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Sample records for valent iron columns

  1. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yuxin; Versteeg, R.; Slater, L.; LaBrecque, D.

    2009-06-01

    Calcium carbonate is a secondary mineral precipitate influencing zero valent iron (ZVI) barrier reactivity and hydraulic performance. We conducted column experiments to investigate electrical signatures resulting from concurrent CaCO{sub 3} and iron oxides precipitation under simulated field geochemical conditions. We identified CaCO{sub 3} as a major mineral phase throughout the columns, with magnetite present primarily close to the influent based on XRD analysis. Electrical measurements revealed decreases in conductivity and polarization of both columns, suggesting that electrically insulating CaCO{sub 3} dominates the electrical response despite the presence of electrically conductive iron oxides. SEM/EDX imaging suggests that the electrical signal reflects the geometrical arrangement of the mineral phases. CaCO{sub 3} forms insulating films on ZVI/magnetite surfaces, restricting charge transfer between the pore electrolyte and ZVI particles, as well as across interconnected ZVI particles. As surface reactivity also depends on the ability of the surface to engage in redox reactions via charge transfer, electrical measurements may provide a minimally invasive technology for monitoring reactivity loss due to CaCO{sub 3} precipitation. Comparison between laboratory and field data shows consistent changes in electrical signatures due to iron corrosion and secondary mineral precipitation.

  2. The effects of flow rate and concentration on nitrobenzene removal in abiotic and biotic zero-valent iron columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Weizhao; Wu, Jinhua; Huang, Weilin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated the effects of varying nitrobenzene (NB) loadings via increasing flow rate or influent NB concentration mode on the removal efficiency in zero-valent iron (ZVI) columns sterilized (abiotic) or preloaded with acclimated microorganisms (biotic). It was shown...... flow rates and influent NB concentrations were at 0.5 mL min− 1 and 80 μmol L− 1 for the abiotic column and 2.0 mL min-1 and 240 μmol L− 1 for the biotic column, respectively. This study indicated that microorganisms not only enhanced overall reduction of NB, but also facilitated NB sequestration...

  3. A comparison of the low frequency electrical signatures of iron oxide versus calcite precipitation in granular zero valent iron columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuxin; Slater, Lee; Versteeg, Roelof; LaBrecque, Douglas

    2008-01-28

    Geophysical methods have been proposed as technologies for non-invasively monitoring geochemical alteration in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). We conducted column experiments to investigate the effect of mineralogy on the electrical signatures resulting from iron corrosion and mineral precipitation in Fe0 columns using (a) Na2SO4, and (b) NaHCO3 plus CaCl2 mixture, solutions. At the influent interface where the reactions were most severe, a contrasting time-lapse electrical response was observed between the two columns. Solid phase analysis confirmed the formation of corrosion halos and increased mineralogical complexity in the corroded sections of the columns compared to the minimal/non-corroded sections. We attribute the contrasting time-lapse signatures to the differences in the electrical properties of the mineral phases formed within the two columns. While newly precipitated/transformed polarizable and semi-conductive iron oxides (mostly magnetite and green rust) increase the polarization and conductivity of the sulfate column, the decrease of both parameters in the bicarbonate column is attributed to the precipitation of non-polarizable and non-conductive calcite. Our results show that precipitate mineralogy is an important factor influencing the electrical properties of the corroded iron cores and must be considered if electrical geophysical methods are to be developed to monitor PRB barrier corrosion processes in situ.

  4. The effects of flow rate and concentration on nitrobenzene removal in abiotic and biotic zero-valent iron columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weizhao; Wu, Jinhua; Huang, Weilin; Li, Yongtao; Jiang, Gangbiao

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of varying nitrobenzene (NB) loadings via increasing flow rate or influent NB concentration mode on the removal efficiency in zero-valent iron (ZVI) columns sterilized (abiotic) or preloaded with acclimated microorganisms (biotic). It was shown that physical sequestration via adsorption/co-precipitation and reductive transformation of NB to aniline (AN) were the two major mechanisms for the NB removal in both abiotic and biotic ZVI columns. The NB removal efficiency decreased in both columns as the flow rate increased from 0.25 to 1.0mLmin(-1) whereas the AN recovery increased accordingly, with relatively high AN recovery observed at the flow rate of 1.0mLmin(-1). At the constant flow rate of 0.5mLmin(-1), increasing influent NB concentration from 80 to 400μmolL(-1) resulted in decreasing of the overall NB removal efficiency from 79.5 to 48.6% in the abiotic column and from 85.6 to 62.5% in the biotic column. The results also showed that the sequestration capacity and chemical reduction capacity were respectively 72% and 157.6% higher in the biotic column than in the abiotic column at the same tested hydraulic conditions and NB loadings. The optimal flow rates and influent NB concentrations were at 0.5mLmin(-1) and 80μmolL(-1) for the abiotic column and 2.0mLmin-1 and 240μmolL(-1) for the biotic column, respectively. This study indicated that microorganisms not only enhanced overall reduction of NB, but also facilitated NB sequestration within the porous media and that the optimal loading conditions for overall removal, sequestration, and reduction of NB may be different. Optimal operation conditions should be found for preferred sequestration or transformation (or both) of the target contaminants to meet different goals of groundwater remediation with the ZVI-PRB systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Modelling of geochemical and isotopic changes in a column experiment for degradation of TCE by zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prommer, Henning; Aziz, Lidia H; Bolaño, Nerea; Taubald, Heinrich; Schüth, Christoph

    2008-04-04

    Zero-valent iron (ZVI) permeable-reactive barriers have become an increasingly used remediation option for the in situ removal of various organic and inorganic chemicals from contaminated groundwater. In the present study a process-based numerical model for the transport and reactions of chlorinated hydrocarbon in the presence of ZVI has been developed and applied to analyse a comprehensive data set from laboratory-scale flow-through experiments. The model formulation includes a reaction network for the individual sequential and/or parallel transformation of chlorinated hydrocarbons by ZVI, for the resulting geochemical changes such as mineral precipitation, and for the carbon isotope fractionation that occurs during each of the transformation reactions of the organic compounds. The isotopic fractionation was modelled by formulating separate reaction networks for lighter ((12)C) and heavier ((13)C) isotopes. The simulation of a column experiment involving the parallel degradation of TCE by hydrogenolysis and beta-elimination can conclusively reproduce the observed concentration profiles of all collected organic and inorganic data as well as the observed carbon isotope ratios of TCE and its daughter products.

  6. Investigations on mobility of carbon colloid supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in a column experiment and a laboratory 2D-aquifer test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Jan; Meißner, Tobias; Potthoff, Annegret; Oswald, Sascha E

    2014-09-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) has recently gained great interest in the scientific community as in situ reagent for installation of permeable reactive barriers in aquifer systems, since nZVI is highly reactive with chlorinated compounds and may render them to harmless substances. However, nZVI has a high tendency to agglomerate and sediment; therefore it shows very limited transport ranges. One new approach to overcome the limited transport of nZVI in porous media is using a suited carrier colloid. In this study we tested mobility of a carbon colloid supported nZVI particle "Carbo-Iron Colloids" (CIC) with a mean size of 0.63 μm in a column experiment of 40 cm length and an experiment in a two-dimensional (2D) aquifer test system with dimensions of 110 × 40 × 5 cm. Results show a breakthrough maximum of 82 % of the input concentration in the column experiment and 58 % in the 2D-aquifer test system. Detected residuals in porous media suggest a strong particle deposition in the first centimeters and few depositions in the porous media in the further travel path. Overall, this suggests a high mobility in porous media which might be a significant enhancement compared to bare or polyanionic stabilized nZVI.

  7. Zero valent iron reduces toxicity and concentrations of organophosphate pesticides in contaminated groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Baun, Anders; Vastrup, Troels

    2013-01-01

    The potential of zero valent iron (ZVI) for remediation of contaminated groundwater from an abandoned chemical disposal site was examined through batch and column experiments. The key contaminants were organophosphate pesticides but the chemical analysis also comprised additional 22 compounds...

  8. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents by zero-valent iron, iron oxide and iron sulfide minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivavec, T.M.; Horney, D.P. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The degradation of chlorinated solvents by reduction at the surface of zero-valent metals and bimetallic systems has emerged as an important approach to the in-situ remediation of ground water. Reduction by iron metal was studied in batch and column systems to develop a mechanistic understanding of the reaction chemistry and to determine the factors that affect dechlorination rate and long term performance in field applications.

  9. Evaluation of activated carbon fiber supported nanoscale zero-valent iron for chromium (VI) removal from groundwater in a permeable reactive column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Guangzhou; Kou, Liqing; Wang, Tiecheng; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2017-10-01

    An activated carbon fiber supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (ACF-nZVI) composite for Cr(VI) removal from groundwater was synthesized according to the liquid phase reduction method. The techniques of N 2 adsorption/desorption, FESEM, EDX, XRD and XPS were used to characterize the ACF-nZVI composite and the interaction between the ACF-nZVI composite and Cr(VI) ions. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of several factors, including the amount of nZVI on activated carbon fiber (ACF), pH value, initial Cr(VI) concentration, and co-existing ions on Cr(VI) removal. The results indicate that presence of ACF can inhibit the aggregation of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles and increase its reactivity, and the Cr(VI) removal efficiency increases with increasing amounts of nZVI on ACF and a decrease in the initial Cr(VI) concentration. In acidic conditions, almost 100% of Cr(VI) in solution can be removed after 60 min of reaction, and the removal efficiency decreases with increasing initial pH values. The Cr(VI) removal is also dependent on the co-existing ions. Reusability experiments on ACF-nZVI demonstrate that the ACF-nZVI composite can keep a high reactivity after five successive reduction cycles. The removal mechanisms are proposed as a two-step interaction including the physical adsorption of Cr(VI) on the surface or inner layers of the ACF-nZVI composite and the subsequent reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by nZVI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Removal of halogenated organic compounds in landfill gas by top covers containing zero-valent iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Winther, K.; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Transformation of gaseous CCl3F and CCl4 by zero-valent iron was studied in systems unsaturated with water under anaerobic conditionssin an N2 gas and in a landfill gas atmosphere. The transformation was studied in batch as well as flow-through column tests. In both systems, the transformation pr...

  11. Adsorption of Hg(II) and Pb(II) ions by nanoscale zero valent iron supported on ostrich bone ash in a fixed-bed column system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Mohammad Javad; Abedi-Koupai, Jahangir; Eslamian, Saeid

    2017-07-01

    In this research, ostrich bone ash (OBA) was modified with nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) particles and applied as a novel composite adsorbent (OBA/nZVI) for dynamic adsorption/reduction of Hg(II) and Pb(II) ions in a fixed-bed column system. Entrapment of nZVI in OBA beads barricades the particles from oxidation and aggregation. The dynamic behavior of metal ions removal by OBA/nZVI was assessed as a function of inlet flow rates, bed height, initial pollutants concentration and pH. The synthesized OBA/nZVI composite was characterized by several physicochemical techniques. Increase in pH and bed height and decrease in flow rates and initial metal concentration resulted in delay of breakthrough time. OBA breakthrough profile is sharper than the OBA/nZVI breakthrough curve for both metal ions and the breakthrough times increase in the order OBA/nZVI-Hg(II) > OBA/nZVI-Pb(II) > OBA-Pb(II) > OBA-Hg(II). Based on the experiment results, redox reaction is expected to occur to a certain extent, as the standard reduction potentials of Hg(II) and Pb(II) are more than that of Fe(II). From a practical point of view, the OBA/nZVI could be applied as a material to remove Hg(II) and Pb(II) ions from natural surface and ground water with a pH value of 5-9.

  12. Removal of chromate in a permeable reactive barrier using zero-valent iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Locht, T

    2002-01-01

    Chromate is a commonly found groundwater contaminant. Permeable reactive barriers containing zero-valent iron as iron filings are able to remove the chromate by a combined reduction/precipitation reaction. However, due to the passivation of the reduction capability of the iron surfaces...... by the precipitation of chromate and other groundwater constituents, the barrier may have a limited capacity for chromate removal. By performing a column experiment with iron filings it was shown that the capacity was slightly lower at high chromate concentration (500 ppm) in comparison to low concentration (20 ppm...

  13. Electrochemical depassivation of zero-valent iron for trichloroethene reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Liang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Jin, Song [Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Advanced Environmental Technologies, LLC, Fort Collins, CO 80524 (United States); Fallgren, Paul H. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO 80217 (United States); Swoboda-Colberg, Norbert G. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Liu, Fei [Beijing Key Laboratory of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Colberg, Patricia J.S., E-mail: pczoo@uwyo.edu [Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrical current may depassivate ZVI and restore its capacity to reduce TCE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrical current may defer or even prevent surface oxidation of ZVI. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrical current coupled with ZVI achieves greater TCE reduction than ZVI alone. - Abstract: Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) composed of zero-valent iron (ZVI) are susceptible to passivation, resulting in substantially decreased rates of chlorinated solvent removal over time. In this study, the application of low electrical direct current (DC) to restore the reductive capacity of passivated ZVI was examined. Electrical current was applied to a laboratory column reactor filled with a mixture of pre-passivated ZVI and sand. Variable voltage settings (0-12 V) were applied through two stainless steel electrodes placed at the ends of the reactor. While only partial restoration of the reductive capacity of the passivated ZVI was observed, higher rates of trichloroethene (TCE) removal were always obtained when current was applied, and the rates of TCE removal were roughly proportional to the voltage level. Although differences were observed between the rates and extent of TCE removal within the column, it is noteworthy that TCE removal was not restricted to that region of the column where the electrons entered (i.e., at the cathode). While complete 'depassivation' of ZVI may be difficult to achieve in practice, the application of DC demonstrated observable restoration of reactivity of the passivated ZVI. This study provides evidence that this approach may significantly extend the life of a ZVI PRB.

  14. DDT, DDD, AND DDE DECHLORINATION BY ZERO-VALENT IRON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traditionally, destruction of DDT [1,1,1-trichIoro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane] for environmental remediation required high-energy processes such as incineration. Here, the capability of powdered zero-valent iron to dechlorinate DDT and related compounds at room tempera...

  15. Nitrogen Atom Transfer From High Valent Iron Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Michael D. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Smith, Jeremy M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2015-10-14

    This report describes the synthesis and reactions of high valent iron nitrides. Organonitrogen compounds such as aziridines are useful species for organic synthesis, but there are few efficient methods for their synthesis. Using iron nitrides to catalytically access these species may allow for their synthesis in an energy-and atom-efficient manner. We have developed a new ligand framework to achieve these goals as well as providing a method for inducing previously unknown reactivity.

  16. Removal of chromium from synthetic plating waste by zero-valent iron and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Saumyen; Bhargava, Puja

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the potential of zero-valent iron and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) for reduction and removal of chromium from synthetic electroplating waste. The zero-valent iron shows promising results as a reductant of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) to trivalent chromium (Cr+3), capable of 100% reduction. The required iron concentration was a function of chromium concentration in the waste stream. Removal of Cr+3 by adsorption or precipitation on iron leads to complete removal of chromium from the waste and was a slower process than the reduction of Cr+6. Presence SRB in a completely mixed batch reactor inhibited the reduction of Cr+6. In a fixed-bed column reactor, SRB enhanced chromium removal and showed promising results for the treatment of wastes with low chromium concentrations. It is proposed that, for waste with high chromium concentration, zero-valent iron is an efficient reductant and can be used for reduction of Cr+6. For low chromium concentrations, a SRB augmented zero-valent iron and sand column is capable of removing chromium completely.

