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Sample records for validated non invasive

  1. Continuous Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Monitoring, a Validation Study of Nexfin in a Pregnant Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, J.; Diepeveen, M.; Ganzevoort, W.; van Montfrans, G. A.; Westerhof, B. E.; Wolf, H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the accuracy of a non-invasive beat-to-beat continuous blood pressure monitoring device (Nexfin) in pregnancy according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension. Methods: The validation was performed according to the International Protocol of the

  2. Comparing the Validity of Non-Invasive Methods in Measuring Thoracic Kyphosis and Lumbar Lordosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Yousefi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: the purpose of this article is to study the validity of each of the non-invasive methods (flexible ruler, spinal mouse, and processing the image versus the one through-Ray radiation (the basic method and comparing them with each other.Materials and Methods: for evaluating the validity of each of these non-invasive methods, the thoracic Kyphosis and lumber Lordosis angle of 20 students of Birjand University (age mean and standard deviation: 26±2, weight: 72±2.5 kg, height: 169±5.5 cm through fours methods of flexible ruler, spinal mouse, and image processing and X-ray.Results: the results indicated that the validity of the methods including flexible ruler, spinal mouse, and image processing in measuring the thoracic Kyphosis and lumber Lordosis angle respectively have an adherence of 0.81, 0.87, 0.73, 0.76, 0.83, 0.89 (p>0.05. As a result, regarding the gained validity against the golden method of X-ray, it could be stated that the three mentioned non-invasive methods have adequate validity. In addition, the one-way analysis of variance test indicated that there existed a meaningful relationship between the three methods of measuring the thoracic Kyphosis and lumber Lordosis, and with respect to the Tukey’s test result, the image processing method is the most precise one.Conclusion as a result, this method could be used along with other non-invasive methods as a valid measuring method.

  3. Validation of Central and Peripheral Non-Invasive Hemodynamic Variables Using an Oscillometric Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverri, Darío; Pizano, Alejandro; Cabrales, Jaime; Moreno, Karen

    2017-10-28

    Peripheral and central blood pressures are parameters of arterial stiffness and important cardiovascular risk markers. Today, there are non-invasive methods that measure these pressures. To validate the non-invasive oscillometric method, compared with invasive pressure measurements obtained by cardiac catheterization. An open, prospective cohort clinical study in 100 patients, 64 ± 11 years old. The measurement of peripheral and central blood pressures obtained using the Arteriograph(®) system oscillometric method, (TensioMed, Budapest-Hungary, Ltd.) was validated in an adult population undergoing simultaneous, contralateral left cardiac catheterization (gold standard) using the radial technique, evaluating the correlation and agreement between the two methods. This study fulfils the latest standardized protocol for central blood pressure validation published by ARTERY Society. The pressures obtained with the Arteriograph(®) show a high correlation with the pressures measured using the gold standard. Overall, the intraclass correlation coefficient for brachial pressures was 0.80 (p oscillometric noninvasive method employed is easy to use and valid for estimating hemodynamic variables such as central and peripheral arterial pressure, having good agreement and conformity with the gold standard in a different type of patients and conditions. This technique can help optimize cardiovascular assessment in primary and secondary prevention, enhance treatment in selected patients and it could be an important element for future cardiovascular prevention.

  4. Non invasive urodynamic assessment in children--are they reliable? Validation of non-invasive urodynamics in children with functional voiding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, H Ravi; Kanitkar, Madhuri

    2010-12-01

    To validate the non-invasive tests that can predict the type of bladder dysfunction normally diagnosed by invasive urodynamics. Children below 12 yrs of age were evaluated prospectively. Non-invasive urodynamic evaluation included history, clinical examination, frequency volume charting, ultrasonographic scan, urine analysis and renal function tests. Micturating cystourethrogram was carried out in children with recurrent urinary tract infections. All children underwent invasive urodynamic studies and the significance of association of the parameters of noninvasive assessment with invasive urodynamics was determined. Chi square test using Epi 6 software was used for statistical analysis of data. 41 children underwent invasive urodynamic studies. The commonest disorder was detrusor instability in 28 (68.2%). Dysynergic voiding was noted in 8 (19.5%). The study was normal in 5 (12.1%). Nocturnal enuresis with day time symptoms, holding maneuvers, small frequent voiding pattern (p<0.05) and a small capacity bladder with insignificant residue (p=0.0003) predicts detrusor instability. Straining (p=0.0006), large capacity bladder with significant post void residue in the absence of vesicouretric reflux (p<0.05) predicts dysyneric voiding. On combining the various non-invasive tests and validating them against invasive urodynamics in diagnosing detrusor instability and dysnergic voiding, they have a sensitivity of 88.4% and 87.5%, specificity of 72.7% and 69.2%, positive predictive value of 0.88 and 0.63 and positive likelihood ratio of 3.1 & 2.2 respectively. Functional voiding disorders can be diagnosed with reasonable accuracy by minimally invasive methods.

  5. Validation of non-invasive haemodynamic methods in patients with liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brittain, Jane M; Busk, Troels M; Møller, Søren

    2018-01-01

    Patients with advanced cirrhosis often present a hyperdynamic circulation characterized by a decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), and an increase in heart rate (HR) and cardiac output (CO). Accurate assessment of the altered circulation can be performed invasively......, SBP, DBP and HR were measured non-invasively and by femoral artery catheterization. CO was measured non-invasively and by indicator dilution technique. The non-invasive pressure monitoring was considered acceptable with a bias (accuracy) and a SD (precision) not exceeding 5 and 8 mmHg, respectively......; however, due to the disadvantages of this approach, non-invasive methods are warranted. The purpose of this study was to compare continuous non-invasive measurements of haemodynamic variables by the Finometer and the Task Force Monitor with simultaneous invasive measurements. In 25 patients with cirrhosis...

  6. Non-invasive quantification of small bowel water content by MRI: a validation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoad, C L [Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Marciani, L [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Foley, S [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Totman, J J [Brain and Body Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Wright, J [Division of GI Surgery, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Bush, D [Division of GI Surgery, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Cox, E F [Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Campbell, E [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Spiller, R C [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Gowland, P A [Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2007-12-07

    Substantial water fluxes across the small intestine occur during digestion of food, but so far measuring these has required invasive intubation techniques. This paper describes a non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for measuring small bowel water content which has been validated using naso-duodenal infusion. Eighteen healthy volunteers were intubated, with the tube position being verified by MRI. After a baseline MRI scan, each volunteer had eight 40 ml boluses of a non-absorbable mannitol and saline solution infused into their proximal small bowel with an MRI scan being acquired after each bolus. The MRI sequence used was an adapted magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography sequence. The image data were thresholded to allow for intra- and inter-subject signal variations. The MRI measured volumes were then compared to the known infused volumes. This MRI technique gave excellent images of the small bowel, which closely resemble those obtained using conventional radiology with barium contrast. The mean difference between the measured MRI volumes and infused volumes was 2% with a standard deviation of 10%. The maximum 95% limits of agreement between observers were -15% to +17% while measurements by the same operator on separate occasions differed by only 4%. This new technique can now be applied to study alterations in small bowel fluid absorption and secretion due to gastrointestinal disease or drug interventio000.

  7. Gene expression signatures predict outcome in non-muscle invasive bladder carcinoma - a multi-center validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Zieger, Karsten; Real, Francisco X.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Clinically useful molecular markers predicting the clinical course of patients diagnosed with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer are needed to improve treatment outcome. Here, we validated four previously reported gene expression signatures for molecular diagnosis of disease stage...... and carcinoma in situ (CIS) and for predicting disease recurrence and progression. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We analyzed tumors from 404 patients diagnosed with bladder cancer in hospitals in Denmark, Sweden, England, Spain, and France using custom microarrays. Molecular classifications were compared with pathologic....... CONCLUSION: This multicenter validation study confirms in an independent series the clinical utility of molecular classifiers to predict the outcome of patients initially diagnosed with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. This information may be useful to better guide patient treatment....

  8. Non-invasive estimation of venous admixture: validation of a new formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, D A; Jenkins, B J; Willis, N; Maddock, H; Mapleson, W W

    1995-05-01

    We have developed a computer program that estimates venous admixture (intra-pulmonary shunt) from four measurements: haemoglobin concentration, end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PE'CO2), fractional inspired oxygen concentration (FIO2) and pulse oximetry (SpO2). The formula was tested on patients in an intensive therapy unit by using it to estimate shunt while it was measured simultaneously by a standard, invasive method. A total of 101 measurements were made in 29 patients. After correcting the systematic errors in the assumed differences between PE'CO2 and arterial PCO2, and between SpO2 and co-oximetrically measured SaO2, and correcting for a trend in the arteriovenous oxygen concentration difference (C(a-v))2) with shunt, the bias of the non-invasive minus invasive shunt differences was negligible, with no significant dependence on shunt. The limits of agreement were then +/- 16% shunt overall (+/- 13% within patients). When SaO2 was used instead of SpO2, the limits were +/- 11% (+/- 8% within patients).

  9. Reliability and validity of non-invasive determined haemoglobin mass and blood volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagoni, Nazzareno; Andersen, Andreas Breenfeldt; Oberholzer, Laura

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The carbon monoxide (CO) rebreathing method used for the determination of haemoglobin mass (Hbmass ) is associated with blood sample analysis (in this study: Radiometer ABL800). As an alternative hereto the aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of a portable and non......-invasive CO pulse oximeter (Rad-57). METHOD: With simultaneous determination of CO in the circulation by ABL800 (%HbCO) and Rad-57 (SpCO), Hbmass and blood volume (BV) were determined in duplicates in 24 volunteers. Percentage of typical errors (%TE) within methods and linear correlations between the two...

  10. Validation of inflationary non-invasive blood pressure monitoring in adult surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Jun; Kotake, Yoshifumi; Fukuda, Mitsue; Yasumura, Rie; Oda, Fujiko; Sato, Nobukazu; Ochiai, Ryoichi; Usuda, Takashi; Kobayashi, Naoki; Takeda, Sunao

    2011-02-01

    Oscillometric determination of blood pressure may be advantageous, as cuff inflation requires lower cuff pressure and shorter duration than deflation. In this observational study, we compared the blood pressure value, cuff pressure, and duration of cuff inflation between a prototype of inflationary non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) and conventional deflationary NIBP in adult patients during anesthesia. Three hundred and twenty-three pairs of measurements were obtained from 64 subjects. The bias and precision of systolic pressure and diastolic pressure were 2.9 ± 8.3 and 5.6 ± 6.1 mmHg, respectively. Inflationary NIBP could better determine NIBP with lower cuff pressure than deflationary NIBP (124 ± 22 vs. 160 ± 33 mmHg, p < 0.05). Inflationary NIBP could also determine NIBP more quickly (13.0 ± 2.3 vs. 32.7 ± 13.6 s, p < 0.05). These data suggest that inflationary NIBP may reduce cuff-related discomfort and complications, and has reasonable accuracy compared to deflationary NIBP in adult surgical patients.

  11. Validation of Dynamic optical coherence tomography for non-invasive, in vivo microcirculation imaging of the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Themstrup, L.; Welzel, Julia; Ciardo, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Dynamic optical coherence tomography (D-OCT) is an angiographic variation of OCT that non-invasively provides images of the in vivo microvasculature of the skin by combining conventional OCT images with flow data. The objective of this study was to investigate and report on the D......-OCT technique for imaging of the vascular networks in skin as well as to validate the method by comparing the results against already accepted blood flow measuring tools. Methods: 35 healthy subjects were recruited for the multicentre study, consisting of three experiments set up to examine the vascular blood...... perfusion during different induced physiologic changes in the blood flow. In order to validate the D-OCT images against existing techniques for blood flow measuring we performed consecutive D-OCT, chromametry and laser speckle contrast imager (LSCI) measurements on identical skin sites in all...

  12. Risk prediction scores for recurrence and progression of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: an international validation in primary tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moniek M Vedder

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine the validity of two risk scores for patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer in different European settings, in patients with primary tumours. METHODS: We included 1,892 patients with primary stage Ta or T1 non-muscle invasive bladder cancer who underwent a transurethral resection in Spain (n = 973, the Netherlands (n = 639, or Denmark (n = 280. We evaluated recurrence-free survival and progression-free survival according to the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC and the Spanish Urological Club for Oncological Treatment (CUETO risk scores for each patient and used the concordance index (c-index to indicate discriminative ability. RESULTS: The 3 cohorts were comparable according to age and sex, but patients from Denmark had a larger proportion of patients with the high stage and grade at diagnosis (p<0.01. At least one recurrence occurred in 839 (44% patients and 258 (14% patients had a progression during a median follow-up of 74 months. Patients from Denmark had the highest 10-year recurrence and progression rates (75% and 24%, respectively, whereas patients from Spain had the lowest rates (34% and 10%, respectively. The EORTC and CUETO risk scores both predicted progression better than recurrence with c-indices ranging from 0.72 to 0.82 while for recurrence, those ranged from 0.55 to 0.61. CONCLUSION: The EORTC and CUETO risk scores can reasonably predict progression, while prediction of recurrence is more difficult. New prognostic markers are needed to better predict recurrence of tumours in primary non-muscle invasive bladder cancer patients.

  13. Design, development and experimental validation of a non-invasive device for recording respiratory events during bottle feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaiola, C; Tamilia, E; Massaroni, C; Morbidoni, G; Schena, E; Formica, D; Taffoni, F

    2014-01-01

    In newborns, a poor coordination between sucking, swallowing and breathing may undermine the effectiveness of oral feeding and signal immaturity of Central Nervous System. The aim of this work is to develop and validate a non-invasive device for recording respiratory events of newborns during bottle feeding. The proposed device working principle is based on the convective heat exchanged between two hot bodies and the infants' breathing. The sensing elements are inserted into a duct and the gas exchanged by infants is conveyed into this duct thanks to an ad hoc designed system to be mounted on a commercial feeding bottle. Two sets of experiments have been carried out in order to investigate the discrimination threshold of the device and characterize the sensor response at oscillating flows. The effect of distance and tilt between nostrils and device, and the breathing frequency, have been investigated simulating nostrils and neonatal respiratory pattern. The device has a discrimination threshold lower than 0.5 L/min at both 10° and 20° of tilt. Distance for these two settings does not affect the threshold in the investigated range (10-20 mm). Moreover, the device is able to detect breathing events, and to discriminate the onset of expiratory phase, during a neonatal respiratory task delivered by a lung simulator. The results foster the successful application of this device to the assessment of the temporal breathing pattern of newborns during bottle feeding with a non-invasive approach.

  14. Development and validation of a measure of informed choice for women undergoing non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Celine; Hill, Melissa; Skirton, Heather; Chitty, Lyn S

    2016-06-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using cell-free DNA for aneuploidy is a highly accurate screening test; however, concerns exist around the potential for routinisation of testing. The multidimensional measure of informed choice (MMIC) is a quantitative instrument developed to assess informed choice for Down syndrome screening (DSS). We have validated a modified MMIC for NIPT and measured informed choice among women offered NIPT in a public health service. The measure was distributed to women recruited across eight maternity units in the United Kingdom who had accepted DSS. Construct validity was assessed by simultaneously conducting qualitative interviews. Five hundred and eighty-five questionnaires were completed and 45 interviews conducted after blood-draw (or equivalent for those that declined NIPT). The measure demonstrated good internal consistency and internal validity. Results indicate the vast majority of women (89%) made an informed choice; 95% were judged to have good knowledge, 88% had a positive attitude and 92% had deliberated. Of the 11% judged to have made an uninformed choice, 55% had not deliberated, 41% had insufficient knowledge, and 19% had a negative attitude. Ethnicity (OR=2.78, P=0.003) and accepting NIPT (OR=16.05, P=0.021) were found to be significant predictors of informed choice. The high rate of informed choice is likely to reflect the importance placed on the provision of pre-test counselling in this study. It will be vital to ensure that this is maintained once NIPT is offered in routine clinical practice.

  15. Validation study of Nexfin® continuous non-invasive blood pressure monitoring in critically ill adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameloot, K; Van De Vijver, K; Van Regenmortel, N; De Laet, I; Schoonheydt, K; Dits, H; Broch, O; Bein, B; Malbrain, M L

    2014-12-01

    Nexfin® (BMEYE, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) is a totally non-invasive blood pressure and cardiac output (CO) monitor based on finger arterial pulse contour analysis. We performed an open observational study in a mix of medical-surgical-burns critically ill patients (N.=45) to validate Nexfin obtained blood pressures (MAPnex) against PiCCO (MAPfem) derived blood pressure measurements. MAPnex, MAPfem and corresponding systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures were measured continuously and registered with a 2 hour interval during the 8-hour study period. Statistical analysis was performed by Pearson regression, Bland and Altman, Concordance plot and Polar plot analysis. MAPnex shows excellent correlation with MAPfem (R² 0.88, mean bias ± LA -2.3±12.4 mmHg, 14.7% error) and may be used interchangeably with invasive monitoring. The excellent MAPnex -MAPfem correlation was preserved in subgroup analysis for patients with severe hypotension, high systemic vascular resistance, low CO, hypothermia and in patients supported by inotropic/vasopressive agents. MAPnex is able to follow changes in MAPfem during the same time interval (level of concordance 85.5%). Nexfin SBP and DBP show significant correlation with PiCCO but the criteria for interchangeability were not met. Finally, polar plot analysis showed that trending capabilities were excellent when changes in MAPnex (ΔMAPnex) were compared to ΔMAPfem (96.1% of changes were within the level of 10% limits of agreement). In this sample of critically ill patients we found a good correlation between MAPnex and invasive blood pressures obtained by PiCCO.

  16. Validating Non-invasive EEG Source Imaging Using Optimal Electrode Configurations on a Representative Rat Head Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Hernández, Pedro A; Bae, Jihye; Song, Yinchen; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Aubert-Vázquez, Eduardo; Riera, Jorge J

    2016-03-30

    The curtain of technical limitations impeding rat multichannel non-invasive electroencephalography (EEG) has risen. Given the importance of this preclinical model, development and validation of EEG source imaging (ESI) is essential. We investigate the validity of well-known human ESI methodologies in rats which individual tissue geometries have been approximated by those extracted from an MRI template, leading also to imprecision in electrode localizations. With the half and fifth sensitivity volumes we determine both the theoretical minimum electrode separation for non-redundant scalp EEG measurements and the electrode sensitivity resolution, which vary over the scalp because of the head geometry. According to our results, electrodes should be at least ~3 to 3.5 mm apart for an optimal configuration. The sensitivity resolution is generally worse for electrodes at the boundaries of the scalp measured region, though, by analogy with human montages, concentrates the sensitivity enough to localize sources. Cramér-Rao lower bounds of source localization errors indicate it is theoretically possible to achieve ESI accuracy at the level of anatomical structures, such as the stimulus-specific somatosensory areas, using the template. More validation for this approximation is provided through the comparison between the template and the individual lead field matrices, for several rats. Finally, using well-accepted inverse methods, we demonstrate that somatosensory ESI is not only expected but also allows exploring unknown phenomena related to global sensory integration. Inheriting the advantages and pitfalls of human ESI, rat ESI will boost the understanding of brain pathophysiological mechanisms and the evaluation of ESI methodologies, new pharmacological treatments and ESI-based biomarkers.

  17. Non-invasive transcranial ultrasound therapy based on a 3D CT scan: protocol validation and in vitro results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquet, F; Pernot, M; Aubry, J-F; Montaldo, G; Tanter, M; Fink, M [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique, ESPCI, Universite Paris VII, UMR CNRS 7587, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France); Marsac, L [Supersonic Imagine, Les Jardins de la Duranne, 510 rue Rene Descartes, 13857 Aix-en-Provence (France)], E-mail: fabrice.marquet@espci.org

    2009-05-07

    A non-invasive protocol for transcranial brain tissue ablation with ultrasound is studied and validated in vitro. The skull induces strong aberrations both in phase and in amplitude, resulting in a severe degradation of the beam shape. Adaptive corrections of the distortions induced by the skull bone are performed using a previous 3D computational tomography scan acquisition (CT) of the skull bone structure. These CT scan data are used as entry parameters in a FDTD (finite differences time domain) simulation of the full wave propagation equation. A numerical computation is used to deduce the impulse response relating the targeted location and the ultrasound therapeutic array, thus providing a virtual time-reversal mirror. This impulse response is then time-reversed and transmitted experimentally by a therapeutic array positioned exactly in the same referential frame as the one used during CT scan acquisitions. In vitro experiments are conducted on monkey and human skull specimens using an array of 300 transmit elements working at a central frequency of 1 MHz. These experiments show a precise refocusing of the ultrasonic beam at the targeted location with a positioning error lower than 0.7 mm. The complete validation of this transcranial adaptive focusing procedure paves the way to in vivo animal and human transcranial HIFU investigations.

  18. Validation of a non-invasive blood-sampling technique for doubly-labelled water experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Christian C; Helversen, Otto Von; Michener, Robert H; Kunz, Thomas H

    2003-04-01

    Two techniques for bleeding small mammals have been used in doubly-labeled water (DLW) studies, including vena puncture and the use of starved nymphal stages of hematophagous reduviid bugs (Reduviidae, Hemiptera). In this study, we tested the validity of using reduviid bugs in doubly-labeled water experiments. We found that the isotope enrichment in initial blood samples collected with bugs was significantly lower compared to isotope enrichment in blood samples obtained using vena puncture. We therefore used the desiccation method for estimating total body water (TBW) in DLW experiments because TBW calculated using the isotope dilution method was overestimated when blood samples were collected using reduviid bugs. In our validation experiment with nectar-feeding bats (Glossophaga soricina), we compared estimates of daily energy expenditure (DEE) using DLW with those derived from the energy balance method. We considered Speakman's equation (controlling for 25% fractionated water loss) as the most appropriate for our study animal and calculated DEE accordingly. On average, DEE estimated with DLW was not significantly different from the mean value obtained with the energy balance method (mean deviation 1.2%). We conclude that although bug hemolymph or intestinal liquids most likely contaminate the samples, estimates of DEE are still valid because the DLW method does not depend on absolute isotope enrichments but on the rate of isotope decrease over time. However, dilution of blood with intestinal liquids or hemolymph from a bug may lead to larger variation in DEE estimates. We also tested how the relative error of DLW estimates changed with varying assumptions about fractionation. We used three additional equations for calculating DEE in DLW experiments. The basic equation for DLW experiments published by Lifson and McClintock (LM-6) assumes no fractionation, resulted in an overestimate of DEE by 10%. Nagy's equation (N-2) controls for changes in body mass but not for

  19. Invasive v. non-invasive blood pressure measurements the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A reasonable correlation exists between invasive and noninvasive methods of measuring systemic blood pressure. However, there are frequent individual differences between these methods and these variations have often caused the validity of the non-invasive measurement to be questioned. The hypothesis that certain ...

  20. Validation of ultrasonography for non-invasive assessment of diaphragm function in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Nicholas P; Bible, Kenneth L; Kim, Min Jeong; Odom, Guy L; Adams, Marvin E; Froehner, Stanley C

    2016-12-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe, degenerative muscle disease that is commonly studied using the mdx mouse. The mdx diaphragm muscle closely mimics the pathophysiological changes in DMD muscles. mdx diaphragm force is commonly assessed ex vivo, precluding time course studies. Here we used ultrasonography to evaluate time-dependent changes in diaphragm function in vivo, by measuring diaphragm movement amplitude. In mdx mice, diaphragm amplitude decreased with age and values were much lower than for wild-type mice. Importantly, diaphragm amplitude strongly correlated with ex vivo specific force values. Micro-dystrophin administration increased mdx diaphragm amplitude by 26% after 4 weeks. Diaphragm amplitude correlated positively with ex vivo force values and negatively with diaphragm fibrosis, a major cause of DMD muscle weakness. These studies validate diaphragm ultrasonography as a reliable technique for assessing time-dependent changes in mdx diaphragm function in vivo. This technique will be valuable for testing potential therapies for DMD. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe, degenerative muscle disease caused by dystrophin mutations. The mdx mouse is a widely used animal model of DMD. The mdx diaphragm muscle most closely recapitulates key features of DMD muscles, including progressive fibrosis and considerable force loss. Diaphragm function in mdx mice is commonly evaluated by specific force measurements ex vivo. While useful, this method only measures force from a small muscle sample at one time point. Therefore, accurate assessment of diaphragm function in vivo would provide an important advance to study the time course of functional decline and treatment benefits. Here, we evaluated an ultrasonography technique for measuring time-dependent changes of diaphragm function in mdx mice. Diaphragm movement amplitude values for mdx mice were considerably lower than those for wild-type, decreased from 8 to 18 months of age, and correlated

  1. Non-invasive assessment of carotid PWV via accelerometric sensors: validation of a new device and comparison with established techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lascio, Nicole; Bruno, Rosa Maria; Stea, Francesco; Bianchini, Elisabetta; Gemignani, Vincenzo; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Faita, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Carotid pulse wave velocity (PWV) is considered as a surrogate marker for carotid stiffness and its assessment is increasingly being used in clinical practice. However, at the moment, its estimation needs specific equipment and a moderate level of technical expertise; moreover, it is based on a mathematical model. The aim of this study was to validate a new system for non-invasive and model-free carotid PWV assessment based on accelerometric sensors by comparison with currently used techniques. Accelerometric PWV (accPWV) values were obtained in 97 volunteers free of cardiovascular disease (age 24-85 years) and compared with standard ultrasound-based carotid stiffness parameters, such as carotid PWV (cPWV), relative distension (relD) and distensibility coefficient (DC). Moreover, the comparison between accPWV measurements and carotid-femoral PWV (cfPWV) was performed. Accelerometric PWV evaluations showed a significant correlation with cPWV measurements (R = 0.67), relD values (R = 0.66) and DC assessments (R = 0.64). These values were also significantly correlated with cfPWV evaluations (R = 0.46). In addition, the first attempt success rate was equal to 76.8 %. The accelerometric system allows a simple and quick local carotid stiffness evaluation and the values obtained with this system are significantly correlated with known carotid stiffness biomarkers. Therefore, the presented device could provide a concrete opportunity for an easy carotid stiffness evaluation even in clinical practice.

  2. Development and Experimental Validation of a Dry Non-Invasive Multi-Channel Mouse Scalp EEG Sensor through Visual Evoked Potential Recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghyeon Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a dry non-invasive multi-channel sensor for measuring brainwaves on the scalps of mice. The research on laboratory animals provide insights to various practical applications involving human beings and other animals such as working animals, pets, and livestock. An experimental framework targeting the laboratory animals has the potential to lead to successful translational research when it closely resembles the environment of real applications. To serve scalp electroencephalography (EEG research environments for the laboratory mice, the dry non-invasive scalp EEG sensor with sixteen electrodes is proposed to measure brainwaves over the entire brain area without any surgical procedures. We validated the proposed sensor system with visual evoked potential (VEP experiments elicited by flash stimulations. The VEP responses obtained from experiments are compared with the existing literature, and analyzed in temporal and spatial perspectives. We further interpret the experimental results using time-frequency distribution (TFD and distance measurements. The developed sensor guarantees stable operations for in vivo experiments in a non-invasive manner without surgical procedures, therefore exhibiting a high potential to strengthen longitudinal experimental studies and reliable translational research exploiting non-invasive paradigms.

  3. Development and Experimental Validation of a Dry Non-Invasive Multi-Channel Mouse Scalp EEG Sensor through Visual Evoked Potential Recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghyeon; Yeon, Chanmi; Kim, Kiseon

    2017-02-09

    In this paper, we introduce a dry non-invasive multi-channel sensor for measuring brainwaves on the scalps of mice. The research on laboratory animals provide insights to various practical applications involving human beings and other animals such as working animals, pets, and livestock. An experimental framework targeting the laboratory animals has the potential to lead to successful translational research when it closely resembles the environment of real applications. To serve scalp electroencephalography (EEG) research environments for the laboratory mice, the dry non-invasive scalp EEG sensor with sixteen electrodes is proposed to measure brainwaves over the entire brain area without any surgical procedures. We validated the proposed sensor system with visual evoked potential (VEP) experiments elicited by flash stimulations. The VEP responses obtained from experiments are compared with the existing literature, and analyzed in temporal and spatial perspectives. We further interpret the experimental results using time-frequency distribution (TFD) and distance measurements. The developed sensor guarantees stable operations for in vivo experiments in a non-invasive manner without surgical procedures, therefore exhibiting a high potential to strengthen longitudinal experimental studies and reliable translational research exploiting non-invasive paradigms.

  4. Validity of inner canthus temperature recorded by infrared thermography as a non-invasive surrogate measure for core temperature at rest, during exercise and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Alex Andrade; Moreira, Danilo Gomes; Brito, Ciro José; da Silva, Cristiano Diniz; Sillero-Quintana, Manuel; Pimenta, Eduardo Mendonça; Bach, Aaron J E; Garcia, Emerson Silami; Bouzas Marins, João Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Research into obtaining a fast, valid, reliable and non-invasive measure of core temperature is of interest in many disciplinary fields. Occupational and sports medicine research has attempted to determine a non-invasive proxy for core temperature particularly when access to participants is limited and thermal safety is of a concern due to protective encapsulating clothing, hot ambient environments and/or high endogenous heat production during athletic competition. This investigation aimed to determine the validity of inner canthus of the eye temperature (TEC) as an alternate non-invasive measure of intestinal core temperature (TC) during rest, exercise and post-exercise conditions. Twelve physically active males rested for 30min prior to exercise, performed 60min of aerobic exercise at 60% V̇O2max and passively recovered a further 60min post-exercise. TEC and TC were measured at 5min intervals during each condition. Mean differences between TEC and TC were 0.61°C during pre-exercise, -1.78°C during exercise and -1.00°C during post-exercise. The reliability between the methods was low in the pre-exercise (ICC=0.49 [-0.09 to 0.82]), exercise (ICC=-0.14 [-0.65 to 0.44]) and post-exercise (ICC=-0.25 [-0.70 to 0.35]) conditions. In conclusion, poor agreement was observed between the TEC values measured through IRT and TC measured through a gastrointestinal telemetry pill. Therefore, TEC is not a valid substitute measurement to gastrointestinal telemetry pill in sports and exercise science settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Validity of hydration non-invasive indices during the weightcutting and official weigh-in for Olympic combat sports.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentín E Fernández-Elías

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Olympic combat sports, weight cutting is a common practice aimed to take advantage of competing in weight divisions below the athlete's normal weight. Fluid and food restriction in combination with dehydration (sauna and/or exercise induced profuse sweating are common weight cut methods. However, the resultant hypohydration could adversely affect health and performance outcomes. PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to determine which of the routinely used non-invasive measures of dehydration best track urine osmolality, the gold standard non-invasive test. METHOD: Immediately prior to the official weigh-in of three National Championships, the hydration status of 345 athletes of Olympic combat sports (i.e., taekwondo, boxing and wrestling was determined using five separate techniques: i urine osmolality (UOSM, ii urine specific gravity (USG, iii urine color (UCOL, iv bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA, and v thirst perception scale (TPS. All techniques were correlated with UOSM divided into three groups: euhydrated (G1; UOSM 250-700 mOsm · kg H2O(-1, dehydrated (G2; UOSM 701-1080 mOsm · kg H2O(-1, and severely dehydrated (G3; UOSM 1081-1500 mOsm · kg H2O(-1. RESULTS: We found a positive high correlation between the UOSM and USG (r = 0.89: p = 0.000, although this relationship lost strength as dehydration increased (G1 r = 0.92; G2 r = 0.73; and G3 r = 0.65; p = 0.000. UCOL showed a moderate although significant correlation when considering the whole sample (r = 0.743: p = 0.000 and G1 (r = 0.702: p = 0.000 but low correlation for the two dehydrated groups (r = 0.498-0.398. TPS and BIA showed very low correlation sizes for all groups assessed. CONCLUSION: In a wide range of pre-competitive hydration status (UOSM 250-1500 mOsm · kg H2O(-1, USG is highly associated with UOSM while being a more affordable and easy to use technique. UCOL is a suitable tool when USG is not available. However, BIA or TPS are not sensitive enough to

  6. Validity of hydration non-invasive indices during the weightcutting and official weigh-in for Olympic combat sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Elías, Valentín E; Martínez-Abellán, Alberto; López-Gullón, José María; Morán-Navarro, Ricardo; Pallarés, Jesús G; De la Cruz-Sánchez, Ernesto; Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    In Olympic combat sports, weight cutting is a common practice aimed to take advantage of competing in weight divisions below the athlete's normal weight. Fluid and food restriction in combination with dehydration (sauna and/or exercise induced profuse sweating) are common weight cut methods. However, the resultant hypohydration could adversely affect health and performance outcomes. The aim of this study is to determine which of the routinely used non-invasive measures of dehydration best track urine osmolality, the gold standard non-invasive test. Immediately prior to the official weigh-in of three National Championships, the hydration status of 345 athletes of Olympic combat sports (i.e., taekwondo, boxing and wrestling) was determined using five separate techniques: i) urine osmolality (UOSM), ii) urine specific gravity (USG), iii) urine color (UCOL), iv) bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and v) thirst perception scale (TPS). All techniques were correlated with UOSM divided into three groups: euhydrated (G1; UOSM 250-700 mOsm · kg H2O(-1)), dehydrated (G2; UOSM 701-1080 mOsm · kg H2O(-1)), and severely dehydrated (G3; UOSM 1081-1500 mOsm · kg H2O(-1)). We found a positive high correlation between the UOSM and USG (r = 0.89: p = 0.000), although this relationship lost strength as dehydration increased (G1 r = 0.92; G2 r = 0.73; and G3 r = 0.65; p = 0.000). UCOL showed a moderate although significant correlation when considering the whole sample (r = 0.743: p = 0.000) and G1 (r = 0.702: p = 0.000) but low correlation for the two dehydrated groups (r = 0.498-0.398). TPS and BIA showed very low correlation sizes for all groups assessed. In a wide range of pre-competitive hydration status (UOSM 250-1500 mOsm · kg H2O(-1)), USG is highly associated with UOSM while being a more affordable and easy to use technique. UCOL is a suitable tool when USG is not available. However, BIA or TPS are not sensitive enough to detect hypohydration at official weight

  7. Phytoplankton invasions: comments on the validity of categorizing the non-indigenous dinoflagellates and diatoms in European seas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Fernando

    2008-04-01

    The validity of categorizing the diatoms and dinoflagellates reported in the literature as non-indigenous phytoplankton in the European Seas was investigated. Species that are synonymous are often included as separate species (Gessnerium mochimaensis=Alexandrium monilatum, Gymnodinium nagasakiense=Karenia mikimotoi, Pleurosigma simonsenii=P. planctonicum), while other species names are synonyms of cosmopolitan taxa (Prorocentrum redfieldii=P. triestinum, Pseliodinium vaubanii=Gyrodinium falcatum, Gonyaulax grindleyi=Protoceratium reticulatum, Asterionella japonica=Asterionellopsis glacialis). Epithets of an exotic etymology (i.e. japonica, sinensis, indica) imply that a cosmopolitan species may be non-indigenous, and several taxa are even considered as non-indigenous in their type locality (Alexandrium tamarense and A. pseudogoniaulax). The records of Alexandrium monilatum, A. leei and Corethron criophilum are doubtful. Cold or warm-water species expand their geographical ranges or increase their abundances to detectable levels during cooling (Coscinodiscus wailesii) or warming periods (Chaetoceros coarctatus, Proboscia indica, Pyrodinium bahamense). These are a few examples of marginal dispersal associated with climatic events instead of species introductions from remote areas. The number of non-indigenous phytoplankton species in European Seas has thus been excessively inflated.

  8. A panel of prognostic protein markers for progression in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer - a multicenter tissue microarray validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Niels; Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm

    2012-01-01

    cohort of 283 patients with long-term follow-up. For validation of the results we used three independent patient cohorts with long-term follow-up from Sweden, Spain, and Taiwan. In total 649 primary NMIBC tissue-microarray specimens from patients with long-term follow-up were used. Protein expression...... in the independent NMIBC cohort with long-term follow-up. These results will be presented at AACR annual meeting 2012. We conclude that ADAM10, TRIM29, Aurora Kinase B, and Cyclin D1 may have prognostic value for guiding optimal treatment of NMIBC patients if successfully validated in the independent patient cohorts...... Ta and T1 urothelial carcinomas. Transcripts from the five genes encoding these proteins were previously included in gene expression signatures for outcome prediction for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). As a training-set, we used primary NMIBC tissue-microarray specimens from a Danish...

  9. Validation of a Novel Collection Device for Non-Invasive Urine Sampling from Free-Ranging Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danish, Lisa Michelle; Heistermann, Michael; Agil, Muhammad; Engelhardt, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in non-invasively collected samples have opened up new and exciting opportunities for wildlife research. Different types of samples, however, involve different limitations and certain physiological markers (e.g., C-peptide, oxytocin) can only be reliably measured from urine. Common collection methods for urine to date work best for arboreal animals and large volumes of urine. Sufficient recovery of urine is thus still difficult for wildlife biologists, particularly for terrestrial and small bodied animals. We tested three collection devices (two commercially available saliva swabs, Salivette synthetic and cotton, and cotton First aid swabs) against a control to permit the collection of small volumes of urine from the ground. We collected urine samples from captive and wild macaques, and humans, measured volume recovery, and analyzed concentrates of selected physiological markers (creatinine, C-peptide, and neopterin). The Salivette synthetic device was superior to the two alternative devices. Concentrations of creatinine, absolute C-peptide, C-peptide per creatinine, absolute neopterin, and neopterin per creatinine measured in samples collected with this device did not differ significantly from the control and were also strongly correlated to it. Fluid recovery was also best for this device. The least suitable device is the First aid collection device; we found that while absolute C-peptide and C-peptide per creatinine concentrations did not differ significantly from the control, creatinine concentrations were significantly lower than the control. In addition, these concentrations were either not or weakly correlated to the control. The Salivette cotton device provided intermediate results, although these concentrations were strongly correlated to the control. Salivette synthetic swabs seem to be useful devices for the collection of small amounts of urine from the ground destined for the assessment of physiological parameters. They thus provide new

  10. Stereological Analysis of Liver Biopsy Histology Sections as a Reference Standard for Validating Non-Invasive Liver Fat Fraction Measurements by MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Pierre, Tim G.; House, Michael J.; Bangma, Sander J.; Pang, Wenjie; Bathgate, Andrew; Gan, Eng K.; Ayonrinde, Oyekoya T.; Bhathal, Prithi S.; Clouston, Andrew; Olynyk, John K.; Adams, Leon A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Validation of non-invasive methods of liver fat quantification requires a reference standard. However, using standard histopathology assessment of liver biopsies is problematical because of poor repeatability. We aimed to assess a stereological method of measuring volumetric liver fat fraction (VLFF) in liver biopsies and to use the method to validate a magnetic resonance imaging method for measurement of VLFF. Methods VLFFs were measured in 59 subjects (1) by three independent analysts using a stereological point counting technique combined with the Delesse principle on liver biopsy histological sections and (2) by three independent analysts using the HepaFat-Scan® technique on magnetic resonance images of the liver. Bland Altman statistics and intraclass correlation (IC) were used to assess the repeatability of each method and the bias between the methods of liver fat fraction measurement. Results Inter-analyst repeatability coefficients for the stereology and HepaFat-Scan® methods were 8.2 (95% CI 7.7–8.8)% and 2.4 (95% CI 2.2–2.5)% VLFF respectively. IC coefficients were 0.86 (95% CI 0.69–0.93) and 0.990 (95% CI 0.985–0.994) respectively. Small biases (≤3.4%) were observable between two pairs of analysts using stereology while no significant biases were observable between any of the three pairs of analysts using HepaFat-Scan®. A bias of 1.4±0.5% VLFF was observed between the HepaFat-Scan® method and the stereological method. Conclusions Repeatability of the stereological method is superior to the previously reported performance of assessment of hepatic steatosis by histopathologists and is a suitable reference standard for validating non-invasive methods of measurement of VLFF. PMID:27501242

  11. Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Ekici, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    The rate of newborns with trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) who have been referred to our pediatric newborn clinic is very high. This shows that prenatal screening in the region is not carried out well. Prenatal diagnosis and screening methods include invasive prenatal diagnosis methods (amniocentesis, chorionic villus sampling (CVS), and cordocentesis) and non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPT) which cell free fetal DNA (cffDNA) screening of maternal blood samples. After the discovery of the signs ...

  12. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicky

    2005-07-10

    Jul 10, 2005 ... Drinker P, McKahnn C. The use of a new apparatus for the prolonged administration of artificial respiration. JAMA 1929; 92: 1658-1660. 5. Emerson J. Some reflections on Iron Lungs and other inventions. Respiratory Care 1998;. 43: 574-583. 6. Brigg C. The benefits of non-invasive ventilation and CPAP ...

  13. Validation of Hepa-index as a non-invasive biomarkers panel for assessment of hepatic fibrosis in Egyptians with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboraie, Mohamed; Schütte, Kerstin; Khairy, Marwa; Elsharkawy, Marwa; Asem, Noha; Elghamry, Fathy; Shalaby, Helmy; Esmat, Gamal; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2017-11-01

    To validate the diagnostic performance of Hepa-Index in predicting different stages of hepatic fibrosis in Egyptian patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Methods: Hundred treatment naïve chronic hepatitis C Egyptian patients were prospectively enrolled between June 2014 and January 2015. They were subjected to: platelet count, alpha-2-macroglobulin (α2-MG), total bilirubin, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), total cholesterol, liver biopsy and histopathological staging of hepatic fibrosis according to METAVIR scoring system. Hepa-Index was calculated according to the formula: Hepa-Index=exp (-0.021 x platelet +1.65 x α2-MG+0.2 x total bilirubin + 0.026 x GGT -1.215 x total cholesterol) / (1+exp (-0.021 x platelet + 1.65 x α2-MG + 0.2 x total bilirubin +0.026 x GGT -1.215 x total cholesterol).  Results: Hepa-Index correlates positively with the stage of hepatic fibrosis. Cut off values of Hepa-Index were: 0.2 for predicting significant hepatic fibrosis (≥F2 METAVIR), 0.3 for severe hepatic fibrosis (≥F3 METAVIR) and 0.4 for cirrhosis (F4 METAVIR). Hepa-Index was able to detect significant fibrosis with sensitivity of 69.4%, specificity of 76.3% and AUROC of 0.803. Hepa-Index was also able to detect severe hepatic fibrosis with sensitivity of 79.2%, specificity of 64.5% and AUROC of 0.783 and cirrhosis with sensitivity of 81.8%, specificity of 68.5% and AUROC of 0.744. Conclusion: Hepa-Index is a good non-invasive biomarkers panel that can be used for non-invasive assessment of hepatic fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C patients.

  14. Evaluation of recently validated non- invasive formula using basic lung functions as new screening tool for pulmonary hypertension in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanem Maha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A prediction formula for mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP using standard lung function measurement has been recently validated to screen for pulmonary hypertension (PH in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF patients. Objective: To test the usefulness of this formula as a new non invasive screening tool for PH in IPF patients. Also, to study its correlation with patients′ clinical data, pulmonary function tests, arterial blood gases (ABGs and other commonly used screening methods for PH including electrocardiogram (ECG, chest X ray (CXR, trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE and computerized tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional study of 37 IPF patients from tertiary hospital. The accuracy of MPAP estimation was assessed by examining the correlation between the predicted MPAP using the formula and PH diagnosed by other screening tools and patients′ clinical signs of PH. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the prediction of PH using cut off point of 21 or 25 mm Hg (p0 = 0.24. The formula-predicted MPAP greater than 25 mm Hg strongly correlated in the expected direction with O2 saturation (r = −0.95, P < 0.000, partial arterial O2 tension (r = −0.71, P < 0.000, right ventricular systolic pressure measured by TTE (r = 0.6, P < 0.000 and hilar width on CXR (r = 0.31, P = 0.03. Chest symptoms, ECG and CTPA signs of PH poorly correlated with the same formula (P > 0.05. Conclusions: The prediction formula for MPAP using standard lung function measurements is a simple non invasive tool that can be used as TTE to screen for PH in IPF patients and select those who need right heart catheterization.

  15. Non-Invasive markers for hepatic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lal Priyanka

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With great advancements in the therapeutic modalities used for the treatment of chronic liver diseases, the accurate assessment of liver fibrosis is a vital need for successful individualized management of disease activity in patients. The lack of accurate, reproducible and easily applied methods for fibrosis assessment has been the major limitation in both the clinical management and for research in liver diseases. However, the problem of the development of biomarkers capable of non-invasive staging of fibrosis in the liver is difficult due to the fact that the process of fibrogenesis is a component of the normal healing response to injury, invasion by pathogens, and many other etiologic factors. Current non-invasive methods range from serum biomarker assays to advanced imaging techniques such as transient elastography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Among non-invasive methods that gain strongest clinical foothold are FibroScan elastometry and serum-based APRI and FibroTest. There are many other tests that are not yet widely validated, but are none the less, promising. The rate of adoption of non-invasive diagnostic tests for liver fibrosis differs from country to country, but remains limited. At the present time, use of non-invasive procedures could be recommended as pre-screening that may allow physicians to narrow down the patients' population before definitive testing of liver fibrosis by biopsy of the liver. This review provides a systematic overview of these techniques, as well as both direct and indirect biomarkers based approaches used to stage fibrosis and covers recent developments in this rapidly advancing area.

  16. External validation of non-invasive prediction models for identifying ultrasonography-diagnosed fatty liver disease in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ya-Nan; Yu, Ming-Xing; Gao, Qian; Li, Yan-Yan; Huang, Jian-Jun; Sun, Chen-Ming; Qiao, Nan; Zhang, Hai-Xia; Wang, Hui; Lu, Qing; Wang, Tong

    2017-07-01

    Several prediction models for fatty liver disease (FLD) are available with limited externally validation and less comprehensive evaluation. The aim was to perform external validation and direct comparison of 4 prediction models (the Fatty Liver Index, the Hepatic Steatosis Index, the ZJU index, and the Framingham Steatosis Index) for FLD both in the overall population and the obese subpopulation.This cross-sectional study included 4247 subjects aged 20 to 65 years recruited from the north of Shanxi Province in China. Anthropometric and biochemical features were collected using standard protocols. FLD was diagnosed by liver ultrasonography. We assessed all models in terms of discrimination, calibration, and decision curve analysis.The original models performed well in terms of discrimination for the overall population, with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) around 0.85, while AUCs for obese individuals were around 0.68. Nevertheless, the predicted risks did not match well with the observed risks both in the overall population and the obese subpopulation. The FLI 2006 was 1 of the 2 best models in terms of discrimination (AUCs were 0.87 and 0.72 for the overall population and the obese subgroup, respectively) and had the best performance in terms of calibration, and attained the highest net benefit.The FLI 2006 is overall the best tool to identify high risk individuals and has great clinical utility. Nonetheless, it does not perform well enough to quantify the actual risk of FLD, which need to be (re)calibrated for clinical use.

  17. Prediction model for recurrence probabilities after intravesical chemotherapy in patients with intermediate-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer, including external validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Rianne J M; Hendriks, Jan C M; Rodriguez Faba, O Rodriguez Faba; Witjes, Wim P J; Palou, Joan; Witjes, J Alfred

    2016-02-01

    To develop a model to predict recurrence for patients with intermediate-risk (IR) non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) treated with intravesical chemotherapy which can be challenging because of the heterogeneous characteristics of these patients. Data from three Dutch trials were combined. Patients treated with intravesical chemotherapy with characteristics according to the IR definition of the EAU guideline 2013 were included. Uni- and multivariable Cox regression with selection methods were used to identify predictors of recurrence at 1, 2, and 5 years. An easy-readable table for recurrence probabilities was developed. An external validation was done using data from Spanish patients. A total of 724 patients were available for analyses, of which 305 were primary patients. Recurrences occurred in 413 patients (57%). History of recurrences, history of intravesical treatment, grade 2, multiple tumors, and adjuvant treatment with epirubicin were relevant predictors for recurrence-free survival with hazard ratios of 1.48, 1.38, 1.22, 1.56, and 1.27, respectively. A table for recurrence probabilities was developed using these five predictors. Based on the probability of recurrence, three risk groups were identified. Patients in each of the separate risk groups should be scheduled for less or more aggressive treatment. The model showed sufficient discrimination and good predictive accuracy. External validation showed good validity. In our model, we identified five relevant predictors for recurrence-free survival in IR-NMIBC patients treated with intravesical chemotherapy. These recurrence predictors allow the urologists to stratify patients in risk groups for recurrence that could help in deciding for an individualized treatment approach.

  18. Non-Invasive Method for the Rapid Assessment of Central Venous Pressure: Description and Validation by a Single Examiner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zidulka, Arnold

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study describes a means of assessing the external jugular venous pressure (JVP as an indicator of normal or elevated central venous pressure (CVP.Methods: Intensive care unit patients having CVP monitoring were examined. With patients in bed, the external jugular vein (EJV was occluded at the base of the neck and observed to distend. The occlusion was then removed and the vein observed for collapse. Complete collapse was hypothesized to indicate a non-elevated CVP (≤8cm of water. In those patients whose EJV collapsed incompletely, the vein was then occluded with the finger near the angle of the jaw. With the occlusion maintained, the vein was milked downwards with the other hand to cause its emptying and was then observed for filling from below. Filling from below was hypothesized to indicate an elevated CVP (>8cm of water.Results: In 12 of the 40 patients examined, the EJV could not be assessed (EJV not seen at all: 5, and difficult to visualize: 7. For the remaining 28 patients, 11 had a CVP > 8 cm, while 17 had a CVP of < 8. EJV assessment was 100% accurate (95% Confidence Interval 88-100 in predicting whether or not a patient’s CVP was greater or less than 8 cm of water.Conclusion: EJV assessment, when visible, is accurate to clinically assess a patient’s CVP in the hands of the author. Further studies are needed to see if they are reproducible by other observer.[WestJEM. 2008;9:201-205.

  19. Validation of the Nexfin® non-invasive continuous blood pressure monitoring validated against Riva-Rocci/Korotkoff in a bariatric patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouwels, Sjaak; Lascaris, Bianca; Nienhuijs, Simon W; Arthur Bouwman, R; Buise, Marc P

    2017-06-01

    The present study aimed to validate the Nexfin® monitor and to assess the accuracy compared to classical sphygmomanometry (Riva-Rocci/Korotkoff (RRK)) blood pressure (BP) measurements in patients with obesity scheduled for bariatric surgery. Validation study. Outpatient clinic for bariatric surgery. 33 patients scheduled for bariatric surgery. The validation process was done according to the protocols developed by the European Society of Hypertension from 2010. The Nexfin® monitor (Edwards Lifesciences/BMEYE B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands) calculates beat-to-beat blood pressure from finger pulse wave analysis. Measurements of systolic and diastolic BP were obtained using classical sphygmomanometry and the Nexfin® alternatingly. In total 99 pairs of BP measurements were used. The device failed pass phase 1 as 65 systolic readings fell within 5mmHg (73 required). And 61, 76 and 90 diastolic readings fell within 5, 10 and 15mmHg respectively. Finally, it failed to pass phase 2 as 23 patients for systolic and 25 for diastolic had at least 2/3 of their comparisons falling within 5mmHg (24 required) but 10 subjects for systolic and 8 for diastolic had all three comparisons more than 5mmHg different from the RRK readings (zero allowed). Mean differences were 7.8±6.9mmHg for SBP and 8.0±7.2mmHg for DBP. Using the revised protocol, the Nexfin® device was not able to pass validation. However using the original protocol, the Nexfin® device passed phase 1 and 2.1 of the validation process and failed to pass phase 2.2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Non-invasive neural stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, William J.; Sanguinetti, Joseph L.; Fini, Maria; Hool, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Neurotechnologies for non-invasively interfacing with neural circuits have been evolving from those capable of sensing neural activity to those capable of restoring and enhancing human brain function. Generally referred to as non-invasive neural stimulation (NINS) methods, these neuromodulation approaches rely on electrical, magnetic, photonic, and acoustic or ultrasonic energy to influence nervous system activity, brain function, and behavior. Evidence that has been surmounting for decades shows that advanced neural engineering of NINS technologies will indeed transform the way humans treat diseases, interact with information, communicate, and learn. The physics underlying the ability of various NINS methods to modulate nervous system activity can be quite different from one another depending on the energy modality used as we briefly discuss. For members of commercial and defense industry sectors that have not traditionally engaged in neuroscience research and development, the science, engineering and technology required to advance NINS methods beyond the state-of-the-art presents tremendous opportunities. Within the past few years alone there have been large increases in global investments made by federal agencies, foundations, private investors and multinational corporations to develop advanced applications of NINS technologies. Driven by these efforts NINS methods and devices have recently been introduced to mass markets via the consumer electronics industry. Further, NINS continues to be explored in a growing number of defense applications focused on enhancing human dimensions. The present paper provides a brief introduction to the field of non-invasive neural stimulation by highlighting some of the more common methods in use or under current development today.

  1. Prediction model for recurrence probabilities after intravesical chemotherapy in patients with intermediate-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer, including external validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, R.J.M.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Rodriguez Faba, O.; Witjes, W.P.J.; Palou, J.; Witjes, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a model to predict recurrence for patients with intermediate-risk (IR) non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) treated with intravesical chemotherapy which can be challenging because of the heterogeneous characteristics of these patients. METHODS: Data from three Dutch trials

  2. A comparison of non-invasive versus invasive methods of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It allows immediate and ongoing Hb changes to be displayed during surgery, which may aid in the rapid detection of clinically significant blood loss. To test the accuracy of this non-invasive monitor, we compared Hb levels obtained using standard invasive techniques (laboratory and arterial blood gas machine analysis) ...

  3. Validation of combinatorial probe-anchor ligation-based sequencing as non-invasive prenatal test for trisomy at a central laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J; Wang, Y; Wang, W; Dong, Y; Xu, C; Zhou, A; Xu, Z; Wu, Z; Tang, X; Chen, F; Yin, Y; Wang, W; Yan, M; Zhang, W; Mu, F; Yang, H

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the clinical validity of a new ultrahigh-throughput non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT) based on combinatorial probe-anchor ligation (cPAL) sequencing of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) using centralized testing. Maternal plasma samples were obtained from 10 594 singleton pregnancies in high-risk populations at 20 centers in China, including 8155 that were collected retrospectively and 2439 prospectively. Fetal outcome data and karyotyping results were documented as gold standard and were double blinded during NIPT. The clinical performance of the ultrahigh-throughput sequencing method, cPAL, for NIPT was validated by evaluating its sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) in detecting trisomies 21, 18 and 13 as the centralized testing mode in the reference laboratory. To ensure stable and reproducible performance of centralized cPAL-based NIPT in detecting trisomies, a series of quality-control systems, including sequencing of two sets of artificial samples, were employed and evaluated. Ten prospective cases were excluded from the study because of incomplete clinical data. Four prospective samples failed to generate a NIPT result due to assay failure, presenting a failure rate of 0.16% (4/2429). A total of 168 retrospective cases and 47 prospective cases had a positive NIPT result for trisomy, giving respective positive rates of 2.06% and 1.94%. Four false-positive and no false-positive cases were observed in the retrospective and prospective groups, respectively, resulting in PPV of 97.62% (95% CI, 94.02-99.35%) and 100% (95% CI, 92.45-100%), respectively. In the retrospective group, sensitivity and specificity were, respectively, 100% (95% CI, 97.07-100%) and 99.98% (95% CI, 99.94-100%) for trisomy 21, 100% (95% CI, 97.75-100%) and 99.98% (95% CI, 99.94-100%) for trisomy 18, and 100% (95% CI, 15.81-100%) and 100% (95% CI, 99.95-100%) for trisomy 13. In the prospective group, sensitivity and specificity were, respectively, 100% (95

  4. Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT): Europe's first multicenter post-market clinical follow-up study validating the quality in clinical routine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flöck, Anne; Tu, Ngoc-Chi; Rüland, Anna; Holzgreve, Wolfgang; Gembruch, Ulrich; Geipel, Annegret

    2017-11-01

    Non-invasive prenatal tests (NIPT) for the determination of fetal aneuploidies from maternal blood are firmly established in clinical routine. For the first time, the accuracy of an NIPT for the determination of trisomies 21, 18 and 13 in singleton pregnancies was assessed by means of a prospective German-wide multicenter post-market clinical follow-up study, to reliably evaluate the quality in clinical routine. The study covered the indications for testing, the test results, the rate of invasive diagnostics and the pregnancy outcome. 2232 cases were tested for trisomy 21. Of these, 1946 cases were additionally examined for trisomy 18 and 13. Sensitivity and specificity for trisomy 21 (43/43) and for trisomy 13 (2/2) were 100%, for trisomy 18 the sensitivity was 80% (4/5) with a specificity of 99.8%. Three false-positive results for trisomy 18 were observed (FPR 0.15%). The no-call rate was 0.5%. In this subgroup, 27.3% (3/11) aneuploidies were diagnosed. The rate of invasive procedures was 2.6%. NIPT provides a very high quality for the fetal trisomies 21, 13 and 18 in clinical routine. The results support the recommendation that NIPT should be offered after genetic counseling and only in conjunction with a qualified ultrasound examination.

  5. Invasive and non-invasive methods for cardiac output measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavdaniti M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemodynamic status monitoring of high-risk surgical patients and critically ill patients inIntensive Care Units is one of the main objectives of their therapeutic management. Cardiac output is one of the mostimportant parameters for cardiac function monitoring, providing an estimate of whole body perfusion oxygen deliveryand allowing for an understanding of the causes of high blood pressure. The purpose of the present review is thedescription of cardiac output measurement methods as presented in the international literature. The articles documentthat there are many methods of monitoring the hemodynamic status of patients, both invasive and non-invasive, themost popular of which is thermodilution. The invasive methods are the Fick method and thermodilution, whereasthe non-invasive methods are oeshophaegeal Doppler, transoesophageal echocardiography, lithium dilution, pulsecontour, partial CO2 rebreathing and thoracic electrical bioimpedance. All of them have their advantages and disadvantages,but thermodilution is the golden standard for critical patients, although it does entail many risks. The idealsystem for cardiac output monitoring would be non-invasive, easy to use, reliable and compatible in patients. A numberof research studies have been carried out in clinical care settings, by nurses as well as other health professionals, for thepurpose of finding a method of measurement that would have the least disadvantages. Nevertheless, the thermodilutiontechnique remains the most common approach in use today.

  6. Non-invasive measurement of adrenocortical activity in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measuring physiological stress reactions through the quantification of plasma cortisol often involves physical restraint, which acts as a stressor itself. Here, we present the validation of a non-invasive method for assessing adrenocortical activity as an indicator of stress in the bat-eared fox (Otocyon megalotis). By conducting ...

  7. Non-invasive ventilation for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Fidelma; Bradley, Judy M; Piper, Amanda J

    2017-02-20

    Non-invasive ventilation may be a means to temporarily reverse or slow the progression of respiratory failure in cystic fibrosis by providing ventilatory support and avoiding tracheal intubation. Using non-invasive ventilation, in the appropriate situation or individuals, can improve lung mechanics through increasing airflow and gas exchange and decreasing the work of breathing. Non-invasive ventilation thus acts as an external respiratory muscle. This is an update of a previously published review. To compare the effect of non-invasive ventilation versus no non-invasive ventilation in people with cystic fibrosis for airway clearance, during sleep and during exercise. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearching relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We searched the reference lists of each trial for additional publications possibly containing other trials.Most recent search: 08 August 2016. Randomised controlled trials comparing a form of pressure preset or volume preset non-invasive ventilation to no non-invasive ventilation used for airway clearance or during sleep or exercise in people with acute or chronic respiratory failure in cystic fibrosis. Three reviewers independently assessed trials for inclusion criteria and methodological quality, and extracted data. Ten trials met the inclusion criteria with a total of 191 participants. Seven trials evaluated single treatment sessions, one evaluated a two-week intervention, one evaluated a six-week intervention and one a three-month intervention. It is only possible to blind trials of airway clearance and overnight ventilatory support to the outcome assessors. In most of the trials we judged there was an unclear risk of bias with regards to blinding due to inadequate descriptions. The six-week trial was the only one judged to have a low risk of bias for all

  8. [Non-invasive monitoring of intracranial pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbachev, V I; Likholetova, N V

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript presents an analysis of different intracranial pressure (ICP) non-invasive monitoring devices. External ventricular drainage still remains a "gold standard" оf neuromonitoring, but this manipulation can be not always feasible, because of contra-indications or absence of neurosurgery in this hospital. Also there is a risk of development infections or hemorrhage. In these conditions the great value is got by development of ways of non-invasive definition of VChD which would allow to carry out safe and, if necessary, numerous measurement of this parameter. Now, the leading place is occupied by various ultrasonic and telemetric methods. The question of accuracy of received data at non-invasive methods remains open and demands further specification.

  9. Non-invasive antenatal RHD typing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoot, C. E.; Soussan, A. Ait; Koelewijn, J.; Bonsel, G.; Paget-Christiaens, L. G. C.; de Haas, M.

    2006-01-01

    The existence of cell free fetal DNA, derived from apoptotic syncytiotrophoblast, in the maternal circulation has opened new possibilities of non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. Although still some technical problems exists, especially the lack of a generic positive control on the presence of fetal DNA

  10. Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Per-Uno; Agrawal, Sachin; Bläckberg, Mats

    2017-01-01

    The management of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has evolved from the first reports on bladder endoscopy and transurethral resection to the introduction of adjuvant intravesical treatment. However, disease recurrence and progression remain an ongoing risk, placing a heavy burden...

  11. Non-invasive monitoring of physiological stress in the Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla): validation of a fecal glucocorticoid assay and methods for practical application in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutt, Kathryn; Setchell, Joanna M; Heistermann, Michael

    2012-11-01

    variation in FGCMs in samples from wild gorillas. Our study highlights the importance of thorough biological and immunological validation of FGCM assays, and presents validated, practical methods for the application of non-invasive adrenocortical monitoring techniques to field conservation contexts where it is crucially needed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Non-invasive fetal ECG analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Gari D; Silva, Ikaro; Behar, Joachim; Moody, George B

    2014-08-01

    Despite the important advances achieved in the field of adult electrocardiography signal processing, the analysis of the non-invasive fetal electrocardiogram (NI-FECG) remains a challenge. Currently no gold standard database exists which provides labelled FECG QRS complexes (and other morphological parameters), and publications rely either on proprietary databases or a very limited set of data recorded from few (or more often, just one) individuals.The PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2013 enables to tackle some of these limitations by releasing a set of NI-FECG data publicly to the scientific community in order to evaluate signal processing techniques for NI-FECG extraction. The Challenge aim was to encourage development of accurate algorithms for locating QRS complexes and estimating the QT interval in non-invasive FECG signals. Using carefully reviewed reference QRS annotations and QT intervals as a gold standard, based on simultaneous direct FECG when possible, the Challenge was designed to measure and compare the performance of participants' algorithms objectively. Multiple challenge events were designed to test basic FHR estimation accuracy, as well as accuracy in measurement of inter-beat (RR) and QT intervals needed as a basis for derivation of other FECG features.This editorial reviews the background issues, the design of the Challenge, the key achievements, and the follow-up research generated as a result of the Challenge, published in the concurrent special issue of Physiological Measurement.

  13. Single non-invasive model to diagnose non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otgonsuren, Munkhzul; Estep, Michael J; Hossain, Nayeem; Younossi, Elena; Frost, Spencer; Henry, Linda; Hunt, Sharon; Fang, Yun; Goodman, Zachary; Younossi, Zobair M

    2014-12-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is the progressive form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). A liver biopsy is considered the "gold standard" for diagnosing/staging NASH. Identification of NAFLD/NASH using non-invasive tools is important for intervention. The study aims were to: develop/validate the predictive performance of a non-invasive model (index of NASH [ION]); assess the performance of a recognized non-invasive model (fatty liver index [FLI]) compared with ION for NAFLD diagnosis; determine which non-invasive model (FLI, ION, or NAFLD fibrosis score [NFS]) performed best in predicting age-adjusted mortality. From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III database, anthropometric, clinical, ultrasound, laboratory, and mortality data were obtained (n = 4458; n = 861 [19.3%] NAFLD by ultrasound) and used to develop the ION model, and then to compare the ION and FLI models for NAFLD diagnosis. For validation and diagnosis of NASH, liver biopsy data were used (n = 152). Age-adjusted Cox proportional hazard modeling estimated the association among the three non-invasive tests (FLI, ION, and NFS) and mortality. FLI's threshold score > 60 and ION's threshold score > 22 had similar specificity (FLI = 80% vs ION = 82%) for NAFLD diagnosis; FLI  50 predicted histological NASH (92% specificity); the FLI model did not predict NASH or mortality. The ION model was best in predicting cardiovascular/diabetes-related mortality; NFS predicted overall or diabetes-related mortality. The ION model was superior in predicting NASH and mortality compared with the FLI model. Studies are needed to validate ION. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Intraspecies differenes in phenotypic plasticity: Invasive versus non-invasive populations of Ceratophyllum demersum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldgaard, Benita; Brix, Hans

    2012-01-01

    High phenotypic plasticity has been hypothesized to affect the invasiveness of plants, as high plasticity may enlarge the breath of environments in which the plants can survive and reproduce. Here we compare the phenotypic plasticity of invasive and non-invasive populations of the same species...... hypothesized that the phenotypic plasticity in fitness-related traits like growth and photosynthesis were higher in the invasive than in the non-invasive population. The invasive population acclimated to elevated temperatures through increased rates of photosynthesis (range: Pamb: 8–452 mol O2 g−1 DM h−1......-harvesting complex. Hence, the invasive population of C. demersum from New Zealand had higher phenotypic plasticity in response to temperature than the non-invasive Danish population. This might be the result of genetic evolution since its introduction to New Zealand five decades ago, but further studies are needed...

  15. Discordant non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwig, Tanja Schlaikjaer; Ambye, Louise; Sørensen, Steen

    2017-01-01

    With a high sensitivity and specificity, non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) is an incomparable screening test for fetal aneuploidy. However, the method is rather newly introduced, and experiences with discordant results are few. We did a systematic review of literature reporting details of false...... biological or technical explanation for the discordant result. The included cases represent only a minor part of the true number of false positive or false negative NIPT cases identified in fetal medicine clinics around the world. To ensure knowledge exchange and transparency of NIPT between laboratories, we...... suggest a systematic recording of discordant NIPT results, as well as a quality assurance by external quality control and accreditation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  16. Techniques for Non-Invasive Monitoring of Arterial Blood Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes S. Meidert

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Since both, hypotension and hypertension, can potentially impair the function of vital organs such as heart, brain, or kidneys, monitoring of arterial blood pressure (BP is a mainstay of hemodynamic monitoring in acutely or critically ill patients. Arterial BP can either be obtained invasively via an arterial catheter or non-invasively. Non-invasive BP measurement provides either intermittent or continuous readings. Most commonly, an occluding upper arm cuff is used for intermittent non-invasive monitoring. BP values are then obtained either manually (by auscultation of Korotkoff sounds or palpation or automatically (e.g., by oscillometry. For continuous non-invasive BP monitoring, the volume clamp method or arterial applanation tonometry can be used. Both techniques enable the arterial waveform and BP values to be obtained continuously. This article describes the different techniques for non-invasive BP measurement, their advantages and limitations, and their clinical applicability.

