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Sample records for valley caldera usa

  1. Hydrothermal system of Long Valley caldera, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorey, M.L.; Lewis, R.E.; Olmsted, F.H.

    1978-01-01

    The geologic and hydrologic setting of the hydrothermal system are described. The geochemical and thermal characteristics of the system are presented. A mathematical model of the Long Valley caldera is analyzed. (MHR)

  2. California's restless giant: the Long Valley Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Bailey, Roy A.; Hendley, James W.; Stauffer, Peter H.; Marcaida, Mae

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have monitored geologic unrest in the Long Valley, California, area since 1980. In that year, following a swarm of strong earthquakes, they discovered that the central part of the Long Valley Caldera had begun actively rising. Unrest in the area persists today. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) continues to provide the public and civil authorities with current information on the volcanic hazard at Long Valley and is prepared to give timely warnings of any impending eruption.

  3. Long Valley Caldera-Mammoth Mountain unrest: The knowns and unknowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.

    2017-01-01

    This perspective is based largely on my study of the Long Valley Caldera (California, USA) over the past 40 years. Here, I’ll examine the “knowns” and the “known unknowns” of the complex tectonic–magmatic system of the Long Valley Caldera volcanic complex. I will also offer a few brief thoughts on the “unknown unknowns” of this system.

  4. Yellowstone and Long Valley - A Comparison of Two Restless Calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D. P.; Smith, R. B.

    2007-12-01

    Three large, silicic calderas in the conterminous United States have explosively erupted volumes > 300 km3 within in the last 2 million years -- Yellowstone caldera (Wyoming) Long Valley caldera (California) and the Vallez caldera (New Mexico) all located in extensional tectonic environments. All have shown varying levels of historic unrest. Pronounced unrest episodes at Yellowstone and Long Valley calderas over the past three decades stimulated extensive research on these two closely monitored calderas, and we explore some emerging similarities and differences. Yellowstone caldera is underlain by a long-lived (> 17 my) upper-mantle hot-spot that has fed a series of caldera-forming, extending to the southwest across southern Idaho to central Oregon including three caldera-forming eruptions from the Yellowstone caldera system in the last 2 my, the most recent at 600,000 ybp. It is marked by relatively low density and low seismic velocities extending to depths of at least 400 km and a regional topographic swell with elevations exceeding 2000 m. The extensive Yellowstone hydrothermal system has a thermal output of 5 GW. The most recent magmatic eruption dated at 70,000 ybp. By comparison, Long Valley caldera is underlain by a relatively modest "hot-spot", the locus of which appears to be influenced by a dilatational jog between the dextral Eastern California Shear Zone and the Walker Lane and westward delamination of the dense lithospheric root of the adjacent Sierra Nevada. The Long Valley system has fed multiple eruptions of over the past 4 my and a single caldera-forming eruption at 760,000 ybp. It is marked by a limited topographic swell but with the elevation of the caldera floor and adjacent basins comparable to the 2000-plus m elevation of the Yellowstone swell. Long Valley caldera hydrothermal system has a thermal output of 0.3 GW (including a 40 MW geothermal power plant). The most recent eruptions from the Long Valley Caldera- Mono Domes volcanic field

  5. Monitoring the hydrologic system for potential effects of geothermal and ground-water development in the Long Valley caldera, Mono County, California, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, C.D.; Lyster, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    In the early 1980's, renewed interest in the geothermal potential of the Long Valley caldera, California, highlighted the need to balance the benefits of energy development with the established recreational activities of the area. The Long Valley Hydrologic Advisory Committee, formed in 1987, instituted a monitoring program to collect data during the early stages of resource utilization to evaluate potential effects on the hydrologic system. Early data show declines in streamflow, spring flow, and ground-water levels caused by 6 years of below-average precipitation. Springs in the Hot Creek State Fish Hatchery area discharge water that is a mixture of nonthermal and hydrothermal components. Possible sources of nonthermal water have been identified by comparing deuterium concentrations in streams and springs. The equivalent amount of undiluted thermal water discharged from the springs was calculated on the basis of boron and chloride concentrations. Quantifying the thermal and nonthermal fractions of the total flow may allow researchers to assess changes in flow volume or temperature of the springs caused by groundwater or geothermal development.

  6. Science guide for the Long Valley Caldera deep hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundle, J.B.; Eichelberger, J.C. (eds.)

    1989-05-01

    The Magma Energy Program of the US Department of Energy, Geothermal Technology Division, is planning to begin drilling a deep (6 km) exploration well in Long Valley Caldera, California, in September 1988. The location of the well is in the central part of the caldera, coincident with a large number of shallow (5-7 km) geophysical anomalies identified through many independent investigations. Results from the hole will permit the following: direct investigation of the geophysical anomalies interpreted to be magma; investigation of the patterns and conditions of deep fluid circulation and heat transport below the caldera floor; determination of the amount of collapse and subsequent resurgence of the central portion of Long Valley caldera; and determination of the intrusion history of the central plutonic complex beneath the caldera, and establishment of the relationship of intrusive to eruptive events. The hole will thus provide a stringent test of the hypothesis that magma is still present within the central plutonic complex. If the interpretation of geophysical anomalies is confirmed, the hole will provide the first observations of the environment near a large silicic magma chamber. 80 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Temperature data from wells in Long Valley Caldera, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Christopher; DeAngelo, Jacob; Williams, Colin; Grubb, Frederick; Hurwitz, Shaul

    2010-01-01

    The 30-by-20-km Long Valley Caldera (LVC) in eastern California (fig.1) formed at 0.76 Ma in a cataclysmic eruption that resulted in the deposition of 600 km? of Bishop Tuff outside the caldera rim (Bailey, 1989). By approximately 0.6 Ma, uplift of the central part of the caldera floor and eruption of rhyolitic lava formed the resurgent dome. The most recent eruptive activity in the area occurred approximately 600 yr ago along the Mono-Inyo craters volcanic chain (Bailey, 2004; Hildreth, 2004). LVC hosts an active hydrothermal system that includes hot springs, fumaroles, mineral deposits, and an active geothermal well field and power plant at Casa Diablo along the southwestern boundary of the resurgent dome (Sorey and Lewis, 1976; Sorey and others, 1978; Sorey and others, 1991). Electric power generation began in 1985 with about 10 Mwe net capacity and was expanded to about 40 Mwe (net) in 1991 (Campbell, 2000; Suemnicht and others, 2007). Plans for further expansion are focused mainly on targets in the caldera?s western moat (Sass and Priest, 2002) where the most recent volcanic activity has occurred (Hildreth, 2004). LVC has been the site of extensive research on geothermal resources and volcanic hazards (Bailey and others, 1976; Muffler and Williams, 1976; Miller and others, 1982; Hill and others 2002). The first geothermal exploratory drilling was done in the shallow (cold groundwater recharge that occurs mostly around the caldera margin and beneath the resurgent dome. Reservoir temperatures at Casa Diablo (fig.1) are about 170?C (for example, MBP-3 and Mammoth-1), decreasing to about 100 degrees C in wells near Hot Creek Gorge (for example, MW-4 and CH-10B), and are generally less than 50?C in thermal springs near Lake

  8. Long Valley Caldera Lake and reincision of Owens River Gorge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, Wes; Fierstein, Judy

    2016-12-16

    Owens River Gorge, today rimmed exclusively in 767-ka Bishop Tuff, was first cut during the Neogene through a ridge of Triassic granodiorite to a depth as great as its present-day floor and was then filled to its rim by a small basaltic shield at 3.3 Ma. The gorge-filling basalt, 200 m thick, blocked a 5-km-long reach of the upper gorge, diverting the Owens River southward around the shield into Rock Creek where another 200-m-deep gorge was cut through the same basement ridge. Much later, during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 22 (~900–866 ka), a piedmont glacier buried the diversion and deposited a thick sheet of Sherwin Till atop the basalt on both sides of the original gorge, showing that the basalt-filled reach had not, by then, been reexcavated. At 767 ka, eruption of the Bishop Tuff blanketed the landscape with welded ignimbrite, deeply covering the till, basalt, and granodiorite and completely filling all additional reaches of both Rock Creek canyon and Owens River Gorge. The ignimbrite rests directly on the basalt and till along the walls of Owens Gorge, but nowhere was it inset against either, showing that the basalt-blocked reach had still not been reexcavated. Subsidence of Long Valley Caldera at 767 ka produced a steep-walled depression at least 700 m deeper than the precaldera floor of Owens Gorge, which was beheaded at the caldera’s southeast rim. Caldera collapse reoriented proximal drainages that had formerly joined east-flowing Owens River, abruptly reversing flow westward into the caldera. It took 600,000 years of sedimentation in the 26-km-long, usually shallow, caldera lake to fill the deep basin and raise lake level to its threshold for overflow. Not until then did reestablishment of Owens River Gorge begin, by incision of the gorge-filling ignimbrite.

  9. The hydrothermal system of Long Valley Caldera, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorey, M.L.; Lewis, Robert Edward; Olmsted, F.H.

    1978-01-01

    Long Valley caldera, an elliptical depression covering 450 km 2 on the eastern front of the Sierra Nevada in east-central California, contains a hot-water convection system with numerous hot springs and measured and estimated aquifer temperatures at depths of 180?C to 280?C. In this study we have synthesized the results of previous geologic, geophysical, geochemical, and hydrologic investigations of the Long Valley area to develop a generalized conceptual and mathematical model which describes the gross features of heat and fluid flow in the hydrothermal system. Cenozoic volcanism in the Long Valley region began about 3.2 m.y. (million years) ago and has continued intermittently until the present time. The major event that resulted in the formation of the Long Valley caldera took place about 0.7 m.y. ago with the eruption of 600 km 3 or more of Bishop Tuff of Pleistocene age, a rhyolitic ash flow, and subsequent collapse of the roof of the magma chamber along one or more steeply inclined ring fractures. Subsequent intracaldera volcanism and uplift of the west-central part of the caldera floor formed a subcircular resurgent dome about 10 km in diameter surrounded by a moat containing rhyolitic, rhyodacitic, and basaltic rocks ranging in age from 0.5 to 0.05 m.y. On the basis of gravity and seismic studies, we estimate an aver- age thickness of fill of 2.4 km above the precaldera granitic and metamorphic basement rocks. A continuous layer of densely welded Bishop Tuff overlies the basement rocks, with an average thickness of 1.4 km; the fill above the welded Bishop Tuff consists of intercalated volcanic flows and tuffs and fluvial and lacustrine deposits. Assuming the average grain density of the fill is between 2.45 and 2.65 g/cm 3 , we calculate the average bulk porosity of the total fill as from 0.11 to 0.21. Comparison of published values of porosity of the welded Bishop Tuff exposed southeast of the caldera with calculated values indicates average bulk porosity

  10. Renewed inflation of Long Valley Caldera, California (2011 to 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery-Brown, Emily; Wicks, Chuck; Cervelli, Peter F.; Langbein, John O.; Svarc, Jerry L.; Shelly, David R.; Hill, David P.; Lisowski, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Slow inflation began at Long Valley Caldera in late 2011, coinciding with renewed swarm seismicity. Ongoing deformation is concentrated within the caldera. We analyze this deformation using a combination of GPS and InSAR (TerraSAR-X) data processed with a persistent scatterer technique. The extension rate of the dome-crossing baseline during this episode (CA99 to KRAC) is 1 cm/yr, similar to past inflation episodes (1990–1995 and 2002–2003), and about a tenth of the peak rate observed during the 1997 unrest. The current deformation is well modeled by the inflation of a prolate spheroidal magma reservoir ∼7 km beneath the resurgent dome, with a volume change of ∼6 × 106 m3/yr from 2011.7 through the end of 2014. The current data cannot resolve a second source, which was required to model the 1997 episode. This source appears to be in the same region as previous inflation episodes, suggesting a persistent reservoir.

  11. Geologic field-trip guide to Long Valley Caldera, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, Wes; Fierstein, Judy

    2017-07-26

    This guide to the geology of Long Valley Caldera is presented in four parts: (1) An overview of the volcanic geology; (2) a chronological summary of the principal geologic events; (3) a road log with directions and descriptions for 38 field-trip stops; and (4) a summary of the geophysical unrest since 1978 and discussion of its causes. The sequence of stops is arranged as a four-day excursion for the quadrennial General Assembly of the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI), centered in Portland, Oregon, in August 2017. Most stops, however, are written freestanding, with directions that allow each one to be visited independently, in any order selected.

  12. Long Valley Caldera 2003 through 2014: overview of low level unrest in the past decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Stuart K.; Hill, David P.; Langbein, John O.; Lisowski, Michael; Mangan, Margaret T.

    2014-01-01

    Long Valley Caldera is located in California along the eastern escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range. The caldera formed about 760,000 years ago as the eruption of 600 km3 of rhyolite magma (Bishop Tuff) resulted in collapse of the partially evacuated magma chamber. Resurgent doming in the central part of the caldera occurred shortly afterwards, and the most recent eruptions inside the caldera occurred about 50,000 years ago. The caldera remains thermally active, with many hot springs and fumaroles, and has had significant deformation and seismicity since at least 1978. Periods of intense unrest in the 1980s to early 2000s are well documented in the literature (Hill and others, 2002; Ewert and others, 2010). In this poster, we extend the timeline forward, documenting seismicity and deformation over the past decade.

  13. Long Valley caldera and the UCERF depiction of Sierra Nevada range-front faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Montgomery-Brown, Emily K.

    2015-01-01

    Long Valley caldera lies within a left-stepping offset in the north-northwest-striking Sierra Nevada range-front normal faults with the Hilton Creek fault to the south and Hartley Springs fault to the north. Both Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast (UCERF) 2 and its update, UCERF3, depict slip on these major range-front normal faults as extending well into the caldera, with significant normal slip on overlapping, subparallel segments separated by ∼10  km. This depiction is countered by (1) geologic evidence that normal faulting within the caldera consists of a series of graben structures associated with postcaldera magmatism (intrusion and tumescence) and not systematic down-to-the-east displacements consistent with distributed range-front faulting and (2) the lack of kinematic evidence for an evolving, postcaldera relay ramp structure between overlapping strands of the two range-front normal faults. The modifications to the UCERF depiction described here reduce the predicted shaking intensity within the caldera, and they are in accord with the tectonic influence that underlapped offset range-front faults have on seismicity patterns within the caldera associated with ongoing volcanic unrest.

  14. A three-dimensional gravity model of the geologic structure of Long Valley caldera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carle, S.F.; Goldstein, N.E.

    1987-03-01

    Several attempts to define and interpret this anomaly have been made in the past using 2-D and 3-D models. None of the previous interpretations have yielded definitive results, but in fairness, the interpretation here has benefited from a larger gravity data base and more subsurface control than available to previous workers. All published 3-D models simplistically assumed constant density of fill. All 2-D models suffered from the inherent three-dimensionality of the complicated density structure of Long Valley caldera. In addition, previous interpreters have lacked access to geological data, such as well lithologies and density logs, seismic refraction interpretations, suface geology, and structural geology interpretations. The purpose of this study is to use all available gravity data and geological information to constrain a multi-unit, 3-D density model based on the geology of Long Valley caldera and its vicinity. Insights on the geologic structure of the caldera fill can help other geophysical interpretations in determining near-surface effects so that deeper structure may be resolved. With adequate control on the structure of the caldera fill, we are able to examine the gravity data for the presence of deeper density anomalies in the crust. 20 refs., 7 figs.

  15. The first report of the aphids of the Valles Caldera National Preserve, New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report 50 species, belonging to 26 genera of aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae), collected within and near the boundary of the Valles Caldera National Preserve in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico, USA. Of these, 35 (70%) represent new distribution records for New Mexico. Plant genera/species...

  16. Monitoring the hydrothermal system in Long Valley caldera, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, C.D.; Sorey, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    An ongoing program to monitor the hydrothermal system in Long Valley for changes caused by volcanic or tectonic processes has produced considerable data on the water chemistry and discharge of springs and fluid temperatures and pressures in wells. Chemical and isotopic data collected under this program have greatly expanded the knowledge of chemical variability both in space and time. Although no chemical or isotopic changes in hot spring waters can be attributed directly to volcanic or tectonic processes, changes in hot spring chemistry that have been recorded probably relate to interactions between and variations in the quantity of liquid and gas discharged. Stable carbon isotope data are consistent with a carbon source either perform the mantle or from metamorphosed carbonate rocks. Continuous and periodic measurements of hot spring discharge at several sites show significant co seismic and a seismic changes since 1980.

  17. Bibliography of literature pertaining to Long Valley Caldera and associated volcanic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, John W.; Harpel, Christopher J.; Brooks, Suzanna K.; Marcaida, Mae

    2011-01-01

    On May 25-27, 1980, Long Valley caldera was rocked by four M=6 earthquakes that heralded the onset of a wave of seismic activity within the caldera which has continued through the present. Unrest has taken the form of seismic swarms, uplift of the resurgent dome, and areas of vegetation killed by increased CO2 emissions, all interpreted as resulting from magma injection into different levels beneath the caldera, as well as beneath Mammoth Mountain along the southwest rim of the caldera. Continuing economic development in the Mammoth Lakes area has swelled the local population, increasing the risk to people and property if an eruption were to occur. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been monitoring geophysical activity in the Long Valley area since the mid-1970s and continues to track the unrest in real time with a sophisticated network of geophysical sensors. Hazards information obtained by this monitoring is provided to local, State, and Federal officials and to the public through the Long Valley Observatory. The Long Valley area also was scientifically important before the onset of current unrest. Lying at the eastern foot of the Sierra Nevada, the deposits from this active volcanic system have provided fertile ground for research into Neogene tectonics, Quaternary geology and geomorphology, regional stratigraphy, and volcanology. In the early 1970s, intensive studies of the area began through the USGS Geothermal Investigations Program, owing to the presence of a large young silicic volcanic system. The paroxysmal eruption of Long Valley caldera about 760,000 years ago produced the Bishop Tuff and associated Bishop ash. The Bishop Tuff is a well-preserved ignimbrite deposit that has continued to provide new and developing insights into the dynamics of ignimbrite-forming eruptions. Another extremely important aspect of the Bishop Tuff is that it is the oldest known normally magnetized unit of the Brunhes Chron. Thus, the age of the Bishop Tuff is used to

  18. Quartz phenocrysts preserve volcanic stresses at Long Valley and Yellowstone calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befus, K. S.; Leonhardi, T. C.; Manga, M.; Tamura, N.; Stan, C. V.

    2016-12-01

    Magmatic processes and eruptions are the consequence of stresses active in volcanic environments. Few techniques are presently available to quantify those stresses because they operate in subsurface and/or hazardous environments, and thus new techniques are needed to advance our understanding of key processes. Here, we provide a dataset of volcanic stresses that were imparted to quartz crystals that traveled through, and were hosted within, pyroclastic and effusive eruptions from Long Valley and Yellowstone calderas. We measured crystal lattice deformation with submicron spatial resolution using the synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction beamline (12.3.2) at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Quartz from all units produces diffraction patterns with residual strains locked in the crystal lattice. We used Hooke's Law and the stiffness constants of quartz to calculate the stresses that caused the preserved residual strains. At Long Valley caldera, quartz preserves stresses of 187±80 MPa within pumice clasts in the F1 fall unit of the Bishop Tuff, and preserves stresses of 120±45 MPa from the Bishop Tuff welded ignimbrite. At Yellowstone caldera quartz preserves stresses of 115±30 and 140±60 MPa within pumices from the basal fall units of the Mesa Falls Tuff and the Tuff of Bluff Point, respectively. Quartz from near-vent and flow-front samples from Summit Lake lava flow preserves stresses up to 130 MPa, and show no variation with distance travelled. We believe that subsurface processes cause the measured residual stresses, but it remains unclear if they are relicts of fragmentation or from the magma chamber. The residual stresses from both Long Valley and Yellowstone samples roughly correlate to lithostatic pressures estimated for the respective pre-eruption magma storage depths. It is possible that residual stress in quartz provides a new geobarometer for crystallization pressure. Moving forward, we will continue to perform analyses and

  19. Proceedings of the symposium on the Long Valley Caldera: A pre-drilling data review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, N.E. (ed.)

    1987-09-01

    This proceedings volume contains papers or abstracts of papers presented at a two-day symposium held at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) on 17 and 18 March 1987. Speakers presented a large body of new scientific results and geologic-hydrogeoloic interpretations for the Long Valley caldera. The talks and the discussions that followed focused on concepts and models for the present-day magmatic-hydrothermal system. Speakers at the symposium also addressed the topic of where to site future scientific drill holes in the caldera. Deep scientific drilling projects such as those being contemplated by the DOE Division of Geothermal Technology (DGT), under the Magma Energy Program, and by the DOE Office of Energy Research, Division of Engineering and Geosciences (DEG), along with the USGS and NSE, under the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP), will be major and expensive national undertakings. DOE/DEG is sponsoring a program of relatively shallow coreholes in the caldera, and DOE/DGT is considering the initiation of a multiphase program to drill a deep hole for geophysical observations and sampling of the ''near magmatic'' environment as early as FY 1988, depending on the DOE budget. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers.

  20. Fluid-driven uplift at Long Valley Caldera, California: Geologic perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, Wes

    2017-07-01

    Since persistent seismicity began in the Sierra Nevada adjacent to Long Valley caldera in 1978-1980, intracaldera unrest has been marked by (1) episodes of uplift totaling 83 cm, centered on the middle Pleistocene resurgent dome, and (2) recurrent earthquake swarms along a 12-km-long segment of the caldera's ring-fault zone that is contiguous with both the dome and the Sierran seismogenic domain. Others have attributed the recent unrest to magmatic intrusion(s), but it is argued here that evidence for new magma is lacking and that ongoing uplift and ring-fault-zone seismicity are both promoted by ascent of aqueous fluid released by second boiling of the residue of the enormous Pleistocene rhyolitic reservoir terminally crystallizing at depths ≥ 10 km. For 2 Myr, eruptive vent clusters migrated southwestward from Glass Mountain to Mammoth Mountain. There has been no eruption on the resurgent dome since 500 ka, and since 230 ka volcanism has been restricted to the caldera's west moat and contiguous Sierran terrain, both outside the structural caldera. High-temperature hydrothermal activity in the central caldera waned after 300 ka, cooling the Pleistocene rhyolitic focus to the extent that drilling on the resurgent dome found mid-caldera temperature to be only 100 °C and isothermal at depths of 2-3 km. Beneath most of the resurgent dome, there is little seismicity at any depth, no emission of magmatic CO2 or other magmatic gases, no elevated 3He/4He ratios, and only normal to below-normal heat flow. Most of the 75-km-long ring-fault zone is likewise aseismic, excepting only the 12-km segment contiguous with the extracaldera seismogenic domain in the Sierra. Since 1980, the Sierran seismicity has released 3.6 times more cumulative seismic energy than have intracaldera earthquakes. The caldera seismicity is not driven by stresses associated with the adjacent uplift but, instead, by the extracaldera tectonic stressfield. Sierran seismicity activated the directly

  1. Workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera: proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1984-10-01

    A workshop reviewed the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and tectonic processes. Workshop participants discussed the need to instrument sites for continuous measurements of several parameters and to obtain additional hydrologic and chemical information from intermediate and deep drill holes. In addition to seismic and deformation monitoring, programs are currently in progress to monitor changes in the discharge characteristics of hot springs, fumaroles, and soil gases, as well as pressures and temperatures in wells. Some hydrochemical parameters are measured continuously, others are measured monthly or at longer intervals. This report summarizes the information presented at the hydrologic monitoring workshop, following the workshop agenda which was divided into four sessions: (1) overview of the hydrothermal system; (2) monitoring springs, fumaroles, and wells; (3) monitoring gas emissions; and (4) conclusions and recommendations.

  2. Modeling the Interaction between Fluid Pressure and Faulting in an Earthquake Swarm at Long Valley Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, P. A.; Shelly, D. R.; Hill, D. P.

    2016-12-01

    Rapid migration of hypocenters during the 2014 Long Valley Caldera, California, earthquake swarm suggests that the activity was initiated and sustained by fluids, composed primarily of water and carbon dioxide, exsolved from underlying magma (Shelly et al., 2016, JGR, doi:10.1002/2015JB012719). To investigate how fluid pressure and faulting may co-evolve, we develop a simulation model that couples fluid flow with mechanical stress, while treating earthquakes with the "static/dynamic friction" approach developed by McClure and Horne (2010, Geotherm. Resour. Counc. Trans., 34, 381-396). We set up the model to represent a vertical, permeable fault (divided into a grid of elements) bounded by impermeable rock in a strike-slip tectonic environment. At the start of the simulation, a high-pressure source is introduced at depth to represent the injection of magmatic-derived fluids along the fault. The fluid flow component of the model simulates diffusion of the source pressure into the fault, and halts when the pressure increase at a fault element is sufficient to cause failure (slip). Next, the mechanical stress component of the model calculates the stress changes that result from the slip. Because these stress changes could induce surrounding elements to slip, the model iterates through this chain-reaction process until a stable configuration is achieved (i.e., slipped elements do not induce further slips).The patch of slipped elements represents an earthquake in the model. The permeability of the patch is increased to represent the effect of shear displacement, and the pressure diffusion simulation resumes. Although this model implements a simplified representation of the earthquake mechanism, it is able to mimic (using reasonable rock properties) the overall character of a local swarm of approximately 1000 earthquakes (-0.9 < M < 2.8) that occurred during 7 July 2014 in Long Valley Caldera.

  3. Microbiology and geochemistry of Little Hot Creek, a hot spring environment in the Long Valley Caldera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, T J; Dodsworth, J A; Costa, K C; Shock, E L; Hedlund, B P

    2010-03-01

    A culture-independent community census was combined with chemical and thermodynamic analyses of three springs located within the Long Valley Caldera, Little Hot Creek (LHC) 1, 3, and 4. All three springs were approximately 80 degrees C, circumneutral, apparently anaerobic and had similar water chemistries. 16S rRNA gene libraries constructed from DNA isolated from spring sediment revealed moderately diverse but highly novel microbial communities. Over half of the phylotypes could not be grouped into known taxonomic classes. Bacterial libraries from LHC1 and LHC3 were predominantly species within the phyla Aquificae and Thermodesulfobacteria, while those from LHC4 were dominated by candidate phyla, including OP1 and OP9. Archaeal libraries from LHC3 contained large numbers of Archaeoglobales and Desulfurococcales, while LHC1 and LHC4 were dominated by Crenarchaeota unaffiliated with known orders. The heterogeneity in microbial populations could not easily be attributed to measurable differences in water chemistry, but may be determined by availability of trace amounts of oxygen to the spring sediments. Thermodynamic modeling predicted the most favorable reactions to be sulfur and nitrate respirations, yielding 40-70 kJ mol(-1) e(-) transferred; however, levels of oxygen at or below our detection limit could result in aerobic respirations yielding up to 100 kJ mol(-1) e(-) transferred. Important electron donors are predicted to be H(2), H(2)S, S(0), Fe(2+) and CH(4), all of which yield similar energies when coupled to a given electron acceptor. The results indicate that springs associated with the Long Valley Caldera contain microbial populations that show some similarities both to springs in Yellowstone and springs in the Great Basin.

  4. Using Laser Altimetry to Detect Topographic Change in Long Valley Caldera, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofton, M. A.; Minster, J.-B.; Ridgway, J. R.; Blair, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    Long Valley caldera California, is a site of extensive volcanism, persistent seismicity, and uplift of a resurgent dome, currently at a rate of about 3 cm/year. Airborne laser altimetry was used to determine the surface topography of the region in 1993. A repeat mission occurred in 1995. Three different laser altimeters were flown, dubbed ATLAS, SLICER and RASCAL. Data processing consists of the combination of the aircraft trajectory and attitude data with the laser range, the determination of an atmospheric delay, laser pulse timing errors, laser system biases, and data geolocation to obtain the position of the laser spot on the ground. Results showed that using the ATLAS and SLICER instruments, the elevation of an overflown lake is determined to precisions of 3.3 cm and 2.9 cm from altitudes of 500 m and 3 km above the ground, and about 10 cm using the RASCAL instrument from 500 m above ground. Comparison with tide gauge data showed the laser measurements are able to resolve centimeter-level changes in the lake elevation over time. Repeat pass analysis of tracks over flat surfaces indicate no systematic biases affect the measurement procedure of the ATLAS and SLICER instruments. Comparison of GPS and laser-derived elevations of easily-identifiable features in the caldera confirm the horizontal accuracy of the measurement is within the diameter of the laser footprint, and vertical accuracy is within the error inherent in the measurement. Crossover analysis shows that the standard error of the means at track intersection points within the caldera, and dome (i.e., where zero and close to the maximum amount of uplift is expected) are about I cm, indicating elevation change at the 3 cm/year level should be detectable. We demonstrate one of the powerful advantages of scanning laser altimetry over other remote sensing techniques; the straightforward creation of precise digital elevation maps of overflown terrain. Initial comparison of the 1993-1995 data indicates uplift

  5. Using Laser Altimetry to Detect Topographic Change at Long Valley Caldera, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofton, M. A.; Minster, J.-B.; Ridgway, J. R.; Blair, J. B.; Rabine, D. L.; Bufton, J. L.; Williams, N. P.

    1997-01-01

    Long Valley caldera, California, is a site of extensive volcanism, persistent seismicity, and uplift of a resurgent dome, currently at a rate of approximately 3 cm/year. Airborne laser altimetry was used to determine the surface topography of the region in 1993. A repeat mission occurred in 1995. Three different laser altimeters were flown, dubbed ATLAS, SLICER and RASCAL. Data processing consists of the combination of the aircraft trajectory and attitude data with the laser range, the determination of an atmospheric delay, laser pulse timing errors, laser system biases, and data geolocation to obtain the position of the laser spot on the ground. Results showed that using the ATLAS and SLICER instruments, the elevation of an overflown lake is determined to precisions of 3.3 cm and 2.9 cm from altitudes of 500 m and 3 km above the ground, and approximately 10 cm using the RASCAL instrument from 500 m above ground. Comparison with tide gauge data showed the laser measurements are able to resolve centimeter-level changes in the lake elevation over time. Repeat pass analysis of tracks over flat surfaces indicate no systematic biases affect the measurement procedure of the ATLAS and SLICER instruments. Comparison of GPS and laser-derived elevations of easily-identifiable features in the caldera confirm the horizontal accuracy of the measurement is within the diameter of the laser footprint, and vertical accuracy is within the error inherent in the measurement. Crossover analysis shows that the standard error of the means at track intersection points within the caldera and dome (i.e., where zero and close to the maximum amount of uplift is expected) are about 1 cm, indicating elevation change at the 3 cm/year level should be detectable. We demonstrate one of the powerful advantages of scanning laser altimetry over other remote sensing techniques; the straightforward creation of precise digital elevation maps of overflown terrain. Initial comparison of the 1993-1995 data

  6. The Life and Times of Supervolcanoes: Inferences from Long Valley Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Cataclysmic eruptions of silicic magma from "supervolcanoes" are among the most awe-inspiring natural phenomena found in the geologic record, in terms of size, power, and potential hazard. Based on the repose intervals between eruptions of this magnitude, the magmas responsible for them could accumulate gradually in the shallow crust over time scales that may be in excess of a million years (Smith, 1979; Spera and Crisp, 1981; Shaw, 1985). Pre-eruption magma residence time scales can also be inferred from the age difference between eruption (i.e., using 40Ar/39Ar dating to determine the time when hot erupted material cools to below its Ar closure temperature, 200 to 600 degC) and early pre-eruption crystallization (i.e., zircon saturation temperatures; Reid et al., 1997). I will discuss observations from Long Valley a Quaternary volcanic center in California. Long Valley is a voluminous, dominantly silicic caldera system. Based on extensive dating of accessory minerals (e.g., U-Th-Pb dating of zircon and allanite) along with geochemical and isotopic data we find that silicic magmas begin to crystallize 10's to 100's of thousands of years prior to their eruption and that rhyolites record episodes of punctuated and independent evolution rather than the periodic tapping of a long-lived magma. The more punctuated versus more gradual magma accumulation rates required by the absolute and model ages, respectively, imply important differences in the mass and heat fluxes associated with the generation, differentiation, and storage of voluminous rhyolites and emphasize the need to reconcile the magmatic age differences.

  7. Scenario earthquake hazards for the Long Valley Caldera-Mono Lake area, east-central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Branum, David M.; Wills, Chris J.; Hill, David P.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) multi-hazards project in the Long Valley Caldera-Mono Lake area, the California Geological Survey (CGS) developed several earthquake scenarios and evaluated potential seismic hazards, including ground shaking, surface fault rupture, liquefaction, and landslide hazards associated with these earthquake scenarios. The results of these analyses can be useful in estimating the extent of potential damage and economic losses because of potential earthquakes and in preparing emergency response plans. The Long Valley Caldera-Mono Lake area has numerous active faults. Five of these faults or fault zones are considered capable of producing magnitude ≥6.7 earthquakes according to the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast, Version 2 (UCERF 2) developed by the 2007 Working Group of California Earthquake Probabilities (WGCEP) and the USGS National Seismic Hazard Mapping (NSHM) Program. These five faults are the Fish Slough, Hartley Springs, Hilton Creek, Mono Lake, and Round Valley Faults. CGS developed earthquake scenarios for these five faults in the study area and for the White Mountains Fault to the east of the study area. Earthquake scenarios are intended to depict the potential consequences of significant earthquakes. They are not necessarily the largest or most damaging earthquakes possible. Earthquake scenarios are both large enough and likely enough that emergency planners should consider them in regional emergency response plans. Earthquake scenarios presented here are based on fault geometry and activity data developed by the WGCEP, and are consistent with the 2008 Update of the United States National Seismic Hazard Maps (NSHM).For the Hilton Creek Fault, two alternative scenarios were developed in addition to the NSHM scenario to account for different opinions in how far north the fault extends into the Long Valley Caldera. For each scenario, ground motions were calculated using the current standard practice

  8. Conductive heat flux in VC-1 and the thermal regime of Valles caldera, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico ( USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, J.H.; Morgan, P.

    1988-01-01

    Over 5% of heat in the western USA is lost through Quaternary silicic volcanic centers, including the Valles caldera in N central New Mexico. These centers are the sites of major hydrothermal activity and upper crustal metamorphism, metasomatism, and mineralization, producing associated geothermal resources. Presents new heat flow data from Valles caldera core hole 1 (VC-1), drilled in the SW margin of the Valles caldera. Thermal conductivities were measured on 55 segments of core from VC-1, waxed and wrapped to preserve fluids. These values were combined with temperature gradient data to calculate heat flow. Above 335 m, which is probably unsaturated, heat flow is 247 + or - 16 mW m-2. Inteprets the shallow thermal gradient data and the thermal regime at VC-1 to indicate a long-lived hydrothermal (and magmatic) system in the southwestern Valles caldera that has been maintained through the generation of shallow magma bodies during the long postcollapse history of the caldera. High heat flow at the VC-1 site is interpreted to result from hot water circulating below the base of the core hole, and we attribute the lower heat flow in the unsaturated zone is attributed to hydrologic recharge. -from Authors

  9. The 1996-2009 borehole dilatometer installations, operation, and maintenance at sites in Long Valley Caldera, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myren, Glenn; Johnston, Malcolm; Mueller, Robert

    2011-01-01

    High seismicity levels with accelerating uplift (under the resurgent dome) in Long Valley caldera in the eastern Sierra Nevada from 1989 to 1997, triggered upgrades to dilational strainmeters and other instrumentation installed in the early 1980's following a series of magnitude 6 earthquakes. This included two additional high-resolution borehole strainmeters and replacement of the failed strainmeter at Devil's Postpile. The purpose of the borehole-monitoring network is to monitor crustal deformation and other geophysical parameters associated with volcanic intrusions and earthquakes in the Long Valley Caldera. Additional instrumentation was added at these sites to improve the capability of providing continuous monitoring of the magma source under the resurgent dome. Sites were selected in regions of hard crystalline rock, where the expected signals from magmatic activity were calculated to be a maximum and the probability of an earthquake of magnitude 4 or greater is large. For the most part, the dilatometers were installed near existing arrays of surface tiltmeters, seismometers, level line, and GPS arrays. At each site, attempts are made to separate tectonic and volcanic signals from known noise sources in each instrument type. Each of these sites was planned to be a multi-parameter monitoring site, which included measurements of 3-component seismic velocity and acceleration, borehole strain, tilt, pore pressure and magnetic field. Using seismicity, geophysical knowledge, geologic and topographic maps, and geologists recommendations, lists of preliminary sites were chosen. Additional requirements were access, and telemetry constraints. When the final site choice was made, a permit was obtained from the U.S. Forest Service. Following this selection process, two new borehole sites were installed on the north and south side of the Long Valley Caldera in June of 1999. One site was located near Big Spring Campground to the east of Crestview. The second site was

  10. Regulatory, Land Ownership, and Water Availability Factors for a Magma Well: Long Valley Caldera and Coso Hot Springs, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackett, Robert

    1985-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is currently engaged in a program to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of extracting thermal energy from high-level molten magma bodies. The program is being carried out under the direction of Sandia National Laboratories where a number of individual projects support the overall program. The existing program elements include (1) high-temperature materials compatibility testing; (2) studies of properties of melts of various compositions; and (3) the investigation of the economics of a magma energy extraction system. Another element of the program is being conducted with the cooperation of the U.S. Geological Survey, and involves locating and outlining magma bodies at selected sites using various geophysical techniques. The ultimate goal here will be to define the limits of a magma body as a drilling target. During an earlier phase of the program, more than twenty candidate study sites considered were evaluated based upon: (1) the likelihood of the presence of a shallow magma chamber, (2) the accessibility of the site, and (3) physical and institutional constraints associated with each site with respect to performing long-term experiments. From these early phase activities, the number of candidate sites were eventually narrowed to just 2. The sites currently under consideration are Coso Hot Springs and the Long Valley caldera (Figure 1). This report describes certain attributes of these sites in order to help identify potential problems related to: (1) state and federal regulations pertaining to geothermal development; (2) land ownership; and (3) water resource availability. The information sources used in this study were mainly maps, publications, and informative documents gathered from the California Division of Oil and Gas and the U.S. Department of the Interior. Environmental studies completed for the entire Long Valley caldera study area, and for portions of the Coso Hot Springs study area were also used for reference.

  11. Formation of low-δ18O rhyolites after caldera collapse at Yellowstone, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, Ilya N.; Valley, John W.

    2000-08-01

    We present a new model for the genesis of low-δ18O rhyolites of the Yellowstone caldera based on analyses of zircons and individual quartz phenocrysts. Low-δ18O rhyolites were erupted soon after the massive caldera-forming Lava Creek Tuff eruption (602 ka, ˜1000 km3) and contain xenocrysts of quartz and zircon inherited from precaldera rhyolites. These zircons are isotopically zoned and out of equilibrium with their host low-δ18O melts and quartz. Diffusion modeling predicts that magmatic disequilibria of oxygen isotopes persists for as much as tens of thousands of years following nearly total remelting of the hydrothermally altered igneous roots of the depressed cauldron, in which the alteration-resistant quartz and zircon initially retained their δ18O values. These results link melting to caldera collapse, rule out rapid or catastrophic magma meteoric water interaction, and indicate wholesale melting rather than assimilation or partial melting.

  12. Three-dimensional electrical resistivity model of the hydrothermal system in Long Valley Caldera, California, from magnetotellurics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Jared R.; Mangan, Margaret T.; McPhee, Darcy K.; Wannamaker, Phil E.

    2016-01-01

    Though shallow flow of hydrothermal fluids in Long Valley Caldera, California, has been well studied, neither the hydrothermal source reservoir nor heat source has been well characterized. Here a grid of magnetotelluric data were collected around the Long Valley volcanic system and modeled in 3-D. The preferred electrical resistivity model suggests that the source reservoir is a narrow east-west elongated body 4 km below the west moat. The heat source could be a zone of 2–5% partial melt 8 km below Deer Mountain. Additionally, a collection of hypersaline fluids, not connected to the shallow hydrothermal system, is found 3 km below the medial graben, which could originate from a zone of 5–10% partial melt 8 km below the south moat. Below Mammoth Mountain is a 3 km thick isolated body containing fluids and gases originating from an 8 km deep zone of 5–10% basaltic partial melt.

  13. Near real-time monitoring of volcanic surface deformation from GPS measurements at Long Valley Caldera, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Kang Hyeun; Herring, Thomas A.; Llenos, Andrea L.

    2013-01-01

    Long Valley Caldera in eastern California is an active volcanic area and has shown continued unrest in the last three decades. We have monitored surface deformation from Global Positioning System (GPS) data by using a projection method that we call Targeted Projection Operator (TPO). TPO projects residual time series with secular rates and periodic terms removed onto a predefined spatial pattern. We used the 2009–2010 slow deflation as a target spatial pattern. The resulting TPO time series shows a detailed deformation history including the 2007–2009 inflation, the 2009–2010 deflation, and a recent inflation that started in late-2011 and is continuing at the present time (November 2012). The recent inflation event is about four times faster than the previous 2007–2009 event. A Mogi source of the recent event is located beneath the resurgent dome at about 6.6 km depth at a rate of 0.009 km3/yr volume change. TPO is simple and fast and can provide a near real-time continuous monitoring tool without directly looking at all the data from many GPS sites in this potentially eruptive volcanic system.

  14. Eruptive history of Mount Mazama and Crater Lake Caldera, Cascade Range, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    New investigations of the geology of Crater Lake National Park necessitate a reinterpretation of the eruptive history of Mount Mazama and of the formation of Crater Lake caldera. Mount Mazama consisted of a glaciated complex of overlapping shields and stratovolcanoes, each of which was probably active for a comparatively short interval. All the Mazama magmas apparently evolved within thermally and compositionally zoned crustal magma reservoirs, which reached their maximum volume and degree of differentiation in the climactic magma chamber ??? 7000 yr B.P. The history displayed in the caldera walls begins with construction of the andesitic Phantom Cone ??? 400,000 yr B.P. Subsequently, at least 6 major centers erupted combinations of mafic andesite, andesite, or dacite before initiation of the Wisconsin Glaciation ??? 75,000 yr B.P. Eruption of andesitic and dacitic lavas from 5 or more discrete centers, as well as an episode of dacitic pyroclastic activity, occurred until ??? 50,000 yr B.P.; by that time, intermediate lava had been erupted at several short-lived vents. Concurrently, and probably during much of the Pleistocene, basaltic to mafic andesitic monogenetic vents built cinder cones and erupted local lava flows low on the flanks of Mount Mazama. Basaltic magma from one of these vents, Forgotten Crater, intercepted the margin of the zoned intermediate to silicic magmatic system and caused eruption of commingled andesitic and dacitic lava along a radial trend sometime between ??? 22,000 and ??? 30,000 yr B.P. Dacitic deposits between 22,000 and 50,000 yr old appear to record emplacement of domes high on the south slope. A line of silicic domes that may be between 22,000 and 30,000 yr old, northeast of and radial to the caldera, and a single dome on the north wall were probably fed by the same developing magma chamber as the dacitic lavas of the Forgotten Crater complex. The dacitic Palisade flow on the northeast wall is ??? 25,000 yr old. These relatively

  15. A Photogrammetric Approach to Measuring Temporal Change in Tree Kill Areas at Mammoth Mountain and Long Valley Caldera, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clor, L. E.; Barefoot, J. D.; Hurwitz, S.; Diefenbach, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    A zone of dead trees and bare ground near Horseshoe Lake on the southeast flank of Mammoth Mountain in California is attributed to high emissions of volcanic CO2 and has been characterized and studied since the 1990s. Measurements of diffuse CO2 emissions have been made since 1994, but tree kills occurred following a large earthquake swarm in 1989 and before these first measurements. In order to track vegetation changes over time, fifteen aerial images of the Horseshoe Lake tree kill from 1951 to 2014 were analyzed using photogrammetric techniques which allow us to quantify the extent of bare ground and provide an indirect analysis of tree mortality, possibly related to CO2 emissions. The aerial images were assigned a uniform spatial reference, then image pixels were classified into two main categories, trees or bare ground, and the aerial extent quantified using the GIS software ArcMap. Between 1951 and 1987, there was little change in area of bare ground or tree density near Horseshoe Lake. The tree kill area appeared in 1992 and expanded rapidly to about 0.20 km2 by 1998, which is similar to its present extent. In images from 2012 and onward, a large increase in bare ground was identified and correlated with a powerful windstorm that occurred in 2011. Overlaying CO2 flux maps on the GIS classified images shows that the area of diffuse emission generally correlates with the tree kill area. This method was applied to imagery of thermal tree kill areas within Long Valley Caldera as well. Tree kill near Shady Rest Park in Mammoth Lakes expanded incrementally to the east, southeast and west between 1993 and 2014 to its present extent of about 0.053 km2, but this area also includes significant tree thinning by the city. In Basalt Canyon, southeast of Shady Rest, tree kill area has slowly expanded since 1995 to its present extent of about 0.041 km2.

  16. Evaluation of the thermal regime of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico, U.S.A., by downward continuation of temperature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczyk, Ted; Morgan, Paul

    1987-03-01

    Downward continuation of temperature data from 73 wells extending to depths of 250 ft (76 m) provides constraints on the thermal regime of the Valles Caldera. Surface-temperature gradient data and bottom-hole temperatures were used as constraints in the downward continuation. Three factors were found to control the shallow thermal regime: (1) heat associated with the main geothermal source; (2) local topography; and (3) west-southwest groundwater flow. Although the well density is relatively high, comparison with the topography shows that the wells are not randomly distributed and tend to be clustered in valleys. Many details in the thermal regime appear to be related to groundwater drainage in these valleys. Temperature gradients and temperatures generally increase in the same direction as the regional drainage of the caldera suggesting a long-wavelength, shallow component to this regional gradient trend. Inversion of gradient and temperature data show additional deep heat input in the west-southwest sector of the caldera which appears to be spatially associated to the youngest volcanism. A previously reported northeast displacement of the main heat source from the surface anomaly has not been confirmed.

  17. Ground deformations in collapsed caldera structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Natale, Giuseppe; Pingue, Folco

    1993-09-01

    A method is presented to analyze the effect of stress-strain discontinuities on the ground deformations generated by a pressure source. This is meant to simulate the effects due to caldera structures, likely to present fractured zones at the borders of the collapsed area. A method originally developed by Crouch (1976) to solve plane-strain problems has been used to simulate deformation curves for several source and discontinuity geometries. The main result is that the location of the discontinuities controls the extension of the deformed zone, and always reduces it with respect to a continuous medium. With respect to a homogeneous medium the presence of lateral discontinuities also acts towards lowering the overpressure required to produce a given amount of deformation. These results indicate that, when analyzing ground deformations in calderas, the use of classical methods involving continuous media should be avoided, or at least taken with caution. These methods, in fact, assume that the extension of the deformed zone is only linked to the source depth. Some examples of ground deformations in active calderas have been analyzed in the framework of the results obtained from theoretical modeling. Four calderas recently affected by ground deformations have been considered: Rabaul (New Guinea), Campi Flegrei (Italy), Long Valley and Yellowstone (U.S.A.). The effects of collapsed structures on the deformation field are possibly evidenced for all the four calderas. At Rabaul and Campi Flegrei, the fracture systems mainly affecting the ground deformations probably represent younger, innermost collapses and are well evidenced by seismicity studies. Ground deformations are here concentrated in an area much smaller than the one enclosed by geologically visible caldera rims. In particular, at Rabaul, the effect of the innermost collapse can explain the high concentration of the uplift in the period 1971-1985, previously modeled by a very shallow source (1-3 km) in terms of

  18. Determining the physical processes behind four large eruptions in rapid sequence in the San Juan caldera cluster (Colorado, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Adam; Caricchi, Luca; Lipman, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Large, explosive volcanic eruptions can have both immediate and long-term negative effects on human societies. Statistical analyses of volcanic eruptions show that the frequency of the largest eruptions on Earth (> ˜450 km3) differs from that observed for smaller eruptions, suggesting different physical processes leading to eruption. This project will characterize the petrography, whole-rock geochemistry, mineral chemistry, and zircon geochronology of four caldera-forming ignimbrites from the San Juan caldera cluster, Colorado, to determine the physical processes leading to eruption. We collected outflow samples along stratigraphy of the three caldera-forming ignimbrites of the San Luis caldera complex: the Nelson Mountain Tuff (>500 km3), Cebolla Creek Tuff (˜250 km3), and Rat Creek Tuff (˜150 km3); and we collected samples of both outflow and intracaldera facies of the Snowshoe Mountain Tuff (>500 km3), which formed the Creede caldera. Single-crystal sanidine 40Ar/39Ar ages show that these eruptions occurred in rapid succession between 26.91 ± 0.02 Ma (Rat Creek) and 26.87 ± 0.02 Ma (Snowshoe Mountain), providing a unique opportunity to investigate the physical processes leading to a rapid sequence of large, explosive volcanic eruptions. Recent studies show that the average flux of magma is an important parameter in determining the frequency and magnitude of volcanic eruptions. High-precision isotope-dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) zircon geochronology will be performed to determine magma fluxes, and cross-correlation of chemical profiles in minerals will be performed to determine the periodicity of magma recharge that preceded these eruptions. Our project intends to combine these findings with similar data from other volcanic regions around the world to identify physical processes controlling the regional and global frequency-magnitude relationships of volcanic eruptions.

  19. Fluid-faulting evolution in high definition: Connecting fault structure and frequency-magnitude variations during the 2014 Long Valley Caldera, California earthquake swarm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R.; Ellsworth, William L.; Hill, David P.

    2016-01-01

    An extended earthquake swarm occurred beneath southeastern Long Valley Caldera between May and November 2014, culminating in three magnitude 3.5 earthquakes and 1145 cataloged events on 26 September alone. The swarm produced the most prolific seismicity in the caldera since a major unrest episode in 1997-1998. To gain insight into the physics controlling swarm evolution, we used large-scale cross-correlation between waveforms of cataloged earthquakes and continuous data, producing precise locations for 8494 events, more than 2.5 times the routine catalog. We also estimated magnitudes for 18,634 events (~5.5 times the routine catalog), using a principal component fit to measure waveform amplitudes relative to cataloged events. This expanded and relocated catalog reveals multiple episodes of pronounced hypocenter expansion and migration on a collection of neighboring faults. Given the rapid migration and alignment of hypocenters on narrow faults, we infer that activity was initiated and sustained by an evolving fluid pressure transient with a low-viscosity fluid, likely composed primarily of water and CO2 exsolved from underlying magma. Although both updip and downdip migration were observed within the swarm, downdip activity ceased shortly after activation, while updip activity persisted for weeks at moderate levels. Strongly migrating, single-fault episodes within the larger swarm exhibited a higher proportion of larger earthquakes (lower Gutenberg-Richter b value), which may have been facilitated by fluid pressure confined in two dimensions within the fault zone. In contrast, the later swarm activity occurred on an increasingly diffuse collection of smaller faults, with a much higher b value.

  20. Scenario earthquake hazards for the Long Valley Caldera-Mono Lake area, east-central California (ver. 2.0, January 2018)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Branum, David M.; Wills, Chris J.; Hill, David P.

    2014-06-30

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) multi-hazards project in the Long Valley Caldera-Mono Lake area, the California Geological Survey (CGS) developed several earthquake scenarios and evaluated potential seismic hazards, including ground shaking, surface fault rupture, liquefaction, and landslide hazards associated with these earthquake scenarios. The results of these analyses can be useful in estimating the extent of potential damage and economic losses because of potential earthquakes and also for preparing emergency response plans.The Long Valley Caldera-Mono Lake area has numerous active faults. Five of these faults or fault zones are considered capable of producing magnitude ≥6.7 earthquakes according to the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast, Version 2 (UCERF 2) developed by the 2007 Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities (WGCEP) and the USGS National Seismic Hazard Mapping Program. These five faults are the Fish Slough, Hartley Springs, Hilton Creek, Mono Lake, and Round Valley Faults. CGS developed earthquake scenarios for these five faults in the study area and for the White Mountains Fault Zone to the east of the study area.In this report, an earthquake scenario is intended to depict the potential consequences of significant earthquakes. A scenario earthquake is not necessarily the largest or most damaging earthquake possible on a recognized fault. Rather it is both large enough and likely enough that emergency planners should consider it in regional emergency response plans. In particular, the ground motion predicted for a given scenario earthquake does not represent a full probabilistic hazard assessment, and thus it does not provide the basis for hazard zoning and earthquake-resistant building design.Earthquake scenarios presented here are based on fault geometry and activity data developed by the WGCEP, and are consistent with the 2008 Update of the United States National Seismic Hazard Maps (NSHM). Alternatives

  1. Deformation near the Casa Diablo geothermal well field and related processes Long Valley caldera, Eastern California, 1993-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howle, J.F.; Langbein, J.O.; Farrar, C.D.; Wilkinson, S.K.

    2003-01-01

    Regional first-order leveling lines, which extend from Lee Vining, CA, to Tom's Place, CA, have been surveyed periodically since 1957 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Geodetic Survey (NGS), and Caltrans. Two of the regional survey lines, or leveling networks, intersect at the Casa Diablo geothermal well field. These leveling networks, referenced to a distant bench mark (C916) near Lee Vining, provide time-series vertical control data of land-surface deformation that began around 1980. These data are also useful for delineating localized subsidence at Casa Diablo related to reservoir pressure and temperature changes owing to geothermal development that began in 1985. A comparison of differences in bench-mark elevations for five time periods between 1983 and 1997 shows the development and expansion of a subsidence bowl at Casa Diablo. The subsidence coincides spatially with the geothermal well field and temporally with the increased production rates and the deepening of injection wells in 1991, which resulted in an increase in the rate of pressure decline. The subsidence, superimposed on a broad area of uplift, totaled about 310 mm by 1997. The USGS established orthogonal tilt arrays in 1983 to better monitor deformation across the caldera. One tilt array (DBR) was established near what would later become the Casa Diablo geothermal well field. This array responded to magmatic intrusions prior to geothermal development, tilting away from the well field. With the start of geothermal fluid extraction in 1985, tilt at the DBR array reversed direction and began tilting into the well field. In 1991, geothermal power production was increased by a factor of four, and reservoir pressures began a period of steep decline. These changes caused a temporary three-fold increase in the tilt rate. The tilt rate became stable in 1993 and was about 40% lower than that measured in 1991-1992, but still greater than the rates measured during 1985-1990. Data from the

  2. Residence of silver in mineral deposits of the Thunder Mountain caldera complex, Central Idaho, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, B.F.; Christian, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Silver is an accessory element in gold, antimony, and tungsten deposits of the caldera complex. Most of the deposits are economically of low grade and genetically of xenothermal or epithermal character. Their gold- and silver-bearing minerals are usually disseminated, fine grained, and difficult to study. Sparsely disseminated pyrite and arsenoprite are common associates. Identified silver minerals are: native silver and electrum; the sulfides acanthite, argentite (the latter always inverted to acanthite), and members of the Silberkies group; the sulfosalts matildite, miargyrite, pyrargyrite, argentian tetrahedrite, and unnamed Ag-Sb-S and Ag-Fe-Sb-S minerals; the telluride hessite and the selenide naumannite; halides of the cerargyrite group; and the antimonate stetefeldtite. Suspected silver minerals include the sulfide uytenbogaardtite and the sulfosalts andorite, diaphorite, and polybasite. Electrum, acanthite, and argentian tetrahedrite are common, though nowhere abundant. The other silver minerals are rare. Silver is present as a minor element in the structure of some varieties of other minerals. These include arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite, chalcostibite, covelline, digenite, galena, sphalerite, and stibnite. The search for adventitious Ag in most of these minerals has been cursory. The results merely indicate that elemental silver is not confined to discrete silver minerals and is, therefore, an additional complication for the recovery of silver-bearing material from some deposits. Silver occurs cryptically in some plants of the region. At Red Mountain, for example, the ashed sapwood of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) contains 2 to 300 ppm Ag. Silver in the ashed wood is roughly 100 times as abundant as it is in soil. The phenomenon, useful in biogeochemical exploration, deserves the attention of mineralogists. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Water availability and land subsidence in the Central Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunt, Claudia C.; Sneed, Michelle; Traum, Jon; Brandt, Justin T.

    2016-05-01

    The Central Valley in California (USA) covers about 52,000 km2 and is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. This agriculture relies heavily on surface-water diversions and groundwater pumpage to meet irrigation water demand. Because the valley is semi-arid and surface-water availability varies substantially, agriculture relies heavily on local groundwater. In the southern two thirds of the valley, the San Joaquin Valley, historic and recent groundwater pumpage has caused significant and extensive drawdowns, aquifer-system compaction and subsidence. During recent drought periods (2007-2009 and 2012-present), groundwater pumping has increased owing to a combination of decreased surface-water availability and land-use changes. Declining groundwater levels, approaching or surpassing historical low levels, have caused accelerated and renewed compaction and subsidence that likely is mostly permanent. The subsidence has caused operational, maintenance, and construction-design problems for water-delivery and flood-control canals in the San Joaquin Valley. Planning for the effects of continued subsidence in the area is important for water agencies. As land use, managed aquifer recharge, and surface-water availability continue to vary, long-term groundwater-level and subsidence monitoring and modelling are critical to understanding the dynamics of historical and continued groundwater use resulting in additional water-level and groundwater storage declines, and associated subsidence. Modeling tools such as the Central Valley Hydrologic Model, can be used in the evaluation of management strategies to mitigate adverse impacts due to subsidence while also optimizing water availability. This knowledge will be critical for successful implementation of recent legislation aimed toward sustainable groundwater use.

  4. Water availability and land subsidence in the Central Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunt, Claudia; Sneed, Michelle; Traum, Jonathan A.; Brandt, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The Central Valley in California (USA) covers about 52,000 km2 and is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. This agriculture relies heavily on surface-water diversions and groundwater pumpage to meet irrigation water demand. Because the valley is semi-arid and surface-water availability varies substantially, agriculture relies heavily on local groundwater. In the southern two thirds of the valley, the San Joaquin Valley, historic and recent groundwater pumpage has caused significant and extensive drawdowns, aquifer-system compaction and subsidence. During recent drought periods (2007–2009 and 2012-present), groundwater pumping has increased owing to a combination of decreased surface-water availability and land-use changes. Declining groundwater levels, approaching or surpassing historical low levels, have caused accelerated and renewed compaction and subsidence that likely is mostly permanent. The subsidence has caused operational, maintenance, and construction-design problems for water-delivery and flood-control canals in the San Joaquin Valley. Planning for the effects of continued subsidence in the area is important for water agencies. As land use, managed aquifer recharge, and surface-water availability continue to vary, long-term groundwater-level and subsidence monitoring and modelling are critical to understanding the dynamics of historical and continued groundwater use resulting in additional water-level and groundwater storage declines, and associated subsidence. Modeling tools such as the Central Valley Hydrologic Model, can be used in the evaluation of management strategies to mitigate adverse impacts due to subsidence while also optimizing water availability. This knowledge will be critical for successful implementation of recent legislation aimed toward sustainable groundwater use.

  5. Tensor controlled-source audiomagnetotelluric survey over the Sulphur Springs Thermal area, Valles Caldera, New Mexico, U.S.A.; Implication for structure of the western Caldera and for CSAMT methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wannamaker, P.E.

    1994-06-01

    We have carried Out an extensive tensor CSAMT survey of the Sulphur Springs geothermal area, Valles Caldera, New Mexico. This survey, consisting of 45 high-quality sites, has been acquired by in support of Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) drillholes VC-2A and VC-2B. Two independent transmitter dipoles were energized for tensor measurements using a 30 kW generator placed approximately 13 km south of the VC-2B wellhead. The soundings in the Sulphur Springs area were arranged in four profiles to cross major structural features. The electric bipoles parallel to each profile were deployed contiguously to ensure against spatial aliasing of the impedance response corresponding to current flow across structural trends. The frequency range of acquisition was 4096 Hz down to 1 Hz for the central line, but only down to 4 Hz for most sites of the other lines. Data quality is high overall and is established by repeatability of measurements. Agreement between the CSAMT and available natural field MT data is very good over almost all the period range of overlap indicating that we are free of calibration problems and that far-field results are generally being obtained. Non plane-wave effects in the CSAMT around Sulphur Springs are apparent at 1 to 2 Hz, and perhaps slightly even at 4 Hz, however, which is near the bottom of our frequency range. CSAMT and MT data taken outside the Valles Caldera to the west were modeled in an attempt to compare resistivity structure exterior to the caldera to that within. With the availability of tensor CSAMT and MT data both inside and outside Valles Caldera, assumptions and methods of CSAMT are tested. In the Sulphur Springs area, near-coincident CSAMT and MT data near well VC -2B indicate that non-lane-wave effects in the apparent resistivity and impedance phase occure at a frequency near to that predicted from the resistivity structure local to the wester caldera.

  6. The McDermitt Caldera, NV-OR, USA: Geologic mapping, volcanology, mineralization, and high precision 40Ar/39Ar dating of early Yellowstone hotspot magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, C. D.; Castor, S. B.; Starkel, W. A.; Ellis, B. S.; Wolff, J. A.; Heizler, M. T.; McIntosh, W. C.

    2012-12-01

    The irregularly keyhole-shaped, 40x30 to 22 km, McDermitt caldera formed at 16.35±0.03 Ma (n=4; Fish Canyon sanidine = 28.201 Ma) during eruption of a zoned, aphyric, mildly peralkaline rhyolite to abundantly anorthoclase-phyric, metaluminous dacite (McDermitt Tuff, MDT). Intracaldera MDT is locally strongly rheomorphic and, where MDT and caldera floor are well-exposed along the western margin, contains abundant megabreccia but is a maximum of ~450 m thick. If this thickness is representative of the caldera, intracaldera MDT has a volume of ~400 km3. Outflow MDT is currently known up to 13 km south of the caldera but only 3 km north of the caldera. Maximum outflow thickness is ~100 m, and outflow volume is probably no more than about 10% that of intracaldera MDT. The thickness and volume relations indicate collapse began very early during eruption, and most tuff ponded within the caldera. Outflow is strongly rheomorphic where draped over paleotopography. Late, undated icelandite lavas and domes are probably residual magma from the caldera chamber. Resurgence is expressed as both a broad, symmetrical dome in the north part and a fault-bound uplift in the south part of the caldera. Mineralization associated with the caldera includes Zr-rich U deposits that are indistinguishable in age with the McDermitt Tuff, Hg, Au, Ga, and Li-rich intracaldera tuffaceous sediments. Although formed during probable regional extension, the caldera is flat-lying and cut only at its west and east margins by much younger, high-angle normal faults. The caldera formed in an area of highly diverse Cenozoic volcanic rocks. The oldest are 39 and 46 Ma metaluminous dacite lavas along the northwest margin. Coarsely plagioclase-phyric to aphyric Steens Basalt lavas crop out around the west, northwest, and northeast margin. An anorthoclase-phyric, low-Si rhyolite lava (16.69±0.02 Ma) that is interbedded with probable Steens lavas northeast of the caldera and a biotite rhyolite lava dome (16.62

  7. Comparing regeneration techniques for afforesting previously farmed bottomland hardwood sites in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Roy Lockhart; Bob Keeland; John McCoy; Thomas J. Dean

    2003-01-01

    A study was implemented to test site preparation methods and artificial regeneration of three oak (Quercus spp.) species on four agricultural fields in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley in Louisiana, USA. Six years after establishment, few consistent differences were found in oak density between sowing acorn methods (seed drill versus broadcast...

  8. Hydro-economic analysis of groundwater pumping for irrigated agriculture in California's Central Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medellín-Azuara, Josué; MacEwan, Duncan; Howitt, Richard E.; Koruakos, George; Dogrul, Emin C.; Brush, Charles F.; Kadir, Tariq N.; Harter, Thomas; Melton, Forrest; Lund, Jay R.

    2015-09-01

    As in many places, groundwater in California (USA) is the major alternative water source for agriculture during drought, so groundwater's availability will drive some inevitable changes in the state's water management. Currently, agricultural, environmental, and urban uses compete for groundwater, resulting in substantial overdraft in dry years with lowering of water tables, which in turn increases pumping costs and reduces groundwater pumping capacity. In this study, SWAP (an economic model of agricultural production and water use in California) and C2VISim (the California Department of Water Resources groundwater model for California's Central Valley) are connected. This paper examines the economic costs of pumping replacement groundwater during drought and the potential loss of pumping capacity as groundwater levels drop. A scenario of three additional drought years continuing from 2014 show lower water tables in California's Central Valley and loss of pumping capacity. Places without access to groundwater and with uncertain surface-water deliveries during drought are the most economically vulnerable in terms of crop revenues, employment and household income. This is particularly true for Tulare Lake Basin, which relies heavily on water imported from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Remote-sensing estimates of idle agricultural land between 2012 and 2014 confirm this finding. Results also point to the potential of a portfolio approach for agriculture, in which crop mixing and conservation practices have substantial roles.

  9. Modelling ground movements at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy): the role of the shallow geothermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiano, Antonio; Giulia di Giuseppe, Maria; Petrillo, Zaccaria; Troise, Claudia; de Natale, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    Campi Flegrei caldera is characterized by large ground movements, well known since Roman times. Superimposed to a general secular subsidence occurring at a rate of 1.5-2.0 cm/year, an episode of sharp uplift is in progress since 1969, with peak rates up to 1 m/year (in 1982-1984), similar to another episode which culminated with the 1538 eruption. Peak uplift episodes are often followed by some amount of subsidence, which prevent a simple interpretation in terms of purely magmatic inflation phenomena. Such up and down episodes of ground deformations are rather common at large calderas, like in Yellowstone (USA), Long Valley (USA), etc. Here we propose an interpretation based on a mixed mechanical-fluid-dynamical model, in which part of the uplift is generated by increase of water pressure in the shallow geothermal system, as a response to rapid inflow of magmatic fluids exsolved from a deeper magma chamber. We use the program THOUGH2 to model the changes of temperature and pressure in the geothermal system due to the magmatic fluids inflow. Changes in pressure in the caldera volume are then used to compute ground deformations. This way, a theoretical time evolution of ground deformation has been obtained, which compares well with the observed one, if appropriate values of permeability are used. We discuss the implication of such a model for eruption forecast purposes, and the extent at which the required values of permeability can be really representative of the real medium.

  10. Influence of hydrologic modifications on Fraxinus pennsylvanica in the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Hugo K.W.; King, Sammy L.; Keim, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    We used tree-ring analysis to examine radial growth response of a common, moderately flood-tolerant species (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall) to hydrologic and climatic variability for > 40 years before and after hydrologic modifications affecting two forest stands in the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley (USA): a stand without levees below dams and a stand within a ring levee. At the stand without levees below dams, spring flood stages decreased and overall growth increased after dam construction, which we attribute to a reduction in flood stress. At the stand within a ring levee, growth responded to the elimination of overbank flooding by shifting from being positively correlated with river stage to not being correlated with river stage. In general, growth in swales was positively correlated with river stage and Palmer Drought Severity Index (an index of soil moisture) for longer periods than flats. Growth decreased after levee construction, but swales were less impacted than flats likely because of differences in elevation and soils provide higher soil moisture. Results of this study indicate that broad-scale hydrologic processes differ in their effects on the flood regime, and the effects on growth of moderately flood-tolerant species such as F. pennsylvanica can be mediated by local-scale factors such as topographic position, which affects soil moisture.

  11. Months between rejuvenation and volcanic eruption at Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Christy B.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Boyce, Jeremy W

    2015-01-01

    Rejuvenation of previously intruded silicic magma is an important process leading to effusive rhyolite, which is the most common product of volcanism at calderas with protracted histories of eruption and unrest such as Yellowstone, Long Valley, and Valles, USA. Although orders of magnitude smaller in volume than rare caldera-forming super-eruptions, these relatively frequent effusions of rhyolite are comparable to the largest eruptions of the 20th century and pose a considerable volcanic hazard. However, the physical pathway from rejuvenation to eruption of silicic magma is unclear particularly because the time between reheating of a subvolcanic intrusion and eruption is poorly quantified. This study uses geospeedometry of trace element profiles with nanometer resolution in sanidine crystals to reveal that Yellowstone’s most recent volcanic cycle began when remobilization of a near- or sub-solidus silicic magma occurred less than 10 months prior to eruption, following a 220,000 year period of volcanic repose. Our results reveal a geologically rapid timescale for rejuvenation and effusion of ~3 km3 of high-silica rhyolite lava even after protracted cooling of the subvolcanic system, which is consistent with recent physical modeling that predict a timescale of several years or less. Future renewal of rhyolitic volcanism at Yellowstone is likely to require an energetic intrusion of mafic or silicic magma into the shallow subvolcanic reservoir and could rapidly generate an eruptible rhyolite on timescales similar to those documented here.

  12. Reclaiming agricultural drainage water with nanofiltration membranes: Imperial Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaka, Y.K.; Schroeder, R.A.; Setmire, J.G.; ,

    2003-01-01

    We conducted pilot-scale field experiments using nanofiltration membranes to lower the salinity and remove Se, As and other toxic contaminants from saline agricultural wastewater in the Imperial Valley, California, USA. Farmlands in the desert climate (rainfall - 7.4 cm/a) of Imperial Valley cover -200,000 ha that are irrigated with water (-1.7 km3 annually) imported from the Colorado River. The salinity (-850 mg/L) and concentration of Se (-2.5 ??g/L) in the Colorado River water are high and evapotranpiration further concentrates salts in irrigation drainage water, reaching salinities of 3,000-15,000 mg/L TDS and a median Se value of -30 ??g/L. Experiments were conducted with two commercially available nanofiltration membranes, using drainage water of varying composition, and with or without the addition of organic precipitation inhibitors. Results show that these membranes selectively remove more than 95% of Se, SO4, Mo, U and DOC, and -30% of As from this wastewater. Low percentages of Cl, NO3 and HCO3, with enough cations to maintain electrical neutrality also were removed. The product water treated by these membranes comprised more than 90% of the wastewater tested. Results indicate that the treated product water from the Alamo River likely will have less than 0.2 ??g/L Se, salinity of 300-500 mg/L TDS and other chemical concentrations that meet the water quality criteria for irrigation and potable use. Because acceptability is a major issue for providing treated wastewater to urban centers, it may be prudent to use the reclaimed water for irrigation and creation of lower salinity wetlands near the Salton Sea; an equivalent volume of Colorado River water can then be diverted for the use of increasing populations of San Diego and other urban centers in southern California. Nanofiltration membranes yield greater reclaimed-water output and require lower pressure and less pretreatment, and therefore are generally more cost effective than traditional reverse

  13. Eruption-triggered mixing of extra-caldera basalt and rhyolite complexes along the East Gallatin-Washburn fault zone, Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, C. J.; Larson, P. B.; Spell, T. L.; Tarbert, K. D.

    2013-08-01

    weakened zones of the upper crust. The decompression induced mixing was facilitated by coeval extensional tectonics and structures in the Norris-Mammoth Corridor. Extra-caldera rhyolites are some of the first volcanics following the collapse of the current caldera and also some of the youngest volcanics in the Yellowstone Plateau and require further understanding of volcanism in the Yellowstone Plateau.

  14. Afforestation of marginal agricultural land in the lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John A. Stanturf; Callie J. Schweitzer; Emile S. Gardiner

    1998-01-01

    Afforestation of marginal agricultural land in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley (LMAV) relies on native species, planted mostly in single-species plantations. Hard mast species such as oak and pecan are favored for their value to wildlife, especially on public land. Successful afforestation requires an understanding of site variation within floodplains and...

  15. Rockfall hazard and risk assessment in the Yosemite Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzetti, F.; Reichenbach, P.; Wieczorek, G. F.

    Rock slides and rock falls are the most frequent types of slope movements in Yosemite National Park, California. In historical time (1857-2002) 392 rock falls and rock slides have been documented in the valley, and some of them have been mapped in detail. We present the results of an attempt to assess rock fall hazards in the Yosemite Valley. Spatial and temporal aspects of rock falls hazard are considered. A detailed inventory of slope movements covering the 145-year period from 1857 to 2002 is used to determine the frequency-volume statistics of rock falls and to estimate the annual frequency of rock falls, providing the temporal component of rock fall hazard. The extent of the areas potentially subject to rock fall hazards in the Yosemite Valley were obtained using STONE, a physically-based rock fall simulation computer program. The software computes 3-dimensional rock fall trajectories starting from a digital elevation model (DEM), the location of rock fall release points, and maps of the dynamic rolling friction coefficient and of the coefficients of normal and tangential energy restitution. For each DEM cell the software calculates the number of rock falls passing through the cell, the maximum rock fall velocity and the maximum flying height. For the Yosemite Valley, a DEM with a ground resolution of 10 × 10 m was prepared using topographic contour lines from the U.S. Geological Survey 1:24 000-scale maps. Rock fall release points were identified as DEM cells having a slope steeper than 60°, an assumption based on the location of historical rock falls. Maps of the normal and tangential energy restitution coefficients and of the rolling friction coefficient were produced from a surficial geologic map. The availability of historical rock falls mapped in detail allowed us to check the computer program performance and to calibrate the model parameters. Visual and statistical comparison of the model results with the mapped rock falls confirmed the accuracy of

  16. Rockfall hazard and risk assessment in the Yosemite Valley, California, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Guzzetti

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rock slides and rock falls are the most frequent types of slope movements in Yosemite National Park, California. In historical time (1857–2002 392 rock falls and rock slides have been documented in the valley, and some of them have been mapped in detail. We present the results of an attempt to assess rock fall hazards in the Yosemite Valley. Spatial and temporal aspects of rock falls hazard are considered. A detailed inventory of slope movements covering the 145-year period from 1857 to 2002 is used to determine the frequency-volume statistics of rock falls and to estimate the annual frequency of rock falls, providing the temporal component of rock fall hazard. The extent of the areas potentially subject to rock fall hazards in the Yosemite Valley were obtained using STONE, a physically-based rock fall simulation computer program. The software computes 3-dimensional rock fall trajectories starting from a digital elevation model (DEM, the location of rock fall release points, and maps of the dynamic rolling friction coefficient and of the coefficients of normal and tangential energy restitution. For each DEM cell the software calculates the number of rock falls passing through the cell, the maximum rock fall velocity and the maximum flying height. For the Yosemite Valley, a DEM with a ground resolution of 10 × 10 m was prepared using topographic contour lines from the U.S. Geological Survey 1:24 000-scale maps. Rock fall release points were identified as DEM cells having a slope steeper than 60°, an assumption based on the location of historical rock falls. Maps of the normal and tangential energy restitution coefficients and of the rolling friction coefficient were produced from a surficial geologic map. The availability of historical rock falls mapped in detail allowed us to check the computer program performance and to calibrate the model parameters. Visual and statistical comparison of the model results with the mapped rock falls

  17. USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Peter

    http://www.systime.dk/ungdomsuddannelser/almen-studieforberedelse/usa-en-grundbog-i-politik-og-okonomi.html......http://www.systime.dk/ungdomsuddannelser/almen-studieforberedelse/usa-en-grundbog-i-politik-og-okonomi.html...