  17. Treatment of acid rock drainage using a sulfate-reducing bioreactor with zero-valent iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, James A., E-mail: jimfield@email.arizona.edu

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • Electron donor from zero-valent iron (ZVI) drives sulfate reduction to sulfide. • Sulfide converts soluble heavy metals into sulfide minerals. • Excess sulfide is sequestered by iron preventing discharge. • Corrosion of ZVI consumes acidity in acid rock drainage. • ZVI as reactive material outlasted limestone in removing heavy metals. - Abstract: This study assessed the bioremediation of acid rock drainage (ARD) in flow-through columns testing zero-valent iron (ZVI) for the first time as the sole exogenous electron donor to drive sulfate-reducing bacteria in permeable reactive barriers. Columns containing ZVI, limestone or a mixture of both materials were inoculated with an anaerobic mixed culture and fed a synthetic ARD containing sulfuric acid and heavy metals (initially copper, and later also cadmium and lead). ZVI significantly enhanced sulfate reduction and the heavy metals were extensively removed (>99.7%). Solid-phase analyses showed that heavy metals were precipitated with biogenic sulfide in the columns packed with ZVI. Excess sulfide was sequestered by iron, preventing the discharge of dissolved sulfide. In the absence of ZVI, heavy metals were also significantly removed (>99.8%) due to precipitation with hydroxide and carbonate ions released from the limestone. Vertical-profiles of heavy metals in the columns packing, at the end of the experiment, demonstrated that the ZVI columns still had excess capacity to remove heavy metals, while the capacity of the limestone control column was approaching saturation. The ZVI provided conditions that enhanced sulfate reduction and generated alkalinity. Collectively, the results demonstrate an innovative passive ARD remediation process using ZVI as sole electron-donor.

  18. Application of Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron to Marine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Kathleen B.; Quinn, Jacqueline W.; Clausen, Christian A.; Geiger, Cherie L.

    2005-01-01

    Contamination of marine waters and sediments with heavy metals and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) including chlorinated solvents, pesticides and PCBs pose ecological and human health risks through the contaminant's potential bioaccumulation in fish, shellfish and avian populations. The contaminants enter marine environments through improper disposal techniques and storm water run-off. Current remediation technologies for application to marine environments include costly dredging and off-site treatment of the contaminated media. Emulsified zero-valent iron (EZVI) has been proven to effectively degrade dissolved-phase and DNAPL-phase contaminants in freshwater environments on both the laboratory and field-scale level. However, the application to marine environments is only just being explored. This paper discusses the potential use of EZVI in brackish and saltwater environments, with supporting laboratory data detailed. Laboratory studies were performed in 2005 to establish the effectiveness of EZVI to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE) in saltwater. Headspace vials were setup to determine the kinetic rate of TCE degradation using EZVI in seawater. The reaction vials were analyzed by Gas Chromatographic/Flame Ionization Detection (GC/FID) for ethene production after a 48 day period using a GC/FID Purge and Trap system. Analytical results showed that EZVI was very effective at degrading TCE. The reaction by-products (ethene, acetylene and ethane) were produced at 71% of the rate in seawater as in the fresh water controls. Additionally, iron within the EZVI particles was protected from oxidation of the corrosive seawater, allowing EZVI to perform in an environment where zero-valent iron alone could not compete. Laboratory studies were also performed to establish the effectiveness of emulsified zero-valent metal (EZVM) to remove dissolved-phase cadmium and lead found in seawater. EZVM is comprised of a combination of magnesium and iron metal surrounded by the

  19. Kinetics of zero valent iron nanoparticle oxidation in oxygenated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Lauren F; Torrey, Jessica D; Amaro, Robert L; Shaw, Justin M

    2012-12-04

    Zero valent iron (ZVI) nanoparticles are versatile in their ability to remove a wide variety of water contaminants, and ZVI-based bimetallic nanoparticles show increased reactivity above that of ZVI alone. ZVI nanoparticles degrade contaminants through the reactive species (e.g., OH*, H(2(g)), H(2)O(2)) that are produced during iron oxidation. Measurement and modeling of aqueous ZVI nanoparticle oxidation kinetics are therefore necessary to optimize nanoparticle design. Stabilized ZVI and iron-nickel nanoparticles of approximately 150 nm in diameter were synthesized through solution chemistry, and nanoparticle oxidation kinetics were determined via measured mass change using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Under flowing aerated water, ZVI nanoparticles had an initial exponential growth behavior indicating surface-dominated oxidation controlled by migration of species (H(2)O and O(2)) to the surface. A region of logarithmic growth followed the exponential growth which, based on the Mott-Cabrera model of thin oxide film growth, suggests a reaction dominated by movement of species (e.g., iron cations and oxygen anions) through the oxide layer. The presence of ethanol or a nickel shell on the ZVI nanoparticles delayed the onset of iron oxidation and reduced the extent of oxidation. In oxygenated water, ZVI nanoparticles oxidized primarily to the iron oxide-hydroxide lepidocrocite.

  20. Stabilization of arsenic sludge with mechanochemically modified zero valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yanjie; Min, Xiaobo; Chai, Liyuan; Wang, Mi; Liyang, Wenjun; Pan, Qinglin; Okido, Masazumi

    2017-02-01

    Modified zero valent iron (ZVI) is obtained from commercial iron powder co-ground with manganese dioxide (MnO2) in intensive mechanical stress. The result indicates that the modified ZVI is very effective in arsenic sludge stabilization with a declination of arsenic leaching contraction from 72.50 mg/L to 0.62 mg/L, much lower than that of ordinary ZVI (10.48 mg/L). The involved process, including mechanochemical activation, corrosion and arsenic adsorption, is characterized explicitly to verify the improved arsenic stabilization mechanism. It shows that the mechanically formed Fe-Mn binary oxides layer results in an intensive corrosion extent, generating a mass of corrosion products. Moreover, as the emergence of Mn will restrain the process of iron (hydr)oxides crystallization, the ultimate corrosion products of the modified ZVI predominates in amorphous iron (hydr)oxides, performing much better in arsenic absorption. According to the BCR analysis, unstable arsenic in sludge is easily transformed to residual fraction by the help of amorphous iron (hydr)oxides, resulting in a restrained environmental availability of arsenic sludge after the modified ZVI stabilization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Toxicity assessment of zero valent iron nanoparticles on Artemia salina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Roy, Rajdeep; Parashar, Abhinav; Raichur, Ashok M; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan; Mukherjee, Anita; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2017-05-01

    The present study deals with the toxicity assessment of two differently synthesized zero valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI, chemical and biological) as well as Fe2+ ions on Artemia salina at three different initial concentrations of 1, 10, and 100 mg/L of these particles. The assessment was done till 96 h at time intervals of 24 h. EC50 value was calculated to evaluate the 50% mortality of Artemia salina at all exposure time durations. Between chemically and biologically synthesized nZVI nanoparticles, insignificant differences in the level of mortality were demonstrated. At even 24 h, Fe2+ ion imparted complete lethality at the highest exposure concentration (100 mg/L). To understand intracellular oxidative stress because of zero valent iron nanoparticles, ROS estimation, SOD activity, GSH activity, and catalase activity was performed which demonstrated that ionic form of iron is quite lethal at high concentrations as compared with the same concentration of nZVI exposure. Lower concentrations of nZVI were more toxic as compared with the ionic form and was in order of CS-nZVI > BS-nZVI > Fe2+ . Cell membrane damage and bio-uptake of nanoparticles were also evaluated for all three concentrations of BS-nZVI, CS-nZVI, and Fe2+ using adult Artemia salina in marine water; both of which supported the observations made in toxicity assessment. This study can be further explored to exploit Artemia salina as a model organism and a biomarker in an nZVI prone aquatic system to detect toxic levels of these nanoparticles. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1617-1627, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Transport of carbon colloid supported nanoscale zero-valent iron in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Jan; Meißner, Tobias; Potthoff, Annegret; Oswald, Sascha E

    2014-08-01

    Injection of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) has recently gained great interest as emerging technology for in-situ remediation of chlorinated organic compounds from groundwater systems. Zero-valent iron (ZVI) is able to reduce organic compounds and to render it to less harmful substances. The use of nanoscale particles instead of granular or microscale particles can increase dechlorination rates by orders of magnitude due to its high surface area. However, classical nZVI appears to be hampered in its environmental application by its limited mobility. One approach is colloid supported transport of nZVI, where the nZVI gets transported by a mobile colloid. In this study transport properties of activated carbon colloid supported nZVI (c-nZVI; d50=2.4μm) are investigated in column tests using columns of 40cm length, which were filled with porous media. A suspension was pumped through the column under different physicochemical conditions (addition of a polyanionic stabilizer and changes in pH and ionic strength). Highest observed breakthrough was 62% of the injected concentration in glass beads with addition of stabilizer. Addition of mono- and bivalent salt, e.g. more than 0.5mM/L CaCl2, can decrease mobility and changes in pH to values below six can inhibit mobility at all. Measurements of colloid sizes and zeta potentials show changes in the mean particle size by a factor of ten and an increase of zeta potential from -62mV to -80mV during the transport experiment. However, results suggest potential applicability of c-nZVI under field conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Removal of thiobencarb in aqueous solution by zero valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurul Amin, Md; Kaneco, Satoshi; Kato, Tetsuya; Katsumata, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Tohru; Ohta, Kiyohisa

    2008-01-01

    A cost-effective method with zero valent iron (ZVI) powder was developed for the purification of thiobencarb (TB)-contaminated water. The removal treatment was performed in the batch system. A sample solution of 10 ml containing 10 microg ml(-1) of TB could be almost completely treated by 100mg of ZVI at 25 degrees C for 12h of treatment time. Since the formation of chloride ion in the aqueous solution during the treatment of TB was observed, the removal of TB with ZVI may contain two processes: reduction (degradation) and adsorption. Because the present treatment for TB is simple, easy handling and cheap, the developed technology with ZVI can contribute to the treatment of agricultural wastewaters.

  4. Source zone remediation by zero valent iron technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann

    Chlorinated solvents have been widely used as industrial solvents. Decades of extensive use have resulted in the contamination of an estimated 800,000 sites in the western world alone. A medium to high risk of problems related to dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) has been assessed to exist...... and groundwater resources from long-term deterioration, the development of in situ technologies suitable for remediation of DNAPL is warranted. Currently, an array of aggressive in situ remediation technologies remediation exists. These technologies may be suitable under various site specific conditions; however......, most of them are limited by subsurface heterogeneities and/or the risk of inadvertent DNAPL displacement during field application. This thesis presents the results of an investigation of the potential for remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones by emerging zero valent iron (ZVI) based...

  5. Study of the adsorption of reactive blue 50 on zero valent iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Sarangerel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available  In this study, removal efficiency of the Reactive blue 50 and adsorption mechanism on the zero valent iron were investigated. Reactive blue 50 which is used to wool and cashmere dyeing were selected due its non-biodegradable and metabolic stability. Zero valent iron particle has been synthesized by chemical method. A systematic characterization of zero valent iron was performed using X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscope and infrared spectrometer analysis. The optimal condition of adsorption was determined as initial reactive dye 50 concentration of 150 mg·L-1, zero valent iron mass of 0.2 g and solution pH of 6.0 at room temperature. At optimal condition, organic dye removal in a real wastewater sample from Tsombon Knit LLC was 99.5%.Mongolian Journal of Chemistry 15 (41, 2014, p21-26

  6. Review of soluble uranium removal by nanoscale zero valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, C; Li, Y L; Landsberger, S

    2016-11-01

    Uranium (U) has been released to surface soil and groundwater through military and industrial activities. Soluble forms of U transferred to drinking water sources and food supplements can potentially threaten humans and the biosphere due to its chemical toxicity and radioactivity. The immobilization of aqueous U onto iron-based minerals is one of the most vital geochemical processes controlling the transport of U. As a consequence, much research has been focused on the use of iron-based materials for the treatment of U contaminated waters. One material currently being tested is nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI). However, understanding the removal mechanism of U onto nZVI is crucial to develop new technologies for contaminated water resources. This review article aims to provide information on the removal mechanism of U onto nZVI under different conditions (pH, U concentration, solution ion strength, humic acid, presence of O2 and CO2, microorganism effect) pertinent to environmental and engineered systems, and to provide risk or performance assessment results with the stability of nZVI products after removal of U in environmental restoration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A sequential zero valent iron and aerobic biodegradation treatment system for nitrobenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, L. S.; Devlin, J. F.; Gillham, R. W.; Binning, P. J.

    2003-11-01

    The remediation of nitroaromatic contaminated groundwater is sometimes difficult because nitroaromatic compounds are resistant to biodegradation and, when they do transform, the degradation of the products may also be incomplete. A simple nitroaromatic compound, nitrobenzene, was chosen to assess the feasibility of an in situ multi-zone treatment system at the laboratory scale. The proposed treatment system consists of a zero valent granular iron zone to reduce nitrobenzene to aniline, followed by a passive oxygen release zone for the aerobic biodegradation of the aniline daughter product using pristine aquifer material from Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Borden, Ontario, as an initial microbial source. In laboratory batch experiments, nitrobenzene was found to reduce quickly in the presence of granular iron forming aniline, which was not further degraded but remained partially sorbed onto the granular iron surface. Aniline was found to be readily biodegraded with little metabolic lag under aerobic conditions using the pristine aquifer material. A sequential column experiment, containing a granular iron reducing zone and an aerobic biodegradation zone, successively degraded nitrobenzene and then aniline to below detection limits (0.5 μM) without any noticeable reduction in hydraulic conductivity from biofouling, or through the formation of precipitates.

  8. Microbial and mineral evolution in zero valent iron-based permeable reactive barriers during long-term operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh; Millot, Romain; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne; Omoregie, Enoma; Chaurand, Perrine; Borschneck, Daniel; Bastiaens, Leen; Rose, Jérôme

    2016-03-01

    Impacts of subsurface biogeochemical processes over time have always been a concern for the long-term performance of zero valent iron (Fe(0))-based permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). To evaluate the biogeochemical impacts, laboratory experiments were performed using flow-through glass columns for 210 days at controlled temperature (20 °C). Two different particle sizes of Fe(0) were used in the columns, and to simulate indigenous microbial activity, extra carbon source was provided in the two columns (biotic columns) and the remaining two columns were kept abiotic using gamma radiations. Heavy metals (Zn, As) were removed efficiently in all the columns, and no exhaustion of treatment capability or clogging was observed during our experimental duration. Newly formed Fe mineral phases and precipitates were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), and micro-XRF techniques in solid phase at the end of the experiment. In addition, 16S rRNA gene extraction was used for microbial community identification in biotic columns. During the incubation, microbial population shifted in favor of Desulfosporosinus species (sulfate-reducing bacteria) from initial dominance of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans in sediments. Dominant mineral phases detected in biotic columns were mackinawite (FeS) and sulfate green rust, while in abiotic columns, magnetite/maghemite phases were more prevalent.

  9. Transport of carbon colloid supported nanoscale zero-valent iron in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Jan; Oswald, Sascha

    2013-04-01

    The use of nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) for environmental remediation is an emerging technology for in situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. Due to its high surface area and high reactivity nZVI is able to dechlorinate organic contaminants and render them to less harmful substances. Carbo-Iron is a newly developed material consisting of activated carbon particles (d50 = 0.6 - 2.4 µm) that are doted with nZVI particles. These particles combine the sorption capacity of activated carbon and the reactivity of nZVI. Additionally the main limitation for nZVI delivery, a limited mobility due to fast aggregation and sedimentation of nZVI in dispersions and soils, might be solved. According to transport theory, particles with a diameter of approximately 1 µm are more mobile than unsupported nZVI particles in sandy aquifer systems. Results from column tests and a two dimensional laboratory aquifer test system are presented: Column tests using columns of 40 cm length were filled with sand. A particle suspension was pumped against gravity through the system. Results show, addition of a polyanionic stabilizer such as Carboxymethylcellulouse (CMC) is required to enhancing mobility. Ionic strength and pH concentrations in an environmental relevant range do not interfere significantly with transport, but particle size was found to be crucial. Another experiment was performed in a two dimensional aquifer test system. The test system contains a sand filled container with a inner size of 40 x 5 x 110 cm and seven ports on each side. A constant flow of water was applied from the left to the right side through all ports and the middle port was fed with a Carbo-Iron suspension. Results show a transport through the laboratory aquifer within few exchanged pore volumes, and breakthrough of Carbo-Iron at the outlet. Deposits of immobile Carbo-Iron were found to be decreasing with distance from the injection port. No gravity effects were observed. Results suggest high mobility of

  10. Reduction of Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Zero-Valent Iron and Palladium Catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-Hun; Shin, Won Sik; Ko, Seok-Oh; Kim, Myung-Chul

    2004-03-31

    Permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is an alternative technology for soil and groundwater remediation. Zero valent iron, which is the most popular PRB material, is only applicable to halogenated aliphatic organics and some heavy metals. The objective of this study was to investigate reductive dechlorination of halogenated compounds and reduction of non-halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons using zero valent metals (ZVMs) and catalysts as reactive materials for PRBs. A group of small aromatic hydrocarbons such as monochlorophenols, phenol and benzene were readily reduced with palladium catalyst and zero valent iron. Poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also tested with the catalysts and zero valent metal combinations. The aromatic rings were reduced and partly reduced PAHs were found as the daughter compounds. The current study demonstrates reduction of aromatic compounds by ZVMs and modified catalysts and implicates that PRB is applicable not only for halogenated organic compounds but nonhalogenated aromatic compounds such as PAHs.