  17. Techniques for Non-Invasive Monitoring of Arterial Blood Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meidert, Agnes S; Saugel, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Since both, hypotension and hypertension, can potentially impair the function of vital organs such as heart, brain, or kidneys, monitoring of arterial blood pressure (BP) is a mainstay of hemodynamic monitoring in acutely or critically ill patients. Arterial BP can either be obtained invasively via an arterial catheter or non-invasively. Non-invasive BP measurement provides either intermittent or continuous readings. Most commonly, an occluding upper arm cuff is used for intermittent non-invasive monitoring. BP values are then obtained either manually (by auscultation of Korotkoff sounds or palpation) or automatically (e.g., by oscillometry). For continuous non-invasive BP monitoring, the volume clamp method or arterial applanation tonometry can be used. Both techniques enable the arterial waveform and BP values to be obtained continuously. This article describes the different techniques for non-invasive BP measurement, their advantages and limitations, and their clinical applicability.

  18. Non-invasive diagnostic methods in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todea, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    The paper, will present the most important non-invasive methods for diagnostic, in different fields of dentistry. Moreover, the laser-based methods will be emphasis. In orthodontics, 3D laser scanners are increasingly being used to establish database for normative population and cross-sectional growth changes but also to asses clinical outcomes in orthognatic surgical and non-surgical treatments. In prevention the main methods for diagnostic of demineralization and caries detection in early stages are represented by laser fluorescence - Quantitative Light Florescence (QLF); DiagnoDent-system-655nm; FOTI-Fiberoptic transillumination; DIFOTI-Digital Imaging Fiberoptic transillumination; and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). In odontology, Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) is a noninvasive real time method used for determining the tooth vitality by monitoring the pulp microcirculation in traumatized teeth, fractured teeth, and teeth undergoing different conservative treatments. In periodontology, recently study shows the ability of LDF to evaluate the health of gingival tissue in periodontal tissue diseases but also after different periodontal treatments.

  19. Non-invasive physical treatments for chronic/recurrent headache

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brønfort, Gert; Haas, Mitchell; Evans, Roni L.; Goldsmith, Charles H.; Assendelft, Willem J.J.; Bouter, Lex M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Non-invasive physical treatments are often used to treat common types of chronic/recurrent headache. Objectives: To quantify and compare the magnitude of short- and long-term effects of non-invasive physical treatments for chronic/recurrent headaches. Search methods: We searched the

  20. Non-invasive physical treatments for chronic/recurrent headache.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronfort, G.; Nilsson, N.; Haas, M.; Evans, R.; Goldsmith, C. H.; Assendelft, W. J.; Bouter, L. M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-invasive physical treatments are often used to treat common types of chronic/recurrent headache. OBJECTIVES: To quantify and compare the magnitude of short- and long-term effects of non-invasive physical treatments for chronic/recurrent headaches. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the

  1. Invasive clonal plant species have a greater root-foraging plasticity than non-invasive ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keser, Lidewij H; Dawson, Wayne; Song, Yao-Bin; Yu, Fei-Hai; Fischer, Markus; Dong, Ming; van Kleunen, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Clonality is frequently positively correlated with plant invasiveness, but which aspects of clonality make some clonal species more invasive than others is not known. Due to their spreading growth form, clonal plants are likely to experience spatial heterogeneity in nutrient availability. Plasticity in allocation of biomass to clonal growth organs and roots may allow these plants to forage for high-nutrient patches. We investigated whether this foraging response is stronger in species that have become invasive than in species that have not. We used six confamilial pairs of native European clonal plant species differing in invasion success in the USA. We grew all species in large pots under homogeneous or heterogeneous nutrient conditions in a greenhouse, and compared their nutrient-foraging response and performance. Neither invasive nor non-invasive species showed significant foraging responses to heterogeneity in clonal growth organ biomass or in aboveground biomass of clonal offspring. Invasive species had, however, a greater positive foraging response in terms of root and belowground biomass than non-invasive species. Invasive species also produced more total biomass. Our results suggest that the ability for strong root foraging is among the characteristics promoting invasiveness in clonal plants.

  2. Effective radiation doses associated with non-invasive versus invasive assessment of coronary anatomy and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, G G; Ntalianis, A; Ntarladimas, Y; de Booij, M; De Winter, O; Barbato, E; Pilet, B; Van Mieghem, C; Wijns, W; De Bruyne, B

    2015-06-01

    To compare the effective radiation dose (ERD) needed to obtain information on coronary anatomy and physiology by a non-invasive versus an invasive diagnostic strategy. Knowledge of anatomy and physiology is needed for management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). There is, however, a growing concern about detrimental long-term effects of radiation associated with diagnostic procedures. In a total of 671 patients with suspected CAD, we compared the ERD needed to obtain anatomical and physiological information through a non-invasive strategy or an invasive strategy. The non-invasive strategy consisted of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The invasive strategy included coronary angiography (CA) and fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurement. In 464 patients, the data were acquired in Period 2009 and in 207 the data were acquired in Period 2011 (after each period, the CCTA- and the CA-equipment had been upgraded). For the Period 2009 total ERD of the non-invasive approach was significantly larger compared to the invasive approach (28.45 ± 5.37 mSv versus 15.79 ± 7.95 mSv, respectively; P < 0.0001). For Period 2011, despite the significant decrease in ERD for both groups (P<0.0001 for both), the ERD remained higher for the non-invasive approach compared to the invasive approach (16.67 ± 10.45 mSv vs. 10.36 ± 5.87 mSv, respectively; P < 0.0001). Simulation of various diagnostic scenarios showed cumulative radiation dose is the lowest when a first positive test is followed by an invasive strategy. To obtain anatomic and physiologic information in patients with suspected CAD, the combination of CA and FFR is associated with lower ERD than the combination of CCTA and SPECT. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Updated Scar Management Practical Guidelines: Non-invasive and invasive measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monstrey, S.; Middelkoop, E.; Vranckx, J.J.; Bassetto, F.; Ziegler, U.E.; Meaume, S.; Teot, L.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids can be aesthetically displeasing and lead to severe psychosocial impairment. Many invasive and non-invasive options are available for the plastic (and any other) surgeon both to prevent and to treat abnormal scar formation. Recently, an updated set of practical

  4. The relation between invasive and non-invasive tear break-up time ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tear stability normal to Nigerians with consideration of gender and age has not been reported. Tear stability in young adults was measured using invasive and non-invasive tear break-up time (TBUT and NIBUT). Forty –five subjects aged 20 to 30 years were selected from among the students of University of. Benin, Edo ...

  5. Updated Scar Management Practical Guidelines: Non-invasive and invasive measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monstrey, S.; Middelkoop, E.; Vranckx, J.J.; Bassetto, F.; Ziegler, U.E.; Meaume, S.; Teot, L.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids can be aesthetically displeasing and lead to severe psychosocial impairment. Many invasive and non-invasive options are available for the plastic (and any other) surgeon both to prevent and to treat abnormal scar formation. Recently, an updated set of practical

  6. Comparative anatomy of invasive and non-invasive species in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative anatomy of invasive and non-invasive species in the family Asteraceae in Nigeria. ... The prominent tiles of parenchymatous cells for effective conduction of water and nutrients; the occurrence of various vessel types: short and long together with wide and narrow vessels for water conservation and reduced ...

  7. Blood biomarkers for the non-invasive diagnosis of endometriosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nisenblat, Vicki; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Shaikh, Rabia; Farquhar, Cindy; Jordan, Vanessa; Scheffers, Carola S.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Johnson, Neil; Hull, M. Louise

    2016-01-01

    About 10% of reproductive-aged women suffer from endometriosis, a costly chronic disease causing pelvic pain and subfertility. Laparoscopy is the gold standard diagnostic test for endometriosis, but is expensive and carries surgical risks. Currently, there are no non-invasive or minimally invasive

  8. Inhibition of proliferation, migration and invasion of human non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the effect of phlomisoside F (PMF) on the proliferation, migration and invasion of human non-small cell lung cancer cell line A549 and explore the possible mechanisms. Methods: The anti-proliferative effect of PMF on A549 cells was determined by CCK-8. Subsequently, migration and invasion were ...

  9. Non-invasive patient-specific acoustic property estimation for MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Urvi; Payne, Allison; Todd, Nick; Parker, Dennis L.; Roemer, Robert B.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2012-10-01

    A technique that non-invasively estimates subject-specific tissue properties for MRgFUS is described and validated in homogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms and ex-vivo porcine muscle. Subsequently, the technique is used to estimate changes in tissue attenuation coefficient due to treatment in in-vivo rabbit muscle.

  10. Disturbance promotes non-indigenous bacterial invasion in soil microcosms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Manqiang; Strandmark, Lisa Bjørnlund; Rønn, Regin

    2012-01-01

    Invasion-biology is largely based on non-experimental observation of larger organisms. Here, we apply an experimental approach to the subject. By using microbial-based microcosm-experiments, invasion-biology can be placed on firmer experimental, and hence, less anecdotal ground. A better understa......Invasion-biology is largely based on non-experimental observation of larger organisms. Here, we apply an experimental approach to the subject. By using microbial-based microcosm-experiments, invasion-biology can be placed on firmer experimental, and hence, less anecdotal ground. A better...... understanding of the mechanisms that govern invasion-success of bacteria in soil communities will provide knowledge on the factors that hinder successful establishment of bacteria artificially inoculated into soil, e.g. for remediation purposes. Further, it will yield valuable information on general principles...

  11. Non-invasive measurement of aortic pressure in patients: Comparing pulse wave analysis and applanation tonometry

    OpenAIRE

    Naidu, M.U.R.; C Prabhakar Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to validate and compare novel methods to determine aortic blood pressure non-invasively based on Oscillometric Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) measurement using four limb-cuff pressure waveforms and two lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) with a validated tonometric pulse wave analysis system in patients. Materials and Methods: After receiving the consent, in 49 patients with hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, PWV, and central blood p...

  12. Fluid challenge: tracking changes in cardiac output with blood pressure monitoring (invasive or non-invasive).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhal, Karim; Ehrmann, Stephan; Perrotin, Dominique; Wolff, Michel; Boulain, Thierry

    2013-11-01

    To assess whether invasive and non-invasive blood pressure (BP) monitoring allows the identification of patients who have responded to a fluid challenge, i.e., who have increased their cardiac output (CO). Patients with signs of circulatory failure were prospectively included. Before and after a fluid challenge, CO and the mean of four intra-arterial and oscillometric brachial cuff BP measurements were collected. Fluid responsiveness was defined by an increase in CO ≥10 or ≥15% in case of regular rhythm or arrhythmia, respectively. In 130 patients, the correlation between a fluid-induced increase in pulse pressure (Δ500mlPP) and fluid-induced increase in CO was weak and was similar for invasive and non-invasive measurements of BP: r² = 0.31 and r² = 0.29, respectively (both p invasive Δ500mlPP was associated with an area under the receiver-operating curve (AUC) of 0.82 (0.74-0.88), similar (p = 0.80) to that of non-invasive Δ500mlPP [AUC of 0.81 (0.73-0.87)]. Outside large gray zones of inconclusive values (5-23% for invasive Δ500mlPP and 4-35% for non-invasive Δ500mlPP, involving 35 and 48% of patients, respectively), the detection of responsiveness or unresponsiveness to fluid was reliable. Cardiac arrhythmia did not impair the performance of invasive or non-invasive Δ500mlPP. Other BP-derived indices did not outperform Δ500mlPP. As evidenced by large gray zones, BP-derived indices poorly reflected fluid responsiveness. However, in our deeply sedated population, a high increase in invasive pulse pressure (>23%) or even in non-invasive pulse pressure (>35%) reliably detected a response to fluid. In the absence of a marked increase in pulse pressure (<4-5%), a response to fluid was unlikely.

  13. Non-Invasive Ocular Rigidity Measurement: A Differential Tonometry Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathios T. Detorakis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Taking into account the fact that Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT geometrically deforms the corneal apex and displaces volume from the anterior segment whereas Dynamic Contour Tonometry (DCT does not, we aimed at developing an algorithm for the calculation of ocular rigidity (OR based on the differences in pressure and volume between deformed and non-deformed status according to the general Friedenwald principle of differential tonometry. Methods: To avoid deviations of GAT IOP from true IOP in eyes with corneas different from the “calibration cornea” we applied the previously described Orssengo-Pye algorithm to calculate an error coefficient “C/B”. To test the feasibility of the proposed model, we calculated the OR coefficient (r in 17 cataract surgery candidates (9 males and 8 females. Results: The calculated r according to our model (mean ± SD, range was 0.0174 ± 0.010 (0.0123–0.022 mmHg/μL. A negative statistically significant correlation between axial length and r was detected whereas correlations between r and other biometric parameters examined were statistically not significant. Conclusions: The proposed method may prove a valid non-invasive tool for the measurement method of OR, which could help in introducing OR in the decision-making of the routine clinical practice.

  14. Invasive versus Non Invasive Methods Applied to Mummy Research: Will This Controversy Ever Be Solved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moissidou, Despina; Day, Jasmine; Shin, Dong Hoon; Bianucci, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the application of non invasive techniques to mummified remains have shed new light on past diseases. The virtual inspection of a corpse, which has almost completely replaced classical autopsy, has proven to be important especially when dealing with valuable museum specimens. In spite of some very rewarding results, there are still many open questions. Non invasive techniques provide information on hard and soft tissue pathologies and allow information to be gleaned concerning mummification practices (e.g., ancient Egyptian artificial mummification). Nevertheless, there are other fields of mummy studies in which the results provided by non invasive techniques are not always self-explanatory. Reliance exclusively upon virtual diagnoses can sometimes lead to inconclusive and misleading interpretations. On the other hand, several types of investigation (e.g., histology, paleomicrobiology, and biochemistry), although minimally invasive, require direct contact with the bodies and, for this reason, are often avoided, particularly by museum curators. Here we present an overview of the non invasive and invasive techniques currently used in mummy studies and propose an approach that might solve these conflicts.

  15. Invasive versus Non Invasive Methods Applied to Mummy Research: Will This Controversy Ever Be Solved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despina Moissidou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in the application of non invasive techniques to mummified remains have shed new light on past diseases. The virtual inspection of a corpse, which has almost completely replaced classical autopsy, has proven to be important especially when dealing with valuable museum specimens. In spite of some very rewarding results, there are still many open questions. Non invasive techniques provide information on hard and soft tissue pathologies and allow information to be gleaned concerning mummification practices (e.g., ancient Egyptian artificial mummification. Nevertheless, there are other fields of mummy studies in which the results provided by non invasive techniques are not always self-explanatory. Reliance exclusively upon virtual diagnoses can sometimes lead to inconclusive and misleading interpretations. On the other hand, several types of investigation (e.g., histology, paleomicrobiology, and biochemistry, although minimally invasive, require direct contact with the bodies and, for this reason, are often avoided, particularly by museum curators. Here we present an overview of the non invasive and invasive techniques currently used in mummy studies and propose an approach that might solve these conflicts.

  16. Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer risk stratification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Isharwal

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: EORTC and CUETO risk tables are the two best-established models to predict recurrence and progression in patients with NMIBC though they tend to overestimate risk and have poor discrimination for prognostic outcomes in external validation. Future research should focus on enhancing the predictive accuracy of risk assessment tools by incorporating additional prognostic factors such as depth of lamina propria invasion and molecular biomarkers after rigorous validation in multi-institutional cohorts.

  17. Proteomic variation and diversity in clinical Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from invasive and non-invasive sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Bittaye

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for a variety of invasive and non-invasive human infections. There are over 90 serotypes of S. pneumoniae differing in their ability to adapt to the different niches within the host. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to discriminate clinical S. pneumoniae isolates recovered from either blood cultures (invasive site isolates or other sites, including sputum, tracheal aspirate, ear, eye and skin swabs (non-invasive site isolates. Global protein expression profiles for five invasive site and six non-invasive site isolates representing five different serotypes (serotypes 4, 6, 9, 14 and 23 were obtained for each isolate and combined into a single data set using Progenesis SameSpots™ software. One-hundred and eighty six protein spots (39% of the protein spots in the dataset differed significantly (ANOVA, p<0.05 in abundance between the invasive site (101 upregulated protein spots and non-invasive site (85 upregulated protein spots isolates. Correlations between the bacterial proteomes and their sites of isolation were determined by Principal Component Analysis (PCA using the significantly different protein spots. Out of the 186 variable protein spots, 105 exhibited a serotype-associated pattern of variability. The expression of the remaining 81 protein spots was concluded to be uniquely linked to the site of bacterial isolation. Mass spectrometry was used to identify selected protein spots that showed either constant or differential abundance levels. The identified proteins had a diverse range of functions including, capsule biogenesis, DNA repair, protein deglycation, translation, stress response and virulence as well as amino acid, carbohydrate, lipid and nucleotide metabolism. These findings provide insight on the proteins that contribute towards the adaptation of the bacteria to different sites within the host.

  18. Comparison of invasive and non-invasive blood pressure monitoring during clinical anaesthesia in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, Paul D; Grint, Nicola; Dugdale, Alexandra

    2010-03-01

    Monitoring blood pressure during anaesthesia is widely recommended in man and animals. The accuracy of any device used to measure blood pressure is an important consideration when selecting monitoring equipment, the ANSI/AAMI SP10 standard is widely cited in this respect in recent veterinary publications. Blood pressure was monitored using invasive and non-invasive techniques during clinical anaesthesia in 19 dogs. The results were compared using Bland-Altman analysis. The bias (and limits of agreement) between invasive and non-invasive measurement was 7.1 mmHg (+/-34.7) for systolic blood pressure, -1.8 mmHg (+/-27.4) for mean blood pressure and 6.9 mmHg (+/-27.5) for diastolic blood pressure. In a clinical setting the bias between invasive and non-invasive measurement techniques was similar or smaller than laboratory reports, however the limits of agreement were considerably wider suggesting that care should be exercised when interpreting NIBP values.

  19. Comparison of non-invasive and invasive blood pressure in aeromedical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, N; Hogg, L A; Corfield, A R; Exton, A D

    2012-12-01

    Blood pressure measurement is an essential physiological measurement for all critically ill patients. Previous work has shown that non-invasive blood pressure is not an accurate reflection of invasive blood pressure measurement. In a transport environment, the effects of motion and vibration may make non-invasive blood pressure less accurate. Consecutive critically ill patients transported by a dedicated aeromedical retrieval and critical care transfer service with simultaneous invasive and non-invasive blood pressure measurements were analysed. Two sets of measurements were recorded, first in a hospital environment before departure (pre-flight) and a second during aeromedical transport (in-flight). A total of 56 complete sets of data were analysed. Bland-Altman plots showed limits of agreement (precision) for pre-flight systolic blood pressure were -37.3 mmHg to 30.0 mmHg, and for pre-flight mean arterial pressure -20.5 mmHg to 25.0 mmHg. The limits of agreement for in-flight systolic blood pressure were -40.6 mmHg to 33.1 mmHg, while those for in-flight mean blood pressure in-flight were -23.6 mmHg to 24.6 mmHg. The bias for the four conditions ranged from 0.5 to -3.8 mmHg. There were no significant differences in values between pre-flight and in-flight blood pressure measurements for all categories of blood pressure measurement. Thus, our data show that non-invasive blood pressure is not a precise reflection of invasive intra-arterial blood pressure. Mean blood pressure measured non-invasively may be a better marker of invasive blood pressure than systolic blood pressure. Our data show no evidence of non-invasive blood pressures being less accurate in an aeromedical transport environment. Anaesthesia © 2012 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  20. Brief Report: Improving the Validity of Assessments of Adolescents' Feelings of Privacy Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Robert D.; Marrero, Matthew D.; Melching, Jessica; Kuhn, Emily S.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of privacy invasion have relied on measures that combine items assessing adolescents' feelings of privacy invasion with items assessing parents' monitoring behaviors. Removing items assessing parents' monitoring behaviors may improve the validity of assessments of privacy invasion. Data were collected from 163 adolescents (M age 13 years,…

  1. Non-invasive blood pressure measurement in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Minjie; DiPetrillo, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is a leading cause of heart attack, stroke, and kidney failure and represents a serious medical issue worldwide. The genetic basis of hypertension is well-established, but few causal genes have been identified thus far. Non-invasive blood pressure measurements are a critical component of high-throughput genetic studies to identify genes controlling blood pressure. Whereas this technique is fairly routine for blood pressure measurements in rats, non-invasive blood pressure measurement in mice has proven to be more challenging. This chapter describes an experimental protocol measuring blood pressure in mice using a CODA non-invasive blood pressure monitoring system. This method enables accurate blood pressure phenotyping in mice for linkage or mutagenesis studies, as well as for other experiments requiring high-throughput blood pressure measurement.

  2. Applicability of non-invasively collected matrices for human biomonitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickmilder Marc

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With its inclusion under Action 3 in the Environment and Health Action Plan 2004–2010 of the European Commission, human biomonitoring is currently receiving an increasing amount of attention from the scientific community as a tool to better quantify human exposure to, and health effects of, environmental stressors. Despite the policy support, however, there are still several issues that restrict the routine application of human biomonitoring data in environmental health impact assessment. One of the main issues is the obvious need to routinely collect human samples for large-scale surveys. Particularly the collection of invasive samples from susceptible populations may suffer from ethical and practical limitations. Children, pregnant women, elderly, or chronically-ill people are among those that would benefit the most from non-invasive, repeated or routine sampling. Therefore, the use of non-invasively collected matrices for human biomonitoring should be promoted as an ethically appropriate, cost-efficient and toxicologically relevant alternative for many biomarkers that are currently determined in invasively collected matrices. This review illustrates that several non-invasively collected matrices are widely used that can be an valuable addition to, or alternative for, invasively collected matrices such as peripheral blood sampling. Moreover, a well-informed choice of matrix can provide an added value for human biomonitoring, as different non-invasively collected matrices can offer opportunities to study additional aspects of exposure to and effects from environmental contaminants, such as repeated sampling, historical overview of exposure, mother-child transfer of substances, or monitoring of substances with short biological half-lives.

  3. Non-invasive management of organic impotence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    or 'hard' and 58% the quality of orgasm as 'good' or. 'excellent'. A positive effect of the device on self-image was reported in 47% of patients, while 21 % reported a negative effect. The majority of participants (84%) would recommend the device to others, Le. 88% of diabetics and 82% of non- diabetics. Fifty-eight per cent of ...

  4. Non-invasive reproductive and stress endocrinology in amphibian conservation physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Non-invasive endocrinology utilizes non-invasive biological samples (such as faeces, urine, hair, aquatic media, and saliva) for the quantification of hormones in wildlife. Urinary-based enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and radio-immunoassay have enabled the rapid quantification of reproductive and stress hormones in amphibians (Anura: Amphibia). With minimal disturbance, these methods can be used to assess the ovarian and testicular endocrine functions as well as physiological stress in captive and free-living populations. Non-invasive endocrine monitoring has therefore greatly advanced our knowledge of the functioning of the stress endocrine system (the hypothalamo–pituitary–interrenal axis) and the reproductive endocrine system (the hypothalamo–pituitary–gonadal axis) in the amphibian physiological stress response, reproductive ecology, health and welfare, and survival. Biological (physiological) validation is necessary for obtaining the excretory lag time of hormone metabolites. Urinary-based EIA for the major reproductive hormones, estradiol and progesterone in females and testosterone in males, can be used to track the reproductive hormone profiles in relationship to reproductive behaviour and environmental data in free-living anurans. Urinary-based corticosterone metabolite EIA can be used to assess the sublethal impacts of biological stressors (such as invasive species and pathogenic diseases) as well as anthropogenic induced environmental stressors (e.g. extreme temperatures) on free-living populations. Non-invasive endocrine methods can also assist in the diagnosis of success or failure of captive breeding programmes by measuring the longitudinal patterns of changes in reproductive hormones and corticosterone within captive anurans and comparing the endocrine profiles with health records and reproductive behaviour. This review paper focuses on the reproductive and the stress endocrinology of anurans and demonstrates the uses of non-invasive endocrinology

  5. Biomechanics of subcellular structures by non-invasive Brillouin microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonacci, Giuseppe; Braakman, Sietse

    2016-11-01

    Cellular biomechanics play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of several diseases. Unfortunately, current methods to measure biomechanical properties are invasive and mostly limited to the surface of a cell. As a result, the mechanical behaviour of subcellular structures and organelles remains poorly characterised. Here, we show three-dimensional biomechanical images of single cells obtained with non-invasive, non-destructive Brillouin microscopy with an unprecedented spatial resolution. Our results quantify the longitudinal elastic modulus of subcellular structures. In particular, we found the nucleoli to be stiffer than both the nuclear envelope (p biomechanics and its role in pathophysiology.

  6. Tissue Damage Characterization Using Non-invasive Optical Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, David

    The ability to determine the degree of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue damage is essential for proper wound assessment and a significant factor for determining patient treatment and morbidity. Accurate characterization of tissue damage is critical for a number of medical applications including surgical removal of nonviable tissue, severity assessment of subcutaneous ulcers, and depth assessment of visually open wounds. The main objective of this research was to develop a non-invasive method for identifying the extent of tissue damage underneath intact skin that is not apparent upon visual examination. This work investigated the relationship between tissue optical properties, blood flow, and tissue viability by testing the hypotheses that (a) changes in tissue oxygenation and/or microcirculatory blood flow measurable by Diffuse Near Infrared Spectroscopy (DNIRS) and Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS) differ between healthy and damaged tissue and (b) the magnitude of those changes differs for different degrees of tissue damage. This was accomplished by developing and validating a procedure for measuring microcirculatory blood flow and tissue oxygenation dynamics at multiple depths (up to 1 centimeter) using non-invasive DCS and DNIRS technologies. Due to the lack of pressure ulcer animal models that are compatible with our optical systems, a proof of concept was conducted in a porcine burn model prior to conducting clinical trials in order to assess the efficacy of the system in-vivo. A reduction in total hemoglobin was observed for superficial (5%) and deep burns (35%) along with a statistically significant difference between the optical properties of superficial and deep burns (p measurements correlated with the extent of tissue injury observed in histological stains. After proof of concept in animals, a human study was conducted and optical data was collected from 20 healthy subjects and 8 patients at risk of developing pressure ulcers. Blood flow index (BFI

  7. Comparison between invasive blood pressure and a non-invasive blood pressure monitor in anesthetized sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Daniel; Barletta, Michele; Mathews, Lindsey; Graham, Lynelle; Quandt, Jane

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring blood pressure under general anesthesia in animals is important to prevent hypotension and poor tissue perfusion. Thirteen sheep were enrolled to evaluate the accuracy of the petMAP, a portable non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) monitor. Animals were anesthetized with midazolam, fentanyl, ketamine, propofol and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen for ovariectomy. Invasive and non-invasive (petMAP) blood pressure measurements were recorded simultaneously every 5 minutes. Agreement between IBP and NIBP was assessed by evaluation of bias and 95% limits of agreement (LOA) using the Bland-Altman method and correlation coefficient. None of the measurements met the criteria for good agreement between invasive and non-invasive readings established by the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation. Systolic blood pressure readings obtained at the left thoracic limb site and mean blood pressure at the right pelvic limb site met the bias and LOA criteria established by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Non-invasive electromagnetic measurement of the peripheral pulsatile blood flow: experimental study and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccalon, H J; Candelon, B J; Doll, H G; Puel, P F; Enjalbert, A P

    1978-01-01

    The non-invasive electromagnetic blood flowmeter described in this paper allows us to measure pulsatile flow through a limb. The limb is placed in a magnetic field and the blood flow rate induces electromagnetic forces which are detected at the skin surface with ECG electrodes (Faraday's law). A special computer technique is necessary to isolate the signal from artefacts (local ECG, BCG, EMG). In vitro calibration is performed using a circulatory model and in vivo using mongrel dogs. Its validity is assessed by comparing the results with the responses obtained from the invasive electromagnetic flowmeter. Sources of error in the measurement such as blood composition (Na+, K+), haematocrit (45% to 29%), and venous flow are reported here. The results indicate that the method is reliable, easy to utilise and offers a unique non-invasive way of measuring true pulsatile blood flow rate in humans. Various clinical applications are discussed for possible use of the device.

  9. Mechanical ventilation in emergency departments: Non invasive or invasive mechanical ventilation. Where is the answer?

    OpenAIRE

    Esquinas Rodriguez Antonio M; Cosentini Roberto; Papadakos Peter J

    2012-01-01

    The Emergency Department length of stay for patients requiring mechanical ventilation paper in this issue is very illustrative of many variables that still confound the way we treat patients that may not require endotracheal intubation (ETI) but may benefit from non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) [1].

  10. Non-invasive spectroscopic techniques in the diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakaki, E.; Sianoudis, IA; Zois, EN; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, AA; Dessinioti, C.; Stefanaki, E.; Stratigos, AJ; Antoniou, C.; Katsambas, A.; Christofidou, E.

    2017-11-01

    The number of non-melanoma skin cancers is increasing worldwide and has become an important health and economic issue. Early detection and treatment of skin cancer can significantly improve patient outcome. Therefore there is an increase in the demand for proper management and effective non-invasive diagnostic modalities in order to avoid relapses or unnecessary treatments. Although the gold standard of diagnosis for non-melanoma skin cancers is biopsy followed by histopathology evaluation, optical non-invasive diagnostic tools have obtained increased attention. Emerging non-invasive or minimal invasive techniques with possible application in the diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancers include high-definition optical coherence tomography, fluorescence spectroscopy, oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectrometry among others spectroscopic techniques. Our findings establish how those spectrometric techniques can be used to more rapidly and easily diagnose skin cancer in an accurate and automated manner in the clinic.

  11. A non-invasive prediction model for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in paediatric patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Katharine; Lopez, Rocio; Liccardo, Daniela; Nobili, Valerio; Alkhouri, Naim

    2014-11-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease encompasses a spectrum of diseases that range from simple steatosis to the aggressive form of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis is currently diagnosed through liver biopsy. To develop a non-invasive predictive model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Anthropometric, laboratory, and histologic data were obtained in a cohort of children with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was employed to create a nomogram predicting the risk of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Internal validation was performed by bootstrapping. Three hundred and two children were included in this analysis with a mean age of 12.3 ± 3.1 years, a mean body mass index percentile of 94.3 ± 6.9, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis was present in 67%. Following stepwise variable selection, total cholesterol, waist circumference percentile, and total bilirubin were included as variables in the model, with good discrimination with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.737. A nomogram was constructed with reasonable accuracy that can predict the risk of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. If validated externally, this tool could be utilized as a non-invasive method to diagnose non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Epilepsy surgery in children and non-invasive evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, Kiyotaka; Sawamura, Atsushi; Yoshida, Katsunari; Tsuda, Hiroshige; Tanaka, Tatsuya [Asahikawa Medical Coll., Hokkaido (Japan); Tanaka, Shigeya

    2001-04-01

    The technique of EEG recording using subdural and depth electrodes has became established, and such invasive EEG is available for epilepsy surgery. However, a non-invasive procedure is required for evaluation of surgical indication for epilepsy patients, particular for children. We analyzed the relationship between the results of presurgical evaluation and seizure outcome, and investigated the role of invasive EEG in epilepsy surgery for children. Over the past decade, 22 children under 16 years of age have been admitted to our hospital for evaluation of surgical indication. High-resolution MR imaging, MR spectroscopy, video-EEG monitoring, and ictal and interictal SPECT were used for presurgical evaluation. Organic lesions were found on MR images from 19 patients. Invasive EEG was recorded in only one patient with occipital epilepsy, who had no lesion. Surgical indication was determined in 17 children, and 6 temporal lobe and 11 extratemporal lobe resections were performed under intraoperative electrocorticogram monitoring. The surgical outcome was excellent in 14 patients who had Engel's class I or II. Surgical complications occurred in two children who had visual field defects. The results showed that a good surgical outcome could be obtained using an intraoperative electrocorticogram, without presurgical invasive EEG, for localization-related epilepsy in children. The role of invasive EEG should be reevaluated in such children. (author)

  13. Urinary biomarkers for the non-invasive diagnosis of endometriosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Emily; Nisenblat, Vicki; Farquhar, Cindy; Fraser, Ian; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Johnson, Neil; Hull, M. Louise

    2015-01-01

    About 10% of reproductive-aged women suffer from endometriosis which is a costly chronic disease that causes pelvic pain and subfertility. Laparoscopy is the 'gold standard' diagnostic test for endometriosis, but it is expensive and carries surgical risks. Currently, there are no simple non-invasive

  14. plasma atrial natriuretic peptide as a non-invasive biochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cistvr

    AS A NON-INVASIVE BIOCHEMICAL MARKER OF. DYSPNOEA IN CONGESTIVE HEART ... Clinical evaluation included a resting electrocardiogram and standard chest X-ray. The patients were matched for .... disorders during rest and exercise. European Journal of Clinical Chemistry & Clinical Biochemistry 31 (2), 69-74.

  15. Non-invasive diagnosis and management of ectopic pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mello, N.M.

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis begins with a focus on non-invasive diagnostic methods for ectopic pregnancy. The heterogeneity found in studies on diagnostic tests for ectopic pregnancy has led to an international recommendation on uniform definitions of early pregnancy complications. Hereafter,

  16. Comparison of non-invasive tear film stability measurement techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael Tm; Murphy, Paul J; Blades, Kenneth J; Craig, Jennifer P

    2018-01-01

    Measurement of tear film stability is commonly used to give an indication of tear film quality but a number of non-invasive techniques exists within the clinical setting. This study sought to compare three non-invasive tear film stability measurement techniques: instrument-mounted wide-field white light clinical interferometry, instrument-mounted keratoscopy and hand-held keratoscopy. Twenty-two subjects were recruited in a prospective, randomised, masked, cross-over study. Tear film break-up or thinning time was measured non-invasively by independent experienced examiners, with each of the three devices, in a randomised order, within an hour. Significant correlation was observed between instrument-mounted interferometric and keratoscopic measurements (p 0.05). Tear film stability values obtained from the hand-held device were significantly shorter and demonstrated narrower spread than the other two instruments (all p 0.05). Good clinical agreement exists between the instrument-mounted interferometric and keratoscopic measurements but not between the hand-held device and either of the instrument-mounted techniques. The results highlight the importance of specifying the instrument employed to record non-invasive tear film stability. © 2017 Optometry Australia.

  17. Blood biomarkers for the non-invasive diagnosis of endometriosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nisenblat, Vicki; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Shaikh, Rabia; Farquhar, Cindy; Jordan, Vanessa; Scheffers, Carola S.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Johnson, Neil; Hull, M. Louise

    2016-01-01

    Background About 10% of reproductive-aged women suffer from endometriosis, a costly chronic disease causing pelvic pain and subfertility. Laparoscopy is the gold standard diagnostic test for endometriosis, but is expensive and carries surgical risks. Currently, there are no non-invasive or minimally

  18. Non-invasive terahertz field imaging inside parallel plate waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    We present a non-invasive broadband air photonic method of imaging of the electric field of THz pulses propagating inside a tapered parallel plate waveguide. The method is based on field-enhanced second harmonic generation of the fundamental laser beam in an external electric field. We apply...

  19. Endometrial biomarkers for the non-invasive diagnosis of endometriosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, Devashana; Hull, M. Louise; Fraser, Ian; Miller, Laura; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Johnson, Neil; Nisenblat, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    About 10% of reproductive-aged women suffer from endometriosis, which is a costly, chronic disease that causes pelvic pain and subfertility. Laparoscopy is the gold standard diagnostic test for endometriosis, but it is expensive and carries surgical risks. Currently, there are no non-invasive tests

  20. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation | Giles | Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is a modality of providing airway and pulmonary support in both acute and chronic diseases of the lung. The method of mechanical ventilation without the use of an endotracheal tube was developed over a century ago, but its utility has only been explored recently with advances in technology.

  1. Non-invasive assessment of maternal hemodynamics in early pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, Anne Marijn; Zeeman, Gerda G.; Groen, Henk; Roberts, Claire; Dekker, Gus A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Non-invasive assessment of maternal hemodynamics in early pregnancy may be promising in evaluating maternal hemodynamic (mal)adaptation to pregnancy. We explored usage of applanation tonometry and Doppler ultrasound for assessment of cardiac output (CO), systemic vascular resistance

  2. Eyeblink Conditioning: A Non-Invasive Biomarker for Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany C.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Eyeblink conditioning (EBC) is a classical conditioning paradigm typically used to study the underlying neural processes of learning and memory. EBC has a well-defined neural circuitry, is non-invasive, and can be employed in human infants shortly after birth making it an ideal tool to use in both developing and special populations. In addition,…

  3. Plasma Atrial Natriuretic Peptide as a non-invasive biochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plasma Atrial Natriuretic Peptide as a non-invasive biochemical marker of dyspnoea in congestive heart failure patients. ... University of Mauritius Research Journal ... score assessed by a 10 graded visual analogue scale in the control group (mean score = 1) and an increased from 1.6 to 6.4 in the heart failure patients.

  4. Implementation of non-invasive prenatal testing by semiconductor sequencing in a genetic laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheedene, Annelies; Sante, Tom; De Smet, Matthias; Vanbellinghen, Jean-François; Grisart, Bernard; Vergult, Sarah; Janssens, Sandra; Menten, Björn

    2016-08-01

    To implement non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for fetal aneuploidies with semiconductor sequencing in an academic cytogenomic laboratory and to evaluate the first 15-month experience on clinical samples. We validated a NIPT protocol for cell-free fetal DNA sequencing from maternal plasma for the detection of trisomy 13, 18 and 21 on a semiconductor sequencing instrument. Fetal DNA fraction calculation for all samples and several quality parameters were implemented in the workflow. One thousand eighty-one clinical NIPT samples were analysed, following the described protocol. Non-invasive prenatal testing was successfully implemented and validated on 201 normal and 74 aneuploid samples. From 1081 clinical samples, 17 samples showed an abnormal result: 14 trisomy 21 samples, one trisomy 18 and one trisomy 16 were detected. Also a maternal copy number variation on chromosome 13 was observed, which could potentially lead to a false positive trisomy 13 result. One sex discordant result was reported, possibly attributable to a vanishing twin. Moreover, our combined fetal fraction calculation enabled a more reliable risk estimate for trisomy 13, 18 and 21. Non-invasive prenatal testing for trisomy 21, 18 and 13 has a very high specificity and sensitivity. Because of several biological phenomena, diagnostic invasive confirmation of abnormal results remains required. © 2016 The Authors. Prenatal Diagnosis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 The Authors. Prenatal Diagnosis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. A novel non-invasive blood pressure waveform measuring system compared to Millar applanation tonometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Földi, Sándor; Horváth, Tamás; Zieger, Flóra; Sótonyi, Péter; Cserey, György

    2017-10-04

    The accurate, non-invasive, measuring of the continuous arterial blood pressure waveform faces some difficulties and an innovative blood pressure measurement technology is urgently needed. However, the arterial blood pressure waveform plays an essential role in health care by providing diagnostic information and base for calculating several heart function parameters. The aim of this study is to introduce a novel non-invasive measuring system that can measure the arterial blood pressure waveform with high accuracy in comparison to an applanation tonometry system. The applied measuring device utilizes a new measurement strategy enabled by the OptoForce 3D force sensor, which is attached to the wrist at the radial artery. To validate the accuracy, 30 simultaneous measurements were taken with a Millar tonometer. For the simultaneously recorded non-invasive signals, the similarity was high (the average correlation was [Formula: see text]). The differences in the systolic and the diastolic blood pressure measured by the two systems are small. The average differences ([Formula: see text]) for simultaneously recorded systolic, diastolic, mean arterial and incisura pressures were: [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively. These results satisfy the AAMI criteria. Based on our results, this new system requires further development and validation against invasive arterial blood pressure monitoring in order to prove its usefulness in patient monitoring, emergency care, and pulse diagnosis.

  6. Comparison between invasive and non-invasive blood pressure in young, middle and old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Li, Qiao; Qiu, Peng

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to compare simultaneous invasive and non-invasive blood pressure (IBP and NIBP) measurements in young, middle and old age using the data from the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC II) database. In total, 23,679 blood pressure measurements were extracted from 742 patients, divided into three groups of young, middle and old age. IBP-NIBP differences in systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP) were 0.1 ± 16.5 mmHg/11.0 ± 12.2 mmHg in young age, -2.9 ± 19.8 mmHg/6.9 ± 17.5 mmHg in middle age and -3.2 ± 29.3 mmHg/8.5 ± 19.8 mmHg in old age. The mean and standard deviation (SD) of invasive systolic blood pressure (ISBP)-non-invasive systolic blood pressure (NISBP) differences increased from young to middle then to old age, and the SD of invasive diastolic blood pressure (IDBP)-non-invasive diastolic blood pressure (NIDBP) differences also increased with age. In young, middle and old age, the correlation coefficients were 0.86, 0.79 and 0.53, respectively, between ISBP and NISBP, and 0.78, 0.78 and 0.41 between IDBP and NIDBP. In conclusion, IBP showed good correlation with NIBP in each age category. The agreement between IBP and NIBP measurements was influenced by age category.

  7. Non-invasive multi wavelengths sensorsystem for measuring carboxy-and methemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gewiß Helge

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Standard pulse oximetry only measures the functional derivatives oxyhemoglobin (O2Hb and deoxyhemoglobin (HHb to calculate the arterial oxygenation. However, the two dysfunctional hemoglobin derivatives carboxyhemoglobin (COHb and methemoglobin (MetHb are of much interest. The gold standard detecting abnormal concentration of COHb or MetHb is the blood gas analysis (BGA. In this paper a non-invasive method for measuring these derivatives and a setup for validation is presented.

  8. Non-invasive multi wavelengths sensorsystem for measuring carboxy-and methemoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Gewiß Helge; Timm Ulrich; Kraitl Jens; Brock Beate; Ewald Hartmut

    2017-01-01

    Standard pulse oximetry only measures the functional derivatives oxyhemoglobin (O2Hb) and deoxyhemoglobin (HHb) to calculate the arterial oxygenation. However, the two dysfunctional hemoglobin derivatives carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and methemoglobin (MetHb) are of much interest. The gold standard detecting abnormal concentration of COHb or MetHb is the blood gas analysis (BGA). In this paper a non-invasive method for measuring these derivatives and a setup for validation is presented.

  9. Implementation of non-invasive prenatal testing by semiconductor sequencing in a genetic laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Dheedene, Annelies; SANTE, TOM; De Smet, Matthias; Vanbellinghen, Jean-François; Grisart, Bernard; Vergult, Sarah; Janssens, Sandra; Menten, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To implement non?invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for fetal aneuploidies with semiconductor sequencing in an academic cytogenomic laboratory and to evaluate the first 15?month experience on clinical samples. Methods We validated a NIPT protocol for cell?free fetal DNA sequencing from maternal plasma for the detection of trisomy 13, 18 and 21 on a semiconductor sequencing instrument. Fetal DNA fraction calculation for all samples and several quality parameters were implemen...

  10. Stress detection in bivalve mollusk using non-invasive bioelectric monitoring of myoneural behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, E.L.; Hardison, B.S. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Dept. of Biology; Dawson, V.K.; Waller, D. [National Fisheries Research Center, La Crosse, WI (United States); Waller, W.T.; Dickson, K.L.; Allen, H.J. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States). Inst. of Applied Sciences

    1995-12-31

    Few studies have demonstrated cause-and-effect linkages between extrinsic environmental factors and intrinsic bioelectric action potentials of bivalve mollusk using non-invasive, non-destructive approaches. A non-invasive, external probe configuration and detection system, similar to one used previously with native unionids, was developed for continuously monitoring bioelectric activities of clams and mussels. Using remote probes and differential amplifiers, bioelectric activities were recorded for cardiac, adductor, siphon and foot responses using a computer equipped with integrating software. To test if remote, non-invasive probes would detect similar information to that recorded by invasive needle electrodes, two individuals of zebra mussel (Dreissenia polymorpha), and Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) were each configured with two sets of probes. One set was inserted between the valves and along the inside surface of the shelf; the other set was positioned remotely about the outside margins of the valves. Signal validation was made by simultaneously recording bioelectric responses for the same animal from both sets of probes. In preliminary stress tests monitored bivalves were subjected to changes in temperatures over 2 to 3 hr intervals from ambient to potentially lethal levels (20 to 30 C for zebra, 25 C to 40 C for corbicula). Dramatic increases resulted in both number and amplitude of cardiac events as temperature increased. Planned studies will use this approach to evaluate bivalve myoneural behavior patterns in response to chemical and non-chemical stimuli.

  11. Skin Rejuvenation with Non-Invasive Pulsed Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, Alexander; Khan, Saiqa; Belov, Vasily; Quinn, Kyle P.; Albadawi, Hassan; Felix Broelsch, G.; Watkins, Michael T.; Georgakoudi, Irene; Papisov, Mikhail; Mihm, Martin C., Jr.; Austen, William G., Jr.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-05-01

    Degenerative skin diseases affect one third of individuals over the age of sixty. Current therapies use various physical and chemical methods to rejuvenate skin; but since the therapies affect many tissue components including cells and extracellular matrix, they may also induce significant side effects, such as scarring. Here we report on a new, non-invasive, non-thermal technique to rejuvenate skin with pulsed electric fields. The fields destroy cells while simultaneously completely preserving the extracellular matrix architecture and releasing multiple growth factors locally that induce new cells and tissue growth. We have identified the specific pulsed electric field parameters in rats that lead to prominent proliferation of the epidermis, formation of microvasculature, and secretion of new collagen at treated areas without scarring. Our results suggest that pulsed electric fields can improve skin function and thus can potentially serve as a novel non-invasive skin therapy for multiple degenerative skin diseases.

  12. Skin Rejuvenation with Non-Invasive Pulsed Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, Alexander; Khan, Saiqa; Belov, Vasily; Quinn, Kyle P.; Albadawi, Hassan; Felix Broelsch, G.; Watkins, Michael T.; Georgakoudi, Irene; Papisov, Mikhail; Mihm Jr., Martin C.; Austen Jr., William G.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative skin diseases affect one third of individuals over the age of sixty. Current therapies use various physical and chemical methods to rejuvenate skin; but since the therapies affect many tissue components including cells and extracellular matrix, they may also induce significant side effects, such as scarring. Here we report on a new, non-invasive, non-thermal technique to rejuvenate skin with pulsed electric fields. The fields destroy cells while simultaneously completely preserving the extracellular matrix architecture and releasing multiple growth factors locally that induce new cells and tissue growth. We have identified the specific pulsed electric field parameters in rats that lead to prominent proliferation of the epidermis, formation of microvasculature, and secretion of new collagen at treated areas without scarring. Our results suggest that pulsed electric fields can improve skin function and thus can potentially serve as a novel non-invasive skin therapy for multiple degenerative skin diseases. PMID:25965851

  13. Disease specific characteristics of fetal epigenetic markers for non-invasive prenatal testing of trisomy 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-invasive prenatal testing of trisomy 21 (T21) is being actively investigated using fetal-specific epigenetic markers (EPs) that are present in maternal plasma. Recently, 12 EPs on chromosome 21 were identified based on tissue-specific epigenetic characteristics between placenta and blood, and demonstrated excellent clinical performance in the non-invasive detection of fetal T21. However, the disease-specific epigenetic characteristics of the EPs have not been established. Therefore, we validated the disease-specific epigenetic characteristics of these EPs for use in non-invasive detection of fetal T21. Methods We performed a high-resolution tiling array analysis of human chromosome 21 using a methyl-CpG binding domain-based protein (MBD) method with whole blood samples from non-pregnant normal women, whole blood samples from pregnant normal women, placenta samples of normal fetuses, and placenta samples of T21 fetuses. Tiling array results were validated by bisulfite direct sequencing and qPCR. Results Among 12 EPs, only four EPs were confirmed to be hypermethylated in normal placenta and hypomethylated in blood. One of these four showed a severe discrepancy in the methylation patterns of T21 placenta samples, and another was located within a region of copy number variations. Thus, two EPs were confirmed to be potential fetal-specific markers based on their disease-specific epigenetic characteristics. The array results of these EPs were consisted with the results obtained by bisulfite direct sequencing and qPCR. Moreover, the two EPs were detected in maternal plasma. Conclusions We validated that two EPs have the potential to be fetal-specific EPs which is consistent with their disease-specific epigenetic characteristics. The findings of this study suggest that disease-specific epigenetic characteristics should be considered in the development of fetal-specific EPs for non-invasive prenatal testing of T21. PMID:24397966

  14. Non-invasive monitoring of endocrine status in laboratory primates: methods, guidelines and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heistermann, M.

    2010-11-01

    During the past three decades, non-invasive methods for assessing physiological, in particular endocrine, status have revolutionized almost all areas of primatology, including behavioural ecology, reproductive biology, stress research, conservation and last but not least management of primates in captivity where the technology plays an integral role in assisting the husbandry, breeding and welfare of many species. Non-invasive endocrine methods make use of the fact that hormones circulating in blood are secreted into saliva or deposited in hair and are eliminated from the body via urinary and faecal excretion. The choice of which matrix to use for hormonal assessment depends on a range of factors, including the type of information required, the measurement techniques involved, species differences in hormone metabolism and route of excretion and the practicality of sample collection. However, although sample collection is usually relatively easy, analysing hormones from these non-invasively collected samples is not as easy as many people think, particularly not when dealing with a new species. In this respect, the importance of a careful validation of each technique is essential in order to generate meaningful and accurate results. This paper aims to provide an overview of the available non-invasive endocrine-based methodologies, their relative merits and their potential areas of application for assessing endocrine status in primates, with special reference to captive environments. In addition, general information is given about the most important aspects and caveats researchers have to be aware of when using these methodologies.

  15. [Non-invasive fetal trisomy (NIFTY) test in prenatal diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łaczmańska, Izabela; Stembalska, Agnieszka

    2014-04-01

    NIFTY (Non-invasive Fetal Trisomy Test) is a non-invasive prenatal test which is used for diagnosing fetal trisomy. The test is based on the analysis of cell free fetal DNA (cffDNA) present in the plasma and serum of a pregnant woman. NIFTY allows to detect fetal trisomy of chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y and also X monosomy. Abnormal NIFTY results still need to be verified using other diagnostic techniques. However the sensitivity of NIFTY for trisomy 21, 18 and 13 is estimated at 99%, 97% and 79% respectively with false positive rate for all examined trisomies and X monosomy of test for common trisomies (apart from ultrasound and biochemical tests) in the case of patient anxiety and in situation when the patient does not consent to invasive prenatal diagnostic tests. The sensitivity and specificity of NIFTY will most likely be improved as laboratory methods develop, and after a sufficiently large group of pregnant patients has been tested. Therefore, this test may soon become the primary diagnostic tool for common trisomies, allowing to avoid invasive prenatal testing in this indication. With high probability cffDNA obtained from the serum of pregnant women will also be used with time in the diagnosis of fetal structural chromosomal aberrations and other genetic changes. The aim of our study is to present a new diagnostic method.

  16. Non-Invasive Screening Tools for Down’s Syndrome: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil D. Avent

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Down’s syndrome (DS is the most common genetic cause of developmental delay with an incidence of 1 in 800 live births, and is the predominant reason why women choose to undergo invasive prenatal diagnosis. However, as invasive tests are associated with around a 1% risk of miscarriage new non-invasive tests have been long sought after. Recently, the most promising approach for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD has been provided by the introduction of next generation sequencing (NGS technologies. The clinical application of NIPD for DS detection is not yet applicable, as large scale validation studies in low-risk pregnancies need to be completed. Currently, prenatal screening is still the first line test for the detection of fetal aneuploidy. Screening cannot diagnose DS, but developing a more advanced screening program can help to improve detection rates, and therefore reduce the number of women offered invasive tests. This article describes how the prenatal screening program has developed since the introduction of maternal age as the original “screening” test, and subsequently discusses recent advances in detecting new screening markers with reference to both proteomic and bioinformatic techniques.

  17. Non-Invasive Screening Tools for Down’s Syndrome: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillence, Kelly A.; Madgett, Tracey E.; Roberts, Llinos A.; Overton, Timothy G.; Avent, Neil D.

    2013-01-01

    Down’s syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of developmental delay with an incidence of 1 in 800 live births, and is the predominant reason why women choose to undergo invasive prenatal diagnosis. However, as invasive tests are associated with around a 1% risk of miscarriage new non-invasive tests have been long sought after. Recently, the most promising approach for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) has been provided by the introduction of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. The clinical application of NIPD for DS detection is not yet applicable, as large scale validation studies in low-risk pregnancies need to be completed. Currently, prenatal screening is still the first line test for the detection of fetal aneuploidy. Screening cannot diagnose DS, but developing a more advanced screening program can help to improve detection rates, and therefore reduce the number of women offered invasive tests. This article describes how the prenatal screening program has developed since the introduction of maternal age as the original “screening” test, and subsequently discusses recent advances in detecting new screening markers with reference to both proteomic and bioinformatic techniques. PMID:26835682

  18. Efficient distinction of invasive aquatic plant species from non-invasive related species using DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahramanzadeh, R; Esselink, G; Kodde, L P; Duistermaat, H; van Valkenburg, J L C H; Marashi, S H; Smulders, M J M; van de Wiel, C C M

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions are regarded as threats to global biodiversity. Among invasive aliens, a number of plant species belonging to the genera Myriophyllum, Ludwigia and Cabomba, and to the Hydrocharitaceae family pose a particular ecological threat to water bodies. Therefore, one would try to prevent them from entering a country. However, many related species are commercially traded, and distinguishing invasive from non-invasive species based on morphology alone is often difficult for plants in a vegetative stage. In this regard, DNA barcoding could become a good alternative. In this study, 242 samples belonging to 26 species from 10 genera of aquatic plants were assessed using the chloroplast loci trnH-psbA, matK and rbcL. Despite testing a large number of primer sets and several PCR protocols, the matK locus could not be amplified or sequenced reliably and therefore was left out of the analysis. Using the other two loci, eight invasive species could be distinguished from their respective related species, a ninth one failed to produce sequences of sufficient quality. Based on the criteria of universal application, high sequence divergence and level of species discrimination, the trnH-psbA noncoding spacer was the best performing barcode in the aquatic plant species studied. Thus, DNA barcoding may be helpful with enforcing a ban on trade of such invasive species, such as is already in place in the Netherlands. This will become even more so once DNA barcoding would be turned into machinery routinely operable by a nonspecialist in botany and molecular genetics. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. The promises and perils of non-invasive brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Jan-Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulation promises innovative experimental possibilities for psychology and neuroscience as well as new therapeutic and palliative measures in medicine. Because of its good risk-benefit ratio, non-invasiveness and reversibility as well as its low effort and cost it has good chances of becoming a widespread tool in science, medicine and even in lay use. While most issues in medical and research ethics such as informed consent, safety, and potential for misuse can be handled with manageable effort, the real promise of brain stimulation does raise one prominent moral worry: it may lay the foundation of reliable, precise and stable manipulations of the mind. This article addresses this worry and concludes that it is not the possibility of manipulation, but the shift in our understanding of our mind which stands in need of careful consideration. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Functional morphology underlies performance differences among invasive and non-invasive ruderal Rubus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Joshua S; Yeakley, J Alan

    2013-10-01

    The ability of some introduced plant species to outperform native species under altered resource conditions makes them highly productive in ecosystems with surplus resources. However, ruderal native species are also productive when resources are available. The differences in abundance among invasive and non-invasive ruderal plants may be related to differences in ability to maintain access to or store resources for continual use. For a group of ruderal species in the Pacific Northwest of North America (invasive Rubus armeniacus; non-invasive R. ursinus, R. parviflorus, R. spectabilis, and Rosa nutkana), we sought to determine whether differences in functional morphological traits, especially metrics of water access and storage, were consistent with differences in water conductance and growth rate. We also investigated the changes in these traits in response to abundant vs. limited water availability. Rubus armeniacus had among the largest root systems and cane cross-sectional areas, the lowest cane tissue densities, and the most plastic ratios of leaf area to plant mass and of xylem area to leaf area, often sharing its rank with R. ursinus or Rosa nutkana. These three species had the highest water conductance and relative growth rates, though Rubus armeniacus grew the most rapidly when water was not limited. Our results suggest that water access and storage abilities vary with morphology among the ruderal species investigated, and that these abilities, in combination, are greatest in the invasive. In turn, functional morphological traits allow R. armeniacus to maintain rapid gas exchange rates during the dry summers in its invaded range, conferring on it high productivity.

  1. Non-invasive Mechanic Ventilation During the “Weaning

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Ünsel,; Perihan Ergin Özcan

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Weaning of the patients from mechanical ventilation is a clinically important subject. Recently, applications of non-invasive mechanic ventilation (NIV) are increasing in post extubation respiratory failure. Studies show that NIV is effective in the weaning of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, presenting with hypercapneic respiratory failure and in the attacks of other chronic respiratory failure, but efficacy and reliability in the other patient ...

  2. Applications of fluorescent biosensors for non-invasive glucose monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Bruen, Danielle; Delaney, Colm; Florea, Larisa; Diamond, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a widespread disease, whereby the body is incapable of regulating the metabolism of glucose1. As a result, this disorder leads to severe health effects such as blindness, kidney failure and stroke1-2, where monitoring glucose has proven to prevent some of these undesired side effects. Current monitoring methods for diabetes are either invasive or non-continuous, where Brooks et al have introduced contact lenses, on the cover of ACS Nanomaterials, as a sensing platform for noninvas...

  3. Non-invasive individual methane measurement in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negussie, E; Lehtinen, J; Mäntysaari, P; Bayat, A R; Liinamo, A-E; Mäntysaari, E A; Lidauer, M H

    2017-05-01

    Attempts to lower the environmental footprint of milk production needs a sound understanding of the genetic and nutritional basis of methane (CH4) emissions from the dairy production systems. This in turn requires accurate and reliable techniques for the measurement of CH4 output from individual cows. Many of the available measurement techniques so far are either slow, expensive, labor intensive and are unsuitable for large-scale individual animal measurements. The main objectives of this study were to examine and validate a non-invasive individual cow CH4 measurement system that is based on photoacoustic IR spectroscopy (PAS) technique implemented in a portable gas analysis equipment (F10), referred to as PAS-F10 method and to estimate the magnitude of between-animal variations in CH4 output traits. Data were collected from 115 Nordic Red cows of the Minkiö experimental dairy farm, at the Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke). Records on continuous daily measurements of CH4, milk yield, feed intake and BW measurements over 2 years period were compiled for data analysis. The daily CH4 output was calculated using carbon dioxide as a tracer method. Estimates from the non-invasive PAS-F10 technique were then tested against open-circuit indirect respiration calorimetric chamber measurements and against estimates from other widely used prediction models. Concordance analysis was used to establish agreement between the chamber and PAS-F10 methods. A linear mixed model was used for the analysis of the large continuous data. The daily CH4 output of cows was 555 l/day and ranged from 330 to 800 l/day. Dry matter intake, level of milk production, lactation stage and diurnal variation had significant effects on daily CH4 output. Estimates of the daily CH4 output from PAS-F10 technique compared relatively well with the other techniques. The concordance correlation coefficient between combined weekly CH4 output estimates of PAS-F10 and chamber was 0.84 with lower and

  4. Non-invasive tools for the diagnosis of cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, C; Haenssle, H A

    2017-08-01

    While the excisional biopsy and histological examination of suspicious lesions remains the current gold standard for diagnosing cutaneous melanoma (CM), there is a demand for more objective and non-invasive examination methods that may support clinicians in their decision when to biopsy or not. This review is based on publications and guidelines retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and MEDLINE and focused on non-invasive diagnostic strategies for detecting melanoma. Ten different non-invasive techniques were compared with regard to applicability, status of development, and resources necessary for introduction into clinical routine (dermoscopy, sequential digital dermoscopy, total body photography, computer-aided multispectral digital analysis, electrical impedance spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, reflectance confocal microscopy, multiphoton tomography, stepwise two-photon-laser spectroscopy, quantitative dynamic infrared imaging). In an effort to create a classification based on our analyses, we suggest to differentiate i) tools for screening of patients in daily clinical routine, ii) tools for examination of a restricted number of preselected lesions that produce an automated diagnostic score, iii) tools for examination of a restricted number of preselected lesions at specialized centers requiring extensive training, iv) devices at an experimental stage of development. None of the discussed examination techniques is able to provide a definite and final diagnosis or to completely replace the histopathological examination. Up to date, the need for fully automated devices offering a complete skin cancer screening has not been satisfied. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Benefits of Manometer in Non-Invasive Ventilatory Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerda, Rodrigo Silva; de Lima, Fernando Cesar Anastácio; Bastos, Leonardo Pereira; Fardin Vinco, Anderson; Schneider, Felipe Britto Azevedo; Luduvico Coelho, Yves; Fernandes, Heitor Gomes Costa; Bacalhau, João Marcus Ramos; Bermudes, Igor Matheus Simonelli; da Silva, Claudinei Ferreira; da Silva, Luiza Paterlini; Pezato, Rogério

    2017-12-01

    Introduction Effective ventilation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is essential to reduce morbidity and mortality rates in cardiac arrest. Hyperventilation during CPR reduces the efficiency of compressions and coronary perfusion. Problem How could ventilation in CPR be optimized? The objective of this study was to evaluate non-invasive ventilator support using different devices. The study compares the regularity and intensity of non-invasive ventilation during simulated, conventional CPR and ventilatory support using three distinct ventilation devices: a standard manual resuscitator, with and without airway pressure manometer, and an automatic transport ventilator. Student's t-test was used to evaluate statistical differences between groups. P values support and CPR was significantly increased in the group with manual resuscitator without manometer when compared with the manual resuscitator with manometer support (MS) group or automatic ventilator (AV) group. The study recommends for ventilatory support the use of a manual resuscitator equipped with MS or AVs, due to the risk of reduction in coronary perfusion pressure and iatrogenic thoracic injury during hyperventilation found using manual resuscitator without manometer. Lacerda RS , de Lima FCA , Bastos LP , Vinco AF , Schneider FBA , Coelho YL , Fernandes HGC , Bacalhau JMR , Bermudes IMS , da Silva CF , da Silva LP , Pezato R . Benefits of manometer in non-invasive ventilatory support. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(6):615-620.

  6. Non-invasive wearable electrochemical sensors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandodkar, Amay J; Wang, Joseph

    2014-07-01

    Wearable sensors have garnered considerable recent interest owing to their tremendous promise for a plethora of applications. Yet the absence of reliable non-invasive chemical sensors has greatly hindered progress in the area of on-body sensing. Electrochemical sensors offer considerable promise as wearable chemical sensors that are suitable for diverse applications owing to their high performance, inherent miniaturization, and low cost. A wide range of wearable electrochemical sensors and biosensors has been developed for real-time non-invasive monitoring of electrolytes and metabolites in sweat, tears, or saliva as indicators of a wearer's health status. With continued innovation and attention to key challenges, such non-invasive electrochemical sensors and biosensors are expected to open up new exciting avenues in the field of wearable wireless sensing devices and body-sensor networks, and thus find considerable use in a wide range of personal health-care monitoring applications, as well as in sport and military applications. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Fungal invasion of normally non-phagocytic host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott G Filler

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Many fungi that cause invasive disease invade host epithelial cells during mucosal and respiratory infection, and subsequently invade endothelial cells during hematogenous infection. Most fungi invade these normally non-phagocytic host cells by inducing their own uptake. Candida albicans hyphae interact with endothelial cells in vitro by binding to N-cadherin on the endothelial cell surface. This binding induces rearrangement of endothelial cell microfilaments, which results in the endocytosis of the organism. The capsule of Cryptococcus neoformans is composed of glucuronoxylomannan, which binds specifically to brain endothelial cells, and appears to mediate both adherence and induction of endocytosis. The mechanisms by which other fungal pathogens induce their own uptake are largely unknown. Some angioinvasive fungi, such as Aspergillus species and the Zygomycetes, invade endothelial cells from the abluminal surface during the initiation of invasive disease, and subsequently invade the luminal surface of endothelial cells during hematogenous dissemination. Invasion of normally non-phagocytic host cells has different consequences, depending on the type of invading fungus. Aspergillus fumigatus blocks apoptosis of pulmonary epithelial cells, whereas Paracoccidioides brasiliensis induces apoptosis of epithelial cells. This review summarizes the mechanisms by which diverse fungal pathogens invade normally non-phagocytic host cells and discusses gaps in our knowledge that provide opportunities for future research.

  8. Non-native plant invasions of United States National parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J.A.; Brown, C.S.; Stohlgren, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    The United States National Park Service was created to protect and make accessible to the public the nation's most precious natural resources and cultural features for present and future generations. However, this heritage is threatened by the invasion of non-native plants, animals, and pathogens. To evaluate the scope of invasions, the USNPS has inventoried non-native plant species in the 216 parks that have significant natural resources, documenting the identity of non-native species. We investigated relationships among non-native plant species richness, the number of threatened and endangered plant species, native species richness, latitude, elevation, park area and park corridors and vectors. Parks with many threatened and endangered plants and high native plant species richness also had high non-native plant species richness. Non-native plant species richness was correlated with number of visitors and kilometers of backcountry trails and rivers. In addition, this work reveals patterns that can be further explored empirically to understand the underlying mechanisms. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008.

  9. Structural lung changes, lung function, and non-invasive inflammatory markers in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robroeks, Charlotte M H H T; Roozeboom, Marieke H; de Jong, Pim A; Tiddens, Harm A W M; Jöbsis, Quirijn; Hendriks, Han J; Yntema, Jan-Bart L; Brackel, Hein L; van Gent, Rene; Robben, Simon; Dompeling, Edward

    2010-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by chronic airway inflammation and recurrent infections, resulting in (ir)reversible structural lung changes and a progressive decline in lung function. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between non-invasive inflammatory markers (IM) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), lung function indices and structural lung changes, visualized by high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans in CF. In 34 CF patients, lung function indices (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity [FVC], residual volume, and total lung capacity [TLC]) and non-invasive IM (exhaled nitric oxide, and condensate acidity, nitrate, nitrite, 8-isoprostane, hydrogen peroxide, interferon-gamma) were assessed. HRCT scans were scored in a standardized and validated way, a composite score and component scores were calculated. In general, the correlations between non-invasive IM and structural lung changes, and between IM and lung function were low (correlation coefficients <0.40). Patients with positive sputum Pseudomonas cultures had higher EBC nitrite levels and higher parenchymal HRCT subscores than patients with Pseudomonas-negative cultures (p < 0.05). Multiple linear regression models demonstrated that FVC was significantly predicted by hydrogen peroxide in EBC, and the scores of bronchiectasis and mosaic perfusion (Pearson correlation coefficient R = 0.78, p < 0.001). TLC was significantly predicted by 8-isoprostane, nitrate, hydrogen peroxide in EBC, and the mucous plugging subscore (R = 0.92, p < 0.01). Static and dynamic lung function indices in this CF group were predicted by the combination of non-invasive IM in EBC and structural lung changes on HRCT imaging. Future longitudinal studies should reveal whether non-invasive monitoring of airway inflammation in CF adds to better follow-up of patients.

