher energy conformers of 1,2-propanediol (continuation of the previous study on the three lowest energy conformers. The present analysis of rotational transitions carried out in the frequency range 38 - 400 GHz represents a significant extension of previous microwave work. The new data were combined with previously-measured microwave transitions and fitted using a Watson's S-reduced Hamiltonian. The final fits were within experimental accuracy, and included spectroscopic parameters up to sixth order of angular momentum, for the ground states of the four higher energy conformers following previously studied ones: g'Ga, gG'g', aGg' and g'Gg. The present analysis provides reliable frequency predictions for astrophysical detection of 1,2-propanediol by radio telescope arrays at millimeter wavelengths. J.-B. Bossa, M.H. Ordu, H.S.P. Müller, F. Lewen, S. Schlemmer, A&A 570 (2014) A12)

  8. Investigation of radiant millimeter wave/terahertz radiation from low-infrared signature targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytaç, B.; Alkuş, Ü.; Sivaslıgil, M.; Şahin, A. B.; Altan, H.

    2017-10-01

    Millimeter (mm) and sub-mm wave radiation is increasingly becoming a region of interest as better methods are developed to detect in this wavelength range. The development of sensitive focal plane array (FPA) architectures as well as single pixel scanners has opened up a new field of passive detection and imaging. Spectral signatures of objects, a long standing area of interest in the Short Wave Infrared (SWIR), Mid-Wave (MWIR) and Long Wave-IR (LWIR) bands can now be assessed in the mm-wave/terahertz (THz) region. The advantage is that this form of radiation is not as adversely affected by poor atmospheric conditions compared to other bands. In this study, a preliminary experiment in a laboratory environment is performed to assess the radiance from targets with low infrared signatures in the millimeter wave/terahertz (THz) band (<1 THz). The goal of this approach is to be able to model the experimental results to better understand the mm-wave/THz signature of targets with low observability in the IR bands.

  9. Study on Fins' Effect of Boiling Flow in Millimeter Channel Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoshi

    2005-11-01

    Recently, a lot of researches about compact heat exchangers with mini-channels have been carried out with the hope of obtaining a high-efficiency heat transfer, due to the higher ratio of surface area than existing heat exchangers. However, there are many uncertain phenomena in fields such as boiling flow in mini-channels. Thus, in order to understand the boiling flow in mini-channels to design high-efficiency heat exchangers, this work focused on the visualization measurement of boiling flow in a millimeter channel. A transparent acrylic channel (heat exchanger form), high-speed camera (2000 fps at 1024 x 1024 pixels), and halogen lamp (backup light) were used as the visualization system. The channel's depth is 2 mm, width is 30 mm, and length is 400 mm. In preparation for commercial use, two types of channels were experimented on: a fins type and a normal slit type (without fins). The fins are circular cylindrical obstacles (diameter is 5 mm) to promote heat transfer, set in a triangular array (distance between each center point is 10 mm). Especially in this work, boiling flow and heat transfer promotion in the millimeter channel heat exchanger with fins was evaluated using a high-speed camera.

  10. The general optics structure of millimeter-wave imaging diagnostic on TOKAMAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Y.; Xie, J.; Liu, W.D.; Luo, C.; Zhao, Z.; Chen, D.; Domier, C.W.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Chen, M.; Hu, X.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced imaging optics techniques have significantly improved the performance of millimeter-wave imaging diagnostics, such as Electron Cyclotron Emission imaging and Microwave Imaging of Reflectometry. The fundamental functions of millimeter-wave imaging optics are focusing, collecting the emission or reflected microwave signal from the target area in the plasma and focusing the emitted (reflected) signal on the detector array. The location of the observation area can be changed using the focus lens. Another important function of the imaging optics is zooming. The size of the observation area in poloidal direction can be adjusted by the zoom lenses and the poloidal spatial resolution is determined by the level of zoom. The field curvature adjustment lenses are employed to adjust the shape of the image plane in the poloidal direction to reduce crosstalk between neighboring channels. The incident angle on each channel is controlled using the specific surface type of the front-side lenses to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. All functions are decoupled with the minimum number of lenses. Successful applications are given

  11. Array capabilities and future arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, D.

    1993-01-01

    Early results from the new third-generation instruments GAMMASPHERE and EUROGAM are confirming the expectation that such arrays will have a revolutionary effect on the field of high-spin nuclear structure. When completed, GAMMASHPERE will have a resolving power am order of magnitude greater that of the best second-generation arrays. When combined with other instruments such as particle-detector arrays and fragment mass analysers, the capabilites of the arrays for the study of more exotic nuclei will be further enhanced. In order to better understand the limitations of these instruments, and to design improved future detector systems, it is important to have some intelligible and reliable calculation for the relative resolving power of different instrument designs. The derivation of such a figure of merit will be briefly presented, and the relative sensitivities of arrays currently proposed or under construction presented. The design of TRIGAM, a new third-generation array proposed for Chalk River, will also be discussed. It is instructive to consider how far arrays of Compton-suppressed Ge detectors could be taken. For example, it will be shown that an idealised open-quote perfectclose quotes third-generation array of 1000 detectors has a sensitivity an order of magnitude higher again than that of GAMMASPHERE. Less conventional options for new arrays will also be explored

  12. THE CHROMOSPHERIC SOLAR LIMB BRIGHTENING AT RADIO, MILLIMETER, SUB-MILLIMETER, AND INFRARED WAVELENGTHS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Luz, V. [Conacyt—SCiESMEX, Instituto de Geofísica, Unidad Michoacán, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Morelia, Michoacán, 58190, México (Mexico)

    2016-07-10

    Observations of the emission at radio, millimeter, sub-millimeter, and infrared wavelengths in the center of the solar disk validate the autoconsistence of semi-empirical models of the chromosphere. Theoretically, these models must reproduce the emission at the solar limb. In this work, we tested both the VALC and C7 semi-empirical models by computing their emission spectrum in the frequency range from 2 GHz to 10 THz at solar limb altitudes. We calculate the Sun's theoretical radii as well as their limb brightening. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium was computed for hydrogen, electron density, and H{sup −}. In order to solve the radiative transfer equation, a three-dimensional (3D) geometry was employed to determine the ray paths, and Bremsstrahlung, H{sup −}, and inverse Bremsstrahlung opacity sources were integrated in the optical depth. We compared the computed solar radii with high-resolution observations at the limb obtained by Clark. We found that there are differences between the observed and computed solar radii of 12,000 km at 20 GHz, 5000 km at 100 GHz, and 1000 km at 3 THz for both semi-empirical models. A difference of 8000 km in the solar radii was found when comparing our results against the heights obtained from H α observations of spicules-off at the solar limb. We conclude that the solar radii cannot be reproduced by VALC and C7 semi-empirical models at radio—infrared wavelengths. Therefore, the structures in the high chromosphere provide a better measurement of the solar radii and their limb brightening as shown in previous investigations.

  13. THE CHROMOSPHERIC SOLAR LIMB BRIGHTENING AT RADIO, MILLIMETER, SUB-MILLIMETER, AND INFRARED WAVELENGTHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Luz, V.

    2016-01-01

    Observations of the emission at radio, millimeter, sub-millimeter, and infrared wavelengths in the center of the solar disk validate the autoconsistence of semi-empirical models of the chromosphere. Theoretically, these models must reproduce the emission at the solar limb. In this work, we tested both the VALC and C7 semi-empirical models by computing their emission spectrum in the frequency range from 2 GHz to 10 THz at solar limb altitudes. We calculate the Sun's theoretical radii as well as their limb brightening. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium was computed for hydrogen, electron density, and H − . In order to solve the radiative transfer equation, a three-dimensional (3D) geometry was employed to determine the ray paths, and Bremsstrahlung, H − , and inverse Bremsstrahlung opacity sources were integrated in the optical depth. We compared the computed solar radii with high-resolution observations at the limb obtained by Clark. We found that there are differences between the observed and computed solar radii of 12,000 km at 20 GHz, 5000 km at 100 GHz, and 1000 km at 3 THz for both semi-empirical models. A difference of 8000 km in the solar radii was found when comparing our results against the heights obtained from H α observations of spicules-off at the solar limb. We conclude that the solar radii cannot be reproduced by VALC and C7 semi-empirical models at radio—infrared wavelengths. Therefore, the structures in the high chromosphere provide a better measurement of the solar radii and their limb brightening as shown in previous investigations.

  14. X-ray microcalorimeter arrays fabricated by surface micromachining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, G.C.; Beall, J.A.; Deiker, S.; Vale, L.R.; Doriese, W.B.; Beyer, Joern; Ullom, J.N.; Reintsema, C.D.; Xu, Y.; Irwin, K.D.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing arrays of Mo/Cu transition edge sensor-based detectors for use as X-ray microcalorimeters and sub-millimeter bolometers. We have fabricated 8x8 pixel X-ray microcalorimeter arrays using surface micromachining. Surface-micromachining techniques hold the promise of scalability to much larger arrays and may allow for the integration of in-plane multiplexer elements. In this paper we describe the surface micromachining process and recent improvements in the device geometry that provide for increased mechanical strength. We also present X-ray and heat pulse spectra collected using these detectors

  15. A millisecond-risetime sub-millimeter light source for lab and in flight bolometer calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbon, Ph.; Delbart, A.; Fesquet, M.; Magneville, C.; Mazeau, B.; Pansart, J.-P.; Yvon, D.; Dumoulin, L.; Marnieros, S.; Camus, Ph.; Durand, T.; Hoffmann, Ch.

    2007-06-01

    The Olimpo balloon project will use a 120 bolometer camera to observe the sky at four frequencies (143, 217, 385 and 600 GHz) with a resolution of 3 to 2 arc-minute. This paper presents the sub-millimeter calibration "lamp" developed for ground testing and in-flight secondary calibration of bolometric detectors. By design, main features of the device are reproducibility and stability of light flux and millisecond rise time. The radiative device will be placed inside the bolometer camera and will illuminate the bolometer array through a hole in the last 2 K mirror. Operation, readout, and monitoring of the device is ensured by warm electronics. Light output flux and duration is programmable, triggered and monitored from a simple computer RS232 interface. It was tested to be reliable in ballooning temperature conditions from -80 to 50C. Design and test's results are explained.

  16. Stray light suppression in the Goddard IRAM 2-Millimeter Observer (GISMO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, E. H.; Benford, D. J.; Fixsen, D. J.; Moseley, S. H.; Staguhn, J. G.; Wollack, E. J.

    2012-09-01

    The Goddard-IRAM Superconducting 2 Millimeter Observer (GISMO) is an 8x16 Transition Edge Sensor (TES) array of bolometers built as a pathfinder for TES detector development efforts at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. GISMO has been used annually at the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique (IRAM) 30 meter telescope since 2007 under engineering time and was opened in the spring of 2012 to the general astronomical community. The spring deployment provided an opportunity to modify elements of the room temperature optics before moving the instrument to its new permanent position in the telescope receiver cabin. This allowed for the possibility to extend the cryostat, introduce improved cold baffling and thus further optimize the stray light performance for final astronomical use of the instrument, which has been completed and validated. We will demonstrate and discuss several of the methods used to quantify and limit the influence of stray light in the GISMO camera.

  17. Rank-defective millimeter-wave channel estimation based on subspace-compressive sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Shakhsi Dastgahian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Millimeter-wave communication (mmWC is considered as one of the pioneer candidates for 5G indoor and outdoor systems in E-band. To subdue the channel propagation characteristics in this band, high dimensional antenna arrays need to be deployed at both the base station (BS and mobile sets (MS. Unlike the conventional MIMO systems, Millimeter-wave (mmW systems lay away to employ the power predatory equipment such as ADC or RF chain in each branch of MIMO system because of hardware constraints. Such systems leverage to the hybrid precoding (combining architecture for downlink deployment. Because there is a large array at the transceiver, it is impossible to estimate the channel by conventional methods. This paper develops a new algorithm to estimate the mmW channel by exploiting the sparse nature of the channel. The main contribution is the representation of a sparse channel model and the exploitation of a modified approach based on Multiple Measurement Vector (MMV greedy sparse framework and subspace method of Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC which work together to recover the indices of non-zero elements of an unknown channel matrix when the rank of the channel matrix is defected. In practical rank-defective channels, MUSIC fails, and we need to propose new extended MUSIC approaches based on subspace enhancement to compensate the limitation of MUSIC. Simulation results indicate that our proposed extended MUSIC algorithms will have proper performances and moderate computational speeds, and that they are even able to work in channels with an unknown sparsity level.

  18. SNP Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Louhelainen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The papers published in this Special Issue “SNP arrays” (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Arrays focus on several perspectives associated with arrays of this type. The range of papers vary from a case report to reviews, thereby targeting wider audiences working in this field. The research focus of SNP arrays is often human cancers but this Issue expands that focus to include areas such as rare conditions, animal breeding and bioinformatics tools. Given the limited scope, the spectrum of papers is nothing short of remarkable and even from a technical point of view these papers will contribute to the field at a general level. Three of the papers published in this Special Issue focus on the use of various SNP array approaches in the analysis of three different cancer types. Two of the papers concentrate on two very different rare conditions, applying the SNP arrays slightly differently. Finally, two other papers evaluate the use of the SNP arrays in the context of genetic analysis of livestock. The findings reported in these papers help to close gaps in the current literature and also to give guidelines for future applications of SNP arrays.

  19. Millimeter wave and terahertz wave transmission characteristics in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Ping; Qin Long; Chen Weijun; Zhao Qing; Shi Anhua; Huang Jie

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted on the shock tube to explore the transmission characteristics of millimeter wave and terahertz wave in high density plasmas, in order to meet the communication requirement of hypersonic vehicles during blackout. The transmission attenuation curves of millimeter wave and terahertz wave in different electron density and collision frequency were obtained. The experiment was also simulated by auxiliary differential equation finite-difference time-domain (ADE-FDTD) methods. The experimental and numerical results show that the transmission attenuation of terahertz wave in the plasma is smaller than that of millimeter wave under the same conditions. The transmission attenuation of terahertz wave in the plasma is enhanced with the increase of electron density. The terahertz wave is a promising alternative to the electromagnetic wave propagation in high density plasmas. (authors)

  20. Millimeter positron focusing using a hybrid lens design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, C.K.; Kwan, P.Y.; Shan, Y.Y.; Naik, P.S.; Weng, H.M.; Beling, C.D.; Fung, S.

    2004-01-01

    The study of metal-semiconductor and metal-oxide-semiconductor systems with low energy positrons is made considerably easier if structures of millimeter dimension can be studied. For this reason the production of a positron beam of sub-millimeter dimension has been a long-term goal of the positron research group at the university of Hong Kong. The hybrid lens system employed consists of a standard Soa extraction lens in a magnetic field free region followed by a gridded Einzel lens that focuses positrons into a 100G magnetic funnel at an energy of 10keV for transportation to the target. Here we report on the present progress, by showing the capability of obtaining millimeter diameter focusing at a preliminary 7.5 kV beam energy. (orig.)

  1. Breathing Valley Fever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-04

    Dr. Duc Vugia, chief of the Infectious Diseases Branch in the California Department of Public Health, discusses Valley Fever.  Created: 2/4/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/5/2014.

  2. The fabrication of millimeter-wavelength accelerating structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, P.J.; Bowden, G.B.; Copeland, M.R.

    1996-11-01

    There is a growing interest in the development of high gradient (≥ 1 GeV/m) accelerating structures. The need for high gradient acceleration based on current microwave technology requires the structures to be operated in the millimeter wavelength. Fabrication of accelerating structures at millimeter scale with sub-micron tolerances poses great challenges. The accelerating structures impose strict requirements on surface smoothness and finish to suppress field emission and multipactor effects. Various fabrication techniques based on conventional machining and micromachining have been evaluated and tested. These will be discussed and measurement results presented

  3. Microwave and millimeter-wave remote sensing for security applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nanzer, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Microwave and millimeter-wave remote sensing techniques are fast becoming a necessity in many aspects of security as detection and classification of objects or intruders becomes more difficult. This groundbreaking resource offers you expert guidance in this burgeoning area. It provides you with a thorough treatment of the principles of microwave and millimeter-wave remote sensing for security applications, as well as practical coverage of the design of radiometer, radar, and imaging systems. You learn how to design active and passive sensors for intruder detection, concealed object detection,

  4. Alumina+Silica+/-Germanium Alteration in Smectite-Bearing Marathon Valley, Endeavour Crater Rim, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Gellert, R.; Van Bommel, S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.; Schroeder, C.; Yen, A. S.; Fox, V. K.; Farrand, W. H.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been exploring Mars for 12+ years, and is presently investigating the geology of a western rim segment of 22 kilometers diameter, Noachian- aged Endeavour crater. The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer has determined the compositions of a pre-impact lithology, the Matijevic fm., and polymict impact breccias ejected from the crater, the Shoemaker fm. Opportunity is now investigating a region named Marathon Valley that cuts southwest-northeast through the central portion of the rim segment and provides a window into the lower stratigraphic record. (Geographic names used here are informal.) At the head of Marathon Valley, referred to here as Upper Marathon Valley, is a shallow, ovoid depression approximately 25×35 millimeters in size, named Spirit of Saint Louis. Layering inside Spirit of Saint Louis appears continuous with the Upper Marathon Valley rocks outside, indicating they are coeval. Spirit of Saint Louis is partly bounded by approximately 10-20 centimeters wide zone containing reddish altered rocks (red zone). Red zones also form prominent curvilinear features in Marathon Valley. Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) spectra provide evidence for a really extensive Fe-Mg smectite in the Marathon Valley region, indicating distinct styles of aqueous alteration. The CRISM detections of smectites are based on metal-OH absorptions at approximately 2.3 and 2.4 micron that are at least two times the background noise level.

  5. electrode array

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    A geoelectric investigation employing vertical electrical soundings (VES) using the Ajayi - Makinde Two-Electrode array and the ... arrangements used in electrical D.C. resistivity survey. These include ..... Refraction Tomography to Study the.

  6. GPM GROUND VALIDATION CONICAL SCANNING MILLIMETER-WAVE IMAGING RADIOMETER (COSMIR) MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (COSMIR) MC3E dataset used the Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer...

  7. GPM GROUND VALIDATION CONICAL SCANNING MILLIMETER-WAVE IMAGING RADIOMETER (COSMIR) GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (COSMIR) GCPEx dataset used the Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer...

  8. Explaining millimeter-sized particles in brown dwarf disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinilla, P.; Birnstiel, T.; Benisty, M.; Ricci, L.; Natta, A.; Dullemond, C.P.; Dominik, C.; Testi, L.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Planets have been detected around a variety of stars, including low-mass objects, such as brown dwarfs. However, such extreme cases are challenging for planet formation models. Recent sub-millimeter observations of disks around brown dwarf measured low spectral indices of the continuum

  9. Analysis of human skin tissue by millimeter-wave reflectometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, P.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background/pupose: Millimeter-wave reflectometry is a potentially interesting technique to analyze the human skin in vivo in order to determine the water content locally in the skin. Purpose of this work is to investigate the possibility of skin-tissue differentiation. In addition, it addresses the

  10. Photonic integrated circuits for millimeter-wave wireless communications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carpintero, G.; Balakier, K.; Yang, Z.; Guzmán, R.C.; Corradi, A.; Jimenez, A.; Kervalla, G.; Fice, M.; Lamponi, M.; Chtioui, M.; Van Dijk, Frédéric; Renaud, C.C.; Wonfor, A.; Bente, E.A.J.M.; Penty, R.V.; White, I.H.; Seeds, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the advantages that the introduction of photonic integration technologies can bring to the development of photonic-enabled wireless communications systems operating in the millimeter wave frequency range. We present two approaches for the development of dual wavelength sources

  11. Digitally assisted analog beamforming for millimeter-wave communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kokkeler, Andre B.J.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2015-01-01

    The paper addresses the research question on how digital beamsteering algorithms can be combined with analog beamforming in the context of millimeter-wave communication for next generation (5G) cellular systems. Key is the use of coarse quantisation of the individual antenna signals next to the

  12. Spatial Stationarity of Ultrawideband and Millimeter Wave Radio Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Tan; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2016-01-01

    For radio channels with broad bandwidth resource, such as those often used for ultrawideband (UWB) and millimeter wave (mmwave) systems, the Wide-Sense Stationary Uncorrelated Scattering (WSSUS) and spatial stationary assumptions are more critical than typical cellular channels with very limited ...

  13. Global design of an active integrated antenna for millimeter wave

    OpenAIRE

    Marzolf, Eric; Drissi, M’hamed

    2001-01-01

    An active integrated antenna working in the millimeter wave has been realized in a monolithic process. The concept of active integrated antenna is first introduced, then the design of the integrated circuit based on a global approach, following electromagnetic and circuit simulations, is presented. The obtained performances of the active antenna are discussed and compared to a passive one.

  14. Millimeter wave VAlidation STandard (mm-VAST) antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.

    This document summarizes the main results of the project “Millimeter wave VAlidation STandard (mm-VAST) antenna” completed by the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) in collaboration with Danish company TICRA for the European Space Agency (ESA) under ESA contract no. 4000109866/13/NL/MH....

  15. Millimeter wave VAlidation STandard (mm-VAST) antenna. Abstract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.

    This document outlines the background, objectives and the main results of the project “Millimeter wave VAlidation STandard (mm-VAST) antenna” completed by the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) in collaboration with Danish company TICRA for the European Space Agency (ESA) under ESA contract no...

  16. A Wing Pod-based Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar on HIAPER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekanandan, Jothiram; Tsai, Peisang; Ellis, Scott; Loew, Eric; Lee, Wen-Chau; Emmett, Joanthan

    2014-05-01

    , occupy minimum cabin space and maximize scan coverage, a pod-based configuration was adopted. Currently, the radar system is capable of collecting observations between zenith and nadir in a fixed scanning mode. Measurements are corrected for aircraft attitude changes. The near-nadir and zenith pointing observations minimize the cross-track Doppler contamination in the radial velocity measurements. An extensive engineering monitoring mechanism is built into the recording system status such as temperature, pressure, various electronic components' status and receiver characteristics. Status parameters are used for real-time system stability estimates and correcting radar system parameters. The pod based radar system is mounted on a modified Gulfstream V aircraft, which is operated and maintained by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) on behalf of the National Science Foundation (NSF). The aircraft is called the High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) (Laursen et al., 2006). It is also instrumented with high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and an array of in situ and remote sensors for atmospheric research. As part of the instrument suite for HIAPER, the NSF funded the development of the HIAPER Cloud Radar (HCR). The HCR is an airborne, millimeter-wavelength, dual-polarization, Doppler radar that serves the atmospheric science community by providing cloud remote sensing capabilities for the NSF/NCAR G-V (HIAPER) aircraft. An optimal radar configuration that is capable of maximizing the accuracy of both qualitative and quantitative estimated cloud microphysical and dynamical properties is the most attractive option to the research community. The Technical specifications of cloud radar are optimized for realizing the desired scientific performance for the pod-based configuration. The radar was both ground and flight tested and preliminary measurements of Doppler and polarization measurements were collected. HCR

  17. Filter arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Ralph H.; Doty, Patrick F.

    2017-08-01

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a tiled filter array that can be used in connection with performance of spatial sampling of optical signals. The filter array comprises filter tiles, wherein a first plurality of filter tiles are formed from a first material, the first material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a first wavelength band pass therethrough. A second plurality of filter tiles is formed from a second material, the second material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a second wavelength band pass therethrough. The first plurality of filter tiles and the second plurality of filter tiles can be interspersed to form the filter array comprising an alternating arrangement of first filter tiles and second filter tiles.

  18. SMA millimeter observations of hot molecular cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández-Hernández, Vicente; Zapata, Luis; Kurtz, Stan [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58090 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Garay, Guido, E-mail: v.hernandez@crya.unam.mx [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino del Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-05-01

    We present Submillimeter Array observations in the 1.3 mm continuum and the CH{sub 3}CN (12 {sub K}-11 {sub K}) line of 17 hot molecular cores associated with young high-mass stars. The angular resolution of the observations ranges from 1.''0 to 4.''0. The continuum observations reveal large (>3500 AU) dusty structures with gas masses from 7 to 375 M {sub ☉}, which probably surround multiple young stars. The CH{sub 3}CN line emission is detected toward all the molecular cores at least up to the K = 6 component and is mostly associated with the emission peaks of the dusty objects. We used the multiple K-components of the CH{sub 3}CN and both the rotational diagram method and a simultaneous synthetic local thermodynamic equilibrium model with the XCLASS program to estimate the temperatures and column densities of the cores. For all sources, we obtained reasonable fits from XCLASS by using a model that combines two components: an extended and warm envelope and a compact hot core of molecular gas, suggesting internal heating by recently formed massive stars. The rotational temperatures lie in the range of 40-132 K and 122-485 K for the extended and compact components, respectively. From the continuum and CH{sub 3}CN results, we infer fractional abundances from 10{sup –9} to 10{sup –7} toward the compact inner components, which increase with the rotational temperature. Our results agree with a chemical scenario in which the CH{sub 3}CN molecule is efficiently formed in the gas phase above 100-300 K, and its abundance increases with temperature.

  19. Realization of a video-rate distributed aperture millimeter-wave imaging system using optical upconversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Christopher; Martin, Richard; Dillon, Thomas; Yao, Peng; Mackrides, Daniel; Harrity, Charles; Zablocki, Alicia; Shreve, Kevin; Bonnett, James; Curt, Petersen; Prather, Dennis

    2013-05-01

    Passive imaging using millimeter waves (mmWs) has many advantages and applications in the defense and security markets. All terrestrial bodies emit mmW radiation and these wavelengths are able to penetrate smoke, fog/clouds/marine layers, and even clothing. One primary obstacle to imaging in this spectrum is that longer wavelengths require larger apertures to achieve the resolutions desired for many applications. Accordingly, lens-based focal plane systems and scanning systems tend to require large aperture optics, which increase the achievable size and weight of such systems to beyond what can be supported by many applications. To overcome this limitation, a distributed aperture detection scheme is used in which the effective aperture size can be increased without the associated volumetric increase in imager size. This distributed aperture system is realized through conversion of the received mmW energy into sidebands on an optical carrier. This conversion serves, in essence, to scale the mmW sparse aperture array signals onto a complementary optical array. The side bands are subsequently stripped from the optical carrier and recombined to provide a real time snapshot of the mmW signal. Using this technique, we have constructed a real-time, video-rate imager operating at 75 GHz. A distributed aperture consisting of 220 upconversion channels is used to realize 2.5k pixels with passive sensitivity. Details of the construction and operation of this imager as well as field testing results will be presented herein.

  20. Imaging spectroscopy using embedded diffractive optical arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnrichs, Michele; Hinnrichs, Bradford

    2017-09-01

    Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) has developed an infrared hyperspectral camera based on diffractive optic arrays. This approach to hyperspectral imaging has been demonstrated in all three infrared bands SWIR, MWIR and LWIR. The hyperspectral optical system has been integrated into the cold-shield of the sensor enabling the small size and weight of this infrared hyperspectral sensor. This new and innovative approach to an infrared hyperspectral imaging spectrometer uses micro-optics that are made up of an area array of diffractive optical elements where each element is tuned to image a different spectral region on a common focal plane array. The lenslet array is embedded in the cold-shield of the sensor and actuated with a miniature piezo-electric motor. This approach enables rapid infrared spectral imaging with multiple spectral images collected and processed simultaneously each frame of the camera. This paper will present our optical mechanical design approach which results in an infrared hyper-spectral imaging system that is small enough for a payload on a small satellite, mini-UAV, commercial quadcopter or man portable. Also, an application of how this spectral imaging technology can easily be used to quantify the mass and volume flow rates of hydrocarbon gases. The diffractive optical elements used in the lenslet array are blazed gratings where each lenslet is tuned for a different spectral bandpass. The lenslets are configured in an area array placed a few millimeters above the focal plane and embedded in the cold-shield to reduce the background signal normally associated with the optics. The detector array is divided into sub-images covered by each lenslet. We have developed various systems using a different number of lenslets in the area array. Depending on the size of the focal plane and the diameter of the lenslet array will determine the number of simultaneous different spectral images collected each frame of the camera. A 2 x 2 lenslet array will image

  1. Millimeter-Wave Holographic Imaging System for Radiating Array Assay and Adjustment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pearson, L

    2000-01-01

    .... The following paragraphs provide a summary of the items purchased and a brief description of the custom antenna scanning facility assembled from the specific item of a Cascade Probe Station. Items Purchased: Receiver System...

  2. CO mapping of the nuclear region of NGC 6946 and IC 342 with Nobeyama millimeter array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuki, Sumio; Kawabe, Ryohei; Okumura, Sachiko K.; Morita, Koh-Ichiro; Ishiguro, Masato

    1990-01-01

    CO observations of nearby galaxies with nuclear active star forming regions (and starburst galaxies) with angular resolutions around 7 seconds revealed that molecular bars with a length of a few kiloparsecs have been formed in the central regions of the galaxies. The molecular bar is interpreted as part of shock waves induced by an oval or barred potential field. By shock dissipation or dissipative cloud-cloud collisions, the molecular gas gains an infall motion and the nuclear star formation activity is fueled. But the distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas in the nuclear regions, which are sites of active star formation, remain unknown. Higher angular resolutions are needed to investigate the gas in the nuclear regions. Researchers made aperture synthesis observations of the nuclear region of the late-type spiral galaxies NGC 6946 and IC 342 with resolutions of 7.6 seconds x 4.2 seconds (P.A. = 147 deg) and 2.4 seconds x 2.3 seconds (P.A. = 149 deg), respectively. The distances to NGC 6496 and IC 342 are assumed to be 5.5 Mpc and 3.9 Mpc, respectively. Researchers have found 100-300 pc nuclear gas disk and ring inside a few kpc molecular gas bars. Researchers present the results of the observations and propose a possible mechanism of active star formation in the nuclear region.

  3. A switched-beam millimeter-wave array with MIMO configuration for 5G applications

    KAUST Repository

    Ikram, M.; Sharawi, M. S.; Klionovski, Kirill; Shamim, Atif

    2018-01-01

    B measured bandwidth of 830 MHz (27.4 GHZ–28.23 GHz). It is fabricated on a commercially available RO3003 substrate with dielectric constant of 3.3 and height of 0.13 mm, respectively. The dimensions of the board are equal to 150 mm3 × 100 mm3 × 0.13 mm3

  4. Experimental Determination of Bending Resonances of Millimeter Size PVF2 Cantilevers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. Thompson

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The polymer piezoelectric polvinylidene fluoride has found widespread use in sensors and actuators. The bending mode of piezoelectricity offers very high sensitivities and low mechanical input impedance, but has not been studied in as much detail for sensor applications. We report the dynamic electromechanical properties of millimeter size cantilevers made from electroded films of PVF2. All devices tested had a single polymer layer. Several resonances are found below 1 kHz and the experimentally observed resonance frequency dependence on cantilever thickness and length are seen to agree well with published models which take the properties of the electrodes into account. It is found that bending resonances are also modulated by the width of the cantilever. Therefore, though the length and thickness control the resonance frequency most strongly, the actual realized value can be fine-tuned by changing cantilever width and the electrode material and its thickness. Further, all resonances display high piezoelectric coupling coefficients (keff, ranging between 0.2 - 0.35. The data presented here will be extremely useful in the design of sensors and actuators for a number of applications, since the combination of millimeter size scales and high piezoelectric sensitivities in the low audio range can be realized with this marriage of polymeric materials and cantilever geometries. Such an array of sensors can be used in cochlear implant applications, and when integrated with a resonance interrogation circuit can be used for the detection of low frequency vibrations of large structures. If appropriate mass/elasticity sensitive layers are coated on the electrodes, such a sensor can be used for the detection of a wide range of chemicals and biochemicals.

  5. LOCALIZING SAGITTARIUS A* AND M87 ON MICROARCSECOND SCALES WITH MILLIMETER VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broderick, Avery E [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Loeb, Abraham [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard University, Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Reid, Mark J., E-mail: aeb@cita.utoronto.ca [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    With the advent of the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a millimeter/submillimeter very long baseline interferometer (VLBI), it has become possible to image a handful of black holes with sub-horizon resolutions. However, these images do not translate into microarcsecond absolute positions due to the lack of absolute phase information when an external phase reference is not used. Due to the short atmospheric coherence time at these wavelengths, nodding between the source and phase reference is impractical. However, here we suggest an alternative scheme which makes use of the fact that many of the VLBI stations within the EHT are arrays in their own right. With this we show that it should be possible to absolutely position the supermassive black holes at the centers of the Milky Way (Sgr A*) and M87 relative to nearby objects with precisions of roughly 1 {mu}as. This is sufficient to detect the perturbations to Sgr A*'s position resulting from interactions with the stars and stellar-mass black holes in the Galactic cusp on year timescales, and severely constrain the astrophysically relevant parameter space for an orbiting intermediate-mass black hole, implicated in some mechanisms for producing the young massive stars in the Galactic center. For M87, it allows the registering of millimeter images, in which the black hole may be identified by its silhouette against nearby emission, and existing larger-scale radio images, eliminating present ambiguities in the nature of the radio core and inclination, opening angle, and source of the radio jet.

  6. A First Comparison of Millimeter Continuum and Mg ii Ultraviolet Line Emission from the Solar Chromosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastian, T. S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Chintzoglou, G.; De Pontieu, B.; Schmit, D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Shimojo, M. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Leenaarts, J. [Institute for Solar Physics, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Loukitcheva, M., E-mail: tbastian@nrao.edu [Center For Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2017-08-20

    We present joint observations of the Sun by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ). Both millimeter/submillimeter- λ continuum emission and ultraviolet (UV) line emission originate from the solar chromosphere and both have the potential to serve as powerful and complementary diagnostics of physical conditions in this enigmatic region of the solar atmosphere. The observations were made of a solar active region on 2015 December 18 as part of the ALMA science verification effort. A map of the Sun’s continuum emission was obtained by ALMA at a wavelength of 1.25 mm (239 GHz). A contemporaneous map was obtained by IRIS in the Mg ii h doublet line at 2803.5 Å. While a clear correlation between the 1.25 mm brightness temperature T{sub B} and the Mg ii h line radiation temperature T {sub rad} is observed, the slope is <1, perhaps as a result of the fact that these diagnostics are sensitive to different parts of the chromosphere and that the Mg ii h line source function includes a scattering component. There is a significant difference (35%) between the mean T{sub B} (1.25 mm) and mean T {sub rad} (Mg ii). Partitioning the maps into “sunspot,” “quiet areas,” and “plage regions” we find the relation between the IRIS Mg ii h line T {sub rad} and the ALMA T {sub B} region-dependent. We suggest this may be the result of regional dependences of the formation heights of the IRIS and ALMA diagnostics and/or the increased degree of coupling between the UV source function and the local gas temperature in the hotter, denser gas in plage regions.

  7. A First Comparison of Millimeter Continuum and Mg ii Ultraviolet Line Emission from the Solar Chromosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastian, T. S.; Chintzoglou, G.; De Pontieu, B.; Schmit, D.; Shimojo, M.; Leenaarts, J.; Loukitcheva, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present joint observations of the Sun by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ). Both millimeter/submillimeter- λ continuum emission and ultraviolet (UV) line emission originate from the solar chromosphere and both have the potential to serve as powerful and complementary diagnostics of physical conditions in this enigmatic region of the solar atmosphere. The observations were made of a solar active region on 2015 December 18 as part of the ALMA science verification effort. A map of the Sun’s continuum emission was obtained by ALMA at a wavelength of 1.25 mm (239 GHz). A contemporaneous map was obtained by IRIS in the Mg ii h doublet line at 2803.5 Å. While a clear correlation between the 1.25 mm brightness temperature T_B and the Mg ii h line radiation temperature T _r_a_d is observed, the slope is <1, perhaps as a result of the fact that these diagnostics are sensitive to different parts of the chromosphere and that the Mg ii h line source function includes a scattering component. There is a significant difference (35%) between the mean T_B (1.25 mm) and mean T _r_a_d (Mg ii). Partitioning the maps into “sunspot,” “quiet areas,” and “plage regions” we find the relation between the IRIS Mg ii h line T _r_a_d and the ALMA T _B region-dependent. We suggest this may be the result of regional dependences of the formation heights of the IRIS and ALMA diagnostics and/or the increased degree of coupling between the UV source function and the local gas temperature in the hotter, denser gas in plage regions.

  8. Transition-Edge Hot-Electron Microbolometers for Millimeter and Submillimeter Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Stevenson, Thomas; U-yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward; Barrentine, Emily

    2014-01-01

    The millimeter and the submillimeter wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum hold a wealth of information about the evolution of the universe. In particular, cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation and its polarization carry the oldest information in the universe, and provide the best test of the inflationary paradigm available to astronomy today. Detecting gravity waves through their imprint on the CMB polarization would have extraordinary repercussions for cosmology and physics. A transition-edge hot-electron micro - bolometer (THM) consists of a superconducting bilayer transition-edge sensor (TES) with a thin-film absorber. Unlike traditional monolithic bolometers that make use of micromachined structures, the THM em ploys the decoupling between electrons and phonons at millikelvin temperatures to provide thermal isolation. The devices are fabricated photolithographically and are easily integrated with antennas via microstrip transmission lines, and with SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) readouts. The small volume of the absorber and TES produces a short thermal time constant that facilitates rapid sky scanning. The THM consists of a thin-film metal absorber overlapping a superconducting TES. The absorber forms the termination of a superconducting microstripline that carries RF power from an antenna. The purpose of forming a separate absorber and TES is to allow flexibility in the optimization of the two components. In particular, the absorbing film's impedance can be chosen to match the antenna, while the TES impedance can be chosen to match to the readout SQUID amplifier. This scheme combines the advantages of the TES with the advantages of planar millimeter-wave transmission line circuits. Antenna-coupling to the detectors via planar transmission lines allows the detector dimensions to be much smaller than a wavelength, so the technique can be extended across the entire microwave, millimeter, and submillimeter wavelength ranges. The

  9. 77 FR 33237 - Saline Valley Warm Springs Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Death Valley National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... Valley Warm Springs Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Death Valley National Park, Inyo... an Environmental Impact Statement for the Saline Valley Warm Springs Management Plan, Death Valley... analysis process for the Saline Valley Warm Springs Management Plan for Death Valley [[Page 33238...

  10. The California Valley grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, J.E.; Schoenherr, Allan A.

    1990-01-01

    Grasslands are distributed throughout California from Oregon to Baja California Norte and from the coast to the desert (Brown 1982) (Figure 1). This review will focus on the dominant formation in cismontane California, a community referred to as Valley Grassland (Munz 1959). Today, Valley Grassland is dominated by non-native annual grasses in genera such as Avena (wild oat), Bromus (brome grass), and Hordeum (barley), and is often referred to as the California annual grassland. On localized sites, native perennial bunchgrasses such as Stipa pultra (purple needle grass) may dominate and such sites are interpreted to be remnants of the pristine valley grassland. In northwestern California a floristically distinct formation of the Valley Grassland, known as Coast Prairie (Munz 1959) or Northern Coastal Grassland (Holland and Keil 1989) is recognized. The dominant grasses include many native perennial bunchgrasses in genera such as Agrostis, Calamagrostis, Danthonia, Deschampsia, Festuca, Koeleria and Poa (Heady et al. 1977). Non-native annuals do not dominate, but on some sites non-native perennials like Anthoxanthum odoratum may colonize the native grassland (Foin and Hektner 1986). Elevationally, California's grasslands extend from sea level to at leas 1500 m. The upper boundary is vague because montane grassland formations are commonly referred to as meadows; a community which Munz (1959) does not recognize. Holland and Keil (1989) describe the montane meadow as an azonal community; that is, a community restricted not so much to a particular climatic zone but rather controlled by substrate characteristics. They consider poor soil-drainage an over-riding factor in the development of montane meadows and, in contrast to grasslands, meadows often remain green through the summer drought. Floristically, meadows are composed of graminoids; Cyperaceae, Juncaceae, and rhizomatous grasses such as Agropyron (wheat grass). Some bunchgrasses, such as Muhlenbergia rigens, are

  11. CMOS front ends for millimeter wave wireless communication systems

    CERN Document Server

    Deferm, Noël

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on the development of circuit and system design techniques for millimeter wave wireless communication systems above 90GHz and fabricated in nanometer scale CMOS technologies. The authors demonstrate a hands-on methodology that was applied to design six different chips, in order to overcome a variety of design challenges. Behavior of both actives and passives, and how to design them to achieve high performance is discussed in detail. This book serves as a valuable reference for millimeter wave designers, working at both the transistor level and system level.   Discusses advantages and disadvantages of designing wireless mm-wave communication circuits and systems in CMOS; Analyzes the limitations and pitfalls of building mm-wave circuits in CMOS; Includes mm-wave building block and system design techniques and applies these to 6 different CMOS chips; Provides guidelines for building measurement setups to evaluate high-frequency chips.  

  12. Experimental Phase Functions of Millimeter-sized Cosmic Dust Grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Guirado, D.; Escobar-Cerezo, J. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Vargas-Martín, F. [Department of Electromagnetism and Electronics, University of Murcia, E-30100 Murcia (Spain); Min, M. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sobornnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Hovenier, J. W. [Astronomical Institute “Anton Pannekoek,” University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-09-01

    We present the experimental phase functions of three types of millimeter-sized dust grains consisting of enstatite, quartz, and volcanic material from Mount Etna, respectively. The three grains present similar sizes but different absorbing properties. The measurements are performed at 527 nm covering the scattering angle range from 3° to 170°. The measured phase functions show two well-defined regions: (i) soft forward peaks and (ii) a continuous increase with the scattering angle at side- and back-scattering regions. This behavior at side- and back-scattering regions is in agreement with the observed phase functions of the Fomalhaut and HR 4796A dust rings. Further computations and measurements (including polarization) for millimeter-sized grains are needed to draw some conclusions about the fluffy or compact structure of the dust grains.