  11. Textile dye degradation using nano zero valent iron: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Chandra Devi; Kanmani, S

    2016-07-15

    Water soluble unfixed dyes and inorganic salts are the major pollutants in textile dyeing industry wastewater. Existing treatment methods fail to degrade textile dyes and have limitations too. The inadequate treatment of textile dyeing wastewater is a major concern when effluent is directly discharged into the nearby environment. Long term disposal threatens the environment, which needs reclamation. This article reviews the current knowledge of nano zero valent iron (nZVI) technique in the degradation of textile dyes. The application of nZVI on textile dye degradation is receiving great attention in the recent years because nZVI particles are highly reactive towards the pollutant, less toxic, and economical. The nZVI particles aggregate quickly with respect to time and the addition of supports such as resin, nickel, zinc, bentonite, biopolymer, kaolin, rectorite, nickel-montmorillonite, bamboo, cellulose, biochar, graphene, and clinoptilolite enhanced the stability of iron nanoparticles. Inclusion of supports may in turn introduce additional toxic pollutants, hence green supports are recommended. The majority of investigations concluded dye color removal as textile dye compound removal, which is not factual. Very few studies monitored the removal of total organic carbon and observed the products formed. The results revealed that partial mineralization of the textile dye compound was achieved. Instead of stand alone technique, nZVI can be integrated with other suitable technique to achieve complete degradation of textile dye and also to treat multiple pollutants in the real textile dyeing wastewater. It is highly recommended to perform more bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to apply this technique to the textile effluent contaminated sites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Haloacetic acid removal by sequential zero-valent iron reduction and biologically active carbon degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shun; Wang, Xiao-mao; Yang, Hong-wei; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2013-01-01

    An innovative haloacetic acid (HAA) removal process was developed. The process consisted of a zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) column followed by a biologically active carbon (BAC) column that were efficient in degrading tri- and di-HAAs, and mono- and di-HAAs, respectively. The merit of the process was demonstrated by its performance in removing trichloroacetic acid (TCAA). An empty bed contact time of 10 min achieved nearly complete removal of 1.2 μM TCAA and its subsequent products, dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and monochloroacetic acid (MCAA). HAA removal was a result of chemical dehalogenation and biodegradation rather than physical adsorption. Preliminary kinetic analyses were conducted and the pseudo-first-order rate constants were estimated at ambient conditions for Fe(0) reduction of TCAA and biodegradation of DCAA and MCAA by BAC. This innovative process is highly promising in removing HAAs from drinking water, swimming pool water, and domestic or industrial wastewater. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reductive degradation of nitrobenzene in aqueous solution by zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing; Zheng, Jia-Chuan; Zhang, Shu-Juan; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2004-02-01

    The reductive degradation of nitrobenzene (NB) by zero-valent iron was investigated. Experimental results showed that the degradation of NB was influenced by pH and NB concentration. The optimum pH value was found to be 3.0 for the reductive degradation of NB in the tested pH ranges of 3.0-12.0. The formation rate of aniline, a major reductive product of NB, followed zero-order kinetics at various pH levels. Furthermore, GC/MS analysis showed that aniline, azobenzene and azoxybenzene were the reductive products of NB by zero-valent iron. With the analysis of the products with GC/MS and FTIR, possible reductive pathways of NB by zero-valent iron were suggested.

  14. Catalytic Degradation of Dichlorvos Using Biosynthesized Zero Valent Iron Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Neha; Tripathi, Ravi Mani; Zafar, Fahmina; Singh, Manoj Pratap

    2017-06-01

    The removal of dichlorvos contamination from water is a challenging task because of the presence of direct carbon to phosphorous covalent bond, which makes them resistant to chemical and thermal degradation. Although there have been reports in the literature for degradation of dichlorvos using nanomaterials, those are based on photocatalysis. In this paper, we report a simple and rapid method for catalytic degradation of dichlorvos using protein-capped zero valent iron nanoparticles (FeNPs). We have developed an unprecedented reliable, clean, nontoxic, eco-friendly, and cost-effective biological method for the synthesis of uniformly distributed FeNPs. Yeast extract was used as reducing and capping agent in the synthesis of FeNPs, and synthesized particles were characterized by the UV-visible spectroscopy, X -ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM micrographs reveal that the nanoparticles size is distributed in the range of 2-10 nm. Selected area electron diffraction pattern shows the polycrystalline rings of FeNPs. The mean size was found to be 5.006 nm from ImageJ. FTIR spectra depicted the presence of biomolecules, which participated in the synthesis and stabilization of nanoparticles. As synthesized, FeNPs were used for the catalytic degradation of dichlorvos in aqueous medium. The degradation activity of the FeNPs has been investigated by the means of incubation time effect, oxidant effect, and nanoparticle concentration effect. The ammonium molybdate test was used to confirm the release of phosphate ions during the interaction of dichlorvos with FeNPs.

  15. Quantification of changes in zero valent iron morphology using X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ping; Bailey, Elizabeth H; Mooney, Sacha J

    2013-11-01

    Morphological changes within the porous architecture of laboratory scale zero valent iron (ZVI) permeable reactive barriers (PRBs), after exposure to different groundwater conditions, have been quantified experimentally for different ZVI/sand ratios (10%, 50% and 100%, W/W) with the aim of inferring porosity changes in field barriers. Column studies were conducted to simulate interaction with different water chemistries, a synthetic groundwater, acidic drainage and deionised (DI) water as control. Morphological changes, in terms of pore size and distribution, were measured using X-ray computed tomography (CT). CT image analysis revealed significant morphological changes in columns treated with different water chemistries. For example, 100% ZVI (W/W) columns had a higher frequency of small pores (0.6 mm) was observed in ZVI grains reacted with typical groundwater, resulting in a porosity of 27%, compared to 32% when exposed to DI water. In comparison, ZVI grains treated with the acidic drainage had higher porosity (44%) and larger average pore size (2.8 mm). 10% ZVI PRB barrier material had the highest mean porosity (56%) after exposure to any water chemistry whilst 100% ZVI (W/W) columns always had the lowest (34%) with the 50% ZVI (W/W) in between (40%). These results agree with previously published PRB field data and simultaneously conducted geochemical monitoring and mass balance calculation, indicating that both the geochemical and hydraulic environment of the PRB play an important role in determining barrier lifespan. This study suggests that X-ray CT image analysis is a powerful tool for studying the detailed inter pores between ZVI grains within PRBs.

  16. Iron-Catalyzed Olefin Metathesis with Low-Valent Iron Alkylidenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauksch, Michael; Tsogoeva, Svetlana B

    2017-08-01

    Inspired by recent reports of low-valent iron-complex-catalyzed formal [2+2] cycloaddition of olefins, we demonstrate computationally that with such low-valent iron complexes and with "strong" ligands, the olefin metathesis is also preferred over the undesired cyclopropanation side-reaction, competition already studied by Hoffmann and co-workers almost 40 years ago (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1981, 103, 5582). The [2+2] cycloaddition step in metathesis propagation, which gives a Chauvin-type metallacyclobutane intermediate, is proposed to proceed either via a planar four-electron Craig-Möbius aromatic [π2s +π2s ] transition-state structure with a low barrier of 4.7 kcal mol(-1) or, alternatively, via a twisted Zimmerman-Möbius aromatic [π2s +π2a ] transition state with a 5.5 kcal mol(-1) activation-energy barrier, with respect to an "encounter" π-complex minimum obtained from an Fe(II) alkylidene and the entering olefin, while the corresponding triplet pathways are all disfavored. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Effect of zero-valent iron and trivalent iron on UASB rapid start-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Fang, Hongyan; Jia, Hui; Yang, Guang; Gao, Fei; Liu, Wenbin

    2018-01-01

    In order to realize the rapid start-up of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, the iron ion in different valence state was added to UASB. The results indicated that the start-up time of R3 (FeCl 3 ) was 48 h faster than that of R2 (zero-valent iron (ZVI)). It was because the FeCl 3 could rapidly promote granulation of sludge as a flocculant. However, ZVI released Fe 2+ through corrosion slowly, and then the Fe 2+ increased start-up speed by enhancing enzyme activity and enriching methanogens. In addition, the ZVI and FeCl 3 could promote hydrolysis acidification and strengthen the decomposition of long-chain fatty acids. The detection of iron ions showed that iron ions mainly existed in the sludge. Because the high concentration of Fe 2+ could inhibit anaerobic bacteria activity, excess Fe 3+ could be changed into iron hydroxide precipitation to hinder the mass transfer process of anaerobic bacteria under the alkaline condition. The FeCl 3 was suitable to be added at the initial stage of UASB start-up, and the ZVI was more fitted to be used in the middle stage of reactor start-up to improve the redox ability.

  18. REDUCTION OF AZO DYES WITH ZERO-VALENT IRON. (R827117)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The reduction of azo dyes by zero-valent iron metal (Fe0) at pH 7.0 in 10 mM HEPES buffer was studied in aqueous, anaerobic batch systems. Orange II was reduced by cleavage of the azo linkage, as evidenced by the production of sulfanilic acid (a substituted ani...

  19. Analytical Characterisation of Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron: A Methodological Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) have been widely tested as they are showing significant promise for environmental remediation. However, many recent studies have demonstrated that their mobility and reactivity in subsurface environments are significantly affected by their te...

  20. Optimization of Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron for the Remediation of Groundwater Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    capped by polymeric thiols, Langmuir 20 (2004), pp. 5613- 5620. [39] T. Raychoudhury, G. Naja , and S. Ghoshal, Assessment of transport of two...32] Raychoudhury, T.; Naja , G.; Ghoshal, S. Assessment of transport of two polyelectrolyte- stabilized zero-valent iron nanoparicles in porous media

  1. Simple colorimetric assay for dehalogenation reactivity of nanoscale zero-valent iron using 4-chlorophenol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, Yuhoon; Mines, Paul D.; Jakobsen, Mogens Havsteen

    2015-01-01

    Despite the wide application of nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) for the treatment of a plethora of pollutants through reductive reactions, reactivity evaluation of nZVI towards dehalogenation has not been standardized. In this light, it was desired to develop a simple colorimetric assay...

  2. Effect of Stabilized Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles on Nitrate Removal from Sandy Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nooralivand

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: During the recent decades, the use of N fertilizers has undeniable development regardless of their effects on the soil and environment. Increasing nitrate ion concentration in soil solution and then, leaching it into groundwater causes increase nitrate concentration in the water and raise the risk suffering from the people to some diseases. World health organization recommended maximum concentration level for nitrate and nitrite in the drinking water 50 and 3 mg/l, respectively. There are different technologies for the removal of nitrate ions from aqueous solution. The conventional methods are ion exchange, biological denitrification, reverse osmosis and chemical reduction. Using nanoscale Fe0 particles compared to other methods of nitrate omission was preferred because of; its high surface area, more reactive, lower cost and higher efficiency. More studies on the reduction of nitrate by zero-valent iron nanoparticles have been in aqueous solutions or in the soil in batch scale. Nanoparticles surface modified with poly-electrolytes, surfactants and polymers cause colloidal stability of the particles against the forces of attraction between particles and increases nanoparticle transport in porous media. The objectives of this study were to synthesize carboxymethyl cellulose stabilized zero-valent iron nanoparticles and consideration of their application for nitrate removal from sandy soil. Materials and Methods: The nanoparticles were synthesized in a lab using borohydride reduction method and their morphological characteristics were examined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD and Fourier Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR. Experiments were conducted on packed sand column (40 cm length and 2.5 cm inner diameter under conditions of different nanoparticle concentration (1, 2, and 3 g1-1and high initial NO3- concentration (150, 250, and 350 mgl-1. Homogeneous soil column was filled with the wet packed

  3. Synthesis of Highly Reactive Subnano-sized Zero-valent Iron using Smectite Clay Templates

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Cheng; Jia, Hanzhang; Li, Hui; Teppen, Brian J.; Stephen A. Boyd

    2010-01-01

    A novel method was developed for synthesizing subnano-sized zero-valent iron (ZVI) using smectite clay layers as templates. Exchangeable Fe(III) cations compensating the structural negative charges of smectites were reduced with NaBH4, resulting in the formation of ZVI. The unique structure of smectite clay, in which isolated exchangeable Fe(III) cations reside near the sites of structural negative charges, inhibited the agglomeration of ZVI resulting in the formation of discrete regions of s...

  4. Effectiveness of nanoscale zero-valent iron for treatment of a PCE-DNAPL source zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavy, Amir; Costanza, Jed; Pennell, Kurt D; Abriola, Linda M

    2010-11-25

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) has received considerable attention as a potential in situ remediation technology for treating chlorinated solvent source zones. Experimental and mathematical modeling studies were conducted to investigate the performance of nZVI in the transformation of tetrachloroethene (PCE) entrapped as a dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). Injection of a 60 g/L suspension of nZVI into a column containing 20-30 mesh Ottawa sand and PCE-DNAPL at a residual saturation of 5.5% resulted in a uniform distribution of nZVI and minimal displacement of PCE. Subsequent flushing with 267 pore volumes of water containing 3mM CaCl(2) at a Darcy velocity of 0.75 m/day resulted in steady-state effluent concentrations of PCE near the solubility limit (ca. 200mg/L) and production of dissolved-phase ethene (10-30 mg/L). Over the duration of the experiment, approximately 30% of the initial PCE-DNAPL mass reacted to form ethene, 50% was eluted as dissolved-phase PCE, and 20% remained in the column as PCE-DNAPL. To further explore the implications of the nZVI column results, a multiphase transport model was developed that incorporated rate-limited PCE-DNAPL dissolution and reactions with nZVI. Using a fitted pseudo first-order transformation rate coefficient of 1.421/h, the model accurately captured observed trends in effluent concentrations of PCE and ethene and overall mass balance. A model sensitivity study reveals a strong dependence of treatment effectiveness on system characteristics. The sensitivity analysis suggests that an increase in the extent of PCE transformation is facilitated by decreasing flow rate, emplacement of nZVI down-gradient of the DNAPL source zone, and decreasing length of the DNAPL source zone. These findings indicate that, although emplacement of high concentrations of nZVI within a PCE-DNAPL source zone can result in substantial transformation of the parent compound, careful attention to design parameters (e.g. flow rate, location

  5. Orange peel + nanostructured zero-valent-iron composite for the removal of hexavalent chromium in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olea-Mejía, O.; Cabral-Prieto, A.; Salcedo-Castillo, U.; López-Tellez, G.; Olea-Cardoso, O.; López-Castañares, R.