  10. Differences in cap formation between invasive Entamoeba histolytica and non-invasive Entamoeba dispar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Talamás-Rohana, Patricia; Castañón, Guadalupe; Salazar-Villatoro, Lizbeth; Hernández-Ramírez, Verónica; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2012-07-01

    The rapid redistribution of surface antigen-antibody complexes in trophozoites of the human protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, in a process known as capping, has been considered as a means of the parasite to evade the host immune response. So far, capping has been documented in the invasive E. histolytica, whereas the mobility of surface components in the non-invasive Entamoeba dispar is not known. E. dispar does not induce liver lesions in rodent experimental models, in contrast to the liver abscesses produced by E. histolytica in the same animal model. We have therefore analyzed the mobility of surface receptors to the lectin concanavalin A and of Rab11, a membrane-associated protein, in both species of Entamoebae by confocal fluorescence microscopy and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The great majority of E. histolytica trophozoites became morphologically polarized through the formation of well-defined caps at the posterior pole of the parasite. Actin colocalized with the lectin caps. Antibodies against the membrane protein Rab 11 also produced capping. In striking contrast, in E. dispar, the mobility of concanavalin A surface receptors was restricted to the formation of irregular surface patches that did no progress to constitute well-defined caps. Also, anti-Rab 11 antibodies did not result in capping in E. dispar. Whether the failure of E. dispar to efficiently mobilize surface molecules in response to lectin or antibodies as shown in the present results is related to its non-invasive character represents an interesting hypothesis requiring further analysis.

  11. Clinical role of non-invasive assessment of portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognesi, Massimo; Di Pascoli, Marco; Sacerdoti, David

    2017-01-07

    Measurement of portal pressure is pivotal in the evaluation of patients with liver cirrhosis. The measurement of the hepatic venous pressure gradient represents the reference method by which portal pressure is estimated. However, it is an invasive procedure that requires significant hospital resources, including experienced staff, and is associated with considerable cost. Non-invasive methods that can be reliably used to estimate the presence and the degree of portal hypertension are urgently needed in clinical practice. Biochemical and morphological parameters have been proposed for this purpose, but have shown disappointing results overall. Splanchnic Doppler ultrasonography and the analysis of microbubble contrast agent kinetics with contrast-enhanced ultrasonography have shown better accuracy for the evaluation of patients with portal hypertension. A key advancement in the non-invasive evaluation of portal hypertension has been the introduction in clinical practice of methods able to measure stiffness in the liver, as well as stiffness/congestion in the spleen. According to the data published to date, it appears to be possible to rule out clinically significant portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis (i.e., hepatic venous pressure gradient ≥ 10 mmHg) with a level of clinically-acceptable accuracy by combining measurements of liver stiffness and spleen stiffness along with Doppler ultrasound evaluation. It is probable that the combination of these methods may also allow for the identification of patients with the most serious degree of portal hypertension, and ongoing research is helping to ensure progress in this field.

  12. Non-invasive measurments of intense relativistic electron beam size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekdahl, Carl; McCuistian, Trent; Moir, David; Rodriguez, Patrick; Broste, William; Johnson, Jeff

    2000-10-01

    To understand relativistic electron beam transport dynamics the size of the beam is often measured using invasive techniques such as imaging the Cerenkov or OTR light emitted from a screen inserted into the beam. These techniques would completely disrupt the DARHT 2 beam, so we are developing a non-invasive method using diamagnetic loops. We show that through conservation of canonical angular momentum the RMS radius of the beam can be found by measuring the magnetic flux excluded by the diamagnetic beam. Furthermore, this measurement is shown to be independent of the details of the beam radial current profile for DARHT 2 parameters. We present results from our test and calibration experiments, as well as results of beam radius measurements on the 20-MeV DARHT 1 accelerator.

  13. [Non-invasive prenatal testing: challenges for future implementation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Lidewij; Page-Chrisiaens, G C M L Lieve; Oepkes, Dick

    2015-01-01

    The non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT) is an accurate and safe test in which blood from the pregnant woman is used to investigate if the unborn child possibly has trisomy 21 (Down's syndrome), trisomy 18 (Edwards' syndrome) or trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome). Since April 2014 the NIPT has been available in the Netherlands as part of the TRIDENT implementation project for those in whom the first trimester combined test showed an elevated risk (> 1:200) of trisomy, or on medical indication, as an alternative to chorionic villous sampling or amniocentesis. Since the introduction of the NIPT the use of these invasive tests, which are associated with a risk of miscarriage, has fallen steeply. The NIPT may replace the combined test. Also the number of conditions that is tested for can be increased. Modification of current prenatal screening will require extensive discussion, but whatever the modification, careful counseling remains essential to facilitate pregnant women's autonomous reproductive decision making.

  14. Non-invasive prenatal testing: ethics and policy considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanstone, Meredith; King, Carol; de Vrijer, Barbra; Nisker, Jeff

    2014-06-01

    New technologies analyzing fetal DNA in maternal blood have led to the wide commercial availability of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). We present here for clinicians the ethical and policy issues related to an emerging practice option. Although NIPT presents opportunities for pregnant women, particularly women who are at increased risk of having a baby with an abnormality or who are otherwise likely to access invasive prenatal testing, NIPT brings significant ethics and policy challenges. The ethical issues include multiple aspects of informed decision-making, such as access to counselling about the possible results of the test in advance of making a decision about participation in NIPT. Policy considerations include issues related to offering and promoting a privately available medical strategy in publicly funded institutions. Ethics and policy considerations merge in NIPT with regard to sex selection and support for persons living with disabilities.

  15. MicroRNA and protein profiles in invasive versus non-invasive oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korvala, Johanna, E-mail: johanna.korvala@oulu.fi [Cancer and Translational Medicine Research Unit, University of Oulu, The Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu University Hospital, Aapistie 5A, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Jee, Kowan [Department of Pathology, University of Turku, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Department of Pathology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Porkola, Emmi [Cancer and Translational Medicine Research Unit, University of Oulu, The Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu University Hospital, Aapistie 5A, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Almangush, Alhadi [Department of Pathology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Mosakhani, Neda [Department of Pathology, HUSLAB, Helsinki (Finland); Bitu, Carolina [Cancer and Translational Medicine Research Unit, University of Oulu, The Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu University Hospital, Aapistie 5A, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Cervigne, Nilva K. [Department of Oral Diagnosis, School of Dentistry, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Av. Limeira, 901 – Bairro Areião, CEP: 13414-903 Piracicaba, São Paulo (Brazil); Department of Clinical and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine of Jundiai - FMJ, Jundiai, SP (Brazil); Zandonadi, Flávia S.; Meirelles, Gabriela V.; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes [Laboratório Nacional de Biociências, LNBio, CNPEM, Rua Giuseppe Máximo Scolfaro, 10.000, Polo II de Alta Tecnologia de Campinas, Campinas/SP, P.O.Box 6192, CEP 13083-970 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Coletta, Ricardo D. [Department of Oral Diagnosis, School of Dentistry, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Av. Limeira, 901 – Bairro Areião, CEP: 13414-903 Piracicaba, São Paulo (Brazil); and others

    2017-01-01

    Complex molecular pathways regulate cancer invasion. This study overviewed proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) invasion. The human highly aggressive OTSCC cell line HSC-3 was examined in a 3D organotypic human leiomyoma model. Non-invasive and invasive cells were laser-captured and protein expression was analyzed using mass spectrometry-based proteomics and miRNA expression by microarray. In functional studies the 3D invasion assay was replicated after silencing candidate miRNAs, miR-498 and miR-940, in invasive OTSCC cell lines (HSC-3 and SCC-15). Cell migration, proliferation and viability were also studied in the silenced cells. In HSC-3 cells, 67 proteins and 53 miRNAs showed significant fold-changes between non-invasive vs. invasive cells. Pathway enrichment analyses allocated “Focal adhesion” and “ECM-receptor interaction” as most important for invasion. Significantly, in HSC-3 cells, miR-498 silencing decreased the invasion area and miR-940 silencing reduced invasion area and depth. Viability, proliferation and migration weren’t significantly affected. In SCC-15 cells, down-regulation of miR-498 significantly reduced invasion and migration. This study shows HSC-3 specific miRNA and protein expression in invasion, and suggests that miR-498 and miR-940 affect invasion in vitro, the process being more influenced by mir-940 silencing in aggressive HSC-3 cells than in the less invasive SCC-15.

  16. MicroRNA and protein profiles in invasive versus non-invasive oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korvala, Johanna; Jee, Kowan; Porkola, Emmi; Almangush, Alhadi; Mosakhani, Neda; Bitu, Carolina; Cervigne, Nilva K; Zandonadi, Flávia S; Meirelles, Gabriela V; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Coletta, Ricardo D; Leivo, Ilmo; Salo, Tuula

    2017-01-01

    Complex molecular pathways regulate cancer invasion. This study overviewed proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) invasion. The human highly aggressive OTSCC cell line HSC-3 was examined in a 3D organotypic human leiomyoma model. Non-invasive and invasive cells were laser-captured and protein expression was analyzed using mass spectrometry-based proteomics and miRNA expression by microarray. In functional studies the 3D invasion assay was replicated after silencing candidate miRNAs, miR-498 and miR-940, in invasive OTSCC cell lines (HSC-3 and SCC-15). Cell migration, proliferation and viability were also studied in the silenced cells. In HSC-3 cells, 67 proteins and 53 miRNAs showed significant fold-changes between non-invasive vs. invasive cells. Pathway enrichment analyses allocated "Focal adhesion" and "ECM-receptor interaction" as most important for invasion. Significantly, in HSC-3 cells, miR-498 silencing decreased the invasion area and miR-940 silencing reduced invasion area and depth. Viability, proliferation and migration weren't significantly affected. In SCC-15 cells, down-regulation of miR-498 significantly reduced invasion and migration. This study shows HSC-3 specific miRNA and protein expression in invasion, and suggests that miR-498 and miR-940 affect invasion in vitro, the process being more influenced by mir-940 silencing in aggressive HSC-3 cells than in the less invasive SCC-15. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Liver breath tests non-invasively predict higher stages of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portincasa, Piero; Grattagliano, Ignazio; Lauterburg, Bernhard H.; Palmieri, Vincenzo O.; Palasciano, Giuseppe; Stellaard, Frans

    Effectively assessing subtle hepatic metabolic functions by novel non-invasive tests might be of clinical utility in scoring NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) and in identifying altered metabolic pathways. The present study was conducted on 39 (20 lean and 19 obese) hypertransaminasemic

  18. Non-Invasive Monitoring of Cardiac Output in Critical Care Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee S. Nguyen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Critically ill patients require close hemodynamic monitoring to titrate treatment on a regular basis. It allows administering fluid with parsimony and adjusting inotropes and vasoactive drugs when necessary. Although invasive monitoring is considered as the reference method, non-invasive monitoring presents the obvious advantage of being associated with fewer complications, at the expanse of accuracy, precision, and step-response change. A great many methods and devices are now used over the world, and this article focuses on several of them, providing with a brief review of related underlying physical principles and validation articles analysis. Reviewed methods include electrical bioimpedance and bioreactance, respiratory-derived cardiac output (CO monitoring technique, pulse wave transit time, ultrasound CO monitoring, multimodal algorithmic estimation, and inductance thoracocardiography. Quality criteria with which devices were reviewed included: accuracy (closeness of agreement between a measurement value and a true value of the measured, precision (closeness of agreement between replicate measurements on the same or similar objects under specified conditions, and step response change (delay between physiological change and its indication. Our conclusion is that the offer of non-invasive monitoring has improved in the past few years, even though further developments are needed to provide clinicians with sufficiently accurate devices for routine use, as alternative to invasive monitoring devices.

  19. Instrumentation for Non-Invasive Assessment of Cardiovascular Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    It is critically important to be able to assess alterations in cardiovascular regulation during and after space flight. We propose to develop an instrument for the non-invasive assessment of such alterations that can be used on the ground and potentially during space flight. This instrumentation would be used by the Cardiovascular Alterations Team at multiple sites for the study of the effects of space flight on the cardiovascular system and the evaluation of countermeasures. In particular, the Cardiovascular Alterations Team will use this instrumentation in conjunction with ground-based human bed-rest studies and during application of acute stresses e.g., tilt, lower body negative pressure, and exercise. In future studies, the Cardiovascular Alterations Team anticipates using this instrumentation to study astronauts before and after space flight and ultimately, during space flight. The instrumentation may also be used by the Bone Demineralization/Calcium Metabolism Team, the Neurovestibular Team and the Human Performance Factors, Sleep and Chronobiology Team to measure changes in autonomic nervous function. The instrumentation will be based on a powerful new technology - cardiovascular system identification (CSI) - which has been developed in our laboratory. CSI provides a non-invasive approach for the study of alterations in cardiovascular regulation. This approach involves the analysis of second-to-second fluctuations in physiologic signals such as heart rate and non-invasively measured arterial blood pressure in order to characterize quantitatively the physiologic mechanisms responsible for the couplings between these signals. Through the characterization of multiple physiologic mechanisms, CSI provides a closed-loop model of the cardiovascular regulatory state in an individual subject.

  20. Infrared thermography: A non-invasive window into thermal physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Glenn J

    2016-12-01

    Infrared thermography is a non-invasive technique that measures mid to long-wave infrared radiation emanating from all objects and converts this to temperature. As an imaging technique, the value of modern infrared thermography is its ability to produce a digitized image or high speed video rendering a thermal map of the scene in false colour. Since temperature is an important environmental parameter influencing animal physiology and metabolic heat production an energetically expensive process, measuring temperature and energy exchange in animals is critical to understanding physiology, especially under field conditions. As a non-contact approach, infrared thermography provides a non-invasive complement to physiological data gathering. One caveat, however, is that only surface temperatures are measured, which guides much research to those thermal events occurring at the skin and insulating regions of the body. As an imaging technique, infrared thermal imaging is also subject to certain uncertainties that require physical modelling, which is typically done via built-in software approaches. Infrared thermal imaging has enabled different insights into the comparative physiology of phenomena ranging from thermogenesis, peripheral blood flow adjustments, evaporative cooling, and to respiratory physiology. In this review, I provide background and guidelines for the use of thermal imaging, primarily aimed at field physiologists and biologists interested in thermal biology. I also discuss some of the better known approaches and discoveries revealed from using thermal imaging with the objective of encouraging more quantitative assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Non-invasive Mechanic Ventilation During the “Weaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Ünsel,

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Weaning of the patients from mechanical ventilation is a clinically important subject. Recently, applications of non-invasive mechanic ventilation (NIV are increasing in post extubation respiratory failure. Studies show that NIV is effective in the weaning of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, presenting with hypercapneic respiratory failure and in the attacks of other chronic respiratory failure, but efficacy and reliability in the other patient group is limited. NIV must be applied by the experienced team in the selected patient group.

  2. PEEP in non invasive ventilatory treatment of worsened BPCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Lari

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory failure due to exacerbation of chronic pulmonary disease is usually treated with bilevel pressure non invasive ventilation. An high inspiratory pressure is used to improve tidal volume, a lower expiratory pressure is used to neutralize end expiratory positive pressure of patient (PEEPi caused by flow limitation and airway trapping. When ventilators for bilevel pressure ventilation are not available, is useful to administer to patient an external low (5cmH2O positive pressure with simple CPAP systems (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, such as Venturi like flow generator largely available and well known everywhere.

  3. Non-invasive Optical Biosensor for Probing Cell Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Fang

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell signaling mediated through a cellular target is encoded by spatial andtemporal dynamics of downstream signaling networks. The coupling of temporal dynamicswith spatial gradients of signaling activities guides cellular responses upon stimulation.Monitoring the integration of cell signaling in real time, if realized, would provide a newdimension for understanding cell biology and physiology. Optical biosensors includingresonant waveguide grating (RWG biosensor manifest a physiologically relevant andintegrated cellular response related to dynamic redistribution of cellular matters, thusproviding a non-invasive means for cell signaling study. This paper reviews recentprogresses in biosensor instrumentation, and theoretical considerations and potentialapplications of optical biosensors for whole cell sensing.

  4. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, M W; Steven, M H; Phillips, G D; Branthwaite, M A

    1990-01-01

    The value of mechanical ventilation using intermittent positive pressure ventilation delivered non-invasively by nasal mask was assessed in six patients with life threatening exacerbations of chronic respiratory disease. Median (range) arterial oxygen and carbon dioxide tensions were 4.4 (3.5-7.2) kPa and 8.7 (5.5-10.9) kPa respectively, with four patients breathing air and two controlled concentrations of oxygen. The arterial oxygen tension increased with mechanical ventilation to a median (...

  5. Etiske utfordringer med non-invasive prenatale tester (NIPT)

    OpenAIRE

    Bjørn Hofmann

    2014-01-01

    Analyser av cellefritt DNA fra foster i gravide kvinners blod gir nye muligheter innen fosterdiagnostikk: Testene er bedre enn eksisterende tester, de reduserer risikoen og er billigere. Flere land har tatt i bruk disse testene, og Helsedirektoratet i Norge har mottatt søknad om å ta i bruk en test som erstatter tidlig ultralyd og blodprøver. Likevel nøler norske myndigheter. Hvorfor gjør de det? Ett av svarene er at non-invasive prenatale tester fører med seg en rekke faglige og moralske spø...

  6. [Evolution of non-invasive ventilation in acute bronchiolitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo del Castillo, B; Fernández Lafever, S N; López Sanguos, C; Díaz-Chirón Sánchez, L; Sánchez da Silva, M; López-Herce Cid, J

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the evolution, over a12-year period, of the use of non-invasive (NIV) and invasive ventilation (IV) in children admitted to a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) due to acute bronchiolitis. A retrospective observational study was performed including all children who were admitted to the PICU requiring NIV or IV between 2001 and 2012. Demographic characteristics, ventilation assistance and clinical outcome were analysed. A comparison was made between the first six years and the last 6 years of the study. A total of 196 children were included; 30.1% of the subjects required IV and 93.3% required NIV. The median duration of IV was 9.5 days and NIV duration was 3 days. The median PICU length of stay was 7 days, and 2% of the patients died. The use of NIV increased from 79.4% in first period to 100% in the second period (P<.0001) and IV use decreased from 46% in first period to 22.6% in the last 6 years (P<.0001). Continuous positive airway pressure and nasopharyngeal tube were the most frequently used modality and interface, although the use of bi-level non-invasive ventilation (P<.001) and of nasal cannulas significantly increased (P<.0001) in the second period, and the PICU length of stay was shorter (P=.011). The increasing use of NIV in bronchiolitis in our PICU during the last 12 years was associated with a decrease in the use of IV and length of stay in the PICU. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Non-invasive prediction of hematocrit levels by portable visible and near-infrared spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Kato, Yukiko Hakariya; Kuratsune, Hirohiko; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2009-10-01

    After blood donation, in some individuals having polycythemia, dehydration causes anemia. Although the hematocrit (Ht) level is closely related to anemia, the current method of measuring Ht is performed after blood drawing. Furthermore, the monitoring of Ht levels contributes to a healthy life. Therefore, a non-invasive test for Ht is warranted for the safe donation of blood and good quality of life. A non-invasive procedure for the prediction of hematocrit levels was developed on the basis of a chemometric analysis of visible and near-infrared (Vis-NIR) spectra of the thumbs using portable spectrophotometer. Transmittance spectra in the 600- to 1100-nm region from thumbs of Japanese volunteers were subjected to a partial least squares regression (PLSR) analysis and leave-out cross-validation to develop chemometric models for predicting Ht levels. Ht levels of masked samples predicted by this model from Vis-NIR spectra provided a coefficient of determination in prediction of 0.6349 with a standard error of prediction of 3.704% and a detection limit in prediction of 17.14%, indicating that the model is applicable for normal and abnormal value in Ht level. These results suggest portable Vis-NIR spectrophotometer to have potential for the non-invasive measurement of Ht levels with a combination of PLSR analysis.

  8. Non-invasive Markers of Liver Fibrosis: Adjuncts or Alternatives to Liver Biopsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jun L; Pavlides, Michael; Moolla, Ahmad; Ryan, John D

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis reflects sustained liver injury often from multiple, simultaneous factors. Whilst the presence of mild fibrosis on biopsy can be a reassuring finding, the identification of advanced fibrosis is critical to the management of patients with chronic liver disease. This necessity has lead to a reliance on liver biopsy which itself is an imperfect test and poorly accepted by patients. The development of robust tools to non-invasively assess liver fibrosis has dramatically enhanced clinical decision making in patients with chronic liver disease, allowing a rapid and informed judgment of disease stage and prognosis. Should a liver biopsy be required, the appropriateness is clearer and the diagnostic yield is greater with the use of these adjuncts. While a number of non-invasive liver fibrosis markers are now used in routine practice, a steady stream of innovative approaches exists. With improvement in the reliability, reproducibility and feasibility of these markers, their potential role in disease management is increasing. Moreover, their adoption into clinical trials as outcome measures reflects their validity and dynamic nature. This review will summarize and appraise the current and novel non-invasive markers of liver fibrosis, both blood and imaging based, and look at their prospective application in everyday clinical care.

  9. From promise to practice: pairing non-invasive sampling with genomics in conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Russello

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Conservation genomics has become an increasingly popular term, yet it remains unclear whether the non-invasive sampling that is essential for many conservation-related studies is compatible with the minimum requirements for harnessing next-generation sequencing technologies. Here, we evaluated the feasibility of using genotyping-by-sequencing of non-invasively collected hair samples to simultaneously identify and genotype single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in a climate-sensitive mammal, the American pika (Ochotona princeps. We identified and genotyped 3,803 high-confidence SNPs across eight sites distributed along two elevational transects using starting DNA amounts as low as 1 ng. Fifty-five outlier loci were detected as candidate gene regions under divergent selection, constituting potential targets for future validation. Genome-wide estimates of gene diversity significantly and positively correlated with elevation across both transects, with all low elevation sites exhibiting significant heterozygote deficit likely due to inbreeding. More broadly, our results highlight a range of issues that must be considered when pairing genomic data collection with non-invasive sampling, particularly related to field sampling protocols for minimizing exogenous DNA, data collection strategies and quality control steps for enhancing target organism yield, and analytical approaches for maximizing cost-effectiveness and information content of recovered genomic data.

  10. Intravesical chemotherapy in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima P Porten

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC is characterized by a tendency for recurrence and capacity for progression. Intravesical instillation therapy has been employed in various clinical settings, which are summarized within this review. Several chemotherapeutic agents have shown clinical efficacy in reducing recurrence rates in the post-transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT setting, including mitomycin C (MMC, doxorubicin, and epirubicin. Mounting evidence also supports the use of intravesical MMC following nephroureterectomy to reduce later urothelial bladder recurrence. In the adjuvant setting, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG immunotherapy is an established first-line agent in the management of carcinoma in situ (CIS and high-grade non muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma (UC. Among high and intermediate-risk patients (based on tumor grade, size, and focality improvements in disease-free intervals have been seen with adjunctive administration of MMC prior to scheduled BCG dosing. Following failure of first-line intravesical therapy, gemcitabine and valrubicin have demonstrated modest activity, though valrubicin remains the only agent currently Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved for the treatment of BCG-refractory CIS. Techniques to optimize intravesical chemotherapy delivery have also been explored including pharmacokinetic methods such as urinary alkalization and voluntary dehydration. Chemohyperthermia and electromotive instillation have been associated with improved freedom from recurrence intervals but may be associated with increased urinary toxicity. Improvements in therapeutic selection may be heralded by novel opportunities for genomic profiling and refinements in clinical risk stratification.

  11. Use of Doppler ultrasound for non-invasive urodynamic diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Ozawa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A totally non-invasive transperineal urodynamic technique using Doppler ultrasonography has been developed. Methods: Since normal urine does not have blood cells, urine was thought not to produce the Doppler effects. However, basic studies confirmed that the decrease of pressure at high velocity (Bernouilli effect caused dissolved gas to form microbubbles, which are detected by Doppler ultrasonography. Subjects sat and the probe was advanced via remote control to achieve gentle contact with the perineal skin. The digital uroflow data signals and the color Doppler ultrasound video images were processed on a personal computer. The flow-velocity curves from two sites; the distal prostatic urethra just above the external sphincter (V1 and the sphincteric urethra (V2 were plotted against time. The parameters of both the pressure-flow studies and the Doppler ultrasound urodynamic studies were compared in men who had various degrees of obstruction. Results: Functional cross-sectional area at prostatic urethra (A1, calculated by Q max /V1, was lower in the group of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO vs. control group. Velocity ratio (VR, which was calculated by V1/V2, was the parameter having the best correlation with BOO index, though A1 had a similar correlation. This method is viable to diagnose the degree of BOO. Conclusions: The development of non-invasive Doppler ultrasound videourodynamics (Doppler UDS will dramatically expand the information on voiding function.

  12. Non-invasive assessment of the liver using imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorling Thompson, Camilla; Wang, Haolu; Liu, Xin; Liang, Xiaowen; Crawford, Darrell H.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2016-12-01

    Chronic liver disease causes 2,000 deaths in Australia per year and early diagnosis is crucial to avoid progression to cirrhosis and end stage liver disease. There is no ideal method to evaluate liver function. Blood tests and liver biopsies provide spot examinations and are unable to track changes in function quickly. Therefore better techniques are needed. Non-invasive imaging has the potential to extract increased information over a large sampling area, continuously tracking dynamic changes in liver function. This project aimed to study the ability of three imaging techniques, multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, infrared thermography and photoacoustic imaging, in measuring liver function. Collagen deposition was obvious in multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging in fibrosis and cirrhosis and comparable to conventional histology. Infrared thermography revealed a significantly increased liver temperature in hepatocellular carcinoma. In addition, multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging and photoacoustic imaging could both track uptake and excretion of indocyanine green in rat liver. These results prove that non-invasive imaging can extract crucial information about the liver continuously over time and has the potential to be translated into clinic in the assessment of liver disease.

  13. Non-invasive high-frequency vascular ultrasound elastography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurice, Roch L [Laboratory of Biorheology and Medical Ultrasonics, Research Center, University of Montreal Hospital, Quebec (Canada); Daronat, Michel [Laboratory of Biorheology and Medical Ultrasonics, Research Center, University of Montreal Hospital, Quebec (Canada); Ohayon, Jacques [Laboratory TIMC-IMAG, UMR CNRS 5525, Institut A. Bonniot, 38706 La Tronche (France); Stoyanova, Ekatherina [Laboratory of Biorheology and Medical Ultrasonics, Research Center, University of Montreal Hospital, Quebec (Canada); Foster, F Stuart [Department of Medical Biophysics, Sunnybrook and Women' s College Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cloutier, Guy [Laboratory of Biorheology and Medical Ultrasonics, Research Center, University of Montreal Hospital, Quebec (Canada); Department of Radiology, Radio-oncology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2005-04-07

    Non-invasive vascular elastography (NIVE) was recently introduced to characterize mechanical properties of superficial arteries. In this paper, the feasibility of NIVE and its applicability in the context of high-frequency ultrasound imaging is investigated. First, experiments were performed in vitro on vessel-mimicking phantoms. Polyvinyl alcohol cryogel was used to create two double-layer vessels with different mechanical properties. In both cases, the stiffness of the inner layer was made softer. Radial stress was applied within the lumen of the phantoms by applying incremental static pressure steps with a column of a flowing mixture of water-glycerol. The vessel phantoms were insonified at 32 MHz with an ultrasound biomicroscope to provide cross-section sequences of radio-frequency (RF) ultrasound data. The Lagrangian speckle model estimator (LSME) was used to assess the two-dimensional-strain tensors, and the composite Von Mises elastograms were computed. A new implementation of the LSME based on the optical flow equations was introduced. Deformation parameters were estimated using an inversion algorithm. For each in vitro experiment, both layers of approximately 1 mm were distinguished. Second, the use of the method for the purpose of studying small vessels (MicroNIVE) in genetically engineered rodents was introduced. Longitudinal scans of the carotid artery were performed at 40 MHz. The in vivo results give confidence in the feasibility of MicroNIVE as a potential tool to non-invasively study the impact of targeted genes on vascular remodelling in rodents.

  14. In vivo non-invasive multiphoton tomography of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Ehlers, Alexander; Le Harzic, Ronan

    2005-10-01

    High resolution non-invasive 3D imaging devices are required to detect pathogenic microorganisms such as Anthrax spores, bacteria, viruses, fungi and chemical agents entering biological tissues such as the epidermis. Due to the low light penetration depth and the biodamage potential, ultraviolet light sources can not be employed to realize intratissue imaging of bio- and chemohazards. We report on the novel near infrared laser technology multiphoton tomography and the high resolution 4D imaging tool DermaInspect for non-invasive detection of intratissue agents and their influence on cellular metabolism based on multiphoton autofluorescence imaging (MAI) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Femtosecond laser pulses in the spectral range of 750 nm to 850 nm have been used to image in vivo human skin with subcellular spatial and picosecond temporal resolution. The non-linear induced autofluorescence of both, skin tissues and microorganisms, originates mainly from naturally endogenous fluorophores/protein structures like NAD(P)H, flavins, keratin, collagen, elastin, porphyrins and melanin. Bacteria emit in the blue/green spectral range due to NAD(P)H and flavoproteins and, in certain cases, in the red spectral range due to the biosynthesis of Zn-porphyrins, coproporphyrin and protoporphyrin. Collagen and exogenous non-centrosymmetric molecules can be detected by SHG signals. The system DermaInspect consists of a wavelength-tunable compact 80/90 MHz Ti:sapphire laser, a scan module with galvo scan mirrors, piezo-driven objective, fast photon detector and time-resolved single photon counting unit. It can be used to perform optical sectioning and 3D autofluorescence lifetime imaging (τ-mapping) with 1 μm spatial resolution and 270 ps temporal resolution. The parameter fluorescence lifetime depends on the type of fluorophore and its microenvironment and can be used to distinguish bio- and chemohazards from cellular background and to gain information for pathogen

  15. New tools for non-invasive exploration of collagen network in cartilaginous tissue-engineered substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrionnet, Christel; Dumas, Dominique; Hupont, Sébastien; Stoltz, Jean François; Mainard, Didier; Gillet, Pierre; Pinzano, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    In tissue engineering approaches, the quality of substitutes is a key element to determine its ability to treat cartilage defects. However, in clinical practice, the evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage substitute quality is not possible due to the invasiveness of the standard procedure, which is to date histology. The aim of this work was to validate a new innovative system performed from two-photon excitation laser adapted to an optical macroscope to evaluate at macroscopic scale the collagen network in cartilage tissue-engineered substitutes in confrontation with gold standard histologic techniques or immunohistochemistry to visualize type II collagen. This system permitted to differentiate the quality of collagen network between ITS and TGF-β1 treatments. Multiscale large field imaging combined to multimodality approaches (SHG-TCSPC) at macroscopical scale represent an innovative and non-invasive technique to monitor the quality of collagen network in cartilage tissue-engineered substitutes before in vivo implantation.

  16. [Wearable chemical sensors for non-invasive monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Hiroyuki; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2007-04-01

    Non-invasive and non-restrictive bioinstrumentation is strongly requested in the field of medical and health care technologies, being under rapid advance in informatization. Applying "Soft-MEMS" techniques onto functional polymers, flexible chemical sensors were developed. This sort of sensors is one of the promising candidates that realize the requirements. Wearable oxygen sensor was first introduced and applied to transcutaneous monitoring of partial pressure of arterial oxygen. Then, wearable glucose sensors, which were constructed by immobilizing glucose oxidase onto the sensing region of a wearable oxygen sensor were reported. Considering the progress towards contact lens type sensor in mind, optical-transparent was developed. On the other hand, biocompatible polymer was introduced. Both sensors were enough sensitive to measure glucose concentration in tear fluids (0.14 mmol/l). In this paper, recent researches on wearable oxygen sensors, wearable glucose sensors and their applications are reported.

  17. Ethical aspects arising from non-invasive fetal diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newson, Ainsley J

    2008-04-01

    Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) could significantly change the framework for testing and screening in pregnancy. This chapter reviews the ethical implications of this technology, including current issues in prenatal diagnosis, implications for informed consent, possible non-medical uses and options for regulation. The prospect of NIPD normalising screening and termination in pregnancy is raised as a concern. NIPD will also require monitoring to ensure women are making well-informed decisions, given that a risk to the pregnancy is absent. The question of whether NIPD will reduce anxiety needs to be established and the prospect that it will increase terminations on the grounds of disability should be recognised. The offer of NIPD external to any clinical oversight might give rise to wider social sex selection, paternity testing or testing 'for information'. The value assumptions of these uses of NIPD need to be addressed.

  18. Description of the Pathogenic Features of Streptococcus pyogenes Isolates from Invasive and Non-Invasive Diseases in Aichi, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Masakado; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Masahiro; Adachi, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Shinichi; Yamashita, Teruo; Minagawa, Hiroko; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2016-07-22

    We identified hypervirulent Streptococcus pyogenes in 27 and 420 isolates from patients with invasive and non-invasive diseases, respectively, in Aichi Prefecture, Japan, between 2003 and 2012, in an attempt to understand why the prevalence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) suddenly increased in this location during 2011. Hypervirulent strains belong to the emm1 genotype, with a mutation in the covR/S genes that regulate many other genes, encoding virulence determinants and resulting in the absence of the proteinase streptococcal exotoxin B and the production of virulence factors such as the superantigen streptococcal exotoxin A, the nuclease streptococcal DNase, the cytotoxin NAD-glycohydrolase, and the hemolysin streptolysin O. We found 1 strain from invasive disease and 1 from non-invasive disease with traits similar to those of hypervirulent strains, except that the sda1 gene was absent. We also found 1 non-emm1 strain with phenotypic and genetic traits identical to those of the emm1 hypervirulent strains except that it did not belong to emm1 genotype, from non-invasive diseases cases in 2011. These findings suggested that hypervirulent and hypervirulent-like strains from invasive and non-invasive disease cases could have at least partially contributed to the sudden increase in the number of patients with STSS in Aichi during 2011.

  19. Complications and radiographic outcome of children's both-bone diaphyseal forearm fractures after invasive and non-invasive treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinikumpu, Juha-Jaakko; Lautamo, Anu; Pokka, Tytti; Serlo, Willy

    2013-04-01

    The incidence of paediatric forearm fractures and their invasive operative treatment is increasing. Evidence supporting increased interest in internal fixation of forearm fractures has been controversial. We studied radiographic outcome and complications of both-bone diaphyseal middle-third forearm fractures according to the type of treatment. The purpose of the study was to determine if there is an advantage in invasive treatment over non-invasive treatment that supports the increasing trend towards invasive surgery. All children and adolescents (forearm fractures in a geographic area with 86,000 children in 2000-2009 were included. There were 168 patients. The types of primary fractures and their malalignment and displacement rates were analysed. The fractures were classified as 'severe' or 'mild' according to radiographic findings. Radiographic fracture healing and alignment and the rate of complications were compared as regards invasive versus non-invasive surgery. Just over a third of all patients suffered from some complication during follow-up. The overall complication rate was highest in the non-invasive treatment group (58%) and lowest in the intramedullary nailing group (24%) (P compartmental syndrome were not problems in the study population despite the type of treatment. We found that the complication rate of diaphyseal forearm fractures was twice as common after non-invasive than after invasive treatment. The need of re-reduction after non-invasive treatment was remarkable. Nevertheless, bone healing was equally good despite the treatment. We conclude that intramedullary fixation of both-bone forearm fractures is a good mode of primary treatment of mild and severe middle-third diaphyseal both-bone forearm fractures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Non-invasive assessment of portal hypertension using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniyappan, Naaventhan; Cox, Eleanor; Bradley, Christopher; Scott, Robert; Austin, Andrew; O'Neill, Richard; Ramjas, Greg; Travis, Simon; White, Hilary; Singh, Rajeev; Thurley, Peter; Guha, Indra Neil; Francis, Susan; Aithal, Guruprasad Padur

    2016-12-01

    Hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) measurement is currently the only validated technique to accurately evaluate changes in portal pressure. In this study, we evaluate the use of non-contrast quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a surrogate measure of portal pressure. Thirty patients undergoing HVPG measurement were prospectively recruited. MR parameters of longitudinal relaxation time (T1), perfusion of the liver and spleen (by arterial spin labelling), and blood flow in the portal, splanchnic and collateral circulation (by phase contrast MRI) were assessed. We estimated the liver stiffness measurement (LSM) and enhanced liver fibrosis (ELF) score. The correlation of all non-invasive parameters with HVPG was evaluated. The mean (range) HVPG of the patients was 9.8 (1-22) mmHg, and 14 patients (48%) had clinically significant portal hypertension (CSPH, HVPG ⩾10mmHg). Liver T1 relaxation time, splenic artery and superior mesenteric artery velocity correlated significantly with HVPG. Using multiple linear regression, liver T1 and splenic artery velocity remained as the two parameters in the multivariate model significantly associated with HVPG (R=0.90, pportal hypertension is related to worse outcomes. However, the standard technique of assessing portal pressure is invasive and not widely used in clinical practice. Here, we have studied the use of non-invasive MRI in evaluating portal pressure. The MRI measures of liver architecture and blood flow in the splenic artery correlated well with portal pressure. Therefore, this non-invasive method can potentially be used to assess portal pressure in clinical trials and monitoring treatment in practice. Copyright © 2016 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Non-Invasive In Vivo Ultrasound Temperature Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Mahdi

    could result in significant artifacts. The first part of this thesis addresses the first limitation by introducing the Recursive Echo Strain Filter (RESF) as a new temperature reconstruction model which largely corrects for the spatial inconsistencies resulting from the infinitesimal model. The performance of this model is validated using the data collected during sub therapeutic temperature changes in the tissue mimicking phantom as well as ex vivo tissue blocks. The second part of this thesis deals with in vivo ultrasound thermography. Tissue deformations caused by natural motions (e.g. respiration, gasping, blood pulsation etc) can create non-thermal changes to the ultrasound echoes which are not accounted for in the derivation of physical model for temperature estimation. These fluctuations can create severe artifacts in the estimated temperature field. Using statistical signal processing techniques an adaptive method is presented which takes advantage of the localized and global availability of these interference patterns and use this data to enhance the estimated temperature in the region of interest. We then propose a model based technique for continuous tracking of temperature in the presence of natural motion and deformation. The method uses the direct discretization of the transient bioheat equation to derive a state space model of temperature change. This model is then used to build a linear estimator based on the Kalman filtering capable of robust estimation of temperature change in the presence of tissue motion and deformation. The robustness of the adaptive and model-based models in removing motion and deformation artifacts is demonstrated using data from in vivo experiments. Both methods are shown to provide effective cancellation of the artifacts with minimal effect on the expected temperature dynamics.

  2. Non-invasive ambient pressure estimation using non-linear ultrasound contrast agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Scheldrup

    Many attempts to find a non-invasive procedure to measure the blood pressure locally in the body have been made. This dissertation focuses on the approaches which utilize highly compressible ultrasound contrast agents as ambient pressure sensors. The literature within the topic has been reviewed...

  3. Co-housing rodents with different coat colours as a simple, non-invasive means of individual identification: validating mixed-strain housing for C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Walker

    Full Text Available Standard practice typically requires the marking of laboratory mice so that they can be individually identified. However, many of the common methods compromise the welfare of the individuals being marked (as well as requiring time, effort, and/or resources on the part of researchers and technicians. Mixing strains of different colour within a cage would allow them to be readily visually identifiable, negating the need for more invasive marking techniques. Here we assess the impact that mixed strain housing has on the phenotypes of female C57BL/6 (black and DBA/2 (brown mice, and on the variability in the data obtained from them. Mice were housed in either mixed strain or single strain pairs for 19 weeks, and their phenotypes then assessed using 23 different behavioural, morphological, haematological and physiological measures widely used in research and/or important for assessing mouse welfare. No negative effects of mixed strain housing could be found on the phenotypes of either strain, including variables relevant to welfare. Differences and similarities between the two strains were almost all as expected from previously published studies, and none were affected by whether mice were housed in mixed- or single-strain pairs. Only one significant main effect of housing type was detected: mixed strain pairs had smaller red blood cell distribution widths, a measure suggesting better health (findings that now need replicating in case they were Type 1 errors resulting from our multiplicity of tests. Furthermore, mixed strain housing did not increase the variation in data obtained from the mice: the standard errors for all variables were essentially identical between the two housing conditions. Mixed strain housing also made animals very easy to distinguish while in the home cage. Female DBA/2 and C57BL/6 mice can thus be housed in mixed strain pairs for identification purposes, with no apparent negative effects on their welfare or the data they

  4. Diversity and distribution of genetic variation in gammarids: Comparing patterns between invasive and non-invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltazar-Soares, Miguel; Paiva, Filipa; Chen, Yiyong; Zhan, Aibin; Briski, Elizabeta

    2017-10-01

    Biological invasions are worldwide phenomena that have reached alarming levels among aquatic species. There are key challenges to understand the factors behind invasion propensity of non-native populations in invasion biology. Interestingly, interpretations cannot be expanded to higher taxonomic levels due to the fact that in the same genus, there are species that are notorious invaders and those that never spread outside their native range. Such variation in invasion propensity offers the possibility to explore, at fine-scale taxonomic level, the existence of specific characteristics that might predict the variability in invasion success. In this work, we explored this possibility from a molecular perspective. The objective was to provide a better understanding of the genetic diversity distribution in the native range of species that exhibit contrasting invasive propensities. For this purpose, we used a total of 784 sequences of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA-COI) collected from seven Gammaroidea, a superfamily of Amphipoda that includes species that are both successful invaders (Gammarus tigrinus, Pontogammarus maeoticus, and Obesogammarus crassus) and strictly restricted to their native regions (Gammarus locusta, Gammarus salinus, Gammarus zaddachi, and Gammarus oceanicus). Despite that genetic diversity did not differ between invasive and non-invasive species, we observed that populations of non-invasive species showed a higher degree of genetic differentiation. Furthermore, we found that both geographic and evolutionary distances might explain genetic differentiation in both non-native and native ranges. This suggests that the lack of population genetic structure may facilitate the distribution of mutations that despite arising in the native range may be beneficial in invasive ranges. The fact that evolutionary distances explained genetic differentiation more often than geographic distances points toward that deep lineage

  5. Non-invasive diagnosis of acute mesenteric ischaemia using PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiss, Jan [University of Turku, Turku University Hospital and Abo Academy, Turku (Finland); Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Surgery, Turku (Finland); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Freiburg (Germany); Naum, Alexandru; Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Knuuti, Juhani; Nuutila, Pirjo [University of Turku, Turku University Hospital and Abo Academy, Turku (Finland); Iozzo, Patricia [University of Turku, Turku University Hospital and Abo Academy, Turku (Finland); National Research Council (CNR), Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa (Italy); Savunen, Timo [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Surgery, Turku (Finland)

    2009-08-15

    Acute mesenteric ischaemia (AMI) is a lethal disease with an increasing incidence. Despite the availability of effective treatment, AMI remains a vascular emergency with over 60% mortality rate mainly due to late diagnosis. The difficulty in diagnosing this fatal condition stems from non-specific clinical and laboratory findings and lack of appropriate imaging study. Our aim was to test a non-invasive method of identifying AMI using PET. The study was conducted in normal pigs (n=14), sham-operated pigs (n=4) and pigs undergoing ischaemia and reperfusion of intestine (n= 6). Liver blood flow was imaged by H{sub 2} {sup 15}O PET and liver blood content by C{sup 15}O PET. Both scans were performed during intestinal ischaemia and during reperfusion. AMI was identified by PET imaging of hepatic perfusion and blood pool. The H{sub 2}{sup 15}O PET scan during AMI detected a 40% decrease in total liver perfusion, which was caused by a 45% reduction of portal blood flow and no alteration in arterial blood flow. Compromised hepatic perfusion during AMI was accompanied by a 75% decrease in hepatic blood pool recognized by the C{sup 15}O PET scan. The striking reduction of liver blood flow and blood content persisted during reperfusion of intestine. Our results demonstrate that AMI can be readily recognized by PET imaging of liver blood flow and blood content. Moreover, PET can be used in detection of perfusion abnormalities after revascularization. This non-invasive imaging tool could represent a novel approach to diagnose AMI. (orig.)

  6. Non-Invasive Measurement of Adrenocortical Activity in Blue-Fronted Parrots (Amazona aestiva, Linnaeus, 1758)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, João C. P.; Fujihara, Caroline J.; Fruhvald, Erika; Trevisol, Eduardo; Destro, Flavia C.; Teixeira, Carlos R.; Pantoja, José C. F.; Schmidt, Elizabeth M. S.; Palme, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Parrots kept in zoos and private households often develop psychological and behavioural disorders. Despite knowing that such disorders have a multifactorial aetiology and that chronic stress is involved, little is known about their development mainly due to a poor understanding of the parrots’ physiology and the lack of validated methods to measure stress in these species. In birds, blood corticosterone concentrations provide information about adrenocortical activity. However, blood sampling techniques are difficult, highly invasive and inappropriate to investigate stressful situations and welfare conditions. Thus, a non-invasive method to measure steroid hormones is critically needed. Aiming to perform a physiological validation of a cortisone enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to measure glucocorticoid metabolites (GCM) in droppings of 24 Blue-fronted parrots (Amazona aestiva), two experiments were designed. During the experiments all droppings were collected at 3-h intervals. Initially, birds were sampled for 24 h (experiment 1) and one week later assigned to four different treatments (experiment 2): Control (undisturbed), Saline (0.2 mL of 0.9% NaCl IM), Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg IM) and Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH; 25 IU IM). Treatments (always one week apart) were applied to all animals in a cross-over study design. A daily rhythm pattern in GCM excretion was detected but there were no sex differences (first experiment). Saline and dexamethasone treatments had no effect on GCM (not different from control concentrations). Following ACTH injection, GCM concentration increased about 13.1-fold (median) at the peak (after 3–9 h), and then dropped to pre-treatment concentrations. By a successful physiological validation, we demonstrated the suitability of the cortisone EIA to non-invasively monitor increased adrenocortical activity, and thus, stress in the Blue-fronted parrot. This method opens up new perspectives for investigating the connection between behavioural

  7. Non-Invasive Measurement of Adrenocortical Activity in Blue-Fronted Parrots (Amazona aestiva, Linnaeus, 1758).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, João C P; Fujihara, Caroline J; Fruhvald, Erika; Trevisol, Eduardo; Destro, Flavia C; Teixeira, Carlos R; Pantoja, José C F; Schmidt, Elizabeth M S; Palme, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Parrots kept in zoos and private households often develop psychological and behavioural disorders. Despite knowing that such disorders have a multifactorial aetiology and that chronic stress is involved, little is known about their development mainly due to a poor understanding of the parrots' physiology and the lack of validated methods to measure stress in these species. In birds, blood corticosterone concentrations provide information about adrenocortical activity. However, blood sampling techniques are difficult, highly invasive and inappropriate to investigate stressful situations and welfare conditions. Thus, a non-invasive method to measure steroid hormones is critically needed. Aiming to perform a physiological validation of a cortisone enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to measure glucocorticoid metabolites (GCM) in droppings of 24 Blue-fronted parrots (Amazona aestiva), two experiments were designed. During the experiments all droppings were collected at 3-h intervals. Initially, birds were sampled for 24 h (experiment 1) and one week later assigned to four different treatments (experiment 2): Control (undisturbed), Saline (0.2 mL of 0.9% NaCl IM), Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg IM) and Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH; 25 IU IM). Treatments (always one week apart) were applied to all animals in a cross-over study design. A daily rhythm pattern in GCM excretion was detected but there were no sex differences (first experiment). Saline and dexamethasone treatments had no effect on GCM (not different from control concentrations). Following ACTH injection, GCM concentration increased about 13.1-fold (median) at the peak (after 3-9 h), and then dropped to pre-treatment concentrations. By a successful physiological validation, we demonstrated the suitability of the cortisone EIA to non-invasively monitor increased adrenocortical activity, and thus, stress in the Blue-fronted parrot. This method opens up new perspectives for investigating the connection between behavioural

  8. Non-Invasive Measurement of Adrenocortical Activity in Blue-Fronted Parrots (Amazona aestiva, Linnaeus, 1758.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João C P Ferreira

    Full Text Available Parrots kept in zoos and private households often develop psychological and behavioural disorders. Despite knowing that such disorders have a multifactorial aetiology and that chronic stress is involved, little is known about their development mainly due to a poor understanding of the parrots' physiology and the lack of validated methods to measure stress in these species. In birds, blood corticosterone concentrations provide information about adrenocortical activity. However, blood sampling techniques are difficult, highly invasive and inappropriate to investigate stressful situations and welfare conditions. Thus, a non-invasive method to measure steroid hormones is critically needed. Aiming to perform a physiological validation of a cortisone enzyme immunoassay (EIA to measure glucocorticoid metabolites (GCM in droppings of 24 Blue-fronted parrots (Amazona aestiva, two experiments were designed. During the experiments all droppings were collected at 3-h intervals. Initially, birds were sampled for 24 h (experiment 1 and one week later assigned to four different treatments (experiment 2: Control (undisturbed, Saline (0.2 mL of 0.9% NaCl IM, Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg IM and Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH; 25 IU IM. Treatments (always one week apart were applied to all animals in a cross-over study design. A daily rhythm pattern in GCM excretion was detected but there were no sex differences (first experiment. Saline and dexamethasone treatments had no effect on GCM (not different from control concentrations. Following ACTH injection, GCM concentration increased about 13.1-fold (median at the peak (after 3-9 h, and then dropped to pre-treatment concentrations. By a successful physiological validation, we demonstrated the suitability of the cortisone EIA to non-invasively monitor increased adrenocortical activity, and thus, stress in the Blue-fronted parrot. This method opens up new perspectives for investigating the connection between behavioural

  9. Applied strategy for options of invasive and non-invasive sensors and instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhang; Xin, Liu; Scopesi, Fabio; Serra, Giovanni; Sun, Jinwei; Rolfe, Peter

    2008-10-01

    A diverse range of sensors and instruments is available for use in the critical care of acutely ill patients and it is not always straightforward to decide which technologies should be used. Clinicians have their own priorities for the physiological variables that they consider need to be monitored in order to provide optimum medical care. Alongside this, consideration must be given to the choice of available technologies. This choice may be influenced by performance criteria, cost, and ease of use. It is also necessary to consider the physical status of the patients, the measurement instruments and any potential risks for the patients so as to provide the best measurement scheme. This paper explores the use of decision support tools that may be used in critical care situations. The care of ill newborn babies requiring mechanical ventilation is considered as a case study. The choice of invasive and non-invasive techniques for blood gas and pH assessment is evaluated and decision trees and hierarchical clustering are considered as possible decision support methodologies.

  10. Non-invasive cerebellar stimulation--a consensus paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, G; Argyropoulos, G P; Boehringer, A; Celnik, P; Edwards, M J; Ferrucci, R; Galea, J M; Groiss, S J; Hiraoka, K; Kassavetis, P; Lesage, E; Manto, M; Miall, R C; Priori, A; Sadnicka, A; Ugawa, Y; Ziemann, U

    2014-02-01

    The field of neurostimulation of the cerebellum either with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS; single pulse or repetitive (rTMS)) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS; anodal or cathodal) is gaining popularity in the scientific community, in particular because these stimulation techniques are non-invasive and provide novel information on cerebellar functions. There is a consensus amongst the panel of experts that both TMS and tDCS can effectively influence cerebellar functions, not only in the motor domain, with effects on visually guided tracking tasks, motor surround inhibition, motor adaptation and learning, but also for the cognitive and affective operations handled by the cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Verbal working memory, semantic associations and predictive language processing are amongst these operations. Both TMS and tDCS modulate the connectivity between the cerebellum and the primary motor cortex, tuning cerebellar excitability. Cerebellar TMS is an effective and valuable method to evaluate the cerebello-thalamo-cortical loop functions and for the study of the pathophysiology of ataxia. In most circumstances, DCS induces a polarity-dependent site-specific modulation of cerebellar activity. Paired associative stimulation of the cerebello-dentato-thalamo-M1 pathway can induce bidirectional long-term spike-timing-dependent plasticity-like changes of corticospinal excitability. However, the panel of experts considers that several important issues still remain unresolved and require further research. In particular, the role of TMS in promoting cerebellar plasticity is not established. Moreover, the exact positioning of electrode stimulation and the duration of the after effects of tDCS remain unclear. Future studies are required to better define how DCS over particular regions of the cerebellum affects individual cerebellar symptoms, given the topographical organization of cerebellar symptoms. The long-term neural consequences of non-invasive

  11. Non-Invasive Gait Monitoring in a Ubiquitous Computing House

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yuji; Motooka, Nobuhisa; Siio, Itiro; Tsukada, Koji; Kambara, Keisuke

    Computers become smaller and cheaper from day to day, and the utilization, as daily life equipments, is now becoming ubiquitous. Therefore, it's essential to discuss the development of applications, as well as the installation of ubiquitous computing technologies into our daily living environments. Based on this idea, in order to investigate how ubiquitous computing can be used in the most efficient way, an experimental house, Ocha House, has been constructed in the campus of Ochanomizu university in 2009. In this study, we described the feature of the design of the experimental house and proposed a non-invasive gait monitoring technique as a healthcare application. Specifically, five wireless accelerometers were fixed on the floor of the house, and the floor vibration was measured when the subject walked along the accelerometers. As a result, the floor acceleration intensity was found to surge at the ground contact, and the gait cycle could be detected. By combining the simple acceleration sensors and the housing structures, human motion monitoring would become less invasive.

  12. A novel device for non-invasive cerebral perfusion assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Tessari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently brain perfusion can be assessed by the means of radio-invasive methods, such as single-photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography, or by hightech methods such as magnetic resonance imaging. These methods are known to be very expensive, with long examination time, and finally, cannot be used for assessing brain oxygen distribution in relation to exercise and/or cognition-tests. The near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS is a non-invasive diagnostic technique. In real time it is capable of measuring tissue oxygenation using portable instrumentation with a relative low cost. We and other groups previously adopted this instrument for investigation of the oxygen consumption in the muscles at rest and during exercise. NIRS can be now used to assess brain perfusion through the intact skull in human subjects by detecting changes in blood hemoglobin concentrations. Changes in perfusion can be related to both arterial and venous problems. This novel equipment features allow for a wide field of innovative applications where portability, wearability, and a small footprint are essential. The present review shows how to use it in relation to exercise protocols of the upper and lower extremities, measured in healthy people and in conditions of arterial and chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency.

  13. Molecular genesis of non-muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma (NMIUC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Courtney; Smith, Steven C.; Theodorescu, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma (UC) is the most common type of bladder cancer in Western nations. Most patients present with the non-muscle-invasive (NMIUC) form of the disease, while up to a third harbour the invasive form (MIUC). Specifically, the aetiology of NMIUC appears to be multifactorial and very different from that of MIUC. Loss of specific tumour suppressor genes as well as gain-of-function mutations in proteins within defined cellular signalling pathways have been implicated in NMIUC aetiology. The regions of chromosome 9 that harbour CDKN2A, CDKN2B, TSC1, PTCH1 and DBC1 are frequently mutated in NMIUC, resulting in functional loss; in addition, HRAS and FGFR3, which are both proto-oncogenes encoding components of the Ras–MAPK signalling pathway, have been found to harbour activating mutations in a large number of NMIUCs. Interestingly, some of these molecular events are mutually exclusive, suggesting functional equivalence. Since several of these driving changes are amenable to therapeutic targeting, understanding the signalling events in NMIUC may offer novel approaches to manage the recurrence and progression of this disease. PMID:20334706

  14. Comparison of accuracy of fibrosis degree classifications by liver biopsy and non-invasive tests in chronic hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Non-invasive tests have been constructed and evaluated mainly for binary diagnoses such as significant fibrosis. Recently, detailed fibrosis classifications for several non-invasive tests have been developed, but their accuracy has not been thoroughly evaluated in comparison to liver biopsy, especially in clinical practice and for Fibroscan. Therefore, the main aim of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of detailed fibrosis classifications available for non-invasive tests and liver biopsy. The secondary aim was to validate these accuracies in independent populations. Methods Four HCV populations provided 2,068 patients with liver biopsy, four different pathologist skill-levels and non-invasive tests. Results were expressed as percentages of correctly classified patients. Results In population #1 including 205 patients and comparing liver biopsy (reference: consensus reading by two experts) and blood tests, Metavir fibrosis (FM) stage accuracy was 64.4% in local pathologists vs. 82.2% (p liver biopsy read by a local pathologist, i.e., in clinical practice; however, the classification precision is apparently lesser. This detailed classification accuracy is much lower than that of significant fibrosis with Fibroscan and even Fibrotest but higher with FibroMeter3G. FibroMeter classification accuracy was significantly higher than those of other non-invasive tests. Finally, for hepatitis C evaluation in clinical practice, fibrosis degree can be evaluated using an accurate blood test. PMID:22129438

  15. Non-invasive beamforming add-on module

    KAUST Repository

    Bader, Ahmed

    2017-02-23

    An embodiment of a non-invasive beamforming add-on apparatus couples to an existing antenna port and rectifies the beam azimuth in the upstream and downstream directions. The apparatus comprises input circuitry that is configured to receive one or more signals from a neighboring node of the linear wireless sensor network; first amplifier circuitry configured to adjust an amplitude of a respective received signal in accordance with a weighting coefficient and invoke a desired phase to a carrier frequency of the received signal thereby forming a first amplified signal; and second amplifier circuitry configured to adjust a gain of the first amplified signal towards upstream and downstream neighbors of the linear wireless sensor in the linear wireless sensor network.

  16. Splenosis: Non-invasive diagnosis of a great mimicker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Paniagua, Inés; Baleato-González, Sandra; García-Figueiras, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Splenosis is defined as the location of heterotopic splenic tissue implants in the abdominal cavity or other atypical location. This entity may mimic different benign and malignant processes, which may cause an inappropriate management of the patient. A previous history of splenic trauma or splenectomy should introduce this entity in the differential diagnosis in these patients. Clinical features and imaging findings of two cases of splenosis are presented and a review of the published literature on this entity is made. Based on the behavior of the lesions in different imaging techniques and taking into account the relevant history of previous splenectomy, it was possible to establish the final diagnosis of intraabdominal splenosis. Splenosis is an entity that should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with prior history of splenectomy and/or spleen trauma to avoid improper handling of them. Imaging techniques are key tools in non-invasive diagnosis of this entity.

  17. Non-Invasive in vivo Imaging in Small Animal Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Koo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive real time in vivo molecular imaging in small animal models has become the essential bridge between in vitro data and their translation into clinical applications. The tremendous development and technological progress, such as tumour modelling, monitoring of tumour growth and detection of metastasis, has facilitated translational drug development. This has added to our knowledge on carcinogenesis. The modalities that are commonly used include Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, Computed Tomography (CT, Positron Emission Tomography (PET, bioluminescence imaging, fluorescence imaging and multi-modality imaging systems. The ability to obtain multiple images longitudinally provides reliable information whilst reducing animal numbers. As yet there is no one modality that is ideal for all experimental studies. This review outlines the instrumentation available together with corresponding applications reported in the literature with particular emphasis on cancer research. Advantages and limitations to current imaging technology are discussed and the issues concerning small animal care during imaging are highlighted.

  18. Non-invasive Loading Model of Murine Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, Blandine

    2016-07-01

    Osteoarthritis is the commonest degenerative joint disease, leading to joint pain and disability. The mouse has been the primary animal used for research, due to its size, relatively short lifespan, and the availability of genetically modified animals. Importantly, they show pathogenesis similar to osteoarthritis in humans. Mechanical loading is a major risk factor for osteoarthritis, and various mouse models have been developed to study the role and effects of mechanics on health and disease in various joints. This review describes the main mouse models used to non-invasively apply mechanical loads on joints. Most of the mouse models of osteoarthritis target the knee, including repetitive loading and joint injury such as ligament rupture, but a few studies have also characterised models for elbow, temporomandibular joint, and whole-body vibration spinal loading. These models are a great opportunity to dissect the influences of various types of mechanical input on joint health and disease.

  19. A non-invasive technique for age at death determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, N; Thomsen, I; Frohlich, B

    1990-01-01

    Several methods for age at death determination of human skeletal remains have been developed. These methods have, especially in combination, proved to be useful in making individual identification of skeletal material in forensic cases. This study is based on the known correlation between actual...... age and structural changes in trabecular bone tissue. Using X-rays taken from live individuals, it provides a useful non-invasive ageing technique for the forensic examiner. An initial pilot study defined five phases of age-related changes in the trabecular tissue of the proximal end of the femur....... A total of 60 X-rays, randomly selected, and covering an age span from 14 years to 94 years, were subsequently scored in blind trials. The results demonstrate a clear relationship between age and changes in the trabecular structures. Based on this relationship it is possible to obtain an age estimate...

  20. Non invasive sensing technologies for cultural heritage management and fruition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Masini, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    The relevance of the information produced by science and technology for the knowledge of the cultural heritage depends on the quality of the feedback and, consequently, on the "cultural" distance between scientists and end-users. In particular, the solution to this problem mainly resides in the capability of end-users' capability to assess and transform the knowledge produced by diagnostics with regard to: information on both cultural objects and sites (decay patterns, vulnerability, presence of buried archaeological remains); decision making (management plan, conservation project, and excavation plan). From our experience in the field of the cultural heritage and namely the conservation, of monuments, there is a significant gap of information between technologists (geophysicists/physicists/engineers) and end-users (conservators/historians/architects). This cultural gap is due to the difficulty to interpret "indirect data" produced by non invasive diagnostics (i.e. radargrams/thermal images/seismic tomography etc..) in order to provide information useful to improve the historical knowledge (e.g. the chronology of the different phases of a building), to characterise the state of conservation (e.g. detection of cracks in the masonry) and to monitor in time cultural heritage artifacts and sites. The possible answer to this difficulty is in the set-up of a knowledge chain regarding the following steps: - Integrated application of novel and robust data processing methods; - Augmented reality as a tool for making easier the interpretation of non invasive - investigations for the analysis of decay pathologies of masonry and architectural surfaces; - The comparison between direct data (carrots, visual inspection) and results from non-invasive tests, including geophysics, aims to improve the interpretation and the rendering of the monuments and even of the archaeological landscapes; - The use of specimens or test beds for the detection of archaeological features and

  1. Cell-baswd non-invasive prenatal testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldbjerg, Niels; Singh, Ripudaman; Christensen, Rikke

    CONTROL ID: 2520273 ABSTRACT FINAL ID: OC06.03 TITLE: Cell based Non-invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT) AUTHORS (FIRST NAME, LAST NAME): Niels Uldbjerg2, Ripudaman Singh4, Rikke Christensen3, Palle Schelde4, Ida Vogel1, Else Marie Vestergaard3, Lotte Hatt4, Steen Kølvrå4 INSTITUTIONS (ALL): 1......, based on circulating cell free fetal DNA in maternal plasma (cffNIPT) has a good screening-performance concerning Down syndrome. Recently, however, a number of publications have indicated that cffNIPT has only limited clinical utility for subchromosomal abnormalities. Therefore, it is of interest...... whether fetal cells – which are known to circulate in maternal blood in extremely low numbers – can be isolated in pure form. If so, it will be possible using whole genome amplification to obtain pure fetal DNA in sufficient amounts to do microarray analysis or NGS without contaminating maternal DNA. We...

  2. Non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido; Bombard, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains a joint ESHG/ASHG position document with recommendations regarding responsible innovation in prenatal screening with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). By virtue of its greater accuracy and safety with respect to prenatal screening for common autosomal aneuploidies, NIPT has...... for common autosomal aneuploidies are possible. The trade-offs involved in these scenarios should be assessed in light of the aim of screening, the balance of benefits and burdens for pregnant women and their partners and considerations of cost-effectiveness and justice. With improving screening technologies...... and decreasing costs of sequencing and analysis, it will become possible in the near future to significantly expand the scope of prenatal screening beyond common autosomal aneuploidies. Commercial providers have already begun expanding their tests to include sex-chromosomal abnormalities and microdeletions...

  3. Non-invasive actionable biomarkers for metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Luo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the current clinical setting, many disease management options are available for men diagnosed with prostate cancer. For metastatic prostate cancer, first-line therapies almost always involve agents designed to inhibit androgen receptor (AR signaling. Castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPCs that arise following first-line androgen deprivation therapies (ADT may continue to respond to additional lines of AR-targeting therapies (abiraterone and enzalutamide, chemotherapies (docetaxel and cabazitaxel, bone-targeting Radium-223 therapy, and immunotherapy sipuleucel-T. The rapidly expanding therapies for CRPC is expected to transform this lethal disease into one that can be managed for prolonged period of time. In the past 3 years, a number of promising biomarkers that may help to guide treatment decisions have been proposed and evaluated, including androgen receptor splice variant-7 (AR-V7, a truncated AR lacking the ligand-binding domain (LBD and mediate constitutively-active AR signaling. Putative treatment selection markers such as AR-V7 may further improve survival benefit of existing therapies and help to accelerate development of new agents for metastatic prostate cancer. In the metastatic setting, it is important to consider compatibility between the putative biomarker with non-invasive sampling. In this review, biomarkers relevant to the setting of metastatic prostate cancer are discussed with respect to a number of key attributes critical for clinical development of non-invasive, actionable markers. It is envisioned that biomarkers for metastatic prostate cancer will continue to be discovered, developed, and refined to meet the unmet needs in both standard-of-care and clinical trial settings.

  4. Research on the multiple linear regression in non-invasive blood glucose measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianming; Chen, Zhencheng

    2015-01-01

    A non-invasive blood glucose measurement sensor and the data process algorithm based on the metabolic energy conservation (MEC) method are presented in this paper. The physiological parameters of human fingertip can be measured by various sensing modalities, and blood glucose value can be evaluated with the physiological parameters by the multiple linear regression analysis. Five methods such as enter, remove, forward, backward and stepwise in multiple linear regression were compared, and the backward method had the best performance. The best correlation coefficient was 0.876 with the standard error of the estimate 0.534, and the significance was 0.012 (sig. regression equation was valid. The Clarke error grid analysis was performed to compare the MEC method with the hexokinase method, using 200 data points. The correlation coefficient R was 0.867 and all of the points were located in Zone A and Zone B, which shows the MEC method provides a feasible and valid way for non-invasive blood glucose measurement.