  13. Nondestructive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy using dielectric focusing probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejase, Jose A.; Shane, Steven S.; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet

    2014-01-01

    A tool for interrogating objects over a wide band of frequencies with subwavelength resolution at small standoff distances (near field region) in the transmission mode using a single source and detector measurement setup in the millimeter wave band is presented. The design utilizes optics like principles for guiding electromagnetic millimeter waves from large cross-sectional areas to considerably smaller sub-wavelength areas. While plano-convex lenses can be used to focus waves to a fine resolution, they usually require a large stand-off distance thus resulting in alignment and spacing issues. The design procedure and simulation analysis of the focusing probes are presented in this study along with experimental verification of performance and imaging and spectroscopy examples. Nondestructive evaluation will find benefit from such an apparatus including biological tissue imaging, electronic package integrity testing, composite dielectric structure evaluation for defects and microfluidic sensing

  14. Nondestructive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy using dielectric focusing probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hejase, Jose A.; Shane, Steven S.; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet [Terahertz Systems Laboratory (TeSLa) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    A tool for interrogating objects over a wide band of frequencies with subwavelength resolution at small standoff distances (near field region) in the transmission mode using a single source and detector measurement setup in the millimeter wave band is presented. The design utilizes optics like principles for guiding electromagnetic millimeter waves from large cross-sectional areas to considerably smaller sub-wavelength areas. While plano-convex lenses can be used to focus waves to a fine resolution, they usually require a large stand-off distance thus resulting in alignment and spacing issues. The design procedure and simulation analysis of the focusing probes are presented in this study along with experimental verification of performance and imaging and spectroscopy examples. Nondestructive evaluation will find benefit from such an apparatus including biological tissue imaging, electronic package integrity testing, composite dielectric structure evaluation for defects and microfluidic sensing.

  15. WDM Phase-Modulated Millimeter-Wave Fiber Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Prince, Kamau; Gibbon, Timothy Braidwood

    2012-01-01

    This chapter presents a computer simulation case study of two typical WDM phase-modulated millimeter-wave systems. The phase-modulated 60 GHz fiber multi-channel transmission systems employ single sideband (SSB) and double sideband subcarrier modulation (DSB-SC) schemes and present one of the lat......This chapter presents a computer simulation case study of two typical WDM phase-modulated millimeter-wave systems. The phase-modulated 60 GHz fiber multi-channel transmission systems employ single sideband (SSB) and double sideband subcarrier modulation (DSB-SC) schemes and present one...... of the latest research efforts in the rapidly emerging Radio-over-Fiber (RoF) application space for in-house access networks....

  16. Rift Valley Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Amy

    2017-06-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a severe veterinary disease of livestock that also causes moderate to severe illness in people. The life cycle of RVF is complex and involves mosquitoes, livestock, people, and the environment. RVF virus is transmitted from either mosquitoes or farm animals to humans, but is generally not transmitted from person to person. People can develop different diseases after infection, including febrile illness, ocular disease, hemorrhagic fever, or encephalitis. There is a significant risk for emergence of RVF into new locations, which would affect human health and livestock industries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Integrated Transceivers for Millimeter Wave and Cellular Communication

    OpenAIRE

    TIRED, TOBIAS

    2016-01-01

    Abstract:This doctoral thesis is addresses two topics in integrated circuit design: multiband direct conversion cellular receivers for cellular frequencies and beam steering transmitters for millimeter wave communication for the cellular backhaul. The trend towards cellular terminals supporting ever more different frequency bands has resulted in complex radio frontends with a large number of RF inputs. Common receivers have, for performance reasons, in the past used differential RF inputs. Ho...

  18. Planar Millimeter-Wave Antennas: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Pitra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the design and the experimental verification of three types of wideband antennas. Attention is turned to the bow-tie antenna, the Vivaldi antenna and the spiral antenna designed for the operation at millimeter waves. Bandwidth, input impedance, gain, and directivity pattern are the investigated parameters. Antennas are compared considering computer simulations in CST Microwave Studio and measured data.

  19. Millimeter-wave structures and drivers for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassiri, A.; Kang, Y.W.; Song, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the development of very high gradient (ge GeV/meter) accelerating structures and millimeter-wave power sources. The need for very high gradient structures to be operated in W-band or at higher frequencies poses great technical challenges and demands innovations in rf science and technology to reach this goal. Requirements for microstructure fabrication and power sources based on deep x-ray lithography techniques are examined

  20. Millimeter-Wave/Terahertz Circuits and Systems for Wireless Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Thyagarajan, Siva Viswanathan

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous use of electronic devices has led to an explosive increase in the amount of data transfer across the globe. Several applications such as media sharing, cloud computing, Internet of things (IoT), big-data applications demand high performance interconnects to achieve high data rate communication. The mm-wave/terahertz band offers several gigahertz of spectrum for high data rate communication applications. This thesis explores millimeter-wave/terahertz circuits and terahertz syste...

  1. Cymbal and BB underwater transducers and arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newnham, R.E.; Zhang, J.; Alkoy, S.; Meyer, R.; Hughes, W.J.; Hladky-Hennion, A.C.; Cochran, J.; Markley, D. [Materials Research Laboratory, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2002-09-01

    The cymbal is a miniaturized class V flextensional transducer that was developed for use as a shallow water sound projector and receiver. Single elements are characterized by high Q, low efficiency, and medium power output capability. Its low cost and thin profile allow the transducer to be assembled into large flexible arrays. Efforts were made to model both single elements and arrays using the ATILA code and the integral equation formulation (EQI).Millimeter size microprobe hydrophones (BBs) have been designed and fabricated from miniature piezoelectric hollow ceramic spheres for underwater applications such as mapping acoustic fields of projectors, and flow noise sensors for complex underwater structures. Green spheres are prepared from soft lead zirconate titanate powders using a coaxial nozzle slurry process. A compact hydrophone with a radially-poled sphere is investigated using inside and outside electrodes. Characterization of these hydrophones is done through measurement of hydrostatic piezoelectric charge coefficients, free field voltage sensitivities and directivity beam patterns. (orig.)

  2. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The configuration of a tomographic array in which the object can rotate about its axis is described. The X-ray detector is a cylindrical screen perpendicular to the axis of rotation. The X-ray source has a line-shaped focus coinciding with the axis of rotation. The beam is fan-shaped with one side of this fan lying along the axis of rotation. The detector screen is placed inside an X-ray image multiplier tube

  3. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A tomographic array with the following characteristics is described. An X-ray screen serving as detector is placed before a photomultiplier tube which itself is placed in front of a television camera connected to a set of image processors. The detector is concave towards the source and is replacable. Different images of the object are obtained simultaneously. Optical fibers and lenses are used for transmission within the system

  4. An Off-Grid Turbo Channel Estimation Algorithm for Millimeter Wave Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyi Han

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The bandwidth shortage has motivated the exploration of the millimeter wave (mmWave frequency spectrum for future communication networks. To compensate for the severe propagation attenuation in the mmWave band, massive antenna arrays can be adopted at both the transmitter and receiver to provide large array gains via directional beamforming. To achieve such array gains, channel estimation (CE with high resolution and low latency is of great importance for mmWave communications. However, classic super-resolution subspace CE methods such as multiple signal classification (MUSIC and estimation of signal parameters via rotation invariant technique (ESPRIT cannot be applied here due to RF chain constraints. In this paper, an enhanced CE algorithm is developed for the off-grid problem when quantizing the angles of mmWave channel in the spatial domain where off-grid problem refers to the scenario that angles do not lie on the quantization grids with high probability, and it results in power leakage and severe reduction of the CE performance. A new model is first proposed to formulate the off-grid problem. The new model divides the continuously-distributed angle into a quantized discrete grid part, referred to as the integral grid angle, and an offset part, termed fractional off-grid angle. Accordingly, an iterative off-grid turbo CE (IOTCE algorithm is proposed to renew and upgrade the CE between the integral grid part and the fractional off-grid part under the Turbo principle. By fully exploiting the sparse structure of mmWave channels, the integral grid part is estimated by a soft-decoding based compressed sensing (CS method called improved turbo compressed channel sensing (ITCCS. It iteratively updates the soft information between the linear minimum mean square error (LMMSE estimator and the sparsity combiner. Monte Carlo simulations are presented to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, and the results show that it enhances the angle

  5. Aburra Valley: Quo vadis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermelin, Michel

    2008-01-01

    These paper intents a brief description of the evolution that characterised natural risk prevention in the area surrounding the city of Medellin, Colombia, called the Aburra Valley. Both the lithological and structural composition of the Valle and its topographic and climatic conditions contribute to the abundance of destructive natural phenomena as earthquakes, slope movements, flash floods and, in a lower proportion, to floods. The population increase, which reaches now 3.5 millions inhabitants and the frequent occupation of sites exposed to natural hazards have resulted in numerous disasters. At present two entities called SIMPAD and DAPARD work on risk prevention, on city and department scale respectively. The amount of knowledge about physical environment is considered to be insufficient, together with regulations which should direct land use in accordance to restrictions related to natural hazards. Several seminars on this topic have already been carried out and the organisers of the present one, destined to commemorate the twentieth anniversary of the Villatina disaster, should make the decision to meet each two years. Furthermore, the creation of a permanent commission dedicated to study past events, to foster information broadcasting and to seek a better knowledge of the Aburra Valley, should be considered

  6. Advancements in Kinetic Inductance Detector, Spectrometer, and Amplifier Technologies for Millimeter-Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, George

    The inductance of a conductor expresses its tendency to oppose a change in current flowing through it. For superconductors, in addition to the familiar magnetic inductance due to energy stored in the magnetic field generated by this current, kinetic inductance due to inertia of charge carriers is a significant and often dominant contribution to total inductance. Devices based on modifying the kinetic inductance of thin film superconductors have widespread application to millimeter-wave astronomy. Lithographically patterning such a film into a high quality factor resonator produces a high sensitivity photodetector known as a kinetic inductance detector (KID), which is sensitive to frequencies above the superconducting energy gap of the chosen material. Inherently multiplexable in the frequency domain and relatively simple to fabricate, KIDs pave the way to the large format focal plane array instruments necessary to conduct the next generation of cosmic microwave background (CMB), star formation, and galaxy evolution studies. In addition, non-linear kinetic inductance can be exploited to develop traveling wave kinetic inductance parametric amplifiers (TKIPs) based on superconducting delay lines to read out these instruments. I present my contributions to both large and small scale collaborative efforts to develop KID arrays, spectrometers integrated with KIDs, and TKIPs. I optimize a dual polarization TiN KID absorber for the next generation Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry, which is designed to investigate the role magnetic fields play in star formation. As part of an effort to demonstrate aluminum KIDs on sky for CMB polarimetry, I fabricate devices for three design variants. SuperSpec and WSpec are respectively the on-chip and waveguide implementations of a filter bank spectrometer concept designed for survey spectroscopy of high redshift galaxies. I provide a robust tool for characterizing the performance of all Super

  7. Valley development on Hawaiian volcanoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, V.R.; Gulick, V.C.

    1987-01-01

    Work in progress on Hawaiian drainage evolution indicates an important potential for understanding drainage development on Mars. Similar to Mars, the Hawaiian valleys were initiated by surface runoff, subsequently enlarged by groundwater sapping, and eventually stabilized as aquifers were depleted. Quantitative geomorphic measurements were used to evaluate the following factors in Hawaiian drainage evolution: climate, stream processes, and time. In comparing regions of similar climate, drainage density shows a general increase with the age of the volcani island. With age and climate held constant, sapping dominated valleys, in contrast to runoff-dominated valleys, display the following: lower drainage densities, higher ratios of valley floor width to valley height, and more positive profile concavities. Studies of stream junction angles indicate increasing junction angles with time on the drier leeward sides of the major islands. The quantitative geomorphic studies and earlier field work yielded important insights for Martian geomorphology. The importance of ash mantling in controlling infiltration on Hawaii also seems to apply to Mars. The Hawaiian valley also have implications for the valley networks of Martian heavily cratered terrains

  8. Millimeter-wave interconnects for microwave-frequency quantum machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechal, Marek; Safavi-Naeini, Amir H.

    2017-10-01

    Superconducting microwave circuits form a versatile platform for storing and manipulating quantum information. A major challenge to further scalability is to find approaches for connecting these systems over long distances and at high rates. One approach is to convert the quantum state of a microwave circuit to optical photons that can be transmitted over kilometers at room temperature with little loss. Many proposals for electro-optic conversion between microwave and optics use optical driving of a weak three-wave mixing nonlinearity to convert the frequency of an excitation. Residual absorption of this optical pump leads to heating, which is problematic at cryogenic temperatures. Here we propose an alternative approach where a nonlinear superconducting circuit is driven to interconvert between microwave-frequency (7 ×109 Hz) and millimeter-wave-frequency photons (3 ×1011 Hz). To understand the potential for quantum state conversion between microwave and millimeter-wave photons, we consider the driven four-wave mixing quantum dynamics of nonlinear circuits. In contrast to the linear dynamics of the driven three-wave mixing converters, the proposed four-wave mixing converter has nonlinear decoherence channels that lead to a more complex parameter space of couplings and pump powers that we map out. We consider physical realizations of such converter circuits by deriving theoretically the upper bound on the maximum obtainable nonlinear coupling between any two modes in a lossless circuit, and synthesizing an optimal circuit based on realistic materials that saturates this bound. Our proposed circuit dissipates less than 10-9 times the energy of current electro-optic converters per qubit. Finally, we outline the quantum link budget for optical, microwave, and millimeter-wave connections, showing that our approach is viable for realizing interconnected quantum processors for intracity or quantum data center environments.

  9. Microwave, Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far Infrared Spectral Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, J. C.; Pickett, H. M.; Drouin, B. J.; Chen, P.; Cohen, E. A.

    2002-01-01

    The spectrum of most known astrophysical molecules is derived from transitions between a few hundred to a few hundred thousand energy levels populated at room temperature. In the microwave and millimeter wave regions. spectroscopy is almost always performed with traditional microwave techniques. In the submillimeter and far infrared microwave technique becomes progressively more technologically challenging and infrared techniques become more widely employed as the wavelength gets shorter. Infrared techniques are typically one to two orders of magnitude less precise but they do generate all the strong features in the spectrum. With microwave technique, it is generally impossible and rarely necessary to measure every single transition of a molecular species, so careful fitting of quantum mechanical Hamiltonians to the transitions measured are required to produce the complete spectral picture of the molecule required by astronomers. The fitting process produces the most precise data possible and is required in the interpret heterodyne observations. The drawback of traditional microwave technique is that precise knowledge of the band origins of low lying excited states is rarely gained. The fitting of data interpolates well for the range of quantum numbers where there is laboratory data, but extrapolation is almost never precise. The majority of high resolution spectroscopic data is millimeter or longer in wavelength and a very limited number of molecules have ever been studied with microwave techniques at wavelengths shorter than 0.3 millimeters. The situation with infrared technique is similarly dire in the submillimeter and far infrared because the black body sources used are competing with a very significant thermal background making the signal to noise poor. Regardless of the technique used the data must be archived in a way useful for the interpretation of observations.

  10. Handbook of RF, microwave, and millimeter-wave components

    CERN Document Server

    Smolskiy, Sergey M; Kochemasov, Victor N

    2012-01-01

    This unique and comprehensive resource offers you a detailed treatment of the operations principles, key parameters, and specific characteristics of active and passive RF, microwave, and millimeter-wave components. The book covers both linear and nonlinear components that are used in a wide range of application areas, from communications and information sciences, to avionics, space, and military engineering. This practical book presents descriptions and clear examples and of the best materials and products used in the field, including laminates, prepregs, substrates; microstrip, coaxial and wa

  11. Millimeter-wave/infrared rectenna development at Georgia Tech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouker, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    The key design issues of the Millimeter Wave/Infrared (MMW/IR) monolithic rectenna have been resolved. The work at Georgia Tech in the last year has focused on increasing the power received by the physically small MMW rectennas in order to increase the rectification efficiency. The solution to this problem is to place a focusing element on the back side of the substrate. The size of the focusing element can be adjusted to help maintain the optimum input power density not only for different power densities called for in various mission scenarios, but also for the nonuniform power density profile of a narrow EM-beam.

  12. Characteristics of Smith-Purcell radiation in millimeter wavelength region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumenko, G A; Potylitsyn, A P; Sukhikh, L G; Shevelev, M V; Popov, Yu; Karataev, P; Bleko, V

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of the Smith-Purcell radiation (SPR) were began with non-relativistic electron beams with some unexpected experimental results. Further the experimental investigations were performed with relativistic electron beams for application to beam diagnostics. Large discrepancy between different theoretical models significantly increases the role of experimental studies of this phenomenon. In this report we present some problems and features of experimental investigations of SPR in millimeter wavelength region. The problems of prewave zone and coherent effects are considered. The shadowing effect, focusing of radiation using a parabolic SPR target and effect of inclination of target strips were investigated with moderately relativistic electron beam. (paper)

  13. Broadband notch filter design for millimeter-wave plasma diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furtula, Vedran; Michelsen, Poul; Leipold, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Notch filters are integrated in plasma diagnostic systems to protect millimeter-wave receivers from intensive stray radiation. Here we present a design of a notch filter with a center frequency of 140 GHz, a rejection bandwidth of ∼ 900 MHz, and a typical insertion loss below 2 dB in the passband...... of ±9 GHz. The design is based on a fundamental rectangular waveguide with eight cylindrical cavities coupled by T-junction apertures formed as thin slits. Parameters that affect the notch performance such as physical lengths and conductor materials are discussed. The excited resonance mode...

  14. Design and development of a multifunction millimeter wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadimi, Sayyid Abdolmajid

    1998-11-01

    The millimeter-wave (MMW) spectrum (30-300 GHz) offers a unique combination of features that are advantageous when retrieving information about the environment. Due to small wavelengths involved, physically small antennas may be used to obtain very high gains (>50 dB) and resulting high spatial resolutions. Moreover, some features have scattering and emission behaviors that are more sensitive at MMW wavelengths than at microwave wavelengths. Examples include, water vapor (H2O). fog, haze, clouds, ozone (O 3) molecules, and chlorine monoxide (ClO) have rotational spectra in this region. The 75-110 GHz (W-band) atmospheric window is relatively quiet, and it can supply spectral information that can be useful in identifying and quantifying pollutants. Information such as the size and concentration of particulate pollutants can be obtained using radar techniques at W-band. Although there have been some activities at millimeter wave frequencies over very narrow bandwidths, there is a great need for wider bandwidth instruments for studying scattering and emission behaviors. To address this need and provide a versatile system for laboratory studies of electromagnetic phenomena at millimeter-wave frequencies, a multifunctionmillimeter- wave sensor has been designed and developed. This instrument is an active/passive wide band sensor operating in the 75-110 GHz region of the millimeter wave spectrum in four primary modes: (1)As a spectrometer measuring absorption over the entire 75-110 GHz region. (2)As a radiometer measuring blackbody emissions over the entire 75-110 GHz region. (3)As a pulse radar over a 500 MHz bandwidth centered around 93.1 GHz with a peak power of 200 mW. (4)As a step frequency radar when used in combination with a network analyzer over selected 9 GHz bandwidth segments (75-84, 84-93, 93-102, and 102-110) of the 75-110 GHz region. Measurements were performed on two volume fraction (15% and 20%) dense random media targets using this system. The results

  15. A cusp electron gun for millimeter wave gyrodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, C. R.; He, W.; Cross, A. W.; Li, F.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Zhang, L.; Ronald, K.; Robertson, C. W.; Whyte, C. G.; Young, A. R.

    2010-04-01

    The experimental results of a thermionic cusp electron gun, to drive millimeter and submillimeter wave harmonic gyrodevices, are reported in this paper. Using a "smooth" magnetic field reversal formed by two coils this gun generated an annular-shaped, axis-encircling electron beam with 1.5 A current, and an adjustable velocity ratio α of up to 1.56 at a beam voltage of 40 kV. The beam cross-sectional shape and transported beam current were measured by a witness plate technique and Faraday cup, respectively. These measured results were found to be in excellent agreement with the simulated results using the three-dimensional code MAGIC.

  16. Millimeter-wave generation and characterization of a GaAs FET by optical mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, David C.; Fetterman, Harold R.; Chew, Wilbert

    1990-01-01

    Coherent mixing of optical radiation from a tunable continuous-wave dye laser and a stabilized He-Ne laser was used to generate millimeter-wave signals in GaAs FETs attached to printed-circuit millimeter-wave antennas. The generated signal was further down-converted to a 2-GHz IF by an antenna-coupled millimeter-wave local oscillator at 62 GHz. Detailed characterizations of power and S/N under different bias conditions have been performed. This technique is expected to allow signal generation and frequency-response evaluation of millimeter-wave devices at frequencies as high as 100 GHz.

  17. Bolometric kinetic inductance detector technology for sub-millimeter radiometric imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Juha; Timofeev, Andrey V.; Vesterinen, Visa; Sipola, Hannu; Helistö, Panu; Aikio, Mika; Mäyrä, Aki; Grönberg, Leif; Luukanen, Arttu

    2015-10-01

    Radiometric sub-millimeter imaging is a candidate technology especially in security screening applications utilizing the property of radiation in the band of 0.2 - 1.0 THz to penetrate through dielectric substances such as clothing. The challenge of the passive technology is the fact that the irradiance corresponding to the blackbody radiation is very weak in this spectral band: about two orders of magnitude below that of the infrared band. Therefore the role of the detector technology is of ultimate importance to achieve sufficient sensitivity. In this paper we present results related to our technology relying on superconducting kinetic inductance detectors operating in a thermal (bolometric) mode. The detector technology is motivated by the fact that it is naturally suitable for scalable multiplexed readout systems, and operates with relatively simple cryogenics. We will review the basic concepts of the detectors, and provide experimental figures of merit. Furthermore, we will discuss the issues related to the scale-up of our detector technology into large 2D focal plane arrays.

  18. Development Of A Multicolor Sub/millimeter Camera Using Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaerth, James A.; Czakon, N. G.; Day, P. K.; Downes, T. P.; Duan, R.; Glenn, J.; Golwala, S. R.; Hollister, M. I.; LeDuc, H. G.; Maloney, P. R.; Mazin, B. A.; Noroozian, O.; Sayers, J.; Siegel, S.; Vayonakis, A.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2011-01-01

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) are superconducting resonators useful for detecting light from the millimeter-wave to the X-ray. These detectors are easily multiplexed, as the resonances can be tuned to slightly different frequencies, allowing hundreds of detectors to be read out simultaneously using a single feedline. The Multicolor Submillimeter Inductance Camera, MUSIC, will use 2304 antenna-coupled MKIDs in multicolor operation, with bands centered at wavelengths of 0.85, 1.1, 1.3 and 2.0 mm, beginning in 2011. Here we present the results of our demonstration instrument, DemoCam, containing a single 3-color array with 72 detectors and optics similar to MUSIC. We present sensitivities achieved at the telescope, and compare to those expected based upon laboratory tests. We explore the factors that limit the sensitivity, in particular electronics noise, antenna efficiency, and excess loading. We discuss mitigation of these factors, and how we plan to improve sensitivity to the level of background-limited performance for the scientific operation of MUSIC. Finally, we note the expected mapping speed and contributions of MUSIC to astrophysics, and in particular to the study of submillimeter galaxies. This research has been funded by grants from the National Science Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and the NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program.

  19. Real-time millimeter-wave imaging radiometer for avionic synthetic vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovberg, John A.; Chou, Ri-Chee; Martin, Christopher A.

    1994-07-01

    ThermoTrex Corporation (TTC) has developed an imaging radiometer, the passive microwave camera (PMC), that uses an array of frequency-scanned antennas coupled to a multi-channel acousto-optic (Bragg cell) spectrum analyzer to form visible images of a scene through acquisition of thermal blackbody radiation in the millimeter-wave spectrum. The output of the Bragg cell is imaged by a standard video camera and passed to a computer for normalization and display at real-time frame rates. One application of this system could be its incorporation into an enhanced vision system to provide pilots with a clear view of the runway during fog and other adverse weather conditions. The unique PMC system architecture will allow compact large-aperture implementations because of its flat antenna sensor. Other potential applications include air traffic control, all-weather area surveillance, fire detection, and security. This paper describes the architecture of the TTC PMC and shows examples of images acquired with the system.

  20. Optics for MUSIC: a new (sub)millimeter camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Jack; Czakon, Nicole G.; Day, Peter K.; Downes, Thomas P.; Duan, Ran P.; Gao, Jiansong; Glenn, Jason; Golwala, Sunil R.; Hollister, Matt I.; LeDuc, Henry G.; Mazin, Benjamin A.; Maloney, Philip R.; Noroozian, Omid; Nguyen, Hien T.; Schlaerth, James A.; Siegel, Seth; Vaillancourt, John E.; Vayonakis, Anastasios; Wilson, Philip R.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2010-07-01

    We will present the design and implementation, along with calculations and some measurements of the performance, of the room-temperature and cryogenic optics for MUSIC, a new (sub)millimeter camera we are developing for the Caltech Submm Observatory (CSO). The design consists of two focusing elements in addition to the CSO primary and secondary mirrors: a warm off-axis elliptical mirror and a cryogenic (4K) lens. These optics will provide a 14 arcmin field of view that is diffraction limited in all four of the MUSIC observing bands (2.00, 1.33, 1.02, and 0.86 mm). A cold (4K) Lyot stop will be used to define the primary mirror illumination, which will be maximized while keeping spillover at the sub 1% level. The MUSIC focal plane will be populated with broadband phased antenna arrays that efficiently couple to factor of (see manuscript) 3 in bandwidth,1, 2 and each pixel on the focal plane will be read out via a set of four lumped element filters that define the MUSIC observing bands (i.e., each pixel on the focal plane simultaneously observes in all four bands). Finally, a series of dielectric and metal-mesh low pass filters have been implemented to reduce the optical power load on the MUSIC cryogenic stages to a quasi-negligible level while maintaining good transmission in-band.

  1. Long-term millimeter VLBI monitoring of M 87 with KVN at milliarcsecond resolution: nuclear spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Young; Lee, Sang-Sung; Hodgson, Jeffrey A.; Algaba, Juan-Carlos; Zhao, Guang-Yao; Kino, Motoki; Byun, Do-Young; Kang, Sincheol

    2018-02-01

    We study the centimeter- to millimeter-wavelength synchrotron spectrum of the core of the radio galaxy M 87 at ≲0.8 mas 110Rs spatial scales using four years of fully simultaneous, multi-frequency VLBI data obtained by the Korean VLBI Network (KVN). We find a core spectral index α of ≳‑0.37 (S ∝ ν+α) between 22 and 129 GHz. By combining resolution-matched flux measurements from the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 15 GHz and taking the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) 230 GHz core flux measurements in epochs 2009 and 2012 as lower limits, we find evidence of a nearly flat core spectrum across 15 and 129 GHz, which could naturally connect the 230 GHz VLBI core flux. The extremely flat spectrum is a strong indication that the jet base does not consist of a simple homogeneous plasma, but of inhomogeneous multi-energy components, with at least one component with the turn-over frequency ≳ 100 GHz. The spectral shape can be qualitatively explained if both the strongly (compact, optically thick at >100 GHz) and the relatively weakly magnetized (more extended, optically thin at <100 GHz) plasma components are colocated in the footprint of the relativistic jet.

  2. The Drentsche Aa valley system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gans, W. de.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis is composed of five papers concerned with Late Quaternary geology and geomorphology of the Aa valley system. The correlation and chronostratigraphic position of the layers have been established by radiocarbon dating. (Auth.)

  3. An Extraordinary Outburst in the Massive Protostellar System NGC 6334I-MM1: Quadrupling of the Millimeter Continuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, T. R.; Brogan, C. L.; Indebetouw, R. [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); MacLeod, G. [Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 443, Krugersdorp 1740 (South Africa); Cyganowski, C. J. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Chandler, C. J. [NRAO, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Chibueze, J. O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Physical Sciences, University of Nigeria, Carver Building, 1 University Road, Nsukka (Nigeria); Friesen, R. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Thesner, C. [Centre for Space Research, Physics Department, North-West University, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Young, K. H., E-mail: thunter@nrao.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-03-10

    Based on sub-arcsecond Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and Submillimeter Array (SMA) 1.3 mm continuum images of the massive protocluster NGC 6334I obtained in 2015 and 2008, we find that the dust emission from MM1 has increased by a factor of 4.0 ± 0.3 during the intervening years, and undergone a significant change in morphology. The continuum emission from the other cluster members (MM2, MM4, and the UCH ii region MM3 = NGC 6334F) has remained constant. Long-term single-dish maser monitoring at HartRAO finds that multiple maser species toward NGC 6334I flared beginning in early 2015, a few months before our ALMA observation, and some persist in that state. New ALMA images obtained in 2016 July–August at 1.1 and 0.87 mm confirm the changes with respect to SMA 0.87 mm images from 2008, and indicate that the (sub)millimeter flaring has continued for at least a year. The excess continuum emission, centered on the hypercompact H ii region MM1B, is extended and elongated (1.″6 × 1.″0 ≈ 2100 × 1300 au) with multiple peaks, suggestive of general heating of the surrounding subcomponents of MM1, some of which may trace clumps in a fragmented disk rather than separate protostars. In either case, these remarkable increases in maser and dust emission provide direct observational evidence of a sudden accretion event in the growth of a massive protostar yielding a sustained luminosity surge by a factor of 70 ± 20, analogous to the largest events in simulations by Meyer et al. This target provides an excellent opportunity to assess the impact of such a rare event on a protocluster over many years.

  4. Josephson frequency meter for millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anischenko, S.E.; Larkin, S.Y.; Chaikovsky, V.I.

    1994-01-01

    Frequency measurements of electromagnetic oscillations of millimeter and submillimeter wavebands with frequency growth due to a number of reasons become more and more difficult. First, these frequencies are considered to be cutoff for semiconductor converting devices and one has to use optical measurement methods instead of traditional ones with frequency transfer. Second, resonance measurement methods are characterized by using relatively narrow bands and optical ones are limited in frequency and time resolution due to the limited range and velocity of movement of their mechanical elements as well as the efficiency of these optical techniques decreases with the increase of wavelength due to diffraction losses. That requires the apriori information on the radiation frequency band of the source involved. Method of measuring frequency of harmonic microwave signals in millimeter and submillimeter wavebands based on the ac Josephson effect in superconducting contacts is devoid of all the above drawbacks. This approach offers a number of major advantages over the more traditional measurement methods, that is the one based on frequency conversion, resonance and interferrometric techniques. It can be characterized by high potential accuracy, wide range of frequencies measured, prompt measurement and the opportunity to obtain panoramic display of the results as well as full automation of the measuring process

  5. Josephson frequency meter for millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anischenko, S.E.; Larkin, S.Y.; Chaikovsky, V.I. [State Research Center, Kiev (Ukraine)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Frequency measurements of electromagnetic oscillations of millimeter and submillimeter wavebands with frequency growth due to a number of reasons become more and more difficult. First, these frequencies are considered to be cutoff for semiconductor converting devices and one has to use optical measurement methods instead of traditional ones with frequency transfer. Second, resonance measurement methods are characterized by using relatively narrow bands and optical ones are limited in frequency and time resolution due to the limited range and velocity of movement of their mechanical elements as well as the efficiency of these optical techniques decreases with the increase of wavelength due to diffraction losses. That requires the apriori information on the radiation frequency band of the source involved. Method of measuring frequency of harmonic microwave signals in millimeter and submillimeter wavebands based on the ac Josephson effect in superconducting contacts is devoid of all the above drawbacks. This approach offers a number of major advantages over the more traditional measurement methods, that is the one based on frequency conversion, resonance and interferrometric techniques. It can be characterized by high potential accuracy, wide range of frequencies measured, prompt measurement and the opportunity to obtain panoramic display of the results as well as full automation of the measuring process.

  6. One millimeter continuum observations of high redshift quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ennis, D.J.; Soifer, B.T.

    1981-01-01

    Upper limits to the one-millimeter continuum flux densities of the high redshift quasars B2 1225 + 31, Ton 490, and PHL 957 are presented. The upper limit to the power observed from these quasars at 1 mm is, on the average, one half of the observed power in the continuum at L-alpha. These observations are used to constrain the temperature of a hypothetical dust shell which reddens the quasar line and continuum emission by an extinction optical depth sufficient to account for the anomalously low L-alpha/H-alpha emission line ratio observed in each of these quasars. For the quasars studied, dust shell temperatures between 25 K and 50 to 95 K are prohibited by the present data. A dust shell at a temperature within this span reradiating all the power absorbed from the quasar ultraviolet continuum would produce a one-millimeter flux density greater than the measured upper limit. The average radius of the model dust shell cannot be between 70 kpc and 1 Mpc

  7. Reflective measurement of water concentration using millimeter wave illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Shijun; Bennett, David; Taylor, Zachary; Bajwa, Neha; Tewari, Priyamvada; Maccabi, Ashkan; Culjat, Martin; Singh, Rahul; Grundfest, Warren

    2011-04-01

    THz and millimeter wave technology have shown the potential to become a valuable medical imaging tool because of its sensitivity to water and safe, non-ionizing photon energy. Using the high dielectric constant of water in these frequency bands, reflectionmode THz sensing systems can be employed to measure water content in a target with high sensitivity. This phenomenology may lead to the development of clinical systems to measure the hydration state of biological targets. Such measurements may be useful in fast and convenient diagnosis of conditions whose symptoms can be characterized by changes in water concentration such as skin burns, dehydration, or chemical exposure. To explore millimeter wave sensitivity to hydration, a reflectometry system is constructed to make water concentration measurements at 100 GHz, and the minimum detectable water concentration difference is measured. This system employs a 100 GHz Gunn diode source and Golay cell detector to perform point reflectivity measurements of a wetted polypropylene towel as it dries on a mass balance. A noise limited, minimum detectable concentration difference of less than 0.5% by mass can be detected in water concentrations ranging from 70% to 80%. This sensitivity is sufficient to detect hydration changes caused by many diseases and pathologies and may be useful in the future as a diagnostic tool for the assessment of burns and other surface pathologies.

  8. 5G antenna array with wide-angle beam steering and dual linear polarizations

    KAUST Repository

    Klionovski, Kirill; Shamim, Atif; Sharawi, Mohammad Said

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design of a switched-beam antenna array at millimeter-wave frequencies for future 5G applications. The proposed antenna array is based on wideband patch antenna elements and a Butler matrix feed network. The patch antenna has a broad radiation pattern for wide-angle beam steering and allows the simultaneous operation with two orthogonal linear polarizations. A combination of two separated Butler matrices provides independent beam steering for both polarizations in the wide operating band. The antenna array has a simple multilayer construction, and it is made on a low-cost Rogers laminate.

  9. 5G antenna array with wide-angle beam steering and dual linear polarizations

    KAUST Repository

    Klionovski, Kirill

    2017-10-25

    In this paper, we present the design of a switched-beam antenna array at millimeter-wave frequencies for future 5G applications. The proposed antenna array is based on wideband patch antenna elements and a Butler matrix feed network. The patch antenna has a broad radiation pattern for wide-angle beam steering and allows the simultaneous operation with two orthogonal linear polarizations. A combination of two separated Butler matrices provides independent beam steering for both polarizations in the wide operating band. The antenna array has a simple multilayer construction, and it is made on a low-cost Rogers laminate.

  10. Quasi-optical antenna-mixer-array design for terahertz frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yong; Potter, Kent A.; Rutledge, David B.

    1992-01-01

    A new quasi-optical antenna-mixer-array design for terahertz frequencies is presented. In the design, antenna and mixer are combined into an entity, based on the technology in which millimeter-wave horn antenna arrays have been fabricated in silicon wafers. It consists of a set of forward- and backward-looking horns made with a set of silicon wafers. The front side is used to receive incoming signal, and the back side is used to feed local oscillator signal. Intermediate frequency is led out from the side of the array. Signal received by the horn array is picked up by antenna probes suspended on thin silicon-oxynitride membranes inside the horns. Mixer diodes will be located on the membranes inside the horns. Modeling of such an antenna-mixer-array design is done on a scaled model at microwave frequencies. The impedance matching, RF and LO isolation, and patterns of the array have been tested and analyzed.

  11. Handling technology of Mega-Watt millimeter-waves for optimized heating of fusion plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takita, Y.; Kobayashi, S.; Ito, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Idei, H.; Notake, T.; Shapiro, M.A.; Temkin, R.J.; Felici, F.; Goodman, T.P.; Sauter, O.; Minami, R.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T.; Mutoh, T.

    2009-01-01

    Millimeter-wave components were re-examined for high power (Mega-Watt) and steady-state (greater than one hour) operation. Some millimeter-wave components, including waveguide joints, vacuum pumping sections, power monitors, sliding waveguides, and injection windows, have been improved for high

  12. Theory for beam-plasma millimeter-wave radiation source experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, M.; Krall, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on theoretical studies for millimeter-wave plasma source experiments. In the device, millimeter-wave radiation is generated in a plasma-filled waveguide driven by counter-streaming electron beams. The beams excite electron plasma waves which couple to produce radiation at twice the plasma frequency. Physics topics relevant to the high electron beam current regime are discussed

  13. On the mechanisms of interaction of low-intensity millimeter waves with biological objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betskii, O.V.

    1994-07-01

    The interaction of low-intensity millimeter-band electromagnetic waves with biological objects is examined. These waves are widely used in medical practice as a means of physiotherapy for the treatment of various human disorders. Principal attention is given to the mechanisms through which millimeter waves act on the human organism.

  14. Coupling in reflector arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1968-01-01

    In order to reduce the space occupied by a reflector array, it is desirable to arrange the array antennas as close to each other as possible; however, in this case coupling between the array antennas will reduce the reflecting properties of the reflector array. The purpose of the present communic......In order to reduce the space occupied by a reflector array, it is desirable to arrange the array antennas as close to each other as possible; however, in this case coupling between the array antennas will reduce the reflecting properties of the reflector array. The purpose of the present...

  15. Measurements of millimeter wave radar transmission and backscatter during dusty infrared test 2, dirt 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petito, F. C.; Wentworth, E. W.

    1980-05-01

    Recently there has been much interest expressed to determine the ability of millimeter wave radar to perform target acquisition during degraded visibility conditions. In this regard, one of the primary issues of concern has been the potential of high-explosive artillery barrages to obscure the battlefield from millimeter wave radar systems. To address this issue 95 GHz millimeter wave radar measurements were conducted during the Dusty Infrared Test 2 (DIRT 2). This test was held at White Sands Missile Range, NM, 18-28 July 1979. Millimeter wave transmission and backscatter measurements were performed during singular live firings and static detonations of 155 mm and 105 mm high-explosive artillery rounds in addition to static detonations of C-4 explosives. A brief description of the millimeter wave portion of the test and instrumentation is given. The data along with some preliminary conclusions are presented.

  16. Functional ecology of an Antarctic Dry Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yuki; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong; Pointing, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys are the largest ice-free region in Antarctica and are critically at risk from climate change. The terrestrial landscape is dominated by oligotrophic mineral soils and extensive exposed rocky surfaces where biota are largely restricted to microbial communities, although their ability to perform the majority of geobiological processes has remained largely uncharacterized. Here, we identified functional traits that drive microbial survival and community assembly, using a metagenomic approach with GeoChip-based functional gene arrays to establish metabolic capabilities in communities inhabiting soil and rock surface niches in McKelvey Valley. Major pathways in primary metabolism were identified, indicating significant plasticity in autotrophic, heterotrophic, and diazotrophic strategies supporting microbial communities. This represents a major advance beyond biodiversity surveys in that we have now identified how putative functional ecology drives microbial community assembly. Significant differences were apparent between open soil, hypolithic, chasmoendolithic, and cryptoendolithic communities. A suite of previously unappreciated Antarctic microbial stress response pathways, thermal, osmotic, and nutrient limitation responses were identified and related to environmental stressors, offering tangible clues to the mechanisms behind the enduring success of microorganisms in this seemingly inhospitable terrain. Rocky substrates exposed to larger fluctuations in environmental stress supported greater functional diversity in stress-response pathways than soils. Soils comprised a unique reservoir of genes involved in transformation of organic hydrocarbons and lignin-like degradative pathways. This has major implications for the evolutionary origin of the organisms, turnover of recalcitrant substrates in Antarctic soils, and predicting future responses to anthropogenic pollution. PMID:23671121

  17. The Millimeter Wave Observatory antenna now at INAOE-Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, A.

    2017-07-01

    The antenna of 5 meters in diameter of the legendary "Millimeter Wave Observatory" is now installed in the INAOE-Mexico. This historic antenna was reinstalled and was equipped with a control system and basic primary focus receivers that enabled it in teaching activities. We work on the characterization of its surface and on the development of receivers and spectrometers to allow it to do research Solar and astronomical masers. The historical contributions of this antenna to science and technology in radio astronomy, serve as the guiding force and the inspiration of the students and technicians of our postgrade in Astrophysics. It is enough to remember that it was with this antenna, that the first molecular outflow was discovered, several lines of molecular emission were discovered and it was the first antenna whose surface was characterized by holography; among many other technological and scientific contributions.

  18. Stimulated Raman scattering of sub-millimeter waves in bismuth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pawan; Tripathi, V. K.

    2007-12-01

    A high-power sub-millimeter wave propagating through bismuth, a semimetal with non-spherical energy surfaces, parametrically excites a space-charge mode and a back-scattered electromagnetic wave. The free carrier density perturbation associated with the space-charge wave couples with the oscillatory velocity due to the pump to derive the scattered wave. The scattered and pump waves exert a pondermotive force on electrons and holes, driving the space-charge wave. The collisional damping of the decay waves determines the threshold for the parametric instability. The threshold intensity for 20 μm wavelength pump turns out to be ˜2×1012 W/cm2. Above the threshold, the growth rate scales increase with ωo, attain a maximum around ωo=6.5ωp, and, after this, falls off.

  19. Experimental development of a millimeter wave free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radack, D.J.; Bidwell, S.W.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Carmel, Y.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Latham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Rodgers, J.; Zhang, Z.X.