    2017-11-01

    In this work we used the Pulsed Plasma in Liquid technique to synthesize zero-valent iron nanostructures. We used a DC Power Source to produce such plasma on water and methanol. The obtained particles were characterized by TEM to determine their shape and size and Mossbauer Spectroscopy to investigate the chemical state of the iron present. We found that 80% of the particles produced in water are composed of metallic iron and when methanol is used 97% of the particles are metallic iron. Once the Fe colloid was formed, orange skin was impregnated with these nanostructures for the removal of in water solution. The Cr(VI) removal experiments were done in a batch system in the presence of the composites at an inicial concentration of 50 ppm of Cr(VI). When using the iron nanostructures supported on the orange peel, the percentage of removal is 100% in the case of nanostructures formed in water and 96% when obtained in methanol.

  6. Remediation of Explosives Contaminated Groundwater With Zero-Valent Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    ceramic- piston pumps, which controlled water flow to the columns at 1.0 mL/min. The columns were operated in an up- flow mode. Figure 18. Schematic...using groundwater diverted from an existing pump-and-treat system. All columns are 15 cm long by 2.5 cm in diameter. Flow rate is 5 mL min-1. Porosity...of contaminant removal using bench- scale reactors . • Task 1. Complete a comprehensive mass balance of the products (both dissolved and sequestered

  7. Nitrate Removal by Acid-Washed Sulfur Modified Iron (SMI) and Zero Valent Iron (ZVI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, K.; Ko, J.; Hong, U.; Lim, J.; Park, S.; Kwon, S.; Kim, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Sulfur Modified Iron (SMI) and Zero Valent Iron (ZVI) have been extensively studied for its ability to reduce different contaminants, including nitrate in groundwater. Although nitrate reduction with ZVI was reported as early as 1964, research projects using the materials as an alternative for nitrate removal have emerged only recently. Therefore, further investigations are still need to maximize the efficiency of nitrate removal using SMI and ZVI. In current work, we determined the mixing ratio, effects of acidification of SMI and ZVI, and need of pH controlling to obtain the highest nitrate removal rate, increasing amount of less expensive compound, ZVI, than SMI. In the results, nitrate removal by only ZVI or SMI was 32.53% and 0.69%, respectively. Although SMI:ZVI(1:4; g/g) was the best mixing ratio for the highest nitrate removal rate, it did not improve the removal rate compared to it when we used only ZVI or SMI. However, the acidified SMI and ZVI (1:4; g/g) with 0.5 N-HCl for 8 hr increased nitrate removal from 32% to 87%. Through the test, we found that using SMI and ZVI (1:4; g/g) acidified is an appropriate method to remediate nitrate-contaminated groundwater with the highest efficiency, increasing ratio of cheaper compound ZVI. Although SMI and ZVI showed the higher nitrate removal rate in low pH in other works, in case of using acidified SMI and ZVI, pH controlling did not affect the nitrate removal rate.

  8. Enhanced nitrate-nitrogen removal by modified attapulgite-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron treating simulated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lei; Lin, Li; Li, Qingyun; Huang, Zhuo; Tang, Xianqiang; Wu, Min; Li, Chao; Cao, Xiaohuan; Scholz, Miklas

    2018-02-26

    Attapulgite (or palygorskite) is a magnesium aluminium phyllosilicate. Modified attapulgite-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) was created by a liquid-phase reduction method and then applied for nitrate-nitrogen (NO 3 -N) removal (transformation) in simulated groundwater. Nanoscale zero-valent iron was sufficiently dispersed on the surface of thermally modified attapulgite. The NO 3 -N removal efficiency reached up to approximately 83.8% with an initial pH values of 7.0. The corresponding thermally modified attapulgite-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (TATP-NZVI) and NO 3 -N concentrations were 2.0 g/L and 20 mg/L respectively. Moreover, 72.1% of the water column NO 3 -N was converted to ammonium-nitrogen (NH 4 -N) within 6 h. The influence of environmental boundary conditions including dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, light illumination and water temperature on NO 3 -N removal was also investigated with batch experiments. The results indicated that the DO concentration greatly impacted on NO 3 -N removal in the TATP-NZVI-contained solution, and the NO 3 -N removal efficiencies were 58.5% and 83.3% with the corresponding DO concentrations of 9.0 and 0.3 mg/L after 6 h of treatment, respectively. Compared to DO concentrations, no significant (p > 0.05) effect of light illumination on NO 3 -N removal and NH 4 -N generation was detected. The water temperature also has great importance concerning NO 3 -N reduction, and the removal efficiency of NO 3 -N at 25 °C was 1.25 times than that at 15 °C. For groundwater, therefore, environmental factors such as water temperature, anaerobic conditions and darkness could influence the NO 3 -N removal efficiency when TATP-NZVI is present. This study also demonstrated that TATP-NZVI has the potential to be developed as a suitable material for direct remediation of NO 3 -N-contaminated groundwater. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Carbothermal synthesis of carbon-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron particles for the remediation of hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Laura B; Mack, Elizabeth J; Hydutsky, Bianca W; Hershman, Jessica M; Skluzacek, Joanna M; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2008-04-01

    Nanoscale, zero-valent iron is a promising reagent for in situ reduction of a variety of subsurface contaminants, but its utility in full-scale remediation projects is limited by material costs. Iron nanoparticles (20-100 nm diameter) supported on carbon (C-Fe0) were synthesized by reacting iron salts, adsorbed or impregnated from aqueous solutions onto 80 m2/g carbon black, at 600-800 degrees C under Ar. Similar products were obtained by heating the reactants under air in a covered alumina crucible. X-ray powder diffraction patterns show that Fe3O4 particles are formed at 300-500 degrees C in the initial stage of the reaction and that these particles are reduced to a mixture of alpha- and gamma-Fe nanoparticles above 600 degrees C. When C-Fe0 was combined with carboxymethylcellulose in a 5:1 weight ratio in water, the resulting material had similar transport properties to previously optimized nanoiron/polyanion suspensions in water-saturated sand columns. At a 10:3 Fe/Cr mole ratio, C-Fe0 reduced a 10 ppm Cr(VI) solution to approximately 1 ppm within three days. The surface area normalized first-order Cr removal rate was 1.2 h(-1) m(-2) under these conditions. These results demonstrate that reactive nanoiron with good transport properties in water-saturated porous media can be made in a scalable process from inexpensive starting materials by carbothermal reduction.

  10. Removal of arsenic from water by supported nano zero-valent iron on activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huijie; Jia, Yongfeng; Wu, Xing; Wang, He

    2009-12-30

    Nano-sized zero-valent iron is an effective adsorbent for arsenic removal from drinking water. However, its application may be limited in public water system and small scale water treatment system due to its tiny particle size. In the present work, nanoscale zero-valent iron was supported onto activated carbon (NZVI/AC) by impregnating carbon with ferrous sulfate followed by chemical reduction with NaBH(4). Approximate 8.2 wt% of iron was loaded onto carbon and SEM analysis showed that the iron particles in the pores of carbon were needle-shaped with the size of 30-500 x 1000-2000 nm. Kinetics study revealed that adsorption of arsenite and arsenate by NZVI/AC was fast in the first 12h and the equilibrium was achieved in approximately 72 h. The adsorption capacity of the synthesized sorbent for arsenite and arsenate at pH 6.5 calculated from Langmuir adsorption isotherms in batch experiments was 18.2 and 12.0mg/g, respectively. Phosphate and silicate markedly decreased the removal of both arsenite and arsenate, while the effect of other anions and humic acid was insignificant. Common metal cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) enhanced arsenate adsorption but ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) was found to suppress arsenite adsorption. NZVI/AC can be effectively regenerated by elution with 0.1M NaOH.

  11. Stimulating short-chain fatty acids production from waste activated sludge by nano zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jingyang; Feng, Leiyu; Chen, Yinguang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hong; Xiao, Naidong; Wang, Dongbo

    2014-10-10

    An efficient and green strategy, i.e. adding nano zero-valent iron into anaerobic fermentation systems to remarkably stimulate the accumulation of short-chain fatty acids from waste activated sludge via accelerating the solubilization and hydrolysis processes has been developed. In the presence of nano zero-valent iron, not only the short-chain fatty acids production was significantly improved, but also the fermentation time for maximal short-chain fatty acids was shortened compared with those in the absence of nano zero-valent iron. Mechanism investigations showed that the solubilization of sludge, hydrolysis of solubilized substances and acidification of hydrolyzed products were all enhanced by addition of nano zero-valent iron. Also, the general microbial activity of anaerobes and relative activities of key enzymes with hydrolysis and acidification of organic matters were improved than those in the control. 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing analysis suggested that the abundance of bacteria responsible for waste activated sludge hydrolysis and short-chain fatty acids production was greatly enhanced due to nano zero-valent iron addition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Removal of arsenite from drinking water by activated carbon supported nano zero-valent iron].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hui-Jie; Jia, Yong-Feng; Wu, Xing; Wang, He

    2009-06-15

    Nano zero-valent iron was loaded onto activated carbon by deoxidizing Fe2+ in aqueous solution and approximately 8.2% (wt) of iron was loaded it. The size of the needle-shaped iron particles in the pores of carbon was (30-500) x (1 000-3 000) nm. The adsorption capacity for arsenic was approximately 1.997 mg/g activated carbon supported nano zero-valent iron (NZVI/AC) in the 2 mg/L As(III) solution at pH 6.5 and (25 +/- 2) degrees C. The uptake of arsenic by NZVI/AC was rapid in the first 12 h (94.3%) and equilibrium was achieved at 72 h (99.86%). As(III) was partly oxidized by the absorbent in the process of absorption. The presence of phosphate and silicate ions significantly decreased arsenic removal rate while the effect of other common ions such as sulfate, carbonate and oxalate was insignificant. NZVI/AC was effectively regenerated after adsorption of arsenic when elution was applied with 0.1 mol/L NaOH solution. The results suggest that NZVI/AC is an ideal candidate for the treatment of arsenic contaminated drinking water.

  13. Study on degradation of nitrobenzene in groundwater using emulsified nano-zero-valent iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun; Wen, Chunyu; Liu, Dengfeng; Zhang, Wenjing; Li, Jintong; Jiang, Hanjie; Qin, Chongwei; Hong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Emulsified nano-zero-valent iron (EZVI) is a modified form of bare nanoiron with improved transportability and targetability for the remediation of organic-solvents polluted soil and groundwater. In this work, EZVI (50-150 nm) was prepared by coating an emulsified vegetable oil membrane on the surface of Fe nanoparticles. EZVI was well-dispersed and less aggregation was observed. Batch experiments were conducted in anaerobic conditions to investigate the kinetics of nitrobenzene reduction by EZVI and the influences of oil concentration, initial iron content, and initial pH. Results indicated that the kinetics of nitrobenzene reduction by EZVI followed a pseudo-first-order kinetics. The observed rate constant of nitrobenzene is 0.0942 min-1. The oil concentration of 1 and 2 % tended to be preferred concentrations. The rate of nitrobenzene degradation and aniline formation increased with increasing iron content. The low pH is favorable to the nitrobenzene reduction by EZVI.

  14. Degradation of Energetic Compounds using Zero-Valent Iron (ZVI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    through dinitroamino- and nitrodiamino- toluenes as intermediates. In contrast to TNT, RDX reduction with iron involved ring cleavage and yielded... nitrotoluene (24DA6NT; 0.1 mg/mL standard in acetonitrile), 2,6-diamino-4- nitrotoluene (26DA4NT; 0.1 mg/mL standard in acetonitrile) and 2,4,6...DNT and TNT (e.g., DAT, 2,6-diamino-4- nitrotoluene ) were removed more easily by oxidation with horseradish peroxidase and H2O2 than DNT and TNT

  15. Nano-Sized Zero Valent Iron and Covalent Organic Polymer Composites for Azo Dye Remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mines, Paul D.; Byun, Jeehye; Hwang, Yuhoon

    2014-01-01

    Having superior reductive properties and large surface areas, nanosized zero valent iron (nZVI) is ideal for the degradation of chemicals such as azo dyes and trichloroethylene (TCE). However, immobilization of nZVI is a key parameter in its effectiveness as a chemical degradation agent...... contaminant removal. Composites of nZVI impregnated within COPs of high surface areas exhibit effective ability to degrade azo dyes, up to 95%, over a 30-minute reaction period. Dye decolorization results were designated a precursor for effectiveness of pollutant decontamination; pollutants ranging...

  16. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A; Illman, Walter A

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A.; Illman, Walter A.

    2015-06-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios.

  18. Synthesis, Characterization and Reactivity of Nanostructured Zero-Valent Iron Particles for Degradation of Azo Dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, Ivan; Levina, Vera; Leybo, Denis; Masov, Vsevolod; Tagirov, Marat; Kuznetsov, Denis

    Nanostructured zero-valent iron (NSZVI) particles were synthesized by the method of ferric ion reduction with sodium borohydride with subsequent drying and passivation at room temperature in technical grade nitrogen. The obtained sample was characterized by means of X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering studies. The prepared NSZVI particles represent 100-200nm aggregates, which consist of 20-30nm iron nanoparticles in zero-valent oxidation state covered by thin oxide shell. The reactivity of the NSZVI sample, as the removal efficiency of refractory azo dyes, was investigated in this study. Two azo dye compounds, namely, orange G and methyl orange, are commonly detected in waste water of textile production. Experimental variables such as NSZVI dosage, initial dye concentration and solution pH were investigated. The kinetic rates of degradation of both dyes by NSZVI increased with the decrease of solution pH from 10 to 3 and with the increase of NSZVI dosage, but decreased with the increase of initial dye concentration. The removal efficiencies achieved for both orange G and methyl orange were higher than 90% after 80min of treatment.

  19. In field arsenic removal from natural water by zero-valent iron assisted by solar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornejo, Lorena [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7-D, Arica (Chile); Laboratorio de Investigaciones Medioambientales de Zonas Aridas, LIMZA, Centro de Investigaciones del Hombre en el Desierto, CIHDE, Arica (Chile)], E-mail: lorenacp@uta.cl; Lienqueo, Hugo; Arenas, Maria [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7-D, Arica (Chile); Acarapi, Jorge [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7-D, Arica (Chile); Laboratorio de Investigaciones Medioambientales de Zonas Aridas, LIMZA, Centro de Investigaciones del Hombre en el Desierto, CIHDE, Arica (Chile); Contreras, David; Yanez, Jorge; Mansilla, Hector D. [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160C, Concepcion (Chile)

    2008-12-15

    An in situ arsenic removal method applicable to highly contaminated water is presented. The method is based in the use of steel wool, lemon juice and solar radiation. The method was evaluated using water from the Camarones River, Atacama Desert in northern Chile, in which the arsenic concentration ranges between 1000 and 1300 {mu}g L{sup -1}. Response surface method analysis was used to optimize the amount of zero-valent iron (steel wool) and the citrate concentration (lemon juice) to be used. The optimal conditions when using solar radiation to remove arsenic from natural water from the Camarones river are: 1.3 g L{sup -1} of steel wool and one drop (ca. 0.04 mL) of lemon juice. Under these conditions, removal percentages are higher than 99.5% and the final arsenic concentration is below 10 {mu}g L{sup -1}. This highly effective arsenic removal method is easy to use and inexpensive to implement. - An in situ arsenic removal method applicable to highly contaminated waters by using zero-valent iron, citrate and solar radiation was developed.