  5. Non-invasive Optical Molecular Imaging for Cancer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhen

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. It remains the second most common cause of death in the US, accounting for nearly 1 out of every 4 deaths. Improved fundamental understanding of molecular processes and pathways resulting in cancer development has catalyzed a shift towards molecular analysis of cancer using imaging technologies. It is expected that the non-invasive or minimally invasive molecular imaging analysis of cancer can significantly aid in improving the early detection of cancer and will result in reduced mortality and morbidity associated with the disease. The central hypothesis of the proposed research is that non-invasive imaging of changes in metabolic activity of individual cells, and extracellular pH within a tissue will improve early stage detection of cancer. The specific goals of this research project were to: (a) develop novel optical imaging probes to image changes in choline metabolism and tissue pH as a function of progression of cancer using clinically isolated tissue biopsies; (b) correlate changes in tissue extracellular pH and metabolic activity of tissues as a function of disease state using clinically isolated tissue biopsies; (c) provide fundamental understanding of relationship between tumor hypoxia, acidification of the extracellular space and altered cellular metabolism with progression of cancer. Three novel molecular imaging probes were developed to detect changes in choline and glucose metabolism and extracellular pH in model systems and clinically isolated cells and biopsies. Glucose uptake and metabolism was measured using a fluorescence analog of glucose, 2-NBDG (2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose), while choline metabolism was measured using a click chemistry analog of choline, propargyl choline, which can be in-situ labeled with a fluorophore Alexa-488 azide via a click chemistry reaction. Extracellular pH in tissue were measured by Alexa-647 labeled pHLIP (pH low insertion peptide

  6. Non-invasive Optical Characterization of Biomaterial Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sharad; Hunter, Martin; Cebe, Peggy; Levitt, Jonathan M.; Kaplan, David L.; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2009-01-01

    Current approaches to study biomaterial mineralization are invasive and prevent dynamic characterization of this process within the same sample. Polarized light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) may offer a non-invasive alternative for assessing the levels of mineraliazation as well as some aspects of the organization of the mineral deposits. Specifically, we used LSS to characterize the formation of hydroxyapatite deposits on three types of silk films (water-annealed, methanol-treated and poly aspartic acid (PAA)-mixed) following 1, 3, 5 and 7 cycles of mineralization. We found that the total light scattering intensity provided a quantitative measure of the degree of mineralization as confirmed by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The PAA-mixed silk films yielded the highest level of mineral deposition and the water-annealed ones the least, consistent with the β sheet content of the films prior to the onset of mineralization. The wavelength dependence of the singly backscattered light was consistent with a self-affine fractal morphology of the deposited films within scales in the range of 150 to 300 nm; this was confirmed by Fourier analysis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the corresponding films. The deposits of minerals in the water-annealed films were predominantly flake-like, with positively correlated density fluctuations (Hurst parameter, H>0.5), whereas methanol-treated and PAA-mixed silk films resulted in densely-packed, bulk mineral deposits with negatively correlated density fluctuations (H<0.5). Therefore, LSS could serve as a valuable tool for understanding the role of biomaterial properties in mineral formation, and, ultimately, for optimizing biomaterial designs that yield mineral deposits with the desired organization. PMID:18313137

  7. Non-invasive index of liver fibrosis induced by alcohol, thioacetamide and schistosomal infection in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Beltagy Doha M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non invasive approaches will likely be increasing utilized to assess liver fibrosis. This work provides a new non invasive index to predict liver fibrosis induced in mice. Methods Fibrosis was generated by thioacetamide (TAA, chronic intake of ethanol, or infection with S. mansoni in 240 mice. Both progression and regression of fibrosis (after treatment with silymarin and/or praziquantel were monitored. The following methods were employed: (i The METAVIR system was utilized to grade and stage liver inflammation and fibosis; (ii Determination of hepatic hydroxyproline and collagen; and (iii Derivation of a new hepatic fibrosis index from the induced changes, and its prospective validation in a group of 70 mice. Results The index is composed of 4 serum variable including total proteins, γ-GT, bilirubin and reduced glutathione (GSH, measured in diseased, treated and normal mice. These parameters were highly correlated with both the histological stage and the grade. They were combined in a logarithmic formula, which non-invasively scores the severity of liver fibrosis through a range (0 to 2, starting with healthy liver (corresponding to stage 0 to advanced fibrosis (corresponding stage 3.Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC for the accuracy of the index to predict the histological stages demonstrated that the areas under the curve (AUC were 0.954, 0.979 and 0.99 for index values corresponding to histological stages 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Also, the index was correlated with stage and grade, (0.947 and 0.859, respectively. The cut off values that cover the range between stages 0-1, 1-2 and 2-3 are 0.4, 1.12 and 1.79, respectively. The results in the validation group confirmed the accuracy of the test. The AUROC was 0.869 and there was good correlation with the stage of fibrosis and grade of inflammation. Conclusion The index fulfils the basic criteria of non-invasive marker of liver fibrosis since it is liver

  8. Non-invasive NMR stratigraphy of a multi-layered artefact: an ancient detached mural painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tullio, Valeria; Capitani, Donatella; Presciutti, Federica; Gentile, Gennaro; Brunetti, Brunetto Giovanni; Proietti, Noemi

    2013-10-01

    NMR stratigraphy was used to investigate in situ, non-destructively and non-invasively, the stratigraphy of hydrogen-rich layers of an ancient Nubian detached mural painting. Because of the detachment procedure, a complex multi-layered artefact was obtained, where, besides layers of the original mural painting, also the materials used during the procedure all became constitutive parts of the artefact. NMR measurements in situ enabled monitoring of the state of conservation of the artefact and planning of minimum representative sampling to validate results obtained in situ by solid-state NMR analysis of the samples. This analysis enabled chemical characterization of all organic materials. Use of reference compounds and prepared specimens assisted data interpretation.

  9. Etiske utfordringer med non-invasive prenatale tester (NIPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn Hofmann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Analyser av cellefritt DNA fra foster i gravide kvinners blod gir nye muligheter innen fosterdiagnostikk: Testene er bedre enn eksisterende tester, de reduserer risikoen og er billigere. Flere land har tatt i bruk disse testene, og Helsedirektoratet i Norge har mottatt søknad om å ta i bruk en test som erstatter tidlig ultralyd og blodprøver. Likevel nøler norske myndigheter. Hvorfor gjør de det? Ett av svarene er at non-invasive prenatale tester fører med seg en rekke faglige og moralske spørsmål og gir flere grunnleggende etiske utfordringer. Denne artikkelen gjennomgår et bredt knippe av de utfordringene som NIPT reiser. Hensikten er å synliggjøre hvorfor NIPT påkaller etisk refleksjon og å bidra til en åpen debatt og en transparent beslutningsprosess. Artikkelen identifiserer fem sentrale og konkrete spørsmål for vurderingen av NIPT.Nøkkelord: non-invasiv prenatal diagnostikk, testing, fravalg, foster, blodprøve, ekspressivisme, statsliberalt dilemma, dilemma, abort, retten til ikke å viteEnglish summary: Ethical challenges with non-invasive prenatal tests (NIPTNon-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT performed with the use of massively parallel sequencing of cell-free DNA (cfDNA testing in maternal plasma gives extended possibilities in prenatal screening. The tests are claimed to be better than existing alternative tests, they reduce the risk, and it is claimed they are cheaper. They have been used in several countries since 2012, and the University Hospital of North Norway has applied to the Directorate of Health to replace first trimester ultrasound and plasma screening with NIPT. The Directorate of Health is reluctant to reply. Why is this? One of the answers may be that NIPT raises a series of professional and moral questions, and poses profound ethical challenges. This article reviews a series of the challenges with NIPT. The aim is to highlight why NIPT calls for ethical reflection and to contribute to an open debate

  10. Invasive validation of arteriograph estimates of central blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossen, Niklas Blach; Laugesen, Esben; Peters, Christian Daugaard; Ebbehøj, Eva; Knudsen, Søren Tang; Poulsen, Per Løgstrup; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Hansen, Klavs Würgler

    2014-05-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) has attracted increasing interest because of a potential superiority over brachial BP in predicting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Several devices estimating central BP noninvasively are now available. The aim of our study was to determine the validity of the Arteriograph, a brachial cuff-based, oscillometric device, in patients with type 2 diabetes. We measured central BP invasively and compared it with the Arteriograph-estimated values in 22 type 2 diabetic patients referred to elective coronary angiography. The difference (invasively measured BP minus Arteriograph-estimated BP) in central systolic BP (SBP) was 4.4±8.7 mm Hg (P = 0.03). The limits of agreement were ±17.1 mm Hg. Compared with invasively measured central SBP, we found a systematic underestimation by the Arteriograph. However, the limits of agreement were similar to the previous Arteriograph validation study and to the invasive validation studies of other brachial cuff-based, oscillometric devices. A limitation in our study was the large number of patients (n = 14 of 36) in which the Arteriograph was unable to analyze the pressure curves. In a research setting, the Arteriograph seems applicable in patients with type 2 diabetes. ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01538290.

  11. Non-invasive distinction of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease using urinary volatile organic compound analysis: early results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasaradnam, Ramesh P; McFarlane, Michael; Daulton, Emma; Westenbrink, Erik; O'Connell, Nicola; Wurie, Subiatu; Nwokolo, Chuka U; Bardhan, Karna D; Savage, Richard S; Covington, James A

    2015-06-01

    Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) is the commonest cause of chronic liver disease in the western world. Current diagnostic methods including Fibroscan have limitations, thus there is a need for more robust non-invasive screening methods. The gut microbiome is altered in several gastrointestinal and hepatic disorders resulting in altered, unique gut fermentation patterns, detectable by analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in urine, breath and faeces. We performed a proof of principle pilot study to determine if progressive fatty liver disease produced an altered urinary VOC pattern; specifically NAFLD and Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH). 34 patients were recruited: 8 NASH cirrhotics (NASH-C); 7 non-cirrhotic NASH; 4 NAFLD and 15 controls. Urine was collected and stored frozen. For assay, the samples were defrosted and aliquoted into vials, which were heated to 40±0.1°C and the headspace analyzed by FAIMS (Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectroscopy). A previously used data processing pipeline employing a Random Forrest classification algorithm and using a 10 fold cross validation method was applied. Urinary VOC results demonstrated sensitivity of 0.58 (0.33 - 0.88), but specificity of 0.93 (0.68 - 1.00) and an Area Under Curve (AUC) 0.73 (0.55 - 0.90) to distinguish between liver disease and controls. However, NASH/NASH-C was separated from the NAFLD/controls with a sensitivity of 0.73 (0.45 - 0.92), specificity of 0.79 (0.54 - 0.94) and AUC of 0.79 (0.64 - 0.95), respectively. This pilot study suggests that urinary VOCs detection may offer the potential for early non-invasive characterisation of liver disease using 'smell prints' to distinguish between NASH and NAFLD.

  12. Non-invasive measurements of tissue hemodynamics with hybrid diffuse optical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durduran, Turgut

    Diffuse optical techniques were used to measure hemodynamics of tissues non-invasively. Spectroscopy and tomography of the brain, muscle and implanted tumors were carried out in animal models and humans. Two qualitatively different methods, diffuse optical tomography and diffuse correlation tomography, were hybridized permitting simultaneous measurement of total hemoglobin concentration, blood oxygen saturation and blood flow. This combination of information was processed further to derive estimates of oxygen metabolism (e.g. CMRO 2) in tissue. The diffuse correlation measurements of blood flow were demonstrated in human tissues, for the first time, demonstrating continous, non-invasive imaging of oxygen metabolism in large tissue volumes several centimeters below the tissue surface. The bulk of these investigations focussed on cerebral hemodynamics. Extensive validation of this methodology was carried out in in vivo rat brain models. Three dimensional images of deep tissue hemodynamics in middle cerebral artery occlusion and cortical spreading depression (CSD) were obtained. CSD hemodynamics were found to depend strongly on partial pressure of carbon dioxide. The technique was then adapted for measurement of human brain. All optical spectroscopic measurements of CMRO2 during functional activation were obtained through intact human skull non-invasively. Finally, a high spatio-temporal resolution measurement of cerebral blood flow due to somatosensory cortex activation following electrical forepaw stimulation in rats was carried out with laser speckle flowmetry. New analysis methods were introduced for laser speckle flowmetry. In other organs, deep tissue hemodynamics were measured on human calf muscle during exercise and cuff-ischemia and were shown to have some clinical utility for peripheral vascular disease. In mice tumor models, the measured hemodynamics were shown to be predictive of photodynamic therapy efficacy, again suggesting promise of clinical utility

  13. Non-invasive assessments for liver fibrosis - the crystal ball we long for.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Grace Lai-Hung

    2018-01-30

    Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis has been one of the most rapidly advancing fields in hepatology in the last decade. Progressive liver fibrosis results in cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and various liver-related complications in essentially all chronic liver diseases. Assessment of liver fibrosis allows clinicians to determine the prognosis, need of treatment, disease progression and response to treatment in patients with chronic liver disease. Liver biopsy has been the gold standard in last few decades and most adopted diagnostic tool in clinical trials. Nonetheless, it is impractical to apply the test in a large number of patients or to do it serially. Hence, various non-invasive assessments have been developed and adopted in some international management guidelines. Liver stiffness measurement (LSM) with transient elastography one of the most widely validated non-invasive assessments for liver fibrosis. It is an accurate and reproducible method to predict advanced fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B. Using transient elastography, it is possible to perform repeated liver fibrosis assessments on a large number of asymptomatic patients. The key challenge of his tool is the confounding effect of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level, such that decrease in LSM may only reflect ALT normalization, hence not accurate enough to indicate regression of liver fibrosis. This may be partially handled by combining LSM with a serum-based formula which is independent of ALT such as the Forns index and Enhanced Liver Fibrosis test. A LSM-based HCC risk score (LSM-HCC score) is useful to prioritize patients for HCC surveillance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficient distinction of invasive aquatic plant species from non-invasive related species using DNA barcoding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghahramanzadeh, R.; Esselink, G.; Kodde, L.P.; Duistermaat, H.; Valkenburg, van J.L.C.H.; Marashi, S.H.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Wiel, van de C.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions are regarded as threats to global biodiversity. Among invasive aliens, a number of plant species belonging to the genera Myriophyllum, Ludwigia and Cabomba, and to the Hydrocharitaceae family pose a particular ecological threat to water bodies. Therefore, one would try to

  15. Photoionization sensors for non-invasive medical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaev, Aleksandr; Rastvorova, Iuliia; Khobnya, Kristina; Podenko, Sofia

    2016-09-01

    The analysis of biomarkers can help to identify the significant number of diseases: lung cancer, tuberculosis, diabetes, high levels of stress, psychosomatic disorders etc. To implement continuous monitoring of the state of human health, compact VUV photoionization detector with current-voltage measurement is designed by Saint-Petersburg Mining University Plasma Research Group. This sensor is based on the patented method of stabilization of electric parameters - CES (Collisional Electron Spectroscopy). During the operation at atmospheric pressure VUV photoionization sensor measures the energy of electrons, produced in the ionization with the resonance photons, whose wavelength situated in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV). A special software was developed to obtain the second-order derivative of the I-U characteristics, taken by the VUV sensor, to construct the energy spectra of the characteristic electrons. VUV photoionization detector has an unique set of parameters: small size (10*10*1 mm), low cost, wide range of recognizable molecules, as well as accuracy, sufficient for using this instrument for the medical purposes. This device can be used for non-invasive medical diagnostics without compromising the quality of life, for control of environment and human life. Work supported by Foundation for Assistance to Small Innovative Enterprises in Science and Technology.

  16. Application of optical non-invasive methods in skin physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, J.; Patzelt, A.; Darvin, M.; Richter, H.; Antoniou, C.; Sterry, W.; Koch, S.

    2008-05-01

    In the present paper the application of optical non-invasive methods in dermatology and cosmetology is discussed. Laser scanning microscopy (LSM) and optical coherent tomography (OCT) are the most promising methods for this application. Using these methods, the analysis of different skin parameters like dryness and oiliness of the skin, the barrier function and the structure of furrows and wrinkles are discussed. Additionally the homogeneity of distribution of topically applied creams, as well as their penetration into the skin were investigated. It is shown that these methods are highly valuable in dermatology for diagnostic and therapy control and for basic research, for instance in the field of structure analysis of hair follicles and sweat glands. The vertical images of the tissue produced by OCT can be easily compared with histological sections. Unfortunately, the resolution of the OCT technique is not high enough to carry out measurements on a cellular level, as is possible by LSM. LSM has the advantage that it can be used for the investigation of penetration and storage processes of topically applied substances, if these substances have fluorescent properties or if they are fluorescent-labelled.

  17. Reducing proactive aggression through non-invasive brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambacher, Franziska; Schuhmann, Teresa; Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud; Brugman, Suzanne; Sack, Alexander T

    2015-10-01

    Aggressive behavior poses a threat to human collaboration and social safety. It is of utmost importance to identify the functional mechanisms underlying aggression and to develop potential interventions capable of reducing dysfunctional aggressive behavior already at a brain level. We here experimentally shifted fronto-cortical asymmetry to manipulate the underlying motivational emotional states in both male and female participants while assessing the behavioral effects on proactive and reactive aggression. Thirty-two healthy volunteers received either anodal transcranial direct current stimulation to increase neural activity within right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, or sham stimulation. Aggressive behavior was measured with the Taylor Aggression Paradigm. We revealed a general gender effect, showing that men displayed more behavioral aggression than women. After the induction of right fronto-hemispheric dominance, proactive aggression was reduced in men. This study demonstrates that non-invasive brain stimulation can reduce aggression in men. This is a relevant and promising step to better understand how cortical brain states connect to impulsive actions and to examine the causal role of the prefrontal cortex in aggression. Ultimately, such findings could help to examine whether the brain can be a direct target for potential supportive interventions in clinical settings dealing with overly aggressive patients and/or violent offenders. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Non-invasive system for monitoring of the manufacturing equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazăre, A. G.; Belu, N.; Ionescu, L. M.; Rachieru, N.; Misztal, A.

    2017-08-01

    The automotive industry is one of the most important industries in the world that concerns the economy and the world culture. High demand has resulted in increasing of the pressure on the production lines. In conclusion, it is required more careful in monitoring of the production equipment not only for maintenance but also for staff safety and to increase the quality of production. In this paper, we propose a solution for non-invasive monitoring of the industrial equipment operation by measuring the current consumption on energy supply lines. Thus, it is determined the utilization schedule of the equipment and operation mode. Based on these measurements, it’s built an activity report for that equipment, available to the quality management and maintenance team. The solution consists of the current measuring equipment, with self-harvesting capabilities and radio transceiver, and an embedded system which run a server. The current measuring equipment will transmit data about consumption of each energy supply network line where is placed the industrial equipment. So, we have an internal measuring radio network. The embedded system will collect data for the equipment and put in a local data base and it will provide via an intranet application. The entire system not requires any supplementary energy supply and interventions in the factory infrastructure. It is experimented in a company from the automotive industries.

  19. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Neil E; Wand, Benedict M; Marston, Louise; Spencer, Sally; Desouza, Lorraine H

    2014-04-11

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in 2010, Issue 9. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques aim to induce an electrical stimulation of the brain in an attempt to reduce chronic pain by directly altering brain activity. They include repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and reduced impedance non-invasive cortical electrostimulation (RINCE). To evaluate the efficacy of non-invasive brain stimulation techniques in chronic pain. We searched CENTRAL (2013, Issue 6), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, LILACS and clinical trials registers. The original search for the review was run in November 2009 and searched all databases from their inception. To identify studies for inclusion in this update we searched from 2009 to July 2013. Randomised and quasi-randomised studies of rTMS, CES, tDCS or RINCE if they employed a sham stimulation control group, recruited patients over the age of 18 with pain of three months duration or more and measured pain as a primary outcome. Two authors independently extracted and verified data. Where possible we entered data into meta-analyses. We excluded studies judged as being at high risk of bias from the analysis. We used the GRADE system to summarise the quality of evidence for core comparisons. We included an additional 23 trials (involving 773 participants randomised) in this update, making a total of 56 trials in the review (involving 1710 participants randomised). This update included a total of 30 rTMS studies, 11 CES, 14 tDCS and one study of RINCE(the original review included 19 rTMS, eight CES and six tDCS studies). We judged only three studies as being at low risk of bias across all criteria.Meta-analysis of studies of rTMS (involving 528 participants) demonstrated significant heterogeneity. Pre-specified subgroup analyses suggest that low-frequency stimulation is ineffective (low

  20. Reducing proactive aggression through non-invasive brain stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhmann, Teresa; Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud; Brugman, Suzanne; Sack, Alexander T.

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive behavior poses a threat to human collaboration and social safety. It is of utmost importance to identify the functional mechanisms underlying aggression and to develop potential interventions capable of reducing dysfunctional aggressive behavior already at a brain level. We here experimentally shifted fronto-cortical asymmetry to manipulate the underlying motivational emotional states in both male and female participants while assessing the behavioral effects on proactive and reactive aggression. Thirty-two healthy volunteers received either anodal transcranial direct current stimulation to increase neural activity within right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, or sham stimulation. Aggressive behavior was measured with the Taylor Aggression Paradigm. We revealed a general gender effect, showing that men displayed more behavioral aggression than women. After the induction of right fronto-hemispheric dominance, proactive aggression was reduced in men. This study demonstrates that non-invasive brain stimulation can reduce aggression in men. This is a relevant and promising step to better understand how cortical brain states connect to impulsive actions and to examine the causal role of the prefrontal cortex in aggression. Ultimately, such findings could help to examine whether the brain can be a direct target for potential supportive interventions in clinical settings dealing with overly aggressive patients and/or violent offenders. PMID:25680991

  1. Alteration of Political Belief by Non-invasive Brain Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawke, Caroline; Kanai, Ryota

    2015-01-01

    People generally have imperfect introspective access to the mechanisms underlying their political beliefs, yet can confidently communicate the reasoning that goes into their decision making process. An innate desire for certainty and security in ones beliefs may play an important and somewhat automatic role in motivating the maintenance or rejection of partisan support. The aim of the current study was to clarify the role of the DLPFC in the alteration of political beliefs. Recent neuroimaging studies have focused on the association between the DLPFC (a region involved in the regulation of cognitive conflict and error feedback processing) and reduced affiliation with opposing political candidates. As such, this study used a method of non-invasive brain simulation (tRNS) to enhance activity of the bilateral DLPFC during the incorporation of political campaign information. These findings indicate a crucial role for this region in political belief formation. However, enhanced activation of DLPFC does not necessarily result in the specific rejection of political beliefs. In contrast to the hypothesis the results appear to indicate a significant increase in conservative values regardless of participant's initial political orientation and the political campaign advertisement they were exposed to.

  2. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, M W; Steven, M H; Phillips, G D; Branthwaite, M A

    1990-02-10

    The value of mechanical ventilation using intermittent positive pressure ventilation delivered non-invasively by nasal mask was assessed in six patients with life threatening exacerbations of chronic respiratory disease. Median (range) arterial oxygen and carbon dioxide tensions were 4.4 (3.5-7.2) kPa and 8.7 (5.5-10.9) kPa respectively, with four patients breathing air and two controlled concentrations of oxygen. The arterial oxygen tension increased with mechanical ventilation to a median (range) of 8.7 (8.0-12.6) kPa and the carbon dioxide tension fell to 8.2 (6.5-9.2) kPa. Four patients discharged after a median of 10 (8-17) days in hospital were well five to 22 months later. One died at four days of worsening sputum retention and another after five weeks using the ventilator for 12-16 hours each day while awaiting heart-lung transplantation. This technique of mechanical ventilation avoids endotracheal intubation and can be used intermittently. Hypercapnic respiratory failure can be relieved in patients with either restrictive or obstructive lung disease in whom controlled oxygen treatment results in unacceptable hypercapnia. Respiratory assistance can be tailored to individual need and undertaken without conventional intensive care facilities.

  3. Discordant non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Tanja Schlaikjaer; Ambye, Louise; Sørensen, Steen; Jørgensen, Finn Stener

    2017-06-01

    With a high sensitivity and specificity, non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) is an incomparable screening test for fetal aneuploidy. However, the method is rather newly introduced, and experiences with discordant results are few. We did a systematic review of literature reporting details of false positive and false negative NIPT results. Discordant sex chromosome results were not included. We identified 22 studies reporting case details. In total, 206 discordant cases were included, of which 88% were false positive and 12% false negative. Details on maternal age, gestational age, platform/company, Z-score, fetal fraction, results and explanation were specified. The main reasons for discordant results were confined placental mosaicism, maternal copy number variation, vanished twin, maternal cancer and true fetal mosaicism. A very high percentage of cases (67%) were reported with no obvious biological or technical explanation for the discordant result. The included cases represent only a minor part of the true number of false positive or false negative NIPT cases identified in fetal medicine clinics around the world. To ensure knowledge exchange and transparency of NIPT between laboratories, we suggest a systematic recording of discordant NIPT results, as well as a quality assurance by external quality control and accreditation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring in neonates using bioreactance: a comparison with echocardiography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Weisz, Dany E

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring is a potentially useful clinical tool in the neonatal setting. Our aim was to evaluate a new method of non-invasive continuous cardiac output (CO) measurement (NICOM™) based on the principle of bioreactance in neonates.

  5. Advanced signal processing theory and implementation for sonar, radar, and non-invasive medical diagnostic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Stergiopoulos, Stergios

    2009-01-01

    Integrates topics of signal processing from sonar, radar, and medical system technologies by identifying their concept similarities. This book covers non-invasive medical diagnostic system applications, including intracranial ultrasound, a technology that attempts to address non-invasive detection on brain injuries and stroke.

  6. Markers for the non-invasive diagnosis of mesothelioma: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bij, S.; Schaake, E.; Koffijberg, H.; Burgers, J. A.; de Mol, B. A. J. M.; Moons, K. G. M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Numerous markers have been evaluated to facilitate the non-invasive diagnostic work-up of mesothelioma. The purpose of this study was to conduct a structured review of the diagnostic performance of non-invasive marker tests for the detection of mesothelioma in patients with suspected

  7. Markers for the non-invasive diagnosis of mesothelioma : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bij, S.; Schaake, E.; Koffijberg, H.; Burgers, J. A.; De Mol, B. A J M; Moons, K.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Numerous markers have been evaluated to facilitate the non-invasive diagnostic work-up of mesothelioma. The purpose of this study was to conduct a structured review of the diagnostic performance of non-invasive marker tests for the detection of mesothelioma in patients with suspected

  8. Non-invasive evaluation of physiological stress in an iconic Australian marsupial: the Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Edward J; Webster, Koa; Nicolson, Vere; Mucci, Al; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2013-06-15

    Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) are the only extant representatives of Australia's unique marsupial family Phascolarctidae and were listed as nationally Vulnerable in 2012. Causes of mortality are diverse, although the disease chlamydiosis, dog attacks, collisions with cars, and loss of habitat represent the principal reasons for the continued species decline. Koala breeding facilities in Queensland and New South Wales, Australia have been established for conservation and tourism. Non-invasive monitoring of physiological stress is important for determining the sub-lethal effects of environmental stressors on the well-being, reproduction and survival of Koalas in Zoos and also in the wild. In this study, we developed a faecal cortisol metabolite (FCM) enzyme-immunoassay (EIA) for monitoring physiological stress in Koalas from two established Zoos in Australia and also within a free-living sub-population from Queensland. Biological validation of the FCM EIA was done using an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge. We discovered excretory lag-times of FCM of 24 h in females (n=2) and 48 h in male (n=2) Koalas in response to the ACTH challenge. FCM levels showed an episodic and delayed peak response lasting up to 9 days post ACTH challenge. This finding should be taken into consideration when designing future experiments to study the impacts of short-term (acute) and chronic stressors on the Koalas. Laboratory validations were done using parallelism and recovery checks (extraction efficiency) of the cortisol standard against pooled Koala faecal extracts. Greater than 99% recovery of the cortisol standard was obtained as well as a parallel displacement curve against Koala faecal extracts. FCM levels of the captive Koalas (n=10 males and 13 females) significantly differed by sex, reproductive condition (lactating versus non-lactating Koalas) and the handling groups. Handled male Koalas had 200% higher FCM levels than their non-handled counterparts, while females

  9. Non-invasive mechanic ventilation in treating acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Lari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Non invasive ventilation (NIV in acute respiratory failure (ARF improve clinical parameters, arterial blood gases, decrease mortality and endo tracheal intubation (ETI rate also outside the intensive care units (ICUs. Objective of this study is to verify applicability of NIV in a general non respiratory medical ward. We enrolled 68 consecutive patients (Pts with Hypoxemic or Hyper capnic ARF: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE, exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, Pneu - monia, acute lung injury / acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS. NIV treatment was CPAP or PSV + PEEP. 12 Pts (18,5% met primary endpoint (NIV failure: 11 Pts (17% needed ETI (5ALI/ARDS p < 0,0001, 6COPD 16,6%, 1 Patient (1,5% died (Pneumonia. No Pts with ACPE failed (p = 0,0027. Secondary endpoints: significant improvement in Respiratory Rate (RR, Kelly Score, pH, PaCO2, PaO2 vs baseline. Median duration of treatment: 16:06 hours: COPD 18:54, ACPE 4:15. Mean length of hospitalisation: 8.66 days. No patients discontinued NIV, no side effects. Results are consistent with literature. Hypoxemic ARF related to ALI/ARDS and pneumonia show worst outcome: it is not advisable to manage these conditions with NIV outside the ICU. NIV for ARF due to COPD and ACPE is feasible, safe and effective in a general medical ward if selection of Pts, staff’s training and monitoring are appropriate. This should encourage the diffusion of NIV in this specific setting. According to strong evidences in literature, NIV should be considered a first line and standard treatment in these clinical conditions irrespective of the setting.

  10. Striving for habitual well-being in non-invasive ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dorthe; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Grøfte, Thorbjørn

    2013-01-01

    ’ behaviour. Conclusions. The substantive theory revealed that the patients’ behaviour was related to their breathlessness, sensation of being restrained by the mask and head gear, and the side effects of non-invasive ventilation. Relevance to clinical practice. This inter-relationship should be addressed......Aims: We present a theoretical account of the pattern of behaviour in patients with acute respiratory failure due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease while undergoing non-invasive ventilation in a hospital setting. Background. Strong evidence supports a positive effect of non......-invasive ventilation, but successful treatment remains a challenge. Little attention has been given to patients’ intolerance of non-invasive ventilation as a cause of treatment failure. A better understanding of the patients’ patterns of behaviour during non-invasive ventilation may improve treatment success. Design...

  11. Agreement of invasive and non-invasive blood pressure measurements in anaesthetised pigs using the Surgivet V9203.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuohy, Philomena P; Raisis, Anthea L; Drynan, Eleanor A

    2017-12-01

    The automated oscillometric method is a common method for measuring blood pressure non-invasively and is broadly and confidently used in the veterinary setting. Twenty-one pigs undergoing anesthesia for exploratory laparotomy were enrolled in a study to evaluate the performance of the Surgivet V9203 non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) monitor. The aim was to compare measurements of arterial blood pressure obtained simultaneously using the Surgivet V9203 oscillometric system and an intra-arterial catheter-transducer system, both at the level of the metatarsus. Invasive blood pressure (IBP) was consistently underestimated by the non-invasive method. Bland-Altman analysis showed poor agreement between the two modalities based on evaluation of mean bias and 95% limits of agreement. The Surgivet V9203 cannot therefore be recommended as a reliable alternative to invasive blood pressure monitoring in anaesthetised pigs. As pulse detection is one of the most important factors affecting NIBP accuracy it is likely that our findings may reflect an anatomical or physiological difference in the species that alters the detection of wall movement by the oscillometric technique and additionally, makes the algorithm used by the Surgivet to determine blood pressure parameters unsuitable for use in pigs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Rosa; Buzzetti, Elena; Roccarina, Davide; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) consists of a broad spectrum of disorders, ranging from simple steatosis to alcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Fatty liver develops in more than 90% of heavy drinkers, however only 30%-35% of them develop more advanced forms of ALD. Therefore, even if the current “gold standard” for the assessment of the stage of alcohol-related liver injury is histology, liver biopsy is not reasonable in all patients who present with ALD. Currently, although several non-invasive fibrosis markers have been suggested as alternatives to liver biopsy in patients with ALD, none has been sufficiently validated. As described in other liver disease, the diagnostic accuracy of such tests in ALD is acceptable for the diagnosis of significant fibrosis or cirrhosis but not for lesser fibrosis stages. Existing data suggest that the use of non-invasive tests could be tailored to first tier screening of patients at risk, in order to diagnose early patients with progressive liver disease and offer targeted interventions for the prevention of decompensation. We review these tests and critically appraise the existing evidence. PMID:26494961

  13. Electromyography data for non-invasive naturally-controlled robotic hand prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Manfredo; Gijsberts, Arjan; Castellini, Claudio; Caputo, Barbara; Hager, Anne-Gabrielle Mittaz; Elsig, Simone; Giatsidis, Giorgio; Bassetto, Franco; Müller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in rehabilitation robotics suggest that it may be possible for hand-amputated subjects to recover at least a significant part of the lost hand functionality. The control of robotic prosthetic hands using non-invasive techniques is still a challenge in real life: myoelectric prostheses give limited control capabilities, the control is often unnatural and must be learned through long training times. Meanwhile, scientific literature results are promising but they are still far from fulfilling real-life needs. This work aims to close this gap by allowing worldwide research groups to develop and test movement recognition and force control algorithms on a benchmark scientific database. The database is targeted at studying the relationship between surface electromyography, hand kinematics and hand forces, with the final goal of developing non-invasive, naturally controlled, robotic hand prostheses. The validation section verifies that the data are similar to data acquired in real-life conditions, and that recognition of different hand tasks by applying state-of-the-art signal features and machine-learning algorithms is possible. PMID:25977804

  14. Electromyography data for non-invasive naturally-controlled robotic hand prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Manfredo; Gijsberts, Arjan; Castellini, Claudio; Caputo, Barbara; Hager, Anne-Gabrielle Mittaz; Elsig, Simone; Giatsidis, Giorgio; Bassetto, Franco; Müller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in rehabilitation robotics suggest that it may be possible for hand-amputated subjects to recover at least a significant part of the lost hand functionality. The control of robotic prosthetic hands using non-invasive techniques is still a challenge in real life: myoelectric prostheses give limited control capabilities, the control is often unnatural and must be learned through long training times. Meanwhile, scientific literature results are promising but they are still far from fulfilling real-life needs. This work aims to close this gap by allowing worldwide research groups to develop and test movement recognition and force control algorithms on a benchmark scientific database. The database is targeted at studying the relationship between surface electromyography, hand kinematics and hand forces, with the final goal of developing non-invasive, naturally controlled, robotic hand prostheses. The validation section verifies that the data are similar to data acquired in real-life conditions, and that recognition of different hand tasks by applying state-of-the-art signal features and machine-learning algorithms is possible.

  15. A multiplex PCR for non-invasive fetal RHD genotyping using cell-free fetal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tounta, Georgia; Vrettou, Christina; Kolialexi, Aggeliki; Papantoniou, Nikolas; Destouni, Aspasia; Tsangaris, George T; Antsaklis, Aris; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Mavrou, Ariadni

    2011-01-01

    To design a protocol for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of fetal Rhesus D (RhD) status. A total of 112 single lymphocytes were used to test the efficiency of the assay. The protocol was validated using blood samples from 84 RhD-negative pregnant women at 7-24 weeks of gestation. Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) was enzymatically digested using AciI and analyzed by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that allowed simultaneous amplification of RHD exons 7 and 10, SRY, RASFF1A and ACTB. On the one genome-equivalent level, the efficiency of the protocol was ≥ 94.6% for each locus amplified. Conclusive results from the first set of PCRs were obtained for 79 cases with one false-positive. In five cases the analysis was repeated and, subsequently, all cases were accurately diagnosed. The proposed protocol is rapid, applicable in most molecular diagnostic laboratories and provides the basis for non-invasive examination of fetal RhD with 96.7% specificity and 100% sensitivity.

  16. Development and validation of a novel predictive scoring model for microvascular invasion in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Hua, Ye; Dai, Tu; He, Jian; Tang, Min; Fu, Xu; Mao, Liang; Jin, Huihan; Qiu, Yudong

    2017-03-01

    Microvascular invasion (MVI) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cannot be accurately predicted preoperatively. This study aimed to establish a predictive scoring model of MVI in solitary HCC patients without macroscopic vascular invasion. A total of 309 consecutive HCC patients who underwent curative hepatectomy were divided into the derivation (n=206) and validation cohort (n=103). A predictive scoring model of MVI was established according to the valuable predictors in the derivation cohort based on multivariate logistic regression analysis. The performance of the predictive model was evaluated in the derivation and validation cohorts. Preoperative imaging features on CECT, such as intratumoral arteries, non-nodular type of HCC and absence of radiological tumor capsule were independent predictors for MVI. The predictive scoring model was established according to the β coefficients of the 3 predictors. Area under receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) of the predictive scoring model was 0.872 (95% CI, 0.817-0.928) and 0.856 (95% CI, 0.771-0.940) in the derivation and validation cohorts. The positive and negative predictive values were 76.5% and 88.0% in the derivation cohort and 74.4% and 88.3% in the validation cohort. The performance of the model was similar between the patients with tumor size ≤5cm and >5cm in AUROC (P=0.910). The predictive scoring model based on intratumoral arteries, non-nodular type of HCC, and absence of the radiological tumor capsule on preoperative CECT is of great value in the prediction of MVI regardless of tumor size. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Estimation Using Ultrasound and Simple Finite Element Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewski, Aaron M; Anthony, Brian

    2017-06-12

    Many commercially-available arterial blood pressure measurement devices suffer from a range of weaknesses. For example, common weaknesses include being inaccurate, invasive, and ad hoc; many also require explicit user calibration or cut off blood flow to a limb. A novel algorithmic approach is presented to accurately estimate systolic and diastolic blood pressure in a way that does not require any explicit user calibration, is non-invasive, and does not cut off blood flow. The approach uses ultrasound images of the arterial wall and corresponding contact force data to obtain blood pressure estimates. To acquire data, an ultrasound probe was placed on the patient's carotid artery and the contact force was increased from 1.5 to 12 Newtons. The artery was then algorithmically segmented from the recorded DICOM B-Mode data. The segmentation data and the contact force were used as input into the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method to solve for the parameters, including blood pressure, of a simple finite element model of the carotid artery. The algorithm was validated on 24 healthy volunteers. Algorithm arterial blood pressure predictions were compared to oscillometric blood pressure cuff readings. Regression and Bland- Altman analyses were performed on the data. Both systolic pressure and diastolic pressure can be estimated using this novel non-invasive ultrasound-based method (systolic accuracy/precision: -2.36 mmHg/10.21 mmHg; diastolic accuracy/precision: -0.32/8.23 mmHg). The method occupies a clinical middle ground between the arterial catheter and cuff-based techniques. It has the potential to give accurate results for patients with hypertension and atherosclerosis.

  18. Invasive Candidiasis in Various Patient Populations: Incorporating Non-Culture Diagnostic Tests into Rational Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Cornelius J.; Shields, Ryan K.; Nguyen, M. Hong

    2016-01-01

    Mortality rates due to invasive candidiasis remain unacceptably high, in part because the poor sensitivity and slow turn-around time of cultures delay the initiation of antifungal treatment. β-d-glucan (Fungitell) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based (T2Candida) assays are FDA-approved adjuncts to cultures for diagnosing invasive candidiasis, but their clinical roles are unclear. We propose a Bayesian framework for interpreting non-culture test results and developing rational patient management strategies, which considers test performance and types of invasive candidiasis that are most common in various patient populations. β-d-glucan sensitivity/specificity for candidemia and intra-abdominal candidiasis is ~80%/80% and ~60%/75%, respectively. In settings with 1%–10% likelihood of candidemia, anticipated β-d-glucan positive and negative predictive values are ~4%–31% and ≥97%, respectively. Corresponding values in settings with 3%–30% likelihood of intra-abdominal candidiasis are ~7%–51% and ~78%–98%. β-d-glucan is predicted to be useful in guiding antifungal treatment for wide ranges of populations at-risk for candidemia (incidence ~5%–40%) or intra-abdominal candidiasis (~7%–20%). Validated PCR-based assays should broaden windows to include populations at lower-risk for candidemia (incidence ≥~2%) and higher-risk for intra-abdominal candidiasis (up to ~40%). In the management of individual patients, non-culture tests may also have value outside of these windows. The proposals we put forth are not definitive treatment guidelines, but rather represent starting points for clinical trial design and debate by the infectious diseases community. The principles presented here will be applicable to other assays as they enter the clinic, and to existing assays as more data become available from different populations. PMID:29376927

  19. Non-invasive assessment of in-vitro embryo quality to improve transfer success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbøge, Tina Rødgaard; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Callesen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    embryos before the transfer to a recipient still remains challenging. Presently, the predominant non-invasive technique for selecting viable embryos is based on morphology, where parameters such as rates of cleavage and blastocyst formation as well as developmental kinetics are evaluated mostly...... subjectively. The simple morphological approach is, however, inadequate for the prediction of embryo quality, and several studies have focused on developing new non-invasive methods using molecular approaches based particularly on proteomics, metabolomics and most recently small non-coding RNA, including micro......RNA. This review outlines the potential of several non-invasive in-vitro methods based on analysis of spent embryo culture medium....

  20. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in hematology patients: let's agree on several things first.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, David; Lemiale, Virginie; Azoulay, Élie

    2012-11-19

    Acute respiratory failure is a dreaded and life-threatening event that represents the main reason for ICU admission. Respiratory events occur in up to 50% of hematology patients, including one-half of those admitted to the ICU. Mortality from acute respiratory failure in hematology patients depends on the patient's general status, acute respiratory failure etiology, need for mechanical ventilation and associated organ dysfunction. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation is clearly beneficial for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. These benefits are based mainly on the avoidance of invasive mechanical ventilation complications. Non-invasive mechanical has also been recommended in hematology patients with acute respiratory failure but its real benefits remain unclear in these settings. There is growing concern about the safety of non-invasive mechanical ventilation to treat hypoxemic acute respiratory failure overall, but also in hematology patients. Prophylactic non-invasive mechanical ventilation in patients with acute respiratory failure but not respiratory distress seems to be effective in hematology patients with a reduced rate of intubation. However, curative non-invasive mechanical ventilation should be restricted to those patients with isolated respiratory failure, with fast improvement of respiratory distress under non-invasive mechanical ventilation, and with rapid switch to intubation to avoid deleterious delays in optimal invasive mechanical ventilation.

  1. Rejuvenecimiento periorbitario no invasivo Non-invasive periorbital rejuvenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Muñóz del Olmo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Cirujanos plásticos y médicos estéticos se esfuerzan por lograr resultados satisfactorios y estéticos que mejoren o suavicen el paso del tiempo a nivel facial, con un especial interés o énfasis en el área periorbitaria. Un gran número de pacientes consultan para mejorar esta zona, pero por diferentes motivos desean que los procedimientos que se les realicen sean poco invasivos y con resultados rápidos, permitiéndoles así incorporarse lo antes posible a sus actividades cotidianas. Es fundamental el conocimiento de las proporciones faciales y periorbitarias para lograr resultados naturales. El objetivo de la técnica que proponemos es lograr una bioestimulación local de la piel, restaurar los volúmenes y reducir las arrugas de expresión o dinámicas, consiguiendo así una apariencia relajada y juvenil en el paciente.Plastic surgeons and aesthetic doctors are making an effort to reach positive aesthetic results. Their aim is to soften the effects of age on facial features stressing in the periorbital area. Many patients come to improve their facial image on this area, but they are asking for non-invasive and fast procedures to keep on their daily life. It is indispensable the knowledge of facial and periorbital proportions to achieve a more natural effect. The aim of the technique exposed is to achieve a local bioestimulation on skin, to restore volumes and to reduce expression and dynamical wrinkles. The expected result is a relaxing, youthful appearance.

  2. Non-invasive genetic monitoring of wild central chimpanzees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimi Arandjelovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An assessment of population size and structure is an important first step in devising conservation and management plans for endangered species. Many threatened animals are elusive, rare and live in habitats that prohibit directly counting individuals. For example, a well-founded estimate of the number of great apes currently living in the wild is lacking. Developing methods to obtain accurate population estimates for these species is a priority for their conservation management. Genotyping non-invasively collected faecal samples is an effective way of evaluating a species' population size without disruption, and can also reveal details concerning population structure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We opportunistically collected wild chimpanzee faecal samples for genetic capture-recapture analyses over a four-year period in a 132 km(2 area of Loango National Park, Gabon. Of the 444 samples, 46% yielded sufficient quantities of DNA for genotyping analysis and the consequent identification of 121 individuals. Using genetic capture-recapture, we estimate that 283 chimpanzees (range: 208-316 inhabited the research area between February 2005 and July 2008. Since chimpanzee males are patrilocal and territorial, we genotyped samples from males using variable Y-chromosome microsatellite markers and could infer that seven chimpanzee groups are present in the area. Genetic information, in combination with field data, also suggested the occurrence of repeated cases of intergroup violence and a probable group extinction. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The poor amplification success rate resulted in a limited number of recaptures and hence only moderate precision (38%, measured as the entire width of the 95% confidence interval, but this was still similar to the best results obtained using intensive nest count surveys of apes (40% to 63%. Genetic capture-recapture methods applied to apes can provide a considerable amount of novel information on

  3. Current status of non-invasive prenatal testing in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samura, Osamu; Sekizawa, Akihiko; Suzumori, Nobuhiro; Sasaki, Aiko; Wada, Seiji; Hamanoue, Haruka; Hirahara, Fumiki; Sawai, Hideaki; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Yamada, Takahiro; Miura, Kiyonori; Masuzaki, Hideaki; Nakayama, Setsuko; Okai, Takashi; Kamei, Yoshimasa; Namba, Akira; Murotsuki, Jun; Tanemoto, Tomohiro; Fukushima, Akimune; Haino, Kazufumi; Tairaku, Shinya; Matsubara, Keiichi; Maeda, Kazuhisa; Kaji, Takashi; Ogawa, Masanobu; Osada, Hisao; Nishizawa, Haruki; Okamoto, Yoko; Kanagawa, Takeshi; Kakigano, Aiko; Kitagawa, Michihiro; Ogawa, Masaki; Izumi, Shunichiro; Katagiri, Yukiko; Takeshita, Naoki; Kasai, Yasuyo; Naruse, Katsuhiko; Neki, Reiko; Masuyama, Hisashi; Hyodo, Maki; Kawano, Yukie; Ohba, Takashi; Ichizuka, Kiyotake; Kido, Yasuhiro; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Miharu, Norio; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Watanabe, Atsushi; Hamajima, Naoki; Hirose, Masaya; Sanui, Ayako; Shirato, Nahoko; Yotsumoto, Junko; Nishiyama, Miyuki; Hirose, Tatsuko; Sago, Haruhiko

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the 3-year experience of a nationwide demonstration project to introduce non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) of maternal plasma for aneuploidy, and review the current status of NIPT in Japan. Tests were conducted to detect aneuploidy in high-risk pregnant women, and adequate genetic counseling was provided. The clinical data, test results, and pregnancy outcomes were recorded. We discuss the problems of NIPT on the basis of published reports and meta-analyses. From April 2013 to March 2016, 30 613 tests were conducted at 55 medical sites participating in a multicenter clinical study. Among the 30 613 women tested, 554 were positive (1.81%) and 30 021 were negative (98.1%) for aneuploidy. Of the 289, 128, and 44 women who tested positive for trisomies 21, 18, and 13, respectively, and underwent definitive testing, 279 (96.5%), 106 (82.8%), and 28 (63.6%) were determined to have a true-positive result. For the 13 481 women with negative result and whose progress could be traced, two had a false-negative result (0.02%). The tests were performed on the condition that a standard level of genetic counseling be provided at hospitals. Here, we report on the 3-year nationwide experience with NIPT in Japan. It is important to establish a genetic counseling system to enable women to make informed decisions regarding prenatal testing. Moreover, a welfare system is warranted to support women who decide to give birth to and raise children with chromosomal diseases. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  4. Development and Validation of a Novel Adult Spinal Deformity Surgical Invasiveness Score: Analysis of 464 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Brian J; Ailon, Tamir; Scheer, Justin K; Klineberg, Eric; Sciubba, Daniel M; Jain, Amit; Zebala, Lukas P; Passias, Peter G; Daniels, Alan H; Burton, Douglas C; Protopsaltis, Themi S; Hamilton, D Kojo; Ames, Christopher P

    2017-06-06

    A surgical invasiveness index (SII) has been validated in general spine procedures but not adult spinal deformity (ASD). To assess the ability of the SII to determine the invasiveness of ASD surgery and to create and validate a novel ASD index incorporating deformity-specific factors, which could serve as a standardized metric to compare outcomes and risk stratification of different ASD procedures for a given deformity. Four hundred sixty-four patients who underwent ASD surgery between 2009 and 2012 were identified in 2 multicenter prospective registries. Multivariable models of estimated blood loss (EBL) and operative time were created using deformity-specific factors. Beta coefficients derived from these models were used to attribute points to each component. Scoring was iteratively refined to determine the R 2 value of multivariate models of EBL and operative time using adult spinal deformity-surgical (ASD-S) as an independent variable. Similarly, we determined weighting of postoperative changes in radiographical parameters, which were incorporated into another index (adult spinal deformity-surgical and radiographical [ASD-SR]). The ability of these models to predict surgical invasiveness was assessed in a validation cohort. Each index was a significant, independent predictor of EBL and operative time ( P deformity-specific components, more accurately predicts the magnitude of ASD surgery than does the SII.

  5. Non-invasive Measurement of Pressure Gradients in Pulsatile Flow using Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Traberg, Marie Sand; Pihl, Michael Johannes

    2013-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how pressure gradients in a pulsatile flow environment can be measured non-invasively using ultrasound. The proposed method relies on vector velocity fields acquired from ultrasound data. 2-D flow data are acquired at 18-23 frames/sec using the Transverse Oscillation...... approach. Pressure gradients are calculated from the measured velocity fields using the Navier-Stokes equation. Velocity fields are measured during constant and pulsating flow on a carotid bifurcation phantom and on a common carotid artery in-vivo. Scanning is performed with a 5 MHz BK8670 linear...... transducer using a BK Medical 2202 UltraView Pro Focus scanner. The calculated pressure gradients are validated through a finite element simulation of the constant flow model. The geometry of the flow simulation model is reproduced using MRI data, thereby providing identical flow domains in measurement...

  6. Open source non-invasive prenatal testing platform and its performance in a public health laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Peter; Richter, Stine R; Balslev-Harder, Marie

    2016-01-01

    : The pipeline correctly detected 27/27 trisomy 21, 4/4 trisomy 18, and 3/3 trisomy 13 fetuses. Neither false negatives nor false positives (chromosomes 13, 18, and 21) were observed in our validation dataset. Fetal sex was identified correctly in all but one triploid fetus (172/173). SeqFF showed a strong...... correlation (R(2)  = 0.72) to Y-chromosomal content of the male fetus samples. DISCUSSION: We have implemented NIPT into Danish health care using published open source scripts for autosomal aneuploidy detection and fetal DNA fraction estimation showing excellent false negative and false positive rates. Seq......OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to introduce non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for fetal autosomal trisomies and gender in a Danish public health setting, using semi-conductor sequencing and published open source scripts for analysis. METHODS: Plasma-derived DNA from a total of 375...

  7. Non-invasive blood pressure measurement in ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) using high definition oscillometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zeeland, Y R A; Wilde, A; Bosman, I H; Uilenreef, J J; Egner, B; Schoemaker, N J

    2017-10-01

    This study was conducted to validate the use of high definition oscillometry (HDO) for non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) measurements in ferrets and to establish reference ranges for NIBP in minimally sedated, healthy, young adult ferrets (blood pressure (DABP) measurement were established in 14 anaesthetised ferrets. Measurements were performed at the forelimb, hind limb and tail under hypo- (170mmHg) conditions. Although HDO correlated well with DABP (r>0.90), it showed significant proportional bias, whereby HDO generally underestimated DABP with hyper- and normotensive conditions, and overestimated DABP with hypotensive conditions. Measurements obtained from the hind limb showed higher bias than those obtained from the tail or forelimb (Ppressures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Canis familiaris As a Model for Non-Invasive Comparative Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunford, Nóra; Andics, Attila; Kis, Anna; Miklósi, Ádám; Gácsi, Márta

    2017-07-01

    There is an ongoing need to improve animal models for investigating human behavior and its biological underpinnings. The domestic dog (Canis familiaris) is a promising model in cognitive neuroscience. However, before it can contribute to advances in this field in a comparative, reliable, and valid manner, several methodological issues warrant attention. We review recent non-invasive canine neuroscience studies, primarily focusing on (i) variability among dogs and between dogs and humans in cranial characteristics, and (ii) generalizability across dog and dog-human studies. We argue not for methodological uniformity but for functional comparability between methods, experimental designs, and neural responses. We conclude that the dog may become an innovative and unique model in comparative neuroscience, complementing more traditional models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Blow collection as a non-invasive method for measuring cortisol in the beluga (Delphinapterus leucas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Thompson

    Full Text Available Non-invasive sampling techniques are increasingly being used to monitor glucocorticoids, such as cortisol, as indicators of stressor load and fitness in zoo and wildlife conservation, research and medicine. For cetaceans, exhaled breath condensate (blow provides a unique sampling matrix for such purposes. The purpose of this work was to develop an appropriate collection methodology and validate the use of a commercially available EIA for measuring cortisol in blow samples collected from belugas (Delphinapterus leucas. Nitex membrane stretched over a petri dish provided the optimal method for collecting blow. A commercially available cortisol EIA for measuring human cortisol (detection limit 35 pg ml-1 was adapted and validated for beluga cortisol using tests of parallelism, accuracy and recovery. Blow samples were collected from aquarium belugas during monthly health checks and during out of water examination, as well as from wild belugas. Two aquarium belugas showed increased blow cortisol between baseline samples and 30 minutes out of water (Baseline, 0.21 and 0.04 µg dl-1; 30 minutes, 0.95 and 0.14 µg dl-1. Six wild belugas also showed increases in blow cortisol between pre and post 1.5 hour examination (Pre 0.03, 0.23, 0.13, 0.19, 0.13, 0.04 µg dl-1, Post 0.60, 0.31, 0.36, 0.24, 0.14, 0.16 µg dl-1. Though this methodology needs further investigation, this study suggests that blow sampling is a good candidate for non-invasive monitoring of cortisol in belugas. It can be collected from both wild and aquarium animals efficiently for the purposes of health monitoring and research, and may ultimately be useful in obtaining data on wild populations, including endangered species, which are difficult to handle directly.

  10. A non-invasive experimental approach for surface temperature measurements on semi-crystalline thermoplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boztepe, Sinan; Gilblas, Remi; de Almeida, Olivier; Le Maoult, Yannick; Schmidt, Fabrice

    2017-10-01

    Most of the thermoforming processes of thermoplastic polymers and their composites are performed adopting a combined heating and forming stages at which a precursor is heated prior to the forming. This step is done in order to improve formability by softening the thermoplastic polymer. Due to low thermal conductivity and semi-transparency of polymers, infrared (IR) heating is widely used for thermoforming of such materials. Predictive radiation heat transfer models for temperature distributions are therefore critical for optimizations of thermoforming process. One of the key challenges is to build a predictive model including the physical background of radiation heat transfer phenomenon in semi-crystalline thermoplastics as their microcrystalline structure introduces an optically heterogeneous medium. In addition, the accuracy of a predictive model is required to be validated experimentally where IR thermography is one of the suitable methods for such a validation as it provides a non-invasive, full-field surface temperature measurement. Although IR cameras provide a non-invasive measurement, a key issue for obtaining a reliable measurement depends on the optical characteristics of a heated material and the operating spectral band of IR camera. It is desired that the surface of a material to be measured has a spectral band where the material behaves opaque and an employed IR camera operates in the corresponding band. In this study, the optical characteristics of the PO-based polymer are discussed and, an experimental approach is proposed in order to measure the surface temperature of the PO-based polymer via IR thermography. The preliminary analyses showed that IR thermographic measurements may not be simply performed on PO-based polymers and require a correction method as their semi-transparent medium introduce a challenge to obtain reliable surface temperature measurements.

  11. Optimal Non-Invasive Fault Classification Model for Packaged Ceramic Tile Quality Monitoring Using MMW Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Smriti; Singh, Dharmendra

    2016-04-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) frequency has emerged as an efficient tool for different stand-off imaging applications. In this paper, we have dealt with a novel MMW imaging application, i.e., non-invasive packaged goods quality estimation for industrial quality monitoring applications. An active MMW imaging radar operating at 60 GHz has been ingeniously designed for concealed fault estimation. Ceramic tiles covered with commonly used packaging cardboard were used as concealed targets for undercover fault classification. A comparison of computer vision-based state-of-the-art feature extraction techniques, viz, discrete Fourier transform (DFT), wavelet transform (WT), principal component analysis (PCA), gray level co-occurrence texture (GLCM), and histogram of oriented gradient (HOG) has been done with respect to their efficient and differentiable feature vector generation capability for undercover target fault classification. An extensive number of experiments were performed with different ceramic tile fault configurations, viz., vertical crack, horizontal crack, random crack, diagonal crack along with the non-faulty tiles. Further, an independent algorithm validation was done demonstrating classification accuracy: 80, 86.67, 73.33, and 93.33 % for DFT, WT, PCA, GLCM, and HOG feature-based artificial neural network (ANN) classifier models, respectively. Classification results show good capability for HOG feature extraction technique towards non-destructive quality inspection with appreciably low false alarm as compared to other techniques. Thereby, a robust and optimal image feature-based neural network classification model has been proposed for non-invasive, automatic fault monitoring for a financially and commercially competent industrial growth.

  12. Non-invasive Optical Techniques for determination of blood Glucose levels: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Jahangiri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the development of non-invasive optical techniques for determination of blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. Early diagnosis and daily management are essential for ensuring the healthy life of diabetic patients. The determination of blood glucose concentration with common devices involves the chemical analysis of blood samples, which are obtained by pricking the finger or extracting blood from the forearm. Pain, discomfort, and inconvenience, associated with current invasive methods, have necessitated the investigation of non-invasive measurement techniques. Non-invasive monitoring of blood glucose level offers several advantages, including absence of pain and biohazard materials, non- exposure to sharp objects, increased testing frequency and consequently, tighter control of glucose concentration. Considering these potential advantages commercialization of non-invasive glucose monitoring devices has become a subject of increasing interest. Several optical technologies have the potential to provide viable non-invasive measuring devices. this review study aimed to describe the major optical technologies for non-invasive glucose monitoring and compare their advantages and disadvantages. second scenario better than other methods in presence of a typically low false positive rate equal to 3%.

  13. Plasticity induced by non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation: A position paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying-Zu; Lu, Ming-Kue; Antal, Andrea; Classen, Joseph; Nitsche, Michael; Ziemann, Ulf; Ridding, Michael; Hamada, Masashi; Ugawa, Yoshikazu; Jaberzadeh, Shapour; Suppa, Antonio; Paulus, Walter; Rothwell, John

    2017-11-01

    Several techniques and protocols of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (NIBS), including transcranial magnetic and electrical stimuli, have been developed in the past decades. Non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation may modulate cortical excitability outlasting the period of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation itself from several minutes to more than one hour. Quite a few lines of evidence, including pharmacological, physiological and behavioral studies in humans and animals, suggest that the effects of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation are produced through effects on synaptic plasticity. However, there is still a need for more direct and conclusive evidence. The fragility and variability of the effects are the major challenges that non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation currently faces. A variety of factors, including biological variation, measurement reproducibility and the neuronal state of the stimulated area, which can be affected by factors such as past and present physical activity, may influence the response to non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation. Work is ongoing to test whether the reliability and consistency of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation can be improved by controlling or monitoring neuronal state and by optimizing the protocol and timing of stimulation. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A novel environmental DNA approach to quantify the cryptic invasion of non-native genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchii, Kimiko; Doi, Hideyuki; Minamoto, Toshifumi

    2016-03-01

    The invasion of non-native species that are closely related to native species can lead to competitive elimination of the native species and/or genomic extinction through hybridization. Such invasions often become serious before they are detected, posing unprecedented threats to biodiversity. A Japanese native strain of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) has become endangered owing to the invasion of non-native strains introduced from the Eurasian continent. Here, we propose a rapid environmental DNA-based approach to quantitatively monitor the invasion of non-native genotypes. Using this system, we developed a method to quantify the relative proportion of native and non-native DNA based on a single-nucleotide polymorphism using cycling probe technology in real-time PCR. The efficiency of this method was confirmed in aquarium experiments, where the quantified proportion of native and non-native DNA in the water was well correlated to the biomass ratio of native and non-native genotypes. This method provided quantitative estimates for the proportion of native and non-native DNA in natural rivers and reservoirs, which allowed us to estimate the degree of invasion of non-native genotypes without catching and analysing individual fish. Our approach would dramatically facilitate the process of quantitatively monitoring the invasion of non-native conspecifics in aquatic ecosystems, thus revealing a promising method for risk assessment and management in biodiversity conservation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Bioimpedance as a Non-Invasive Method to Evaluate Eggs and Poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DR Klein

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The need to comply with animal welfare has motivated the research for non-invasive methods that allow the evaluation of poultry and eggs to be painless while providing accurate measurements. In this scenario, bioelectrical impedance was tested as a minimally invasive tool for sexing day-old chicks of two different chicken strains and for evaluating the quality of eggs submitted to different days of storage relative to their hatchability. The resistance and phase angle measured allowed the differentiation between chicken strains, but not between sexes. Eggs stored for seven days showed higher resistance and lower phase angle those stored for only one day. Although the bioimpedance method seems to be a promising method to evaluate egg and chick quality, the results of the present study suggest that further studies are needed to validate its utilization, particularly in terms of electrode type and positioning, as well as for the determination of which electrodes and equipment are best suited for different evaluation purposes.

  16. Invasive versus non-invasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure in neuromuscular disease and chest wall disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fang; Annane, Djillali; Orlikowski, David; He, Li; Yang, Mi; Zhou, Muke; Liu, Guan J

    2017-12-04

    Acute respiratory failure is a common life-threatening complication of acute onset neuromuscular diseases, and may exacerbate chronic hypoventilation in patients with neuromuscular disease or chest wall disorders. Standard management includes oxygen supplementation, physiotherapy, cough assistance, and, whenever needed, antibiotics and intermittent positive pressure ventilation. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) via nasal, buccal or full-face devices has become routine practice in many centres. The primary objective of this review was to compare the efficacy of non-invasive ventilation with invasive ventilation in improving short-term survival in acute respiratory failure in people with neuromuscular disease and chest wall disorders. The secondary objectives were to compare the effects of NIV with those of invasive mechanical ventilation on improvement in arterial blood gas after 24 hours and lung function measurements after one month, incidence of barotrauma and ventilator-associated pneumonia, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay in the intensive care unit and length of hospital stay. We searched the following databases on 11 September 2017: the Cochrane Neuromuscular Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and Embase. We also searched conference proceedings and clinical trials registries. We planned to include randomised or quasi-randomised trials with or without blinding. We planned to include trials performed in children or adults with acute onset neuromuscular diseases or chronic neuromuscular disease or chest wall disorders presenting with acute respiratory failure that compared the benefits and risks of invasive ventilation versus NIV. Two review authors reviewed searches and independently selected studies for assessment. We planned to follow standard Cochrane methodology for data collection and analysis. We did not identify any trials eligible for inclusion in the review. Acute respiratory failure is a life-threatening complication of

  17. The clinical utility of non-invasive prenatal testing in pregnancies with ultrasound anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulen, L; Faas, B; Feenstra, I; van Vugt, J M; Bekker, M N

    ObjectivesThis study aims to evaluate the application of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) as an alternative to invasive diagnostic testing in pregnancies with abnormal ultrasound findings.MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed of 251 single and multiple pregnancies at high risk for fetal

  18. Clinical utility of non-invasive prenatal testing in pregnancies with ultrasound anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulen, L.; Faas, B.H.W.; Feenstra, I.; Vugt, J.M.G. van; Bekker, M.N.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the application of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) as an alternative to invasive diagnostic prenatal testing in pregnancies with abnormal ultrasound findings. METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of 251 singleton and multiple pregnancies at high risk for fetal

  19. BCG-unresponsive non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: recommendations from the IBCG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamat, A.M.; Colombel, M.; Sundi, D.; Lamm, D.; Boehle, A.; Brausi, M.; Buckley, R.; Persad, R.; Palou, J.; Soloway, M.; Witjes, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with live attenuated BCG remains the standard of care for patients with high-risk and intermediate-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Most patients initially respond, but recurrence is frequent and progression to invasive cancer is a concern. No established

  20. The clinical utility of non-invasive prenatal testing in pregnancies with ultrasound anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulen, Lean; Faas, Brigitte H W; Feenstra, Ilse; van Vugt, John M G; Bekker, Mireille N

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate the application of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) as an alternative to invasive diagnostic prenatal testing for pregnancies with abnormal ultrasound findings. METHOD: A retrospective analysis was performed of 251 single and multiple pregnancies at high

  1. Trial by Dutch Laboratories for Evaluation of Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing. Part II - Women's Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schendel, Rachel V; Page-Christiaens, Lieve|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068392087; Beulen, Lean; Bilardo, Catia M; de Boer, Marjon A; Coumans, Audrey B C; Faas, Brigitte H; van Langen, Irene M; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30481816X; van Maarle, Merel C; Macville, Merryn V E; Oepkes, Dick; Pajkrt, Eva; Henneman, Lidewij

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate preferences and decision-making amongst high-risk pregnant women offered a choice between Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT), invasive testing or no further testing. METHODS: Nationwide implementation study (TRIDENT) offering NIPT as contingent screening test for women at

  2. Trial by Dutch Laboratories for Evaluation of Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing. : Part II - Women's Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schendel, Rachel V; Page-Christiaens, Lieve; Beulen, Lean; Bilardo, Catia M; de Boer, Marjon A; Coumans, Audrey B C; Faas, Brigitte H; van Langen, Irene M; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D; van Maarle, Merel C; Macville, Merryn V E; Oepkes, Dick; Pajkrt, Eva; Henneman, Lidewij

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate preferences and decision-making amongst high-risk pregnant women offered a choice between Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT), invasive testing or no further testing. METHODS: Nationwide implementation study (TRIDENT) offering NIPT as contingent screening test for women at

  3. UWB based low-cost and non-invasive practical breast cancer early detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayasarveswari, V.; Khatun, S.; Fakir, M. M.; Jusoh, M.; Ali, S.