  18. Wetland Reserve Program enhances site occupancy and species richness in assemblages of anuran amphibians in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Susan C.; Waddle, J. Hardin; Faulkner, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    We measured amphibian habitat use to quantify the effectiveness of conservation practices implemented under the Wetland Reserve Program (WRP), an initiative of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service. From February to June 2007, we quantified calling male anurans in cultivated cropland, former cultivated cropland restored through the WRP, and mature bottomland hardwood forest. Sites were located in two watersheds within the Mississippi Alluvial Valley of Arkansas and Louisiana, USA. We estimated detection probability and site occupancy within each land use category using a Bayesian hierarchical model of community species occurrence, and derived an estimate of species richness at each site. Relative to sites in cultivated cropland, nine of 1 l species detected were significantly more likely to occur at WRP sites and six were more likely to occur at forested sites. Species richness estimates were also higher for WRP and forested sites, compared to those in cultivated cropland. Almost half (45 %) of the species responded positively to both WRP and forested sites, indicating that patches undergoing restoration may be important transitional habitats. Wetland Reserve Program conservation practices are successful in restoring suitable habitat and reducing the impact of cultivation-induced habitat loss on amphibians in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley.

  19. Ground referencing GRACE satellite estimates of groundwater storage changes in the California Central Valley, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Scanlon, B. R.; Longuevergne, L.; Long, D.

    2012-01-01

    International audience; [1] There is increasing interest in using Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite data to remotely monitor groundwater storage variations; however, comparisons with ground-based well data are limited but necessary to validate satellite data processing, especially when the study area is close to or below the GRACE footprint. The Central Valley is a heavily irrigated region with large-scale groundwater depletion during droughts. Here we compare updated ...

  20. Mollusca, Hirudinea, and Amphibia biogeography and paleobiology in Tule Valley and adjacent regions of Bonneville Basin, western USA [draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Mollusk, leeches (Hirudinea), and amphibian distribution are described for Tule Valley and adjacent Snake Valley and Fish Springs Flat, Tule Valley aquatic resources...

  1. PREFACE: Collapse Calderas Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottsmann, Jo; Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo

    2008-10-01

    Caldera-formation is one of the most awe-inspiring and powerful displays of nature's force. Resultant deposits may cover vast areas and significantly alter the immediate topography. Post-collapse activity may include resurgence, unrest, intra-caldera volcanism and potentially the start of a new magmatic cycle, perhaps eventually leading to renewed collapse. Since volcanoes and their eruptions are the surface manifestation of magmatic processes, calderas provide key insights into the generation and evolution of large-volume silicic magma bodies in the Earth's crust. Despite their potentially ferocious nature, calderas play a crucial role in modern society's life. Collapse calderas host essential economic deposits and supply power for many via the exploitation of geothermal reservoirs, and thus receive considerable scientific, economic and industrial attention. Calderas also attract millions of visitors world-wide with their spectacular scenic displays. To build on the outcomes of the 2005 calderas workshop in Tenerife (Spain) and to assess the most recent advances on caldera research, a follow-up meeting was proposed to be held in Mexico in 2008. This abstract volume presents contributions to the 2nd Calderas Workshop held at Hotel Misión La Muralla, Querétaro, Mexico, 19-25 October 2008. The title of the workshop `Reconstructing the evolution of collapse calderas: Magma storage, mobilisation and eruption' set the theme for five days of presentations and discussions, both at the venue as well as during visits to the surrounding calderas of Amealco, Amazcala and Huichapan. The multi-disciplinary workshop was attended by more than 40 scientist from North, Central and South America, Europe, Australia and Asia. Contributions covered five thematic topics: geology, geochemistry/petrology, structural analysis/modelling, geophysics, and hazards. The workshop was generously supported by the International Association of Volcanology and the Chemistry of The Earth's Interior

  2. Geochemical evidence for seasonal controls on the transportation of Holocene loess, Matanuska Valley, southern Alaska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Budahn, James R.; Skipp, Gary L.; McGeehin, John P.

    2016-06-01

    Loess is a widespread Quaternary deposit in Alaska and loess accretion occurs today in some regions, such as the Matanuska Valley. The source of loess in the Matanuska Valley has been debated for more than seven decades, with the Knik River and the Matanuska River, both to the east, being the leading candidates and the Susitna River, to the west, as a less favorable source. We report here new stratigraphic, mineralogic, and geochemical data that test the competing hypotheses of these river sources. Loess thickness data are consistent with previous studies that show that a source or sources lay to the east, which rules out the Susitna River as a source. Knik and Matanuska River silts can be distinguished using Sc-Th-La, LaN/YbN vs. Eu/Eu∗, Cr/Sc, and As/Sb. Matanuska Valley loess falls clearly within the range of values for these ratios found in Matanuska River silt. Dust storms from the Matanuska River are most common in autumn, when river discharge is at a minimum and silt-rich point bars are exposed, wind speed from the north is beginning to increase after a low-velocity period in summer, snow depth is still minimal, and soil temperatures are still above freezing. Thus, seasonal changes in climate and hydrology emerge as critical factors in the timing of aeolian silt transport in southern Alaska. These findings could be applicable to understanding seasonal controls on Pleistocene loess accretion in Europe, New Zealand, South America, and elsewhere in North America.

  3. Constraints on tree seedling establishment in montane grasslands of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coop, Jonathan D; Givnish, Thomas J

    2008-04-01

    Montane and subalpine grasslands are prominent, but poorly understood, features of the Rocky Mountains. These communities frequently occur below reversed tree lines on valley floors, where nightly cold air accumulation is spatially coupled with fine soil texture. We used field experiments to assess the roles of minimum temperature, soil texture, grass competition, and ungulate browsing on the growth, photosynthetic performance, and survival of transplanted ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) seedlings at 32 sites straddling such reversed tree lines in the Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) of the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico (USA). Seedling growth increased most strongly with increasing nighttime minimum temperatures away from the valley bottoms; seedlings experiencing the coldest temperatures on the caldera floor exhibited stunted needles and often no measurable height growth. Based on the chlorophyll fluorescence ratios PhiPSII and Fv/Fm, we found that low minimum temperatures, low soil moisture, and fine soil texture all contributed to photoinhibition. Neighboring herbs had only minor negative effects on seedlings. We found no effect of ungulates, but golden-mantled ground squirrels (Spermophilus lateralis) caused substantial seedling mortality. Second-year seedling survival was highest on sandy soils, and third-year survival was highest at sites with higher minimum temperatures. We conclude that differential tree seedling establishment driven by low minimum temperatures in the valley bottoms is the primary factor maintaining montane grasslands of the VCNP, although this process probably operated historically in combination with frequent surface fire to set the position of the tree line ecotone. As at alpine tree lines, reversed tree lines bordering montane and subalpine grasslands can represent temperature-sensitive boundaries of the tree life form.

  4. Ground referencing GRACE satellite estimates of groundwater storage changes in the California Central Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, B. R.; Longuevergne, L.; Long, D.

    2012-04-01

    There is increasing interest in using Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite data to remotely monitor groundwater storage variations; however, comparisons with ground-based well data are limited but necessary to validate satellite data processing, especially when the study area is close to or below the GRACE footprint. The Central Valley is a heavily irrigated region with large-scale groundwater depletion during droughts. Here we compare updated estimates of groundwater storage changes in the California Central Valley using GRACE satellites with storage changes from groundwater level data. A new processing approach was applied that optimally uses available GRACE and water balance component data to extract changes in groundwater storage. GRACE satellites show that groundwater depletion totaled ˜31.0 ± 3.0 km3 for Groupe de Recherche de Geodesie Spatiale (GRGS) satellite data during the drought from October 2006 through March 2010. Groundwater storage changes from GRACE agreed with those from well data for the overlap period (April 2006 through September 2009) (27 km3 for both). General correspondence between GRACE and groundwater level data validates the methodology and increases confidence in use of GRACE satellites to monitor groundwater storage changes.

  5. Spatially distributed pesticide exposure assessment in the Central Valley, California, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Yuzhou [Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Zhang Minghua, E-mail: mhzhang@ucdavis.ed [Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Field runoff is an important transport mechanism by which pesticides move into the hydrologic environment of intensive agricultural regions such as California's Central Valley. This study presents a spatially explicit modeling approach to extend Pesticide Root Zone Model (PRZM), a field-scale pesticide transport model, into basin level. The approach was applied to simulate chlorpyrifos use in the Central Valley during 2003-2007. The average value of loading as percent of use (LAPU) is 0.031%. Results of this study provide strong evidence that surface runoff generation and pesticide application timing are the two influencing factors on the spatial and temporal variability of chlorpyrifos sources from agricultural fields. This is one of the first studies in coupling GIS and field-scale models and providing simulations for the dynamics of pesticides over an agriculturally dominated landscape. The demonstrated modeling approach may be useful for implementations of best management practice (BMP) and total maximum daily load (TMDL). - Runoff generation and application timing are governing factors on spatiotemporal variability of pesticide sources.

  6. Plants and ventifacts delineate late Holocene wind vectors in the Coachella Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, P.G.; Webb, R.H.; Fisher, M.; Muth, Allan

    2009-01-01

    Strong westerly winds that emanate from San Gorgonio Pass, the lowest point between Palm Springs and Los Angeles, California, dominate aeolian transport in the Coachella Valley of the western Sonoran Desert. These winds deposit sand in coppice dunes that are critical habitat for several species, including the state and federally listed threatened species Uma inornata, a lizard. Although wind directions are generally defined in this valley, the wind field has complex interactions with local topography and becomes more variable with distance from the pass. Local, dominant wind directions are preserved by growth patterns of Larrea tridentata (creosote bush), a shrub characteristic of the hot North American deserts, and ventifacts. Exceptionally long-lived, Larrea has the potential to preserve wind direction over centuries to millennia, shaped by the abrasive pruning of windward branches and the persistent training of leeward branches. Wind direction preserved in Larrea individuals and clones was mapped at 192 locations. Compared with wind data from three weather stations, Larrea vectors effectively reflect annual prevailing winds. Ventifacts measured at 24 locations record winds 10° more westerly than Larrea and appear to reflect the direction of the most erosive winds. Based on detailed mapping of local wind directions as preserved in Larrea, only the northern half of the Mission-Morongo Creek floodplain is likely to supply sand to protected U. inornata habitat in the Willow Hole ecological reserve.

  7. A statistical learning framework for groundwater nitrate models of the Central Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Bernard T.; Fienen, Michael N.; Lorenz, David L.

    2015-12-01

    We used a statistical learning framework to evaluate the ability of three machine-learning methods to predict nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater of the Central Valley, California: boosted regression trees (BRT), artificial neural networks (ANN), and Bayesian networks (BN). Machine learning methods can learn complex patterns in the data but because of overfitting may not generalize well to new data. The statistical learning framework involves cross-validation (CV) training and testing data and a separate hold-out data set for model evaluation, with the goal of optimizing predictive performance by controlling for model overfit. The order of prediction performance according to both CV testing R2 and that for the hold-out data set was BRT > BN > ANN. For each method we identified two models based on CV testing results: that with maximum testing R2 and a version with R2 within one standard error of the maximum (the 1SE model). The former yielded CV training R2 values of 0.94-1.0. Cross-validation testing R2 values indicate predictive performance, and these were 0.22-0.39 for the maximum R2 models and 0.19-0.36 for the 1SE models. Evaluation with hold-out data suggested that the 1SE BRT and ANN models predicted better for an independent data set compared with the maximum R2 versions, which is relevant to extrapolation by mapping. Scatterplots of predicted vs. observed hold-out data obtained for final models helped identify prediction bias, which was fairly pronounced for ANN and BN. Lastly, the models were compared with multiple linear regression (MLR) and a previous random forest regression (RFR) model. Whereas BRT results were comparable to RFR, MLR had low hold-out R2 (0.07) and explained less than half the variation in the training data. Spatial patterns of predictions by the final, 1SE BRT model agreed reasonably well with previously observed patterns of nitrate occurrence in groundwater of the Central Valley.

  8. Insights into controls on hexavalent chromium in groundwater provided by environmental tracers, Sacramento Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Andrew H.; Mills, Christopher T.; Morrison, Jean M.; Ball, Lyndsay B.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental tracers are useful for determining groundwater age and recharge source, yet their application in studies of geogenic Cr(VI) in groundwater has been limited. Environmental tracer data from 166 wells located in the Sacramento Valley, northern California, were interpreted and compared to Cr concentrations to determine the origin and age of groundwater with elevated Cr(VI), and better understand where Cr(VI) becomes mobilized and how it evolves along flowpaths. In addition to major ion and trace element concentrations, the dataset includes δ18O, δ2H, 3H concentration, 14C activity (of dissolved inorganic C), δ13C, 3He/4He ratio, and noble gas concentrations (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe). Noble gas recharge temperatures (NGTs) were computed, and age-related tracers were interpreted in combination to constrain the age distribution in samples and sort them into six different age categories spanning from 10,000 yr old. Nearly all measured Cr is in the form of Cr(IV). Concentrations range from 3 mg L−1), and commonly have δ18O values enriched relative to local precipitation. These samples likely contain irrigation water and are elevated due to accelerated mobilization of Cr(VI) in the unsaturated zone (UZ) in irrigated areas. Group 2 samples are from throughout the valley and typically contain water 1000–10,000 yr old, have δ18O values consistent with local precipitation, and have unexpectedly warm NGTs. Chromium(VI) concentrations in Group 2 samples may be elevated for multiple reasons, but the hypothesis most consistent with all available data (notably, the warm NGTs) is a relatively long UZ residence time due to recharge through a deep UZ near the margin of the basin. A possible explanation for why Cr(VI) may be primarily mobilized in the UZ rather than farther along flowpaths in the oxic portion of the saturated zone is more dynamic cycling of Mn in the UZ due to transient moisture and redox conditions.

  9. Buried paleoindian-age landscapes in stream valleys of the central plains, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    A systematic study of late-Quaternary landscape evolution in the Central Plains documented widespread, deeply buried paleosols that represent Paleoindian-age landscapes in terrace fills of large streams (> 5th order), in alluvial fans, and in draws in areas of western Kansas with a thick loess mantle. Alluvial stratigraphic sections were investigated along a steep bio-climatic gradient extending from the moist-subhumid forest-prairie border of the east-central Plains to the dry-subhumid and semi-arid shortgrass prairie of the west-central Plains. Radiocarbon ages indicate that most large streams were characterized by slow aggradation accompanied by cumulic soil development from ca. 11,500 to 10,000??14C yr B.P. In the valleys of some large streams, such as the Ninnescah and Saline rivers, these processes continued into the early Holocene. The soil-stratigraphic record in the draws of western Kansas indicates slow aggradation punctuated by episodes of landscape stability and pedogenesis beginning as early as ca. 13,300??14C yr B.P. and spanning the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary. The development record of alluvial fans in western Kansas is similar to the record in the draws; slow aggradation was punctuated by multiple episodes of soil development between ca. 13,000 and 9000??14C yr B.P. In eastern Kansas and Nebraska, development of alluvial fans was common during the early and middle Holocene, but evidence shows fan development as early as ca. 11,300??14C yr B.P. Buried soils dating between ca. 12,600 and 9000??14C yr B.P. were documented in fans throughout the region. In stream valleys across the Central Plains, rapid alluviation after ca. 9000??14C yr B.P. resulted in deeply buried soils that may harbor Paleoindian cultural deposits. Hence, the paucity of recorded stratified Paleoindian sites in the Central Plains is probably related to poor visibility (i.e., deep burial in alluvial deposits) instead of limited human occupation in the region during the terminal

  10. Application of the Gauss theorem to the study of silicic calderas: The calderas of La Primavera, Los Azufres, and Los Humeros (Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Enríquez, J. O.; Domínguez-Méndez, F.; Lozada-Zumaeta, M.; Morales-Rodríguez, H. F.; Andaverde-Arredondo, J. A.

    2005-10-01

    used to estimate their collapses. The respective estimated subsidences for La Primavera (600 m), Los Humeros (500 m), and Los Azufres calderas (800 and 1200 m, respectively) are supported by borehole data. These relatively small subsidences, in relation to many calderas in western US, can be explained by the presence of cylindrical to sub-spherical magma chambers (of smaller size than those underlying the western US calderas—of Yellowstone, Valles, and Long Valley for example) in an epicontinental setting of young Quaternary rocks (against Precambrian cratonic basement in western US). A reassessment of all the available geological and geophysical information was also done. In particular, the caldera limits were checked and corrected when necessary based on available 2-D gravity modeling, gravity gradients, and the location of the volcanic vents. Regional tectonic lineaments might explain many of the particular details of their structures. La Primavera caldera might have formed through a piecemeal subsidence (controlled by the pre-caldera tectonics); Los Humeros caldera is an example of a caldera that evolved by incremental growth (as the Vulsiniani calderas in Italy). The Los Azufres caldera comprises two contiguous calderas emplaced in a regional tectonic depression.

  11. Setting A Stopwatch for Post-Caldera Effusive Rhyolite Eruptions at Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, C. B.; Vazquez, J. A.; Boyce, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Rejuvenation of previously intruded silicic magma is an important process leading to effusive rhyolite, which is the most common product of volcanism at calderas with protracted histories of eruption and unrest such as Yellowstone caldera (Wyoming), Long Valley caldera (California), and Valles caldera (New Mexico) in the United States. Although orders of magnitude smaller in volume than rare caldera-forming supereruptions, these relatively frequent effusions of rhyolite are comparable to the largest eruptions of the 20th century and pose a considerable volcanic hazard. However, the physical pathway from rejuvenation to eruption of silicic magma is unclear, particularly because the time between reheating of a subvolcanic intrusion and eruption is poorly quantified. This study uses trace element diffusion in sanidine crystals measured at nanometer-scale with NanoSIMS to reveal that rejuvenation of a near-solidus or subsolidus silicic intrusion occurred within ~10 months following a protracted period (220 k.y.) of volcanic repose, and resulted in effusion of ~3 km3 of high-silica rhyolite lava at the onset of Yellowstone's last volcanic interval. In addition we find that the frequently made assumption in geospeedometry of a step-function initial condition can be inaccurate despite petrographic evidence for resorption, and can be addressed by interrogating diffusion time scale concordance between multiple trace elements that are geochemically similar. The results of this study reveal that a sufficiently energetic rejuvenation of Yellowstone's shallow crystal-melt mush and/or hydrothermally altered wall rock could lead to an effusive eruption within months. Fortunately, any significant rejuvenation of the reservoir is likely to be associated with deformation or seismicity and identifiable by geophysical monitoring.

  12. Land subsidence in the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA, 2007–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sneed

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapid land subsidence was recently measured using multiple methods in two areas of the San Joaquin Valley (SJV: between Merced and Fresno (El Nido, and between Fresno and Bakersfield (Pixley. Recent land-use changes and diminished surface-water availability have led to increased groundwater pumping, groundwater-level declines, and land subsidence. Differential land subsidence has reduced the flow capacity of water-conveyance systems in these areas, exacerbating flood hazards and affecting the delivery of irrigation water. Vertical land-surface changes during 2007–2014 were determined by using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR, Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS, and extensometer data. Results of the InSAR analysis indicate that about 7600 km2 subsided 50–540 mm during 2008–2010; CGPS and extensometer data indicate that these rates continued or accelerated through December 2014. The maximum InSAR-measured rate of 270 mm yr−1 occurred in the El Nido area, and is among the largest rates ever measured in the SJV. In the Pixley area, the maximum InSAR-measured rate during 2008–2010 was 90 mm yr−1. Groundwater was an important part of the water supply in both areas, and pumping increased when land use changed or when surface water was less available. This increased pumping caused groundwater-level declines to near or below historical lows during the drought periods 2007–2009 and 2012–present. Long-term groundwater-level and land-subsidence monitoring in the SJV is critical for understanding the interconnection of land use, groundwater levels, and subsidence, and evaluating management strategies that help mitigate subsidence hazards to infrastructure while optimizing water supplies.

  13. Land subsidence in the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA, 2007-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneed, Michelle; Brandt, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Rapid land subsidence was recently measured using multiple methods in two areas of the San Joaquin Valley (SJV): between Merced and Fresno (El Nido), and between Fresno and Bakersfield (Pixley). Recent land-use changes and diminished surface-water availability have led to increased groundwater pumping, groundwater-level declines, and land subsidence. Differential land subsidence has reduced the flow capacity of water-conveyance systems in these areas, exacerbating flood hazards and affecting the delivery of irrigation water. Vertical land-surface changes during 2007–2014 were determined by using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS), and extensometer data. Results of the InSAR analysis indicate that about 7600 km2 subsided 50–540 mm during 2008–2010; CGPS and extensometer data indicate that these rates continued or accelerated through December 2014. The maximum InSAR-measured rate of 270 mm yr−1 occurred in the El Nido area, and is among the largest rates ever measured in the SJV. In the Pixley area, the maximum InSAR-measured rate during 2008–2010 was 90 mm yr−1. Groundwater was an important part of the water supply in both areas, and pumping increased when land use changed or when surface water was less available. This increased pumping caused groundwater-level declines to near or below historical lows during the drought periods 2007–2009 and 2012–present. Long-term groundwater-level and land-subsidence monitoring in the SJV is critical for understanding the interconnection of land use, groundwater levels, and subsidence, and evaluating management strategies that help mitigate subsidence hazards to infrastructure while optimizing water supplies.

  14. Nomination of the Lahontan Valley Wetlands Nevada, U.S.A. as Wetlands of International Importance under the RAMSAR Convention

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a proposal to list the Lahontan Valley Wetlands as a Wetlands of International Importance. The Lahontan Valley Wetlands are an important habitat for...

  15. Tree growth and recruitment in a leveed floodplain forest in the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Hugo K.W.; King, Sammy L.; Keim, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Flooding is a defining disturbance in floodplain forests affecting seed germination, seedling establishment, and tree growth. Globally, flood control, including artificial levees, dams, and channelization has altered flood regimes in floodplains. However, a paucity of data are available in regards to the long-term effects of levees on stand establishment and tree growth in floodplain forests. In this study, we used dendrochronological techniques to reconstruct tree recruitment and tree growth over a 90-year period at three stands within a ring levee in the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley (MAV) and to evaluate whether recruitment patterns and tree growth changed following levee construction. We hypothesized that: (1) sugarberry is increasing in dominance and overcup oak (Quercus lyrata) is becoming less dominant since the levee, and that changes in hydrology are playing a greater role than canopy disturbance in these changes in species dominance; and (2) that overcup oak growth has declined following construction of the levee and cessation of overbank flooding whereas that of sugarberry has increased. Recruitment patterns shifted from flood-tolerant overcup oak to flood-intolerant sugarberry (Celtis laevigata) after levee construction. None of the 122 sugarberry trees cored in this study established prior to the levee, but it was the most common species established after the levee. The mechanisms behind the compositional change are unknown, however, the cosmopolitan distribution of overcup oak during the pre-levee period and sugarberry during the post-levee period, the lack of sugarberry establishment in the pre-levee period, and the confinement of overcup oak regeneration to the lowest areas in each stand after harvest in the post-levee period indicate that species-specific responses to flooding and light availability are forcing recruitment patterns. Overcup oak growth was also affected by levee construction, but in contrast to our hypothesis, growth actually

  16. Impacts of Discharge Reductions on Physical and Thermal Habitat Characteristics in a Desert Spring, Death Valley National Park, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, R. R.; Stone, M. C.; Sada, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    Desert springs are biodiversity hotspots that are sensitive to anthropogenic activities. Despite their importance, the effects of human disturbance on desert springs are not well known, and scarce information exists describing the biotic or environmental effects of incrementally increasing disturbance. The objective of this research was to quantify the influence of incremental reductions in discharge on the physical and thermal characteristics of a desert springbrook. This objective was accomplished through a combination of field experiments at Travertine Spring in Death Valley National Park, USA, and hydraulic/temperature modeling in order to: (1) quantify changes in physical characteristics of the springbrook channel and aquatic environment; (2) investigate the effects of reduced spring discharge on seasonal spatial temperature patterns; (3) delineate tipping points that exhibit a non-linear response to decreased flow. The study results supported our predictions that decreased discharge would modify physical habitat characteristics of the springbrook, reduce aquatic habitat volume, increase variability in water temperatures along the springbrook, and reduce springbrook suitability for invertebrates that require stable environments. Field observations revealed a significant relationship between water depth and flow velocity with reduced spring discharge. The rate of change of mean water depths, velocities, and habitat volumes were greatest with only a 10% reduction in spring flow. In addition, a non-linear temperature response to flow reductions was present under all modeled conditions. Generally, water temperature gradients increased as flows were decreased, and the sensitivity of reduced discharge increased with distance from the spring source. The degree of sensitivity was a function of season, which reflects the influence of ambient air temperature and wind in the cooling of the springbrook. These results suggest that habitat for species using stable thermal

  17. Inverse geochemical modeling of groundwater evolution with emphasis on arsenic in the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer, Arkansas (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, M.U.; Davis, R.K.; Steele, K.F.; Kim, B.; Kresse, T.M.; Fazio, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Inverse geochemical modeling (PHREEQC) was used to identify the evolution of groundwater with emphasis on arsenic (As) release under reducing conditions in the shallow (25-30 m) Mississippi River Valley Alluvial aquifer, Arkansas, USA. The modeling was based on flow paths defined by high-precision (??2 cm) water level contour map; X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopic (SEM), and chemical analysis of boring-sediments for minerals; and detailed chemical analysis of groundwater along the flow paths. Potential phases were constrained using general trends in chemical analyses data of groundwater and sediments, and saturation indices data (MINTEQA2) of minerals in groundwater. Modeling results show that calcite, halite, fluorite, Fe oxyhydroxide, organic matter, H2S (gas) were dissolving with mole transfers of 1.40E - 03, 2.13E - 04, 4.15E - 06, 1.25E + 01, 3.11, and 9.34, respectively along the dominant flow line. Along the same flow line, FeS, siderite, and vivianite were precipitating with mole transfers of 9.34, 3.11, and 2.64E - 07, respectively. Cation exchange reactions of Ca2+ (4.93E - 04 mol) for Na+ (2.51E - 04 mol) on exchange sites occurred along the dominant flow line. Gypsum dissolution reactions were dominant over calcite dissolution in some of the flow lines due to the common ion effect. The concentration of As in groundwater ranged from rate of reduction of Fe oxyhydroxide over SO42 - with co-precipitation of As into sulfide is the limiting factor controlling dissolved As in groundwater. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Carbon Dioxide In The Urban Salt Lake Valley, Utah USA: Source And Long-Term Monitoring Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehleringer, J.; Lai, C.; Strong, C.; Pataki, D. E.; Bowling, D. R.; Schauer, A. J.; Bush, S.

    2011-12-01

    A high-precision, decadal record of carbon isotope ratios in atmospheric carbon dioxide has been produced for the urbanized Salt Lake Valley, Utah USA. These data complement a similar time series of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations for different locations in the same urban region. This isotopic record includes diurnal and nocturnal observations based on flask (IRMS-based) and continuous (TDL-based) measurement systems. These data reveal repeatable diurnal and seasonal variations in the anthropogenic and biogenic carbon sources that can be used to reconstruct different source inputs. As the Salt Lake Valley is an isolated urban region, the impacts of local anthropogenic inputs can be distinguished from regional patterns as measured by NOAA at the rural Wendover monitoring station 200 km to the west of the Salt Lake Valley. Complementary data, such as vehicle exhaust, emission from power plants and household furnaces, plant and soil organic matter, are also provided to quantify the carbon isotope ratios of the predominant anthropogenic and biogenic sources within the Salt Lake Valley. The combined source and long-term observational values will be made freely available and their utility is discussed for modeling efforts including urban metabolism modeling and atmospheric trace gas modeling.

  19. AMPHIBIAN OCCURRENCE AND AQUATIC INVADERS IN A CHANGING LANDSCAPE: IMPLICATIONS FOR WETLAND MITIGATION IN THE WILLAMETTE VALLEY, OREGON, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite concern about the conservation status of amphibians in western North America, few field studies have documented occurrence patterns of amphibians relative to potential stressors. We surveyed wetland fauna in Oregon Willamette Valley and used an information theoretic appro...

  20. Changes in magma storage conditions following caldera collapse at Okataina Volcanic Center, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Allison; Cooper, Kari M.; Leever, Marissa; Wimpenny, Josh; Deering, Chad; Rooney, Tyrone; Gravley, Darren; Yin, Qing-zhu

    2016-01-01

    Large silicic volcanic centers produce both small rhyolitic eruptions and catastrophic caldera-forming eruptions. Although changes in trace element and isotopic compositions within eruptions following caldera collapse have been observed at rhyolitic volcanic centers such as Yellowstone and Long Valley, much still remains unknown about the ways in which magma reservoirs are affected by caldera collapse. We present 238U-230Th age, trace element, and Hf isotopic data from individual zircon crystals from four eruptions from the Okataina Volcanic Center, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, in order to assess changes in trace element and isotopic composition of the reservoir following the 45-ka caldera-forming Rotoiti eruption. Our data indicate that (1) mixing of magmas derived from crustal melts and mantle melts takes place within the shallow reservoir; (2) while the basic processes of melt generation likely did not change significantly between pre- and post-caldera rhyolites, post-caldera zircons show increased trace element and isotopic heterogeneity that suggests a decrease in the degree of interconnectedness of the liquid within the reservoir following collapse; and (3) post-caldera eruptions from different vents indicate different storage times of the amalgamated melt prior to eruption. These data further suggest that the timescales needed to generate large volumes of eruptible melt may depend on the timescales needed to increase interconnectedness and achieve widespread homogenization throughout the reservoir.

  1. Rethinking climate change adaptation and place through a situated pathways framework: A case study from the Big Hole Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Murphy; Laurie Yung; Carina Wyborn; Daniel R. Williams

    2017-01-01

    This paper critically examines the temporal and spatial dynamics of adaptation in climate change science and explores how dynamic notions of 'place' elucidate novel ways of understanding community vulnerability and adaptation. Using data gathered from a narrative scenario-building process carried out among communities of the Big Hole Valley in Montana, the...

  2. Understory vegetation as an indicator for floodplain forest restoration in the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane De Steven; Stephen P. Faulkner; Bobby D. Keeland; Michael J. Baldwin; John W. McCoy; Steven C. Hughes

    2015-01-01

    In the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley (MAV), complete alteration of river-floodplain hydrology allowed for widespread conversion of forested bottomlands to intensive agriculture, resulting in nearly 80% forest loss. Governmental programs have attempted to restore forest habitat and functions within this altered landscape by the methods of tree planting (...

  3. Chemistry, mineralogy and origin of the clay-hill nitrate deposits, Amargosa River valley, Death Valley region, California, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericksen, G.E.; Hosterman, J.W.; St., Amand

    1988-01-01

    The clay-hill nitrate deposits of the Amargosa River valley, California, are caliche-type accumulations of water-soluble saline minerals in clay-rich soils on saline lake beds of Miocene, Pliocene(?) and Pleistocene age. The soils have a maximum thickness of ??? 50 cm, and commonly consist of three layers: (1) an upper 5-10 cm of saline-free soil; (2) an underlying 15-20 cm of rubbly saline soil; and (3) a hard nitrate-rich caliche, 10-20 cm thick, at the bottom of the soil profile. The saline constituents, which make up as much as 50% of the caliche, are chiefly Cl-, NO-3, SO2-4 and Na+. In addition are minor amounts of K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+, varying, though generally minor, amounts of B2O3 and CO2-3, and trace amounts of I (probably as IO-3), NO-2, CrO2-4 and Mo (probably as MoO2-4). The water-soluble saline materials have an I/Br ratio of ??? 1, which is much higher than nearly all other saline depostis. The principal saline minerals of the caliche are halite (NaCl), nitratite (NaNO3), darapskite (Na3(SO4)(NO3)??H2O), glauberite (Na2Ca(SO4)2), gypsum (CaSO4??2H2O) and anhydrite (CaSO4). Borax (Na2B4O5(OH)4??8H2O), tincalconite (Na2B4O5(OH)4??3H2O) and trona (Na3(CO3)(HCO3)??2H2O) are abundant locally. The clay-hill nitrate deposits are analogous to the well-known Chilean nitrate deposits, and probably are of similar origin. Whereas the Chilean deposits are in permeable soils of the nearly rainless Atacama Desert, the clay-hill deposits are in relatively impervious clay-rich soils that inhibited leaching by rain water. The annual rainfall in the Death Valley region of ??? 5 cm is sufficient to leach water-soluble minerals from the more permeable soils. The clay-hill deposits contain saline materials from the lake beds beneath the nitrate deposits are well as wind-transported materials from nearby clay-hill soils, playas and salt marshes. The nitrate is probably of organic origin, consisting of atmospheric nitrogen fixed as protein by photoautotrophic blue-green algae

  4. An ignimbrite caldera from the bottom up: Exhumed floor and fill of the resurgent Bonanza caldera, Southern Rocky Mountain volcanic field, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Peter W.; Zimmerer, Matthew J.; McIntosh, William C.

    2015-01-01

    intrusions; (6) brief time span for the entire caldera cycle (33.12 to ca. 33.03 Ma); (7) an exceptionally steep-sided resurgent dome, with dips of 40°–50° on west and 70°–80° on northeast flanks. Some near-original caldera morphology has been erosionally exhumed and remains defined by present-day landforms (western topographic rim, resurgent core, and ring-fault valley), while tilting and deep erosion provide three-dimensional exposures of intracaldera fill, floor, and resurgent structures. The absence of Plinian-fall deposits beneath proximal ignimbrites at Bonanza and other calderas in the region is interpreted as evidence for early initiation of pyroclastic flows, rather than lack of a high eruption column. Although the absence of a Plinian deposit beneath some ignimbrites elsewhere has been interpreted to indicate that abrupt rapid foundering of the magma-body roof initiated the eruption, initial caldera collapse began at Bonanza only after several hundred kilometers of rhyolitic tuff had erupted, as indicated by the minor volume of this composition in the basal intracaldera ignimbrite. Caldera-filling ignimbrite has been largely stripped from the southern and eastern flank of the Bonanza dome, exposing large areas of caldera-floor as a structurally coherent domed plate, bounded by ring faults with locations that are geometrically closely constrained even though largely concealed beneath valley alluvium. The structurally coherent floor at Bonanza contrasts with fault-disrupted floors at some well-exposed multicyclic calderas where successive ignimbrite eruptions caused recurrent subsidence. Floor rocks at Bonanza are intensely brecciated within ∼100 m inboard of ring faults, probably due to compression and crushing of the subsiding floor in proximity to steep inward-dipping faults. Upper levels of the floor are locally penetrated by dike-like crack fills of intracaldera ignimbrite, interpreted as dilatant fracture fills rather than ignimbrite vents. The

  5. Comparison of alternative representations of hydraulic-conductivity anisotropy in folded fractured-sedimentary rock: Modeling groundwater flow in the Shenandoah Valley (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, R.M.; Voss, C.I.; Southworth, S.

    2009-01-01

    A numerical representation that explicitly represents the generalized three-dimensional anisotropy of folded fractured-sedimentary rocks in a groundwater model best reproduces the salient features of the flow system in the Shenandoah Valley, USA. This conclusion results from a comparison of four alternative representations of anisotropy in which the hydraulic-conductivity tensor represents the bedrock structure as (model A) anisotropic with variable strikes and dips, (model B) horizontally anisotropic with a uniform strike, (model C) horizontally anisotropic with variable strikes, and (model D) isotropic. Simulations using the US Geological Survey groundwater flow and transport model SUTRA are based on a representation of hydraulic conductivity that conforms to bedding planes in a three-dimensional structural model of the valley that duplicates the pattern of folded sedimentary rocks. In the most general representation, (model A), the directions of maximum and medium hydraulic conductivity conform to the strike and dip of bedding, respectively, while the minimum hydraulic-conductivity direction is perpendicular to bedding. Model A produced a physically realistic flow system that reflects the underlying bedrock structure, with a flow field that is significantly different from those produced by the other three models. ?? Springer-Verlag 2009.

  6. Relations of hydrogeologic factors, groundwater reduction-oxidation conditions, and temporal and spatial distributions of nitrate, Central-Eastside San Joaquin Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, Matthew K.; Green, Christopher T.; Belitz, Kenneth; Singleton, Michael J.; Esser, Bradley K.

    2011-01-01

    In a 2,700-km2 area in the eastern San Joaquin Valley, California (USA), data from multiple sources were used to determine interrelations among hydrogeologic factors, reduction-oxidation (redox) conditions, and temporal and spatial distributions of nitrate (NO3), a widely detected groundwater contaminant. Groundwater is predominantly modern, or mixtures of modern water, with detectable NO3 and oxic redox conditions, but some zones have anoxic or mixed redox conditions. Anoxic conditions were associated with long residence times that occurred near the valley trough and in areas of historical groundwater discharge with shallow depth to water. Anoxic conditions also were associated with interactions of shallow, modern groundwater with soils. NO3 concentrations were significantly lower in anoxic than oxic or mixed redox groundwater, primarily because residence times of anoxic waters exceed the duration of increased pumping and fertilizer use associated with modern agriculture. Effects of redox reactions on NO3 concentrations were relatively minor. Dissolved N2 gas data indicated that denitrification has eliminated >5 mg/L NO3–N in about 10% of 39 wells. Increasing NO3 concentrations over time were slightly less prevalent in anoxic than oxic or mixed redox groundwater. Spatial and temporal trends of NO3 are primarily controlled by water and NO3 fluxes of modern land use.

  7. Natural recharge estimation and uncertainty analysis of an adjudicated groundwater basin using a regional-scale flow and subsidence model (Antelope Valley, California, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siade, Adam; Nishikawa, Tracy; Martin, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Groundwater has provided 50-90 % of the total water supply in Antelope Valley, California (USA). The associated groundwater-level declines have led the Los Angeles County Superior Court of California to recently rule that the Antelope Valley groundwater basin is in overdraft, i.e., annual pumpage exceeds annual recharge. Natural recharge consists primarily of mountain-front recharge and is an important component of the total groundwater budget in Antelope Valley. Therefore, natural recharge plays a major role in the Court's decision. The exact quantity and distribution of natural recharge is uncertain, with total estimates from previous studies ranging from 37 to 200 gigaliters per year (GL/year). In order to better understand the uncertainty associated with natural recharge and to provide a tool for groundwater management, a numerical model of groundwater flow and land subsidence was developed. The transient model was calibrated using PEST with water-level and subsidence data; prior information was incorporated through the use of Tikhonov regularization. The calibrated estimate of natural recharge was 36 GL/year, which is appreciably less than the value used by the court (74 GL/year). The effect of parameter uncertainty on the estimation of natural recharge was addressed using the Null-Space Monte Carlo method. A Pareto trade-off method was also used to portray the reasonableness of larger natural recharge rates. The reasonableness of the 74 GL/year value and the effect of uncertain pumpage rates were also evaluated. The uncertainty analyses indicate that the total natural recharge likely ranges between 34.5 and 54.3 GL/year.

  8. Natural recharge estimation and uncertainty analysis of an adjudicated groundwater basin using a regional-scale flow and subsidence model (Antelope Valley, California, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siade, Adam J.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Martin, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater has provided 50–90 % of the total water supply in Antelope Valley, California (USA). The associated groundwater-level declines have led the Los Angeles County Superior Court of California to recently rule that the Antelope Valley groundwater basin is in overdraft, i.e., annual pumpage exceeds annual recharge. Natural recharge consists primarily of mountain-front recharge and is an important component of the total groundwater budget in Antelope Valley. Therefore, natural recharge plays a major role in the Court’s decision. The exact quantity and distribution of natural recharge is uncertain, with total estimates from previous studies ranging from 37 to 200 gigaliters per year (GL/year). In order to better understand the uncertainty associated with natural recharge and to provide a tool for groundwater management, a numerical model of groundwater flow and land subsidence was developed. The transient model was calibrated using PEST with water-level and subsidence data; prior information was incorporated through the use of Tikhonov regularization. The calibrated estimate of natural recharge was 36 GL/year, which is appreciably less than the value used by the court (74 GL/year). The effect of parameter uncertainty on the estimation of natural recharge was addressed using the Null-Space Monte Carlo method. A Pareto trade-off method was also used to portray the reasonableness of larger natural recharge rates. The reasonableness of the 74 GL/year value and the effect of uncertain pumpage rates were also evaluated. The uncertainty analyses indicate that the total natural recharge likely ranges between 34.5 and 54.3 GL/year.

  9. Groundwater influence on water budget of a small constructed floodplain wetland in the Ridge and Valley of Virginia, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, Andrea L.; Hession, W. Cully

    2015-01-01

    Study region: A floodplain in the headwaters of a tributary to the Chesapeake Bay, Ridge and Valley of the Eastern United States. Study focus: This study investigated the influence of groundwater exchange in the annual wetland hydrologic budget and identified spatial and temporal variability in groundwater hydraulic gradients using an array of nested piezometers. New hydrological insights for the region: Data showed that the created wetland met hydrologic success criteria, and that the ...

  10. Age, genesis, and paleoclimatic interpretation of the Sangamon/Loveland complex in the Lower Mississippi Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markewich, H.W.; Wysocki, D.A.; Pavich, M.J.; Rutledge, E.M.

    2011-01-01

    For more than a century, the Sangamon paleosol (the Sangamon) has been an integral part of geologic and pedologic investigations in the central United States, including the Upper Mississippi and Lower Missouri River Valleys. Compositional, pedologic, micromorphologic, stratigraphic, and age data indicate that the prominent reddish paleosol developed in silt-rich deposits of the Lower Mississippi Valley, from southernmost Illinois to northwestern Mississippi, represents multiple periods of soil formation, and is wholly or in part time equivalent to the Sangamon of the central United States. Thermoluminescence data, for localities where the Sangamon developed in loess, indicate that the primary period of loess deposition was from 190 to 130 ka (oxygen isotope stage, OIS6), that loess deposition continued intermittently from 130 to 74 ka (OIS5), and that deposition was wholly or in part coeval with Loveland loess deposition in the central United States. Beryllium-10, chemical, and pedologic data indicate that in the Lower Mississippi Valley: (1) the Sangamon represents a minimum time period of 60-80 k.y.; (2) there were at least two periods of soil formation, ca. 130-90 ka and 74-58 ka (OIS4); and (3) rates of weathering and pedogenesis equaled or exceeded the net loess-accumulation rate until at least 46 ka (OIS3) and resulted in development of a paleosol in the overlying basal Roxana Silt. Along a N-S transect from southern Illinois to western Mississippi, Sangamon macroscopic characteristics as well asthe micro-morphology, chemistry, and mineralogy, suggest a regional paleoclimate during periods of soil formation that: (1) was warm to hot, with a wider range in temperature, precipitation, and evapotranspiration than present; (2) had seasonal to decadal or longer periods of drought; and (3) had down-valley (southward) trends of increasing temperature and precipitation and decreasing seasonality and variation in annualto decadal precipitation. ?? 2011 Geological

  11. Can We Mitigate Climate Extremes using Managed Aquifer Recharge: Case Studies California Central Valley and South-Central Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, B. R.; Reedy, R. C.; Faunt, C. C.; Pool, D. R.; Uhlman, K.

    2015-12-01

    Frequent long-term droughts interspersed with intense floods in the southwestern U.S. underscore the need to store more water to manage these climate extremes. Here we show how managed aquifer recharge can enhance drought resilience in the southwestern U.S. with ~ 70% of California under extreme drought and 75% of Arizona under moderate drought. Data on water sources, transportation, and users were compiled for managed aquifer recharge systems in the Central Valley and south-central Arizona. Groundwater depletion of 115 to 145 km3 in the 1900s created large subsurface reservoirs in thick alluvial basins in these regions. Large canals and aqueducts up to several 100 km long allow water to be imported from reservoirs, mostly in more humid regions. Imported water is either used instead of groundwater or is applied in surface spreading basins primarily during wet periods (≤1.3 km3/yr Central Valley, ≤0.7 km3/yr Arizona) and is extracted during droughts. The dominant water users include irrigators and municipalities both within and outside the managed aquifer recharge systems. Groundwater modeling indicates that recharge basins significantly increase groundwater storage in the Central Valley. Managed aquifer recharge systems significantly enhance drought resilience and increase sustainability of water resources in semiarid regions, complementing surface water reservoirs and conjunctive surface water/groundwater use by providing longer term storage.

  12. Effect of stress fields on magma chamber stability and the formation of collapse calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, William; Burke, Kevin; Strecker, Manfred

    2003-08-01

    The summits of many of the Earth's and other planets' larger volcanoes are occupied by calderas that formed by collapse into an evacuating, underlying magma chamber. These collapse calderas are typically several tens of square kilometers in area and are commonly elliptical in shape. We show that the long axes of late Quaternary collapse calderas in the Kenya rift valley, the western Basin and Range province, the Snake River-Yellowstone Plateau, and the Iceland rift zone are parallel to the upper crustal minimum horizontal stress direction (Sh) as determined by independent criteria. We suggest that circular magma chambers beneath these volcanoes became elliptical by stress-induced spalling of their chamber walls, by a mechanism that is analogous to the formation of breakouts in boreholes and tunnels. In breakouts, the hole becomes elongate parallel to the far-field minimum stress. In the Kenya rift, Late Pleistocene caldera collapse was accompanied by a 45° rotation of Sh and an increase in the magnitude of the maximum horizontal stress (SH). The breakout model predicts increasingly unstable caldera walls under these conditions, a possible explanation for the sudden appearance of so many collapse events in a volcanic setting that had never experienced them before. This mechanism of stress change-induced collapse may have played a role in other caldera settings.

  13. A 28,000 year history of vegetation and climate from Lower Red Rock Lake, Centennial Valley, Southwestern Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, Stephanie Ann; Whitlock, Cathy; Pierce, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    A sediment core extending to 28,000 cal yr BP from Lower Red Rock Lake in the Centennial Valley of southwestern Montana provides new information on the nature of full-glacial vegetation as well as a history of late-glacial and Holocene vegetation and climate in a poorly studied region. Prior to 17,000 cal yr BP, the eastern Centennial Valley was occupied by a large lake (Pleistocene Lake Centennial), and valley glaciers were present in adjacent mountain ranges. The lake lowered upon erosion of a newly formed western outlet in late-glacial time. High pollen percentages of Juniperus, Poaceae, Asteraceae, and other herbs as well as low pollen accumulation rates suggest sparse vegetation cover. Inferred cold dry conditions are consistent with a strengthened glacial anticyclone at this time. Between 17,000 and 10,500 cal yr BP, high Picea and Abies pollen percentages suggest a shift to subalpine parkland and warmer conditions than before. This is attributed to the northward shift of the jet stream and increasing summer insolation. From 10,500 to 7100 cal yr BP, pollen evidence of open dry forests suggests warm conditions, which were likely a response to increased summer insolation and a strengthened Pacific subtropical high-pressure system. From 7100 to 2400 cal yr BP, cooler moister conditions promoted closed forest and wetlands. Increases in Picea and Abies pollen percentages after 2400 cal yr BP suggest increasing effective moisture. The postglacial pattern of Pseudotsuga expansion indicates that it arrived later on the Atlantic side of the Continental Divide than on the Pacific side. The Divide may have been a physical barrier for refugial populations or it delimited different climate regions that influenced the timing of Pseudotsuga expansion.

  14. High-resolution seismic profiling reveals faulting associated with the 1934 Ms 6.6 Hansel Valley earthquake (Utah, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Pier Paolo G.; Duross, Christopher; Kokkalas, Sotirios

    2017-01-01

    The 1934 Ms 6.6 Hansel Valley, Utah, earthquake produced an 8-km-long by 3-km-wide zone of north-south−trending surface deformation in an extensional basin within the easternmost Basin and Range Province. Less than 0.5 m of purely vertical displacement was measured at the surface, although seismologic data suggest mostly strike-slip faulting at depth. Characterization of the origin and kinematics of faulting in the Hansel Valley earthquake is important to understand how complex fault ruptures accommodate regions of continental extension and transtension. Here, we address three questions: (1) How does the 1934 surface rupture compare with faults in the subsurface? (2) Are the 1934 fault scarps tectonic or secondary features? (3) Did the 1934 earthquake have components of both strike-slip and dip-slip motion? To address these questions, we acquired a 6.6-km-long, high-resolution seismic profile across Hansel Valley, including the 1934 ruptures. We observed numerous east- and west-dipping normal faults that dip 40°−70° and offset late Quaternary strata from within a few tens of meters of the surface down to a depth of ∼1 km. Spatial correspondence between the 1934 surface ruptures and subsurface faults suggests that ruptures associated with the earthquake are of tectonic origin. Our data clearly show complex basin faulting that is most consistent with transtensional tectonics. Although the kinematics of the 1934 earthquake remain underconstrained, we interpret the disagreement between surface (normal) and subsurface (strike-slip) kinematics as due to slip partitioning during fault propagation and to the effect of preexisting structural complexities. We infer that the 1934 earthquake occurred along an ∼3-km wide, off-fault damage zone characterized by distributed deformation along small-displacement faults that may be alternatively activated during different earthquake episodes.

  15. Resolving the interactions between population density and air pollution emissions controls in the San Joaquin Valley, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hixson, Mark; Mahmud, Abdullah; Hu, Jianlin; Kleeman, Michael J

    2012-05-01

    The effectiveness of emissions control programs designed to reduce concentrations of airborne particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter system that simultaneously considered interactions between land use and transportation, area source, and point source emissions. The ambient PM2.5 response to each combination of population density and emissions control was evaluated using a regional chemical transport model over a 3-week winter stagnation episode. Comparisons between scenarios were based on regional average and population-weighted PM2.5 concentrations. In the absence of any emissions control program, population-weighted concentrations of PM2.5 in the future San Joaquin Valley are lowest undergrowth scenarios that emphasize low population density. A complete ban on wood burning and a 90% reduction in emissions from food cooking operations and diesel engines must occur before medium- to high-density growth scenarios result in lower population-weighted concentrations of PM2.5. These trends partly reflect the fact that existing downtown urban cores that naturally act as anchor points for new high-density growth in the San Joaquin Valley are located close to major transportation corridors for goods movement. Adding growth buffers around transportation corridors had little impact in the current analysis, since the 8-km resolution of the chemical transport model already provided an artificial buffer around major emissions sources. Assuming that future emissions controls will greatly reduce or eliminate emissions from residential wood burning, food cooking, and diesel engines, the 2030 growth scenario using "as-planned" (medium) population density achieves the lowest population-weighted average PM2.5 concentration in the future San Joaquin Valley during a severe winter stagnation event. The San Joaquin Valley is one of the most heavily polluted air basins in the United States that are projected to experience strong population growth in the coming decades. The best

  16. Weathering and transport of chromium and nickel from serpentinite in the Coast Range ophiolite to the Sacramento Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Mills, Christopher T.; Breit, George N.; Hooper, Robert L.; Holloway, JoAnn M.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Ranville, James F.

    2015-01-01

    A soil geochemical study in northern California was done to investigate the role that weathering and transport play in the regional distribution and mobility of geogenic Cr and Ni, which are both potentially toxic and carcinogenic. These elements are enriched in ultramafic rocks (primarily serpentinite) and the soils derived from them (1700–10,000 mg Cr per kg soil and 1300–3900 mg Ni per kg soil) in the Coast Range ophiolite. Chromium and Ni have been transported eastward from the Coast Range into the western Sacramento Valley and as a result, valley soil is enriched in Cr (80–1420 mg kg−1) and Ni (65–224 mg kg−1) compared to median values of U.S. soils of 50 and 15 mg kg−1, respectively. Nickel in ultramafic source rocks and soils is present in serpentine minerals (lizardite, antigorite, and chrysotile) and is more easily weathered compared to Cr, which primarily resides in highly refractory chromite ([Mg,Fe2+][Cr3+,Al,Fe3+]2O4). Although the majority of Cr and Ni in soils are in refractory chromite and serpentine minerals, the etching and dissolution of these minerals, presence of Cr- and Ni-enriched clay minerals and development of nanocrystalline Fe (hydr)oxides is evidence that a significant fractions of these elements have been transferred to potentially more labile phases.

  17. Terroir, the Relationship of Geology, Soils, and Climate to Wine: An Example from the Northern Willamette Valley of Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, S. F.

    2012-12-01

    Wines differ from each other based on seven different factors: the type of grape; the bedrock geology and resulting soils; the climate; the soil hydrology; the physiography of the site; the winemaker; and the vineyard management techniques. The first five of these factors make up what the French call terroir, "the taste of the place". Bedrocks weather into soils which then liberate chemical nutrients to the grape vines. Twelve of the sixteen essential elements for wine grapes come from the soil. All around the world the geology and soils make up an important component of the terroir of the wine. Using examples from the Willamette Valley of Oregon, terroir of the region will be discussed because it is strongly influenced by the bedrock geology and soils. The four dominant groups are the volcanic soils, the Jory Soil Series, which developed on the Columbia River Basalts, the Willakenzie Soil Series, developed on uplifted marine sedimentary rocks in the foothills of the Oregon Coast Range, the Laurelwood Soil Series, developed from loess soils developed on basalt bedrock, and Woodburn Soil Series developed in Missoula Flood deposits on the valley bottoms. The wines made from the grapes of these four soils are very different.

  18. A hybrid machine learning model to predict and visualize nitrate concentration throughout the Central Valley aquifer, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Katherine M; Nolan, Bernard T; A Traum, Jonathan; Faunt, Claudia C; Bell, Andrew M; Gronberg, Jo Ann M; Wheeler, David C; Z Rosecrans, Celia; Jurgens, Bryant; Schwarz, Gregory E; Belitz, Kenneth; M Eberts, Sandra; Kourakos, George; Harter, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Intense demand for water in the Central Valley of California and related increases in groundwater nitrate concentration threaten the sustainability of the groundwater resource. To assess contamination risk in the region, we developed a hybrid, non-linear, machine learning model within a statistical learning framework to predict nitrate contamination of groundwater to depths of approximately 500m below ground surface. A database of 145 predictor variables representing well characteristics, historical and current field and landscape-scale nitrogen mass balances, historical and current land use, oxidation/reduction conditions, groundwater flow, climate, soil characteristics, depth to groundwater, and groundwater age were assigned to over 6000 private supply and public supply wells measured previously for nitrate and located throughout the study area. The boosted regression tree (BRT) method was used to screen and rank variables to predict nitrate concentration at the depths of domestic and public well supplies. The novel approach included as predictor variables outputs from existing physically based models of the Central Valley. The top five most important predictor variables included two oxidation/reduction variables (probability of manganese concentration to exceed 50ppb and probability of dissolved oxygen concentration to be below 0.5ppm), field-scale adjusted unsaturated zone nitrogen input for the 1975 time period, average difference between precipitation and evapotranspiration during the years 1971-2000, and 1992 total landscape nitrogen input. Twenty-five variables were selected for the final model for log-transformed nitrate. In general, increasing probability of anoxic conditions and increasing precipitation relative to potential evapotranspiration had a corresponding decrease in nitrate concentration predictions. Conversely, increasing 1975 unsaturated zone nitrogen leaching flux and 1992 total landscape nitrogen input had an increasing relative impact on

  19. A hybrid machine learning model to predict and visualize nitrate concentration throughout the Central Valley aquifer, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Katherine M.; Nolan, Bernard T.; Traum, Jonathan A.; Faunt, Claudia; Bell, Andrew M.; Gronberg, Jo Ann M.; Wheeler, David C.; Zamora, Celia; Jurgens, Bryant; Schwarz, Gregory E.; Belitz, Kenneth; Eberts, Sandra; Kourakos, George; Harter, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Intense demand for water in the Central Valley of California and related increases in groundwater nitrate concentration threaten the sustainability of the groundwater resource. To assess contamination risk in the region, we developed a hybrid, non-linear, machine learning model within a statistical learning framework to predict nitrate contamination of groundwater to depths of approximately 500 m below ground surface. A database of 145 predictor variables representing well characteristics, historical and current field and landscape-scale nitrogen mass balances, historical and current land use, oxidation/reduction conditions, groundwater flow, climate, soil characteristics, depth to groundwater, and groundwater age were assigned to over 6000 private supply and public supply wells measured previously for nitrate and located throughout the study area. The boosted regression tree (BRT) method was used to screen and rank variables to predict nitrate concentration at the depths of domestic and public well supplies. The novel approach included as predictor variables outputs from existing physically based models of the Central Valley. The top five most important predictor variables included two oxidation/reduction variables (probability of manganese concentration to exceed 50 ppb and probability of dissolved oxygen concentration to be below 0.5 ppm), field-scale adjusted unsaturated zone nitrogen input for the 1975 time period, average difference between precipitation and evapotranspiration during the years 1971–2000, and 1992 total landscape nitrogen input. Twenty-five variables were selected for the final model for log-transformed nitrate. In general, increasing probability of anoxic conditions and increasing precipitation relative to potential evapotranspiration had a corresponding decrease in nitrate concentration predictions. Conversely, increasing 1975 unsaturated zone nitrogen leaching flux and 1992 total landscape nitrogen input had an increasing relative

  20. Plant water use characteristics of five dominant shrub species of the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas, USA: implications for shrubland restoration and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Arjun; White, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    The biogeographic distribution of plant species is inherently associated with the plasticity of physiological adaptations to environmental variation. For semi-arid shrublands with a legacy of saline soils, characterization of soil water-tolerant shrub species is necessary for habitat restoration given future projection of increased drought magnitude and persistence in these ecosystems. Five dominant native shrub species commonly found in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, TX, USA, were studied, namely Acacia farnesiana, Celtis ehrenbergiana, Forestiera angustifolia, Parkinsonia aculeata and Prosopis glandulosa. To simulate drought conditions, we suspended watering of healthy, greenhouse-grown plants for 4 weeks. Effects of soil salinity were also studied by dosing plants with 10% NaCl solution with suspended watering. For soil water deficit treatment, the soil water potential of P. glandulosa was the highest (-1.20 MPa), followed by A. farnesiana (-4.69 MPa), P. aculeata (-5.39 MPa), F. angustifolia (-6.20 MPa) and C. ehrenbergiana (-10.02 MPa). For the soil salinity treatment, P. glandulosa also had the highest soil water potential value (-1.60 MPa), followed by C. ehrenbergiana (-1.70 MPa), A. farnesiana (-1.84 MPa), P. aculeata (-2.04 MPa) and F. angustifolia (-6.99 MPa). Within the species, only C. ehrenbergiana and F. angustifolia for soil water deficit treatment and A. farnesiana for the salinity treatment had significantly lower soil water potential after 4 weeks of treatment (P water potential, stomatal conductance and net photosynthesis of the species significantly reduced over time for both treatments (P water availability, some species demonstrated limited tolerance for extreme water stress that may be important for management of future shrub diversity in Lower Rio Grande Valley.

  1. Hydrogeologic Heterogeneity Enhances the Transfer of Salt Toward the High-Quality Deep Aquifers of the Western San Joaquin Valley (CA, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henri, C. V.; Harter, T.; Zhang, H.

    2016-12-01

    Increasing anthropogenic and drought stresses lead salinity to be of serious concern within regard to with the sustainability of regional groundwater quality. Agricultural basins of the Central Valley, CA (USA) are, and will continue to be, impacted by salinity issues in the coming future decades and or centuries. The aquifer system below the Western San Joaquin Valley is characterized by a shallow unconfined aquifer with high salinity overlying high quality semi-confined and deeper confined aquifers. A key challenge in the area is to predict if, when and how water traveling from the the low-quality shallow groundwater will reach and degrade the deeper semi-confined and confined aquifers. Previous studies, accounting for a simplified description of the aquifer hydraulic properties in their flow model, concluded that saline shallow groundwater would need 200-400 years to reach the semi-confined aquifer and 250-600 years to impact the deeper confined aquifer. However, well known heterogeneities in aquifer hydraulic properties significantly impact contaminant transport due to preferential flow paths and increased dispersion. Our study aims to (1) better understand the impact of heterogeneous hydraulic properties on the distribution of travel times from non-point source contamination, and (2) reassess the temporal scale of salt transfer into the deeper aquifers of the Western San Joaquin Valley. A detailed non-stationary geostatistical model was developed to describe the spatial variability of hydrofacies in great detail at the basin scale. The hydraulic properties corresponding to each hydrofacies are then calibrated in order to reproduce water fluxes previously modeled and calibrated. Subsequently, we use the random-walk particle tracking method to simulate the advective-dispersive transport of salt throughout the study area from a non-point source zone represented by the entire top layer of the model. The flux concentrations of solute crossing a series of monitoring

  2. Nonstatistical dynamics on the caldera

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Peter; Carpenter, Barry K; Ezra, Gregory S; Wiggins, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    We explore both classical and quantum dynamics of a model potential exhibiting a caldera: that is, a shallow potential well with two pairs of symmetry related index one saddles associated with entrance/exit channels. Classical trajectory simulations at several different energies confirm the existence of the `dynamical matching' phenomenon originally proposed by Carpenter, where the momentum direction associated with an incoming trajectory initiated at a high energy saddle point determines to a considerable extent the outcome of the reaction (passage through the diametrically opposing exit channel). By studying a `stretched' version of the caldera model, we have uncovered a generalized dynamical matching: bundles of trajectories can reflect off a hard potential wall so as to end up exiting predominantly through the transition state opposite the reflection point. We also investigate the effects of dissipation on the classical dynamics. In addition to classical trajectory studies, we examine the dynamics of quan...

  3. Timing and origin for sand dunes in the Green River Lowland of Illinois, upper Mississippi River Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, X.; Hanson, P.R.; Wang, Hongfang; Young, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The recent increase in dune studies in North America has been heavily focused in the Great Plains, while less attention has historically been given to the dune fields east of the Mississippi River. Here we report ages and suggest a potential sediment source for sand dunes in the Green River Lowland, Illinois, which may provide a better understanding of the dynamic interactions between eolian, glacial, lacustrine and fluvial processes that shaped the landscapes of the upper Midwest. Seven coherent optically stimulated luminescence ages (OSL, or optical ages) obtained from four sites suggest that major dune construction in the Green River Lowland occurred within a narrow time window around 17,500 ago. This implies either an enhanced aridity or an episodic increase of sediment supply at 17,500 years ago, or combination of the both. Contrary to previous assertions that dune sand was sourced from the deflation of the underlying outwash sand deposited when the Lake Michigan Lobe retreated from the area, we propose that Green River Lowland dunes sand originated from the Green Bay Lobe through the Rock River. Specifically, sediment supply increased in the Rock River valley during drainage of Glacial Lake Scuppernong, which formed between ???18,000 and 17,000 years ago, when the Green Bay Lobe retreated from its terminal moraine. The lake drained catastrophically through the Rock River valley, providing glacial sediment and water to erode the preexisting sandy sediments. Throughout the remainder of the late Pleistocene, the Laurentide Ice Sheet drained into larger more northerly glacial lakes that in turn drained through other river valleys. Therefore, the dunes in the Green River Lowland formed only during the catastrophic drainage of Glacial Lake Scuppernong, but were stabilized through the remainder of the Pleistocene. This scenario explains the abrupt dune construction around 17,500 years ago, and explains the lack of later dune activity up to the Pleistocene

  4. Integration of subsidence, deformation, and groundwater-level measurements to characterize land subsidence in the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneed, M.; Solt, M.; Brandt, J.

    2012-12-01

    Extensive groundwater withdrawal from unconsolidated deposits in the San Joaquin Valley caused widespread aquifer-system compaction and resultant land subsidence that locally exceeded 8 meters (m) from 1926 to 1970. The importation of surface water in the early 1970s resulted in decreased pumping, recovery of water levels, and a reduced rate of compaction in some areas. However, reduced surface-water availability during droughts (1976-77, 1987-92, and 2007-09) caused increased pumping, water-level declines, and renewed compaction. Land subsidence resulting from this compaction has reduced freeboard and flow capacity of the Delta-Mendota Canal (DMC), the California Aqueduct, and other canals that deliver irrigation water and transport floodwater. The location and magnitude of vertical land-surface changes during 2006-11 in the northwestern and central San Joaquin Valley were determined using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), Global Positioning System (GPS), and extensometer techniques. Results of the InSAR analysis indicate that a 3,200 square-kilometer area, including parts of the DMC, the San Joaquin River, and the Eastside Bypass, was affected by at least 20 millimeters (mm) of subsidence during 2008-10. Within that area, InSAR analysis also indicates a localized maximum subsidence of at least 540 mm. Furthermore, InSAR results for 2006-10 indicate that subsidence rates doubled around 2008. GPS surveys in 2008 and 2010 confirm the high rates of subsidence measured using InSAR; GPS surveys in late 2011 indicate that these high rates continued through the next year. A comparison of data from extensometers (anchored near the top of the Corcoran Clay) and a continuous GPS station near Mendota indicates that most of the aquifer-system compaction occurred below the top of the Corcoran Clay (CC). The lack of correlation between continuous GPS data near Los Banos, which show subsidence, and water levels from nearby wells screened above the CC, which show

  5. Nonstatistical dynamics on the caldera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Peter; Wiggins, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.wiggins@mac.com [School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TW (United Kingdom); Kramer, Zeb C., E-mail: zck3@cornell.edu; Ezra, Gregory S., E-mail: gse1@cornell.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Baker Laboratory, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Carpenter, Barry K., E-mail: CarpenterB1@cardiff.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3AT (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-21

    We explore both classical and quantum dynamics of a model potential exhibiting a caldera: that is, a shallow potential well with two pairs of symmetry related index one saddles associated with entrance/exit channels. Classical trajectory simulations at several different energies confirm the existence of the “dynamical matching” phenomenon originally proposed by Carpenter, where the momentum direction associated with an incoming trajectory initiated at a high energy saddle point determines to a considerable extent the outcome of the reaction (passage through the diametrically opposing exit channel). By studying a “stretched” version of the caldera model, we have uncovered a generalized dynamical matching: bundles of trajectories can reflect off a hard potential wall so as to end up exiting predominantly through the transition state opposite the reflection point. We also investigate the effects of dissipation on the classical dynamics. In addition to classical trajectory studies, we examine the dynamics of quantum wave packets on the caldera potential (stretched and unstretched). These computations reveal a quantum mechanical analogue of the “dynamical matching” phenomenon, where the initial expectation value of the momentum direction for the wave packet determines the exit channel through which most of the probability density passes to product.

  6. Nonstatistical dynamics on the caldera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Peter; Kramer, Zeb C; Carpenter, Barry K; Ezra, Gregory S; Wiggins, Stephen

    2014-07-21

    We explore both classical and quantum dynamics of a model potential exhibiting a caldera: that is, a shallow potential well with two pairs of symmetry related index one saddles associated with entrance/exit channels. Classical trajectory simulations at several different energies confirm the existence of the "dynamical matching" phenomenon originally proposed by Carpenter, where the momentum direction associated with an incoming trajectory initiated at a high energy saddle point determines to a considerable extent the outcome of the reaction (passage through the diametrically opposing exit channel). By studying a "stretched" version of the caldera model, we have uncovered a generalized dynamical matching: bundles of trajectories can reflect off a hard potential wall so as to end up exiting predominantly through the transition state opposite the reflection point. We also investigate the effects of dissipation on the classical dynamics. In addition to classical trajectory studies, we examine the dynamics of quantum wave packets on the caldera potential (stretched and unstretched). These computations reveal a quantum mechanical analogue of the "dynamical matching" phenomenon, where the initial expectation value of the momentum direction for the wave packet determines the exit channel through which most of the probability density passes to product.

  7. Kinetics of selenium release in mine waste from the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale, Phosphoria Formation, Wooley Valley, Idaho, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillings, Lisa L.; Amacher, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorite from the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale member of the Permian Phosphoria Formation has been mined in southeastern Idaho since 1906. Dumps of waste rock from mining operations contain high concentrations of Se which readily leach into nearby streams and wetlands. While the most common mineralogical residence of Se in the phosphatic shale is elemental Se, Se(0), Se is also an integral component of sulfide phases (pyrite, sphalerite and vaesite–pyritess) in the waste rock. It may also be present as adsorbed selenate and/or selenite, and FeSe2 and organo-selenides.Se release from the waste rock has been observed in field and laboratory experiments. Release rates calculated from waste rock dump and column leachate solutions describe the net, overall Se release from all of the possible sources of Se listed above. In field studies, Se concentration in seepage water (pH 7.4–7.8) from the Wooley Valley Unit 4 dump ranges from 3600 µg/L in May to 10 µg/L by Sept. Surface water flow, Q, from the seep also declines over the summer, from 2 L/s in May to 0.03 L/s in Sept. Se flux ([Se] ⁎ Q) reaches a steady-state of reaction with a rate constant, k, = 1.35 – 6.35e−3 h− 1 (11.8–55.6 yr− 1).Laboratory experiments were performed with the waste shale in packed bed reactors; residence time varied from 0.09 to 400 h and outlet pH ∼ 7.5. Here, Se concentration increased with increasing residence time and release was modeled with a first order reaction with k = 2.19e−3 h− 1 (19.2 yr− 1).Rate constants reported here fall within an order of magnitude of reported rate constants for oxidation of Se(0) formed by bacterial precipitation. This similarity among rate constants from both field and laboratory studies combined with the direct observation of Se(0) in waste shales of the Phosphoria Formation suggests that oxidation of Se(0) may control steady-state Se concentration in water draining the Wooley Valley waste dump.

  8. Stratigraphy of the Volcanic Products Around Nemrut Caldera: Implications for Reconstruction of the Caldera Formation

    OpenAIRE

    KARAOĞLU, Özgür; ÖZDEMİR, Yavuz; TOLLUOĞLU, A. ÜMİT

    2005-01-01

    The volcanological development of the Nemrut stratovolcano, located near the southwestern tip of Lake Van in eastern Turkey, is subdivided into three stages: pre-caldera, post-caldera and late stages. Two ignimbrite flows have been recognized in the pre-caldera stage. The earlier of the two occurred after basaltic lavas formed along extensional fissures. The latter, which forms the main subject of this paper, was a major flow associated with the development of the Nemrut caldera. The pyroclas...

  9. The migration, dissolution, and fate of chlorinated solvents in the urbanized alluvial valleys of the southwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R. E.

    The migration, dissolution, and subsequent fate of spilled chlorinated solvents in the urban alluvial valleys of the southwestern U.S. appear to be governed by a unique set of hydrogeologic and geochemical processes occurring within terrigeneous clastic depositional systems. The alluvial and lacustrine fill of the basins, the trapping of solvents in fine-grained sediments beneath the urbanized valley centers, the oxic conditions typical of the deeper alluvium, and the contaminant-transport patterns produced by large-scale basin pumping combine to produce long aqueous-phase plumes derived from the dissolution of trapped chlorinated solvents. Although of limited aqueous solubility, these dense solvents are sufficiently mobile and soluble in the southwestern alluvial valleys to have produced aqueous plumes that have migrated several kilometers through the deeper alluvium and have contaminated valuable water-supply well fields in California, Arizona, and New Mexico. The typical length of these plumes and the presence of oxic groundwater indicate that it is unlikely that natural attenuation will be a practical remedial option in the southwestern alluvial valleys or in other alluvial systems in which similar hydrogeologic and geochemical conditions exist. Résumé La migration, la dissolution et l'évolution consécutive des rejets de solvants chlorés dans les vallées alluviales du sud-ouest des États-Unis paraissent déterminées par un même ensemble de processus hydrogéologiques et géochimiques intervenant dans des formations de dépôts clastiques terrigènes. Les remplissages alluviaux et lacustres des bassins, le piégeage des solvants par des sédiments fins sous les centres des vallées urbanisées, les conditions oxiques typiques des alluvions plus profondes et les types de transport de contaminants provoqués par le pompage à l'échelle du bassin se combinent pour produire des panaches, étendus dans la phase aqueuse, provenant de la dissolution de

  10. Fire Regimes of Remnant Pitch Pine Communities in the Ridge and Valley Region of Central Pennsylvania, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Marschall

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many fire-adapted ecosystems in the northeastern U.S. are converting to fire-intolerant vegetation communities due to fire suppression in the 20th century. Prescribed fire and other vegetation management activities that increase resilience and resistance to global changes are increasingly being implemented, particularly on public lands. For many fire-dependent communities, there is little quantitative data describing historical fire regime attributes such as frequency, severity, and seasonality, or how these varied through time. Where available, fire-scarred live and remnant trees, including stumps and snags, offer valuable insights into historical fire regimes through tree-ring and fire-scar analyses. In this study, we dated fire scars from 66 trees at two sites in the Ridge and Valley Province of the Appalachian Mountains in central Pennsylvania, and described fire frequency, severity, and seasonality from the mid-17th century to 2013. Fires were historically frequent, of low to moderate severity, occurred mostly during the dormant season, and were influenced by aspect and topography. The current extended fire-free interval is unprecedented in the previous 250–300 years at both sites.

  11. Geochemical evidence for Se mobilization by the weathering of pyritic shale, San Joaquin Valley, California, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presser, T.S.; Swain, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Acidic (pH 4) seeps issue from the weathered Upper Cretaceous-Paleocene marine sedimentary shales of the Moreno Formation in the semi-arid Coast Ranges of California. The chemistry of the acidic solutions is believed to be evidence of current reactions ultimately yielding hydrous sodium and magnesium sulfate salts, e.g. mirabilite and bloedite, from the oxidation of primary pyrite. The selenate form of Se is concentrated in these soluble salts, which act as temporary geological sinks. Theoretically, the open lattice structures of these hydrous minerals could incorporate the selenate (SeO4-2) anion in the sulfate (SO4-2) space. When coupled with a semi-arid to arid climate, fractional crystallization and evaporative concentration can occur creating a sodium-sulfate fluid that exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency limit of 1000 ??g l-1 for a toxic Se waste. The oxidative alkaline conditions necessary to ensure the concentration of soluble selenate are provided in the accompanying marine sandstones of the Panoche and Lodo Formations and the eugeosynclinal Franciscan assemblage. Runoff and extensive mass wasting in the area reflect these processes and provide the mechanisms which transport Se to the farmlands of the west-central San Joaquin Valley. Subsurface drainage from these soils consequently transports Se to refuge areas in amounts elevated to cause a threat to wildlife. ?? 1990.