  20. Utilization of food industry wastes for the production of zero-valent iron nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, S; Grosso, J P; Nouws, H P A; Albergaria, J T; Delerue-Matos, C

    2014-10-15

    The proper disposal of the several types of wastes produced in industrial activities increases production costs. As a consequence, it is common to develop strategies to reuse these wastes in the same process and in different processes or to transform them for use in other processes. This work combines the needs for new synthesis methods of nanomaterials and the reduction of production cost using wastes from citrine juice (orange, lime, lemon and mandarin) to produce a new added value product, green zero-valent iron nanoparticles that can be used in several applications, including environmental remediation. The results indicate that extracts of the tested fruit wastes (peel, albedo and pulp fractions) can be used to produce zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVIs). This shows that these wastes can be an added value product. The resulting nZVIs had sizes ranging from 3 up to 300 nm and distinct reactivities (pulp>peel>albedo extracts). All the studied nanoparticles did not present a significant agglomeration/settling tendency when compared to similar nanoparticles, which indicates that they remain in suspension and retain their reactivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Amoxicillin Oxidative Degradation Synthesized by Nano Zero Valent Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Yazdanbakhsh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Amoxicillin is one of the most important groups of pharmaceuticals that benefits humans and animals. However, antibiotics excertion in wastewaters and environment have emerged as a serious risk to the biotic environment, and their toxic effects can harm the organisms. Iron-based metallic nanoparticles have received special attention in regard with remediation of groundwater contaminants. In the typical nZVI-based bimetallic particle system, Fe acts as the reducing agent. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the synthesis and characteristics of nZVI in regard with degrading AMX. Methods: In this study, nZVI nanoparticles were synthesized using the liquid-phase reduction method by EDTA as a stabilizer material. Structure and properties of nanoparticles were characterized by BET, SEM, XRD and EDX analysis. A multi-variate analysis was applied using a response surface methodology (RSM in order to develop a quadratic model as a functional relationship between AMX removal efficiency and independent variables ( initial pH values, dosage of nZVI, contact time and amoxicillin concentration. The four independent variables of solution pH (2–10, AMX concentration (5-45mg/l, contact time (5-85 min and nanoparticles dose (0.25 – 1.25 g were transformed to the coded values. Results: The study results demonstrated that more than 69 % of AMX was removed by nZVI. The optimal AMX removal conditions using nZVI were found as 1.25 g of nZVI, pH 4, contact time of 80 min and concentration of 30 mg/l. Conclusions: The ability of nZVI in degradation of AMX revealed that these materials can serve as a potential nano material with respect to the environmental remediation.

  2. Application of Recycled Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticle to the Treatment of Wastewater Containing Nitrobenzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heon Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zero-valent iron (ZVI was synthesized using iron oxide, a byproduct of pickling line at a steel work. ZVI with a mean particle size of 500 nm was synthesized. The reaction activity of the synthesized ZVI was much higher than commercial ZVI. When applied to the decomposition of nitrobenzene (NB, the ZVI particles underwent corrosion and passivation oxide film formation, resulting in particle size decrease. The NB decomposition rate increased with increasing ZVI dosage level and with decreasing pH. The solution pH increased monotonously with increasing reaction duration, whereas the aniline concentration showed a maximum at 50 min. Based on the GC/MS analysis, NB is presumed to be reduced into aniline via reductive intermediates such as azobenzene and azoxybenzene. When combined with a subsequent biological process, the synthesized ZVI will be able to decompose NB in wastewater effectively.

  3. Removal of Perfluorinated Compounds From Water using Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvaniti, Olga S.; Hwang, Yuhoon; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    ZVI, under the same experimental conditions. Removal efficiencies of PFCs using MgAC coated nZVI were enhanced under acidic conditions and lower reaction temperature, as well as nZVI concentration increased. Based on removal mechanism experiments, it was demonstrated that PFCs removal can be accomplished......, the application of biological and conventional physicochemical treatment methods does not seem to remove sufficient these compounds from water and wastewater. In the current study, the removal efficiency of four PFCs using three different types of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) was investigated. Influencing...... factors such as, initial pH solution, reaction temperature and nZVI dosage were also studied. According to the results, target compounds were removed in the presence of chemically synthesized nZVI modified with Mg-aminoclay (MgAC) than under commercial iron powder and chemically synthesized uncoated n...

  4. Aggregation and deposition kinetics of carboxymethyl cellulose-modified zero-valent iron nanoparticles in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychoudhury, Trishikhi; Tufenkji, Nathalie; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2012-04-15

    Transport and deposition of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-modified nanoparticles of zero-valent iron (NZVI) were investigated in laboratory-scale sand packed columns. Aggregation resulted in a change in the particle size distribution (PSD) with time, and the changes in average particle size were determined by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). The change in PSD over time was influenced by the CMC-NZVI concentration in suspension. A particle-particle attachment efficiency was evaluated by fitting an aggregation model with NTA data and subsequently used to predict changes in PSD over time. Changes in particle sizes over time led to corresponding changes in single-collector contact efficiencies, resulting in altered particle deposition rates over time. A coupled aggregation-colloid transport model was used to demonstrate how changes in PSD can reduce the transport of CMC-NZVI in column experiments. The effects of particle concentrations in the range of 0.07 g L(-1) to 0.725 g L(-1) on the transport in porous media were evaluated by comparing the elution profiles of CMC-NZVI from packed sand columns. Changes in PSD over time could reasonably account for a gradual increase in effluent concentration between 1 and 5 pore volumes (PVs). Processes such as detachment of deposited particles also likely contributed to the gradual increase in effluent concentrations. The particle-collector attachment efficiency increased with CMC-NZVI particle concentration due to a rise in dissolved Na(+) concentration with increased addition of Na-CMC. This inadvertent change in ionic strength led to decreased effluent concentrations at higher CMC-NZVI concentrations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The ecotoxic potential of a new zero-valent iron nanomaterial, designed for the elimination of halogenated pollutants, and its effect on reductive dechlorinating microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiwy, Andreas; Maes, Hanna M; Koske, Daniel; Flecken, Mirkko; Schmidt, Kathrin R; Schell, Heico; Tiehm, Andreas; Kamptner, Andre; Thümmler, Silke; Stanjek, Helge; Heggen, Marc; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Braun, Jürgen; Schäffer, Andreas; Hollert, Henner

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ecotoxic potential of a new zero-valent iron nanomaterial produced for the elimination of chlorinated pollutants at contaminated sites. Abiotic dechlorination through the newly developed nanoscale zero-valent iron material and its effects on dechlorinating bacteria were investigated in anaerobic batch and column experiments. The aged, i.e. oxidized, iron material was characterization with dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis, x-ray diffractometry and cell-free reactive oxygen measurements. Furthermore, it was evaluated in aerobic ecotoxicological test systems with algae, crustacean, and fish, and also applied in a mechanism specific test for mutagenicity. The anaerobic column experiments showed co-occurrence of abiotic and biological dechlorination of the common groundwater contaminant perchloroethene. No prolonged toxicity of the nanomaterial (measured for up to 300 days) towards the investigated dechlorinating microorganism was observed. The nanomaterial has a flake like appearance and an inhomogeneous size distribution. The toxicity to crustacean and fish was calculated and the obtained EC50 values were 163 mg/L and 458 mg/L, respectively. The nanomaterial showed no mutagenicity. It physically interacted with algae, which had implications for further testing and the evaluation of the results. Thus, the newly developed iron nanomaterial was slightly toxic in its reduced state but no prolonged toxicity was recorded. The aquatic tests revealed a low toxicity with EC50 values ≥ 163 mg/L. These concentrations are unlikely to be reached in the aquatic environment. Hence, this nanomaterial is probably of no environmental concern not prohibiting its application for groundwater remediation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of zero-valent iron nanoparticles supported on SBA-15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Sombra dos Santos

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to synthesize zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI supported on SBA-15 nanosilica. The nanosilica generate in the system by polymer reaction with hydrochloric acid under controlled temperature. After, the iron nanomaterial was obtained by sodium borohydride reduction as described in this work. Afterward the synthesis of the nanoparticles contained iron supported on silica SBA-15, the material was characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, zeta potential and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The results indicated that nanomaterial obtained was in nanometric scale, by TEM results, and showing characteristic peaks at EDS results, with 11.9% iron and 14.0% silicon content, respectively, and containing 73.0% and 27.0% of their respective oxides through X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The isoelectric potential of the sample was around 2.0, close to the value reported for silica, due to the higher percentage of silica in the sample when compared to iron. The obtained material can be used, for some cases, as an possible alternative, to the Fenton reaction for the degradation of xenobiotic compounds or other applications in the groundwater and wastewater treatments.

  7. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS USING ZERO-VALENT IRON: GEOCHEMICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL EFFECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geochemical and microbiological factors that control long-term performance of subsurface permeable reactive barriers were evaluated at the Elizabeth City, NC and the Denver Federal Center, CO sites. These ground water treatment systems use zero-valent iron filings (Peerless Meta...

  8. Low-valent iron: an Fe(I) ate compound as a building block for a linear trinuclear Fe cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenberg, C.; Viciu, L.; Vogt, M.; Rodríguez-Lugo, R.E.; Adelhardt, M.; Sutter, J.; Khusniyarov, M.M.; Meyer, K.; de Bruin, B.; Bill, E.; Grützmacher, H.

    2015-01-01

    A low-valent trinuclear iron complex with an unusual linear Fe(I)-Fe(II)-Fe(I) unit is presented. It is accessed in a rational approach using a salt metathesis reaction between a new anionic Fe(I) containing heterocycle and FeCl2. Its electronic structure was studied by single crystal XRD analysis,

  9. Enhanced Biogas Production from Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron-Amended Anaerobic Bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells; Laughton, Stephanie N; Wiesner, Mark R

    2015-08-01

    Addition of nanoscale zero valent iron (NZVI) to anaerobic batch reactors to enhance methanogenic activity is described. Two NZVI systems were tested: a commercially available NZVI (cNZVI) slurry and a freshly synthesized NZVI (sNZVI) suspension that was prepared immediately before addition to the reactors. In both systems, the addition of NZVI increased pH and decreased oxidation/reduction potential compared with unamended control reactors. Biodegradation of a model brewery wastewater was enhanced as indicated by an increase in chemical oxygen demand removal with both sNZVI and cNZVI amendments at all concentrations tested (1.25-5.0 g Fe/L). Methane production increased for all NZVI-amended bioreactors, with a maximum increase of 28% achieved on the addition of 2.5 and 5.0 g/L cNZVI. Addition of bulk zero-valent iron resulted in only a 5% increase in methane, indicating the advantage of using the nanoscale particles. NZVI amendments further improved produced biogas by decreasing the amount of CO 2 released from the bioreactor by approximately 58%. Overall, addition of cNZVI proved more beneficial than the sNZVI at equal iron concentrations, due to decreased colloidal stability and larger effective particle size of sNZVI. Although some have reported cytotoxicity of NZVI to anaerobic microorganisms, work presented here suggests that NZVI of a certain particle size and reactivity can serve as an amendment to anaerobic digesters to enhance degradation and increase the value of the produced biogas, yielding a more energy-efficient anaerobic method for wastewater treatment.

  10. Treatment of dissolved perchlorate, nitrate, and sulfate using zero-valent iron and organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, YingYing; Ptacek, Carol J; Blowes, David W

    2014-05-01

    Waters containing ClO and dissolved NO, derived from detonated explosives and solid propellants, often also contain elevated concentrations of other dissolved constituents, including SO. Four column experiments, containing mixtures of silica sand, zero-valent Fe (ZVI) and organic C (OC) were conducted to evaluate the potential for simultaneous removal of NO, SO and ClO. Initially, the flow rate was maintained at 0.5 pore volumes (PV) d and then decreased to 0.1 PV d after 100 PV of flow. Nitrate concentrations decreased from 10.8 mg L (NO-N) to trace levels through NO reduction to NH using ZVI alone and through denitrification using OC. Observations from the mixture of ZVI and OC suggest a combination of NO reduction and denitrification. Up to 71% of input SO (24.5 ± 3.5 mg L) was removed in the column containing OC, and >99.7% of the input ClO (857 ± 63 μg L) was removed by the OC- and (ZVI + OC)-containing columns as the flow rate was maintained at 0.1 PV d. Nitrate and ClO removal followed first-order and zero-order rates, respectively. Nitrate >2 mg L (NO-N) inhibited ClO removal in the OC-containing column but not in the (ZVI + OC)-containing column. Sulfate did not inhibit ClO degradation within any of the columns. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  11. Removal of Reactive Red 198 by Nanoparticle Zero Valent Iron in the Presence of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siroos Shojaei

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Although dyes are widely used in textile industries, they are carcinogenic, teratogenic and mutagenic. Industries discharge their wastewater containing a variety of colors into water resources and make harmful effect on the environment. The present study aims to Evaluate removal of reactive red 198 by nanoparticle zero valent iron (NZVI in the presence of hydrogen peroxide from aqueous solution. The effective parameters on the removal of dye such as the hydrogen peroxide concentration of NZVI, contact time, pH and dye concentration were investigated and optimized. According to the results, the combination of NZVI with hydrogen peroxide is more effective than single hydrogen peroxide. At pH = 4, contact time= 40 min, 200 M of hydrogen peroxide, dye concentration= 75 mg/L and concentration of NZVI 2g/L, color removal was achieved 91% approximately. Based on the results of experiments, using hydrogen peroxide- NZVI has high efficiency in removal of azo dye type.

  12. Injection of Zero Valent Iron into an Unconfined Aquifer Using Shear-Thinning Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Macbeth, Tamzen

    2011-02-18

    Approximately 190 kg of two micron-diameter zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles were injected into a test zone in the top two meters of an unconfined aquifer within a trichloroethene (TCE) source area. A shear-thinning fluid was used to enhance ZVI delivery in the subsurface to a radial distance of up to four meters from a single injection well. The ZVI particles were mixed in-line with the injection water, shear-thinning fluid, and a low concentration of surfactant. ZVI was observed at each of the seven monitoring wells within the targeted radius of influence during injection. Additionally, all wells within the targeted zone showed low TCE concentrations and primarily dechlorination products present 44 days after injection. These results suggest that ZVI can be directly injected into an aquifer with shear-thinning fluids and extends the applicability of ZVI to situations where other emplacement methods may not be viable.

  13. Dechlorination of short chain chlorinated paraffins by nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Lu, Mang; Zhang, Zhong-Zhi; Xiao, Meng; Zhang, Min

    2012-12-01

    In this study, nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles were synthesized and used for the reductive dehalogenation of short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) in the laboratory. The results show that the dechlorination rate of chlorinated n-decane (CP(10)) by NZVI increased with decreased solution pH. Increasing the loading of NZVI enhanced the dechlorination rate of CP(10). With an increase in temperature, the degradation rate increased. The reduction of CP(10) by NZVI was accelerated with increasing the concentration of humic acid up to 15 mg/L but then was inhibited. The dechlorination of CP(10) within the initial 18 h followed pseudo-first order rate model. The formation of intermediate products indicates a stepwise dechlorination pathway of SCCPs by NZVI. The carbon chain length and chlorination degree of SCCPs have a polynominal impact on dechlorination reactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimization of Reactive Blue 21 removal by Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron using response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Reza Sohrabi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Since Reactive Blue 21 (RB21 is one of the dye compounds which is harmful to human life, a simple and sensitive method to remove this pollutant from wastewater is using Nano Zero-Valent Iron (NZVI catalyst. In this paper, a Central Composite Rotatable Design (CCRD was employed for response surface modeling to optimize experimental conditions of the RB21 removal from aqueous solution. The significance and adequacy of the model were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA. Four independent variables—including catalyst amount (0.1–0.9 g, pH (3.5–9.5, removal time (30–150 s and dye concentration (10–50 mg/L—were transformed to coded values and consequently second order quadratic model was built to predict the responses. The result showed that under optimized experimental conditions the removal of RB21 was over 95%.