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the main causes of women death worldwide. Breast tumor is an early stage of cancer that locates in cells of a human breast. As there is no remedy, early detection is crucial. Towards this, Ultra-Wideband (UWB) is a prominent candidate. It is a wireless communication technology which can achieve high bandwidth with low power utilization. UWB is suitable to be used for short range communication systems including breast cancer detection since it is secure, non-invasive and human health friendly. This paper presents the low-cost and non-invasive early breast cancer detection strategy using UWB sensor (or antenna). Emphasis is given here to detect breast tumor in 2D and 3D environments. The developed system consisted of hardware and software. Hardware included UWB transceiver and a pair of home-made directional sensor/antenna. The software included feed-forward back propagation Neural Network (NN) module to detect the tumor existence, size and location along with soft interface between software and hardware. Forward scattering technique was used by placing two sensors diagonally opposite sides of a breast phantom. UWB pulses were transmitted from one side of phantom and received from other side, controlled by the software interface in PC environment. Collected received signals were then fed into the NN module for training, testing and validation. The system exhibited detection efficiency on tumor existence, location (x, y, z), and size were approximately 100%, (78.17%, 70.66%, 92.46%), 85.86% respectively. The proposed UWB based early breast cancer detection system could be more practical with low-cost, user friendly and non-harmful features. This project may help users to monitor their breast health regularly at their home.

  4. blood pressure influence of the the Invasive v. non-invasive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-02-02

    Feb 2, 1991 ... invasive methods of measuring systemic blood pressure. However, there ..... was not possible due to the lack of a high speed recorder.) 3. A separate .... clinician needs to interpret the measurement in the light of the patient's ...

  5. blood pressure influence of the the Invasive v. non-invasive

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-02-02

    Feb 2, 1991 ... rating pressure was used to classify the invasive pulse pres- ... Twenty-one patients in the Intensive Care Unit, King Edward ..... SI%!. ~. 0 .. 8'1%! 0. 7. 000. 0. S. 0 .. Os. 00 .. .. .. '00. ,ac. '60 tlrv~m M.&U IP. TABLE IV. NO. OF PATIENTS IN EACH GROUP WHERE THE. MAXIMUM DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ...

  6. Non invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in chronic hemodialysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The liver biopsy has long been the "gold standard" for assessing liver fibrosis in patients with hepatitis C. It's an invasive procedure which is associated with an elevated bleeding, especially in chronic hemodialysis patients. Main goal is to assess liver fibrosis in chronic hemodialysis with HCV by Fibroscan and by biological ...

  7. Simple non-invasive assessment of advanced glycation endproduct accumulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerwaldt, R; Graaff, R; Links, TP; Jager, JJ; Alderson, NL; Thorpe, [No Value; Baynes, JW; Gans, ROB; Smit, AJ

    Aims/hypothesis. The accumulation of AGE is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic complications of diabetes mellitus and renal failure. All current measurements of AGE accumulation require invasive sampling. We exploited the fact that several AGE exhibit autofluorescence to develop a

  8. Innovative continuous non-invasive cuffless blood pressure monitoring based on photoplethysmography technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Rodríguez, Juan C; Ruiz-Sanmartín, Adolf; Ribas, Vicent; Caballero, Jesús; García-Roche, Alejandra; Riera, Jordi; Nuvials, Xavier; de Nadal, Miriam; de Sola-Morales, Oriol; Serra, Joaquim; Rello, Jordi

    2013-09-01

    To develop and validate a continuous non-invasive blood pressure (BP) monitoring system using photoplethysmography (PPG) technology through pulse oximetry (PO). This prospective study was conducted at a critical care department and post-anesthesia care unit of a university teaching hospital. Inclusion criteria were critically ill adult patients undergoing invasive BP measurement with an arterial catheter and PO monitoring. Exclusion criteria were arrhythmia, imminent death condition, and disturbances in the arterial or the PPG curve morphology. Arterial BP and finger PO waves were recorded simultaneously for 30 min. Systolic arterial pressure (SAP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and diastolic arterial pressure (DAP) were extracted from computer-assisted arterial pulse wave analysis. Inherent traits of both waves were used to construct a regression model with a Deep Belief Network-Restricted Boltzmann Machine (DBN-RBM) from a training cohort of patients and in order to infer BP values from the PO wave. Bland-Altman analysis was performed. A total of 707 patients were enrolled, of whom 135 were excluded. Of the 572 studied, 525 were assigned to the training cohort (TC) and 47 to the validation cohort (VC). After data processing, 53,708 frames were obtained from the TC and 7,715 frames from the VC. The mean prediction biases were -2.98 ± 19.35, -3.38 ± 10.35, and -3.65 ± 8.69 mmHg for SAP, MAP, and DAP respectively. BP can be inferred from PPG using DBN-RBM modeling techniques. The results obtained with this technology are promising, but its intrinsic variability and its wide limits of agreement do not allow clinical application at this time.

  9. Who is who? Non-invasive methods to individually sex and mark altricial chicks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Iris; Scharff, Constance; Honarmand, Mariam

    2014-01-01

    Many experiments require early determination of offspring's sex as well as early marking of newborns for individual recognition. According to animal welfare guidelines, non-invasive techniques should be preferred whenever applicable. In our group, we work on different species of song birds...... applicable in a standard equipped lab and especially suitable for working in the field as no special equipment is required for sampling and storage. Handling of chicks is minimized and marking and sexing techniques are non-invasive thereby supporting the RRR-principle of animal welfare guidelines....... in the lab and in the field, and we successfully apply non-invasive methods to sex and individually mark chicks. This paper presents a comprehensive non-invasive tool-box. Sexing birds prior to the expression of secondary sexual traits requires the collection of DNA-bearing material for PCR. We established...

  10. Non-Invasive Continuous Respiratory Monitoring on General Hospital Wards : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, Kim; van Zaane, Bas; Bosch, Els J; Kalkman, Cor J; Peelen, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Failure to recognize acute deterioration in hospitalized patients may contribute to cardiopulmonary arrest, unscheduled intensive care unit admission and increased mortality. PURPOSE: In this systematic review we aimed to determine whether continuous non-invasive respiratory monitoring

  11. Non-invasive Foetal ECG - a Comparable Alternative to the Doppler CTG?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, J; Louwen, F

    2012-03-01

    This review discusses the alternative of using the non-invasive foetal ECG compared with the conventionally used Doppler CTG. Non-invasive abdominal electrocardiograms (ECG) have been approved for clinical routine since 2008; subsequently they were also approved for antepartum and subpartum procedures. The first study results have been published. Non-invasive foetal ECG is especially indicated during early pregnancy, while the Doppler CTG is recommended for the vernix period. Beyond the vernix period no difference has been recorded in the success rate of either approach. The foetal ECG signal quality is independent of the BMI, whereas the success rate of the Doppler CTG is diminished with an increased BMI. During the first stage of labour, non-invasive foetal ECG demonstrates better signal quality; however during the second stage of labour no difference has been identified between the methods.

  12. Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord, roots and peripheral nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossini, P M; Burke, D; Chen, R

    2015-01-01

    These guidelines provide an up-date of previous IFCN report on "Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord and roots: basic principles and procedures for routine clinical application" (Rossini et al., 1994). A new Committee, composed of international experts, some...... theoretical, physiological and practical aspects of non-invasive stimulation of brain, spinal cord, nerve roots and peripheral nerves in the light of more updated knowledge, and include some recent extensions and developments....... of whom were in the panel of the 1994 "Report", was selected to produce a current state-of-the-art review of non-invasive stimulation both for clinical application and research in neuroscience. Since 1994, the international scientific community has seen a rapid increase in non-invasive brain stimulation...

  13. Non-Invasive Prediction of Histologic Chorioamnionitis in Women with Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Su Ah; Park, Kyo Hoon; Lee, Seung Mi

    2016-01-01

    To develop a model based on non-invasive clinical and ultrasonographic parameters for predicting the likelihood of subsequent histologic chorioamnionitis in women with preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM...

  14. Non-invasive sampling methods of inflammatory biomarkers in asthma and allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, Johan Diderik

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, a series of clinical studies have been described, in which we applied, evaluated or modified novel and existing non- or semi-invasive sampling methods and detection techniques for the assessment of biomarkers in allergic airway inflammation.

  15. Cytokeratin 18 as a non invasive marker in diagnosis of NASH and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytokeratin 18 as a non invasive marker in diagnosis of NASH and its usefulness in correlation with disease severity in Egyptian patients. MM Maher, WA Ibrahim, SA Saleh, L Shash, HA Gabal, M Tarif, M Gamal ...

  16. Non-invasive Mechanical Ventilation Enhances Patient Autonomy in Decision-Making Regarding Chronic Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviri, S; Linton, D M; van Heerden, P V

    2005-06-01

    Patients with respiratory failure due to progressive muscle weakness often require chronic ventilatory support, but many do not make decisions regarding ventilation prior to a crisis. We studied the use of non-invasive ventilation as a tool to enable communication and facilitate decision-making regarding chronic ventilation. Patients with profound muscle weakness and acute respiratory failure, were supported or weaned by non-invasive positive or negative pressure ventilation. The patients were then interviewed and their informed autonomous decisions were used to plan their future management. Non-invasive ventilation could be used safely to support patients with acute respiratory failure until decisions regarding chronic ventilation are made and as an alternative means of ventilation for those who refuse tracheostomy. Non-invasive ventilation may be used in patients with profound muscle weakness, as a means of enhancing patient autonomy by improving communication and maintaining ventilation until decisions about ongoing care are made.

  17. Modulating neural plasticity with non-invasive brain stimulation in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Wobrock, Thomas; Rajji, Tarek; Malchow, Berend; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2013-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder characterised by a complex phenotype including positive, negative, affective and cognitive symptoms. Various theories have been developed to integrate the clinical phenotype into a strong neurobiological framework. One theory describes schizophrenia as a disorder of impaired neural plasticity. Recently, non-invasive brain stimulation techniques have garnered much attention to their ability to modulate plasticity and treat schizophrenia. The aim of this review is to introduce the basic physiological principles of conventional non-invasive brain stimulation techniques and to review the available evidence for schizophrenia. Despite promising evidence for efficacy in a large number of clinical trials, we continue to have a rudimentary understanding of the underlying neurobiology. Additional investigation is required to improve the response rates to non-invasive brain stimulation, to reduce the interindividual variability and to improve the understanding of non-invasive brain stimulation in schizophrenia.

  18. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation and epidural anesthesia for an emergency open cholecystectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtlu, Bülent Serhan; Köksal, Bengü; Hancı, Volkan; Turan, Işıl Özkoçak

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive ventilation is an accepted treatment modality in both acute exacerbations of respiratory diseases and chronic obstructive lung disease. It is commonly utilized in the intensive care units, or for postoperative respiratory support in post-anesthesia care units. This report describes intraoperative support in non-invasive ventilation to neuroaxial anesthesia for an emergency upper abdominal surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation and epidural anesthesia for an emergency open cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtlu, Bülent Serhan; Köksal, Bengü; Hancı, Volkan; Turan, Işıl Özkoçak

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive ventilation is an accepted treatment modality in both acute exacerbations of respiratory diseases and chronic obstructive lung disease. It is commonly utilized in the intensive care units, or for postoperative respiratory support in post-anesthesia care units. This report describes intraoperative support in non-invasive ventilation to neuroaxial anesthesia for an emergency upper abdominal surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Personalized management of cirrhosis by non-invasive tests of liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Grace Lai-Hung; Espinosa, Wendell Zaragoza; Wong, Vicnent Wai-Sun

    2015-09-01

    Owing to the high prevalence of various chronic liver diseases, cirrhosis is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In recent years, the development of non-invasive tests of fibrosis allows accurate diagnosis of cirrhosis and reduces the need for liver biopsy. In this review, we discuss the application of these non-invasive tests beyond the diagnosis of cirrhosis. In particular, their role in the selection of patients for hepatocellular carcinoma surveillance and varices screening is highlighted.

  1. Non-invasive acoustic-based monitoring of uranium in solution and H/D ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantea, Cristian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Beedle, Christopher Craig [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sinha, Dipen N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lakis, Rollin Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The primary objective of this project is to adapt existing non-invasive acoustic techniques (Swept-Frequency Acoustic Interferometry and Gaussian-pulse acoustic technique) for the purpose of demonstrating the ability to quantify U or H/D ratios in solution. Furthermore, a successful demonstration will provide an easily implemented, low cost, and non-invasive method for remote and unattended uranium mass measurements for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

  2. Phenotypic screening, transcriptional profiling, and comparative genomic analysis of an invasive and non-invasive strain of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaller Martin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasion of host tissue by the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans is an important step during the development of candidosis. However, not all C. albicans strains possess the same invasive and virulence properties. For example, the two clinical isolates SC5314 and ATCC10231 differ in their ability to invade host tissue and cause experimental infections. Strain SC5314 is invasive whereas strain ATCC10231 is non-invasive and strongly attenuated in virulence compared to SC5314. In this study we compare the in vitro phenotypic, transcriptional and genomic profiles of these two widely used laboratory strains in order to determine the principal biological and genetic properties responsible for their differential virulence. Results In all media tested, the two strains showed the same metabolic flexibility, stress resistance, adhesion properties and hydrolytic enzyme secretion in vitro. However, differences were observed in response to cell-surface disturbing agents and alkaline pH. Furthermore, reduced hyphal formation in strain ATCC10231 under certain conditions correlated with reduced invasive properties in an in vitro invasion assay and a reduced ability to invade epithelial tissue. Despite these diverse phenotypic properties, no substantial genomic differences were detected by comparative genome hybridisation within the open reading frames. However, in vitro transcriptional profiling displayed major differences in the gene expression of these two strains, even under normal in vitro growth conditions. Conclusion Our data suggest that the reason for differential virulence of C. albicans strains is not due to the absence of specific genes, but rather due to differences in the expression, function or activity of common genes.

  3. Non invasive assessment of renal artery using dual MRA techniques compared with invasive renal angiography in cases of renovascular hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ragab

    2011-03-01

    Conclusion: The combined approach of non-invasive CE MRA and PC MRA techniques achieves a very high specificity, PPV and NPV for the detection of renal arterial pathomorphologic features as compared to standard renal angiography. Adding PC MRA to CE MRA helps to differentiate between mild and moderate stenoses as well as moderate and sever arterial stenotic lesions. So, CE MRA is a morphological test while PC MRA helps in grading the arterial stenoses.

  4. Lab-on-a-chip technology: impacting non-invasive prenatal diagnostics (NIPD) through miniaturisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantak, Chaitanya; Chang, Chia-Pin; Wong, Chee Chung; Mahyuddin, Aniza; Choolani, Mahesh; Rahman, Abdur

    2014-03-07

    This paper aims to provide a concise review of non-invasive prenatal diagnostics (NIPD) to the lab-on-a-chip and microfluidics community. Having a market of over one billion dollars to explore and a plethora of applications, NIPD requires greater attention from microfluidics researchers. In this review, a complete overview of conventional diagnostic procedures including invasive as well as non-invasive (fetal cells and cell-free fetal DNA) types are discussed. Special focus is given to reviewing the recent and past microfluidic approaches to NIPD, as well as various commercial entities in NIPD. This review concludes with future challenges and ethical considerations of the field.

  5. 3D-CRT, Proton, or Brachytherapy APBI in Treating Patients With Invasive and Non-invasive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-29

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Grade 1 Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Grade 2 Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Grade 3 Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal and Lobular Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  6. Non-invasive prenatal detection of haemoglobin Bart's disease by cardiothoracic ratio during the first trimester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Li; Pan, Min; Han, Jin; Yang, Xin; Ou, Yan-Mei; Liao, Can; Li, Dong-Zhi

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of the sonographic cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) in early pregnancy for the prediction of fetal haemoglobin (Hb) Bart's disease. Over a 1.5-year period at a Chinese tertiary obstetric centre, women at risk of Hb Bart's disease were given the option of a non-invasive approach to exclude an affected pregnancy between 11 weeks and 13 weeks and 6 days of gestation, with a routine rescan after a 2-week interval. The fetal CTR, a sonographic marker, was assessed, and invasive testing followed in cases of fetal cardiomegaly. The diagnosis of fetal Hb Bart's disease was based on DNA analysis from chorionic villus sampling. Of 154 at-risk cases studied, five cases (four at 11 weeks of gestation) were subjected to direct invasive testing because of an unsatisfactory scan. Of the remaining 149 cases, non-invasive ultrasound examinations were performed successfully. Thirty-four (22.8%) affected pregnancies were revealed, including one picked up on rescan. The sensitivity and specificity of the non-invasive approach were 97.1% and 100%, respectively. The need for an invasive test was reduced by 74.7%, and all affected pregnancies except one were diagnosed before 14 weeks of gestation. CTR can differentiate reliably between pregnancies with and without Hb Bart's disease. This non-invasive approach for the exclusion of Hb Bart's disease can be used in early pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A review on the non-invasive evaluation of skeletal muscle oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, A. A. A.; Laili, M. H.; Aziz, N. A.; Laili, A. R.; Salikin, M. S.; Rusop, M.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this review is to conduct a feasibility study of non-invasive evaluation in skeletal muscle oxygenation. This non-invasive evaluation could extract many information using a safe non-invasive method regarding to the oxygenation and microcirculation status in human blood muscle. This brief review highlights the progress of the application of NIRS to evaluate skeletal muscle oxygenation in various activity of human nature from the historical point of view to the present advancement. Since the discovery of non-invasive optical method during 1992, there are many non-invasive techniques uses optical properties on human subject such as near infrared spectroscopy NIRS, optical topography, functional near infrared spectroscopy fNIRS and imaging fNIRI. Furthermore, in this paper we discuss the light absorption potential (LAP) towards chromophores content inside human muscle. Modified beer lambert law was studied in order to build a better understanding toward LAP between chromophores under tissue multilayers in human muscle. This paper will describe the NIRS principle and the basis for its proposed used in skeletal muscle oxygenation. This will cover the advantages and limitation of such application. Thus, these non-invasive techniques could open other possibilities to study muscle performance diagnosis.

  8. Combined Invasive Subcortical and Non-invasive Surface Neurophysiological Recordings for the Assessment of Cognitive and Emotional Functions in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenado, Carlos; Elben, Saskia; Petri, David; Hirschmann, Jan; Groiss, Stefan J; Vesper, Jan; Schnitzler, Alfons; Wojtecki, Lars

    2016-05-19

    In spite of the success in applying non-invasive electroencephalography (EEG), magneto-encephalography (MEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for extracting crucial information about the mechanism of the human brain, such methods remain insufficient to provide information about physiological processes reflecting cognitive and emotional functions at the subcortical level. In this respect, modern invasive clinical approaches in humans, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), offer a tremendous possibility to record subcortical brain activity, namely local field potentials (LFPs) representing coherent activity of neural assemblies from localized basal ganglia or thalamic regions. Notwithstanding the fact that invasive approaches in humans are applied only after medical indication and thus recorded data correspond to altered brain circuits, valuable insight can be gained regarding the presence of intact brain functions in relation to brain oscillatory activity and the pathophysiology of disorders in response to experimental cognitive paradigms. In this direction, a growing number of DBS studies in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) target not only motor functions but also higher level processes such as emotions, decision-making, attention, memory and sensory perception. Recent clinical trials also emphasize the role of DBS as an alternative treatment in neuropsychiatric disorders ranging from obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) to chronic disorders of consciousness (DOC). Consequently, we focus on the use of combined invasive (LFP) and non-invasive (EEG) human brain recordings in assessing the role of cortical-subcortical structures in cognitive and emotional processing trough experimental paradigms (e.g. speech stimuli with emotional connotation or paradigms of cognitive control such as the Flanker task), for patients undergoing DBS treatment.

  9. Inhibition of proliferation, migration and invasion of human non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Xiao-xian Lu, Xiao-xia Ji, Jie Bao, Qian-qian Li, Dan-dan Ji and Liang Luo*. Intensive Care Units, The ... with PMF (10, 20 and 40 µM) for 48 h resulted in significantly decreased migration and invasion in A549 cells. In addition, PMF at ..... Zhao B, Liang H, Yu Y, Dong X. A new furanolabdane diterpene glycoside from ...

  10. Non-invasive endodontic treatment of large periapical lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Huiz Peeters

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In most cases of large periapical radiolucent lesions of pulpal origin, we often encounter a dilemmatic situation, such as whether to either treat these cases endodontically or surgically. Development of techniques, instruments and root medicaments as well as the tendency toward minimally invasive treatment, all support dentists to treat those cases using the minimal invasive principle (i.e. endodontically instead of surgically. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report and discuss the managing of periapical lesions by endodontic no invasive treatment. Case management: The patient with large periapical lesions were treated with noninvasive endodontic treatment. After 6 months, patients in this report were asymptomatic and radiolucencies had disappeared. When the root canal treatment is done according to accepted clinical principles and under aseptic condition, including cleaning, shaping, abturating as well as proper diagnosis, the healing process of the infected area will occur. Conclusion: Some lesions, however, may not be treated conservatively and may require surgical treatment for total elimination of the lesions.

  11. Capacitive Sensing for Non-Invasive Breathing and Heart Monitoring in Non-Restrained, Non-Sedated Laboratory Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos González-Sánchez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Animal testing plays a vital role in biomedical research. Stress reduction is important for improving research results and increasing the welfare and the quality of life of laboratory animals. To estimate stress we believe it is of great importance to develop non-invasive techniques for monitoring physiological signals during the transport of laboratory animals, thereby allowing the gathering of information on the transport conditions, and, eventually, the improvement of these conditions. Here, we study the suitability of commercially available electric potential integrated circuit (EPIC sensors, using both contact and contactless techniques, for monitoring the heart rate and breathing rate of non-restrained, non-sedated laboratory mice. The design has been tested under different scenarios with the aim of checking the plausibility of performing contactless capture of mouse heart activity (ideally with an electrocardiogram. First experimental results are shown.

  12. Open source non-invasive prenatal testing platform and its performance in a public health laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Peter; Richter, Stine R; Balslev-Harder, Marie; Miltoft, Caroline B; Tabor, Ann; Duno, Morten; Kjaergaard, Susanne

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to introduce non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for fetal autosomal trisomies and gender in a Danish public health setting, using semi-conductor sequencing and published open source scripts for analysis. Plasma-derived DNA from a total of 375 pregnant women (divided into three datasets) was whole-genome sequenced on the Ion Proton™ platform and analyzed using a pipeline based on WISECONDOR for fetal autosomal aneuploidy detection and SeqFF for fetal DNA fraction estimation. We furthermore validated a fetal sex determination analysis. The pipeline correctly detected 27/27 trisomy 21, 4/4 trisomy 18, and 3/3 trisomy 13 fetuses. Neither false negatives nor false positives (chromosomes 13, 18, and 21) were observed in our validation dataset. Fetal sex was identified correctly in all but one triploid fetus (172/173). SeqFF showed a strong correlation (R(2)  = 0.72) to Y-chromosomal content of the male fetus samples. We have implemented NIPT into Danish health care using published open source scripts for autosomal aneuploidy detection and fetal DNA fraction estimation showing excellent false negative and false positive rates. SeqFF provides a good estimation of fetal DNA fraction. This coupled with an analysis of fetal sex that provides a complete NIPT workflow, which may easily be adapted for implementation in other public health laboratories. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Hydrogel-based electrochemical sensor for non-invasive and continuous glucose monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Habeen; Lee, Ji-Young; Kim, Dong-Chul; Koh, Younggook; Cha, Junhoe

    2017-07-01

    Monitoring blood glucose level of diabetic patients is crucial in diabetes care from life threating complications. Selfmonitoring blood glucose (SMBG) that involves finger prick to draw blood samples into the measurement system is a widely-used method of routine measurement of blood glucose levels to date. SMBG includes, however, unavoidable pain problems resulting from the repetitive measurements. We hereby present a hydrogel-based electrochemical (H-EC) sensor to monitor the glucose level, non-invasively. Glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized in the disc-type hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) based hydrogel and kept intact in the hydrogel. Fast electron transfer mediated by Prussian blue (PB, hexacyanoferrate) generated efficient signal amplifications to facilitate the detection of the extracted glucose from the interstitial fluid. The linear response and the selectivity against glucose of the H-EC sensor were validated by chronoamperometry. For the practical use, the outcomes from the correlation of the extracted glucose concentration and the blood glucose value by on-body extraction, as well as the validation of the hydrogel-based electrochemical (H-EC) device, were applied to the on-body glucose monitoring.

  14. Improving the Positive Predictive Value of Non-Invasive Prenatal Screening (NIPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles M Strom

    Full Text Available We evaluated performance characteristics of a laboratory-developed, non-invasive prenatal screening (NIPS assay for fetal aneuploidies. This assay employs massively parallel shotgun sequencing with full automation. GC sequencing bias correction and statistical smoothing were performed to enhance discrimination of affected and unaffected pregnancies. Maternal plasma samples from pregnancies with known aneuploidy status were used for assay development, verification, and validation. Assay verification studies using 2,085 known samples (1873 unaffected, 69 trisomy 21, 20 trisomy 18, 17 trisomy 13 demonstrated complete discrimination between autosomal trisomy (Z scores >8 and unaffected (Z scores <4 singleton pregnancies. A validation study using 552 known samples (21 trisomy 21, 10 trisomy 18, 1 trisomy 13 confirmed complete discrimination. Twin pregnancies showed similar results. Follow-up of abnormal results from the first 10,000 clinical samples demonstrated PPVs of 98% (41/42 for trisomy 21, 92% (23/25 for trisomy 18, and 69% (9/13 for trisomy 13. Adjustment for causes of false-positive results identified during clinical testing (eg, maternal duplications improved PPVs to 100% for trisomy 21 and 96% for trisomy 18. This NIPS test demonstrates excellent discrimination between trisomic and unaffected pregnancies. The PPVs obtained in initial clinical testing are substantially higher than previously reported NIPS methods.

  15. Improving the Positive Predictive Value of Non-Invasive Prenatal Screening (NIPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Charles M; Anderson, Ben; Tsao, David; Zhang, Ke; Liu, Yan; Livingston, Kayla; Elzinga, Christopher; Evans, Matthew; Nguyen, Quoclinh; Wolfson, David; Rowland, Charles; Kolacki, Paula; Maxwell, Megan; Wang, Jia-Chi; Rabin, Douglas; Catanese, Joseph; Owen, Renius; Braastad, Corey; Sun, Weimin

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated performance characteristics of a laboratory-developed, non-invasive prenatal screening (NIPS) assay for fetal aneuploidies. This assay employs massively parallel shotgun sequencing with full automation. GC sequencing bias correction and statistical smoothing were performed to enhance discrimination of affected and unaffected pregnancies. Maternal plasma samples from pregnancies with known aneuploidy status were used for assay development, verification, and validation. Assay verification studies using 2,085 known samples (1873 unaffected, 69 trisomy 21, 20 trisomy 18, 17 trisomy 13) demonstrated complete discrimination between autosomal trisomy (Z scores >8) and unaffected (Z scores pregnancies. A validation study using 552 known samples (21 trisomy 21, 10 trisomy 18, 1 trisomy 13) confirmed complete discrimination. Twin pregnancies showed similar results. Follow-up of abnormal results from the first 10,000 clinical samples demonstrated PPVs of 98% (41/42) for trisomy 21, 92% (23/25) for trisomy 18, and 69% (9/13) for trisomy 13. Adjustment for causes of false-positive results identified during clinical testing (eg, maternal duplications) improved PPVs to 100% for trisomy 21 and 96% for trisomy 18. This NIPS test demonstrates excellent discrimination between trisomic and unaffected pregnancies. The PPVs obtained in initial clinical testing are substantially higher than previously reported NIPS methods.

  16. Non-Invasive Detection of Anaemia Using Digital Photographs of the Conjunctiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collings, Shaun; Thompson, Oliver; Hirst, Evan; Goossens, Louise; George, Anup; Weinkove, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Anaemia is a major health burden worldwide. Although the finding of conjunctival pallor on clinical examination is associated with anaemia, inter-observer variability is high, and definitive diagnosis of anaemia requires a blood sample. We aimed to detect anaemia by quantifying conjunctival pallor using digital photographs taken with a consumer camera and a popular smartphone. Our goal was to develop a non-invasive screening test for anaemia. The conjunctivae of haemato-oncology in- and outpatients were photographed in ambient lighting using a digital camera (Panasonic DMC-LX5), and the internal rear-facing camera of a smartphone (Apple iPhone 5S) alongside an in-frame calibration card. Following image calibration, conjunctival erythema index (EI) was calculated and correlated with laboratory-measured haemoglobin concentration. Three clinicians independently evaluated each image for conjunctival pallor. Conjunctival EI was reproducible between images (average coefficient of variation 2.96%). EI of the palpebral conjunctiva correlated more strongly with haemoglobin concentration than that of the forniceal conjunctiva. Using the compact camera, palpebral conjunctival EI had a sensitivity of 93% and 57% and specificity of 78% and 83% for detection of anaemia (haemoglobin < 110 g/L) in training and internal validation sets, respectively. Similar results were found using the iPhone camera, though the EI cut-off value differed. Conjunctival EI analysis compared favourably with clinician assessment, with a higher positive likelihood ratio for prediction of anaemia. Erythema index of the palpebral conjunctiva calculated from images taken with a compact camera or mobile phone correlates with haemoglobin and compares favourably to clinician assessment for prediction of anaemia. If confirmed in further series, this technique may be useful for the non-invasive screening for anaemia.

  17. Non-Invasive Continuous Respiratory Monitoring on General Hospital Wards: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim van Loon

    Full Text Available Failure to recognize acute deterioration in hospitalized patients may contribute to cardiopulmonary arrest, unscheduled intensive care unit admission and increased mortality.In this systematic review we aimed to determine whether continuous non-invasive respiratory monitoring improves early diagnosis of patient deterioration and reduces critical incidents on hospital wards.Studies were retrieved from Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and the Cochrane library, searched from 1970 till October 25, 2014.Electronic databases were searched using keywords and corresponding synonyms 'ward', 'continuous', 'monitoring' and 'respiration'. Pediatric, fetal and animal studies were excluded.Since no validated tool is currently available for diagnostic or intervention studies with continuous monitoring, methodological quality was assessed with a modified tool based on modified STARD, CONSORT, and TREND statements.Six intervention and five diagnostic studies were included, evaluating the use of eight different devices for continuous respiratory monitoring. Quantitative data synthesis was not possible because intervention, study design and outcomes differed considerably between studies. Outcomes estimates for the intervention studies ranged from RR 0.14 (0.03, 0.64 for cardiopulmonary resuscitation to RR 1.00 (0.41, 2.35 for unplanned ICU admission after introduction of continuous respiratory monitoring.The methodological quality of most studies was moderate, e.g. 'before-after' designs, incomplete reporting of primary outcomes, and incomplete clinical implementation of the monitoring system.Based on the findings of this systematic review, implementation of routine continuous non-invasive respiratory monitoring on general hospital wards cannot yet be advocated as results are inconclusive, and methodological quality of the studies needs improvement. Future research in this area should focus on technology explicitly suitable for low care settings and tailored alarm and

  18. Mammary epithelial cells isolated from milk are a valuable, non-invasive source of mammary transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion eBoutinaud

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Milk is produced in the udder by mammary epithelial cells (MEC. Milk contains MEC, which are gradually exfoliated from the epithelium during lactation. Isolation of MEC from milk using immunomagnetic separation may be a useful non-invasive method to investigate transcriptional regulations in ruminants’ udder. This review aims to describe the process of isolating MEC from milk, to provide an overview on the studies that use this method to analyze gene expression by qRT PCR and to evaluate the validity of this method by analysing and comparing the results between studies. In several goat and cow studies, consistent reductions in alpha-lactalbumin mRNA levels during once-daily milking (ODM and in SLC2A1 mRNA level during feed restriction are observed. The effect of ODM on alpha-lactalbumin mRNA level was similarly observed in milk isolated MEC and mammary biopsy. Moreover, we and others showed decreasing alpha-lactalbumin and increasing BAX mRNA levels with advanced stages of lactation in dairy cows and buffalo. The relevance of using the milk-isolated MEC method to analyze mammary gene expression is proven, as the transcript variations were also consistent with milk yield and composition variations under the effect of different factors such as prolactin inhibition or photoperiod. . However, the RNA from milk-isolated MEC is particularly sensitive to degradation. This could explain the differences obtained between milk-isolated MEC and mammary biopsy in two studies where gene expression was compared using qRT-PCR or RNA Sequencing analyses. As a conclusion, when the RNA quality is conserved, MEC isolated from milk are a valuable, non-invasive source of mammary mRNA to study various factors that impact milk yield and composition (ODM, feeding level, endocrine status, photoperiod modulation and stage of lactation.

  19. Inter-tester reliability of non-invasive technique for measurement of innominate motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhia, Divya Bharatkumar; Bussey, Melanie D; Mani, Ramakrishnan; Jayakaran, Prasath; Aldabe, Daniela; Milosavljevic, Stephan

    2012-02-01

    Although the complex anatomical orientation and position of the sacroiliac joints (SIJ) has rendered their 3D kinematic evaluation difficult, recent techniques of palpation-digitization of pelvic landmarks using electromagnetic tracking device have been able to accurately and non-invasively quantify the subtle SIJ kinematics. While this technique demonstrates radiographic validity and high test-retest reliability, it is yet to be assessed with regards to inter-tester and trial-to-trial reliability. A single-group repeated measure design using 4 testers was conducted to evaluate the inter-tester and trial-to-trial reliability of palpation-digitization technique for innominate vector length measurements using the Polhemus electromagnetic tracking device. Fourteen young, healthy adults between the ages of 18-40 years participated in the study. The innominate vector length was calculated from 3D co-ordinates of palpated and digitized pelvic landmarks in two test positions of hip. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine how palpation-digitization errors for pelvic landmarks impacts on innominate angle calculation. Reliability indexes of Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (≥0.97) and Standard error of measurement (SEM) (≤2.02 mm) demonstrated very high inter-tester and trial-to-trial reliability and accuracy of palpation-digitization technique for innominate vector length measurements, irrespective of the two test positions. A higher consistency of measurements was obtained within-testers as compared to between testers, and sensitivity analysis demonstrated a negligible influence of palpation-digitization errors on the innominate angle measurements. The results support clinical and research utility of this technique for non-invasive kinematic evaluation of SIJ motion for this population. Further research on the use of this palpation-digitization technique in symptomatic population is warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Non-Invasive Mechanic Ventilation Using in Flail Chest, Caused By Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Onat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 75-year-old woman admitted our faculty emergency room with shortness of breath, and chest pain after traffic accident’s second hour. She was diagnosed as bilateral multipl rib fractures, left clavicula fracture, and left flail chest by phsical and radiological examinations. She was transfered to Chest Surgery Depatment’s intensive care unit. The patient was undergone non-invasive mask mechanic ventilation support, because of the decreasing of blood oxygen saturation and increasing of arteriel blood partial carbondioxide pressure. The treatment of non-invasive mechanic ventilation was succesfull for ventilation support. With this report, we would like to attentioned that non-invasive mechanic ventilation for blunt chest trauma patients could be used succesfully and could be used instead of endotracheal invasive mechanic ventilation.

  1. Tissue-Informative Mechanism for Wearable Non-invasive Continuous Blood Pressure Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sung Hun; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Dae Jung; Bien, Franklin; Kim, Jae Joon

    2014-10-01

    Accurate continuous direct measurement of the blood pressure is currently available thru direct invasive methods via intravascular needles, and is mostly limited to use during surgical procedures or in the intensive care unit (ICU). Non-invasive methods that are mostly based on auscultation or cuff oscillometric principles do provide relatively accurate measurement of blood pressure. However, they mostly involve physical inconveniences such as pressure or stress on the human body. Here, we introduce a new non-invasive mechanism of tissue-informative measurement, where an experimental phenomenon called subcutaneous tissue pressure equilibrium is revealed and related for application in detection of absolute blood pressure. A prototype was experimentally verified to provide an absolute blood pressure measurement by wearing a watch-type measurement module that does not cause any discomfort. This work is supposed to contribute remarkably to the advancement of continuous non-invasive mobile devices for 24-7 daily-life ambulatory blood-pressure monitoring.

  2. Experiences of high-risk pregnant women who were offered a choice between non-invasive prenatal testing, invasive testing or no follow-up test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Schendel, Rachel; Page-Christiaens, Lieve; Beulen, Lean; Bilardo, Katia; De Boer, Marjon; Coumans, Audrey; Faas, Brigitte; Van Langen, Irene; Lichtenbelt, Klaske; Van Maarle, Merel; Macville, Merryn; Oepkes, Dick; Pajkrt, Eva; Henneman, Lidewij

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The TRIDENT study (Trial by Dutch laboratories for Evaluation of Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing) evaluates the implementation of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) in the Dutch healthcare system. Here we report on the preferences and experiences of pregnant women at high risk for fetal

  3. Evolution of invasive placentation with special reference to non-human primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Anthony Michael; Pijnenborg, Robert

    2011-01-01

    It is now possible to view human placentation in an evolutionary context because advances in molecular phylogenetics provide a reliable scenario for the evolution of mammals. Perhaps the most striking finding is the uniqueness of human placenta. The lower primates have non-invasive placentae...... and even tarsiers and New World monkeys show restricted trophoblast invasion. Moreover, a truly villous placenta occurs only in Old World monkeys and great apes. The two latter groups of haplorhine primates show varying degrees of trophoblast-uterine interaction, including differences in the extent...... of decidualization, formation and disintegration of a cytotrophoblastic shell, degree of interstitial trophoblast invasion and depth of trophoblast invasion into spiral arteries. Recently, the occurrence of human-like deep invasion was confirmed in gorillas and chimpanzees. As the still enigmatic disease of pre...

  4. High-intensity focused ultrasound in breast pathology: non-invasive treatment of benign and malignant lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo Marincola, Beatrice; Pediconi, Federica; Anzidei, Michele; Miglio, Elena; Di Mare, Luisa; Telesca, Marianna; Mancini, Massimiliano; D'Amati, Giulia; Monti, Massimo; Catalano, Carlo; Napoli, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    Breast neoplasms are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in women. Even if surgery is the treatment of choice, other forms of less invasive radical treatment are desirable. High-intensity focused ultrasound is already established as a valid non-invasive technique that ensures tumor ablation in various organs. The use of ultrasound or magnetic resonance guidance allows having some advantages such as the capability to treat tumors in moving organs or the possibility to have a real-time monitoring of the temperature increase. The aim of this paper is to report the use of high-intensity focused ultrasound technique with ultrasound and magnetic resonance guidance for the ablation of breast tumors, including both benign and malignant lesions.

  5. Evaluation of a simple non-invasive 13C breath test to evaluate diet effects on gastric emptying in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henry; Strathe, Anders Bjerring; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2010-01-01

    A study was carried out to validate gastric emptying using non-invasive 13C breath test against total evacuation of the stomach content through a gastric cannulae. Three different diets were used; a high soluble fibre diet based on sugar beet pulp, a high insoluble fibre diet based on wheat bran ...... of the gastric content. Thus, the breath test is applicable for evaluating dietary effects on gastric emptying and potentially improves the behaviour and well being of gestating sows and lends confidence to applicability in clinical human trials....

  6. Continuous Non-Invasive Arterial Pressure Assessment during Surgery to Improve Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Stenglova

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Blood pressure (BP is one of the most important variables evaluated during almost every medical examination. Most national anesthesiology societies recommend BP monitoring at least once every 5 min in anesthetized subjects undergoing surgical procedures. In most cases, BP is monitored non-invasively using oscillometric cuffs. Although the risk of arterial cannulation is not very high, the invasive BP monitoring is usually indicated only in the case of high-risk patients or in complex surgical procedures. However, recent evidence points out that when using intermittent BP monitoring short periods of hypotension may be overlooked. In addition, large datasets have demonstrated that even short periods of low BP (or their cumulative duration may have a detrimental impact on the development of postoperative outcome including increased risk of acute kidney or myocardial injury development. Recently marketed continuous non-invasive blood pressure monitoring tools may help us to recognize the BP fluctuation without the associated burden of arterial cannulation filling the gap between intermittent non-invasive cuff and continuous invasive arterial pressure. Among others, several novel devices based either on volume clamp/vascular unloading method or on applanation tonometry are nowadays available. Moreover, several near-future smart technologies may lead to better hypotension recognition or even prediction potentially improving our ability to maintain BP stability throughout the anesthesia or surgical procedure. In this review, novel or emerging technologies of non-invasive continuous blood pressure assessment and their potential to improve postoperative outcome are discussed.

  7. Early non-invasive detection of fetal Y chromosome sequences in maternal plasma using multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolialexi, Aggeliki; Tounta, Georgia; Apostolou, Paraskevi; Vrettou, Christina; Papantoniou, Nikos; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Antsaklis, Aris; Mavrou, Ariadni

    2012-03-01

    Clinical indications for fetal sex determination include risk of X-linked disorders, a family history of conditions associated with ambiguous development of the external genitalia, and some fetal ultrasound findings. It is usually performed in the first trimester from fetal material obtained through CVS and is associated with an approximately 1% risk of miscarriage. Ultrasound fetal sex determination is often performed after 11 weeks of gestation. This study aims to validate a reliable method for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of fetal gender using maternal plasma cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) for fetal sex assessment in the first trimester of pregnancy and test its clinical utility in the diagnosis of potentially affected pregnancies in carriers of X-linked disorders. In the validation study, blood samples from 100 pregnant women at 6-11 weeks of gestation were analysed. In the clinical study, 17 pregnancies at risk of having an affected fetus were tested. 7 ml of maternal blood in EDTA were obtained and cffDNA was extracted using a commercially available kit. DNA was enzymatically digested using a methylation sensitive endonuclease (AciI) to remove maternal unmethylated sequences of the RASSF1A gene. A multiplex PCR was performed for the simultaneous amplification of target sequences of SRY and DYS14 from chromosome Y, along with RASSF1A and ACTB sequences. Amplification of these loci indicates fetal gender, confirms the presence of cffDNA and allows assessment of digestion efficiency. After establishing the appropriate experimental conditions, validation studies were successful in all 100 cases tested with no false negative or false positive results. Y chromosome-specific sequences were detected in 68 samples, and 32 cases were diagnosed as female based on the amplification of RASFF1A sequences only, in the absence of ACTB. In the clinical studies, fetal sex was correctly diagnosed in 16 pregnancies, and one case was reported as inconclusive. Fetal sex

  8. Non-invasive diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. A critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Mariana V; Cortez-Pinto, Helena

    2013-05-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects one in every three subjects in the occidental world. The vast majority will not progress, but a relevant minority will develop liver cirrhosis and its complications. The classical gold standard for diagnosing and staging NAFLD and assessing fibrosis is liver biopsy (LB). However, it has important sample error issues and subjectivity in the interpretation, apart from a small but real risk of complications. The decision to perform an LB is even harder in a condition so prevalent such as NAFLD, in which the probability of finding severe liver injury is low. In an attempt to overcome LB and to subcategorize patients with NAFLD in different prognoses allowing better management decisions, several non-invasive methods have been studied in the last decade. The literature is vast and confusing. This review will summarize which methods have been tested and how they perform, which tests are adequate for clinical practice and how they can change the management of these patients. Copyright © 2012 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Ability of non-invasive intermittent blood pressure monitoring and a continuous non-invasive arterial pressure monitor (CNAP™) to provide new readings in each 1-min interval during elective caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, T; Telec, N; Dennis, A; Griffiths, J; Buettner, A

    2012-03-01

    We compared the ability of automated non-invasive intermittent oscillometric blood pressure monitoring with a new device, CNAP(TM) (continuous non-invasive arterial pressure) to provide a new blood pressure reading in each 1-min interval between spinal anaesthesia and delivery during caesarean section. We also compared the accuracy of continuous non-invasive arterial pressure readings with non-invasive blood pressure measurements before spinal anaesthesia. Fifty-nine women participated. The non-invasive and continuous non-invasive monitors displayed new blood pressure readings in a mean of 82% (11%) and 83% (13%) (p = 0.97) of the one-minute intervals between spinal anaesthesia and delivery, respectively. Continuous non-invasive arterial pressure was more likely to fail on two or more consecutive minutes (p=0.001). From the pre-spinal readings, the mean bias, defined as non-invasive-continuous non-invasive arterial pressure, and limits of agreement (±2SD mean bias) for systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure respectively were +1.3 (±26.0), -2.9 (±21.8) and +2.6 (±20.4) mmHg. The new monitor has disadvantages compared with conventional non-invasive intermittent blood pressure monitoring. Anaesthesia © 2012 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  10. Non-invasive oscillometric wrist and upper arm blood pressure measurements compared with invasive values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, F; Klaus, D; Aristidou, Y; Wiemeyer, A; Lösse, B

    1996-01-01

    In 100 patients invasive blood pressure (BP) measurements in the aortic arch were compared with oscillometric devices at the left upper arm (UA1, device: Hestia OZ 80) and at the left and right wrists (Wl, Wr, device: NAiS Blood Pressure Watch). BPs/BPd at Wl were on average 4.3/6.0 mmHg higher than aortic BP with a relative high variability. Difference between Wls and Aos more than +/- 20 mmHg in 16% of patients between Wld and Aod more than +/- 20 mmHg in 5% of patients. Within the limits of +/- 10 mmHg, we found 56% of the systolic and 74% of the diastolic wrist values compared to the aorta. The automatic oscillometric BP measurement at the wrist is a useful method for BP self-measurement, but should be compared with upper arm values before recommending it (difference < +/- 10 mmHg) in the individual case.

  11. Validation of the three web quality dimensions of a minimally invasive surgery e-learning platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Morán, Juan Francisco; Pagador, J Blas; Sánchez-Peralta, Luisa Fernanda; Sánchez-González, Patricia; Noguera, José; Burgos, Daniel; Gómez, Enrique J; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M

    2017-11-01

    E-learning web environments, including the new TELMA platform, are increasingly being used to provide cognitive training in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) to surgeons. A complete validation of this MIS e-learning platform has been performed to determine whether it complies with the three web quality dimensions: usability, content and functionality. 21 Surgeons participated in the validation trials. They performed a set of tasks in the TELMA platform, where an e-MIS validity approach was followed. Subjective (questionnaires and checklists) and objective (web analytics) metrics were analysed to achieve the complete validation of usability, content and functionality. The TELMA platform allowed access to didactic content with easy and intuitive navigation. Surgeons performed all tasks with a close-to-ideal number of clicks and amount of time. They considered the design of the website to be consistent (95.24%), organised (90.48%) and attractive (85.71%). Moreover, they gave the content a high score (4.06 out of 5) and considered it adequate for teaching purposes. The surgeons scored the professional language and content (4.35), logo (4.24) and recommendations (4.20) the highest. Regarding functionality, the TELMA platform received an acceptance of 95.24% for navigation and 90.48% for interactivity. According to the study, it seems that TELMA had an attractive design, innovative content and interactive navigation, which are three key features of an e-learning platform. TELMA successfully met the three criteria necessary for consideration as a website of quality by achieving more than 70% of agreements regarding all usability, content and functionality items validated; this constitutes a preliminary requirement for an effective e-learning platform. However, the content completeness, authoring tool and registration process required improvement. Finally, the e-MIS validity methodology used to measure the three dimensions of web quality in this work can be applied to other

  12. Imaging modalities for the non-invasive diagnosis of endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisenblat, Vicki; Bossuyt, Patrick M M; Farquhar, Cindy; Johnson, Neil; Hull, M Louise

    2016-02-26

    About 10% of women of reproductive age suffer from endometriosis. Endometriosis is a costly chronic disease that causes pelvic pain and subfertility. Laparoscopy, the gold standard diagnostic test for endometriosis, is expensive and carries surgical risks. Currently, no non-invasive tests that can be used to accurately diagnose endometriosis are available in clinical practice. This is the first review of diagnostic test accuracy of imaging tests for endometriosis that uses Cochrane methods to provide an update on the rapidly expanding literature in this field. • To provide estimates of the diagnostic accuracy of imaging modalities for the diagnosis of pelvic endometriosis, ovarian endometriosis and deeply infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) versus surgical diagnosis as a reference standard.• To describe performance of imaging tests for mapping of deep endometriotic lesions in the pelvis at specific anatomical sites.Imaging tests were evaluated as replacement tests for diagnostic surgery and as triage tests that would assist decision making regarding diagnostic surgery for endometriosis. We searched the following databases to 20 April 2015: MEDLINE, CENTRAL, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science, LILACS, OAIster, TRIP, ClinicalTrials.gov, MEDION, DARE, and PubMed. Searches were not restricted to a particular study design or language nor to specific publication dates. The search strategy incorporated words in the title, abstracts, text words across the record and medical subject headings (MeSH). We considered published peer-reviewed cross-sectional studies and randomised controlled trials of any size that included prospectively recruited women of reproductive age suspected of having one or more of the following target conditions: endometrioma, pelvic endometriosis, DIE or endometriotic lesions at specific intrapelvic anatomical locations. We included studies that compared the diagnostic test accuracy of one or more imaging modalities versus findings of surgical

  13. Non-invasive blood pressure monitoring with an oscillometric brachial cuff: impact of arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhal, Karim; Martin, Maëlle; Ehrmann, Stephan; Faiz, Sofian; Rozec, Bertrand; Boulain, Thierry

    2017-09-27

    Arrhythmia-induced beat-to-beat variability of blood pressure (BP) is deemed to hinder the reliability of non-invasive oscillometric measurements (NIBP) but few data support this belief. We assessed the impact of arrhythmia on a NIBP device never tested for this purpose. We compared, in intensive care unit patients with and without arrhythmia, the agreement between three pairs of NIBP (Infinity™ Delta monitor, Dräger medical systems) and invasive readings. For systolic, diastolic and mean BP, the mean bias between NIBP and invasive measurements was not higher, in 89 patients with arrhythmia, than that observed in 127 patients with regular rhythm (p = 0.93 for mean BP). Averaging three measurements overcame the higher within-subject variability of NIBP measurements during arrhythmia, and yielded similar agreement between the two techniques in patients with arrhythmia and with regular rhythm. The international organization for standardization criteria (mean bias invasive BP invasive BP invasive BP > 140 mmHg) by NIBP was similar during arrhythmia and regular rhythm [areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCROC) of 0.88-0.92, p > 0.13]. The detection of a 10% increase in mean invasive BP after cardiovascular intervention was also associated with similar AUCROCs between the two groups. Provided that triplicates are averaged, the agreement between NIBP measured with the tested device and invasive measurements was not worse during arrhythmia than during regular rhythm.

  14. A new method for non-invasive estimation of human muscle fiber type composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Baguet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been established that excellence in sports with short and long exercise duration requires a high proportion of fast-twitch (FT or type-II fibers and slow-twitch (ST or type-I fibers, respectively. Until today, the muscle biopsy method is still accepted as gold standard to measure muscle fiber type composition. Because of its invasive nature and high sampling variance, it would be useful to develop a non-invasive alternative. METHODOLOGY: Eighty-three control subjects, 15 talented young track-and-field athletes, 51 elite athletes and 14 ex-athletes volunteered to participate in the current study. The carnosine content of all 163 subjects was measured in the gastrocnemius muscle by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1H-MRS. Muscle biopsies for fiber typing were taken from 12 untrained males. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A significant positive correlation was found between muscle carnosine, measured by (1H-MRS, and percentage area occupied by type II fibers. Explosive athletes had ∼30% higher carnosine levels compared to a reference population, whereas it was ∼20% lower than normal in typical endurance athletes. Similar results were found in young talents and ex-athletes. When active elite runners were ranked according to their best running distance, a negative sigmoidal curve was found between logarithm of running distance and muscle carnosine. CONCLUSIONS: Muscle carnosine content shows a good reflection of the disciplines of elite track-and-field athletes and is able to distinguish between individual track running distances. The differences between endurance and sprint muscle types is also observed in young talents and former athletes, suggesting this characteristic is genetically determined and can be applied in early talent identification. This quick method provides a valid alternative for the muscle biopsy method. In addition, this technique may also contribute to the diagnosis and monitoring of many conditions and

  15. A New Method for Non-Invasive Estimation of Human Muscle Fiber Type Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baguet, Audrey; Everaert, Inge; Hespel, Peter; Petrovic, Mirko; Achten, Eric; Derave, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Background It has been established that excellence in sports with short and long exercise duration requires a high proportion of fast-twitch (FT) or type-II fibers and slow-twitch (ST) or type-I fibers, respectively. Until today, the muscle biopsy method is still accepted as gold standard to measure muscle fiber type composition. Because of its invasive nature and high sampling variance, it would be useful to develop a non-invasive alternative. Methodology Eighty-three control subjects, 15 talented young track-and-field athletes, 51 elite athletes and 14 ex-athletes volunteered to participate in the current study. The carnosine content of all 163 subjects was measured in the gastrocnemius muscle by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Muscle biopsies for fiber typing were taken from 12 untrained males. Principal Findings A significant positive correlation was found between muscle carnosine, measured by 1H-MRS, and percentage area occupied by type II fibers. Explosive athletes had ∼30% higher carnosine levels compared to a reference population, whereas it was ∼20% lower than normal in typical endurance athletes. Similar results were found in young talents and ex-athletes. When active elite runners were ranked according to their best running distance, a negative sigmoidal curve was found between logarithm of running distance and muscle carnosine. Conclusions Muscle carnosine content shows a good reflection of the disciplines of elite track-and-field athletes and is able to distinguish between individual track running distances. The differences between endurance and sprint muscle types is also observed in young talents and former athletes, suggesting this characteristic is genetically determined and can be applied in early talent identification. This quick method provides a valid alternative for the muscle biopsy method. In addition, this technique may also contribute to the diagnosis and monitoring of many conditions and diseases that are

  16. Clinical utility of non?invasive prenatal testing in pregnancies with ultrasound anomalies

    OpenAIRE

    Beulen, L.; Faas, B. H. W.; Feenstra, I.; van Vugt, J. M. G.; Bekker, M. N.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the application of non?invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) as an alternative to invasive diagnostic prenatal testing in pregnancies with abnormal ultrasound findings. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of 251 singleton and multiple pregnancies at high risk for fetal chromosomal abnormality based on findings at sonographic examination, in which NIPT was performed as a first?tier genetic test. NIPT was performed by massively parallel sequencing of cell?free DN...

  17. Non-invasive measurement of cardiac output by Finometer in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, N; Hobolth, L; Møller, S

    2010-01-01

    The Finometer measures haemodynamic parameters including cardiac output (CO) using non-invasive volume-clamp techniques. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of the Finometer in hyperdynamic cirrhotic patients using an invasive indicator dilution technique as control. CO was measured......, the Finometer can be used to measure changes in CO, whereas absolute measurements are associated with higher variation in patients with cirrhosis. The Finometer seems useful for repeated determinations such as in studies of effect of pharmacotherapy....

  18. Evaluation of non-invasive trunk sprays and trunk-injected emamectic benzoate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; D.L. Cappaert; T.M. Poland; A.C. Anulewicz; P. Lewis; J. Molongoski

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, we continued to evaluate two neo-nicotinoid insecticides, imidacloprid and dinotefuron, applied as non-invasive trunk sprays to control emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. Neo-nicotinoid products are widely used to protect landscape ash trees because they are relatively safe for humans and non-target species. These...

  19. Non-Invasive Nanoparticle Imaging Technologies for Cosmetic and Skin Care Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynlee L. Lin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The nanotechnology field is growing at an unprecedented rate. This is resulting in significant benefits in skin care products and formulations. Likewise, imaging technology is also advancing. The convergence of these fields offers a unique opportunity to observe and quantify the interactions of nanoparticles within cosmetic and skin care formulations. More importantly, imaging technology holds tremendous promise for understanding how formulated nanoparticles interact with our skin. Imaging technologies can be broken into two major groups that include those that require invasive sample collection and processing (e.g., electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy and those that can be used in non-invasive data collection settings. Fluorescence microscopy, confocal microscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography fall into the latter category and are the focus of this review in the context of skin care product and cosmetics testing. Cosmetic and skin care product testing is most informative when carried out in volunteers. This makes invasive or disruptive analysis techniques unfeasible and supports the use of non-invasive imaging technologies. The combination of non-invasive imaging and minimally invasive microbiopsy sampling for combined imaging and molecular data is the future of skin care product testing.

  20. Effect of non-invasive prenatal testing as a contingent approach on the indications for invasive prenatal diagnosis and prenatal detection rate of Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, K O; Poon, C F; Kwok, S L; Chan, K Yk; Tang, M Hy; Kan, A Sy; Leung, K Y

    2016-06-01

    In Hong Kong, universal combined first-trimester screening for Down's syndrome was started as a 'free service' in July 2010. Non-invasive prenatal testing was available as a self-financed item in August 2011. This study aimed to determine whether the introduction of non-invasive prenatal testing as a contingent approach influenced the indications for invasive prenatal diagnosis and the consequent prenatal detection of Down's syndrome. This historical cohort study was conducted at the Prenatal Diagnosis Clinic of Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Hong Kong. We compared the indications for invasive prenatal diagnosis and prenatal detection of Down's syndrome in singleton pregnancies 1 year before and 2 years following the availability of non-invasive prenatal testing as a contingent test after a positive aneuploidy test. All pregnant women who attended our hospital for counselling about universal Down's syndrome screening between August 2010 and July 2013 were recruited. A total of 16 098 women were counselled. After the introduction of non-invasive prenatal testing, the invasive prenatal diagnosis rate for a positive aneuploidy screening reduced from 77.7% in 2010-11 to 68.8% in 2012-13. The new combined conventional plus non-invasive prenatal testing strategy was associated with a lower false-positive rate (6.9% in 2010-11 vs 5.2% in 2011-12 and 4.9% in 2012-13). There was no significant increase in invasive prenatal diagnosis for structural anomalies over the years. There was no significant trend in the overall prenatal detection rate of Down's syndrome (100% 1 year before vs 89.1% 2 years after introduction of non-invasive prenatal testing). Four (2.6%) of 156 women who underwent non-invasive prenatal testing for a screen-positive result had a high-risk result for trisomy 21, which was subsequently confirmed by invasive prenatal diagnosis. There were no false-negative cases. The introduction of non-invasive prenatal testing as a contingent approach reduced the invasive

  1. Non-Invasive Gene Therapy of Experimental Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pardridge, William M

    2005-01-01

    ... medicine without the use of viral vectors. The brain gene targeting technology developed in this work creates an "artificial virus" which is comprised of non-immunogenic lipids and proteins, wherein the therapeutic gene is packaged...

  2. Continuous Non-invasive finger cuff CareTaker® comparable to invasive intra-arterial pressure in patients undergoing major intra-abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, Irwin; Deal, Edward; Spitz, Francis; Baruch, Martin; Allen, I Elaine; Seaman, Julia E; Pukenas, Erin; Jean, Smith

    2017-03-21

    Despite increased interest in non-invasive arterial pressure monitoring, the majority of commercially available technologies have failed to satisfy the limits established for the validation of automatic arterial pressure monitoring by the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI). According to the ANSI/AAMI/ISO 81060-2:2013 standards, the group-average accuracy and precision are defined as acceptable if bias is not greater than 5 mmHg and standard deviation is not greater than 8 mmHg. In this study, these standards are used to evaluate the CareTaker® (CT) device, a device measuring continuous non-invasive blood pressure via a pulse contour algorithm called Pulse Decomposition Analysis. A convenience sample of 24 patients scheduled for major abdominal surgery were consented to participate in this IRB approved pilot study. Each patient was monitored with a radial arterial catheter and CT using a finger cuff applied to the contralateral thumb. Hemodynamic variables were measured and analyzed from both devices for the first thirty minutes of the surgical procedure including the induction of anesthesia. The mean arterial pressure (MAP), systolic and diastolic blood pressures continuously collected from the arterial catheter and CT were compared. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated between arterial catheter and CT blood pressure measurements, a Bland-Altman analysis, and polar and 4Q plots were created. The correlation of systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures were 0.92, 0.86, 0.91, respectively (p pressures, respectively with a standard deviation of 7.34, 6.47, 5.33 mmHg for systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures, respectively (p blood pressure measured using the non-invasive CT device was shown to correlate well with the arterial catheter measurements. Larger studies are needed to confirm these results in more varied settings. Most patients exhibited very good agreement between methods. Results were well

  3. An imaging co-registration system using novel non-invasive and non-radioactive external markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Tung-Hsin [Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (Taiwan); Department of Atomic Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Taiwan (Taiwan); Department of Radiological Technology, Yuanpei University of Science and Technology, Taiwan (Taiwan); Wang, Jiunn-Kuen; Liu, Ren-Shyan [Department of Nuclear Medicine and National PET/Cyclotron Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (Taiwan); Lee, Jason J.S. [Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (Taiwan); Guo, Wan-Yuo [Department of Radiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming University, 112, Taipei, Taiwan (Taiwan)

    2003-06-01

    We present a system of image co-registration and its validation in phantom and volunteer studies. The system co-registered images via six novel non-invasive and non-radioactive external markers. The fiducial markers were attached with sponge bases on the skin surface of the phantom and the volunteers in a non-collinear and non-coplanar array. The subjects were scanned with a 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) imager using 2D spin-echo T1-weighted (SE) and 3D spoiled gradient recalled pulse sequences (SPGR) and with a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for transmission imaging (TI) and emission imaging (EI). The sponge bases created radiolucent gaps with good contrast between the fiducial markers and skin surface. They made the markers visible with clear edge boundaries on both PET and MR images. The images to be registered were rescaled, interpolated, reformatted and followed by point-to-point registration for coordinate determination and the estimation of geometrical transformation and fiducial registration errors (FREs) via the fiducial markers. The images formed four matched pairs of inter-modality (SE-TI, SPGR-TI, SE-EI and SPGR-EI) and two pairs of intra-modality (SE-SPGR, TI-EI) imaging for direct co-registration. The parameters for direct co-registration of SE-TI and SPRG-TI were subsequently used as a bridge and applied for indirect co-registration of SE with EI (SE-EI{sup TI}) and SPGR with EI (SPGR-EI{sup TI}), respectively. The overall FREs of the phantom were, respectively, 1.50 mm for inter-modality and 1.10 mm for intra-modality direct co-registration. Those of volunteers were, respectively, 1.79 mm for inter-modality and 1.21 mm for intra-modality direct co-registration. For indirect co-registration, the overall FREs of the phantom were 2.53 mm (SE-EI{sup TI}) and 2.28 (SPGR-EI{sup TI}) mm; those of volunteers were 2.84 mm (SE-EI{sup TI}) and 2.81 mm (SPGR-EI{sup TI}). The errors of direct co-registration were smaller than those of indirect co

  4. Non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy and beyond: challenges of responsible innovation in prenatal screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido; Bombard, Yvonne; Bianchi, Diana W; Bergmann, Carsten; Borry, Pascal; Chitty, Lyn S; Fellmann, Florence; Forzano, Francesca; Hall, Alison; Henneman, Lidewij; Howard, Heidi C; Lucassen, Anneke; Ormond, Kelly; Peterlin, Borut; Radojkovic, Dragica; Rogowski, Wolf; Soller, Maria; Tibben, Aad; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; van El, Carla G; Cornel, Martina C

    2015-11-01

    This paper contains a joint ESHG/ASHG position document with recommendations regarding responsible innovation in prenatal screening with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). By virtue of its greater accuracy and safety with respect to prenatal screening for common autosomal aneuploidies, NIPT has the potential of helping the practice better achieve its aim of facilitating autonomous reproductive choices, provided that balanced pretest information and non-directive counseling are available as part of the screening offer. Depending on the health-care setting, different scenarios for NIPT-based screening for common autosomal aneuploidies are possible. The trade-offs involved in these scenarios should be assessed in light of the aim of screening, the balance of benefits and burdens for pregnant women and their partners and considerations of cost-effectiveness and justice. With improving screening technologies and decreasing costs of sequencing and analysis, it will become possible in the near future to significantly expand the scope of prenatal screening beyond common autosomal aneuploidies. Commercial providers have already begun expanding their tests to include sex-chromosomal abnormalities and microdeletions. However, multiple false positives may undermine the main achievement of NIPT in the context of prenatal screening: the significant reduction of the invasive testing rate. This document argues for a cautious expansion of the scope of prenatal screening to serious congenital and childhood disorders, only following sound validation studies and a comprehensive evaluation of all relevant aspects. A further core message of this document is that in countries where prenatal screening is offered as a public health programme, governments and public health authorities should adopt an active role to ensure the responsible innovation of prenatal screening on the basis of ethical principles. Crucial elements are the quality of the screening process as a whole (including non

  5. Non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy and beyond: challenges of responsible innovation in prenatal screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido; Bombard, Yvonne; Bianchi, Diana W; Bergmann, Carsten; Borry, Pascal; Chitty, Lyn S; Fellmann, Florence; Forzano, Francesca; Hall, Alison; Henneman, Lidewij; Howard, Heidi C; Lucassen, Anneke; Ormond, Kelly; Peterlin, Borut; Radojkovic, Dragica; Rogowski, Wolf; Soller, Maria; Tibben, Aad; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; van El, Carla G; Cornel, Martina C

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains a joint ESHG/ASHG position document with recommendations regarding responsible innovation in prenatal screening with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). By virtue of its greater accuracy and safety with respect to prenatal screening for common autosomal aneuploidies, NIPT has the potential of helping the practice better achieve its aim of facilitating autonomous reproductive choices, provided that balanced pretest information and non-directive counseling are available as part of the screening offer. Depending on the health-care setting, different scenarios for NIPT-based screening for common autosomal aneuploidies are possible. The trade-offs involved in these scenarios should be assessed in light of the aim of screening, the balance of benefits and burdens for pregnant women and their partners and considerations of cost-effectiveness and justice. With improving screening technologies and decreasing costs of sequencing and analysis, it will become possible in the near future to significantly expand the scope of prenatal screening beyond common autosomal aneuploidies. Commercial providers have already begun expanding their tests to include sex-chromosomal abnormalities and microdeletions. However, multiple false positives may undermine the main achievement of NIPT in the context of prenatal screening: the significant reduction of the invasive testing rate. This document argues for a cautious expansion of the scope of prenatal screening to serious congenital and childhood disorders, only following sound validation studies and a comprehensive evaluation of all relevant aspects. A further core message of this document is that in countries where prenatal screening is offered as a public health programme, governments and public health authorities should adopt an active role to ensure the responsible innovation of prenatal screening on the basis of ethical principles. Crucial elements are the quality of the screening process as a whole (including non

  6. Aesthetic smile evaluation--a non-invasive solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Boglarka O; Mehta, Shamir B; Banerji, Subir; Millar, Brian J

    2011-09-01

    Enhancement of the aesthetic zone is a common reason for patients to seek dental care. This article describes a protocol for the examination, assessment and treatment planning for a patient seeking a solution to an aesthetic concern. The technique of undertaking an intra-oral'mock-up' using resin composite as a diagnostic approach can be particularly helpful when planning for future prosthodontic rehabilitation. The latter can allow the operator and patient to visualize crudely what is aesthetically and functionally possible, given the constraints imposed by that patient. The patient has ultimately managed in a minimally invasive manner. It can be very tempting for a dental operator to impose his/her concepts of the'artistic ideal' when planning for care in the smile zone. Such ideals are largely based on established universal aesthetic principles of tooth colour, size, shape, form, position, symmetry and proportion. However, beauty is a very subjective matter. It is essential for the operator to listen attentively to his/her patient's concerns. Meticulous patient examination and assessment are absolutely critical factors in attempting to attain a successful outcome. The use of reversible, chairside intra-oral mock-up techniques can not only help with the transference of essential information to the dental technician when planning for restorative intervention in the smile zone, but can also allow the patient to gain an insight and indeed contribute his/her views to the possible restorative endpoint, respectively.