    1990-01-01

    A 1 MW (cw), millimeter wave FEL (λ 3 ∼ 0.5 mm)is currently under development with an application for heating fusion plasmas. Two salient features of the FEL are the use of a short-period wiggler ell w ≤ 10 mm electromagnet and a mildly relativistic (E beam ≤ 1 MeV) sheet electron beam. The FEL has been designed to operate in the high-gain regime and uses a tapered wiggler. The wiggler provides beam focusing as well as the magnetostatic pump wave. The effectiveness of wiggler focusing is being investigated. Planned experiments will address the critical issues of beam interception and stable single-mode operation. 12 refs., 1 tab

  20. Analog 65/130 nm CMOS 5 GHz Sub-Arrays with ROACH-2 FPGA Beamformers for Hybrid Aperture-Array Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-20

    factor, where c is the wave speed . Proposed two-level hybrid beamforming architecture consists of an analog sub-array at level-1 (L-element analog...gigabit transceivers, to support 4x10Ge links (SFP+) for high- speed communication. ROACH-2 also supports two ZDOk+ interfaces supporting high speed ADCs...antenna systems with hybrid analog and digital beamforming for millimeter wave 5G ,” IEEE Communications Magazine, vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 186–194, January

  1. Millimeter wave and terahertz dielectric properties of biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Usman Ansar

    Broadband dielectric properties of materials can be employed to identify, detect, and characterize materials through their unique spectral signatures. In this study, millimeter wave, submillimeter wave, and terahertz dielectric properties of biological substances inclusive of liquids, solids, and powders were obtained using Dispersive Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DFTS). Two broadband polarizing interferometers were constructed to test materials from 60 GHz to 1.2 THz. This is an extremely difficult portion of the frequency spectrum to obtain a material's dielectric properties since neither optical nor microwave-based techniques provide accurate data. The dielectric characteristics of liquids such as cyclohexane, chlorobenzene, benzene, ethanol, methanol, 1,4 dioxane, and 10% formalin were obtained using the liquid interferometer. Subsequently the solid interferometer was utilized to determine the dielectric properties of human breast tissues, which are fixed and preserved in 10% formalin. This joint collaboration with the Tufts New England Medical Center demonstrated a significant difference between the dielectric response of tumorous and non-tumorous breast tissues across the spectrum. Powders such as anthrax, flour, talc, corn starch, dry milk, and baking soda have been involved in a number of security threats and false alarms around the globe in the last decade. To be able to differentiate hoax attacks and serious security threats, the dielectric properties of common household powders were also examined using the solid interferometer to identify the powders' unique resonance peaks. A new sample preparation kit was designed to test the powder specimens. It was anticipated that millimeter wave and terahertz dielectric characterization will enable one to clearly distinguish one powder from the other; however most of the powders had relatively close dielectric responses and only Talc had a resonance signature recorded at 1.135 THz. Furthermore, due to

  2. An optimal design for millimeter-wide facture plugging zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yili Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lost circulation control in millimeter-wide fractures has been a challenge in well drilling all the time. Low pressure-bearing capacity of a plugging zone will result in excessive consumption of lost circulation materials (LCMs and extra down time. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted on the plugging of millimeter-wide fractures to evaluate the plugging effects of different types of LCM including rigid granules, elastic particles and fiber. Maximum plugging pressure, total loss volume before sealing and plugging time were taken as the evaluation index of the LCM plugging effect. According to the experimental results, the synergistic plugging mechanisms of different LCM combinations were also analyzed. Experimental results showed that the total loss volume of the plugging zone formed by rigid and elastic particle combination was generally greater than 400 mL, and the maximum plugging pressure of the plugging zone formed by elastic particle and fiber combination was generally less than 6 MPa. In contrast, the plugging zone formed by the combination of the three types of LCMs has the maximum plugging pressure of up to 13 MPa and total loss volume before sealing of 75 mL. In the synergistic plugging process, rigid granules form a frame with high pressure-bearing capacity in the narrower parts of the fractures; elastic particles generate elastic force through elastic deformation to increase the friction between a fracture and a plugging zone to make the plugging zone more stable; fibers filling in the pore space between the particles increase the tightness and integrity of the plugging zone. The experimental results can provide guidance for the optimal design of LCMs used in the field.

  3. Boring and Sealing Rock with Directed Energy Millimeter-Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woskov, P.; Einstein, H. H.; Oglesby, K.

    2015-12-01

    Millimeter-wave directed energy is being investigated to penetrate into deep crystalline basement rock formations to lower well costs and to melt rocks, metals, and other additives to seal wells for applications that include nuclear waste storage and geothermal energy. Laboratory tests have established that intense millimeter-wave (MMW) beams > 1 kW/cm2 can melt and/ or vaporize hard crystalline rocks. In principle this will make it possible to create open boreholes and a method to seal them with a glass/ceramic liner and plug formed from the original rock or with other materials. A 10 kW, 28 GHz commercial (CPI) gyrotron system with a launched beam diameter of about 32 mm was used to heat basalt, granite, limestone, and sandstone specimens to temperatures over 2500 °C to create melts and holes. A calibrated 137 GHz radiometer view, collinear with the heating beam, monitored real time peak rock temperature. A water load surrounding the rock test specimen primarily monitored unabsorbed power at 28 GHz. Power balance analysis of the laboratory observations shows that the temperature rise is limited by radiative heat loss, which would be expected to be trapped in a borehole. The analysis also indicates that the emissivity (absorption efficiency) in the radiated infrared range is lower than the emissivity at 28 GHz, giving the MMW frequency range an important advantage for rock melting. Strength tests on one granite type indicated that heating the rock initially weakens it, but with exposure to higher temperatures the resolidified black glassy product regains strength. Basalt was the easiest to melt and penetrate, if a melt leak path was provided, because of its low viscosity. Full beam holes up to about 50 mm diameter (diffraction increased beam size) were achieved through 30 mm thick basalt and granite specimens. Laboratory experiments to form a seal in an existing hole have also been carried out by melting rock and a simulated steel casing.

  4. Results of daily monitoring of positioning MLC multi leaf collimator for Siemens 160 with an array of cameras; Resultados de control diario del poscionamiento del colimador multilaminas 160 MLC de Siemens mediante un array de camaras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Fernandez, A.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, C.; Martin Martin, G.; Saez Beltran, M.

    2011-07-01

    Modern techniques of radiotherapy, and in particular the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), require sub-millimeter accuracy in the positioning of multi leaf collimators to ensure that patients receive the prescribed dose. It is difficult to include checks of positioning accuracy as high on the agendas of regular monitoring of the accelerators of a hospital. This paper presents the results of a method that enables rapid verification of the position of the sheets with an accuracy of tenths of a millimeter by using an ionization chamber array. The procedure has been applied to the daily control of the two accelerators of our service for 12 months.

  5. Surveying Low-Mass Star Formation with the Submillimeter Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Large astronomical surveys yield important statistical information that can’t be derived from single-object and small-number surveys. In this talk I will review two recent surveys in low-mass star formation undertaken by the Submillimeter Array (SMA): a millimeter continuum survey of disks surrounding variably accreting young stars, and a complete continuum and molecular line survey of all protostars in the nearby Perseus Molecular Cloud. I will highlight several new insights into the processes by which low-mass stars gain their mass that have resulted from the statistical power of these surveys.

  6. Results of daily monitoring of positioning MLC multileaf collimator for Siemens 160 with an array of cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Fernandez, A.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, C.; Martin Martin, G.; Saez Beltran, M.

    2011-01-01

    Modern techniques of radiotherapy, and in particular the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), require sub-millimeter accuracy in the positioning of multileaf collimators to ensure that patients receive the prescribed dose. It is difficult to include checks of positioning accuracy as high on the agendas of regular monitoring of the accelerators of a hospital. This paper presents the results of a method that enables rapid verification of the position of the sheets with an accuracy of tenths of a millimeter by using an ionization chamber array. The procedure has been applied to the daily control of the two accelerators of our service for 12 months.

  7. Site characterization at the Rabbit Valley Geophysical Performance Evaluation Range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppenjan, S.; Martinez, M.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) is developing a Geophysical Performance Evaluation Range (GPER) at Rabbit Valley located 30 miles west of Grand Junction, Colorado. The purpose of the range is to provide a test area for geophysical instruments and survey procedures. Assessment of equipment accuracy and resolution is accomplished through the use of static and dynamic physical models. These models include targets with fixed configurations and targets that can be re-configured to simulate specific specifications. Initial testing (1991) combined with the current tests at the Rabbit Valley GPER will establish baseline data and will provide performance criteria for the development of geophysical technologies and techniques. The US DOE's Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) staff has conducted a Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) survey of the site with its stepped FM-CW GPR. Additionally, STL contracted several other geophysical tests. These include an airborne GPR survey incorporating a ''chirped'' FM-CW GPR system and a magnetic survey with a surfaced-towed magnetometer array unit Ground-based and aerial video and still frame pictures were also acquired. STL compiled and analyzed all of the geophysical maps and created a site characterization database. This paper discusses the results of the multi-sensor geophysical studies performed at Rabbit Valley and the future plans for the site

  8. Enhancement of ionic conductivity in stabilized zirconia ceramics under millimeter-wave irradiation heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Akira; Ayano, Keiko; Hayashi, Hidetaka

    2011-01-01

    Ionic conductivity in yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramics under millimeter-wave irradiation heating was compared with that obtained using conventional heating. The former was found to result in higher conductivity than the latter. Enhancement of the ionic conductivity and the reduction in activation energy seemed to depend on self-heating resulting from the millimeter-wave irradiation. Millimeter-wave irradiation heating restricted the degradation in conductivity accompanying over-substitution, suggesting the optimum structure that provided the maximum conductivity could be different between the two heating methods.

  9. Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Signal Power Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadziabdic, Dzenan

    Among the major limitations in high-speed communications and highresolution radars is the lack of efficient and powerful signal sources with low distortion. Microwave and millimeter-wave (mm-wave) signal power is needed for signal transmission. Progress in signal generation stems largely from...... distortion and high PAE were observed. The estimated output power of 42.5 dBm and PAE of 31.3% are comparable to the state-of-the-art results reported for GaN HEMT amplifiers. Wireless communication systems planned in the near future will operate at E-band, around 71-86 GHz, and require mm-wave-PAs to boost...... the application of novel materials like galliumnitride (GaN) and silicon-carbide (SiC) and fabrication of indiumphosphide (InP) based transistors. One goal of this thesis is to assess GaN HEMT technology with respect to linear efficient signal power generation. While most reports on GaN HEMT high-power devices...

  10. Millimeter and submillimeter wave spectroscopy: molecules of astrophysical interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plummer, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    Species of three general types of molecular ions were studied by means of millimeter-submillimeter (mm/sub-mm) wave spectroscopy. Because of their highly reactive nature, it has been possible to study ionic species in the microwave region for only the past ten is presented here. A new method is presented here for production of such molecular ions in concentrations greater by one to two orders of magnitude than possible with previous techniques, and the subsequent first mm/sub/mm/ detections of two isotopic forms of HCO + , three isotopic forms of ArD + , and the molecular ion H 3 O + . Simple neutral species, which are generally less reactive than ions, are also present in relatively large concentrations in the interstellar medium and in the atmospheres of cool stars themselves. Presented here is the first laboratory microwave detection of two isotopic species of LiH 2 , a solid at normal temperatures and pressures. In addition, a combined analysis of these data, additional data collected on the related species LiD, and existing data on LiD is presented. Finally, a large fraction of the mm/sub/mm/ emissions observed toward the interstellar medium were shown to belong to a small number of relatively heavy, stable, but spectroscopically complicated molecules, many of them internal rotors

  11. Dielectric properties of alumina/zirconia composites at millimeter wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molla, J.; Heidinger, R.; Ibarra, A.; Link, G.

    1994-01-01

    Alumina-zirconia composites with ZrO 2 contents up to 20% and negligible porosity were investigated at millimeter (mm) wavelengths to determine the changes appearing in the dielectric properties of pure alumina ceramics when unstabilized or partially stabilized ZrO 2 is added to improve the mechanical strength. It is demonstrated that it essential to distinguish between the contributions of the monoclinic and the tetragonal phase of zirconia (m-ZrO 2 , t-ZrO 2 ). Permittivity is raised with increasing content of either phases; the effective permittivity can be assessed by the rule of mixtures (Maxwell-Garnett formulation of the generalized Clasussius-Mossotti relation) using permittivity values of 10 for Al 2 O 3 , 14-21 for m-ZrO 2 and 40-45 for t-ZrO 2 . The permittivity data show only a small variation in the investigated range of 9-145 GHz. For the dielectric loss, there is evidence of a predominant contribution of m-ZrO 2 ; in addition, the marked increase in loss with frequency becomes sharper. The t-ZrO 2 , which is responsible for strengthening, does not show any significant influence on losses. It is therefore concluded, that ZrO 2 strengthening of alumina is feasible without affecting mm-wave losses at room temperature as long as the presence of m-ZrO 2 is avoided

  12. Human postprandial gastric emptying of 1-3-millimeter spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.H.; Elashoff, J.; Porter-Fink, V.; Dressman, J.; Amidon, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    Microspheres of pancreatin should empty from the stomachs of patients with pancreatic insufficiency as fast as food. The present study was undertaken in 26 healthy subjects to identify the size of spheres that would empty from the stomach with food and to determine whether different meals alter this size. Spheres of predefined sizes were labeled with /sup 113m/In or /sup 99m/Tc. Using a gamma-camera, we studied the concurrent gastric emptying of spheres labeled with /sup 113m/In and of chicken liver labeled with /sup 99m/Tc in 100-g, 154-kcal or 420-g, 919-kcal meals, or the concurrent emptying of 1-mm vs. larger spheres. One-millimeter spheres emptied consistently (p less than 0.01, paired t-test) faster than 2.4- or 3.2-mm spheres when ingested together with either the 420- or 100-g meals. Thus, in the 1-3-mm range of diameters, sphere size was a more important determinant of sphere emptying than meal size. Statistical analyses indicated that spheres 1.4 +/- 0.3 mm in diameter with a density of 1 empty at the same rate as /sup 99m/Tc-liver. Our data indicate some commercially marketed microspheres of pancreatin will empty too slowly to be effective in digestion of food

  13. Human postprandial gastric emptying of 1-3-millimeter spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, J.H.; Elashoff, J.; Porter-Fink, V.; Dressman, J.; Amidon, G.L.

    1988-06-01

    Microspheres of pancreatin should empty from the stomachs of patients with pancreatic insufficiency as fast as food. The present study was undertaken in 26 healthy subjects to identify the size of spheres that would empty from the stomach with food and to determine whether different meals alter this size. Spheres of predefined sizes were labeled with /sup 113m/In or /sup 99m/Tc. Using a gamma-camera, we studied the concurrent gastric emptying of spheres labeled with /sup 113m/In and of chicken liver labeled with /sup 99m/Tc in 100-g, 154-kcal or 420-g, 919-kcal meals, or the concurrent emptying of 1-mm vs. larger spheres. One-millimeter spheres emptied consistently (p less than 0.01, paired t-test) faster than 2.4- or 3.2-mm spheres when ingested together with either the 420- or 100-g meals. Thus, in the 1-3-mm range of diameters, sphere size was a more important determinant of sphere emptying than meal size. Statistical analyses indicated that spheres 1.4 +/- 0.3 mm in diameter with a density of 1 empty at the same rate as /sup 99m/Tc-liver. Our data indicate some commercially marketed microspheres of pancreatin will empty too slowly to be effective in digestion of food.

  14. Millimeter wave free electron laser amplifiers: Experiments and designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidwell, S.W.; Zhang, Z.X.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Bensen, D.M.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Lantham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Rodgers, J.

    1991-01-01

    Free electron laser amplifies are investigated as sources of high- average-power (1 MW) millimeter to submillimeter wave radiation (200 GHz - 600 GHz) for application to electron cyclotron resonance heating of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. As a stepping-stone to higher frequencies and cw operation a pulsed amplifier (τ pulse ≅ 80 ns) at 98 GHz is being developed. Status is reported on this experiment which investigates linear gain amplification with use of sheet electron beam (transverse cross section = 0.1 cm x 2.0 cm, V beam = 440 keV, I beam ≅ 10 A) and short-period wiggler (ell w = 0.96 cm) and with expected output of 140 W. Predictions of gain and efficiency from a 1-D universal formulation are presented. Beam propagation results, with wiggler focusing as a means of sheet beam confinement in both transverse dimensions, through the 54 cm (56 period) pulsed electromagnet wiggler are discussed. Peak wiggler fields of 5.1 kG on-axis have been achieved

  15. Near-field millimeter - wave imaging of nonmetallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalsami, N.; Bakhtiari, S.; Raptis, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    A near-field millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging system has been designed and built in the 94-GHz range for on-line inspection of nonmetallic (dielectric) materials. The imaging system consists of a transceiver block coupled to an antenna that scans the material to be imaged; a reflector plate is placed behind the material. A quadrature IF mixer in the transceiver block enables measurement of in-phase and quadrature-phase components of reflected signals with respect to the transmitted signal. All transceiver components, with the exception of the Gunn-diode oscillator and antenna, were fabricated in uniform blocks and integrated and packaged into a compact unit (12.7 x 10.2 x 2.5 cm). The objective of this work is to test the applicability of a near-field compact mm-wave sensor for on-line inspection of sheetlike materials such as paper, fabrics, and plastics. This paper presents initial near-field mm-wave images of paper and fabric samples containing known artifacts

  16. Research on metal-plated cellulose nitrate flakes and their infrared / millimeter wave characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shu-qin; Zhu, Chen-guang; Wang, Li-hong; Ou'yang, De-hua; Pan, Gong-pei

    2016-10-01

    Copper-plated and silver-plated cellulose nitrate flakes, which were prepared by using chemical plating technology, were used to jam infrared detector and millimeter-wave radar. It was tested for the conductivity and infrared jamming performance of plating and also the RCS (Radar Cross Section) performance of millimeter-wave radar. Test results showed that the prepared metal-plated cellulose nitrate flakes have obvious conductivity, and infrared total radiation energy of silver plating and copper plating had approximately increased 32% and 21% respectively. Through determination, the millimeter-wave reflecting property and RCS of silver-plated cellulose nitrate flakes were higher than that of copper-plated cellulose nitrate flakes. Therefore, silver-plated cellulose nitrate flakes can be used as an effective infrared / millimeter wave composite jamming material.

  17. The influence of punctural millimeter wave therapy on clinical presentation of patients with essential hypertention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotenko К.V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to estimate the influence of punctural millimeter wave therapy on clinical presentation. Material and methods. This study includes 102 patients with essential hypertension the I and II stage. Patients were divided into three equal groups depending on the method of treatment: some of them received procedures of punctural millimeter wave therapy, some of them received these procedures as the "placebo" and those who had not received specified procedures. Dynamics of clinical symptomatology and condition of eye bottom vessels was estimated. It was shown that addition of punctural millimeter wave therapy in complex therapy of patients with essential hypertension promotes the expressed regress of clinical symptomatology and state normalization the retinal vessels at these patients. Results. Addition of punctural millimeter wave therapy into the complex therapy was shown to lead to pronounced regress of clinical symptoms. Conclusion. The received results allow to recommend this method to be used in clinical practice for treating patients with essential hypertension.

  18. A Temporal Millimeter Wave Propagation Model for Tunnels Using Ray Frustum Techniques and FFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choonghyen Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A temporal millimeter wave propagation model for tunnels is presented using ray frustum techniques and fast Fourier transform (FFT. To directly estimate or simulate effects of millimeter wave channel properties on the performance of communication services, time domain impulse responses of demodulated signals should be obtained, which needs rather large computation time. To mitigate the computational burden, ray frustum techniques are used to obtain frequency domain transfer function of millimeter wave propagation environment and FFT of equivalent low pass signals are used to retrieve demodulated waveforms. This approach is numerically efficient and helps to directly estimate impact of tunnel structures and surfaces roughness on the performance of millimeter wave communication services.

  19. Optical/Millimeter-Wave Double-Resonance Spectroscopy of Rydberg Atoms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gallagher, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    AFOSR grant F49620-03-1-0287 is a DUlUP grant providing laser and millimeter wave instrumentation for the AFOSR sponsored research programs of Robert Jones and Thomas Gallagher at the University of Virginia...

  20. In-tube shock wave driven by atmospheric millimeter-wave plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Yasuhisa; Kajiwara, Ken; Takahashi, Koji; Kasugai, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Keishi; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2009-01-01

    A shock wave in a tube supported by atmospheric millimeter-wave plasma is discussed. After atmospheric breakdown, the shock wave supported by the millimeter wave propagates at a constant velocity in the tube. In this study, a driving model of the millimeter-wave shock wave is proposed. The model consists of a normal shock wave supported by a propagating heat-supply area in which an ionization front is located. The flow properties predicted by the model show good agreement with the measured properties of the shock wave generated in the tube using a 170 GHz millimeter wave beam. The shock propagation velocity U shock is identical to the propagation velocity of the ionization front U ioniz when U ioniz is supersonic. Then the pressure increment at the tube end is independent of the power density. (author)

  1. Millimeter Wave Attenuation in Moist Air: Laboratory Measurements and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    generation of incoherent noise, Mnd wavelengths. (e) scintillitions due to random fluctuations of the medium in space and time. The array of mathematical ...calculations are for observations in the zenith direction free air is very empty. The molecular radius r -1.5 x ICI-4 Lem. groud lvel Coaic aditio of

  2. Tunable ferromagnetic resonance in La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites at millimeter wave frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Konstantin A.; Wu, Chuanjian; Yu, Zhong; Sun, Ke; Afsar, Mohammed N.; Harris, Vincent G.

    2018-05-01

    Transmittance measurements have been performed on La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites in millimeter waves. Broadband millimeter-wave measurements have been carried out using the free space quasi-optical spectrometer, equipped with a set of high power backward wave oscillators covering the frequency range of 30 - 120 GHz. Strong absorption zones have been observed in the millimeter-wave transmittance spectra of all La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites due to the ferromagnetic resonance. Linear shift of ferromagnetic resonance frequency as functions of La-Co substitutions have been found. Real and imaginary parts of dielectric permittivity of La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites have been calculated using the analysis of recorded high precision transmittance spectra. Frequency dependences of magnetic permeability of La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites, as well as saturation magnetization and anisotropy field have been determined based on Schlömann's theory for partially magnetized ferrites. La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites have been further investigated by DC magnetization to assess magnetic behavior and compare with millimeter wave data. Consistency of saturation magnetization determined independently by both millimeter wave absorption and DC magnetization have been found for all La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites. These materials seem to be quite promising as tunable millimeter wave absorbers, filters, circulators, based on the adjusting of their substitution parameters.

  3. Fiber Laser Array

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simpson, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    ...., field-dependent, loss within the coupled laser array. During this program, Jaycor focused on the construction and use of an experimental apparatus that can be used to investigate the coherent combination of an array of fiber lasers...

  4. Better building of valley fills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chironis, N.P.

    1980-03-01

    Current US regulations for building valley fills or head of hollow fills to hold excess spoil resulting from contour mining are meeting with considerable opposition, particularly from operators in steep-slope areas. An alternative method has been submitted to the Office of Surface Mining by Virgina. Known as the zoned concept method, it has already been used successfully in building water-holding dams and coal refuse embankments on sloping terrain. The ways in which drainage and seepage are managed are described.

  5. Variability in millimeter wave scattering properties of dendritic ice crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botta, Giovanni; Aydin, Kültegin; Verlinde, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    A detailed electromagnetic scattering model for ice crystals is necessary for calculating radar reflectivity from cloud resolving model output in any radar simulator. The radar reflectivity depends on the backscattering cross sections and size distributions of particles in the radar resolution volume. The backscattering cross section depends on the size, mass and distribution of mass within the crystal. Most of the available electromagnetic scattering data for ice hydrometeors rely on simple ice crystal types and a single mass–dimensional relationship for a given type. However, a literature survey reveals that the mass–dimensional relationships for dendrites cover a relatively broad region in the mass–dimensional plane. This variability of mass and mass distribution of dendritic ice crystals cause significant variability in their backscattering cross sections, more than 10 dB for all sizes (0.5–5 mm maximum dimension) and exceeding 20 dB for the larger ones at X-, Ka-, and W-band frequencies. Realistic particle size distributions are used to calculate radar reflectivity and ice water content (IWC) for three mass–dimensional relationships. The uncertainty in the IWC for a given reflectivity spans an order of magnitude in value at all three frequencies because of variations in the unknown mass–dimensional relationship and particle size distribution. The sensitivity to the particle size distribution is reduced through the use of dual frequency reflectivity ratios, e.g., Ka- and W-band frequencies, together with the reflectivity at one of the frequencies for estimating IWC. -- Highlights: • Millimeter wave backscattering characteristics of dendritic crystals are modeled. • Natural variability of dendrite shapes leads to large variability in their mass. • Dendrite mass variability causes large backscattering cross section variability. • Reflectivity–ice water content relation is sensitive to mass and size distribution. • Dual frequency

  6. Millimeter-wave nondestructive evaluation of pavement conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vines-Cavanau, David; Busuioc, Dan; Birken, Ralf; Wang, Ming

    2012-04-01

    The United States is suffering from an aging civil infrastructure crisis. Key to recovery are rapid inspection technologies like that being investigated by the VOTERS project (Versatile Onboard Traffic Embedded Roaming Sensors), which aims to outfit ordinary road vehicles with compact low-cost hardware that enables them to rapidly assess and report the condition of roadways and bridge decks free of driver interaction. A key piece of hardware, and the focus of this paper, is a 24 GHz millimeter-wave radar system that measures the reflectivity of pavement surfaces. To account for the variability of real-world driving, such as changes in height, angle, speed, and temperature, a sensor fusion approach is used that corrects MWR measurements based on data from four additional sensors. The corrected MWR measurements are expected to be useful for various characterization applications, including: material type; deterioration such as cracks and potholes; and surface coverage conditions such as dry, wet, oil, water, and ice. Success at each of these applications is an important step towards achieving the VOTERS objective, however, this paper focuses on surface coverage, as whatever covers the driving surface will be most apparent to the MWR sensor and if not accounted for could significantly limit the accuracy of other applications. Contributions of the paper include findings from static lab tests, which validate the approach and show the effects of height and angle. Further contributions come from lab and in-field dynamic tests, which show the effects of speed and demonstrate that the MWR approach is accurate under city driving conditions.

  7. Code-modulated interferometric imaging system using phased arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Vikas; Greene, Kevin; Floyd, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging provides compelling capabilities for security screening, navigation, and bio- medical applications. Traditional scanned or focal-plane mm-wave imagers are bulky and costly. In contrast, phased-array hardware developed for mass-market wireless communications and automotive radar promise to be extremely low cost. In this work, we present techniques which can allow low-cost phased-array receivers to be reconfigured or re-purposed as interferometric imagers, removing the need for custom hardware and thereby reducing cost. Since traditional phased arrays power combine incoming signals prior to digitization, orthogonal code-modulation is applied to each incoming signal using phase shifters within each front-end and two-bit codes. These code-modulated signals can then be combined and processed coherently through a shared hardware path. Once digitized, visibility functions can be recovered through squaring and code-demultiplexing operations. Pro- vided that codes are selected such that the product of two orthogonal codes is a third unique and orthogonal code, it is possible to demultiplex complex visibility functions directly. As such, the proposed system modulates incoming signals but demodulates desired correlations. In this work, we present the operation of the system, a validation of its operation using behavioral models of a traditional phased array, and a benchmarking of the code-modulated interferometer against traditional interferometer and focal-plane arrays.

  8. New technologies for the detection of millimeter and submillimeter waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, P. L.; Clarke, J.; Gildemeister, J. M.; Lanting, T.; Lee, A. T.

    2001-01-01

    Voltage-biased superconducting bolometers have many operational advantages over conventional bolometer technology including sensitivity, linearity, speed, and immunity from environmental disturbance. A review is given of the Berkeley program for developing this new technology. Developments include fully lithographed individual bolometers in the spiderweb configuration, arrays of 1024 close-packed absorber-coupled bolometers, antenna-coupled bolometers, and a frequency-domain SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) readout multiplexer.

  9. A Switchable 3D-Coverage Phased Array Antenna Package for 5G Mobile Terminals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojaroudiparchin, Naser; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript proposes a new design of a millimeter-wave (mm-Wave) array antenna package with beam steering characteristic for the fifth generation (5G) mobile applications. In order to achieve a broad 3D scanning coverage of the space with high-gain beams, three identical sub arrays of patch a...... and efficiency, which is suitable for 5G mobile communications. In addition, the impact of user’s hand on the antenna performance has been investigated....... antennas have been compactly arranged along the edge region of the mobile phone PCB to form the antenna package. By switching the feeding to one of the sub arrays, the desired direction of coverage can be achieved. The proposed design has >10 dB gain in the upper spherical space, good directivity......This manuscript proposes a new design of a millimeter-wave (mm-Wave) array antenna package with beam steering characteristic for the fifth generation (5G) mobile applications. In order to achieve a broad 3D scanning coverage of the space with high-gain beams, three identical sub arrays of patch...

  10. California's restless giant: the Long Valley Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Bailey, Roy A.; Hendley, James W.; Stauffer, Peter H.; Marcaida, Mae

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have monitored geologic unrest in the Long Valley, California, area since 1980. In that year, following a swarm of strong earthquakes, they discovered that the central part of the Long Valley Caldera had begun actively rising. Unrest in the area persists today. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) continues to provide the public and civil authorities with current information on the volcanic hazard at Long Valley and is prepared to give timely warnings of any impending eruption.

  11. Far-Infrared and Millimeter Continuum Studies of K-Giants: Alpha Boo and Alpha Tau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Martin; Carbon, Duane F.; Welch, William J.; Lim, Tanya; Forster, James R.; Goorvitch, David; Thigpen, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have imaged two normal, non-coronal, infrared-bright K-giants, alpha Boo and alpha Tau, in the 1.4-millimeter and 2.8-millimeter continuum using BIMA. These stars have been used as important absolute calibrators for several infrared satellites. Our goals are: (1) to probe the structure of their upper photospheres; (2) to establish whether these stars radiate as simple photospheres or possess long-wavelength chromospheres; and (3) to make a connection between millimeter-wave and far-infrared absolute flux calibrations. To accomplish these goals we also present ISO Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) measurements of both these K-giants. The far-infrared and millimeter continuum radiation is produced in the vicinity of the temperature minimum in a Boo and a Tau, offering a direct test of the model photospheres and chromospheres for these two cool giants. We find that current photospheric models predict fluxes in reasonable agreement with those observed for those wavelengths which sample the upper photosphere, namely less than or equal to 170 micrometers in alpha Tau and less than or equal to 125 micrometers in alpha Boo. It is possible that alpha Tau is still radiative as far as 0.9 - 1.4 millimeters. We detect chromospheric radiation from both stars by 2.8 millimeters (by 1.4 millimeters in alpha Boo), and are able to establish useful bounds on the location of the temperature minimum. An attempt to interpret the chromospheric fluxes using the two-component "bifurcation model" proposed by Wiedemann et al. (1994) appears to lead to a significant contradiction.

  12. Small martian valleys: Pristine and degraded morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, V.R.; Partridge, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    The equatorial heavily cratered uplands of Mars are dissected by two classes of small valleys that are intimately associated in compound networks. Pristine valleys with steep valley walls preferentially occupy downstream portions of compound basins. Degraded valleys with eroded walls are laterally more extensive and have higher drainage densities than pristine valleys. Morphometric and crater-counting studies indicate that relatively dense drainage networks were emplaced on Mars during the heavy bombardment about 4.0 b.y. ago. Over a period of approximately 10 8 years, these networks were degraded and subsequently invaded by headwardly extending pristine valleys. The pristine valleys locally reactivated the compound networks, probably through sapping processes dependent upon high water tables. Fluvial activity in the heavily cratered uplands generally ceased approximately 3.8--3.9 b.y. ago, coincident with the rapid decline in cratering rates. The relict compound valleys on Mars are morphometrically distinct from most terrestrial drainage systems. The differences might be caused by a Martian valley formation episode characterized by hyperaridity, by inadequate time for network growth, by very permeable rock types, or by a combination of factors

  13. EPA Region 1 - Valley Depth in Meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raster of the Depth in meters of EPA-delimited Valleys in Region 1.Valleys (areas that are lower than their neighbors) were extracted from a Digital Elevation Model (USGS, 30m) by finding the local average elevation, subtracting the actual elevation from the average, and selecting areas where the actual elevation was below the average. The landscape was sampled at seven scales (circles of 1, 2, 4, 7, 11, 16, and 22 km radius) to take into account the diversity of valley shapes and sizes. Areas selected in at least four scales were designated as valleys.

  14. New Insights Into Valley Formation and Preservation: Geophysical Imaging of the Offshore Trinity River Paleovalley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, C. M.; Swartz, J. M.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Goff, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Trinity River paleovalley is an offshore stratigraphic structure located on the inner continental shelf of the Gulf of Mexico offshore Galveston, Texas. Its formation is linked to the paleo-Trinity system as it existed across the continental shelf during the last glacial period. Newly acquired high-resolution geophysical data have imaged more complexity to the valley morphology and shelf stratigraphy than was previously captured. Significantly, the paleo-Trinity River valley appears to change in the degree of confinement and relief relative to the surrounding strata. Proximal to the modern shoreline, the interpreted time-transgressive erosive surface formed by the paleo-river system is broad and rugose with no single valley, but just 5 km farther offshore the system appears to become confined to a 10 km wide valley structure before again becoming unconfined once again 30 km offshore. Fluvial stratigraphy in this region has a similar degree of complexity in morphology and preservation. A dense geophysical survey of several hundred km is planned for Fall 2017, which will provide unprecedented imaging of the paleovalley morphology and associated stratigraphy. Our analysis leverages robust chirp processing techniques that allow for imaging of strata on the decimeter scale. We will integrate our geophysical results with a wide array of both newly collected and previously published sediment cores. This approach will allow us to address several key questions regarding incised valley formation and preservation on glacial-interglacial timescales including: to what extent do paleo-rivers remain confined within a single broad valley structure, what is the fluvial systems response to transgression, and what stratigraphy is created and preserved at the transition from fluvial to estuarine environments? Our work illustrates that traditional models of incised valley formation and subsequent infilling potentially fail to capture the full breadth of dynamics of past river

  15. Development of a multi-channel horn mixer array for microwave imaging plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Naoki; Kuwahara, Daisuke; Nagayama, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Microwave to millimeter-wave diagnostics techniques, such as interferometry, reflectometry, scattering, and radiometry, have been powerful tools for diagnosing magnetically confined plasmas. The resultant measurements have clarified several physics issues, including instability, wave phenomena, and fluctuation-induced transport. Electron cyclotron emission imaging has been an important tool in the investigation of temperature fluctuations, while reflectometry has been employed to measure plasma density profiles and their fluctuations. We have developed a horn-antenna mixer array (HMA), a 50 - 110 GHz 1D antenna array, which can be easily stacked as a 2D array. This article describes an upgrade to the horn mixer array that combines well-characterized mixers, waveguide-to-microstrip line transitions, intermediate frequency amplifiers, and internal local oscillator modules using a monolithic microwave integrated circuit technology to improve system performance. We also report on the use of a multi-channel HMA system. (author)

  16. A landscape scale valley confinement algorithm: Delineating unconfined valley bottoms for geomorphic, aquatic, and riparian applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    David E. Nagel; John M. Buffington; Sharon L. Parkes; Seth Wenger; Jaime R. Goode

    2014-01-01

    Valley confinement is an important landscape characteristic linked to aquatic habitat, riparian diversity, and geomorphic processes. This report describes a GIS program called the Valley Confinement Algorithm (VCA), which identifies unconfined valleys in montane landscapes. The algorithm uses nationally available digital elevation models (DEMs) at 10-30 m resolution to...

  17. Geophysical Surveys of the Hydrologic Basin Underlying Yosemite Valley, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, E. L.; Shaw, K. A.; Carey, C.; Dunn, M. E.; Whitman, S.; Bourdeau, J.; Eckert, E.; Louie, J. N.; Stock, G. M.

    2017-12-01

    UNR students in an Applied Geophysics course conducted geophysical investigations in Yosemite Valley during the months of March and August 2017. The goal of the study is to understand better the depth to bedrock, the geometry of the bedrock basin, and the properties of stratigraphy- below the valley floor. Gutenberg and others published the only prior geophysical investigation in 1956, to constrain the depth to bedrock. We employed gravity, resistivity, and refraction microtremor(ReMi) methods to investigate the interface between valley fill and bedrock, as well as shallow contrasts. Resistivity and ReMi arrays along three north-south transects investigated the top 50-60m of the basin fill. Gravity results constrained by shallow measurements suggest a maximum depth of 1000 m to bedrock. ReMi and resistivity techniques identified shallow contrasts in shear velocity and electrical resistivity that yielded information about the location of the unconfined water table, the thickness of the soil zone, and spatial variation in shallow sediment composition. The upper several meters of sediment commonly showed shear velocities below 200 m/s, while biomass-rich areas and sandy river banks could be below 150 m/s. Vs30 values consistently increased towards the edge of the basin. The general pattern for resistivity profiles was a zone of relatively high resistivity, >100 ohm-m, in the top 4 meters, followed by one or more layers with decreased resistivity. According to gravity measurements, assuming either -0.5 g/cc or -0.7 g/cc density contrast between bedrock and basin sediments, a maximum depth to bedrock is found south of El Capitan at respectively, 1145 ± 215 m or 818 ± 150 m. Longitudinal basin geometry coincides with the basin depth geometry discussed by Gutenberg in 1956. Their results describe a "double camel" shape where the deepest points are near El Capitan and the Ahwahnee Hotel and is shallowest near Yosemite Falls, in a wider part of the valley. An August Deep

  18. Millimeter-Gap Magnetically Insulated Transmission Line Power Flow Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutsel, Brian Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stoltzfus, Brian S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fowler, William E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); LeChien, Keith R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mazarakis, Michael G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, James K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mulville, Thomas D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Savage, Mark E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stygar, William A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); McKenney, John L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Peter A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); MacRunnels, Diego J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Long, Finis W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Porter, John L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    An experiment platform has been designed to study vacuum power flow in magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). The platform was driven by the 400-GW Mykonos-V accelerator. The experiments conducted quantify the current loss in a millimeter-gap MITL with respect to vacuum conditions in the MITL for two different gap distances, 1.0 and 1.3 mm. The current loss for each gap was measured for three different vacuum pump down times. As a ride along experiment, multiple shots were conducted with each set of hardware to determine if there was a conditioning effect to increase current delivery on subsequent shots. The experiment results revealed large differences in performance for the 1.0 and 1.3 mm gaps. The 1.0 mm gap resulted in current loss of 40%-60% of peak current. The 1.3 mm gap resulted in current losses of less than 5% of peak current. Classical MITL models that neglect plasma expansion predict that there should be zero current loss, after magnetic insulation is established, for both of these gaps. The experiments result s indicate that the vacuum pressure or pump down time did not have a significant effect on the measured current loss at vacuum pressures between 1e-4 and 1e-5 Torr. Additionally, there was not repeatable evidence of a conditioning effect that reduced current loss for subsequent full-energy shots on a given set of hardware. It should be noted that the experiments conducted likely did not have large loss contributions due to ion emission from the anode due to the relatively small current densi-ties (25-40 kA/cm) in the MITL that limited the anode temperature rise due to ohmic heating. The results and conclusions from these experiments may have limited applicability to MITLs of high current density (>400 kA/cm) used in the convolute and load region of the Z which experience temperature increases of >400° C and generate ion emission from anode surfaces.

  19. West Valley Demonstration Project, West Valley, New York: Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Under the West Valley Demonstration Project Act, Public Law 96-368, liquid high-level radioactive waste stored at the Western New York Nuclear Services Center, West Valley, New York, that resulted from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing operations conducted between 1966 and 1972, is to be solidified in borosilicate glass and transported to a federal repository for geologic disposal. A major milestone was reached in May 1988 when the Project began reducing the volume of the liquid high-level waste. By the end of 1988, approximately 15 percent of the initial inventory had been processed into two waste streams. The decontaminated low-level liquid waste is being solidified in cement. The high-level waste stream is being stored in an underground tank pending its incorporation into borosilicate glass. Four tests of the waste glass melter system were completed. These tests confirmed equipment operability, control system reliability, and provided samples of waste glass for durability testing. In mid-1988, the Department validated an integrated cost and schedule plan for activities required to complete the production of the waste borosilicate glass. Design of the radioactive Vitrification Facility continued

  20. Millimeter-Wave Wireless Power Transfer Technology for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Manohara, Harish; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Vo, Tuan A.; Mojarradi, Hadi; Bae, Sam Y.; Marzwell, Neville

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a new compact, scalable, and low cost technology for efficient receiving of power using RF waves at 94 GHz. This technology employs a highly innovative array of slot antennas that is integrated on substrate composed of gold (Au), silicon (Si), and silicon dioxide (SiO2) layers. The length of the slots and spacing between them are optimized for a highly efficient beam through a 3-D electromagnetic simulation process. Antenna simulation results shows a good beam profile with very low side lobe levels and better than 93% antenna efficiency.

  1. The Pocatello Valley, Idaho, earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, A. M.; Langer, C.J.; Bucknam, R.C.

    1975-01-01

    A Richter magnitude 6.3 earthquake occurred at 8:31 p.m mountain daylight time on March 27, 1975, near the Utah-Idaho border in Pocatello Valley. The epicenter of the main shock was located at 42.094° N, 112.478° W, and had a focal depth of 5.5 km. This earthquake was the largest in the continental United States since the destructive San Fernando earthquake of February 1971. The main shock was preceded by a magnitude 4.5 foreshock on March 26. 