  15. Microbial reduction of nitrate in the presence of zero-valent iron and biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seok-Young; Seo, Yong-Deuk; Kim, Beomseok; Kim, In Young; Cha, Daniel K

    2016-01-01

    The denitrification of nitrate (NO3(-)) by mixed cultures in the presence of zero-valent iron [Fe(0)] and biochar was investigated through a series of batch experiments. It was hypothesized that biochar may provide microbes with additional electrons to enhance the anaerobic biotransformation of nitrate in the presence of Fe(0) by facilitating electron transfer. When compared to the anaerobic transformation of nitrate by microbes in the presence of Fe(0) alone, the presence of biochar significantly enhanced anaerobic denitrification by microbes with Fe(0). Graphite also promoted the anaerobic microbial transformation of nitrate with Fe(0), and it was speculated that electron-conducting graphene moieties were responsible for the improvement. The results obtained in this work suggest that nitrate can be effectively denitrified by microbes with Fe(0) and biochar in natural and engineered systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cadmium immobilization in river sediment using stabilized nanoscale zero-valent iron with enhanced transport by polysaccharide coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Danlian; Hu, Zhengxun; Peng, Zhiwei; Zeng, Guangming; Chen, Guomin; Zhang, Chen; Cheng, Min; Wan, Jia; Wang, Xi; Qin, Xiang

    2018-03-15

    Proper management of metal-contaminated sediment plays a key role in sediment recovery and reuse. This study synthesized two kinds of stabilized nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) with starch (S-nZVI) and carboxymethyl cellulose (C-nZVI) for the in situ immobilization of Cd(II) in river sediment and investigated their transport in porous media. Experimental data showed that when the sediment sample was treated with C-nZVI for 56 days at a dosage ranging from 5 to 10 mg/g-sediment as Fe 0 , the TCLP (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure) leachability of Cd(II) in the sediment decreased by 93.75-96.43%, and the PBET (physiologically-based extraction test) bioaccessibility of Cd(II) decreased by 22.79-71.32%. Additionally, the acid soluble fraction of Cd(II) was partially transformed to a residual fraction, resulting in a 32.4-33.1% decrease of acid soluble Cd(II) and a 125.4-205.6% increase of the residual-Cd(II) fraction. Surface complexation with iron oxyhydroxide minerals might be the main mechanism of Cd(II) immobilization in sediment. Column experiments indicate that starch or carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) could extend the travel distance of nZVI, but inherent site physical and chemical heterogeneities still posed challenges for nanoparticle transport. Over all, this study verifies the effectiveness of stabilized nZVI for Cd(II) immobilization in sediment and discusses the potential immobilization mechanism. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of nano zero valent iron effects on fermentation of municipal anaerobic sludge and inducing biogas production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amen, Tareq W. M.; Eljamal, Osama; Khalil, Ahmed M. E.; Matsunaga, Nobuhiro

    2017-05-01

    The application of nano size materials on wastewater is going extensive because its high reactivity compared with other materials. As a result, numerous research studies investigated the effectiveness of dosing nano zero valent iron (nZVI) or micro zero valent iron (mZVI) on anaerobic digestion (AD) of sludge and production of biogas as promising renewable energy but inconsistent outcomes have appeared. In this paper, different dosing concentrations of nZVI were applied on anaerobic activated municipal sludge to examine the impact of nZVI on sludge fermentation, biogas generation, and methane (CH4) content stimulation. The results showed that addition 250 mg/L nZVI nanoparticles could enhance 25.23% biogas production and the methane content reached 94.05% after one week of digestion compared with 62.67% without adding iron nanoparticles.

  18. Kinetic and Thermodynamics of Methylene Blue Adsorption onto Zero Valent Iron Supported on Mesoporous Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atyaf Khalid Hameed

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Zero valent iron supported on mesoporous silicanano particles (NZVI/MSNs was prepared by the aqueous phase borohydride reduction methods. Prior to the reduction, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs were prepared through the activation of fumed silica with concentrated HCl by refluxing at 90 °C. FTIR, XRD, FESEM, EDX and BET were used to characterize theadsorbents prepared. BET surface areas of MSNs, NZVI, and NZVI/MSNs were 126, 41, and 72 m2/g for, respectively. The performance of NZVI/MSNs as adsorbent was examined by adsorption of methylene blue (MB, performed in series of batch experiments. In the kinetic studies, pseudo first order and pseudo second order kinetic models were examined. The pseudo second order equation provided the best fit with the experimental data. Thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption process is endothermic with ΔH° was 90.53 kJ/mol. Positive ΔS° (300 J/mol and negative ΔG° (-6.42 kJ/mol was recorded, indicating the spontaneous of the adsorption process and naturally favorable. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 5th March 2016; Revised: 18th March 2016; Accepted: 18th March 2016 How to Cite: Hameed, A.K., Dewayanto, N., Dongyun, D., Nordin, M.R., Mohd Hasbi Ab. Rahim, M.H.A. (2016. Kinetic and Thermodynamics of Methylene Blue Adsorption onto Zero Valent Iron Supported on Mesoporous Silica. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (2: 250-261 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.2.443.250-261 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.2.443.250-261

  19. Study on degradation of nitrobenzene in groundwater using emulsified nano-zero-valent iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Jun, E-mail: dongjun@jlu.edu.cn; Wen, Chunyu, E-mail: 13756014702@163.com; Liu, Dengfeng, E-mail: 862337789@qq.com [Jilin University, College of Environment and Resources (China); Zhang, Wenjing, E-mail: zhangwj@caep.org.cn [Chinese Academy for Environmental Planning (CAEP) (China); Li, Jintong, E-mail: 1535448369@qq.com; Jiang, Hanjie, E-mail: 1932639992@qq.com; Qin, Chongwei, E-mail: 476158689@qq.com; Hong, Mei, E-mail: hongmei@jlu.edu.cn [Jilin University, College of Environment and Resources (China)

    2015-01-15

    Emulsified nano-zero-valent iron (EZVI) is a modified form of bare nanoiron with improved transportability and targetability for the remediation of organic-solvents polluted soil and groundwater. In this work, EZVI (50–150 nm) was prepared by coating an emulsified vegetable oil membrane on the surface of Fe nanoparticles. EZVI was well-dispersed and less aggregation was observed. Batch experiments were conducted in anaerobic conditions to investigate the kinetics of nitrobenzene reduction by EZVI and the influences of oil concentration, initial iron content, and initial pH. Results indicated that the kinetics of nitrobenzene reduction by EZVI followed a pseudo-first-order kinetics. The observed rate constant of nitrobenzene is 0.0942 min{sup −1}. The oil concentration of 1 and 2 % tended to be preferred concentrations. The rate of nitrobenzene degradation and aniline formation increased with increasing iron content. The low pH is favorable to the nitrobenzene reduction by EZVI.

  20. Enhancing zero valent iron based natural organic matter removal by mixing with dispersed carbon cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Keller, Jurg; Gernjak, Wolfgang

    2016-04-15

    Former studies have shown that adding granular activated carbon (GAC) cathodes could enhance the overall performance of the zero valent iron (ZVI) process for organics removal. The present study evaluates for the first time the performance of such an enhanced ZVI process to remove natural organic matter (NOM), an important water quality parameter in drinking water. Lab-scale batch tests were conducted with surface reservoir feed water from a drinking water plant. In the GAC enhanced ZVI process dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and UV254 were reduced by 61±3% and 70±2%, respectively, during 24h treatment corresponding to 1.8min empty bed contact time. The process was superior to ZVI alone, particularly during the earlier stages of the process due to the synergistically increased iron dissolution rate. Besides GAC, graphite and anthracite also prove to be suitable and potentially more cost-effective options as cathode materials for the enhanced ZVI process, whereby electrically conductive graphite clearly outperformed anthracite. The dominant mechanisms in terms of NOM removal from surface water were found to be coagulation following iron dissolution and adsorption in the case of employing GAC. Oxidation was also occurring to a lesser degree, converting some non-biodegradable into biodegradable DOC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Removal of arsenate from drinking water by activated carbon supported nano zero-valent iron].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hui-jie; Jia, Yong-feng; Yao, Shu-hu; Wu, Xing; Wang, Shu-ying

    2009-12-01

    A new adsorbent, activated carbon impregnated with nano zero-valent iron was prepared, which size of the needle-shaped iron particles in the pores of carbon was (30-500) nm x (1000-3000) nm and approximately 8.2% of iron was loaded onto it. The arsenate removal percentage was 99.5% by 1.5 g/L NZVI/AC in the 2 mg/L arsenic solution at pH 6.5 and (25 +/- 2) degrees C. The adsorption capacity was about 15.4 mg/g when equilibrium concentration was 1.0 mg/L. Kinetics revealed that uptake of arsenate ion by NZVI/AC was 91.4% in the first 12 h and equilibrium time was about 72 h. The intraparticle diffusion model was applied to study the mechanics of arsenate in the activated carbon. The presence of phosphate and silicate could significantly decrease arsenate removal while the effects of the other anions and cations on the arsenic removal were neglectable. NZVI/AC can be effectively regenerated when elution is done with 0.1 mol/L NaOH solution. Our results suggest that NZVI/AC is a suitable candidate for drinking water treatment due to its high reactivity.

  2. An Experimental Study of Micron-Size Zero-Valent Iron Emplacement in Permeable Porous Media Using Polymer-Enhanced Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Covert, Matthew A.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2005-12-22

    At the Hanford Site, an extensive In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) permeable reactive barrier was installed to prevent chromate from reaching the Columbia River. However, chromium has been detected in several wells, indicating a premature loss of the reductive capacity in the aquifer. One possible cause for premature chromate breakthrough is associated with the presence of high-permeability zones in the aquifer. In these zones, groundwater moves relatively fast and is able to oxidize iron more rapidly. There is also a possibility that the high-permeability flow paths are deficient in reducing equivalents (e.g. reactive iron), required for barrier performance. One way enhancement of the current barrier reductive capacity can be achieved is by the addition of micron-scale zero-valent iron to the high-permeability zones within the aquifer. The potential emplacement of zero-valent iron (Fe0) into high-permeability Hanford sediments (Ringold Unit E gravels) using shear-thinning fluids containing polymers was investigated in three-dimensional wedge-shaped aquifer models. Polymers were used to create a suspension viscous enough to keep the Fe0 in solution for extended time periods to improve colloid movement into the porous media without causing a permanent detrimental decrease in hydraulic conductivity. Porous media were packed in the wedge-shaped flow cell to create either a heterogeneous layered system with a high-permeability zone in between two low-permeability zones or a high-permeability channel surrounded by low-permeability materials. The injection flow rate, polymer type, polymer concentration, and injected pore volumes were determined based on preliminary short- and long-column experiments.

  3. Transport and retention of xanthan gum-stabilized microscale zero-valent iron particles in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Jia; Tang, Fenglin; Zheng, Xilai; Shao, Haibing; Kolditz, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Microscale zero valent iron (mZVI) is a promising material for in-situ contaminated groundwater remediation. However, its usefulness has been usually inhibited by mZVI particles' low mobility in saturated porous media for sedimentation and deposition. In our study, laboratory experiments, including sedimentation studies, rheological measurements and transport tests, were conducted to investigate the feasibility of xanthan gum (XG) being used as a coating agent for mZVI particle stabilization. In addition, the effects of XG concentration, flow rate, grain diameter and water chemistry on XG-coated mZVI (XG-mZVI) particle mobility were explored by analyzing its breakthrough curves and retention profiles. It was demonstrated that XG worked efficiently to enhance the suspension stability and mobility of mZVI particles through the porous media as a shear thinning fluid, especially at a higher concentration level (3 g/L). The results of the column study showed that the mobility of XG-mZVI particles increased with an increasing flow rate and larger grain diameter. At the highest flow rate (2.30 × 10(-3) m/s) within the coarsest porous media (0.8-1.2 mm), 86.52% of the XG-mZVI flowed through the column. At the lowest flow rate (0.97 × 10(-4) m/s) within the finest porous media (0.3-0.6 mm), the retention was dramatically strengthened, with only 48.22% of the particles flowing through the column. The XG-mZVI particles appeared to be easily trapped at the beginning of the column especially at a low flow rate. In terms of two representative water chemistry parameters (ion strength and pH value), no significant influence on XG-mZVI particle mobility was observed. The experimental results suggested that straining was the primary mechanism of XG-mZVI retention under saturated condition. Given the above results, the specific site-related conditions should be taken into consideration for the design of a successful delivery system to achieve a compromise between

  4. Ligand effects on nitrate reduction by zero-valent iron: Role of surface complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaojie; Chen, Zhihao; Wang, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Shujuan

    2017-05-01

    Surface passivation is a key limiting factor in the application of zero-valent iron (ZVI) for water remediation. Addition of ligands is a useful approach to overcome this issue. In this work, a small amount of acetylacetone (AA) (0.5 mM) was found highly efficient to enhance the reduction of nitrate by ZVI at near neutral conditions (pH 6.0) with the formation of considerable black coating on ZVI. At an initial nitrate concentration of 20 mg N/L, the pseudo first-order reduction rate constant of nitrate in the ZVI-AA-NO3- system was 0.0991 h-1, which was 52 times higher than that in the ZVI-NO3- system. Under otherwise identical conditions, the other five ligands, including EDTA, formate, acetate, oxalate, and phosphate, had negligible effects. Based on the pKa values of these ligands and the final species of iron, the ligand effects on nitrate reduction by ZVI were summarized from three aspects: (1) the ability to offer potentially dissociable protons from the ligands; (2) the complexation ability to eliminate iron (hydr)oxide precipitates from the surface of ZVI; and (3) the ability to lower down the redox potentials of iron species. The good performance of AA in these three aspects makes it advantage over the other ligands. A cycle test up to six runs demonstrates that AA could continuously take effect in the ZVI system. The results here point out the potential of AA as an effective ligand in ZVI system for enhanced contaminant transformation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ecotoxicity of nanoscale zero-valent iron particles – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Tomás Albergaria

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of nanoscale zero-valent iron particles (nZVIs in the environmental remediation of water and soil is increasing. This increase is related to the higher reactivity and mobility of nZVIs compared with that of macro- or micro-sized iron particles. The introduction of nZVIs into the environment raises concerns related to their fate and effect on aquatic and terrestrial biota. Knowledge of these issues will allow a better understanding not only of the remediation process but also of the long-term effects and impact of nZVIs on ecosystems, leading to a safer and more efficient application of these particles. This paper presents the current state of play concerning the toxic effects of nZVIs on organisms at different stages of the food chain. The majority of studies show that nZVIs have a negative impact on bacteria, aquatic invertebrates, such as Daphnia mag-na, terrestrial organisms, such as Eisenia fetida, and seed germination. However, the number of published studies related to this issue is clearly insufficient. This reinforces the need for further research in order to specify the toxic concentrations of nZVIs that affect the most important target organisms. Furthermore, an evaluation of the effects of the coating of nanoparticles should also be pursued

  6. Deactivation of nanoscale zero-valent iron by humic acid and by retention in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Gun; Hwang, Yu-Hoon; Shin, Hang-Sik; Ko, Seok-Oh

    2013-01-01

    The effects of the deactivation of nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI), induced by humic acid (HA) and by the retention of NZVI in water, on nitrate reduction were investigated using a kinetic study. Both the nitrate removal and generation of ammonia were significantly inhibited as the HA adsorption amount and retention time were increased. However, HA removal was greatly enhanced when the NZVI was used after 1 d or 25 d of retention in water. The results are caused by the formation of iron oxides/hydroxides, which increased the specific surface area and the degree of NZVI aggregation which was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, the nitrate reduction was greater at the beginning of reaction in the presence of HA when fresh NZVI was used, because of the enhanced electron transfer by the HA in bulk phase and on NZVI surface as train sequences. The pseudo second order adsorption kinetic equation incorporating deactivation and a Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) type kinetic equation provided accurate descriptions of the nitrate removal and ammonia generation, respectively. The deactivation constant and the reaction rate constant of the LH type kinetic equation were strongly correlated with the HA amount accumulated on NZVI. These results suggest that the HA accumulation on the NZVI surface reactive sites plays the dominant role in the inhibition and the inhibition can be described successfully using the deactivation model. The HA accumulation on NZVI was verified using TEM.