  7. Non-invasive Detection of Breast Cancer Lymph Node Metastasis using Carbonic Anhydrases IX and XII Targeted Imaging Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafreshi, Narges K.; Bui, Marilyn M.; Bishop, Kellsey; Lloyd, Mark C.; Enkemann, Steven A.; Lopez, Alexis S.; Abrahams, Dominique; Carter, Bradford W.; Vagner, Josef; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Gillies, Robert J.; Morse, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop targeted molecular imaging probes for the non-invasive detection of breast cancer lymph node metastasis. Methods Six cell surface or secreted markers were identified by expression profiling and from the literature as being highly expressed in breast cancer lymph node metastases. Two of these markers were cell surface carbonic anhydrase isozymes (CAIX and/or CAXII) and were validated for protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) of patient tissue samples on a breast cancer tissue microarray containing 47 normal breast tissue samples, 42 ductal carcinoma in situ, 43 invasive ductal carcinomas without metastasis, 46 invasive ductal carcinomas with metastasis and 49 lymph node macrometastases of breast carcinoma. Targeted probes were developed by conjugation of CAIX and CAXII specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to a near-infrared fluorescent dye. Results Together, these two markers were expressed in 100% of the lymph node metastases surveyed. Selectivity of the imaging probes were confirmed by intravenous injection into nude mice bearing mammary fat pad tumors of marker expressing cells, and non-expressing cells or by pre-injection of unlabeled antibody. Imaging of LN metastases showed that peritumorally-injected probes detected nodes harboring metastatic tumor cells. As few as 1,000 cells were detected, as determined by implanting, under ultrasound guidance, a range in number of CAIX and CAXII expressing cells into the axillary LNs. Conclusion These imaging probes have potential for non-invasive staging of breast cancer in the clinic and elimination of unneeded surgery, which is costly and associated with morbidities. PMID:22016510

  8. Non-Invasive Radiofrequency-Induced Targeted Hyperthermia for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Raoof

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted biological therapies for hepatocellular cancer have shown minimal improvements in median survival. Multiple pathways to oncogenesis leading to rapid development of resistance to such therapies is a concern. Non-invasive radiofrequency field-induced targeted hyperthermia using nanoparticles is a radical departure from conventional modalities. In this paper we underscore the need for innovative strategies for the treatment of hepatocellular cancer, describe the central paradigm of targeted hyperthermia using non-invasive electromagnetic energy, review the process of characterization and modification of nanoparticles for the task, and summarize data from cell-based and animal-based models of hepatocellular cancer treated with non-invasive RF energy. Finally, future strategies and challenges in bringing this modality from bench to clinic are discussed.

  9. Non-invasive detection of fasting blood glucose level via electrochemical measurement of saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sarul; Khadgawat, Rajesh; Anand, Sneh; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Machine learning techniques such as logistic regression (LR), support vector machine (SVM) and artificial neural network (ANN) were used to detect fasting blood glucose levels (FBGL) in a mixed population of healthy and diseased individuals in an Indian population. The occurrence of elevated FBGL was estimated in a non-invasive manner from the status of an individual's salivary electrochemical parameters such as pH, redox potential, conductivity and concentration of sodium, potassium and calcium ions. The samples were obtained from 175 randomly selected volunteers comprising half healthy and half diabetic patients. The models were trained using 70 % of the total data, and tested upon the remaining set. For each algorithm, data points were cross-validated by randomly shuffling them three times prior to implementing the model. The performance of the machine learning technique was reported in terms of four statistically significant parameters-accuracy, precision, sensitivity and F1 score. SVM using RBF kernel showed the best performance for classifying high FBGLs with approximately 85 % accuracy, 84 % precision, 85 % sensitivity and 85 % F1 score. This study has been approved by the ethical committee of All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India with the reference number: IEC/NP-278/01-08-2014, RP-29/2014.

  10. Calibration of oscillometric non-invasive devices for monitoring blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doh, Il; Lim, Hyun Kyoon; Ahn, Bongyoung

    2015-04-01

    Blood pressure is one of the most important vital signs used to monitor a patient’s medical condition and is widely measured in hospitals and at home. Automatic, non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) monitoring devices measure systolic and diastolic blood pressures from the analysis of cuff pressure oscillations caused by periodic variations of blood pressure in an artery. Currently, clinical validation by comparing them to the auscultatory reference has been used to verify the performance of NIBP devices. However, there are presently no calibration methods for NIBP devices. Here, we propose an SI-traceable calibration method for oscillometric NIBP devices. The calibration system generates pressure-pulses at pre-determined cuff pressures, and with pre-determined amplitude, to the device-under-test. The uncertainty of each pulse is analyzed and used for the calculation of blood pressure (BP) uncertainty. The maximum uncertainty for systolic and diastolic BP using the newly developed calibration system is (0.74 and 0.60) mmHg (k = 2) depending on the pressure and amplitude of each pulse, as well as the number of pulses applied. The present method can be used for calibration of oscillometric NIBP devices.

  11. A non-invasive photoacoustic and ultrasonic method for the measurement of glucose solution concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Siwei; Tao, Wei; He, Qiaozhi; Zhao, Hui; Cao, Wenwu

    2017-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease affecting nearly 400 million people worldwide. In order to manage the disease, patients need to monitor the blood glucose level by puncturing the finger several times a day, which is uncomfortable and inconvenient. We present here a potential non-invasive monitoring method based on the velocity of ultrasonic waves generated in glucose solution by the photoacoustic principal, which can recognize the glucose concentration down to 20mg/dL. In order to apply this method to warm bodies, we carefully designed the experiment and performed measurements from 30 °C to 50 °C to generate a set of calibration curves, which may be used by engineers to build devices. Most importantly, we have theoretically explained the relationship between the compressibility and the glucose concentration. Our results show that the compressibility of solution decreases with the glucose concentration, which clarified the controversy between theory and experiment results in the literature. The derived formula is generally validity, which can be used to nondestructively measure solution concentration for other types of solutions using photoacoustic principle.

  12. Photogrammetry: a Non-Invasive and Objective Method for Detecting Locomotion Problems in Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AS Mendes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Locomotion problems in broiler chickens can cause economic losses of up to 40% of the total revenues due to carcass condemnation and downgrading at processing. Leg disorders, such as femoral lesions, tibial dyschondroplasia, and spondylolisthesis, substantially impact the welfare of chickens as these disorders can prevent birds from reaching the feeders and drinkers, thus reducing feed and water intake. The most important issues related to broiler welfare reported in the last two decades are their growing sensitivity to metabolic and locomotion problems due to the fast growth rates and inactivity. Traditional methods for the determination of gait score include the manual scoring of animal behavior in the broiler house. Recorded video images can also be used for manual scoring of chicken gait score. However, scoring of some animal-based information by human experts and manual methods remain difficult, time consuming and expensive when implemented at farm level. In an effort to objectively detect leg disorders, this study aimed at validating the photogrammetry technique as a non-invasive method for identifying locomotion problems in broilers. Photogrammetry allows determining the geometric properties of broilers from digital photos that are processed and analyzed using a computer software. Results obtained using photogrammetry were tested for their correlation with those obtained by accepted methodologies, including gait score and macroscopic examination of femoral degeneration and tibial dyschondroplasia. The photogrammetry results agreed with the results of the afore mentioned accepted methods.

  13. Real time, non-invasive assessment of leaflet deformation in heart valve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortsmit, J; Driessen, N J B; Rutten, M C M; Baaijens, F P T

    2009-03-01

    In heart valve tissue engineering, most bioreactors try to mimic physiological flow and operate with a preset transvalvular pressure applied to the tissue. The induced deformations are unknown and can vary during culturing as a consequence of changing mechanical properties of the engineered construct. Real-time measurement and control of local tissue strains are desired to systematically study the effects of mechanical loading on tissue development and, consequently, to design an optimal conditioning protocol. In this study, a method is presented to assess local tissue strains in heart valve leaflets during culturing. We hypothesize that local tissue strains can be determined from volumetric deformation. Volumetric deformation is defined as the amount of fluid displaced by the deformed heart valve leaflets in a stented configuration, and is measured, non-invasively, using a flow sensor. A numerical model is employed to relate volumetric deformation to local tissue strains in various regions of the leaflets (e.g. belly and commissures). The flow-based deformation measurement method was validated and its functionality was demonstrated in a tissue engineering experiment. Tri-leaflet, stented heart valves were cultured in vitro and during mechanical conditioning, realistic values for volumetric and local deformation were obtained.

  14. Pore Level Modeling of Immiscible Drainage: Validation in the Invasion Percolation and DLA Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferer, M.V.; Bromhal, G.S.; Smith, D.H.

    2003-03-01

    Motivated by a wide-range of applications from ground water remediation to carbon dioxide sequestration and by difficulties in reconciling experiments with previous modeling, we have developed a pore-level model of two-phase flow in porous media. We have attempted to make our model as physical and as reliable as possible, incorporating both capillary effects and viscous effects. After a detailed discussion of the model, we validate it in the very different limits of zero capillary number and zero-viscosity ratio. Invasion percolation (IP) models the flow in the limit of zero capillary number; results from our model show detailed agreement with results from IP, for small capillary numbers. Diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) models the flow in the limit of zero-viscosity ratio; flow patterns from our model have the same fractal dimension as patterns from DLA for small viscosity ratios.

  15. Sound: a non-invasive measure of cough intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kai K; Matos, Sergio; Ward, Katie; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Moxham, John; Evans, David H; Birring, Surinder S

    2017-01-01

    Cough intensity is an important determinant of cough severity reported by patients. Cough sound analysis has been widely validated for the measurement of cough frequency but few studies have validated its use in the assessment of cough strength. We investigated the relationship between cough sound and physiological measures of cough strength. 32 patients with chronic cough and controls underwent contemporaneous measurements of voluntary cough sound, flow and oesophageal pressure. Sound power, peak energy, rise-time, duration, peak-frequency, bandwidth and centroid-frequency were assessed and compared with physiological measures. The relationship between sound and subjective cough strength Visual Analogue Score (VAS), the repeatability of cough sounds and the effect of microphone position were also assessed. Sound power and energy correlated strongly with cough flow (median Spearman's r=0.87-0.88) and oesophageal pressure (median Spearman's r=0.89). Sound power and energy correlated strongly with cough strength VAS (median Spearman's r=0.84-0.86) and were highly repeatable (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.93-0.94) but both were affected by change in microphone position. Cough sound power and energy correlate strongly with physiological measures and subjective perception of cough strength. Power and energy are highly repeatable measures but the microphone position should be standardised. Our findings support the use of cough sound as an index of cough strength.

  16. Comparing invasive blood pressure measurements with both classic intermittent and novel continuous, non-invasive measurements in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buisman, P.L.; Poterman, Marieke; Kalmar, A.F.; Scheeren, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background and Goal of Study: Measuring blood pressure (BP) invasively via an arterial catheter (ABP) is widely used but may cause complications [1]. Classic non-invasive measurement by arm cuff (NIBP) measures BP intermittently (BPNIBP), presenting a major shortcoming, but with minor risk of

  17. Size of Non-lepidic Invasive Pattern Predicts Recurrence in Pulmonary Mucinous Adenocarcinoma: Morphologic Analysis of 188 Resected Cases with Reappraisal of Invasion Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soohyun Hwang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background We reviewed a series of 188 resected pulmonary mucinous adenocarcinomas (MAs to clarify the prognostic significance of lepidic and non-lepidic patterns. Methods Non-lepidic patterns were divided into bland, non-distorted acini with uncertain invasiveness (pattern 1, unequivocal invasion into stroma (pattern 2, or invasion into alveolar spaces (pattern 3. Results The mean proportion of invasive patterns (patterns 2 and 3 was lowest in small (≤ 3 cm tumors, and gradually increased in intermediate (> 3 cm and ≤ 7 cm and large (> 7 cm tumors (8.4%, 34.3%, and 50.1%, respectively. Adjusted T (aT stage, as determined by the size of invasive patterns, was positively correlated with adverse histologic and clinical features including older age, male sex, and ever smokers. aTis tumors, which were exclusively composed of lepidic pattern (n = 9, or a mixture of lepidic and pattern 1 (n = 40 without any invasive patterns, showed 100% disease- free survival (DFS. The aT1mi tumors, with minimal (≤ 5 mm invasive patterns (n = 63, showed a 95.2% 5-year DFS, with recurrences (n = 2 limited to tumors greater than 3 cm in total size (n = 23. Both T and aT stage were significantly associated with DFS; however, survival within the separate T-stage subgroups was stratified according to the aT stage, most notably in the intermediatestage subgroups. In multivariate analysis, the size of invasive patterns (p = .020, pleural invasion (p < .001, and vascular invasion (p = .048 were independent predictors of recurrence, whereas total size failed to achieve statistical significance (p = .121. Conclusions This study provides a rationale for histologic risk stratification in pulmonary MA based on the extent of invasive growth patterns with refined criteria for invasion.

  18. From Korotkoff and Marey to automatic non-invasive oscillometric blood pressure measurement: does easiness come with reliability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmira, A; Perez-Martin, A; Schuster, I; Aichoun, I; Coudray, S; Bereksi-Reguig, F; Dauzat, M

    2016-01-01

    The auscultatory technique remains the point of reference for the validation of non-invasive blood pressure measurement devices, although the exact origin of the Korotkoff sounds is still debated and comparison with intra-arterial measurement shows limits and pitfalls. Automatic oscillometric devices are now widely used by nurses, physicians, and patients. However, many available devices have not been duly validated. Moreover, they calculate systolic and diastolic blood pressures using undisclosed algorithms. Therefore, these devices are not interchangeable, and their reliability may be questionable in some clinical situations. Nevertheless, oscillometry is increasingly used, beside NIBP, for the assessment of central blood pressure and systemic arterial wall stiffness. Awareness of its limits and causes of error is all the more necessary.

  19. Non-Invasive Acoustic-Based Monitoring of Heavy Water and Uranium Process Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantea, Cristian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sinha, Dipen N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lakis, Rollin Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Beedle, Christopher Craig [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Davis, Eric Sean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-20

    This presentation includes slides on Project Goals; Heavy Water Production Monitoring: A New Challenge for the IAEA; Noninvasive Measurements in SFAI Cell; Large Scatter in Literature Values; Large Scatter in Literature Values; Highest Precision Sound Speed Data Available: New Standard in H/D; ~400 pts of data; Noninvasive Measurements in SFAI Cell; New funding from NA241 SGTech; Uranium Solution Monitoring: Inspired by IAEA Challenge in Kazakhstan; Non-Invasive Acoustic-Based Monitoring of Uranium in Solutions; Non-Invasive Acoustic-Based Monitoring of Uranium in Solutions; and finally a summary.

  20. Non-invasive Morphological and Elemental Analysis of Ivory Plate for Artworks\

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tihlaříková, Eva; Neděla, Vilém; Hradilová, J.; Hradil, David

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, S1 (2017), s. 1832-1833 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA ČR(CZ) GA17-25687S Institutional support: RVO:68081731 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : ESEM * EDS * non-invasive morphological analysis * non-invasive elemental analysis Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering; CA - Inorganic Chemistry (UACH-T) Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  1. Non-invasive and Non-destructive Characterization of Tissue Engineered Constructs Using Ultrasound Imaging Technologies: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kang; Wagner, William R

    2016-03-01

    With the rapid expansion of biomaterial development and coupled efforts to translate such advances toward the clinic, non-invasive and non-destructive imaging tools to evaluate implants in situ in a timely manner are critically needed. The required multi-level information is comprehensive, including structural, mechanical, and biological changes such as scaffold degradation, mechanical strength, cell infiltration, extracellular matrix formation and vascularization to name a few. With its inherent advantages of non-invasiveness and non-destructiveness, ultrasound imaging can be an ideal tool for both preclinical and clinical uses. In this review, currently available ultrasound imaging technologies that have been applied in vitro and in vivo for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are discussed and some new emerging ultrasound technologies and multi-modality approaches utilizing ultrasound are introduced.

  2. Non-invasive estimation of cerebrospinal fluid pressure waveforms by means of retinal venous pulsatility and central aortic blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golzan, S Mojtaba; Kim, Mi Ok; Seddighi, Amir Saied; Avolio, Alberto; Graham, Stuart L

    2012-09-01

    Current techniques used for cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFp) measurements are invasive. They require a surgical procedure for placement of a pressure catheter in the brain ventricles or in the brain tissue. The human eye provides direct visualisation of its physiological structures and due to its anatomical connection with CSF via the retrolaminar optic nerve it may provide accessible information about CSFp. A total of 25 subjects were included in this study. 15 subjects were used to characterise the relationship between intraocular pressure (IOP), spontaneous retinal venous pulsatility (SRVP), and CSFp. IOP was manipulated and SRVP amplitudes recorded dynamically using the dynamic vessel analyzer (DVA). The relationship between IOP and SRVP amplitude was established to estimate CSFp. Additionally Doppler blood flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery and arterial blood pressure (ABP) were acquired for all subjects. This was to compare and validate our findings with an alternative approach (ICM+) which uses these values to estimate CSFp. A CSFp waveform was extracted from central blood pressure (CBP) waveform by removing its cardiac component frequency. Furthermore to calibrate the CSFp to CBP waveform ratio, invasive CSFp, and ABP was measured from 10 subjects with brain tumours who had a range of normal to elevated CSFp (i.e., 0-30 mmHg). Results show good agreement between the two methods (correlation r (2) = 0.55) Mean estimated CSFp for the two techniques did not show any significant difference (p > 0.05). A significant correlation between CBP pulse (CBPp) and invasive CSFp pulse (CSFpp) was observed (i.e., CSFpp = 0.0654CBBp + 3.91, p invasively and may provide a novel method to estimate CSF waveforms non-invasively.

  3. Validity of Initial Clinical Diagnosis of Unstable Angina Based on the Invasive and Noninvasive Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hasan Namazi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A few studies have focused on diagnostic performance of residents for controlling the patients with acute chest pain referring to chest pain units. We aimed to assess diagnostic performance of cardiology residents for controlling the patients with acute chest pain, considering invasive and non-invasive diagnostic modalities as the key standards to confirm or refuse diagnosis of unstable angina.Methods: One hundred and twenty nine patients with chest pain or angina referring to chest pain unit of Modarres hospital between 2013 and 2014 were assessed. The patients were categorized into two subgroups. The first group included 23 patients who were discharged by the resident in initial evaluation because of ruling-out diagnosis of unstable angina, but were assessed non-invasively by exercise test or SPECT as key standards. The second group included 106 patients who were hospitalized and admitted to CCU by residents’ order and also were assessed invasively by coronary angiography or noninvasively by exercise test or SPECT.Results: Overall, of 129 patients, 23 were initially diagnosed not to be necessarily hospitalized and thus were discharged by resident’s order. Of those, assessing by SPECT indicated positive result in five of 19 patients and by exercise test indicated positive result in 1 of 4 patients yielding a sensitivity of 83.3%, a specificity of 17.6%, a PPV of 26.3%, a NPV of 75.0%, and an accuracy of 34.8% for assessing disease by resident. The remaining 106 patients were admitted to CCU ward in accordance with the resident’s order. Among those patients, 85 underwent coronary angiography with positive results in 53 patients. Also, SPECT was positive in 10 of 19 patients and exercise test was positive in one of two patients yielding a sensitivity of 95.3%, a specificity of 0.0%, a PPV of 59.2%, a NPV of 0.0%, and an accuracy of 57.5%.Conclusions: For patients with suspicion to unstable angina, the decision of residents in

  4. Early Invasive Versus Selective Strategy for Non-ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome: The ICTUS Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedemaker, N.P.G.; Damman, P.; Woudstra, P.; Hirsch, A.; Windhausen, F.; Tijssen, J.G.; Winter, R.J. de; Verheugt, F.W.A.; et al.,

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ICTUS (Invasive Versus Conservative Treatment in Unstable Coronary Syndromes) trial compared early invasive strategy with a selective invasive strategy in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) and an elevated cardiac troponin T. No long-term

  5. Early Invasive Versus Selective Strategy for Non-ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome: The ICTUS Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedemaker, Niels P. G.; Damman, Peter; Woudstra, Pier; Hirsch, Alexander; Windhausen, Fons; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; de Winter, Robbert J.; Peters, R. J. G.; Dunselman, P. H. J. M.; Verheugt, F. W. A.; Janus, C. L.; Umans, V.; Bendermacher, P. E. F.; Michels, H. R.; Sadé e, A.; Hertzberger, D.; de Miliano, P. A. R. M.; Liem, A. H.; Tjon Joe Gin, R.; van der Linde, M.; Lok, D.; Hoedemaker, G.; Pieterse, M.; van den Merkhof, L.; Danië ls, M.; van Hessen, M.; Hermans, W.; Schotborgh, C. E.; de Zwaan, C.; Bredero, A.; de Jaegere, P.; Janssen, M.; Louwerenburg, J.; Veerhoek, M.; Schalij, M.; de Porto, A.; Zijlstra, F.; Winter, J.; de Feyter, P.; Robles de Medina, R.; Withagen, P.; Sedney, M.; Thijssen, H.; van Rees, C.; van den Bergh, P.; de Cock, C.; van 't Hof, A.; Suttorp, M. J.; Windhausen, F.; Cornel, J. H.; de Feyter, P. J.; Dü ren, D.; Liem, K.; Sanders, G. T. B.; Fischer, J.; van Straalen, J.

    2017-01-01

    The ICTUS (Invasive Versus Conservative Treatment in Unstable Coronary Syndromes) trial compared early invasive strategy with a selective invasive strategy in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) and an elevated cardiac troponin T. No long-term benefit of an

  6. Women's Experience with Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing and Emotional Well-being and Satisfaction after Test-Results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schendel, R.V. van; Page-Christiaens, G.; Beulen, L.; Bilardo, C.M.; Boer, M.A. de; Coumans, A.B.C.; Faas, B.H.W.; Langen, I.M. van; Lichtenbelt, K.D.; Maarle, M.C. van; Macville, M.V.E.; Oepkes, D.; Pajkrt, E.; Henneman, L.

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, high-risk pregnant women opt for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) instead of invasive diagnostic testing. Since NIPT is less accurate than invasive testing, a normal NIPT result might leave women less reassured. A questionnaire study was performed among pregnant women with elevated

  7. Snowpack, fire, and forest disturbance: interactions affect montane invasions by non-native shrubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jens T; Latimer, Andrew M

    2015-06-01

    Montane regions worldwide have experienced relatively low plant invasion rates, a trend attributed to increased climatic severity, low rates of disturbance, and reduced propagule pressure relative to lowlands. Manipulative experiments at elevations above the invasive range of non-native species can clarify the relative contributions of these mechanisms to montane invasion resistance, yet such experiments are rare. Furthermore, global climate change and land use changes are expected to cause decreases in snowpack and increases in disturbance by fire and forest thinning in montane forests. We examined the importance of these factors in limiting montane invasions using a field transplant experiment above the invasive range of two non-native lowland shrubs, Scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius) and Spanish broom (Spartium junceum), in the rain-snow transition zone of the Sierra Nevada of California. We tested the effects of canopy closure, prescribed fire, and winter snow depth on demographic transitions of each species. Establishment of both species was most likely at intermediate levels of canopy disturbance, but at this intermediate canopy level, snow depth had negative effects on winter survival of seedlings. We used matrix population models to show that an 86% reduction in winter snowfall would cause a 2.8-fold increase in population growth rates in Scotch broom and a 3.5-fold increase in Spanish broom. Fall prescribed fire increased germination rates, but decreased overall population growth rates by reducing plant survival. However, at longer fire return intervals, population recovery between fires is likely to keep growth rates high, especially under low snowpack conditions. Many treatment combinations had positive growth rates despite being above the current invasive range, indicating that propagule pressure, disturbance, and climate can all strongly affect plant invasions in montane regions. We conclude that projected reductions in winter snowpack and increases in

  8. Non-invasive and non-destructive characterization of tissue engineered constructs using ultrasound imaging technologies: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kang; Wagner, William R.

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid expansion of biomaterial development and coupled efforts to translate such advances toward the clinic, non-invasive and non-destructive imaging tools to evaluate implants in situ in a timely manner are critically needed. The required multilevel information is comprehensive, including structural, mechanical, and biological changes such as scaffold degradation, mechanical strength, cell infiltration, extracellular matrix formation and vascularization to name a few. With its inher...

  9. European non-invasive trisomy evaluation (EU-NITE) study: a multicenter prospective cohort study for non-invasive fetal trisomy 21 testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, E J; Jacobsson, B; van Scheltema, P A; de Boer, M A; Hoffer, M J V; Hollemon, D; Westgren, M; Song, K; Oepkes, D

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the performance of a directed non-invasive prenatal testing method of cell-free DNA analysis for fetal trisomy 21 (T21) by shipping the whole blood samples from Europe to a laboratory in the USA. A European multicenter prospective, consecutive cohort study was performed enrolling pregnant women from Sweden and the Netherlands. Blood samples were drawn just prior to a planned of invasive diagnostic procedure in a population at increased risk for fetal T21 and then shipped to the USA without any blood processing. Chromosome-selective sequencing was carried out on chromosome 21 with reporting high risk or low risk of T21. Karyotyping or rapid aneuploidy detection was used as the clinical reference standard. Of the 520 eligible study subjects, a T21 test result was obtained in 504/520 (96.9%). Risk assessment was accurate in 503/504 subjects (99.8%). There was one false negative result for T21 (sensitivity 17/18, 94.4%, and specificity 100%). This is the first prospective European multicenter study showing that non-invasive prenatal testing using directed sequencing of cell-free DNA applied to blood samples shipped across the Atlantic Ocean, is highly accurate for assessing risk of fetal T21. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Non-invasive imaging in detecting myocardial viability: Myocardial function versus perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal A. Elfigih

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is the most prevalent and single most common cause of morbidity and mortality [1] with the resulting left ventricular (LV dysfunction an important complication. The distinction between viable and non-viable myocardium in patients with LV dysfunction is a clinically important issue among possible candidates for myocardial revascularization. Several available non-invasive techniques are used to detect and assess ischemia and myocardial viability. These techniques include echocardiography, radionuclide images, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and recently myocardial computed tomography perfusion imaging. This review aims to distinguish between the available non-invasive imaging techniques in detecting signs of functional and perfusion viability and identify those which have the most clinical relevance in detecting myocardial viability in patients with CAD and chronic ischemic LV dysfunction. The most current available studies showed that both myocardial perfusion and function based on non-invasive imaging have high sensitivity with however wide range of specificity for detecting myocardial viability. Both perfusion and function imaging modalities provide complementary information about myocardial viability and no optimum single imaging technique exists that can provide very accurate diagnostic and prognostic viability assessment. The weight of the body of evidence suggested that non-invasive imaging can help in guiding therapeutic decision making in patients with LV dysfunction.

  11. Emerging technologies for non-invasive quantification of physiological oxygen transport in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, P; Taguchi, M; Burrs, S L; Hauser, B A; Salim, W W A W; Claussen, J C; McLamore, E S

    2013-09-01

    Oxygen plays a critical role in plant metabolism, stress response/signaling, and adaptation to environmental changes (Lambers and Colmer, Plant Soil 274:7-15, 2005; Pitzschke et al., Antioxid Redox Signal 8:1757-1764, 2006; Van Breusegem et al., Plant Sci 161:405-414, 2001). Reactive oxygen species (ROS), by-products of various metabolic pathways in which oxygen is a key molecule, are produced during adaptation responses to environmental stress. While much is known about plant adaptation to stress (e.g., detoxifying enzymes, antioxidant production), the link between ROS metabolism, O2 transport, and stress response mechanisms is unknown. Thus, non-invasive technologies for measuring O2 are critical for understanding the link between physiological O2 transport and ROS signaling. New non-invasive technologies allow real-time measurement of O2 at the single cell and even organelle levels. This review briefly summarizes currently available (i.e., mainstream) technologies for measuring O2 and then introduces emerging technologies for measuring O2. Advanced techniques that provide the ability to non-invasively (i.e., non-destructively) measure O2 are highlighted. In the near future, these non-invasive sensors will facilitate novel experimentation that will allow plant physiologists to ask new hypothesis-driven research questions aimed at improving our understanding of physiological O2 transport.

  12. Non-invasive vascular imaging in perforator flap surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saba, Luca; Piga, Mario [Dept. of Radiology, Azienda Ospedaliero Univ. (AOU), di Cagliari-Polo di Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy)], e-mail: lucasaba@tiscali.it; Atzeni, Matteo; Ribuffo, Diego [Dept. of Surgery, Section of Plastic Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliero Univ. (AOU), di Cagliari-Polo di Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Rozen, Warren Matthew [Jack Brockhov Reconstructive Plastic Surgery Research Unit, Dept. of Anatomy and Cell Biology, The Univ. of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Alonso-Burgos, Alberto [Dept. of Radiology, Clinica Univ., Univ. de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Bura, Raffaella [Dept. of Surgery, Section of Vascular Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliero Univ. (AOU), di Cagliari-Polo di Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    Preoperative imaging using a range of imaging modalities has become increasingly popular for preoperative planning in plastic surgery, in particular in perforator flap surgery. Modalities in this role include ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and computed tomographic angiography (CTA). The evidence for the use of these techniques has been reported in only a handful of studies. In this paper we conducted a non-systematic review of the literature to establish the role for each of these modalities. The role of state-of-the-art vascular imaging as an application in perforator flap surgery is thus offered.

  13. Invasive validation of a novel brachial cuff-based oscillometric device (SphygmoCor XCEL) for measuring central blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Toshihiro; Nakagomi, Atsushi; Okada, Sho; Ohno, Yuji; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    Studies have established the prognostic value of central SBP and pulse pressure (PP). The SphygmoCor XCEL (AtCor Medical, Sydney, Australia) device provides practical central blood pressure (BP) measurement for daily clinical use with its easy-to-use, operator-independent procedure. However, this device has not been validated against invasive measurement. Simultaneous oscillometric and high-fidelity invasive measurements of central SBP and PP were compared for 36 patients who underwent coronary arteriography. Invasive measurement of brachial BP was also performed. Oscillometrically measured brachial SBP and DBP were used for calibration. The differences between the invasive and the oscillometric measurements were -4.6 ± 9.9 mmHg for central SBP and -18.5 ± 10.6 mmHg for central PP (mean ± SD). We found strong correlation between the invasive and oscillometric measurements (central SBP and central PP, respectively: r = 0.91 and 0.89; slope, 1.28 and 1.38; both P pressure ranges, the bias was mainly due to calibration error rather than device-specific error because errors of the central measurements correlated well with those of brachial measurements (SBP and PP, respectively: r = 0.80 and 0.77; both P invasive measurements indicates that SphygmoCor XCEL warrants future investigations to determine the clinical validity of this device.

  14. Dynamic characterization of satellite components through non-invasive methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullens, Joshua G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiest, Heather K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mascarenas, David D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-24

    The rapid deployment of satellites is hindered by the need to flight-qualify their components and the resulting mechanical assembly. Conventional methods for qualification testing of satellite components are costly and time consuming. Furthermore, full-scale vehicles must be subjected to launch loads during testing. The harsh testing environment increases the risk of component damage during qualification. The focus of this research effort was to assess the performance of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques as replacement for traditional vibration testing. SHM techniques were applied on a small-scale structure representative of a responsive satellite. The test structure consisted of an extruded aluminum space-frame covered with aluminum shear plates, which was assembled using bolted joints. Multiple piezoelectric patches were bonded to the test structure and acted as combined actuators and sensors. Various methods of SHM were explored including impedance-based health monitoring, wave propagation, and conventional frequency response functions. Using these methods in conjunction with finite element modeling, the dynamic properties of the test structure were established and areas of potential damage were identified and localized. The adequacy of the results from each SHM method was validated by comparison to results from conventional vibration testing.

  15. Dynamic characterization of satellite components through non-invasive methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, Joshua G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiest, Heather K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mascarenas, David D. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macknelly, David [INST-OFF/AWE; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-10-21

    The rapid deployment of satellites is hindered by the need to flight-qualify their components and the resulting mechanical assembly. Conventional methods for qualification testing of satellite components are costly and time consuming. Furthermore, full-scale vehicles must be subjected to launch loads during testing. This harsh testing environment increases the risk of component damage during qualification. The focus of this research effort was to assess the performance of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques as a replacement for traditional vibration testing. SHM techniques were applied on a small-scale structure representative of a responsive satellite. The test structure consisted of an extruded aluminum space-frame covered with aluminum shear plates, which was assembled using bolted joints. Multiple piezoelectric patches were bonded to the test structure and acted as combined actuators and sensors. Various methods of SHM were explored including impedance-based health monitoring, wave propagation, and conventional frequency response functions. Using these methods in conjunction with finite element modelling, the dynamic properties of the test structure were established and areas of potential damage were identified and localized. The adequacy of the results from each SHM method was validated by comparison to results from conventional vibration testing.

  16. Nanomedicine as a non-invasive strategy for drug delivery across the blood brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Vivienne H; Sosa, Chris; Liu, Rui; Yao, Nan; Priestley, Rodney D

    2016-12-30

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle to drug delivery for diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). This brief review highlights the current invasive and non-invasive technologies available to address this problem. In particular, nanomedicine has shown much promise as a non-invasive strategy due to its drug loading capabilities, ease of targeting to the BBB, and small size. The versatility of this technology in terms of type of drug and imaging agent, carrier material, and targeting mechanism is highlighted in this review. The recent inclusion of imaging agents in the nanocarriers has important consequences for the field of theranostics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Changing trends in serotypes of S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive and non-invasive diseases in unvaccinated population in Mexico (2000-2014)

    OpenAIRE

    María Noemí Carnalla-Barajas; Araceli Soto-Noguerón; Miguel Angel Sánchez-Alemán; Fortino Solórzano-Santos; María Elena Velazquez-Meza; Gabriela Echániz-Aviles; Francisco Márquez-Díaz; Lucila Martínez-Medina; María Elizabeth Olvera-Herrera; Maria Guadalupe Miranda-Novales; Martha Camacho-Velázquez; José Guillermo Vásquez-Rosales; Rosario Vázquez-Larios; Eduardo Rivera-Martínez; Ana María Hernández-Dueñas

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) targeted against a limited number of serotypes substantially decreased invasive (IPD) and non-invasive pneumococcal diseases (NIPD) but it was accompanied by non-vaccine type replacement disease. After 9 years of introduction of PCV in Mexico, we analyze the evidence of the indirect effects on IPD and NIPD serotype distribution among groups not targeted to receive the vaccine. Methods: From January 2000 to December 2014, pneu...

  18. The application of synchrotron radiation to non-invasive angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, E. B.; Zeman, H. D.; Campbell, L. E.; Hofstadter, R.; Meyer-Berkhout, U.; Otis, J. N.; Rolfe, J.; Stone, J. P.; Wilson, S.; Rubenstein, E.; Harrison, D. C.; Kernoff, R. S.; Thompson, A. C.; Brown, G. S.

    1983-04-01

    Synchrotron radiation provides a new source of X-rays highly-suited to iodine K-edge Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA). The use of such beams provides maximum sensitivity to intra-arterial iodine and virtually eliminates image contrast due to non-vascular body structures. The intensity of the beams permits short exposure times and allows images to be recorded, in line-scan fashion, in sharp focus despite arterial motions. The sensitivity of this method offers the prospect of visualizing arteries, and in particular the coronary arteries, by peripheral venous injection. The principles of DSA have been demonstrated using phantoms and excised animal hearts, and in vivo studies in animals have begun. The instrumentation developed for this purpose and the results obtained to date are summarized.

  19. External Validation of Risk Prediction Scores for Invasive Candidiasis in a Medical/Surgical Intensive Care Unit: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Armin; Baronia, Arvind Kumar; Azim, Afzal; Marak, Rungmei S. K.; Yadav, Reema; Sharma, Preeti; Gurjar, Mohan; Poddar, Banani; Singh, Ratender Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to conduct external validation of risk prediction scores for invasive candidiasis. Methods: We conducted a prospective observational study in a 12-bedded adult medical/surgical Intensive Care Unit (ICU) to evaluate Candida score >3, colonization index (CI) >0.5, corrected CI >0.4 (CCI), and Ostrosky's clinical prediction rule (CPR). Patients' characteristics and risk factors for invasive candidiasis were noted. Patients were divided into two groups; invasive candidiasis and no-invasive candidiasis. Results: Of 198 patients, 17 developed invasive candidiasis. Discriminatory power (area under receiver operator curve [AUROC]) for Candida score, CI, CCI, and CPR were 0.66, 0.67, 0.63, and 0.62, respectively. A large number of patients in the no-invasive candidiasis group (114 out of 181) were exposed to antifungal agents during their stay in ICU. Subgroup analysis was carried out after excluding such patients from no-invasive candidiasis group. AUROC of Candida score, CI, CCI, and CPR were 0.7, 0.7, 0.65, and 0.72, respectively, and positive predictive values (PPVs) were in the range of 25%–47%, along with negative predictive values (NPVs) in the range of 84%–96% in the subgroup analysis. Conclusion: Currently available risk prediction scores have good NPV but poor PPV. They are useful for selecting patients who are not likely to benefit from antifungal therapy. PMID:28904481

  20. Smartphone spectrometer for non-invasive diffuse reflectance spectroscopy based hemoglobin sensing (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Perry S.

    2016-10-01

    Fiber-optic based diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is shown to be a highly specific and highly sensitive method for non-invasive detection of various cancers (e.g. cervical and oral) as well as many other diseases. Fiber-optic DRS diagnosis relies on non-invasive biomarker detection (e.g. oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin) and can be done without the need for sophisticated laboratory analysis of samples. Thus, it is highly amenable for clinical adoption especially in resource scarce regions that have limited access to such developed laboratory infrastructure. Despite the demonstrated effectiveness of fiber-optic DRS, such systems remain cost prohibitive in many of these regions, mainly due to the use of bulky and expensive spectrometers. Here, a fiber-optic DRS system is coupled to a smartphone spectrometer and is proposed as a low-cost solution for non-invasive tissue hemoglobin sensing. The performance of the system is assessed by measuring tissue phantoms with varying hemoglobin concentrations. A DRS retrieval algorithm is used to extract hemoglobin parameters from the measurements and determine the accuracy of the system. The results are then compared with those of a previously reported fiber-optic DRS system which is based on a larger more expensive spectrometer system. The preliminary results are encouraging and indicate the potential of the smartphone spectrometer as a viable low-cost option for non-invasive tissue hemoglobin sensing.

  1. Modelling obstructive sleep apnea susceptibility using non-invasive inflammatory biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Abd El Mabood Suliman

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: OSA patients have increased level of HS-CRP, ESR, and Exhaled FENO which confirm association of inflammation in OSA. These simple inflammatory markers may be used also as simple non invasive predictors to diagnose OSA. Moreover, the HS-CRP may be used as a useful parameter to predict OSA severity.

  2. Interferon alfa in the treatment paradigm for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamm, D.; Brausi, M.; O'Donnell, M.A.; Witjes, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In this article, we review the various options for and the potential role of interferon alfa (IFN-alpha) in the treatment of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). METHODS: PubMed was searched for journal articles on IFN-alpha use in treating bladder cancer. The references listed in

  3. Treatment Options Available for Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Failure in Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yates, D.R.; Brausi, M.A.; Catto, J.W.; Dalbagni, G.; Roupret, M.; Shariat, S.F.; Sylvester, R.J.; Witjes, J.A.; Zlotta, A.R.; Palou-Redorta, J.

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT: Intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is a standard conservative treatment for patients with high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Many patients will experience recurrence or progression following BCG and are termed BCG failures. OBJECTIVE: To summarise the current

  4. Nocturnal non-invasive ventilation in addition to rehabilitation in hypercapnic patients with COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duiverman, M.L.; Wempe, J.B.; Bladder, G.; Jansen, D.F.; Kerstjens, H.A.M.; Zijlstra, J.G.; Wijkstra, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Long-term non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) might improve the outcomes of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with chronic respiratory failure. A study was undertaken to investigate whether nocturnal NIPPV in addition to

  5. Non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy and beyond: challenges of responsible innovation in prenatal screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dondorp, W.; de Wert, G.; Bombard, Y.; Bianchi, D.W.; Bergmann, C.; Borry, P.; Chitty, L.S.; Fellmann, F.; Forzano, F.; Hall, A.; Henneman, L.; Howard, H.C.; Lucassen, A.; Ormond, K.; Peterlin, B.; Radojkovic, D.; Rogowski, W.; Soller, M.; Tibben, A.; Tranebjaerg, L.; van El, C.G.; Cornel, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains a joint ESHG/ASHG position document with recommendations regarding responsible innovation in prenatal screening with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). By virtue of its greater accuracy and safety with respect to prenatal screening for common autosomal aneuploidies, NIPT has

  6. Non-invasive dendrochronology of late-medieval objects in Oslo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daly, Aoife; Streeton, Noëlle L.W.

    2017-01-01

    A technique for non-invasive dendrochronological analysis of oak was developed for archaeological material, using an industrial CT scanner. Since 2013, this experience has been extended within the scope of the research project ‘After the Black Death: Painting and Polychrome Sculpture in Norway...

  7. The mouthwash : A non-invasive sampling method to study cytokine gene polymorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laine, ML; Farre, MA; Crusius, JBA; van Winkelhoff, AJ; Pena, AS

    Background: We describe a simple, non-invasive mouthwash sampling method for rapid DNA isolation to detect cytokine gene polymorphisms. In the present paper, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1B) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RN) gene polymorphisms were studied. Methods: Two mouthwash samples and

  8. Non-invasive measurement of adrenal response after standardized exercise tests in prepubertal children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijsman, Sigrid M.; Koers, Nicoline F.; Bocca, Gianni; van der Veen, Betty S.; Appelhof, Maaike; Kamps, Arvid W. A.

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of non-invasive evaluation of adrenal response in healthy prepubertal children by standardized exercise tests. Methods: On separate occasions, healthy prepubertal children performed a submaximal cycling test, a maximal cycling test, and a 20-m shuttle-run

  9. Non Invasive Biomedical Analysis - Breath Networking Session at PittCon 2011, Atlanta, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    This was the second year that our breath colleagues organized a networking session at the Pittsburgh Conference and Exposition or ''PittCon'' (http://www.pincon.org/).This time it was called "Non-invasive Biomedical Analysis" to broaden the scope a bit, but the primary focus rema...

  10. Current Directions in Non-Invasive Low Intensity Electric Brain Stimulation for Depressive Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Sack, A.T.

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive stimulation of the human brain to improve depressive symptoms is increasingly finding its way in clinical settings as a viable form of somatic treatment. Following successful modulation of neural excitability with subsequent antidepressant effects, neural polarization by administrating

  11. Experimental bifurcation analysis of an impact oscillator - Tuning a non-invasive control scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bureau, Emil; Schilder, Frank; Santos, Ilmar

    2013-01-01

    We investigate a non-invasive, locally stabilizing control scheme necessary for an experimental bifurcation analysis. Our test-rig comprises a harmonically forced impact oscillator with hardening spring nonlinearity controlled by electromagnetic actuators, and serves as a prototype for electromag...

  12. Bridging the gaps between non-invasive genetic sampling and population parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesca Marucco; Luigi Boitani; Daniel H. Pletscher; Michael K. Schwartz

    2011-01-01

    Reliable estimates of population parameters are necessary for effective management and conservation actions. The use of genetic data for capture­recapture (CR) analyses has become an important tool to estimate population parameters for elusive species. Strong emphasis has been placed on the genetic analysis of non-invasive samples, or on the CR analysis; however,...

  13. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling of oxprenolol in man using continuous non-invasive blood pressure monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, R.; Oosterhuis, B.; Karemaker, J. M.; Wemer, J.; van Boxtel, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the plasma concentration of oxprenolol and its haemodynamic effects during physical exercise was studied in 6 healthy volunteers, in whom BP and heart rate (HR) were continuously monitored by non-invasive techniques (Fin-A-Press-Tonometer) during repeated three-minute

  14. Continuous non-invasive blood pressure monitoring: reliability of Finapres device during the Valsalva manoeuvre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imholz, B. P.; van Montfrans, G. A.; Settels, J. J.; van der Hoeven, G. M.; Karemaker, J. M.; Wieling, W.

    1988-01-01

    Because of the inherent risks of intra-arterial blood pressure monitoring a new non-invasive device, Finapres, which measures blood pressure continuously in the finger, was evaluated in 14 hypertensive and one normotensive subject. Brachial intra-arterial and finger pressures were compared during a

  15. Non-Invasive Ventilation in HIV Positive patients with Sepsis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    46987.2

    Non-Invasive Ventilation in HIV Positive patients with. Sepsis and Respiratory Failure in the Adult Medical. Emergency Unit of the University Teaching Hospital,. Lusaka, Zambia. L. Mwiinga\\ S. Lakhi\\ B. Andrews1. ,z,3. 1Department of Internal Medicine, University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka. 2 Vanderbilt Institute for Global ...

  16. Changes in the Pincate Reserve ecosystems: Invasion of non-native plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denise Z. Avila-Jimenez

    2005-01-01

    Over the years, humans have modified the Sonoran Desert by introducing invasive plants that prosper in disturbed and non-disturbed habitats. These invaders modify the dynamics and structure of populations and the composition of communities, which in turn can result in radical changes in wildlife habitat. The natural landscape of the Sonoran Desert is characterized by...

  17. The extent of selected non-native invasive plants on Missouri forestland

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Keith Moser; Mark H. Hansen; Mark D. Nelson

    2008-01-01

    The Northern Research Station's Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (NRSFIA) collects forest-related data throughout a 24-state region in the northeastern United States, ranging from North Dakota to Maine and Kansas to Maryland. Based on discussions with stakeholders and others, NRS-FIA found that the impact of non-native invasive plants (NNIPs) may be known at...

  18. Iron oxide-labeled collagen scaffolds for non-invasive MR imaging in tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, Marianne E.; Hermann, Alina; Bühren, Anne; Olde-Damink, Leon; Möckel, Diana; Gremse, Felix; Ehling, Josef; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive imaging holds significant potential for implementation in tissue engineering. It can be used to monitor the localization and function of tissue-engineered implants, as well as their resorption and remodelling. Thus far, however, the vast majority of effort in this area of research have

  19. Non-invasive monitoring of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for pharmacological drug profiling in children and adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrier, Lenneke

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the potential role of non-invasive measurement of pharmacokinetics (pk) and pharmacodynamics (pd) in the research and development of central nervous system (cns) stimulants or depressants for children and adolescents. First, we evaluated the feasibility of using saliva as an

  20. Variation in non-invasive measurements of vascular function in healthy volunteers during daytime.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avest, E. ter; Holewijn, S.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.; Graaf, J. de

    2005-01-01

    Although it is often recommended to standardize the time of day when performing non-invasive measurements of vascular function, the exact influence of the time of day on the outcome of IMT (intima-media thickness), PWV (pulse wave velocity), AIX (augmentation index) and FMD (flow-mediated

  1. Structural lung changes, lung function, and non-invasive inflammatory markers in cystic fibrosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robroeks, C.M.; Roozeboom, M.H.; Jong, P.A. de; Tiddens, H.A.W.M.; Jobsis, Q.; Hendriks, H.J.M.; Yntema, J.L.; Brackel, H.L.; Gent, R. van; Robben, S.; Dompeling, E.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by chronic airway inflammation and recurrent infections, resulting in (ir)reversible structural lung changes and a progressive decline in lung function. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between non-invasive

  2. Trial by Dutch Laboratories for Evaluation of Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing. Part I - Clinical Impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oepkes, Dick; Page-Christiaens, Lieve C; Bax, Caroline J; Bekker, Mireille N; Bilardo, Catia M; Boon, Elles M J; Schuring-Blom, G Heleen; Coumans, Audrey B C; Faas, Brigitte H; Galjaard, Robert-Jan H; Go, Attie T; Henneman, Lidewij; Macville, Merryn V E; Pajkrt, Eva; Suijkerbuijk, Ron F; Huijsdens-vanAmsterdam, Karin; Van Opstal, Diane; Verweij, E J Joanne; Weiss, Marjan M; Sistermans, Erik A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical impact of nationwide implementation of genome-wide Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT) in pregnancies at increased risk for fetal trisomies 21, 18 and 13. METHOD: Women with elevated risk based on first trimester combined testing (FCT ≥ 1:200) or medical history,

  3. Domiciliary Non-invasive Ventilation in COPD : An International Survey of Indications and Practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crimi, Claudia; Noto, Alberto; Princi, Pietro; Cuvelier, Antoine; Masa, Juan F.; Simonds, Anita; Elliott, Mark W.; Wijkstra, Peter; Windisch, Wolfram; Nava, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that metanalyses and clinical guidelines do not recommend the routine use of domiciliary non-invasive ventilation (NIV) for patients diagnosed with severe stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and with chronic respiratory failure, it is common practice in some

  4. Non-invasive prenatal detection for trisomy 2 : What women want and are willing to pay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, E.J.; Oepkes, D.; de Vries, M.; van den Akker, M.E.; van den Akker, E.S.; de Boer, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the attitude among pregnant women regarding non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for detecting trisomy 21 (T21) and to quantify their willingness to pay for NIPT. Methods A questionnaire was administered to pregnant women who received counselling for first-trimester

  5. NIPTRIC : an online tool for clinical interpretation of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; Johansson, Lennart F.; de Boer, Eddy N.; Boon, Elles M. J.; Suijkerbuijk, Ron F.; Bouman, Katelijne; Bilardo, Katia; Swertz, Morris A.; Dijkstra, Martijn; van Langen, Irene M.; Sinke, Richard J.; Meerman, te Gerard J.

    2016-01-01

    To properly interpret the result of a pregnant woman's non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT), her a priori risk must be taken into account in order to obtain her personalised a posteriori risk (PPR), which more accurately expresses her true likelihood of carrying a foetus with trisomy. Our aim was to

  6. Use of non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation for acute respiratory failure: prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M T; Yam, L Y; Lau, C W; Ching, C K; Lee, C H

    2000-12-01

    To study the effectiveness and safety of non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation in the management of acute respiratory failure. Prospective study. Regional public hospital, Hong Kong. One hundred and eighty-nine haemodynamically stable adult Chinese patients with acute respiratory failure (119 men and 70 women; mean age, 71.2 years [range, 18-92 years]) who were treated with non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation as the primary mode of ventilatory assistance from 1 January 1996 to 31 December 1998. Arterial blood gas measurements, respiratory rate, airway pressures used, use of endotracheal intubation, and standardised mortality ratio. Fifty-two patients had hypoxaemic respiratory failure (group I); 97 had hypercapnic respiratory failure (group II); and 40 had either type with advanced co-morbidities and were not planned to receive endotracheal intubation (group III). For groups I and II, the overall mean duration of non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation was 56.2 hours. Improvements in gas exchange were seen in approximately 71% of these patients, endotracheal intubation was not needed for 82%, and the standardised mortality ratio was 0.86. The hospital survival rate was approximately 93% in non-intubated patients and 41% in intubated patients. Predictors of success were reduction in respiratory rate within 6 hours (Parterial carbon dioxide tension within 24 hours (PNon-invasive positive-pressure ventilation is effective in treating haemodynamically stable patients with acute respiratory failure and causes few and minor complications.

  7. Non-native megaherbivores: the case for novel function to manage plant invasions on islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Dennis M

    2015-07-20

    There is a heated debate about whether all non-native species are 'guilty until proven innocent', or whether some should be accepted or even welcomed. Further fanning the flames, I here present a case where introductions of carefully vetted, non-native species could provide a net conservation benefit. On many islands, native megaherbivores (flightless birds, tortoises) recently went extinct. Here, rewilding with carefully selected non-native species as ecological replacements is increasingly considered a solution, reinstating a herbivory regime that largely benefits the native flora. Based on these efforts, I suggest that restoration practitioners working on islands without a history of native megaherbivores that are threatened by invasive plants should consider introducing a non-native island megaherbivore, and that large and giant tortoises are ideal candidates. Such tortoises would be equally useful on islands where eradication of invasive mammals has led to increased problems with invasive plants, or on islands that never had introduced mammalian herbivores, but where invasive plants are a problem. My proposal may seem radical, but the reversibility of using giant tortoises means that nothing is lost from trying, and that indeed much is to be gained. As an easily regulated adaptive management tool, it represents an innovative, hypothesis-driven 'innocent until proven guilty' approach. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  8. Chemohyperthermia in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: An overview of the literature and recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, Esmee I. M. L.; Crezee, Hans; de la Rosette, Jean J.; de Reijke, Theo M.

    2016-01-01

    Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is characterised by a high risk of recurrence for the present standard treatment of transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) followed by intravesical instillation of Mitomycin-C (MMC) or bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). To decrease this high recurrence

  9. Invasive and non-invasive evaluation of spontaneous arteriogenesis in a novel porcine model for peripheral arterial obstructive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Ivo R; Voskuil, Michiel; van Royen, Niels; Hoefer, Imo E; Scheffler, Klaus; Grundmann, Sebastian; Hennig, Jürgen; Schaper, Wolfgang; Bode, Christoph; Piek, Jan J

    2003-03-01

    Our current knowledge regarding the efficacy of factors stimulating collateral artery growth in the peripheral circulation primarily stems from models in small animals. However, experimental models in large sized animals are a prerequisite for extrapolation of growth factor therapy to patients with peripheral atherosclerotic obstructive disease. Therefore, we have developed a novel porcine femoral artery ligation model using non-invasive and invasive evaluation techniques. In 12 young farm pigs and nine older minipigs, a ligation of the superficial femoral artery was performed. Using an intra-arterial catheter, phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was administered with a first-pass over the collateral vascular bed. Directly after ligation as well as after 2 weeks of continuous infusion of PBS, perfusion of the leg was measured using various flow and pressure parameters. Using a pump driven extracorporal system, collateral conductance was determined under maximal vasodilatation. Conductance decreased after acute ligation to similar levels in both young farm pigs as well as the older minipigs (both 9.3% of normal perfusion) and recovered after 2 weeks to a higher value in farm pigs compared with minipigs (22.4 vs. 12.7% of normal; Parteries. To the best of our knowledge this is the first in vivo pig model for hemodynamic assessment of growth of collateral arteries in the peripheral circulation, that is suitable for evaluation of arteriogenic effects of growth factors or genes.

  10. Non-invasive determination of the complete elastic moduli of spider silks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, Kristie J.; Akhenblit, Paul; McKiernan, Keri; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2013-03-01

    Spider silks possess nature’s most exceptional mechanical properties, with unrivalled extensibility and high tensile strength. Unfortunately, our understanding of silks is limited because the complete elastic response has never been measured—leaving a stark lack of essential fundamental information. Using non-invasive, non-destructive Brillouin light scattering, we obtain the entire stiffness tensors (revealing negative Poisson’s ratios), refractive indices, and longitudinal and transverse sound velocities for major and minor ampullate spider silks: Argiope aurantia, Latrodectus hesperus, Nephila clavipes, Peucetia viridans. These results completely quantify the linear elastic response for all possible deformation modes, information unobtainable with traditional stress-strain tests. For completeness, we apply the principles of Brillouin imaging to spatially map the elastic stiffnesses on a spider web without deforming or disrupting the web in a non-invasive, non-contact measurement, finding variation among discrete fibres, junctions and glue spots. Finally, we provide the stiffness changes that occur with supercontraction.

  11. Non-Invasive Therapy of Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcial, José M; Pérez, Reynerio; Vargas, Pedro; Franqui-Rivera, Hilton

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Lifestyle changes, like the cessation of the use of tobacco as well as a modification of dietary and exercise habits, can be the most cost-effective interventions in patients with PAD. Smocking cessation is the most important intervention, since it increases survival in these patients. Antiplatelet therapy is an essential component in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) of the lower extremities. In addition to delaying arterial obstructive progression, these agents are most usefull in reducing adverse cardiovascular events such as non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), stroke and vascular death. Mainstay of treatment continues to be aspirin monotherapy (75-325mg daily). Current treatment for lower extremity PAD is directed towards the relief of symptoms and improvement in QoL. The two agents which have consistently been found to be most efficient in achieving these goals are cilostazol and naftidrofuryl oxalate. Naftidrofuryl oxalate may emerge as the most efficient and cost-effective treatment for symptom relief.

  12. A novel non-invasive diagnostic sampling technique for cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaman Taslimi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is important for chemotherapy and epidemiological studies. Common approaches for Leishmania detection involve the invasive collection of specimens for direct identification of amastigotes by microscopy and the culturing of promastigotes from infected tissues. Although these techniques are highly specific, they require highly skilled health workers and have the inherent risks of all invasive procedures, such as pain and risk of bacterial and fungal super-infection. Therefore, it is essential to reduce discomfort, potential infection and scarring caused by invasive diagnostic approaches especially for children. In this report, we present a novel non-invasive method, that is painless, rapid and user-friendly, using sequential tape strips for sampling and isolation of DNA from the surface of active and healed skin lesions of CL patients. A total of 119 patients suspected of suffering from cutaneous leishmaniasis with different clinical manifestations were recruited and samples were collected both from their lesions and from uninfected areas. In addition, 15 fungal-infected lesions and 54 areas of healthy skin were examined. The duration of sampling is short (less than one minute and species identification by PCR is highly specific and sensitive. The sequential tape stripping sampling method is a sensitive, non-invasive and cost-effective alternative to traditional diagnostic assays and it is suitable for field studies as well as for use in health care centers.

  13. Predicting plant invasions under climate change: are species distribution models validated by field trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Christine S; Burns, Bruce R; Stanley, Margaret C

    2014-09-01

    Climate change may facilitate alien species invasion into new areas, particularly for species from warm native ranges introduced into areas currently marginal for temperature. Although conclusions from modelling approaches and experimental studies are generally similar, combining the two approaches has rarely occurred. The aim of this study was to validate species distribution models by conducting field trials in sites of differing suitability as predicted by the models, thus increasing confidence in their ability to assess invasion risk. Three recently naturalized alien plants in New Zealand were used as study species (Archontophoenix cunninghamiana, Psidium guajava and Schefflera actinophylla): they originate from warm native ranges, are woody bird-dispersed species and of concern as potential weeds. Seedlings were grown in six sites across the country, differing both in climate and suitability (as predicted by the species distribution models). Seedling growth and survival were recorded over two summers and one or two winter seasons, and temperature and precipitation were monitored hourly at each site. Additionally, alien seedling performances were compared to those of closely related native species (Rhopalostylis sapida, Lophomyrtus bullata and Schefflera digitata). Furthermore, half of the seedlings were sprayed with pesticide, to investigate whether enemy release may influence performance. The results showed large differences in growth and survival of the alien species among the six sites. In the more suitable sites, performance was frequently higher compared to the native species. Leaf damage from invertebrate herbivory was low for both alien and native seedlings, with little evidence that the alien species should have an advantage over the native species because of enemy release. Correlations between performance in the field and predicted suitability of species distribution models were generally high. The projected increase in minimum temperature and reduced

  14. Fetal analysis with invasive method (FA-I) and fetal analysis with non-invasive method (FA-NI): replacing current, deceptively imprecise clinical nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B; Dudenhausen, Joachim

    2017-11-27

    There is a problem with the current nomenclature of prenatal evaluation. The current nomenclature of "prenatal testing" and "prenatal screening" - along with their subsets of "ultrasound testing," "ultrasound screening," "non-invasive prenatal testing," "non-invasive prenatal screening," and "prenatal diagnosis" - has become so imprecise that clinical misinterpretation and distortion of the informed consent process are increasingly difficult to avoid. To remedy this problem, we propose a new, precise nomenclature: "fetal analysis with invasive method" (FA-I) and "fetal analysis with non-invasive method," (FANI) using various techniques. This new nomenclature is designed to be precise and therefore facilitate effective communication among physicians and with pregnant women. For ease of use the new nomenclature can be formulated as an abbreviation: FA-I and FA-NI.

  15. Gravity destabilized non-wetting phase invasion in macro-heterogeneous porous media: Near pore scale macro modified invasion percolation simulation of experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GLASS JR.,ROBERT J.; CONRAD,STEPHEN H.; YARRINGTON,LANE

    2000-03-08

    The authors reconceptualize macro modified invasion percolation (MMIP) at the near pore (NP) scale and apply it to simulate the non-wetting phase invasion experiments of Glass et al [in review] conducted in macro-heterogeneous porous media. For experiments where viscous forces were non-negligible, they redefine the total pore filling pressure to include viscous losses within the invading phase as well as the viscous influence to decrease randomness imposed by capillary forces at the front. NP-MMIP exhibits the complex invasion order seen experimentally with characteristic alternations between periods of gravity stabilized and destabilized invasion growth controlled by capillary barriers. The breaching of these barriers and subsequent pore scale fingering of the non-wetting phase is represented extremely well as is the saturation field evolution, and total volume invaded.

  16. Detection of fetal mutations causing hemoglobinopathies by non-invasive prenatal diagnosis from maternal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, E; Sawant, P M; Nadkarni, A H; Gorakshakar, A; Ghosh, K; Colah, R B

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of hemoglobinopathies enables couples at risk to have a healthy child. Currently used fetal sampling procedures are invasive with some risk of miscarriage. A non-invasive approach to obtain fetal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for diagnosis would eliminate this risk. To develop and evaluate a non-invasive prenatal diagnostic approach for hemoglobinopathies using cell-free fetal DNA circulating in the maternal plasma. Couples referred to us for prenatal diagnosis of hemoglobinopathies where the maternal and paternal mutations were different were included in the study. Maternal peripheral blood was collected at different periods of gestation before the invasive fetal sampling procedure was done. The blood was centrifuged to isolate the plasma and prepare DNA. A size separation approach was used to isolate fetal DNA. Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based protocols were developed for detection of the presence or absence of the paternal mutation. There were 30 couples where the parental mutations were different. Of these, in 14 cases the paternal mutation was absent and in 16 cases it was present in the fetus. Using cell-free fetal DNA from maternal plasma, the absence of the paternal mutation was accurately determined in 12 of the 14 cases and the presence of the paternal mutation was correctly identified in 12 of the 16 cases. Thus, this non-invasive approach gave comparable results to those obtained by the conventional invasive fetal sampling methods in 24 cases giving an accuracy of 80.0%. Although the nested PCR approach enabled amplification of small quantities of cell-free DNA from maternal plasma at different periods of gestation after size separation to eliminate the more abundant maternal DNA, an accurate diagnosis of the presence or absence of the paternal mutation in the fetus was not possible in all cases to make it clinically applicable.

  17. [Analysis of non-invasive prenatal screening detection in fetal chromosome aneuploidy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, A J; Zhu, C F; Xue, S W; Cui, S Y; Qu, S Z; Liu, N; Kong, X D

    2017-11-25

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of non-invasive prenatal screening (NIPS) in the detection of fetal aneuploidies. Methods: Cell free DNA was sequenced in 5 566 pregnant women to identify the fetal aneuploidies in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University from January 1(st), 2015 to March 15(th), 2016. Among them, 5 230 (93.96%, 5 230/5 566) were singleton pregnancies and 336 (6.04%, 336/5 566) were twin pregnancies. In singleton pregnancies, 1 809 (34.59%, 1 809/5 230) were women with advanced maternal age, and 3 421 (65.41%, 3 421/5 230) were young women. The positive results of NIPS were validated by karyotyping through invasive procedures and neonatal outcomes were followed up by telephone. Results: Among the 5 566 women, 69 (1.24%, 69/5 566) got positive NIPS results, with 66 in singleton pregnancies and 3 in twin pregnancies. Two were monochorionic diamniotic twins and 1 was dichorionic twin pregnancy. The positive predictive value of NIPS for trisomy 21, 18 and 13 were 100.0%, 90.9% and 100.0%, and was 55.6% for sex chromosome aneuploidies. There was no false negative case found during the follow-up. In the advanced maternal age group and young women group, the prevalence rates of fetal chromosomal aneuploidies were 1.11%(20/1 809) and 0.94%(32/3 421), respectively. In the young women with soft markers in fetal ultrasound, the prevalence of fetal chromosomal aneuploidies was 1.44% (7/487), and in serum high risk women, it was 0.94% (7/747). In women with the serum screening risk with cut-off value, 0.89%(9/1 016) had fetal aneuploidies, and the prevalence was 0.77%(9/1 171) in volunteers. There was no statistically significant difference among these groups ( P= 0.636). Conclusions: There is no difference in the detection rate of fetal aneuploidies between high-risk women in serum screening and volunteers in NIPS. NIPS is more suitable as a first line screening test for women without fetal ultrasound abnormalities. It should be used carefully

  18. A non-invasive exploitation of energy conservation potentials using ultrasonics. Non-invasive diagnostics; Mit Ultraschall eingriffsfrei Energieeinsparpotenziale erschliessen. Nichtinvasive Diagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacher, Joerg [Flexim GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Energy conservation is profitable. The independent energy efficiency service provider Eta Cube (Frankfurt, Federal Republic of Germany) provides an intelligent energy optimization which is financed by consumption cuts. A non-invasive measuring clamp-on ultrasonic system is used in order to determine the efficiency potential in the preparation of hot water and domestic water as well as for the air conditioning of buildings. The Fluxus F601 Double Energy from Flexim Flexible Industriemesstechnik GmbH (Berlin, Federal Republic of Germany) determines the performance and efficiency of thermal consumers without interruption of the supply.

  19. Non-invasive biophysical measurement of travelling waves in the insect inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarria-S, Fabio A; Chivers, Benedict D; Soulsbury, Carl D; Montealegre-Z, Fernando

    2017-05-01

    Frequency analysis in the mammalian cochlea depends on the propagation of frequency information in the form of a travelling wave (TW) across tonotopically arranged auditory sensilla. TWs have been directly observed in the basilar papilla of birds and the ears of bush-crickets (Insecta: Orthoptera) and have also been indirectly inferred in the hearing organs of some reptiles and frogs. Existing experimental approaches to measure TW function in tetrapods and bush-crickets are inherently invasive, compromising the fine-scale mechanics of each system. Located in the forelegs, the bush-cricket ear exhibits outer, middle and inner components; the inner ear containing tonotopically arranged auditory sensilla within a fluid-filled cavity, and externally protected by the leg cuticle. Here, we report bush-crickets with transparent ear cuticles as potential model species for direct, non-invasive measuring of TWs and tonotopy. Using laser Doppler vibrometry and spectroscopy, we show that increased transmittance of light through the ear cuticle allows for effective non-invasive measurements of TWs and frequency mapping. More transparent cuticles allow several properties of TWs to be precisely recovered and measured in vivo from intact specimens. Our approach provides an innovative, non-invasive alternative to measure the natural motion of the sensilla-bearing surface embedded in the intact inner ear fluid.