  2. Radwaste challenge at Beaver Valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Duquesne Light Company met the problem of accumulating low-level radioactive waste at its Beaver Valley nuclear plant with an aggressive program to reduce the quantity of contaminated material and demonstrate that the plant was improving its radiological protection. There was also an economic incentive to reduce low-level wastes. The imaginative campaign involved workers in the reduction effort through training and the adoption of practical approaches to reducing the amount of material exposed to radiation that include sorting trash by radiation level and a compacting system. 4 figures

  3. A 35 GHz wireless millimeter-wave power sensor based on GaAs micromachining technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, De-bo; Liao, Xiao-ping

    2012-01-01

    A novel MEMS wireless millimeter-wave power sensor based on GaAs MMIC technology is presented in this paper. The principle of this wireless millimeter-wave power sensor is explained. It is designed and fabricated using MEMS technology and the GaAs MMIC process. With the millimeter-wave power range from 0.1 to 80 mW, the sensitivity of the wireless millimeter-wave power sensor is about 0.246 mV mW −1 at 35 GHz. In order to verify the power detection capability, this wireless power sensor is mounted on a PCB which influences the microwave performance of the CPW-fed antenna including the return loss and the radiation pattern. The frequency-dependent characteristic and the degree-dependent characteristic of this wireless power sensor are researched. Furthermore, in addition to the combination of the advantages of CPW-fed antenna with the advantages of the thermoelectric power sensor, another significant advantage of this wireless millimeter-wave power sensor is that it can be integrated with MMICs and other planar connecting circuit structures with zero dc power consumption. These features make it suitable for various applications ranging from the environment or space radiation detection systems to radar receiver and transmitter systems. (paper)

  4. Millimeter and X-Ray Emission from the 5 July 2012 Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsap, Y. T.; Smirnova, V. V.; Motorina, G. G.; Morgachev, A. S.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Nagnibeda, V. G.; Ryzhov, V. S.

    2018-03-01

    The 5 July 2012 solar flare SOL2012-07-05T11:44 (11:39 - 11:49 UT) with an increasing millimeter spectrum between 93 and 140 GHz is considered. We use space and ground-based observations in X-ray, extreme ultraviolet, microwave, and millimeter wave ranges obtained with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, Radio Solar Telescope Network, and Bauman Moscow State Technical University millimeter radio telescope RT-7.5. The main parameters of thermal and accelerated electrons were determined through X-ray spectral fitting assuming the homogeneous thermal source and thick-target model. From the data of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/SDO and differential-emission-measure calculations it is shown that the thermal coronal plasma gives a negligible contribution to the millimeter flare emission. Model calculations suggest that the observed increase of millimeter spectral flux with frequency is determined by gyrosynchrotron emission of high-energy (≳ 300 keV) electrons in the chromosphere. The consequences of the results are discussed in the light of the flare-energy-release mechanisms.

  5. Critical object recognition in millimeter-wave images with robustness to rotation and scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzade, Hoda; Ghojogh, Benyamin; Faezi, Sina; Shabany, Mahdi

    2017-06-01

    Locating critical objects is crucial in various security applications and industries. For example, in security applications, such as in airports, these objects might be hidden or covered under shields or secret sheaths. Millimeter-wave images can be utilized to discover and recognize the critical objects out of the hidden cases without any health risk due to their non-ionizing features. However, millimeter-wave images usually have waves in and around the detected objects, making object recognition difficult. Thus, regular image processing and classification methods cannot be used for these images and additional pre-processings and classification methods should be introduced. This paper proposes a novel pre-processing method for canceling rotation and scale using principal component analysis. In addition, a two-layer classification method is introduced and utilized for recognition. Moreover, a large dataset of millimeter-wave images is collected and created for experiments. Experimental results show that a typical classification method such as support vector machines can recognize 45.5% of a type of critical objects at 34.2% false alarm rate (FAR), which is a drastically poor recognition. The same method within the proposed recognition framework achieves 92.9% recognition rate at 0.43% FAR, which indicates a highly significant improvement. The significant contribution of this work is to introduce a new method for analyzing millimeter-wave images based on machine vision and learning approaches, which is not yet widely noted in the field of millimeter-wave image analysis.

  6. Performance Analysis of Millimeter-Wave Multi-hop Machine-to-Machine Networks Based on Hop Distance Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haejoon Jung

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As an intrinsic part of the Internet of Things (IoT ecosystem, machine-to-machine (M2M communications are expected to provide ubiquitous connectivity between machines. Millimeter-wave (mmWave communication is another promising technology for the future communication systems to alleviate the pressure of scarce spectrum resources. For this reason, in this paper, we consider multi-hop M2M communications, where a machine-type communication (MTC device with the limited transmit power relays to help other devices using mmWave. To be specific, we focus on hop distance statistics and their impacts on system performances in multi-hop wireless networks (MWNs with directional antenna arrays in mmWave for M2M communications. Different from microwave systems, in mmWave communications, wireless channel suffers from blockage by obstacles that heavily attenuate line-of-sight signals, which may result in limited per-hop progress in MWNs. We consider two routing strategies aiming at different types of applications and derive the probability distributions of their hop distances. Moreover, we provide their baseline statistics assuming the blockage-free scenario to quantify the impact of blockages. Based on the hop distance analysis, we propose a method to estimate the end-to-end performances (e.g., outage probability, hop count, and transmit energy of the mmWave MWNs, which provides important insights into mmWave MWN design without time-consuming and repetitive end-to-end simulation.

  7. Improving angular resolution with Scan-MUSIC algorithm for real complex targets using 35-GHz millimeter-wave radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Canh

    2004-08-01

    Scan-MUSIC algorithm, developed by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), improves angular resolution for target detection with the use of a single rotatable radar scanning the angular region of interest. This algorithm has been adapted and extended from the MUSIC algorithm that has been used for a linear sensor array. Previously, it was shown that the SMUSIC algorithm and a Millimeter Wave radar can be used to resolve two closely spaced point targets that exhibited constructive interference, but not for the targets that exhibited destructive interference. Therefore, there were some limitations of the algorithm for the point targets. In this paper, the SMUSIC algorithm is applied to a problem of resolving real complex scatterer-type targets, which is more useful and of greater practical interest, particular for the future Army radar system. The paper presents results of the angular resolution of the targets, an M60 tank and an M113 Armored Personnel Carrier (APC), that are within the mainlobe of a Κα-band radar antenna. In particular, we applied the algorithm to resolve centroids of the targets that were placed within the beamwidth of the antenna. The collected coherent data using the stepped-frequency radar were compute magnitudely for the SMUSIC calculation. Even though there were significantly different signal returns for different orientations and offsets of the two targets, we resolved those two target centroids when they were as close as about 1/3 of the antenna beamwidth.

  8. Performance Analysis of Millimeter-Wave Multi-hop Machine-to-Machine Networks Based on Hop Distance Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Haejoon; Lee, In-Ho

    2018-01-12

    As an intrinsic part of the Internet of Things (IoT) ecosystem, machine-to-machine (M2M) communications are expected to provide ubiquitous connectivity between machines. Millimeter-wave (mmWave) communication is another promising technology for the future communication systems to alleviate the pressure of scarce spectrum resources. For this reason, in this paper, we consider multi-hop M2M communications, where a machine-type communication (MTC) device with the limited transmit power relays to help other devices using mmWave. To be specific, we focus on hop distance statistics and their impacts on system performances in multi-hop wireless networks (MWNs) with directional antenna arrays in mmWave for M2M communications. Different from microwave systems, in mmWave communications, wireless channel suffers from blockage by obstacles that heavily attenuate line-of-sight signals, which may result in limited per-hop progress in MWNs. We consider two routing strategies aiming at different types of applications and derive the probability distributions of their hop distances. Moreover, we provide their baseline statistics assuming the blockage-free scenario to quantify the impact of blockages. Based on the hop distance analysis, we propose a method to estimate the end-to-end performances (e.g., outage probability, hop count, and transmit energy) of the mmWave MWNs, which provides important insights into mmWave MWN design without time-consuming and repetitive end-to-end simulation.

  9. THE SCUBA-2 COSMOLOGY LEGACY SURVEY: ALMA RESOLVES THE REST-FRAME FAR-INFRARED EMISSION OF SUB-MILLIMETER GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, J. M.; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Chen, Chian-Chou; Danielson, A. L. R.; Edge, A. C.; Ma, C.-J. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Almaini, O.; Conselice, C.; Hartley, W. G.; Lani, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Blain, A. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Bremer, M. N.; Coppin, K. E. K. [School of Physics, HH Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Chapman, S. C. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 3J5 (Canada); Dunlop, J. S.; Ivison, R. J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford HIll, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Farrah, D. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Geach, J. E. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Karim, A., E-mail: j.m.simpson@dur.ac.uk [Argelander-Institute for Astronomy, Bonn University, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); and others

    2015-01-20

    We present high-resolution (0.''3) Atacama Large Millimeter Array 870 μm imaging of 52 sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs) in the Ultra Deep Survey field to investigate the size and morphology of the sub-millimeter (sub-mm) emission on 2-10 kpc scales. We derive a median intrinsic angular size of FWHM = 0.''30 ± 0.''04 for the 23 SMGs in the sample detected at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) >10. Using the photometric redshifts of the SMGs we show that this corresponds to a median physical half-light diameter of 2.4 ± 0.2 kpc. A stacking analysis of the SMGs detected at S/N <10 shows they have sizes consistent with the 870 μm bright SMGs in the sample. We compare our results to the sizes of SMGs derived from other multi-wavelength studies, and show that the rest-frame ∼250 μm sizes of SMGs are consistent with studies of resolved {sup 12}CO (J = 3-2 to 7-6) emission lines, but that sizes derived from 1.4 GHz imaging appear to be approximately two times larger on average, which we attribute to cosmic ray diffusion. The rest-frame optical sizes of SMGs are around four times larger than the sub-millimeter sizes, indicating that the star formation in these galaxies is compact relative to the pre-existing stellar distribution. The size of the starburst region in SMGs is consistent with the majority of the star formation occurring in a central region, a few kiloparsecs in extent, with a median star formation rate surface density of 90 ± 30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2}, which may suggest that we are witnessing an intense period of bulge growth in these galaxies.

  10. Real time three-dimensional space video rate sensors for millimeter waves imaging based very inexpensive plasma LED lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levanon, Assaf; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak; Kopeika, Natan S.; Rozban, Daniel; Abramovich, Amir

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, much effort has been invested to develop inexpensive but sensitive Millimeter Wave (MMW) detectors that can be used in focal plane arrays (FPAs), in order to implement real time MMW imaging. Real time MMW imaging systems are required for many varied applications in many fields as homeland security, medicine, communications, military products and space technology. It is mainly because this radiation has high penetration and good navigability through dust storm, fog, heavy rain, dielectric materials, biological tissue, and diverse materials. Moreover, the atmospheric attenuation in this range of the spectrum is relatively low and the scattering is also low compared to NIR and VIS. The lack of inexpensive room temperature imaging systems makes it difficult to provide a suitable MMW system for many of the above applications. In last few years we advanced in research and development of sensors using very inexpensive (30-50 cents) Glow Discharge Detector (GDD) plasma indicator lamps as MMW detectors. This paper presents three kinds of GDD sensor based lamp Focal Plane Arrays (FPA). Those three kinds of cameras are different in the number of detectors, scanning operation, and detection method. The 1st and 2nd generations are 8 × 8 pixel array and an 18 × 2 mono-rail scanner array respectively, both of them for direct detection and limited to fixed imaging. The last designed sensor is a multiplexing frame rate of 16x16 GDD FPA. It permits real time video rate imaging of 30 frames/ sec and comprehensive 3D MMW imaging. The principle of detection in this sensor is a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) system while each of the 16 GDD pixel lines is sampled simultaneously. Direct detection is also possible and can be done with a friendly user interface. This FPA sensor is built over 256 commercial GDD lamps with 3 mm diameter International Light, Inc., Peabody, MA model 527 Ne indicator lamps as pixel detectors. All three sensors are fully supported

  11. MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN THE SUBSTELLAR DOMAIN: MILLIMETER OBSERVATIONS OF YOUNG VERY LOW MASS OBJECTS IN TAURUS AND ρ OPHIUCHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngoc Phan-Bao; Lee, Chin-Fei; Ho, Paul T. P.; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2011-01-01

    We report here our search for molecular outflows from young very low mass stars and brown dwarfs in Taurus and ρ Ophiuchi. Using the Submillimeter Array and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, we have observed four targets at 1.3 mm wavelength (230 GHz) to search for CO J = 2 → 1 outflows. A young very low mass star MHO 5 (in Taurus) with an estimated mass of 90 M J , which is just above the hydrogen-burning limit, shows two gas lobes that are likely outflows. While the CO map of MHO 5 does not show a clear structure of outflow, possibly due to environment gas, its position-velocity diagram indicates two distinct blue- and redshifted components. We therefore conclude that they are components of a bipolar molecular outflow from MHO 5. We estimate an outflow mass of 7.0 x 10 -5 M sun and a mass-loss rate of 9.0 x 10 -10 M sun . These values are over two orders of magnitude smaller than the typical ones for T Tauri stars and somewhat weaker than those we have observed in the young brown dwarf ISO-Oph 102 of 60 M J in ρ Ophiuchi. This makes MHO 5 the first young very low mass star showing a bipolar molecular outflow in Taurus. The detection boosts the scenario that very low mass objects form like low-mass stars but in a version scaled down by a factor of over 100.

  12. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  13. Josephson junction arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bindslev Hansen, J.; Lindelof, P.E.

    1985-01-01

    In this review we intend to cover recent work involving arrays of Josephson junctions. The work on such arrays falls naturally into three main areas of interest: 1. Technical applications of Josephson junction arrays for high-frequency devices. 2. Experimental studies of 2-D model systems (Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition, commensurate-incommensurate transition in frustrated (flux) lattices). 3. Investigations of phenomena associated with non-equilibrium superconductivity in and around Josephson junctions (with high current density). (orig./BUD)

  14. Phased-array radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookner, E.

    1985-02-01

    The operating principles, technology, and applications of phased-array radars are reviewed and illustrated with diagrams and photographs. Consideration is given to the antenna elements, circuitry for time delays, phase shifters, pulse coding and compression, and hybrid radars combining phased arrays with lenses to alter the beam characteristics. The capabilities and typical hardware of phased arrays are shown using the US military systems COBRA DANE and PAVE PAWS as examples.

  15. Miniaturized Dynamic Pressure Sensor Arrays with Sub-Millimeter (mm) Spacing for Cross-Flow Transition Measurements, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Interdisciplinary Consulting Corporation (IC2) and in partnership with the University of Florida (UF) propose a microfabricated, dynamic piezoelectric pressure...

  16. Miniaturized Dynamic Pressure Sensor Arrays with Sub-Millimeter (mm) Spacing for Cross-Flow Transition Measurements, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Interdisciplinary Consulting Corporation (IC2) and in partnership with the University of Florida (UF) propose a microfabricated, dynamic piezoelectric pressure...

  17. Solar Science with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array-A New View of Our Sun

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wedemeyer, S.; Bastian, T.S.; Brajša, R.; Hudson, H. S.; Fleishman, G.; Loukitcheva, M.; Fleck, B.; Kontar, E. P.; de Pontieu, B.; Yagoubov, P.; Tiwari, S.; Soler, R.; Black, J.H.; Antolin, P.; Scullion, E.; Gunár, Stanislav; Labrosse, N.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Benz, A. O.; White, S.M.; Hauschildt, P.; Doyle, J.G.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Ayres, T.; Heinzel, Petr; Karlický, Marian; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Gary, D.; Alissandrakis, C. E.; Nindos, A.; Solanki, S.K.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Shimojo, M.; Kato, Y.; Zaqarashvili, T.; Perez, E.; Selhorst, C.L.; Bárta, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 200, 1-4 (2016), s. 1-73 ISSN 0038-6308 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-24782S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 312495 - SOLAR NET Grant - others:EC(XE) 606862 Program:FP7 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Sun * photosphere * chromosphere Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 7.497, year: 2016

  18. Terrestrial Cosmogenic-Nuclide Dating of Alluvial Fans in Death Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machette, Michael N.; Slate, Janet L.; Phillips, Fred M.

    2008-01-01

    Panamint Valley and over Wingate Wash. A remnant of ancient lake shoreline deposits that once extended across the Hanaupah Canyon fan constrains the timing and extent of the last deep cycle of Pleistocene Lake Manly. The lacustrine delta complex yields a 36Cl depth-profile date of 130 ka, which is consistent with deposition during a highstand of Lake Manly at the end of MIS 6. These deposits are presently at an altitude of about 30 meters above sea level (asl), which relates to a lake with a maximum depth of about 115 meters. Remnants of shoreline deposits at higher elevations on the southern margin of the Hanaupah Canyon fan complex are cut across older alluvium (unit Qao) and may be related to an MIS 6 highstand of at least 67 meters asl or, more likely, an older (MIS 8 or earlier) highstand that is poorly preserved and still undated in the valley. As part of our work on the west-side fans, we also dated an older phase of alluvial-fan deposits from the Trail Canyon fan complex, which is north of Hanaupah Canyon. A 36Cl depth-profile age of 170 ka suggests alluvial deposition of unit Qaio (older phase of Qao) took place prior to the MIS 6 highstand of Lake Manly. Knowing the absolute ages (or range in ages) of the intermediate-age (Qai) surfaces in Death Valley allows us to estimate the following rates of geologic processes: (1) a lateral slip rate of 5 millimeters per year for the northern Death Valley fault zone; (2) uplift of 50 meters in roughly the past 80,000 years for parts of the Mustard Canyon hills in east-central Death Valley; and (3) an estimated 10-40 m of dip-slip thrust movement on the Echo Canyon fault in Furnace Creek Canyon.

  19. Valley-dependent band structure and valley polarization in periodically modulated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei-Tao

    2016-08-01

    The valley-dependent energy band and transport property of graphene under a periodic magnetic-strained field are studied, where the time-reversal symmetry is broken and the valley degeneracy is lifted. The considered superlattice is composed of two different barriers, providing more degrees of freedom for engineering the electronic structure. The electrons near the K and K' valleys are dominated by different effective superlattices. It is found that the energy bands for both valleys are symmetric with respect to ky=-(AM+ξ AS) /4 under the symmetric superlattices. More finite-energy Dirac points, more prominent collimation behavior, and new crossing points are found for K' valley. The degenerate miniband near the K valley splits into two subminibands and produces a new band gap under the asymmetric superlattices. The velocity for the K' valley is greatly renormalized compared with the K valley, and so we can achieve a finite velocity for the K valley while the velocity for the K' valley is zero. Especially, the miniband and band gap could be manipulated independently, leading to an increase of the conductance. The characteristics of the band structure are reflected in the transmission spectra. The Dirac points and the crossing points appear as pronounced peaks in transmission. A remarkable valley polarization is obtained which is robust to the disorder and can be controlled by the strain, the period, and the voltage.

  20. THE CARMA PAIRED ANTENNA CALIBRATION SYSTEM: ATMOSPHERIC PHASE CORRECTION FOR MILLIMETER WAVE INTERFEROMETRY AND ITS APPLICATION TO MAPPING THE ULTRALUMINOUS GALAXY ARP 193

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zauderer, B. Ashley; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Curley, Roger; Pound, Marc W.; Mundy, Lee G.; Teng, Stacy H.; Teuben, Peter J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Carpenter, John M. [California Institute of Technology, Department of Astronomy, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Peréz, Laura M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 0, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Lamb, James W.; Woody, David P.; Leitch, Erik M.; Muchovej, Stephen J.; Volgenau, Nikolaus H. [California Institute of Technology, Owens Valley Radio Observatory, Big Pine, CA 93513 (United States); Bock, Douglas C.-J. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping NSW 1710 (Australia); Carlstrom, John E.; Culverhouse, Thomas L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Plambeck, Richard L. [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marrone, Daniel P. [Department of Astronomy, Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); and others

    2016-01-15

    Phase fluctuations introduced by the atmosphere are the main limiting factor in attaining diffraction limited performance in extended interferometric arrays at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. We report the results of C-PACS, the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy Paired Antenna Calibration System. We present a systematic study of several hundred test observations taken during the 2009–2010 winter observing season where we utilize CARMA's eight 3.5 m antennas to monitor an atmospheric calibrator while simultaneously acquiring science observations with 6.1 and 10.4 m antennas on baselines ranging from a few hundred meters to ∼2 km. We find that C-PACS is systematically successful at improving coherence on long baselines under a variety of atmospheric conditions. We find that the angular separation between the atmospheric calibrator and target source is the most important consideration, with consistently successful phase correction at CARMA requiring a suitable calibrator located ≲6° away from the science target. We show that cloud cover does not affect the success of C-PACS. We demonstrate C-PACS in typical use by applying it to the observations of the nearby very luminous infrared galaxy Arp 193 in {sup 12}CO(2-1) at a linear resolution of ≈70 pc (0.″12 × 0.″18), 3 times better than previously published molecular maps of this galaxy. We resolve the molecular disk rotation kinematics and the molecular gas distribution and measure the gas surface densities and masses on 90 pc scales. We find that molecular gas constitutes ∼30% of the dynamical mass in the inner 700 pc of this object with a surface density ∼10{sup 4} M{sub ⊙} pc{sup −2}; we compare these properties to those of the starburst region of NGC 253.

  1. Storage array reflection considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C.; Taylor, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    The assumptions used for reflection conditions of single containers are fairly well established and consistently applied throughout the industry in nuclear criticality safety evaluations. Containers are usually considered to be either fully water reflected (i.e., surrounded by 6 to 12 in. of water) for safety calculations or reflected by 1 in. of water for nominal (structural material and air) conditions. Tables and figures are usually available for performing comparative evaluations of containers under various loading conditions. Reflection considerations used for evaluating the safety of storage arrays of fissile material are not as well established. When evaluating arrays, it has become more common for analysts to use calculations to demonstrate the safety of the array configuration. In performing these calculations, the analyst has considerable freedom concerning the assumptions made for modeling the reflection of the array. Considerations are given for the physical layout of the array with little or no discussion (or demonstration) of what conditions are bounded by the assumed reflection conditions. For example, an array may be generically evaluated by placing it in a corner of a room in which the opposing walls are far away. Typically, it is believed that complete flooding of the room is incredible, so the array is evaluated for various levels of water mist interspersed among array containers. This paper discusses some assumptions that are made regarding storage array reflection

  2. The EUROBALL array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi Alvarez, C.

    1998-01-01

    The quality of the multidetector array EUROBALL is described, with emphasis on the history and formal organization of the related European collaboration. The detector layout is presented together with the electronics and Data Acquisition capabilities. The status of the instrument, its performances and the main features of some recently developed ancillary detectors will also be described. The EUROBALL array is operational in Legnaro National Laboratory (Italy) since April 1997 and is expected to run up to November 1998. The array represents a significant improvement in detector efficiency and sensitivity with respect to the previous generation of multidetector arrays

  3. Rectenna array measurement results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The measured performance characteristics of a rectenna array are reviewed and compared to the performance of a single element. It is shown that the performance may be extrapolated from the individual element to that of the collection of elements. Techniques for current and voltage combining were demonstrated. The array performance as a function of various operating parameters is characterized and techniques for overvoltage protection and automatic fault clearing in the array demonstrated. A method for detecting failed elements also exists. Instrumentation for deriving performance effectiveness is described. Measured harmonic radiation patterns and fundamental frequency scattered patterns for a low level illumination rectenna array are presented.

  4. Arrayed waveguide Sagnac interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, José; Muñoz, Pascual; Sales, Salvador; Pastor, Daniel; Ortega, Beatriz; Martinez, Alfonso

    2003-02-01

    We present a novel device, an arrayed waveguide Sagnac interferometer, that combines the flexibility of arrayed waveguides and the wide application range of fiber or integrated optics Sagnac loops. We form the device by closing an array of wavelength-selective light paths provided by two arrayed waveguides with a single 2 x 2 coupler in a Sagnac configuration. The equations that describe the device's operation in general conditions are derived. A preliminary experimental demonstration is provided of a fiber prototype in passive operation that shows good agreement with the expected theoretical performance. Potential applications of the device in nonlinear operation are outlined and discussed.

  5. The Very Large Array Data Processing Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Brian R.; Masters, Joseph S.; Chandler, Claire J.; Davis, Lindsey E.; Kern, Jeffrey S.; Ott, Juergen; Schinzel, Frank K.; Medlin, Drew; Muders, Dirk; Williams, Stewart; Geers, Vincent C.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Butler, Bryan J.; Nakazato, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Kanako

    2018-01-01

    We present the VLA Pipeline, software that is part of the larger pipeline processing framework used for the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), and Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) for both interferometric and single dish observations.Through a collection of base code jointly used by the VLA and ALMA, the pipeline builds a hierarchy of classes to execute individual atomic pipeline tasks within the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) package. Each pipeline task contains heuristics designed by the team to actively decide the best processing path and execution parameters for calibration and imaging. The pipeline code is developed and written in Python and uses a "context" structure for tracking the heuristic decisions and processing results. The pipeline "weblog" acts as the user interface in verifying the quality assurance of each calibration and imaging stage. The majority of VLA scheduling blocks above 1 GHz are now processed with the standard continuum recipe of the pipeline and offer a calibrated measurement set as a basic data product to observatory users. In addition, the pipeline is used for processing data from the VLA Sky Survey (VLASS), a seven year community-driven endeavor started in September 2017 to survey the entire sky down to a declination of -40 degrees at S-band (2-4 GHz). This 5500 hour next-generation large radio survey will explore the time and spectral domains, relying on pipeline processing to generate calibrated measurement sets, polarimetry, and imaging data products that are available to the astronomical community with no proprietary period. Here we present an overview of the pipeline design philosophy, heuristics, and calibration and imaging results produced by the pipeline. Future development will include the testing of spectral line recipes, low signal-to-noise heuristics, and serving as a testing platform for science ready data products.The pipeline is developed as part of the CASA software package by an

  6. Sustainable agricultural development in inland valleys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, S.J.

    2018-01-01

    The inland valley in Africa are common landscapes that have favorable conditions for agricultural production. Compared to the surrounding uplands they are characterized by a relatively high and secure water availability and high soil fertility levels. Inland valleys thus have a high agricultural

  7. Valley dependent transport in graphene L junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K. S.

    2018-05-01

    We studied the valley dependent transport in graphene L junctions connecting an armchair lead and a zigzag lead. The junction can be used in valleytronic devices and circuits. Electrons injected from the armchair lead into the junction is not valley polarized, but they can become valley polarized in the zigzag lead. There are Fermi energies, where the current in the zigzag lead is highly valley polarized and the junction is an efficient generator of valley polarized current. The features of the valley polarized current depend sensitively on the widths of the two leads, as well as the number of dimers in the armchair lead, because this number has a sensitive effect on the band structure of the armchair lead. When an external potential is applied to the junction, the energy range with high valley polarization is enlarged enhancing its function as a generator of highly valley polarized current. The scaling behavior found in other graphene devices is also found in L junctions, which means that the results presented here can be extended to junctions with larger dimensions after appropriate scaling of the energy.

  8. Beaver assisted river valley formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Cherie J.; Cooper, D.J.; Baker, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    We examined how beaver dams affect key ecosystem processes, including pattern and process of sediment deposition, the composition and spatial pattern of vegetation, and nutrient loading and processing. We provide new evidence for the formation of heterogeneous beaver meadows on riverine system floodplains and terraces where dynamic flows are capable of breaching in-channel beaver dams. Our data show a 1.7-m high beaver dam triggered overbank flooding that drowned vegetation in areas deeply flooded, deposited nutrient-rich sediment in a spatially heterogeneous pattern on the floodplain and terrace, and scoured soils in other areas. The site quickly de-watered following the dam breach by high stream flows, protecting the deposited sediment from future re-mobilization by overbank floods. Bare sediment either exposed by scouring or deposited by the beaver flood was quickly colonized by a spatially heterogeneous plant community, forming a beaver meadow. Many willow and some aspen seedlings established in the more heavily disturbed areas, suggesting the site may succeed to a willow carr plant community suitable for future beaver re-occupation. We expand existing theory beyond the beaver pond to include terraces within valleys. This more fully explains how beavers can help drive the formation of alluvial valleys and their complex vegetation patterns as was first postulated by Ruedemann and Schoonmaker in 1938. ?? 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Research on Ground Motion Metal Target Based on Rocket Projectile by Using Millimeter Wave Radiometer Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Dongyang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available How to detect the ground motion metal target effectively is an important guarantee for precision strike in the process of Rocket Projectile flight. Accordingly and in view of the millimeter- wave radiation characteristic of the ground motion metal target, a mathematical model was established based on Rocket Projectile about millimeter-wave detection to the ground motion metal target. Through changing various parameters in the process of Rocket Projectile flight, the detection model was studied by simulation. The parameters variation and effective range of millimeter wave radiometer were obtained in the process of rotation and horizontal flight. So a certain theoretical basis was formed for the precision strike to the ground motion metal target.

  10. Telecommunication service markets through the year 2000 in relation to millimeter wave satellite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    NASA is currently conducting a series of millimeter wave satellite system and market studies to develop 30/20 GHz satellite system concepts that have commercial potential for the period 1980-2000. The results of the market studies to-date focusing on the overall demand forecasts and distributions by geographic location, distance, and user category are discussed. Tables are presented indicating baseline market forecast voice and video services, data service category, impacted baseline forecast, and traffic/distance distribution voice services. It is concluded that the total market and system activity will be influential in determining the potential role of millimeter wave systems in the overall transmission needs of the nation, and the amount of the total forecasted traffic suitable for millimeter wave systems.

  11. Development of a contrast phantom for active millimeter-wave imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Jeffrey; Weatherall, James C.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Smith, Barry T.

    2011-06-01

    As the development of active millimeter wave imaging systems continues, it is necessary to validate materials that simulate the expected response of explosives. While physics-based models have been used to develop simulants, it is desirable to image both the explosive and simulant together in a controlled fashion in order to demonstrate success. To this end, a millimeter wave contrast phantom has been created to calibrate image grayscale while controlling the configuration of the explosive and simulant such that direct comparison of their respective returns can be performed. The physics of the phantom are described, with millimeter wave images presented to show successful development of the phantom and simulant validation at GHz frequencies.

  12. Millimeter-wave radiation from a Teflon dielectric probe and its imaging application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Eiji; Sakai, Shigeki

    2008-01-01

    The beam profile of a millimeter wave radiated from the tip of a Teflon dielectric probe was characterized experimentally by using a three-dimensional scanning dielectric probe and numerically by using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The measured intensity distribution and polarization of the millimeter wave radiated from the tip of the probe was in good agreement with those of the FDTD simulation. A reflection type of a millimeter- wave imaging system using this dielectric probe was constructed. The resolution of the imaging system was as small as 1 mm, which was slightly smaller than a half wavelength, 1.6 mm, of the radiation wave. Translucent measurement of a commercially manufactured IC card which consists of an IC chip and a leaf-shaped antenna coil was demonstrated. Not only the internal two-dimensional structures but also the vertical information of the card could be provided

  13. Millimeter-scale MEMS enabled autonomous systems: system feasibility and mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulskamp, Jeffrey S.

    2012-06-01

    Millimeter-scale robotic systems based on highly integrated microelectronics and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) could offer unique benefits and attributes for small-scale autonomous systems. This extreme scale for robotics will naturally constrain the realizable system capabilities significantly. This paper assesses the feasibility of developing such systems by defining the fundamental design trade spaces between component design variables and system level performance parameters. This permits the development of mobility enabling component technologies within a system relevant context. Feasible ranges of system mass, required aerodynamic power, available battery power, load supported power, flight endurance, and required leg load bearing capability are presented for millimeter-scale platforms. The analysis illustrates the feasibility of developing both flight capable and ground mobile millimeter-scale autonomous systems while highlighting the significant challenges that must be overcome to realize their potential.

  14. The Next-Generation Very Large Array: Technical Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Mark; Selina, Rob

    2018-01-01

    As part of its mandate as a national observatory, the NRAO is looking toward the long range future of radio astronomy and fostering the long term growth of the US astronomical community. NRAO has sponsored a series of science and technical community meetings to consider the science mission and design of a next-generation Very Large Array (ngVLA), building on the legacies of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Very Large Array (VLA).The basic ngVLA design emerging from these discussions is an interferometric array with approximately ten times the sensitivity and ten times higher spatial resolution than the VLA and ALMA radio telescopes, optimized for operation in the wavelength range 0.3cm to 3cm. The ngVLA would open a new window on the Universe through ultra-sensitive imaging of thermal line and continuum emission down to milli-arcsecond resolution, as well as unprecedented broadband continuum polarimetric imaging of non-thermal processes. The specifications and concepts for major ngVLA system elements are rapidly converging.We will provide an overview of the current system design of the ngVLA. The concepts for major system elements such as the antenna, receiving electronics, and central signal processing will be presented. We will also describe the major development activities that are presently underway to advance the design.

  15. Focal plane array with modular pixel array components for scalability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Randolph R; Campbell, David V; Shinde, Subhash L; Rienstra, Jeffrey L; Serkland, Darwin K; Holmes, Michael L

    2014-12-09

    A modular, scalable focal plane array is provided as an array of integrated circuit dice, wherein each die includes a given amount of modular pixel array circuitry. The array of dice effectively multiplies the amount of modular pixel array circuitry to produce a larger pixel array without increasing die size. Desired pixel pitch across the enlarged pixel array is preserved by forming die stacks with each pixel array circuitry die stacked on a separate die that contains the corresponding signal processing circuitry. Techniques for die stack interconnections and die stack placement are implemented to ensure that the desired pixel pitch is preserved across the enlarged pixel array.

  16. The millimeter IRAM-30 m line survey toward IK Tauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velilla Prieto, L.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Cernicharo, J.; Agúndez, M.; Quintana-Lacaci, G.; Bujarrabal, V.; Alcolea, J.; Balança, C.; Herpin, F.; Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We aim to investigate the physical and chemical properties of the molecular envelope of the oxygen-rich AGB star IK Tau. Methods: We carried out a millimeter wavelength line survey between 79 and 356 GHz with the IRAM-30 m telescope. We analysed the molecular lines detected in IK Tau using the population diagram technique to derive rotational temperatures and column densities. We conducted a radiative transfer analysis of the SO2 lines, which also helped us to verify the validity of the approximated method of the population diagram for the rest of the molecules. Results: For the first time in this source we detected rotational lines in the ground vibrational state of HCO+, NS, NO, and H2CO, as well as several isotopologues of molecules previously identified, namely, C18O, Si17O, Si18O, 29SiS, 30SiS, Si34S, H13CN, 13CS, C34S, H234S, 34SO, and 34SO2. We also detected several rotational lines in vibrationally excited states of SiS and SiO isotopologues, as well as rotational lines of H2O in the vibrationally excited state ν2 = 2. We have also increased the number of rotational lines detected of molecules that were previously identified toward IK Tau, including vibrationally excited states, enabling a detailed study of the molecular abundances and excitation temperatures. In particular, we highlight the detection of NS and H2CO with fractional abundances of f(NS) 10-8 and f(H2CO) [10-7-10-8]. Most of the molecules display rotational temperatures between 15 and 40 K. NaCl and SiS isotopologues display rotational temperatures higher than the average ( 65 K). In the case of SO2 a warm component with Trot 290 K is also detected. Conclusions: With a total of 350 lines detected of 34 different molecular species (including different isotopologues), IK Tau displays a rich chemistry for an oxygen-rich circumstellar envelope. The detection of carbon bearing molecules like H2CO, as well as the discrepancies found between our derived abundances and the predictions from

  17. Experimental study of coherent radiation in the millimeter-wave region at the KURRI-LINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Toshiharu [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    1996-07-01

    Coherent radiation, i.e., synchrotron radiation, transition radiation, Cherenkov radiation, or Smith-Purcell radiation emitted by short bunches of electrons has been observed in the millimeter-wave region. Properties of coherent radiation are characterized by the coherence effect and the relativistic one. The intensity of coherent radiation is enormously enhanced by several orders of magnitude in comparison with the incoherent radiation and the flux of radiation concentrates around the direction of the electron beam. Coherent radiation is useful as the intense light source in the millimeter-wave region. (author)

  18. Continuously distributed magnetization profile for millimeter-scale elastomeric undulatory swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diller, Eric; Zhuang, Jiang; Zhan Lum, Guo; Edwards, Matthew R.; Sitti, Metin

    2014-04-01

    We have developed a millimeter-scale magnetically driven swimming robot for untethered motion at mid to low Reynolds numbers. The robot is propelled by continuous undulatory deformation, which is enabled by the distributed magnetization profile of a flexible sheet. We demonstrate control of a prototype device and measure deformation and speed as a function of magnetic field strength and frequency. Experimental results are compared with simple magnetoelastic and fluid propulsion models. The presented mechanism provides an efficient remote actuation method at the millimeter scale that may be suitable for further scaling down in size for micro-robotics applications in biotechnology and healthcare.

  19. Reception of low-intensity millimeter-wave electromagnetic radiation by the electroreceptors in skates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akoev, G.N.; Avelev, V.D.

    1995-01-01

    Low intensity millimeter-wave electromagnetic radiation of less than 10 mW cm -2 power intensity has a nonthermal effect on the body and it is widely used in medical practice for treatment of various diseases. Nevertheless, the effect of EMR on biological tissues is not understood. The skin and its sensory receptors are considered to be responsible for EMR reception, but this has yet to be confirmed. The present experiments were designed to study the effect of millimeter-wave electromagnetic radiation on the ampullae of Lorenzini in skates, which are very sensitive to weak electrical stimuli at low frequency. (author)

  20. Plasma generation using high-power millimeter-wave beam and its application for thrust generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Yasuhisa; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Takahashi, Koji; Kasugai, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2006-01-01

    Propagation of an ionization front in the beam channel was observed after plasma was generated using a 170 GHz millimeter-wave beam in the atmosphere. The propagation velocity of the ionization front was found to be supersonic when the millimeter-wave power density was greater than 75 kW cm -2 . The momentum coupling coefficient C m , a ratio of the propulsive impulse to the input energy, was measured using conical and cylindrical thruster models. A C m value greater than 350 N MW -1 was recorded when the ionization front propagated with supersonic velocity

  1. Triggering the GRANDE array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.L.; Bratton, C.B.; Gurr, J.; Kropp, W.; Nelson, M.; Sobel, H.; Svoboda, R.; Yodh, G.; Burnett, T.; Chaloupka, V.; Wilkes, R.J.; Cherry, M.; Ellison, S.B.; Guzik, T.G.; Wefel, J.; Gaidos, J.; Loeffler, F.; Sembroski, G.; Goodman, J.; Haines, T.J.; Kielczewska, D.; Lane, C.; Steinberg, R.; Lieber, M.; Nagle, D.; Potter, M.; Tripp, R.

    1990-01-01

    A brief description of the Gamma Ray And Neutrino Detector Experiment (GRANDE) is presented. The detector elements and electronics are described. The trigger logic for the array is then examined. The triggers for the Gamma Ray and the Neutrino portions of the array are treated separately. (orig.)

  2. ISS Solar Array Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James P.; Martin, Keith D.; Thomas, Justin R.; Caro, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Solar Array Management (SAM) software toolset provides the capabilities necessary to operate a spacecraft with complex solar array constraints. It monitors spacecraft telemetry and provides interpretations of solar array constraint data in an intuitive manner. The toolset provides extensive situational awareness to ensure mission success by analyzing power generation needs, array motion constraints, and structural loading situations. The software suite consists of several components including samCS (constraint set selector), samShadyTimers (array shadowing timers), samWin (visualization GUI), samLock (array motion constraint computation), and samJet (attitude control system configuration selector). It provides high availability and uptime for extended and continuous mission support. It is able to support two-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) array positioning and supports up to ten simultaneous constraints with intuitive 1D and 2D decision support visualizations of constraint data. Display synchronization is enabled across a networked control center and multiple methods for constraint data interpolation are supported. Use of this software toolset increases flight safety, reduces mission support effort, optimizes solar array operation for achieving mission goals, and has run for weeks at a time without issues. The SAM toolset is currently used in ISS real-time mission operations.

  3. Fabrication of antenna-coupled transition edge polarization-sensitive bolometer arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Minhee; Bock, James; Leduc, Henry; Day, Peter; Kim, Moon J.

    2004-01-01

    We have fabricated antenna-coupled superconducting transition edge sensor (TES) arrays for far-infrared and millimeter-wave applications. The advantage of antenna coupling is that the large optical coupling structure required for far-infrared/millimeter wavelengths is not thermally active. The sensor can thus be as small as lithographic techniques permit. By eliminating large absorbers, this technology enables bolometers working at frequencies as low as 30 GHz, covering the entire spectral region of interest for future space-borne studies of cosmic microwave background polarization. We developed a focal plane architecture with dual-polarization sensitivity in a single spectral band, or single-polarization sensitivity in multiple spectral bands. We use TES layers consisting of Al/Ti/Au/Ti thin films and Nb electrical contacts on a low-stress Si 3 N 4 membrane

  4. Hidden Valley Search at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Verducci, M

    2011-01-01

    A number of extensions of the Standard Model result in neutral and weakly-coupled particles that decay to multi hadrons or multi leptons with macroscopic decay lengths. These particles with decay paths that can be comparable with ATLAS detector dimensions represent, from an experimental point of view, a challenge both for the trigger and for the reconstruction capabilities of the ATLAS detector. We will present a set of signature driven triggers for the ATLAS detector that target such displaced decays and evaluate their performances for some benchmark models and describe analysis strategies and limits on the production of such long-lived particles. A first estimation of the Hidden Valley trigger rates has been evaluated with 6 pb-1 of data collected at ATLAS during the data taking of 2010.

  5. Preliminary estimates of spatially distributed net infiltration and recharge for the Death Valley region, Nevada-California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hevesi, J.A.; Flint, A.L.; Flint, L.E.