  12. Regional Evaluation of Groundwater Age Distributions Using Lumped Parameter Models with Large, Sparse Datasets: Example from the Central Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, B. C.; Bohlke, J. K.; Voss, S.; Fram, M. S.; Esser, B.

    2015-12-01

    Tracer-based, lumped parameter models (LPMs) are an appealing way to estimate the distribution of age for groundwater because the cost of sampling wells is often less than building numerical groundwater flow models sufficiently complex to provide groundwater age distributions. In practice, however, tracer datasets are often incomplete because of anthropogenic or terrigenic contamination of tracers, or analytical limitations. While age interpretations using such datsets can have large uncertainties, it may still be possible to identify key parts of the age distribution if LPMs are carefully chosen to match hydrogeologic conceptualization and the degree of age mixing is reasonably estimated. We developed a systematic approach for evaluating groundwater age distributions using LPMs with a large but incomplete set of tracer data (3H, 3Hetrit, 14C, and CFCs) from 535 wells, mostly used for public supply, in the Central Valley, California, USA that were sampled by the USGS for the California State Water Resources Control Board Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment or the USGS National Water Quality Assessment Programs. In addition to mean ages, LPMs gave estimates of unsaturated zone travel times, recharge rates for pre- and post-development groundwater, the degree of age mixing in wells, proportion of young water (supplies being derived from it.

  13. Regional oxygen reduction and denitrification rates in groundwater from multi-model residence time distributions, San Joaquin Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher T.; Jurgens, Bryant; Zhang, Yong; Starn, Jeffrey; Singleton, Michael J.; Esser, Bradley K.

    2016-01-01

    Rates of oxygen and nitrate reduction are key factors in determining the chemical evolution of groundwater. Little is known about how these rates vary and covary in regional groundwater settings, as few studies have focused on regional datasets with multiple tracers and methods of analysis that account for effects of mixed residence times on apparent reaction rates. This study provides insight into the characteristics of residence times and rates of O2 reduction and denitrification (NO3− reduction) by comparing reaction rates using multi-model analytical residence time distributions (RTDs) applied to a data set of atmospheric tracers of groundwater age and geochemical data from 141 well samples in the Central Eastern San Joaquin Valley, CA. The RTD approach accounts for mixtures of residence times in a single sample to provide estimates of in-situ rates. Tracers included SF6, CFCs, 3H, He from 3H (tritiogenic He),14C, and terrigenic He. Parameter estimation and multi-model averaging were used to establish RTDs with lower error variances than those produced by individual RTD models. The set of multi-model RTDs was used in combination with NO3− and dissolved gas data to estimate zero order and first order rates of O2 reduction and denitrification. Results indicated that O2 reduction and denitrification rates followed approximately log-normal distributions. Rates of O2 and NO3− reduction were correlated and, on an electron milliequivalent basis, denitrification rates tended to exceed O2 reduction rates. Estimated historical NO3− trends were similar to historical measurements. Results show that the multi-model approach can improve estimation of age distributions, and that relatively easily measured O2 rates can provide information about trends in denitrification rates, which are more difficult to estimate.

  14. Progressive failure of sheeted rock slopes: the 2009–2010 Rhombus Wall rock falls in Yosemite Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Greg M.; Martel, Stephen J.; Collins, Brian D.; Harp, Edwin L.

    2012-01-01

    Progressive rock-fall failures in natural rock slopes are common in many environments, but often elude detailed quantitative documentation and analysis. Here we present high-resolution photography, video, and laser scanning data that document spatial and temporal patterns of a 15-month-long sequence of at least 14 rock falls from the Rhombus Wall, a sheeted granitic cliff in Yosemite Valley, California. The rock-fall sequence began on 26 August 2009 with a small failure at the tip of an overhanging rock slab. Several hours later, a series of five rock falls totaling 736 m3progressed upward along a sheeting joint behind the overhanging slab. Over the next 3 weeks, audible cracking occurred on the Rhombus Wall, suggesting crack propagation, while visual monitoring revealed opening of a sheeting joint adjacent to the previous failure surface. On 14 September 2009 a 110 m3 slab detached along this sheeting joint. Additional rock falls between 30 August and 20 November 2010, totaling 187 m3, radiated outward from the initial failure area along cliff (sub)parallel sheeting joints. We suggest that these progressive failures might have been related to stress redistributions accompanying propagation of sheeting joints behind the cliff face. Mechanical analyses indicate that tensile stresses should occur perpendicular to the cliff face and open sheeting joints, and that sheeting joints should propagate parallel to a cliff face from areas of stress concentrations. The analyses also account for how sheeting joints can propagate to lengths many times greater than their depths behind cliff faces. We posit that as a region of failure spreads across a cliff face, stress concentrations along its margin will spread with it, promoting further crack propagation and rock falls.

  15. One hundred and fifty years of Coulomb stress history along the California-Nevada border, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdecchia, Alessandro; Carena, Sara

    2015-02-01

    The region north of the Garlock Fault between the Sierra Nevada and Death Valley has experienced at least eight Mw ≥ 6 earthquakes in historical times, beginning with the 1872, Mw 7.5, Owens Valley earthquake. Furthermore, since 1978, the Long Valley Caldera has been undergoing periods of unrest, with earthquake swarms and resurgence. Our goal is to determine whether the 1872 Owens Valley earthquake and the caldera unrest have influenced the evolution of seismicity in the area. We model the evolution of coseismic, postseismic, and interseismic Coulomb stress change (Coulomb failure stress (ΔCFS)) in the region due to both Mw ≥ 6 earthquakes and caldera inflation in the last 150 years. Our results show that the 1872 Owens Valley earthquake has an important influence on subsequent events, strongly encouraging faulting in northern Owens Valley while inhibiting it elsewhere. There is also a correlation between caldera inflation and seismicity in northern Owens Valley, evidenced by the west-to-east migration of earthquakes from the Long Valley Caldera toward the White Mountains immediately following the 1978 caldera inflation event. Finally, we show that a total ΔCFS increase of up to 30 bars in the last 150 years has occurred on part of the White Mountains fault, making it a possible candidate for the next major earthquake in this region.

  16. Climate History of the Southern San Joaquin Valley of California, USA: Authentic Paleoclimate Research with K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, D.; Negrini, R. M.; Palacios-Fest, M. R.; Auffant, K.

    2006-12-01

    For three summers, the Department of Geology at California State University, Bakersfield (CSUB) has invited teachers from local schools to participate in a research program that is investigating the climate history of the San Joaquin Valley of California. In each 4-week summer project, three elementary/middle school teachers and three high school teachers worked with CSUB faculty, undergraduate geology students, and a small group of high school students. The research centers around the analysis of 50-foot (15 m) sediment cores from two locations in the Tulare Lake basin. These cores preserve a regional climate record dating back to about 35,000 years before the present. Research tasks include the description of sediments from the cores for parameters such as grain size, color, and mineralogy. Sediment analyses include total organic and total inorganic carbon, as well as magnetic susceptibility. Ostracode shells were separated from the sediments, ostracode species present were identified and their abundances determined. Each teacher was put in charge of the description and analysis of several 5-foot (1.5 m) core segments. Each teacher was the leader of a research group including a CSUB geology student and one or two high school students. The groups were responsible for all aspects of the description and analysis of their core segments. They were also in charge of the paleoclimate interpretations and the presentation of their research results at the end of the summer projects. Surveys conducted before and after the summer program indicate that teacher's knowledge of climate change and regional geology, as well as their confidence in teaching Earth science at their schools increased. Follow- up surveys conducted a year after the first summer program indicate that the research experience had a lasting positive impact on teacher's confidence and their enthusiasm for teaching Earth science. Several of the teachers have developed lesson plans and/or field trips for their

  17. Subsidence of ash-flow calderas: Relation to caldera size and magma-chamber geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, P.W.

    1997-01-01

    Diverse subsidence geometries and collapse processes for ash-flow calderas are inferred to reflect varying sizes, roof geometries, and depths of the source magma chambers, in combination with prior volcanic and regional tectonic influences. Based largely on a review of features at eroded pre-Quaternary calderas, a continuum of geometries and subsidence styles is inferred to exist, in both island-arc and continental settings, between small funnel calderas and larger plate (piston) subsidences bounded by arcuate faults. Within most ring-fault calderas, the subsided block is variably disrupted, due to differential movement during ash-flow eruptions and postcollapse magmatism, but highly chaotic piecemeal subsidence appears to be uncommon for large-diameter calderas. Small-scale downsag structures and accompanying extensional fractures develop along margins of most calderas during early stages of subsidence, but downsag is dominant only at calderas that have not subsided deeply. Calderas that are loci for multicyclic ash-flow eruption and subsidence cycles have the most complex internal structures. Large calderas have flared inner topographic walls due to landsliding of unstable slopes, and the resulting slide debris can constitute large proportions of caldera fill. Because the slide debris is concentrated near caldera walls, models from geophysical data can suggest a funnel geometry, even for large plate-subsidence calderas bounded by ring faults. Simple geometric models indicate that many large calderas have subsided 3-5 km, greater than the depth of most naturally exposed sections of intracaldera deposits. Many ring-fault platesubsidence calderas and intrusive ring complexes have been recognized in the western U.S., Japan, and elsewhere, but no well-documented examples of exposed eroded calderas have large-scale funnel geometry or chaotically disrupted caldera floors. Reported ignimbrite "shields" in the central Andes, where large-volume ash-flows are inferred to

  18. Characterization of the deformation and thermal behavior of granitic exfoliation sheets with LiDAR and infrared thermography (Yosemite Valley, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Antoine; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Collins, Brian D.; Stock, Greg M.

    2017-04-01

    Yosemite Valley is a long (11 km) and deep ( 1 km) glacier-carved valley, bounded by steep granitic cliffs cutting the western slope of the central Sierra Nevada mountain range (California, USA). These cliffs produce numerous rockfalls every year (925 events reported between 1857 and 2011) and this rockfall activity is often linked to the presence of sheeting joints (Stock et al., 2013), also called exfoliation joints, formed in response to stress changes associated with changes in the topography (Martel, 2011). Furthermore, the historical rockfall inventory indicates that many events occurred without recognized triggers (Austin et al., 2014), in summer time, and on sunny days in particular. This suggests that thermal stress changes are involved in triggering of rockfalls (Collins and Stock, 2016). To further characterize the relationship between thermal stresses and rock face deformation, we carried out three experiments in Yosemite Valley during October 2015: (i) monitoring of a sub-vertical granodiorite exfoliation sheet on the Rhombus Wall for 24 consecutive hours (from 8:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.) using terrestrial LiDAR, crackmeters and infrared thermal sensors; (ii) monitoring the El Capitan rockwall composed of tens of exfoliation sheets for 8 consecutive hours (from 5:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.) with terrestrial LiDAR and thermal imaging; (iii) collecting several sequences of thermal GigaPan panoramas during periods of rock cooling on both cliffs (Rhombus Wall and El Capitan). In parallel to these experiments, we also developed a method for calibrating and correcting the raw apparent temperature measured by our thermal imager (a FLIR T660 infrared camera) from thermoresistances, reflective and black papers and by using some information given by the LiDAR point clouds (range, dip and dip direction). LiDAR monitoring of experiments (i) and (ii) allowed us to detect millimetric deformations for the exfoliations sheets whose crack aperture is persistent, deep and greater

  19. The influence of faults in basin-fill deposits on land subsidence, Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbey, Thomas

    2002-07-01

    The role of horizontal deformation caused by pumping of confined-aquifer systems is recognized as contributing to the development of earth fissures in semiarid regions, including Las Vegas Valley, Nevada. In spite of stabilizing water levels, new earth fissures continue to develop while existing ones continue to lengthen and widen near basin-fill faults. A three-dimensional granular displacement model based on Biot's consolidation theory (Biot, MA, 1941, General theory of three-dimensional consolidation. Jour. Applied Physics 12:155-164) has been used to evaluate the nature of displacement in the vicinity of two vertical faults. The fault was simulated as (1) a low-permeability barrier to horizontal flow, (2) a gap or structural break in the medium, but where groundwater flow is not obstructed, and (3) a combination of conditions (1) and (2). Results indicate that the low-permeability barrier greatly enhances horizontal displacement. The fault plane also represents a location of significant differential vertical subsidence. Large computed strains in the vicinity of the fault may suggest high potential for failure and the development of earth fissures when the fault is assumed to have low permeability. Results using a combination of the two boundaries suggest that potential fissure development may be great at or near the fault plane and that horizontal deformation is likely to play a key role in this development. Résumé. On considère que la déformation horizontale provoquée par un pompage dans un aquifère captif joue un rôle dans le développement des fissures du sol en régions semi-arides, comme la vallée de Las Vegas (Nevada). Malgré des niveaux d'eau stabilisés, de nouvelles fissures du sol continuent de se développer en longueur et en largeur au voisinage de failles dans les bassins sédimentaires. Un modèle de déplacement granulaire tri-dimensionnel, basé sur la théorie de la consolidation de Biot (Biot, M A, 1941, General theory of three

  20. The future of volcanism at Yellowstone caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, G.; Stix, J.

    2009-12-01

    Yellowstone caldera has produced three very large Pliocene and Pleistocene ignimbrite eruptions, the 2500 km3 Huckleberry Ridge Tuff, 280 km3 Mesa Falls Tuff, and 1000 km3 Lava Creek Tuff, at 2.05, 1.29 and 0.639 Ma, respectively. Today, Yellowstone caldera is seismically active, and its degassing rate is among the highest of Earth’s volcanoes. Whether, when and how this restless rhyolitic caldera will erupt again is of utmost importance. We analyzed trace elements in whole rock, glass and crystals of intra-caldera and extra-caldera Yellowstone rhyolites erupted during the last 0.5 Ma, in order to decipher their petrogenesis and shed light on future volcanism at Yellowstone. Based on these data, together with published mapping, hydrothermal activity, seismicity, seismic tomography, ground deformation and neotectonic data, we identify six areas within or near the caldera where eruptions may potentially occur in the future. Among these areas are two NNW-trending eruptive vent lineaments, which (1) cut through the caldera between the two resurgent domes, and (2) define the western caldera rim. These eruptive vents are those of the 173-70 ka Central Plateau Member (CPM) rhyolites, the youngest intra-caldera rhyolites, which total ~ 600 km3 in volume. These lineaments, despite being seismically and hydrothermally less active than other regions of the caldera, thus appear the most likely foci of future eruptions related to CPM magmatism. The volume of such effusive rhyolitic eruptions may reach several cubic kilometers. (3) Much of the seismicity, ground deformation, hydrothermal activity and degassing is observed in the northeastern part of the caldera. Despite this current unrest, no volcanism has occurred in this area in the last 0.48 Ma, and the upper crust (composed of older ignimbrite material as elsewhere beneath the caldera) may be more fertile and more likely to melt subsequent to deep heat inputs than the crust beneath the CPM lineaments, where ~ 600 km3 of

  1. Calderas and mineralization: volcanic geology and mineralization in the Chianti caldera complex, Trans-Pecos Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duex, T.W.; Henry, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes preliminary results of an ongoing study of the volcanic stratigraphy, caldera activity, and known and potential mineralization of the Chinati Mountains area of Trans-Pecos Texas. Many ore deposits are spatially associated with calderas and other volcanic centers. A genetic relationship between calderas and base and precious metal mineralization has been proposed by some and denied by others. Steven and others have demonstrated that calderas provide an important setting for mineralization in the San Juan volcanic field of Colorado. Mineralization is not found in all calderas but is apparently restricted to calderas that had complex, postsubsidence igneous activity. A comparison of volcanic setting, volcanic history, caldera evolution, and evidence of mineralization in Trans-Pecos to those of the San Juan volcanic field, a major mineral producer, indicates that Trans-Pecos Texas also could be an important mineralized region. The Chianti caldera complex in Trans-Pecos Texas contains at least two calderas that have had considerable postsubsidence activity and that display large areas of hydrothermal alteration and mineralization. Abundant prospects in Trans-Pecos and numerous producing mines immediately south of the Trans-Pecos volcanic field in Mexico are additional evidence that ore-grade deposits could occur in Texas.

  2. Post-supereruption recovery at Toba Caldera

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adonara E Mucek; Martin Danisík; Shanaka L De Silva; Axel K Schmitt; Indyo Pratomo; Matthew A Coble

    2017-01-01

    ..., limiting our ability to understand how supervolcanoes work and address their hazards. Toba Caldera, Indonesia, caused the greatest volcanic catastrophe of the last 100 kyr, climactically erupting ∼74 ka...

  3. Post-supereruption recovery at Toba Caldera

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adonara E Mucek; Martin Danisík; Shanaka L De Silva; Axel K Schmitt; Indyo Pratomo; Matthew A Coble

    2017-01-01

      Large calderas, or supervolcanoes, are sites of the most catastrophic and hazardous events on Earth, yet the temporal details of post-supereruption activity, or resurgence, remain largely unknown...

  4. Intracaldera volcanism and sedimentation - Creede Caldera, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, G.; Krier, D.; Snow, M.G. [and others

    1997-06-01

    Within the Creede caldera, Colorado, many of the answers to its postcaldera volcanic and sedimentary history lie within the sequence of tuffaceous elastic sedimentary rocks and tuffs known as the Creede Formation. The Creede Formation and its interbedded ash deposits were sampled by research coreholes Creede 1 and 2, drilled during the fall of 1991. In an earlier study of the Creede Formation, based on surface outcrops and shallow mining company coreholes, Heiken and Krier concluded that the process of caldera structural resurgence was rapid and that a caldera lake had developed in an annulus ({open_quotes}moat{close_quotes}) located between the resurgent dome and caldera wall. So far we have a picture of intracaldera activity consisting of intermittent hydrovolcanic eruptions within a caldera lake for the lower third of the Creede Formation, and both magmatic and hydrovolcanic ash eruptions throughout the top two-thirds. Most of the ash deposits interbedded with the moat sedimentary rocks are extremely fine-grained. Ash fallout into the moat lake and unconsolidated ash eroded from caldera walls and the slopes of the resurgent dome were deposited over stream delta distributaries within relatively shallow water in the northwestern moat, and in deeper waters of the northern moat, where the caldera was intersected by a graben. Interbedded with ash beds and tuffaceous siltstones are coarse-grained turbidites from adjacent steep slopes and travertine from fissure ridges adjacent to the moat. Sedimentation rates and provenance for elastic sediments are linked to the frequent volcanic activity in and near the caldera; nearly all of the Creede Formation sedimentary rocks are tuffaceous.

  5. CALDERA ACTIVITIES IN NORTH BALI, INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    -, K. Watanabe; -, T. Yamanaka; -, A. Harijoko; -, C. Saitra; -, I W. Warmada

    2015-01-01

    One of the most serious natural hazards is largescaled Plinian eruption that forms caldera. Although the probability to have such large-scaled eruption is very low, the result will be catastrophic if it happens. Thus, it is important to clarify features of caldera system including eruption timing, scale of eruption, precursor activity, etc. With enough scientific information, we may be able to mitigate such very rare but extremely large-scaled geohazard. In Bali Island, Indonesia, there are t...

  6. Monitoring super-volcanoes: geophysical and geochemical signals at Yellowstone and other large caldera systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B; Smith, Robert B; Hill, David P

    2006-08-15

    Earth's largest calderas form as the ground collapses during immense volcanic eruptions, when hundreds to thousands of cubic kilometres of magma are explosively withdrawn from the Earth's crust over a period of days to weeks. Continuing long after such great eruptions, the resulting calderas often exhibit pronounced unrest, with frequent earthquakes, alternating uplift and subsidence of the ground, and considerable heat and mass flux. Because many active and extinct calderas show evidence for repetition of large eruptions, such systems demand detailed scientific study and monitoring. Two calderas in North America, Yellowstone (Wyoming) and Long Valley (California), are in areas of youthful tectonic complexity. Scientists strive to understand the signals generated when tectonic, volcanic and hydrothermal (hot ground water) processes intersect. One obstacle to accurate forecasting of large volcanic events is humanity's lack of familiarity with the signals leading up to the largest class of volcanic eruptions. Accordingly, it may be difficult to recognize the difference between smaller and larger eruptions. To prepare ourselves and society, scientists must scrutinize a spectrum of volcanic signals and assess the many factors contributing to unrest and toward diverse modes of eruption.

  7. Monitoring super-volcanoes: Geophysical and geochemical signals at Yellowstone and other large caldera systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Smith, Robert B.; Hill, David P.

    2006-01-01

    Earth's largest calderas form as the ground collapses during immense volcanic eruptions, when hundreds to thousands of cubic kilometres of magma are explosively withdrawn from the Earth's crust over a period of days to weeks. Continuing long after such great eruptions, the resulting calderas often exhibit pronounced unrest, with frequent earthquakes, alternating uplift and subsidence of the ground, and considerable heat and mass flux. Because many active and extinct calderas show evidence for repetition of large eruptions, such systems demand detailed scientific study and monitoring. Two calderas in North America, Yellowstone (Wyoming) and Long Valley (California), are in areas of youthful tectonic complexity. Scientists strive to understand the signals generated when tectonic, volcanic and hydrothermal (hot ground water) processes intersect. One obstacle to accurate forecasting of large volcanic events is humanity's lack of familiarity with the signals leading up to the largest class of volcanic eruptions. Accordingly, it may be difficult to recognize the difference between smaller and larger eruptions. To prepare ourselves and society, scientists must scrutinize a spectrum of volcanic signals and assess the many factors contributing to unrest and toward diverse modes of eruption. ?? 2006 The Royal Society.

  8. 1925 Clarkston Valley, USA Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Location: east of Helena. Affected area: 803,000 square kilometers. Damage: $0.3 million. Chimneys fell in every direction from the shaking. In addition, brick and...

  9. Buellia dispersa (Lichens Used as Bio-Indicators for Air Pollution Transport: A Case Study within the Las Vegas Valley, Nevada (USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas B. Sims

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hazardous substances (e.g., toxic elements, oxides of nitrogen, carbon and sulfur are discharged to the environment by a number of natural and anthropogenic activities. Anthropogenic air pollution commonly contains trace elements derived from contaminants and additives released into the atmosphere during fossil fuel combustion (automobiles, power generation, etc. as well as physical processes (e.g., metal refining, vehicle brake wear, and tire and pavement wear. Analysis of pollutant chemical concentrations in lichens collected across the Las Vegas Valley allows documentation of the distribution of air pollution in the Valley. Analyses of lichen biomass (Buellia dispersa, when compared to windrose diagrams, shows pathways of airborne pollutant transport across the Las Vegas Valley. The west and north sectors of the Las Vegas Valley contained the lowest target contaminates (e.g., Cr, Cu, Co, Pb, Ni and the highest NO3− while the east and south sectors contained the highest levels of target contaminates and lowest NO3−. Additionally, metals and NO3− detected in the east and south sectors of the valley indicate that air pollution generated in the valley is moving from the south to the north-northeast and across the valley, exiting on the north and south side of Frenchman Mountain.

  10. Origin of calderas: discriminating between collapses and explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izumi Yokoyama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Origins of calderas may differ according to their subsurface structure that may be characterized by high or low density deposits that may be observed as high or low gravity anomalies, respectively. In the Introduction, the pioneering work of Fouqué[1879] on Santorini caldera is referred to in relation to definition of calderas. First, our discussion is focused on four calderas that were seen forming during the period from 1815 (the Tambora eruption to 1991 (the Pinatubo eruption. Coincidently, these four calderas are all low-gravity-anomaly type. Their formation processes and subsurface structure are summarized by the existing data analyzed by various authors. These results are confirmed by results of drillings at some other calderas. Then, caldera formation of both types is discussed: High-gravity-anomaly-type calderas are expected to originate from subsidence of high-density ejecta into the summit magma reservoir. On the calderas of this type, the genetic eruptions believed to be accompanied by subsidences were not actually observed, and consequently three examples are mentioned only briefly. The low-gravity-anomaly-type calderas are discussed from standpoint of both the models of collapses and explosions. It is also emphasized that dynamic pressure ofexplosions is an important factor in the caldera formation, not only volume of the ejecta. To confirm the possibility that volcanic ejecta and edifices collapse into magma reservoirs, we discuss stress propagation from a depleted reservoir upward towards the Earth surface. Formation mechanisms of large calderas of this type are speculated; large calderas measuring about 20 km across may develop by successive merging of component calderas over a long period of times. A Kamchatka caldera under enlargement during the Holocene period is interpreted by successive merging of five component calderas.

  11. Caldera resurgence driven by magma viscosity contrasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galetto, Federico; Acocella, Valerio; Caricchi, Luca

    2017-11-24

    Calderas are impressive volcanic depressions commonly produced by major eruptions. Equally impressive is the uplift of the caldera floor that may follow, dubbed caldera resurgence, resulting from magma accumulation and accompanied by minor eruptions. Why magma accumulates, driving resurgence instead of feeding large eruptions, is one of the least understood processes in volcanology. Here we use thermal and experimental models to define the conditions promoting resurgence. Thermal modelling suggests that a magma reservoir develops a growing transition zone with relatively low viscosity contrast with respect to any newly injected magma. Experiments show that this viscosity contrast provides a rheological barrier, impeding the propagation through dikes of the new injected magma, which stagnates and promotes resurgence. In explaining resurgence and its related features, we provide the theoretical background to account for the transition from magma eruption to accumulation, which is essential not only to develop resurgence, but also large magma reservoirs.

  12. Geothermal hydrology of Valles Caldera and the southwestern Jemez Mountains, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, Frank W.; Rogers, Robert J.; Sorey, M.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Jemez Mountains in north-central New Mexico are volcanic in origin and have a large central caldera known as Valles Caldera. The mountains contain the Valles geothermal system, which was investigated during 1970-82 as a source of geothermal energy. This report describes the geothermal hydrology of the Jemez Mountains and presents results of an earlier 1972-75 U.S. Geological Survey study of the area in light of more recent information. Several distinct types of thermal and nonthermal ground water are recognized in the Jemez Mountains. Two types of near-surface thermal water are in the caldera: thermal meteoric water and acid sulfate water. The principal reservoir of geothermal fluids is at depth under the central and western parts of the caldera. Nonthermal ground water in Valles Caldera occurs in diverse perched aquifers and deeper valley-fill aquifers. The geothermal reservoir is recharged by meteorically derived water that moves downward from the aquifers in the caldera fill to depths of 6,500 feet or more and at temperatures reaching about 330 degrees Celsius. The heated geothermal water rises convectively to depths of 2,000 feet or less and mixes with other ground water as it flows away from the geothermal reservoir. A vapor zone containing steam, carbon dioxide, and other gases exists above parts of the liquid-dominated geothermal zone. Two subsystems are generally recognized within the larger geothermal system: the Redondo Creek subsystem and the Sulphur Creek subsystem. The permeability in the Redondo Creek subsystem is controlled by stratigraphy and fault-related structures. Most of the permeability is in the high-angle, normal faults and associated fractures that form the Redondo Creek Graben. Faults and related fractures control the flow of thermal fluids in the subsystem, which is bounded by high-angle faults. The Redondo Creek subsystem has been more extensively studied than other parts of the system. The Sulphur Springs subsystem is not as well

  13. A Real Options Method for Estimating the Adoption Potential of Forestry and Agroforestry Systems on Private Lands in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory E. Frey; D. Evan Mercer; Frederick W. Cubbage; Robert C. Abt

    2010-01-01

    The Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley (LMAV), once was the largest forested bottom-land area in the continental United States, but has undergone widespread loss of forest through conversion to farmland. Restoration of forest functions and values has been a key conservation goal in the LMAV since the 1970s. This study utilizes a partial differential real options...

  14. Late Pleistocene and Holocene paleoseismology of an intraplate seismic zone in a large alluvial valley, the New Madrid seismic zone, Central USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guccione, Margaret J.

    2005-10-01

    The New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) is an intraplate right-lateral strike-slip and thrust fault system contained mostly within the Mississippi Alluvial Valley. The most recent earthquake sequence in the zone occurred in 1811 1812 and had estimated moment magnitudes of 7 8 (e.g., [Johnston, A.C., 1996. Seismic moment assessment of stable continental earthquakes, Part 3: 1811 1812 New Madrid, 1886 Charleston, and 1755 Lisbon. Geophysical Journal International 126, 314 344; Johnston, A.C., Schweig III, E.S, 1996. The enigma of the New Madrid earthquakes of 1811 1812. Annual Reviews of Earth and Planetary Sciences 24, 339 384; Hough, S.E., Armbruster, J.G., Seeber, L., Hough, J.F., 2000. On the modified Mercalli intensities and magnitudes of the New Madrid earthquakes. Journal of Geophysical Research 105 (B10), 23,839 23,864; Tuttle, M.P., 2001. The use of liquefaction features in paleoseismology: Lessons learned in the New Madrid seismic zone, central United States. Journal of Seismology 5, 361 380]). Four earlier prehistoric earthquakes or earthquake sequences have been dated A.D. 1450 ± 150, 900 ± 100, 300 ± 200, and 2350 B.C. ± 200 years using paleoliquefaction features, particularly those associated with native American artifacts, and in some cases surface deformation ([Craven, J. A. 1995. Paleoseismology study in the New Madrid seismic zone using geological and archeological features to constrain ages of liquefaction deposits. M.S thesis, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, U.S.A.; Tuttle, M.P., Lafferty III, R.H., Guccione, M.J., Schweig III, E.S., Lopinot, N., Cande, R., Dyer-Williams, K., Haynes, M., 1996. Use of archaeology to date liquefaction features and seismic events in the New Madrid seismic zone, central United States. Geoarchaeology 11, 451 480; Guccione, M.J., Mueller, K., Champion, J., Shepherd, S., Odhiambo, B., 2002b. Stream response to repeated co-seismic folding, Tiptonville dome, western Tennessee. Geomorphology 43(2002), 313 349; Tuttle, M

  15. Post-supereruption recovery at Toba Caldera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucek, Adonara E; Danišík, Martin; de Silva, Shanaka L; Schmitt, Axel K; Pratomo, Indyo; Coble, Matthew A

    2017-05-16

    Large calderas, or supervolcanoes, are sites of the most catastrophic and hazardous events on Earth, yet the temporal details of post-supereruption activity, or resurgence, remain largely unknown, limiting our ability to understand how supervolcanoes work and address their hazards. Toba Caldera, Indonesia, caused the greatest volcanic catastrophe of the last 100 kyr, climactically erupting ∼74 ka. Since the supereruption, Toba has been in a state of resurgence but its magmatic and uplift history has remained unclear. Here we reveal that new (14)C, zircon U-Th crystallization and (U-Th)/He ages show resurgence commenced at 69.7±4.5 ka and continued until at least ∼2.7 ka, progressing westward across the caldera, as reflected by post-caldera effusive lava eruptions and uplifted lake sediment. The major stratovolcano north of Toba, Sinabung, shows strong geochemical kinship with Toba, and zircons from recent eruption products suggest Toba's climactic magma reservoir extends beneath Sinabung and is being tapped during eruptions.

  16. Stability of zircon u-pb systematics in a greenschist-grade mylonite - an example from the rockfish valley fault zone, central Virginia, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Wayne, D. M.; Sinha, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    The mid-Paleozoic, greenschist-grade Rockfish Valley Fault Zone (RVFZ) of central Virginia cuts the Grenville-aged Pedlar River Charnockite Suite (PRCS) and contains zircons that underwent brittle failure during ductile deformation. Electron microprobe analyses and scanning electron microscope (SEM) backscattered electron (BSE) imaging show that zircons from the protolith PRCS are concentrically zoned (with alternating U-Hf-rich and U-Hf-poor bands), and contain numerous radial microcracks. Z...

  17. Limited Boron Isotopic Variation Between Caldera-Forming and Post-Caldera Low-δ 18O Rhyolites from Yellowstone Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, A. K.

    2004-12-01

    Post-collapse rhyolites from within Yellowstone caldera show prominent excursions to δ 18O values (VSMOW) as low as ˜0 ‰ that provide strong evidence for significant non-lithospheric oxygen input into magmas, presumably via infiltration of meteoric waters (1). Very little, however, is known about the behavior of other stable isotope systems, such as boron, in low δ 18O rhyolites and their potential for unraveling the mechanisms by which brines and magmas interact. Ion microprobe measurements of quartz-hosted melt inclusions from two low-δ 18O rhyolite flows (South Biscuit Basin SBB and Middle Biscuit Basin MBB) yielded average δ 11B values (NIST SRM 951) of -1.5 and -0.9 ‰ , respectively. These values overlap within error with those for glassy obsidian matrix from SBB and MBB. Melt inclusions from two caldera-forming tuff eruptions (Lava Creek Tuff LCT and Huckleberry Ridge Tuff HRT), known to have 'normal' oxygen isotopic compositions, also yielded indistinguishable δ 11B values of -1.8 ‰ . Recent petrologic studies (1) suggested that bulk remelting of hydrothermally altered volcanic rocks, specifically HRT, in the down-dropped roof of the magma chamber produced the low-δ 18O magmas. The lack of strong boron isotopic variations (within ±2‰ ) between 'normal' and low-δ 18O rhyolites, however, contrasts with published evidence for strong 11B-depletion in hydrothermal altered rhyolite encountered in Yellowstone drill-wells (δ 11B = -9.7 ‰ ; 2). This implies that boron isotopic fractionation due to interaction with hydrothermal fluids was either absent in the source region of the SBB and MBB magmas, or became masked due to subsequent processes. From preliminary mixing calculations it is concluded that assimilation of 11B- and 18O-depleted rocks by fresh rhyolite recharge could be a compositionally and thermally viable alterative to bulk remelting. (1) I. N. Bindeman and J. W. Valley (2001) J Petrol 42, 1491-1517; (2) M. R. Palmer and N. C. Sturchio

  18. Determination of Aquifer and Fault Permeabilities by Studying the Poroelastic Response of Rocks Using InSAR in the Upper Coachella Valley Area, CA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appana, R.; Saar, M. O.

    2007-12-01

    Coachella Valley in California is an area enclosed between Little Bernardino, San Jacinto, and San Bernardino Mountains. The San Andreas Fault system runs through the valley. Satellite interferometry (InSAR) has revealed a differential uplift of the land surface over a period of time across two basin-cutting faults, the Banning Fault (BF) and the Garnet Hill Fault (GHF), in the upper Coachella valley region. This uplift is due to a combined effect of both elastic response of the aquifer due to groundwater recharge at the White Water Spreading Facility and tectonic stresses in the region (Wisely et. al., AGU 2006). In this region, faults appear to act as semi-permeable barriers to groundwater flow (Wisely et. al., AGU 2005). As a result, water levels are not restored uniformly throughout the entire aquifer leading to differential uplift of the land surface. Hence, by developing a numerical model of groundwater flow in this aquifer system, that includes hydraulic representations of the existing faults, a better water management strategy can be achieved which aims at restoring the groundwater levels throughout the aquifer. In addition, the proposed model would better constrain fault permeabilities with implications for research related to earthquake dynamics and assessment of potential slip along segments of the San Andreas Fault system. A finite element code is being used to implement the groundwater flow model. The model simulates the poroelastic response of the faulted aquifer to changing groundwater levels. InSAR data and well data collected in this region will be used to constrain the model yielding parameters such as the hydraulic conductivity field of the aquifer and fault system, storage co-efficients, skeletal compressibilities, and the grounwater influx, and outflux, of the basin.

  19. Valles Caldera, New Mexico Microearthquakes: Improved Detection and Location with Expanded Caldera Station Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, L. S.; Roberts, P. M.; Ten Cate, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Los Alamos Seismic Network (LASN) has operated for 44 years, providing data to locate more than 2,500 earthquakes in north-central New Mexico. Roughly 1-2 earthquakes are detected and located per month within about 150 km of Los Alamos, a total of over 900 from 1973 to present. LASN's primary purpose is to monitor seismicity close to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for seismic hazards; monitoring seismicity associated with the nearby Valles Caldera is secondary. Until 2010 the network comprised only 7 stations, all near LANL or in the nearby Jemez Mountains. Just one station (PER, installed in 1998) was close enough to Valles Caldera to be able to detect microearthquakes located in or near the caldera. An initial study of the data from station PER between 1998 and 2002 identified and located 13 events with magnitudes less than 0.5 using the single-station hodogram technique. Those events were all located south of the caldera within a few kilometers of PER. Recently, two new digital broadband stations were installed inside the caldera, one on a northeastern ring-fracture dome, station CDAB, and the other on a northwestern dome, station SAMT. Also, station PER was upgraded with digital broadband instrumentation. Thus, LASN now can detect and record microearthquakes as small as magnitude -1.5 near the caldera, and they can be located using arrival times at multiple stations. Several recent events located near station SAMT on the caldera's ring fracture are the first that have been seen in that area. Additional events were recorded (by all three stations) and located in the area south of the caldera where the earlier hodogram-only events were located. These new multi-station event recordings allow a more quantitative assessment of the uncertainties in the initial single-station hodogram locations. Each event is located using multiple arrival times as well as the hodogram method at as many as three stations. Thus, improvements can be made to the

  20. Meie ingel Silicon Valleys / Raigo Neudorf

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Neudorf, Raigo

    2008-01-01

    Ettevõtluse Arendamise Sihtasutuse esinduse töölepanekust USAs Silicon Valleys räägib esinduse juht Andrus Viirg. Vt. ka: Eestlasi leidub San Franciscos omajagu; Muljetavaldav karjäär; USAga ammune tuttav

  1. Core lithology, Valles caldera No. 1, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, J.N.; Goff, F.; Goff, S.; Maassen, L.; Mathews, K.; Wachs, D.; Wilson, D.

    1987-04-01

    Vallas caldera No. 1 (VC-1) is the first Continental Scientific Drilling Program research core hole in the Vallas caldera and the first continuously cored hole in the region. The hole penetrated 298 m of moat volcanics and caldera-fill ignimbrites, 35 m of volcaniclastic breccia, and 523 m of Paleozoic carbonates, sandstones, and shales with over 95% core recovery. The primary research objectives included coring through the youngest rhyolite flow within the caldera; obtaining structural and stratigraphic information near the intersection of the ring-fracture zone and the pre-caldera Jemez fault zone; and penetrating a high-temperature hydrothermal outflow plume near its source. This report presents a compilation of lithologic and geophysical logs and photographs of core that were collected while drilling VC-1. It is intended to be a reference tool for researchers interested in caldera processes and associated geologic phenomena.

  2. Magnetic study of the Furnas caldera (Azores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Torta

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available A local ground magnetic study of the Furnas caldera (S. Miguel Island, Azores has provided new insight into the magnetic structure of this volcano. Analysis of the data comprised removal of the IGRF, reduction to the pole, pseudogravity integration and upward continuation. Also, a spectral method was applied to estimate the depth to the magnetic sources, as well as a 2.5D forward modelling technique. Magnetic properties obtained at the laboratory for some representative sample rocks were considered in the modelling process. The most relevant features are the existence of an important negative anomaly inside the caldera and of an intense positive anomaly to the south of the coast. The former points out a decrease in the magnetization of the caldera filling materials with respect to the surrounding rocks, which could be explained as the result of post-eruption processes such as hydrothermal alteration. This is expected as Furnas has an active hydrothermal system probably related with a magmatic reservoir at high temperature. The positive anomaly suggests the existence of a strongly-magnetized body beneath the south coast.

  3. Caldera-Fill Sediments at Toba Caldera, Sumatra, Indonesia: A Field Reconnaissance Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesner, C. A.; Barbee, O. A.; Lesmana, Z.; Nasution, A.

    2013-12-01

    The 74 ka Toba Caldera in northern Sumatra offers a unique opportunity to study caldera-fill sedimentation and its implications on the dynamic post-collapse history of Earth's largest Quaternary resurgent caldera. Although the complete 74,000 year sedimentation record is hidden beneath Lake Toba, a significant portion (~20-74 ka) of the post-caldera sedimentary sequence has been uplifted above lake level and is exposed on the 45 x 18 km Samosir Island resurgent dome. This extensive sedimentary record, over 100 m thick in places, is exposed by stream incision, and in resurgent dome fault scarps. Reconnaissance mapping and sampling of the sedimentary veneer covering Samosir Island was conducted in 2012-2013 to supplement recent sub-bottom seismic reflection profiling (chirp sonar) of the younger sediments and provide the basis for a more detailed caldera-fill sedimentation study at Toba. Our preliminary mapping indicates that distinct lacustrine and fluvial sedimentary sequences occur on Samosir Island. The lacustrine sequence dominates the surface exposures across the island and consists of interbedded clays, silts, sands, and diatomites. Different depositional environments and processes are suggested by regional variations in the componentry (i.e. abundance of diatoms, pumice clasts, reworked lake sediment clasts, rafted pumice blocks, etc.), but no significant ash-beds have been identified. An underlying coarse-grained indurated fluvial sequence is exposed in deeply incised drainages and fault scarps. This sequence consists mostly of coarse oxidized sands in eastern Samosir (approximately in the center of the caldera) that thicken and become coarser in western Samosir towards the caldera wall, where breccias and debris flows are also common. Blocks and boulders up to several meters in diameter derived from the basement rocks in the western caldera walls suggest a wedge of alluvial sediments formed before the lake reached its maximum level. Samples have been

  4. Joint environmental assessment for Chevron USA, Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc.: Midway Valley 3D seismic project, Kern County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The proposed Midway Valley 3D Geophysical Exploration Project covers approximately 31,444 aces of private lands, 6,880 acres of Department of Energy (DOE) Lands within Naval Petroleum Reserve 2 (NPR2) and 3,840 acres of lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), in western Kern County, California. This environmental assessment (EA) presents an overview of the affected environment within the project area using results of a literature review of biological field surveys previously conducted within or adjacent to a proposed 3D seismic project. The purpose is to provide background information to identify potential and known locations of sensitive wildlife and special status plant species within the proposed seismic project area. Biological field surveys, following agency approved survey protocols, will be conducted during October through November 1996 to acquire current resources data to provide avoidance as the project is being implemented in the field.

  5. Inverse modeling using PS-InSAR for improved calibration of hydraulic parameters and prediction of future subsidence for Las Vegas Valley, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Burbey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Las Vegas Valley has had a long history of surface deformation due to groundwater pumping that began in the early 20th century. After nearly 80 years of pumping, PS-InSAR interferograms have revealed detailed and complex spatial patterns of subsidence in the Las Vegas Valley area that do not coincide with major pumping regions. High spatial and temporal resolution subsidence observations from InSAR and hydraulic head data were used to inversely calibrate transmissivities (T, elastic and inelastic skeletal storage coefficients (Ske and Skv of the developed-zone aquifer and conductance (CR of the basin-fill faults for the entire Las Vegas basin. The results indicate that the subsidence observations from PS-InSAR are extremely beneficial for accurately quantifying hydraulic parameters, and the model calibration results are far more accurate than when using only water-levels as observations, and just a few random subsidence observations. Future predictions of land subsidence to year 2030 were made on the basis of existing pumping patterns and rates. Simulation results suggests that subsidence will continue in northwest subsidence bowl area, which is expected to undergo an additional 11.3 cm of subsidence. Even mitigation measures that include artificial recharge and reduced pumping do not significantly reduce the compaction in the northwest subsidence bowl. This is due to the slow draining of thick confining units in the region. However, a small amount of uplift of 0.4 cm is expected in the North and Central bowl areas over the next 20 years.

  6. Using remote sensing and GIS techniques to estimate discharge and recharge fluxes for the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agnese, F. A.; Faunt, C.C.; Turner, A.K.; ,

    1996-01-01

    The recharge and discharge components of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system were defined by techniques that integrated disparate data types to develop a spatially complex representation of near-surface hydrological processes. Image classification methods were applied to multispectral satellite data to produce a vegetation map. The vegetation map was combined with ancillary data in a GIS to delineate different types of wetlands, phreatophytes and wet playa areas. Existing evapotranspiration-rate estimates were used to calculate discharge volumes for these area. An empirical method of groundwater recharge estimation was modified to incorporate data describing soil-moisture conditions, and a recharge potential map was produced. These discharge and recharge maps were readily converted to data arrays for numerical modelling codes. Inverse parameter estimation techniques also used these data to evaluate the reliability and sensitivity of estimated values.The recharge and discharge components of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system were defined by remote sensing and GIS techniques that integrated disparate data types to develop a spatially complex representation of near-surface hydrological processes. Image classification methods were applied to multispectral satellite data to produce a vegetation map. This map provided a basis for subsequent evapotranspiration and infiltration estimations. The vegetation map was combined with ancillary data in a GIS to delineate different types of wetlands, phreatophytes and wet playa areas. Existing evapotranspiration-rate estimates were then used to calculate discharge volumes for these areas. A previously used empirical method of groundwater recharge estimation was modified by GIS methods to incorporate data describing soil-moisture conditions, and a recharge potential map was produced. These discharge and recharge maps were readily converted to data arrays for numerical modelling codes. Inverse parameter

  7. Decadal to monthly timescales of magma transfer and reservoir growth at a caldera volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druitt, T H; Costa, F; Deloule, E; Dungan, M; Scaillet, B

    2012-02-01

    Caldera-forming volcanic eruptions are low-frequency, high-impact events capable of discharging tens to thousands of cubic kilometres of magma explosively on timescales of hours to days, with devastating effects on local and global scales. Because no such eruption has been monitored during its long build-up phase, the precursor phenomena are not well understood. Geophysical signals obtained during recent episodes of unrest at calderas such as Yellowstone, USA, and Campi Flegrei, Italy, are difficult to interpret, and the conditions necessary for large eruptions are poorly constrained. Here we present a study of pre-eruptive magmatic processes and their timescales using chemically zoned crystals from the 'Minoan' caldera-forming eruption of Santorini volcano, Greece, which occurred in the late 1600s BC. The results provide insights into how rapidly large silicic systems may pass from a quiescent state to one on the edge of eruption. Despite the large volume of erupted magma (40-60 cubic kilometres), and the 18,000-year gestation period between the Minoan eruption and the previous major eruption, most crystals in the Minoan magma record processes that occurred less than about 100 years before the eruption. Recharge of the magma reservoir by large volumes of silicic magma (and some mafic magma) occurred during the century before eruption, and mixing between different silicic magma batches was still taking place during the final months. Final assembly of large silicic magma reservoirs may occur on timescales that are geologically very short by comparison with the preceding repose period, with major growth phases immediately before eruption. These observations have implications for the monitoring of long-dormant, but potentially active, caldera systems.

  8. Caldera processes and magma-hydrothermal systems continental scientific drilling program: thermal regimes, Valles caldera research, scientific and management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, F.; Nielson, D.L. (eds.)

    1986-05-01

    Long-range core-drilling operations and initial scientific investigations are described for four sites in the Valles caldera, New Mexico. The plan concentrates on the period 1986 to 1993 and has six primary objectives: (1) study the origin, evolution, physical/chemical dynamics of the vapor-dominated portion of the Valles geothermal system; (2) investigate the characteristics of caldera fill and mechanisms of caldera collapse and resurgence; (3) determine the physical/chemical conditions in the heat transfer zone between crystallizing plutons and the hydrothermal system; (4) study the mechanism of ore deposition in the caldera environment; (5) develop and test high-temperature drilling techniques and logging tools; and (6) evaluate the geothermal resource within a large silicic caldera. Core holes VC-2a (500 m) and VC-2b (2000 m) are planned in the Sulphur Springs area; these core holes will probe the vapor-dominated zone, the underlying hot-water-dominated zone, the boiling interface and probable ore deposition between the two zones, and the deep structure and stratigraphy along the western part of the Valles caldera fracture zone and resurgent dome. Core hole VC-3 will involve reopening existing well Baca number12 and deepening it from 3.2 km (present total depth) to 5.5 km, this core hole will penetrate the deep-crystallized silicic pluton, investigate conductive heat transfer in that zone, and study the evolution of the central resurgent dome. Core hole VC-4 is designed to penetrate deep into the presumably thick caldera fill in eastern Valles caldera and examine the relationship between caldera formation, sedimentation, tectonics, and volcanism. Core hole VC-5 is to test structure, stratigraphy, and magmatic evolution of pre-Valles caldera rocks, their relations to Valles caldera, and the influences of regional structure on volcanism and caldera formation.

  9. The West Elk Breccia: Evidence of a Massive Volcanic Debris Avalanche in the Eastern Gunnison River Valley, West-Central Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, P. J.; Ettensohn, F. R.

    2016-12-01

    The West Elk Breccia of the Gunnison River Valley in west-central Colorado is an Oligocene diamictite ascribed to a lahar origin by previous workers. In contrast, our work suggests that one or more volcanic debris avalanches that transformed to debris flows are a more likely depositional mechanism in the eastern Gunnison River valley and tributaries. We examined deposits over an area of 250 km2 for sedimentological and stratigraphic evidence of depositional mechanisms and flow rheology. Large blocks, or megaclasts, of stratified volcaniclastic deposits, which retain original stratigraphy, can be found over 30 km from the likely source volcano in a tuffaceous stream-gravel conglomerate. The most proximal conglomerate probably represents the transition from debris avalanche to debris flow as the initial avalanche bulked up and dilated during entry into the local drainage basins of the ancient Gunnison River and its tributaries. Mono-lithologic breccia beds of proximal deposits, almost entirely surrounded by the tuffaceous conglomerate, may represent megaclasts that dip at angles greater than normal stream gradient (up to 50 degrees or more with no thickening or thinning of beds). Some beds in distal deposits (>20 km from the source) show graded bedding and inverse grading, indicative of deposition by lahars; others contain breadcrust bombs, typically the product of dome collapse and block-and-ash flows. Jigsaw fracturing of individual clasts and megaclasts are further evidence of debris avalanche emplacement. Conversely, beds in proximal locations, which represent the steepest slopes of the ancient volcano, show sub-horizontal bedding of andesite and basaltic andesite. The presence of megaclasts is difficult to determine greater than 30 km from the source, and exposures are sparse in the most distal deposits, about 40 km from the source. Field observations and comparisons with Quaternary events suggest that the West Elk Breccia probably represents a series of sector

  10. Using water chemistry, isotopes and microbiology to evaluate groundwater sources, flow paths and geochemical reactions in the Death Valley flow system, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, James M.; Hershey, Ronald L. [Desert Research Institute, 2215 Raggio Pwky, Reno, NV, USA 89512 (United States); Moser, Duane P.; Fisher, Jenny C.; Reihle, Jessica; Wheatley, Alexandra [Desert Research Institute, 755 E. Flamingo Rd, Las Vegas, NV, USA 89130 (United States); Baldino, Cristi; Weissenfluh, Darrick [US Fish and Wildlife Service, Ash Meadows NWR, Amargosa Valley, NV, USA 89020 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Springs of Ash Meadows and Furnace Creek (near or in Death Valley, CA) have nearly constant flow, temperature, chemistry, and similar δ{sup 2}H and δ{sup 18}O signatures. These factors indicate shared water sources and/or analogous geochemical reactions along similar flow paths. DNA-based (16S rRNA gene) microbial diversity assessments further illuminate these relationships. Whereas, all Ash Meadows springs share related archaea populations, variations in carbon-14 (Crystal Spring) and strontium isotopes, Na{sup +}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, and methane concentrations (Big Spring), correspond with microbial differences within and between the two discharge areas. Similar geochemical signatures linking Ash Meadows and Furnace Creek springs appear to support a distinct end member at Big Spring in Ash Meadows, which is also supported by coincident enrichment in microbial methanogens and methanotrophs. Conversely, DNA libraries from a deep carbonate well (878 m) located between Ash Meadows and Furnace Creek (BLM-1), indicate no shared microbial diversity between Ash Meadows or Furnace Creek springs. (authors)

  11. Influence of water chemistry on the distribution of an acidophilic protozoan in an acid mine drainage system at the abandoned Green Valley coal mine, Indiana, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brake, S.S.; Dannelly, H.K.; Connors, K.A.; Hasiotis, S.T. [Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN (United States). Dept. of Geography Geology & Anthropology

    2001-07-01

    Euglena mutabilis, a benthic photosynthetic protozoan that intracellularly sequesters Fe, is variably abundant in the main effluent channel that contains acid mine drainage (AMD) discharging from the Green Valley coal mine site in western Indiana. Samples of effluent (pH 3.0-4.6) taken from the main channel and samples of contaminated stream water (pH 3.3 to 8.0) collected from an adjacent stream were analyzed to evaluate the influence of water chemistry on E. mutabilis distribution. E. mutabilis communities were restricted to areas containing unmixed effluent with the thickest (up to 3 mm) benthic communities residing in effluent containing high concentrations of total Fe (up to 12110 mg/l), SO{sub 4}(up to 2940 mg/l), Al (up to 1846 mg/l), and Cl (up to 629 mg/l). Communities were also present, but much less abundant, in areas with effluent containing lower concentrations of these same constituents. In effluent where SO{sub 4} was most highly concentrated, E. mutabilis was largely absent, suggesting that extremely high concentrations of SO{sub 4} may have an adverse effect on this potentially beneficial Fe-mediating, acidophilic protozoan.

  12. Role of Anopheles quadrimaculatus and Coquillettidia perturbans (Diptera: Culicidae) in the transmission cycle of Cache Valley virus (Bunyaviridae: Bunyavirus) in the midwest, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, C G; Blackmore, M S; Grimstad, P R

    1998-09-01

    Midwestern populations of Coquillettidia perturbans (Walker) and Anopheles quadrimaculatus (Say) were tested for their ability to transmit Cache Valley virus (CV), a recognized human and animal pathogen. Field-collected mosquitoes were fed artificial blood meals containing 5.2-6.2 log10 pfu/ml of CV. After 9-23 d at 28 degrees C, 75-93% of blood-fed Cq. perturbans had disseminated infections and 6-62% transmitted the virus to suckling mice. However, when infected with a lower virus titer (3.3 log10 pfu/ml), only 10-36% of the mosquitoes had disseminated infections and 0-10% transmitted the virus to suckling mice. A similar infection rate (21%) was observed in Cq. perturbans fed on viremic (3.2 log10 pfu/ml) hamsters. An. quadrimaculatus were infected (81-100%) by both doses used, with transmission rates ranging from 13-67% after 16-23 d of incubation. Transmission rates for the laboratory strain An. quadrimaculatus SAVANNAH ranged from 20 to 33% after 7-14 d of incubation. Our data show that although An. quadrimaculatus is more susceptible to CV infections than Cq. perturbans, both mosquito species could be involved in the midwestern transmission cycle of the virus.

  13. Chapter 1. Valles Caldera National Preserve land use history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt F. Anschuetz

    2007-01-01

    The land use history of the Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) extends back over thousands of years. Few known archaeological properties in the Valles Caldera date to the Paleoindian period (10000/9500–5500 B.C.). These finds include the recent discovery, during ongoing archaeological studies (Dr. Bob Parmeter, personal communication, VCNP, Los Alamos, 2005), of...

  14. Case History: Merging the Tools of DC Resistivity and Fracture Trace Analysis for Locating High Yield Domestic Water Wells in Karst Terrain, Shenandoah Valley, Virginia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangos, W.; Eaton, L. S.

    2004-05-01

    The karstic eastern margin of Virginia's Shenandoah Valley hosts large volumes of high quality ground water in discrete zones or pockets. Industrial and culinary exploitation poses a challenging exploration problem. Recent work by the authors using geophysical and aerial photogrammetric techniques resulted in the successful location of three high- yield water wells. This indirect methodology increases the probability of locating valuable wells by locating geologic features that may harbor water-bearing zones. The eastern Shenandoah Valley is geologically complex. The underlying bedrock is dominantly limestones, dolomites, and shales of Cambrian age that have been extensively folded, fractured, and faulted. Geomorphologic features such as solution cavities, caves, disappearing streams, and sinkholes are common. Extensive alluvial fan and river terrace deposits, comprised dominantly of quartzite gravel and sand, cover much of the land surface, and fill surface depressions. The combination of sand and gravel filtering and large storage capacity in the voids makes this region ideal for producing a large quantity of high quality groundwater. Two sites were investigated for karst aquifers near the town of Stuarts Draft. Interbedded limestones and dolomites underlie Barth Farm, situated on the north bank of the South River. The owners attempted to installed a water well to service an active vineyard. The drilling located a previously unknown, water-filled cavern ~5 m below the surface; subsequent high pumping rates in finishing the well resulted in a surface collapse and the creation of a sinkhole. A second effort, offset by ~30 meters, resulted in a catastrophic collapse, and seriously endangered the lives of the drillers. A subsequent dipole-dipole DC resistivity survey delineated a conductive zone coincident with the two sinkholes. Fracture trace analysis of pre-drilling aerial photographs indicates the presence of lineaments that pass through this drilling site

  15. Channelization and floodplain forests: Impacts of accelerated sedimentation and valley plug formation on floodplain forests of the Middle Fork Forked Deer River, Tennessee, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswalt, S.N.; King, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the severe degradation of floodplain habitats resulting from channelization and concomitant excessive coarse sedimentation on the Middle Fork Forked Deer River in west Tennessee from 2000 to 2003. Land use practices have resulted in excessive sediment in the tributaries and river system eventually resulting in sand deposition on the floodplain, increased overbank flooding, a rise in the groundwater table, and ponding of upstream timber. Our objectives were to: (1) determine the composition of floodplain vegetation communities along the degraded river reach, (2) to isolate relationships among these communities, geomorphic features, and environmental variables and (3) evaluate successional changes based on current stand conditions. Vegetation communities were not specifically associated with predefined geomorphic features; nevertheless, hydrologic and geomorphic processes as a result of channelization have clearly affected vegetation communities. The presence of valley plugs and continued degradation of upstream reaches and tributaries on the impacted study reach has arrested recovery of floodplain plant communities. Historically common species like Liquidambar styraciflua L. and Quercus spp. L. were not important, with importance values (IV) less than 1, and occurred in less than 20% of forested plots, while Acer rubrum L., a disturbance-tolerant species, was the most important species on the site (IV = 78.1) and occurred in 87% of forested plots. The results of this study also indicate that channelization impacts on the Middle Fork Forked Deer River are more temporally and spatially complex than previously described for other river systems. Rehabilitation of this system necessitates a long-term, landscape-scale solution that addresses watershed rehabilitation in a spatially and temporally hierarchical manner. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. How piecemeal is your caldera? Going beyond modelling to investigate the structural evolution of explosive caldera volcanoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willcox, Chris; Branney, Mike [University of Leicester, UK, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Carrasco-Nunez, Gerardo [Centro de Geociencias Campus Juraquilla, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 1-742 Queretaro, Qro. 76001 (Mexico)], E-mail: cpw14@le.ac.uk

    2008-10-01

    Despite a profusion of analogue models relatively little is known about the internal structure and temporal evolution of explosive caldera volcanoes. So how can modellers test their predictions given that the internal structures of many young calderas are concealed? Mapping ancient exhumed calderas has proven advantageous, yet this requires a large investment of time and expertise to constrain the structural evolution in sufficient detail. We aim to investigate the interplay between the structural evolution and eruption style over time at a modern caldera. We have selected Los Humeros (Mexico) because it is thought to be an example of a caldera with some piecemeal development, and it also has a well-exposed pyroclastic succession and abundant borehole data.

  17. Central San Juan caldera cluster: Regional volcanic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Peter W.

    2000-01-01

    Eruption of at least 8800 km3 of dacitic-rhyolitic magma as 9 major ash-slow sheets (individually 150-5000 km3) was accompanied by recurrent caldera subsidence between 28.3 and about 26.5 Ma in the central San Juan Mountains, Colorado. Voluminous andesitic-decitic lavas and breccias were erupted from central volcanoes prior to the ash-flow eruptions, and similar lava eruptions continued within and adjacent to the calderas during the period of explosive volcanism, making the central San Juan caldera cluster an exceptional site for study of caldera-related volcanic processes. Exposed calderas vary in size from 10 to 75 km in maximum diameter, the largest calderas being associated with the most voluminous eruptions. After collapse of the giant La Garita caldera during eruption if the Fish Canyon Tuff at 17.6 Ma, seven additional explosive eruptions and calderas formed inside the La Garita depression within about 1 m.y. Because of the nested geometry, maximum loci of recurrently overlapping collapse events are inferred to have subsided as much as 10-17 km, far deeper than the roof of the composite subvolcanic batholith defined by gravity data, which represents solidified caldera-related magma bodies. Erosional dissection to depths of as much as 1.5 km, although insufficient to reach the subvolcanic batholith, has exposed diverse features of intracaldera ash-flow tuff and interleaved caldera-collapse landslide deposits that accumulated to multikilometer thickness within concurrently subsiding caldera structures. The calderas display a variety of postcollapse resurgent uplift structures, and caldera-forming events produced complex fault geometries that localized late mineralization, including the epithermal base- and precious-metal veins of the well-known Creede mining district. Most of the central San Juan calderas have been deeply eroded, and their identification is dependent on detailed geologic mapping. In contrast, the primary volcanic morphology of the

  18. The El Cajete Series, Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, S.; Kircher, D. E.; Wolff, J. A.

    1988-06-01

    Three rhyolite eruptive units totaling 3 km3 dense rock equivalent volume are the youngest products from the Valles caldera, New Mexico. These pyroclastic and effusive units, herein called the El Cajete Series, were erupted over an appreciable time period with Plinian and ignimbrite-forming activity preceding an effusive phase by a lengthy but indeterminable interval. New U-Th disequilibrium and published fission track dates support an age for the event between 170 and 130 ka. The explosive phases formed the El Cajete Plinian deposit (about 1.3 km3), minor dry pyroclastic surges, and the Battleship Rock tuff (about 1.0 km3), a valley-confined welded ignimbrite. The Plinian eruption column is estimated to have been 28 km high during deposition of the most widely dispersed pumice fall unit. Slow effusion of the Banco Bonito obsidian lava flow (<1.0 km3) onto a dissected surface cut into the El Cajete and Battleship Rock pyroclastic deposits, accompanied by minor explosive activity, terminated the event. Twenty-four bulk-rock samples from all three eruptive stages exhibit little significant compositional variation, and the three units are petrographically identical apart from differences arising from contrasting eruption styles. Very few phenocrysts appear to have been in equilibrium with their enclosing high-silica rhyolitic liquid. Plagioclase grains are typically strongly resorbed, while biotite and hornblende frequently occur in aggregate grains in which textures characteristic of plutonic rocks can be discerned. These features result from partial melting of preexisting crustal igneous rock, probably of dioritic to granodioritic composition, and subsequent eruption of the resulting liquid plus restite crystals. Rapid generation and eruption of rhyolitic magma during this most recent phase of activity in the Jemez Mountains may imply that the Valles magma system is presently in a state where small magma bodies are transient phenomena.

  19. Comparison of particle-tracking and lumped-parameter models for determining groundwater age distributions and nitrate in water-supply wells, Central Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, B. C.; Bohlke, J. K.; Kauffman, L. J.; Belitz, K.

    2013-12-01

    Age distributions for 30 production wells (mostly public-supply) were determined using two methods: 1) calibration of age tracer data with lumped parameter models (LPMs) and 2) by advective particle tracking (PT) simulations using MODPATH and a regional steady-state groundwater flow model. The LPMs were calibrated with measurements of 3H, 3He(trit), and 14C by minimizing the Chi-square test statistic using a non-linear solver. A partial exponential model (PEM) was the primary LPM used in this study and a combination of two PEMs were used in cases where binary age mixtures were identified. The PEM is a reformulated version of the exponential model that is parameterized to simulate the age distribution in a well that is screened over any finite interval within the aquifer. The regional numerical model was calibrated to water-levels and gradients, and simulated PT age tracer concentrations were calibrated to the MODPATH porosity value. Age distributions were then used to predict nitrate concentrations in wells using agricultural application rates of nitrate in the central eastside of the San Joaquin Valley, California. Both methods showed that wells in the study area captured groundwater with a broad range of ages, spanning decades to millennia. Age distributions from the LPMs predicted age tracer and nitrate concentrations more accurately than the regional PT simulation; whereas PT simulations incorporating more detailed information about water-levels and hydraulic gradients near wells also provided good fits. 14C concentrations were not simulated well by the regional steady-state model, especially for wells with a significant fraction of old groundwater, because the model simulates the current, perturbed system and does not simulate recharge rates and velocities of the predevelopment system. Results from the LPMs yielded an average recharge rate of 0.55 m/yr, which was similar to the average recharge rate of 0.54 m/yr determined from a water budget analysis for the

  20. Stratigraphy of Reforma Caldera, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Sánchez, L.; Macias, J. L.; Osorio, L. S.; Pola, A.; Avellán, D. R.; Arce, J. L.; Saucedo, R.; Sánchez, J. M.; García-Tenorio, F.; Cisneros, G.; Reyes-Agustín, G.; Cardona, S.; Jimenez, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Reforma caldera is located at ~35 km to the northwest of Santa Rosalía in the central part of the Baja California peninsula. It has 10 km in diameter and a maximum height of 1200 masl in the center and between 100 and 500 masl in its slopes. Reforma is within a tectonic zone affected by two fault systems: A NW-SE normal fault system linked to the opening of the Gulf of California, and a NNW-SSE and NW-SE strike-slip fault system associated with an active Riedel system. Reforma was built upon Cretaceous granites that outcrop at the caldera center, Miocene to Pliocene volcano-sedimentary rocks of the Comondú group, and Miocene marine sediments of the Santa Rosalía basin. On top of these rocks outcrop at least four submarine to subaerial ignimbrites interbedded with marine fossiliferous beds and the lower Pleistocene deposits associated to the Reforma caldera. These deposits are formed by a ignimbrite that shifts to different lithofacies that change gradually their welding, here dubbed basal, transitional, intermediate, and upper (all of then enriched in black fiammes), followed by a pumice-rich, white fiammes, and vitrophyre lithofacies, which are distributed around the 9 km wide caldera and have been associated to the caldera formation episode. Deposits related to post-caldera volcanism are andesite-basaltic lava flows erupted along the caldera rim through localized feeding dikes and andesitic and rhyolitic domes, and scoria cinder cones exposed inside and outside the caldera. On top of these deposits rest the middle Pleistocene Aguajito caldera deposits.

  1. Caldera-scale inflation of the Lazufre volcanic area, South America: Evidence from InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch, J.; Anderssohn, J.; Walter, T. R.; Motagh, M.

    2008-07-01

    Collapsed calderas are the structural surface expression of the largest volcanic eruptions on Earth and may reach diameters of tens of kilometres while erupting volumes larger than 1000 km 3. Remnants of collapse calderas can be found along the South American volcanic arc and are thought to be inactive. However, this study shows that systems of such dimension may become active in a relatively short period of time without attracting much attention. Using satellite-based InSAR data, a 45 km wide elongated area of ground deformation was observed in the Lazufre volcanic region (Chile), where no deformation was detected 10 years ago. The deformation signal shows an uplift of up to ~ 3 cm yr - 1 during 2003-2006, affecting an area of about 1100 km 2, comparable in size to super-volcanoes such as Yellowstone or Long Valley. This deformation signal can be explained by an inflating magma body at about 10 km depth, expanding and propagating laterally at a velocity of up to 4 km per year. Although it is not clear whether this intrusion will lead to an eruption, its dimensions and the rapid deformation rate insinuate that a potentially large volcanic system is forming.

  2. Valley fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... especially the first trimester) People of Native American, African, or Philippine descent may also get more severe ... that causes Valley fever) Chest x-ray Sputum culture Sputum smear (KOH test) Tests done for more ...

  3. Valley Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... loss Headache Valley fever Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  4. Magma storage in a strike-slip caldera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxby, J; Gottsmann, J; Cashman, K; Gutiérrez, E

    2016-07-22

    Silicic calderas form during explosive volcanic eruptions when magma withdrawal triggers collapse along bounding faults. The nature of specific interactions between magmatism and tectonism in caldera-forming systems is, however, unclear. Regional stress patterns may control the location and geometry of magma reservoirs, which in turn may control the spatial and temporal development of faults. Here we provide new insight into strike-slip volcano-tectonic relations by analysing Bouguer gravity data from Ilopango caldera, El Salvador, which has a long history of catastrophic explosive eruptions. The observed low gravity beneath the caldera is aligned along the principal horizontal stress orientations of the El Salvador Fault Zone. Data inversion shows that the causative low-density structure extends to ca. 6 km depth, which we interpret as a shallow plumbing system comprising a fractured hydrothermal reservoir overlying a magmatic reservoir with vol% exsolved vapour. Fault-controlled localization of magma constrains potential vent locations for future eruptions.

  5. 2.8-Ma ash-flow caldera at Chegem River in the northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), contemporaneous granites, and associated ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, P.W.; Bogatikov, O.A.; Tsvetkov, A.A.; Gazis, C.; Gurbanov, A.G.; Hon, K.; Koronovsky, N.V.; Kovalenko, V.I.; Marchev, P.

    1993-01-01

    , and associated aplitic phases have textural features of Climax-type molybdenite porphyries in the western USA. Similar 40Ar/39Ar ages, mineral chemistry, and bulk-rock compositions indicate that the Chegem Tuff, intracaldera intrusion, and Eldjurta Granite are all parts of a large magmatic system that broadly resembles the middle Tertiary Questa caldera system and associated Mo deposits in northern New Mexico, USA. Because of their young age and superb three-dimensional exposures, rocks of the Chegem-Tirniauz region offer exceptional opportunities for detailed study of caldera structures, compositional gradients in volcanic rocks relative to cogenetic granites, and the thermal and fluid-flow history of a large young upper-crustal magmatic system. ?? 1993.

  6. New Seismic Monitoring Station at Mohawk Ridge, Valles Caldera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Peter Morse [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-20

    Two new broadband digital seismic stations were installed in the Valles Caldera in 2011 and 2012. The first is located on the summit of Cerros del Abrigo (station code CDAB) and the second is located on the flanks of San Antonio Mountain (station code SAMT). Seismic monitoring stations in the caldera serve multiple purposes. These stations augment and expand the current coverage of the Los Alamos Seismic Network (LASN), which is operated to support seismic and volcanic hazards studies for LANL and northern New Mexico (Figure 1). They also provide unique continuous seismic data within the caldera that can be used for scientific studies of the caldera’s substructure and detection of very small seismic signals that may indicate changes in the current and evolving state of remnant magma that is known to exist beneath the caldera. Since the installation of CDAB and SAMT, several very small earthquakes have already been detected near San Antonio Mountain just west of SAMT (Figure 2). These are the first events to be seen in that area. Caldera stations also improve the detection and epicenter determination quality for larger local earthquakes on the Pajarito Fault System east of the Preserve and the Nacimiento Uplift to the west. These larger earthquakes are a concern to LANL Seismic Hazards assessments and seismic monitoring of the Los Alamos region, including the VCNP, is a DOE requirement. Currently the next closest seismic stations to the caldera are on Pipeline Road (PPR) just west of Los Alamos, and Peralta Ridge (PER) south of the caldera. There is no station coverage near the resurgent dome, Redondo Peak, in the center of the caldera. Filling this “hole” is the highest priority for the next new LASN station. We propose to install this station in 2018 on Mohawk Ridge just east of Redondito, in the same area already occupied by other scientific installations, such as the MCON flux tower operated by UNM.

  7. Intracaldera volcanism and sedimentation-Creede caldera, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, G.; Krier, D.; Snow, M.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); McCormick, T. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1994-12-31

    Within the Creede caldera, Colorado, many of the answers to its postcaldera volcanic and sedimentary history lie within the sequence of tuffaceous clastic sedimentary rocks and tuffs known as the Creede Formation. The Creede Formation and its interbedded ash deposits were sampled by research coreholes Creede 1 and 2, drilled during the fall of 1991. In an earlier study of the Creede Formation, based on surface outcrops and shallow mining company coreholes, Heiken and Krier (1987) concluded that the process of caldera structural resurgence was rapid and that a caldera lake had developed in an annulus (``moat``) located between the resurgent dome and caldera wall. So far we have a picture of intracaldera activity consisting of intermittent hydrovoleanic eruptions within a caldera lake for the lower third of the Creede Formation, and both magmatic and hydrovolcanic ash eruptions throughout the top two-thirds. Most of the ash deposits interbedded with the moat sedimentary rocks are extremely fine-grained. Ash fallout into the moat lake and unconsolidated ash eroded from caldera walls and the slopes of the resurgent dome were deposited over stream delta distributaries within relatively shallow water in the northwestern moat, and in deeper waters of the northern moat, where the caldera was intersected by a graben. Interbedded with ash beds and tuffaceous siltstones are coarse-grained turbidites from adjacent steep slopes and travertine from fissure ridges adjacent to the moat. Sedimentation rates and provenance for clastic sediments are linked to the frequent volcanic activity in and near the caldera; nearly all of the Creede Formation sedimentary rocks are tuffaceous.

  8. 150 Years of Coulomb Stress History Along the California-Nevada Border, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carena, S.; Verdecchia, A.

    2014-12-01

    The temporal and spatial correlation among earthquakes in diffuse plate boundary zones is not well understood yet. The region north of the Garlock fault between the Sierra Nevada and Death Valley is part of a diffuse plate boundary zone, which absorbs a significant fraction of the plate motion between Pacific and North America. This area has experienced at least eight Mw ≥ 6 earthquakes in historical times, beginning with the 1872 Mw 7.5 Owens Valley earthquake. Furthermore, since 1978 Long Valley caldera has been undergoing periods of unrest, with earthquake swarms and resurgence. Our goal is to determine whether the 1872 Owens Valley earthquake has influenced the seismicity and volcanic activity in the area. We model the evolution of coseismic, interseismic and postseismic Coulomb stress (ΔCFS) in the region due to both earthquakes and caldera activity in the last 150 years. Our results show that the 1872 Owens Valley earthquake strongly encourages faulting in northern Owens Valley. In addition, there is a correlation among smaller events, in the form of a west-to-east migration of earthquakes from Long Valley caldera toward the White Mountains immediately following the 1978 caldera inflation event. The last event in this sequence, the 1986 Mw 6.3 Chalfant Valley earthquake, controls the location of over 80% of its own aftershocks, which occur in areas of positive ΔCFS and reach Mw 5.7. We also calculate the cumulative ΔCFS on several major active faults in the region. Stresses up to 30 bars and 10 bars respectively have accumulated on the White Mountains (Central section) and Deep Springs faults, comparable to the expected stress drop in an average earthquake. Because no surface ruptures more recent than 1.8 ka have been identified on these faults [dePolo, 1989; Lee et al., 2001], we consider them as likely candidates for the next major earthquake in the region.