  20. Invasive non-typhoidal salmonella disease: an emerging and neglected tropical disease in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feasey, Nicholas A; Dougan, Gordon; Kingsley, Robert A; Heyderman, Robert S; Gordon, Melita A

    2012-01-01

    Summary Invasive strains of non-typhoidal salmonellae have emerged as a prominent cause of bloodstream infection in African adults and children, with an associated case fatality of 20–25%. The clinical presentation of invasive non-typhoidal salmonella disease in Africa is diverse: fever, hepatosplenomegaly, and respiratory symptoms are common, and features of enterocolitis are often absent. The most important risk factors are HIV infection in adults, and malaria, HIV, and malnutrition in children. A distinct genotype of Salmonella enterica var Typhimurium, ST313, has emerged as a new pathogenic clade in sub-Saharan Africa, and might have adapted to cause invasive disease in human beings. Multidrug-resistant ST313 has caused epidemics in several African countries, and has driven the use of expensive antimicrobial drugs in the poorest health services in the world. Studies of systemic cellular and humoral immune responses in adults infected with HIV have revealed key host immune defects contributing to invasive non-typhoidal salmonella disease. This emerging pathogen might therefore have adapted to occupy an ecological and immunological niche provided by HIV, malaria, and malnutrition in Africa. A good understanding of the epidemiology of this neglected disease will open new avenues for development and implementation of vaccine and public health strategies to prevent infections and interrupt transmission. PMID:22587967

  1. Non-invasive continuous blood pressure monitoring of tachycardic episodes during interventional electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Roberto; Viscardi, Valentina; Furukawa, Toshiyuki; Brignole, Michele

    2010-11-01

    We thought to evaluate feasibility of continuous non-invasive blood pressure monitoring during procedures of interventional electrophysiology. We evaluated continuous non-invasive finger blood pressure (BP) monitoring by means of the Nexfin device in 22 patients (mean age 70 ± 24 years), undergoing procedures of interventional electrophysiology, in critical situations of hypotension caused by tachyarrhythmias or by intermittent incremental ventricular temporary pacing till to the maximum tolerated systolic BP fall (mean 61 ± 14 mmHg per patient at a rate of 195 ± 37 bpm). In all patients, Nexfin was able to detect immediately, at the onset of tachyarrythmia, the changes in BP and recorded reliable waveforms. The quality of the signal was arbitrarily classified as excellent in 11 cases, good in 10 cases, and sufficient in 1 case. In basal conditions, calibrations of the signal occurred every 49.2 ± 24.3 s and accounted for 4% of total monitoring time; during tachyarrhythmias their frequency increased to one every 12.7 s and accounted for 19% of total recording duration. A linear correlation for a range of BP values from 41 to 190 mmHg was found between non-invasive and intra-arterial BP among a total of 1055 beats from three patients who underwent simultaneous recordings with both methods (coefficient of correlation of 0.81, P invasive BP monitoring is feasible in the clinical practise of an interventional electrophysiology laboratory without the need of utilization of an intra-arterial BP line.

  2. An invasive non-native mammal population conserves genetic diversity lost from its native range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, A J; Holland, O J; McDonald, R A; Clout, M N; Gleeson, D M

    2015-05-01

    Invasive, non-native species are one of the major causes of global biodiversity loss. Although they are, by definition, successful in their non-native range, their populations generally show major reductions in their genetic diversity during the demographic bottleneck they experience during colonization. By investigating the mitochondrial genetic diversity of an invasive non-native species, the stoat Mustela erminea, in New Zealand and comparing it to diversity in the species' native range in Great Britain, we reveal the opposite effect. We demonstrate that the New Zealand stoat population contains four mitochondrial haplotypes that have not been found in the native range. Stoats in Britain rely heavily on introduced rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus as their primary prey and were introduced to New Zealand in a misguided attempt at biological control of rabbits, which had also been introduced there. While invasive stoats have since decimated the New Zealand avifauna, native stoat populations were themselves decimated by the introduction to Britain of Myxoma virus as a control measure for rabbits. We highlight the irony that while introduced species (rabbits) and subsequent biocontrol (myxomatosis) have caused population crashes of native stoats, invasive stoats in New Zealand, which were also introduced for biological control, now contain more genetic haplotypes than their most likely native source. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Fetal-specific DNA methylation ratio permits non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Elisavet A.; Karagrigoriou, Alex; Tsaliki, Evdokia; Velissariou, Voula; Carter, Nigel P.; Patsalis, Philippos C.

    2014-01-01

    The trials performed worldwide towards Non-Invasive Prenatal Diagnosis (NIPD) of Down syndrome (or Trisomy 21) have demonstrated the great commercial and medical potential of NIPD compared to the currently used invasive prenatal diagnostic procedures. Extensive investigation of methylation differences between the mother and the fetus has led to the identification of Differentially Methylated Regions (DMRs). In this study, we present a strategy using the Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDiP) methodology in combination with real-time qPCR to achieve fetal chromosome dosage assessment which can be performed non-invasively through the analysis of fetal-specific DMRs. We achieved non-invasive prenatal detection of trisomy 21 by determining the methylation ratio of normal and trisomy 21 cases for each tested fetal-specific DMR present in maternal peripheral blood, followed by further statistical analysis. The application of the above fetal-specific methylation ratio approach provided correct diagnosis of 14 trisomy 21 and 26 normal cases. PMID:21378977

  4. (19)F-heptuloses as tools for the non-invasive imaging of GLUT2-expressing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malaisse, Willy J; Zhang, Ying; Louchami, Karim

    2012-01-01

    Suitable analogs of d-mannoheptulose are currently considered as possible tools for the non-invasive imaging of pancreatic islet insulin-producing cells. Here, we examined whether (19)F-heptuloses could be used for non-invasive imaging of GLUT2-expressing cells. After 20 min incubation, the uptake...

  5. USPIO-labeled textile materials for non-invasive MR imaging of tissue-engineered vascular grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, Marianne E.; Koch, Sabine; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria; Schuster, Philipp; Wehner, Jakob; Wu, Zhuojun; Gremse, Felix; Schulz, Volkmar; Rongen, Lisanne; Wolf, Frederic; Frese, Julia; Gesche, Valentine N.; van Zandvoort, Marc; Mela, P.; Jockenhoeve, Stefan; Kiessling, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive imaging might assist in the clinical translation of tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVG). It can e.g. be used to facilitate the implantation of TEVG, to longitudinally monitor their localization and function, and to provide non-invasive and quantitative feedback on their remodeling

  6. Non invasive Brain-Computer Interface system: towards its application as assistive technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincotti, Febo; Mattia, Donatella; Aloise, Fabio; Bufalari, Simona; Schalk, Gerwin; Oriolo, Giuseppe; Cherubini, Andrea; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Babiloni, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    The quality of life of people suffering from severe motor disabilities can benefit from the use of current assistive technology capable of ameliorating communication, house-environment management and mobility, according to the user's residual motor abilities. Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) are systems that can translate brain activity into signals that control external devices. Thus they can represent the only technology for severely paralyzed patients to increase or maintain their communication and control options. Here we report on a pilot study in which a system was implemented and validated to allow disabled persons to improve or recover their mobility (directly or by emulation) and communication within the surrounding environment. The system is based on a software controller that offers to the user a communication interface that is matched with the individual's residual motor abilities. Patients (n=14) with severe motor disabilities due to progressive neurodegenerative disorders were trained to use the system prototype under a rehabilitation program carried out in a house-like furnished space. All users utilized regular assistive control options (e.g., microswitches or head trackers). In addition, four subjects learned to operate the system by means of a non-invasive EEG-based BCI. This system was controlled by the subjects' voluntary modulations of EEG sensorimotor rhythms recorded on the scalp; this skill was learnt even though the subjects have not had control over their limbs for a long time. We conclude that such a prototype system, which integrates several different assistive technologies including a BCI system, can potentially facilitate the translation from pre-clinical demonstrations to a clinical useful BCI. PMID:18394526

  7. Application of non-invasive optical monitoring methodologies to follow and record painting cleaning processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, R.; Dal Fovo, A.; Striova, J.; Pezzati, L.; Pampaloni, E.; Raffaelli, M.; Barucci, M.

    2015-11-01

    The cleaning of painted artworks, i.e. the critical operation whereby materials are selectively removed from a painted surface by partial thinning or complete elimination of varnish, is one of the most debated conservation operations, being an irreversible process, which may result in chromatic and morphological variations in the painted surface. Due to ageing, the upper layer is subject to darkening and yellowing because of blanching and fading from ultraviolet exposure, dust deposition, and overpainted layers due, for instance, to restoration interventions. This degradation can either alter the original appearance of painting polychromy or cause mechanical failure of the finishes. To address these adverse conditions, a process of examination and analysis is critical to the definition and interpretation of the varnish layer. When investigating the ageing process of old paintings, it is of great importance to obtain insight into the painting technique as practiced in the past, and the first step in gaining this knowledge is, to a large extent, based on the study of the varnish film. An effective control of the process and objective evaluation of its outcome requires therefore instrumental/analytical support. The present study illustrates the successful application of non-invasive optical techniques—such as colorimetry, multispectral reflectography, laser scanning micro-profilometry, and optical coherence tomography—to the monitoring of an Italian fourteenth-century painting cleaning process. Results presented here confirm that optical techniques play a pivotal role in artwork diagnostics, especially with regard to conservation operations, while also indicating their validity when applied to the monitoring of the cleaning process.

  8. Non-invasive bedside assessment of central venous pressure: scanning into the future.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Rizkallah

    Full Text Available Noninvasive evaluation of central venous pressure (CVP can be achieved by assessing the Jugular Venous Pressure (JVP, Peripheral Venous Collapse (PVC, and ultrasound visualization of the inferior vena cava. The relative accuracy of these techniques compared to one another and their application by trainees of varying experience remains uncertain. We compare the application and utility of the JVP, PVC, and handheld Mini Echo amongst trainees of varying experience including a medical student, internal medicine resident, and cardiology fellow. We also introduce and validate a new physical exam technique to assess central venous pressures, the Anthem sign.Patients presenting for their regularly scheduled echocardiograms at the hospital echo department had clinical evaluations of their CVP using these non-invasive bedside techniques. The examiners were blinded to the echo results, each other's assessments, and patient history; their CVP estimates were compared to the gold standard level 3 echo-cardiographer's estimates at the completion of the study.325 patients combined were examined (mean age 65, s.d. 16 years. When compared to the gold standard of central venous pressure by a level 3 echocardiographer, the JVP was the most sensitive at 86%, improving with clinical experience (p<0.01. The classic PVC technique and Anthem sign had better specificity compared to the JVP. Mini Echo estimates were comparable to physical exam assessments.JVP evaluation is the most sensitive physical examination technique in CVP assessments. The PVC techniques along with the newly described Anthem sign may be of value for the early learner who still has not mastered the art of JVP assessment and in obese patients in whom JVP evaluation is problematic. Mini Echo estimates of CVPs are comparable to physical examination by trained clinicians and require less instruction. The use of Mini Echo in medical training should be further evaluated and encouraged.

  9. Cognitive and Neurophysiological Effects of Non-invasive Brain Stimulation in Stroke Patients after Motor Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agata, Federico; Peila, Elena; Cicerale, Alessandro; Caglio, Marcella M; Caroppo, Paola; Vighetti, Sergio; Piedimonte, Alessandro; Minuto, Alice; Campagnoli, Marcello; Salatino, Adriana; Molo, Maria T; Mortara, Paolo; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Massazza, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of two specific Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation (NIBS) paradigms, the repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS), and transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), in the upper limb rehabilitation of patients with stroke. Short and long term outcomes (after 3 and 6 months, respectively) were evaluated. We measured, at multiple time points, the manual dexterity using a validated clinical scale (ARAT), electroencephalography auditory event related potentials, and neuropsychological performances in patients with chronic stroke of middle severity. Thirty four patients were enrolled and randomized. The intervention group was treated with a NIBS protocol longer than usual, applying a second cycle of stimulation, after a washout period, using different techniques in the two cycles (rTMS/tDCS). We compared the results with a control group treated with sham stimulation. We split the data analysis into three studies. In this first study we examined if a cumulative effect was clinically visible. In the second study we compared the effects of the two techniques. In the third study we explored if patients with minor cognitive impairment have most benefit from the treatment and if cognitive and motor outcomes were correlated. We found that the impairment in some cognitive domains cannot be considered an exclusion criterion for rehabilitation with NIBS. ERP improved, related to cognitive and attentional processes after stimulation on the motor cortex, but transitorily. This effect could be linked to the restoration of hemispheric balance or by the effects of distant connections. In our study the effects of the two NIBS were comparable, with some advantages using tDCS vs. rTMS in stroke rehabilitation. Finally we found that more than one cycle (2-4 weeks), spaced out by washout periods, should be used, only in responder patients, to obtain clinical relevant results.

  10. Detection of trisomies 13, 18 and 21 using non-invasive prenatal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Rong; Cai, Na; Wang, Xiaobin; Wang, Lin; Cui, Ke; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiang; Li, Xu

    2017-05-01

    The clinical performance of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) in the Down's syndrome screening based on 1,901 pregnant women in a Chinese hospital was investigated. This was a retrospective analysis of NIPT study in singleton pregnancy (n=1,901). The NIPT test is offered routinely as a prenatal screening test for common fetal aneuploidies, including trisomy 13 (T13), T18 and T21 to pregnant women with risk factors of one or more anomalies. Maternal peripheral blood (5 ml) was collected in an ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) tube at a gestational age of 12+0 to 32+6 weeks. The samples were delivered at -80°C to the certified Shenzhen BGI Clinical Laboratory Center. Sequencing data were analyzed using a proprietary algorithm. Women with positive NIPT results were recommended to receive karyotype analysis and amniotic fluid puncture for further validation. The cases were followed up for 56 days after delivery. All the patients underwent ultrasound examination, and the majority of patients (91.16%) showed normal findings. In contrast, 136 (7.15%) showed ultrasound anomalies. The most common anomaly was echogenic heart focus (n=80), accounting for 4.21% of the patients. Twenty-two cases were classified by the NIPT to be positive for the T21 (n=15), T18 (n=5) and T13 (n=2), respectively, while the others (n=1,879) were classified to be NIPT negative cases. Among these cases, the fetal outcome data were obtained in 1,483 cases, while 396 were lost to follow-up. The majority of cases (75.47%) were normal at birth. Neonatal death was observed in 1 case. Five pregnant women decided termination of pregnancy despite the presence of NIPT negativity. In conclusion, NIPT technique is feasible for the prenatal screening of T18 and T21 with higher sensitivity and specificity compared with conventional methods.

  11. Feasibility of non-invasive optical blood-glucose detection using overtone circular dichroism

    CERN Document Server

    Hokr, Brett H; Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is one of the most debilitating and costly diseases currently plaguing humanity. It is a leading cause of death and dismemberment in the world, and we know how to treat it. Accurate, continuous monitoring and control of blood glucose levels via insulin treatments are widely known to mitigate the majority of detrimental effects caused by the disease. The primary limitation of continuous glucose monitoring is patient non-compliance due to the unpleasant nature of "finger-stick" testing methods. This limitation can be largely, or even completely, removed by non-invasive testing methods. In this report, we demonstrate the vibrational overtone circular dichroism properties of glucose and analyze its use as a method of non-invasive glucose monitoring, capable of assuaging this trillion dollar scourge.

  12. Non-Invasive, Non-Contact Heart Monitoring of Hemodialysis Patients with a Micropower Impulse Radar Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, J; Levin, N; Poland, D; Welsh, P; Paulsen, C; Trebes, J; Rosenbury, R; Killip, T

    2002-02-01

    This report summarizes the LLNL LDRD funded portion of a collaborative project to demonstrate and clinically evaluate the micropower impulse radar technology as a means to non-invasively monitor the heart of chronic care patients undergoing hemodialysis. The development is based upon technologies and expertise unique to LLNL. The LLNL LDRD funded portion of this project was used to assist in the definition, design, construction, and evaluation of the prototype.

  13. High-speed biosensing strategy for non-invasive profiling of multiple cancer fusion genes in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Kevin M; Wee, Eugene J H; Trau, Matt

    2017-03-15

    Aberrant chromosal rearrangements, such as the multiple variants of TMPRSS2:ERG fusion gene mutations in prostate cancer (PCa), are promising diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers due to their specific expression in cancerous tissue only. Additionally, TMPRSS2:ERG variants are detectable in urine to provide non-invasive PCa diagnostic sampling as an attractive surrogate for needle biopsies. Therefore, rapid and simplistic assays for identifying multiple urinary TMPRSS2:ERG variants are potentially useful to aid in early cancer detection, immediate patient risk stratification, and prompt personalized treatment. However, current strategies for simultaneous detection of multiple gene fusions are limited by tedious and prolonged experimental protocols, thus limiting their use as rapid clinical screening tools. Herein, we report a simple and rapid gene fusion strategy which expliots the specificity of DNA ligase and the speed of isothermal amplification to simultaneously detect multiple fusion gene RNAs within a short sample-to-answer timeframe of 60min. The method has a low detection limit of 2 amol (1000 copies), and was successfully applied for non-invasive fusion gene profiling in patient urine samples with subsequent validation by a PCR-based gold standard approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Early invasive strategy in diabetic patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza Román, Anna; Latour Pérez, Jaime; de Miguel Balsa, Eva; Pino Izquierdo, Karel; Coves Orts, Francisco Javier; García Ochando, Luis; de la Torre Fernández, Maria José

    2014-05-20

    In the management of non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS), several studies have shown a reduction in mortality with the use of an invasive strategy in high-risk patients, including diabetic patients. Paradoxically, other studies have shown an under-utilization of this invasive strategy in these patients. The aim of this study is to determine the characteristics of patients managed conservatively and identify determinants of the use of invasive or conservative strategy. Retrospective cohort study conducted in diabetic patients with NSTE-ACS included in the ARIAM-SEMICYUC registry (n=531) in 2010 and 2011. We performed crude and adjusted unconditional logistic regression. We analyzed 531 diabetic patients, 264 (49.7%) of which received invasive strategy. Patients managed conservatively were a subgroup characterized by older age and cardiovascular comorbidity, increased risk of bleeding and the absence of high-risk electrocardiogram (ECG). In diabetic patients with NSTE-ACS, independent predictors associated with conservative strategy were low-risk ECG, initial Killip class>1, high risk of bleeding and pretreatment with clopidogrel. The fear of bleeding complications or advanced coronary lesions could be the cause of the underutilization of an invasive strategy in diabetic patients with NSTE-ACS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Uptake of non-invasive prenatal testing in Chinese women: money matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J; Zhen, L; Pan, M; Yang, X; Ou, Y-M; Liao, C; Li, D-Z

    2015-12-01

    To determine the influence of free invasive prenatal testing on the uptake of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). Over a 2-year period at a Chinese tertiary prenatal diagnostic unit, women at risk of fetal trisomy were given the option of NIPT or invasive prenatal testing. Invasive prenatal testing was offered free of charge to women with a local Hukou (household registration); however, women without a local Hukou were charged for invasive prenatal testing. Both women with and without a local Hukou were charged for NIPT. During the first year, 2647 women with a positive trisomy 21 screening test were referred (474 women with a local Hukou and 2173 women without a local Hukou). Only 1.6% of the women with a local Hukou underwent NIPT, while this proportion was 20.6% in the women without a local Hukou. During the second year, the price of NIPT was reduced. The total number of women referred was 3047 (502 women with a local Hukou and 2545 women without a local Hukou). The uptake of NIPT in women without a local Hukou doubled, but the uptake of NIPT remained stable in women with a local Hukou. The financial impact on the uptake of NIPT should not be underestimated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of non-invasive and invasive arterial blood pressure measurement for assessment of dynamic cerebral autoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Nils H; Ortega-Gutierrez, Santiago; Reccius, Andres; Masurkar, Arjun; Huang, Amy; Marshall, Randolph S

    2014-02-01

    There is a growing interest in measuring cerebral autoregulation in patients with acute brain injury. Non-invasive finger photo-plethysmography (Finapres) is the method of choice to relate arterial blood pressure to changes in cerebral blood flow. Among acutely ill patients, however, peripheral vasoconstriction often limits the use of Finapres requiring direct intravascular blood pressure measurement. We evaluated how these two different forms of blood pressure monitoring affect the parameters of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (DCA). We performed 37 simultaneous recordings of BP and cerebral blood flow velocity in 15 patients with acute brain injury. DCA was estimated in the frequency domain using transfer function analysis to calculate phase shift, gain, and coherence. In addition the mean velocity index (Mx) was calculated for assessment of DCA in the time domain. The mean patient age was 58.1 ± 15.9 years, 80 % (n = 12) were women. We found good inter-method agreement between Finapres and direct intravascular measurement using Bland–Altman and correlation analyses. Finapres gives higher values for the efficiency of dynamic CA compared with values derived from radial artery catheter, as indicated by biases in the phase (26.3 ± 11.6° vs. 21.7 ± 10.5°, p = 0.001) and Mx (0.571 ± 0.137 vs. 0.649 ± 0.128, p blood pressure methods. The average coherence between CBFV and ABP was higher when BP was measured with arterial catheter for frequencies above 0.05 Hz (0.8 vs. 0.73, p invasive arterial blood pressure monitoring may improve accuracy and thus should be the preferred method for DCA assessment in the ICU.

  17. Pneumococci in biofilms are non-invasive: implications on nasopharyngeal colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Paul Gilley

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the human nasopharynx asymptomatically. Invasive pneumococcal disease develops following bacterial aspiration into the lungs. Pneumococci within the nasopharynx exist as biofilms, a growth phenotype characterized by surface attachment, encasement within an extracellular matrix, and antimicrobial resistance. Experimental evidence indicates that biofilm pneumococci are attenuated versus their planktonic counterpart. Biofilm pneumococci failed to cause invasive disease in experimentally challenged mice and in vitro were shown to be non-invasive despite being hyper-adhesive. This attenuated phenotype corresponds with observations that biofilm pneumococci elicit significantly less cytokine and chemokine production from host cells than their planktonic counterparts. Microarray and proteomic studies show that pneumococci within biofilms have decreased metabolism, less capsular polysaccharide, and reduced production of the pore-forming toxin pneumolysin. Biofilm pneumococci are predominately in the transparent phenotype, which has elevated cell wall phosphorylcholine, an adhesin subject to C-reactive protein mediated opsonization. Herein, we review these changes in virulence, interpret their impact on colonization and transmission, and discuss the notion that non-invasive biofilms are principal lifestyle of S. pneumoniae.

  18. Prospective non-invasive follow-up of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Dana; Radu, Corina; Grigorescu, Mircea Dan; Lupsor, Monica; Feier, Diana; Grigorescu, Mircea

    2012-12-01

    Non-invasive methods for the assessment of liver fibrosis are accurate in staging chronic liver diseases before treatment. To prospectively assess liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) in patients treated vs untreated, using non-invasive methods. 224 patients with CHC were included in the study: 179 received antiviral treatment for 48 weeks, and 45 patients received no antiviral therapy. All patients underwent liver biopsy at baseline and were also evaluated by simple biological scores (APRI, HAPRI, Forns, Bonacini, Lok) and transient elastography (TE). The progression of fibrosis was non-invasively assessed over a period of 72 weeks. Fibrosis decreased significantly in patients who gained sustained virological response (SVR). A significant decrease of fibrosis was also observed in all treated patients, irrespective of SVR when using APRI, HAPRI and Bonacini scores (p=0.001, 0.009 and 0.02). Untreated patients yielded constant values of fibrosis or a slight increase in follow-up. Patients with Lok score and stiffness predictive for cirrhosis had a decreasing trend of fibrosis (p=0.03 for Lok and 0.05 for TE), but persisting in the cirrhosis domain. Of the non responders, those who gained biological response demonstrated improvement of fibrosis assessed by APRI and TE. The prospective follow-up of liver fibrosis assessed by simple biological scores and TE in patients with CHC revealed a downstaging of fibrosis in treated patients and especially in those who gained SVR.

  19. Recording human cortical population spikes non-invasively--An EEG tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterstraat, Gunnar; Fedele, Tommaso; Burghoff, Martin; Scheer, Hans-Jürgen; Curio, Gabriel

    2015-07-30

    Non-invasively recorded somatosensory high-frequency oscillations (sHFOs) evoked by electric nerve stimulation are markers of human cortical population spikes. Previously, their analysis was based on massive averaging of EEG responses. Advanced neurotechnology and optimized off-line analysis can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of sHFOs, eventually enabling single-trial analysis. The rationale for developing dedicated low-noise EEG technology for sHFOs is unfolded. Detailed recording procedures and tailored analysis principles are explained step-by-step. Source codes in Matlab and Python are provided as supplementary material online. Combining synergistic hardware and analysis improvements, evoked sHFOs at around 600 Hz ('σ-bursts') can be studied in single-trials. Additionally, optimized spatial filters increase the signal-to-noise ratio of components at about 1 kHz ('κ-bursts') enabling their detection in non-invasive surface EEG. sHFOs offer a unique possibility to record evoked human cortical population spikes non-invasively. The experimental approaches and algorithms presented here enable also non-specialized EEG laboratories to combine measurements of conventional low-frequency EEG with the analysis of concomitant cortical population spike responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Non-invasive assessment of hepatic fat accumulation in chronic hepatitis C by {sup 1}H magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krssak, Martin [Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Hofer, Harald [Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Wrba, Fritz [Department of Clinical Pathology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Meyerspeer, Martin [MR Centre-of-Excellence, Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Center for Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Brehm, Attila [Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Institute for Clinical Diabetology, German Diabetes Center, Leibniz Center of Diabetes Research and Department of Medicine/Metabolic Diseases, Heinrich Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Lohninger, Alfred [Department of Medical Chemistry, Center for Physiology and Pathophysiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Steindl-Munda, Petra [Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); MR Centre-of-Excellence, Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Moser, Ewald [MR Centre-of-Excellence, Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Center for Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Ferenci, Peter [Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Roden, Michael, E-mail: michael.roden@ddz.uni-duesseldorf.d [Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Institute for Clinical Diabetology, German Diabetes Center, Leibniz Center of Diabetes Research and Department of Medicine/Metabolic Diseases, Heinrich Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    Background: Liver biopsy is the standard method for diagnosis of hepatic steatosis, but is invasive and carries some risk of morbidity. Aims and methods: Quantification of hepatocellular lipid content (HCL) with non-invasive single voxel {sup 1}H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 3 T was compared with histological grading and biochemical analysis of liver biopsies in 29 patients with chronic hepatitis C. Body mass index, indices of insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment index, HOMA-IR), serum lipids and serum liver transaminases were also quantified. Results: HCL as assessed by {sup 1}H MRS linearly correlated (r = 0.70, p < 0.001) with histological evaluation of liver biopsies and was in agreement with histological steatosis staging in 65% of the patients. Biochemically assessed hepatic triglyceride contents correlated with HCL measured with {sup 1}H MRS (r = 0.63, p < 0.03) and allowed discriminating between none or mild steatosis versus moderate or severe steatosis. Patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 3 had a higher prevalence of steatosis (62%) which was not explained by differences in body mass or whole body insulin resistance. When these patients were excluded from correlation analysis, hepatic fat accumulation positively correlated with insulin resistance in the remaining hepatitis C patients (HCL vs. HOMA-IR, r = 0.559, p < 0.020, n = 17). Conclusion: Localized {sup 1}H MRS is a valid and useful method for quantification of HCL content in patients with chronic hepatitis C and can be easily applied to non-invasively monitoring of steatosis during repeated follow-up measurements in a clinical setting.

  1. Clinical evaluation of the Surgivet V60046, a non invasive blood pressure monitor in anaesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deflandre, Catherine J A; Hellebrekers, Ludo J

    2008-01-01

    To compare the performance of the Surgivet Non-Invasive Blood Pressure (NIBP) monitor V60046 with an invasive blood pressure (IBP) technique in anaesthetized dogs. A prospective study. Thirty-four dogs, anaesthetized for a variety of procedures. Various anaesthetic protocols were used. Invasive blood pressure measurement was made using a catheter in the femoral or the pedal artery. A cuff was placed on the contralateral limb to allow non invasive measurements. Recordings of arterial blood pressures (ABPs) were taken at simultaneous times for a range of pressures. For analysis, three pressure levels were determined: high [systolic blood pressure (SAP) > 121 mmHg], normal (91 mmHg invasive and non invasive measurements were made using Bland-Altmann analysis. The NIBP monitor consistently underestimated blood pressure at all levels. The lowest biases and greatest precision were obtained at low and normal pressure levels for SAP and mean arterial pressure (MAP). At low blood pressure levels, the biases +/- 95% confidence interval (CI) were 1.9 +/- 2.96 mmHg (SAP), 8.3 +/- 2.41 mmHg diastolic arterial pressure (DAP) and 3.5 +/- 2.09 mmHg (MAP). At normal blood pressure levels, biases and CI were: 1.2 +/- 2.13 mmHg (SAP), 5.2 +/- 2.32 mmHg (DAP) and 2.1 +/- 1.54 mmHg (MAP). At high blood pressure levels, the biases and CI were 22.7 +/- 5.85 mmHg (SAP), 5.5 +/- 3.13 mmHg (DAP) and 9.4 +/- 3.52 mmHg (MAP). In 90.6% of cases of hypotension (MAP blood pressure was correctly diagnosed by the Surgivet. Measurement of blood pressure with the indirect monitor allowed detection of hypotension using either SAP or MAP. The most accurate readings were determined for MAP at hypotensive and normal levels. The monitor lacked accuracy at high pressures. When severe challenges to the cardiovascular system are anticipated, an invasive method of recording ABP is preferable. For routine usage, the Surgivet monitor provided a reliable and safe method of NIBP monitoring in dogs, thereby

  2. Non-invasive imaging of retinal blood flow in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Anne; Hansen, Mathias M; Klefter, Oliver Niels

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the circulation in the retinal vessels in patients with blood dyscrasia due to myeloproliferative neoplasms using non-invasive retinal imaging. METHODS: Prospective consecutive case series of seven treatment-naïve patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (n = 2), polycythemia vera...... (n = 4), essential thrombocytosis (n = 1) examined before and after cytoreductive treatment. We investigated retinal circulation with motion-contrast imaging, retinal oximetry and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. RESULTS: Retinal venous blood velocity increased by 8.14% (CI95 3.67% to 12....... The retinopathy had resolved at follow-up in all patients. CONCLUSION: With non-invasive retinal imaging, we were able to demonstrate increased retinal venous blood velocity, increased retinal arterial blood oxygenation and normalization of intravascular reflectivity patterns after successful treatment...

  3. Reflection infrared spectroscopy for the non-invasive in situ study of artists' pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miliani, C.; Rosi, F.; Daveri, A.; Brunetti, B. G.

    2012-02-01

    The potential of fibre optic reflection infrared spectroscopy for the non-invasive identification of artists' pigments is presented. Sixteen different carbonate, sulphate and silicate-based pigments are taken into account considering their wide use during the history of art and their infrared optical properties. The infrared distortions mainly generated by the specular reflection are discussed on the basis of experimental measurements carried out on reference samples. The study on pure materials permitted the definition of marker bands, mainly combination and overtone modes, enhanced by the diffuse reflection component of the light, functional for the non-invasive pigment identification in real artworks. Several case studies are reported, including wall, easel, canvas paintings and manuscripts from ancient to modern art demonstrating the strengths of the technique on the identification of pigments even in the presence of complex mixtures of both organic (binders, varnishes) and inorganic (supports, fillers and other pigments) compounds.

  4. Report on Non-invasive acoustic monitoring of D2O concentration Oct 31 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantea, Cristian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sinha, Dipen N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lakis, Rollin Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Beedle, Christopher Craig [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Davis, Eric Sean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-06

    There is an urgent need for real-time monitoring of the hydrogen /deuterium ratio (H/D) for heavy water production monitoring. Based upon published literature, sound speed is sensitive to the deuterium content of heavy water and can be measured using existing acoustic methods to determine the deuterium concentration in heavy water solutions. We plan to adapt existing non-invasive acoustic techniques (Swept-Frequency Acoustic Interferometry and Gaussian-pulse acoustic technique) for the purpose of quantifying H/D ratios in solution. A successful demonstration will provide an easily implemented, low cost, and non-invasive method for remote and unattended H/D ratio measurements with a resolution of less than 0.2% vol.

  5. Development of non-invasive ventilation treatment practice for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Helle M; Titlestad, Ingrid L; Huniche, Lotte

    2017-01-01

    and identifying end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease posed difficulties and caused doubts concerning initiation and continuation of non-invasive ventilation as life-sustaining treatment. Health professionals expressed a need for knowledge of patients' perspectives and attitude towards non......: The participatory approach enabled continuous and complementary development of knowledge and treatment practice. The investigation of patient perspectives was particularly productive in qualifying cooperation among health professionals. The study resulted in preparing, and implementing, new clinical strategies.......-invasive ventilation. Methods: The study adheres to principles of Critical psychological practice research. Data on patients' and health professionals' perspectives were obtained from observations from the ward and semi-structured interviews with 16 patients. A group of health professionals was set up to form a co...

  6. A Microwave Metamaterial Inspired Sensor for Non-Invasive Blood Glucose Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vrba

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a microwave sensor based on an artificial transmission line is proposed for non-invasive blood glucose monitoring. A corresponding numerical model of the sensor implemented in microstrip technology is created in the commercial full-wave numerical simulation tool COMSOL Multiphysics and virtually tested by means of numerical simulations. Blood-glucose solution models with various blood glucose concentrations are used as a model of a biological tissue under test. Furthermore, a possible methodology for performing non-invasive tests is proposed. Sensitivity of the sensor developed here is compared to a sensor based on a section of a conventional microstrip transmission line of the same length and width.

  7. Evaluation of four non-invasive methods for examination and characterization of pressure ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, E.S.; Karlsmark, T.

    2008-01-01

    , we here report on usability of four non-invasive techniques for evaluation of pressure ulcers. Methods: Fifteen pressure ulcers in stage 0-IV were examined using four different non-invasive techniques [redness index, skin temperature, skin elasticity (i.e. retraction time), and ultrasound scanning......Background: Pressure ulcers are globally of major concern and there is need for research in the pathogenesis for early intervention. Early studies have suggested existence of a hypo-echogenic subepidermal layer at the location of pressure ulcers, visualized by ultrasound scans. As a continuation......]. Measurements were made at the ulcer, 5 cm from the ulcer, and at a reference skin location without ulcers. Results: The redness index was, in all cases, higher at the ulcers than at the reference skin. Temperature measurements were rather scattered. Ultrasound scans showed a hypo-echogenic subepidermal layer...

  8. An Investigation of Pulse Transit Time as a Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Measurement Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, B M; O' Flynn, B; Mathewson, A, E-mail: brian.mccarthy@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, UCC, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)

    2011-08-17

    The objective of this paper is to examine the Pulse Transit Method (PTT) as a non-invasive means to track Blood Pressure over a short period of time. PTT was measured as the time it takes for an ECG R-wave to propagate to the finger, where it is detected by a photoplethysmograph sensor. The PTT method is ideal for continuous 24-hour Blood Pressure Measurement (BPM) since it is both cuff-less and non-invasive and therefore comfortable and unobtrusive for the patient. Other techniques, such as the oscillometric method, have shown to be accurate and reliable but require a cuff for operation, making them unsuitable for long term monitoring. Although a relatively new technique, the PTT method has shown to be able to accurately track blood pressure changes over short periods of time, after which re-calibration is necessary. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of the method.

  9. An Investigation of Pulse Transit Time as a Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Measurement Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, B. M.; O'Flynn, B.; Mathewson, A.

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the Pulse Transit Method (PTT) as a non-invasive means to track Blood Pressure over a short period of time. PTT was measured as the time it takes for an ECG R-wave to propagate to the finger, where it is detected by a photoplethysmograph sensor. The PTT method is ideal for continuous 24-hour Blood Pressure Measurement (BPM) since it is both cuff-less and non-invasive and therefore comfortable and unobtrusive for the patient. Other techniques, such as the oscillometric method, have shown to be accurate and reliable but require a cuff for operation, making them unsuitable for long term monitoring. Although a relatively new technique, the PTT method has shown to be able to accurately track blood pressure changes over short periods of time, after which re-calibration is necessary. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of the method.

  10. Case report: Non-invasive neurally adjusted ventilatory assist in a newborn with unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosens, Sander; Derriks, Frank; Cools, Filip

    2016-11-01

    Diaphragmatic paralysis is a rare cause of respiratory distress in the newborn. In this paper, a patient with unilateral phrenic nerve injury after traumatic delivery is presented. The child inadequately responded to standard respiratory supportive measures. Non-invasive neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NIV-NAVA®), providing an optimally synchronized respiratory support proportional to the effort of the patient, resulted in prompt clinical and biological improvement of the patient's respiratory condition. NAVA is a relatively new mode of ventilation in neonatal care. In this case of unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis, it provided an alternative strategy of non-invasive respiratory support avoiding prolonged mechanical ventilation. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:E37-E39. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A holistic multimodal approach to the non-invasive analysis of watercolour paintings

    CERN Document Server

    Kogou, Sotiria; Bellesia, Sonia; Burgio, Lucia; Bailey, Kate; Brooks, Charlotte; Liang, Haida

    2015-01-01

    A holistic approach using non-invasive multimodal imaging and spectroscopic techniques to study the materials (pigments, drawing materials and paper) and painting techniques of watercolour paintings is presented. The non-invasive imaging and spectroscopic techniques include VIS-NIR reflectance spectroscopy and multispectral imaging, micro-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The three spectroscopic techniques complement each other in pigment identification. Multispectral imaging (near infrared bands), OCT and micro-Raman complement each other in the visualisation and identification of the drawing material. OCT probes the microstructure and light scattering properties of the substrate while XRF detects the elemental composition that indicates the sizing methods and the filler content. The multiple techniques were applied in a study of forty six 19th century Chinese export watercolours from the Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A) and the Royal Hort...

  12. Composite Biomarkers For Non-invasive Screening, Diagnosis And Prognosis Of Colorectal Cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Hicham

    2014-09-11

    The present invention concerns particular biomarkers for diagnosing and/or prognosticating colorectal cancer, in particular in a non-invasive manner. The methods and compositions concern analysis of methylation patterns of one or more genes from a set of 29 genes identified as described herein. In certain embodiments, the gene set includes at least P15.INK4b, SST, GAS7, CNRIP1, and PIK3CG.

  13. Non-Invasive Mechanic Ventilation Using in Flail Chest, Caused By Blunt Chest Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Serdar Onat; Alper Avcı; Refik Ülkü; Cemal Özçelik

    2008-01-01

    A 75-year-old woman admitted our faculty emergency room with shortness of breath, and chest pain after traffic accident’s second hour. She was diagnosed as bilateral multipl rib fractures, left clavicula fracture, and left flail chest by phsical and radiological examinations. She was transfered to Chest Surgery Depatment’s intensive care unit. The patient was undergone non-invasive mask mechanic ventilation support, because of the decreasing of blood oxygen saturation and increasing of arteri...

  14. Non-invasive parameters as predictors of high risk of variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Andrea Peñaloza-Posada

    2014-10-01

    Conclusions: The presence of large esophageal varices is the most important predictive risk factor for the occurrence of VB, independently of the class of Child-Pugh. Additionally, the portal vein diameter ≥ 13 mm is a non-invasive parameter related to high risk of VB. Therefore, these factors could be used as predictors of high risk of VB when the measure of HPVG is not available.

  15. Non-invasive blood glucose detection system based on conservation of energy method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Jian-Ming; Liang, Yong-Bo; Chen, Hong-Bo; Yin, Shi-Min; Chen, Zhen-Cheng

    2017-02-01

    The most common method used for minimizing the occurrence of diabetes complications is frequent glucose testing to adjust the insulin dose. However, using blood glucose (BG) meters presents a risk of infection. It is of great importance to develop non-invasive BG detection techniques. To realize high-accuracy, low-cost and continuous glucose monitoring, we have developed a non-invasive BG detection system using a mixed signal processor 430 (MSP430) microcontroller. This method is based on the combination of the conservation-of-energy method with a sensor integration module, which collects physiological parameters, such as the blood oxygen saturation (SPO2), blood flow velocity and heart rate. New methods to detect the basal metabolic rate (BMR) and BV are proposed, which combine the human body heat balance and characteristic signals of photoplethysmography as well dual elastic chambers theory. Four hundred clinical trials on real-time non-invasive BG monitoring under suitable experiment conditions were performed on different individuals, including diabetic patients, senior citizens and healthy adults. A multisensory information fusion model was applied to process these samples. The algorithm (we defined it as DCBPN algorithm) applied in the model combines a decision tree and back propagation neural network, which classifies the physiological and environmental parameters into three categories, and then establishes a corresponding prediction model for the three categories. The DCBPN algorithm provides an accuracy of 88.53% in predicting the BG of new samples. Thus, this system demonstrates a great potential to reliably detect BG values in a non-invasive setting.

  16. Non-Invasive Biomarkers for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Carrier Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Mónica Alejandra Anaya-Segura; Froylan Arturo García-Martínez; Luis Ángel Montes-Almanza; Benjamín-Gómez Díaz; Guillermina Ávila-Ramírez; Ikuri Alvarez-Maya; Ramón Mauricio Coral-Vázquez; Paul Mondragón-Terán; Rosa Elena Escobar-Cedillo; Noemí García-Calderón; Norma Alejandra Vázquez-Cardenas; Silvia García; Luz Berenice López-Hernández

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive biological indicators of the absence/presence or progress of the disease that could be used to support diagnosis and to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment are of utmost importance in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). This neuromuscular disorder affects male children, causing weakness and disability, whereas female relatives are at risk of being carriers of the disease. A biomarker with both high sensitivity and specificity for accurate prediction is preferred. Until now cr...

  17. Performance of Momguard, a new non-invasive prenatal testing protocol developed in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Mi-Young; Cho, Dae-Yeon; Won, Hye-Sung; Hwang, Ah Reum; Jeong, Bada; Kim, Jihun; Oh, Mijin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the performance of Momguard, non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT) for detecting trisomy (T) 21, T18, T13, and sex-chromosome abnormalities recently developed in Korea. Methods This preliminary study formed part of a large prospective cohort study conducted at Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. Only pregnant women who underwent both NIPT and confirmatory karyotyping were included in this study. NIPT results were compared with those of karyotype analyses. Results Among 93 eli...

  18. Aneuploidy screening by non?invasive prenatal testing in twin pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Fosler, L.; Winters, P.; Jones, K. W.; Curnow, K. J.; Sehnert, A. J.; Bhatt, S.; Platt, L. D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To describe our experience with non?invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) in twin pregnancy. Methods Two sets of maternal blood samples from twin pregnancies were analyzed at our laboratory using NIPT: 115 stored samples from pregnancies with known outcome (Clinical Study A) and 487 prospectively collected samples for which outcomes were requested from providers (Clinical Study B). NIPT was used to screen for the presence of fetal aneuploidy on chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y i...

  19. A non-invasive protocol to determine the personalized moment arms of knee and ankle muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefoy, A; Doriot, N; Senk, M; Dohin, B; Pradon, D; Chèze, L

    2007-01-01

    One difficulty that comes with predicting muscular forces is the accuracy of experimental data, particularly the assessment of muscle moment arms with respect to each joint rotation axis. This paper presents a non-invasive experimental protocol to obtain the personalized muscle moment arms with respect to the ankle and knee joints. A specific pointer is used by a specialist of lower limb anatomy in order to define the local portion of the line of action of the different muscles closed to the joint on the standing subject's lower limb. With this pointer, the three-dimensional coordinates of several points representing the line of action of 12 ankle and knee muscles are collected by a Motion Analysis system. The collection is done five times by the same operator and one time by two different operators. From this data, the intra and inter operator repeatabilities are tested. Relative (ICC) and absolute (SEM) reliabilities are determined in order to evaluate the intra operator repeatability of this non-invasive protocol. The ICC values obtained are higher than 0.91 for 10 among 12 muscles. The intra operator repeatability is thus confirmed. From the records realized by the two operators, the differences are negligible. Thus, the inter operator repeatability is also confirmed. The moments arms obtained using this non-invasive experimental protocol are compared with those calculated from origin and insertion points reported in the literature, according to the work of Whites, Pierrynowskis and Kepples, respectively. The estimations obtained using the non-invasive experimental protocol are found, for some muscles, more realistic than those calculated using the literature data and are always coherent with the role of the muscles described in anatomical books.

  20. Clinical and diagnostic utility of saliva as a non-invasive diagnostic fluid: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes, Lazaro Alessandro Soares; MUSSAVIRA, Sayeeda; Bindhu, Omana Sukumaran

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review presents the latest trends in salivary research and its applications in health and disease. Among the large number of analytes present in saliva, many are affected by diverse physiological and pathological conditions. Further, the non-invasive, easy and cost-effective collection methods prompt an interest in evaluating its diagnostic or prognostic utility. Accumulating data over the past two decades indicates towards the possible utility of saliva to monitor overall hea...

  1. Non-invasive method of determination of thermoelectric materials figure of merit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashcheulov А. А.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermoelectric effects arising in a sample placed in a measuring oscillating loop have been studied. It has been shown that asymmetric character of flowing current results in a volumetric bundle of induced Foucault currents and regions of Peltier heat release by thermoelectric sample which leads to increasing of irreversible heat losses recorded by measuring oscillating loop. The presence of this effect has caused the emergence of ingenious non-invasive method for recording of thermoelectric materials figure of merit.

  2. Non-invasive evaluation of intestinal disorders: The role of elastographic techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Branchi, Federica; Caprioli, Flavio; Orlando, Stefania; Conte, Dario; Fraquelli, Mirella

    2017-01-01

    Over the recent years the non-invasive techniques for the evaluation of the small bowel have been playing a major role in the management of chronic intestinal diseases, such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The diagnostic performances of magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and ultrasound in the field of small bowel disorders, have been assessed and established for more than two decades. Newer sonographic techniques, such as strain elastography and shear wave elastography, hav...

  3. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in hematology patients: let's agree on several things first

    OpenAIRE

    Schnell, David; Lemiale, Virginie; Azoulay, ?lie

    2012-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure is a dreaded and life-threatening event that represents the main reason for ICU admission. Respiratory events occur in up to 50% of hematology patients, including one-half of those admitted to the ICU. Mortality from acute respiratory failure in hematology patients depends on the patient's general status, acute respiratory failure etiology, need for mechanical ventilation and associated organ dysfunction. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation is clearly beneficial for ...

  4. Non-invasive assessment of the donor corneal endothelium using ocular redox fluorometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Shimazaki, J; Laing, R A; Tsubota, K; Kenyon, K R

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the usefulness of ocular redox fluorometry for evaluating donor corneal endothelial viability. METHODS: Corneas from 42 recipients of penetrating keratoplasty and four donor corneas were examined by ocular redox fluorometry. Autofluorescence from reduced pyridine nucleotides (PN) and oxidised flavoproteins (Fp) of the human corneal endothelium were measured non-invasively, and the PN/Fp ratio was used as a tissue metabolic indicator. Specular microscopy and electron micro...

  5. Evaluation of the accuracy of non-invasive automatic blood pressure monitors.

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahara, M.

    1990-01-01

    Non-invasive automatic blood pressure monitors (BP-103N, DINAMAP 845XT, Finapres 2300) were compared with the auscultatory method. The blood pressure readings given by the oscillometric method (BP-103N, DINAMAP 845XT) were accurate and reproducible. Agreement with the auscultatory method was especially good for systolic pressure. For diastolic pressure readings, there was less agreement with the results of the auscultatory method. The finger arterial pressure method (Finapres 2300) occasional...

  6. Non-invasive discrimination between pancreatic islets and exocrine cells using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binlin; Li, Ge; Hao, Mingming; Mukherjee, Sushmita

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we propose a non-invasive method to distinguish pancreatic islet cells from exocrine cell clusters using multiphoton (MP) imaging. We demonstrate the principle of distinguishing them based on autofluorescence. The results show that MP imaging has a potential to distinguish pancreatic islets from exocrine cells. This ability to distinguish the two cell types could have many applications, such as the examination of fresh pancreatic biopsies when staining is not possible or desirable.

  7. Non-invasive Markers of Liver Fibrosis: Adjuncts or Alternatives to Liver Biopsy?

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Jun L.; Pavlides, Michael; Moolla, Ahmad; Ryan, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis reflects sustained liver injury often from multiple, simultaneous factors. Whilst the presence of mild fibrosis on biopsy can be a reassuring finding, the identification of advanced fibrosis is critical to the management of patients with chronic liver disease. This necessity has lead to a reliance on liver biopsy which itself is an imperfect test and poorly accepted by patients. The development of robust tools to non-invasively assess liver fibrosis has dramatically enhanced cl...

  8. Non-invasive Brain Stimulation, a Tool to Revert Maladaptive Plasticity in Neuropathic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Naro, Antonino; Milardi, Demetrio; Russo, Margherita; Terranova, Carmen; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Cacciola, Alberto; Marino, Silvia; Calabro, Rocco S.; Quartarone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Neuromodulatory effects of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) have been extensively studied in chronic pain. A hypothetic mechanism of action would be to prevent or revert the ongoing maladaptive plasticity within the pain matrix. In this review, the authors discuss the mechanisms underlying the development of maladaptive plasticity in patients with chronic pain and the putative mechanisms of NIBS in modulating synaptic plasticity in neuropathic pain conditions.

  9. Non-invasive Brain Stimulation, a Tool to Revert Maladaptive Plasticity in Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naro, Antonino; Milardi, Demetrio; Russo, Margherita; Terranova, Carmen; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Cacciola, Alberto; Marino, Silvia; Calabro, Rocco S; Quartarone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Neuromodulatory effects of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) have been extensively studied in chronic pain. A hypothetic mechanism of action would be to prevent or revert the ongoing maladaptive plasticity within the pain matrix. In this review, the authors discuss the mechanisms underlying the development of maladaptive plasticity in patients with chronic pain and the putative mechanisms of NIBS in modulating synaptic plasticity in neuropathic pain conditions.

  10. CD47 Promotes Tumor Invasion and Metastasis in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Zhao; Jianxin Wang; Xiaodan Kong; Encheng Li; Yuanbin Liu; Xiaohui Du; Zhijie Kang; Ying Tang; Yanbin Kuang; Zhihui Yang; Youwen Zhou; Qi Wang

    2016-01-01

    CD47 is overexpressed in many human cancers, its level positively correlates with tumor invasion and metastasis. However, it is largely unknown whether CD47 overexpression drives metastasis and how CD47 lead to tumor metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we analyzed NSCLC specimens and cell lines, and revealed that CD47 is expressed at a higher level than in tumor-free control samples. Furthermore, increased CD47 expression correlated with clinical staging, lymph no...

  11. Real time non invasive imaging of fatty acid uptake in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Henkin, Amy H.; Cohen, Allison S.; Dubikovskaya, Elena A.; Park, Hyo Min; Nikitin, Gennady F.; Auzias, Mathieu G.; Kazantzis, Melissa; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Stahl, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Detection and quantification of fatty acid fluxes in animal model systems following physiological, pathological, or pharmacological challenges is key to our understanding of complex metabolic networks as these macronutrients also activate transcription factors and modulate signaling cascades including insulin-sensitivity. To enable non-invasive, real-time, spatiotemporal quantitative imaging of fatty acid fluxes in animals, we created a bioactivatable molecular imaging probe based on long-cha...

  12. Utility of Transcutaneous Capnography for Optimization of Non-Invasive Ventilation Pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhajed, Prashant N; Gehrer, Simone; Pandey, Kamlesh V; Vaidya, Preyas J; Leuppi, Joerg D; Tamm, Michael; Strobel, Werner

    2016-09-01

    Nocturnal Non-invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation (NPPV) is the treatment of choice in patients with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure due to hypoventilation. Continuous oxygen saturation measured with a pulse oximeter provides a surrogate measure of arterial oxygen saturation but does not completely reflect ventilation. Currently, Partial Pressure of Arterial (PaCO2) measured by arterial blood analysis is used for estimating the adequacy of ventilatory support and serves as the gold standard. To examine the safety, feasibility and utility of cutaneous capnography to re-titrate the non-invasive positive pressure ventilation settings in patients with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure due to hypoventilation. Twelve patients with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure prospectively underwent complete polysomnography and cutaneous capnography measurement on the ear lobe. Non-invasive ventilation pressures were adjusted with the aim of normalizing cutaneous carbon dioxide or at least reducing it by 10 to 15 mmHg. Sensor drift for cutaneous carbon dioxide of 0.7 mmHg per hour was integrated in the analysis. Mean baseline cutaneous carbon dioxide was 45.4 ± 6.5 mmHg and drift corrected awake value was 45.1 ± 8.3 mmHg. The correlation of baseline cutaneous carbon dioxide and the corrected awake cutaneous carbon dioxide with arterial blood gas values were 0.91 and 0.85 respectively. Inspiratory positive airway pressures were changed in nine patients (75%) and expiratory positive airway pressures in eight patients (66%). Epworth sleepiness score before and after the study showed no change in five patients, improvement in six patients and deterioration in one patient. Cutaneous capnography is feasible and permits the optimization of non-invasive ventilation pressure settings in patients with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure due to hypoventilation. Continuous cutaneous capnography might serve as an important additional tool to complement diurnal

  13. Attitudes towards non-invasive prenatal diagnosis among obstetricians in Pakistan: a developing, Islamic country

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, S.; Jafri, H; Rashid, Y.; Mason, G.; Ehsan, Y; Ahmed, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Stakeholders' views are essential for informing implementation strategies for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). Little is known about such views in developing countries. We explored attitudes towards NIPT among obstetricians in Pakistan, a developing, Islamic country. Methods A 35-item questionnaire was distributed and collected at eight events (a national conference and seven workshops in five cities) for obstetric professionals on advances in fetal medicine. Results Responses...

  14. NIKEI: a new inexpensive and non-invasive scoring system to exclude advanced fibrosis in patients with NAFLD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Münevver Demir

    Full Text Available AIMS: To develop, validate and compare a non-invasive fibrosis scoring system for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD derived from routinely obtained clinical and biochemical parameters. METHODS: 267 consecutive patients with biopsy proven fatty liver or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis were randomly assigned to the estimation (2/3 or validation (1/3 group to develop a model for the prediction of advanced fibrosis. Univariate statistics were performed to compare patients with and without advanced fibrosis, and following a multivariate logistic regression analysis a new scoring system was constructed. This non-invasive Koeln-Essen-index (NIKEI was validated and compared to the FIB-4 index by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC. We evaluated a stepwise combination of both scoring systems for the precise prediction of advanced fibrosis. To set in contrast, we additionally tested the diagnostic accuracy of the AST/ALT ratio, BARD score and the NAFLD fibrosis score in our cohort. RESULTS: Age, AST, AST/ALT ratio, and total bilirubin were identified as significant predictors of advanced fibrosis and used to construct the NIKEI with an AUC of 0.968 [0.937; 0.998] compared to 0.929 [0.869; 0.989] for the FIB-4 index. The absence of advanced fibrosis could be confirmed with excellent accuracy (99-100%. The positive predictive value of the FIB-4 index was higher (100% vs. 60%, however, the false negative rate was also high (33%. With a stepwise combination of both indices 82%-84% of biopsies would have been avoidable without a single misclassification. The AUROC for AST/ALT ratio, the NAFLD fibrosis score, and the BARD score were 0.81 (95% CI, 0.72-0.90, 0.96 (95% CI 0.92-0.99, and 0.67 (95% CI 0.55-0.78, respectively. CONCLUSION: The NIKEI can reliably exclude advanced fibrosis in subjects with NAFLD. In combination with the FIB-4 index misclassification with inadequate clinical management can be avoided while

  15. Non-invasive monitoring of Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine efficacy using biophotonic imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraz M Alam

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes infection of the nasopharynx represents a key step in the pathogenic cycle of this organism and a major focus for vaccine development, requiring robust models to facilitate the screening of potentially protective antigens. One antigen that may be an important target for vaccination is the chemokine protease, SpyCEP, which is cell surface-associated and plays a role in pathogenesis. Biophotonic imaging (BPI can non-invasively characterize the spatial location and abundance of bioluminescent bacteria in vivo. We have developed a bioluminescent derivative of a pharyngeal S. pyogenes strain by transformation of an emm75 clinical isolate with the luxABCDE operon. Evaluation of isogenic recombinant strains in vitro and in vivo confirmed that bioluminescence conferred a growth deficit that manifests as a fitness cost during infection. Notwithstanding this, bioluminescence expression permitted non-invasive longitudinal quantitation of S. pyogenes within the murine nasopharynx albeit with a detection limit corresponding to approximately 10(5 bacterial colony forming units (CFU in this region. Vaccination of mice with heat killed streptococci, or with SpyCEP led to a specific IgG response in the serum. BPI demonstrated that both vaccine candidates reduced S. pyogenes bioluminescence emission over the course of nasopharyngeal infection. The work suggests the potential for BPI to be used in the non-invasive longitudinal evaluation of potential S. pyogenes vaccines.

  16. Continuous non-invasive monitoring improves blood pressure stability in upright position: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benes, Jan; Simanova, Alena; Tovarnicka, Tereza; Sevcikova, Silvie; Kletecka, Jakub; Zatloukal, Jan; Pradl, Richard; Chytra, Ivan; Kasal, Eduard

    2015-02-01

    Intermittent blood pressure (BP) monitoring is the standard-of-care during low and intermediate risk anaesthesia, yet it could lead to delayed recognition of BP fluctuations. Perioperative hypotension is known to be associated with postoperative complications. Continuous, non-invasive methods for BP monitoring have been developed recently. We have tested a novel non-invasive, continuous monitor (using the volume clamp method) to assist with maintaining BP in safe ranges for patients undergoing surgery in a beach chair position. Forty adult patients undergoing thyroid gland surgery in an upright position were included in this prospective randomised controlled trial. Patients were equally allocated to the group with continuous monitoring of BP using the CNAP® Monitor and to the control group managed using an intermittent oscillometric BP cuff. The absolute and proportional time spent outside the range of ±20% of the target BP along with other hemodynamic and clinical parameters were evaluated. The continuous monitoring decreased the anaesthesia time spent below -20% pressure range [absolute: 12 min (4-20) vs. 27 min (16-34); p=0.001; relative to procedure length: 14% (7-20) vs. 33.5% (17.5-53); p=0.003]. No significant differences were observed in postoperative morbidity or in hospital length of stay. Continuous non-invasive BP monitoring via the CNAP® Monitor allows for better BP management in patients undergoing surgery in a beach chair position. In our randomised trial the time spent in hypotension was significantly shorter using continuous monitoring.

  17. Multi-scale simulations predict responses to non-invasive nerve root stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Hirata, Akimasa; Terao, Yasuo; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Established biophysical neurone models have achieved limited success in reproducing electrophysiological responses to non-invasive stimulation of the human nervous system. This is related to our insufficient knowledge of the induced electric currents inside the human body. Despite the numerous research and clinical applications of non-invasive stimulation, it is still unclear which internal sites are actually affected by it. Approach. We performed multi-scale computer simulations that, by making use of advances in computing power and numerical algorithms, combine a microscopic model of electrical excitation of neurones with a macroscopic electromagnetic model of the realistic whole-body anatomy. Main results. The simulations yield responses consistent with those experimentally recorded following magnetic and electrical motor root stimulation in human subjects, and reproduce the observed amplitudes and latencies for a wide variety of stimulation parameters. Significance. Our findings demonstrate that modern computational techniques can produce detailed predictions about which and where neurones are activated, leading to improved understanding of the physics and basic mechanisms of non-invasive stimulation and enabling potential new applications that make use of improved targeting of stimulation.

  18. Mid-Infrared Photoacoustic Detection of Glucose in Human Skin: Towards Non-Invasive Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Kottmann

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a widespread metabolic disease without cure. Great efforts are being made to develop a non-invasive monitoring of the blood glucose level. Various attempts have been made, including a number of non-optical approaches as well as optical techniques involving visible, near- and mid-infrared light. However, no true breakthrough has been achieved so far, i.e., there is no fully non-invasive monitoring device available. Here we present a new study based on mid-infrared spectroscopy and photoacoustic detection. We employ two setups, one with a fiber-coupled photoacoustic (PA cell and a tunable quantum cascade laser (QCL, and a second setup with two QCLs at different wavelengths combined with PA detection. In both cases, the PA cells are in direct skin contact. The performance is tested with an oral glucose tolerance test. While the first setup often gives reasonable qualitative agreement with ordinary invasive blood glucose measurements, the dual-wavelength approach yields a considerably improved stability and an uncertainty of only ±30 mg/dL of the blood glucose concentration level at a confidence level of 90%. This result is achieved without advanced data treatment such as principal component analysis involving extended wavelength ranges.

  19. Toenail as Non-invasive Biomarker in Metal Toxicity Measurement of Welding Fumes Exposure - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, S. F. Z.; Hariri, A.; Ma'arop, N. F.; Hussin, N. S. A. W.

    2017-01-01

    Workers are exposed to a variety of heavy metal pollutants that are released into the environment as a consequence of workplace activities. This chemical pollutants are incorporated into the human by varies of routes entry and can then be stored and distributed in different tissues, consequently have a potential to lead an adverse health effects and/or diseases. As to minimize the impact, a control measures should be taken to avoid these effects and human biological marker is a very effective tool in the assessment of occupational exposure and potential related risk as the results is normally accurate and reproducible. Toenail is the ideal matrix for most common heavy metals due to its reliability and practicality compared to other biological samples as well as it is a non-invasive and this appears as a huge advantage of toenail as a biomarker. This paper reviews studies that measure the heavy metals concentration in toenail as non-invasive matrix which later may adapt in the investigation of metal fume emitted from welding process. The development of new methodology and modern analytical techniques has allowed the use of toenail as non-invasive approach. The presence of a heavy metal in this matrix reflects an exposure but the correlations between heavy metal levels in the toenail must be established to ensure that these levels are related to the total body burden. These findings suggest that further studies on interactions of these heavy metals in metal fumes utilizing toenail biomarker endpoints are highly warranted especially among welders.

  20. Retinal functional imager (RFI): non-invasive functional imaging of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganekal, S

    2013-01-01

    Retinal functional imager (RFI) is a unique non-invasive functional imaging system with novel capabilities for visualizing the retina. The objective of this review was to show the utility of non-invasive functional imaging in various disorders. Electronic literature search was carried out using the websites www.pubmed.gov and www.google.com. The search words were retinal functional imager and non-invasive retinal imaging used in combination. The articles published or translated into English were studied. The RFI directly measures hemodynamic parameters such as retinal blood-flow velocity, oximetric state, metabolic responses to photic activation and generates capillary perfusion maps (CPM) that provides retinal vasculature detail similar to flourescein angiography. All of these parameters stand in a direct relationship to the function and therefore the health of the retina, and are known to be degraded in the course of retinal diseases. Detecting changes in retinal function aid early diagnosis and treatment as functional changes often precede structural changes in many retinal disorders. © NEPjOPH.

  1. Promoting social plasticity in developmental disorders with non-invasive brain stimulation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggio, Paulo S; Asthana, Manish K; Costa, Thiago L; Valasek, Cláudia A; Osório, Ana A C

    2015-01-01

    Being socially connected directly impacts our basic needs and survival. People with deficits in social cognition might exhibit abnormal behaviors and face many challenges in our highly social-dependent world. These challenges and limitations are associated with a substantial economical and subjective impact. As many conditions where social cognition is affected are highly prevalent, more treatments have to be developed. Based on recent research, we review studies where non-invasive neuromodulatory techniques have been used to promote Social Plasticity in developmental disorders. We focused on three populations where non-invasive brain stimulation seems to be a promising approach in inducing social plasticity: Schizophrenia, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Williams Syndrome (WS). There are still very few studies directly evaluating the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the social cognition of these populations. However, when considering the promising preliminary evidences presented in this review and the limited amount of clinical interventions available for treating social cognition deficits in these populations today, it is clear that the social neuroscientist arsenal may profit from non-invasive brain stimulation techniques for rehabilitation and promotion of social plasticity.

  2. Non-invasive prenatal detection of achondroplasia using circulating fetal DNA in maternal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ji Hyae; Kim, Mee Jin; Kim, Shin Young; Kim, Hye Ok; Song, Mee Jin; Kim, Min Hyoung; Park, So Yeon; Yang, Jae Hyug; Ryu, Hyun Mee

    2011-02-01

    To perform a reliable non-invasive detection of the fetal achondroplasia using maternal plasma. We developed a quantitative fluorescent-polymerase chain reaction (QF-PCR) method suitable for detection of the FGFR3 mutation (G1138A) causing achondroplasia. This method was applied in a non-invasive detection of the fetal achondroplasia using circulating fetal-DNA (cf-DNA) in maternal plasma. Maternal plasmas were obtained at 27 weeks of gestational age from women carrying an achondroplasia fetus or a normal fetus. Two percent or less achondroplasia DNA was reliably detected by QF-PCR. In a woman carrying a normal fetus, analysis of cf-DNA showed only one peak of the wild-type G allele. In a woman expected an achondroplasia fetus, analysis of cf-DNA showed the two peaks of wild-type G allele and mutant-type A allele and accurately detected the fetal achondroplasia. The non-invasive method using maternal plasma and QF-PCR may be useful for diagnosis of the fetal achondroplasia.