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional ground-water flow model has been developed to evaluate the Death Valley regional flow system, which includes ground water beneath the Nevada Test Site. Estimates of spatially distributed net infiltration and recharge are needed to define upper boundary conditions. This study presents a preliminary application of a conceptual and numerical model of net infiltration. The model was developed in studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which is located in the approximate center of the Death Valley ground-water flow system. The conceptual model describes the effects of precipitation, runoff, evapotranspiration, and redistribution of water in the shallow unsaturated zone on predicted rates of net infiltration; precipitation and soil depth are the two most significant variables. The conceptual model was tested using a preliminary numerical model based on energy- and water-balance calculations. Daily precipitation for 1980 through 1995, averaging 202 millimeters per year over the 39,556 square kilometers area of the ground-water flow model, was input to the numerical model to simulate net infiltration ranging from zero for a soil thickness greater than 6 meters to over 350 millimeters per year for thin soils at high elevations in the Spring Mountains overlying permeable bedrock. Estimated average net infiltration over the entire ground-water flow model domain is 7.8 millimeters per year. To evaluate the application of the net-infiltration model developed on a local scale at Yucca Mountain, to net-infiltration estimates representing the magnitude and distribution of recharge on a regional scale, the net-infiltration results were compared with recharge estimates obtained using empirical methods. Comparison of model results with previous estimates of basinwide recharge suggests that the net-infiltration estimates obtained using this model may overestimate recharge because of uncertainty in modeled precipitation, bedrock permeability, and soil properties for

  6. Planar millimeter wave radar frontend for automotive applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Grubert

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A fully integrated planar sensor for 77 GHz automotive applications is presented. The frontend consists of a transceiver multichip module and an electronically steerable microstrip patch array. The antenna feed network is based on a modified Rotman-lens and connected to the array in a multilayer approach offering higher integration. Furthermore, the frontend comprises a phase lock loop to allow proper frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW radar operation. The latest experimental results verify the functionality of this advanced frontend design featuring automatic cruise control, precrash sensing and cut-in detection. These promising radar measurements give reason to a detailed theoretical investigation of system performance. Employing commercially available MMIC various circuit topologies are compared based on signal-tonoise considerations. Different scenarios for both sequential and parallel lobing hint to more advanced sensor designs and better performance. These improvements strongly depend on the availability of suitable MMIC and reliable packaging technologies. Within our present approach possible future MMIC developments are already considered and, thus, can be easily adapted by the flexible frontend design. Es wird ein integrierter planarer Sensor für 77 GHz Radaranwendungen vorgestellt. Das Frontend besteht aus einem Sende- und Empfangs-Multi-Chip-Modul und einer elektronisch schwenkbaren Antenne. Das Speisenetzwerk der Antenne basiert auf einer modifizierten Rotman- Linse. Für eine kompakte Bauweise sind Antenne und Speisenetzwerk mehrlagig integriert. Weiterhin umfasst das Frontend eine Phasenregelschleife für eine präzise Steuerung des frequenzmodulierten Dauerstrichradars. Die aktuellen Messergebnisse bestätigen die Funktionalit¨at dieses neuartigen Frontend-Designs, das automatische Geschwindigkeitsregelung, Kollisionswarnung sowie Nahbereichsüberwachung ermöglicht. Die Qualität der Messergebnisse hat weiterf

  7. High Resolution Millimeter Wave Absorption Spectroscopy of Flexi- Ble Complex Organic Molecules: Laboratory Spectrum of 1, 2-Butanediol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, Assimo

    2017-11-01

    The enhancing sensibility of radioastronomical observations allows for detec- tion of complex organic molecules (COMs) with increasing size. Observations performed by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) open up new oppor- tunities to reveal the COMs, at the same time, the huge amount of data collected and the extremely rich surveys represent a challenge for the astrochemistry community. Among all the detected molecules, the diols are object of chemical interest, because of their similarity with important biological building block molecules such as sugar alcohols. The simplest of them, ethylene glycol (EG), is one of the largest COMs detected in space thus far. Lines attributable to the most stable conformer of EG were detected in different environments and recently also the higher energy conformer has been observed both towards IRAS 16293-2422 and the Orion KL. Observations of 1, 2- and 1, 3-propanediol toward Sgr B2 (N-LMH) were attempted as part of the GBT Prebiotic Interstellar Molecule Sur- vey Legacy Project, but no transitions were detected. Although up to now, due the fact that the column densities of molecules tend to decrease with increasing molecular weight, no large diols have been observed in interstellar space, owing to the raising sensitivity of the radioastronomy observations, their future detection can not be excluded. In this context we report, for the first time, the laboratory millimeter spectrum of 1, 2-butanediol (BD) recorded in the 59.6-103.6 GHz frequency region (5.03-2.89 mm). BD (the ethylated form of EG) is a flexible molecule characterized by a great conformational complexity, thus at room condi- tions the population is distributed in a large number of species, leading to a very congested spectrum. This problem has been overcome exploiting the rotational and conformational cooling produced by the supersonic expansion technique. Six conformers of BD, including the global minimum, have been assigned yielding the rotational constants

  8. Sensor array signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Naidu, Prabhakar S

    2009-01-01

    Chapter One: An Overview of Wavefields 1.1 Types of Wavefields and the Governing Equations 1.2 Wavefield in open space 1.3 Wavefield in bounded space 1.4 Stochastic wavefield 1.5 Multipath propagation 1.6 Propagation through random medium 1.7 ExercisesChapter Two: Sensor Array Systems 2.1 Uniform linear array (ULA) 2.2 Planar array 2.3 Distributed sensor array 2.4 Broadband sensor array 2.5 Source and sensor arrays 2.6 Multi-component sensor array2.7 ExercisesChapter Three: Frequency Wavenumber Processing 3.1 Digital filters in the w-k domain 3.2 Mapping of 1D into 2D filters 3.3 Multichannel Wiener filters 3.4 Wiener filters for ULA and UCA 3.5 Predictive noise cancellation 3.6 Exercises Chapter Four: Source Localization: Frequency Wavenumber Spectrum4.1 Frequency wavenumber spectrum 4.2 Beamformation 4.3 Capon's w-k spectrum 4.4 Maximum entropy w-k spectrum 4.5 Doppler-Azimuth Processing4.6 ExercisesChapter Five: Source Localization: Subspace Methods 5.1 Subspace methods (Narrowband) 5.2 Subspace methods (B...

  9. Double-layer imprint lithography on wafers and foils from the submicrometer to the millimeter scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, P.F.; Yakimets, I.; Peter, M.; Meinders, E.R.; Huskens, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a thermal imprint technique, double-layer nanoimprint lithography (dlNIL), is introduced, allowing complete filling of features in the dimensional range of submicrometer to millimeter. The imprinting and filling quality of dlNIL was studied on Si substrates as a model system and

  10. Millimeter-Wave Thermal Analysis Development and Application to GEN IV Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wosko, Paul; Sundram, S. K.

    2012-10-16

    New millimeter-wave thermal analysis instrumentation has been developed and studied for characterization of materials required for diverse fuel and structural needs in high temperature reactor environments such as the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). A two-receiver 137 GHz system with orthogonal polarizations for anisotropic resolution of material properties has been implemented at MIT. The system was tested with graphite and silicon carbide specimens at temperatures up to 1300 ºC inside an electric furnace. The analytic and hardware basis for active millimeter-wave radiometry of reactor materials at high temperature has been established. Real-time, non contact measurement sensitivity to anisotropic surface emissivity and submillimeter surface displacement was demonstrated. The 137 GHz emissivity of reactor grade graphite (NBG17) from SGL Group was found to be low, ~ 5 %, in the 500 – 1200 °C range and increases by a factor of 2 to 4 with small linear grooves simulating fracturing. The low graphite emissivity would make millimeter-wave active radiometry a sensitive diagnostic of graphite changes due to environmentally induced stress fracturing, swelling, or corrosion. The silicon carbide tested from Ortek, Inc. was found to have a much higher emissivity at 137 GHz of ~90% Thin coatings of silicon carbide on reactor grade graphite supplied by SGL Group were found to be mostly transparent to millimeter-waves, increasing the 137 GHz emissivity of the coated reactor grade graphite to about ~14% at 1250 ºC.

  11. Strong Scattering of High Power Millimeter Waves in Tokamak Plasmas with Tearing Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerhof, E.; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Oosterbeek, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    In tokamak plasmas with a tearing mode, strong scattering of high power millimeter waves, as used for heating and noninductive current drive, is shown to occur. This new wave scattering phenomenon is shown to be related to the passage of the O point of a magnetic island through the high power...

  12. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mears, C.A.

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 ± 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker's theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs

  13. Photonic Implementation of 4-QAM/QPSK Electrical Modulation at Millimeter-Wave Frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Jensen, Jesper Bevensee; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2008-01-01

    We propose a photonic method for generating millimeter-wave 4-QAM/QPSK modulated signals. The method is based on optical phase modulation by multilevel electrical signals and optical carrier-suppression. Simulation results are presented for 2.5 Gsymbol/s 4-QAM and QPSK signals at a 36 GHz carrier...

  14. A high-power millimeter wave driven steam gun for pellet injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Yasuyuki

    1997-01-01

    A concept of steam gun is proposed for using in two-stage pneumatic hydrogen isotope pellet injectors. The steam gun is driven by megawatt-level high-power millimeter waves (∼100 GHz) supplied by gyrotrons. A small amount of water is injected into its pump tube. The water is instantaneously heated by the millimeter waves and vaporized. Generated high-pressure steam accelerates a piston for compressing light gas to drive a frozen pellet. Discussions in this paper concentrate on the piston acceleration. Results show that 1 MW millimeter waves accelerate the 25 g piston to velocities of ∼200 m/s in a 1 m-long pump tube. The piston acceleration characteristics are not improved in comparison to light gas guns with first valves. The steam gun concept, however, avoids the use of a large amount of high-pressure gas for piston accelerations. In future fusion reactors, gyrotrons used during preionization and start-up phase would be available for producing required millimeter waves. (author)

  15. Long-range correlations of electroencephalogram in rats irradiated by millimeter wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Taorong; Pei Jian; Li Fen; Zhang Jie; Qi Hongxing; Chen Shude; Qiao Dengjiang

    2011-01-01

    A quantitative study was conducted on stress reaction in rat induced by 35 GHz millimeter wave. Long-range correlations analysis of the rat electroencephalogram(EEG) was investigated. The scaling exponents α 1 and α 2 were calculated by de-trended fluctuation analysis (DFA) method. The exponent α 1 shows that the high frequency EEG component is characterized by Brownian noise before irradiated by 35 GHz millimeter wave while it has long-range correlations during irradiation. The exponent α 2 shows that the low frequency EEG component has long-range correlations before irradiation while it is characterized by Brownian noise during irradiation. Introducing stress parameter k(k=α 2 /α 1 ), the average change rate of k was used to evaluate the intensity of stress in rat evoked by 35 GHz millimeter wave. The k increases 49.9%±13.6% during irradiation, which indicates that the high frequency EEG component becomes more ordered and the low frequency EEG component becomes more disordered, showing the acute stress in rat induced by 35 GHz millimeter wave. (authors)

  16. The gyrotron - a natural source of high-power orbital angular momentum millimeter-wave beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumm, M.; Sawant, A.; Choe, M. S.; Choi, E. M.

    2017-08-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of electromagnetic-wave beams provides further diversity to multiplexing in wireless communication. The present report shows that higher-order mode gyrotrons are natural sources of high-power OAM millimeter (mm) wave beams. The well-defined OAM of their rotating cavity modes operating at near cutoff frequency has been derived by photonic and electromagnetic wave approaches.

  17. Low-cost millimeter-wave transceiver module using SMD packaged MMICs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijningen, M. van; Gauthier, G.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to realize low-cost millimeter-wave modules using only SMD packaged MMICs integrated on a single organic substrate. This approach is demonstrated on a 38 GHz transceiver module for point-to-point LMDS communication systems. The required SMD package technology and

  18. Low-Cost Millimeter-Wave Transceiver Module using SMD packaged MMICs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to realize low-cost millimeter-wave modules using only SMD packaged MMICs integrated on a single organic substrate. This approach is demonstrated on a 38 GHz transceiver module for point-to-point LMDS communication systems. The required SMD package technology and

  19. Development of millimeter-wave accelerating structures using precision metal forming technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-06-03

    High gradients in radio-frequency (RF) driven accelerators require short wavelengths that have the concomitant requirements of small feature size and high tolerances, 1-2 {micro}m for millimeter wavelengths. Precision metal-forming stampling has the promise of meeting those tolerances with high production rates. This STI will evaluate that promise.

  20. Millimeter wave beam steered fiber wireless systems for 5G indoor coverage : Integrated circuits and systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Zizheng; Zhang, Xuebing; Zhao, Xinran; Shen, Longfei; Deng, Xiong; Yin, Xin; Koonen, Ton

    2017-01-01

    In this talk, we review our recent progress and on-going research on millimeter wave beam steered fiber wireless systems for 5G indoor coverage enabled by the advanced photonic integrated circuit and well-designed fiber-wireless networks.

  1. A Novel HBT Frequency Doubler Design for Millimeter-Wave Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Krozer, Viktor; Vidkjær, Jens

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we presents a novel HBT frequency doubler design for millimeter-wave application. A HBT frequency doubler theory is described which leads to accurate design equations for optimal performance. The developed theory shows that an optimal HBT frequency doubler can be achieved using a no...

  2. Wireless link using on-chip photonic integrated millimeter-wave sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guzmán, R. C.; Gordón, C.; Carpintero, G.; Leijtens, X.; Lawniczak, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few years wireless link data traffic has drastically increased due to a change in the way today's society creates, shares, and consumes information. Millimeter-waves (30-300 GHz) have a great advantage due to the wide bandwidths available for carrying information, enabling broadband

  3. Design procedure for millimeter-wave InP DHBT stacked power amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Squartecchia, Michele; Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Midili, Virginio

    2015-01-01

    The stacked-transistor concept for power amplifiers (PA) has been investigated in this work. Specifically, this architecture has been applied in the design of millimeter-wave monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) using indium phosphide (InP) double heterojunction bipolar transistors...

  4. SSALMON - The Solar Simulations for the Atacama Large Millimeter Observatory Network

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wedemeyer, S.; Bastian, T.S.; Brajsa, R.; Bárta, Miroslav; Hudson, H. S.; Fleishman, G.; Loukitcheva, M.; Fleck, B.; Kontar, E.; de Pontieu, B.; Tiwari, S.; Kato, Y.; Soler, R.; Yagoubov, P.; Black, J.H.; Antolin, P.; Gunár, Stanislav; Labrosse, N.; Benz, A. O.; Nindos, A.; Steffen, M.; Scullion, E.; Doyle, J.G.; Zaqarashvili, T.; Hanslmeier, A.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Heinzel, Petr; Ayres, T.; Karlický, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 12 (2015), s. 2679-2692 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-24782S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 312495 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : solar atmosphere * chromosphere * millimeter radiation Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.409, year: 2015

  5. ON THE EFFECT OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND IN HIGH-REDSHIFT (SUB-)MILLIMETER OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Cunha, Elisabete; Groves, Brent; Walter, Fabian; Decarli, Roberto; Rix, Hans-Walter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Weiss, Axel [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Bertoldi, Frank [Argelander Institute for Astronomy, University of Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Carilli, Chris [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Pete V. Domenici Array Science Center, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Daddi, Emanuele; Sargent, Mark [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, Irfu/Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Elbaz, David; Ivison, Rob [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Maiolino, Roberto [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Riechers, Dominik [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Smail, Ian, E-mail: cunha@mpia.de [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-20

    Modern (sub-)millimeter interferometers enable the measurement of the cool gas and dust emission of high-redshift galaxies (z > 5). However, at these redshifts the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature is higher, approaching, and even exceeding, the temperature of cold dust and molecular gas observed in the local universe. In this paper, we discuss the impact of the warmer CMB on (sub-)millimeter observations of high-redshift galaxies. The CMB affects the observed (sub-)millimeter dust continuum and the line emission (e.g., carbon monoxide, CO) in two ways: (1) it provides an additional source of (both dust and gas) heating and (2) it is a non-negligible background against which the line and continuum emission are measured. We show that these two competing processes affect the way we interpret the dust and gas properties of high-redshift galaxies using spectral energy distribution models. We quantify these effects and provide correction factors to compute what fraction of the intrinsic dust (and line) emission can be detected against the CMB as a function of frequency, redshift, and temperature. We discuss implications on the derived properties of high-redshift galaxies from (sub-)millimeter data. Specifically, the inferred dust and molecular gas masses can be severely underestimated for cold systems if the impact of the CMB is not properly taken into account.

  6. On Bit Error Probability and Power Optimization in Multihop Millimeter Wave Relay Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Chelli, Ali; Kansanen, Kimmo; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim; Balasingham, Ilangko

    2018-01-01

    5G networks are expected to provide gigabit data rate to users via millimeter-wave (mmWave) communication technology. One of the major problem faced by mmWaves is that they cannot penetrate buildings. In this paper, we utilize multihop relaying

  7. Design of Vivaldi antenna array with end-fire beam steering function for 5G mobile terminals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojaroudiparchin, Naser; Shen, Ming; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2015-01-01

    to form a linear phased array in the edge region (top-side) on a mobile phone PCB. The simulated results show that the antenna has the reflection coefficient (S11) less than -10 dB in the frequency range of 27.4 to 28.6 GHz. The proposed phased array antenna has good gain, efficiency, and 3D beam steering...... characteristics in the entire operation band, which makes it suitable for millimeter-wave 5G communications. In addition, the performance of the antenna in the vicinity of user’s hand has been investigated in this study....

  8. Introduction to adaptive arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Monzingo, Bob; Haupt, Randy

    2011-01-01

    This second edition is an extensive modernization of the bestselling introduction to the subject of adaptive array sensor systems. With the number of applications of adaptive array sensor systems growing each year, this look at the principles and fundamental techniques that are critical to these systems is more important than ever before. Introduction to Adaptive Arrays, 2nd Edition is organized as a tutorial, taking the reader by the hand and leading them through the maze of jargon that often surrounds this highly technical subject. It is easy to read and easy to follow as fundamental concept

  9. Piezoelectric transducer array microspeaker

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo

    2016-12-19

    In this paper we present the fabrication and characterization of a piezoelectric micro-speaker. The speaker is an array of micro-machined piezoelectric membranes, fabricated on silicon wafer using advanced micro-machining techniques. Each array contains 2n piezoelectric transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a circular shape structure. The membrane is made out four layers: 300nm of platinum for the bottom electrode, 250nm or lead zirconate titanate (PZT), a top electrode of 300nm and a structural layer of 50

  10. Valley-filtered edge states and quantum valley Hall effect in gated bilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu-Long; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Jun

    2017-05-10

    Electron edge states in gated bilayer graphene in the quantum valley Hall (QVH) effect regime can carry both charge and valley currents. We show that an interlayer potential splits the zero-energy level and opens a bulk gap, yielding counter-propagating edge modes with different valleys. A rich variety of valley current states can be obtained by tuning the applied boundary potential and lead to the QVH effect, as well as to the unbalanced QVH effect. A method to individually manipulate the edge states by the boundary potentials is proposed.

  11. Vegetation - San Felipe Valley [ds172

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This Vegetation Map of the San Felipe Valley Wildlife Area in San Diego County, California is based on vegetation samples collected in the field in 2002 and 2005 and...

  12. Babesiosis in Lower Hudson Valley, New York

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast discusses a study about an increase in babesiosis in the Lower Hudson Valley of New York state. Dr. Julie Joseph, Assistant Professor of Medicine at New York Medical College, shares details of this study.

  13. Meie mees Silicon Valleys / Kertu Ruus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ruus, Kertu, 1977-

    2007-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Delovõje Vedomosti 5. dets. lk. 4. Peaminister Andrus Ansip avas Eesti Ettevõtluse Sihtasutuse esinduse Silicon Valley pealinnas San Joses. Vt. samas: Ränioru kliima on tehnoloogiasõbralik; Andrus Viirg

  14. Meie ingel Silicon Valleys / Raigo Neudorf

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Neudorf, Raigo

    2008-01-01

    Ettevõtluse Arendamise Sihtasutuse esinduse töölepanekust USAs Silicon Valleys räägib esinduse juht Andrus Viirg. Vt. ka: Eestlasi leidub San Franciscos omajagu; Muljetavaldav karjäär; USAga ammune tuttav

  15. Burrowing Owl - Palo Verde Valley [ds197

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — These burrowing owl observations were collected during the spring and early summer of 1976 in the Palo Verde Valley, eastern Riverside County, California. This is an...

  16. Protein Functionalized Nanodiamond Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various nanoscale elements are currently being explored for bio-applications, such as in bio-images, bio-detection, and bio-sensors. Among them, nanodiamonds possess remarkable features such as low bio-cytotoxicity, good optical property in fluorescent and Raman spectra, and good photostability for bio-applications. In this work, we devise techniques to position functionalized nanodiamonds on self-assembled monolayer (SAMs arrays adsorbed on silicon and ITO substrates surface using electron beam lithography techniques. The nanodiamond arrays were functionalized with lysozyme to target a certain biomolecule or protein specifically. The optical properties of the nanodiamond-protein complex arrays were characterized by a high throughput confocal microscope. The synthesized nanodiamond-lysozyme complex arrays were found to still retain their functionality in interacting with E. coli.

  17. Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Altug, Hatice; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    We recently proposed two-dimensional coupled photonic crystal nanocavity arrays as a route to achieve a slow-group velocity of light in all crystal directions, thereby enabling numerous applications...

  18. Carbon nanotube array actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geier, S; Mahrholz, T; Wierach, P; Sinapius, M

    2013-01-01

    Experimental investigations of highly vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), also known as CNT-arrays, are the main focus of this paper. The free strain as result of an active material behavior is analyzed via a novel experimental setup. Previous test experiences of papers made of randomly oriented CNTs, also called Bucky-papers, reveal comparably low free strain. The anisotropy of aligned CNTs promises better performance. Via synthesis techniques like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD), highly aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are synthesized. Two different types of CNT-arrays are analyzed, morphologically first, and optically tested for their active characteristics afterwards. One type of the analyzed arrays features tube lengths of 750–2000 μm with a large variety of diameters between 20 and 50 nm and a wave-like CNT-shape. The second type features a maximum, almost uniform, length of 12 μm and a constant diameter of 50 nm. Different CNT-lengths and array types are tested due to their active behavior. As result of the presented tests, it is reported that the quality of orientation is the most decisive property for excellent active behavior. Due to their alignment, CNT-arrays feature the opportunity to clarify the actuation mechanism of architectures made of CNTs. (paper)

  19. Electrical valley filtering in transition metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tzu-Chi; Chou, Mei-Yin; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2018-03-01

    This work investigates the feasibility of electrical valley filtering for holes in transition metal dichalcogenides. We look specifically into the scheme that utilizes a potential barrier to produce valley-dependent tunneling rates, and perform the study with both a k .p -based analytic method and a recursive Green's function-based numerical method. The study yields the transmission coefficient as a function of incident energy and transverse wave vector, for holes going through lateral quantum barriers oriented in either armchair or zigzag directions, in both homogeneous and heterogeneous systems. The main findings are the following: (1) The tunneling current valley polarization increases with increasing barrier width or height; (2) both the valley-orbit interaction and band structure warping contribute to valley-dependent tunneling, with the former contribution being manifest in structures with asymmetric potential barriers, and the latter being orientation dependent and reaching maximum for transmission in the armchair direction; and (3) for transmission ˜0.1 , a tunneling current valley polarization of the order of 10 % can be achieved.

  20. Inferring giant planets from ALMA millimeter continuum and line observations in (transition) disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, S.; Pinilla, P.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; de Juan Ovelar, M.

    2018-05-01

    Context. Radial gaps or cavities in the continuum emission in the IR-mm wavelength range are potential signatures of protoplanets embedded in their natal protoplanetary disk are. Hitherto, models have relied on the combination of mm continuum observations and near-infrared scattered light images to put constraints on the properties of embedded planets. Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations are now probing spatially resolved rotational line emission of CO and other chemical species. These observations can provide complementary information on the mechanism carving the gaps in dust and additional constraints on the purported planet mass. Aims: We investigate whether the combination of ALMA continuum and CO line observations can constrain the presence and mass of planets embedded in protoplanetary disks. Methods: We post-processed azimuthally averaged 2D hydrodynamical simulations of planet-disk models, in which the dust densities and grain size distributions are computed with a dust evolution code that considers radial drift, fragmentation, and growth. The simulations explored various planet masses (1 MJ ≤ Mp ≤ 15 MJ) and turbulent parameters (10-4 ≤ α ≤ 10-3). The outputs were then post-processed with the thermochemical code DALI, accounting for the radially and vertically varying dust properties. We obtained the gas and dust temperature structures, chemical abundances, and synthetic emission maps of both thermal continuum and CO rotational lines. This is the first study combining hydrodynamical simulations, dust evolution, full radiative transfer, and chemistry to predict gas emission of disks hosting massive planets. Results: All radial intensity profiles of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O show a gap at the planet location. The ratio between the location of the gap as seen in CO and the peak in the mm continuum at the pressure maximum outside the orbit of the planet shows a clear dependence on planet mass and is independent of disk

  1. 2D Unitary ESPRIT Based Super-Resolution Channel Estimation for Millimeter-Wave Massive MIMO with Hybrid Precoding

    KAUST Repository

    Liao, Anwen

    2017-11-01

    Millimeter-wave (mmWave) massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) with hybrid precoding is a promising technique for the future 5G wireless communications. Due to a large number of antennas but a much smaller number of radio frequency (RF) chains, estimating the high-dimensional mmWave massive MIMO channel will bring the large pilot overhead. To overcome this challenge, this paper proposes a super-resolution channel estimation scheme based on two-dimensional (2D) unitary ESPRIT algorithm. By exploiting the angular sparsity of mmWave channels, the continuously distributed angle of arrivals/departures (AoAs/AoDs) can be jointly estimated with high accuracy. Specifically, by designing the uplink training signals at both base station (BS) and mobile station (MS), we first use low pilot overhead to estimate a low-dimensional effective channel, which has the same shift-invariance of array response as the high-dimensional mmWave MIMO channel to be estimated. From the low-dimensional effective channel, the superresolution estimates of AoAs and AoDs can be jointly obtained by exploiting the 2D unitary ESPRIT channel estimation algorithm. Furthermore, the associated path gains can be acquired based on the least squares (LS) criterion. Finally, we can reconstruct the high-dimensional mmWave MIMO channel according to the obtained AoAs, AoDs, and path gains. Simulation results have confirmed that the proposed scheme is superior to conventional schemes with a much lower pilot overhead.

  2. Millimeter wave radar system on a rotating platform for combined search and track functionality with SAR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulenbacher, Uwe; Rech, Klaus; Sedlmeier, Johannes; Pratisto, Hans; Wellig, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Ground based millimeter wave radar sensors offer the potential for a weather-independent automatic ground surveillance at day and night, e.g. for camp protection applications. The basic principle and the experimental verification of a radar system concept is described, which by means of an extreme off-axis positioning of the antenna(s) combines azimuthal mechanical beam steering with the formation of a circular-arc shaped synthetic aperture (SA). In automatic ground surveillance the function of search and detection of moving ground targets is performed by means of the conventional mechanical scan mode. The rotated antenna structure designed as a small array with two or more RX antenna elements with simultaneous receiver chains allows to instantaneous track multiple moving targets (monopulse principle). The simultaneously operated SAR mode yields areal images of the distribution of stationary scatterers. For ground surveillance application this SAR mode is best suited for identifying possible threats by means of change detection. The feasibility of this concept was tested by means of an experimental radar system comprising of a 94 GHz (W band) FM-CW module with 1 GHz bandwidth and two RX antennas with parallel receiver channels, placed off-axis at a rotating platform. SAR mode and search/track mode were tested during an outdoor measurement campaign. The scenery of two persons walking along a road and partially through forest served as test for the capability to track multiple moving targets. For SAR mode verification an image of the area composed of roads, grassland, woodland and several man-made objects was reconstructed from the measured data.

  3. 2D Unitary ESPRIT Based Super-Resolution Channel Estimation for Millimeter-Wave Massive MIMO with Hybrid Precoding

    KAUST Repository

    Liao, Anwen; Gao, Zhen; Wu, Yongpeng; Wang, Hua; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2017-01-01

    Millimeter-wave (mmWave) massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) with hybrid precoding is a promising technique for the future 5G wireless communications. Due to a large number of antennas but a much smaller number of radio frequency (RF) chains, estimating the high-dimensional mmWave massive MIMO channel will bring the large pilot overhead. To overcome this challenge, this paper proposes a super-resolution channel estimation scheme based on two-dimensional (2D) unitary ESPRIT algorithm. By exploiting the angular sparsity of mmWave channels, the continuously distributed angle of arrivals/departures (AoAs/AoDs) can be jointly estimated with high accuracy. Specifically, by designing the uplink training signals at both base station (BS) and mobile station (MS), we first use low pilot overhead to estimate a low-dimensional effective channel, which has the same shift-invariance of array response as the high-dimensional mmWave MIMO channel to be estimated. From the low-dimensional effective channel, the superresolution estimates of AoAs and AoDs can be jointly obtained by exploiting the 2D unitary ESPRIT channel estimation algorithm. Furthermore, the associated path gains can be acquired based on the least squares (LS) criterion. Finally, we can reconstruct the high-dimensional mmWave MIMO channel according to the obtained AoAs, AoDs, and path gains. Simulation results have confirmed that the proposed scheme is superior to conventional schemes with a much lower pilot overhead.

  4. An LTCC Based Compact SIW Antenna Array Feed Network for a Passive Imaging Radiometer

    KAUST Repository

    Abuzaid, Hattan

    2013-02-05

    Passive millimeter-wave (PMMW) imaging is a technique that allows the detection of inherent millimeter-wave radiation emitted by bodies. Since different bodies with varying properties emit unequal power intensities, a contrast can be established to detect their presence. The advantage of this imaging scheme over other techniques, such as optical and infrared imaging, is its ability to operate under all weather conditions. This is because the relatively long wavelengths of millimeter-waves, as compared to visible light, penetrate through clouds, fog, and sandstorms. The core of a PMMW camera is an antenna, which receives the electromagnetic radiation from a scene. Because PMMW systems require high gains to operate, large antenna arrays are typically employed. This mandatory increase of antenna elements is associated with a large feeding network. Therefore, PMMW cameras usually have a big profile. In this work, two enabling technologies, namely, Substrate integrated Waveguide (SIW) and Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC), are coupled with an innovative design to miniaturize the passive front-end. The two technologies synergize very well with the shielded characteristics of SIW and the high density multilayer integration of LTCC. The proposed design involves a novel multilayer power divider, which is incorporated in a folded feed network structure by moving between layers. The end result is an efficient feeding network, which footprint is least affected by an increase in array size. This is because the addition of more elements is accommodated by a vertical expansion rather than a lateral one. To characterize the feed network, an antenna array has been designed and integrated through efficient transitions.The complete structure has been simulated and fabricated. The results demonstrate an excellent performance, manifesting in a gain of 20 dBi and a bandwidth of more than 11.4% at 35 GHz. These values satisfy the general requirements of a PMMW system.

  5. The Tunka-133 EAS Cherenkov light array: Status of 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezhnev, S.F.; Besson, D.; Budnev, N.M.; Chiavassa, A.; Chvalaev, O.A.; Gress, O.A.; Dyachok, A.N.; Epimakhov, S.N.; Haungs, A.; Karpov, N.I.; Kalmykov, N.N.; Konstantinov, E.N.; Korobchenko, A.V.; Korosteleva, E.E.; Kozhin, V.A.; Kuzmichev, L.A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.K.; Lubsandorzhiev, N.B.; Mirgazov, R.R.; Panasyuk, M.I.

    2012-01-01

    A new EAS Cherenkov light array, Tunka-133, with ∼1km 2 geometrical area has been installed at the Tunka Valley (50 km from Lake Baikal) in 2009. The array permits a detailed study of cosmic ray energy spectrum and mass composition in the energy range 10 16 –10 18 eV with a uniform method. We describe the array construction, DAQ and methods of the array calibration. The method of energy reconstruction and absolute calibration of measurements are discussed. The analysis of spatial and time structure of EAS Cherenkov light allows to estimate the depth of the EAS maximum X max . The results on the all particles energy spectrum and the mean depth of the EAS maximum X max vs. primary energy derived from the data of two winter seasons (2009–2011) are presented. Preliminary results of joint operation of the Cherenkov array with antennas for the detection of EAS radio signals are shown. Plans for future upgrades – deployment of remote clusters, radioantennas and a scintillator detector network and a prototype of the HiSCORE gamma-telescope – are discussed.

  6. Topological Valley Transport in Two-dimensional Honeycomb Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuting; Jiang, Hua; Hang, Zhi Hong

    2018-01-25

    Two-dimensional photonic crystals, in analogy to AB/BA stacking bilayer graphene in electronic system, are studied. Inequivalent valleys in the momentum space for photons can be manipulated by simply engineering diameters of cylinders in a honeycomb lattice. The inequivalent valleys in photonic crystal are selectively excited by a designed optical chiral source and bulk valley polarizations are visualized. Unidirectional valley interface states are proved to exist on a domain wall connecting two photonic crystals with different valley Chern numbers. With the similar optical vortex index, interface states can couple with bulk valley polarizations and thus valley filter and valley coupler can be designed. Our simple dielectric PC scheme can help to exploit the valley degree of freedom for future optical devices.

  7. Testing of focal plane arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merriam, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Problems associated with the testing of focal plane arrays are briefly examined with reference to the instrumentation and measurement procedures. In particular, the approach and instrumentation used as the Naval Ocean Systems Center is presented. Most of the measurements are made with flooded illumination on the focal plane array. The array is treated as an ensemble of individual pixels, data being taken on each pixel and array averages and standard deviations computed for the entire array. Data maps are generated, showing the pixel data in the proper spatial position on the array and the array statistics

  8. Christmas Valley Renewable Energy Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Mar, Robert [Oregon Department of Energy, Salem, OR (United States)

    2017-05-22

    In partnership with the Oregon Military Department, the Department of Energy used the award to assess and evaluate renewable resources in a 2,622-acre location in Lake County, central Oregon, leading to future development of up to 200 MW of solar electricity. In partnership with the Oregon Military Department, the Department of Energy used the award to assess and evaluate renewable resources in a 2,622-acre location in Lake County, central Oregon, leading to future development of up to 200 MW of solar electricity. The Oregon Military Department (Military) acquired a large parcel of land located in south central Oregon. The land was previously owned by the US Air Force and developed for an Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Transmitter Facility, located about 10 miles east of the town of Christmas Valley. The Military is investigating a number of uses for the site, including Research and Development (R&D) laboratory, emergency response, military operations, developing renewable energy and related educational programs. One of the key potential uses would be for a large scale solar photovoltaic power plant. This is an attractive use because the site has excellent solar exposure; an existing strong electrical interconnection to the power grid; and a secure location at a moderate cost per acre. The project objectives include: 1. Site evaluation 2. Research and Development (R&D) facility analysis 3. Utility interconnection studies and agreements 4. Additional on-site renewable energy resources analysis 5. Community education, outreach and mitigation 6. Renewable energy and emergency readiness training program for veterans

  9. The involvement of cutaneous receptors in the biological effects of electromagnetic millimeter waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Emil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of peripheral nerve terminations in the mechanisms of action of electromagnetic millimeter waves (mmW was assessed. It is currently thought that mmW could be used in noninvasive complementary therapy because of their analgesic effect. However, the mechanisms of their antinociceptive effect and non-ionizing radiation are the subjects of controversy. The mechanisms of interaction of mmW and the cutaneous tissue have not been elucidated. We observed mast cell degranulation at the place of mmW action, a decrease of chronaxie and Turck reflex time, an increase in the number of afferent impulses after sciatic nerve at stimulation, as well as an increase electrocardiogram R-R interval of isolated frog heart after application of mmW. Based on these investigations, we propose that electromagnetic waves of millimeter length modify, through indirect mechanisms, the excitability and reactivity of peripheral nerve terminations.

  10. 36th Annual International Conference on Infrared Millimeter and Terahertz Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittleman, Daniel M. [Rice University

    2011-12-31

    The Major Topic List of the 2011 conference featured a category entitled “IR, millimeter-wave, and THz spectroscopy,” another entitled “Gyro-Oscillators and Amplifiers, Plasma Diagnostics,” and a third called “Free Electron Lasers and Synchrotron Radiation.” Topical areas of interest to meeting participants include millimeter-wave electronics, high-power sources, high-frequency communications systems, and terahertz sensing and imaging, all of which are prominent in the research portfolios of the DOE. The development and study of new materials, components, and systems for use in the IR, THz, and MMW regions of the spectrum are of significant interest as well. a series of technical sessions were organized on the following topics: terahertz metamaterials and plasmonics; imaging techniques and applications; graphene spectroscopy; waveguide concepts; gyrotron science and technology; ultrafast terahertz measurements; and quantum cascade lasers.

  11. Soft Computing Methods for Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Design Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, Narendra; Mittal, Ankush

    2012-01-01

    The growing commercial market of Microwave/ Millimeter wave industry over the past decade has led to the explosion of interests and opportunities for the design and development of microwave components.The design of most microwave components requires the use of commercially available electromagnetic (EM) simulation tools for their analysis. In the design process, the simulations are carried out by varying the design parameters until the desired response is obtained. The optimization of design parameters by manual searching is a cumbersome and time consuming process. Soft computing methods such as Genetic Algorithm (GA), Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Fuzzy Logic (FL) have been widely used by EM researchers for microwave design since last decade. The aim of these methods is to tolerate imprecision, uncertainty, and approximation to achieve robust and low cost solution in a small time frame.  Modeling and optimization are essential parts and powerful tools for the microwave/millimeter wave design. This boo...

  12. Design and Fabrication Challenges for Millimeter-Scale Three-Dimensional Phononic Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frieder Lucklum

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available While phononic crystals can be theoretically modeled with a variety of analytical and numerical methods, the practical realization and comprehensive characterization of complex designs is often challenging. This is especially important for the nearly limitless possibilities of periodic, three-dimensional structures. In this contribution, we take a look at these design and fabrication challenges of different 3D phononic elements based on recent research using additive manufacturing. Different fabrication technologies introduce specific limitations in terms of, e.g., material choices, minimum feature size, aspect ratios, or support requirements that have to be taken into account during design and theoretical modeling. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of additive technologies suitable for millimeter and sub-millimeter feature sizes. Furthermore, we present comprehensive experimental characterization of finite, simple cubic lattices in terms of wave polarization and propagation direction to demonstrate the substantial differences between complete phononic band gap and application oriented directional band gaps of selected propagation modes.

  13. The influence of polarization on millimeter wave propagation through rain. Ph.D Thesis. Interim Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, P. H.; Bostian, C. W.; Stutzman, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    The influence of polarization on millimeter wave propagation is investigated from both an experimental and a theoretical viewpoint. First, previous theoretical and experimental work relating to the attenuation and depolarization of millimeter waves by rainfall is discussed. Considerable detail is included in the literature review. Next, a theoretical model is developed to predict the cross polarization level during rainfall from the path average rain rate and the scattered field from a single raindrop. Finally, data from the VPI and SU depolarization experiment are presented as verification of the new model, and a comparison is made with other theories and experiments. Aspects of the new model are: (1) spherical rather than plane waves are assumed, (2) the average drop diameter is used rather than a drop size distribution, and (3) it is simple enough so that the effect which changing one or more parameters has on the crosspolarization level is easily seen.

  14. Wafer scale millimeter-wave integrated circuits based on epitaxial graphene in high data rate communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibpour, Omid; He, Zhongxia Simon; Strupinski, Wlodek; Rorsman, Niklas; Zirath, Herbert

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the demand for high data rate wireless communications has increased dramatically, which requires larger bandwidth to sustain multi-user accessibility and quality of services. This can be achieved at millimeter wave frequencies. Graphene is a promising material for the development of millimeter-wave electronics because of its outstanding electron transport properties. Up to now, due to the lack of high quality material and process technology, the operating frequency of demonstrated circuits has been far below the potential of graphene. Here, we present monolithic integrated circuits based on epitaxial graphene operating at unprecedented high frequencies (80-100 GHz). The demonstrated circuits are capable of encoding/decoding of multi-gigabit-per-second information into/from the amplitude or phase of the carrier signal. The developed fabrication process is scalable to large wafer sizes.

  15. Performance Investigation of Millimeter Wave Generation Reliant on Stimulated Brillouin Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tickoo, Sheetal; Gupta, Amit

    2018-04-01

    In this work, photonic method of generating the millimeter waves has been done based on Brillouin scattering effect in optical fiber. Here different approaches are proposed to get maximum frequency shift in mm-wave region using only pumps, radio signals with Mach-Zehnder modulator. Moreover for generated signal validation, signals modulated and send to both wired and wireless medium in optical domain. It is observed that maximum shift of 300 GHz is realized using 60 GHz input sine wave. Basically a frequency doubler is proposed which double shift of input frequency and provide better SNR. For the future generation network system, the generation of millimeter waves makes them well reliable for the transmission of the data.

  16. The investigation of using 5G millimeter-wave communications links for environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Congzheng

    2017-04-01

    There has been significantly increasing recognition that millimeter waves from 30 GHz to 300 GHz as carriers for future 5G cellular networks. This is good for high speed, line-of-sight communication, potentially using very densely deployed infrastructure involving many small cells. High resolution, continuous and accurate monitoring of environmental conditions, such as rainfall and water vapor are of great important to meteorology, hydrology (e.g. flood warning), agriculture, environmental policy (e.g. pollution regulation) and weather forecasting. We have built a 28GHz measurement link at our research institute in central Beijing, China. This work will study the potential of using millimeter wave based wireless links to monitor environmental conditions including rainfall and water vapor.

  17. Review on Millimeter Wave Antennas- Potential Candidate for 5G Enabled Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Matin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The millimeter wave (mmWave band is considered as the potential candidate for high speed communication services in 5G networks due to its huge bandwidth. Moreover, mmWave frequencies lead to miniaturization of RF front end including antennas. In this article, we provide an overview of recent research achievements of millimeter-wave antenna design along with the design considerations for compact antennas and antennas in package/on chip, mostly in the 60 GHz band is described along with their inherent benefits and challenges. A comparative analysis of various designs is also presented. The antennas with wide bandwidth, high-gain, compact size and low profile with easiness of integration in-package or on-chip with other components are required for 5G enabled applications.