  9. Quilotoa volcano — Ecuador: An overview of young dacitic volcanism in a lake-filled caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Minard L.; Mothes, Patricia A.

    2008-09-01

    Quilotoa volcano, an example of young dacitic volcanism in a lake-filled caldera, is found at the southwest end of the Ecuador's volcanic front. It has had a long series of powerful plinian eruptions of moderate to large size (VEI = 4-6), at repetitive intervals of roughly 10-15 thousand years. At least eight eruptive cycles (labeled Q-I to Q-VIII with increasing age) over the past 200 ka are recognized, often beginning with a phreatomagmatic onset and followed by a pumice-rich lapilli fall, and then a sequence of pumice, crystal, and lithic-rich deposits belonging to surges and ash flows. These unwelded pyroclastic flows left veneers on hillsides as well as very thick accumulations in the surrounding valleys, the farthest ash flow having traveled about 17 km down the Toachi valley. The bulk volumes of the youngest flow deposits are on the order of 5 km 3, but that of Q-I's 800 yr BP ash-fall unit is about 18 km 3. In the last two eruption cycles water has had a more important role. Upon Quilotoa's low-relief volcanic edifice, three calderas are recognized; the formation of the oldest one predates the Q-IV cycle and the others occurred during the Q-II and Q-I cycles. Dacite lava domes are common along the present caldera rim and most were emplaced at the end of the Q-II cycle; older domes of dark dacite belong to the Q-III and IV cycles. The explosive onset of the Q-I cycle expulsed as much as 250 million m 3 of the lake's water, resulting in large debris flows that scoured the eastern flanks of the edifice and descended the Toachi river. Little variation in the mineralogy and chemistry of Quilotoa's eruptive products is observed, suggesting that the source is a homogeneous magma body at shallow depth. Both the pyroclastic material and the domes are composed chiefly of gray porphyritic dacites carrying large phenocrysts of plagioclase, amphibole, biotite, and occasionally quartz.

  10. Caldera ring-fault intrusion through repeated sheet capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, J.; Gudmundsson, A.

    2014-12-01

    The subsurface structure of caldera-bounding ring faults remains a contentious issue, with geometries often inferred from numerical and analogue models as well as from geophysical studies. All of these inferred structures need to be compared with actual ring-faults so as to test the model implications. Here we present field observations of a deeply eroded and uniquely well exposed section of caldera ring fault in a Tertiary central volcano in south-western Iceland. The Hafnarfjall ring fault represents the outermost fault complex of an elliptical caldera with an original diameter of approximately 5 km. Vertical displacement is estimated to be > 200 m on the steeply inward-dipping ring fault. Several thin (software COMSOL, we offer a mechanical explanation for the deflection of inclined sheets into sub-vertical dikes at a mechanically stratified fault damage zone and core. A model is proposed whereby ring faults can act as a barrier for the propagation of inclined sheets away from a magma chamber within the caldera. Our findings provide an alternative mechanical explanation for magma channelling along caldera ring-faults, which is a process likely to be fundamental in controlling the location of post-caldera volcanism.

  11. Assessment of Long Valley as a site for drilling to the magmatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundle, J.B.; Carrigan, C.R.; Hardee, H.C.; Luth, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    Recent earthquakes, ground uplift, and increased hydrothermal activity are only the most recent examples of intense tectonic and volcanic activity that has occurred at Long Valley caldera, CA, over the last 3 million years. A large number of geophysical experiments conducted by several hundred investigators over the past few years clearly indicates that a major body of magma exists within the central part of the caldera at drillable depths on the order of 5 km. Plans are underway to drill toward and eventually into this magma body. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Geology and structure of the Malpaso caldera and El Ocote ignimbrite, Aguascalientes, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Obregón, Jorge; Aguirre-Díaz, Gerardo

    2008-10-01

    A new caldera, named Malpaso, is reported west of the city of Aguascalientes, Mexico. The Malpaso caldera is a volcano-tectonic depression, highly fractured and faulted, and was filled by voluminous pyroclastic products related to the caldera collapse. Due to these characteristics it as a graben caldera. It is truncated by younger normal faults of the Calvillo and Aguascalientes grabens. In this work we present a summary of the geologic and structural observations on this caldera, as well as a description of the main caldera product, the high-grade El Ocote ignimbrite.

  13. Origin and evolution of valleys on Martian volcanoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulick, V.C.; Baker, V.R. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA))

    1990-08-30

    Morphological analyses of six Martian volcanoes, Ceraunius Tholus, Hecates Tholus, Alba Patera, Hadriaca Patera, Apollinaris Patera, and Tyrrhena Patera, indicate that fluvial processes were the dominant influence in the initiation and subsequent development of many dissecting valleys. Lava processes and possibly volcanic density flows were also important as valley-forming processes. Fluvial valleys are especially well developed on Alba Patera, Ceraunius Tholus, and Hecates Tholus. These valleys are inset into the surrounding landscape. They formed in regions of subdued lava flow morphology, contain tributaries, and tend to widen slightly in the downstream direction. Lava channels on Alba Patera are located on the crest of lava flows and have a discontinuous, irregular surface morphology, and distributary patterns. These channels sometimes narrow toward their termini. Possible volcanic density flow channels are located on the northern flank of Ceraunius Tholus. Valleys dissecting Apollinaris Patera, Hadriaca Patera, and Tyrrhena Patera appear to have a complex evolution, probably a mixed fluvial and lava origin. They are inset into a subdued (possibly mantled) surface, lack tributaries, and either have fairly constant widths or widen slightly downvalley. Valleys surrounding the caldera of Apollinaris appear to have formed by fluvial and possibly by volcanic density flow processes, while those on the Apollinaris fan structure may have a mixed lava and fluvial origin. Valleys on Tyrrhena have broad flat floors and theater heads, which have been extensively enlarged, probably by sapping.

  14. Mega-rings Surrounding Timber Mountain Nested Calderas, Geophysical Anomalies: Rethinking Structure and Volcanism Near Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, M. C.; Smith, K. D.; Savino, J. M.; Vogt, T. J.

    2004-12-01

    Observed regional mega-rings define a zone ˜80-100 km in diameter centered on Timber Mountain (TM). The mega-rings encompass known smaller rhyolitic nested Miocene calderas ( ˜11-15 my, calderas cluster within the central area and on the outer margin of the interpreted larger mega-ring complex. The mega-ring interpretation is consistent with observations of regional physiography, tomographic images, seismicity patterns, and structural relationships. Mega-rings consist of arcuate faulted blocks with deformation (some remain active structures) patterns showing a genetic relationship to the TM volcanic system; they appear to be spatially associated and temporally correlated with Miocene volcanism and two geophysically identified crustal/upper mantle features. A 50+ km diameter pipe-like high velocity anomaly extends from crustal depth to over 200 km beneath TM (evidence for 400km depth to NE). The pipe is located between two ˜100 km sub-parallel N/S linear trends of small-magnitude earthquake activity, one extending through the central NV Test Site, and a second located near Beatty, NV. Neither the kinematics nor relational mechanism of 100km seismically active N/S linear zones, pipe, and mega-rings are understood. Interpreted mega-rings are: 1) Similar in size to larger terrestrial volcanic complexes (e.g., Yellowstone, Indonesia's Toba system); 2) Located in the region of structural transition from the Mohave block to the south, N/S Basin and Range features to the north, Walker Lane to the NW, and the Las Vegas Valley shear zone to the SE; 3) Associated with the two seismically active zones (similar to other caldera fault-bounded sags), the mantle high velocity feature, and possibly a regional bouguer gravity anomaly; 4) Nearly coincident with area hydrologic basins and sub-basins; 5) Similar to features described from terrestrial and planetary caldera-collapse studies, and as modeled in laboratory scaled investigations (ice melt, balloon/sand). Post Mid

  15. Carbonatite ring-complexes explained by caldera-style volcanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Magnus; Malehmir, Alireza; Troll, Valentin R; Dehghannejad, Mahdieh; Juhlin, Christopher; Ask, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Carbonatites are rare, carbonate-rich magmatic rocks that make up a minute portion of the crust only, yet they are of great relevance for our understanding of crustal and mantle processes. Although they occur in all continents and from Archaean to present, the deeper plumbing system of carbonatite ring-complexes is usually poorly constrained. Here, we show that carbonatite ring-complexes can be explained by caldera-style volcanism. Our geophysical investigation of the Alnö carbonatite ring-complex in central Sweden identifies a solidified saucer-shaped magma chamber at ~3 km depth that links to surface exposures through a ring fault system. Caldera subsidence during final stages of activity caused carbonatite eruptions north of the main complex, providing the crucial element to connect plutonic and eruptive features of carbonatite magmatism. The way carbonatite magmas are stored, transported and erupt at the surface is thus comparable to known emplacement styles from silicic calderas.

  16. Magma mixing and the generation of isotopically juvenile silicic magma at Yellowstone caldera inferred from coupling 238U–230Th ages with trace elements and Hf and O isotopes in zircon and Pb isotopes in sanidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelten, Mark E.; Cooper, Kari M.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Reid, Mary R.; Barfod, Gry H.; Wimpenny, Josh; Yin, Qing-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    The nature of compositional heterogeneity within large silicic magma bodies has important implications for how silicic reservoirs are assembled and evolve through time. We examine compositional heterogeneity in the youngest (~170 to 70 ka) post-caldera volcanism at Yellowstone caldera, the Central Plateau Member (CPM) rhyolites, as a case study. We compare 238U–230Th age, trace-element, and Hf isotopic data from zircons, and major-element, Ba, and Pb isotopic data from sanidines hosted in two CPM rhyolites (Hayden Valley and Solfatara Plateau flows) and one extracaldera rhyolite (Gibbon River flow), all of which erupted near the caldera margin ca. 100 ka. The Hayden Valley flow hosts two zircon populations and one sanidine population that are consistent with residence in the CPM reservoir. The Gibbon River flow hosts one zircon population that is compositionally distinct from Hayden Valley flow zircons. The Solfatara Plateau flow contains multiple sanidine populations and all three zircon populations found in the Hayden Valley and Gibbon River flows, demonstrating that the Solfatara Plateau flow formed by mixing extracaldera magma with the margin of the CPM reservoir. This process highlights the dynamic nature of magmatic interactions at the margins of large silicic reservoirs. More generally, Hf isotopic data from the CPM zircons provide the first direct evidence for isotopically juvenile magmas contributing mass to the youngest post-caldera magmatic system and demonstrate that the sources contributing magma to the CPM reservoir were heterogeneous in 176Hf/177Hf at ca. 100 ka. Thus, the limited compositional variability of CPM glasses reflects homogenization occurring within the CPM reservoir, not a homogeneous source.

  17. Evolution of Eastern Upper Basin Member Rhyolites, Yellowstone Caldera, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, C. J.; Larson, P. B.

    2008-12-01

    Cyclic recharging of the large magmatic system underneath Yellowstone Caldera, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming, is key to understanding source contributions to these rhyolitic magmas. To better understand recharging of the Caldera magmatic system we focus on the eastern Upper Basin Member Rhyolites (EUBM), which erupted at 480 ka following the collapse of the Yellowstone Caldera at 640 ka. The EUBM outcrops in the northeast corner of the Caldera ring fracture. Genesis of the high silica EUBM could have feasibly included assimilation of an array of bedrock lithologies: Precambrian gneiss, Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments, Eocene Absaroka Volcanics, and Pliocene and Quaternary volcanics of the Yellowstone Caldera. The most reasonable heat source for assimilation is from basaltic injections. Preliminary geochemical data agree well with previous studies and show that although the intercaldera rhyolites are geochemically homogeneous (e.g., silica in the range 72.1-78.2 weight percent), the EUBM exhibits distinctive signatures. EUBM major and trace element concentrations generally show higher weight percents of TiO2 as well as higher ppms of Ba, Sc, and Sr when compared to other intercaldera rhyolites. EUBM are also generally depleted in O isotope ratios and enriched in 87/86Sr, 207/204Pb, and 208/204Pb when compared to other intercaldera rhyolites. The variation in geochemistry in the EUBM is not easily explained if their magma supply was entirely remelted shallow instrusives. Although the significant decrease in EUBM O istotope ratios strongly suggests hydrothermal alteration of the magma's source rock, major and trace element data and isotope ratios suggest contributions from a less evolved source. Our preliminary data show that, of the possible magma sources, the Precambrian gneiss and Pliocene/Quaternary Caldera volcanics exhibit a geochemical signature closest to that of the EUBM. Therefore, we propose that the EUBM is a product of partial melting of

  18. Workshop on recent research in the Valles caldera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, G. (comp.)

    1985-02-01

    Over the last 5 years, there has been increased interest in the geology of the Jemez Mountains volcanic field, New Mexico. Of special interest is the Toledo-Valles caldera complex, which is targeted for research coring as part of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The general topics covered in this workshop were (1) hydrothermal systems and rock-water interactions, (2) volcanology and structural framework of the Jemez volcanic field, (3) determining the presence or absence of melt below the Valles caldera, and (4) deep coring and drilling technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for each presentation.

  19. Igneous evolution of a complex laccolith-caldera, the Solitario, Trans-Pecos Texas: Implications for calderas and subjacent plutons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, C.D.; Kunk, M.J.; Muehlberger, W.R.; McIntosh, W.C.

    1997-01-01

    The Solitario is a large, combination laccolith and caldera (herein termed "laccocaldera"), with a 16-km-diameter dome over which developed a 6 x 2 km caldera. This laccocaldera underwent a complex sequence of predoming sill, laccolith, and dike intrusion and concurrent volcanism; doming with emplacement of a main laccolith; ash-flow eruption and caldera collapse; intracaldera sedimentation and volcanism; and late intrusion. Detailed geologic mapping and 40Ar/39Ar dating reveal that the Solitario evolved over an interval of approximately 1 m.y. in three distinct pulses at 36.0, 35.4, and 35.0 Ma. The size, duration, and episodicity of Solitario magmatism are more typical of large ash-flow calderas than of most previously described laccoliths. Small volumes of magma intruded as abundant rhyolitic to trachytic sills and small laccoliths and extruded as lavas and tuffs during the first pulse at 36.0 Ma. Emplacement of the main laccolith, doming, ash-flow eruption, and caldera collapse occurred at 35.4 Ma during the most voluminous pulse. A complex sequence of debris-flow and debris-avalanche deposits, megabreccia, trachyte lava, and minor ash-flow tuff subsequently filled the caldera. The final magmatic pulse at 35.0 Ma consisted of several small laccoliths or stocks and numerous dikes in caldera fill and along the ring fracture. Solitario rocks appear to be part of a broadly cogenetic, metaluminous suite. Peralkaline rhyolite lava domes were emplaced north and west of the Solitario at approximately 35.4 Ma, contemporaneous with laccolith emplacement and the main pulse in the Solitario. The spatial and temporal relation along with sparse geochemical data suggest that the peralkaline rhyolites are crustal melts related to the magmatic-thermal flux represented by the main pulse of Solitario magmatism. Current models of laccolith emplacement and evolution suggest a continuum from initial sill emplacement through growth of the main laccolith. Although the Solitario

  20. An ion microprobe study of individual zircon phenocrysts from voluminous post-caldera rhyolites of the Yellowstone caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, K. E.; Bindeman, I. N.; Schmitt, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    Following the formation of the Yellowstone caldera from the 640 ka supereruption of the Lava Creek Tuff (LCT), a voluminous episode of post-caldera volcanism filled the caldera with >600 km3 of low-δ18O rhyolite. Such low-δ18O signatures require remelting of 100s of km3 of hydrothermally altered (18O-depleted) rock in the shallow crust. We present a high resolution oxygen isotope and geochronology (U-Th and U-Pb) study of individual zircon crystals from seven of these voluminous post-caldera rhyolites in order to elucidate their genesis. Oxygen isotope and geochronology analyses of zircon were performed with an ion microprobe that enabled us to doubly fingerprint 25-30 µm diameter spots. Host groundmass glasses and coexisting quartz were analyzed in bulk for oxygen isotopes by laser fluorination. We find that zircons from the youngest (200-80 ka) post-caldera rhyolites have oxygen isotopic compositions that are in equilibrium with low-δ18O host groundmass glasses and quartz and are unzoned in oxygen and U-Th age. This finding is in contrast to prior work on older (500-250 ka) post-caldera rhyolites, which exhibit isotopic disequilibria and age zoning, including the presence of clearly inherited zircon cores. Average U-Th crystallization ages and δ18O zircon values for Pitchstone Plateau flow (81±7 ka, 2.8±0.2‰), West Yellowstone flow (118±8 ka, 2.8±0.1‰), Elephant Back flow (175±22 ka, 2.7±0.2‰) and Tuff of Bluff Point (176±20 ka, 2.7±0.1‰) are overlapping or nearly overlapping in age and identical in oxygen isotope composition within uncertainty (2 SE). New U-Pb geochronology and oxygen isotope data for the North Biscuit Basin flow establish that it has an age (188±33 ka) and δ18O signature (2.8±0.2‰) that is distinctive of the youngest post-caldera rhyolites. Conversely, the South Biscuit Basin flow has a heterogeneous zircon population with ages that range from 550-250 ka. In this unit, older and larger (200-400 µm) zircons have more

  1. GPS time series at Campi Flegrei caldera (2000-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prospero De Martino

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Campi Flegrei caldera is an active volcanic system associated to a high volcanic risk, and represents a well known and peculiar example of ground deformations (bradyseism, characterized by intense uplift periods, followed by subsidence phases with some episodic superimposed mini-uplifts. Ground deformation is an important volcanic precursor, and, its continuous monitoring, is one of the main tool for short time forecast of eruptive activity. This paper provides an overview of the continuous GPS monitoring of the Campi Flegrei caldera from January 2000 to July 2013, including network operations, data recording and processing, and data products. In this period the GPS time series allowed continuous and accurate tracking of ground deformation of the area. Seven main uplift episodes were detected, and during each uplift period, the recurrent horizontal displacement pattern, radial from the “caldera center”, suggests no significant change in deformation source geometry and location occurs. The complete archive of GPS time series at Campi Flegrei area is reported in the Supplementary materials. These data can be usefull for the scientific community in improving the research on Campi Flegrei caldera dynamic and hazard assessment.

  2. Vesuvius, the Tengger Mountains and the problem of calderas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escher, B.G.

    1926-01-01

    Until recently there was no good general map of the Tengger Mountains, so that in 1914 F. von Wolff (bibl. 1) in his work „Der Vulkanismus”, vol. I, p. 510—511, gives a reproduction of Pr. Junghuhn's map of 1844. For a volcanic district that has frequently been used as an example of a caldera and

  3. The Salma Caldera complex, northeastern Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, K.S.

    1985-01-01

    The upper Proterozoic Salma caldera is genetically part of an elongate alkali granitic massif, Jabal Salma. Comenditic ash-flow tuffs, the oldest recognized rocks of the caldera complex, were erupted during caldera collapse associated with the rapid evacuation of the upper, mildly peralkaline part of a zoned magma reservoir. Within the tuff sequence, a massive, lithic-rich intracaldera tuff containing megabreccia blocks is overlain by a layered ash-flow sequence. Later peralkaline granite intruded the caldera ring fracture zone. Metaluminous to peraluminous magma rose beneath the caldera approximately 580 Ma ago and solidified as biotite alkali-feldspar granite, syenogranite, and granophyre. No apparent structural doming of the exposed volcanic rocks along the east side of the caldera took place, and post- emplacement deformation and metamorphism of the caldera are minimal.

  4. Geology of the Vilama caldera: A new interpretation of a large-scale explosive event in the Central Andean plateau during the Upper Miocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, M. M.; Caffe, P. J.; Coira, B. L.; Onoe, A. T.; Kay, S. Mahlburg

    2007-07-01

    The Vilama caldera is one of the very large-volume volcanic structures that formed during the ignimbrite flare-up that lasted from 10 Ma to 4 Ma on the central Andean plateau. Formerly, the Vilama structure was interpreted as a 65 × 40 km wide caldera with a two stage evolution. New field correlations, petrographical, geochemical and geochronological data lead to a substantially larger reinterpreted Vilama ignimbrite, whose outcrops cover more than 4000 km 2. New and existing K/Ar and Ar/Ar dating shows that the dacitic Vilama ignimbrite erupted from the Vilama caldera at 8.4-8.5 Ma. The ignimbrite can be divided into extracaldera outflow and intracaldera deposits. The outflow has a mean thickness of ˜ 40 m and is separated into a restricted valley-ponded lower cooling unit, and a laterally extensive low aspect ratio upper cooling unit. The Vilama caldera, which is roughly rectangular (35-40 km × 15-18 km) in shape and has central coordinates of 22°24' S and 66°57' W, is considered to have formed in a single-stage collapse event. As the topographic rim is only seen on the western side, the extent of collapse and geometry of the caldera are incompletely known and inferred from indirect data. Possible collapse geometries include a slightly asymmetric single-block subsidence and non-chaotic multiple-block collapse. Estimated erupted volumes range from ˜ 1800 to 1200 km 3, or 1400 to 1000 km 3 in dense rock equivalents. The properties of the Vilama ignimbrite which include a crystal-rich and pumice-poor nature, a high degree of welding and induration and a prodigious volume, suggest that an external drive, rather than volatile overpressures, controlled and maintained the eruption. The best candidate is caldera subsidence triggered by the instability of a magma chamber roof above a batholith-scale magma body. Transtensive/distensive tectonic stresses resulted in the northwest elongation of the magma chamber and/or influenced the roughly rectangular

  5. Boiling Water at Hot Creek - The Dangerous and Dynamic Thermal Springs in California's Long Valley Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Christopher D.; Evans, William C.; Venezky, Dina Y.; Hurwitz, Shaul; Oliver, Lynn K.

    2007-01-01

    The beautiful blue pools and impressive boiling fountains along Hot Creek in east-central California have provided enjoyment to generations of visitors, but they have also been the cause of injury or death to some who disregarded warnings and fences. The springs and geysers in the stream bed and along its banks change location, temperature, and flow rates frequently and unpredictably. The hot springs and geysers of Hot Creek are visible signs of dynamic geologic processes in this volcanic region, where underground heat drives thermal spring activity.

  6. Soil degradation in farmlands of California’s San Joaquin Valley resulting from drought-induced land-use changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrigation in California’s Central Valley (USA) has decreased significantly due to water shortages resulting from the current drought, which began in 2010. In particular, fallow fields in the west side of the San Joaquin Valley (WSJV), which is the southwest portion of the Central Valley, increased ...

  7. Application of HydroGeoSphere to model the response to anthropogenic climate change of three-dimensional hydrological processes in the geologically, geothermally, and topographically complex Valles Caldera super volcano, New Mexico: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wine, M.; Cadol, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is expected to reduce streamflow in the southwestern USA due to reduction in precipitation and increases in evaporative demand. Understanding the effects of climate change in this region is particularly important for mountainous areas since these are primary sources of recharge in arid and semi-arid environments. Therefore we undertook to model effects of climate change on the hydrological processes in Valles Caldera (448 km2), located in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. In Valles Caldera modeling the surficial, hydrogeological, and geothermal processes that influence hydrologic fluxes each present challenges. The surficial dynamics of evaporative demand and snowmelt both serve to control recharge dynamics, but are complicated by the complex topography and spatiotemporal vegetation dynamics. Complex factors affecting evaporative demand include leaf area index, temperature, albedo, and radiation affected by topographic shading; all of these factors vary in space and time. Snowmelt processes interact with evaporative demand and geology to serve as an important control on streamflow generation, but modeling the effects of spatiotemporal snow distributions on streamflow generation remains a challenge. The complexity of Valles Caldera's geology—and its associated hydraulic properties—rivals that of its surficial hydrologic forcings. Hydrologically important geologic features that have formed in the Valles Caldera are three-dimensionally intricate and include a dense system of faults, alluvium, landslides, lake deposits, and features associated with the eruption and collapse of this super volcano. Coupling geothermally-driven convection to the hydrologic cycle in this still-active geothermal system presents yet an additional challenge in modeling Valles Caldera. Preliminary results from applying the three-dimensional distributed hydrologic finite element model HydroGeoSphere to a sub-catchment of Valles Caldera will be

  8. Hollow volcanic tumulus caves of Kilauea Caldera, Hawaii County, Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Halliday

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to lava tube caves with commonly noted features, sizable subcrustal spaces of several types exist on the floor of Kilauea Caldera. Most of these are formed by drainage of partially stabilized volcanic structures enlarged or formed by injection of very fluid lava beneath a plastic crust. Most conspicuous are hollow tumuli, possibly first described by Walker in 1991. Walker mapped and described the outer chamber of Tumulus E-I Cave. Further exploration has revealed that it has a hyperthermic inner room beneath an adjoining tumulus with no connection evident on the surface. Two lengthy, sinuous hollow tumuli also are present in this part of the caldera. These findings support Walkers conclusions that hollow tumuli provide valuable insights into tumulus-forming mechanisms, and provide information about the processes of emplacement of pahoehoe sheet flows.

  9. Uplift, thermal unrest and magma intrusion at Yellowstone caldera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, Charles W; Thatcher, Wayne; Dzurisin, Daniel; Svarc, Jerry

    2006-03-02

    The Yellowstone caldera, in the western United States, formed approximately 640,000 years ago when an explosive eruption ejected approximately 1,000 km3 of material. It is the youngest of a series of large calderas that formed during sequential cataclysmic eruptions that began approximately 16 million years ago in eastern Oregon and northern Nevada. The Yellowstone caldera was largely buried by rhyolite lava flows during eruptions that occurred from approximately 150,000 to approximately 70,000 years ago. Since the last eruption, Yellowstone has remained restless, with high seismicity, continuing uplift/subsidence episodes with movements of approximately 70 cm historically to several metres since the Pleistocene epoch, and intense hydrothermal activity. Here we present observations of a new mode of surface deformation in Yellowstone, based on radar interferometry observations from the European Space Agency ERS-2 satellite. We infer that the observed pattern of uplift and subsidence results from variations in the movement of molten basalt into and out of the Yellowstone volcanic system.

  10. Uplift, thermal unrest and magma intrusion at Yellowstone caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, Charles W.; Thatcher, Wayne; Dzurisin, Daniel; Svarc, Jerry

    2006-03-01

    The Yellowstone caldera, in the western United States, formed ~640,000years ago when an explosive eruption ejected ~1,000km3 of material. It is the youngest of a series of large calderas that formed during sequential cataclysmic eruptions that began ~16 million years ago in eastern Oregon and northern Nevada. The Yellowstone caldera was largely buried by rhyolite lava flows during eruptions that occurred from ~150,000 to ~70,000years ago. Since the last eruption, Yellowstone has remained restless, with high seismicity, continuing uplift/subsidence episodes with movements of ~70cm historically to several metres since the Pleistocene epoch, and intense hydrothermal activity. Here we present observations of a new mode of surface deformation in Yellowstone, based on radar interferometry observations from the European Space Agency ERS-2 satellite. We infer that the observed pattern of uplift and subsidence results from variations in the movement of molten basalt into and out of the Yellowstone volcanic system.

  11. Geologic Map of Mount Mazama and Crater Lake Caldera, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Charles R.

    2008-01-01

    Crater Lake partly fills one of the most spectacular calderas of the world, an 8-by-10-km basin more than 1 km deep formed by collapse of the volcano known as Mount Mazama (fig. 1) during a rapid series of explosive eruptions about 7,700 years ago. Having a maximum depth of 594 m, Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States. Crater Lake National Park, dedicated in 1902, encompasses 645 km2 of pristine forested and alpine terrain, including the lake itself, virtually all of Mount Mazama, and most of the area of the geologic map. The geology of the area was first described in detail by Diller and Patton (1902) and later by Williams (1942), whose vivid account led to international recognition of Crater Lake as the classic collapse caldera. Because of excellent preservation and access, Mount Mazama, Crater Lake caldera, and the deposits formed by the climactic eruption constitute a natural laboratory for study of volcanic and magmatic processes. For example, the climactic ejecta are renowned among volcanologists as evidence for systematic compositional zonation within a subterranean magma chamber. Mount Mazama's climactic eruption also is important as the source of the widespread Mazama ash, a useful Holocene stratigraphic marker throughout the Pacific Northwest, adjacent Canada, and offshore. A detailed bathymetric survey of the floor of Crater Lake in 2000 (Bacon and others, 2002) provides a unique record of postcaldera eruptions, the interplay between volcanism and filling of the lake, and sediment transport within this closed basin. Knowledge of the geology and eruptive history of the Mount Mazama edifice, greatly enhanced by the caldera wall exposures, gives exceptional insight into how large volcanoes of magmatic arcs grow and evolve. Lastly, the many smaller volcanoes of the High Cascades beyond the limits of Mount Mazama are a source of information on the flux of mantle-derived magma through the region. General principles of magmatic and eruptive

  12. A comparison of estimates of basin-scale soil-moisture evapotranspiration and estimates of riparian groundwater evapotranspiration with implications for water budgets in the Verde Valley, Central Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Fred; Wiele, Stephen M.; Pool, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Population growth in the Verde Valley in Arizona has led to efforts to better understand water availability in the watershed. Evapotranspiration (ET) is a substantial component of the water budget and a critical factor in estimating groundwater recharge in the area. In this study, four estimates of ET are compared and discussed with applications to the Verde Valley. Higher potential ET (PET) rates from the soil-water balance (SWB) recharge model resulted in an average annual ET volume about 17% greater than for ET from the basin characteristics (BCM) recharge model. Annual BCM PET volume, however, was greater by about a factor of 2 or more than SWB actual ET (AET) estimates, which are used in the SWB model to estimate groundwater recharge. ET also was estimated using a method that combines MODIS-EVI remote sensing data and geospatial information and by the MODFLOW-EVT ET package as part of a regional groundwater-flow model that includes the study area. Annual ET volumes were about same for upper-bound MODIS-EVI ET for perennial streams as for the MODFLOW ET estimates, with the small differences between the two methods having minimal impact on annual or longer groundwater budgets for the study area.

  13. Energy valley in transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwayen, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The Energy Valley foundation was born in 2004. It functions as a catalyst and platform for private and public organisations. It has a supporting and facilitating role in realising projects on energy conservation and sustainable energy. The Energy Valley a

  14. January 2000 classified RADARSAT image depicting winter shorebird habitat in the Willamette Valley, OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is one of a collection of three land cover maps of the Willamette Valley of Oregon, USA, depicting 4 habitat classes: wet with 50% vegetation (class 2),...

  15. December 1999 classified RADARSAT image depicting winter shorebird habitat in the Willamette Valley, OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is one of a collection of three land cover maps of the Willamette Valley of Oregon, USA, depicting 4 habitat classes: wet with 50% vegetation (class 2),...

  16. March 2000 classified RADARSAT image depicting winter shorebird habitat in the Willamette Valley, OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is one of a collection of three land cover maps of the Willamette Valley of Oregon, USA, depicting 4 habitat classes: wet with 50% vegetation (class 2),...

  17. Implications of a Caldera Origin of the Lunar Crater Copernicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J.

    2007-12-01

    The forthcoming renaissance in lunar exploration will focus on many objectives such as Copernicus. Copernicus appears to be a caldera for at least 8 reasons. If a caldera we see (1) transient activity (2) no overturned impact flap at the crater margins (3) internal sinuous leveed lava flow channels (4) a lava covered floor (5) terraces of different ages (6) multiple central volcanoes, one showing a directed volcanic blast (7) olivine-rich komatiitic lavas on central volcanoes and (8) magmatic inflation/deflation on caldera flanks localizing craterlets and extinct fumaroles in "loop" patterns. Regarding (6), directed volcanic blasts can remove a segment of the volcano wall as evidenced in terrestrial analogs at Mt. St. Helens and Bezymianny. Impact mechanisms to produce this feature in Copernicus are contrived. For (7) Clementine spectral data show a high olivine content of the central mountains on Copernicus which I interpret as forsteritic spinifex mineralization in komatiitic lavas and not as impact rebound of olivine-rich deep seated rocks. (8) MacDonald (1956) documented loop patterns on the flank of Halemaumau in Hawaii defining arcuate fractures localizing fumaroles and craterlets. Inflation/deflation of subjacent magma bodies are interpreted as the cause for these loops. Inflation/deflation mechanisms on caldera flanks are common around terrestrial calderas. "Loop" patterns on the flank of Copernicus localizing "gouge" craterlets have been interpreted as ballistic features resulting from the meteorite impact of this crater. Questioned is the logic of a linear N26E trending array of fragments within Copernicus to serve as a source of ballistic projectiles to form the loops localizing conjugate craterlets. The fused craterlet axes on the lunar loops do not point back to a presumed impact center in Copernicus. The axes are oriented parallel to a regional northwest (N35-60W) fracture zone. Implications for an endogenic origin of Copernicus would involve

  18. Kilauea, USA Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The basaltic shield volcano on the Island of Hawaii is among the most extensively studied volcanoes in the world. The volcano, with its summit caldera, is located on...

  19. Magma transfer at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy) before the 1538 AD eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Vito, Mauro A; Acocella, Valerio; Aiello, Giuseppe; Barra, Diana; Battaglia, Maurizio; Carandente, Antonio; Del Gaudio, Carlo; de Vita, Sandro; Ricciardi, Giovanni P; Ricco, Ciro; Scandone, Roberto; Terrasi, Filippo

    2016-08-25

    Calderas are collapse structures related to the emptying of magmatic reservoirs, often associated with large eruptions from long-lived magmatic systems. Understanding how magma is transferred from a magma reservoir to the surface before eruptions is a major challenge. Here we exploit the historical, archaeological and geological record of Campi Flegrei caldera to estimate the surface deformation preceding the Monte Nuovo eruption and investigate the shallow magma transfer. Our data suggest a progressive magma accumulation from ~1251 to 1536 in a 4.6 ± 0.9 km deep source below the caldera centre, and its transfer, between 1536 and 1538, to a 3.8 ± 0.6 km deep magmatic source ~4 km NW of the caldera centre, below Monte Nuovo; this peripheral source fed the eruption through a shallower source, 0.4 ± 0.3 km deep. This is the first reconstruction of pre-eruptive magma transfer at Campi Flegrei and corroborates the existence of a stationary oblate source, below the caldera centre, that has been feeding lateral eruptions for the last ~5 ka. Our results suggest: 1) repeated emplacement of magma through intrusions below the caldera centre; 2) occasional lateral transfer of magma feeding non-central eruptions within the caldera. Comparison with historical unrest at calderas worldwide suggests that this behavior is common.

  20. Magma storage and evolution of the Central Plateau Member Rhyolites, Yellowstone caldera, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befus, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    We use volatile and trace element contents from quartz-hosted melt inclusions to place constraints on the pre-eruptive storage and evolution of 6 lavas and 3 tuffs from the Central Plateau Member Rhyolites, Yellowstone. Overall, inclusions contain 1.0-2.5% H2O and 50-600 ppm CO2. Individual units have more restricted volatile contents, and define regions in H2O and CO2 space with internal variability of ±0.5 wt.% and ±100 ppm, respectively. Water contents in both lavas and pyroclastic units are similar, but CO2 contents vary and can be used to separate the units as CO2-rich and CO2-poor. CO2-rich units contain 300 to 600 ppm CO2 (Tuff of Bluff Point, Pitchstone Plateau, Trischmann Knob, Buffalo Lake, Summit Lake). CO2-poor units contain 50 to 200 ppm CO2 (Solfatara Plateau, West Yellowstone, Tuff of Cold Mountain Creek, unnamed tuff on Douglas Knob). Volatile contents do not correlate with eruption age, volume, or style. Inclusions from individual units contain incompatible trace-element concentrations that range from primitive to evolved. Incompatible elements within each unit increase systematically from primitive inclusions (units differ by <20%), to more evolved inclusions, and finally to highly evolved matrix. The inclusions preserve a systematic evolution produced by crystal fractionation, which we estimate to range from 38±8 wt.% to 54±11 wt.%. Inclusions from the Tuffs of Bluff Point and Cold Mountain Creek display similar evolution, except that matrix glass in those tuffs is less evolved than the inclusions. We infer the magmas were volatile-saturated at depth because H2O and CO2 do not correlate positively with incompatible elements. If true, then the CO2-rich magmas were stored at 90 to 150 MPa and contained a fluid that was 60-75 mol.% CO2, whereas CO2-poor magmas were stored at 50 to 70 MPa and contained a more H2O-rich fluid (XCO2 = 40-60%). The variations in pressure/depth suggest the magmas were at least temporarily stored as separate batches that followed similar evolutionary paths in the shallow crust.

  1. Seismic constraints on caldera dynamics from the 2015 Axial Seamount eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcock, William S D; Tolstoy, Maya; Waldhauser, Felix; Garcia, Charles; Tan, Yen Joe; Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R; Caplan-Auerbach, Jacqueline; Dziak, Robert P; Arnulf, Adrien F; Mann, M Everett

    2016-12-16

    Seismic observations in volcanically active calderas are challenging. A new cabled observatory atop Axial Seamount on the Juan de Fuca ridge allows unprecedented real-time monitoring of a submarine caldera. Beginning on 24 April 2015, the seismic network captured an eruption that culminated in explosive acoustic signals where lava erupted on the seafloor. Extensive seismic activity preceding the eruption shows that inflation is accommodated by the reactivation of an outward-dipping caldera ring fault, with strong tidal triggering indicating a critically stressed system. The ring fault accommodated deflation during the eruption and provided a pathway for a dike that propagated south and north beneath the caldera's east wall. Once north of the caldera, the eruption stepped westward, and a dike propagated along the extensional north rift. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Preliminary geologic studies of Sierra El Aguajito (Baja California, Mexico): a resurgent-type caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garduño-Monroy, V. H.; Vargas-Ledezma, H.; Campos-Enriquez, J. O.

    1993-12-01

    Geologic field studies conducted in the Quaternary volcanic field of Tres Virgenes (State of Baja California Sur, Mexico) revealed the existence of a resurgent caldera. The caldera's eruptive products, the Aguajito sequence, overlie the products of the nearby Reforma caldera (Reforma sequence) whose youngest products have already been dated as Quaternary. The rim of the Aguajito caldera is inferred by the existence of an arcuate alignment of rhyolitic domes. The mean diameter of this subcircular feature is 10 km. The volume of its mapped acidic products is a minimum of 10 km 3. Several horizons within the sequence contain shells. K/Ar dates of the ignimbrites and domes of El Aguajito formation confirm that the unit are Pleistocene. The detailed stratigraphy also shows the evolution of a marine regression partly related to the caldera.

  3. Post-glacial inflation-deflation cycles, tilting, and faulting in the Yellowstone Caldera based on Yellowstone Lake shorelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Kenneth L.; Cannon, Kenneth P.; Meyer, Grant A.; Trebesch, Matthew J.; Watts, Raymond D.

    2002-01-01

    by a ~5 m rise in lake level to S2. The lowest generally recognizable shoreline is S2. It is ~5 m above datum (3 m above S1) and is ~8 ka, as dated on both sides of the outlet. Yellowstone Lake and the river near Fishing Bridge were 5-6 m below their present level about 3-4 ka, as indicated by 14C ages from submerged beach deposits, drowned valleys, and submerged Yellowstone River gravels. Thus, the lake in the outlet region has been below or near its present level for about half the time since a 1 km-thick icecap melted from the Yellowstone Lake basin about 16 ka. The amplitude of two rises in lake and river level can be estimated based on the altitude of Le Hardys Rapids, indicators of former lake and river levels, and reconstruction of the river gradient from the outlet to Le Hardys Rapids. Both between ~9.5 ka and ~8.5 ka, and after ~3 ka, Le Hardys Rapids (LHR) was uplifted about 8 meters above the outlet, suggesting a cyclic deformation process. Older possible rises in lake level are suggested by locations where the ~10.7 ka S4 truncates older shorelines, and valleys truncated by the ~12.6 ka S5 shoreline. Using these controls, a plot of lake level through time shows 5-7 millennial-scale oscillations since 14.5 ka. Major cycles of inflation and deflation are thousands of years long. Le Hardys Rapids has twice been uplifted ~8 m relative to the lake outlet. These two locations span only the central 25% of the historic caldera doming, so that if we use historic doming as a model, total projected uplift would be ~32 m. This ?heavy breathing? of the central part of the Yellowstone caldera may reflect a combination of several possible processes: magmatic inflation, tectonic stretching and deflation, and hydrothermal fluid sealing and inflation followed by cracking of the seal, pressure release, and deflation. Over the entire postglacial period, subsidence has balanced or slightly exceeded uplift as shown by older shorelines that descend towards the caldera axis. We

  4. Sheet flow caves of Kilauea Caldera, Hawaii County, Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Halliday

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminal lobes of sheet flows of pahoehoe lava sometimes form three-dimensional nests, initially separated by partitions consisting of accreted ‘skins” of each lobe. Melting breaks down these partitions, forming a uniform flow unit. In Kilauea Caldera we have found and mapped sizable drained cavities in low-slope sheet flows. Their general pattern includes three-dimensional nests, with partially melted septa evident in some examples. Christmas Cave is the most extensive found to date, with 632 meters surveyed on two levels. It is located at the lower end of an inflated sheet flow tongue which underwent local deflation as a result of drainage through the cave after its parameters were partially fixed. Small conduit remnants persist in its boundary ridges. The major part of the cave consists of wide, low nestled chambers. Meltdown of such partitions is one of the few emplacement mechanisms of thermal erosion which may not involve any mechanical element. Additional caves in this caldera are being identified and studied.

  5. Caldera volcanoes of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. J. N.; Rogan, A. M.; Smith, I. E. M.; Northey, D. J.; Nairn, I. A.; Houghton, B. F.

    1984-09-01

    The Taupo volcanic zone (TVZ) has been active since 2 Ma and has erupted >104 km3 of dominantly rhyolitic magma during the last 1 m.y. Most of the volcanism is concentrated in a 125×60 km area forming the central TVZ and is expressed largely as six major caldera volcanoes, Rotorua, Okataina, Kapenga, Mangakino, Maroa, and Taupo, marked by localized collapse of the underlying basement and clustering of known or inferred vent sites. These centers have activity spans from 150 to 600 ka and have each erupted at least 300 to 1000 km3 of magma. All centers except Rotorua are known or inferred to have had complex histories of multiple caldera collapse, which have occurred alongside general basement collapse within the TVZ accompanying regional extension. Deep-seated NE trending basement lineations and/or faults have influenced vent sites at Okataina, Maroa, and Taupo. Welded ignimbrites are prominent in the pre-140 ka record; their absence since then is attributed to the effects of surface water on eruption styles rather than to a change in eruptive behavior. Volcanism from the centers has been overwhelmingly rhyolitic (>97% SiO2 69-77 wt%) with minor high-A1 basalt and dacite and traces of andesite, mostly as lithic fragments in ignimbrites from Okataina and Mangakino. Although insignificant in volume, the basalt is important as a low-Si end-member in mixing relationships with the rhyolite (at one extreme generating the dacites) and occasionally as a trigger for the rhyolitic eruptions. The current average rhyolite magma eruption rate from the central TVZ is ˜0.27 m3 s-1, equally divided between Okataina and Taupo, a figure close to the long-term average for the last 1.1 Ma. However, geothermal heat flow data imply that a further 1.4-1.8 m3 s-1 of magma may be intruded within the crust. The ratio of inferred intruded material to erupted material is higher at centers where lava extrusions are volumetrically significant (Okataina, Maroa), and this is correlated with

  6. Onset of Grain Boundary Migration and Drastic Weakening of Quartzite during increasing grade of Metamorphism in the Contact Aureole surrounding the Eureka Valley-Joshua Flat-Beer Creek pluton, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, S. S.; Student, J. J.; Jakeway, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Eureka Valley-Joshua Flat-Beer Creek (EJB) pluton in eastern California is surrounded by a ~1.3 km wide intensely deformed concordant aureole of metasedimentary rocks. South of the pluton, the Harkless Quartzite can be mapped from where it is located outside the aureole, with its regional strike through the transition into the aureole and concordancy with the pluton. The transition into concordancy, which is fairly abrupt, occurs over a distance of less than 100 m. Across this transition the bedding rotates close to 90° to become subvertical. Here the metasedimentary formations in the aureole have undergone 65% shortening. A suite of Harkless Quartzite samples was collected starting at 2.3 km south of the pluton, across the transition into concordancy at 1.3 km, and to within 450m from the pluton contact. Microstructurally, the transition is defined by changes in the dominant recrystallization mechanisms. At 2.3 km from the pluton, subgrain rotation recrystallization (SGR) plus grain boundary migration (GBM) operate together and many sedimentary grains (rounded grain boundaries) exist. As the pluton is approached, SGR decreases, GBM increases, and rounded grain boundaries slowly disappear. The abrupt transition into concordancy is marked by the final disappearance of SGR and rounded grain boundaries and extensive GBM. The transition is not completely smooth, and other variables such as pinning and amount of fluid inclusions seem to have a strong local affect on the dominant recrystallization mechanism. We suspect that the onset of extensive GBM allows for the diffusion of water into the crystal lattice which results in the drastic weakening and rotation of metasedimentary formations into concordancy.

  7. 238U-230Th dating of chevkinite in high-silica rhyolites from La Primavera and Yellowstone calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.; Velasco, Noel O.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Bleick, Heather A.; Stelten, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Application of 238U-230Th disequilibrium dating of accessory minerals with contrasting stabilities and compositions can provide a unique perspective on magmatic evolution by placing the thermochemical evolution of magma within the framework of absolute time. Chevkinite, a Th-rich accessory mineral that occurs in peralkaline and metaluminous rhyolites, may be particularly useful as a chronometer of crystallization and differentiation because its composition may reflect the chemical changes of its host melt. Ion microprobe 128U-230Th dating of single chevkinite microphenocrysts from pre- and post-caldera La Primavera, Mexico, rhyolites yields model crystallization ages that are within 10's of k.y. of their corresponding K-Ar ages of ca. 125 ka to 85 ka, while chevkinite microphenocrysts from a post-caldera Yellowstone, USA, rhyolite yield a range of ages from ca. 110 ka to 250 ka, which is indistinguishable from the age distribution of coexisting zircon. Internal chevkinite-zircon isochrons from La Primavera yield Pleistocene ages with ~5% precision due to the nearly two order difference in Th/U between both minerals. Coupling chevkinite 238U-230Th ages and compositional analyses reveals a secular trend of Th/U and rare earth elements recorded in Yellowstone rhyolite, likely reflecting progressive compositional evolution of host magma. The relatively short timescale between chevkinite-zircon crystallization and eruption suggests that crystal-poor rhyolites at La Primavera were erupted shortly after differentiation and/or reheating. These results indicate that 238U-230Th dating of chevkinite via ion microprobe analysis may be used to date crystallization and chemical evolution of silicic magmas.

  8. Giant caldera in the Arctic Ocean: Evidence of the catastrophic eruptive event

    OpenAIRE

    Alexey Piskarev; Daria Elkina

    2017-01-01

    A giant caldera located in the eastern segment of the Gakkel Ridge could be firstly seen on the bathymetric map of the Arctic Ocean published in 1999. In 2014, seismic and multibeam echosounding data were acquired at the location. The caldera is 80?km long, 40?km wide and 1.2?km deep. The total volume of ejected volcanic material is estimated as no less than 3000 km3 placing it into the same category with the largest Quaternary calderas (Yellowstone and Toba). Time of the eruption is estimate...

  9. Volcano-tectonic architecture of a Caldera Complex, Karthala volcano, Grande Comore: new field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, S.; Kervyn, M.; Soulé, H.; Cnudde, V.; De Kock, T.; Jacobs, P.

    2012-04-01

    Karthala volcano on the oceanic island of Grande Comore, West-Indian Ocean, is one of worlds' largest active alkaline basalt shield volcanoes, with 5 eruptions since 1991. In the last century the volcanic activity mainly concentrated within the 3.5 x 2.8 km large area of the summit caldera complex. Limited study has so far been carried out to unravel the structure and geometry of the summit caldera complex, the collapse chronology and the recent changes caused by the 2005 - 2007 eruption phases. Two exploratory missions to the Karthala summit in July 2011 led to an updated overview of the volcano-tectonic structures, evidence of the local orientation of the principle stresses and a preliminary stratigraphy of the 400 m deep rock sequence exposed in the caldera walls. Three overlapping caldera's build the main structure of the complex, with vertically-subsided blocks forming intermediate terraces along the caldera structures. Within these blocks, several graben-like structures with N-S and N135°E orientations are evidencing a secondary influence of extension during or after the overall vertical collapse. One of the southwestern caldera blocks shows a 'tilted block' morphology, with a caldera-inward rotation. 'Choungou Changouméni', a nested pit crater in the Northern caldera, was 30 m deep in 1965 and has now been almost completely filled with pyroclastic deposits and lava flows. Caldera walls in the whole complex consist of massif meter-thick alkali-basalt flows with decimetric intercalations of weathered pyroclastic layers, and are topped by scoria and tuff cones. The caldera floor itself is covered by volcanic ash, lapilli, and massif scoriaceous surfaces of ancient flows. At the intersection of the 3 main caldera structures two deep explosion craters are located, together named 'Choungou Chahalé'. These were the centres of recent phreatic activity. Their vertical walls show a sequence of thick alkali basalt flows and hold numerous cross-cutting dykes which

  10. Volcanology. A large magmatic sill complex beneath the Toba caldera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaxybulatov, K; Shapiro, N M; Koulakov, I; Mordret, A; Landès, M; Sens-Schönfelder, C

    2014-10-31

    An understanding of the formation of large magmatic reservoirs is a key issue for the evaluation of possible strong volcanic eruptions in the future. We estimated the size and level of maturity of one of the largest volcanic reservoirs, based on radial seismic anisotropy. We used ambient-noise seismic tomography below the Toba caldera (in northern Sumatra) to observe the anisotropy that we interpret as the expression of a fine-scale layering caused by the presence of many partially molten sills in the crust below 7 kilometers. This result demonstrates that the magmatic reservoirs of present (non-eroded) supervolcanoes can be formed as large sill complexes and supports the concept of the long-term incremental evolution of magma bodies that lead to the largest volcanic eruptions. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Silicon Valley: Planet Startup

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. P. Ester; dr. A. Maas

    2016-01-01

    For decades now, Silicon Valley has been the home of the future. It's the birthplace of the world's most successful high-tech companies-including Apple, Yahoo, Google, Facebook, Twitter, and many more. So what's the secret? What is it about Silicon Valley that fosters entrepreneurship and

  12. Haemoragisk Rift Valley Fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, Christian; Thybo, Søren

    2007-01-01

    A case of fatal hemorrhagic Rift Valley fever during an epidemic in Kenya's North Eastern Province in January 2007 is described.......A case of fatal hemorrhagic Rift Valley fever during an epidemic in Kenya's North Eastern Province in January 2007 is described....

  13. Surface morphology of caldera-forming eruption deposits revealed by lidar mapping of Crater Lake National Park, Oregon- Implications for emplacement and surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joel E.; Bacon, Charles R.; Major, Jon J.; Wright, Heather M.; Vallance, James W.

    2017-01-01

    Large explosive eruptions of silicic magma can produce widespread pumice fall, extensive ignimbrite sheets, and collapse calderas. The surfaces of voluminous ignimbrites are rarely preserved or documented because most terrestrial examples are heavily vegetated, or severely modified by post-depositional processes. Much research addresses the internal sedimentary characteristics, flow processes, and depositional mechanisms of ignimbrites, however, surface features of ignimbrites are less well documented and understood, except for comparatively small-volume deposits of historical eruptions. The ~7,700 calendar year B.P. climactic eruption of Mount Mazama, USA vented ~50 km3 of magma, deposited first as rhyodacite pumice fall and then as a zoned rhyodacite-to-andesite ignimbrite as Crater Lake caldera collapsed. Lidar collected during summer 2010 reveals the remarkably well-preserved surface of the Mazama ignimbrite and related deposits surrounding Crater Lake caldera in unprecedented detail despite forest cover. The ±1 m lateral and ±4 cm vertical resolution lidar allows surface morphologies to be classified. Surface morphologies are created by internal depositional processes and can point to the processes at work when pyroclastic flows come to rest. We describe nine surface features including furrow-ridge sets and wedge-shaped mounds in pumice fall eroded by high-energy pyroclastic surges, flow- parallel ridges that record the passage of multiple pyroclastic flows, perched benches of marginal deposits stranded by more-mobile pyroclastic-flow cores, hummocks of dense clasts interpreted as lag deposit, transverse ridges that mark the compression and imbrication of flows as they came to rest, scarps indicating ignimbrite remobilization, fields of pit craters caused by phreatic explosions, fractures and cracks caused by extensional processes resulting from ignimbrite volume loss, and stream channels eroded in the newly formed surface. The nine morphologies presented

  14. Monitoring a supervolcano in repose: Heat and volatile flux at the yellostone caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Hurwitz, S.

    2008-01-01

    Although giant calderas ("supervolcanoes") may slumber for tens of thousands of years between eruptions, their abundant earthquakes and crustal deformation reveal the potential for future upheaval. Any eventual supereruption could devastate global human populations, so these systems must be carefully scrutinized. Insight into dormant but restless calderas can be gained by monitoring their output of heat and gas. At Yellowstone, the large thermal and CO2 fluxes require massive input of basaltic magma, which continues to invade the lower to mid-crust, sustains the overlying high-silica magma reservoir, and may result in volcanic hazard for millennia to come. The high flux of CO2 may contribute to the measured deformation of the caldera floor and can also modify the pressure, thermal, and chemical signals emitted from the magma. In order to recognize precursors to eruption, we must scrutinize the varied signals emerging from restless calderas with the goal of discriminating magmatic, hydrothermal, and hybrid phenomena.

  15. Giant caldera in the Arctic Ocean: Evidence of the catastrophic eruptive event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskarev, Alexey; Elkina, Daria

    2017-01-01

    A giant caldera located in the eastern segment of the Gakkel Ridge could be firstly seen on the bathymetric map of the Arctic Ocean published in 1999. In 2014, seismic and multibeam echosounding data were acquired at the location. The caldera is 80 km long, 40 km wide and 1.2 km deep. The total volume of ejected volcanic material is estimated as no less than 3000 km3 placing it into the same category with the largest Quaternary calderas (Yellowstone and Toba). Time of the eruption is estimated as ~1.1 Ma. Thin layers of the volcanic material related to the eruption had been identified in sedimentary cores located about 1000 km away from the Gakkel Ridge. The Gakkel Ridge Caldera is the single example of a supervolcano in the rift zone of the Mid-Oceanic Ridge System. PMID:28393928

  16. Steady subsidence of a repeatedly erupting caldera through InSAR observations: Aso, Japan

    KAUST Repository

    Nobile, Adriano

    2017-04-05

    The relation between unrest and eruption at calderas is still poorly understood. Aso caldera, Japan, shows minor episodic phreatomagmatic eruptions associated with steady subsidence. We analyse the deformation of Aso using SAR images from 1993 to 2011 and compare it with the eruptive activity. Although the dataset suffers from limitations (e.g. atmospheric effects, coherence loss, low signal-to-noise ratio), we observe a steady subsidence signal from 1996 to 1998, which suggests an overall contraction of a magmatic source below the caldera centre, from 4 to 5 km depth. We propose that the observed contraction may have been induced by the release of the magmatic fluids feeding the eruptions. If confirmed by further data, this hypothesis suggests that degassing processes play a crucial role in triggering minor eruptions within open conduit calderas, such as at Aso. Our study underlines the importance of defining any eruptive potential also from deflating magmatic systems with open conduit.

  17. Giant caldera in the Arctic Ocean: Evidence of the catastrophic eruptive event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskarev, Alexey; Elkina, Daria

    2017-04-10

    A giant caldera located in the eastern segment of the Gakkel Ridge could be firstly seen on the bathymetric map of the Arctic Ocean published in 1999. In 2014, seismic and multibeam echosounding data were acquired at the location. The caldera is 80 km long, 40 km wide and 1.2 km deep. The total volume of ejected volcanic material is estimated as no less than 3000 km(3) placing it into the same category with the largest Quaternary calderas (Yellowstone and Toba). Time of the eruption is estimated as ~1.1 Ma. Thin layers of the volcanic material related to the eruption had been identified in sedimentary cores located about 1000 km away from the Gakkel Ridge. The Gakkel Ridge Caldera is the single example of a supervolcano in the rift zone of the Mid-Oceanic Ridge System.

  18. Giant caldera in the Arctic Ocean: Evidence of the catastrophic eruptive event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskarev, Alexey; Elkina, Daria

    2017-04-01

    A giant caldera located in the eastern segment of the Gakkel Ridge could be firstly seen on the bathymetric map of the Arctic Ocean published in 1999. In 2014, seismic and multibeam echosounding data were acquired at the location. The caldera is 80 km long, 40 km wide and 1.2 km deep. The total volume of ejected volcanic material is estimated as no less than 3000 km3 placing it into the same category with the largest Quaternary calderas (Yellowstone and Toba). Time of the eruption is estimated as ~1.1 Ma. Thin layers of the volcanic material related to the eruption had been identified in sedimentary cores located about 1000 km away from the Gakkel Ridge. The Gakkel Ridge Caldera is the single example of a supervolcano in the rift zone of the Mid-Oceanic Ridge System.

  19. Field trip guide to the Valles Caldera and its geothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, F.E.; Bolivar, S.L.

    1983-12-01

    This field trip guide has been compiled from extensive field trips led at Los Alamos National Laboratory during the past six years. The original version of this guide was designed to augment a workshop on the Valles Caldera for the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP). This workshop was held at Los Alamos, New Mexico, 5-7 October 1982. More stops were added to this guide to display the volcanic and geothermal features at the Valles Caldera. The trip covers about 90 miles (one way) and takes two days to complete; however, those who wish to compress the trip into one day are advised to use the designated stops listed in the Introduction. Valles Caldera and vicinity comprise both one of the most exciting geothermal areas in the United States and one of the best preserved Quaternary caldera complexes in the world.

  20. Patterns of Fluid Circulation and Steam Generation in Caldera-Hosted Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, M. E.; Cook, S. J.

    2009-05-01

    Steam formation is an important mechanism powering near surface phenomena in active hydrothermal systems (e.g., Yellowstone) and an established ore deposition mechanism in ancient equivalents (e.g., Creede). To gain insights into factors controlling steam formation and distribution in these systems, a series of steady-state numerical models were run on a hypothetical caldera-hosted system based on characteristics of a representative suite of calderas (e.g., Yellowstone, Valles, Creede). Base model conditions consisted of (1) a 10 km-wide caldera with a flat floor and rim height of 800 m; (2) a 500 C intrusion 1.5 km below the caldera centre; (3) a regional conductive heat flux twice continental average (0.10 W/m2); (4) host rock thermal conductivity of 2.5 W/m C, density 2650 kg/m3 and pore fraction 0.05. An impermeable intrusion was modeled with a 500 m wide surrounding region with a permeability (k) 10-3 m2 less than the system meant to represent a ductile region produced by elevated temperature (T > 350 C). The remainder of the system was given homogenous permeability. Cylindrical coordinates were used to represent caldera geometry. For these conditions, a minimum k = 10-15 m2 was required to achieve the target thermal condition of T approximately 220 C at 300 m below ground surface observed in active systems (e.g., Yellowstone). This model also resulted in a continuous steam plume originating at the intrusive contact that reached within 300 m of the surface along the edges of the caldera ~2 km from caldera centre. Models with k caldera centre and reduced its volume, but still achieved target conditions. Increasing intrusion temperature by 10% produced a second distinct plume at the caldera centre that also achieved target conditions. Increasing the rim height for these conditions produced the base (i.e., single plume) conditions. Resurgent doming up to 300 m was also modeled for the caldera floor. Increasing dome height shifted steam towards the caldera centre

  1. Inner structure of La Pacana Caldera (Central Andes, Chile) using gravimetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, F.; Pavez Alvarado, A.

    2010-12-01

    La Pacana caldera is located in the Altiplano Puna Volcanic Complex in the Chilean Andes and is a 60 by 35 km NS elongated body. It is one of the largest resurgent calderas in the world, comparable to the supervolcanoes of La Garita, Toba and Yellowstone. It has been described as being formed 4 My ago during an eruption with a VEI of 8,7, which makes it the fifth largest eruption ever in the geological record. This eruption was followed by a subsidence of 0,9 up to 2 km according to previous studies. Different models for this caldera formation were proposed but with a lack of sub surface information. We hence carried a gravimetry study to investigate its inner structure and to better off constrains on these proposed models. The residual Bouguer anomaly (figure 1) is asymetric with multiple high and low gravity, with an average amplitude of -14 mGal, which reaches -24 mGal near the resurgent dome, interpreted as the deepest part of the caldera. Based on this, we propose that the main collapse zone is not related to the topographic border, but to resurgent dome edges. This is compatible with a piecemeal collapse geometry. There are several gravity highs below strato-volcanoes and postcaldera domes within La Pacana caldera, which are interpreted as magmatic reservoirs. Our data combined with previous geological studies allowed us to separate La Pacana in two nested calderas and to trace its NNW, N and NNE borders, previously unrecognized features. The 2,5 D forward modelling cross sections constrained with geological data showed that the maximum caldera depth is 1,3 km with a minimum of 0,6 km in its southern part. We finally suggest that caldera rims are surrounded by paleozoic basement uplifted by thrust fault systems. La Pacana's residual Bouguer anomaly is small (1/2) when compared with the ones associated to other supervolcanoes (Toba, Yellowstone). La Pacana caldera constitutes then an anomaly for supervolcanoes internal structure due to its interpreted low

  2. Post-eruptive flooding of Santorini caldera and implications for tsunami generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomikou, Paraskevi; Druitt, Tim; Hübscher, Christian; Mather, Tamsin; Paulatto, Michele; Kalnins, Lara; Kelfoun, Karim; Papanikolaou, Dimitris; Bejelou, Konstantina; Lampridou, Danai; Pyle, David; Carey, Steven; Watts, Anthony; Weiß, Benedikt; Parks, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    Caldera-forming eruptions of island volcanoes generate tsunamis by the interaction of different eruptive phenomena with the sea. Such tsunamis are a major hazard, but forward models of their impacts are limited by poor understanding of source mechanisms. The eruption of Santorini 3600 years ago was one of the largest of eruptions known worldwide from the past 10,000 years - and was at least 3 times larger than the catastrophic eruption of Krakatoa. This huge eruption evacuated large volumes of magma, causing collapse of the large caldera, which is now filled with seawater. Tsunamis from this eruption have been proposed to have played a role in the demise of the Minoan culture across the southern Aegean, through damage to coastal towns, harbors, shipping and maritime trade. Before the eruption, there was an older caldera in the northern part of Santorini, partly filled with a shallow lagoon. In our study, we present bathymetric and seismic evidence showing that the caldera was not open to the sea during the main phase of the eruption, but was flooded once the eruption had finished. Following subsidence of the caldera floor, rapid inflow of seawater and landslides cut a deep 2.0-2.5 km3 submarine channel into the northern flank of the caldera wall. Hydrodynamic modelling indicates that the caldera was flooded through this breach in less than a couple of days. It was previously proposed that collapse of the caldera could have led to the formation of a major tsunami; but this is ruled out by our new evidence. Any tsunami's generated were most likely caused by entry of pyroclastic flows into the sea, combined with slumping of submarine pyroclastic accumulations. This idea is consistent with previous assertions that pyroclastic flows were the main cause of tsunamis at Krakatau.

  3. Investigation of the groundwater system at Masaya Caldera, Nicaragua, using transient electromagnetics and numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, R.E.; Sanford, W.E.; Connor, C.B.; Sandberg, S.K.; Diez, M.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of groundwater beneath Masaya Volcano, in Nicaragua, and its surrounding caldera was characterized using the transient electromagnetic method (TEM). Multiple soundings were conducted at 30 sites. Models of the TEM data consistently indicate a resistive layer that is underlain by one or more conductive layers. These two layers represent the unsaturated and saturated zones, respectively, with the boundary between them indicating the water-table elevation. A map of the TEM data shows that the water table in the caldera is a subdued replica of the topography, with higher elevations beneath the edifice in the south-central caldera and lower elevations in the eastern caldera, coinciding with the elevation of Laguna de Masaya. These TEM data, combined with regional hydrologic data, indicate that the caldera in hydrologically isolated from the surrounding region, with as much as 60??m of difference in elevation of the groundwater table across caldera-bounding faults. The water-table information and estimates of fluxes of water through the system were used to constrain a numerical simulation of groundwater flow. The simulation results indicate that basalt flows in the outer parts of the caldera have a relatively high transmissivity, whereas the central edifice has a substantially lower transmissivity. A layer of relatively high transmissivity must be present at depth within the edifice in order to deliver the observed flux of water and steam to the active vent. This hydrologic information about the caldera provides a baseline for assessing the response of this isolated groundwater system to future changes in magmatic activity. ?? 2007.

  4. Catastrophic isotopic modification of rhyolitic magma at times of caldera subsidence, Yellowstone plateau volcanic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, W.; Christiansen, R.L.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    This Wyoming volcanic field has undergone repeated eruption of rhyolitic magma strongly depleted in 18O. Large calderas subsided 2.0, 1.3 and 0.6 m.y. ago on eruption of ash-flow sheets. More than 60 other rhyolite lavas and tuffs permit reconstruction of the long-term chemical and isotopic evolution of the silicic system. Narrow delta 18O ranges in the ash-flow sheets contrast with wide delta 18O variation in post-caldera lavas. The earliest post-collapse lavas are 3-6per mille lighter than the preceding ash-flow sheets. The 18O depletions were short-lived events that immediately followed caldera subsidence and sequences of post-caldera lavas record partial recovery toward pre-caldera delta 18O values. Contemporaneous extra-caldera rhyolites show no effects of the repeated depletions. Although some contamination by foundering roof rocks seems to be required, water was probably the predominant contaminant.-W.H.B.

  5. Hydrothermal activity in the Tulancingo-Acoculco Caldera Complex, central Mexico. Exploratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Hernandez, Aida [Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos, CFE, Alejandro Volta 655, 58290 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Centro de Geociencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Juriquilla, Queretaro, Qro., 76230 (Mexico); Garcia-Estrada, Gerardo; Palma-Guzman, Hugo; Quijano-Leon, Jose L. [Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos, CFE, Alejandro Volta 655, 58290 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo; Gonzalez-Partida, Eduardo [Centro de Geociencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Juriquilla, Queretaro, Qro., 76230 (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    Mineral alteration and fluid inclusion studies of drill cuttings and core samples indicate that the sedimentary basement rocks and the volcanic rocks associated with Tulancingo-Acoculco Caldera Complex have been the site of two distinct and major hydrothermal events. The complex, located in the eastern portion of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, is formed by the Pliocene Tulancingo Caldera and the younger (Pleistocene) Acoculco Caldera, which developed within the older depression. The volcanic rocks are underlain by Cretaceous sedimentary rocks of the Sierra Madre Oriental. The earliest important hydrothermal event occurred during the emplacement of Mid-Tertiary granitic intrusions that metamorphosed the sedimentary rocks; these intrusives are not exposed at the surface. However, granitic rocks were encountered at the bottom of exploratory borehole EAC-1, drilled within the Caldera Complex. The second main event occurred during the formation of the Tulancingo and Acoculco Calderas. Both episodes lead to secondary mineralization that reduced the permeability of the reservoir rocks. A possible third hydrothermal event may be associated with the recent magmatic activity within the Acoculco Caldera.Thermal logs from well EAC-1 display a conductive thermal gradient with maximum temperatures exceeding 300 C at 2000 m depth. Although there are no active thermal springs in the area, there is extensive fossil surface hydrothermal alteration and cold gas discharges with high He{sup 3}/He{sup 4} ratios. (author)

  6. Post-eruptive flooding of Santorini caldera and implications for tsunami generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomikou, P; Druitt, T H; Hübscher, C; Mather, T A; Paulatto, M; Kalnins, L M; Kelfoun, K; Papanikolaou, D; Bejelou, K; Lampridou, D; Pyle, D M; Carey, S; Watts, A B; Weiß, B; Parks, M M

    2016-11-08

    Caldera-forming eruptions of island volcanoes generate tsunamis by the interaction of different eruptive phenomena with the sea. Such tsunamis are a major hazard, but forward models of their impacts are limited by poor understanding of source mechanisms. The caldera-forming eruption of Santorini in the Late Bronze Age is known to have been tsunamigenic, and caldera collapse has been proposed as a mechanism. Here, we present bathymetric and seismic evidence showing that the caldera was not open to the sea during the main phase of the eruption, but was flooded once the eruption had finished. Inflow of water and associated landsliding cut a deep, 2.0-2.5 km(3), submarine channel, thus filling the caldera in less than a couple of days. If, as at most such volcanoes, caldera collapse occurred syn-eruptively, then it cannot have generated tsunamis. Entry of pyroclastic flows into the sea, combined with slumping of submarine pyroclastic accumulations, were the main mechanisms of tsunami production.

  7. Rapid magma evolution constrained by zircon petrochronology and 40Ar/39Ar sanidine ages for the Huckleberry Ridge Tuff, Yellowstone, USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivera, Tiffany; Storey, Michael; Schmitz, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the time scales of magmatic differentiation, storage, and eruption of large volume silicic magmas is a primary goal of igneous petrology. Within the Huckleberry Ridge Tuff (HRT; Idaho, USA), representing the earliest and largest caldera-forming eruption associated with Yellowstone...... of single zircon crystals demonstrates an absence of pre-Pleistocene xenocrysts, but reveals the presence of antecrysts recycled from pre-caldera rhyolites in the HRT magma. The petrochronologic interpretation of autocrystic zircon thermal, chemical, and temporal characteristics suggests that HRT member B...

  8. Peralkaline ash flow tuffs and calderas of the McDermitt volcanic field, southeast Oregon and north central Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytuba, J.J.; McKee, E.H.

    1984-01-01

    This volcanic field covers an area of 20 000 km2 and consists of seven large-volume ash-flow sheets that vented 16.1-15 m.y. ago. The volcanic field is characterized by peralkaline, high-silica rhyolite, and all but one of the sheets are comendites. Each ash-flow sheet resulted in the formation of a large collapse caldera. Thickening of the ash-flow sheets, monoclinal warping outside the caldera ring-fault and tilting-in towards the caldera of blocks bounded by curvilinear faults all indicate regional subsidence prior to caldera collapse. The McDermitt caldera complex is highly mineralized; it contains ore deposits of Hg, Sb, Cs, Li and U. The peralkaline tuffs have high contents of these elements and were the source rocks from which metals were leached by hydrothermal systems developed during the last stage of caldera-related volcanism. (Following abstract) -W.H.B.

  9. The confirmation of a work hypothesis: a new caldera in the center of the Mexican Volcanic Belt; La confirmacion de una hipotesis de trabajo: una nueva caldera en el centro del Cinturon Volcanico Mexicano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anguita Virella, Francisco; Pal Verma, Surendra; Milan, Marcos; Garcia Cacho, Luis; Samaniego M, Daniel [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1991-12-31

    After synthesizing the most relevant aspects of the current volcanology and the genesis process of the collapse calderas, a process is described on the location and confirmation of a new caldera (the Mazahua) in the central part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB). [Espanol] Tras sintetizar los aspectos mas destacados de la vulcanologia actual y el proceso de genesis de las calderas de colapso, se describe el proceso de localizacion y confirmacion de una nueva caldera (la Mazahua) en la parte central del Cinturon Volcanico Mexicano (CVM).

  10. Seismic and gravity signature of the Ischia Island Caldera (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, P.; de Matteis, R.; Russo, G.

    2009-04-01

    The Campania (Italy) coasts are characterized by the presence of several volcanoes. The island of Ischia, located at the northwestern end of the Gulf of Naples, belongs to the Neapolitan Volcanic District together with Phlegrean Fields and Vesuvius, having all these Pleistocene volcanoes erupted in historical times, and it is characterized by diffuse hydrothermal phenomena The island represents the emergent part of a more extensive volcanic area developed mainly westward of the island, with underwater volcanoes aligned along regional fault patterns. The activity of Ischia volcano is testified by the occurrence of eruptions in historical times, the presence of intense hydrothermal phenomena, and by seismic activity (e.g. the 1883 Casamicciola earthquake). Ischia is populated by about 50,000 inhabitants increasing, mainly in the summer, due to thriving tourism business, partially due to its active volcanic state. Hazard assessment at active, densely populated volcanoes is critically based on knowledge of the volcanoes past behavior and the definition of its present state. As a contribution to the definition of the present state of the Ischia island volcano, we obtain a model of the shallow crust using geophysical observables through seismic tomography and 3D gravity inversion. In particular we use travel times collected during the Serapis experiment on the island and its surroundings and free air anomaly. A new 3D gravity inversion procedure has been developed to take better into account the shape and the effects of topography approximating it by a triangular mesh. Below each triangle, a sequence of triangular prisms is built, the uppermost prism having the upper face coincident with the triangle following the topography. The inversion is performed searching for a regularized solution using the minimum norm stabilizer. The main results inferable from the 3D seismic and gravity images are the definition of the caldera rims hypothesize by many authors along the

  11. Geochemical and geochronologic data from the Hall Creek caldera, Toiyabe Range, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Joseph P.; Henry, Christopher D.