  7. Toxicity of nano-zero valent iron to freshwater and marine organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo A Keller

    Full Text Available We tested whether three commercial forms (uncoated, organic coating, and iron oxide coating of nano zero-valent iron (nZVI are toxic to freshwater and marine organisms, specifically three species of marine phytoplankton, one species of freshwater phytoplankton, and a freshwater zooplankton species (Daphnia magna, because these organisms may be exposed downstream of where nZVI is applied to remediate polluted soil. The aggregation and reactivity of the three types of nZVI varied considerably, which was reflected in their toxicity. Since levels of Fe(2+ and Fe(3+ increase as the nZVI react, we also evaluated their toxicity independently. All four phytoplankton species displayed decreasing population growth rates, and Daphnia magna showed increasing mortality, in response to increasing levels of nZVI, and to a lesser degree with increasing Fe(2+ and Fe(3+. All forms of nZVI aggregated in soil and water, especially in the presence of a high concentration of calcium ions in groundwater, thus reducing their transports through the environment. However, uncoated nZVI aggregated extremely rapidly, thus vastly reducing the probability of environmental transport and potential for toxicity. This information can be used to design a risk management strategy to arrest the transport of injected nZVI beyond the intended remediation area, by injecting inert calcium salts as a barrier to transport.

  8. Bioinhibitory effect of hydrogenotrophic bacteria on nitrate reduction by nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yi; Dong, Qi; Zhang, Keqiang

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogenotrophic bacteria (HTB) were introduced into a nitrate removal system, which used nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) as reductant, to investigate its bioinhibitory effect. Based on the results, it was noted that addition of HTB culture (10-50 mL) led to 58.9-91.4% decrease in the first observed rate constant (kobs1), which represented the nitrate removal rate by nZVI, and a reduction in the generated poisonous by-products from 94.9% to 38.5%. In other words, HTB had a significant inhibitory effect on nitrate reduction by nZVI. However, the pathway of this bioinhibition only prevented the occurrence of chemical reduction, but not competition for nitrate. Furthermore, FeOOH coating was observed on the surface of nZVI, instead of Fe3O4 or Fe2O3, which could prevent electron transmission from nZVI to nitrate. Considering that FeOOH was the product of iron corrosion, the result indicated that HTB could inhibit chemical reduction by enhancing the reaction between nZVI and water. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A built-in zero valent iron anaerobic reactor to enhance treatment of azo dye wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaobin; Jing, Yanwen; Quan, Xie; Liu, Yiwen; Onu, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Waste scrap iron was packed into an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor to form a zero valent iron (ZVI) - UASB reactor system for treatment of azo dye wastewater. The ZVI acted as a reductant to decrease ORP in the reactor by more than 40 mv and functioned as an acid buffer to increase the pH in the reactor from 5.44 to 6.29, both of which improved the performance of the anaerobic reactor. As a result, the removal of color and COD in this reactor was 91.7% and 53%, respectively, which was significantly higher than that of a reference UASB reactor without ZVI. The UV-visible spectrum demonstrated that absorption bands of the azo dye from the ZVI-UASB reactor were substantially reduced. The ZVI promoted methanogenesis, which was confirmed by an increase in CH(4) content in the biogas from 47.9% to 64.8%. The ZVI bed was protected well from rusting, which allowed it to function stably. The effluent could be further purified only by pH adjustment because the Fe(2+) released from ZVI served as a flocculent.

  10. Graduated characterization method using a multi-well microplate for reducing reactivity of nanoscale zero valent iron materials

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Yuhoon; Salatas, Apostolos; Mines, Paul D.; Jakobsen, Mogens Havsteen; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Even though nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) has been intensively studied for the treatment of a plethora of pollutants through reductive reaction, quantification of nZVI reactivity has not yet been standardized. Here, we adapted colorimetric assays for determining reductive activity of nZVI and its composites with other metals. The assay quantifies reduction products to avoid interfering reactions, such as sorption and volatilization. Three different reaction products, ammonium, phenol, and...

  11. A Study of Efficiency of Zero-valent Iron Nanoparticles in Degradation of Trichlorethylene from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Dehghan

    2016-12-01

    mg/l, and contact time= 86 min. The results of kinetic studies revealed that TCE degradation by nZVI follows first-order kinetic model. Conclusion: It is conclude that zero-valent iron nanoparticles have a good efficiency in the degradation of TCE. On the other hand, separation of these nanoparticles is simple due to its magnetism properties, which can improve the use of these nanoparticles. 

  12. Ultrasound-assisted synthesis of nanosized zero-valent iron for metal cations extraction and wastewater treatment applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, I. Yu; Lysov, D. V.; Levina, V. V.; Mazov, I. N.; Gusev, A. A.; Yudintseva, T. I.; Kuznetsov, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    Nanosized zero-valent iron has shown good results in wastewater treatment and activation of physicochemical processes. Its applications in modern industry are complicated by high production costs of nanomaterials produced via existing synthesis routes. Therefore there is a need of cheap and high-productive methods of nanosized zero-valent iron with advanced functional properties. Improvement of oxidative conditions with additions may find its place in extraction of rare-earth metals, where high cost of nanomaterials could be viable. In this paper we studied an effect of ultrasonic irradiation on specific surface area and particle size of nanosized zero-valent iron synthesized by methods of chemical precipitation with high- temperature reduction in hydrogen flow and sodium borohydride reduction. Obtained results showed significant decrease of particle size and differences in particles morphology depending on presence of ultrasonication during synthesis and on chosen method. For ultrasonic-assisted synthesis with 100% amplitude, particle size calculated from specific surface area was 70 nm for sample synthesized by chemical precipitation with high-temperature reduction and 35 nm for borohydide reduction method compared to 63 nm for reference sample without ultrasonication.

  13. A novel conditioning process for enhancing dewaterability of waste activated sludge by combination of zero-valent iron and persulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu; Wang, Qilin; Jiang, Guangming; Liu, Peng; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-06-01

    Improvement of sludge dewaterability is crucial for reducing the costs of sludge disposal in wastewater treatment plants. This study presents a novel conditioning method for improving waste activated sludge dewaterability by combination of persulfate and zero-valent iron. The combination of zero-valent iron (0-30g/L) and persulfate (0-6g/L) under neutral pH substantially enhanced the sludge dewaterability due to the advanced oxidization reactions. The highest enhancement of sludge dewaterability was achieved at 4g persulfate/L and 15g zero-valent iron/L, with which the capillary suction time was reduced by over 50%. The release of soluble chemical oxygen demand during the conditioning process implied the decomposition of sludge structure and microorganisms, which facilitated the improvement of dewaterability due to the release of bound water that was included in sludge structure and microorganism. Economic analysis showed that the proposed conditioning process with persulfate and ZVI is more economically favorable for improving WAS dewaterability than classical Fenton reagent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barriers: A Review of Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, NE

    2001-06-11

    This report briefly reviews issues regarding the implementation of the zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology at sites managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Initially, the PRB technology, using zero-valent iron for the reactive media, was received with great enthusiasm, and DOE invested millions of dollars testing and implementing PRBs. Recently, a negative perception of the technology has been building. This perception is based on the failure of some deployments to satisfy goals for treatment and operating expenses. The purpose of this report, therefore, is to suggest reasons for the problems that have been encountered and to recommend whether DOE should invest in additional research and deployments. The principal conclusion of this review is that the most significant problems have been the result of insufficient characterization, which resulted in poor engineering implementation. Although there are legitimate concerns regarding the longevity of the reactive media, the ability of zero-valent iron to reduce certain chlorinated hydrocarbons and to immobilize certain metals and radionuclides is well documented. The primary problem encountered at some DOE full-scale deployments has been an inadequate assessment of site hydrology, which resulted in misapplication of the technology. The result is PRBs with higher than expected flow velocities and/or incomplete plume capture. A review of the literature reveals that cautions regarding subsurface heterogeneity were published several years prior to the full-scale implementations. Nevertheless, design and construction have typically been undertaken as if the subsurface was homogeneous. More recently published literature has demonstrated that hydraulic heterogeneity can cause so much uncertainty in performance that use of a passive PRB is precluded. Thus, the primary conclusion of this review is that more attention must be given to site-specific issues. Indeed, the use of a passive PRB requires

  15. The interactions between nanoscale zero-valent iron and microbes in the subsurface environment: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yankai [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Dong, Haoran, E-mail: dongh@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Zeng, Guangming; Tang, Lin; Jiang, Zhao; Zhang, Cong; Deng, Junmin; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yi [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China)

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • The interactions between various microbes and NZVI were summarized. • The adverse and positive effects of NZVI on the growth of microbes were reviewed. • The synergistic effects of NZVI and bacteria on pollutant removal were reviewed. • The effects of iron-reducing bacteria on the aged NZVI were reviewed. • Future challenges to study the interactions between NZVI and microbes are suggested. - Abstract: Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles, applied for in-situ subsurface remediation, are inevitable to interact with various microbes in the remediation sites directly or indirectly. This review summarizes their interactions, including the effects of NZVI on microbial activity and growth, the synergistic effect of NZVI and microbes on the contaminant removal, and the effects of microbes on the aging of NZVI. NZVI could exert either inhibitive or stimulative effects on the growth of microbes. The mechanisms of NZVI cytotoxicity (i.e., the inhibitive effect) include physical damage and biochemical destruction. The stimulative effects of NZVI on certain bacteria are associated with the creation of appropriate living environment, either through providing electron donor (e.g., H{sub 2}) or carbon sources (e.g., the engineered organic surface modifiers), or through eliminating the noxious substances that can cause bactericidal consequence. As a result of the positive interaction, the combination of NZVI and some microbes shows synergistic effect on contaminant removal. Additionally, the aged NZVI can be utilized by some iron-reducing bacteria, resulting in the transformation of Fe(III) to Fe(II), which can further contribute to the contaminant reduction. However, the Fe(III)-reduction process can probably induce environmental risks, such as environmental methylation and remobilization of the previously entrapped heavy metals.

  16. Ecofriendly Synthesis of nano Zero Valent Iron from Banana Peel Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunardi; Ashadi; Budi Rahardjo, Sentot; Inayati

    2017-01-01

    In this study, nano Zero Valent Iron (nZVI) were synthesized from banana peel extract (BPE) and ferrous sulfate. During the synthesis of nZVI both the precursor and the reducing agent were mixed in a clean sterilized flask in 1:1 proportion. For the reduction of Fe ions, 5 ml of filtered BPE was mixed to 5 ml of freshly prepared 0.001 M - 0.005 M aqueous of FeSO4 solution with constant stirring at room temperature. Within a particular time change in colour from brown to black color obtained by nanoparticles synthesis. A systematic characterization of nZVI was performed using UV-Vis. UV-visible absorption is used to investigate SPR. Characteristic surface plasmon absorption band was observed at 210 nm for the black colored nZVI synthesized from 0.001-0.005 M ferrous sulfate with BPE concentration 5 ml. It has been found that the optimum concentration for the synthesis of nZVI is 0.001M Fe2+ ions. There is small decrease in the intensity of SPR band from 0.001 to 0.005 M. The characterization size of nZVI was performed using TEM. The result shows that formation of particles size of nZVI was more 100 nm.

  17. Zero-valent iron pretreatment for detoxifying iodine in liquid crystal display (LCD) manufacturing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J W; Cha, D K; Oh, Y K; Ko, K B; Song, J S

    2009-05-15

    This study investigated reductive transformation of iodine by zero-valent iron (ZVI), and the subsequent detoxification of iodine-laden wastewater. ZVI completely reduced aqueous iodine to non-toxic iodide. Respirometric bioassay illustrated that the presence of iodine increase the lag phase before the onset of oxygen consumption. The length of lag phase was proportional to increasing iodine dosage. The reduction products of iodine by ZVI did not exhibit any inhibitory effect on the biodegradation. The cumulative biological oxidation associated with iodine toxicity was closely fitted to Gompertz model. When iodine-laden wastewater was continuously fed to a bench-scale activated sludge unit, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies decreased from above 90% to below 80% along with a marked decrease in biomass concentration. On the other hand, the COD removal efficiency and biomass concentration remained constant in the integrated ZVI-activated sludge system. Respirometric bioassay with real iodine-laden LCD manufacturing wastewater demonstrated that ZVI was effective for detoxifying iodine and consequently enhancing biodegradability of wastewater. This result suggested that ZVI pretreatment may be a feasible option for the removal of iodine in LCD processing wastewater, instead of more costly processes such as adsorption and chemical oxidation, which are commonly in the iodine-laden LCD wastewater treatment facility.

  18. Oxidation of polyvinyl alcohol by persulfate activated with heat, Fe2+, and zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seok-Young; Kim, Hyeong-Woo; Park, Jun-Mo; Park, Hung-Suck; Yoon, Chohee

    2009-08-30

    The oxidation of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) by persulfate (S(2)O(8)(2-)) activated with heat, Fe(2+), and zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) was investigated via batch experiments. It was hypothesized that elevated temperature and the addition of Fe(2+) or Fe(0) into a persulfate-water system could enhance the oxidation of PVA by activated persulfate. Increasing the temperature from 20 to 60 degrees C or 80 degrees C accelerated the oxidation rate of PVA, which achieved complete oxidation in 30 and 10 min, respectively. At 20 degrees C, the addition of Fe(2+) or Fe(0) to the persulfate-water system significantly enhanced the oxidation of PVA. The optimal persulfate-to-Fe(2+) or Fe(0) molar ratio was found to be 1:1. Complete oxidation of PVA was obtained by Fe(0)-activated persulfate in 2h. Synergistic activation of persulfate by heat and Fe(2+) or Fe(0) was also shown to enhance the oxidation of PVA in the persulfate-water system. By using GC-MS analysis, an oxidation product of PVA was identified as vinyl acetic acid (C(4)H(6)O(2)), which is readily biodegradable. Our results suggest that the oxidative treatment of PVA by activated persulfate is a viable option for the pretreatment of PVA-laden wastewater to enhance its biodegradability.

  19. Zero-valent iron-activated persulfate oxidation of a commercial alkyl phenol polyethoxylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, Kubra; Olmez-Hanci, Tugba; Arslan-Alaton, Idil

    2016-01-01

    Aqueous Triton X-45 (TX-45; 20 mg/L; original total organic carbon (TOC) = 14 mg/L), a representative, commercially important alkylphenol polyethoxylate, was subjected to persulfate (PS) oxidation activated with zero-valent iron (ZVI) nanoparticles. After optimization of the ZVI/PS treatment combination (1 g/L ZVI; 2.5 mM PS at pH5) in terms of pH (3-9), ZVI (0.5-5 g/L) and PS (0.5-5.0 mM) concentrations, TX-45 could be efficiently (>90%) degraded within short treatment periods (40%) TOC removals. The degree of PS consumption and Fe release was also followed during the experiments and a positive correlation existed between enhanced TX-45 removals and ZVI-activated PS consumption rates accompanied with a parallel Fe release. Acute toxicity tests were conducted using two different bioassays to examine the toxicological safety of the ZVI/PS oxidation system. Acute toxicity profiles significantly decreased from an original value of 66% relative inhibition to 21% and from 16% relative inhibition to non-toxic values according to Vibrio fischeri and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata bioassays, respectively. The photobacterium V. fischeri appeared to be more sensitive to TX-45 and its degradation products than the microalgae P. subcapitata.