  18. Some thoughts about millimeter-wave drivers for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, an attempt is made to overview some problems important for the development of high-power millimeter-wave drivers for future linear colliders. Since the microwave pulse duration required at high frequencies is much shorter than at low ones, two options seem possible. The first one is to develop 'moderate' power level, long-pulse tubes based on relatively reliable technology and then greatly compress these microwave pulses. The second one is to operate at much higher voltages and to directly generate very high-power pulses of the required length. Besides discussing pros and cons of these options, an overview of the methods of mode selection in oversized microwave circuits required for producing multimegawatt power at millimeter wavelengths is presented. Also the issue of thermal limitations caused by microwave losses in circuit walls is discussed, and some scaling laws for the maximum power and pulse duration are given

  19. Wafer scale millimeter-wave integrated circuits based on epitaxial graphene in high data rate communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibpour, Omid; He, Zhongxia Simon; Strupinski, Wlodek; Rorsman, Niklas; Zirath, Herbert

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the demand for high data rate wireless communications has increased dramatically, which requires larger bandwidth to sustain multi-user accessibility and quality of services. This can be achieved at millimeter wave frequencies. Graphene is a promising material for the development of millimeter-wave electronics because of its outstanding electron transport properties. Up to now, due to the lack of high quality material and process technology, the operating frequency of demonstrated circuits has been far below the potential of graphene. Here, we present monolithic integrated circuits based on epitaxial graphene operating at unprecedented high frequencies (80-100 GHz). The demonstrated circuits are capable of encoding/decoding of multi-gigabit-per-second information into/from the amplitude or phase of the carrier signal. The developed fabrication process is scalable to large wafer sizes.

  20. Simulation of millimeter-wave body images and its application to biometric recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Moreno, Miriam; Fierrez, Julian; Vera-Rodriguez, Ruben; Parron, Josep

    2012-06-01

    One of the emerging applications of the millimeter-wave imaging technology is its use in biometric recognition. This is mainly due to some properties of the millimeter-waves such as their ability to penetrate through clothing and other occlusions, their low obtrusiveness when collecting the image and the fact that they are harmless to health. In this work we first describe the generation of a database comprising 1200 synthetic images at 94 GHz obtained from the body of 50 people. Then we extract a small set of distance-based features from each image and select the best feature subsets for person recognition using the SFFS feature selection algorithm. Finally these features are used in body geometry authentication obtaining promising results.

  1. Risks of exposure to ionizing and millimeter-wave radiation from airport whole-body scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, John E

    2012-06-01

    Considerable public concern has been expressed around the world about the radiation risks posed by the backscatter (ionizing radiation) and millimeter-wave (nonionizing radiation) whole-body scanners that have been deployed at many airports. The backscatter and millimeter-wave scanners currently deployed in the U.S. almost certainly pose negligible radiation risks if used as intended, but their safety is difficult-to-impossible to prove using publicly accessible data. The scanners are widely disliked and often feared, which is a problem made worse by what appears to be a veil of secrecy that covers their specifications and dosimetry. Therefore, for these and future similar technologies to gain wide acceptance, more openness is needed, as is independent review and regulation. Publicly accessible, and preferably peer-reviewed evidence is needed that the deployed units (not just the prototypes) meet widely-accepted safety standards. It is also critical that risk-perception issues be handled more competently.

  2. New approaches to dust mitigation in the Antelope Valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farber, R.J.; Kim, B.M.; Grantz, D.A.; Vaughn, D.L.; Zink, T.; Skadberg, K.; Cowherd, C.; Grelinger, M.A.; Campbell, R.; De Salvio, A.; VanCuren, T.; Bort, J.

    1999-07-01

    The arid deserts of the southwestern US experience a frequent dust problem which can lead to PM10 violations. Blowing dust is also one of the major air quality problems of the arid deserts. From 1992 through the present, a group of research scientists have been investigating new techniques for mitigating the windblown dust in the Mojave Desert and more specifically the Antelope Valley near Palmdale and Lancaster, CA. This paper summarizes the progress made toward dust suppression in the Antelope Valley during the initial research phase from 1992 through 1996. During this period, there were both successes and failures. Stabilizing disturbed desert lands in a water-starved environment is challenging. The initial attempts focused on revegetation of native plants by seedings. There were mixed results depending on both the magnitude and timing of the rainfall. Various types of windfences were also erected and their effectiveness was studied using BSNE's. In the present program, the objectives have been broadened to include mitigating dust from all types of disturbed lands, not only abandoned farmlands. Techniques include new approaches to revegetation using seedlings, varying water treatments and soil amendments. An array of chemical suppressants are also being evaluated for cost-effectiveness as a function of longevity. Various geometries of wind fences have also been erected in blow sand areas and are being evaluated for cost-effectiveness using an interesting evaluation scheme. This portion of the paper provides a progress report of these latest dust mitigation techniques. This current research program is due to conclude about 2002. The end product of this decade research program will be a cookbook of dust mitigation solutions for various users including regulatory agencies, the USDA NRCS, farmers and construction interests.

  3. Impact of Millimeter-Level Margins on Peripheral Normal Brain Sparing for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Lijun; Sahgal, Arjun; Larson, David A.; Pinnaduwage, Dilini; Fogh, Shannon; Barani, Igor; Nakamura, Jean; McDermott, Michael; Sneed, Penny

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how millimeter-level margins beyond the gross tumor volume (GTV) impact peripheral normal brain tissue sparing for Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: A mathematical formula was derived to predict the peripheral isodose volume, such as the 12-Gy isodose volume, with increasing margins by millimeters. The empirical parameters of the formula were derived from a cohort of brain tumor and surgical tumor resection cavity cases (n=15) treated with the Gamma Knife Perfexion. This was done by first adding margins from 0.5 to 3.0 mm to each individual target and then creating for each expanded target a series of treatment plans of nearly identical quality as the original plan. Finally, the formula was integrated with a published logistic regression model to estimate the treatment-induced complication rate for stereotactic radiosurgery when millimeter-level margins are added. Results: Confirmatory correlation between the nominal target radius (ie, R T ) and commonly used maximum target size was found for the studied cases, except for a few outliers. The peripheral isodose volume such as the 12-Gy volume was found to increase exponentially with increasing Δ/R T , where Δ is the margin size. Such a curve fitted the data (logarithmic regression, R 2 >0.99), and the 12-Gy isodose volume was shown to increase steeply with a 0.5- to 3.0-mm margin applied to a target. For example, a 2-mm margin on average resulted in an increase of 55% ± 16% in the 12-Gy volume; this corresponded to an increase in the symptomatic necrosis rate of 6% to 25%, depending on the Δ/R T values for the target. Conclusions: Millimeter-level margins beyond the GTV significantly impact peripheral normal brain sparing and should be applied with caution. Our model provides a rapid estimate of such an effect, particularly for large and/or irregularly shaped targets

  4. Organic Single-Crystal Semiconductor Films on a Millimeter Domain Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sooncheol; Kim, Jehan; Kim, Geunjin; Yu, Kilho; Jo, Yong-Ryun; Kim, Bong-Joong; Kim, Junghwan; Kang, Hongkyu; Park, Byoungwook; Lee, Kwanghee

    2015-11-18

    Nucleation and growth processes can be effectively controlled in organic semiconductor films through a new concept of template-mediated molecular crystal seeds during the phase transition; the effective control of these processes ensures millimeter-scale crystal domains, as well as the performance of the resulting organic films with intrinsic hole mobility of 18 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Waveguide-Integrated MEMS Concepts for Tunable Millimeter-Wave Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Baghchehsaraei, Zargham

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents two families of novel waveguide-integrated components based on millimeter-wave microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for reconfigurable systems. The first group comprises V-band (50–75 GHz) and W-band (75–110 GHz) waveguide switches and switchable irises, and their application as switchable cavity resonators, and tunable bandpass filters implemented by integration of novel MEMS-reconfigurable surfaces into a rectangular waveguide. The second category comprises MEMS-based ...

  6. High power millimeter-wave free electron laser based on recirculating electrostatic accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung-Cheol; Kim, Sun-Kook; Jeong, Young-Uk; Cho, Sung-Oh; Lee, Jongmin

    1995-01-01

    Progress in the development of a high power, millimeter-wave free electron laser driven by a recirculating electrostatic accelerator is reported. The energy and the current of electron beam are 430 keV and 2 A, respectively. The expected average output power is above 10 kW at the wavelength of 3-10 mm. Minimizing of the beam loss is a key issue for CW operation of the FEL with high efficiency. (author)

  7. Millimeter-Wave Receiver Concepts for 77 GHz Automotive Radar in Silicon-Germanium Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Kissinger, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    The book presents the analysis and design of integrated automotive radar receivers in Silicon-Germanium technology, for use in complex multi-channel radar transceiver front-ends in the 77GHz frequency band. The main emphasis of the work is the realization of high-linearity and low-power modular receiver channels as well as the investigation of millimeter-wave integrated test concepts for the receiver front-end.

  8. Concealed object segmentation and three-dimensional localization with passive millimeter-wave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Seokwon

    2013-05-01

    Millimeter waves imaging draws increasing attention in security applications for weapon detection under clothing. In this paper, concealed object segmentation and three-dimensional localization schemes are reviewed. A concealed object is segmented by the k-means algorithm. A feature-based stereo-matching method estimates the longitudinal distance of the concealed object. The distance is estimated by the discrepancy between the corresponding centers of the segmented objects. Experimental results are provided with the analysis of the depth resolution.

  9. Effects of Variable Spot Size on Human Exposure to 95 GHz Millimeter Wave Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-11

    Laboratory. Ross, J. A., Allen, S. J., Beason, C. W., & Johnson, L. R. (2008). Power density measurement of 94-GHz radiofrequency radiation using carbon...effectiveness) at the smallest spot size. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Avoidance, behavior, millimeter waves, nonlethal weapons, radiofrequency 16...System power density measurements (mean ± standard deviation) for the three different power density settings (low, middle, high) used in Experiment 1B

  10. Experimental Implementation of a Passive Millimeter-Wave Fast Sequential Lobing Radiometric Seeker Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Rossi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the theory of operation of a passive millimeter-wave seeker sensor using a fast electronic sequential-lobing technique and the experimental validation obtained through laboratory trials. The paper analyzes in detail the theoretical performance of a difference channel sensor and a pseudo-monopulse sensor deriving agile formulas for the estimation of target angular tracking accuracy and the subsequent experimental validation.

  11. Experimental Implementation of a Passive Millimeter-Wave Fast Sequential Lobing Radiometric Seeker Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Massimiliano Rossi; Riccardo Maria Liberati; Marco Frasca; Mauro Angelini

    2018-01-01

    The paper investigates the theory of operation of a passive millimeter-wave seeker sensor using a fast electronic sequential-lobing technique and the experimental validation obtained through laboratory trials. The paper analyzes in detail the theoretical performance of a difference channel sensor and a pseudo-monopulse sensor deriving agile formulas for the estimation of target angular tracking accuracy and the subsequent experimental validation.

  12. Common-mode rejection in Martin-Puplett spectrometers for astronomical observations at millimeter wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; de Bernardis, Paolo; Masi, Silvia; Schillaci, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    The Martin-Puplett interferometer (MPI) is a differential Fourier transform spectrometer that measures the difference between spectral brightness at two input ports. This unique feature makes the MPI an optimal zero instrument, able to detect small brightness gradients embedded in a large common background. In this paper, we experimentally investigate the common-mode rejection achievable in the MPI at millimeter wavelengths, and discuss the use of the instrument to measure the spectrum of cosmic microwave background anisotropy.

  13. Wire Array Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Evans, Dan

    Over the past five years, the cost of solar panels has dropped drastically and, in concert, the number of installed modules has risen exponentially. However, solar electricity is still more than twice as expensive as electricity from a natural gas plant. Fortunately, wire array solar cells have emerged as a promising technology for further lowering the cost of solar. Si wire array solar cells are formed with a unique, low cost growth method and use 100 times less material than conventional Si cells. The wires can be embedded in a transparent, flexible polymer to create a free-standing array that can be rolled up for easy installation in a variety of form factors. Furthermore, by incorporating multijunctions into the wire morphology, higher efficiencies can be achieved while taking advantage of the unique defect relaxation pathways afforded by the 3D wire geometry. The work in this thesis shepherded Si wires from undoped arrays to flexible, functional large area devices and laid the groundwork for multijunction wire array cells. Fabrication techniques were developed to turn intrinsic Si wires into full p-n junctions and the wires were passivated with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H. Single wire devices yielded open circuit voltages of 600 mV and efficiencies of 9%. The arrays were then embedded in a polymer and contacted with a transparent, flexible, Ni nanoparticle and Ag nanowire top contact. The contact connected >99% of the wires in parallel and yielded flexible, substrate free solar cells featuring hundreds of thousands of wires. Building on the success of the Si wire arrays, GaP was epitaxially grown on the material to create heterostructures for photoelectrochemistry. These cells were limited by low absorption in the GaP due to its indirect bandgap, and poor current collection due to a diffusion length of only 80 nm. However, GaAsP on SiGe offers a superior combination of materials, and wire architectures based on these semiconductors were investigated for multijunction

  14. MILLIMETER TRANSIENT POINT SOURCES IN THE SPTpol 100 SQUARE DEGREE SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehorn, N.; Haan, T. de; George, E. M. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Natoli, T.; Carlstrom, J. E. [Department of Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Ade, P. A. R. [Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3XQ (United Kingdom); Austermann, J. E.; Beall, J. A. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, 325 Broadway Mailcode 817.03, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Bender, A. N.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Chang, C. L.; Citron, R.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Gallicchio, J. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chiang, H. C. [School of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban (South Africa); Cho, H-M. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Dobbs, M. A. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Everett, W., E-mail: nwhitehorn@berkeley.edu, E-mail: t.natoli@utoronto.ca [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); and others

    2016-10-20

    The millimeter transient sky is largely unexplored, with measurements limited to follow-up of objects detected at other wavelengths. High-angular-resolution telescopes, designed for measurement of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), offer the possibility to discover new, unknown transient sources in this band—particularly the afterglows of unobserved gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Here, we use the 10 m millimeter-wave South Pole Telescope, designed for the primary purpose of observing the CMB at arcminute and larger angular scales, to conduct a search for such objects. During the 2012–2013 season, the telescope was used to continuously observe a 100 deg{sup 2} patch of sky centered at R.A. 23{sup h}30{sup m} and decl. −55° using the polarization-sensitive SPTpol camera in two bands centered at 95 and 150 GHz. These 6000 hr of observations provided continuous monitoring for day- to month-scale millimeter-wave transient sources at the 10 mJy level. One candidate object was observed with properties broadly consistent with a GRB afterglow, but at a statistical significance too low ( p = 0.01) to confirm detection.

  15. THE CHROMOSPHERIC SOLAR MILLIMETER-WAVE CAVITY ORIGINATES IN THE TEMPERATURE MINIMUM REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Luz, Victor [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Tonantzintla, Puebla, Mexico, Apdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 (Mexico); Raulin, Jean-Pierre [CRAAM, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP 01302-907 (Brazil); Lara, Alejandro [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico 04510 (Mexico)

    2013-01-10

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the local radio emission at the lower part of the solar atmosphere. To accomplish this, we have used a numerical code to simulate the emission and transport of high-frequency electromagnetic waves from 2 GHz up to 10 THz. As initial conditions, we used VALC, SEL05, and C7 solar chromospheric models. In this way, the generated synthetic spectra allow us to study the local emission and absorption processes with high resolution in both altitude and frequency. Associated with the temperature minimum predicted by these models, we found that the local optical depth at millimeter wavelengths remains constant, producing an optically thin layer that is surrounded by two layers of high local emission. We call this structure the Chromospheric Solar Millimeter-wave Cavity (CSMC). The temperature profile, which features temperature minimum layers and a subsequent temperature rise, produces the CSMC phenomenon. The CSMC shows the complexity of the relation between the theoretical temperature profile and the observed brightness temperature and may help us to understand the dispersion of the observed brightness temperature in the millimeter wavelength range.

  16. High-power TM01 millimeter wave pulse sensor in circular waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guang-Qiang; Zhu Xiang-Qin; Chen Zai-Gao; Wang Xue-Feng; Zhang Li-Jun

    2015-01-01

    By investigating the interaction of an n-type silicon sample with the TM 01 mode millimeter wave in a circular waveguide, a viable high-power TM 01 millimeter wave sensor is proposed. Based on the hot electron effect, the silicon sample serving as a sensing element (SE) and appropriately mounted on the inner wall of the circular waveguide is devoted to the on-line measurement of a high-power millimeter wave pulse. A three-dimensional parallel finite-difference time-domain method is applied to simulate the wave propagation within the measuring structure. The transverse electric field distribution, the dependences of the frequency response of the voltage standing-wave ratio (VSWR) in the circular waveguide, and the average electric field amplitude within the SE on the electrophysical parameters of the SE are calculated and analyzed in the frequency range of 300–400 GHz. As a result, the optimal dimensions and specific resistance of the SE are obtained, which provide a VSWR of no more than 2.0, a relative sensitivity around 0.0046 kW −1 fluctuating within ± 17.3%, and a maximum enduring power of about 4.3 MW. (paper)

  17. Content-Based Multi-Channel Network Coding Algorithm in the Millimeter-Wave Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With the development of wireless technology, the widespread use of 5G is already an irreversible trend, and millimeter-wave sensor networks are becoming more and more common. However, due to the high degree of complexity and bandwidth bottlenecks, the millimeter-wave sensor network still faces numerous problems. In this paper, we propose a novel content-based multi-channel network coding algorithm, which uses the functions of data fusion, multi-channel and network coding to improve the data transmission; the algorithm is referred to as content-based multi-channel network coding (CMNC. The CMNC algorithm provides a fusion-driven model based on the Dempster-Shafer (D-S evidence theory to classify the sensor nodes into different classes according to the data content. By using the result of the classification, the CMNC algorithm also provides the channel assignment strategy and uses network coding to further improve the quality of data transmission in the millimeter-wave sensor network. Extensive simulations are carried out and compared to other methods. Our simulation results show that the proposed CMNC algorithm can effectively improve the quality of data transmission and has better performance than the compared methods.

  18. Carbon loaded Teflon (CLT): a power density meter for biological experiments using millimeter waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Stewart J; Ross, James A

    2007-01-01

    The standard technique for measurement of millimeter wave fields utilizes an open-ended waveguide attached to a HP power meter. The alignment of the waveguide with the propagation (K) vector is critical to making accurate measurements. Using this technique, it is difficult and time consuming to make a detailed map of average incident power density over areas of biological interest and the spatial resolution of this instrument does not allow accurate measurements in non-uniform fields. For biological experiments, it is important to know the center field average incident power density and the distribution over the exposed area. Two 4 ft x 4 ft x 1/32 inch sheets of carbon loaded Teflon (CLT) (one 15% carbon and one 25% carbon) were procured and a series of tests to determine the usefulness of CLT in defining fields in the millimeter wavelength range was initiated. Since the CLT was to be used both in the laboratory, where the environment was well controlled, and in the field, where the environment could not be controlled, tests were made to determine effects of change in environmental conditions on ability to use CLT as a millimeter wave dosimeter. The empirical results of this study indicate CLT to be an effective dosimeter for biological experiments both in the laboratory and in the field.

  19. RF Performance of Layer-Structured Broadband Passive Millimeter-Wave Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio Sakakibara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Low profile and simple configuration are advantageous for RF module in passive millimeter-wave imaging system. High sensitivity over broad operation bandwidth is also necessary to detect right information from weak signal. We propose a broadband layer-structured module with low profile, simple structure, and ease of manufacture. This module is composed of a lens antenna and a detector module that consists of a detector circuit and a broadband microstrip-to-waveguide transition. The module forms a layer structure as a printed substrate with detector circuit is fixed between two metal plates with horn antennas and back-short waveguides. We developed a broadband passive millimeter-wave imaging module composed of a lens antenna and a detector module in this work. The gain and the antenna efficiency were measured, and the broadband operation was observed for the lens antenna. For the detector module, peak sensitivity was 8100 V/W. Furthermore, the detector module recognized a difference in the absorber’s temperature. The designs of the lens antenna and the detector module are presented and the RF performances of these components are reported. Finally, passive millimeter-wave imaging of a car, a human, and a metal plate in clothes is demonstrated in this paper.

  20. Infrastructure for the design and fabrication of MEMS for RF/microwave and millimeter wave applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerguizian, Vahe; Rafaf, Mustapha

    2004-08-01

    This article describes and provides valuable information for companies and universities with strategies to start fabricating MEMS for RF/Microwave and millimeter wave applications. The present work shows the infrastructure developed for RF/Microwave and millimeter wave MEMS platforms, which helps the identification, evaluation and selection of design tools and fabrication foundries taking into account packaging and testing. The selected and implemented simple infrastructure models, based on surface and bulk micromachining, yield inexpensive and innovative approaches for distributed choices of MEMS operating tools. With different educational or industrial institution needs, these models may be modified for specific resource changes using a careful analyzed iteration process. The inputs of the project are evaluation selection criteria and information sources such as financial, technical, availability, accessibility, simplicity, versatility and practical considerations. The outputs of the project are the selection of different MEMS design tools or software (solid modeling, electrostatic/electromagnetic and others, compatible with existing standard RF/Microwave design tools) and different MEMS manufacturing foundries. Typical RF/Microwave and millimeter wave MEMS solutions are introduced on the platform during the evaluation and development phases of the project for the validation of realistic results and operational decision making choices. The encountered challenges during the investigation and the development steps are identified and the dynamic behavior of the infrastructure is emphasized. The inputs (resources) and the outputs (demonstrated solutions) are presented in tables and flow chart mode diagrams.

  1. A Novel System for Identification of Inhibitors of Rift Valley Fever Virus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Piper

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is a human and livestock pathogen endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. We have developed a T7-dependent system for the efficient production of RVFV-like particles (RVF-VLPs based on the virulent ZH-501 strain of RVFV. The RVF-VLPs are capable of performing a single round of infection, allowing for the study of viral replication, assembly, and infectivity. We demonstrate that these RVF-VLPs are antigenically indistinguishable from authentic RVFV and respond similarly to a wide array of known and previously unknown chemical inhibitors. This system should be useful for screening for small molecule inhibitors of RVFV replication.

  2. A novel system for identification of inhibitors of rift valley Fever virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Mary E; Gerrard, Sonja R

    2010-03-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a human and livestock pathogen endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. We have developed a T7-dependent system for the efficient production of RVFV-like particles (RVF-VLPs) based on the virulent ZH-501 strain of RVFV. The RVF-VLPs are capable of performing a single round of infection, allowing for the study of viral replication, assembly, and infectivity. We demonstrate that these RVF-VLPs are antigenically indistinguishable from authentic RVFV and respond similarly to a wide array of known and previously unknown chemical inhibitors. This system should be useful for screening for small molecule inhibitors of RVFV replication.

  3. Observations of basin ground motions from a dense seismic array in San Jose, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, A.; Carver, D.; Cranswick, E.; Bice, T.; Sell, R.; Hanson, S.

    2001-01-01

    We installed a dense array of 41 digital seismographs in San Jose, California, to evaluate in detail the effects of a deep sedimentary basin and shallow sedimentary deposits on earthquake ground motions. This urban array is located near the eastern edge of the Santa Clara Valley and spans the Evergreen sedimentary basin identified by gravity data. Average station spacing is 1 km, with three stations initially spaced 110 m apart. Despite the high-noise urban environment, the stations of the array successfully triggered on and recorded small local earthquakes (M 2.5-2.8 at 10-25 km distance) and larger regional events such as the M 5.0 Bolinas earthquake (90 km distance), M 4.6-5.6 earthquakes near Mammoth Lakes (270 km distance), M 4.9-5.6 events in western Nevada (420 km distance) and the M 7.1 Hector Mine earthquake (590 km distance). Maps of spectral ratios across the array show that the highest amplitudes in all frequency bands studied (0.125-8 Hz) are generally observed at stations farther from the eastern edge of the Santa Clara Valley. Larger spectral amplitudes are often observed above the western edge of the Evergreen Basin. Snapshots of the recorded wavefield crossing the array for regional events to the east reveal that large, low-frequency (0.125-0.5 Hz) arrivals after the S-wave travel from south to north across the array. A moving-window, cross-correlation analysis finds that these later arrivals are surface waves traveling from the south. The timing and propagation direction of these arrivals indicates that they were likely produced by scattering of incident S waves at the border of the Santa Clara Valley to the south of the array. It is remarkable that the largest low-frequency phases at many of the valley sites for regional events to the east are basin surface waves coming from a direction about 70 degrees different from that of the epicenters. Basin surface waves emanating from the eastern edge of the valley are also identified by the cross

  4. Wintertime Ambient Ammonia Concentrations in Northern Utah's Urban Valleys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, I. A.; Martin, R. S.; Silva, P.; Baasandorj, M.

    2017-12-01

    Many of the population centers in northern Utah are currently classified as non-attainment or serious non-attainment, Wasatch Front, for PM2.5 and previous studies have shown ammonium nitrate to often be the largest contributor to the particulate mass. Furthermore, measurements have shown several of the Wasatch Front cities and Cache Valley (UT/ID) consistently recorded some of the highest ambient ammonia (NH3) concentrations in the continental United States. As a part of the multi-organization 2017 Utah Winter Fine Particulate Study real-time NH3 concentrations were monitored in the Cache Valley at the Logan, UT site, collocated at an EPA sampling trailer near the Utah State University (USU) campus. A Picarro model G2508 was to used collect 5-sec averaged concentrations of NH3, carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) from January 16th to February 14th, 2017. Parts of three inversion events, wherein the PM2.5 concentrations approached or exceeded the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, were captured during the sampling period, including a 10-day event from January 25th to February 4th. Concentrations of all three of the observed species showed significant accumulation during the events, with NH3 concentrations ranging from below the detection limit (70 ppb. Preliminary analysis suggested the temporal NH3 changes tracked the increase in PM2.5 throughout the inversion events; however, a one-day period of NH3 depletion during the main inversion event was observed while PM2.5 continued to increase. Additionally, a network of passive NH3 samplers (Ogawa Model 3300) were arrayed at 25 sites throughout the Cache Valley and at 11 sites located along the Wasatch Front. These networks sampled for three 7-day periods, during the same study time frame. Ion chromatographic (IC) analyses of the sample pads are not yet finalized; however, preliminary results show concentrations in the tens of ppb and seemingly spatially correlate with previous studies showing elevated

  5. Analysis of Mining-induced Valley Closure Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Mitra, R.; Oh, J.; Hebblewhite, B.

    2016-05-01

    Valley closure movements have been observed for decades in Australia and overseas when underground mining occurred beneath or in close proximity to valleys and other forms of irregular topographies. Valley closure is defined as the inward movements of the valley sides towards the valley centreline. Due to the complexity of the local geology and the interplay between several geological, topographical and mining factors, the underlying mechanisms that actually cause this behaviour are not completely understood. A comprehensive programme of numerical modelling investigations has been carried out to further evaluate and quantify the influence of a number of these mining and geological factors and their inter-relationships. The factors investigated in this paper include longwall positional factors, horizontal stress, panel width, depth of cover and geological structures around the valley. It is found that mining in a series passing beneath the valley dramatically increases valley closure, and mining parallel to valley induces much more closure than other mining orientations. The redistribution of horizontal stress and influence of mining activity have also been recognised as important factors promoting valley closure, and the effect of geological structure around the valley is found to be relatively small. This paper provides further insight into both the valley closure mechanisms and how these mechanisms should be considered in valley closure prediction models.

  6. Towards 5G: A Photonic Based Millimeter Wave Signal Generation for Applying in 5G Access Fronthaul

    OpenAIRE

    Alavi, S. E.; Soltanian, M. R. K.; Amiri, I. S.; Khalily, M.; Supa?at, A. S. M.; Ahmad, H.

    2016-01-01

    5G communications require a multi Gb/s data transmission in its small cells. For this purpose millimeter wave (mm-wave) RF signals are the best solutions to be utilized for high speed data transmission. Generation of these high frequency RF signals is challenging in electrical domain therefore photonic generation of these signals is more studied. In this work, a photonic based simple and robust method for generating millimeter waves applicable in 5G access fronthaul is presented. Besides gene...

  7. A review of array radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookner, E.

    1981-10-01

    Achievements in the area of array radars are illustrated by such activities as the operational deployment of the large high-power, high-range-resolution Cobra Dane; the operational deployment of two all-solid-state high-power, large UHF Pave Paws radars; and the development of the SAM multifunction Patriot radar. This paper reviews the following topics: array radars steered in azimuth and elevation by phase shifting (phase-phase steered arrays); arrays steered + or - 60 deg, limited scan arrays, hemispherical coverage, and omnidirectional coverage arrays; array radars steering electronically in only one dimension, either by frequency or by phase steering; and array radar antennas which use no electronic scanning but instead use array antennas for achieving low antenna sidelobes.

  8. A NEXT GENERATION MULTI-BEAM FOCAL PLANE ARRAY RECEIVER OF TRAO FOR 86-115 GHZ BAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon-Hee Chung

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The noise temperature of existing millimeter-wave receivers is already within two or three times quantum noise limit. One of practical ways to increase the observation speed of single dish radio telescope without longer integration time is use of multi-beam focal plane array receiver as demonstrated in several large single dish radio telescopes. In this context the TRAO (Taeduk Radio Astronomy Observatory, which operates a 143n Cassegrain radio telescope, is planning to develop a 4 x 4 beams focal plane array SIS receiver system for 86-115 GHz band. Even though millimeter-wave HEMT LNA-based receivers approach the noise temperature comparable to the SIS receiver at W-band, it is believed that the receiver based on SIS mixer seems to offer a bit more advantages. The critical part of the multi-beam array receiver will be sideband separating SIS mixers. Employing such a type of SIS mixer makes it possible to simplify the quasi-optics of receiver. Otherwise, an SSB filter should be used in front of the mixer or some sophisticated post-processing of observation data is needed. In this paper we will present a preliminary design concept and components needed for the development of a new 3 mm band multi-beam focal plane array receiver.

  9. The lakes of the Jordan Rift Valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gat, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of the proceedings of a workshop on the Lakes of the Jordan Rift Valley that was held in conjunction with the CRP on The Use of Isotope Techniques in Lake Dynamics Investigations. The paper presents a review of the geological, hydrogeological and physical limnological setting of the lakes in the Jordan Rift Valley, Lake Hula, Lake Kinneret and the Dead Sea. This is complemented by a description of the isotope hydrology of the system that includes the use of a wide range of isotopes: oxygen-18, deuterium, tritium, carbon-14, carbon-13, chlorine isotopes, boron-11 and helium-3/4. Environmental isotope aspects of the salt balances of the lakes, their palaeolimnology and biogeochemical tracers are also presented. The scope of application of isotopic tracers is very broad and provides a clear insight into many aspects of the physical, chemical and biological limnology of the Rift Valley Lakes. (author)

  10. A new Proposal to Mexico Valley Zonification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Estrella, H. C.; Yussim, S.; Lomnitz, C.

    2004-12-01

    The effects of the Michoacan earthquake (19th September, 1985, Mw 8.1) in Mexico City caused a significant change in the political, social and scientific history, as it was considered the worst seismic disaster ever lived in Mexico. Since then, numerous efforts have been made to understand and determine the parameters that caused the special features registered. One of these efforts had began on 1960 with the work by Marsal and Masari, who published the Mexico Valley seismological and geotechnical zonification (1969), based on gravimetric and shallow borehole data. In this work, we present a revision of the studies that proposed the zonification, a description of the valley geology, and basing on it we propose a new zonification for Mexico Valley.

  11. Geologic summary of the Owens Valley drilling project, Owens and Rose Valleys, Inyo County, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaer, D.W.

    1981-07-01

    The Owens Valley Drilling Project consists of eight drill holes located in southwest Inyo County, California, having an aggregate depth of 19,205 feet (5853 m). Project holes penetrated the Coso Formation of upper Pliocene or early Pleistocene age and the Owens Lake sand and lakebed units of the same age. The project objective was to improve the reliability of uranium-potential-resource estimates assigned to the Coso Formation in the Owens Valley region. Uranium-potential-resource estimates for this area in $100 per pound U 3 O 8 forward-cost-category material have been estimatd to be 16,954 tons (15,384 metric tons). This estimate is based partly on project drilling results. Within the Owens Valley project area, the Coso Formation was encountered only in the Rose Valley region, and for this reason Rose Valley is considered to be the only portion of the project area favorable for economically sized uranium deposits. The sequence of sediments contained in the Owens Valley basin is considered to be largely equivalent but lithologically dissimilar to the Coso Formation of Haiwee Ridge and Rose Valley. The most important factor in the concentration of significant amounts of uranium in the rock units investigated appears to be the availability of reducing agents. Significant amounts of reductants (pyrite) were found in the Coso Formation. No organic debris was noted. Many small, disconnected uranium occurrences, 100 to 500 ppM U 3 O 8 , were encountered in several of the holes

  12. Development and testing of a fast Fourier transform high dynamic-range spectral diagnostics for millimeter wave characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoen, D. J.; Bongers, W. A.; Westerhof, E.; Baar, M. R. de; Berg, M. A. van den; Beveren, V. van; Goede, A. P. H.; Graswinckel, M. F.; Schueller, F. C.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Buerger, A.; Hennen, B. A.

    2009-01-01

    A fast Fourier transform (FFT) based wide range millimeter wave diagnostics for spectral characterization of scattered millimeter waves in plasmas has been successfully brought into operation. The scattered millimeter waves are heterodyne downconverted and directly digitized using a fast analog-digital converter and a compact peripheral component interconnect computer. Frequency spectra are obtained by FFT in the time domain of the intermediate frequency signal. The scattered millimeter waves are generated during high power electron cyclotron resonance heating experiments on the TEXTOR tokamak and demonstrate the performance of the diagnostics and, in particular, the usability of direct digitizing and Fourier transformation of millimeter wave signals. The diagnostics is able to acquire 4 GHz wide spectra of signals in the range of 136-140 GHz. The rate of spectra is tunable and has been tested between 200 000 spectra/s with a frequency resolution of 100 MHz and 120 spectra/s with a frequency resolution of 25 kHz. The respective dynamic ranges are 52 and 88 dB. Major benefits of the new diagnostics are a tunable time and frequency resolution due to postdetection, near-real time processing of the acquired data. This diagnostics has a wider application in astrophysics, earth observation, plasma physics, and molecular spectroscopy for the detection and analysis of millimeter wave radiation, providing high-resolution spectra at high temporal resolution and large dynamic range.

  13. Detector array and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timothy, J.G.; Bybee, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    A detector array and method are described in which sets of electrode elements are provided. Each set consists of a number of linear extending parallel electrodes. The sets of electrode elements are disposed at an angle (preferably orthogonal) with respect to one another so that the individual elements intersect and overlap individual elements of the other sets. Electrical insulation is provided between the overlapping elements. The detector array is exposed to a source of charged particles which in accordance with one embodiment comprise electrons derived from a microchannel array plate exposed to photons. Amplifier and discriminator means are provided for each individual electrode element. Detection means are provided to sense pulses on individual electrode elements in the sets, with coincidence of pulses on individual intersecting electrode elements being indicative of charged particle impact at the intersection of the elements. Electronic readout means provide an indication of coincident events and the location where the charged particle or particles impacted. Display means are provided for generating appropriate displays representative of the intensity and locaton of charged particles impacting on the detector array

  14. Diode lasers and arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streifer, W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the principles of operation of III-V semiconductor diode lasers, the use of distributed feedback, and high power laser arrays. The semiconductor laser is a robust, miniature, versatile device, which directly converts electricity to light with very high efficiency. Applications to pumping solid-state lasers and to fiber optic and point-to-point communications are reviewed

  15. Array Theory and Nial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falster, Peter; Jenkins, Michael

    1999-01-01

    This report is the result of collaboration between the authors during the first 8 months of 1999 when M. Jenkins was visiting professor at DTU. The report documents the development of a tool for the investigation of array theory concepts and in particular presents various approaches to choose...

  16. Piezoelectric transducer array microspeaker

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo; Conchouso Gonzalez, David; Castro, David; Kosel, Jü rgen; Foulds, Ian G.

    2016-01-01

    contains 2n piezoelectric transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a circular shape structure. The membrane is made out four layers: 300nm of platinum for the bottom electrode, 250nm or lead zirconate titanate (PZT

  17. Groundwater quality in Coachella Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Barbara J. Milby; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. Coachella Valley is one of the study areas being evaluated. The Coachella study area is approximately 820 square miles (2,124 square kilometers) and includes the Coachella Valley groundwater basin (California Department of Water Resources, 2003). Coachella Valley has an arid climate, with average annual rainfall of about 6 inches (15 centimeters). The runoff from the surrounding mountains drains to rivers that flow east and south out of the study area to the Salton Sea. Land use in the study area is approximately 67 percent (%) natural, 21% agricultural, and 12% urban. The primary natural land cover is shrubland. The largest urban areas are the cities of Indio and Palm Springs (2010 populations of 76,000 and 44,000, respectively). Groundwater in this basin is used for public and domestic water supply and for irrigation. The main water-bearing units are gravel, sand, silt, and clay derived from surrounding mountains. The primary aquifers in Coachella Valley are defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database. Public-supply wells in Coachella Valley are completed to depths between 490 and 900 feet (149 to 274 meters), consist of solid casing from the land surface to a depth of 260 to 510 feet (79 to 155 meters), and are screened or perforated below the solid casing. Recharge to the groundwater system is primarily runoff from the surrounding mountains, and by direct infiltration of irrigation. The primary sources of discharge are pumping wells, evapotranspiration, and underflow to

  18. EMPIRICAL PREDICTIONS FOR (SUB-)MILLIMETER LINE AND CONTINUUM DEEP FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Cunha, Elisabete; Walter, Fabian; Decarli, Roberto; Rix, Hans-Walter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bertoldi, Frank [Argelander Institute for Astronomy, University of Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Carilli, Chris [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Pete V. Domenici Array Science Center, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Sargent, Mark [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, Irfu/Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Ivison, Rob [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Maiolino, Roberto [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Riechers, Dominik [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Smail, Ian [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Weiss, Axel, E-mail: cunha@mpia.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    Modern (sub-)millimeter/radio interferometers such as ALMA, JVLA, and the PdBI successor NOEMA will enable us to measure the dust and molecular gas emission from galaxies that have luminosities lower than the Milky Way, out to high redshifts and with unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity. This will provide new constraints on the star formation properties and gas reservoir in galaxies throughout cosmic times through dedicated deep field campaigns targeting the CO/[C II] lines and dust continuum emission in the (sub-)millimeter regime. In this paper, we present empirical predictions for such line and continuum deep fields. We base these predictions on the deepest available optical/near-infrared Advanced Camera for Surveys and NICMOS data on the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (over an area of about 12 arcmin{sup 2}). Using a physically motivated spectral energy distribution model, we fit the observed optical/near-infrared emission of 13,099 galaxies with redshifts up to z = 5, and obtain median-likelihood estimates of their stellar mass, star formation rate, dust attenuation, and dust luminosity. We combine the attenuated stellar spectra with a library of infrared emission models spanning a wide range of dust temperatures to derive statistical constraints on the dust emission in the infrared and (sub-)millimeter which are consistent with the observed optical/near-infrared emission in terms of energy balance. This allows us to estimate, for each galaxy, the (sub-)millimeter continuum flux densities in several ALMA, PdBI/NOEMA, and JVLA bands. As a consistency check, we verify that the 850 {mu}m number counts and extragalactic background light derived using our predictions are consistent with previous observations. Using empirical relations between the observed CO/[C II] line luminosities and the infrared luminosity of star-forming galaxies, we infer the luminosity of the CO(1-0) and [C II] lines from the estimated infrared luminosity of each galaxy in our sample

  19. Direct measurement of exciton valley coherence in monolayer WSe2

    KAUST Repository

    Hao, Kai; Moody, Galan; Wu, Fengcheng; Dass, Chandriker Kavir; Xu, Lixiang; Chen, Chang Hsiao; Sun, Liuyang; Li, Ming-yang; Li, Lain-Jong; MacDonald, Allan H.; Li, Xiaoqin

    2016-01-01

    In crystals, energy band extrema in momentum space can be identified by a valley index. The internal quantum degree of freedom associated with valley pseudospin indices can act as a useful information carrier, analogous to electronic charge

  20. Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope System Theory of Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, George R.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this learning module is to enable learners to describe how the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) system functions in support of Apple Valley Science and Technology Center's (AVSTC) client schools' radio astronomy activities.

  1. Mechanical control over valley magnetotransport in strained graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ning, E-mail: maning@stu.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, MOE Key Laboratory of Advanced Transducers and Intelligent Control System, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Department of Applied Physics, MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Zhang, Shengli, E-mail: zhangsl@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Liu, Daqing, E-mail: liudq@cczu.edu.cn [School of Mathematics and Physics, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China)

    2016-05-06

    Recent experiments report that the graphene exhibits Landau levels (LLs) that form in the presence of a uniform strain pseudomagnetic field with magnitudes up to hundreds of tesla. We further reveal that the strain removes the valley degeneracy in LLs, and leads to a significant valley polarization with inversion symmetry broken. This accordingly gives rise to the well separated valley Hall plateaus and Shubnikov–de Haas oscillations. These effects are absent in strainless graphene, and can be used to generate and detect valley polarization by mechanical means, forming the basis for the new paradigm “valleytronics” applications. - Highlights: • We explore the mechanical strain effects on the valley magnetotransport in graphene. • We analytically derive the dc collisional and Hall conductivities under strain. • The strain removes the valley degeneracy in Landau levels. • The strain causes a significant valley polarization with inversion symmetry broken. • The strain leads to the well separated valley Hall and Shubnikov–de Haas effects.

  2. The Health Valley: Global Entrepreneurial Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuis, Benoit

    2014-12-01

    In the space of a decade, the Lake Geneva region has become the Health Valley, a world-class laboratory for discovering and developing healthcare of the future. Through visionary individuals and thanks to exceptional infrastructure this region has become one of the most dynamic in the field of innovation, including leading scientific research and exceptional actors for the commercialization of academic innovation to industrial applications that will improve the lives of patients and their families. Here follows the chronicle of a spectacular expansion into the Health Valley.