    2017-01-01

    The magmatic, tectonic, and topographic evolution of what is now the northern Great Basin remains controversial, notably the temporal and spatial relation between magmatism and extensional faulting. This controversy is exemplified in the northern Toiyabe Range of central Nevada, where previous geologic mapping suggested the presence of a caldera that sourced the late Eocene (34.0 mega-annum [Ma]) tuff of Hall Creek. This region was also inferred to be the locus of large-magnitude middle Tertiary extension (more than 100 percent strain) localized along the Bernd Canyon detachment fault, and to be the approximate location of a middle Tertiary paleodivide that separated east and west-draining paleovalleys. Geologic mapping, 40Ar/39Ar dating, and geochemical analyses document the geologic history and extent of the Hall Creek caldera, define the regional paleotopography at the time it formed, and clarify the timing and kinematics of post-caldera extensional faulting. During and after late Eocene volcanism, the northern Toiyabe Range was characterized by an east-west trending ridge in the area of present-day Mount Callaghan, probably localized along a Mesozoic anticline. Andesite lava flows erupted around 35–34 Ma ponded hundreds of meters thick in the erosional low areas surrounding this structural high, particularly in the Simpson Park Mountains. The Hall Creek caldera formed ca. 34.0 Ma during eruption of the approximately 400 cubic kilometers (km3) tuff of Hall Creek, a moderately crystal-rich rhyolite (71–77 percent SiO2) ash-flow tuff. Caldera collapse was piston-like with an intact floor block, and the caldera filled with thick (approximately 2,600 meters) intracaldera tuff and interbedded breccia lenses shed from the caldera walls. The most extensive exposed megabreccia deposits are concentrated on or close to the caldera floor in the southwestern part of the caldera. Both silicic and intermediate post-caldera lavas were locally erupted within 400 thousand

  12. Geometry of Valley Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Petroff, Alexander P; Abrams, Daniel M; Lobkovsky, Alexander E; Kudrolli, Arshad; Rothman, Daniel H

    2011-01-01

    Although amphitheater-shaped valley heads can be cut by groundwater flows emerging from springs, recent geological evidence suggests that other processes may also produce similar features, thus confounding the interpretations of such valley heads on Earth and Mars. To better understand the origin of this topographic form we combine field observations, laboratory experiments, analysis of a high-resolution topographic map, and mathematical theory to quantitatively characterize a class of physical phenomena that produce amphitheater-shaped heads. The resulting geometric growth equation accurately predicts the shape of decimeter-wide channels in laboratory experiments, 100-meter wide valleys in Florida and Idaho, and kilometer wide valleys on Mars. We find that whenever the processes shaping a landscape favor the growth of sharply protruding features, channels develop amphitheater-shaped heads with an aspect ratio of pi.

  13. Stress field control during large caldera-forming eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Costa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Crustal stress field can have a significant influence on the way magma is channelled through the crust and erupted explosively at the surface. Large Caldera Forming Eruptions (LCFEs can erupt hundreds to thousands of cubic kilometres of magma in a relatively short time along fissures under the control of a far-field extensional stress. The associated eruption intensities are estimated in the range 109 - 1011 kg/s. We analyse syn-eruptive dynamics of LCFEs, by simulating numerically explosive flow of magma through a shallow dyke conduit connected to a magma chamber that in turn is fed by a deeper magma reservoir, both under the action of an extensional far-field stress. Results indicate that huge amounts of high viscosity silicic magma can be erupted over timescales of a few to several hours. Our study provides answers to outstanding questions relating to the intensity and duration of catastrophic volcanic eruptions in the past. In addition, it presents far-reaching implications for the understanding of dynamics and intensity of large-magnitude volcanic eruptions on Earth and to highlight the necessity of a future research to advance our knowledge of these rare catastrophic events.

  14. Tourism Development Based on Geopark in Bakkara Caldera Toba, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginting, N.; Vinky Rahman, N.; Sembiring, G.

    2017-03-01

    Bakkara Caldera Toba is an outstanding product of natural phenomena of Toba Supervolcano which has fascinating nature and culture. Bakkara has a great potential to develop world tourism further. It requires a model of sustainable planning Geopark to develop Bakkara. This sustainable concept helps to improve the local community and tourist’s quality of life and also still maintain the quality of the environment. through field observation and depth interview. The Collected data with a triangulation method. Development tourism destination such as attractions and environment; facilities and services; accessibility; image; and price to consume. It associated based on Geopark aspects there are; geological heritage; geo-conservation activities; sustainable tourism activities; educational; activities; community involvement products; strong management structure; and secure basis, infrastructure, and activities. The results of this study indicate that the Bakkara has the potential to become a tourist destination by applying the concept of Geotourism which accentuate its natural side, by optimizing the management of its destination attractions, its facilities and services, and its accessibilities.

  15. Scientific core hole VC-2A, Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musgrave, J.; Goff, S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Turner, T. (Turner (Tom), Salt Lake City, UT (USA))

    1990-10-01

    This report details the remedial action activities that were necessary to complete scientific core hole Valles caldera {number sign}2A (VC-2A) before it was relinquished to the landowners. Sandia National Laboratories, acting as the Geoscience Research Drilling Office (GRDO), managed the coring operations. Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) obtained the proper drilling permits with the New Mexico State Engineers Office (SEO). A legal agreement between Los Alamos and the landowners states that the Laboratory will give the landowners the completed core hold with casing, well head, and other hardware at the end of May 1991, or earlier if scientific investigations were completed. By May 1988, the Science Team completed the planned scientific investigations in the VC-2A core hole. Upon the insistence of the GRDO, the New Mexico Oil Conservation Division (OCD) inspected the core hole, declared jurisdiction, and required that the 11.43- by 11.43-cm annular cement job be repaired to comply with OCD regulations. These regulations state that there must be a return to surface of cement in all cementing operations. We successfully completed a squeeze cementing operation and relinquished the core hold to the landowners in November 1988 to the satisfaction of the OCD, SEO, the landowners, and Los Alamos. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Calderas produced by hydromagmatic eruptions through permafrost in northwest Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beget, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Most hydromagmatic eruptions on Earth are generated by interactions of lava and ground or surface water. This eruptive process typically produces craters 0.1-1 km in diameter, although a few as large as 1-2 km were described. In contrast, a series of Pleistocene hydromagmatic eruptions through 80-100-m-thick permafrost on the Seward Peninsula of Alaska produced four craters 3-8 km in diameter. These craters, called the Espenberg maars, are the four largest maars known on Earth. The thermodynamic properties of ground ice influence the rate and amount of water melted during the course of the eruption. Large quantities of water are present, but only small amounts can be melted at any time to interact with magma. This would tend to produce sustained and highly explosive low water/magma (fuel-coolant) ratios during the eruptions. An area of 400 km(sub 2) around the Alaskan maars shows strong reductions in the density of thaw lakes, ground ice, and other surface manifestations of permafrost because of deep burial by coeval tephra falls. The unusually large Espenberg maars are the first examples of calderas produced by hydromagmatic eruptions. These distinctive landforms can apparently be used as an indicator of the presence of permafrost at the time of eruption.

  17. Intermontane valley fills

    OpenAIRE

    Mey, Jürgen (Diplom-Geologe)

    2017-01-01

    Sedimentary valley fills are a widespread characteristic of mountain belts around the world. They transiently store material over time spans ranging from thousands to millions of years and therefore play an important role in modulating the sediment flux from the orogen to the foreland and to oceanic depocenters. In most cases, their formation can be attributed to specific fluvial conditions, which are closely related to climatic and tectonic processes. Hence, valley-fill deposits constitute v...

  18. Stratigraphy of Pyroclastic Deposits of EL Aguajito Caldera, Baja California Sur, MÉXICO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio Ocampo, L. S.; Macias, J. L.; García Sánchez, L.; Pola, A.; Saucedo, R.; Sánchez, J. M.; Avellán, D. R.; Cardona, S.; Reyes-Agustín, G.; Arce, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    El Aguajito caldera is located in the State of Baja California Sur, it comprises an area of 450 km2 and sits within the Santa Rosalía Basin which is controlled by NE-SW extensional structures and the NW-SE Cimarron Fault that transects the caldera structure. The oldest rocks are ~90 Ma granodiorites covered by an Oligocene-Miocene volcano-sedimentary sequence, the Miocene Santa Lucia Formation and La Esperanza basalt. Pliocene volcanism is represented by La Reforma caldera, El Aguajito caldera, and the Tres Vírgenes Volcanic complex. This study focuses on the cartography and stratigraphy of area in order to understand the evolution of the volcanic system. The stratigraphy from base to top consists of a series of shallow marine sediments (fossiliferous sandstones) covered by a thick sequence of ignimbrites and pyroclastic flows interbedded with volcaniclastic deposits (Gloria and El Infierno Formations). On top of these deposits is El Aguajito caldera, it consists of a 2 m thick pumice fallout followed by an ignimbrite with three transitional lithofacies: a ≤30-m thick light-pink pyroclastic flow enriched in pumice at the base that gradually becomes enrich in lithics towards the top with the occurrence of degasing pipes. On top rests a 15 m-thick light-purple ignimbrite slightly welded with fiammes and a sequence of pumiceous pyroclastic flows and fallouts. These deposits have been associate to the caldera formation with a collapse diameter of ~8 km marked by rhyolitic domes exposed along a ring collapse crowned the sequence as well as NW-SE aligned rhyolitic domes parallel to the seashore. This cartography allowed to present a preliminary new geological map with four stratigraphic units recognized so far, that were emplaced under subaerial conditions beginning with a Plinian column followed by the emplacement of El Aguajito ignimbrite with its subsequent caldera collapse and finally the extrusion of resurgent domes.

  19. Järelkajad Eesti presidendi visiidist USA-sse

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Töövisiit Ameerika Ühendriikidesse 17.-21.01.2006. Ülevaade president Arnold Rüütli USA-vsiidist, kohtumisest San Francisco ja Sunnyvale'i linnapeadega, investor Steve Jürvetsoniga, kohalike väliseestlastega, külaskäigust Silicon Valley tehnoloogiaettevõtetesse, California Ülikooli biotehnoloogia uurimiskeskusesse

  20. President Ilves töövisiidil USAs

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    President Toomas Hendrik Ilves alustas töövisiiti USA läänerannikul, teadus- ja kõrgtehnoloogia keskuses Silicon Valley's. Riigipea kohtus ka San Francisco linnapea Gavin Newsom'iga ja Stanfordi Ülikooli rektori John L. Hennessy'ga. Vabariigi President töövisiidil Ameerika Ühendriikides 9.-16.06.2009

  1. Eruptive and noneruptive calderas, northeastern San Juan Mountains, Colorado: Where did the ignimbrites come from?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, P.W.; McIntosh, W.C.

    2008-01-01

    The northeastern San Juan Mountains, the least studied portion of this well-known segment of the Southern Rocky Mountains Volcanic Field are the site of several newly identified and reinterpreted ignimbrite calderas. These calderas document some unique eruptive features not described before from large volcanic systems elsewhere, as based on recent mapping, petrologic data, and a large array of newly determined high-precision, laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar ages (140 samples). Tightly grouped sanidine ages document exceptionally brief durations of 50-100 k.y. or less for individual Oligocene caldera cycles; biotite ages are more variable and commonly as much as several hundred k.y. older than sanidine from the same volcanic unit. A previously unknown ignimbrite caldera at North Pass, along the Continental Divide in the Cochetopa Hills, was the source of the newly distinguished 32.25-Ma Saguache Creek Tuff (???400-500 km3). This regionally, distinctive crystal-poor alkalic rhyolite helps fill an apparent gap in the southwestward migration from older explosive activity, from calderas along the N-S Sawatch locus in central Colorado (youngest, Bonanza Tuff at 33.2 Ma), to the culmination of Tertiary volcanism in the San Juan region, where large-volume ignimbrite eruptions started at ca. 29.5 Ma and peaked with the enormous Fish Canyon Tuff (5000 km3) at 28.0 Ma. The entire North Pass cycle, including caldera-forming Saguache Creek Tuff, thick caldera-filling lavas, and a smaller volume late tuff sheet, is tightly bracketed at 32.25-32.17 Ma. No large ignimbrites were erupted in the interval 32-29 Ma, but a previously unmapped cluster of dacite-rhyolite lava flows and small tuffs, areally associated with a newly recognized intermediate-composition intrusion 5 ?? 10 km across (largest subvolcanic intrusion in San Juan region) centered 15 km north of the North Pass caldera, marks a near-caldera-size silicic system active at 29.8 Ma. In contrast to the completely filled North Pass

  2. Magma Storage, Recharge and the Caldera Cycle at Rabaul, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbro, G.; Bouvet de Maisonneuve, C.; Sindang, M.

    2015-12-01

    Many calderas have a history of repeated caldera-forming eruptions, interspersed with periods of more minor activity. Rabaul, for instance, has had at least 11 ignimbrite-forming eruptions over the last 200 ky. The most recent of these was the '1400 BP' eruption, which led to caldera collapse. Since then, there has been multiple smaller eruptions, including the ongoing activity from Tavurvur and Vulcan. An important question facing volcanology today is what controls the size of eruptions at calderas such as Rabaul.Detailed stratigraphic sampling of the 1400BP eruption reveals that prior to eruption, the magma reservoir below Rabaul contained a well-mixed dacite with whole-rock SiO2 contents of 65.0-66.4 wt%. The dacite contains a single phenocryst assemblage of plag (An44-52), cpx (En43-46Fs13-15Wo40-41), opx (En69-71Fs25-28Wo3) and magnetite, along with minor apatite. The homogeneity of the dacite is underscored by the narrow range of compositions of both the matrix glass and the melt inclusions (67.8-69.0 wt% SiO2). The only exception to this is at the top of the ignimbrite, representing some of the last magma to have been withdrawn. Dispersed throughout the dacitic pumices are darker, more mafic blebs. Streaks of mingled magma with a range of SiO2 contents, down to 59.9 wt% SiO2 are also found in the pumice, suggesting that a mafic recharge magma was intruded into the base of the reservoir shortly before eruption. High TiO2 contents rule out the direct involvement of basalt, and instead imply the magma that intruded into the reservoir was an andesite with at least 56 wt% SiO2. Phenocrysts related to this recharge magma are rare, and the crystals found in the dark blebs are identical in composition to those found in the dacite, indicating that the recharge was aphyric. The present-day, post-caldera recharge magma is different to the pre-1400 BP recharge magma: it is basaltic. This suggests that the plumbing system of Rabaul is different during the pre-caldera and

  3. Phase III Drilling Operations at the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVF 51-20)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1999-06-01

    During July-September, 1998, a jointly funded drilling operation deepened the Long Valley Exploratory Well from 7178 feet to 9832 feet. This was the third major drilling phase of a project that began in 1989, but had sporadic progress because of discontinuities in tiding. Support for Phase III came from the California Energy Commission (CEC), the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP), the US Geological Survey (USGS), and DOE. Each of these agencies had a somewhat different agenda: the CEC wants to evaluate the energy potential (specifically energy extraction from magma) of Long Valley Caldera; the ICDP is studying the evolution and other characteristics of young, silicic calderas; the USGS will use this hole as an observatory in their Volcano Hazards program; and the DOE, through Sandia, has an opportunity to test new geothermal tools and techniques in a realistic field environment. This report gives a description of the equipment used in drilling and testing; a narrative of the drilling operations; compiled daily drilling reports; cost information on the project; and a brief summary of engineering results related to equipment performance and energy potential. Detailed description of the scientific results will appear in publications by the USGS and other researchers.

  4. Caldera of Godean, Sleman, Yogyakarta: A Volcanic Geomorphology Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Gendoet Hartono

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Godean hills is located approximately 10 km westward from the Yogyakarta City. The landscape of Godean hills and plains is affected by various factors, such as lithology, geological structure, and sub-aerial process. The purpose of this study was to reveal the landscape of Godean. The method consisted of field study, morphological variables assessment, rock sampling, and laboratory analysis. The results of field mapping indicated that the landscape of Godean  is an isolated hill with a steep slope of >40° and an elevation of +231 m a.s.l, passed by the rivers flows from northeast to southwest that disembogue into the west part of Kulon Progo. The morphologhy of Godean hills varies including G. (Gunung/Mountain So (+173 m amsl, G. Gede (+218 m a.s.l, G. Wungkal (+187 m a.s.l, G. Butak (+154 m a.s.l, and G. Berjo ( + 175 m a.s.l, dominated by the lithology of igneous rock, which is composed of porphyry andesite-microdiorite, pumice lapilli, and quartz rich lapilli-tuff. In addition, most of the igneous rocks have weathered and have been altered to clays, while the deposition from Merapi volcano formed a landscape with an altitude between +100–+150 m a.s.l surrounding Godean hills. Sentolo Formation was found in Kembang, Bantul, which is located approximately ±5km in the south of the study area N93ºE/12º,  while the distribution in the southwest and northeast relatively covers the Godean hills in curve shape. The results of the analysis provide information related with Godean landscape that it is the remains of the volcanic caldera, with various igneous rock types and volcaniclastics deposits, as well as endured the occurrences of hydrothermal alteration and mineralization. Further geophysical research is required to determine the configuration of igneous rocks under the earth's surface.

  5. Public views and attitudes concerning fire and fuels reduction strategies in the Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt Anschuetz; Carol Raish

    2010-01-01

    The Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP), located in the heart of the Jemez Mountains in northcentral New Mexico, is a special place for many residents of the region. The large volcanic caldera, formerly the privately owned Baca Ranch, is an 89,000-acre property known for its scenic meadows and abundant wildlife, including herds of elk. The U.S. purchased the...

  6. Doubly stochastic models for volcanic hazard assessment at Campi Flegrei caldera

    CERN Document Server

    Bevilacqua, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This study provides innovative mathematical models for assessing the eruption probability and associated volcanic hazards, and applies them to the Campi Flegrei caldera in Italy. Throughout the book, significant attention is devoted to quantifying the sources of uncertainty affecting the forecast estimates. The Campi Flegrei caldera is certainly one of the world’s highest-risk volcanoes, with more than 70 eruptions over the last 15,000 years, prevalently explosive ones of varying magnitude, intensity and vent location. In the second half of the twentieth century the volcano apparently once again entered a phase of unrest that continues to the present. Hundreds of thousands of people live inside the caldera and over a million more in the nearby city of Naples, making a future eruption of Campi Flegrei an event with potentially catastrophic consequences at the national and European levels.

  7. Progressive approach to eruption at Campi Flegrei caldera in southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Christopher R. J.; de Natale, Giuseppe; Carlino, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    Unrest at large calderas rarely ends in eruption, encouraging vulnerable communities to perceive emergency warnings of volcanic activity as false alarms. A classic example is the Campi Flegrei caldera in southern Italy, where three episodes of major uplift since 1950 have raised its central district by about 3 m without an eruption. Individual episodes have conventionally been treated as independent events, so that only data from an ongoing episode are considered pertinent to evaluating eruptive potential. An implicit assumption is that the crust relaxes accumulated stress after each episode. Here we apply a new model of elastic-brittle failure to test the alternative view that successive episodes promote a long-term accumulation of stress in the crust. The results provide the first quantitative evidence that Campi Flegrei is evolving towards conditions more favourable to eruption and identify field tests for predictions on how the caldera will behave during future unrest.

  8. Graben calderas of the Sierra Madre Occidental: The case of Guanajuato, central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.; Tristán-González, M.; Labarthe-Hernández, G.; Marti, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO) volcanic province is characterized by voluminous silicic ignimbrites that reach an accumulated thickness of 500 to 1500 m. A single ignimbrite can reach up to 350 m thick in its outflow facies. This ignimbrite sequence formed mostly within 38-23 Ma, building up a total estimated volume of ca. 580,000 km3 making the SMO the largest ignimbrite province of the world. We have showed that several and probably most of the SMO ignimbrites were erupted from fissures associated to Basin and Range fault systems or grabens (Geology, 2003), thus naming these volcano-tectonic structures as graben calderas (Caldera Volcanism book, Elsevier, 2008). Generally, the sequence observed in graben calderas include, from oldest to youngest, alluvial fan deposits combined with lacustrine deposits, pyroclastic surge deposits and minor volume ignimbrites, a large-volume ignimbrite that could be massive or made of successive layers, and sometimes silicic lava domes and/or mafic fissural lavas both with vents aligned with the graben trend. Fallout deposits, plinian or non-plinian, are not observed in the sequence. Thus, onset of caldera collapse represented by the major ignimbrite must occur just after deposition of continental sediments within the graben domain. A similar volcano-tectonic development is observed in pull-apart grabens. Therefore, extensional or transtensional tectonics, before and during caldera collapse, and the emplacement of a subgraben shallow silicic magma chamber are the necessary conditions for the development of graben calderas. We describe here the case of the Guanajuato graben caldera, located in the central part of Mexico and in the southeastern portion of the SMO volcanic province. The caldera is part of the economically important mining district of Guanajuato, with 28 silver mines, some active since the 16th century. The caldera structure, a rectangle of 10 x 16 km, was controlled by NW and NE regional fault systems. Most ore

  9. Progressive approach to eruption at Campi Flegrei caldera in southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Christopher R J; De Natale, Giuseppe; Carlino, Stefano

    2017-05-15

    Unrest at large calderas rarely ends in eruption, encouraging vulnerable communities to perceive emergency warnings of volcanic activity as false alarms. A classic example is the Campi Flegrei caldera in southern Italy, where three episodes of major uplift since 1950 have raised its central district by about 3 m without an eruption. Individual episodes have conventionally been treated as independent events, so that only data from an ongoing episode are considered pertinent to evaluating eruptive potential. An implicit assumption is that the crust relaxes accumulated stress after each episode. Here we apply a new model of elastic-brittle failure to test the alternative view that successive episodes promote a long-term accumulation of stress in the crust. The results provide the first quantitative evidence that Campi Flegrei is evolving towards conditions more favourable to eruption and identify field tests for predictions on how the caldera will behave during future unrest.

  10. Clues on the origin of post-2000 earthquakes at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodini, G; Selva, J; Del Pezzo, E; Marsan, D; De Siena, L; D'Auria, L; Bianco, F; Caliro, S; De Martino, P; Ricciolino, P; Petrillo, Z

    2017-06-30

    The inter-arrival times of the post 2000 seismicity at Campi Flegrei caldera are statistically distributed into different populations. The low inter-arrival times population represents swarm events, while the high inter-arrival times population marks background seismicity. Here, we show that the background seismicity is increasing at the same rate of (1) the ground uplift and (2) the concentration of the fumarolic gas specie more sensitive to temperature. The seismic temporal increase is strongly correlated with the results of recent simulations, modelling injection of magmatic fluids in the Campi Flegrei hydrothermal system. These concurrent variations point to a unique process of temperature-pressure increase of the hydrothermal system controlling geophysical and geochemical signals at the caldera. Our results thus show that the occurrence of background seismicity is an excellent parameter to monitor the current unrest of the caldera.

  11. Accelerated uplift and magmatic intrusion of the Yellowstone caldera, 2004 to 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wu-Lung; Smith, Robert B; Wicks, Charles; Farrell, Jamie M; Puskas, Christine M

    2007-11-09

    The Yellowstone caldera began a rapid episode of ground uplift in mid-2004, revealed by Global Positioning System and interferometric synthetic aperture radar measurements, at rates up to 7 centimeters per year, which is over three times faster than previously observed inflation rates. Source modeling of the deformation data suggests an expanding volcanic sill of approximately 1200 square kilometers at a 10-kilometer depth beneath the caldera, coincident with the top of a seismically imaged crustal magma chamber. The modeled rate of source volume increase is 0.1 cubic kilometer per year, similar to the amount of magma intrusion required to supply the observed high heat flow of the caldera. This evidence suggests magma recharge as the main mechanism for the accelerated uplift, although pressurization of magmatic fluids cannot be ruled out.

  12. Electrical structure of Plaine des Sables caldera, Piton de la Fournaise volcano (Reunion Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Schnegg

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available An Audio Magnetotelluric (AMT profile has been carried out across the Plaine des Sables, a former caldera of the active Piton de la Fournaise volcano, Reunion Island. Located in the Western Indian Ocean, between the Mascarene and Madagascar basins, this basaltic shield volcano originates from the activity of a hot spot. Our aim was to determine the internal structure of the volcano, in particular the shallow electrical properties of an area extending between the old and the new caldera rims. Although several teams had already conducted AMT work in this region a few years ago, there was a need for more a detailed, in depth survey. Our final model displays a noticeable slope of the Plaine des Sables basement oriented toward the present Fournaise summit. This slope is interpreted as resulting from successive landslides toward the ocean. We conclude that this dipping, electrically good conducting layer, probably belongs to the flat layering of an older caldera.

  13. Characterizing analogue caldera collapse with computerized X-ray micro-tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Sam; Holohan, Eoghan; Boone, Matthieu; Pauwels, Elin; Cnudde, Veerle; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2013-04-01

    Analogue models in the past mainly explored caldera collapse structures by documenting 2D model cross-sections. Kinematic aspects and 3D structures of caldera collapse are less well understood, although they are essential to interpret recent field and monitoring data. We applied high resolution radiography and computerized X-ray micro-tomography (µCT) to image the deformation during analogue fluid withdrawal in small-scale caldera collapse models. The models test and highlight the possibilities and limitations of µCT-scanning to qualitatively image and quantitatively analyse deformation of analogue volcano-tectonic experiments. High resolution interval radiography sequences document '2.5D' surface and internal model geometry, and subsidence kinematics of a collapsing caldera block into an emptying fluid body in an unprecedented way. During the whole drainage process, all subsidence was bound by caldera ring faults. Subsidence was associated with dilatation of the analogue granular material within the collapsing column. The temporal subsidence rate pattern within the subsiding volume comprised three phases: 1) Upward ring fault propagation, 2) Rapid subsidence with the highest subsidence rates within the uppermost subsiding volume, 3) Relatively slower subsidence rates over the whole column with intermittent subsidence rate acceleration. Such acceleration did almost never affect the whole column. By using radiography sequences it is possible in a non-destructive manner to obtain a continuous observation of fault propagation, down sag mechanisms and the subsequent development of collapse structures. Multi-angle µCT scans of the collapse result allow for a full virtual 3D reconstruction of the model. This leads to an unprecedented 3D view on fault geometries. The developed method is a step towards the quantitative documentation of volcano-tectonic models that would render data interpretations immediately comparable to monitoring data available from recent

  14. Reconstruction of the most recent volcanic eruptions from the Valles caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, J. A.; Brunstad, K. A.; Gardner, J. N.

    2011-01-01

    Products of the latest eruptions from the Valles caldera, New Mexico, consist of the El Cajete Pyroclastic Beds and Battleship Rock Ignimbrite, a sequence of pyroclastic fall and density current deposits erupted at ~ 55 ka, capped by the later Banco Bonito Flow erupted at ~ 40 ka, and collectively named the East Fork Member of the Valles Rhyolite. The stratigraphy of the East Fork Member has been the subject of conflicting interpretations in the past; a long-running investigation of short-lived exposures over a period of many years enables us to present a more complete event stratigraphy for these eruptions than has hitherto been possible. The volume of rhyolitic magma erupted during the 55 ka event may have been more than 10 km 3, and for the 40 ka event can be estimated with rather more confidence at 4 km 3. During the earlier event, plinian eruptions dispersed fallout pumice over much of the Valles caldera, the southern Jemez Mountains, and the Rio Grande rift. We infer a fallout thickness of several decimeters at the site of the city of Santa Fe, and significant ash fall in eastern New Mexico. In contrast, pyroclastic density currents were channeled within the caldera moat and southwestward into the head of Cañon de San Diego, the principal drainage from the caldera. Simultaneous (or rapidly alternating) pyroclastic fallout and density current activity characterized the ~ 55 ka event, with density currents becoming more frequent as the eruption progressed through two distinct stages separated by a brief hiatus. One early pyroclastic surge razed a forest in the southern caldera moat, in a similar manner to the initial blast of the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Ignimbrite outflow from the caldera through the drainage notch may have been restricted in runout distance due to steep, rugged topography in this vicinity promoting mixing between flows and air, and the formation of phoenix clouds. Lavas erupted during both the ~ 55 and ~ 40 ka events were

  15. Preliminary report, between seismic swarms, the constant cycles of inflation/ deflation in some volcanic calderas in the world and the minimum and/or solar maximum years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casati, Michele

    2014-05-01

    The global communication network and GPS satellites have enabled us to monitor for more than a decade, some of the more sensitive, well-known and highly urbanized volcanic areas around the world. The possibility of electromagnetic coupling between the dynamics of the Earth-Sun and major geophysical events is a topic of research. However the majority of researchers are orienting their research in one direction. They are attempting to demonstrate a significant EM coupling between the solar dynamics and terrestrial seismicity ignoring a possible relationship between solar dynamics and the dynamics inherent in volcanic calderas. The scientific references are scarce, however, a study conducted by the Vesuvius Observatory of Naples, notes that the seismic activity on the volcano is closely related to changes in solar activity and the Earth's magnetic field. We decided to extend the study to many other volcanic calderas in the world in order to generalise the relationship between solar activity and caldera activity and/or deformation of the ground. The list of Northern Hemisphere volcanoes examined is as follows: Long Valley, Yellowstone, Three sisters, Kilauea Hawaii, Axial seamount (United States); Augustine ( Alaska), Sakurajima (Japan); Hammarinn, Krisuvik; Askja (Iceland) and Campi Flegrei (Italy). We note that the deformation of volcanoes recorded in GPS logs varies in long, slow geodynamic processes related to the two well-known time periods within the eleven-year cycle of solar magnetic activity: the solar minimum and maximum. We find that the years of minimum (maximum), are coincident with the years in which transition between a phase of deflation (inflation) occurs. Additionally, the seismicity recorded in such areas reaches its peak in the years of solar minimum or maximum. However, the total number and magnitude of seismic events is greater during deep solar minima, than maxima, evidenced by increased seismic activity occurring between 2006 and 2010. This

  16. There's more than one way to build a caldera magma chamber: Evidence from volcanic-plutonic relationships at three faulted Rio-Grande-rift calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerer, M. J.; McIntosh, W. C.

    2011-12-01

    The temporal and chemical relationships of volcanic and plutonic rocks of the Questa (NM), Mt. Aetna (CO), and Organ caldera (NM) complexes were investigated to establish the origin of these silicic magmas. Rio Grande Rift faulting at these systems has exposed both intracaldera sequences and subvolcanic plutons. Ar/Ar and U/Pb ages reveal the timing of volcanic activity and pluton emplacement and cooling. We observe a link between ignimbrite zoning patterns and the temporal-chemical relationship of volcanic and plutonic rocks. The Questa caldera erupted the high-SiO2 peralkaline Amalia Tuff (AT) at 25.4 Ma. Volumetrically minor phases of two resurgent plutons and a ring dike are compositionally similar to the AT. The age of the ring dike (25.4 Ma) is indistinguishable to AT, suggesting that the peralkaline intrusions are nonerupted AT. The remaining pluton ages are 100 ka to 6.1 Ma younger than AT and are too young to be the AT residual crystal mush. The Mt. Princeton batholith and nested Mt. Aetna caldera are interpreted to be the sources for the 37.3 Ma, low-SiO2 rhyolitic Wall Mountain Tuff (WMT) and the 34.3 Ma, dacitic Badger Creek Tuff (BCT). U/Pb and Ar/Ar ages of Mt. Princeton batholith (36.5 to 35.1 Ma) indicate that it was emplaced and rapidly cooled during the interval between the WMT and BCT eruptions, and that any WMT age intrusions are now eroded. During the eruption of the BCT, the fully crystallized Mt. Princeton batholith collapsed into the Mt. Aetna caldera. Intrusions along the margins of the Mt. Aetna caldera are compositionally identical the BCT and contain zircons 100 to 500 ka older than the tuff, suggesting that the BCT magma chamber was incrementally emplaced prior to caldera eruption. The Organ caldera complex erupted three ignimbrites: a basal high-silica 36.5 Ma rhyolite, a middle intermediate-silica 36.2 Ma rhyolite, and an upper 36.0 Ma low-silica rhyolite. The intracaldera sequence is intruded by the Organ Needle pluton. U/Pb zircon

  17. Boyne Valley Tombs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Frank

    The passage tombs of the Boyne Valley exhibit the greatest level of development of the megalithic tomb building tradition in Ireland in terms of their morphology, embellishment, burial tradition, grave goods, clustering, and landscape siting. This section examines these characteristics and gives a summary archaeoastronomical appraisal of their orientation and detected astronomical alignment.

  18. Breathing Valley Fever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-04

    Dr. Duc Vugia, chief of the Infectious Diseases Branch in the California Department of Public Health, discusses Valley Fever.  Created: 2/4/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/5/2014.

  19. Bringing Silicon Valley inside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, G

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, Silicon Valley companies produced 41 IPOs, which by January 1999 had a combined market capitalization of $27 billion--that works out to $54,000 in new wealth creation per worker in a single year. Multiply the number of employees in your company by $54,000. Did your business create that much new wealth last year? Half that amount? It's not a group of geniuses generating such riches. It's a business model. In Silicon Valley, ideas, capital, and talent circulate freely, gathering into whatever combinations are most likely to generate innovation and wealth. Unlike most traditional companies, which spend their energy in resource allocation--a system designed to avoid failure--the Valley operates through resource attraction--a system that nurtures innovation. In a traditional company, people with innovative ideas must go hat in hand to the guardians of the old ideas for funding and for staff. But in Silicon Valley, a slew of venture capitalists vie to attract the best new ideas, infusing relatively small amounts of capital into a portfolio of ventures. And talent is free to go to the companies offering the most exhilarating work and the greatest potential rewards. It should actually be easier for large, traditional companies to set up similar markets for capital, ideas, and talent internally. After all, big companies often already have extensive capital, marketing, and distribution resources, and a first crack at the talent in their own ranks. And some of them are doing it. The choice is yours--you can do your best to make sure you never put a dollar of capital at risk, or you can tap into the kind of wealth that's being created every day in Silicon Valley.

  20. Application of electric and electromagnetic methods to the definition of the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Maio, R.; Patella, D.; Cecere, G. [Naples Univ. Federico II, Naples (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche; Petrillo, Z.; De Martino, P. [Osservatorio Vesuviano, Ercolano, NA (Italy); Siniscalchi, A. [Bari Univ., Bari (Italy). Dipt. di Geologia e Geofisica

    2000-04-01

    The results of an analysis of dipolar geoelectrical (DG), magnetotelluric (MT) and self-potential (SP) data collected over the emerged portion of the Campi Flegrei (CF) caldera (Southern Italy) are presented. The DG and MT data are from previous surveys, while the SP data have been recently collected during a survey consisting of 265 pickup land sites. Although the emerged part of the CF caldera appears as a highly inhomogeneous structure, a few simple features have been highlighted through an integrated analysis of subsets of consistent data. A well resolved feature is the structural pattern of the caldera depression along a roughly E-W- profile, deduced from a 2D combined interpretation of the MT and DG soundings. Resistivity dispersion effects have also been observed at both ends of this profile. They have been ascribed to the presence of hydrothermally altered zones related to the main fracture systems bordering the caldera. A pressure-temperature source body at a mean depth of about 5 km bsl under Pozzuoli bay (Italy) has been inferred from the analysis of the 3D SP tomography imaging.

  1. Modeling surface deformation observed with synthetic aperture radar interferometry at Campi Flegrei caldera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundgren, P.; Usai, S.; Sansosti, E.; Lanari, R.; Tesauro, M.; Fornaro, G.; Berardino, P.

    2001-01-01

    Satellite radar interferometry of Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy, reveals a pattern of subsidence during the period 1993–1998. Interferograms spanning the first half of the observation period (1993–1995) have a lower amplitude and average rate of subsidence than those spanning either the second half

  2. Galileo's Last Fly-Bys of Io: NIMS Observations of Loki, Tupan, and Emakong Calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Kamp, L. W.; Davies, A. G.; Smythe, W. D.; Carlson, R. W.; Doute, S.; McEwen, A.; Turtle, E. P.; Leader, F.; Mehlman, R.

    2002-01-01

    NIMS results from the 2001 Galileo fly-bys of Io will be presented, focusing on three calderas that may contain lava lakes. Preliminary results from the January 2002 Io fly-by will be presented. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Geology and ore deposits of the McDermitt Caldera, Nevada-Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytuba, James J.

    1976-01-01

    The McDermitt caldera is a Miocene collapse structure along the Nevada-Oregon border. The oval-shaped caldera is bounded by arcuate normal faults on the north and south and by rhyolite ring domes on the west. Precollapse ash-flow tuffs exposed within the south caldera rim consist of three cooling units and are peralkaline in composition. Refractive indexes of nonhydrated glasses from basal vitrophyres of the. units range from 1.493 to 1.503 and are typical of comendites. Post-collapse intracaldera rocks consist of tuffaceous lake sediments, rhyolite flows and domes, and ash-flow tuffs. Within the caldera are the mercury mines of Bretz, Cordero, McDermitt, Opalite, and Ruja and the Moonlight uranium mine. The mercury mines are adjacent to ring fracture faults, and the uranium mine and other uranium occurrences are located within rhyolite ring domes. Fluid inclusions in quartz indicate a deposition temperature of 340?C for the uranium deposit and 200?C for the mercury deposits. The mercury deposits formed at shallow depth by replacement of lakebed sediments and volcanic rocks.

  4. Lithium enrichment in intracontinental rhyolite magmas leads to Li deposits in caldera basins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas R; Coble, Matthew A; Rytuba, James J; Mahood, Gail A

    2017-08-16

    The omnipresence of lithium-ion batteries in mobile electronics, and hybrid and electric vehicles necessitates discovery of new lithium resources to meet rising demand and to diversify the global lithium supply chain. Here we demonstrate that lake sediments preserved within intracontinental rhyolitic calderas formed on eruption and weathering of lithium-enriched magmas have the potential to host large lithium clay deposits. We compare lithium concentrations of magmas formed in a variety of tectonic settings using in situ trace-element measurements of quartz-hosted melt inclusions to demonstrate that moderate to extreme lithium enrichment occurs in magmas that incorporate felsic continental crust. Cenozoic calderas in western North America and in other intracontinental settings that generated such magmas are promising new targets for lithium exploration because lithium leached from the eruptive products by meteoric and hydrothermal fluids becomes concentrated in clays within caldera lake sediments to potentially economically extractable levels.Lithium is increasingly being utilized for modern technology in the form of lithium-ion batteries. Here, using in situ measurements of quartz-hosted melt inclusions, the authors demonstrate that preserved lake sediments within rhyolitic calderas have the potential to host large lithium-rich clay deposits.

  5. More than a scenic mountain landscape: Valles Caldera National Preserve land use history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt F. Anschuetz; Thomas Merlan

    2007-01-01

    This study focuses on the cultural-historical environment of the 88,900-acre (35,560-ha) Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) over the past four centuries of Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. governance. It includes a review and synthesis of available published and unpublished historical, ethnohistorical, and ethnographic literature about the human occupation of the area...

  6. Applying hydrology to land management on the Valles Caldera National Preserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert R. Parmenter

    2009-01-01

    Since 2004, the Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico has hosted extensive field hydrology research by scientists from the Center for Sustainability of semi- Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas (SAHRA) at the University of Arizona. With the development of a detailed hydrologic understanding of VCNP's climate, geology,...

  7. Chapter 9. The Valles Caldera National Preserve as a multi-layered ethnographic landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt F. Anschuetz

    2007-01-01

    The land use history of the Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP), as represented in the documentary record maintained in various archives and libraries, focuses primarily on the Hispanic and Anglo-American occupation of the locale subsequent to 1860. In an act of June 21, 1860, the U.S. Congress authorized the Baca Land Grant heirs to choose as many as five square...

  8. Modeling surface deformation observed with synthetic aperture radar interferometry at Campi Flegrei caldera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundgren, P.; Usai, S.; Sansosti, E.; Lanari, R.; Tesauro, M.; Fornaro, G.; Berardino, P.

    Satellite radar interferometry of Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy, reveals a pattern of subsidence during the period 1993–1998. Interferograms spanning the first half of the observation period (1993–1995) have a lower amplitude and average rate of subsidence than those spanning either the second half

  9. Application of electric and electromagnetic methods to the definition of the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Cecere

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of an analysis of Dipolar Geoelectrical (DG, Magnetotelluric (MT and Self-Potential (SP data collected over the emerged portion of the Campi Flegrei (CF caldera (South Italy are presented. The DG and MT data are from previous surveys, while the SP data have been recently collected during a survey consisting of 265 pickup land sites. Although the emerged part of the CF caldera appears as a highly inhomogeneous structure, a few simple features have been highlighted through an integrated analysis of subsets of consistent data. A well resolved feature is the structural pattern of the caldera depression along a roughly E-W profile, deduced from a 2D combined interpretation of the MT and DG soundings. Resistivity dispersion effects have also been observed at both ends of this profile. They have been ascribed to the presence of hydrothermally altered zones related to the main fracture systems bordering the caldera. A pressure/temperature source body at a mean depth of about 5 km bsl under the Bay of Pozzuoli has been inferred from the analysis of the 3D SP tomography imaging.

  10. Magnetic fabrics in sub-caldera plutons recording magma ascent and fault-caldera interactions, the Etiavnica volcano-plutonic complex, Western Carpathians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomek, Filip; Žák, Jiří

    2013-04-01

    The Štiavnica volcano-plutonic complex in the Western Carpatians exposes a spectacular section through middle Miocene stratovolcano (50 km in diameter) built on Variscan basement and late Paleozoic to Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. The stratovolcano consists of early andesite lava flows, extrusive domes, and pyroclastic flow deposits intruded by andesite and andesite porphyry sills and laccoliths. At around 14.5-15.5 Ma, the pre-volcanic basement beneath the central portion of the stratovolcano was intruded by a diorite stock and a voluminous bell-jar granodiorite pluton followed by quartz diorite to granodiorite porphyry dikes and stocks. The pluton emplacement led to the development of a 20 km wide collapse caldera associated with late andesite and dacite extrusive domes, dome flows, pyroclastic deposits, and quartz-diorite porphyry dikes and sills. Subsequently, the central domain underwent resurgence accompanied by intrusion of small rhyolitic and granite porphyry bodies. The present-day exposure with significant vertical relief cuts through all these units including the sub-caldera plutons and their flat roof which represents the volcano basement. The sub-caldera plutons exhibit contrasting magnetic fabrics as revealed by anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS). The diorite is characterized by very low degree of magnetic anisotropy (less than 10 %) and both prolate and oblate AMS ellipsoids. Magnetic foliations are mostly sub-parallel to the nearby pluton roof margin and are associated with steep lineations. In contrast, the younger granodiorite shows slightly higher degree of magnetic anisotropy (up to 12 %) and chiefly oblate susceptibility ellipsoids for the same magnetic mineralogy (both plutons are ferromagnetic, with the AMS carried predominantly by magnetite). Unlike fabric in the diorite, magnetic foliations are homogeneously oriented and dip moderately to the W to WNW whereas magnetic lineations vary from down-dip to subhorizontal. We interpret

  11. Plio-pleistocene volcano-tectonic evolution of la Reforma Caldera, Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demant, Alain; Ortlieb, Luc

    1981-01-01

    La Reforma volcanic complex, in east-central Baja California, shows a characteristic caldera structure, 10 km in diameter. The first eruptive stage, during the Pliocene, was manifested by ash and pumice falls and by subaqueous pumitic flows. In a second stage basic flows were deposited in a near-shore environment (subaerial and pillow lavas). During the early Pleistocene a large ignimbritic eruption, producing mainly pantelleritic tuffs, immediately predated the formation of the caldera itself. Afterwards, along marginal fractures of the caldera, some rhyolitic domes and flows partially covered the thick ignimbritic sheet. A block of Miocene substratum, in the center of the caldera, has been uplifted, nearly 1 km, by "resurgent doming". Small outcrops of diorite might constitute the top of coarse-grained crystallized magmatic bodies, and thus support the "resurgent doming" interpretation. A few basaltic cones were finally built on the flanks of the caldera complex; the latter are not related to the caldera history but to the extension tectonics of the Gulf of California which are also responsible for the Tortuga Island and the Holocene Tres Virgenes tholeiitic cones. South of la Reforma are found the highest (+300 m) Pleistocene marine deposits of the Gulf coast of Baja California. The uplift of this area is due in part to the positive epeirogenic movements of the whole peninsular crustal block, and also to the late doming of the caldera. On the coastal (eastern) flank of La Reforma complex up to seven stepped wave-cut terraces have been preserved, the highest reaching more than +150 m and the lowest ones +25 m. Lateral correlations of the marine terraces along the whole Gulf of California suggest that this volcano-tectonic uplift, that is still active, is of the order of 240 mm/10 3 y. The set of terraces is interpreted to be Middle (700-125 × 10 3y) to Upper (125-80 × 10 3y) Pleistocene, and is tentatively correlated with the paleoclimatic chronology of deep

  12. A short review of our current understanding of the development of ring faults during collapse caldera formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelina eGeyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The term collapse caldera refers to those volcanic depressions resulting from the sinking of the chamber roof due to the rapid withdrawal of magma during the course of an eruption. During the last three decades, collapse caldera dynamics has been the focus of attention of numerous, theoretical, numerical and experimental studies. Nonetheless, even if there is a tendency to go for a general and comprehensive caldera dynamics model, some key aspects remain unclear, controversial or completely unsolved. This is the case of ring fault nucleation points and propagation and dip direction. Since direct information on calderas’ deeper structure comes mainly from partially eroded calderas or few witnessed collapses, ring faults layout at depth remains still uncertain. This has generated a strong debate over the detailed internal fault and fracture configuration of a caldera collapse and, in more detail, how ring faults initiate and propagate. We offer here a very short description of the main results obtained by those analogue and theoretical/mathematical models applied to the study of collapse caldera formation. We place special attention on those observations related to the nucleation and propagation of the collapse-controlling ring faults. This summary is relevant to understand the current state-of-the-art of this topic and it should be taken under consideration in future works dealing with collapse caldera dynamics.

  13. A short review of our current understanding of the development of ring faults during collapse caldera formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Adelina; Marti, Joan

    2014-09-01

    The term collapse caldera refers to those volcanic depressions resulting from the sinking of the chamber roof due to the rapid withdrawal of magma during the course of an eruption. During the last three decades, collapse caldera dynamics has been the focus of attention of numerous, theoretical, numerical and experimental studies. Nonetheless, even if there is a tendency to go for a general and comprehensive caldera dynamics model, some key aspects remain unclear, controversial or completely unsolved. This is the case of ring fault nucleation points and propagation and dip direction. Since direct information on calderas’ deeper structure comes mainly from partially eroded calderas or few witnessed collapses, ring faults layout at depth remains still uncertain. This has generated a strong debate over the detailed internal fault and fracture configuration of a caldera collapse and, in more detail, how ring faults initiate and propagate. We offer here a very short description of the main results obtained by those analogue and theoretical/mathematical models applied to the study of collapse caldera formation. We place special attention on those observations related to the nucleation and propagation of the collapse-controlling ring faults. This summary is relevant to understand the current state-of-the-art of this topic and it should be taken under consideration in future works dealing with collapse caldera dynamics.

  14. Green valley galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The “green valley” is a wide region separating the blue and the red peaks in the ultraviolet-optical color magnitude diagram, first revealed using GALEX UV photometry. The term was coined by Christopher Martin (Caltech, in 2005. Green valley highlights the discriminating power of UV to very low relative levels of ongoing star formation, to which the optical colors, including u−r, are insensitive. It corresponds to massive galaxies below the star-forming, “main” sequence, and therefore represents a critical tool for the study of the quenching of star formation and its possible resurgence in otherwise quiescent galaxies. This article reviews the results pertaining to (predominantly disk morphology, structure, environment, dust content and gas properties of green valley galaxies in the local universe. Their relationship to AGN is also discussed. Attention is given to biases emerging from defining the “green valley” using optical colors. We review various evolutionary scenarios and we present evidence for a new one, the quasi-static view of the green valley, in which the majority (but not all of galaxies currently in the green valley were only partially quenched in the distant past and now participate in a slow cosmic decline of star formation, which also drives down the activity on the main sequence, presumably as a result of the dwindling accretion/cooling onto galaxy disks. This emerging synthetic picture is based on the findings from Fang et al. (2012, Salim et al. (2012 and Martin et al. (2007, as well as other results.

  15. Probing the source and timing of rejuvenation and hybridization in post-caldera rhyolite magmas at Yellowstone Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, C.; Vazquez, J. A.; Boyce, J. W.; Stelton, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    We find petrographic, isotopic and geochemical evidence for rejuvenation and recycling of subvolcanic intrusions within low δ18O intracaldera rhyolite lavas erupted following the formation of Yellowstone Caldera. In order to resolve the timing and compositional end-members involved in rejuvenation and hybridization of Yellowstone's subvolcanic magma reservoir, we have analyzed the Pb isotopic composition of clinopyroxene and sanidine phenocrysts and performed U-Pb dating of zircons from the South Biscuit Basin (SBB) and Scaup Lake (SCL) rhyolite lava flows. Both SBB and SCL erupted ca. 260 ka based on indistinguishable 40Ar/39Ar ages [1,2] and represent a renewed episode of postcaldera volcanism after a hiatus of ~200 kyr. Zoned phenocrysts of quartz, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, plagioclase, and sanidine and accessory zircon and Fe-Ti oxides characterize both SBB and SCL. SCL and SBB clinopyroxene have identical compositions and core-to-rim zoning patterns in Fe, Mg, and trace elements and commonly exhibit exsolution lamellae in their cores, suggesting that subsolidus conditions were attained during the early evolution of these rhyolites. The exsolution-bearing cores are mantled by a zone of relatively high Mg/Fe and low HREE & Rb, which is in turn overgrown by a rim with slightly lower Mg/Fe, and higher HREE & Rb. This zoning pattern suggests rejuvenation of subsolidus rhyolite by the influx of at least two less evolved, hotter silicic magmas. Diffusion modeling of Fe-Mg concentration profiles in clinopyroxene suggests that these events occurred on the order of 103 yrs prior to eruption. To identify the source of the rejuvenated rhyolite and delimit intra-grain variability, we analyzed the Pb-isotopic compositions of the SBB and SCL clinopyroxene zones via LA-MC-ICPMS. The different zones within SBB and SCL clinopyroxene yield indistinguishable Pb-isotope compositions with 208Pb/206Pb=2.165-2.185 and 207Pb/206Pb=0.882-0.890, which matches the Pb

  16. Fluvial valleys and Martian palaeoclimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; Baker, Victor R.

    1989-10-01

    Theoretical models of early Martian atmospheric evolution describe the maintenance of a dense CO2 atmosphere and a warm, wet climate until the end of the heavy-bombardment phase of impacting. However, the presence of very young, earthlike fluvial valleys on the northern flank of Alba Patera conflicts with this scenario. Whereas the widespread ancient Martian valleys generally have morphologies indicative of sapping erosion by the slow outflow of subsurface water, the local Alba valleys were probably formed by surface-runoff processes. Because subsurface water flow might be maintained by hydrothermal energy inputs and because surface-runoff valleys developed late in Martian history, it is not necessary to invoke drastically different planet-wide climatic conditions to explain valley development on Mars. The Alba fluvial valleys can be explained by hydrothermal activity or outflow-channel discharges that locally modified the atmosphere, including precipitation and local overland flow on low-permeability volcanic ash.

  17. Molecular identification of Armillaria gallica from the Niobrara Valley Preserve in Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee-Sook Kim; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2011-01-01

    Armillaria isolates were collected from a unique forest ecosystem in the Niobrara Valley Preserve in Nebraska, USA, which comprises a glacial and early postglacial refugium in the central plains of North America. The isolates were collected from diverse forest trees representing a unique mixture of forest types. Combined methods of rDNA sequencing and flow cytometric...

  18. Hydrogeochemical data for thermal and nonthermal waters and gases of the Valles Caldera- southern Jemez Mountains region, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevenell, L.; Goff, F.; Vuataz, F.; Trujillo, P.E. Jr.; Counce, D.; Janik, C.J.; Evans, W.

    1987-03-01

    This report presents field, chemical, gas, and isotopic data for thermal and nonthermal waters of the southern Jemez Mountains, New Mexico. This region includes all thermal and mineral waters associated with Valles Caldera and many of those located near the Nacimiento Uplift, north of San Ysidro. Waters of the region can be categorized into five general types: (1) surface and near-surface meteoric waters; (2) acid-sulfate waters at Sulphur Springs (Valles Caldera); (3) thermal meteoric waters in the ring fracture zone (Valles Caldera); (4) deep geothermal waters of the Baca geothermal field and derivative waters in the Soda Dam and Jemez Springs area (Valles Caldera); and (5) mineralized waters near San Ysidro. Some waters display chemical and isotopic characteristics intermediate between the types listed. Data in this report will help in interpreting the geothermal potential of the Jemez Mountains region and will provide background for investigating problems in hydrology, structural geology, hydrothermal alterations, and hydrothermal solution chemistry.

  19. Evolution of the Creede Caldera and its relation to mineralization in the Creede mining district, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Paul B.; Rye, Robert O.; Bethke, Philip M.

    2000-01-01

    At 25 Ma a major epithermal silver and base metal deposit formed in rhyolitic welded tuff near Creede, Colorado. Nearly 24000 metric tons of silver, appreciable lead, and small amounts of zinc, copper, and gold, have been produced from large, crustified veins under Bachelor and Bulldog Mountains north and northwest of Creede. Prior geologic, hydrologic, and stable-isotope studies showed that ore deposition was associated with the mixing and boiling of waters from diverse sources and suggester that a critical part of the ore-forming fluid may have originated within the ancient lake and sediments of the lacustrine Creede Formation that filled the Creede caldera. Two drill holes that sampled the heretofore hidden lower half of the Creede Formation are the focus of this book. The Creede caldera formed at 26.9 Ma within a high constructional plateau of silicic ashflows that covered and were sporadically interlayed with, intermediate lavas and lahars from large stratovolcanoes. The Creede caldera lake had an inflow evaporation balance that did not permit rapid filling to create a brim-full deep lake. Thus salts were evaporatively concentrated; but, with the exception of possible gypsum, no evaporite minerals preserved. Cool springs deposited travertine as mounds and contributed to limestone interlaminations within the sediment. The lake bottom was anoxic, and bacterial reduction of sulfate led to extreme sulfur isotopic fractionation in diagenetic pyrite. The caldera gradually resurged, converting the initial equant lake into an arcuate moat. Resurgent doming, alluvial fans, lacustrine sediments, ashfalls, and lava domes displaced water, lifted the lake so that it overlapped what later became the southern edge of the mineralized are, and eventually filled the basin. At 25.1 Ma an unseen pluton intruded beneath the northen part of the Creede district and created a convecting olume that drew in brine from the Creede caldera fill, meteotic water from highlands to the north

  20. Aeromagnetic evidence for a volcanic caldera(?) complex beneath the divide of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, John C.; Finn, C.A.; Blankenship, D.; Bell, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    A 1995-96 aeromagnetic survey over part of the Sinuous Ridge (SR) beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) divide shows a 70-km diameter circular pattern of 400-1200-nT anomalies suggesting one of the largest volcanic caldera(?) complexes on earth. Radar-ice-sounding (RIS) shows the northern part of this pattern overlies the SR, and extends south over the Bentley Subglacial Trench (BST). Modeled sources of all but one the caldera(?) anomalies are at the base of <1-2-km thick ice and their volcanic edifices have been glacially removed. The exception is a 700-m high, 15-km wide 'volcano' producing an 800-nT anomaly over the BST. 'Intrusion' of this 'volcano' beneath 3 km of ice probably resulted in pillow basalt rather than easily removed hyaloclastite erupted beneath thinner ice. The background area (-300 to -500-nT) surrounding the caldera(?) is possibly caused by a shallow Curie isotherm. We suggest uplift of the SR forced the advance of the WAIS.A 1995-96 aeromagnetic survey over part of the Sinuous Ridge (SR) beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) divide shows a 70-km diameter circular pattern of 400-1200-nT anomalies suggesting one of the largest volcanic caldera(?) complexes on earth. Radar-ice-sounding (RIS) shows the northern part of this pattern overlies the SR, and extends south over the Bentley Subglacial Trench (BST). Modeled sources of all but one the caldera(?) anomalies are at the base of < 1-2-km thick ice and their volcanic edifices have been glacially removed. The exception is a 700-m high, 15-km wide 'volcano' producing an 800-nT anomaly over the BST. 'Intrusion' of this 'volcano' beneath 3 km of ice probably resulted in pillow basalt rather than easily removed hyaloclastite erupted beneath thinner ice. The background area (-300 to -500-nT) surrounding the caldera(?) is possibly caused by a shallow Curie isotherm. We suggest uplift of the SR forced the advance of the WAIS.

  1. Geologic field trip guide to Mount Mazama and Crater Lake Caldera, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Charles R.; Wright, Heather M.

    2017-08-08

    Crater Lake partly fills one of the most spectacular calderas of the world—an 8 by 10 kilometer (km) basin more than 1 km deep formed by collapse of the Mount Mazama volcano during a rapid series of explosive eruptions ~7,700 years ago. Having a maximum depth of 594 meters (m), Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States. Crater Lake National Park, dedicated in 1902, encompasses 645 square kilometers (km2) of pristine forested and alpine terrain, including the lake itself, and virtually all of Mount Mazama. The geology of the area was first described in detail by Diller and Patton (1902) and later by Williams (1942), whose vivid account led to international recognition of Crater Lake as the classic collapse caldera. Because of excellent preservation and access, Mount Mazama, Crater Lake caldera, and the deposits formed by the climactic eruption constitute a natural laboratory for study of volcanic and magmatic processes. For example, the climactic ejecta are renowned among volcanologists as evidence for systematic compositional zonation within a subterranean magma chamber. Mount Mazama’s climactic eruption also is important as the source of the widespread Mazama ash, a useful Holocene stratigraphic marker throughout the Pacific Northwest United States, adjacent Canada, and offshore. A detailed bathymetric survey of the floor of Crater Lake in 2000 (Bacon and others, 2002) provides a unique record of postcaldera eruptions, the interplay between volcanism and filling of the lake, and sediment transport within this closed basin. Knowledge of the geology and eruptive history of the Mount Mazama edifice, enhanced by the caldera wall exposures, gives exceptional insight into how large volcanoes of magmatic arcs grow and evolve. In addition, many smaller volcanoes of the High Cascades beyond the limits of Mount Mazama provide information on the flux of mantle-derived magma through the region. General principles of magmatic and eruptive processes revealed by

  2. Optical manipulation of valley pseudospin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ziliang; Sun, Dezheng; Heinz, Tony F.

    2017-01-01

    The coherent manipulation of spin and pseudospin underlies existing and emerging quantum technologies, including quantum communication and quantum computation. Valley polarization, associated with the occupancy of degenerate, but quantum mechanically distinct valleys in momentum space, closely resembles spin polarization and has been proposed as a pseudospin carrier for the future quantum electronics. Valley exciton polarization has been created in the transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers using excitation by circularly polarized light and has been detected both optically and electrically. In addition, the existence of coherence in the valley pseudospin has been identified experimentally. The manipulation of such valley coherence has, however, remained out of reach. Here we demonstrate all-optical control of the valley coherence by means of the pseudomagnetic field associated with the optical Stark effect. Using below-bandgap circularly polarized light, we rotate the valley exciton pseudospin in monolayer WSe2 on the femtosecond timescale. Both the direction and speed of the rotation can be manipulated optically by tuning the dynamic phase of excitons in opposite valleys. This study unveils the possibility of generation, manipulation, and detection of the valley pseudospin by coupling to photons.

  3. Conductive heat flux in VC-1 and the thermal regime of Valles Caldera, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, J. H.; Morgan, Paul

    1988-06-01

    Over 5% of heat in the western United States is lost through Quaternary silicic volcanic centers, including the Valles caldera in north central New Mexico. These centers are the sites of major hydrothermal activity and upper crustal metamorphism, metasomatism, and mineralization, producing associated geothermal resources. We present new heat flow data from Valles caldera core hole 1 (VC-1), drilled in the southwestern margin of the Valles caldera. Thermal conductivities were measured on 55 segments of core from VC-1, waxed and wrapped to preserve fluids. These values were combined with temperature gradient data to calculate heat flow. Above 335 m, which is probably unsaturated, heat flow is 247±16 mW m-2. The only deep temperature information available is from an uncalibrated commercial log made 19 months after drilling. Gradients, derived from uncalibrated temperature logs, and conductivities are inversely correlated between 335 and 737 m, indicating a conductive thermal regime, and component heat fluxes over three depth intervals (335-539 m, 549-628 m, and 628-737 m) are in excellent agreement with each other with an average of 504±15 mW m-2. Temperature logs to 518 m depth with well-calibrated temperature sensors result in a revised heat flow of 463±15 mW m. We use shallow thermal gradient data from 75 other sites in and around the caldera to interpret the thermal regime at the VC-1 site. A critical review of published thermal conductivity data from the Valles caldera yields an average thermal conductivity of ≥1 W m-1 K-1 for the near-surface tuffaceous material, and we assume that shallow gradient values (°C km-1) are approximately numerically equal to heat flow (mW m-2). Heat loss from the caldera is asymmetrically distributed, with higher values (400 mW m-2 or higher) concentrated in the west-southwestern quadrant of the caldera. This quadrant also contains the main drainage from the caldera and the youngest volcanism associated with the caldera. We

  4. Pyroclastic deposits as a guide for reconstructing the multi-stage evolution of the Somma-Vesuvius Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioni, Raffaello; Santacroce, Roberto; Sbrana, Alessandro

    The evolution of the Somma-Vesuvius caldera has been reconstructed based on geomorphic observations, detailed stratigraphic studies, and the distribution and facies variations of pyroclastic and epiclastic deposits produced by the past 20,000years of volcanic activity. The present caldera is a multicyclic, nested structure related to the emptying of large, shallow reservoirs during Plinian eruptions. The caldera cuts a stratovolcano whose original summit was at 1600-1900m elevation, approximately 500m north of the present crater. Four caldera-forming events have been recognized, each occurring during major Plinian eruptions (18,300 BP "Pomici di Base", 8000 BP "Mercato Pumice", 3400 BP "Avellino Pumice" and AD 79 "Pompeii Pumice"). The timing of each caldera collapse is defined by peculiar "collapse-marking" deposits, characterized by large amounts of lithic clasts from the outer margins of the magma chamber and its apophysis as well as from the shallow volcanic and sedimentary units. In proximal sites the deposits consist of coarse breccias resulting from emplacement of either dense pyroclastic flows (Pomici di Base and Pompeii eruptions) or fall layers (Avellino eruption). During each caldera collapse, the destabilization of the shallow magmatic system induced decompression of hydrothermal-magmatic and hydrothermal fluids hosted in the wall rocks. This process, and the magma-ground water interaction triggered by the fracturing of the thick Mesozoic carbonate basement hosting the aquifer system, strongly enhanced the explosivity of the eruptions.

  5. Time scales of magma storage and differentiation of voluminous high-silica rhyolites at Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge; Reid, Mary

    2002-09-01

    Ion microprobe dating of zircons from post-collapse rhyolites at Yellowstone caldera reveals the time scales of crystallization and storage of silicic magma in a differentiating magma reservoir, the role of recycling of crystals from the caldera-forming magmatism, and the timing and efficacy of crystal-melt separation. Zircons in the voluminous ( 900 km3) Central Plateau Member lavas, which progressively erupted between 70 to 160 ka, yield 238U-230Th disequilibrium ages dominantly spanning the range from those of their respective eruptions to 200 ka mean zircon ages range to ca. 60,000 years before eruption. When considered together with the trace element and Sr- and Nd-isotope compositions of their host melts, the age distributions of the CPM zircons show that the rhyolites are cogenetic and differentiated tens of thousands of years prior to eruption from an evolving magma reservoir. Thus, the post-caldera CPM rhyolites were not erupted from a long-standing body of rhyolitic magma left over from the caldera-forming eruption, nor do they represent significant remobilization of the plutonic roots of the caldera. Rather, the CPM magma was generated and differentiated by episodes of effective crystal-melt separation at 200 and 125 ka and, sustained by thermal inputs, stored for timescales on par with estimates for other voluminous caldera-related rhyolites.

  6. Gradual caldera collapse at Bárdarbunga volcano, Iceland, regulated by lateral magma outflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Magnús T; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Hooper, Andrew; Holohan, Eoghan P; Halldórsson, Sæmundur A; Ófeigsson, Benedikt G; Cesca, Simone; Vogfjörd, Kristín S; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Högnadóttir, Thórdís; Einarsson, Páll; Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Jarosch, Alexander H; Jónasson, Kristján; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Bagnardi, Marco; Parks, Michelle M; Hjörleifsdóttir, Vala; Pálsson, Finnur; Walter, Thomas R; Schöpfer, Martin P J; Heimann, Sebastian; Reynolds, Hannah I; Dumont, Stéphanie; Bali, Eniko; Gudfinnsson, Gudmundur H; Dahm, Torsten; Roberts, Matthew J; Hensch, Martin; Belart, Joaquín M C; Spaans, Karsten; Jakobsson, Sigurdur; Gudmundsson, Gunnar B; Fridriksdóttir, Hildur M; Drouin, Vincent; Dürig, Tobias; Aðalgeirsdóttir, Guðfinna; Riishuus, Morten S; Pedersen, Gro B M; van Boeckel, Tayo; Oddsson, Björn; Pfeffer, Melissa A; Barsotti, Sara; Bergsson, Baldur; Donovan, Amy; Burton, Mike R; Aiuppa, Alessandro

    2016-07-15

    Large volcanic eruptions on Earth commonly occur with a collapse of the roof of a crustal magma reservoir, forming a caldera. Only a few such collapses occur per century, and the lack of detailed observations has obscured insight into the mechanical interplay between collapse and eruption. We use multiparameter geophysical and geochemical data to show that the 110-square-kilometer and 65-meter-deep collapse of Bárdarbunga caldera in 2014-2015 was initiated through withdrawal of magma, and lateral migration through a 48-kilometers-long dike, from a 12-kilometers deep reservoir. Interaction between the pressure exerted by the subsiding reservoir roof and the physical properties of the subsurface flow path explain the gradual, near-exponential decline of both collapse rate and the intensity of the 180-day-long eruption. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Interpreting compositional zonation of the Zaragoza ignimbrite from Los Humeros caldera, Central Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco-Nunez, Gerardo [Centro de Geociencias, UNAM, Campus Juriquilla, Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico); McCurry, Michael [Department of Geology, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID (United States); Branney, Michael J [Department of Geology, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-01

    Compositional zonation in ignimbrites is relatively common, and is often inferred to record gradual withdrawal by an eruption of a density-stratified magma chamber (with silicic magma towards the top and more dense, mafic magma at the bottom). We show that this model does not match observations at the ca. 0.1 Ma Zaragoza ignimbrite from Los Humeros caldera in central Mexico. Detailed petrologic studies reveal a more complex scenario: the ignimbrite exhibits a 'double' vertical zonation based on the compositions of pumice lapilli. We present evidence for mingling and limited mixing occurred during or immediately before the caldera-forming eruption. One possibility to explain the observations is that the ignimbrite eruption occurred in response to intrusion of a hybridized andesitic magma into a rhyodacitic magma chamber.

  8. The timescales of magmatic processes prior to a caldera-forming eruption

    OpenAIRE

    Fabbro, Gareth Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Large, explosive, caldera-forming eruptions are amongst the most destructive phenomena on the planet, but the processes that allow the large bodies of crystal-poor silicic magma that feed them to assemble in the shallow crust are still poorly understood. Of particular interest is the timescales over which these reservoirs exist prior to eruption. Long storage times—up to 105 y—have previously been estimated using the repose times between eruptions and radiometric dating of crystals found with...

  9. Lithium enrichment in intracontinental rhyolite magmas leads to Li deposits in caldera basins

    OpenAIRE

    Benson, Thomas R.; Coble, Matthew A.; Rytuba, James J.; Mahood, Gail A.

    2017-01-01

    The omnipresence of lithium-ion batteries in mobile electronics, and hybrid and electric vehicles necessitates discovery of new lithium resources to meet rising demand and to diversify the global lithium supply chain. Here we demonstrate that lake sediments preserved within intracontinental rhyolitic calderas formed on eruption and weathering of lithium-enriched magmas have the potential to host large lithium clay deposits. We compare lithium concentrations of magmas formed in a variety of te...

  10. The hydrothermal outflow plume of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, and a comparison with other outflow plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Fraser; Shevenell, Lisa; Gardner, Jamie N.; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Grigsby, Charles O.

    1988-06-01

    Stratigraphic, temperature gradient, hydrogeochemical, and hydrologic data have been integrated with geologic data from previous studies to show the structural configuration of the Valles caldera hydrothermal ouflow plume. Hydrologic data suggest that 25-50% of the discharge of the Valles outflow is confined to the Jemez fault zone, which predates caldera formation. Thermal gradient data from bores penetrating the plume show that shallow gradients are highest in the vicinity of the Jemez fault zone (up to 190°C/km). Shallow heat flow above the hydrothermal plume is as high as 500 mW m-2 near core hole VC-1 (Jemez fault zone) to 200 mW m-2 at Fenton Hill (Jemez Plateau). Chemical and isotopic data indicate that two source reservoirs within the caldera (Redondo Creek and Sulphur Springs reservoirs) are parents to mixed fluids flowing in the hydrothermal plume. However, isotopic data, borehole data, basic geology, and inverse relations between temperature and chloride content at major hot springs indicate that no single reservoir fluid and no single diluting fluid are involved in mixing. The Valles caldera hydrothermal plume is structurally dominated by lateral flow through a belt of vertical conduits (Jemez fault zone) that strike away from the source reservoir. Stratigraphically confined flow is present but dispersed over a wide area in relatively impermeable rocks. The Valles configuration is contrasted with the configuration of the hydrothermal plume at Roosevelt Hot Springs, which is dominated by lateral flow through a near-surface, widespread, permeable aquifer. Data from 12 other representative geothermal systems show that outflow plumes occur in a variety of magmatic and tectonic settings, have varying reservoir compositions, and have different flow characteristics. Although temperature reversals are commonly observed in wells penetrating outflow plumes, reversals are not observed in all plumes. Less information is available on the absolute age of

  11. Ecology of Coyotes on the Valles Caldera National Preserve, New Mexico: Implications for Elk Calf Recruitment

    OpenAIRE

    Gifford, Suzanne J.

    2013-01-01

    Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) managers were concerned about low elk recruitment observed at the same time as an apparent increase in sightings of coyotes and observations of coyote predation on elk calves. The goal of this study was to describe coyotes’ ecological interactions with elk, particularly coyote diet and movements on the Valle Grande, a large grassland meadow in the southeastern portion of the VCNP. We examined coyote diet by quantifying undigested remains of food item...

  12. Post-caldera volcanism: In situ measurement of U-Pb age and oxygen isotope ratio in Pleistocene zircons from Yellowstone caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, I.N.; Valley, J.W.; Wooden, J.L.; Persing, H.M.

    2001-01-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field, the site of some of the largest known silicic volcanic eruptions, is the present location of NE-migrating hotspot volcanic activity. Most volcanic rocks in the Yellowstone caldera (0.6 Ma), which formed in response to the climactic eruption of 1000 km3 of Lava Creek Tuff (LCT), have unusually low oxygen isotope ratios. Ion microprobe analysis of both U-Pb age and ??18O in zircons from these low-??18O lavas reveals evidence of complex inheritance and remelting. A majority of analyzed zircons from low-??18O lavas erupted inside the Yellowstone caldera have cores that range in age from 2.4 to 0.7 Ma, significantly older than their eruption ages (0.5-0.4 Ma). These ages and the high-??18O cores indicate that these lavas are largely derived from nearly total remelting of normal-??18O Huckleberry Ridge Tuff (HRT) and other pre-LCT volcanic rocks. A post-HRT low-??18O lava shows similar inheritance of HRT-age zircons. The recycling of volcanic rocks by shallow remelting can change the water content and eruptive potential of magma. This newly proposed mechanism of intracaldera volcanism is best studied by combining in situ analysis of oxygen and U-Pb isotope ratios of individual crystals. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Post-caldera volcanism: in situ measurement of U-Pb age and oxygen isotope ratio in Pleistocene zircons from Yellowstone caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, Ilya N.; Valley, John W.; Wooden, J. L.; Persing, Harold M.

    2001-07-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field, the site of some of the largest known silicic volcanic eruptions, is the present location of NE-migrating hotspot volcanic activity. Most volcanic rocks in the Yellowstone caldera (0.6 Ma), which formed in response to the climactic eruption of 1000 km3 of Lava Creek Tuff (LCT), have unusually low oxygen isotope ratios. Ion microprobe analysis of both U-Pb age and δ18O in zircons from these low-δ18O lavas reveals evidence of complex inheritance and remelting. A majority of analyzed zircons from low-δ18O lavas erupted inside the Yellowstone caldera have cores that range in age from 2.4 to 0.7 Ma, significantly older than their eruption ages (0.5-0.4 Ma). These ages and the high-δ18O cores indicate that these lavas are largely derived from nearly total remelting of normal-δ18O Huckleberry Ridge Tuff (HRT) and other pre-LCT volcanic rocks. A post-HRT low-δ18O lava shows similar inheritance of HRT-age zircons. The recycling of volcanic rocks by shallow remelting can change the water content and eruptive potential of magma. This newly proposed mechanism of intracaldera volcanism is best studied by combining in situ analysis of oxygen and U-Pb isotope ratios of individual crystals.

  14. Numerical models of caldera deformation: Effects of multiphase and multicomponent hydrothermal fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutnak, M.; Hurwitz, S.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Hsieh, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Ground surface displacement (GSD) in large calderas is often interpreted as resulting from magma intrusion at depth. Recent advances in geodetic measurements of GSD, notably interferometric synthetic aperture radar, reveal complex and multifaceted deformation patterns that often require complex source models to explain the observed GSD. Although hydrothermal fluids have been discussed as a possible deformation agent, very few quantitative studies addressing the effects of multiphase flow on crustal mechanics have been attempted. Recent increases in the power and availability of computing resources allow robust quantitative assessment of the complex time-variant thermal interplay between aqueous fluid flow and crustal deformation. We carry out numerical simulations of multiphase (liquid-gas), multicomponent (H 2O-CO2) hydrothermal fluid flow and poroelastic deformation using a range of realistic physical parameters and processes. Hydrothermal fluid injection, circulation, and gas formation can generate complex, temporally and spatially varying patterns of GSD, with deformation rates, magnitudes, and geometries (including subsidence) similar to those observed in several large calderas. The potential for both rapid and gradual deformation resulting from magma-derived fluids suggests that hydrothermal fluid circulation may help explain deformation episodes at calderas that have not culminated in magmatic eruption.