  3. Non-Invasive Monitoring of Streptococcus pyogenes Vaccine Efficacy Using Biophotonic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Faraz M.; Bateman, Colin; Turner, Claire E.; Wiles, Siouxsie; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes infection of the nasopharynx represents a key step in the pathogenic cycle of this organism and a major focus for vaccine development, requiring robust models to facilitate the screening of potentially protective antigens. One antigen that may be an important target for vaccination is the chemokine protease, SpyCEP, which is cell surface-associated and plays a role in pathogenesis. Biophotonic imaging (BPI) can non-invasively characterize the spatial location and abundance of bioluminescent bacteria in vivo. We have developed a bioluminescent derivative of a pharyngeal S. pyogenes strain by transformation of an emm75 clinical isolate with the luxABCDE operon. Evaluation of isogenic recombinant strains in vitro and in vivo confirmed that bioluminescence conferred a growth deficit that manifests as a fitness cost during infection. Notwithstanding this, bioluminescence expression permitted non-invasive longitudinal quantitation of S. pyogenes within the murine nasopharynx albeit with a detection limit corresponding to approximately 105 bacterial colony forming units (CFU) in this region. Vaccination of mice with heat killed streptococci, or with SpyCEP led to a specific IgG response in the serum. BPI demonstrated that both vaccine candidates reduced S. pyogenes bioluminescence emission over the course of nasopharyngeal infection. The work suggests the potential for BPI to be used in the non-invasive longitudinal evaluation of potential S. pyogenes vaccines. PMID:24278474

  4. Non-Invasive Cytology Brush PCR for the Diagnosis and Causative Species Identification of American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Braulio Mark Valencia; Nicolas Veland; Milena Alba; Vanessa Adaui; Jorge Arevalo; Low, Donald E.; Alejandro Llanos-Cuentas; Andrea K Boggild

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traditional methods of detecting Leishmania from cutaneous lesions involve invasive diagnostic procedures, such as scrapings, which cause discomfort, require technical expertise, and carry risks of invasive procedures. We compared the performance of 2 novel, molecular-based non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). METHODS: Consecutive patients presenting to the Leishmania Clinic at the Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia were enrolled. PCR was perform...

  5. Life-history characteristics of an age-validated established invasive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has been suggested that the invasive, omnivorous Clarias garipienus is capable of rapid invasions and long-term persistence in recently inhabited freshwater systems. To test this hypothesis, the life history of the established, extralimital Darlington Dam (33°10'31”S, 25°09'13”E) population was investigated. By counting ...

  6. Non-invasive screening method for simultaneous evaluation of in vivo growth factor release profiles from multiple ectopic bone tissue engineering implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempen, Diederik H.R.; Lu, Lichun; Classic, Kelly L.; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Creemers, Laura B.; Maran, Avudaiappan; Dhert, Wouter J.A.; Yaszemski, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a screening method based on scintillation probes for the simultaneous evaluation of in vivo growth factor release profiles of multiple implants in the same animal. First, we characterized the scintillation probes in a series of in vitro experiments to optimize the accuracy of the measurement setup. The scintillation probes were found to have a strong geometric dependence and experience saturation effects at high activities. In vitro simulation of 4 subcutaneous limb implants in a rat showed minimal interference of surrounding implants on local measurements at close to parallel positioning of the probes. These characteristics were taken into consideration for the design of the probe setup and in vivo experiment. The measurement setup was then validated in a rat subcutaneous implantation model using 4 different sustained release carriers loaded with 125I-BMP-2 per animal. The implants were removed after 42 or 84 days of implantation, for comparison of the non-invasive method to ex-vivo radioisotope counting. The non-invasive method demonstrated a good correlation with the ex-vivo counting method at both time-points of all 4 carriers. Overall, this study showed that scintillation probes could be successfully used for paired measurement of 4 release profiles with minimal interference of the surrounding implants, and may find use as non-invasive screening tools for various drug delivery applications. PMID:18554743

  7. Treatment of Non-Metastatic Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: AUA/ASCO/ASTRO/SUO Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sam S; Bochner, Bernard H; Chou, Roger; Dreicer, Robert; Kamat, Ashish M; Lerner, Seth P; Lotan, Yair; Meeks, Joshua J; Michalski, Jeff M; Morgan, Todd M; Quale, Diane Z; Rosenberg, Jonathan E; Zietman, Anthony L; Holzbeierlein, Jeffrey M

    2017-09-01

    This multidisciplinary, evidence-based guideline for clinically non-metastatic muscle-invasive bladder cancer focuses on the evaluation, treatment and surveillance of muscle-invasive bladder cancer guided toward curative intent. A systematic review utilizing research from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality as well as additional supplementation by the authors and consultant methodologists was used to develop the guideline. Evidence-based statements were based on body of evidence strengths Grade A, B or C and were designated as Strong, Moderate and Conditional Recommendations with additional statements presented in the form of Clinical Principles or Expert Opinions. For the first time for any type of malignancy, the American Urological Association, American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology and Society of Urologic Oncology have formulated an evidence-based guideline based on a risk-stratified clinical framework for the management of muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer. This document is designed to be used in conjunction with the associated treatment algorithm. The intensity and scope of care for muscle-invasive bladder cancer should focus on the patient, disease and treatment response characteristics. This guideline attempts to improve a clinician's ability to evaluate and treat each patient, but higher quality evidence in future trials will be essential to improve level of care for these patients. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy: current status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, P; Cuckle, H; Pergament, E

    2013-07-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for aneuploidy using cell-free DNA in maternal plasma is revolutionizing prenatal screening and diagnosis. We review NIPT in the context of established screening and invasive technologies, the range of cytogenetic abnormalities detectable, cost, counseling and ethical issues. Current NIPT approaches involve whole-genome sequencing, targeted sequencing and assessment of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) differences between mother and fetus. Clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of NIPT for Down and Edwards syndromes, and possibly Patau syndrome, in high-risk women. Universal NIPT is not cost-effective, but using NIPT contingently in women found at moderate or high risk by conventional screening is cost-effective. Positive NIPT results must be confirmed using invasive techniques. Established screening, fetal ultrasound and invasive procedures with microarray testing allow the detection of a broad range of additional abnormalities not yet detectable by NIPT. NIPT approaches that take advantage of SNP information potentially allow the identification of parent of origin for imbalances, triploidy, uniparental disomy and consanguinity, and separate evaluation of dizygotic twins. Fetal fraction enrichment, improved sequencing and selected analysis of the most informative sequences should result in tests for additional chromosomal abnormalities. Providing adequate prenatal counseling poses a substantial challenge given the broad range of prenatal testing options now available. Copyright © 2013 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Non-invasive prenatal determination of fetal sex: translating research into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M; Finning, K; Martin, P; Hogg, J; Meaney, C; Norbury, G; Daniels, G; Chitty, L S

    2011-07-01

    The effectiveness and clinical utility of non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) for fetal sex determination using cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) was assessed by undertaking a prospective national audit of UK testing. NIPD was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of the DYS14 or SRY gene in cffDNA extracted from maternal plasma. All cases referred for fetal sex determination from 1 April 2006 to 31 March 2009 were ascertained from two laboratories offering the test. Fetal gender determined by NIPD was compared with that based on ultrasound, invasive test or phenotype at birth. Indication and rate of invasive testing was ascertained. In the first year, results were issued in 150/161 pregnancies tested. Of the 135 with outcome data, results were concordant in 130/135 [96.3% (95% CI 91.6-98.8%)]. Reporting criteria were changed and in the subsequent 511 pregnancies the concordancy rate increased to 401/403 [99.5% (95% CI 98.2-99.9%)]. Over the 3 years only 32.9% (174/528) underwent invasive testing. NIPD for fetal sex determination using cffDNA is highly accurate when performed in National Health Service laboratories if stringent reporting criteria are applied. Parents should be advised of the small risk of discordant results and possible need for repeat testing to resolve inconclusive results. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Comparison of high-definition oscillometry -- a non-invasive technology for arterial blood pressure measurement -- with a direct invasive method using radio-telemetry in awake healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Eric; Egner, Beate; Brown, Scott A; King, Jonathan N; Laveissiere, Arnaud; Champeroux, Pascal; Richard, Serge

    2013-12-01

    This study compared indirect blood pressure measurements using a non-invasive method, high-definition oscillometry (HDO), with direct measurements using a radio-telemetry device in awake cats. Paired measurements partitioned to five sub-ranges were collected in six cats using both methods. The results were analysed for assessment of correlation and agreement between the two methods, taking into account all pressure ranges, and with data separated in three sub-groups, low, normal and high ranges of systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure. SBP data displayed a mean correlation coefficient of 0.92 ± 0.02 that was reduced for low SBP. The agreement level evaluated from the whole data set was high and slightly reduced for low SBP values. The mean correlation coefficient of DBP was lower than for SBP (ie, 0.81 ± 0.02). The bias for DBP between the two methods was 22.3 ± 1.6 mmHg, suggesting that HDO produced lower values than telemetry. These results suggest that HDO met the validation criteria defined by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine consensus panel and provided a faithful measurement of SBP in conscious cats. For DBP, results suggest that HDO tended to underestimate DBP. This finding is clearly inconsistent with the good agreement reported in dogs, but is similar to outcomes achieved in marmosets and cynomolgus monkeys, suggesting that this is not related to HDO but is species related. The data support that the HDO is the first and only validated non-invasive blood pressure device and, as such, it is the only non-invasive reference technique that should be used in future validation studies.

  11. Prediction of human core body temperature using non-invasive measurement methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermann, Reto; Wyss, Eva; Annaheim, Simon; Psikuta, Agnes; Davey, Sarah; Rossi, René Michel

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of core body temperature is an efficient method for monitoring heat stress amongst workers in hot conditions. However, invasive measurement of core body temperature (e.g. rectal, intestinal, oesophageal temperature) is impractical for such applications. Therefore, the aim of this study was to define relevant non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature under various conditions. We conducted two human subject studies with different experimental protocols, different environmental temperatures (10 °C, 30 °C) and different subjects. In both studies the same non-invasive measurement methods (skin temperature, skin heat flux, heart rate) were applied. A principle component analysis was conducted to extract independent factors, which were then used in a linear regression model. We identified six parameters (three skin temperatures, two skin heat fluxes and heart rate), which were included for the calculation of two factors. The predictive value of these factors for core body temperature was evaluated by a multiple regression analysis. The calculated root mean square deviation (rmsd) was in the range from 0.28 °C to 0.34 °C for all environmental conditions. These errors are similar to previous models using non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature. The results from this study illustrate that multiple physiological parameters (e.g. skin temperature and skin heat fluxes) are needed to predict core body temperature. In addition, the physiological measurements chosen in this study and the algorithm defined in this work are potentially applicable as real-time core body temperature monitoring to assess health risk in broad range of working conditions.

  12. Prediction of human core body temperature using non-invasive measurement methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermann, Reto; Wyss, Eva; Annaheim, Simon; Psikuta, Agnes; Davey, Sarah; Rossi, René Michel

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of core body temperature is an efficient method for monitoring heat stress amongst workers in hot conditions. However, invasive measurement of core body temperature (e.g. rectal, intestinal, oesophageal temperature) is impractical for such applications. Therefore, the aim of this study was to define relevant non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature under various conditions. We conducted two human subject studies with different experimental protocols, different environmental temperatures (10 °C, 30 °C) and different subjects. In both studies the same non-invasive measurement methods (skin temperature, skin heat flux, heart rate) were applied. A principle component analysis was conducted to extract independent factors, which were then used in a linear regression model. We identified six parameters (three skin temperatures, two skin heat fluxes and heart rate), which were included for the calculation of two factors. The predictive value of these factors for core body temperature was evaluated by a multiple regression analysis. The calculated root mean square deviation (rmsd) was in the range from 0.28 °C to 0.34 °C for all environmental conditions. These errors are similar to previous models using non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature. The results from this study illustrate that multiple physiological parameters (e.g. skin temperature and skin heat fluxes) are needed to predict core body temperature. In addition, the physiological measurements chosen in this study and the algorithm defined in this work are potentially applicable as real-time core body temperature monitoring to assess health risk in broad range of working conditions.

  13. Automated non-invasive measurement of cardiac output: comparison of electrical bioimpedance and carbon dioxide rebreathing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S A; Russell, A E; West, M J; Chalmers, J

    1988-01-01

    Two commercial automated, non-invasive systems for estimation of cardiac output were evaluated. Values of cardiac output obtained by electrical bioimpedance cardiography (BoMed NCCOM3 machine) were compared with values derived from an indirect Fick technique that uses carbon dioxide rebreathing (Gould 9000 IV system) during 103 simultaneous measurements made at rest in 19 randomly selected subjects and on exercise in 11 subjects. Cardiac output values obtained with impedance cardiography were significantly correlated with those measured by the indirect Fick method, although there was a wide scatter with over 73% of the readings lying outside the limits defined by the line of identity +/- 20%. This correlation was greatly reduced when stroke volume index was used instead of cardiac output. Indirect Fick results were linearly related to oxygen uptake both at rest and on exercise, while impedance cardiography results did not correlate with oxygen uptake. Impedance cardiography gave consistently lower results for cardiac output than indirect Fick at all levels of exercise. Both machines were easy to use and produced acceptable mean (SE) coefficients of variation (BoMed NCCOM3 7.7 (1.0)%, Gould 9000 IV 10.6 (1.4)%). Further validation is required before either of these machines can be recommended as an alternative to invasive monitoring in clinical practice. PMID:3128316

  14. Comparison of non-invasive and implanted telemetric measurement of blood pressure and electrocardiogram in conscious beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Gemma; Milliken, Phil; Patel, Bela; McMahon, Nick

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of a non-invasive telemetry monitoring system to detect and quantify changes in blood pressure and electrocardiogram (ECG) parameters in response to vehicle, L-NAME or minoxidil administration to freely moving beagle dogs. Data from a non-invasive telemetry monitoring system were compared to data captured from an invasive telemetry implant in the same animals. Blood pressure and ECG data were simultaneously acquired from male dogs using a non-invasive and an invasive implanted telemetry system for 2 hours predose and 24 hours post dosing with vehicle (n=5), minoxidil at 1 mg/kg (n=4) and L-NAME at 10 mg/kg (n=5) on separate test days. Values for mean blood pressure, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, heart rate, RR, PR, QRS, QT and QTcL (heart rate corrected QT interval) interval were reported for both methods. Statistically significant reductions in blood pressure and pulse pressure and increases in heart rate, with associated ECG interval changes were apparent following dosing with minoxidil using both methods. Statistically significant increases in blood pressure and pulse pressure were apparent following dosing with L-NAME when using the invasive telemetry system, changes were apparent when using the non-invasive telemetry system, however, no change was apparent for pulse pressure, they were of shorter duration and not statistically significant. Statistically significant decreases in heart rate, with associated changes in ECG intervals, were apparent following treatment with L-NAME for both invasive and non-invasive methods. This study shows that the non-invasive system can be successfully used to acquire both ECG and blood pressure data in freely moving jacketed dogs for at least 26 hours, yet requires further technique refinement to improve system sensitivity to detect smaller changes in blood pressure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Diagnostic performance and costs of contingent screening models for trisomy 21 incorporating non-invasive prenatal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Susannah; O'Leary, Peter; Dickinson, Jan E; Suthers, Graeme K

    2017-08-01

    Contingent screening for trisomy 21 using non-invasive prenatal testing has the potential to reduce invasive diagnostic testing and increase the detection of trisomy 21. To describe the diagnostic and economic performance of prenatal screening models for trisomy 21 that use non-invasive prenatal testing as a contingent screen across a range of combined first trimester screening risk cut-offs from a public health system perspective. Using a hypothetical cohort of 300 000 pregnancies, we modelled the outcomes of 25 contingent non-invasive prenatal testing screening models and compared these to conventional screening, offering women with a high-risk (1 > 300) combined first trimester screening result an invasive test. The 25 models used a range of risk cut-offs. High-risk women were offered invasive testing. Intermediate-risk women were offered non-invasive prenatal testing. We report the cost of each model, detection rate, costs per diagnosis, invasive tests per diagnosis and the number of fetal losses per diagnosis. The cost per prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 21 using the conventional model was $51 876 compared to the contingent models which varied from $49 309-66 686. The number of diagnoses and cost per diagnosis increased as the intermediate-risk threshold was lowered. Results were sensitive to trisomy 21 incidence, uptake of testing and cost of non-invasive prenatal testing. Contingent non-invasive prenatal testing models using more sensitive combined first trimester screening risk cut-offs than conventional screening improved the detection rate of trisomy 21, reduced procedure-related fetal loss and could potentially be provided at a lower cost per diagnosis than conventional screening. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  16. Use of non-invasive ventilation is increasing in patients admitted with a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøttenborg, Sandra Søgaard; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich

    2013-01-01

    A nationwide chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) quality improvement programme--DrCOPD--was initiated in Denmark in 2008. We examined subsequent national and regional trends in the use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and trends in mortality following NIV and invasive mechanical...... ventilation among patients acutely admitted with a COPD exacerbation....

  17. Non-invasive continuous finger blood pressure measurement during orthostatic stress compared to intra-arterial pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imholz, B. P.; Settels, J. J.; van der Meiracker, A. H.; Wesseling, K. H.; Wieling, W.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether invasive blood pressure responses to orthostatic stress can be replaced by non-invasive continuous finger blood pressure responses. DESIGN - Intrabrachial and Finapres blood pressures were simultaneously measured during passive head up tilt and during

  18. Trial by Dutch laboratories for evaluation of non-invasive prenatal testing. Part II-women's perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schendel, R.V. van; Page-Christiaens, G.C.; Beulen, L.; Bilardo, C.M.; Boer, M.A. de; Coumans, A.B.; Faas, B.H.W.; Langen, I.M. van; Lichtenbelt, K.D.; Maarle, M.C. van; Macville, M.V.; Oepkes, D.; Pajkrt, E.; Henneman, L.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate preferences and decision-making among high-risk pregnant women offered a choice between Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT), invasive testing or no further testing. METHODS: Nationwide implementation study (TRIDENT) offering NIPT as contingent screening test for women at

  19. Epidemiological and molecular analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes isolates causing invasive disease in Spain (1998-2009): comparison with non-invasive isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, M; Ardanuy, C; Tamayo, E; Domènech, A; Liñares, J; Pérez-Trallero, E

    2011-10-01

    The incidence, clinical manifestations, and circulating clones involved in Streptococcus pyogenes invasive disease was analyzed in two regions of Spain between 1998 and 2009. The annual average incidence of invasive disease was 2 episodes per 100,000 inhabitants (3.1 for children and 1.9 for adults). The most frequent clinical manifestations were cellulitis (41.3%), bacteremia without focus (19.0%), streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (12.6%), and pneumonia (7.7%). Among 247 invasive isolates analyzed, the most prevalent clones were emm1/ST28 (27.9%), emm3/ST15-406 (9.8%), and emm4/ST39 (6.5%). The emm1/ST28 clone was the only clone detected each year throughout the study period and was associated with more than one third of all fatal outcomes. When invasive isolates were compared with 1,189 non-invasive isolates, the emm1/ST28 clone was significantly associated with invasive disease. The speA and ssa genes were more frequent among invasive emm1 and emm4 isolates, respectively. Forty-two (17%) invasive isolates were resistant to erythromycin (21 harbored the mef gene and 21 the ermB or ermA genes). Twenty-two (8.9%) isolates had reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] 2-8 μg/mL) and 32 (13%) were tetracycline-resistant (tetM or tetO gene). In conclusion, the emm1 type was overrepresented among invasive cases and was associated with high mortality rates.

  20. Retrospective cine 3He ventilation imaging under spontaneous breathing conditions: a non-invasive protocol for small-animal lung function imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupar, Vasile; Canet-Soulas, Emmanuelle; Gaillard, Sophie; Alsaid, Hasan; Beckmann, Nicolau; Crémillieux, Yannick

    2007-04-01

    A non-invasive and free-breathing hyperpolarized (HP) (3)He imaging protocol for small animals was implemented and validated on rats for lung function imaging. Animals were allowed to breathe a mixture of air and (3)He from a mask and a gas reservoir fitted to their heads. Radial imaging sequences were used, and MRI signal intensity changes were monitored for retrospective cine image reconstruction. The ventilation cycle of the animals was imaged with a 100 ms temporal resolution. The sliding window imaging technique was applied to reconstruct 5 ms time-shifted image series covering the complete breathing cycle. Image series were processed to extract quantitative ventilation parameters such as the gas arrival time. The reproducibility and the non-invasiveness of this ventilation imaging protocol were evaluated by multiple acquisitions on the same animals. c 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Clinical, social and ethical issues associated with non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Blanche; Edwards, Samantha; Chitty, Lyn S; Lewis, Celine

    2017-02-09

    Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT), based on analysis of cell-free foetal DNA, is rapidly becoming a preferred method to screen for chromosomal aneuploidy with the technology now available in over 90 countries. This review provides an up-to-date discussion of the key clinical, social and ethical implications associated with this revolutionary technology. Stakeholders are positive about a test that is highly accurate, safe, can be perfomed early in pregnancy, identifies affected pregnancies that might otherwise have been missed and reduces the need for invasive testing. Nevertheless, professional societies currently recommend it as an advanced screening test due to the low false positive rate (FPR). Despite the practical and psychological benefits, a number of concerns have been raised which warrant attention. These include the potential for routinisation of testing and subsequent impact on informed decision-making, an "easy" blood test inadvertently contributing to women feeling pressured to take the test, fears NIPT will lead to less tolerance and support for those living with Down syndrome and the heightened expectation of having "perfect babies". These issues can be addressed to some extent through clinician education, patient information and establishing national and international consensus in the development of comprehensive and regularly updated guidelines. As the number of conditions we are able to test for non-invasively expands it will be increasingly important to ensure pre-test counselling can be delivered effectively supported by knowledgeable healthcare professionals.

  2. Trends in Nanomaterial-Based Non-Invasive Diabetes Sensing Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Makaram

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Blood glucose monitoring is considered the gold standard for diabetes diagnostics and self-monitoring. However, the underlying process is invasive and highly uncomfortable for patients. Furthermore, the process must be completed several times a day to successfully manage the disease, which greatly contributes to the massive need for non-invasive monitoring options. Human serums, such as saliva, sweat, breath, urine and tears, contain traces of glucose and are easily accessible. Therefore, they allow minimal to non-invasive glucose monitoring, making them attractive alternatives to blood measurements. Numerous developments regarding noninvasive glucose detection techniques have taken place over the years, but recently, they have gained recognition as viable alternatives, due to the advent of nanotechnology-based sensors. Such sensors are optimal for testing the amount of glucose in serums other than blood thanks to their enhanced sensitivity and selectivity ranges, in addition to their size and compatibility with electronic circuitry. These nanotechnology approaches are rapidly evolving, and new techniques are constantly emerging. Hence, this manuscript aims to review current and future nanomaterial-based technologies utilizing saliva, sweat, breath and tears as a diagnostic medium for diabetes monitoring.

  3. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR promotes carcinogenesis and invasion of gastric adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Na Keum; Lee, Jung Hwa; Park, Chan Hyuk; Yu, Dayeon; Lee, Yong Chan [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Jae-Ho; Noh, Sung Hoon [Department of Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Kil, E-mail: sklee@yuhs.ac [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • HOTAIR expression was tested in fifty patients with gastric cancer. • Cell proliferation was measured after HOTAIR silencing in gastric cancer cell line. • siRNA–HOTAIR suppresses cell invasiveness and capacity of migration. • Knock down of HOTAR leads to decreased expression of EMT markers. • Inhibition of HOTAIR induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. - Abstract: Gastric cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide; however, the mechanism of carcinogenesis is complex and poorly understood. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR (HOX transcript antisense RNA) recently emerged as a promoter of metastasis in various cancers including gastric cancer. Here we investigated the impact of HOTAIR on apoptosis, cell proliferation and cell cycle to dissect the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. We examined the mechanism of invasion and metastasis and analyzed the clinical significance of HOTAIR. Downregulation of HOTAIR was confirmed by two different siRNAs. The expression of HOTAIR was significantly elevated in various gastric cancer cell lines and tissues compared to normal control. si-HOTAIR significantly reduced viability in MKN 28, MKN 74, and KATO III cells but not in AGS cells. si-HOTAIR induced apoptosis in KATO III cells. Lymphovascular invasion and lymph node metastasis were more common in the high level of HOTAIR group. si-HOTAIR significantly decreased invasiveness and migration. si-HOTAIR led to differential expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition markers. We found that HOTAIR was involved in inhibition of apoptosis and promoted invasiveness, supporting a role for HOTAIR in carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer.

  4. Investigation of opportunities of the optical non-invasive diagnostics method for the blood sugar control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastovskaia, Elena A.; Gorbunova, Elena V.; Chertov, Aleksandr N.; Korotaev, Valery V.

    2015-03-01

    The relevance of noninvasive method for determining the blood sugar is caused by necessity of regular monitoring of glucose levels in diabetic patients blood. Traditional invasive method is painful, because it requires a finger pricking. Despite the active studies in the field of non-invasive medical diagnostics, to date the painless and inexpensive instrument for blood sugar control for personal use doesn't exist. It's possible to measure the concentration of glucose in the blood with help of spectrophotometry method. It consists of registering and analyzing the spectral characteristics of the radiation which missed, reflected or absorbed by the object. The authors proposed a measuring scheme for studying the spectral characteristics of the radiation, missed by earlobe. Ultra-violet, visible and near infrared spectral ranges are considered. The paper presents the description of construction and working principles of the proposed special retaining clip and results of experiment with real patient.

  5. Towards Non-Invasive Extraction and Determination of Blood Glucose Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Catherine; Salvetti, Paola; Naylor, Katy; Albatat, Mohammad

    2017-09-27

    Diabetes is a condition where the body is incapable of proper utilization of glucose and one that, if not properly managed, can lead to critical illness. Glucose monitoring and decision support is vital in avoiding potential adverse health effects. Current methods mainly involve invasive blood extraction for the purposes of blood glucose level notification, yet such methods rely on active user participation and subjective interpretation of the result. This paper reviews existing research in methods of extraction and monitoring of glucose levels. The purpose of this paper is to examine blood glucose extraction methods in addition to indicators of blood glucose level, toward development of an innovative, non-invasive extraction technology. Decision support methods are also analyzed toward customized, automated, and intelligent diabetic management.

  6. Non-invasive continuous blood pressure monitoring: a review of current applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Elena; Chen, Guo; Alexander, Brenton; Cannesson, Maxime

    2013-03-01

    Blood pressure monitoring has come a long way from the initial observations made by Reverend Hales in the 18th century. There are none that deny the importance of monitoring perioperative blood pressure; however, the limited ability of the current prevalent technology (oscillometric blood pressure monitoring) to offer continuous blood pressure measurements leaves room for improvement. Invasive monitoring is able to detect beat-to-beat blood pressure measurement, but the risks inherent to the procedure make it unsuitable for routine use except when this risk is outweighed by the benefits. This review focuses on the discoveries which have led up to the current blood pressure monitoring technologies, and especially the creation of those offering non-invasive but continuous blood pressure monitoring capabilities, including their methods of measurement and limitations.

  7. Non-opioid pain management in benign minimally invasive hysterectomy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Emily; Lamvu, Georgine; Patanwala, Insiyyah; Barron, Kenneth I; Witzeman, Kathryn; Tu, Frank F; As-Sanie, Sawsan

    2017-06-01

    Less postoperative pain typically is associated with a minimally invasive hysterectomy compared with a laparotomy approach; however, poor pain control can still be an issue. Multiple guidelines exist for managing postoperative pain, yet most are not specialty-specific and are based on procedures that bear little relevance to a minimally invasive hysterectomy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is enough quality evidence within the benign gynecology literature to make non-opioid pain control recommendations for women who undergo a benign minimally invasive hysterectomy. We queried PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Cochrane databases using MeSH terms: "postoperative pain," "perioperative pain," "postoperative analgesia," "pain management," "pain control," "minimally invasive gynecologic surgery," and "hysterectomy." A manual examination of references from identified studies was also performed. All PubMed published studies that involved minimally invasive hysterectomies through November 9, 2016, were included. This systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Studies were restricted to benign minimally invasive hysterectomies evaluating non-opioid pharmacologic therapies. Primary outcomes included amount of postoperative analgesics consumed and postoperative pain scores. Two reviewers independently completed an in-depth evaluation of each study for characteristics and results using an established database, according to inclusion/exclusion criteria. A risk assessment was performed, and a quality rating was assigned with the use of the Cochrane Collaboration's Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. Initially 1155 studies were identified, and 24 studies met all inclusion criteria. Based on limited data of varying quality, intravenous acetaminophen, anticonvulsants and dexamethasone demonstrate opioid-sparing benefits; ketorolac shows

  8. Zero-Heat-Flux Thermometry for Non-Invasive Measurement of Core Body Temperature in Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guschlbauer, Maria; Maul, Alexandra C; Yan, Xiaowei; Herff, Holger; Annecke, Thorsten; Sterner-Kock, Anja; Böttiger, Bernd W; Schroeder, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia is a severe, unpleasant side effect during general anesthesia. Thus, temperature surveillance is a prerequisite in general anesthesia settings during experimental surgeries. The gold standard to measure the core body temperature (Tcore) is placement of a Swan-Ganz catheter in the pulmonary artery, which is a highly invasive procedure. Therefore, Tcore is commonly examined in the urine bladder and rectum. However, these procedures are known for their inaccuracy and delayed record of temperatures. Zero-heat-flux (ZHF) thermometry is an alternative, non-invasive method quantifying Tcore in human patients by applying a thermosensoric patch to the lateral forehead. Since the porcine cranial anatomy is different to the human's, the optimal location of the patch remains unclear to date. The aim was to compare three different patch locations of ZHF thermometry in a porcine hypothermia model. Hypothermia (33.0 °C Tcore) was conducted in 11 anesthetized female pigs (26-30 kg). Tcore was measured continuously by an invasive Swan-Ganz catheter in the pulmonary artery (Tpulm). A ZHF thermometry device was mounted on three different defined locations. The smallest average difference between Tpulm and TZHF during stable temperatures was 0.21 ± 0.16 °C at location A, where the patch was placed directly behind the eye. Also during rapidly changing temperatures location A showed the smallest bias with 0.48 ± 0.29 °C. Location A provided the most reliable data for Tcore. Therefore, the ZHF thermometry patch should be placed directly behind the left temporal corner of the eye to provide a non-invasive method for accurate measurement of Tcore in pigs.

  9. An invasion risk map for non-native aquatic macrophytes of the Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argantonio Rodríguez-Merino

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater systems are particularly susceptible to non-native organisms, owing to their high sensitivity to the impacts that are caused by these organisms. Species distribution models, which are based on both environmental and socio-economic variables, facilitate the identification of the most vulnerable areas for the spread of non-native species. We used MaxEnt to predict the potential distribution of 20 non-native aquatic macrophytes in the Iberian Peninsula. Some selected variables, such as the temperature seasonality and the precipitation in the driest quarter, highlight the importance of the climate on their distribution. Notably, the human influence in the territory appears as a key variable in the distribution of studied species. The model discriminated between favorable and unfavorable areas with high accuracy. We used the model to build an invasion risk map of aquatic macrophytes for the Iberian Peninsula that included results from 20 individual models. It showed that the most vulnerable areas are located near to the sea, the major rivers basins, and the high population density areas. These facts suggest the importance of the human impact on the colonization and distribution of non-native aquatic macrophytes in the Iberian Peninsula, and more precisely agricultural development during the Green Revolution at the end of the 70’s. Our work also emphasizes the utility of species distribution models for the prevention and management of biological invasions.

  10. miRandola 2017: a curated knowledge base of non-invasive biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, Francesco; Di Bella, Sebastiano; Vannini, Federica

    2018-01-01

    miRandola (http://mirandola.iit.cnr.it/) is a database of extracellular non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that was initially published in 2012, foreseeing the relevance of ncRNAs as non-invasive biomarkers. An increasing amount of experimental evidence shows that ncRNAs are frequently dysregulated in dise...... on their extracellular form: Argonaute2 protein, exosome, microvesicle, microparticle, membrane vesicle, high density lipoprotein and circulating. We also implemented a new web interface to improve the user experience.......miRandola (http://mirandola.iit.cnr.it/) is a database of extracellular non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that was initially published in 2012, foreseeing the relevance of ncRNAs as non-invasive biomarkers. An increasing amount of experimental evidence shows that ncRNAs are frequently dysregulated...... in diseases. Further, ncRNAs have been discovered in different extracellular forms, such as exosomes, which circulate in human body fluids. Thus, miRandola 2017 is an effort to update and collect the accumulating information on extracellular ncRNAs that is spread across scientific publications and different...

  11. Does non-invasive brain stimulation improve cognition in major depressive disorder? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortella, Gabriel; Selingardi, Priscila M L; Moreno, Marina L; Veronezi, Beatriz P; Brunoni, Andre R

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques, such as repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), have been increasingly used in different contexts to improve cognitive performance and ameliorate depression symptoms. Considering that major depression is usually accompanied by cognitive deficits, NIBS technique could be also helpful to improve cognition in depressed patients. In this systematic review, we researched for articles published in PubMed/MEDLINE from the first date available to June 2014 that assessed cognitive performance in patients with depression before and after NIBS. Out of 191 references, 25 (16 for rTMS and 9 for tDCS) studies matched our eligibility criteria. Non-invasive brain stimulation interventions, such as rTMS and tDCS seem to be a promising tool for cognitive enhancement in MDD, although several issues and biases (e.g., blinding issues, tests without correction for multiple comparisons, placebo effects and exploratory analyses, practice effects) hinder us to conclude that NIBS technique improve cognition in patients with depression. We discussed possible shortcomings of the included studies, such as the use of different depression treatment protocols, the possibility that some findings were false-positive results of the employed cognitive tasks and whether cognition improvement could have been an epiphenomenon secondary to depression improvement. To conclude, whereas these non-pharmacological, non-invasive techniques are particularly appealing for cognitive improvement in depression, further studies are still warranted to disentangle whether NIBS technique induce positive effects on cognition beyond their antidepressant effects.

  12. Prognostic significance of fluorescent in situ hybridisation in the follow-up of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maffezzini, Massimo; Campodonico, Fabio; Capponi, Giacomo; Canepa, Giorgio; Casazza, Stefania; Bandelloni, Roberto; Tamagno, Stefania; Puntoni, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the potential contribution of a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) as prognostic indicator of the risk of recurrence or progression in patients undergoing follow-up for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer...

  13. Proposed Application of Fast Fourier Transform in Near Infra Red Based Non Invasive Blood Glucose Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenie, R. P.; Iskandar, J.; Kurniawan, A.; Rustami, E.; Syafutra, H.; Nurdin, N. M.; Handoyo, T.; Prabowo, J.; Febryarto, R.; Rahayu, M. S. K.; Damayanthi, E.; Rimbawan; Sukandar, D.; Suryana, Y.; Irzaman; Alatas, H.

    2017-03-01

    Worldwide emergence of glycaemic status related health disorders, such as diabetes and metabolic syndrome, is growing in alarming rate. The objective was to propose new methods for non invasive blood glucose level measurement system, based on implementation of Fast Fourier Transform methods. This was an initial-lab-scale-research. Data on non invasive blood glucose measurement are referred from Scopus, Medline, and Google Scholar, from 2011 until 2016, and was used as design references, combined with in house verification. System was developed in modular fashion, based on aforementioned compiled references. Several preliminary tests to understand relationship between LED and photo-diode responses have been done. Several references were used as non invasive blood glucose measurement tools design basis. Solution is developed in modular fashion. we have proven different sensor responses to water and glucose. Human test for non invasive blood glucose level measurement system is needed.

  14. Evaluation of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for aneuploidy in an NHS setting: a reliable accurate prenatal non-invasive diagnosis (RAPID) protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Melissa; Wright, David; Daley, Rebecca; Lewis, Celine; McKay, Fiona; Mason, Sarah; Lench, Nicholas; Howarth, Abigail; Boustred, Christopher; Lo, Kitty; Plagnol, Vincent; Spencer, Kevin; Fisher, Jane; Kroese, Mark; Morris, Stephen; Chitty, Lyn S

    2014-07-16

    Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for aneuploidies is now available through commercial companies in many countries, including through private practice in the United Kingdom (UK). Thorough evaluation of service delivery requirements are needed to facilitate NIPT being offered more widely within state funded healthcare systems such as the UK's National Health Service (NHS). Successful implementation will require the development of laboratory standards, consideration of stakeholder views, an analysis of costs and development of patient and health professional educational materials. NIPT will be offered in an NHS setting as a contingent screening test. Pregnant woman will be recruited through six maternity units in England and Scotland. Women eligible for Down's syndrome screening (DSS) will be informed about the study at the time of booking. Women that choose routine DSS will be offered NIPT if they have a screening risk ≥ 1:1000. NIPT results for trisomy 21, 18, 13 will be reported within 7-10 working days. Data on DSS, NIPT and invasive testing uptake, pregnancy outcomes and test efficacy will be collected. Additional data will be gathered though questionnaires to a) determine acceptability to patients and health professionals, b) evaluate patient and health professional education, c) assess informed choice in women accepting or declining testing and d) gauge family expenses. Qualitative interviews will also be conducted with a sub-set of participating women and health professionals. The results of this study will make a significant contribution to policy decisions around the implementation of NIPT for aneuploidies within the UK NHS. The laboratory standards for testing and reporting, education materials and counselling strategies developed as part of the study are likely to underpin the introduction of NIPT into NHS practice. 13865.

  15. A Lab-on-a-Chip-Based Non-Invasive Optical Sensor for Measuring Glucose in Saliva

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Dong Geon; Jung, Daewoong; Kong, Seong Ho

    2017-01-01

    A lab-on-a-chip (LOC)-based non-invasive optical sensor for measuring glucose in saliva was fabricated. Existing glucose sensors utilizing blood require acquisition of a blood sample by pricking the finger, which is painful and inconvenient. To overcome these limitations, we propose a non-invasive glucose sensor with LOC, micro-electro-mechanical system and optical measurement technology. The proposed sensor for measuring glucose in saliva involves pretreatment, mixing, and measurement on a s...

  16. Non-destructive and non-invasive analyses shed light on the realization technique of ancient polychrome prints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striová, Jana; Coccolini, Gabriele; Micheli, Sara; Lofrumento, Cristiana; Galeotti, Monica; Cagnini, Andrea; Castellucci, Emilio Mario

    2009-08-01

    Five polychrome prints representing famous painters, such as Albrecht Dürer, were analyzed using a non-destructive and non-invasive methodology as required by the artwork typology. The diagnostic strategy includes X-ray fluorescence (XRF), reflectance micro-infrared (microFTIR) and micro-Raman (microRaman) spectroscopy. These prints were realized with a la poupée method that involves application of the polychrome inks on a single copper plate, before the printing process. A broad range of compounds (i.e., cinnabar, red lead, white lead, umber earth, hydrated calcium sulfate, calcium carbonate, amorphous carbon, and Prussian blue) was employed as chalcographic inks, using linseed oil as a binding medium. Gamboge was identified in the delicate finishing brush touches realized in watercolor.

  17. Biochemical non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis cannot replace biopsy in HIV-HCV coinfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliemann, Dimas A; Wolff, Fernando H; Tovo, Cristiane V; Alencastro, Paulo R; Ikeda, Maria L R; Brandão, Ajácio B M; Barcellos, Nêmora; Fuchs, Sandra C

    2016-01-01

    The liver biopsy has been considered the gold standard for the diagnosis and quantification of fibrosis. However, this method presents limitations. In addition, the non-invasive evaluation of liver fibrosis is a challenge. The aim of this study was to validate the fibrosis cirrhosis index (FCI) index in a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfected patients, and compare to AST/ALT ratio (AAR), AST to platelet ratio index (APRI) and FIB-4 scores, as a tool for the assessment of liver fibrosis in coinfected patients. Retrospective cross sectional study including 92 HIV-HCV coinfected patients evaluated in two reference centers for HIV treatment in the Public Health System in Southern Brazil. Patients who underwent liver biopsy for any indication and had concomitant laboratory data in the 3 months prior to liver biopsy, to allow the calculation of studied noninvasive markers (AAR, APRI, FIB-4 and FCI) were included. APRI 1.5 presents the best negative predictive value and FCI > 1.25 the best specificity to detect significant fibrosis. The values of noninvasive markers for each Metavir fibrosis stage showed statistically significant differences only for APRI. In conclusion, until better noninvasive markers for liver fibrosis are developed and validated for HIV-HCV coinfected patients, noninvasive serum markers should be used carefully in this population.

  18. In vivo imaging of enamel by reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM): non-invasive analysis of dental surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contaldo, Maria; Serpico, Rosario; Lucchese, Alberta

    2014-07-01

    The aim is to establish the feasibility to image in vivo microscopic dental surface by non-invasive, real-time, en face Reflectance Confocal Microscopy (RCM). Fifteen healthy volunteers referred at the Multidisciplinary Department of Medical-Surgical and Odontostomatological Specialties, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy, were enrolled. A commercially available hand-held RCM (Vivascope(®)3000, Lucid, Rochester, NY, USA) was used to image in vivo the dental surface of the upper right and left central incisors of each volunteer. Totally, thirty vestibular surfaces of upper central incisors were imaged in vivo by RCM to preliminary image the dental surface and assess the feasibility of a more extended study on teeth. In vivo RCM was able to image the dental surface within the enamel, at a maximum depth imaging of 300 μm, with images good in quality and the capability to detect enamel structures such as enamel lamellae and enamel damages, such as unevenness and cracks. In conclusion, enamel "optical biopsy", gained by RCM imaging, revealed to be a non-invasive real-time tool valid to obtain architectural details of the dental surface with no need for extraction or processing the samples. RCM appears to be an optimum auxiliary device for investigating the architectural pattern of superficial enamel, therefore inviting further experiments aimed to define our knowledge about damages after etching treatments or bracket removal and the responsiveness to fluoride seals and the morphology of the tooth/restoration interface. Moreover, this device could also be used to detect relevant diseases like caries, or to assess surface properties to evaluate lesion activity.

  19. Non-invasive short-term assessment of retinoids effects on human skin in vivo using multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancrède-Bohin, E; Baldeweck, T; Decencière, E; Brizion, S; Victorin, S; Parent, N; Faugere, J; Souverain, L; Bagot, M; Pena, A-M

    2015-04-01

    The occlusive patch test developed for assessing topical retinoids activity in human skin has been extended as a short-term screening protocol for anti-ageing agents. In this model, biopsies are performed at the end of the occlusion period for morphological and immuno-histochemistry analysis. Multiphoton microscopy is a recent non-invasive imaging technique that combined with image processing tools allows the in vivo quantification of human skin modifications. To validate with gold standards of anti-ageing that are retinoids, the relevance of multiphoton microscopy for kinetic and quantitative assessment in this model. Twenty women, aged 50-65 years, were enrolled. Retinol 0.3% (RO) and Retinoic acid 0.025% (RA) were applied to the dorsal photo-damaged side of their forearm under occlusive patches for 12 days. A patch alone was applied to a third area as control. Evaluation was performed at day D0, D12 (end of treatment), D18 and D32 using multiphoton microscopy. Epidermal thickness, normalized area of the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ) and melanin density were estimated using 3D image processing tools. Main significant results are: Epidermal thickening at D12, D18 and D32 with RO and at D12, D18 with RA vs. baseline and vs. Increased DEJ undulation at D32 with RO and at D12 with RA vs. baseline and vs. Decreased melanin content with RO (at D12 and D18 vs. baseline and at D32 vs. baseline and vs. control) and with RA (at D12 vs. baseline). This study shows that multiphoton microscopy associated to specific 3D image processing tools allows cutaneous effects induced by topical retinoids in this in vivo model to be non-invasively detected, quantified and followed over time. This innovative approach could be applied to the evaluation of other active compounds. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  20. Non-invasive assessment of low- and intermediate-risk patients with chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, Pelbreton C; Gonzalez, Jorge A; Kramer, Christopher M

    2017-04-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) remains a significant global public health burden despite advancements in prevention and therapeutic strategies. Common non-invasive imaging modalities, anatomic and functional, are available for the assessment of patients with stable chest pain. Exercise electrocardiography is a long-standing method for evaluation for CAD and remains the initial test for the majority of patients who can exercise adequately with a baseline interpretable electrocardiogram. The addition of cardiac imaging to exercise testing provides incremental benefit for accurate diagnosis for CAD and is particularly useful in patients who are unable to exercise adequately and/or have uninterpretable electrocardiograms. Radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging and echocardiography with exercise or pharmacological stress provide high sensitivity and specificity in the detection and further risk stratification of patients with CAD. Recently, coronary computed tomography angiography has demonstrated its growing role to rule out significant CAD given its high negative predictive value. Although less available, stress cardiac magnetic resonance provides a comprehensive assessment of cardiac structure and function and provides a high diagnostic accuracy in the detection of CAD. The utilization of non-invasive testing is complex due to various advantages and limitations, particularly in the assessment of low- and intermediate-risk patients with chest pain, where no single study is suitable for all patients. This review will describe currently available non-invasive modalities, along with current evidence-based guidelines and appropriate use criteria in the assessment of low- and intermediate-risk patients with suspected, stable CAD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Non-invasive assessment of leaf water status using a dual-mode microwave resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadshani, Said; Kurakin, Andriy; Amanov, Shukhrat; Hein, Benedikt; Rongen, Heinz; Cranstone, Steve; Blievernicht, Ulrich; Menzel, Elmar; Léon, Jens; Klein, Norbert; Ballvora, Agim

    2015-01-01

    The water status in plant leaves is a good indicator for the water status in the whole plant revealing stress if the water supply is reduced. The analysis of dynamic aspects of water availability in plant tissues provides useful information for the understanding of the mechanistic basis of drought stress tolerance, which may lead to improved plant breeding and management practices. The determination of the water content in plant tissues during plant development has been a challenge and is currently feasible based on destructive analysis only. We present here the application of a non-invasive quantitative method to determine the volumetric water content of leaves and the ionic conductivity of the leaf juice from non-invasive microwave measurements at two different frequencies by one sensor device. A semi-open microwave cavity loaded with a ceramic dielectric resonator and a metallic lumped-element capacitor- and inductor structure was employed for non-invasive microwave measurements at 150 MHz and 2.4 Gigahertz on potato, maize, canola and wheat leaves. Three leaves detached from each plant were chosen, representing three developmental stages being representative for tissue of various age. Clear correlations between the leaf- induced resonance frequency shifts and changes of the inverse resonator quality factor at 2.4 GHz to the gravimetrically determined drying status of the leaves were found. Moreover, the ionic conductivity of Maize leaves, as determined from the ratio of the inverse quality factor and frequency shift at 150 MHz by use of cavity perturbation theory, was found to be in good agreement with direct measurements on plant juice. In conjunction with a compact battery- powered circuit board- microwave electronic module and a user-friendly software interface, this method enables rapid in-vivo water amount assessment of plants by a handheld device for potential use in the field.

  2. A REVIEW OF NON-INVASIVE IMAGING METHODS AND APPLICATIONS IN CONTAMINANT HYDROGEOLOGY RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werth, Charles J.; Zhang, Changyong; Brusseau, M. L.; Oostrom, Martinus; Baumann, T.

    2010-03-08

    Contaminant hydrogeological processes occurring in porous media are typically not amenable to direct observation. As a result, indirect measurements (e.g., contaminant breakthrough at a fixed location) are often used to infer processes occurring at different scales, locations, or times. To overcome this limitation, non-invasive imaging methods are increasingly being used in contaminant hydrogeology research. The most common methods, and the subjects of this review, are optical imaging using UV or visible light, dual-energy gamma-radiation, X-ray microtomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Non-invasive imaging techniques have provided valuable insights into a variety of complex systems and processes, including porous media characterization, multiphase fluid distribution, fluid flow, solute transport and mixing, colloidal transport and deposition, and reactions. In this paper we review the theory underlying these methods, applications of these methods to contaminant hydrogeology research, and methods’ advantages and disadvantages. As expected, there is no perfect method or tool for non-invasive imaging. However, optical methods generally present the least expensive and easiest options for imaging fluid distribution, solute and fluid flow, colloid transport, and reactions in artificial two-dimensional (2D) porous media. Gamma radiation methods present the best opportunity for characterization of fluid distributions in 2D at the Darcy scale. X-ray methods present the highest resolution and flexibility for three-dimensional (3D) natural porous media characterization, and 3D characterization of fluid distributions in natural porous media. And MRI presents the best option for 3D characterization of fluid distribution, fluid flow, colloid transport, and reaction in artificial porous media. Obvious deficiencies ripe for method development are the ability to image transient processes such as fluid flow and colloid transport in natural porous media in three

  3. The immunological response created by interstitial and non-invasive laser immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahavar, Cody F.; Zhou, Feifan; Hasanjee, Aamr M.; West, Connor L.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) is an innovative cancer modality that uses laser irradiation and immunological stimulation to treat late-stage, metastatic cancers. LIT can be performed through either interstitial or non-invasive laser irradiation. Although LIT is still in development, recent clinical trials have shown that it can be used to successfully treat patients with late-stage breast cancer and melanoma. The development of LIT has been focused on creating an optimal immune response created by irradiating the tumor. One important factor that could enhance the immune response is the duration of laser irradiation. Irradiating the tumor for a shorter or longer amount of time could weaken the immune response created by LIT. Another factor that could weaken this immune response is the proliferation of regulatory T cells (TRegs) in response to the laser irradiation. However, low dose cyclophosphamide (CY) can help suppress the proliferation of TRegs and help create a more optimal immune response. An additional factor that could weaken the effectiveness of LIT is the selectivity of the laser. If LIT is performed non-invasively, then deeply embedded tumors and highly pigmented skin could cause an uneven temperature distribution inside the tumor. To solve this problem, an immunologically modified carbon nanotube system was created by using an immunoadjuvant known as glycated chitosan (GC) as a surfactant for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to immunologically modify SWNTs. SWNT-GC retains the optical properties of SWNTs and the immunological functions of GC to help increase the selectivity of the laser and create a more optimal immune response. In this preliminary study, tumor-bearing rats were treated with LIT either interstitially by an 805-nm laser with GC and low-dose CY, or non-invasively by a 980-nm laser with SWNT-GC. The goal was to observe the effects of CY on the immune response induced by LIT and to also determine the effect of irradiation duration for

  4. Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of fetal RhD by using free fetal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönenç, G; Işçi, H; Yiğiter, A B; Hançer, V; Büyükdoğan, M; Güdücü, N; Dünder, I

    2015-01-01

    Anti-D immunoglobulin is applied to all pregnant women having RhD incompatibility to prevent hemolytic disease of the newborn. The aim of this study is to determine fetal RhD status in the Rh incompatible pregnancies with an non-invasive technique; free fetal DNA isolation from maternal circulation. In the case of Rh incompatibility especially with a history of previous fetal anemia, it can be beneficial to know Rh status antenatally in terms of monitoring fetuses with Rh positive [RhD(+)] status consciously. Total free DNA was isolated in 50 Rh negative [RhD(-)] pregnant women, who had RhD alloimmunisation with their husbands. The gene in isolated DNA was investigated with TagMan prob and real time PCR by using primers belonging to exon 7 of the RhD gene. The authors analyzed 50 RhD(-) women by using quantitative real time PCR technique. Five of them were RhD(-) and the rest of them were found to be RhD(+). After birth one of the infants who were analyzed as RhD(+) were found to be RhD(-). The detection of fetal RhD status by using a non-invasive method from maternal circulation was found to be possible. Assessing fetal RhD status non-invasively by using free fetal DNA in maternal blood will be cost-efficient, avoiding unnecessary indirect Coombs test and unnecessary Rhogam applications that is used in RH incompatible pregnancies. This study will throw a fresh light on prenatal diagnosis.

  5. Non-invasive brain-to-brain interface (BBI: establishing functional links between two brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Schik Yoo

    Full Text Available Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS is capable of modulating the neural activity of specific brain regions, with a potential role as a non-invasive computer-to-brain interface (CBI. In conjunction with the use of brain-to-computer interface (BCI techniques that translate brain function to generate computer commands, we investigated the feasibility of using the FUS-based CBI to non-invasively establish a functional link between the brains of different species (i.e. human and Sprague-Dawley rat, thus creating a brain-to-brain interface (BBI. The implementation was aimed to non-invasively translate the human volunteer's intention to stimulate a rat's brain motor area that is responsible for the tail movement. The volunteer initiated the intention by looking at a strobe light flicker on a computer display, and the degree of synchronization in the electroencephalographic steady-state-visual-evoked-potentials (SSVEP with respect to the strobe frequency was analyzed using a computer. Increased signal amplitude in the SSVEP, indicating the volunteer's intention, triggered the delivery of a burst-mode FUS (350 kHz ultrasound frequency, tone burst duration of 0.5 ms, pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz, given for 300 msec duration to excite the motor area of an anesthetized rat transcranially. The successful excitation subsequently elicited the tail movement, which was detected by a motion sensor. The interface was achieved at 94.0±3.0% accuracy, with a time delay of 1.59±1.07 sec from the thought-initiation to the creation of the tail movement. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of a computer-mediated BBI that links central neural functions between two biological entities, which may confer unexplored opportunities in the study of neuroscience with potential implications for therapeutic applications.

  6. Gingival crevicular blood: As a non-invasive screening tool for diabetes mellitus in dental clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Neema; Shankarapillai, Rajesh; Mathur, Lalit Kumar; Manohar, Balaji; Mathur, Aditi; Jain, Meetu

    2013-07-01

    A high number of patients with periodontitis may have undiagnosed diabetes. Self-monitoring devices provide a simple method for rapid monitoring of the glucose level in the blood by utilizing a blood sample from the finger, but this method requires a needle puncture to obtain blood. It is possible that gingival crevicular blood (GCB) from routine periodontal probing may be a source of blood for glucose measurements. To establish whether GCB can be used as a non-invasive diagnostic aid in screening for diabetes mellitus during routine periodontal examination. The study involved 50 diabetics and 50 non-diabetics, with an age range of 26-66 years. Both diabetic and non-diabetic patients had moderate to severe gingivitis with at least one tooth in the maxillary anterior region showing bleeding upon probing. The Gingival Index and Oral Hygiene Index-Simplified were recorded. Blood oozing from the gingival sulcus/pocket following periodontal pocket probing was collected using a capillary tube and transferred to the test stick of a glucose self-monitoring device (Accu-Chek, Roche Diagnostic, Germany) in patients with comparable gingival and oral hygiene status. This value was compared with the peripheral fingerstick blood glucose (PFBG) value, which was obtained by pricking the finger tip at the same visit. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. There was no statistically significant difference between the gingival crevicular blood glucose (GCBG) values and the PFBG values in both the diabetic (P = 0.129, NS) and the non-diabetic (P = 0.503, NS) groups. Karl Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was calculated, which showed a positive correlation between the two measurements in the diabetic (r = 0.943) as well as the non-diabetic (r = 0.926) groups. The results suggest that GCB can be used as a non-invasive diagnostic aid in screening for diabetes mellitus during routine periodontal examination.

  7. Non-invasive respiratory monitoring during wakefulness and sleep in pre- and postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aittokallio, Jenni; Virkki, Arho; Aittokallio, Tero; Saaresranta, Tarja; Polo-Kantola, Päivi; Polo, Olli

    2006-01-25

    Menopause and aging cause hormonal changes with respiratory consequences. The aim of the present study was to investigate the physiological changes in respiration during wakefulness and sleep across menopause in non-patient population using non-invasive measurements of blood and tissue gases. The arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2), heart rate, end-tidal partial carbon dioxide tension (EtCO2) and transcutaneous partial carbon dioxide tension (TcCO2) were measured during wakefulness and sleep in thirteen pairs of BMI-matched pre- and postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women had lower SaO2 during sleep than during wakefulness, whereas premenopausal women maintained their wakefulness SaO2 levels also during sleep. EtCO2 levels did not change either between wakefulness and sleep or between premenopausal and postmenopausal groups. TcCO2 levels increased from wakefulness to sleep in both groups and the increase was greater in the postmenopausal group. The impact of sleep on the non-invasive measurements of blood and tissue gases is stronger in postmenopausal women.

  8. Non-invasive determination of instantaneous brachial blood flow using the oscillometric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shing-Hong; Wang, Jia-Jung; Cheng, Da-Chuan

    2009-08-01

    The oscillometric method has been widely used to measure arterial systolic and diastolic blood pressures, but its potential for arterial blood flow measurements still remains to be explored. The aim of this study was to non-invasively determine arterial blood flow using an oscillometric blood flow measurement system. The system consists of a pneumatic elastic cuff, an air-pumping motor, a releaser valve, a pressure transducer, and an airflow meter. To build a non-linear cuff model, we measured airflow pumped into the pneumatic cuff and cuff pressure using an airflow meter and pressure transducer during the inflation period, respectively. During the deflation period, only the pressure transducer was used to record cuff pressure. Based on the cuff model, the oscillometric blood flow waveform was obtained by integrating the oscillometric pressure waveform. We compared arterial blood flow derived from the maximum amplitude of the oscillometric blood flow waveform with Doppler-measured blood flow calculated with the diameters and blood velocities of the brachial arteries in 32 subjects who underwent diagnostic evaluations for peripheral arterial embolism. A linear correlation coefficient of r = 0.716 was found between the oscillometry- and Doppler-based blood flow measurements in the 32 subjects. These results suggest that blood flow passing through the brachial artery can be quantified non-invasively using the oscillometric approach after appropriate calibration.

  9. Non-invasive evaluation of voiding function in asymptomatic primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Hasan Serkan; Akpinar, Burcu; Gurocak, Serhat; Akata, Deniz; Bakkaloglu, Mehmet; Tekgul, Serdar

    2008-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the voiding characteristics of primary school children by using questionnaires and non-invasive diagnostic tools. The voiding characteristics of 212 healthy children in two primary schools were evaluated with ultrasound for bladder wall thickness (BWT) in association with the Pediatric Lower Urinary Tract Symptom Score (PLUTSS), familial questionnaire, uroflowmetry (UF) and urinalysis. Most of the children (70%) had achieved urinary and fecal continence between the ages of 18 months and 36 months. Twenty-five per cent of healthy children void fewer than four times or more than seven times per day. Ninety percent of children had a PLUTSS within normal ranges (< 9). Fifteen percent of patients had a uroflowmetric pattern other than bell-shaped. The peak and average flow rates were higher in girls. Enuresis nocturna was detected in 10% of children. None of the children had documented urinary tract infection. The average BWT from posterior wall at full bladder in healthy children was 1.1 mm. The anterior and posterior BWT measurements before and after micturition were found to be thicker in boys. Regarding the UF pattern, in post-voiding measurements in children with abnormal UF pattern, the bladder walls were thicker. Non-invasive tests in non-symptomatic children showed a range of variability, and these deviations should be kept in mind during the evaluation of voiding characteristics of a child. The symptom scoring system, with the high sensitivity and specificity rates it possesses, is one of the promising tools for this purpose.

  10. Portable non-invasive brain-computer interface: challenges and opportunities of optical modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Clara A.; Hendrickson, Scott M.; Swett, Bruce A.; Fitch, Michael J.; Walter, Erich C.; McLoughlin, Michael P.; Chevillet, Mark A.; Blodgett, David W.; Hwang, Grace M.

    2017-05-01

    The development of portable non-invasive brain computer interface technologies with higher spatio-temporal resolution has been motivated by the tremendous success seen with implanted devices. This talk will discuss efforts to overcome several major obstacles to viability including approaches that promise to improve spatial and temporal resolution. Optical approaches in particular will be highlighted and the potential benefits of both Blood-Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) and Fast Optical Signal (FOS) will be discussed. Early-stage research into the correlations between neural activity and FOS will be explored.

  11. Non-invasive epigenetic detection of fetal trisomy 21 in first trimester maternal plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyae Lim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Down syndrome (DS is the most common known aneuploidy, caused by an extra copy of all or part of chromosome 21. Fetal-specific epigenetic markers have been investigated for non-invasive prenatal detection of fetal DS. The phosphodiesterases gene, PDE9A, located on chromosome 21q22.3, is completely methylated in blood (M-PDE9A and unmethylated in the placenta (U-PDE9A. Therefore, we estimated the accuracy of non-invasive fetal DS detection during the first trimester of pregnancy using this tissue-specific epigenetic characteristic of PDE9A. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A nested, case-control study was conducted using maternal plasma samples collected from 108 pregnant women carrying 18 DS and 90 normal fetuses (each case was matched with 5 controls according to gestational weeks at blood sampling. All pregnancies were singletons at or before 12 weeks of gestation between October 2008 and May 2009. The maternal plasma levels of M-PDE9A and U-PDE9A were measured by quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. M-PDE9A and U-PDE9A levels were obtained in all samples and did not differ between male and female fetuses. M-PDE9A levels did not differ between the DS cases and controls (1854.3 vs 2004.5 copies/mL; P = 0.928. U-PDE9A levels were significantly elevated in women with DS fetuses compared with controls (356.8 vs 194.7 copies/mL, P<0.001. The sensitivities of U-PDE9A level and the unmethylation index of PDE9A for non-invasive fetal DS detection were 77.8% and 83.3%, respectively, with a 5% false-positive rate. In the risk assessment for fetal DS, the adjusted odds ratios of U-PDE9A level and UI were 46.2 [95% confidence interval: 7.8-151.6] and 63.7 [95% confidence interval: 23.2-206.7], respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that U-PDE9A level and the unmethylation index of PDE9A may be useful biomarkers for non-invasive fetal DS detection during the first trimester of pregnancy, regardless of fetal

  12. Non-Invasive Microwave Sensors for Biomedical Applications: New Design Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Costanzo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The basic operation principles of non-invasive microwave sensors are summarized in this work, with specific emphasis on health-care systems applications. Design criteria to achieve reliable results in terms of biological parameters detection are specifically highlighted. In particular, the importance to adopt accurate frequency models for the complex permittivity (in terms of both dielectric constant as well as loss tangent in the synthesis procedure of the microwave sensor is clearly motivated. Finally, an application example of the outlined new perspectives in the framework of glucose monitoring to face diabete disease is deeply discussed.

  13. Differential Mueller matrix polarimetry technique for non-invasive measurement of glucose concentration on human fingertip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Quoc-Hung; Lo, Yu-Lung

    2017-06-26

    A differential Mueller matrix polarimetry technique is proposed for obtaining non-invasive (NI) measurements of the glucose concentration on the human fingertip. The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated by detecting the optical rotation angle and depolarization index of tissue phantom samples containing de-ionized water (DI), glucose solutions with concentrations ranging from 0~500 mg/dL and 2% lipofundin. The results show that the extracted optical rotation angle increases linearly with an increasing glucose concentration, while the depolarization index decreases. The practical applicability of the proposed method is demonstrated by measuring the optical rotation angle and depolarization index properties of the human fingertips of healthy volunteers.

  14. Non-invasive Estimation of Pressure Changes along a Streamline using Vector Velocity Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Traberg, Marie Sand

    2015-01-01

    A non-invasive method for estimating pressure changes along a streamline using ultrasound is presented. The suggested method estimates pressure gradients from 2-D vector velocity fields. Changes in pressure are derived using a model based on the Navier-Stokes equations. Scans of a carotid...... bifurcation phantom with a 70% constriction are performed using a linear array transducer connected to the experimental scanner, SARUS. 2-D fields of angle-independent vector velocities are acquired to a depth of 3 cm using directional synthetic aperture vector flow imaging. The performance of the suggested...

  15. Luminescent Tension-Indicating Orthopedic Strain Gauges for Non-Invasive Measurements Through Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anker, Jeffrey (Inventor); Rogalski, Melissa (Inventor); Anderson, Dakota (Inventor); Heath, Jonathon (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Strain gauges that can provide information with regard to the state of implantable devices are described. The strain gauges can exhibit luminescence that is detectable through living tissue, and the detectable luminescent emission can vary according to the strain applied to the gauge. A change in residual strain of the device can signify a loss of mechanical integrity and/or loosening of the implant, and this can be non-invasively detected either by simple visual detection of the luminescent emission or through examination of the emission with a detector such as a spectrometer or a camera.

  16. Modeling the pelvic region for non-invasive pelvic intraoperative neuromonitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moszkowski Tomasz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Finite element analysis (FEA of electric current distribution in the pelvis minor may help to assess the usability of non-invasive surface stimulation for continuous pelvic intraoperative neuromonitoring. FEA requires generation of quality volumetric tetrahedral mesh geometry. This study proposes the generation of a suitable mesh based on MRI data. The resulting volumetric mesh models the autonomous nerve structures at risk during total mesorectal excision. The model also contains the bone, cartilage, fat, skin, muscle tissues of the pelvic region, and a set of electrodes for surface stimulation. The model is ready for finite element analysis of the discrete Maxwell’s equations.

  17. Online estimation of respiratory mechanics in non-invasive pressure support ventilation: a bench model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulqueeny, Qestra; Tassaux, Didier; Vignaux, Laurence; Jolliet, Philippe; Schindhelm, Klaus; Redmond, Stephen; Lovell, Nigel H

    2010-01-01

    An online algorithm for determining respiratory mechanics in patients using non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in pressure support mode was developed and embedded in a ventilator system. Based on multiple linear regression (MLR) of respiratory data, the algorithm was tested on a patient bench model under conditions with and without leak and simulating a variety of mechanics. Bland-Altman analysis indicates reliable measures of compliance across the clinical range of interest (± 11-18% limits of agreement). Resistance measures showed large quantitative errors (30-50%), however, it was still possible to qualitatively distinguish between normal and obstructive resistances. This outcome provides clinically significant information for ventilator titration and patient management.

  18. Non-Invasive Renal Perfusion Imaging Using Arterial Spin Labeling MRI: Challenges and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Nery

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue perfusion allows for delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissues, and in the kidneys is also a key determinant of glomerular filtration. Quantification of regional renal perfusion provides a potential window into renal (patho physiology. However, non-invasive, practical, and robust methods to measure renal perfusion remain elusive, particularly in the clinic. Arterial spin labeling (ASL, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technique, is arguably the only available method with potential to meet all these needs. Recent developments suggest its viability for clinical application. This review addresses several of these developments and discusses remaining challenges with the emphasis on renal imaging in human subjects.

  19. Non-invasive electrocardiogram detection of in vivo zebrafish embryos using electric potential sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendon-Morales, E.; Prance, R. J.; Prance, H.; Aviles-Espinosa, R.

    2015-11-01

    In this letter, we report the continuous detection of the cardiac electrical activity in embryonic zebrafish using a non-invasive approach. We present a portable and cost-effective platform based on the electric potential sensing technology, to monitor in vivo electrocardiogram activity from the zebrafish heart. This proof of principle demonstration shows how electrocardiogram measurements from the embryonic zebrafish may become accessible by using electric field detection. We present preliminary results using the prototype, which enables the acquisition of electrophysiological signals from in vivo 3 and 5 days-post-fertilization zebrafish embryos. The recorded waveforms show electrocardiogram traces including detailed features such as QRS complex, P and T waves.

  20. Pre-Analytical Conditions in Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing of Cell-Free Fetal RHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Frederik Banch; Jakobsen, Tanja Roien; Rieneck, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) in maternal plasma can predict the fetal RhD type in D negative pregnant women. In Denmark, routine antenatal screening for the fetal RhD gene (RHD) directs the administration of antenatal anti-D prophylaxis only to women who carry an Rh......D positive fetus. Prophylaxis reduces the risk of immunization that may lead to hemolytic disease of the fetus and the newborn. The reliability of predicting the fetal RhD type depends on pre-analytical factors and assay sensitivity. We evaluated the testing setup in the Capital Region of Denmark, based...