  3. Solar energy innovation and Silicon Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2015-03-01

    The growth of the U. S. and global solar energy industry depends on a strong relationship between science and engineering innovation, manufacturing, and cycles of policy design and advancement. The mixture of the academic and industrial engine of innovation that is Silicon Valley, and the strong suite of environmental policies for which California is a leader work together to both drive the solar energy industry, and keep Silicon Valley competitive as China, Europe and other area of solar energy strength continue to build their clean energy sectors.

  4. Clean Cities Award Winning Coalition: Coachella Valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ICF Kaiser

    1999-05-20

    Southern California's Coachella Valley became a Clean Cities region in 1996. Since then, they've made great strides. SunLine Transit, the regional public transit provider, was the first transit provider to replace its entire fleet with compressed natural gas buses. They've also built the foundation for a nationally recognized model in the clean air movement, by partnering with Southern California Gas Company to install a refueling station and developing a curriculum for AFV maintenance with the College of the Desert. Today the valley is home to more than 275 AFVs and 15 refueling stations.

  5. 27 CFR 9.27 - Lime Kiln Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lime Kiln Valley. 9.27... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.27 Lime Kiln Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Lime Kiln Valley...

  6. An example of Alaknanda valley, Garhwal Himalaya, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014) have been best explained by the geometry .... flows through narrow valley confined by the steep valley slopes. ... valley (figure 3b) which opens up around Srina- ... Method. 4.1 Drainage basin and stream network. Digital Elevation Model (DEM) helps in extracting ... was processed to fill the pits or sinks, and to obtain.

  7. Concurrent array-based queue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard

    2015-01-06

    According to one embodiment, a method for implementing an array-based queue in memory of a memory system that includes a controller includes configuring, in the memory, metadata of the array-based queue. The configuring comprises defining, in metadata, an array start location in the memory for the array-based queue, defining, in the metadata, an array size for the array-based queue, defining, in the metadata, a queue top for the array-based queue and defining, in the metadata, a queue bottom for the array-based queue. The method also includes the controller serving a request for an operation on the queue, the request providing the location in the memory of the metadata of the queue.

  8. Radar techniques using array antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Wirth, Wulf-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Radar Techniques Using Array Antennas is a thorough introduction to the possibilities of radar technology based on electronic steerable and active array antennas. Topics covered include array signal processing, array calibration, adaptive digital beamforming, adaptive monopulse, superresolution, pulse compression, sequential detection, target detection with long pulse series, space-time adaptive processing (STAP), moving target detection using synthetic aperture radar (SAR), target imaging, energy management and system parameter relations. The discussed methods are confirmed by simulation stud

  9. Babesiosis in Lower Hudson Valley, New York

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-05-12

    This podcast discusses a study about an increase in babesiosis in the Lower Hudson Valley of New York state. Dr. Julie Joseph, Assistant Professor of Medicine at New York Medical College, shares details of this study.  Created: 5/12/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/23/2011.

  10. Rift Valley Fever, Mayotte, 2007–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giry, Claude; Gabrie, Philippe; Tarantola, Arnaud; Pettinelli, François; Collet, Louis; D’Ortenzio, Eric; Renault, Philippe; Pierre, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    After the 2006–2007 epidemic wave of Rift Valley fever (RVF) in East Africa and its circulation in the Comoros, laboratory case-finding of RVF was conducted in Mayotte from September 2007 through May 2008. Ten recent human RVF cases were detected, which confirms the indigenous transmission of RFV virus in Mayotte. PMID:19331733

  11. SADF EARLYIRON AGE EXCAVATIONS IN THETUGELA VALLEY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    effect of the high flanking ridges of the Tugela. Valley. The high ... fire. Police intervention and the Bhengu superior- ity in numbers brought an end to the fights just prior to the ..... The tail and three legs of the reptile are miss- ing . . ~C£.'.':.-:".

  12. Potential hydrologic characterization wells in Amargosa Valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyles, B.; Mihevc, T.

    1994-09-01

    More than 500 domestic, agricultural, and monitoring wells were identified in the Amargosa Valley. From this list, 80 wells were identified as potential hydrologic characterization wells, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Underground Test Area/Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (UGTA/RIFS). Previous hydrogeologic studies have shown that groundwater flow in the basin is complex and that aquifers may have little lateral continuity. Wells located more than 10 km or so from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) boundary may yield data that are difficult to correlate to sources from the NTS. Also, monitoring well locations should be chosen within the guidelines of a hydrologic conceptual model and monitoring plan. Since these do not exist at this time, recompletion recommendations will be restricted to wells relatively close (approximately 20 km) to the NTS boundary. Recompletion recommendations were made for two abandoned agricultural irrigation wells near the town of Amargosa Valley (previously Lathrop Wells), for two abandoned wildcat oil wells about 10 km southwest of Amargosa Valley, and for Test Well 5 (TW-5), about 10 km east of Amargosa Valley

  13. Geomorphological hazards in Swat valley, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usman, A.

    1999-01-01

    This study attempts to describe, interpret and analyze, in depth, the varied geomorphological hazards and their impacts prevailing in the swat valley locate in the northern hilly and mountainous regions of Pakistan. The hills and mountains re zones of high geomorphological activity with rapid rates of weathering, active tectonic activities, abundant precipitation, rapid runoff and heavy sediment transport. Due to the varied topography, lithology, steep slope, erodible soil, heavy winter snowfall and intensive rainfall in the spring and summer seasons, several kinds of geomorphological hazards, such as geomorphic gravitational hazards, Fluvial hazards, Glacial hazards, Geo tectonic hazards, are occurring frequently in swat valley. Amongst them, geomorphic gravitational hazards, such as rock fall rock slide, debris slide mud flow avalanches, are major hazards in mountains and hills while fluvial hazards and sedimentation are mainly confined to the alluvial plain and lowlands of the valley. The Getechtonic hazards, on the other hand, have wide spread distribution in the valley the magnitude and occurrence of each king of hazard is thus, varied according to intensity of process and physical geographic environment. This paper discusses the type distribution and damage due to the various geomorphological hazards and their reduction treatments. The study would to be of particular importance and interest to both natural and social scientists, as well as planner, environmentalists and decision-makers for successful developmental interventions in the region. (author)

  14. Antelope Valley Community College District Education Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newmyer, Joe

    An analysis is provided of a proposal to the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges by the Antelope Valley Community College District (AVCCD) to develop an education center in Palmdale to accommodate rapid growth. First, pros and cons are discussed for the following major options: (1) increase utilization and/or expand the…

  15. Ecological Researches in the Yagnob Valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razykov, Z.A.; Yunusov, M.M.; Bezzubov, N.I.; Murtazaev, Kh.; Fajzullaev, B.G.

    2002-01-01

    The article dwells on the resents of the estimation of the ecology surroundings of the Yagnob Valley. The researches included appraisal of radiation background, determination of the amount of heavy and radioactive elements in soil, bottom sedimentations, ashes in plants, water in rivers and wells. Designing on the premise of the researches implemented the ecology surrounding are estimated as propitious man's habitation. (Authors)

  16. 27 CFR 9.174 - Yadkin Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...”. (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Yadkin Valley...-Salem, N.C.; VA; Tenn. (1953, Limited Revision 1962), and, (2) Charlotte, North Carolina; South Carolina... North Carolina within Wilkes, Surry, Yadkin and portions of Stokes, Forsyth, Davidson, and Davie...

  17. 27 CFR 9.41 - Lancaster Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lancaster Valley. 9.41 Section 9.41 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... through the town of Gap and along Mine Ridge to the 76°07′30″ west longitude line in Paradise Township. (9...

  18. NNSS Soils Monitoring: Plutonium Valley (CAU 366)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Julianne J.; Mizell, Steve A.; Nikolich, George; Campbell, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Restoration Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites Contamination Area (CA) during precipitation runoff events.

  19. College in Paradise! (Paradise Valley Shopping Mall).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoolland, Lucile B.

    Rio Salado Community College (RSCC), a non-campus college within the Maricopa Community College District, offers hundreds of day, late afternoon, and evening classes at locations throughout the county. The Paradise Valley community had always participated heavily in the evening classes offered by RSCC at local high schools. In fall 1982, an effort…

  20. Temperature profiles from Salt Valley, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, J. H.; Lachenbruch, A. H.; Smith, E. P.

    Temperature profiles were obtained in the nine drilled wells as part of a thermal study of the Salt Valley anticline, Paradox Basin, Utha. Thermal conductivities were also measured on 10 samples judged to be representative of the rocks encountered in the deepest hole. The temperature profiles and thermal conductivities are presented, together with preliminary interpretive remarks and suggestions for additional work.

  1. Poultry Slaughter facility Zambezi Valley, Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernooij, A.G.; Wilschut, S.

    2015-01-01

    This business plan focuses on the establishment of a slaughterhouse, one of the essential elements of a sustainable and profitable poultry meat value chain. There is a growing demand for poultry meat in the Zambezi Valley, and currently a large part of the consumed broilers comes from other parts of

  2. Business plan Hatchery Facility Zambezi Valley, Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernooij, A.G.; Wilschut, S.

    2015-01-01

    This business plan focuses on the establishment of a hatchery, one of the essential elements of a sustainable and profitable poultry meat value chain. There is a growing demand for poultry meat in the Zambezi Valley, and currently a large part of the consumed broilers comes from other parts of the

  3. Eco-Hydrological Modelling of Stream Valleys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Ole

    a flow reduction in the order of 20 % in a natural spring, whereas no effect could be measured in neither short nor deep piezometers in the river valley 50 m from the spring. Problems of measuring effects of pumping are partly caused by disturbances from natural water level fluctuations. In this aspect...

  4. The Big Optical Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozurkewich, D.; Johnston, K.J.; Simon, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the design and the capabilities of the Naval Research Laboratory Big Optical Array (BOA), an interferometric optical array for high-resolution imaging of stars, stellar systems, and other celestial objects. There are four important differences between the BOA design and the design of Mark III Optical Interferometer on Mount Wilson (California). These include a long passive delay line which will be used in BOA to do most of the delay compensation, so that the fast delay line will have a very short travel; the beam combination in BOA will be done in triplets, to allow measurement of closure phase; the same light will be used for both star and fringe tracking; and the fringe tracker will use several wavelength channels

  5. A 4 probe array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernando, C E [CEGB, Marchwood Engineering Laboratories, Marchwood, Southampton, Hampshire (United Kingdom)

    1980-11-01

    A NDT system is described which moves away from the present manual method using a single send/receive transducer combination and uses instead an array of four transducers. Four transducers are shown sufficient to define a point reflector with a resolution of m{lambda}z/R where m{lambda} is the minimum detectable path difference in the system (corresponding to a m cycle time resolution), z the range and R the radius of the array. Signal averaging with an input ADC rate of 100 MHz is used with voice output for the range data. Typical resolution measurements in a water tank are presented. We expect a resolution of the order of mm in steel at a range of 80 mm. The system is expected to have applications in automated, high resolution, sizing of defects and in the inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds. (author)

  6. Timed arrays wideband and time varying antenna arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Haupt, Randy L

    2015-01-01

    Introduces timed arrays and design approaches to meet the new high performance standards The author concentrates on any aspect of an antenna array that must be viewed from a time perspective. The first chapters briefly introduce antenna arrays and explain the difference between phased and timed arrays. Since timed arrays are designed for realistic time-varying signals and scenarios, the book also reviews wideband signals, baseband and passband RF signals, polarization and signal bandwidth. Other topics covered include time domain, mutual coupling, wideband elements, and dispersion. The auth

  7. Mutual capacitance of liquid conductors in deformable tactile sensing arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Fontecchio, Adam K. [Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Departments, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Visell, Yon [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Media Arts and Technology, California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2016-01-04

    Advances in highly deformable electronics are needed in order to enable emerging categories of soft computing devices ranging from wearable electronics, to medical devices, and soft robotic components. The combination of highly elastic substrates with intrinsically stretchable conductors holds the promise of enabling electronic sensors that can conform to curved objects, reconfigurable displays, or soft biological tissues, including the skin. Here, we contribute sensing principles for tactile (mechanical image) sensors based on very low modulus polymer substrates with embedded liquid metal microfluidic arrays. The sensors are fabricated using a single-step casting method that utilizes fine nylon filaments to produce arrays of cylindrical channels on two layers. The liquid metal (gallium indium alloy) conductors that fill these channels readily adopt the shape of the embedding membrane, yielding levels of deformability greater than 400%, due to the use of soft polymer substrates. We modeled the sensor performance using electrostatic theory and continuum mechanics, yielding excellent agreement with experiments. Using a matrix-addressed capacitance measurement technique, we are able to resolve strain distributions with millimeter resolution over areas of several square centimeters.

  8. Solar collector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, John Champlin; Martins, Guy Lawrence

    2015-09-06

    A method and apparatus for efficient manufacture, assembly and production of solar energy. In one aspect, the apparatus may include a number of modular solar receiver assemblies that may be separately manufactured, assembled and individually inserted into a solar collector array housing shaped to receive a plurality of solar receivers. The housing may include optical elements for focusing light onto the individual receivers, and a circuit for electrically connecting the solar receivers.

  9. Photovoltaic cell array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, J. T. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell array consisting of parallel columns of silicon filaments is described. Each fiber is doped to produce an inner region of one polarity type and an outer region of an opposite polarity type to thereby form a continuous radial semi conductor junction. Spaced rows of electrical contacts alternately connect to the inner and outer regions to provide a plurality of electrical outputs which may be combined in parallel or in series.

  10. Phased array antenna control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doland, G. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Several new and useful improvements in steering and control of phased array antennas having a small number of elements, typically on the order of 5 to 17 elements are provided. Among the improvements are increasing the number of beam steering positions, reducing the possibility of phase transients in signals received or transmitted with the antennas, and increasing control and testing capacity with respect to the antennas.

  11. Seismometer array station processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, F.A.; Lea, T.G.; Douglas, A.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of the design, construction and initial testing of two types of Seismometer Array Station Processor (SASP), one to work with data stored on magnetic tape in analogue form, the other with data in digital form. The purpose of a SASP is to detect the short period P waves recorded by a UK-type array of 20 seismometers and to edit these on to a a digital library tape or disc. The edited data are then processed to obtain a rough location for the source and to produce seismograms (after optimum processing) for analysis by a seismologist. SASPs are an important component in the scheme for monitoring underground explosions advocated by the UK in the Conference of the Committee on Disarmament. With digital input a SASP can operate at 30 times real time using a linear detection process and at 20 times real time using the log detector of Weichert. Although the log detector is slower, it has the advantage over the linear detector that signals with lower signal-to-noise ratio can be detected and spurious large amplitudes are less likely to produce a detection. It is recommended, therefore, that where possible array data should be recorded in digital form for input to a SASP and that the log detector of Weichert be used. Trial runs show that a SASP is capable of detecting signals down to signal-to-noise ratios of about two with very few false detections, and at mid-continental array sites it should be capable of detecting most, if not all, the signals with magnitude above msub(b) 4.5; the UK argues that, given a suitable network, it is realistic to hope that sources of this magnitude and above can be detected and identified by seismological means alone. (author)

  12. Lectin-Array Blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Raquel; Echevarria, Juan; Hernandez, Alvaro; Reichardt, Niels-Christian

    2017-09-01

    Aberrant protein glycosylation is a hallmark of cancer, infectious diseases, and autoimmune or neurodegenerative disorders. Unlocking the potential of glycans as disease markers will require rapid and unbiased glycoproteomics methods for glycan biomarker discovery. The present method is a facile and rapid protocol for qualitative analysis of protein glycosylation in complex biological mixtures. While traditional lectin arrays only provide an average signal for the glycans in the mixture, which is usually dominated by the most abundant proteins, our method provides individual lectin binding profiles for all proteins separated in the gel electrophoresis step. Proteins do not have to be excised from the gel for subsequent analysis via the lectin array but are transferred by contact diffusion from the gel to a glass slide presenting multiple copies of printed lectin arrays. Fluorescently marked glycoproteins are trapped by the printed lectins via specific carbohydrate-lectin interactions and after a washing step their binding profile with up to 20 lectin probes is analyzed with a fluorescent scanner. The method produces the equivalent of 20 lectin blots in a single experiment, giving detailed insight into the binding epitopes present in the fractionated proteins. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Array processor architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, George H. (Inventor); Lundstrom, Stephen F. (Inventor); Shafer, Philip E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A high speed parallel array data processing architecture fashioned under a computational envelope approach includes a data base memory for secondary storage of programs and data, and a plurality of memory modules interconnected to a plurality of processing modules by a connection network of the Omega gender. Programs and data are fed from the data base memory to the plurality of memory modules and from hence the programs are fed through the connection network to the array of processors (one copy of each program for each processor). Execution of the programs occur with the processors operating normally quite independently of each other in a multiprocessing fashion. For data dependent operations and other suitable operations, all processors are instructed to finish one given task or program branch before all are instructed to proceed in parallel processing fashion on the next instruction. Even when functioning in the parallel processing mode however, the processors are not locked-step but execute their own copy of the program individually unless or until another overall processor array synchronization instruction is issued.

  14. The geochemistry of groundwater resources in the Jordan Valley: The impact of the Rift Valley brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, E.; Vengosh, A.; Gavrieli, I.; Marie, Amarisa; Bullen, T.D.; Mayer, B.; Polak, A.; Shavit, U.

    2007-01-01

    The chemical composition of groundwater in the Jordan Valley, along the section between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea, is investigated in order to evaluate the origin of the groundwater resources and, in particular, to elucidate the role of deep brines on the chemical composition of the regional groundwater resources in the Jordan Valley. Samples were collected from shallow groundwater in research boreholes on two sites in the northern and southern parts of the Jordan Valley, adjacent to the Jordan River. Data is also compiled from previous published studies. Geochemical data (e.g., Br/Cl, Na/Cl and SO4/Cl ratios) and B, O, Sr and S isotopic compositions are used to define groundwater groups, to map their distribution in the Jordan valley, and to evaluate their origin. The combined geochemical tools enabled the delineation of three major sources of solutes that differentially affect the quality of groundwater in the Jordan Valley: (1) flow and mixing with hypersaline brines with high Br/Cl (>2 ?? 10-3) and low Na/Cl (shallow saline groundwaters influenced by brine mixing exhibit a north-south variation in their Br/Cl and Na/Cl ratios. This chemical trend was observed also in hypersaline brines in the Jordan valley, which suggests a local mixing process between the water bodies. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Induced dynamic nonlinear ground response at Gamer Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Z.; Bodin, P.; Langston, C.A.; Pearce, F.; Gomberg, J.; Johnson, P.A.; Menq, F.-Y.; Brackman, T.

    2008-01-01

    We present results from a prototype experiment in which we actively induce, observe, and quantify in situ nonlinear sediment response in the near surface. This experiment was part of a suite of experiments conducted during August 2004 in Garner Valley, California, using a large mobile shaker truck from the Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) facility. We deployed a dense accelerometer array within meters of the mobile shaker truck to replicate a controlled, laboratory-style soil dynamics experiment in order to observe wave-amplitude-dependent sediment properties. Ground motion exceeding 1g acceleration was produced near the shaker truck. The wave field was dominated by Rayleigh surface waves and ground motions were strong enough to produce observable nonlinear changes in wave velocity. We found that as the force load of the shaker increased, the Rayleigh-wave phase velocity decreased by as much as ???30% at the highest frequencies used (up to 30 Hz). Phase velocity dispersion curves were inverted for S-wave velocity as a function of depth using a simple isotropic elastic model to estimate the depth dependence of changes to the velocity structure. The greatest change in velocity occurred nearest the surface, within the upper 4 m. These estimated S-wave velocity values were used with estimates of surface strain to compare with laboratory-based shear modulus reduction measurements from the same site. Our results suggest that it may be possible to characterize nonlinear soil properties in situ using a noninvasive field technique.

  16. Seismic study of soil dynamics at Garner Valley, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archuleta, R.J.; Seale, S.H.

    1990-01-01

    The Garner Valley downhole array (GVDA) of force-balanced accelerometers was designed to determine the effect that near-surface soil layers have on surface ground motion by measuring in situ seismic waves at various depths. Although there are many laboratory, theoretical and numerical studies that are used to predict the effects that local site geology might have on seismic waves, there are very few direct measurements that can be used to confirm the predictions made by these methods. The effects of local site geology on seismic ground motions are critical for estimating the base motion of structures. The variations in site amplifications at particular periods can range over a factor of 20 or more in comparing amplitude spectra from rock and soil sites, e.g., Mexico City (1985) or San Francisco (1989). The basic phenomenon of nonlinear soil response, and by inference severe attenuation of seismic waves, has rarely been measured although it is commonly observed in laboratory experiments. The basic question is whether or not the local site geology amplifies are attenuates the seismic ground motion. Because the answer depends on the interaction between the local site geology and the amplitude as well as the frequency content of the incoming seismic waves, the in situ measurements must sample the depth variations of the local structure as well as record seismic waves over as wide a range as possible in amplitude and frequency

  17. A valley-filtering switch based on strained graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Feng; Ma, Yanling; Zhang, Ying-Tao

    2011-09-28

    We investigate valley-dependent transport through a graphene sheet modulated by both the substrate strain and the fringe field of two parallel ferromagnetic metal (FM) stripes. When the magnetizations of the two FM stripes are switched from the parallel to the antiparallel alignment, the total conductance, valley polarization and valley conductance excess change greatly over a wide range of Fermi energy, which results from the dependence of the valley-related transmission suppression on the polarity configuration of inhomogeneous magnetic fields. Thus the proposed structure exhibits the significant features of a valley-filtering switch and a magnetoresistance device.

  18. A valley-filtering switch based on strained graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Feng; Ma Yanling; Zhang Yingtao

    2011-01-01

    We investigate valley-dependent transport through a graphene sheet modulated by both the substrate strain and the fringe field of two parallel ferromagnetic metal (FM) stripes. When the magnetizations of the two FM stripes are switched from the parallel to the antiparallel alignment, the total conductance, valley polarization and valley conductance excess change greatly over a wide range of Fermi energy, which results from the dependence of the valley-related transmission suppression on the polarity configuration of inhomogeneous magnetic fields. Thus the proposed structure exhibits the significant features of a valley-filtering switch and a magnetoresistance device. (paper)

  19. Flower elliptical constellation of millimeter-wave radiometers for precipitating cloud monitoring at geostationary scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, F. S.; Cimini, D.; Montopoli, M.; Rossi, T.; Mortari, D.; di Michele, S.; Bauer, P.

    2009-04-01

    Millimeter-wave observation of the atmospheric parameters is becoming an appealing goal within satellite radiometry applications. The major technological advantage of millimeter-wave (MMW) radiometers is the reduced size of the overall system, for given performances, with respect to microwave sensor. On the other hand, millimeter-wave sounding can exploit window frequencies and various gaseous absorption bands at 50/60 GHz, 118 GHz and 183 GHz. These bands can be used to estimate tropospheric temperature profiles, integrated water vapor and cloud liquid content and, using a differentia spectral mode, light rainfall and snowfall. Millimeter-wave radiometers, for given observation conditions, can also exhibit relatively small field-of-views (FOVs), of the order of some kilometers for low-Earth-orbit (LEO) satellites. However, the temporal resolution of LEO millimeter-wave system observations remains a major drawback with respect to the geostationary-Earth-orbit (GEO) satellites. An overpass every about 12 hours for a single LEO platform (conditioned to a sufficiently large swath of the scanning MMW radiometer) is usually too much when compared with the typical temporal scale variation of atmospheric fields. This feature cannot be improved by resorting to GEO platforms due to their high orbit altitude and consequent degradation of the MMW-sensor FOVs. A way to tackle this impasse is to draw our attention at the regional scale and to focus non-circular orbits over the area of interest, exploiting the concept of micro-satellite flower constellations. The Flower Constellations (FCs) is a general class of elliptical orbits which can be optimized, through genetic algorithms, in order to maximize the revisiting time and the orbital height, ensuring also a repeating ground-track. The constellation concept nicely matches the choice of mini-satellites as a baseline choice, due to their small size, weight (less than 500 kilograms) and relatively low cost (essential when

  20. ESTIMATING THE PARAMETERS OF SAGITTARIUS A*'s ACCRETION FLOW VIA MILLIMETER VLBI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broderick, Avery E [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Fish, Vincent L; Doeleman, Sheperd S [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Haystack Observatory, Route 40, Westford, MA 01886 (United States); Loeb, Abraham [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard University, Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2009-05-20

    Recent millimeter-VLBI observations of Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) have, for the first time, directly probed distances comparable to the horizon scale of a black hole. This provides unprecedented access to the environment immediately around the horizon of an accreting black hole. We leverage both existing spectral and polarization measurements and our present understanding of accretion theory to produce a suite of generic radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) models of Sgr A*, which we then fit to these recent millimeter-VLBI observations. We find that if the accretion flow onto Sgr A* is well described by an RIAF model, the orientation and magnitude of the black hole's spin are constrained to a two-dimensional surface in the spin, inclination, position angle parameter space. For each of these, we find the likeliest values and their 1{sigma} and 2{sigma} errors to be a = 0{sup +0.4+0.7}, {theta}=50{sup o+10{sup o}}{sup +30{sup o}}{sub -10{sup o}}{sub -10{sup o}}, and {xi}=-20{sup o+31{sup o}}{sup +107{sup o}}{sub -16{sup o}}{sub -29{sup o}}, when the resulting probability distribution is marginalized over the others. The most probable combination is a = 0{sup +0.2+0.4}, {theta}=90{sup o}{sub -40{sup o}}{sub -50{sup o}}, and {xi}=-14{sup o+7{sup o}}{sup +11{sup o}}{sub -7{sup o}}{sub -11{sup o}}, though the uncertainties on these are very strongly correlated, and high probability configurations exist for a variety of inclination angles above 30 deg. and spins below 0.99. Nevertheless, this demonstrates the ability millimeter-VLBI observations, even with only a few stations, to significantly constrain the properties of Sgr A*.

  1. Multiplicity of the Protostar Serpens SMM 1 Revealed by Millimeter Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Minho

    2009-01-01

    The Serpens SMM 1 region was observed in the 6.9 mm continuum with an angular resolution of about 0.6 arcsec. Two sources were found to have steep positive spectra suggesting emission from dust. The stronger one, SMM 1a, is the driving source of the bipolar jet known previously, and the mass of the dense molecular gas traced by the millimeter continuum is about 8 solar mass. The newly found source, SMM 1b, positionally coincides with the brightest mid-IR source in this region, which implies t...

  2. Numerical modeling of heat and mass transfer in the human eye under millimeter wave exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampatzakis, Andreas; Samaras, Theodoros

    2013-05-01

    Human exposure to millimeter wave (MMW) radiation is expected to increase in the next several years. In this work, we present a thermal model of the human eye under MMW illumination. The model takes into account the fluid dynamics of the aqueous humor and predicts a frequency-dependent reversal of its flow that also depends on the incident power density. The calculated maximum fluid velocity in the anterior chamber and the temperature rise at the corneal apex are reported for frequencies from 40 to 100 GHz and different values of incident power density. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Millimeter-Wave Integrated Circuit Design for Wireless and Radar Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Krozer, Viktor; Vidkjær, Jens

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a quadrature voltage-controlled oscillator (QVCO), frequency doubler, and sub-harmonic mixer (SHM) for a millimeter-wave (mm-wave) front-end implemented in a high-speed InP DHBT technology. The QVCO exhibits large tuning range from 38 to 47.8 GHz with an output power around -...... from 40-50 GHz. To the authors knowledge the QVCO, frequency doubler, and SHM presents the first mm-wave implementations of these circuits in InP DHBT technology....

  4. POLOCAM: a millimeter wavelength cryogenic polarimeter prototype for MUSIC-POL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Glenn T.; Vaillancourt, John E.; Savini, Giorgio; Ade, Peter A. R.; Beland, Stephane; Glenn, Jason; Hollister, Matthew I.; Maloney, Philip R.; Sayers, Jack

    2012-09-01

    As a proof-of-concept, we have constructed and tested a cryogenic polarimeter in the laboratory as a prototype for the MUSIC instrument (Multiwavelength Sub/millimeter Kinetic Inductance Camera). The POLOCAM instrument consists of a rotating cryogenic polarization modulator (sapphire half-waveplate) and polarization analyzer (lithographed copper polarizers deposited on a thin film) placed into the optical path at the Lyot stop (4K cold pupil stop) in a cryogenic dewar. We present an overview of the project, design and performance results of the POLOCAM instrument (including polarization efficiencies and instrumental polarization), as well as future application to the MUSIC-POL instrument.

  5. Design and modeling of InP DHBT power amplifiers at millimeter-wave frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Lei; Johansen, Tom K.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the design and modeling of InP DHBT based millimeter-wave(mm-wave) power amplifiers is described. This includes the modeling of InP DHBT devices and layout parasitics. An EM-circuit co-simulation approach is described to allow all parasitics to be modeled for accurate circuit...... demonstrates a power gain of 4.5dB with a saturated output power of 14.2dBm at 69.2GHz. © 2012 European Microwave Assoc....

  6. Millimeter-Wave GaN MMIC Integration with Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Michael

    This thesis addresses the analysis, design, integration and test of microwave and millimeter-wave monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC or MMICs). Recent and ongoing progress in semiconductor device fabrication and MMIC processing technology has pushed the upper limit in MMIC frequencies from millimeter-wave (30-300 GHz) to terahertz (300-3000 GHz). MMIC components operating at these frequencies will be used to improve the sensitivity and performance of radiometers, receivers for communication systems, passive remote sensing systems, transceivers for radar instruments and radio astronomy systems. However, a serious hurdle in the utilization of these MMIC components, and a main topic presented in this thesis, is the development and reliable fabrication of practical packaging techniques. The focus of this thesis is the investigation of first, the design and analysis of microwave and millimeter-wave GaN MMICs and second, the integration of those MMICs into usable waveguide components. The analysis, design and testing of various X-band (8-12 GHz) thru H-band (170-260 GHz) GaN MMIC power amplifier (PA or PAs), including a V-band (40-75 GHz) voltage controlled oscillator, is the majority of this work. Several PA designs utilizing high-efficiency techniques are analyzed, designed and tested. These examples include a 2nd harmonic injection amplifier, a Class-E amplifier fabricated with a GaN-on-SiC 300 GHz fT process, and an example of the applicability of supply-modulation with a Doherty power amplifier, all operating at 10 GHz. Two H-band GaN MMIC PAs are designed, one with integrated CPW-to-waveguide transitions for integration. The analysis of PA stability is especially important for wideband, high- fT devices and a new way of analyzing stability is explored and experimentally validated. Last, the challenges of integrating MMICs operating at millimeter-wave frequencies are discussed and assemblies using additive and traditional manufacturing are demonstrated.

  7. Permanent-magnet helical undulator for a millimeter-wave free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jongmin; Jeong, Young-Uk; Lee, Byung-Cheol; Kim, Sun-Kook; Cho, Sung-Oh

    1995-01-01

    Permanent-magnet helical undulator for a millimeter-wave free-electron laser was designed and constructed. The configuration of the undulator is based on bifilar-type permanent-magnet helical undulator and Halbach-type planar undulator. This new configuration shows enhanced magnetic field and low field error. Period, total length and peak magnetic-field amplitude of the undulator is 36 mm, 900 mm and 1.44 kG, respectively. Adiabatic tapering of the magnetic field in end sides of the undulator was achieved using stepped soft-iron tubes. (author)

  8. Millimeter Wave Hybrid Photonic Wireless Links for High-Speed Wireless Access and Mobile Fronthaul

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rommel, Simon

    As the introduction of the fifth generation of mobile services (5G) is set to revolutionize the way people, devices and machines connect, the changes to the underlying networks and technologies are no less drastic. The massive increase in user and data capacity, as well as the decrease in latency...... networks. In summary, the work presented in this thesis has regarded a multitude of aspects of millimeter wave hybrid photonic wireless links, expanding upon the state of the art and showing their feasibility for use in fifth generation mobile and high speed wireless access networks – hopefully bringing...

  9. Solar Flash Sub-Millimeter Wave Range Spectrum Part Radiation Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Shustikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, solar flares are under observation on the RT-7.5 radio telescope of BMSTU. This telescope operates in a little-studied range of the spectrum, at wavelengths of 3.2 and 2.2 mm (93 and 140 GHz, thereby providing unique information about parameters of the chromosphere plasma and zone of the temperature minimum. Observations on various instruments provided relatively small amount of data on the radio emission flare at frequencies close to 93 GHz, and at frequency of 140 GHz such observations were not carried out. For these reasons, data collected from the RT-7.5 radio telescope are of high value (Shustikov et al., 2012.This work describes modeling and gives interpretation of the reason for raising flux density spectrum of sub-millimeter radio frequency emission using as an example the GOES flare of class M 5.3 occurred on 04.07.2012 in the active region 11515. This flare was observed on the RT-7.5 radio telescope of BMSTU and was described by Shustikov et al. (2012 and by Smirnova et al. (2013, where it has been suggested that the reason for raising radio frequency emission is a bremsstrahlung of the thermal electrons in the hot plasma of the solar chromosphere. Rough estimates of the plasma temperature at the flare source were obtained.This paper proposes model calculations of the flux density spectrum of the sub-millimeter radio emission based on the gyrosynchrotron Fleischman-Kuznetsov code (Fleishman & Kuznetsov, 2010. Section 1 briefly describes observational data, tools and processing methods used in the work. Section 2 shows results of modeling the flare radio emission. Section 3 discusses results and conclusions.Numerical modeling the sub-millimeter part of the spectrum of the radio flux density for the GOES flare of class M5.3 has been carried out. This flare occurred in the active region 11515 on 04.07.2012. Modeling was based on the observations on the BMSTU’s RT-7.5 radio telescope.The paper draws conclusion based on the

  10. Millimeter-sized marine plastics: a new pelagic habitat for microorganisms and invertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Reisser, Julia Wiener; Shaw, Jeremy; Hallegraeff, Gustaaf; Proietti, Maíra Carneiro; Barnes, David; Thums, Michele; Wilcox, Chris; Hardesty, Britta Denise; Pattiaratchi, Charitha

    2014-01-01

    Millimeter-sized plastics are abundant in most marine surface waters, and known to carry fouling organisms that potentially play key roles in the fate and ecological impacts of plastic pollution. In this study we used scanning electron microscopy to characterize biodiversity of organisms on the surface of 68 small floating plastics (length range = 1.7–24.3 mm, median = 3.2 mm) from Australia-wide coastal and oceanic, tropical to temperate sample collections. Diatoms were the most diverse grou...

  11. Epoxy-based broadband anti-reflection coating for millimeter-wave optics

    OpenAIRE

    Rosen, Darin; Suzuki, Aritoki; Keating, Brian; Krantz, William; Lee, Adrian T.; Quealy, Erin; Richards, Paul L.; Siritanasak, Praween; Walker, William

    2013-01-01

    We have developed epoxy-based, broadband anti-reflection coatings for millimeter-wave astrophysics experiments with cryogenic optics. By using multiple-layer coatings where each layer steps in dielectric constant, we achieved low reflection over a wide bandwidth. We suppressed the reflection from an alumina disk to 10% over fractional bandwidths of 92% and 104% using two-layer and three-layer coatings, respectively. The dielectric constants of epoxies were tuned between 2.06 and 7.44 by mixin...

  12. Experimental realization of millimeter-wave amplification by a sheet beam free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Levush, B.; Rodgers, J.; Cheng, S.

    1994-01-01

    We report an observation of millimeter-wave (94 GHz) amplification in a sheet beam, short period, planar wiggler, free electron laser amplifier. The observed gain is about 5 dB for a 530 keV, 4 A beam through a 54 cm wiggler. Wave energy absorption was also observed when the beam energy is off-resonance. Experimental results are in good agreement with numerical simulation. This amplifier configuration has potential for producing equally high output power but at relatively low voltage compared with longer period free electron lasers

  13. Development of a high power millimeter wave free-electron laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidwell, S.W.; Zhang, Z.X.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Levush, B.; Rodgers, J.; Freund, H.P.

    1992-01-01

    Progress on the development of a high-average-power millimeter wave free-electron laser amplifier is reported. Successful sheet electron beam propagation has been observed through a 54 cm long wiggler magnet. One hundred percent transport efficiency is reported with a 15 A, 0.1 cm x 2.0 cm, sheet electron beam through B w = 5.1 kG, λ w = 0.96 cm, planar electromagnet wiggler. Preliminary success with a novel, yet simple, method of side focusing using offset poles is reported. Status of development on a 94 GHz, 180 kW, pulsed amplifier is discussed with results from numerical simulation

  14. Diagnosis and Treatment of Neurological Disorders by Millimeter-Wave Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Peter H.; Pikov, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, millimeter waves are being employed for telecomm, radar, and imaging applications. To date in the U.S, however, very few investigations on the impact of this radiation on biological systems at the cellular level have been undertaken. In the beginning, to examine the impact of millimeter waves on cellular processes, researchers discovered that cell membrane depolarization may be triggered by low levels of integrated power at these high frequencies. Such a situation could be used to advantage in the direct stimulation of neuronal cells for applications in neuroprosthetics and diagnosing or treating neurological disorders. An experimental system was set up to directly monitor cell response on exposure to continuous-wave, fixed-frequency, millimeter-wave radiation at low and modest power levels (0.1 to 100 safe exposure standards) between 50 and 100 GHz. Two immortalized cell lines derived from lung and neuronal tissue were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) that locates on the inside of the cell membrane lipid bi-layer. Oxonol dye was added to the cell medium. When membrane depolarization occurs, the oxonal bound to the outer wall of the lipid bi-layer can penetrate close to the inner wall where the GFP resides. Under fluorescent excitation (488 nm), the normally green GFP (520 nm) optical signal quenches and gives rise to a red output when the oxonol comes close enough to the GFP to excite a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with an output at 620 nm. The presence of a strong FRET signature upon exposures of 30 seconds to 2 minutes at 5-10 milliwatts per square centimeter RF power at 50 GHz, followed by a return to the normal 520-nm GFP signal after a few minutes indicating repolarization of the membrane, indicates that low levels of RF energy may be able to trigger non-destructive membrane depolarization without direct cell contact. Such a mechanism could be used to stimulate neuronal cells in the cortex without the need for

  15. Telecommunication service markets through the year 2000 in relation to millimeter wave satellite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    NASA is currently conducting a series of millimeter wave satellite system market studies to develop 30/20 GHz satellite system concepts that have commercial potential. Four contractual efforts were undertaken: two parallel and independent system studies and two parallel and independent market studies. The marketing efforts are focused on forecasting the total domestic demand for long haul telecommunications services for the 1980-2000 period. Work completed to date and reported in this paper include projections of: geographical distribution of traffic; traffic volume as a function of urban area size; and user identification and forecasted demand.

  16. Optically addressed ultra-wideband phased antenna array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jian

    Demands for high data rate and multifunctional apertures from both civilian and military users have motivated development of ultra-wideband (UWB) electrically steered phased arrays. Meanwhile, the need for large contiguous frequency is pushing operation of radio systems into the millimeter-wave (mm-wave) range. Therefore, modern radio systems require UWB performance from VHF to mm-wave. However, traditional electronic systems suffer many challenges that make achieving these requirements difficult. Several examples includes: voltage controlled oscillators (VCO) cannot provide a tunable range of several octaves, distribution of wideband local oscillator signals undergo high loss and dispersion through RF transmission lines, and antennas have very limited bandwidth or bulky sizes. Recently, RF photonics technology has drawn considerable attention because of its advantages over traditional systems, with the capability of offering extreme power efficiency, information capacity, frequency agility, and spatial beam diversity. A hybrid RF photonic communication system utilizing optical links and an RF transducer at the antenna potentially provides ultra-wideband data transmission, i.e., over 100 GHz. A successful implementation of such an optically addressed phased array requires addressing several key challenges. Photonic generation of an RF source with over a seven-octave bandwidth has been demonstrated in the last few years. However, one challenge which still remains is how to convey phased optical signals to downconversion modules and antennas. Therefore, a feed network with phase sweeping capability and low excessive phase noise needs to be developed. Another key challenge is to develop an ultra-wideband array antenna. Modern frontends require antennas to be compact, planar, and low-profile in addition to possessing broad bandwidth, conforming to stringent space, weight, cost, and power constraints. To address these issues, I will study broadband and miniaturization

  17. Evaluating the peak-to-valley dose ratio of synchrotron microbeams using PRESAGE fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annabell, N.; Yagi, N.; Umetani, K.; Wong, C.; Geso, M.