  15. Source and dynamics of a volcanic caldera unrest: Campi Flegrei, 1983-84.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Siena, Luca; Chiodini, Giovanni; Vilardo, Giuseppe; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Castellano, Mario; Colombelli, Simona; Tisato, Nicola; Ventura, Guido

    2017-08-14

    Despite their importance for eruption forecasting the causes of seismic rupture processes during caldera unrest are still poorly reconstructed from seismic images. Seismic source locations and waveform attenuation analyses of earthquakes in the Campi Flegrei area (Southern Italy) during the 1983-1984 unrest have revealed a 4-4.5 km deep NW-SE striking aseismic zone of high attenuation offshore Pozzuoli. The lateral features and the principal axis of the attenuation anomaly correspond to the main source of ground uplift during the unrest. Seismic swarms correlate in space and time with fluid injections from a deep hot source, inferred to represent geochemical and temperature variations at Solfatara. These swarms struck a high-attenuation 3-4 km deep reservoir of supercritical fluids under Pozzuoli and migrated towards a shallower aseismic deformation source under Solfatara. The reservoir became aseismic for two months just after the main seismic swarm (April 1, 1984) due to a SE-to-NW directed input from the high-attenuation domain, possibly a dyke emplacement. The unrest ended after fluids migrated from Pozzuoli to the location of the last caldera eruption (Mt. Nuovo, 1538 AD). The results show that the high attenuation domain controls the largest monitored seismic, deformation, and geochemical unrest at the caldera.

  16. Radon and helium in soil gases at Cañadas caldera, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Pedro; Pérez, Nemesio; Salazar, José; Reimer, Mike; Notsu, Kenji; Wakita, Hiroshi

    2004-03-01

    The spatial distribution of soil radon was investigated at Cañadas caldera, Tenerife, in two surveys carried out in the summers of 1992 and 1995 by using α-particle-sensitive cellulose nitrate films (Track-Etch) and emanometry, respectively. Soil helium was studied at several transects crossing different structural features of the area. Radon concentration measured by Track-Etch ranged from 1.0 to 1990 pCi/l while that measured by emanometry ranged from 0.1 to 618 pCi/l. Soil helium concentration varied from 5250 to 15 560 ppb with an average value of 6197 ppb. The spatial distribution of soil radon correlates quite closely with structural features (fractures, emission centers, etc.), where the main geothermal manifestations (fumaroles, steam ground and high subsurface temperature and gas contents) also occur. Areas showing high soil Rn concentrations occur at the summit of Teide, Roques de Garcı´a, caldera rim and south and east off side of the caldera. High soil helium anomalies correlate well spatially with those of radon, especially at the summit of Teide where relatively high 3He/ 4He isotopic ratios occur, suggesting a deep contribution for these emanations. Data indicate that radon and helium are supplied mostly from a deep source, with a minor contribution from U- and Th-rich shallow rocks and soils.

  17. Petrologic evolution of divergent peralkaline magmas from the Silent Canyon caldera complex, southwestern Nevada volcanic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, D.A.; Sargent, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Silent Canyon volcanic center consists of a buried Miocene peralkaline caldera complex and outlying peralkaline lava domes. Two widespread ash flow sheets, the Tub Spring and overlying Grouse Canyon members of the Miocene Belted Range Tuff, were erupted from the caldera complex and have volumes of 60-100 km3 and 200 km3, respectively. Eruption of the ash flows was preceded by widespread extrusion of precaldera comendite domes and was followed by extrusion of postcollapse peralkaline lavas and tuffs within and outside the caldera complex. Lava flows and tuffs were also deposited between the two major ash flow sheets. Rocks of the Silent Canyon center vary significantly in silica content and peralkalinity. Weakly peralkaline silicic comendites (PI 1.0-1.1) are the most abundant precaldera lavas. Postcollapse lavas range from trachyte to silicic comendite; some have anomalous light rare earth element (LREE) enrichments. Silent Canyon rocks follow a common petrologic evolution from trachyte to low-silica comendite; above 73% SiO2, compositions of the moderately peralkaline comendites diverge from those of the weakly peralkaline silicic comendites. The development of divergent peralkaline magmas, toward both pantelleritic and weakly peralkaline compositions, is unusual in a single volcanic center. -from Authors

  18. An S to P Converted Phase Recorded Near Long Valley/Mono Craters Region, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammon, C. J.; Zucca, J.; Kasameyer, P.

    1989-01-01

    We examine and model the arrival time of a large secondary seismic arrival recorded in the Long Valley/Mono Craters region of east-central California. Zucca et. al. (1987) and Peppin (1987) both previously reported on different features of this same arrival. Using both arrays of sources and receivers we demonstrate that the arrival is an S to P converted phase as first suggested by Lewis and Peppin (1988). Backprojection of the observed travel times allows us to constrain the location of the converting material to a southeast dipping zone between 7 and 16 km depth, and {+-} 5 km on either side of the topographic margin of the caldera. The analysis demonstrates the power of source and receiver array combinations when analyzing seismic arrivals in complicated environments.

  19. Mechanisms of crustal uplift and subsidence at the Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzurisin, D.; Yamashita, K.M.; Kleinman, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Leveling surveys in 1923, 1976, and each year from 1983 to 1993 have shown that the east-central part of the Yellowstone caldera, near the base of the Sour Creek resurgent dome, rose at an average rate of 14??1 mm/year from 1923 to 1976 and 22??1 mm/year from 1976 to 1984. In contrast, no detectable movement occurred in the same area from 1984 to 1985 (-2??5 mm/year), and from 1985 to 1993 the area subsided at an average rate of 19??1 mm/year. We conclude that uplift from 1923 to 1984 was caused by: (1) pressurization of the deep hydrothermal system by fluids released from a crystallizing body of rhyolite magma beneath the caldera, then trapped beneath a self-sealed zone near the base of the hydrothermal system; and (2) aseismic intrusions of magma into the lower part of the sub-caldera magma body. Subsidence since 1985 is attributed to: (1) depressurization and fluid loss from the deep hydrothermal system, and (2) sagging of the caldera floor in response to regional crustal extension. Future intrusions might trigger renewed eruptive activity at Yellowstone, but most intrusions at large silicic calderas seem to be accommodated without eruptions. Overpressurization of the deep hydrothermal system could conceivably result in a phreatic or phreatomagmatic eruption, but this hazard is mitigated by episodic rupturing of the self-sealed zone during shallow earthquake swarms. Historical ground movements, although rapid by most geologic standards, seem to be typical of inter-eruption periods at large, mature, silicic magma systems like Yellowstone. The greatest short-term hazards posed by continuing unrest in the Yellowstone region are: (1) moderate to large earthquakes (magnitude 5.5-7.5), with a recurrence interval of a few decdes; and (2) small hydrothermal explosions, most of which affect only a small area (<0.01 km2), with a recurrence interval of a few years. ?? 1994 Springer-Verlag.

  20. Imaging hydrothermal systems at Furnas caldera (Azores, Portugal): Insights from Audio-Magnetotelluric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Colin; Kiyan, Duygu; Rath, Volker; Byrdina, Svetlana; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Silva, Catarina; Viveiros, Maria FB; Ferreira, Teresa

    2016-04-01

    The Furnas volcano is the eastern-most of the three active central volcanoes of Sao Miguel Island. The main caldera formed about 30 ka BP, followed by a younger eruption at 10-12 ka BP, which forms the steep topography of more than 200 m in the measuring area. It contains several very young eruptive centers, and a shallow caldera lake. Tectonic features of varying directions have been identified in the Caldera and its vicinity. In the northern part of the caldera, containing the fumarole field of Caldeiras das Furnas, a detailed map of surface CO2 emissions was recently made available. In 2015, a pilot survey of 13 AudioMagnetoTelluric soundings (AMT) and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) data were collected along two profiles in the eastern part of Furnas caldera in order to image the electrical conductivity of the subsurface. The data quality achieved by both techniques is extraordinary and first results indicate a general correlation between regions of elevated conductivity and the mapped surface CO2 emissions, suggesting that they may both be caused by the presence hydrothermal fluids. Tensor decomposition analysis using the Groom-Bailey approach produce a generalised geo-electric strike direction, 72deg East of North, for the AMT data compared to the surface geological strike derived from the major mapped fault crossing the profiles of 105deg. An analysis of the real induction arrows at certain frequencies (at depths greater than 350 m) infer that an extended conductor at depth does not exactly correspond to the degassing structures at the surface and extends outside the area of investigation. The geometry of the most conductive regions with electrical conductivities less then1 Ώm found at various depths differ from what was expected from earlier geologic and tectonic studies and possibly may not be directly related to the mapped fault systems at the surface. On the eastern profile, which seemed to be more appropriate for 2-D modelling with 72deg strike

  1. Geochemical constraints on the link between volcanism and plutonism at the Yunshan caldera complex, SE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lili; He, Zhenyu; Beier, Christoph; Klemd, Reiner

    2018-01-01

    The Yunshan caldera complex is part of a larger scale, ca. 2000-km-long volcanic-plutonic complex belt in the coastal region of SE China. The volcanic rocks in the caldera complex are characterized by high-silica peraluminous and peralkaline rhyolites associated with an intracaldera porphyritic quartz monzonite pluton. In this study, we present zircon U-Pb, Hf and stable O isotopes along with geochemical data of both volcanic and plutonic rocks to evaluate the potential petrogenetic link between volcanism and plutonism in the Yunshan caldera complex. SHRIMP zircon U-Pb geochronology of both volcanic and plutonic rocks yields almost identical ages ranging from 95.6 to 93.1 Ma. The peraluminous and peralkaline rhyolites show negative anomalies of Sr, P, Ti and Ba and to a lesser extent negative Nb and Ta anomalies, along with positive Rb anomalies and `seagull-like' rare earth element (REE) patterns with negative Eu anomalies and low (La/Yb)N ratios. The intracaldera porphyritic quartz monzonite displays minor negative Rb, Nb, Ta, Sr, P and Ti anomalies and a positive Ba anomaly with REE patterns characterized by relatively high (La/Yb)N ratios and lack significant Eu anomalies. The peraluminous and peralkaline rhyolites and the porphyritic quartz monzonite exhibit consistent ɛ Nd( t) of - 3.7 to - 2.2 and display zircon ɛ Hf( t) values of - 2.1 to 3.7. They further have similar, mantle-like, zircon oxygen isotopic compositions (δ18OVSMOW mainly = 4.63 to 5.76‰). We interpret these observations to be in agreement with a crystal mush model in which the parental magma of the volcanic and plutonic rocks of the Yunshan caldera complex was likely produced by interaction of asthenosphere melts with subduction-influenced enriched mantle wedge. The peralkaline rhyolites are interpreted to represent the most differentiated magma that has subsequently experienced significant fluid-melt interactions, whereas the porphyritic quartz monzonite may be representative of the

  2. Eruptive history, geochronology, and post-eruption structural evolution of the late Eocene Hall Creek Caldera, Toiyabe Range, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Joseph P.; Henry, Christopher D.

    2017-02-24

    The magmatic, tectonic, and topographic evolution of what is now the northern Great Basin remains controversial, notably the temporal and spatial relation between magmatism and extensional faulting. This controversy is exemplified in the northern Toiyabe Range of central Nevada, where previous geologic mapping suggested the presence of a caldera that sourced the late Eocene (34.0 mega-annum [Ma]) tuff of Hall Creek. This region was also inferred to be the locus of large-magnitude middle Tertiary extension (more than 100 percent strain) localized along the Bernd Canyon detachment fault, and to be the approximate location of a middle Tertiary paleodivide that separated east and west-draining paleovalleys. Geologic mapping, 40Ar/39Ar dating, and geochemical analyses document the geologic history and extent of the Hall Creek caldera, define the regional paleotopography at the time it formed, and clarify the timing and kinematics of post-caldera extensional faulting. During and after late Eocene volcanism, the northern Toiyabe Range was characterized by an east-west trending ridge in the area of present-day Mount Callaghan, probably localized along a Mesozoic anticline. Andesite lava flows erupted around 35–34 Ma ponded hundreds of meters thick in the erosional low areas surrounding this structural high, particularly in the Simpson Park Mountains. The Hall Creek caldera formed ca. 34.0 Ma during eruption of the approximately 400 cubic kilometers (km3) tuff of Hall Creek, a moderately crystal-rich rhyolite (71–77 percent SiO2) ash-flow tuff. Caldera collapse was piston-like with an intact floor block, and the caldera filled with thick (approximately 2,600 meters) intracaldera tuff and interbedded breccia lenses shed from the caldera walls. The most extensive exposed megabreccia deposits are concentrated on or close to the caldera floor in the southwestern part of the caldera. Both silicic and intermediate post-caldera lavas were locally erupted within 400 thousand

  3. Det sorte USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndal, Jørn

    Bogen gennemgår det sorte USAs historie fra 1776 til 2016, idet grundtemaet er spændingsforholdet mellem USAs grundlæggelsesidealer og den racemæssige praksis, et spændingsforhold som Gunnar Myrdal kaldte "det amerikanske dilemma." Bogen, der er opbygget som politisk, social og racemæssig historie...

  4. Glemmer USA Afghanistan nu?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Peter Viggo

    2015-01-01

    Hvis Obamas efterfølger kan skrue den rigtige strategiske fortælling sammen så vil USA ikke forlade Afghanistan med udgangen af 2016.......Hvis Obamas efterfølger kan skrue den rigtige strategiske fortælling sammen så vil USA ikke forlade Afghanistan med udgangen af 2016....

  5. Det sorte USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndal, Jørn

    Bogen gennemgår det sorte USAs historie fra 1776 til 2016, idet grundtemaet er spændingsforholdet mellem USAs grundlæggelsesidealer og den racemæssige praksis, et spændingsforhold som Gunnar Myrdal kaldte "det amerikanske dilemma." Bogen, der er opbygget som politisk, social og racemæssig histori...

  6. Dark Valley in Newton Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-418, 11 July 2003This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) high resolution image shows part of a dark-floored valley system in northern Newton Crater. The valley might have been originally formed by liquid water; the dark material is probably sand that has blown into the valley in more recent times. The picture was acquired earlier this week on July 6, 2003, and is located near 39.2oS, 157.9oW. The picture covers an area 2.3 km (1.4 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  7. Volcanic unrest and hazard communication in Long Valley Volcanic Region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Mangan, Margaret T.; McNutt, Stephen R.

    2017-01-01

    The onset of volcanic unrest in Long Valley Caldera, California, in 1980 and the subsequent fluctuations in unrest levels through May 2016 illustrate: (1) the evolving relations between scientists monitoring the unrest and studying the underlying tectonic/magmatic processes and their implications for geologic hazards, and (2) the challenges in communicating the significance of the hazards to the public and civil authorities in a mountain resort setting. Circumstances special to this case include (1) the sensitivity of an isolated resort area to media hype of potential high-impact volcanic and earthquake hazards and its impact on potential recreational visitors and the local economy, (2) a small permanent population (~8000), which facilitates face-to-face communication between scientists monitoring the hazard, civil authorities, and the public, and (3) the relatively frequent turnover of people in positions of civil authority, which requires a continuing education effort on the nature of caldera unrest and related hazards. Because of delays associated with communication protocols between the State and Federal governments during the onset of unrest, local civil authorities and the public first learned that the U.S. Geological Survey was about to release a notice of potential volcanic hazards associated with earthquake activity and 25-cm uplift of the resurgent dome in the center of the caldera through an article in the Los Angeles Times published in May 1982. The immediate reaction was outrage and denial. Gradual acceptance that the hazard was real required over a decade of frequent meetings between scientists and civil authorities together with public presentations underscored by frequently felt earthquakes and the onset of magmatic CO2 emissions in 1990 following a 11-month long earthquake swarm beneath Mammoth Mountain on the southwest rim of the caldera. Four fatalities, one on 24 May 1998 and three on 6 April 2006, underscored the hazard posed by the CO2

  8. Holocene erosion, sedimentation, and stratigraphy at Raven Fork, Southern Blue Ridge Mountains, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    David S. Leigh; Paul A. Webb

    2006-01-01

    Holocene colluvial and alluvial stratigraphy and a radiocarbon chronology are presented for the valley of the lower three kilometers of Raven Fork, a mountain stream draining 194 km2 of high relief (1.3 km) terrain of the Southern Blue Ridge Mountains in western North Carolina, USA, which is in a region that lacks good chronological data. Lower hillslopes, alluvial/...

  9. RailroadValleySpringfish_CH

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify the areas where final critical habitat for the Railroad Valley springfish (Crenichthys nevadae) occur. The irrigation ditch that is on the north...

  10. Electromagnetic imaging of the deep Campi Flegrei caldera structure (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulia Di Giuseppe, Maria; Isaia, Roberto; Patella, Domenico; Piochi, Monica; Troiano, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    The Campi Flegrei caldera (CFc) is the most hazardous volcano in Europe. Enormous investigative efforts have been done aimed to share its inner structure and to understand its unrest dynamics, making the CFc one of the main subjects of interest of modern volcanology. Due to the destructive potential and the active geothermal system, the CFc geological structures have been investigated through many different methodologies. A key role belongs to the applied geophysics that allows to gain knowledge about the volcanic setting and consequently to understand the dynamics of this active caldera system. So far, the main CFc structures have been not yet clearly defined. The strong heterogeneity of the territory associated to the composite coastal morphology and the extreme urbanization represent a major obstacle to apply the geophysical techniques. Therefore the geometry and configuration of the CFc plumbing system are still largely undefined, although seismic surveys nowadays detected findings of melt-bearing rocks, at least locally. Here a deep electromagnetic (EM) imaging the CFc is presented. A Magnetotelluric (MT) profile has been carried out across a 12 km-long transect, ideally intersecting the main recent volcano-tectonic structures. The peculiar sensitivity to subsurface fluids and melts, associated with huge electric conductivity contrasts, make the MT particularly well suited to be applied in active volcanic settings. The obtained results highlight the buried structures down to 10 km of depth providing an interpretative key into the overall caldera dynamics. In particular, the deep magmatic source is revealed, as well as the main ascent pathway of magmatic fluids and the related structures which critically contributing to the shallower-level of deformation at CFc.

  11. Ignimbrite Analyses of Batur Caldera, Bali, based on 14C Dating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igan S. Sutawidjaja

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.vol4no3.20094The Batur Caldera, in the northeastern part of Bali Island, is an elliptical collapse structure 13.8 by 10 km in size and another circular composite collapse structure with a diameter of 7.5 km in its centre. Two stages of the collapse were interrupted by silicic andesite lavas and domes. The first collapse was initiated by the eruption of about 84 km3 of the dacitic "Ubud Ignimbrite", about 29,300 years B.P., which caused a steep-walled depression about 1 km deep. The second ignimbrite was erupted from a large crater about the present lake, and it  produced about 19 km3 of a similar voluminous dacitic ignimbrite, called the "Gunungkawi Ignimbrite" about 20,150 years B.P. This second eruption trig- gered a second collapse, which created the central circular caldera, and formed a basin structure. Both the Ubud and Gunungkawi Ignimbrites consist of a similar dacitic composition, white to red (the most abundant nearly 90 % and dark grey to black dacitic pumice clasts. The large clasts, up to 20 cm in diameter, are in the non-welded ignimbrite, particularly in the upper part of the Gunungkawi Ignimbrite. The intracaldera ignimbrite, called the "Batur Ignimbrite" about 5 km3  in volume is a densely welded ignimbrite and generally shows typical welded features. The ignimbrite comprises at least five different flow units, separated by thin (15 - 40 cm welded pumiceous airfall deposits, with flattened pumice clasts. Another large eruption occurred about 5,500 years B.P., producing around 0.09 km3  andesitic ignimbrite. This was initiated by phreatomagmatic eruptions, indicated by thick phreatomagmatic and surge deposits, underlying the ignimbrite. The caldera and its vicinity are partly filled, and variably mantled by later eruptive products of dacitic and andesitic phreatomagmatic and airfall deposits.  

  12. The lifecycle of caldera-forming volcanoes in the Main Ethiopian Rift: insights from Aluto volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, T. A.; Hutchison, W.; Yirgu, G.; Biggs, J.; Cohen, B. E.; Barfod, D. N.; Lewi, E.; Pyle, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    The silicic peralkaline volcanoes of the East African Rift are some of the least studied and yet potentially most dangerous volcanoes in the world. We present the first detailed account of the eruptive history of Aluto, a restless silicic volcano located in the Main Ethiopian Rift, using new constraints from fieldwork, remote sensing, 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and geochemistry. Prior to the growth of the Aluto volcanic complex (before 500 ka) the region was characterized by a significant period of fault development and mafic fissure eruptions. The earliest volcanism at Aluto built up a trachytic complex over 8 km in diameter. Aluto then underwent large-volume ignimbrite eruptions at ca. 300 ka developing a ~42 km2 collapse structure. After a hiatus of ~250 kyr, a phase of post-caldera volcanism began. Since ca. 60 ka, highly-evolved peralkaline rhyolite lavas, ignimbrites and pumice fall deposits have erupted from vents across the complex. The age of the youngest volcanism is not well known. Geochemical modelling is consistent with rhyolite genesis from protracted fractionation (>80 %) of typical 'rift basalt'. Based on the field stratigraphy and the number, style and volume of recent eruptions we suggest that silicic eruptions occur at an average rate of 1 per 1000 years, and that future eruptions of Aluto will involve explosive emplacement of localised pumice cones and effusive obsidian coulees of volumes between 1-100 × 106 m3. Comparisons with other caldera volcanoes in this section of the rift suggest that there may be parallels between Aluto's behaviour and that of other volcanic centres, both in terms of the volcanic 'lifecycle', and broad timings of caldera collapse events.

  13. New proximal tephras at Somma-Vesuvius: evidences of a pre-caldera, large (?) explosive eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparice, Domenico; Scarpati, Claudio; Mazzeo, Fabio Carmine; Petrosino, Paola; Arienzo, Ilenia; Gisbert, Guillem; Petrelli, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    A 5 m thick pyroclastic and volcaniclastic sequence, never reported before, comprising a pumice fall deposit has been recognized in a disused quarry near Pollena Trocchia, on the NW slope of Somma-Vesuvius. It is composed of three stratigraphic units: a pumice fall deposit that underlies a pyroclastic density current deposit; they are overlain by a volcaniclastic unit emplaced during a quiescent period of the volcano. The pyroclastic deposits are separated by a horizon of reworked material indicating the emplacement from two distinct eruptive events. The pumice fall deposit has been subject of a detailed investigation. It consists of an ash bed overlaid by a roughly stratified pumice fall layer. The presence of ballistic clasts indicates the proximal nature of this deposit and its stratigraphic position below the Pomici di Base (22 ka) Plinian deposit allows constraining its age to the pre-caldera period (22-39 ky) of activity of Somma-Vesuvius. Samples have been collected in order to perform sedimentological (grain size and componentry), geochemical and isotopic analyses. Samples range from moderately to poorly sorted and show a trachytic composition. The comparison with literature data of compatible deposits vented from Somma-Vesuvius (Schiava, Taurano and Codola eruptions as well as borehole data) allows excluding any correlation with already known Vesuvian products suggesting that the analysed products are ascribable to a new, pre-caldera, explosive eruption. We name this new event ;Carcavone eruption;. Based on thickness, maximum lithic clasts and orientation of impact sags, showing a provenance from SE, we envisage the emplacement from a Plinian style eruption vented in the northern sector of the current caldera.

  14. A fluid-driven earthquake swarm on the margin of the Yellowstone caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R.; Hill, David P.; Massin, Frederick; Farrell, Jamie; Smith, Robert B.; Taira, Taka'aki

    2013-01-01

    Over the past several decades, the Yellowstone caldera has experienced frequent earthquake swarms and repeated cycles of uplift and subsidence, reflecting dynamic volcanic and tectonic processes. Here, we examine the detailed spatial-temporal evolution of the 2010 Madison Plateau swarm, which occurred near the northwest boundary of the Yellowstone caldera. To fully explore the evolution of the swarm, we integrated procedures for seismic waveform-based earthquake detection with precise double-difference relative relocation. Using cross-correlation of continuous seismic data and waveform templates constructed from cataloged events, we detected and precisely located 8710 earthquakes during the three-week swarm, nearly four times the number of events included in the standard catalog. This high-resolution analysis reveals distinct migration of earthquake activity over the course of the swarm. The swarm initiated abruptly on January 17, 2010 at about 10 km depth and expanded dramatically outward (both shallower and deeper) over time, primarily along a NNW-striking, ~55º ENE-dipping structure. To explain these characteristics, we hypothesize that the swarm was triggered by the rupture of a zone of confined high-pressure aqueous fluids into a pre-existing crustal fault system, prompting release of accumulated stress. The high-pressure fluid injection may have been accommodated by hybrid shear and dilatational failure, as is commonly observed in exhumed hydrothermally affected fault zones. This process has likely occurred repeatedly in Yellowstone as aqueous fluids exsolved from magma migrate into the brittle crust, and it may be a key element in the observed cycles of caldera uplift and subsidence.

  15. Survey and assessment of post volcanic activities of a young caldera lake, Lake Cuicocha, Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gunkel

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cuicocha is a young volcano adjacent to the inactive Pleistocene Cotacachi volcano complex, located in the western cordilleras of the Ecuadorian Andes. A series of eruptions with intensive ash emission and collapse of the caldera occurred around 4500–3000 y BP. A crater 3.2 km in diameter and a maximum depth of 450 m was formed. Further eruptions of the volcano occurred 1300 y BP and formed four smaller domes within the caldera. Over the last few hundred years, a caldera lake has developed, with a maximum depth of 148 m. The lake water is characterized by sodium carbonate with elevated concentrations of manganese, calcium and chloride. Nowadays, an emission of gases, mainly CO2, and an input of warm spring water occur in Lake Cuicocha. The zone of high activity is in the western basin of the lake at a depth of 78 m, and continuous gas emissions with sediment resuspension were observed using sonar. In the hypolimnion of the lake, CO2 accumulation occurs up to 0.2% saturation, but the risk of a limnic eruption can be excluded at present. The lake possesses monomictic stratification behaviour, and during overturn an intensive gas exchange with the atmosphere occurs. Investigations concerning the sedimentation processes of the lake suggest only a thin sediment layer of up to 10–20 cm in the deeper lake basin; in the western bay, in the area of gas emissions, the lake bottom is partly depleted of sediment in the form of holes, and no lake colmation exists. Decreases in the lake water level of about 30 cm y−1 indicate a percolation of water into fractures and fissures of the volcano, triggered by a nearby earthquake in 1987.

  16. Menes caldera, a highly active site of brine seepage in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea: "In situ" observations from the NAUTINIL expedition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huguen, C.; Foucher, J.-P.; Mascle, J.; Ondreas, H.; Thouement, M.; Gontharet, S.; Stadnitskaia, A.; Pierre, C; Bayon, G.; Loncke, L; Boetius, A.; Bouloubassi, I.; de Lange, G.; Caprais, J.-C.; Fouquet, Y.; Woodside, J.M.; Dupre, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the first "in situ" seafloor observations of fluid escape structures in a fault-controlled caldera-type depression of about 8 km diameter, named the Menes caldera, in the Eastern Mediterranean sea off Egypt (western province of the Nile Deep Sea Fan). A detailed analysis of seven

  17. Crustal-scale recycling in caldera complexes and rift zones along the Yellowstone hotspot track: O and Hf isotopic evidence in diverse zircons from voluminous rhyolites of the Picabo volcanic field, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Dana L.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Watts, Kathryn E.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Fu, Bin; McCurry, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Rhyolites of the Picabo volcanic field (10.4-6.6 Ma) in eastern Idaho are preserved as thick ignimbrites and lavas along the margins of the Snake River Plain (SRP), and within a deep (>3 km) borehole near the central axis of the Yellowstone hotspot track. In this study we present new O and Hf isotope data and U-Pb geochronology for individual zircons, O isotope data for major phenocrysts (quartz, plagioclase, and pyroxene), whole rock Sr and Nd isotope ratios, and whole rock geochemistry for a suite of Picabo rhyolites. We synthesize our new datasets with published Ar-Ar geochronology to establish the eruptive framework of the Picabo volcanic field, and interpret its petrogenetic history in the context of other well-studied caldera complexes in the SRP. Caldera complex evolution at Picabo began with eruption of the 10.44±0.27 Ma (U-Pb) Tuff of Arbon Valley (TAV), a chemically zoned and normal-δ18O (δ18O magma=7.9‰) unit with high, zoned 87Sr/86Sri (0.71488-0.72520), and low-ɛNd(0) (-18) and ɛHf(0) (-28). The TAV and an associated post caldera lava flow possess the lowest ɛNd(0) (-23), indicating ˜40-60% derivation from the Archean upper crust. Normal-δ18O rhyolites were followed by a series of lower-δ18O eruptions with more typical (lower crustal) Sr-Nd-Hf isotope ratios and whole rock chemistry. The voluminous 8.25±0.26 Ma West Pocatello rhyolite has the lowest δ18O value (δ18Omelt=3.3‰), and we correlate it to a 1,000 m thick intracaldera tuff present in the INEL-1 borehole (with published zircon ages 8.04-8.35 Ma, and similarly low-δ18O zircon values). The significant (4-5‰) decrease in magmatic-δ18O values in Picabo rhyolites is accompanied by an increase in zircon δ18O heterogeneity from ˜1‰ variation in the TAV to >5‰ variation in the late-stage low-δ18O rhyolites, a trend similar to what is characteristic of Heise and Yellowstone, and which indicates remelting of variably hydrothermally altered tuffs followed by rapid batch

  18. Crustal-scale recycling in caldera complexes and rift zones along the Yellowstone hotspot track: O and Hf isotopic evidence in diverse zircons from voluminous rhyolites of the Picabo volcanic field, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Dana L.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Watts, Kathryn E.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Fu, Bin; McCurry, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Rhyolites of the Picabo volcanic field (10.4–6.6 Ma) in eastern Idaho are preserved as thick ignimbrites and lavas along the margins of the Snake River Plain (SRP), and within a deep (>3 km) borehole near the central axis of the Yellowstone hotspot track. In this study we present new O and Hf isotope data and U–Pb geochronology for individual zircons, O isotope data for major phenocrysts (quartz, plagioclase, and pyroxene), whole rock Sr and Nd isotope ratios, and whole rock geochemistry for a suite of Picabo rhyolites. We synthesize our new datasets with published Ar–Ar geochronology to establish the eruptive framework of the Picabo volcanic field, and interpret its petrogenetic history in the context of other well-studied caldera complexes in the SRP. Caldera complex evolution at Picabo began with eruption of the 10.44±0.27 Ma (U–Pb) Tuff of Arbon Valley (TAV), a chemically zoned and normal-δ18O (δ18O magma=7.9‰) unit with high, zoned 87Sr/86Sri (0.71488–0.72520), and low-εNd(0) (−18) and εHf(0) (−28). The TAV and an associated post caldera lava flow possess the lowest εNd(0) (−23), indicating ∼40–60% derivation from the Archean upper crust. Normal-δ18O rhyolites were followed by a series of lower-δ18O eruptions with more typical (lower crustal) Sr–Nd–Hf isotope ratios and whole rock chemistry. The voluminous 8.25±0.26 Ma West Pocatello rhyolite has the lowest δ18O value (δ18Omelt=3.3‰), and we correlate it to a 1,000 m thick intracaldera tuff present in the INEL-1 borehole (with published zircon ages 8.04–8.35 Ma, and similarly low-δ18O zircon values). The significant (4–5‰) decrease in magmatic-δ18O values in Picabo rhyolites is accompanied by an increase in zircon δ18O heterogeneity from ∼1‰ variation in the TAV to >5‰ variation in the late-stage low-δ18O rhyolites, a trend similar to what is characteristic of Heise and Yellowstone, and which indicates remelting of variably hydrothermally altered tuffs

  19. The Laramide Mesa formation and the Ojo de Agua caldera, southeast of the Cananea copper mining district, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Dennis P.; Miller, Robert J.; Woodbourne, Keith L.

    2006-01-01

    The Mesa Formation extends from Cananea, Mexico, southeast to the Sonora River and is the main host rock of Laramide porphyry copper deposits in the Cananea District and at the Alacran porphyry prospect to the east. The Mesa consists of two members-a lower andesite and an upper dacite. The lowest part of the dacite member is a crystal tuff about 100 m thick. This tuff is the outfall of a caldera centered near the village of Ojo de Agua, dated by 40Ar/39Ar at 65.8 Ma ?0.4. The Ojo de Agua Caldera is about 9 km in diameter and is filled by a light gray biotite dacite tuff with abundant flattened pumice fragments. The volume of the caldera is estimated to be 24 km3.

  20. Aprovechamiento del recurso biomasa a partir de los desechos de madera para una caldera de vapor

    OpenAIRE

    Arroyo Vinueza, Juan Sebastián; Reina Guzmán, Washington Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Este artículo describe el potencial energético de la biomasa residual que proviene de la madera al ser utilizado en una caldera de vapor como combustible sustitutivo; esto con el fin de proporcionar una alternativa de energía limpia diferente a la actual dependencia del petróleo usado en estos dispositivos. Además, la información detalla la industria que proporciona los desechos de madera y sus diferentes formas de presentación, sus propiedades físicas y energéticas; t...

  1. Las cocinas del infierno. La visualidad de las mujeres en las calderas de Pedro Botero

    OpenAIRE

    Zuriaga Senent, Vicente Francesc

    2013-01-01

    Casi todas las religiones nos hablan del infierno como lugar en el que las almas son torturadas eternamente. El judaísmo lo llama Gehena, la mitología clásica Tártaro y Hades, las religiones paganas Inframundo, y la tradición cristiana castellana Las calderas de Pedro Botero. Los profetas del Antiguo Testamento narran con claridad los tormentos del infierno y Dante en La Divina Comedia nos lo relata con una visión particular. La literatura y el arte nos ofrecen abundancia de imáge...

  2. Micro kinematic indicators in the Green Tuff Ignimbrite: can they tell us about caldera collapse?

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Rebecca; Dyble, Jodie

    2014-01-01

    This poster presents the results from a 4 week research placement through the Nuffield Foundation scheme. Jodie created this poster as part of the assessment for a Gold CREST Award from the British Science Association. We are also presenting this poster at the VMSG conference, Norwich, 2015. It should be cited as: Dyble, J.A., Williams, R., 2015. Micro kinematic indicators in the Green Tuff Ignimbrite: can they tell us about caldera collapse? VMSG Meeting, Norwch, 5th-7th January 2015. htt...

  3. Hydrothermal alteration in the Baca Geothermal System, Redondo Dome, Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulen, Jeffrey B.; Nielson, Dennis L.

    1986-02-01

    Thermal fluids circulating in the active hydrothermal system of the resurgent Redondo dome of the Valles caldera have interacted with their diverse host rocks to produce well-zoned alteration assemblages, which not only help locate permeable fluid channels but also provide insight into the system's thermal history. The alteration shows that fluid flow has been confined principally to steeply dipping normal faults and subsidiary fractures as well as thin stratigraphic aquifers. Permeability along many of these channels has been reduced or locally eliminated by hydrothermal self-sealing. Alteration from the surface through the base of the Miocene Paliza Canyon Formation is of three distinctive types: argillic, propylitic, and phyllic. Argillic alteration forms a blanket above the deep water table in formerly permeable nonwelded tuffs. Beneath the argillic zone, pervasive propylitic alteration is weakly developed in felsic host rocks but locally intense in deep intermediate composition volcanics. Strong phyllic alteration is commonly but not invariably associated with major active thermal fluid channels. Phyllic zones yielding no fluid were clearly once permeable but now are hydrothermally sealed. High-temperature alteration phases at Baca are presently found at much lower temperatures. We suggest either that isotherms have collapsed due to gradual cooling of the system, that they have retreated without overall heat loss due to uplift of the Redondo dome, that the system has shifted laterally, or that it has contracted due to a drop in the water table. The deepest Well (B-12, 3423 m) in the dome may have penetrated through the base of the active hydrothermal system. Below a depth of 2440 m in this well, hydrothermal veining largely disappears, and the rocks resemble those developed by isochemical thermal metamorphism. The transition is reflected by temperature logs, which show a conductive thermal gradient below 2440 m. This depth may mark the dome's neutral plane

  4. Insights From the Kilgore Tuff: Surprising Homogeneity of Supervolcanic Magmas in Yellowstone Hotspot Calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, K. E.; Bindeman, I. N.; Schmitt, A. K.; Morgan, L. A.

    2008-12-01

    Supervolcanic eruptions in the late Miocene Heise volcanic field in eastern Idaho concluded ~4.5Ma with the eruption of the Kilgore Tuff, an extremely voluminous (1,800km3) caldera-forming ignimbrite. The Heise volcanic field represents the most recently extinct phase of volcanism over the Yellowstone hotspot and is the most immediate predecessor to the active Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field in western Wyoming. Thus, the climactic Kilgore Tuff of the Heise field is an important example of silicic magma genesis in the Yellowstone hotspot track, and may serve as an analog to large volume, late-stage magmatism in the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field. We present major and trace element analyses, oxygen isotope ratios of bulk and individual phenocrysts, strontium isotope ratios of whole rock powders, and uranium-lead zircon crystallization ages of five geographically discrete and compositionally diverse samples of the Kilgore Tuff. Despite the presence of both high and low-silica rhyolites, with and without quartz phenocrysts, our isotopic and geochronologic data indicate that the Kilgore Tuff was erupted from a remarkably homogeneous silicic magma chamber with a constant and low δ18O value of 3.32±0.02‰, a 87Sr/86Sr ratio of 0.7105±0.0001, and a 238U-206Pb crystallization age of 4.64±0.05Ma (uncertainties are 1σ). Our new data support a shallow crustal recycling model of magma genesis for the Kilgore Tuff, in which low-δ18O intracaldera fill, consisting of hydrothermally altered and buried volcanic rocks from three previous caldera-forming eruptions, is remelted in batches and rapidly assembled into one voluminous, well-mixed magma chamber. Following isotopic homogenization by convection, fractional crystallization resulted in low and high-silica magma types in the parental Kilgore batholith. Similar processes may also explain effusive, large volume silicic magma genesis of the low-δ18O Central Plateau Member rhyolites (0.25-0.07Ma, 700km3) in the

  5. USA Hire Testing Platform

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The USA Hire Testing Platform delivers tests used in hiring for positions in the Federal Government. To safeguard the integrity of the hiring processes and ensure...

  6. USA kunstidessant Venemaale

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    USA kunstnike näitus "Kolm sajandit ameerika kunsti" Moskvas Pushkini muuseumis. Eksponeeritakse Mark Rothko, Jean-Michel Basguiat', Roy Lichtensteini, Robert Rauschenbergi, Georgia O'Keefe'i, Willem de Kooningi töid

  7. Initial results from VC-1, First Continental Scientific Drilling Program Core Hole in Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Fraser; Rowley, John; Gardner, Jamie N.; Hawkins, Ward; Goff, Sue; Charles, Robert; Wachs, Daniel; Maassen, Larry; Heiken, Grant

    1986-02-01

    Valles Caldera 1 (VC-1) is the first Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) core hole drilled in the Valles caldera and the first continuously cored well in the caldera region. The objectives of VC-1 were to penetrate a hydrothermal outflow plume near its source, to obtain structural and stratigraphie information near the intersection of the ring fracture zone and the precaldera Jemez fault zone, arid to core the youngest volcanic unit inside the caldera (Banco Bonito obsidian). Coring of the 856-m well took only 35 days to finish, during which all objectives were attained and core recovery exceeded 95%. VC-1 penetrates 298 m of moat volcanics and caldera fill ignimbrites, 35 m of precaldera volcaniclastic breccia, and 523 m of Paleozoic carbonates, sandstones, and shales. A previously unknown obsidian flow was encountered at 160 m depth underlying the Battleship Rock Tuff in the caldera moat zone. Hydrothermal alteration is concentrated in sheared, brecciated, and fractured zones from the volcaniclastic breccia to total depth with both the intensity and rank of alterations increasing with depth. Alteration assemblages consist primarily of clays, calcite, pyrite, quartz, and chlorite, but chalcopyrite and sphalerite have been identified as high as 450 m and molybdenite has been identified in a fractured zone at 847 m. Carbon 13 and oxygen 18 analyses of core show that the most intense zones of hydrothermal alteration occur in the Madera Limestone above 550 m and in the Madera and Sandia formations below 700 m. This corresponds with zones of most intense calcite and quartz veining. Thermal aquifers were penetrated at the 480-, 540-, and 845-m intervals. Although these intervals are associated with alteration, brecciation, and veining, they are also intervals where clastic layers occur in the Paleozoic sedimentary rocks.

  8. The High Rock caldera complex, NW Nevada: Geologic mapping, volcanology, geochemistry, and ultra-high precision 40Ar/39Ar dating of early Yellowstone hotspot magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausback, B.; Smith, J.; Henry, C. D.; Hilton, R. P.; McIntosh, W. C.; Heizler, M. T.; Noble, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    Our new work reveals a complex evolution of the High Rock caldera, one of the oldest calderas related to initiation of the Yellowstone hotspot. The caldera formed at 16.43±0.01 Ma (n=2, Fish Canyon sanidine = 28.201 Ma; all ages reported here agree with stratigraphy) during eruption of the zoned (metaluminous, high-silica dacite to slightly peralkaline, low-silica rhyolite), abundantly porphyritic Summit Lake Tuff. The only exposed precaldera rocks are a suite of intermediate lavas along the western margin. They are undated but compositionally similar to 30 Ma rocks in the region, so probably unrelated to the caldera. The caldera margin is entirely buried by moat domes and post-collapse lavas and tuff. Sparsely porphyritic rhyolite lavas erupted at 16.30±0.01 Ma (n=1) north of the caldera, possibly along the ring fracture. A large suite of petrographically and compositionally nearly indistinguishable, abundantly porphyritic, peralkaline rhyolite lavas and tuffs, the Soldier Meadow (SM) rock type, erupted from vents around the entire caldera margin in two pulses at 16.14±0.01 and 16.09±0.01 Ma (n=6 and 3). The first pulse includes lavas along the western and eastern margin; the Soldier Meadow Tuff (SMT, a moderately peralkaline, crystal-rich welded ignimbrite that is thinly-layered with coarse lag breccias in the proximal area and massive in distal locations), which erupted along the eastern caldera margin; and accidental blocks (up to 3m) of SMT brought up in the interior of the caldera by later eruptions. The second pulse includes several more lavas and associated small-volume flow, fall, and surge(?) tuffs along the northeastern and southwestern margin. Distribution of the SM rock type suggests that its magma chamber underlay the entire caldera. Rocks of the second pulse are distinguished only by higher incompatible element concentrations (Rb, Zr, Nb, Th), which suggests the magma body continued to differentiate between pulses. The tuffs of Alkali Flat and

  9. Nursery stock quality as an indicator of bottomland hardwood forest restoration success in the Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass F. Jacobs; Rosa C. Goodman; Emile S. Gardiner; K Frances Salifu; Ronald P. Overton; George Hernandez

    2012-01-01

    Seedling morphological quality standards are lacking for bottomland hardwood restoration plantings in the Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley, USA, which may contribute toward variable restoration success. We measured initial seedling morphology (shoot height, root collar diameter, number of first order lateral roots, fresh mass, and root volume), second year field...

  10. Source parameter inversion for earthquakes in the Bardarbunga caldera (August 2014-February 2015) based on high-rate GPS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Cardozo, Félix; Hjörleifsdóttir, Vala; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Geirsson, Halldor; Iglesias, Arturo

    2017-04-01

    In August 2014 a sequence of earthquakes took place in the Bardarbunga caldera (7x11 km) and a laterally propagating dike that connected the caldera with the Holuhraun lava field. The caldera earthquakes were coincident in time with the caldera subsidence ( 70 m) and the propagation of a dike, which ended in a fissural eruption in Holuhraun (Guðmundsson et al., 2016). The volcanic seismic sources represented by the moment tensor, commonly have a large non-double couple component, which implies that the source can not be described as a slip on a planar fault. However, encountering an apropiate physical mechanism that explain the non double couple component is a challenging task since there are several phenomena that could explain it, such as intrusive processes like dikes or sills (Kanamori et al 1993, Riel et al 2014) as well as geometric effects due slip on a curved fault (Nettles & Ekström, 1998). The earthquakes in the Bardarbunga caldera are quite interesting not only due to the magnitudes (around seventy events between 5.0non double couple components; for some of them, the seismic waves were registered by a GPS high-rate station and for one (18th september 2014 Mw. 5.3), a ring fault model was built based on interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) also (Guðmundsson et al., 2016). Taking into account that the Bardarbunga caldera is covered by glacier (which makes difficult detecting changes in the surface using InSAR) and detecting waveforms in GPS stations is common only for large tectonics earthquakes (above Mw.7); observing a volcanic earthquakes simultaneously by InSAR and GPS is a rare and outstanding opportunity for constrain the volcanic seismic source . Likewise, if we assume that all the subsidence earthquakes in Bardarbunga have a common seismic source, we can use the same fault plane costrained for the 18th september earthquake, for inverting the seismic source of all the events in the caldera, only variying some parameters such as half

  11. A physical model of sill expansion to explain the dynamics of unrest at calderas with application to Campi Flegrei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudicepietro, Flora; Macedonio, Giovanni; Martini, Marcello

    2017-07-01

    Many calderas show remarkable unrests, which often do not culminate in eruptions (non-eruptive unrest). In this context the interpretation of the geophysical data collected by the monitoring networks is difficult. When the unrest is eruptive, a vent opening process occurs, which leads to an eruption. In volcanic calderas, vent locations typically are scattered over a large area and monogenic cones form. The resulting pattern is characterized by a wide dispersion of eruptive vents, therefore, the location of the future vent in calderas is not easily predictable. We propose an interpretation of the deformation associated to unrest and vent pattern commonly observed at volcanic calderas, based on a physical model that simulates the intrusion and the expansion of a sill. The model can explain both the uplift and the subsequent subsidence, through a single geological process. In particular, we simulate the vertical displacement that occurred at the central area of Campi Flegrei caldera during the last decades, and we obtain good agreement with the data of a leveling benchmark near the center of the caldera. Considering that the stress mainly controls the vent opening process, we try to gain insight on the vent opening in calderas through the study of the stress field produced by the intrusion of an expanding sill. We find that the tensile stress in the rock above the sill is concentrated in a ring-shaped area with radius depending on the physical properties of magma and rock, the feeding rate and the magma cooling rate. This stress field is consistent with widely dispersed eruptive vents and monogenic cone formation, which are often observed in the calderas. However, considering the mechanical properties of the elastic plate and the rheology of magma, we show that remarkable deformations may be associated with low values of stress in the rock at the top of the intrusion, thereby resulting in non-eruptive unrests. Moreover, we have found that, under the assumption of

  12. Resurgent Toba – field, chronologic, and model constraints on time scales and mechanisms of resurgence at large calderas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanaka L De Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available New data reveal details of the post-caldera history at the Earth’s youngest resurgent supervolcano, Toba caldera in Sumatra. Resurgence after the caldera-forming ~74 ka Youngest Toba Tuff eruption uplifted the caldera floor as a resurgent dome, Samosir Island, capped with 100m of lake sediments. 14C age data from the uppermost datable sediments reveal that Samosir Island was submerged beneath lake level (~900m a.s.l ~33.7 ky. Since then, Samosir experienced 700m of uplift as a tilted block dipping to the west. Using 14C ages and elevations of sediment along a transect of Samosir reveal that minimum uplift rates were ~4.9 cm/yr from ~33.7 to 22.5 ka, but diminished to ~0.7 cm/yr after 22.5ka. Thermo-mechanical models informed by these rates reveal that detumescence does not produce the uplift nor the uplift rates estimated for Samosir. However, models calculating the effect of volume change of the magma reservoir within a temperature-dependent viscoelastic host rock reveal that a single pulse of ~475 km3 of magma produces a better fit to the uplift data than a constant flux. Reproducing the uplift rates require more sophisticated models. Motivation for resurgent uplift of the caldera floor is rebound of remnant magma as the system re-established magmastatic and isostatic equilibrium after the caldera collapse. Previous assertions that the caldera floor was apparently at 400m a.s.l or lower requires that uplift must have initiated between sometime between 33.7 ka and 74 ka at a minimum average uplift rate of ~1.1 cm/ year. The change in uplift rate from pre-33.7 ka to immediately post-33.7 ka suggests a role for deep recharge augmenting rebound. Average minimum rates of resurgent uplift at Toba are at least an order of magnitude slower than net rates of restlessness at currently active calderas. This connotes a distinction between resurgence and restlessness controlled by different processes, scales of process, and controlling variables.

  13. An Epidemiological Model of Rift Valley Fever with Spatial Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianchan Niu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As a category A agent in the Center for Disease Control bioterrorism list, Rift Valley fever (RVF is considered a major threat to the United States (USA. Should the pathogen be intentionally or unintentionally introduced to the continental USA, there is tremendous potential for economic damages due to loss of livestock, trade restrictions, and subsequent food supply chain disruptions. We have incorporated the effects of space into a mathematical model of RVF in order to study the dynamics of the pathogen spread as affected by the movement of humans, livestock, and mosquitoes. The model accounts for the horizontal transmission of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV between two mosquito and one livestock species, and mother-to-offspring transmission of virus in one of the mosquito species. Space effects are introduced by dividing geographic space into smaller patches and considering the patch-to-patch movement of species. For each patch, a system of ordinary differential equations models fractions of populations susceptible to, incubating, infectious with, or immune to RVFV. The main contribution of this work is a methodology for analyzing the likelihood of pathogen establishment should an introduction occur into an area devoid of RVF. Examples are provided for general and specific cases to illustrate the methodology.

  14. Pyroclastic flow dynamics and hazard in a caldera setting: Application to Phlegrean Fields (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todesco, Micol; Neri, Augusto; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Papale, Paolo; Rosi, Mauro

    2006-11-01

    Numerical simulation of pyroclastic density currents has developed significantly in recent years and is increasingly applied to volcanological research. Results from physical modeling are commonly taken into account in volcanic hazard assessment and in the definition of hazard mitigation strategies. In this work, we modeled pyroclastic density currents in the Phlegrean Fields caldera, where flows propagating along the flat ground could be confined by the old crater rims that separate downtown Naples from the caldera. The different eruptive scenarios (mass eruption rates, magma compositions, and water contents) were based on available knowledge of this volcanic system, and appropriate vent conditions were calculated for each scenario. Simulations were performed along different topographic profiles to evaluate the effects of topographic barriers on flow propagation. Simulations highlighted interesting features associated with the presence of obstacles such as the development of backflows. Complex interaction between outward moving fronts and backflows can affect flow propagation; if backflows reach the vent, they can even interfere with fountain dynamics and induce a more collapsing behavior. Results show that in the case of large events (≥108 kg/s), obstacles affect flow propagation by reducing flow velocity and hence dynamic pressure in distal regions, but they cannot stop the advancement of flows. Deadly conditions (in terms of temperature and ash concentration) characterize the entire region invaded by pyroclastic flows. In the case of small events (2.5 × 107 kg/s), flows are confined by distal topographic barriers which provide valuable protection to the region beyond.

  15. Thermomechanical controls on magma supply and volcanic deformation: application to Aira caldera, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, James; Gottsmann, Joachim; Nakamichi, Haruhisa; Iguchi, Masato

    2016-09-13

    Ground deformation often precedes volcanic eruptions, and results from complex interactions between source processes and the thermomechanical behaviour of surrounding rocks. Previous models aiming to constrain source processes were unable to include realistic mechanical and thermal rock properties, and the role of thermomechanical heterogeneity in magma accumulation was unclear. Here we show how spatio-temporal deformation and magma reservoir evolution are fundamentally controlled by three-dimensional thermomechanical heterogeneity. Using the example of continued inflation at Aira caldera, Japan, we demonstrate that magma is accumulating faster than it can be erupted, and the current uplift is approaching the level inferred prior to the violent 1914 Plinian eruption. Magma storage conditions coincide with estimates for the caldera-forming reservoir ~29,000 years ago, and the inferred magma supply rate indicates a ~130-year timeframe to amass enough magma to feed a future 1914-sized eruption. These new inferences are important for eruption forecasting and risk mitigation, and have significant implications for the interpretations of volcanic deformation worldwide.

  16. Discovery of a flank caldera and very young glacial activity at Hecates Tholus, Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauber, Ernst; van Gasselt, Stephan; Ivanov, Boris; Werner, Stephanie; Head, James W; Neukum, Gerhard; Jaumann, Ralf; Greeley, Ronald; Mitchell, Karl L; Muller, Peter

    2005-03-17

    The majority of volcanic products on Mars are thought to be mafic and effusive. Explosive eruptions of basic to ultrabasic chemistry are expected to be common, but evidence for them is rare and mostly confined to very old surface features. Here we present new image and topographic data from the High Resolution Stereo Camera that reveal previously unknown traces of an explosive eruption at 30 degrees N and 149 degrees E on the northwestern flank of the shield volcano Hecates Tholus. The eruption created a large, 10-km-diameter caldera approximately 350 million years ago. We interpret these observations to mean that large-scale explosive volcanism on Mars was not confined to the planet's early evolution. We also show that glacial deposits partly fill the caldera and an adjacent depression. Their age, derived from crater counts, is about 5 to 24 million years. Climate models predict that near-surface ice is not stable at mid-latitudes today, assuming a thermo-dynamic steady state. Therefore, the discovery of very young glacial features at Hecates Tholus suggests recent climate changes. We show that the absolute ages of these very recent glacial deposits correspond very well to a period of increased obliquity of the planet's rotational axis.

  17. Molecular analysis of the benthos microbial community in Zavarzin thermal spring (Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, Russia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, Alexey S; Bryanskaya, Alla V; Malup, Tatiana K; Meshcheryakova, Irina A; Lazareva, Elena V; Taran, Oksana P; Ivanisenko, Timofey V; Ivanisenko, Vladimir A; Zhmodik, Sergey M; Kolchanov, Nikolay A; Peltek, Sergey E

    2014-01-01

    Geothermal areas are of great interest for the study of microbial communities. The results of such investigations can be used in a variety of fields (ecology, microbiology, medicine) to answer fundamental questions, as well as those with practical benefits. Uzon caldera is located in the Uzon-Geyser depression that is situated in the centre of the Karym-Semyachin region of the East Kamchatka graben-synclinorium. The microbial communities of Zavarzin spring are well studied; however, its benthic microbial mat has not been previously described. Pyrosequencing of the V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene was used to study the benthic microbial community of the Zavarzin thermal spring (Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka). The community is dominated by bacteria (>95% of all sequences), including thermophilic, chemoorganotrophic Caldiserica (33.0%) and Dictyoglomi (24.8%). The benthic community and the previously examined planktonic community of Zavarzin spring have qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different, compositions. In this study, we performed a metagenomic analysis of the benthic microbial mat of Zavarzin spring. We compared this benthic community to microbial communities found in the water and of an integral probe consisting of water and bottom sediments. Various phylogenetic groups of microorganisms, including potentially new ones, represent the full-fledged trophic system of Zavarzin. A thorough geochemical study of the spring was performed.

  18. Differentiation and thermal history of the post-collapse magma reservoir at Yellowstone caldera as revealed by combining the temperature-age-compositional history of zircons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, J. A.; Reid, M. R.; Kyriazis, S. F.

    2006-12-01

    Coupling the age and compositional history recorded between and within single accessory minerals, such as zircon or allanite, may provide a high-resolution perspective on the thermochemical evolution of voluminous magma reservoirs in the prelude to eruption. At Yellowstone caldera, USA, more than 900km3 of high- silica rhyolite erupted sequentially in the aftermath of caldera collapse from an evolving magma reservoir. At least 21 lavas and tuffs comprise the voluminous Central Plateau Member (CPM) of the Plateau Rhyolite which erupted between 160 ka and 70 ka. 238U-230Th disequilibrium and U-Pb dating reveal that CPM zircons crystallized approximately 0 to 60 thousand years prior to their respective K-Ar eruption ages, and contain little inheritance from the caldera-forming magma. To obtain a temperature-time-compositional history for CPM zircons and evaluate the applicability of the zircon thermometry to high-silica rhyolites, we performed ion microprobe analyses of trace element concentrations in >65 of the dated zircons from four lavas representing early, middle, and late tapping of the CPM reservoir. Most CPM zircons contain typical REE patterns with chondrite-normalized Lu/La of up to 30,000, and with Eu/Eu* as low as 0.03. A subset of the results (~45%) yield elevated light REE, Ti, and Fe concentrations where sampled zircon domains included small inclusions of Fe-Ti oxides, chevkinite, and/or monazite. Application of Ti-in-zircon thermometry to dated zircons that are unaffected by inclusions yield temperatures that have a range of approximately 70 degrees. Calculated temperatures would largely fall within the range of 800°-840°C for CPM magmas obtained by Zr-glass, zircon saturation, and QUILF thermometry if an essentially fixed melt aTiO2 of 0.3 due to ilmenite saturation is assumed. Where analyzed, the rims of single zircons yield temperatures that are 10°-20° lower than their cores. Our combination of zircon thermometry, age, and composition reveals

  19. New Temperature and H2O estimates for Post Caldera Yellowstone Rhyolite Lavas from Feldspar Geothermometry and Rhyolite-MELTS Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, J. S.; Till, C. B.

    2016-12-01

    Determination of the thermal histories of previously erupted silicic magma bodies at Yellowstone, specifically the effusive eruptions that have characterized the system since ca. 260 ka, is critical to understanding the future behavior of the system. Post-caldera Yellowstone rhyolite flows have been extensively studied using Fe-Ti oxides, QUILF, titaniQ, and zircon saturation geothermometry. In this study, we add two-feldspar and liquid-feldspar thermometry of five rhyolitic Upper Basin Member flows (Scaup Lake, South, North, East, and Middle Biscuit Basin) and one Central Plateau Member (Hayden Valley). The feldspar rims record temperatures between 780 to 880°C using the plagioclase-liquid and sanidine-liquid thermometers of Putirka (2008) and the SOLVCALC two feldspar thermometer. Additionally, rhyolite-MELTS modeling was performed at varying water contents assuming a pressure of 3 kbar, similar to the modern day reservoir. We find the modeling best reproduces the overall phase proportions, feldspar compositions, and feldspar thermometry at ≤1.5 H2O wt. % for all flows. In general, the location of the feldspar solvus predicted by rhyolite-MELTS is in excellent agreement with two feldspar thermometry (e.g., for the Scaup Lake flow, MELTS solvus=826°C vs. two feldspar thermometry=819±20°C), whereas the plagioclase-liquid thermometry records higher temperatures. The rhyolite-MELTS models also suggest that quartz, rather than feldspar, is the first silicic phase to crystallize in all the lava compositions. When compared to the location of vapor saturation as predicted by rhyolite-MELTS ( 730-735°C), the thermometry of the feldspar rims suggests they crystallized at temperatures significantly above vapor saturation. This work sheds light on the calibration and interpretation of rhyolite-MELTS models in conjunction with detailed feldspar thermometry.

  20. Sulfurihydrogenibium rodmanii sp. nov., a sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotroph from the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia, and emended description of the genus Sulfurihydrogenibium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Andrew H; Liu, Yitai; Ferrera, Isabel; Beveridge, Terry J; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    2008-05-01

    Four thermophilic, sulfur-oxidizing, chemolithoautotrophic strains with >99 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity were isolated from terrestrial hot springs in the Geyser Valley and the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, Russia. One strain, designated UZ3-5T, was characterized fully. Cells of UZ3-5T were Gram-negative, motile, slightly oval rods (about 0.7 microm wide and 1.0 microm long) with multiple polar flagella. All four strains were obligately microaerophilic chemolithoautotrophs and could use elemental sulfur or thiosulfate as electron donors and oxygen (1-14 %, v/v) as the electron acceptor. Strain UZ3-5T grew at temperatures between 55 and 80 degrees C (optimally at 75 degrees C; 1.1 h doubling time), at pH 5.0-7.2 (optimally at pH 6.0-6.3) and at 0-0.9 % NaCl (optimally in the absence of NaCl). The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain UZ3-5T was 35 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain UZ3-5T was a member of the genus Sulfurihydrogenibium, its closest relative in culture being Sulfurihydrogenibium azorense Az-Fu1T (98.3 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). On the basis of its physiological and molecular characteristics, strain UZ3-5T represents a novel species of the genus Sulfurihydrogenibium, for which the name Sulfurihydrogenibium rodmanii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is UZ3-5T (=OCM 900T =ATCC BAA-1536T =DSM 19533T).

  1. Phreatomagmatic explosive eruptions along fissures on the top of mafic stratovolcanoes with overlapping compound calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Karoly; Geshi, Nobuo

    2017-04-01

    On near summit flank eruptions on stratovolcanoes it is commonly inferred that external water to have little or no influence on the course of the eruptions. Hence eruptions are typicaly "dry" that form spatter-dominated fissures and scoria cones. This assumption is based on that in elevated regions - especially on steep slopes - the hydrogeological conditions are not favourable to store large volume of ground water that can have effect on the eruptions. However there is some controversial trend of eruption progression from an early dry eruption below the summit that later turn to be phreatomagmatic as the eruption locus migrates toward the summit. The Suoana Ccrater on top of Miyakejima Island's mafic stratovolcano is a fine example to demonstrate such process. Suona Crater is the topmost crater of the 3 km long fissure aligned chain of small-volume volcanoes that formed in the 7th century flank of the summit region of the Miyakejima mafic stratovolcano. The oval shape crater of Suona (400 x 300 m) is surrounded by a tuff ring that developed over lava flows and epiclastic deposits accumulated in an older caldera forming about a tuff ring that is about 25 m in its thickest section with a basal consistent lava spatter dominated unit gradually transforming into a more scoria-dominated middle unit. A caldera-forming eruption in AD 2000 half-sectioned the Suona Crater exposing of its internal diatreme - crater in-fill - tephra rim succession providing a unique opportunity to understand the 3D architecture of the volcano. Toward the top of the preserved and exposed tuff ring section a clear gradual transition can be seen toward more abundance of chilled dark juvenile particles providing a matrix of a coarse ash that commonly hold cauliflower lapilli and bomb. This transition indicates that the eruption progressed from an early dry explosive phase such as lava fountaining to be a more Strombolian style explosive eruption that later on turned to be heavily influenced by

  2. Geology of the Mid-Miocene Rooster Comb Caldera and Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field, eastern Oregon: Silicic volcanism associated with Grande Ronde flood basalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas R.; Mahood, Gail A.

    2016-01-01

    The Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field (LOVF) of eastern Oregon consists of rhyolitic caldera centers and lava fields contemporaneous with and spatially related to Mid-Miocene Columbia River flood basalt volcanism. Previous studies delineated two calderas in the southeastern part of LOVF near Owyhee Reservoir, the result of eruptions of two ignimbrites, the Tuff of Leslie Gulch and the Tuff of Spring Creek. Our new interpretation is that these two map units are differentially altered parts of a single ignimbrite produced in a major phreatomagmatic eruption at ~ 15.8 Ma. Areas previously mapped as Tuff of Spring Creek are locations where the ignimbrite contains abundant clinoptilolite ± mordenite, which made it susceptible to erosion. The resistant intracaldera Tuff of Leslie Gulch has an alteration assemblage of albite ± quartz, indicative of low-temperature hydrothermal alteration. Our new mapping of caldera lake sediments and pre- and post-caldera rhyolitic lavas and intrusions that are chemically similar to intracaldera Tuff of Leslie Gulch point to a single ~ 20 × 25 km caldera, which we name the Rooster Comb Caldera. Erosion of the resurgently uplifted southern half of the caldera created dramatic exposures of intracaldera Tuff of Leslie Gulch cut by post-caldera rhyolite dikes and intrusions that are the deeper-level equivalents of lava domes and flows that erupted into the caldera lake preserved in exposures to the northeast. The Rooster Comb Caldera has features in common with more southerly Mid-Miocene calderas of the McDermitt Volcanic Field and High Rock Caldera Complex, including formation in a basinal setting shortly after flood basalt eruptions ceased in the region, and forming on eruption of peralkaline ignimbrite. The volcanism at Rooster Comb Caldera postdates the main activity at McDermitt and High Rock, but, like it, begins ~ 300 ky after flood basalt volcanism begins in the area, and while flood basalts don't erupt through the silicic focus, are

  3. Modelling photochemistry in alpine valleys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Brulfert

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic is a serious problem in the Chamonix Valley, France: traffic, noise and above all air pollution worry the inhabitants. The big fire in the Mont-Blanc tunnel made it possible, in the framework of the POVA project (POllution in Alpine Valleys, to undertake measurement campaigns with and without heavy-vehicle traffic through the Chamonix and Maurienne valleys, towards Italy (before and after the tunnel re-opening. Modelling is one of the aspects of POVA and should make it possible to explain the processes leading to episodes of atmospheric pollution, both in summer and in winter. Atmospheric prediction model ARPS 4.5.2 (Advanced Regional Prediction System, developed at the CAPS (Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms of the University of Oklahoma, enables to resolve the dynamics above a complex terrain. This model is coupled to the TAPOM 1.5.2 atmospheric chemistry (Transport and Air POllution Model code developed at the Air and Soil Pollution Laboratory of the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne. The numerical codes MM5 and CHIMERE are used to compute large scale boundary forcing. This paper focuses on modelling Chamonix valley using 300-m grid cells to calculate the dynamics and the reactive chemistry which makes possible to accurately represent the dynamics in the Chamonix valley (slope and valley winds and to process chemistry at fine scale. The summer 2003 intensive campaign was used to validate the model and to study chemistry. NOy according to O3 reduction demonstrates a VOC controlled regime, different from the NOx controlled regime expected and observed in the nearby city of Grenoble.

  4. EPA Region 1 - Valley Depth in Meters

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Raster of the Depth in meters of EPA-delimited Valleys in Region 1. Valleys (areas that are lower than their neighbors) were extracted from a Digital Elevation Model...

  5. Valley evolution by meandering rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Ajay Brian Sanjay

    Fluvial systems form landscapes and sedimentary deposits with a rich hierarchy of structures that extend from grain- to valley scale. Large-scale pattern formation in fluvial systems is commonly attributed to forcing by external factors, including climate change, tectonic uplift, and sea-level change. Yet over geologic timescales, rivers may also develop large-scale erosional and depositional patterns that do not bear on environmental history. This dissertation uses a combination of numerical modeling and topographic analysis to identify and quantify patterns in river valleys that form as a consequence of river meandering alone, under constant external forcing. Chapter 2 identifies a numerical artifact in existing, grid-based models that represent the co-evolution of river channel migration and bank strength over geologic timescales. A new, vector-based technique for bank-material tracking is shown to improve predictions for the evolution of meander belts, floodplains, sedimentary deposits formed by aggrading channels, and bedrock river valleys, particularly when spatial contrasts in bank strength are strong. Chapters 3 and 4 apply this numerical technique to establishing valley topography formed by a vertically incising, meandering river subject to constant external forcing---which should serve as the null hypothesis for valley evolution. In Chapter 3, this scenario is shown to explain a variety of common bedrock river valley types and smaller-scale features within them---including entrenched channels, long-wavelength, arcuate scars in valley walls, and bedrock-cored river terraces. Chapter 4 describes the age and geometric statistics of river terraces formed by meandering with constant external forcing, and compares them to terraces in natural river valleys. The frequency of intrinsic terrace formation by meandering is shown to reflect a characteristic relief-generation timescale, and terrace length is identified as a key criterion for distinguishing these

  6. Quantifying volcanic hazard at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy) with uncertainty assessment: 2. Pyroclastic density current invasion maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Augusto; Bevilacqua, Andrea; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Isaia, Roberto; Aspinall, Willy P.; Bisson, Marina; Flandoli, Franco; Baxter, Peter J.; Bertagnini, Antonella; Iannuzzi, Enrico; Orsucci, Simone; Pistolesi, Marco; Rosi, Mauro; Vitale, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Campi Flegrei (CF) is an example of an active caldera containing densely populated settlements at very high risk of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). We present here an innovative method for assessing background spatial PDC hazard in a caldera setting with probabilistic invasion maps conditional on the occurrence of an explosive event. The method encompasses the probabilistic assessment of potential vent opening positions, derived in the companion paper, combined with inferences about the spatial density distribution of PDC invasion areas from a simplified flow model, informed by reconstruction of deposits from eruptions in the last 15 ka. The flow model describes the PDC kinematics and accounts for main effects of topography on flow propagation. Structured expert elicitation is used to incorporate certain sources of epistemic uncertainty, and a Monte Carlo approach is adopted to produce a set of probabilistic hazard maps for the whole CF area. Our findings show that, in case of eruption, almost the entire caldera is exposed to invasion with a mean probability of at least 5%, with peaks greater than 50% in some central areas. Some areas outside the caldera are also exposed to this danger, with mean probabilities of invasion of the order of 5-10%. Our analysis suggests that these probability estimates have location-specific uncertainties which can be substantial. The results prove to be robust with respect to alternative elicitation models and allow the influence on hazard mapping of different sources of uncertainty, and of theoretical and numerical assumptions, to be quantified.

  7. An Airborne Scanning Laser Altimetry Survey of Long Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofton, M. A.; Blair, J. B.; Minster, J.-B.; Ridgway, J. R.; Williams, N. P.; Bufton, J. L.; Rabine, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Between 28 September and 7 October 1995, we conducted an airborne laser altimetry experiment over the Long Valley caldera, California, in which each of two scanning laser altimeters (dubbed SLICER and RASCAL) were flown in a NASA T-39 jet aircraft. Operating concurrently were a Global Positioning System (GPS) guidance system and dual frequency receivers for precise navigation and post-flight calculation or the airplane trajectory relative to a ground station, and an inertial navigation system (INS) for attitude determination. Reduction of raw laser ranges requires merging the differential kinematic GPS aircraft trajectory and the INS data with the laser data, and determination of the atmospheric delay. Data geolocation consists of obtaining the centre location and the mean elevation within each footprint in a geodetic coordinate system. The elevation of Crowley Lake is recovered to an accuracy of approximately 3 cm or better from 3 km above ground level and crossover analysis indicates that the elevation estimates are consistent from pass to pass. We test our geolocation procedures by comparing laser-derived elevations with those determined in situ for recognizable ground features. A comparison of laser and GPS-derived positions shows that the horizontal accuracy is better than the diameter of the footprint and vertical accuracy is within the error inherent in the range measurement. A comparison of SLICER elevation data with digital elevation models (DEMs) of the region shows that the DEM data provides surface topography to within stated accuracy limits. Although research continues to utilize the full potential of laser altimetry data, our results constitute a successful demonstration that the technique may be used to perform geodetic monitoring of surface topographic changes.

  8. Evaluation of 20-min and Annual Radiation Budget Components and Cloudiness in a Mountainous Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, E.

    2007-05-01

    Logan, Utah (USA) is among cities located in the mountainous valley in the western portion of Rocky Mountains in North America. It is the county seat of Cache Valley, a metropolitan area with a population of about 100,000. The valley had the polluted air in the USA during January 2004. To evaluate the daily and annual radiation budget and cloudiness in this mountainous valley, we set up a radiation station in the middle of the valley to measure the 20- min radiation budget components namely: incoming (Rso) and outgoing (Rso) solar or shortwave radiation, using to CM21 Kipp and Zonen (one inverted) and incoming (Rli) (or atmospheric) and outgoing (Rlo) or terrestrial) longwave radiation using two CG1 Kipp and Zonen Pyrgeometers (one inverted) during the year of 2003. All pyranometers and Pyrgeometers were ventilated with four CV2 Kipp and Zonen ventilation systems throughout the year to prevent deposition of dew, frost and snow, which otherwise would disturb the measurements. We also measured the 2-m air temperature and relative humidity along with surface temperature. All measurements were taken every 2 s, averaged to 20 min, continuously throughout the year 2000. A Met One heated rain gauge measured precipitation. Comparison of the annual radiation budget components indicates that about 25% of the annual Rsi (5848.6 MJ/ (squared m-y)) was reflected back to sky as Rso. Rli and Rlo amounted to 9968.7 and 13303.5 MJ/ (squared m-y)), respectively. This yielded about 1364.9 MJ/ (squared m- y)) available energy (Rn). Having the 2-m air temperature and moisture data and comparison between the theoretical and the measured longwave radiation, we evaluated the 20-m cloudy conditions throughout the year of 2003. The average cloud base height was 587 m (ranged from zero for foggy conditions to about 3000 m). Annual cloudiness contributed about 139.1 MJ/ (squared m-y)) more energy in this valley.

  9. Volcanic flood simulation of magma effusion using FLO-2D for drainage of a caldera lake at the Mt. Baekdusan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Khil-Ha; Kim, Sung-Wook; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2014-05-01

    Many volcanic craters and calderas are filled with large amounts of water that can pose significant flood hazards to downstream communities due to their high elevation and the potential for catastrophic releases of water. Recent reports pointed out the Baekdusan volcano that is located between the border of China and North Korea as a potential active volcano. Since Millennium Eruption around 1000 AD, smaller eruptions have occurred at roughly 100-year intervals, with the last one in 1903. Sudden release of huge volume of water stored in temporarily elevated caldera lakes are a recurrent feature of volcanic environments, due to the case with which outlet channels are blocked by and re-cut through, unwelded pyroclastic deposits. The volcano is showing signs of waking from a century-long slumber recently. Volcanic floods, including breakouts from volcanic lakes, can affect communities beyond the areas immediately affected by a volcanic eruption and cause significant hydrological hazards because floods from lake-filled calderas may be particularly large and high. Although a number of case studies have been presented in the literature, investigation of the underlying physical processes is required as well as a method for interpreting the process of the rapid release of water stored in a caldera lake. The development of various forecasting techniques to prevent and minimize economic and social damage is in urgent need. This study focuses on constructing a flood hazard map triggered by the magma effusion in the Baekdusan volcano. A physically-based uplift model was developed to compute the amount of water and time to peak flow. The ordinary differential equation was numerically solved using the finite difference method and Newton-Raphson iteration method was used to solve nonlinear equation. The magma effusion rate into the caldera lake is followed by examples at other volcanic activities. As a result, the hydrograph serves as an upper boundary condition when hydrodynamic

  10. Det sorte USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndal, Jørn

    Bogen gennemgår det sorte USAs historie fra 1776 til 2016, idet grundtemaet er spændingsforholdet mellem USAs grundlæggelsesidealer og den racemæssige praksis, et spændingsforhold som Gunnar Myrdal kaldte "det amerikanske dilemma." Bogen, der er opbygget som politisk, social og racemæssig histori......, er opdelt i 13 kapitler og består af fire dele: Første del: Slaveriet; anden del: Jim Crow; tredje del. King-årene; fjerde del: Frem mod Obama....

  11. Bonded 2D-DEM Models of Pit Craters and Collapse Calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holohan, E. P.; Schöpfer, M. P. J.; Walsh, J. J.

    2010-05-01

    Subsidence of the roof of a magma reservoir commonly produces volcanic depressions, which, depending on scale, are termed pit craters or collapse calderas. To identify what geometric and mechanical factors influence the structural evolution of this subsidence, we used Distinct Element Method (DEM) numerical models. The models comprise an assemblage of gravitationally-loaded circular particles that interact at their contacts according to elastic-frictional laws. Cohesion is provided by inter-particle bonds that break once their shear or tensile strength is exceeded. Varying particle and bond micro-properties yields assemblage macro-properties characteristic of natural rock masses (e.g. elasticity, failure, and strain softening), with fracture localization simulated by bond breakage. The magma reservoir is represented as a region of non-bonded, low-fiction particles. Withdrawal of magma is simulated by incrementally reducing the area of the reservoir particles. The resultant gravity-driven failure and subsidence of the overlying reservoir roof is explicitly replicated. We investigated the effect on subsidence of several initial mechanical and geometric properties. Of these, the strength (cohesion) and thickness/diameter ratio (T/D) of the roof exerted strongest influences, whilst the roof's Young's Modulus and the reservoir's ceiling curvature imparted secondary influences. These properties interacted to produce four ‘end-member' subsidence styles, although elements of several styles tended to occur in any one model realization: (1) Predominantly central sagging at low T/D and low strength; (2) hitherto unrecognized ‘central snapping' at low T/D and high strength; (3) predominantly single central block subsidence at low to intermediate strength and at intermediate T/D ratios; (4) multiple central block subsidence at high strength and high T/D ratios. The critical T/D ratio, at which subsidence changes from single central block to multiple central block, was

  12. Reticulite‐producing fountains from ring fractures in Kīlauea Caldera ca. 1500 CE: Chapter 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Michael; Carey, Rebecca J.; Swanson, Don; Houghton, Bruce F.; Carey, Rebecca; Cayol, Valérie; Poland, Michael P.; Weis, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    A widely dispersed reticulite bed occurs close to the base of the Keanakākoʻi Tephra at Kīlauea Volcano. It can be divided into six subunits in the northern sector of the volcano; the reticulite also occurs in the southern sector, but outcrops are sparse owing to penecontemporaneous erosion and burial. Multilobate isopachs for each subunit and the total deposit suggest that multiple fountaining vents were distributed in the northern half of the caldera, possibly along ring fractures for the newly formed caldera. Isopach maps also show a sharp decline in thickness along the dispersal axis of each lobe, which could be explained by remobilization of tephra and/or inclined fountains. Despite such isopach characteristics, thinning rates calculated from the isopach data indicate that the fountains were among the most intense and powerful of all studied Kīlauea fountains. Density analyses of the pyroclasts suggest that fountaining was high (>600m) yet complex, possibly due to lava ponding and reentrainment. The calculated volume of the reticulite deposited around the caldera rim is approximately 0.2km3, more voluminous than the deposits of the 1959 Kīlauea Iki eruption; this volume is a minimum, however, as the low-density tephra is easily remobilized, and 600m high caldera walls probably trapped tephra within the caldera, which is deeply buried today and not accounted for in the volume calculations. The duration of this eruption was most likely at least a few days to weeks, based on the calculated volume and estimated discharge rates as seen during the Kīlauea Iki 1959 eruption.

  13. The 1817 Eruption of Okmok Caldera, Umnak Island, Alaska: New Insights Into a Complex Historical Eruption in the Eastern Aleutians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, C. A.; Beget, J.; Grey, D.; Wolfe, B.

    2003-12-01

    Okmok is a 10-km-diameter, late-Holocene caldera on Umnak Island in the eastern Aleutians, 1400 km southwest of Anchorage. The most recent eruption in 1997 was strombolian in character, producing a basaltic-andesite lava flow within the caldera and localized ash fall. Since caldera-formation approximately 2050 14C yrs BP, however, more violent eruptions from vents within the caldera have impacted all flanks of the volcano with tephra fall, ballistics, pyroclastic surges and flows, and lahars. An example of these more violent intracaldera events is the 1817 eruption. Reevaluation of historical accounts of activity at Okmok combined with new geologic mapping and tephra studies suggest that an 1817 eruption included (1) early, largely hydrovolcanic, explosive activity and the production of significant pyroclastic fall and surge deposits extending down the north and east flanks of the volcano; (2) generation of a flood that reached the Bering Sea; (3) late-stage strombolian fountaining and lava flow production. Vents from the 1817 eruption form a 4-km-long arc that parallels the base of the north caldera wall and include a 50-70-m-deep, elongate maar crater erupted through pre-existing tuff cone deposits. Terrace morphology and flood deposits less than 200 14C yrs BP indicate a flooding event down Crater Creek consistent with historical accounts of Aleut village inundation at the coastline in 1817. The later part of the eruption produced a 120-m high cinder and spatter cone and a blocky a'a lava flow field that fills a shallow basin near the outlet of Crater Creek. These preliminary results indicate that Okmok is capable of eruptions far more violent than the largely effusive events of the last century.

  14. Isotopic modeling and the formation of the post-caldera eastern Upper Basin Member rhyolites, Yellowstone, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, C. J.; Larson, P. B.

    2010-12-01

    An array of samples from the eastern Upper Basin Member of the Plateau Rhyolites in the Yellowstone Plateau were collected and analyzed to evaluate styles of deposition, geochemical variation, and plausible sources for these low δ18O rhyolites. The eastern Upper Basin Member is comprised of the Tuff of Sulphur Creek, Canyon flow, and Dunraven Road flow, all high silica rhyolites that were thought to have erupted from within the present Yellowstone Caldera between the northeastern resurgent dome and the northeastern portion of the ring fracture. These eruptions are some of the earliest intracaldera rhyolites and followed the last caldera collapse by approximately 160ka, and generally differ from most other intra-caldera rhyolites by low δ18O values (1.5 to 4.5 per mil) , higher radiogenic isotope ratios, increased plagioclase abundance, and less depleted/ more primitive geochemistry, e.g., higher Sc, Ti, Ba, and Sr. Petrologic textures, higher radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr values in plagioclase phenocrysts (0.7134 to 0.7185) than surrounding melt (0.7099 to 0.7161), whole rock radiogenic values, and δ18O depletions on the order of 5 per mil found in the Tuff of Sulphur Creek and Canyon flow indicate at least a two-stage petrogenesis. Assimilation and fractional crystallization processes may have occurred while the magmatic system was younger leaving un-erupted material at the margins. This magmatic rind may have been hydrothermally altered after cooling, subsided during caldera collapses, and then assimilated/melted to form the Tuff of Sulphur Creek and the Canyon flow. The youngest flow from the eastern Upper Basin Member, the Dunraven Road flow, is geochemically more similar to the extra-caldera Roaring Mountain Member and can be modeled using assimilation of hydrothermally altered wall rock from the ring fracture followed by fractional crystallization.

  15. A preliminary study of older hot spring alteration in Sevenmile Hole, Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Peter B.; Phillips, Allison; John, David; Cosca, Michael; Pritchard, Chad; Andersen, Allen; Manion, Jennifer

    2009-11-01

    Erosion in the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone Caldera (640 ka), Wyoming, has exposed a cross section of older hydrothermal alteration in the canyon walls. The altered outcrops of the post-collapse tuff of Sulphur Creek (480 ka) extend from the canyon rim to more than 300 m beneath it. The hydrothermal minerals are zoned, with an advanced argillic alteration consisting of an association of quartz (opal) + kaolinite ± alunite ± dickite, and an argillic or potassic alteration association with quartz + illite ± adularia. Disseminated fine-grained pyrite or marcasite is ubiquitous in both alteration types. These alteration associations are characteristic products of shallow volcanic epithermal environments. The contact between the two alteration types is about 100 m beneath the rim. By analogy to other active geothermal systems including active hydrothermal springs in the Yellowstone Caldera, the transition from kaolinite to illite occurred at temperatures in the range 150 to 170 °C. An 40Ar/ 39Ar age on alunite of 154,000 ± 16,000 years suggests that hydrothermal activity has been ongoing since at least that time. A northwest-trending linear array of extinct and active hot spring centers in the Sevenmile Hole area implies a deeper structural control for the upflowing hydrothermal fluids. We interpret this deeper structure to be the Yellowstone Caldera ring fault that is covered by the younger tuff of Sulphur Creek. The Sevenmile Hole altered area lies at the eastern end of a band of hydrothermal centers that may mark the buried extension of the Yellowstone Caldera ring fault across the northern part of the Caldera.

  16. Post 19 ka B.P. eruptive history of Ulleung Island, Korea, inferred from an intra-caldera pyroclastic sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, G. B.; Cronin, S. J.; Yoon, W. S.; Sohn, Y. K.

    2014-04-01

    Ulleung Island is a Quaternary volcanic island located in the mid-western part of the East Sea (Sea of Japan) back-arc basin, which has erupted from the Pliocene until the late Holocene. This study focuses on reconstructing the latest eruptive history of the island by describing the sedimentological and stratigraphic characteristics of the most recent, trachytic/phonolitic pyroclastic sequence, named the Nari Tephra Formation. This formation is preserved as a succession of unwelded pyroclastic and epiclastic deposits within an embayed margin of the Nari Caldera. The embayment acted as a topographic trap for proximal pyroclastic deposits, and contains a complete record of the past 19,000 years of eruption history. The formation includes evidence for five separate eruptive episodes (Member N-1 to N-5), with intervening weathered and/or soil horizons indicating hundreds to thousands of years of repose between each eruption. Eruption styles and depositional mechanisms varied between and during individual episodes, reflecting changing dynamics of the magma plumbing system, magmatic gas coupling, and a variable role of external water. Extra-caldera sequences show that only a few of these eruptions generated sustained eruption columns or pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) large enough to overtop the caldera wall. Thus tephra sequences outside the caldera provide an underestimate of eruption frequency, and care needs to be taken in the interpretation and correlation to distal tephra sequences recognized in marine and terrestrial records. In addition, topographic effects of caldera structures should be considered for the assessment of PDC-related hazards in such moderately sized pyroclastic eruptions.

  17. Quantitative investigations of geologic surfaces utilizing airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) and polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) data for Death Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.; Kruse, Fred A.

    1991-01-01

    Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) data were collected over Death Valley, California, USA, in September 1989. These two data sets were used to quantitatively characterize both the mineralogy and surface structure of the valley floor. Field mapping and characterization of the salt flats across the valley identified 16 separate units. The AVIRIS data were calibrated using the 'empirical line' method, and spectra extracted for the 16 units. A water vapor map was generated from the AVIRIS data and showed spatial variations in its distribution due to evaporation of surface water. Unmixing of the 16 spectral units produced maps of endmember abundance.

  18. Health care reform in the USA: Recommendations from USA and non-USA radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Lauren Mb; Martin, Diego R; Bader, Till; Semelka, Richard C

    2012-02-28

    To compare the opinions and recommendations of imaging specialists from United States (USA) and non-USA developed nations for USA health care reform. A survey was emailed out to 18 imaging specialists from 17 non-USA developed nation countries and 14 radiologists within the USA regarding health care reform. The questionnaire contained the following questions: what are the strengths of your health care system, what problems are present in your nation's health care system, and what recommendations do you have for health care reform in the USA. USA and non-USA radiologists received the same questionnaire. Strengths of the USA health care system include high quality care, autonomy, and access to timely care. Twelve of 14 (86%) USA radiologists identified medicolegal action as a major problem in their health care system and felt that medicolegal reform was a critical aspect of health care reform. None of the non-USA radiologists identified medicolegal aspects as a problem in their own country nor identified it as a subject for USA health care reform. Eleven of 14 (79%) USA radiologists and 16/18 (89%) non-USA radiologists identified universal health care coverage as an important recommendation for reform. Without full universal coverage, meaningful health care reform will likely require medicolegal reform as an early and important aspect of improved and efficient health care.

  19. Timing and development of the Heise volcanic field, Snake River Plain, Idaho, western USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, L.A.; McIntosh, W.C.

    2005-01-01

    The Snake River Plain (SRP) developed over the last 16 Ma as a bimodal volcanic province in response to the southwest movement of the North American plate over a fixed melting anomaly. Volcanism along the SRP is dominated by eruptions of explosive high-silica rhyolites and represents some of the largest eruptions known. Basaltic eruptions represent the final stages of volcanism, forming a thin cap above voluminous rhyolitic deposits. Volcanism progressed, generally from west to east, along the plain episodically in successive volcanic fields comprised of nested caldera complexes with major caldera-forming eruptions within a particular field separated by ca. 0.5-1 Ma, similar to, and in continuation with, the present-day Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field. Passage of the North American plate over the melting anomaly at a particular point in time and space was accompanied by uplift, regional tectonism, massive explosive eruptions, and caldera subsidence, and followed by basaltic volcanism and general subsidence. The Heise volcan ic field in the eastern SRP, Idaho, represents an adjacent and slightly older field immediately to the southwest of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field. Five large-volume (>0.5 km3) rhyolitic ignimbrites constitute a time-stratigraphic framework of late Miocene to early Pliocene volcanism for the study region. Field relations and high-precision 40Ar/39Ar age determinations establish that four of these regional ignimbrites were erupted from the Heise volcanic field and form the framework of the Heise Group. These are the Blacktail Creek Tuff (6.62 ?? 0.03 Ma), Walcott Tuff (6.27 ?? 0.04 Ma), Conant Creek Tuff (5.51 ?? 0.13 Ma), and Kilgore Tuff (4.45 ?? 0.05 Ma; all errors reported at ?? 2??). The fifth widespread ignimbrite in the regions is the Arbon Valley Tuff Member of the Starlight Formation (10.21 ?? 0.03 Ma), which erupted from a caldera source outside of the Heise volcanic field. These results establish the Conant Creek Tuff as a

  20. Interplay Between Tectonics And Volcanic Processes Active In The Yellowstone Caldera Detected Via DInSAR And GPS Time-Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizzani, Pietro; Battaglia, Maurizio; Castaldo, Raffaele; Pepe, Antonio; Zeni, Giovanni; Lanari, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    We discriminate and quantify the effects of different stress sources that are active in the Yellowstone volcanic region. In particular, the use of long-term deformation time series allows us to separate the spatial and temporal contributions of the regional tectonic field due to North American (NA) plate motion from the dynamic of magmatic/hydrothermal sources beneath the caldera area. Yellowstone volcano was formed by three major caldera forming eruptions that occurred around 2.0, 1.3 and 0.64 Ma, the most recent one responsible for the 60 km-wide and 40 km-long Yellowstone caldera. Two structural resurgent domes emerged after the last caldera forming eruption: the Mallard Lake (ML) resurgent dome in the southwestern region of Yellowstone caldera, and the Sour Creek (SC) resurgent dome in the northeast part of the caldera. In this work, we extensively exploit DInSAR and GPS measurements to investigate surface deformation at Yellowstone caldera over the last 18 years. We start by analyzing the 1992-2010 deformation time series retrieved by applying the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) DInSAR technique. This allows us identifying three macro-areas: i) Norris Geyser Basin (NGB), ii) ML and SC resurgent domes and iii) Snake River Plain (SRP), characterized by unique deformation behaviors. In particular, SRP shows a signal related to tectonic deformation, while the other two regions are influenced by the caldera unrest. To isolate the deformation signals related to different stress sources in the Yellowstone caldera, we also remove from the retrieved mean deformation velocity maps the mean displacement rate associated to the northern sector of the Snake River Plain. This latter is the result of tectonic processes controlled by complex interactions between the NA plate, moving in the ENE - WSW direction with a rate of about 2 cm/yr, and the flow of the asthenosphere plume beneath the Yellowstone volcanic region. These de-trended data allow recognizing four major deformation

  1. The Central Valley Hydrologic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunt, C.; Belitz, K.; Hanson, R. T.

    2009-12-01

    Historically, California’s Central Valley has been one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. The Central Valley also is rapidly becoming an important area for California’s expanding urban population. In response to this competition for water, a number of water-related issues have gained prominence: conjunctive use, artificial recharge, hydrologic implications of land-use change, subsidence, and effects of climate variability. To provide information to stakeholders addressing these issues, the USGS made a detailed assessment of the Central Valley aquifer system that includes the present status of water resources and how these resources have changed over time. The principal product of this assessment is a tool, referred to as the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM), that simulates surface-water flows, groundwater flows, and land subsidence in response to stresses from human uses and from climate variability throughout the entire Central Valley. The CVHM utilizes MODFLOW combined with a new tool called “Farm Process” to simulate groundwater and surface-water flow, irrigated agriculture, land subsidence, and other key processes in the Central Valley on a monthly basis. This model was discretized horizontally into 20,000 1-mi2 cells and vertically into 10 layers ranging in thickness from 50 feet at the land surface to 750 feet at depth. A texture model constructed by using data from more than 8,500 drillers’ logs was used to estimate hydraulic properties. Unmetered pumpage and surface-water deliveries for 21 water-balance regions were simulated with the Farm Process. Model results indicate that human activities, predominately surface-water deliveries and groundwater pumping for irrigated agriculture, have dramatically influenced the hydrology of the Central Valley. These human activities have increased flow though the aquifer system by about a factor of six compared to pre-development conditions. The simulated hydrology reflects spatial

  2. Baltimaade kunsti turnee USAs

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1998-01-01

    5. nov.-st USA Lõuna-Carolina osariigis Wellington B. Grey galeriis ja Jenkins Fine Art Center's 13 eesti, läti ja leedu kunstniku näitus, mis hakkab kolme aasta jooksul ringlema Ameerikas. Eksponeeritud fotokunst, video, installatsioon, joonistused. Kuraator Peeter Linnap ja Mari Laanemets peavad ettekande näituse avamisega samal ajal toimuval Fotohariduse Ühingu konverentsil

  3. USA kaitseb Iisraeli / Aadu Hiietamm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hiietamm, Aadu, 1954-

    2006-01-01

    ÜRO Julgeolekunõukogus peetud arutelul ei võetud USA vastuseisu tõttu vastu üleskutset viivitamatuks tingimusteta vaherahuks, USA toetab Iisraeli rünnakuid Hizbollah' sisside vastu. Lisa: Eesti mõistab hukka

  4. Petrogenesis of Rinjani Post-1257-Caldera-Forming-Eruption Lava Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heryadi Rachmat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.3.2.107-126After the catastrophic 1257 caldera-forming eruption, a new chapter of Old Rinjani volcanic activity beganwith the appearance of Rombongan and Barujari Volcanoes within the caldera. However, no published petrogeneticstudy focuses mainly on these products. The Rombongan eruption in 1944 and Barujari eruptions in pre-1944, 1966,1994, 2004, and 2009 produced basaltic andesite pyroclastic materials and lava flows. A total of thirty-one sampleswere analyzed, including six samples for each period of eruption except from 2004 (only one sample. The sampleswere used for petrography, whole-rock geochemistry, and trace and rare earth element analyses. The Rombonganand Barujari lavas are composed of calc-alkaline and high K calc-alkaline porphyritic basaltic andesite. The magmashows narrow variation of SiO2 content that implies small changes during its generation. The magma that formedRombongan and Barujari lavas is island-arc alkaline basalt. Generally, data show that the rocks are enriched in LargeIon Lithophile Elements (LILE: K, Rb, Ba, Sr, and Ba and depleted in High Field Strength Elements (HFSE: Y, Ti,and Nb which are typically a suite from a subduction zone. The pattern shows a medium enrichment in Light REEand relatively depleted in Heavy REE. The processes are dominantly controlled by fractional crystallization andmagma mixing. All of the Barujari and Rombongan lavas would have been produced by the same source of magmawith little variation in composition caused by host rock filter process. New flux of magma would likely have occurredfrom pre-1944 until 2009 period that indicates slightly decrease and increase of SiO2 content. The Rombongan andBarujari lava generations show an arc magma differentiation trend.

  5. Magma storage and evolution of the most recent effusive and explosive eruptions from Yellowstone Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befus, Kenneth S.; Gardner, James E.

    2016-04-01

    Between 70 and 175 ka, over 350 km3 of high-silica rhyolite magma erupted both effusively and explosively from within the Yellowstone Caldera. Phenocrysts in all studied lavas and tuffs are remarkably homogenous at the crystal, eruption, and caldera-scale, and yield QUILF temperatures of 750 ± 25 °C. Phase equilibrium experiments replicate the observed phenocryst assemblage at those temperatures and suggest that the magmas were all stored in the upper crust. Quartz-hosted glass inclusions contain 1.0-2.5 % H2O and 50-600 ppm CO2, but some units are relatively rich in CO2 (300-600 ppm) and some are CO2-poor (50-200 ppm). The CO2-rich magmas were stored at 90-150 MPa and contained a fluid that was 60-75 mol% CO2. CO2-poor magmas were stored at 50-70 MPa, with a more H2O-rich fluid (X_{{{text{CO}}2 }} = 40-60 %). Storage pressures and volatiles do not correlate with eruption age, volume, or style. Trace-element contents in glass inclusions and host matrix glass preserve a systematic evolution produced by crystal fractionation, estimated to range from 36 ± 12 to 52 ± 12 wt%. Because the erupted products contain eruption. In the Tuffs of Bluff Point and Cold Mountain Creek, matrix glass is less evolved than most inclusions, which may indicate that more primitive rhyolite was injected into the reservoir just before those eruptions. The presence and dissolution of granophyre in one flow may record evidence for heating prior to eruption and also demonstrate that the Yellowstone magmatic system may undergo rapid changes. The variations in depth suggest the magmas were sourced from multiple chambers that follow similar evolutionary paths in the upper crust.

  6. Low- δ18O tephra from a compositionally zoned magma body: Fisher Caldera, Unimak Island, Aleutians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, Ilya N.; Fournelle, John H.; Valley, John W.

    2001-11-01

    We present the results of an oxygen isotope study of phenocrysts in pumice clasts and ash layers produced by the 9100 yr BP composite dacite-basaltic andesite climactic eruption that formed Fisher Caldera in the eastern Aleutians. Products of the eruption represent a low-δ18O magma with δ18O plagioclase (+4.79±0.24‰) and clinopyroxene (3.81±0.23‰) corresponding to equilibrium at magmatic temperatures. Dacitic and overlying basaltic-andesitic tephra of the climactic eruption, subsequent intracaldera basaltic to andesitic lavas, and a cumulate inclusion, are similarly low in δ18O. Other analyzed lavas and pyroclastics of Unimak island and the lower Alaska peninsula, as well as precaldera Fisher basalt, have normal δ18O magmatic values (>+5.5‰). We propose a model in which prior to 9100 yr BP, normal mantle-derived basaltic magma coalesced in a large shallow precaldera magma chamber during Late Wisconsin glaciation. Lowering of magmatic δ18O resulted then from long-term assimilation of ∼5-10% of syn-glacial hydrothermally-altered country rocks. Differentiation of basaltic magma was concurrent with this assimilation and produced low-δ18O Fisher dacites, cumulates, and post-caldera crystal-richer lavas. We propose the use of δ18O values of phenocrysts (especially alteration-resistant pyroxene) in tephra as a tool for tephrochronological and tephrostratigraphic correlation. Distinctly low-δ18O values are useful in identification of the Fisher ash in the eastern Aleutians and in the lower Alaska Peninsula.

  7. The Jurassic Bupyeong caldera in South Korea and its tectonic implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J.; Kwon, S.; Kim, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Bupyeong circular structure with ~10 km in diameter, near to the west of Seoul in middle Korea, has been considered as the remnant of a Mesozoic caldera, and consists of felsic volcanic and plutonic rocks. However, the ages of the magmatism have not been well constrained. We measured in situ U-Pb zircon ages using LA-ICP-MS technique. Two welded tuffs at the western part of the structure gave 171.3 ± 2.6 (95% confidence level hereafter) Ma (n=18) and 173.4 ± 4.6 Ma (n=3). Four granitic rocks within the structure gave 170.5 ± 5.2 Ma (n=8), 171.3 ± 2.6 Ma (n=18), 172.3 ± 1.9 Ma (n=19) and 172.3 ± 3.7 Ma (n=10). The age data indicate coeval volcanism and plutonism of early Middle Jurassic, supporting the caldera interpretation. The early Middle Jurassic granitic plutons are widespread in South Korea and form NE-SW or NNE-SSW belts. Only those in the Bupyeong structure are associated with volcanic rocks, indicating that they are shallow level intrusions, while others are deeper level ones. This observation is well supported by aluminum-in-hornblende geobarometric data of previous works, in that granites near the Bupyeong structure have lower emplacement pressure (<4 kb), compared with those in other areas (5-8 kb). In summary, the Bupyeong structure may have formed outside of main orogenic zone during the Daebo (Jurassic) orogeny.

  8. Habitat suitability and conservation of the Giant Gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento Valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, B.J.; Wylie, G.D.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Resource managers often have little information regarding the habitat requirements and distribution of rare species. Factor analysis-based habitat suitability models describe the ecological niche of a species and identify locations where these conditions occur on the landscape using existing occurrence data. We used factor analyses to assess the suitability of habitats for Thamnophis gigas (Giant Gartersnake), a rare, threatened species endemic to the Central Valley of California, USA, and to map the locations of habitat suitable for T. gigas in the Sacramento Valley. Factor analyses indicated that the niche of T. gigas is composed of sites near rice agriculture with low stream densities. Sites with high canal densities and near wetlands also appeared suitable, but results for these variables were sensitive to potential sampling bias. In the Sacramento Valley, suitable habitats occur primarily in the central portion of the valley floor. Based upon the results of the factor analyses, recovery planning for T. gigas will require an on-the-ground assessment of the current distribution and abundance of T. gigas, maintaining the few remaining natural wetlands and the practice of rice agriculture in the Sacramento Valley, and studying the effects of agricultural practices and land use changes on populations of T. gigas. ?? 2010 by the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists.

  9. Guantanamo rikub USA seadusi / Krister Paris

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Paris, Krister

    2003-01-01

    Kaks USA tsiviilkohut leiavad oma otsuses, et USA valitsus rikub USA-s ja Guantanamo sõjaväebaasis kinnipeetavate nn. vaenlasvõitlejate õigusi. Inimõigusorganisatsioonid avaldavad heameelt kohtute otsuste üle

  10. Systematic Mapping and Statistical Analyses of Valley Landform and Vegetation Asymmetries Across Hydroclimatic Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, M. J.; Pierce, J. L.; McNamara, J. P.; Flores, A. N.; Benner, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    Terrain aspect alters the spatial distribution of insolation across topography, driving eco-pedo-hydro-geomorphic feedbacks that can alter landform evolution and result in valley asymmetries for a suite of land surface characteristics (e.g. slope length and steepness, vegetation, soil properties, and drainage development). Asymmetric valleys serve as natural laboratories for studying how landscapes respond to climate perturbation. In the semi-arid montane granodioritic terrain of the Idaho batholith, Northern Rocky Mountains, USA, prior works indicate that reduced insolation on northern (pole-facing) aspects prolongs snow pack persistence, and is associated with thicker, finer-grained soils, that retain more water, prolong the growing season, support coniferous forest rather than sagebrush steppe ecosystems, stabilize slopes at steeper angles, and produce sparser drainage networks. We hypothesize that the primary drivers of valley asymmetry development are changes in the pedon-scale water-balance that coalesce to alter catchment-scale runoff and drainage development, and ultimately cause the divide between north and south-facing land surfaces to migrate northward. We explore this conceptual framework by coupling land surface analyses with statistical modeling to assess relationships and the relative importance of land surface characteristics. Throughout the Idaho batholith, we systematically mapped and tabulated various statistical measures of landforms, land cover, and hydroclimate within discrete valley segments (n=~10,000). We developed a random forest based statistical model to predict valley slope asymmetry based upon numerous measures (n>300) of landscape asymmetries. Preliminary results suggest that drainages are tightly coupled with hillslopes throughout the region, with drainage-network slope being one of the strongest predictors of land-surface-averaged slope asymmetry. When slope-related statistics are excluded, due to possible autocorrelation, valley

  11. Jurassic ash-flow sheets, calderas, and related intrusions of the Cordilleran volcanic arc in southeastern Arizona: implications for regional tectonics and ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, P.W.; Hagstrum, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    Volcanologic, petrologic, and paleomagnetic studies of widespread Jurassic ash-flow sheets in the Huachuca-southern Dragoon Mountains area have led to identification of four large source calderas and associated comagnetic intracaldera intrusions. Stratigraphic, facies, and contact features of the caldera-related tuffs also provide constraints on the locations, lateral displacements, and very existence for some major northwest-trending faults and inferred regional thrusts in southeastern Arizona. Silicic alkalic compositions of the Jurassic caldera-related, ash-flow tuffs; bimodal associated mafic magmatism; and interstratified coarse sedimentary deposits provide evidence for synvolcanic extension and rifting within the Cordilleran magmatic arc. Gold-copper mineralization is associated with subvolcanic intrusions at several of the Jurassic calderas. -from Authors

  12. How Frequently Can a "Supervolcano" Erupt? Rapid Emplacement of Voluminous Compositionally Diverse Ignimbrites, Central San Juan Calderas, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, P. W.; McIntosh, W. C.

    2006-12-01

    High-resolution single-crystal laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on sanidine phenocrysts document sequential eruption of four multi-hundred cubic-kilometer ignimbrites and associated lavas flows from calderas in the central San Juan Mountains, Colorado within a cumulative time interval of less than 50-100 ka. The tight recurrence interval was not evident from previous incremental-heating 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages, which were stratigraphically inconsistent on time scales beyond analytical precision. The new single- crystal results show that three tuff sheets, Rat Creek (>150 km3), Cebolla Creek (>250 km3), and Nelson Mountain Tuffs Creek (>500 km3) from spatially overlapping sources in the San Luis- Cochetopa caldera complex, erupted between 26.92±0.05 and 26.91±0.03 Ma (9 separate samples). A sequence of four postcollapse lavas at Cochetopa erupted at 26.86±0.04 Ma (6 samples) while an andesitic stratocone grew within San Luis caldera complex. Concurrently, Snowshoe Mountain Tuff (>500 km3) erupted from the Creede caldera, 20 km to the south, at 26.87±0.05 Ma (5 samples). Within this limited time interval, eruptive compositions fluctuated widely. Rat Creek and Nelson Mountain Tuffs are compositionally zoned from crystal-poor low-Si rhyolite to cpx-bearing dacite, while the intervening Cebolla Creek Tuff is uniform mafic hbl-rich dacite. Cochetopa Dome lavas are nearly aphyric high-Si rhyolite, while Snowshoe Mountain Tuff is crystal-rich low-Si cpx-bearing dacite. For comparison, four ignimbrites from Aso caldera in southern Japan, with a cumulative volume of ~300 km3, erupted at 270, 140, 120, and 90 ka (Nakada et al., 2003); four overlapping caldera collapses at Santorini in the Aegean were each associated with silicic tuff with volumes of several tens of kilometers, at 203, ~100, 21, and 3.6 ka (Druitt, 1999). In contrast, larger "supervolcano" systems, such as Yellowstone, commonly have repose periods of 0.5- 1x106 m.y., even when eruptive compositions

  13. Limits of Luminescence Dating: an update regarding quartz of the Southern Alps of New Zealand and the Olympic Mountains, Washington, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Wyshnytzky, Cianna E.; Rittenour, Tammy M.

    2013-01-01

    Late Pleistocene glacial sediments from the South Fork Hoh River valley in the Olympic Mountains, Washington, USA and the Lake Hawea valley in the Southern Alps, New Zealand were dated using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) on quartz and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) on feldspar sand from 2011-2013. High sediment supply (typical of glacial environments), short transport distances, and sediment newly eroded from bedrock sources were expected to pose problems for luminescence d...

  14. Crystal scale anatomy of a dying supervolcano: an isotope and geochronology study of individual phenocrysts from voluminous rhyolites of the Yellowstone caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Kathryn E.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Schmitt, Axel K.

    2012-07-01

    A voluminous (>600 km3) and long-lived (~520-75 ka) phase of rhyolitic eruptions followed collapse of the Yellowstone caldera 640 ka. Whether these eruptions represent a dying cycle, or the growth of a new magma chamber, remains an important question. We use new U-Th zircon ages and δ18O values determined by ion microprobe, and sanidine Pb isotope ratios determined by laser ablation, to investigate the genesis of voluminous post-caldera rhyolites. The oldest post-caldera rhyolites, erupted between ~520 and 470 ka, exhibit extreme age and oxygen isotopic heterogeneity, requiring derivation from individual parcels of low-δ18O melts. We find a progressive increase in zircon homogeneity for rhyolite eruptions from ~260 to 75 ka, with homogeneous low-δ18O zircon values of 2.7-2.8‰ that are in equilibrium with low-δ18O host melts for the majority of the youngest eruptions. New sanidine Pb isotope data define separate arrays for post-caldera rhyolites and the caldera-forming tuffs that preceded them, indicating that they were not sourced from a mushy Lava Creek Tuff batholith that remained after caldera collapse. Rather, our new age and isotopic data indicate that the post-caldera rhyolites were generated by remelting of a variety of intracaldera source rocks, consisting of pre-Lava Creek Tuff volcanic and plutonic rocks and earlier erupted post-Lava Creek Tuff rhyolites. Batch assembly of low-δ18O melts starting at ~260 ka resulted in progressive homogenization, followed by differentiation and cooling up until the last rhyolite eruption ~75 ka, a trend that we interpret to be characteristic of a dying magma reservoir beneath the Yellowstone caldera.

  15. Deep-sea magnetic vector anomalies over the Hakurei hydrothermal field and the Bayonnaise knoll caldera, Izu-Ogasawara arc, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honsho, Chie; Ura, Tamaki; Kim, Kangsoo

    2013-10-01

    We conducted deep-sea magnetic measurements using autonomous underwater vehicles in the Bayonnaise knoll caldera, the Izu-Ogasawara island arc, which hosts the large Hakurei hydrothermal field. We improved the conventional correction method applied for removing the effect of vehicle magnetization, thus greatly enhancing the precision of the resulting vector anomalies. The magnetization distribution obtained from the vector anomaly data shows a ˜2 km wide belt of high magnetization, trending NNW-SSE going through the caldera, and a low-magnetization zone ˜300 m by ˜500 m in area, extending over the Hakurei site. Comparison between the results obtained using the vector anomaly and the total intensity anomaly shows that the magnetic field is determined more accurately, especially in areas of sparse data distribution, when the vector anomaly rather than the total intensity anomaly is used. We suggest a geologically motivated model that basaltic volcanism associated with the back-arc rifting occurred after the formation of the caldera, resulting in the formation of the high-magnetization belt underneath the silicic caldera. The Hakurei hydrothermal field lies in the intersection of the basaltic volcanism belt and the caldera wall fault, suggesting a mechanism that hot water generated by the heat of the volcanic activity has been spouting out through the caldera wall fault. The deposit apparently extends beyond the low-magnetization zone, climbing up the caldera wall. This may indicate that hot water rising from the deep through the alteration zone is transported laterally when it comes near the seafloor along fissures and fractures in the caldera wall.

  16. New geologic evidence for additional 16.5-15.5 Ma silicic calderas in northwest Nevada related to initial impingement of the Yellowstone hot spot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coble, Matthew A; Mahood, Gail A [Department Geological and Environmental Sciences, 450 Serra Mall, Bldg 320, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3115 (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Three silicic calderas have been newly identified in northwest Nevada west of McDermitt caldera. This volcanism is interpreted to have formed during a short interval at 16.5-15.5 Ma, during the waning stage of Steens flood basalt volcanism after the initial impingement of the Yellowstone hot spot. New mapping demonstrates that the area affected by this mid-Miocene silicic volcanism is significantly larger than previously appreciated in the western U.S.

  17. Homeopathy in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P

    2001-04-01

    Homeopathy was introduced into the USA by Hans Burch Gram in 1825. It developed largely through immigration of German homeopaths. The first homeopathic medical college was established in Allentown, PA in 1835. The American institute of Homeopathy (AIH) was founded in 1844. The American Medical Association was founded in 1847 and pursued policies hostile to homeopathy from the outset. Eclectic medicine was widespread in nineteenth century medicine, one of the greatest homeopaths, JT Kent had originally been an eclectic. The International Hahnemannian Association split from the AIH in 1880. The Flexner Report of 1910 resulted in many homeopathic medical colleges being closed down. Homeopathy in the USA was in steep decline from the 1920s to the 1960s but has had a strong recovery since the 1970s.

  18. Central Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    This view of central Florida, USA (28.0N, 81.5W) shows both coasts of the Florida peninsula with Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center readily visible in the center on the Atlantic coast. Other features on the Earth which are visible through the clouds include Tampa Bay, several lakes and the Gulf of Mexico on Florida's east coast. The space shuttle's tail fin and both orbital maneuvering systems (OMS) pods are seen in the foreground.

  19. USA-USSR protocol

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    On 30 November the USA Atomic Energy Commission and the USSR State Committee for the Utilization of Atomic Energy signed, in Washington, a protocol 'on carrying out of joint projects in the field of high energy physics at the accelerators of the National Accelerator Laboratory (Batavia) and the Institute for High Energy Physics (Serpukhov)'. The protocol will be in force for five years and can be extended by mutual agreement.

  20. Mechanically and optically controlled graphene valley filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Fenghua; Jin, Guojun, E-mail: gjin@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-05-07

    We theoretically investigate the valley-dependent electronic transport through a graphene monolayer modulated simultaneously by a uniform uniaxial strain and linearly polarized light. Within the Floquet formalism, we calculate the transmission probabilities and conductances of the two valleys. It is found that valley polarization can appear only if the two modulations coexist. Under a proper stretching of the sample, the ratio of the light intensity and the light frequency squared is important. If this quantity is small, the electron transport is mainly contributed by the valley-symmetric central band and the conductance is valley unpolarized; but when this quantity is large, the valley-asymmetric sidebands also take part in the transport and the valley polarization of the conductance appears. Furthermore, the degree of the polarization can be tuned by the strain strength, light intensity, and light frequency. It is proposed that the detection of the valley polarization can be realized utilizing the valley beam splitting. Thus, a graphene monolayer can be used as a mechanically and optically controlled valley filter.

  1. The Microclimate of Valley Glaciers

    OpenAIRE

    Oerlemans, J.

    2010-01-01

    Glaciers have fascinated mankind throughout history. Glaciers look solid and robust, but observing them for only a couple of years shows that they are dynamic and change shape all the time. The lower glaciers come, the greater the contrast with the surrounding landscape. Many glaciers in the world enter pastures and forests. It is not surprising that laymen, artists and scientists have reported on the behaviour of large valley glaciers. A wealth of information on glacier fluctuations in histo...

  2. Case study of a tornado in the upper Rhine valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannesen, R.; Dotzek, N.; Gysi, H.; Beheng, K.D. [Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Meteorologie und Klimaforschung

    1998-08-01

    On 9 September 1995 a short-lived tornado occurred in the upper Rhine valley near Oberkirch-Nussbach, uprooting several trees as well as damaging buildings and cars. The storm, confirmed by eye witnesses and damage analyses performed by Wetteramt Freiburg of the German weather service, was also detected by the IMK C-band Doppler radar in Karlsruhe. The data show a well-defined mesocyclonic rotation in the tornado`s parent Cb cloud. The orography distinctly influenced the development of a wind field suitable for supercell formation. This points to preferred areas of tornadic activity. The dominant effects of vertical wind shear compared to convective energy during tornadogenesis are evident for this storm. Its small scale confirms the existence of small supercell storms being studied in the USA in recent years. (orig.) 21 refs.

  3. Constraints on tree seedling establishment in montane grasslands of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan D. Coop; Thomas J. Givnish

    2008-01-01

    Montane and subalpine grasslands are prominent, but poorly understood, features of the Rocky Mountains. These communities frequently occur below reversed tree lines on valley floors, where nightly cold air accumulation is spatially coupled with fine soil texture. We used field experiments to assess the roles of minimum temperature, soil texture, grass competition, and...

  4. Overview for geologic field-trip guides to Mount Mazama, Crater Lake Caldera, and Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Charles R.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Jensen, Robert A.; Wright, Heather M.

    2017-08-16

    These field-trip guides were written for the occasion of the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI) quadrennial scientific assembly in Portland, Oregon, in August 2017. The guide to Mount Mazama and Crater Lake caldera is an updated and expanded version of the guide (Bacon, 1989) for part of an earlier IAVCEI trip to the southern Cascade Range. The guide to Newberry Volcano describes the stops included in the 2017 field trip. Crater Lake and Newberry are the two best-preserved and most recent calderas in the Cascades Volcanic Arc. Although located in different settings in the arc, with Crater Lake on the arc axis and Newberry in the rear-arc, both volcanoes are located at the intersection of the arc and the northwest corner region of the extensional Basin and Range Province.

  5. Rapid differentiation in a sill-like magma reservoir: a case study from the campi flegrei caldera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Lucia; Mastrolorenzo, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, geophysical investigations have detected wide magma reservoirs beneath quiescent calderas. However, the discovery of partially melted horizons inside the crust is not sufficient to put constraints on capability of reservoirs to supply cataclysmic eruptions, which strictly depends on the chemical-physical properties of magmas (composition, viscosity, gas content etc.), and thus on their differentiation histories. In this study, by using geochemical, isotopic and textural records of rocks erupted from the high-risk Campi Flegrei caldera, we show that the alkaline magmas have evolved toward a critical state of explosive behaviour over a time span shorter than the repose time of most volcanic systems and that these magmas have risen rapidly toward the surface. Moreover, similar results on the depth and timescale of magma storage were previously obtained for the neighbouring Somma-Vesuvius volcano. This consistency suggests that there might be a unique long-lived magma pool beneath the whole Neapolitan area.

  6. Caldera collapse: Perspectives from comparing Galápagos volcanoes, nuclear-test sinks, sandbox models, and volcanoes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, K.A.

    2010-01-01

    The 1968 trapdoor collapse (1.5 km3) of Fernandina caldera in the Galapágos Islands developed the same kinds of structures as found in small sandbox-collapse models and in concentrically zoned sinks formed in desert alluvium by fault subsidence into underground nuclear-explosion cavities. Fernandina’s collapse developed through shear failure in which the roof above the evacuating chamber was lowered mostly intact. This coherent subsidence contrasts to chaotic piecemeal collapse at small, rocky pit craters, underscoring the role of rock strength relative to subsidence size. The zoning at Fernandina implies that the deflated magma chamber underlay a central basin and a bordering inward-dipping monocline, which separates a blind inner reverse fault from an outer zone of normal faulting. Similar concentric zoning patterns can be recognized in coherent subsidence structures ranging over 16 orders of magnitude in size, from sandbox experiments to the giant Olympus Mons caldera on Mars.

  7. Measuring Variable Scales of Surface Deformation in and around the Yellowstone Caldera with TerraSAR-X Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, C. W., Jr.; Dzurisin, D.

    2014-12-01

    Utilizing three years of TerraSAR-X (TSX) Stripmap data covering the Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming, we identify several examples showing the benefits of the high spatial and temporal resolution TSX data. Although the Stripmap footprints are small, compared to those of past SAR satellites, we are nonetheless able to track subsidence/uplift cycles of the ~50 x 80 km Yellowstone caldera using multiple strips. The Stripmap data are also useful for measuring deformation associated with the area of the North Rim anomaly, an area of repeated uplift and subsidence, ~30 km in diameter near the intersection of the north caldera rim, north-trending Mammoth-Norris Corridor, and west-northwest trending seismic belt east of Hebgen Lake. We measured ~45 mm of uplift associated with an episode that occurred mostly during the winter of 2013-2014 (as verified by GPS), and ~15 mm of subsequent subsidence in the early summer of 2014. The TSX Stripmap data have also proven effective at measuring small-scale deformation features. Because of the high-resolution of the TSX Stripmap data, we have also been able to measure many small-scale deforming features in Yellowstone National Park that are associated with apparent aquifer discharge/recharge cycles, unstable slope movement, geyser basin deformation, and deformation related to other hydrothermal features. We present an example of ~3 cm of seasonal deformation likely resulting from water movement in and out of an aquifer along the southwest caldera rim. We also document subsidence of ~1 cm/yr in a circular area nearly 0.5 km across near the vent from the Pitchstone Plateau, a thick rhyolite flow that erupted nearly 70 ka. TSX data are instrumental in identifying the seasonal variation found in some of these features, and in measuring the small spatial areas of deformation associated with other features.

  8. The Late Cretaceous Middle Fork caldera, its resurgent intrusion, and enduring landscape stability in east-central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Charles R.; Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Aleinikoff, John N.; Slack, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Dissected caldera structures expose thick intracaldera tuff and, uncommonly, cogenetic shallow plutons, while remnants of correlative outflow tuffs deposited on the pre-eruption ground surface record elements of ancient landscapes. The Middle Fork caldera encompasses a 10 km × 20 km area of rhyolite welded tuff and granite porphyry in east-central Alaska, ∼100 km west of the Yukon border. Intracaldera tuff is at least 850 m thick. The K-feldspar megacrystic granite porphyry is exposed over much of a 7 km × 12 km area having 650 m of relief within the western part of the caldera fill. Sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe with reverse geometry (SHRIMP-RG) analyses of zircon from intracaldera tuff, granite porphyry, and outflow tuff yield U-Pb ages of 70.0 ± 1.2, 69.7 ± 1.2, and 71.1 ± 0.5 Ma (95% confidence), respectively. An aeromagnetic survey indicates that the tuff is reversely magnetized, and, therefore, that the caldera-forming eruption occurred in the C31r geomagnetic polarity chron. The tuff and porphyry have arc geochemical signatures and a limited range in SiO2 of 69 to 72 wt%. Although their phenocrysts differ in size and abundance, similar quartz + K-feldspar + plagioclase + biotite mineralogy, whole-rock geochemistry, and analytically indistinguishable ages indicate that the tuff and porphyry were comagmatic. Resorption of phenocrysts in tuff and porphyry suggests that these magmas formed by thermal rejuvenation of near-solidus or solidified crystal mush. A rare magmatic enclave (54% SiO2, arc geochemical signature) in the porphyry may be similar to parental magma and provides evidence of mafic magma and thermal input.

  9. Magnetotelluric imaging of the resurgent caldera on the island of Ischia (southern Italy): inferences for its structure and activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giuseppe, M. G.; Troiano, A.; Carlino, S.

    2017-12-01

    The island of Ischia (located in the Bay of Naples, Italy) represents a peculiar case of a well-exposed caldera that has experienced a large (>800 m) and rapid resurgence, accompanied by volcanic activity. What drives the resurgence of calderas is a crucial issue to investigate, because this process is associated with potential eruptions and high risk to people living within and around such large active volcanic systems. To improve the knowledge of volcano-tectonic processes affecting the caldera of Ischia, electromagnetic imaging of the structures associated with its resurgence was performed and integrated with available geological information. A magnetotelluric (MT) survey of the island was carried out along two main profiles through the central-western sector, providing an electrical resistivity map to a depth of 3 km. These resistivity cross sections allowed us to identify the presence of a very shallow magmatic intrusion, possibly a laccolith, at a depth of about 1 km, which was responsible for both the resurgence and the volcanic activity. Furthermore, the tectonic structures bordering the resurgent area and the occurrence of a large thermal anomaly in the western sector of the caldera also provided a signature in the resistivity cross sections, with the magma intrusion producing advection of hot fluids with high geothermal gradients (>150 °C km-1) in the southern and western sectors. All of these data are fundamental for the assessment of the island's volcano-tectonic dynamics and their associated hazards. The structure and activity of the island have been controlled by the process of resurgence associated with the arrival of new magma and the progressive intrusion of a laccolith at a shallow depth. The reactivation of such a shallow system may imply imminent eruption which would pose a major volcanic hazard.

  10. Spin-Valley Beam Splitter in Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Yu; Shi, Zhi-Gui; Li, Shun; Zhang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The fourfold spin-valley degenerate degrees of freedom in bulk graphene can support rich physics and novel applications associated with multicomponent quantum Hall effects and linear conductance filtering. In this work, we study how to break the spin-valley degeneracy of electron beams spatially. We propose a spin-valley beam splitter in a gated ferromagnetic/pristine/strained graphene structure. We demonstrate that, in a full resonant tunneling regime for all spin-valley beam components, the formation of quasi-standing waves can lead four giant lateral Goos-H\\"{a}nchen shifts as large as the transverse beam width, while the interplay of the two modulated regions can lead difference of resonant angles or energies for the four spin-valley flavors, manifesting an effective spin-valley beam splitting effect. The beam splitting effect is found to be controllable by the gating and strain.

  11. Oncolytic Seneca Valley Virus: past perspectives and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke MJ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Burke Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, MACC Fund Research Center, Milwaukee, WI, USA Abstract: Seneca Valley Virus isolate 001 (SVV-001 is an oncolytic RNA virus of the Picornaviridae family. It is also the first picornavirus discovered of the novel genus Senecavirus. SVV-001 replicates through an RNA intermediate, bypassing a DNA phase, and is unable to integrate into the host genome. SVV-001 was originally discovered as a contaminant in the cell culture of fetal retinoblasts and has since been identified as a potent oncolytic virus against tumors of neuroendocrine origin. SVV-001 has a number of features that make it an attractive oncolytic virus, namely, its ability to target and penetrate solid tumors via intravenous administration, inability for insertional mutagenesis, and being a self-replicating RNA virus with selective tropism for cancer cells. SVV-001 has been studied in both pediatric and adult early phase studies reporting safety and some clinical efficacy, albeit primarily in adult tumors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of SVV-001 and what its future as an oncolytic virus may hold. Keywords: oncolytic, virus, oncology, Seneca, valley

  12. Low-velocity zones in the crust beneath Aso caldera, Kyushu, Japan, derived from receiver function analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yuki; Ohkura, Takahiro; Shibutani, Takuo; Hirahara, Kazuro; Yoshikawa, Shin; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Aso volcano, in central Kyushu Island in southwest Japan, has a large caldera (18 × 25 km) that formed by the ejection of more than 600 km3 of deposits 89 thousand years ago. We calculated receiver functions from teleseismic waveform data obtained from densely distributed stations in and around the caldera. We estimated the crustal S wave velocity structure from the receiver functions by using genetic algorithm inversion. We detected a low-velocity zone (Vs > 2.2 km/s) at a depth of 8-15 km beneath the eastern flank of the central cones. A sill-like deformation source has been detected at a depth of 15.5 km by analyses of GPS data, and a swarm of low-frequency earthquakes exists at depths of 15-25 km just beneath this low-velocity zone. Magma may be newly generated and accumulated in this low-velocity zone as a result of hot intrusions coming from beneath it. Except for the region beneath the eastern flank of the central cones, a second low-velocity zone (Vs > 1.9 km/s) extends in and around the caldera at a depth of 15-23 km, although phenomena representing intrusions have not been detected below it. From the estimated velocity structure, these low-velocity zones are interpreted to contain a maximum of 15% melt or 30% water.

  13. Evidence for water influx from a caldera lake during the explosive hydromagmatic eruption of 1790, Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, L.G.

    1997-01-01

    In 1790 a major hydromagmatic eruption at the summit of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, deposited up to 10 m of pyroclastic fall and surge deposits and killed several dozen Hawaiian natives who were crossing the island. Previous studies have hypothesized that the explosivity of this eruption was due to the influx of groundwater into the conduit and mixing of the groundwater with ascending magma. This study proposes that surface water, not groundwater, was the agent responsible for the explosiveness of the eruption. That is, a lake or pond may have existed in the caldera in 1790 and explosions may have taken place when magma ascended into the lake from below. That assertion is based on two lines of evidence: (1) high vesicularity (averaging 73% of more than 3000 lapilli) and high vesicle number density (105-107 cm-3 melt) of pumice clasts suggest that some phases of the eruption involved vigorous, sustained magma ascent; and (2) numerical calculations suggest that under most circumstances, hydrostatic pressure would not be sufficient to drive water into the eruptive conduit during vigorous magma ascent unless the water table were above the ground surface. These results are supported by historical data on the rate of infilling of the caldera floor during the early 1800s. When extrapolated back to 1790, they suggest that the caldera floor was below the water table.

  14. A novel thermophilic methane-oxidizing bacteria from thermal springs of Uzon volcano caldera, Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorianchikova, E.; Kizilova, A.; Kravchenko, I.; Galchenko, V.

    2012-04-01

    Methane is a radiatively active trace gas, contributing significantly to the greenhouse effect. It is 26 times more efficient in absorbing and re-emitting infrared radiation than carbon dioxide. Methanotrophs play an essential role in the global carbon cycle by oxidizing 50-75% of the biologically produced methane in situ, before it reaches the atmosphere. Methane-oxidizing bacteria are isolated from the various ecosystems and described at present. Their biology, processes of methane oxidation in fresh-water, marsh, soil and marine habitats are investigated quite well. Processes of methane oxidation in places with extreme physical and chemical conditions (high or low , salinity and temperature values) are studied in much smaller degree. Such ecosystems occupy a considerable part of the Earth's surface. The existence of aerobic methanotrophs inhabiting extreme environments has been verified so far by cultivation experiments and direct detection of methane monooxygenase genes specific to almost all aerobic methanotrophs. Thermophilic and thermotolerant methanotrophs have been isolated from such extreme environments and consist of the gammaproteobacterial (type I) genera Methylothermus, Methylocaldum, Methylococcus and the verrucomicrobial genus Methylacidiphilum. Uzon volcano caldera is a unique area, where volcanic processes still happen today. Hydrothermal springs of the area are extreme ecosystems which microbial communities represent considerable scientific interest of fundamental and applied character. A thermophilic aerobic methane-oxidising bacterium was isolated from a sediment sample from a hot spring (56.1; 5.3) of Uzon caldera. Strain S21 was isolated using mineral low salt medium. The headspace gas was composed of CH4, Ar, CO2, and O2 (40:40:15:5). The temperature of cultivation was 50, pH 5.5. Cells of strain S21 in exponential and early-stationary phase were coccoid bacilli, about 1 μm in diameter, and motile with a single polar flagellum. PCR and

  15. Reservoir processes and fluid origins in the Baca Geothermal System, Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truesdell, Alfred H.; Janik, Cathy J.

    1986-02-01

    At the Baca geothermal field in the Valles caldera, New Mexico, 19 deep wells were drilled in an attempt to develop a 50-MWe (megawatts electric) power plant. The chemical and isotopic compositions of steam and water samples have been used to indicate uniquely the origin of reservoir fluids and natural reservoir processes. Two distinct reservoir fluids exist at Baca. These fluids originate from the same deep, high-temperature (335°C), saline (2500 mg/kg Cl) parent water but have had different histories during upflow. One fluid (from wells 4 and 13) is isotopically light, high in radiogenic noble gases, CO2 and HCO3, and low in Ca. It has a temperature of 290°-295°C and a reservoir chloride near 1900 mg/kg. This fluid resulted from rapid upward flow through 1.1- to 1.4-m.y.-old Bandelier Tuff reservoir rocks after long residence in pre-Bandelier (>7 m.y.) sediments and Precambrian basement rocks and 25% dilution with high-altitude cold groundwater from Redondo Peak. The other water (from wells 15, 19, and 24) moved slowly through the Bandelier Tuff and cooled conductively (with minor steam loss for well 19) from 335°C to 280°-260°C. Apparently, short residence in old basement rocks has left this water with low radiogenic gases. Conductive cooling without mixing has kept the original chloride and relatively heavy isotope composition of the deep water. The recharge to the deep parent water is not well understood but may be from lower elevation precipitation outside the Valles caldera area. Gases are in equilibrium in all-liquid reservoir fluids at near reservoir temperatures, and the concentrations of atmospheric gases are similar to those of air-saturated water, indicating little boiling and steam loss. All water, solutes, and gases in the reservoir fluids originate from air-saturated meteoric recharge water, watermineral reactions, and rock leaching, with the possible exception of excess 3He that must have an ultimate mantle source. This gas could originate

  16. Volatile Release and Eruption Dynamics of a Basaltic Plinian Eruption From Masaya Caldera, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrmann, H.; Freundt, A.; Kutterolf, S.; Schmincke, H.; Strauch, W.

    2003-12-01

    Our project is part of SFB 574 "Volatiles and Fluids in subduction zones", and focusses on degassing dynamics of highly-explosive arc volcanoes. Masaya Caldera in west-central Nicaragua is part of the Central American volcanic arc at the convergent boundary of the Cocos and Carribean plates. A basaltic plinian eruption of VEI 6 occurred at Masaya Caldera in the Late-Pleistocene, depositing a widespread fan of scoria lapilli, named Fontana Tephra. We have constrained parameters of the Fontana eruption by extensive isopach and isopleth mapping. Total erupted tephra volume is >0.83 km3 (about 1012 kg DRE). The eruption columns reached 30 to 35 km height at an average discharge rate of 1.3*108 kg/s. This violent eruption was not continuous but proceeded in distinct pulses evident by the well-bedded deposit. An initial sequence of numerous highly explosive but short pulses formed a well-bedded layer of very highly vesicular, hawaiian-type lapilli, possibly representing a gas-enriched top zone of the magma reservoir. The following series of longer-duration plinian events, interupted by weak phases of ash emission, formed beds of highly vesicular scoria lapilli. The eruption ceased with abundant short-lived pulses of lower-energy subplinian activity. We estimate volatile emissions during the eruption from the differences in volatile concentration between matrix glass and glass inclusions in minerals, considered to represent degassed and undegassed melt, respectively. Concentrations of fluorine of about 7000 ppm are about equal in matrix glass and glass inclusions, indicating little degassing of fluorine during eruption. Chlorine contents amount to 1200 ppm in the inclusions, and to about 1000 ppm in matrix glass. The concentration difference, multiplied by erupted magma mass, suggests a total chlorine emission of 16 Mt. Apparently only little chlorine exsolved in the initial eruption phase, but degassing strongly increased during the plinian phase. Sulphur concentrations

  17. Historical Earthquakes and Expected Seismic Damage at Ischia Island, Resurgent Caldera (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlino, S.; Cubellis, E.

    2005-05-01

    Information on the seismicity of the Ischia island spans about eight centuries, starting from 1228. This is characterized by the occurence of earthquakes with low energy and high intensity. The most recent earthquake of 1883 caused 2333 deaths and the destruction of the historical and environmental heritage of some areas of the island, specially at Casamicciola town. This event (Imax = XI degree MCS), represents an important date in the prevention of natural disasters, in that it was after this earthquake that the first Seismic Safety Act in Italy was passed. After the 1883 earthquake there was a period of seismic quiescence except for some isolated events felt at beginning of the last century and the very occasional micro-earthquakes recorded in the last 20 years in the northern part of the island. The epicenter of all known earthquakes are on the northern slope of Mt. Epomeo (787 m a. s.l.) resurgent block, while analysis of the effects of earthquakes and the geological structures allows us to evaluate the stress fields that generate the earthquakes. The Mt. Epomeo is a resurgent structure in the central sector of the island, whose uplift is correlated to the caldera resurgence process, for the increase of pressure of shallow magma reservoir. The caldera was formed after a large explosive eruption that deposited the Mt. Epomeo Green Tuff, about 55 ka B.P. The uplift, which started about 30 ka B.P., was of about 900 meters. The resurgent structure is bordered by a system of faults and fractures, with NW-SE, NE-SW and N-S strike and along these faults, in the northern sector, the seismicity has been localized. In a volcanic area, interpretation of the mechanisms of release and propagation of seismic energy is made even more complex as the stress field that acts at a regional level is compounded by that generated from migration of magmatic masses towards the surface, as well as the rheologic properties of the rocks dependent on the high geothermic gradient. Such

  18. Perspectives on managing multi-cultural landscapes: Use, access, and fire/fuels management attitudes and preferences of user groups concerning the Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) and adjacent areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt F. Anschuetz

    2014-01-01

    The Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP), which consists of a large, 1.2- to 1.6-million-year-old volcanic caldera, forms the heart of the Jemez Mountains in north-central New Mexico (Figure 1). Known as the Valles Caldera, this bowl-shaped hollow is an especially treasured place within this beloved mountainous landscape for many residents of the region. Its valles...

  19. A landscape scale valley confinement algorithm: Delineating unconfined valley bottoms for geomorphic, aquatic, and riparian applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    David E. Nagel; John M. Buffington; Sharon L. Parkes; Seth Wenger; Jaime R. Goode

    2014-01-01

    Valley confinement is an important landscape characteristic linked to aquatic habitat, riparian diversity, and geomorphic processes. This report describes a GIS program called the Valley Confinement Algorithm (VCA), which identifies unconfined valleys in montane landscapes. The algorithm uses nationally available digital elevation models (DEMs) at 10-30 m resolution to...

  20. Seismic Signals reveal Precursors, Force History and Runout Dynamics of the Tsunami-creating Askja Caldera Landslide, July 21, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöpa, A.; Chao, W. A.; Burtin, A.; Hovius, N.

    2016-12-01

    We have analysed signals from a network of 52 seismic stations that recorded a large landslide at the steep-sided Askja caldera, Central Iceland, on 21 July 2014. As no direct observations where made, the seismic signals are a very valuable record not only to describe the landslide dynamics in great detail but also to identify triggers and precursors of the slide useful for early warning purposes. This study is motivated by the high hazard potential of the side as the landslide created a tsunami in the caldera lake with waves up to 60 m high reaching famous tourist spots at the northern lake shore. Analysis of the high frequencies reveals that the main slope failure started at 23.24UTC. The relatively long rise time of 40 s until the maximum peak ground velocity was reached points towards cascading failure of the caldera wall. The high seismic energies recorded during the first two minutes of the slide are the result of colliding and impacting blocks. Velocity peaks in the seismic signals following the main failure are indicative for subsequent slope failures that occur less frequent, with shorter duration and lower amplitude during the twelve hours after the main event. The high frequency records of the stations up to 30 km away from the landslide source area show that the background noise level started to increase 20 min before the main failure, with amplitudes up to three times the background level about seven minutes before the main slide. Five minutes before the main failure, amplitudes decreased back to the background level. The characteristic increase and decrease in ground velocities before the main landslide could be implemented in a monitoring and early warning system of the caldera walls at Askjas. Inversion of the long-period signals (0.025-0.05 Hz) enables us to describe the history of the forces acting on the Earth during the landslide. The maximum acceleration of the moving mass was reached 40 s after the start of the slide with unloading forces

  1. High-Resolution Seismic Identification of the Caldera System and Dynamics of the Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano, Barents Sea Slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Garcia, C.; Feseker, T.; Mienert, J.; Berndt, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano (HMMV) is an active 1 km wide cold seep structure located at 1250 m deep in the Bear Island Slide, southwestern Barents Sea. The HMMV is one of the few examples of mud volcanoes in non-compressional tectonic settings. Previous studies defined the deeper structure of the HMMV as an approximately 3 km deep seismic disturbance in Plio-Pleistocene deposits. Two-dimensional 3.5 kHz Sediment Echosounder Profiler data combined with Chirp seismic data collected during two cruises in 2005 and 2006 show the HMMV as an inverted-conical-shaped structure composed by five seismic units (U5-U1 from older to younger) and characterized by pull-down of reflections towards its geometrical centre as well as by a vertically oriented central area of poor seismic image quality. The lack of coherent reflectivity or "blanking" is likely due to the presence of gas in the section. Several studies have interpreted this lack of reflectivity as a "caldera" for mud volcanoes which constitutes the main pathway for fluid and gas in such structures. Isopach maps of the identified seismic units show that U5-U2 distribution is regional, but the youngest unit U1 is confined to the surroundings of the HMMV. The seismic signature of U5-U3 is mainly parallel or absent while unit U1 follows a hummocky trend, interpreted as mud flow deposits. Although the seismic unit U2 is mainly parallel, hummocky reflections as those in U1 have been identified westward of the geometrical centre of the volcano. Detailed analysis of the blanking effect over the seismic units reveals spatially overlapping calderas indicating different ages. Both size and position change, being circular and centrically located in U5-U3 units and oval and northeasterly displaced in both U2 and U1. The shallow structure of the HMMV can be described as a caldera complex in which five overlapping calderas have been identified. They record the migration dynamics of the HMMV over the time. Three years of in

  2. Disparity of Chlorine to Fluorine Concentration Ratios Between Thermal Waters and Rocks of Yellowstone National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConville, E. G.; Szymanski, M. E.; Hurwitz, S.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Hayden, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    Low chlorine to fluorine concentration ratios (Cl/F) of 0.5 by weight are observed in Yellowstone rhyolites within glass inclusions and erupted rhyolitic glass. In contrast, Yellowstone thermal waters have Cl/F of >10 and Cl/F of waters at Norris Geyser Basin can exceed 100. Similar Cl/F have been observed in other volcanic hydrothermal systems (e.g., Lassen, Long Valley Caldera). The goal of this study is to identify fluorine-bearing minerals that could remove a substantial amount of F from the hydrothermal fluids within the Yellowstone caldera and in the Norris Geyser Basin near the northern margin of the caldera. We used a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to study thin sections from core samples obtained during research drilling by the USGS in the 1960s. The Y-2 well (Lower Geyser Basin) penetrated mostly Plateau Rhyolites ( 0.15 Ma) and Y-7 and Y-8 wells (Upper Geyser Basin) penetrated glacial sandstones and conglomerates, underlain by the Biscuit Basin flow ( 0.5 Ma). The thin sections from Y-12 in the Norris Geyser Basin are all from the Lava Creek Tuff. Fluorine-bearing minerals are found in all drill cores. Fluorite is present in Y-2 at a depth of 153 m, in Y-7 at 65m, and in Y-12 at 276 m. Fluoroapatite first appears in the Biscuit Basin flow at 60 m in Y-7 and 59 m in Y-8. Rare earth fluorocarbonates, such as bastnaesite (Ce,La,Y)CO3F and/or parisite Ca(Ce,La)2(CO3)3F2, are predominantly found in Y-12 at depths >276 m. Our estimated abundances of these fluorine-bearing minerals are at least 2 orders of magnitude less than required to substantially affect the Cl/F ratio in thermal waters. Fluorine-bearing minerals may be more abundant at greater depth. Another possible explanation is that the fluorite is too fine-grained to be identified by SEM. Finally, the high Cl/F in thermal waters could be explained by the ascent of Cl-rich fluid from a cooling magma body or from older crustal rocks that underlie the caldera.

  3. The shallow-water chitons (Mollusca, Polyplacophora of Caldera, Region of Atacama, northern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Araya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Molluscan species of the northern littoral of Chile have been sparsely studied. This work reviews for the first time the diversity of polyplacophoran molluscs around the port of Caldera, in the Region of Atacama (26°45’49”S; 70°45’17”W to 27°20’23”S; 70°56’46”W, northern Chile. Eleven species were found in this study: Acanthopleura echinata (Barnes, 1824; Callistochiton pulchellus (Gray, 1828; Calloplax vivipara (Plate, 1899, Chaetopleura peruviana (Lamarck, 1819; Chiton cumingsii Frembly, 1827; Chiton granosus Frembly, 1827; Chiton magnificus Deshayes, 1827; Enoplochiton niger (Barnes, 1824, Radsia barnesii (Gray, 1828, Tonicia atrata (G. B. Sowerby II, 1840 and Tonicia chilensis (Frembly, 1827. All of the species occurring in the area have distributions in the southeastern Pacific Ocean, from Ecuador to central Chile, and three of them are species endemic to the Chilean coasts (Calloplax vivipara, Radsia barnesii, and Tonicia atrata. This diversity of species is comparable to that of better surveyed faunas of central and southern Chile or Patagonia. Of the eleven species recorded, the geographic distribution records for Callistochiton pulchellus, Radsia barnesii and Tonicia atrata are extended, and Calloplax vivipara is found alive again after 40 years, filling a gap in its known distribution. Illustrations of living specimens in their habitat, distribution records and a taxonomic key for all the studied taxa are also provided.

  4. Microbial diversity in acidic thermal pools in the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardanov, Andrey V; Gumerov, Vadim M; Beletsky, Alexey V; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2017-08-16

    Microbial communities of four acidic thermal pools in the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, Russia, were studied using amplification and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments. The sites differed in temperature and pH: 1805 (60 °C, pH 3.7), 1810 (90 °C, pH 4.1), 1818 (80 °C, pH 3.5), and 1807 (86 °C, pH 5.6). Archaea of the order Sulfolobales were present among the dominant groups in all four pools. Acidilobales dominated in pool 1818 but were a minor fraction at the higher temperature in pool 1810. Uncultivated Archaea of the Hot Thaumarchaeota-related clade were present in significant quantities in pools 1805 and 1807, but they were not abundant in pools 1810 and 1818, where high temperatures were combined with low pH. Nanoarchaeota were present in all pools, but were more abundant in pools 1810 and 1818. A similar abundance pattern was observed for Halobacteriales. Thermophilic Bacteria were less diverse and were mostly represented by aerobic hydrogen- and sulfur-oxidizers of the phylum Aquificae and sulfur-oxidising Proteobacteria of the genus Acidithiobacillus. Thus we showed that extremely acidic hot pools contain diverse microbial communities comprising different metabolic groups of prokaryotes, including putative lithoautotrophs using energy sources of volcanic origin, and various facultative and obligate heterotrophs.

  5. Biodiversity of thermophilic prokaryotes with hydrolytic activities in hot springs of Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka (Russia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kublanov, Ilya V; Perevalova, Anna A; Slobodkina, Galina B; Lebedinsky, Aleksander V; Bidzhieva, Salima K; Kolganova, Tatyana V; Kaliberda, Elena N; Rumsh, Lev D; Haertlé, Thomas; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A

    2009-01-01

    Samples of water from the hot springs of Uzon Caldera with temperatures from 68 to 87 degrees C and pHs of 4.1 to 7.0, supplemented with proteinaceous (albumin, casein, or alpha- or beta-keratin) or carbohydrate (cellulose, carboxymethyl cellulose, chitin, or agarose) biological polymers, were filled with thermal water and incubated at the same sites, with the contents of the tubes freely accessible to the hydrothermal fluid. As a result, several enrichment cultures growing in situ on different polymeric substrates were obtained. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments obtained after PCR with Bacteria-specific primers showed that the bacterial communities developing on carbohydrates included the genera Caldicellulosiruptor and Dictyoglomus and that those developing on proteins contained members of the Thermotogales order. DGGE analysis performed after PCR with Archaea- and Crenarchaeota-specific primers showed that archaea related to uncultured environmental clones, particularly those of the Crenarchaeota phylum, were present in both carbohydrate- and protein-degrading communities. Five isolates obtained from in situ enrichments or corresponding natural samples of water and sediments represented the bacterial genera Dictyoglomus and Caldanaerobacter as well as new archaea of the Crenarchaeota phylum. Thus, in situ enrichment and consequent isolation showed the diversity of thermophilic prokaryotes competing for biopolymers in microbial communities of terrestrial hot springs.

  6. Uncultured archaea dominate in the thermal groundwater of Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardanov, Andrey V; Gumerov, Vadim M; Beletsky, Alexey V; Perevalova, Anna A; Karpov, Gennady A; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2011-05-01

    The thermoacidophilic microbial community inhabiting the groundwater with pH 4.0 and temperature 50°C at the East Thermal Field of Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, was examined using pyrosequencing of the V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Bacteria comprise about 30% of microorganisms and are represented primarily by aerobic lithoautotrophs using the energy sources of volcanic origin--thermoacidophilic methanotrophs of the phylum Verrucomicrobia and Acidithiobacillus spp. oxidising metals and reduced sulfur compounds. More than 70% of microbial population in this habitat were represented by archaea, in majority affiliated with "uncultured" lineages. The most numerous group (39% of all archaea) represented a novel division in the phylum Euryarchaeota related to the order Thermoplasmatales. Another abundant group (33% of all archaea) was related to MCG1 lineage of the phylum Crenarchaeota, originally detected in the Yellowstone hot spring as the environmental clone pJP89. The organisms belonging to these two groups are widely spread in hydrothermal environments worldwide. These data indicate an important environmental role of these two archaeal groups and should stimulate the investigation of their metabolism by cultivation or metagenomic approaches.

  7. Change in Magma Dynamics at Okataina Rhyolite Caldera revealed by Plagioclase Textures and Geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, P. A. R.

    2015-12-01

    A fundamental reorganization of magma dynamics at Okataina volcano, New Zealand, occurred at 26 ka involving a change from smaller volume, high-temperature rhyodacite magmas to a lower eruptive tempo of larger volume, low-temperature, rhyolite magmas. Zircon studies demonstrate the presence of a periodically active, long-lived (100,000 yr) magmatic reservoir. However, there is little correlation between periods of zircon crystallization and eruption events. In contrast, the changing magmatic dynamics is revealed in plagioclase growth histories. Crystals from the ~0.7 ka Kaharoa eruption are characterized by resorbed cores displaying a cellular-texture of high-An (>40) zones partially replaced by low-An (cellular texture of variable An content (An 40-50). The crystals display step-wise re-growth of successively higher An, Fe, Mg and Ti content, consistent with progressive mafic recharge. Two crystal groups are distinguished by trace element chemistry indicating growth in separate melts and co-occurrence via magma-mingling. The contrasting zoning patterns in plagioclase correspond to the evolutionary history of magmatism at Okataina. Emptying of the magma reservoir following caldera eruption at 46 ka reduced barriers to mafic magma ascent. This is recorded by the frequent resorption and recharge episodes in Hauparu crystals. Subsequent re-development of a more silicic reservoir zone (post-26 ka) dampened thermal and mass perturbations, resulting in simpler growth histories of the Kaharoa crystals. The plagioclase lack features associated with rapid decompression events that are common in andesite systems.

  8. Duration of the Banco Bonito Rhyolite Eruption, Vales Caldera, New Mexico based on magma transport modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Benjamin R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baldridge, W. Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gable, Carl W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sicilian, James M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2007-03-05

    Finite volume calculations of the flow of rhyolite are presented to investigate the fate of viscous magmas flowing in planar fractures with realistic length to width ratios of up to 2500:1. Heat and mass transfer for a melt with a temperature dependent viscosity and the potential to undergo phase change are considered. Magma driving pressures and dike widths are chosen to satisfy simple elastic considerations. These models are applied within a parameter space relevant to the Banco Bonito rhyolite flow, Valles caldera, New Mexico. We estimate a maximum eruption duration for the event of ~200 days, realized at a minimum possible dike width of 5-6 m and driving pressure of 7-8 MPa. Simplifications in the current model may warrant scaling of these results. However, we demonstrate the applicability of our model to magma dynamics issues and suggest that such models may be used to infer information about both the timing of an eruption and the evolution of the associated magma source.