    2012-01-01

    The peak-to-valley dose ratio of a microbeam array can be measured by fluorescence of PRESAGE dosimeters. Peak-to-valley dose ratios are calculated using this new technique and also by EBT2 film. Synchrotron-generated microbeam radiotherapy holds great promise for future treatment, but the high dose gradients present conventional dosimetry with a challenge. Measuring the important peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR) of a microbeam-collimated synchrotron source requires both a dosimeter and an analysis method capable of exceptional spatial resolution. The PVDR is of great interest since it is the limiting factor for potential application of the microbeam radiation therapy technique clinically for its tissue-sparing properties (i.e. the valley dose should be below the tolerance of normal tissue). In this work a new method of measuring the dose response of PRESAGE dosimeters is introduced using the fluorescence from a 638 nm laser on a confocal laser-scanning microscope. This fluorescent microscopy method produces dosimetry data at a pixel size as low as 78 nm, giving a much better spatial resolution than optical computed tomography, which is normally used for scanning PRESAGE dosimeters. Using this technique the PVDR of the BL28B2 microbeam at the SPring-8 synchrotron in Japan is estimated to be approximately 52:1 at a depth of 2.5 mm. The PVDR was also estimated with EBT2 GAFchromic films as 30.5:1 at the surface in order to compare the PRESAGE fluorescent results with a more established dosimetry system. This estimation is in good agreement with previously measured ratios using other dosimeters and Monte Carlo simulations. This means that it is possible to use PRESAGE dosimeters with confocal microscopy for the determination of PVDR

  18. An absorptive single-pole four-throw switch using multiple-contact MEMS switches and its application to a monolithic millimeter-wave beam-forming network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sanghyo; Kim, Jong-Man; Kim, Yong-Kweon; Kwon, Youngwoo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a new absorptive single-pole four-throw (SP4T) switch based on multiple-contact switching is proposed and integrated with a Butler matrix to demonstrate a monolithic beam-forming network at millimeter waves (mm waves). In order to simplify the switching driving circuit and reduce the number of unit switches in an absorptive SP4T switch, the individual switches were replaced with long-span multiple-contact switches using stress-free single-crystalline-silicon MEMS technology. This approach improves the mechanical stability as well as the manufacturing yield, thereby allowing successful integration into a monolithic beam former. The fabricated absorptive SP4T MEMS switch shows insertion loss less than 1.3 dB, return losses better than 11 dB at 30 GHz and wideband isolation performance higher than 39 dB from 20 to 40 GHz. The absorptive SP4T MEMS switch is integrated with a 4 × 4 Butler matrix on a single chip to implement a monolithic beam-forming network, directing beam into four distinct angles. Array factors from the measured data show that the proposed absorptive SPnT MEMS switch can be effectively used for high-performance mm-wave beam-switching systems. This work corresponds to the first demonstration of a monolithic beam-forming network using switched beams

  19. Groundwater quality in the Antelope Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Barbara J. Milby; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. Antelope Valley is one of the study areas being evaluated. The Antelope study area is approximately 1,600 square miles (4,144 square kilometers) and includes the Antelope Valley groundwater basin (California Department of Water Resources, 2003). Antelope Valley has an arid climate and is part of the Mojave Desert. Average annual rainfall is about 6 inches (15 centimeters). The study area has internal drainage, with runoff from the surrounding mountains draining towards dry lakebeds in the lower parts of the valley. Land use in the study area is approximately 68 percent (%) natural (mostly shrubland and grassland), 24% agricultural, and 8% urban. The primary crops are pasture and hay. The largest urban areas are the cities of Palmdale and Lancaster (2010 populations of 152,000 and 156,000, respectively). Groundwater in this basin is used for public and domestic water supply and for irrigation. The main water-bearing units are gravel, sand, silt, and clay derived from surrounding mountains. The primary aquifers in Antelope Valley are defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database. Public-supply wells in Antelope Valley are completed to depths between 360 and 700 feet (110 to 213 meters), consist of solid casing from the land surface to a depth of 180 to 350 feet (55 to 107 meters), and are screened or perforated below the solid casing. Recharge to the groundwater system is primarily runoff from the surrounding mountains, and by direct infiltration of irrigation and sewer and septic

  20. Groundwater quality in the Owens Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Barbara J. Milby; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. Owens Valley is one of the study areas being evaluated. The Owens study area is approximately 1,030 square miles (2,668 square kilometers) and includes the Owens Valley groundwater basin (California Department of Water Resources, 2003). Owens Valley has a semiarid to arid climate, with average annual rainfall of about 6 inches (15 centimeters). The study area has internal drainage, with runoff primarily from the Sierra Nevada draining east to the Owens River, which flows south to Owens Lake dry lakebed at the southern end of the valley. Beginning in the early 1900s, the City of Los Angeles began diverting the flow of the Owens River to the Los Angeles Aqueduct, resulting in the evaporation of Owens Lake and the formation of the current Owens Lake dry lakebed. Land use in the study area is approximately 94 percent (%) natural, 5% agricultural, and 1% urban. The primary natural land cover is shrubland. The largest urban area is the city of Bishop (2010 population of 4,000). Groundwater in this basin is used for public and domestic water supply and for irrigation. The main water-bearing units are gravel, sand, silt, and clay derived from surrounding mountains. Recharge to the groundwater system is primarily runoff from the Sierra Nevada, and by direct infiltration of irrigation. The primary sources of discharge are pumping wells, evapotranspiration, and underflow to the Owens Lake dry lakebed. The primary aquifers in Owens Valley are defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database

  1. Microscopic Identification of Prokaryotes in Modern and Ancient Halite, Saline Valley and Death Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Brian A.; Lowenstein, Tim K.; Timofeeff, Michael N.

    2009-06-01

    Primary fluid inclusions in halite crystallized in Saline Valley, California, in 1980, 2004-2005, and 2007, contain rod- and coccoid-shaped microparticles the same size and morphology as archaea and bacteria living in modern brines. Primary fluid inclusions from a well-dated (0-100,000 years), 90 m long salt core from Badwater Basin, Death Valley, California, also contain microparticles, here interpreted as halophilic and halotolerant prokaryotes. Prokaryotes are distinguished from crystals on the basis of morphology, optical properties (birefringence), and uniformity of size. Electron micrographs of microparticles from filtered modern brine (Saline Valley), dissolved modern halite crystals (Saline Valley), and dissolved ancient halite crystals (Death Valley) support in situ microscopic observations that prokaryotes are present in fluid inclusions in ancient halite. In the Death Valley salt core, prokaryotes in fluid inclusions occur almost exclusively in halite precipitated in perennial saline lakes 10,000 to 35,000 years ago. This suggests that trapping and preservation of prokaryotes in fluid inclusions is influenced by the surface environment in which the halite originally precipitated. In all cases, prokaryotes in fluid inclusions in halite from the Death Valley salt core are miniaturized (<1 μm diameter cocci, <2.5 μm long, very rare rod shapes), which supports interpretations that the prokaryotes are indigenous to the halite and starvation survival may be the normal response of some prokaryotes to entrapment in fluid inclusions for millennia. These results reinforce the view that fluid inclusions in halite and possibly other evaporites are important repositories of microbial life and should be carefully examined in the search for ancient microorganisms on Earth, Mars, and elsewhere in the Solar System.

  2. Educational Cosmic Ray Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soluk, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    In the last decade a great deal of interest has arisen in using sparse arrays of cosmic ray detectors located at schools as a means of doing both outreach and physics research. This approach has the unique advantage of involving grade school students in an actual ongoing experiment, rather then a simple teaching exercise, while at the same time providing researchers with the basic infrastructure for installation of cosmic ray detectors. A survey is made of projects in North America and Europe and in particular the ALTA experiment at the University of Alberta which was the first experiment operating under this paradigm

  3. Storage array reflection considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C.; Taylor, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    The assumptions used for reflection conditions of single containers are fairly well established and consistently applied throughout the industry in nuclear criticality safety evaluations. Containers are usually considered to be either fully water-reflected (i.e. surrounded by 6 to 12 in. of water) for safety calculations or reflected by 1 in. of water for nominal (structural material and air) conditions. Tables and figures are usually available for performing comparative evaluations of containers under various loading conditions. Reflection considerations used for evaluating the safety of storage arrays of fissile material are not as well established

  4. Advanced Antenna-Coupled Superconducting Detector Arrays for CMB Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, James

    2014-01-01

    We are developing high-sensitivity millimeter-wave detector arrays for measuring the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This development is directed to advance the technology readiness of the Inflation Probe mission in NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program. The Inflation Probe is a fourth-generation CMB satellite that will measure the polarization of the CMB to astrophysical limits, characterizing the inflationary polarization signal, mapping large-scale structure based on polarization induced by gravitational lensing, and mapping Galactic magnetic fields through measurements of polarized dust emission. The inflationary polarization signal is produced by a background of gravitational waves from the epoch of inflation, an exponential expansion of space-time in the early universe, with an amplitude that depends on the physical mechanism producing inflation. The inflationary polarization signal may be distinguished by its unique 'B-mode' vector properties from polarization from the density variations that predominantly source CMB temperature anisotropy. Mission concepts for the Inflation Probe are being developed in the US, Europe and Japan. The arrays are based on planar antennas that provide integral beam collimation, polarization analysis, and spectral band definition in a compact lithographed format that eliminates discrete fore-optics such as lenses and feedhorns. The antennas are coupled to transition-edge superconducting bolometers, read out with multiplexed SQUID current amplifiers. The superconducting sensors and readouts developed in this program share common technologies with NASA X-ray and FIR detector applications. Our program targets developments required for space observations, and we discuss our technical progress over the past two years and plans for future development. We are incorporating arrays into active sub-orbital and ground-based experiments, which advance technology readiness while producing state of the art CMB

  5. CHROMOSPHERIC SUNSPOTS IN THE MILLIMETER RANGE AS OBSERVED BY THE NOBEYAMA RADIOHELIOGRAPH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwai, Kazumasa [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Koganei 184-8795, Tokyo (Japan); Koshiishi, Hideki [Aerospace Research and Development Directorate, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Tsukuba 305-8505 (Japan); Shibasaki, Kiyoto [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Minamimaki, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Nozawa, Satoshi; Miyawaki, Shun; Yoneya, Takuro, E-mail: kazumasa.iwai@nict.go.jp [Department of Science, Ibaraki University, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan)

    2016-01-10

    We investigate the upper chromosphere and the transition region of the sunspot umbra using the radio brightness temperature at 34 GHz (corresponding to 8.8 mm observations) as observed by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH). Radio free–free emission in the longer millimeter range is generated around the transition region, and its brightness temperature yields the region's temperature and density distribution. We use the NoRH data at 34 GHz by applying the Steer-CLEAN image synthesis. These data and the analysis method enable us to investigate the chromospheric structures in the longer millimeter range with high spatial resolution and sufficient visibilities. We also perform simultaneous observations of one sunspot using the NoRH and the Nobeyama 45 m telescope operating at 115 GHz. We determine that 115 GHz emission mainly originates from the lower chromosphere while 34 GHz emission mainly originates from the upper chromosphere and transition region. These observational results are consistent with the radio emission characteristics estimated from current atmospheric models of the chromosphere. On the other hand, the observed brightness temperature of the umbral region is almost the same as that of the quiet region. This result is inconsistent with current sunspot models, which predict a considerably higher brightness temperature of the sunspot umbra at 34 GHz. This inconsistency suggests that the temperature of the region at which the 34 GHz radio emission becomes optically thick should be lower than that predicted by the models.

  6. Distance Dependence of Path Loss for Millimeter Wave Inter-Vehicle Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fujise

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Millimeter-wave path loss between two cars was measured to obtainthe general applicable distance for inter-vehicle communication systemsin real environments. An abrupt and substantial increase in path lossdue to interruption, curves, and different-lane traveling has been amajor concern in inter-vehicle communications. The path lossmeasurements were carried out using 60-GHz CW radiowaves and standardhorn antennas on metropolitan highways and regular roads. Because thepropagation loss is traffic-dependent, the highways were classifiedinto uncrowded and crowded highways, and the regular roads wereclassified into uncrowded and crowded roads. The path loss for thehighways exhibited 2nd-power-law attenuation and that for the regularroads exhibited 1st-power-law attenuation with an increase ininter-vehicle distance. Additional losses of 15 dB for the highways and5 dB for the regular roads were observed when the inter-vehicledistance was more than approximately 30 m. Thus, we were able todemonstrate millimeter-wave inter-vehicle communications at aninter-vehicle distance of more than 100 m.

  7. System design development for microwave and millimeter-wave materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feher, Lambert; Thumm, Manfred

    2002-06-01

    The most notable effect in processing dielectrics with micro- and millimeter-waves is volumetric heating of these materials, offering the opportunity of very high heating rates for the samples. In comparison to conventional heating where the heat transfer is diffusive and depends on the thermal conductivity of the material, the microwave field penetrates the sample and acts as an instantaneous heat source at each point of the sample. By this unique property, microwave heating at 2.45 GHz and 915 MHz ISM (Industrial, Medical, Scientific) frequencies is established as an important industrial technology since more than 50 years ago. Successful application of microwaves in industries has been reported e.g. by food processing systems, domestic ovens, rubber industry, vacuum drying etc. The present paper shows some outlines of microwave system development at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM by transferring properties from the higher frequency regime (millimeter-waves) to lower frequency applications. Anyway, the need for using higher frequencies like 24 GHz (ISM frequency) for industrial applications has to be carefully verified with respect to special physical/engineering advantages or to limits the standard microwave technology meets for the specific problem.

  8. THE LATE STAGES OF PROTOPLANETARY DISK EVOLUTION: A MILLIMETER SURVEY OF UPPER SCORPIUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, Geoffrey S.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Ménard, Francois; Duchêne, Gaspard; Pinte, Christophe; Phillips, Neil

    2012-01-01

    We present deep 1.2 mm photometry of 37 stars in the young (5 Myr) Upper Scorpius OB association, sensitive to ∼4 × 10 –3 M Jup of cool millimeter dust. Disks around four low- and solar-mass stars are detected, as well as one debris disk around an intermediate-mass star, with dust masses ranging from 3.6 × 10 –3 to 1.0 × 10 –1 M Jup . The source with the most massive disk exhibits a transition-disk spectral energy distribution. Combining our results with previous studies, we find that the millimeter-detection fraction of Class II sources has significantly decreased from younger ages, and comparison with near-infrared and Hα measurements indicates that the present disks have undergone significant evolution in composition or structure at all radii. The disks of Upper Scorpius represent the tail-end of the depletion of primordial disks; while a few near-solar-mass stars may still sustain giant planet formation, this process has finished around higher mass stars.

  9. Micro combustion in sub-millimeter channels for novel modular thermophotovoltaic power generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, J F; Tang, A K; Duan, L; Li, X C; Yang, W M; Chou, S K; Xue, H

    2010-01-01

    The performance of micro combustion-driven power systems is strongly influenced by the combustor structure. A novel modular thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power generator is presented, which is based on the sub-millimeter parallel plate combustor. It has the potential to achieve a high power density because of the high radiation energy per unit volume due to the high surface-to-volume ratio of the micro-combustor. The work experimentally investigated the ignition limitation for two micro-combustors. It also studied the effects of three major parameters on a sub-millimeter combustor, namely hydrogen to oxygen mixing ratio, hydrogen volumetric flow rate and nozzle geometry. The results show that the combustion efficiency decreases with the increase of the hydrogen flow rate, which is caused by reduced residence time. The average wall temperature with the rectangular nozzle is 25 K higher than that with the circle nozzle. The output electrical power and power density of the modular TPV power generator are projected to be 0.175 W and 0.0722 W cm −3 respectively. We experimentally achieve 0.166 W of electrical power, which is in good agreement with the model prediction

  10. Narrow-band modulation of semiconductor lasers at millimeter wave frequencies (7100 GHz) by mode locking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, K.Y.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the possibility of mode locking a semiconductor laser at millimeter wave frequencies approaching and beyond 100 GHz which was investigated theoretically and experimentally. It is found that there are no fundamental theoretical limitations in mode locking at frequencies below 100 GHz. AT these high frequencies, only a few modes are locked and the output usually takes the form of a deep sinusoidal modulation which is synchronized in phase with the externally applied modulation at the intermodal heat frequency. This can be regarded for practical purposes as a highly efficient means of directly modulating an optical carrier over a narrow band at millimeter wave frequencies. Both active and passive mode locking are theoretically possible. Experimentally, predictions on active mode locking have been verified in prior publications up to 40 GHz. For passive mode locking, evidence consistent with passive mode locking was observed in an inhomogeneously pumped GaAIAs laser at a frequency of approximately 70 GHz. A large differential gain-absorption ratio such as that present in an inhomogeneously pumped single quantum well laser is necessary for pushing the passive mode-locking frequency beyond 100 GHz

  11. Millimeter-Sized Marine Plastics: A New Pelagic Habitat for Microorganisms and Invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisser, Julia; Shaw, Jeremy; Hallegraeff, Gustaaf; Proietti, Maira; Barnes, David K. A.; Thums, Michele; Wilcox, Chris; Hardesty, Britta Denise; Pattiaratchi, Charitha

    2014-01-01

    Millimeter-sized plastics are abundant in most marine surface waters, and known to carry fouling organisms that potentially play key roles in the fate and ecological impacts of plastic pollution. In this study we used scanning electron microscopy to characterize biodiversity of organisms on the surface of 68 small floating plastics (length range = 1.7–24.3 mm, median = 3.2 mm) from Australia-wide coastal and oceanic, tropical to temperate sample collections. Diatoms were the most diverse group of plastic colonizers, represented by 14 genera. We also recorded ‘epiplastic’ coccolithophores (7 genera), bryozoans, barnacles (Lepas spp.), a dinoflagellate (Ceratium), an isopod (Asellota), a marine worm, marine insect eggs (Halobates sp.), as well as rounded, elongated, and spiral cells putatively identified as bacteria, cyanobacteria, and fungi. Furthermore, we observed a variety of plastic surface microtextures, including pits and grooves conforming to the shape of microorganisms, suggesting that biota may play an important role in plastic degradation. This study highlights how anthropogenic millimeter-sized polymers have created a new pelagic habitat for microorganisms and invertebrates. The ecological ramifications of this phenomenon for marine organism dispersal, ocean productivity, and biotransfer of plastic-associated pollutants, remains to be elucidated. PMID:24941218

  12. Ultrasonic, microwave, and millimeter wave inspection techniques for adhesively bonded stacked open honeycomb core composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Clint D.; Cox, Ian; Ghasr, Mohammad Tayeb Ahmed; Ying, Kuang P.; Zoughi, Reza

    2015-03-01

    Honeycomb sandwich composites are used extensively in the aerospace industry to provide stiffness and thickness to lightweight structures. A common fabrication method for thick, curved sandwich structures is to stack and bond multiple honeycomb layers prior to machining core curvatures. Once bonded, each adhesive layer must be inspected for delaminations and the presence of unwanted foreign materials. From a manufacturing and cost standpoint, it can be advantageous to inspect the open core prior to face sheet closeout in order to reduce end-article scrap rates. However, by nature, these honeycomb sandwich composite structures are primarily manufactured from low permittivity and low loss materials making detection of delamination and some of the foreign materials (which also are low permittivity and low loss) quite challenging in the microwave and millimeter wave regime. Likewise, foreign materials such as release film in adhesive layers can be sufficiently thin as to not cause significant attenuation in through-transmission ultrasonic signals, making them difficult to detect. This paper presents a collaborative effort intended to explore the efficacy of different non-contact NDI techniques for detecting flaws in a stacked open fiberglass honeycomb core panel. These techniques primarily included air-coupled through-transmission ultrasonics, single-sided wideband synthetic aperture microwave and millimeter-wave imaging, and lens-focused technique. The goal of this investigation has been to not only evaluate the efficacy of these techniques, but also to determine their unique advantages and limitations for evaluating parameters such as flaw type, flaw size, and flaw depth.

  13. Millimeter-sized marine plastics: a new pelagic habitat for microorganisms and invertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Reisser

    Full Text Available Millimeter-sized plastics are abundant in most marine surface waters, and known to carry fouling organisms that potentially play key roles in the fate and ecological impacts of plastic pollution. In this study we used scanning electron microscopy to characterize biodiversity of organisms on the surface of 68 small floating plastics (length range = 1.7-24.3 mm, median = 3.2 mm from Australia-wide coastal and oceanic, tropical to temperate sample collections. Diatoms were the most diverse group of plastic colonizers, represented by 14 genera. We also recorded 'epiplastic' coccolithophores (7 genera, bryozoans, barnacles (Lepas spp., a dinoflagellate (Ceratium, an isopod (Asellota, a marine worm, marine insect eggs (Halobates sp., as well as rounded, elongated, and spiral cells putatively identified as bacteria, cyanobacteria, and fungi. Furthermore, we observed a variety of plastic surface microtextures, including pits and grooves conforming to the shape of microorganisms, suggesting that biota may play an important role in plastic degradation. This study highlights how anthropogenic millimeter-sized polymers have created a new pelagic habitat for microorganisms and invertebrates. The ecological ramifications of this phenomenon for marine organism dispersal, ocean productivity, and biotransfer of plastic-associated pollutants, remains to be elucidated.

  14. Digital frequency domain multiplexing readout electronics for the next generation of millimeter telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Amy N.; Cliche, Jean-François; de Haan, Tijmen; Dobbs, Matt A.; Gilbert, Adam J.; Montgomery, Joshua; Rowlands, Neil; Smecher, Graeme M.; Smith, Ken; Wilson, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    Frequency domain multiplexing (fMux) is an established technique for the readout of transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers in millimeter-wavelength astrophysical instrumentation. In fMux, the signals from multiple detectors are read out on a single pair of wires reducing the total cryogenic thermal loading as well as the cold component complexity and cost of a system. The current digital fMux system, in use by POLARBEAR, EBEX, and the South Pole Telescope, is limited to a multiplexing factor of 16 by the dynamic range of the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device pre-amplifier and the total system bandwidth. Increased multiplexing is key for the next generation of large format TES cameras, such as SPT-3G and POLARBEAR2, which plan to have on the of order 15,000 detectors. Here, we present the next generation fMux readout, focusing on the warm electronics. In this system, the multiplexing factor increases to 64 channels per module (2 wires) while maintaining low noise levels and detector stability. This is achieved by increasing the system bandwidth, reducing the dynamic range requirements though active feedback, and digital synthesis of voltage biases with a novel polyphase filter algorithm. In addition, a version of the new fMux readout includes features such as low power consumption and radiation-hard components making it viable for future space-based millimeter telescopes such as the LiteBIRD satellite.

  15. Characteristics of ocular temperature elevations after exposure to quasi- and millimeter waves (18-40 GHz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Masami; Suzuki, Yukihisa; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Sasaki, Kensuke; Wake, Kanako; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Kamimura, Yoshitsugu; Hirata, Akimasa; Sasaki, Kazuyuki; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate changes in ocular temperature in rabbit eyes exposed to different frequencies (18 to 40 GHz) of quasi-millimeter waves, and millimeter waves (MMW). Pigmented rabbits were anesthetized with both general and topical anesthesia, and thermometer probes (0.5 mm in diameter) were inserted into their cornea (stroma), lens (nucleus) and vitreous (center of vitreous). The eyes were exposed unilaterally to 200 mW/cm2 by horn antenna for 3 min at 18, 22 and 26.5 GHz using a K band exposure system or 26.5, 35 and 40 GHz using a Ka band exposure system. Changes in temperature of the cornea, lens and vitreous were measured with a fluoroptic thermometer. Since the ocular temperatures after exposure to 26.5 GHz generated by the K band and Ka band systems were similar, we assumed that experimental data from these 2 exposure systems were comparable. The highest ocular temperature was induced by 40 GHz MMW, followed by 35 GHz. The 26.5 and 22 GHz corneal temperatures were almost the same. The lowest temperature was recorded at 18 GHz. The elevation in ocular temperature in response to exposure to 200 mW/cm2 MMW is dependent on MMW frequency. MMW exposure induced heat is conveyed not only to the cornea but also the crystalline lens.

  16. Design of a Millimeter-Wave Concentrator for Beam Reception in High-Power Wireless Power Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunari, Masafumi; Wongsuryrat, Nat; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Nakamura, Yusuke; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Koizumi, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the performance of a developed taper-tube concentrator for 94-GHz millimeter-wave beam reception during wireless power transfer. The received energy is converted into kinetic energy of a working gas in the tube to drive an engine or thruster. The concentrator, which is assumed to have mirror reflection of millimeter waves in it, is designed to be shorter than conventional tapered waveguides of millimeter waves. A dimensionless design law of a concentrator is proposed based on geometric optics theory. Because the applicability of geometric optics theory is unclear, the ratio of its bore diameter to its wavelength was set as small compared to those in other possible applications. Then, the discrepancy between the designed and measured power reception was examined. Results show that the maximum discrepancy was as low as 7 % for the bore-to-wavelength ratio of 20 at the narrow end of the concentrator.

  17. Selecting Sums in Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund

    2008-01-01

    In an array of n numbers each of the \\binomn2+nUnknown control sequence '\\binom' contiguous subarrays define a sum. In this paper we focus on algorithms for selecting and reporting maximal sums from an array of numbers. First, we consider the problem of reporting k subarrays inducing the k largest...... sums among all subarrays of length at least l and at most u. For this problem we design an optimal O(n + k) time algorithm. Secondly, we consider the problem of selecting a subarray storing the k’th largest sum. For this problem we prove a time bound of Θ(n · max {1,log(k/n)}) by describing...... an algorithm with this running time and by proving a matching lower bound. Finally, we combine the ideas and obtain an O(n· max {1,log(k/n)}) time algorithm that selects a subarray storing the k’th largest sum among all subarrays of length at least l and at most u....

  18. Programmable cellular arrays. Faults testing and correcting in cellular arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cercel, L.

    1978-03-01

    A review of some recent researches about programmable cellular arrays in computing and digital processing of information systems is presented, and includes both combinational and sequential arrays, with full arbitrary behaviour, or which can realize better implementations of specialized blocks as: arithmetic units, counters, comparators, control systems, memory blocks, etc. Also, the paper presents applications of cellular arrays in microprogramming, in implementing of a specialized computer for matrix operations, in modeling of universal computing systems. The last section deals with problems of fault testing and correcting in cellular arrays. (author)

  19. Ward Valley transfer stalled by Babbitt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt announced on November 24 that he would not authorize the land transfer for the proposed low-level waste disposal site at Ward Valley, California, until a legal challenge to the facility's license and environmental impact statement is resolved. Even if the matter is resolved quickly, there exists the possibility that yet another hearing will be held on the project, even though state courts in California have stated flatly that no such hearings are required

  20. Ward Valley transfer stalled by Babbitt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt announced on November 24 that he would not authorize the land transfer for the proposed low-level waste disposal site at Ward Valley, California, until a legal challenge to the facility's license and environmental impact statement is resolved. Even if the matter is resolved quickly, there exists the possibility that yet another hearing will be held on the project, even though state courts in California have stated flatly that no such hearings are required.

  1. Ground water in Dale Valley, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Allan D.

    1979-01-01

    Dale Valley is a broad valley segment, enlarged by glacial erosion, at the headwaters of Little Tonawanda Creek near Warsaw , New York. A thin, shallow alluvial aquifer immediately underlies the valley floor but is little used. A deeper gravel aquifer, buried beneath many feet of lake deposits, is tapped by several industrial wells. A finite-difference digital model treated the deep aquifer as two-dimensional with recharge and discharge through a confining layer. It was calibrated by simulating (1) natural conditions, (2) an 18-day aquifer test, and (3) 91 days of well-field operation. Streamflow records and model simulations suggest that in moderately wet years such as 1974, a demand of 750 gallons per minute could be met by withdrawal from the creek and from the aquifer without excessive drawdown at production wells or existing domestic wells. With reasonable but unverified model adjustments to simulate an unusually dry year, the model predicts that a demand of 600 gallons per minute could be met from the same sources. Water high in chloride has migrated from bedrock into parts of the deep aquifer. Industrial pumpage, faults in the bedrock, and the natural flow system may be responsible. (Woodard-USGS)

  2. Combinatorial aspects of covering arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J. Colbourn

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Covering arrays generalize orthogonal arrays by requiring that t -tuples be covered, but not requiring that the appearance of t -tuples be balanced.Their uses in screening experiments has found application in software testing, hardware testing, and a variety of fields in which interactions among factors are to be identified. Here a combinatorial view of covering arrays is adopted, encompassing basic bounds, direct constructions, recursive constructions, algorithmic methods, and applications.

  3. Virgin Valley opal district, Humboldt County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staatz, Mortimer Hay; Bauer, Herman L.

    1951-01-01

    The Virgin Valley opal district, Humboldt County, Nevada, is near the Oregon-Nevada border in the Sheldon Game Refuge. Nineteen claims owned by Jack and Toni Crane were examined, sampled, and tested radiometrically for uranium. Numerous discontinuous layers of opal are interbedded with a gently-dipping series of vitric tuff and ash which is at least 300 ft thick. The tuff and ash are capped by a dark, vesicular basalt in the eastern part of the area and by a thin layer of terrace qravels in the area along the west side of Virgin Valley. Silicification of the ash and tuff has produced a rock that ranges from partly opalized rock that resembles silicified shale to completely altered rock that is entirely translucent, and consists of massive, brown and pale-green opal. Carnotite, the only identified uranium mineral, occurs as fracture coatings or fine layers in the opal; in places, no uranium minerals are visible in the radioactive opal. The opal layers are irregular in extent and thickness. The exposed length of the layers ranges from 8 to 1, 200 ft or more, and the thickness of the layers ranges from 0. 1 to 3. 9 ft. The uranium content of each opal layer, and of different parts of the same layer, differs widely. On the east side of Virgin Valley four of the seven observed opal layers, nos. 3, 4, 5, and 7, are more radioactive than the average; and the uranium content ranges from 0. 002 to 0. 12 percent. Two samples, taken 5 ft apart across opal layer no. 7, contained 0. 003 and 0. -049 percent uranium. On the west side of the valley only four of the fifteen observed opal layers, nos; 9, , 10, 14, and 15, are more radioactive than the average; and the uranium content ranges from 0. 004 to 0. 047 percent. Material of the highest grade was found in a small discontinuous layer of pale-green opal (no. 4) on the east side of Virgin Valley. The grade of this layer ranged from 0. 027 to 0. 12 percent uranium.

  4. Ground-water flow directions and estimation of aquifer hydraulic properties in the lower Great Miami River Buried Valley aquifer system, Hamilton Area, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Rodney A.; Bossenbroek, Karen E.

    2005-01-01

    The Great Miami River Buried Valley Aquifer System is one of the most productive sources of potable water in the Midwest, yielding as much as 3,000 gallons per minute to wells. Many water-supply wells tapping this aquifer system are purposely placed near rivers to take advantage of induced infiltration from the rivers. The City of Hamilton's North Well Field consists of 10 wells near the Great Miami River, all completed in the lower Great Miami River Buried Valley Aquifer System. A well-drilling program and a multiple-well aquifer test were done to investigate ground-water flow directions and to estimate aquifer hydraulic properties in the lower part of the Great Miami River Buried Valley Aquifer System. Descriptions of lithology from 10 well borings indicate varying amounts and thickness of clay or till, and therefore, varying levels of potential aquifer confinement. Borings also indicate that the aquifer properties can change dramatically over relatively short distances. Grain-size analyses indicate an average bulk hydraulic conductivity value of aquifer materials of 240 feet per day; the geometric mean of hydraulic conductivity values of aquifer material was 89 feet per day. Median grain sizes of aquifer material and clay units were 1.3 millimeters and 0.1 millimeters, respectively. Water levels in the Hamilton North Well Field are affected by stream stage in the Great Miami River and barometric pressure. Bank storage in response to stream stage is evident. Results from a multiple-well aquifer test at the well field indicate, as do the lithologic descriptions, that the aquifer is semiconfined in some areas and unconfined in others. Transmissivity and storage coefficient of the semiconfined part of the aquifer were 50,000 feet squared per day and 5x10-4, respectively. The average hydraulic conductivity (450 feet per day) based on the aquifer test is reasonable for glacial outwash but is higher than calculated from grain-size analyses, implying a scale effect

  5. Nanoelectrode array for electrochemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yelton, William G [Sandia Park, NM; Siegal, Michael P [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-12-01

    A nanoelectrode array comprises a plurality of nanoelectrodes wherein the geometric dimensions of the electrode controls the electrochemical response, and the current density is independent of time. By combining a massive array of nanoelectrodes in parallel, the current signal can be amplified while still retaining the beneficial geometric advantages of nanoelectrodes. Such nanoelectrode arrays can be used in a sensor system for rapid, non-contaminating field analysis. For example, an array of suitably functionalized nanoelectrodes can be incorporated into a small, integrated sensor system that can identify many species rapidly and simultaneously under field conditions in high-resistivity water, without the need for chemical addition to increase conductivity.

  6. Array architectures for iterative algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadish, Hosagrahar V.; Rao, Sailesh K.; Kailath, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Regular mesh-connected arrays are shown to be isomorphic to a class of so-called regular iterative algorithms. For a wide variety of problems it is shown how to obtain appropriate iterative algorithms and then how to translate these algorithms into arrays in a systematic fashion. Several 'systolic' arrays presented in the literature are shown to be specific cases of the variety of architectures that can be derived by the techniques presented here. These include arrays for Fourier Transform, Matrix Multiplication, and Sorting.

  7. Valley and spin thermoelectric transport in ferromagnetic silicene junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ping Niu, Zhi; Dong, Shihao

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the valley and spin resolved thermoelectric transport in a normal/ferromagnetic/normal silicene junction. Due to the coupling between the valley and spin degrees of freedom, thermally induced pure valley and spin currents can be demonstrated. The magnitude and sign of these currents can be manipulated by adjusting the ferromagnetic exchange field and local external electric field, thus the currents are controllable. We also find fully valley and/or spin polarized currents. Similar to the currents, owing to the band structure symmetry, tunable pure spin and/or valley thermopowers with zero charge counterpart are generated. The results obtained here suggest a feasible way of generating a pure valley (spin) current and thermopower in silicene

  8. Valley-orbit hybrid states in Si quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, John; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.

    2013-03-01

    The conduction band for electrons in layered Si nanostructures oriented along (001) has two low-lying valleys. Most theoretical treatments assume that these valleys are decoupled from the long-wavelength physics of electron confinement. In this work, we show that even a minimal amount of disorder (a single atomic step at the quantum well interface) is sufficient to mix valley states and electron orbitals, causing a significant distortion of the long-wavelength electron envelope. For physically realistic electric fields and dot sizes, this valley-orbit coupling impacts all electronic states in Si quantum dots, implying that one must always consider valley-orbit hybrid states, rather than distinct valley and orbital degrees of freedom. We discuss the ramifications of our results on silicon quantum dot qubits. This work was supported in part by ARO (W911NF-08-1-0482) and NSF (DMR-0805045).

  9. Valley Hall effect and Nernst effect in strain engineered graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhi Ping; Yao, Jian-ming

    2018-04-01

    We theoretically predict the existence of tunneling valley Hall effect and Nernst effect in the normal/strain/normal graphene junctions, where a strained graphene is sandwiched by two normal graphene electrodes. By applying an electric bias a pure transverse valley Hall current with longitudinal charge current is generated. If the system is driven by a temperature bias, a valley Nernst effect is observed, where a pure transverse valley current without charge current propagates. Furthermore, the transverse valley current can be modulated by the Fermi energy and crystallographic orientation. When the magnetic field is further considered, we obtain a fully valley-polarized current. It is expected these features may be helpful in the design of the controllable valleytronic devices.

  10. Micro-ring structures stabilize microdroplets to enable long term spheroid culture in 384 hanging drop array plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Amy Y; Tung, Yi-Chung; Kuo, Chuan-Hsien; Mosadegh, Bobak; Bedenis, Rachel; Pienta, Kenneth J; Takayama, Shuichi

    2012-04-01

    Using stereolithography, 20 different structural variations comprised of millimeter diameter holes surrounded by trenches, plateaus, or micro-ring structures were prepared and tested for their ability to stably hold arrays of microliter sized droplets within the structures over an extended period of time. The micro-ring structures were the most effective in stabilizing droplets against mechanical and chemical perturbations. After confirming the importance of micro-ring structures using rapid prototyping, we developed an injection molding tool for mass production of polystyrene 3D cell culture plates with an array of 384 such micro-ring surrounded through-hole structures. These newly designed and injection molded polystyrene 384 hanging drop array plates with micro-rings were stable and robust against mechanical perturbations as well as surface fouling-facilitated droplet spreading making them capable of long term cell spheroid culture of up to 22 days within the droplet array. This is a significant improvement over previously reported 384 hanging drop array plates which are susceptible to small mechanical shocks and could not reliably maintain hanging drops for longer than a few days. With enhanced droplet stability, the hanging drop array plates with micro-ring structures provide better platforms and open up new opportunities for high-throughput preparation of microscale 3D cell constructs for drug screening and cell analysis.

  11. Josephson junctions array resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gargiulo, Oscar; Muppalla, Phani; Mirzaei, Iman; Kirchmair, Gerhard [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2016-07-01

    We present an experimental analysis of the self- and cross-Kerr effect of extended plasma resonances in Josephson junction chains. The chain consists of 1600 individual junctions and we can measure quality factors in excess of 10000. The Kerr effect manifests itself as a frequency shift that depends linearly on the number of photons in a resonant mode. By changing the input power we are able to measure this frequency shift on a single mode (self-kerr). By changing the input power on another mode while measuring the same one, we are able to evaluate the cross-kerr effect. We can measure the cross-Kerr effect by probing the resonance frequency of one mode while exciting another mode of the array with a microwave drive.

  12. Diagnosable structured logic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Sterling (Inventor); Miles, Lowell (Inventor); Gambles, Jody (Inventor); Maki, Gary K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A diagnosable structured logic array and associated process is provided. A base cell structure is provided comprising a logic unit comprising a plurality of input nodes, a plurality of selection nodes, and an output node, a plurality of switches coupled to the selection nodes, where the switches comprises a plurality of input lines, a selection line and an output line, a memory cell coupled to the output node, and a test address bus and a program control bus coupled to the plurality of input lines and the selection line of the plurality of switches. A state on each of the plurality of input nodes is verifiably loaded and read from the memory cell. A trusted memory block is provided. The associated process is provided for testing and verifying a plurality of truth table inputs of the logic unit.

  13. Low Frequency Space Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennison, B.; Weiler, K.W.; Johnston, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Low Frequency Space Array (LFSA) is a conceptual mission to survey the entire sky and to image individual sources at frequencies between 1.5 and 26 MHz, a frequency range over which the earth's ionosphere transmits poorly or not at all. With high resolution, high sensitivity observations, a new window will be opened in the electromagnetic spectrum for astronomical investigation. Also, extending observations down to such low frequencies will bring astronomy to the fundamental limit below which the galaxy becomes optically thick due to free-free absorption. A number of major scientific goals can be pursued with such a mission, including mapping galactic emission and absorption, studies of individual source spectra in a frequency range where a number of important processes may play a role, high resolution imaging of extended sources, localization of the impulsive emission from Jupiter, and a search for coherent emission processes. 19 references

  14. Scintillator detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cusano, D.A.; Dibianca, F.A.

    1981-01-01

    This patent application relates to a scintillator detector array for use in computerized tomography and comprises a housing including a plurality of chambers, the said housing having a front wall transmissive to x-rays and side walls opaque to x-rays, such as of tungsten and tantalum, a liquid scintillation medium including a soluble fluor, the solvent for the fluor being disposed in the chambers. The solvent comprises either an intrinsically high Z solvent or a solvent which has dissolved therein a high Z compound e.g. iodo or bromonaphthalene; or toluene, xylene or trimethylbenzene with a lead or tin alkyl dissolved therein. Also disposed about the chambers are a plurality of photoelectric devices. (author)

  15. System using a megawatt class millimeter wave source and a high-power rectenna to beam power to a suspended platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Malcolm; Friedman, Herbert W.

    2005-07-19

    A system for beaming power to a high altitude platform is based upon a high power millimeter gyrotron source, optical transmission components, and a high-power receiving antenna (i.e., a rectenna) capable of rectifying received millimeter energy and converting such energy into useable electrical power.

  16. F-band millimeter-wave signal generation for wireless link data transmission using on-chip photonic integrated dual-wavelength sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guzman, Robinson; Carpintero, G.; Gordon Gallegos, Carlos; Lawniczuk, Katarzyna; Leijtens, Xaveer

    2015-01-01

    Millimeter-waves (30-300 GHz) have interest due to the wide bandwidths available for carrying information, enabling broadband wireless communications. Photonics is a key technology for millimeter wave signal generation, recently demonstrating the use of photonic integration to reduce size and cost.

  17. Cascading Constrained 2-D Arrays using Periodic Merging Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Laursen, Torben Vaarby

    2003-01-01

    We consider a method for designing 2-D constrained codes by cascading finite width arrays using predefined finite width periodic merging arrays. This provides a constructive lower bound on the capacity of the 2-D constrained code. Examples include symmetric RLL and density constrained codes...

  18. Networked Sensor Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tighe, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    A set of independent radiation sensors, coupled with real-time data telemetry, offers the opportunity to run correlation algorithms for the sensor array as well as to incorporate non-radiological data into the system. This may enhance the overall sensitivity of the sensors and provide an opportunity to project the location of a source within the array. In collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), we have conducted field experiments to test a prototype system. Combining the outputs of a set of distributed sensors permits the correlation that the independent sensor outputs. Combined with additional information such as traffic patterns and velocities, this can reduce random/false detections and enhance detection capability. The principle components of such a system include: (1) A set of radiation sensors. These may be of varying type and complexity, including gamma and/or neutron detectors, gross count and spectral-capable sensors, and low to high energy-resolution sensors. (2) A set of non-radiation sensors. These may include sensors such as vehicle presence and imaging sensors. (3) A communications architecture for near real-time telemetry. Depending upon existing infrastructure and bandwidth requirements, this may be a radio or hard-wire based system. (4) A central command console to pole the sensors, correlate their output, and display the data in a meaningful form to the system operator. Both sensitivity and selectivity are important considerations when evaluating the performance of a detection system. Depending on the application, the optimization of sensitivity as well as the rejection of ''nuisance'' radioactive sources may or may not be critical

  19. MX Siting Investigation. Gravity Survey - Sevier Desert Valley, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-24

    Cheyenne, Wyoming. DMAHTC reduces the data to Simple Bouguer Anomaly (see Section A1.4, Appendix Al.0). The Defense Mapping Agency Aerospace Center...Desert Valley, Utah ......... 2 2 Topographic Setting - Sevier Desert Valley, Utah . 3 LIST OF DRAWINGS Drawing Number 1 Complete Bouguer Anomaly...gravity stations were distributed throughout the valley at an approxi- mate interval of 1.4 miles (2.3 km). Drawing 1 is a Complete Bouguer Anomaly

  20. Sweet Spot Control of 1:2 Array Antenna using A Modified Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyo-Hwan HYUN

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel scheme that quickly searches for the sweet spot of 1:2 array antennas, and locks on to it for high-speed millimeter wavelength transmissions, when communications to another antenna array are disconnected. The proposed method utilizes a modified genetic algorithm, which selects a superior initial group through preprocessing in order to solve the local solution in a genetic algorithm. TDD (Time Division Duplex is utilized as the transfer method and data controller for the antenna. Once the initial communication is completed for the specific number of individuals, no longer antenna's data will be transmitted until each station processes GA in order to produce the next generation. After reproduction, individuals of the next generation become the data, and communication between each station is made again. The simulation results of 1:1, 1:2 array antennas, and experiment results of 1:1 array antenna confirmed the efficiency of the proposed method. The bit of gene is each 8bit, 16bit and 16bit split gene. 16bit split has similar performance as 16bit gene, but the gene of antenna is 8bit.