  9. A three-dimensional QP imaging of the shallowest subsurface of Campi Flegrei offshore caldera, southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serlenga, Vincenzo; de Lorenzo, Salvatore; Russo, Guido; Amoroso, Ortensia; Virieux, Jean; Garambois, Stephane; Zollo, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    We build a three-dimensional attenuation image of the shallowest subsurface of Campi Flegrei caldera, a resurgent caldera located 15 km west of Naples, southern Italy. Extracting tstar (t*) measurements from an active seismic dataset can be achieved by a spectral ratio method which has been intensively used for earthquakes. The applicability of such measurement has to be validated for active seismic datasets which have a narrower frequency band compared to frequency band of quakes. The validation, as well as the robustness, of such extraction for narrow Ricker source wavelet has been checked through many synthetic and realistic tests. These tests allow us to conclude that this measurement is valid as long as 1) short signal time window are chosen to perform the spectral analysis; 2) the effects caused by heterogeneities of the sampled medium on the seismic spectra have to be taken into account in the description of elastic Green's function. Through such a deconvolution strategy, contributions of the fine velocity structure on signal amplitudes have been significantly removed: in case of suspicious behavior of the spectrum ratio, the measurement is disregarded. This procedure, a kind of deconvolution of the phase propagation imprint, is expected to leave nearly untouched the attenuation signature of seismic traces we are interested in. Such refined measurement approach based on the spectral ratio method has been applied to the real active seismic SERAPIS database providing us a reasonable dataset of 11,873 differential t* measurements (dt*). These data are used for imaging anelastic properties of Campi Flegrei caldera through a linearized, iterative, damped attenuation tomography. Based on configuration of sources and receivers, an attenuating volume as large as 13 x 13 x 1.5 km3 has been imaged. The tomography, with a resolution of 1 km in the horizontal directions and 0.5 km in the vertical direction, allowed to image important features whose reliability has been

  10. Voluminous low δ18O magmas in the late Miocene Heise volcanic field, Idaho: Implications for the fate of Yellowstone hotspot calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, I.N.; Watts, K.E.; Schmitt, A.K.; Morgan, L.A.; Shanks, P.W.C.

    2007-01-01

    We report oxygen isotope compositions of phenocrysts and U-Pb ages of zircons in four large caldera-forming ignimbrites and post-caldera lavas of the Heise volcanic field, a nested caldera complex in the Snake River Plain, that preceded volcanism in Yellowstone. Early eruption of three normal δ18O voluminous ignimbrites with δ18Oquartz = 6.4‰ and δ18Ozircon = 4.8‰ started at Heise at 6.6 Ma, and was followed by a 2‰–3‰ δ18O depletion in the subsequent 4.45 Ma Kilgore caldera cycle that includes the 1800 km3 Kilgore ignimbrite, and post-Kilgore intracaldera lavas with δ18Oquartz = 4.3‰ and δ18Ozircon = 1.5‰. The Kilgore ignimbrite represents the largest known low-δ18O magma in the Snake River Plain and worldwide. The post-Kilgore low δ18O volcanism likely represents the waning stages of silicic magmatism at Heise, prior to the reinitiation of normal δ18O silicic volcanism 100 km to the northeast at Yellowstone. The occurrence of low δ18O magmas at Heise and Yellowstone hallmarks a mature stage of individual volcanic cycles in each caldera complex. Sudden shifts in δ18O of silicic magmas erupted from the same nested caldera complexes argue against any inheritance of the low δ18O signature from mantle or crustal sources. Instead, δ18O age trends indicate progressive remelting of low δ18O hydrothermally altered intracaldera rocks of previous eruptions. This trend may be generally applicable to older caldera complexes in the Snake River Plain that are poorly exposed.

  11. Tšarterkool USA-s / Johannes Kiersch

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kiersch, Johannes

    2001-01-01

    24.-27. mainì 01 toimub Tallinnas EFFE 2001 (European Forum of Freedom in Education) konverents "Haridus tänases kodanikuühiskonnas." Konverentsil esineb ka Witteni Waldorf-pedagoogika Instituudi õppejõud Johannes Kiersch. Lähemalt tema artiklist USA-s populaarsust võitvate tsharterkoolide kohta, mis on riigi- ja erakooli vahevorm

  12. Vernal Pool Distribution - Central Valley, 2005 [ds650

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — "Great Valley Vernal Pool Distribution", originally mapped by Bob Holland, 2005. This dataset contains vernal pool areas mapped over Califorina's Central Valley,...

  13. Valley filtering due to orbital magnetic moment in bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang-Soo

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the effect of valley-dependent orbital magnetic moment on the transmission of quasiparticles through biased bilayer graphene npn and pnp junctions in the presence of out-of-plane magnetic field. It is shown that the valley-polarized Zeeman-like energy splitting, due to the interaction of orbital magnetic moment with magnetic field, can suppress the transmission of quasiparticles of one valley while transmitting those of the other valley. This valley-selective transmission property can be exploited for valley filtering. We demonstrate that the npn and pnp junction, respectively, filters off the K‧-valley and K-valley particles, with nearly perfect degree of filtration.

  14. 27 CFR 9.100 - Mesilla Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mesilla Valley. 9.100 Section 9.100 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Mesilla Valley viticultural area is located within Dona Ana County, New Mexico, and El Paso County, Texas...

  15. Valley Pearl’ table grape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valley Pearl’ is an early to mid-season, white seedless table grape (Vitis vinifera L.) suitable for commercial table grape production where V. vinifera can be grown. Significant characteristics of ‘Valley Pearl’ are its high and consistent fruit production on spur pruned vines and large round berr...

  16. Regional dust storm modeling for health services: The case of valley fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprigg, William A.; Nickovic, Slobodan; Galgiani, John N.; Pejanovic, Goran; Petkovic, Slavko; Vujadinovic, Mirjam; Vukovic, Ana; Dacic, Milan; DiBiase, Scott; Prasad, Anup; El-Askary, Hesham

    2014-09-01

    On 5 July 2011, a massive dust storm struck Phoenix, Arizona (USA), raising concerns for increased cases of valley fever (coccidioidomycosis, or, cocci). A quasi-operational experimental airborne dust forecast system predicted the event and provides model output for continuing analysis in collaboration with public health and air quality communities. An objective of this collaboration was to see if a signal in cases of valley fever in the region could be detected and traced to the storm - an American haboob. To better understand the atmospheric life cycle of cocci spores, the DREAM dust model (also herein, NMME-DREAM) was modified to simulate spore emission, transport and deposition. Inexact knowledge of where cocci-causing fungus grows, the low resolution of cocci surveillance and an overall active period for significant dust events complicate analysis of the effect of the 5 July 2011 storm. In the larger context of monthly to annual disease surveillance, valley fever statistics, when compared against PM10 observation networks and modeled airborne dust concentrations, may reveal a likely cause and effect. Details provided by models and satellites fill time and space voids in conventional approaches to air quality and disease surveillance, leading to land-atmosphere modeling and remote sensing that clearly mark a path to advance valley fever epidemiology, surveillance and risk avoidance.

  17. Beaver assisted river valley formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, C.J.; Cooper, D.J.; Baker, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    We examined how beaver dams affect key ecosystem processes, including pattern and process of sediment deposition, the composition and spatial pattern of vegetation, and nutrient loading and processing. We provide new evidence for the formation of heterogeneous beaver meadows on riverine system floodplains and terraces where dynamic flows are capable of breaching in-channel beaver dams. Our data show a 1.7-m high beaver dam triggered overbank flooding that drowned vegetation in areas deeply flooded, deposited nutrient-rich sediment in a spatially heterogeneous pattern on the floodplain and terrace, and scoured soils in other areas. The site quickly de-watered following the dam breach by high stream flows, protecting the deposited sediment from future re-mobilization by overbank floods. Bare sediment either exposed by scouring or deposited by the beaver flood was quickly colonized by a spatially heterogeneous plant community, forming a beaver meadow. Many willow and some aspen seedlings established in the more heavily disturbed areas, suggesting the site may succeed to a willow carr plant community suitable for future beaver re-occupation. We expand existing theory beyond the beaver pond to include terraces within valleys. This more fully explains how beavers can help drive the formation of alluvial valleys and their complex vegetation patterns as was first postulated by Ruedemann and Schoonmaker in 1938. ?? 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Transforming the "Valley of Death" into a "Valley of Opportunity"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Merceret, Francis J.; O'Brien, T. P.; Roeder, William P.; Huddleston, Lisa L.; Bauman, William H., III

    2014-01-01

    Transitioning technology from research to operations (23 R2O) is difficult. The problem's importance is exemplified in the literature and in every failed attempt to do so. Although the R2O gap is often called the "valley of death", a recent a Space Weather editorial called it a "Valley of Opportunity". There are significant opportunities for space weather organizations to learn from the terrestrial experience. Dedicated R2O organizations like those of the various NOAA testbeds and collaborative "proving ground" projects take common approaches to improving terrestrial weather forecasting through the early transition of research capabilities into the operational environment. Here we present experience-proven principles for the establishment and operation of similar space weather organizations, public or private. These principles were developed and currently being demonstrated by NASA at the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) and the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center. The AMU was established in 1991 jointly by NASA, the U.S. Air Force (USAF) and the National Weather Service (NWS) to provide tools and techniques for improving weather support to the Space Shuttle Program (Madura et al., 2011). The primary customers were the USAF 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) and the NWS Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG who provided the weather observing and forecast support for Shuttle operations). SPoRT was established in 2002 to transition NASA satellite and remote-sensing technology to the NWS. The continuing success of these organizations suggests the common principles guiding them may be valuable for similar endeavors in the space weather arena.

  19. Go.USA.gov URL Shortner API

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — The Go.USA.gov REST API allows you interact with Go.USA.gov by shortening URLs, previewing long urls, and getting the number of clicks to a Go.USA.gov URL.. An API...

  20. TTÜ ja TÜ osalevad USA armee miljoniprojektides

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2016-01-01

    TTÜ ja TÜ liitusid USA-s tegutseva meditsiinitehnoloogia ettevõtete konsortsiumiga. Nii jõuavad juhtivate Eesti kõrgkoolide teadmised USA armeesse, kes konsortsiumi kaudu innovaatilisi tooteid ja teenuseid sisse ostab

  1. Strengths and strain energies of volcanic edifices: implications for eruptions, collapse calderas, and landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, A.

    2012-07-01

    Natural hazards associated with volcanic edifices depend partly on how fracture resistant the edifices are, i.e. on their strengths. Observations worldwide indicate that large fluid-driven extension fractures (dikes, inclined sheets), shear fractures (landslides), and mixed-mode fractures (ring dikes and ring faults) normally propagate more easily in a basaltic edifice (shield volcano) than in a stratovolcano. For example, dike-fed eruptions occur once every few years in many basaltic edifices but once every 102-3 yr in many stratovolcanoes. Large landslides and caldera collapses also appear to be more common in a typical basaltic edifice/shield volcano than in a typical stratovolcano. In contrast to a basaltic edifice, a stratovolcano is composed of mechanically dissimilar rock layers, i.e. layers with mismatching elastic properties (primarily Young's modulus). Elastic mismatch encourages fracture deflection and arrest at contacts and increases the amount of energy needed for a large-scale edifice failure. Fracture-related hazards depend on the potential energy available to propagate the fractures which, in turn, depends on the boundary conditions during fracture propagation. Here there are two possible scenarios: one in which the outer boundary of the volcanic edifice or rift zone does not move during the fracture propagation (constant displacement); the other in which the boundary moves (constant load). In the former, the total potential energy is the strain energy stored in the volcano before fracture formation; in the latter, the total potential energy is the strain energy plus the work done by the forces moving the boundary. Constant-displacement boundary conditions favor small eruptions, landslides, and caldera collapses, whereas constant-load conditions favor comparatively large eruptions, landslides, and collapses. For a typical magma chamber (sill-like with a diameter of 8 km), the strain energy change due to magma-chamber inflation is estimated at the

  2. Strengths and strain energies of volcanic edifices: implications for eruptions, collapse calderas, and landslides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gudmundsson

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural hazards associated with volcanic edifices depend partly on how fracture resistant the edifices are, i.e. on their strengths. Observations worldwide indicate that large fluid-driven extension fractures (dikes, inclined sheets, shear fractures (landslides, and mixed-mode fractures (ring dikes and ring faults normally propagate more easily in a basaltic edifice (shield volcano than in a stratovolcano. For example, dike-fed eruptions occur once every few years in many basaltic edifices but once every 102-3 yr in many stratovolcanoes. Large landslides and caldera collapses also appear to be more common in a typical basaltic edifice/shield volcano than in a typical stratovolcano. In contrast to a basaltic edifice, a stratovolcano is composed of mechanically dissimilar rock layers, i.e. layers with mismatching elastic properties (primarily Young's modulus. Elastic mismatch encourages fracture deflection and arrest at contacts and increases the amount of energy needed for a large-scale edifice failure. Fracture-related hazards depend on the potential energy available to propagate the fractures which, in turn, depends on the boundary conditions during fracture propagation. Here there are two possible scenarios: one in which the outer boundary of the volcanic edifice or rift zone does not move during the fracture propagation (constant displacement; the other in which the boundary moves (constant load. In the former, the total potential energy is the strain energy stored in the volcano before fracture formation; in the latter, the total potential energy is the strain energy plus the work done by the forces moving the boundary. Constant-displacement boundary conditions favor small eruptions, landslides, and caldera collapses, whereas constant-load conditions favor comparatively large eruptions, landslides, and collapses. For a typical magma chamber (sill-like with a diameter of 8 km, the strain energy change due to magma-chamber inflation

  3. Audiomagnetotellurics-Magnetotelluric (AMT-MT) survey of the Campi Flegrei inner caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalchi, Agata; Tripaldi, Simona; Romano, Gerardo; D'Auria, Luca; Improta, Luigi; Petrillo, Zaccaria

    2017-04-01

    In the framework of the EU project MED-SUV, an audiomagnetotellurics-magnetotelluric (AMT-MT) survey in the frequency band 0.1-100kHz was performed in the eastern border of the Campi Flegrei inner caldera comprising the area where seismicity is concentred in the last decade. This survey was aimed to provide new insights on the electrical resistivity structure of the subsoil. Among all the collected MT soundings, twenty-two, on a total of forty-three, were selected along a WSW-ENE alignment that crosses the main fumarole emissions (Solfatara, Pisciarelli and Agnano) and used for 2D regularized inversion. The obtained model is characterized by a quite narrow resistivity range that well matches typical range of enhanced geothermal environment as largely documented in the international literature. In particular focusing on the Solfatara and Pisciarelli districts the resistivity distribution clearly calls to mind the behavior of a high temperature geothermal system with a very conductive cap in the shallower part. Here the presence of gaps in this conductor just in correspondence of the main superficial emissions describes the inflow and outflow pathway of the shallow fluids circulation. A high resistive reservoir appearing at a depth of about 500 m b.s.l.. WithinWithin this region we selected a vertical resistivity profile just in correspondence of a Vp/Vs profile versus depth coming from a passive seismic tomography (Vanorio et al., 2005). The comparison of the two behaviors shows a clear anti-correlation between the two physical parameters (high resistivity and low Vp/Vs) in the depth range 500-1000 m supporting the interpretation that an over-pressurized gas bearing rocks under supercritical conditions constituting the reservoir of the enhanced geothermal system. On the eastern side of this resistive plume up to 2.5 km of depth is present a local relative conductive unit underneath the Pisciarelli area. In the same volume most of the recent (from 2005 up to date

  4. Euroopa teadis USA salavanglaist / Tõnis Erilaid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Erilaid, Tõnis, 1943-

    2005-01-01

    USA endise välisministri Colin Powelli sõnul pole see tema sõpradele Euroopas uudiseks, et USA on viinud vange riikidesse, kus tema seadused ei kehti. USA praeguse välisministri Condoleezza Rice'i sõnul on USA vange üle kuulanud väljaspool USA-d. USA Today kirjeldab Stare Kiejkuty küla Poolas, kus arvatavasti on olnud salavangla

  5. Optimum geometry for boiler soot blowers nozzles; Geometria optima de toberas para deshollinadores de caldera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza Garza, Jesus; Garcia Tinoco, Guillermo J.; Martinez Flores, Jose Oscar [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1989-12-31

    For boiler soot blowing converging-diverging nozzles are employed, whose function is to convert thermal energy of a gas into kinetic energy to remove the deposits that adhere to the heat exchanger surfaces. In this paper are described the experimental equipment and the methods for flow, dynamic pressure, discharge velocity and air expansion factor calculation in each nozzle, as a function of its design geometry, utilizing air from a five stage centrifugal compressor. The graphic analysis of the results, concludes that the most efficient nozzles are not the ones than develop the greatest velocity, but the ones of highest dynamic pressure at the outlet. The nozzle geometry that allows obtaining the maximum dynamic air pressure at the discharge is A{sub 2}/A{sub g}=1.3676 [Espanol] Para el deshollinado de calderas se utilizan las toberas convergentes-divergentes, cuya funcion es convertir la energia termica de un gas en energia cinetica para remover los depositos que se adhieren a las superficies de intercambio de calor. En este trabajo se describen el equipo experimental y los metodos de calculo para flujo, presion dinamica, velocidad a la descarga y factor de expansion del aire en cada tobera, como funcion de su geometria de diseno. Durante la experimentacion se evaluaron siete disenos diferentes de toberas, empleando aire de un compresor centrifugo de cinco etapas. Del analisis grafico de los resultados, se concluye que las toberas mas eficientes no son las que desarrollan mayor velocidad sino las de mayor presion dinamica de la salida. La geometria de tobera que permite obtener la maxima presion dinamica del aire a la descarga es A{sub 2}/A{sub g} = 1.3676.

  6. Comparative geochemical and microbiological characterization of two thermal pools in the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Elizabeth A; Unrine, Jason M; Mills, Gary L; Romanek, Christopher S; Wiegel, Juergen

    2012-04-01

    Arkashin Schurf (Arkashin) and Zavarzin Spring (Zavarzin), two active thermal pools in the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, Russia, were studied for geochemical and microbiological characterization. Arkashin, the smaller of the two pools, had broader temperature and pH ranges, and the sediments had higher concentrations of total As (4,250 mg/kg) relative to Zavarzin (48.9 mg/kg). Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether profiles represented distinct archaeal communities in each pool and agreed well with previous studies of these pools. Although no archaeal 16S rRNA sequences were recovered from Arkashin, sequences recovered from Zavarzin were mostly representatives of the Crenarchaeota and "Korarchaeota," and 13% of the sequences were unclassifiable. The bacterial community in Arkashin was dominated by uncultured "Bacteroidetes," Hydrogenobaculum of the Aquificales and Variovorax of the Betaproteobacteria, and 19% of the sequences remained unclassified. These results were consistent with other studies of As-rich features. The most abundant members of the Zavarzin bacterial community included the Chloroflexi, as well as members of the classes Deltaproteobacteria and Clostridia. In addition, 24% of the sequences were unclassified and at least 5% of those represent new groups among the established Bacterial phyla. Ecological structure in each pool was inferred from taxonomic classifications and bulk stable isotope δ values of C, N, and S. Hydrogenobaculum was responsible for primary production in Arkashin. However, in Zavarzin, the carbon source appeared to be allochthonous to the identified bacterial community members. Additionally, sequences related to organisms expected to participate in N and S cycles were identified from both pools.

  7. Microbial life in Bourlyashchy, the hottest thermal pool of Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyh, Nikolay A; Mardanov, Andrey V; Gumerov, Vadim M; Miroshnichenko, Margarita L; Lebedinsky, Alexander V; Merkel, Alexander Y; Crowe, Douglas; Pimenov, Nikolay V; Rusanov, Igor I; Ravin, Nikolay V; Moran, Mary Ann; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A

    2015-11-01

    Bourlyashchy is the largest and hottest pool in the Uzon Caldera, located in the territory of Kronotsky Nature Reserve, Kamchatka, Russia, with sediment surface temperatures at the margins ranging from 86 to 97 °C, and pH from 6.0 to 7.0. The microbial communities of the pool water and sediments were studied comprehensively from 2005 to 2014. Radioisotopic tracer studies revealed the processes of inorganic carbon assimilation, sulfate reduction, lithotrophic methanogenesis and potentially very active process of acetate oxidation to CO2. The total number of microbial cells in water was different in different years ranging from 5.2 to 7.0 × 10(6); in sediments, it changed from year to year between 6.3 × 10(6) and 1.75 × 10(8), increasing with a decrease in temperature. FISH with Archaea- and Bacteria-specific probes showed that the share of Bacteria differed with year, changing from 34 to 71%. According to 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data, lithoautotrophs (Aquificales and Thermoproteales) predominated in water samples, while in sediments they shared the niche with organotrophic Crenarchaeota, Korarchaeota, and bacteria of the genus Caldimicrobium (phylum Thermodesulfobacteria). The majority of organisms in water belonged to cultivated orders of prokaryotes; the only large uncultured group was that representing a novel order in class Thermoprotei. In sediments, unclassified Aquificeae comprised a significant part of the bacterial population. Thus, we showed that the hottest of the terrestrial hot pools studied contains numerous and active microbial populations where Bacteria represent a significant part of the microbial community, and planktonic and sediment populations differ in both composition and function.

  8. Renewed Volcano-Stratigraphc Studies of Calderas with Geothermal Potential in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, J. L.; Arce, J. L.; García-Tenorio, F.; Layer, P. W.; Saucedo, R.; Castro, R.; Garduño, V. H.; Jimenez, A.; Pérez, H.; Valdez, G.; Meriggi, L.

    2014-12-01

    During the past six years we have carried out volcanologic fieldwork either in active geothermal fields in Mexico (Los Azufres, Tres Vírgenes, and Cerro Prieto) or in potential sites in which some geothermal exploration studied had been done by the National Power Company (CFE). These studies have been very successful in reassessing the location of the geothermal reservoirs within the volcanic successions through detailed mapping of the volcanic units using high resolution topography and satellite imagery to produce 3-D imagery in conjunction with field work to produce preliminary geologic maps. Detailed stratigraphy of volcanic units, assisted with 40Ar/39Ar and radiocarbon geochronology have redefined the evolution of some of these complexes. For example, our studies at Los Azufres geothermal field located in the State of Michoacán indicate that the volcanic complex of the same name sits upon a structural high transected by E-W faults related to the youngest structures of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. The volcanic complex has been emplaced during the past ~1.5 Ma. During this time, magmas evolved from basaltic to rhyolitic in composition with the emplacement of circa 100 vents. Several landforms have undergone intense hydrothermal alteration and, in some cases, generated debris avalanches. The revised stratigraphy based on drill holes and new dates of cores suggested that the geothermal reservoir is hosted in Miocene rocks bracketed between the Miocene Sierra de Mil Cumbres volcanics (17-22 Ma) and the products of the volcanic field itself. Similar studies will be carried out at four other Pleistocene calderas (Acoculco, La Primavera, Aguajito and Reforma) attempting to refine their volcanic stratigraphy, evolution, and the location of the geothermal system, and those results will help in the design of exploration strategies for geothermal sources.

  9. Geology and geothermal waters of Lightning Dock region, Animas Valley and Pyramid Mountains, Hidalgo County, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elston, W.E.; Deal, E.G.; Logsdon, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    This circular covers the geology of the Pyramid Peak, Swallow Fork Peak, Table Top Mountain, and South Pyramid Peak 7-1/2-min quadrangles, which include the Lightning Dock KGRA. Hot wells (70 to 115.5/sup 0/C) seem to be structurally controlled by intersections of the ring-fracture zone of an Oligocene ash-flow tuff cauldron (Muir cauldron), a Miocene-to-Holocene north-trending basin-and-range fault (Animas Valley fault), and a northeast-trending lineament that appears to control anomalously heated underground waters and Pliocene-Pleistocene basalt cones in the San Bernardino, San Simon, and Animas Valleys. The Muir cauldron, approximately 20 km in diameter, collapsed in two stages, each associated with the eruption of a rhyolite ash-flow-tuff sheet and of ring-fracture domes. Most of the hydrothermal alteration of the Lightning Dock KGRA is related to the first stage of eruption and collapse, not to the modern geothermal system. Contrary to previous reports, no silicic volcanic rocks younger than basin-and-range faulting are known; unconformities beneath rhyolite ring-fracture domes are caused by Oligocene caldera collapse, not by basin-and-range faulting. The Animas Valley is the site of widespread post-20 My travertine deposits and near-surface veins of calcite, fluorite, and/or psilomelane, controlled by north- or northwest-trending basin-and-range faults. The fluoride-bearing waters of the Lightning Dock KGRA may be a late stage of this hydrothermal activity. Distribution of Pliocene-Pleistocene basalt suggests that deep-seated basalt near the solids may be the ultimate heat source.

  10. Estudio vulcanológico y qeoquímico del maar de la Caldera del Rey. Tenerife (Canarias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paradas Herrero, A.

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study a cartographic, morphological, geochemical and petrographic study is made of the ''Caldera del Rey". The "Caldera del Rey" is a volcanic structure formed by two overlapping maars, The second one (maar that was formed is of greaten dimensions and destroyed part of the first one, Both maars erupted throught a possible fracture N 35 E, which is one of the directions with regional importance in the Archipelago. The eruption, which was very explosive, has been thought to be due in part to the great importance of the gaseous phase of the salic magma and also to the steam produced during the interaction of the magma with underground water. This explosivity can be clearly seen in the cleaf resalte cul out in the "Serie Basáltica Antigua" to some extent penetrated and fragmented by the eruption, The phreatomagmatic character of the eruption is evident because of the existence of accretionary lapilli. The materials emitted are exc1usively of aerial projection: agglomerates, tuffs cinerites. There was no flow of lava. ' Some of the fragments of tuffs as cinerites and pumice are comagmatic. These correspond to salic trachytic phonolitic rocks, which represent one of the last stages of differentiation of the alkaline oceanic magmas. The geochemical character of the materials of the "Caldera del Rey" is characteristic and can be easily distinguished from other nearly salic deposits formed in different cycles.

    En este trabajo se hace el estudio cartográfico, morfológico, petrográfico y geoquímico de la Caldera del Rey. La Caldera del Reyes un edificio volcánico formado por dos maars imbricados. El que se formó en segundo lugar es de mayores dimensiones y destruyó en parte el primero. Ambos aprovecharon para hacer erupción una posible fractura de dirección N 35'"E, de importancia regional en el Archipiélago. La erupción fue de una gran explosividad, que se supone debida, en parte, a la gran importancia de la fase gaseosa del

  11. Real-time monitoring of seismicity and deformation during the Bárdarbunga rifting event and associated caldera subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Vogfjörd, Kristín; Roberts, Matthew; Barsotti, Sara; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Hensch, Martin; Bergsson, Bergur; Kjartansson, vilhjálmur; Erlendsson, Pálmi; Friðriksdóttir, Hildur; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Guðmundsson, Magnús; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Árnadóttir, Thóra; Heimisson, Elías; Hjorleifsdóttir, Vala; Soring, Jón; Björnsson, Bogi; Oddsson, Björn

    2015-04-01

    We present a monitoring overview of a rifting event and associated caldera subsidence in a glaciated environment during the Bárðarbunga volcanic crisis. Following a slight increase in seismicity and a weak deformation signal, noticed a few months before the unrest by the SIL monitoring team, an intense seismic swarm began in the subglacial Bárðarbunga caldera on August 16 2014. During the following two weeks, a dyke intruded into the crust beneath the Vatnajökull ice cap, propagating 48 km from the caldera to the east-north-east and north of the glacier where an effusive eruption started in Holuhraun. The eruption is still ongoing at the time of writing and has become the largest eruption in over 200 years in Iceland. The dyke propagation was episodic with a variable rate and on several occasions low frequency seismic tremor was observed. Four ice cauldrons, manifestations of small subglacial eruptions, were detected. Soon after the swarm began the 7x11 km wide caldera started to subside and is still subsiding (although at slower rates) and has in total subsided over 60 meters. Unrest in subglacial volcanoes always calls for interdisciplinary efforts and teamwork plays a key role for efficient monitoring. Iceland has experienced six subglacial volcanic crises since modern digital monitoring started in the early 90s. With every crisis the monitoring capabilities, data interpretations, communication and information dissemination procedures have improved. The Civil Protection calls for a board of experts and scientists (Civil Protection Science Board, CPSB) to share their knowledge and provide up-to-date information on the current status of the volcano, the relevant hazards and most likely scenarios. The evolution of the rifting was monitored in real-time by the joint interpretation of seismic and cGPS data. The dyke propagation could be tracked and new, updated models of the dyke volume were presented at the CPSB meetings, often daily. In addition, deformation

  12. Photosensitive Epilepsy In Kashmir Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem S M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A random population of 618 people with epilepsy hailing from different parts of Kashmir valley was screened for photosensitivity both clinically and on a standard protocol of intermittent photic stimulation (IPS provoked EEG recordings. Six (0.9% patients with a mean age of 15+6.57 years were found to be photosensitive; five had generalized and one had absence seizures. The baseline EEG in all patients showed generalized epileptiform discharges. On IPS, similar EEG findings were obtained with a narrow range of stimulus frequency i.e. 7-12 cycles/sec. There appears to be a low prevalence of photo-sensitivity in our epileptic population, possibly related to genetic factors.

  13. Zeolite-clay mineral zonation of volcaniclastic sediments within the McDermitt caldera complex of Nevada and Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanzman, Richard K.; Rytuba, James J.

    1979-01-01

    Volcaniclastic sediments deposited in the moat of the collapsed McDermitt caldera complex have been altered chiefly to zeolites and potassium feldspar. The original rhyolitic and peralkaline ash-flow tuffs are included in conglomerates at the caldera rims and grade into a lacustrine series near the center of the collapse. The tuffs show a lateral zeolitic alteration from almost fresh glass to clinoptilolite, clinoptilolite-mordenite, and erionite; to analcime-potassium feldspar; and finally to potassium feldspar. Vertical zonation is in approximately the same order. Clay minerals in associated mudstones, on the other hand, show little lateral variation but a distinct vertical zonation, having a basal dioctahedral smectite, a medial trioctahedral smectite, and an upper dioctahedral smectite. The medial trioctahedral smectite is enriched in lithium (as much as 6,800 ppm Li). Hydrothermal alteration of the volcaniclastic sediments, forming both mercury and uranium deposits, caused a distinct zeolite and clay-mineral zonation within the general lateral zonation. The center of alteration is generally potassium feldspar, commonly associated with alunite. Potassium feldspar grades laterally and vertically to either clinoptilolite or clinoptilolite-mordenite, generally associated with gypsum. This zone then grades vertically and laterally into fresh glass. The clay minerals are a dioctahedral smectite, a mixed-layer clay mineral, and a 7-A clay mineral. The mixed-layer and 7-A clay minerals are associated with the potassium feldspar-alunite zone of alteration, and the dioctahedral smectite is associated with clinoptilolite. This mineralogical zonation may be an exploration guide for mercury and uranium mineralization in the caldera complex environment.

  14. The initiation and development of a caldera-forming Plinian eruption (172 ka Lower Pumice 2 eruption, Santorini, Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, J. M.; Cas, R. A. F.; Druitt, T. H.; Carey, R. J.

    2017-07-01

    The rhyodacitic 172 ka Lower Pumice 2 (LP2) eruption terminated the first magmatic cycle at Santorini (Greece), producing a proximal short-lived precursory eruption column, depositing a column (LP2-A2, A3). The progressive increase in maximum vesicle number density (NVF) in rhyodacitic pumice, from 3.2 × 109 cm- 3 in the basal fall unit of LP2-A2-1 to 9.2 × 109 cm- 3 in LP2-A3, translates to an increase in magma decompression rate from 18 to 29 MPa s- 1 over the course of the initial Plinian phase. This is interpreted to be a consequence of progressive vent widening and a deepening of the fragmentation surface. Such interpretations are supported by the increase in lithic clast abundance vertically through LP2-A, and the occurrence of basement-derived (deep) lithic components in LP2-A3. The increasing lithic clast content and the inability to effectively entrain air into the eruption column, due to vent widening, resulted in column collapse and the development of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs; LP2-B). A major vent excavation event or the opening of new vents, possibly associated with incipient caldera collapse, facilitated the ingress of water into the magmatic system, the development of widespread PDCs and the deposition of a < 20m thick massive phreatomagmatic tuff (LP2-C). The eruption cumulated in catastrophic caldera collapse, the enlargement of a pre-existing flooded caldera and the discharge of lithic-rich PDCs, depositing proximal < 9 m thick lithic lag breccias (LP2-D).

  15. The volcanic history of Mars: High-resolution crater-based studies of the calderas of 20 volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Stuart J.; di Achille, Gaetano; Hynek, Brian M.

    2011-02-01

    Determining absolute surface ages for bodies in the Solar System is, at present, only possible for Earth and Moon with radiometric dating for both bodies and biologic proxies such as fossils for Earth. Relative ages through cratering statistics are recognized as one of the most reliable proxies for relative ages, calibrated by lunar geologic mapping and Apollo program sample returns. In this work, we have utilized the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's ConTeXt Camera's images which provide the highest resolution wide-scale coverage of Mars to systematically crater-age-date the calderas of 20 of Mars' largest volcanoes in order to constrain the length of time over which these volcanoes - and major volcanic activity on the planet, by extension - were active. This constitutes the largest uniform and comprehensive research on these features to date, eliminating unknown uncertainties by multiple researchers analyzing different volcanoes with varied data and methods. We confirm previous results that Mars has had active volcanism throughout most of its history although it varied spatially and temporally, with the latest large-scale caldera activity ending approximately 150 ma in the Tharsis region. We find a transition from explosive to effusive eruption style occurring in the Hesperian, at approximately 3.5 Ga ago, though different regions of the planet transitioned at different times. Since we were statistically complete in our crater counts to sizes as small as ˜60 m in most cases, we also used our results to study the importance of secondary cratering and its effects on crater size-frequency distributions within the small regions of volcanic calderas. We found that there is no "golden rule" for the diameters secondaries become important in crater counts of martian surfaces, with one volcano showing a classic field of secondaries ˜2 crater diameters from the center of its primary but not affecting the size-frequency distribution, and another clearly showing an influence

  16. Persistent inflation at Aira caldera accompanying explosive activity at Sakurajima volcano: Constraining deformation source parameters from Finite Element inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, James; Gottsmann, Jo; Iguchi, Masato; Nakamichi, Haruhisa

    2015-04-01

    Aira caldera is located within Kagoshima Bay at the southern end of Kyushu, Japan. Sakurajima is an active post-caldera andesitic stratovolcano that sits on the caldera's southern rim. Despite frequent Vulcanian-type explosive activity, the area is experiencing continued uplift at a maximum rate of approximately 1.5 cm/yr with a footprint of 40 km, indicating that magma is being supplied faster than it is erupted. This is of particular concern as the amplitude of deformation is approaching the level inferred prior to the 1914 VEI 4 eruption. Using GPS data from 1996 - 2007 we explore causes for the uplift. To solve for the optimum deformation source parameters we use an inverse Finite Element method accounting for three-dimensional material heterogeneity (inferred from seismic tomography) and the surrounding topography of the region. The same inversions are also carried out using Finite Element models that incorporate simplified homogeneous or one-dimensional subsurface material properties, with and without topography. Results from the comparison of the six different models show statistically significant differences in the inferred deformation sources. This indicates that both subsurface heterogeneity and surface topography are essential in geodetic modelling to extract the most realistic deformation source parameters. The current best-fit source sits within a seismic low-velocity zone in the north-east of the caldera at a depth of approximately 14 km with a volume increase of 1.2 x 108 m3. The source location underlies a region of active underwater fumaroles within the Wakamiko crater and differs significantly from previous analytical modelling results. Seismic data further highlights areas of high seismic attenuation as well as large aseismic zones, both of which could allude to inelastic behaviour and a significant heat source at depth. To integrate these observations, subsequent forward Finite Element models will quantify the importance of rheology and

  17. A 2-D FEM thermal model to simulate water flow in a porous media: Campi Flegrei caldera case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Romano

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic and geothermal aspects both exist in many geologically young areas. In these areas the heat transfer process is of fundamental importance, so that the thermal and fluid-dynamic processes characterizing a viscous fluid in a porous medium are very important to understand the complex dynamics of the these areas. The Campi Flegrei caldera, located west of the city of Naples, within the central-southern sector of the large graben of Campanian plain, is a region where both volcanic and geothermal phenomena are present. The upper part of the geothermal system can be considered roughly as a succession of volcanic porous material (tuff saturated by a mixture formed mainly by water and carbon dioxide. We have implemented a finite elements approach in transient conditions to simulate water flow in a 2-D porous medium to model the changes of temperature in the geothermal system due to magmatic fluid inflow, accounting for a transient phase, not considered in the analytical solutions and fluid compressibility. The thermal model is described by means of conductive/convective equations, in which we propose a thermal source represented by a parabolic shape function to better simulate an increase of temperature in the central part (magma chamber of a box, simulating the Campi Flegrei caldera and using more recent evaluations, from literature, for the medium's parameters (specific heat capacity, density, thermal conductivity, permeability. A best-fit velocity for the permeant is evaluated by comparing the simulated temperatures with those measured in wells drilled by Agip (Italian Oil Agency in the 1980s in the framework of geothermal exploration. A few tens of days are enough to reach the thermal steady state, showing the quick response of the system to heat injection. The increase in the pressure due to the heat transport is then used to compute ground deformation, in particular the vertical displacements characteristics of the Campi Flegrei caldera

  18. Crystallization and eruption ages of Breccia Museo (Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy) plutonic clasts and their relation to the Campanian ignimbrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Samantha K.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Pappalardo, Lucia; Stockli, Daniel F.; Lovera, Oscar M.

    2014-01-01

    The Campi Flegrei volcanic district (Naples region, Italy) is a 12-km-wide, restless caldera system that has erupted at least six voluminous ignimbrites during the late Pleistocene, including the >300 km3 Campanian ignimbrite (CI) which originated from the largest known volcanic event of the Mediterranean region. The Breccia Museo (BM), a petrologically heterogeneous and stratigraphically complex volcanic deposit extending over 200 km2 in close proximity to Campi Flegrei, has long remained contentious regarding its age and stratigraphic relation to the CI. Here, we present crystallization and eruption ages for BM plutonic ejecta clasts that were determined via uranium decay series and (U-Th)/He dating of zircon, respectively. Despite mineralogical and textural heterogeneity of these syenitic clasts, their U-Th zircon rim crystallization ages are indistinguishable with an average age of 49.7 ± 2.5 ka (2σ errors; mean square of weighted deviates MSWD = 1.2; n = 34). A subset of these crystals was used to obtain disequilibrium-corrected (U-Th)/He zircon ages which average 41.7 ± 1.8 ka (probability of fit P = 0.54; n = 15). This age closely overlaps with published CI 40Ar/39Ar eruption ages (40.6 ± 0.1 ka) after recalibration to recently revised flux monitor ages. Concordant eruption ages for BM and CI agree with previous chemostratigraphic and paleomagnetic correlations, suggesting their origin from the same eruption. However, they are at variance with recalibrated 40Ar/39Ar ages which have BM postdate CI by 3 ± 1 ka. BM syenites show similar geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopical features of pre-caldera rocks erupted between 58 and 46 ka, but are distinctive from subsequent caldera-forming magmas. Energy-constrained assimilation and fractional crystallization modeling of Nd-Sr isotopic data suggests that pre-caldera magmas formed a carapace of BM-type intrusions in a mid-crust magma chamber (≥8 km depth) shielding the younger CI magma from contamination by

  19. [Interactions between larvae of the hoverfly Eristalinus sepulchralis and microorganisms in the hydrothermal springs of the Uzon caldera, Kamchatka].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobkova, L E; Barinova, E S; Dulov, L E; Gal'chenko, V F

    2007-01-01

    The physicochemical and microbial characteristics of some medium-temperature hydrotherms of Kamchatka Peninsula (Uzon caldera), habitats of the hoverfly Eristalinus sepulchralis larvae, were studied. In these hydrothermal vents, the larvae were found to use various prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms as a nutrient substrate. The rates of chemo- and photosynthetic activity of the suspended microbial communities inhabiting the hydrotherms and supporting the existence of larvae were measured. By light and electron microscopy, exo- and endosymbiotic prokaryotic microorganisms were revealed in the digestive and respiratory systems of larvae.

  20. Selected data fron continental scientific drilling core holes VC-1 and VC-2a, Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musgrave, J.A.; Goff, F.; Shevenell, L.; Trujillo, P.E. Jr.; Counce, D.; Luedemann, G.; Garcia, S.; Dennis, B.; Hulen, J.B.; Janik, C.; Tomei, F.A.

    1989-02-01

    This report presents geochemical and isotopic data on rocks and water and wellbore geophysical data from the Continental Scientific Drilling Program core holes VC-1 and VC-2a, Valles Caldera, New Mexico. These core holes were drilled as a portion of a broader program that seeks to answer fundamental questions about magma, water/rock interactions, ore deposits, and volcanology. The data in this report will assist the interpretation of the hydrothermal system in the Jemez Mountains and will stimulate further research in magmatic processes, hydrothermal alteration, ore deposits, hydrology, structural geology, and hydrothermal solution chemistry. 37 refs., 36 figs., 28 tabs.

  1. Qena Valley Evolution, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkareem, Mohamed

    2010-05-01

    Remotely sensed topographic and optical data were used to identify tectonic phenomena in Qena Valley. Using digital elevation model, morphotectonic features were identified. Processing and analysis were carried out by the combined use of: (1) digital elevation model, (2) digital drainage network analysis, (3) optical data analysis, and (4) lineament extraction and analysis. Structural information from other sources, such as geological maps, remotely sensed images and field observations were analyzed with geographic information system techniques. The analysis results reveal that the linear features of Qena Valley controlled by several structural elements have different trends NW-SE, NE-SW and N-S trends. Basement rocks at Qena valley has a major NE-SW trending and the sedimentary rocks are dominated by a NW-SE, NE-SW and N-S trends while, E-W are less abundant. The NE-SW trends at north Eastern Desert Egypt attain to normal faults that reflect extension in NW-SE direction, which is related to strike slip faulting along NW-SE directed Najd fault system. Further, the NE-SW is abundant as joints and fractures seem to have controlled the path of the Nile in Qift - Qena area. The NW-SE direction are abundant in the rock fracture trends (Gulf of Suez or Red Sea) and reflects Neoproterozoic faults have been reactivated in Neogene during rifting events of the Red Sea opening and marked the sedimentary rocks at Qena valley. The results of the lineament density map reveals that Qena valley was originated along one fault that trend like the Gulf of Suez and the range of the Red Sea Hills. This major fault was dissected by several lateral faults are seen well exposed at numerous places within the valley, especially on its eastern side. Both sides of Qena valley have a similar density matching may attain to that this lineaments affected Qena valley during rifting. This rifts it probably happened in Early Miocene associated with Red Sea tectonics. The general southward slope of

  2. 27 CFR 9.78 - Ohio River Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ohio River Valley. 9.78... River Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Ohio River Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Ohio River Valley...

  3. Pepeljajev eesti näitlejatega USA-s

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Sasha Pepeljajevi tantsulavastust "Uksed" etendati USA rahvusvahelisel teatrifestivalil "Arts & Ideas". Vene-Eesti trupi Apparatus lavastus on pühendatud Daniil Harmsi 100. sünniaastapäevale ning põhineb tema töödel

  4. El Morro caldera (33° 10‧ S, 66° 24‧ W), San Luis, Argentina: An exceptional case of fossil pre-collapse updoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sruoga, P.; Ibañes, O. D.; Japas, M. S.; Urbina, N. E.

    2017-05-01

    Volcanism at Sierra del Morro represents the final stages of the flat-slab related magmatism in the easternmost San Luis Neogene Volcanic Belt. This 80 km-long NW-WNW-trending belt tracks the episodic inland migration of both magmatism and tectonic deformation since 18 Ma. The Sierra del Morro stands out in the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas as a metamorphic block uplifted during the Late Miocene-Pleistocene by a combination of magma injection and tectonic deformation. Although sequences that preserve stages of basement updoming are not often preserved, exposures in Sierra del Morro are exception in providing key evidence and insight into the involved processes. Based on the comprehensive study of volcanic stratigraphy and structures, the reconstruction of the volcanic architecture has been carried out. We infer a three stage evolution of the El Morro caldera as follows: 1) pre-collapse updoming and volcanism, 2) collapse caldera formation and 3) post-caldera volcanism. The ascent of magma is recorded in small tumescence sites, strongly controlled by oblique transtensional WNW-NW and ENE-striking brittle-ductile megashear zones. Even though the area affected by tumescence was large, magma injection progressed only locally. At Cerros Guanaco and Pampa, metamorphic rocks were updomed and strongly brecciated, whereas at Sierra del Morro magma was emplaced as pre-collapse domes with associated block-and-ash flows, ignimbrite caldera-forming eruptions and post-caldera lava domes and dykes. The caldera is located in the intersection of two major oblique transtensional WNW-NW and ENE-trending brittle-ductile megashear zones, where the highest positive dilatation occurred.

  5. Nordkorea kan endelig ramme USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Peter Viggo

    2017-01-01

    Nordkoreas evne til at nå USA baner vej for en forhandlet løsning, fordi præsident Trump ikke har andre alternativer. Krig vil koste over en million døde, og Kina er imod effektive sanktioner. Det nødvendige pres for at få USA til forhandlingsbordet er nu på plads.......Nordkoreas evne til at nå USA baner vej for en forhandlet løsning, fordi præsident Trump ikke har andre alternativer. Krig vil koste over en million døde, og Kina er imod effektive sanktioner. Det nødvendige pres for at få USA til forhandlingsbordet er nu på plads....

  6. Alluvial Boundary of California's Central Valley

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the extent of the alluvial deposits in the Central Valley of California and encompasses the contiguous Sacramento, San Joaquin, and...

  7. Meie mees Silicon Valleys / Kertu Ruus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ruus, Kertu, 1977-

    2007-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Delovõje Vedomosti 5. dets. lk. 4. Peaminister Andrus Ansip avas Eesti Ettevõtluse Sihtasutuse esinduse Silicon Valley pealinnas San Joses. Vt. samas: Ränioru kliima on tehnoloogiasõbralik; Andrus Viirg

  8. Vegetation - San Felipe Valley [ds172

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This Vegetation Map of the San Felipe Valley Wildlife Area in San Diego County, California is based on vegetation samples collected in the field in 2002 and 2005 and...

  9. Detection of valley currents in graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K. S.

    2018-02-01

    There are two valleys in the band structure of graphene zigzag ribbons, which can be used to construct valleytronic devices. We studied the use of a T junction formed by an armchair ribbon and a zigzag ribbon to detect the valley-dependent currents in a zigzag graphene ribbon. A current flowing in a zigzag ribbon is divided by the T junction into the zigzag and armchair leads and this separation process is valley dependent. By measuring the currents in the two outgoing leads, the valley-dependent currents in the incoming lead can be determined. The method does not require superconducting or magnetic elements as in other approaches and thus will be useful in the development of valleytronic devices.

  10. Airborne Dust Models in Valley Fever Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprigg, W. A.; Galgiani, J. N.; Vujadinovic, M.; Pejanovic, G.; Vukovic, A. J.; Prasad, A. K.; Djurdjevic, V.; Nickovic, S.

    2011-12-01

    Dust storms (haboobs) struck Phoenix, Arizona, in 2011 on July 5th and again on July 18th. One potential consequence: an estimated 3,600 new cases of Valley Fever in Maricopa County from the first storm alone. The fungi, Coccidioides immitis, the cause of the respiratory infection, Valley Fever, lives in the dry desert soils of the American southwest and southward through Mexico, Central America and South America. The fungi become part of the dust storm and, a few weeks after inhalation, symptoms of Valley Fever may appear, including pneumonia-like illness, rashes, and severe fatigue. Some fatalities occur. Our airborne dust forecast system predicted the timing and extent of the storm, as it has done with other, often different, dust events. Atmosphere/land surface models can be part of public health services to reduce risk of Valley Fever and exacerbation of other respiratory and cardiovascular illness.

  11. VALMET-A valley air pollution model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteman, C.D.; Allwine, K.J.

    1983-09-01

    Following a thorough analysis of meteorological data obtained from deep valleys of western Colorado, a modular air-pollution model has been developed to simulate the transport and diffusion of pollutants released from an elevated point source in a well-defined mountain valley during the nighttime and morning transition periods. This initial version of the model, named VALMET, operates on a valley cross section at an arbitrary distance down-valley from a continuous point source. The model has been constructed to include parameterizations of the major physical processes that act to disperse pollution during these time periods. The model has not been fully evaluated. Further testing, evaluations, and development of the model are needed. Priorities for further development and testing are provided.

  12. Burrowing Owl - Palo Verde Valley [ds197

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — These burrowing owl observations were collected during the spring and early summer of 1976 in the Palo Verde Valley, eastern Riverside County, California. This is an...

  13. New River Valley Agriculture & Agritourism Strategic Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Martha A.; Scott, Kelli H.

    2017-01-01

    This strategic plan discusses plans for improving the marketing of agritourism and agribusiness in the New River Valley (Floyd, Giles, Montgomery and Pulaski Counties), and potentially increasing community wealth while improving the access to local crops and products. Includes Planning for an Agricultural Future in Giles, Montgomery, and Pulaski Counties: An Agricultural Regional Assessment, prepare for the New River Valley Agricultural & Agritourism Project Management Team by Matson Consu...

  14. A probability tomography approach to the analysis of potential field data in the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Patella

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of the application of the 3D probability tomography imaging approach to the study of the Campi Flegrei (CF caldera are presented and discussed. The tomography approach has been applied to gravity, magnetic and ground deformation data already available in literature. The analysis of the 3D tomographic images is preceded by a brief qualitative interpretation of the original survey maps and by an outline of the probability tomography approach for each geophysical prospecting method. The results derived from the 3D tomographic images are the high occurrence probabilities of both gravity and ground deformation source centres in the CF caldera under the town of Pozzuoli. A Bouguer negative anomaly source centre is highlighted in the depth range 1.6-2 km b.s.l., whereas a positive ground deformation point source, responsible for the bradyseismic crisis of 1982-1984, is estimated at a mean depth of 3-4 km b.s.l. These inferences, combined with the results of a previous analysis of magnetotelluric, dipolar geoelectrical and self-potential data, corroborate the hypothesis that the bradyseismic events in the CF area may be explained by hot fluids vertical advection and subsequent lateral diffusion within a trapped reservoir overlying a magma chamber.

  15. A GIS-based volcanic hazard and risk assessment of eruptions sourced within Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcorn, Rebecca; Panter, Kurt S.; Gorsevski, Pece V.

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the spatial extent of a possible future eruption using a GIS-based volcanic hazard tool designed to simulate pyroclastic fallout and density currents (PDCs) as well as lava flows and to assess the social and economic vulnerabilities of the area at risk. Simulated pyroclastic fallout deposits originating from the El Cajete crater within the Valles Caldera, Jemez Mountains volcanic field, New Mexico, are calibrated to isopach and lithic isopleth maps of the Lower and Upper El Cajete as constructed by Wolff et al. (2011). The change in the axial orientation of fallout deposits between the Lower and Upper El Cajete is best matched using seasonal variations in wind speed and direction based on modern atmospheric records. The calibration of PDCs is based on the distribution and run-out of the Battleship Rock Ignimbrite. Once calibrated, hazards are simulated at a second vent location determined from probability distributions of structural features. The resulting hazard simulation maps show the potential distribution of pyroclastic fallout, PDCs and lava flows, indicating areas to the S/SE of Valles Caldera to be at greatest risk.

  16. Clinopyroxene Diffusion Chronometry of the Scaup Lake Rhyolite, Yellowstone Caldera, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugman, K. K.; Till, C. B.; Bose, M.

    2016-12-01

    Eruption of the Scaup Lake flow (SCL) ended 220,000 years of dormancy and began the youngest sequence of eruptions at Yellowstone caldera [Christiansen et al., USGS, 2007]. Quantification of the time intervals between magmatic events and eruption recorded in SCL is critical to interpreting signs of unrest at modern-day Yellowstone. SCL rhyolite includes zoned phenocrysts and accessory phases that indicate multiple rejuvenation events occurred shortly before eruption; previous studies focused on feldspar and zircon crystal records [e.g. Bindeman et al., J.Pet, 2008; Till et al., Geology, 2015]. Here we exploit zoned clinopyroxene (cpx)—one of the earliest-crystalized minerals in SCL as indicated by petrographic relationships—as a diffusion dating tool and utilize elements with different diffusivities to more precisely resolve rejuvenation-eruption timescales. Using NanoSIMS concentration profiles with 300-900 nanometer spacing, we employ the slower-diffusing REE Ce as a proxy for the initial profile shape of faster-diffusing Fe to calculate diffusive timescales. The outermost resolvable zone boundary in SCL cpx yields a rejuvenation-eruption timescale of 166 ± 80 yrs (1 SD). In comparison, modeling relaxation of Fe from a step function initial condition at the same temperature (920°C) yields a less precise timescale of 488 +9000 -300 yrs. Examination of our results, in concert with observed petrographic relationships, indicates SCL cpx may record an older, separate rejuvenation event than those recorded in feldspar rims at eruption [Till et al., Geology, 2015]. The difference in the youngest recorded event between feldspar and cpx may be due to different crystallization intervals for these phases and/or slower crystal growth rates for cpx relative to feldspar. Our diffusion modeling results reinforce that intracrystalline zoning timescales modeled using a step function initial condition should be considered maxima, especially in viscous rhyolitic magmas, and

  17. The Askja rockslide and the associated tsunami in the caldera lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogfjörd, Kristin; Kristinn Helgason, Jon; Jonsdottir, Kristin; Brynjolfsson, Sveinn; Grimsdottir, Harpa; Johannesson, Tomas; Hensch, Martin; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    A large rockslide was released in Askja, central Iceland, on the evening of 21 July 2014 and descended into the caldera lake. It is one of the largest known rockslides since the settlement of Iceland. The release area of the slide is approximately 900 m wide and 350 m above the lake. The front of the landslide travelled at least 2000 m along the lake bottom where it reached the depth of 150 m. The total run-out is approximatly 3100 m and the fall height 500 m. The estimated volume of the slide is estimated as 15-50 million m3. The rockslide appeared as shallow tremor on IMO seismographs near Askja and the data show that the slide was released at 23:24. The slide created seismic waves that travelled over most of Iceland in roughly one minute. In addition, it triggered atmospheric pressure waves that were detected on an infrasound array some 210 km southwest of the event. The infrasound waves travelled this distance in 11 minutes and were reflected in the stratosphere. Photographs from the rockslide area indicate that considerable movement had started a few years before the slide was released. Slow movement in the bedrock seems to have accelerated in the summer of 2014. There was deep snow in the mountains and fairly warm weather before the slide occurred. Percolating water from the melting snow might, thus, have increased the rate of movement. Seismic data indicate that a creeping movement started around 40 minutes before the slide, but at 23:24 the failure point was reached and the rockslide was released. The slide triggered a tsunami in the lake that washed up on the lakeshores all around the lake, reaching up to 20-30 m elevation above the water level and even higher in some places. The wave travelled farthest around 400 m (horizontally) into the flatland SE of the crater Víti. It was fortunate that the rockslide occurred late at night when nobody was close to the water, otherwise it would have been extremely hazardous. A few hours earlier, dozens of people were

  18. Geochemical exploration of a promissory Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS): the Acoculco caldera, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, Loic; Romero, Ruben Bernard; Pérez-Zarate, Daniel; Guevara, Mirna; Santoyo Gutiérrez, Edgar

    2014-05-01

    The Acoculco caldera (Puebla, Mexico) has been identified by the Mexican Federal Electricity Company (in Spanish 'Comisión Federal de Electricidad', CFE) as a potential Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) candidate. Two exploration wells were drilled and promising temperatures of ~300° C have been measured at a depth of 2000 m with a geothermal gradient of 11oC/100m, which is three times higher than the baseline gradient measured within the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. As usually observed in Hot Dry Rock systems, thermal manifestations in surface are scarce and consist in low-temperature bubbling springs and soil degassing. The goals of this study were to identify the origin of these fluids, to estimate the soil degassing rate and to explore new areas for a future detailed exploration and drilling activities. Water and gas samples were collected for chemical and isotopic analysis (δ18O, δD, 3He/4He, 13C, 15N) and a multi-gas (CO2, CH4, H2S) soil survey was carried out using the accumulation chamber method. Springs' compositions indicate a meteoric origin and the dissolution of CO2 and H2S-rich gases, while gas compositions reveal a MORB-type origin mixed with some arc-type contribution. Gas geothermometry results are similar to temperatures measured during well drilling (260° C-300° C). Amongst all measured CO2 fluxes, only 5% (mean: 5543 g m-2 day-1) show typical geothermal values, while the remaining fluxes are low and correspond to biogenic degassing (mean: 18 g m-2 day-1). The low degassing rate of the geothermal system is a consequence of the intense hydrothermal alteration observed in the upper 800 m of the system which acts as an impermeable caprock. Highest measured CO2 fluxes (above > 600 g m-2 day-1) have corresponding CH4/CO2 flux ratios similar to mass ratios of sampled gases, which suggest an advective fluid transport. To represent field conditions, a numerical model was also applied to simulate the migration of CO2 towards the surface through a

  19. Environmental Magnetism of mid-Pleistocene Lacustrine Sediments of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, L. L.; Geissman, J. W.; Fawcett, P.; Tim, W.; Goff, F.

    2007-12-01

    Rock magnetic measurements are applied to almost 80 m of lacustrine sediment (VC-3) to augment independent means of interpreting the environmental conditions of a mid-Pleistocene lake in the Valle Grande of the Valles Caldera, northern New Mexico. An age model for the core is pinned to an Ar/Ar age determination of 552 ± 3 ka for a sanidine bearing ash layer at 78 m depth and major transitions in the organic carbon record at 53 m, 40 m, 27 m, and 17 m; these data suggest that deposition of VC-3 spans MIS 14 to MIS 10, including glacial terminations VI (531 ka) and V (426 ka). AF demagnetization resolves positive inclination magnetizations from most of the core, consistent with Brunhes normal polarity. Three thin (Big Lost excursion (~580 ± 8 ka). Data from an array of rock magnetic investigations indicate magnetite, titanomagnetite, and pyrhotite characterize VC-3 sediments. Susceptibility and frequency dependent susceptibility experiments at low temperature reveal an abundance of paramagnetic and super-paramagnetic material. Scanning electron microscopy of magnetic separates show an array of Fe-oxide and Fe-sulfide grains, including titanomagnetites with trellis ilmenite intergrowths. NRM intensities of sediment deposited during glacial periods typically range from 0.04 mA/m to values as high as 1.6 mA/m; interglacial sediment NRM intensities range from 0.05 mA/m to 0.2 mA/m. NRM values increase to 3.3 mA/m, between 48 m to 43 m, where the sediment exhibits shallow mud crack, bioturbation, and oxidation. Overall, trends in susceptibility, ARM, and SIRM are similar to those in NRM intensity. Bivariate plot of susceptibility/ARM shows little variation in concentration of low coercivity minerals (i.e. magnetite) in VC-3 sediments. Also, the concentration of high coercivity minerals (i.e. hematite) indicated by the IRM/susceptibility curve show similar variation between sediments deposited during glacial and interglacial times as the remanence data sets but the

  20. Lithologic Control on Secondary Clay Mineral Formation in the Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caylor, E.; Rasmussen, C.; Dhakal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the transformation of rock to soil is central to landscape evolution and ecosystem function. The objective of this study was to examine controls on secondary mineral formation in a forested catchment in the Catalina-Jemez CZO. We hypothesized landscape position controls the type of secondary minerals formed in that well-drained hillslopes favor Si-poor secondary phases such as kaolinite, whereas poorly drained portions of the landscape that collect solutes from surrounding areas favor formation of Si-rich secondary phases such as smectite. The study focused on a catchment in Valles Caldera in northern New Mexico where soils are derived from a mix of rhyolitic volcanic material, vegetation includes a mixed conifer forest, and climate is characterized by a mean annual precipitation of ~800 mm yr-1 and mean annual temperature of 4.5°C. Soils were collected at the soil-saprolite boundary from three landscape positions, classified as well drained hillslope, poorly drained convergent area, and poorly drained hill slope. Clay fractions were isolated and analyzed using a combination of quantitative and qualitative x-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses and thermal analysis. Quantitative XRD of random powder mounts indicated the presence of both primary phases such as quartz, and alkali and plagioclase feldspars, and secondary phases that include illite, Fe-oxyhydroxides including both goethite and hematite, kaolinite, and smectite. The clay fractions were dominated by smectite ranging from 36-42%, illite ranging from 21-35%, and kaolinite ranging from 1-8%. Qualitative XRD of oriented mounts confirmed the presence of smectite in all samples, with varying degrees of interlayering and interstratification. In contrast to our hypothesis, results indicated that secondary mineral assemblage was not strongly controlled by landscape position, but rather varied with underlying variation in lithology. The catchment is underlain by a combination of porphorytic rhyolite and

  1. MULTISCALE THERMAL-INFRARED MEASUREMENTS OF THE MAUNA LOA CALDERA, HAWAII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. BALICK; A. GILLESPIE; ET AL

    2001-03-01

    Until recently, most thermal infrared measurements of natural scenes have been made at disparate scales, typically 10{sup {minus}3}-10{sup {minus}2} m (spectra) and 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} m (satellite images), with occasional airborne images (10{sup 1} m) filling the gap. Temperature and emissivity fields are spatially heterogeneous over a similar range of scales, depending on scene composition. A common problem for the land surface, therefore, has been relating field spectral and temperature measurements to satellite data, yet in many cases this is necessary if satellite data are to be interpreted to yield meaningful information about the land surface. Recently, three new satellites with thermal imaging capability at the 10{sup 1}-10{sup 2} m scale have been launched: MTI, TERRA, and Landsat 7. MTI acquires multispectral images in the mid-infrared (3-5{micro}m) and longwave infrared (8-10{micro}m) with 20m resolution. ASTER and MODIS aboard TERRA acquire multispectral longwave images at 90m and 500-1000m, respectively, and MODIS also acquires multispectral mid-infrared images. Landsat 7 acquires broadband longwave images at 60m. As part of an experiment to validate the temperature and thermal emissivity values calculated from MTI and ASTER images, we have targeted the summit region of Mauna Loa for field characterization and near-simultaneous satellite imaging, both on daytime and nighttime overpasses, and compare the results to previously acquired 10{sup {minus}1} m airborne images, ground-level multispectral FLIR images, and the field spectra. Mauna Loa was chosen in large part because the 4x6km summit caldera, flooded with fresh basalt in 1984, appears to be spectrally homogeneous at scales between 10{sup {minus}1} and 10{sup 2} m, facilitating the comparison of sensed temperature. The validation results suggest that, with careful atmospheric compensation, it is possible to match ground measurements with measurements from space, and to use the Mauna Loa validation

  2. Constraining the Carbon Cycle through Tree Rings: A Case Study of the Valles Caldera, NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, M. R.; Babst, F.; Moore, D. J.; Trouet, V.

    2013-12-01

    and the derived biomass increments illustrate that the forests at the Valles Caldera are considerably less productive during years of extreme drought and warmer than average temperatures. With future projections calling for consecutive years of extreme conditions in the American Southwest, this could have a substantial effect on the overall productivity of these forests.

  3. The Natural and Political Caldera-lake crisis of Mount Pinatubo, Philippines, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodolfo, K. S.; Rodolfo, K. S.

    2001-12-01

    In 1991 Mount Pinatubo's eruptions produced a caldera with a 5.4 km2 catchment that ever since has gathered a lake with a surface that has risen roughly 10 m every rainy season. The rim is lowest at 960+ masl in the northwest, at the Maraunot notch, named after the stream into which overtopping lake water would drain, thence along the Balin Baquero and Bucao to the town of Botolan and the South China Sea 40 km downstream. In December 2000, with only 10 m of remaining notch freeboard, Philippine government geologists and American colleagues were aware of the potential for catastrophic breaching, because the surface 20 m of rock beneath the rim is highly erodible breccia. A breakout of as much as 60 x 106 m3 is considered possible. Easily eroded eruption debris is abundant in the path of the flood, which could "bulk up" into worst-case lahars with a volume of 3 x 108 m3. Government engineers discussed lowering the lake with siphons or a tunnel, or scraping down and strengthening the notch, but did nothing. Only in August, three months into a very wet monsoon season, when only about 5 m of freeboard remained, did the government inform the 46,000 Botolan inhabitants of the danger. It did so only after Oxfam GB, a humanitarian organization, issued a report written by private geological consultants familiar with Pinatubo and its lahars. The crisis, still evolving, unfortunately is pitting government attitudes and policies -- strict control of information and decisions regarding hazards -- against those of academic science, and of some NGOs concerned with community development and empowerment. In August, the government abruptly abandoned its initial denials of a serious threat, and decided to build a canal with which to induce a breach at a propitious time. Poorly paid and supervised aborigine labor has inadvertently reduced the freeboard to only 2 m, and the government is announcing that it will evacuate Botolan and induce the breach as early as September 5. Spontaneous

  4. High Resolution Magnetotelluric Imaging of the Nisyros Caldera and Geothermal Resource (Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzanis, Andreas; Sakkas, Vassilis; Lagios, Evangelos

    2017-04-01

    This work reports the qualitative and quantitative re-examination of legacy magnetotelluric soundings data obtained in the caldera of Nisyros, a small island volcano at the eastern end of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA), Greece, in an attempt to explore the high temperature geothermal resource of the area. The data set comprises 39 single-site soundings and is re-examined with improved data processing methods, new hypothetical event analysis techniques to study the spatial configuration of the telluric field and two-dimensional inversion tools. Iteratively reweighted least squares have been implemented to compute stable and smooth Earth response functions, which were found to exhibit 2-D to weakly 3-D attributes as a result of induction in low-contrast local geoelectric inhomogeneities, superimposed on a dominantly 2-D background structure. The transfer functions appear to be free of coastal and island induction effects due to the low offshore/onshore resistivity contrast at, and below sea level. The spatial properties of the telluric field are studied with hypothetical event analysis based on 3-D decompositions of the impedance tensor [1]. The results indicate that convection and hydrothermal circulation is controlled by a system of antithetic NE-SW oriented active normal faults which form a graben-like structure and define the 2-D background, as well as a conjugate system of NNW-SSE normal faults which is particularly active at the SW quadrant of the island and define the main convection path. It was determined that under these conditions the data can be interpreted with 2-D inversion, which was carried out with [2]. The inversion has successfully reconstructed detailed images of the structural and functional elements of the hydrothermal system. The structural elements include a number of shallow hot water reservoirs in the argillic and phyllic alteration zones and a laterally extended deep (approx. 1km) circulation zone, all embedded in a low-resistivity matrix

  5. FrogwatchUSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droege, S.

    2002-01-01

    full text: Frogs and toads are perhaps the most approachable and available of all our wildlife. In many, if not most places, they are abundant. In wetter parts of the East, almost anyone outside on a warm rainy night in spring will hear their dream-like calls, bellows, trills and snores. Even in the deserts of the Southwest, a nocturnal trip after a summer monsoon will yield toads moving across the roads toward a cacophonous orgy of mating and calling in the roadside ditches and desert pools. Birds share with frogs and toads this same sense of presence in our daily lives. But the difference is that birds are like the attractive neighbor who just never gives you the time of day, while frogs are more like the troglodyte who appears regularly to chat, philosophize, and have a beer. Uninvited, frogs appear in our water gardens, toads are on our stoops in the morning, we catch them when we are kids, raise their babies in the aquarium, and feel sorry when we find we have run them over with the lawnmower. When concerns about declining populations of amphibians reached the mass media, the Secretaries' office became involved. In addition to using traditional research mechanisms to investigate the problem, the Secretary also wanted to involve the public directly. The combination of high public appeal and the relative ease with which frog calls can be learned made a large-scale monitoring program for frogs and toads possible. What emerged was a program called Frogwatch USA, modeled after a successful Canadian program with a similar name. A web site was created (www.frogwatch.org) that presented potential frogwatchers with directions and a way to register their site online as well as enter their data. Observers chose where to count frogs depending on what they felt was important. For some it was their backyard, others chose vulnerable wetlands in their neighborhoods, or spots on local refuges and parks. Initially funded at $8,000 a year and then after two years increased to

  6. Analysis of vector magnetic anomalies over the Bayonnaise Knoll caldera obtained from a deep-sea magnetic exploration by AUV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayanagi, K.; Isezaki, N.; Matsuo, J.; Harada, M.; Kasaya, T.

    2011-12-01

    Bayonnaise Knoll is a submarine caldera with an outer rim of 2.5-3 km and a floor of 840-920 m, which is located in the Izu-Ogasawara arc. A large hydrothermal deposit, Hakurei deposit, lies in the southeast part of the caldera. In the R/V Bosei-maru cruise, we observed three components of magnetic anomalies at depths of 400-570 m along SE-NW and WE tracks across the caldera. In the R/V Yokosuka YK10-17 cruise, we observed three components and total intensity of magnetic anomalies at altitudes of 60-100 m around the Hakurei deposit and at depth of 500 m above the caldera. The analysis of these data is now energetically pushed forward. A 3D gridded data set of the vector magnetic anomaly in the latter cruise was made by solving the Laplace's equation in the areas where observation data were not available, which is the unique procedure for analysis of the vector anomalies. Several magnetization solutions have been so far obtained by successive approximation and inversion methods. We will here present the measurement of the geomagnetic field and analysis of magnetization structure in Bayonnaise Knoll caldera. Note that this study has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology (MEXT).

  7. The Project Serapis: High Resolution Seismic Imagingof The Campi Flegrei Caldera Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollo, A.; Virieux, J.; Capuano, P.; Chiarabba, C.; de Franco, R.; Makris, J.; Michelini, A.; Musacchio, G.; Serapis Group

    expected NE-SW and SE-NW structural trends and it has been designed to get 2D/3D images of the crustal structure at a regional scale. A denser 2D network of 35 OBSs has been deployed in the bay of Pozzuoli aimed at detecting and modeling reflected/converted waves from 1 the possible shallow to deep discontinuities beneath the Campi Flegrei caldera. The main target of this particular receiver lay-out is the detailed imaging of the magma chamber top, expected at 4-5 km depth, according to temperature measurements in wells and sparse seismic observations. About 5000 shots have been performed dur- ing the SERAPIS experiment, at an average spatial spacing of 125 m, for a total ship travel path of 620 km. All of the seismic lines have been re-sampled at least twice, using a staggered configuration, which results in a smaller source spacing (less than 65m). In the gulf of Pozzuoli the source array had a geometry of a 5x5 km grid, slightly shifted south with respect to the OBS array. Seismic signals produced by air- guns have been well detected up to 50-60 km distance and the whole Campi Flegrei, Ischia and Procida on-land networks have recorded high quality seismograms pro- duced by the gridded source array in the bay of Pozzuoli. Due to the extended and very dense source and receiver arrays used for SERAPIS, this campaign can provide an innovative contribution to the accurate reconstruction of the Campi Flegrei caldera structure and to the definition of its feeding system at depth. *SERAPIS group: Auger Emmanuel, Bernard Marie-Lise, Bobbio Antonella, Bonagura Mariateresa, Cantore Luciana, Convertito Vincenzo, D'Auria Luca, De Matteis Raffaella, Emolo Anto- nio, Festa Gaetano, Gasparini Paolo, Giberti Grazia, Herrero Andre, Improta Luigi, Lancieri Maria Flora, Nielsen Stefan, Nisii Vincenzo, Russo Guido, Satriano Clau- dio, Simini Mariella, Vassallo Maurizio, Bruno Pier Paolo, Buonocunto Ciro, Capello Marco, Del Pezzo Edoardo, Galluzzo Danilo, Gaudiosi Germana, Giuliana Alessio

  8. Topological Valley Transport in Two-dimensional Honeycomb Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuting; Jiang, Hua; Hang, Zhi Hong

    2018-01-25

    Two-dimensional photonic crystals, in analogy to AB/BA stacking bilayer graphene in electronic system, are studied. Inequivalent valleys in the momentum space for photons can be manipulated by simply engineering diameters of cylinders in a honeycomb lattice. The inequivalent valleys in photonic crystal are selectively excited by a designed optical chiral source and bulk valley polarizations are visualized. Unidirectional valley interface states are proved to exist on a domain wall connecting two photonic crystals with different valley Chern numbers. With the similar optical vortex index, interface states can couple with bulk valley polarizations and thus valley filter and valley coupler can be designed. Our simple dielectric PC scheme can help to exploit the valley degree of freedom for future optical devices.

  9. The earliest low and high δ18O caldera-forming eruptions of the Yellowstone plume: Implications for the 30–40 Ma Oregon calderas and speculations on plume-triggered delaminations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Nicole Seligman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We present new isotopic and trace element data for four eruptive centers in Oregon: Wildcat Mountain (40 Ma, Crooked River (32–28 Ma, Tower Mountain (32 Ma, and Mohawk River (32 Ma. The first three calderas are located too far east to be sourced through renewed subduction of the Farallon slab following accretion of the Yellowstone-produced Siletzia terrane at ~50 Ma. Basalts of the three eastern eruptive centers yield high Nb/Yb and Th/Yb ratios, indicating an enriched sublithospheric mantle source, while Mohawk River yields trace element and isotopic (δ18O and εHf values that correlate with its location above a subduction zone. The voluminous rhyolitic tuffs and lavas of Crooked River (41 x 27 km have δ18Ozircon values that include seven low δ18Ozircon units (1.8–4.5 ‰, one high δ18Ozircon unit (7.4–8.8 ‰, and two units with heterogeneous zircons (2.0–9.0 ‰, similar to younger Yellowstone-Snake River Plain rhyolites. In order to produce these low δ18O values, a large heat source, widespread hydrothermal circulation, and repeated remelting are all required. In contrast, Wildcat Mountain and Tower Mountain rocks yield high δ18Ozircon values (6.4–7.9 ‰ and normal to low εHfi values (5.2–12.6, indicating crustal melting of high-δ18O supracrustal rocks. We propose that these calderas were produced by the first appearance of the Yellowstone plume east of the Cascadia subduction zone, which is supported by plate reconstructions that put the Yellowstone plume under Crooked River at 32–28 Ma. Given the eastern location of these calderas along the suture of the accreted Siletzia terrane and North America, we suggest that the Yellowstone hotspot is directly responsible for magmatism at Crooked River, and for plume-assisted delamination of portions of the edge of the Blue Mountains that produced the Tower Mountain magmas, while the older Wildcat Mountain magmas are related to suture zone instabilities that were created