  20. Nanoscale zero-valent iron-assisted soil washing for the removal of potentially toxic elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boente, C; Sierra, C; Martínez-Blanco, D; Menéndez-Aguado, J M; Gallego, J R

    2018-02-09

    The present study focuses on soil washing enhancement via soil pretreatment with nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) for the remediation of potentially toxic elements. To this end, soil polluted with As, Cu, Hg, Pb and Sb was partitioned into various grain sizes (500-2000, 125-500 and PTEs) fate, and allowed a metallurgical accounting correction considering the dilution effects caused by nanoparticle addition. As a result, remarkable recovery yields were obtained for Cu, Pb and Sb, which concentrated with the nZVI in the magnetically separated fraction (WHIMS tests) and underflow (hydrocyclone tests). In contrast, Hg, concentrated in the non-magnetic fraction and overflow respectively, while the behavior of As was unaltered by the nZVI pretreatment. All things considered, the addition of nZVI enhanced the efficiency of soil washing, particularly for larger fractions (125-2000 μm). The proposed methodology lays the foundations for nanoparticle utilization in soil washing operations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mercury remediation in wetland sediment using zero-valent iron and granular activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ariel S.; Huntington, Thomas G.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Amirbahman, Aria

    2016-01-01

    Wetlands are hotspots for production of toxic methylmercury (MeHg) that can bioaccumulate in the food web. The objective of this study was to determine whether the application of zero-valent iron (ZVI) or granular activated carbon (GAC) to wetland sediment could reduce MeHg production and bioavailability to benthic organisms. Field mesocosms were installed in a wetland fringing Hodgdon Pond (Maine, USA), and ZVI and GAC were applied. Pore-water MeHg concentrations were lower in treated compared with untreated mesocosms; however, sediment MeHg, as well as total Hg (THg), concentrations were not significantly different between treated and untreated mesocosms, suggesting that smaller pore-water MeHg concentrations in treated sediment were likely due to adsorption to ZVI and GAC, rather than inhibition of MeHg production. In laboratory experiments with intact vegetated sediment clumps, amendments did not significantly change sediment THg and MeHg concentrations; however, the mean pore-water MeHg and MeHg:THg ratios were lower in the amended sediment than the control. In the laboratory microcosms, snails (Lymnaea stagnalis) accumulated less MeHg in sediment treated with ZVI or GAC. The study results suggest that both GAC and ZVI have potential for reducing MeHg bioaccumulation in wetland sediment.

  2. Reductive degradation of carbaryl in water by zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghauch, A; Gallet, C; Charef, A; Rima, J; Martin-Bouyer, M

    2001-02-01

    Reduction of carbaryl solution by zero-valent iron powder (ZVIP) was studied in a rotator batch system (70 rpm) in order to evaluate the utility of this reaction in remediation of carbamate contaminated water. Degradation with different amount of ZVIP: 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 g/ml at pH 6.6 and at ambient temperature was investigated. The results show that the process exhibits a degradation rate appearing to be directly proportional to the surface contact area of ZVIP (325-mesh) with the carbaryl molecules. Three analytical techniques were used to monitor carbaryl degradation: (1) A UV-Vis diode array spectrophotometer was used to record all spectra. (2) A high performance liquid chromatography was used to separate by-products and examine the evolution of breakdown products. (3) A home-built spectrophosphorimeter that uses the solid surface room temperature phosphorescence (SSRTP) was employed to observe selectively the decline of the carbaryl concentration at different amount of ZVIP on Whatman no. 1 filter paper. Results show that the reducing degradation of carbaryl with ZVIP as the source of electrons is effective with a half-life close to several minutes.

  3. Demonstration of Combined Zero-Valent Iron and Electrical Resistance Heating for In Situ Trichloroethene Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Macbeth, Tamzen; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Mackley, Rob D.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Sandberg, Greg; Powell, Thomas; Powers, Jeff; Pitre, Emile; Michalsen, Mandy M.; Ballock-Dixon, Sage; Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus

    2011-06-27

    The effectiveness of in situ treatment using zero-valent iron to remediate sites with non-aqueous phase or significant sediment-associated contaminant mass can be limited by relatively low rates of mass transfer to bring contaminants in contact with the reactive media. For a field test in a trichloroethene source area, combining moderate-temperature (maximum 50oC) subsurface electrical resistance heating with in situ ZVI treatment was shown to accelerate dechlorination and dissolution rates by a factor of 4 to 6 based on organic daughter products and a factor 8-16 using a chloride concentrations. A mass-discharge-based analysis was used to evaluate reaction, dissolution, and volatilization at ambient groundwater temperature (~10oC) and as temperature was increased up to about 50oC. Increased reaction and contaminant dissolution were observed with increased temperature, but volatilization was minimal during the test because in situ reactions maintained low aqueous-phase TCE concentrations.

  4. Data of furfural adsorption on nano zero valent iron (NZVI synthesized from Nettle extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Fazlzadeh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Among various water and wastewater treatment methods, adsorption techniques are widely used to remove certain classes of pollutants due to its unique features. Thus, the aim of this data article is to synthesize zero valent iron nanoparticles (NZVI from Nettle leaf extract by green synthesis method as an environmentally friendly technique, and to evaluate it's efficiency in the removal of furfural from aqueous solutions. The data of possible adsorption mechanism and isotherm of furfural on the synthesized adsorbent are depicted in this data article. The data acquired showed that the adsorption trend follows the pseudo-second order kinetic model and that the Langmuir isotherm was suitable for correlation of equilibrium data with the maximum adsorption capacity of 454.4 mg/g. The information of initial furfural concentration, pH, adsorbent dosage and contact time effects on the removal efficiency are presented. Considering the findings data, the developed nanoparticle from Nettle leaf extract, as a low cost adsorbent, could be considered as promising adsorbent for furfural and probably similar organic pollutants removal from aqueous solutions.

  5. -encapsulated zero-valent iron nanoparticles for degradation of organic dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhou; Wu, Qingzhi; Wang, Min; Yang, Yushi; Long, Jia; Chen, Xiaohui

    2014-09-01

    A series of nanocomposites consisting of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (ZVI NPs) encapsulated in SiO2 microspheres were successfully synthesized through a successive two-step method, i.e., the wet chemical reduction by borohydride followed by a modified Stöber method. The as-synthesized nanocomposites were characterized using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer. The catalytic performance of SiO2-encapsulated ZVI nanocomposites for the degradation of organic dyes was investigated using methylene blue (MB) as the model dye in the presence of H2O2. The results showed that the degradation efficiency and apparent rate constant of the degradation reaction were significantly enhanced with increased ZVI NPs encapsulated in SiO2 microspheres, whereas the dosage of H2O2 remarkably promoted degradation rate without affecting degradation efficiency. The content-dependent magnetic property ensured the excellent magnetic separation of degradation products under an external magnet. This strategy for the synthesis of SiO2-encapsulated ZVI NPs nanocomposites was low cost and easy to scale-up for industrial production, thereby enabling promising applications in environmental remediation.

  6. Immobilization of chromate in hyperalkaline waste streams by green rusts and zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Christine M; Burke, Ian T; Ahmed, Imad A M; Shaw, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Zero-valent iron (ZVI) and green rusts can be used as reductants to convert chromium from soluble, highly toxic Cr(VI) to insoluble Cr(III). This study compared the reduction rates of Cr(VI) by ZVI and two carbonate green rust phases in alkaline/hyperalkaline solutions. Batch experiments were carried out with synthetic chromate solutions at pH 7.7-12.3 and a chromite ore processing residue (COPR) leachate (pH approximately 12.2). Green rust removes chromate from high pH solutions (pH 10-12.5) very rapidly (<400 s). Chromate reduction rates for both green rust phases were consistently higher than for ZVI throughout the pH range studied; the surface area normalized rate constants were two orders of magnitude higher in the COPR leachate solution at pH 12.2. The performances of both green rusts were unaffected by changes in pH. In contrast, ZVI exhibited a marked decline in reduction rate with increasing pH to become almost ineffective above pH12.

  7. Enhanced anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge digestion by the addition of zero valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yinghong; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Chen, Suo

    2014-04-01

    Anaerobic digestion is promising technology to recover energy from waste activated sludge. However, the sludge digestion is limited by its low efficiency of hydrolysis-acidification. Zero valent iron (ZVI) as a reducing material is expected to enhance anaerobic process including the hydrolysis-acidification process. Considering that, ZVI was added into an anaerobic sludge digestion system to accelerate the sludge digestion in this study. The results indicated that ZVI effectively enhanced the decomposition of protein and cellulose, the two main components of the sludge. Compared to the control test without ZVI, the degradation of protein increased 21.9% and the volatile fatty acids production increased 37.3% with adding ZVI. More acetate and less propionate are found during the hydrolysis-acidification with ZVI. The activities of several key enzymes in the hydrolysis and acidification increased 0.6-1 time. ZVI made the methane production raise 43.5% and sludge reduction ratio increase 12.2 percent points. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that the abundances of hydrogen-consuming microorganisms including homoacetogens and hydrogenotrophic methanogens with ZVI were higher than the control, which reduced the H2 accumulation to create a beneficial condition for the sludge digestion in thermodynamics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Enhanced chromium (VI) removal using activated carbon modified by zero valent iron and silver bimetallic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakavandi, Babak; Kalantary, Roshanak Rezaei; Farzadkia, Mahdi; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Esrafili, Ali; Azari, Ali; Yari, Ahmad Reza; Javid, Allah Bakhsh

    2014-01-01

    Recently, adsorption process has been introduced as a favorable and effective technique for the removal of metal ions from aqueous solutions. In the present study, bimetallic nanoparticles consisting of zero valent iron and silver were loaded on the activated carbon powder for the preparation of a new adsorbent (PAC-Fe(o)/Ag). The above adsorbent was characterized by using XRD, SEM and TEM techniqes. Experimental data were exploited for kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic evaluations related to the adsorption processes. The Cr(VI) adsorption process was found to be favorable at pH 3 and it reached equilibrium state within 60 min. The stirring rate did not have a significant effect on the adsorption efficiency. Furthermore, the monolayer adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) based on the Langmuir model was measured to be 100 mg/g. The experimental equilibrium data were fitted to the Freundlich adsorption and pseudo second-order models. According to the thermodynamic study, the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature, indicating the adsorption capacity increases with increasing the temperature. The results also revealed that the synthesized composite can be potentially applied as a magnetic adsorbent to remove Cr(VI) contaminants from aqueous solutions.

  9. Micro-electrolysis of Cr (VI) in the nanoscale zero-valent iron loaded activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Limei; Liao, Libing; Lv, Guocheng; Qin, Faxiang; He, Yujuan; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2013-06-15

    In this paper we prepared a novel material of activated carbon/nanoscale zero-valent iron (C-Fe(0)) composite. The C-Fe(0) was proved to possess large specific surface area and outstanding reducibility that result in the rapid and stable reaction with Cr (VI). The prepared composite has been examined in detail in terms of the influence of solution pH, concentration and reaction time in the Cr (VI) removal experiments. The results showed that the C-Fe(0) formed a micro-electrolysis which dominated the reaction rate. The Micro-electrolysis reaches equilibrium is ten minutes. Its reaction rate is ten times higher than that of traditional adsorption reaction, and the removal rate of Cr reaches up to 99.5%. By analyzing the obtained profiles from the cyclic voltammetry, PXRD and XPS, we demonstrate that the Cr (VI) is reduced to insoluble Cr (III) compound in the reaction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Degradation of carbon tetrachloride in the presence of zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Jorge S; Rose, Candace; Lafreniere, Lorraine

    2010-08-05

    Efforts to achieve the decomposition of carbon tetrachloride through anaerobic and aerobic bioremediation and chemical transformation have met with limited success because of the conditions required and the formation of hazardous intermediates. Recently, particles of zero-valent iron (ZVI) have been used with limited success for in situ remediation of carbon tetrachloride. We studied a modified microparticulate product that combines controlled-release carbon with ZVI for stimulation of in situ chemical reduction of persistent organic compounds in groundwater. With this product, a number of physical, chemical, and microbiological processes were combined to create very strongly reducing conditions that stimulate rapid, complete dechlorination of organic solvents. In principle, the organic component of ZVI microparticles is nutrient rich and hydrophilic and has high surface area capable of supporting the growth of bacteria in the groundwater environment. In our experiments, we found that as the bacteria grew, oxygen was consumed, and the redox potential decreased to values reaching -600 mV. The small modified ZVI particles provide substantial reactive surface area that, in these conditions, directly stimulates chemical dechlorination and cleanup of the contaminated area without accumulation of undesirable breakdown products. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of ZVI microparticles in reducing carbon tetrachloride under laboratory and field conditions. Changes in concentrations and in chemical and physical parameters were monitored to determine the role of the organic products in the reductive dechlorination reaction. Laboratory and field studies are presented.

  11. Mercury remediation in wetland sediment using zero-valent iron and granular activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ariel S; Huntington, Thomas G; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C; Amirbahman, Aria

    2016-05-01

    Wetlands are hotspots for production of toxic methylmercury (MeHg) that can bioaccumulate in the food web. The objective of this study was to determine whether the application of zero-valent iron (ZVI) or granular activated carbon (GAC) to wetland sediment could reduce MeHg production and bioavailability to benthic organisms. Field mesocosms were installed in a wetland fringing Hodgdon Pond (Maine, USA), and ZVI and GAC were applied. Pore-water MeHg concentrations were lower in treated compared with untreated mesocosms; however, sediment MeHg, as well as total Hg (THg), concentrations were not significantly different between treated and untreated mesocosms, suggesting that smaller pore-water MeHg concentrations in treated sediment were likely due to adsorption to ZVI and GAC, rather than inhibition of MeHg production. In laboratory experiments with intact vegetated sediment clumps, amendments did not significantly change sediment THg and MeHg concentrations; however, the mean pore-water MeHg and MeHg:THg ratios were lower in the amended sediment than the control. In the laboratory microcosms, snails (Lymnaea stagnalis) accumulated less MeHg in sediment treated with ZVI or GAC. The study results suggest that both GAC and ZVI have potential for reducing MeHg bioaccumulation in wetland sediment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Synthesis of Highly Reactive Subnano-sized Zero-valent Iron using Smectite Clay Templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Cheng; Jia, Hanzhang; Li, Hui; Teppen, Brian J.; Boyd, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    A novel method was developed for synthesizing subnano-sized zero-valent iron (ZVI) using smectite clay layers as templates. Exchangeable Fe(III) cations compensating the structural negative charges of smectites were reduced with NaBH4, resulting in the formation of ZVI. The unique structure of smectite clay, in which isolated exchangeable Fe(III) cations reside near the sites of structural negative charges, inhibited the agglomeration of ZVI resulting in the formation of discrete regions of subnanoscale ZVI particles in the smectite interlayer regions. X-ray diffraction revealed an interlayer spacing of ~ 5 Å. The non-structural iron content of this clay yields a calculated ratio of two atoms of ZVI per three cation exchange sites, in full agreement with the XRD results since the diameter of elemental Fe is 2.5 Å. The clay-templated ZVI showed superior reactivity and efficiency compared to other previously reported forms of ZVI as indicated by the reduction of nitrobenzene; structural Fe within the aluminosilicate layers was nonreactive. At a 1:3 molar ratio of nitrobenzene:non-structural Fe, a reaction efficiency of 83% was achieved, and over 80% of the nitrobenzene was reduced within one minute. These results confirm that non-structural Fe from Fe(III)-smectite was reduced predominantly to ZVI which was responsible for the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline. This new form of subnano-scale ZVI may find utility in the development of remediation technologies for persistent environmental contaminants, e.g. as components of constructed reactive domains such as reactive caps for contaminated sediments. PMID:20446730

  13. Zero valent iron produces dichloroacetamide from chloramphenicol antibiotics in the absence of chlorine and chloramines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wenhai; Ding, Shunke; Bond, Tom; Gao, Naiyun; Yin, Daqiang; Xu, Bin; Cao, Zhongqi

    2016-11-01

    Dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) is an important type of nitrogenous disinfection byproduct. This study is the first to report that DCAcAm can be formed in the absence of chlorinated disinfectants (chlorine and chloramines). This can occur through reduction of three chloramphenicol (CAP) antibiotics by zero valent iron (ZVI). The effects of key experimental parameters, including reaction time, ZVI dose, pH, temperature, water type, and the presence of humic acid (HA) on the formation of DCAcAm were ascertained. The DCAcAm yields from three CAPs all presented the trend of increasing first and then decreasing with time and also increased with increasing ZVI dosage. DCAcAm yields from the ZVI reduction route were higher than those resulting from the chlorination of some previously identified DCAcAm precursors. Acidic conditions favored the formation of DCAcAm by the ZVI route. In addition, lower temperatures increased DCAcAm yields at extended contact times (>12 h). DCAcAm formed from the three CAPs in the presence of HA was lower than in the absence of HA. The formation potential of DCAcAm from the reduction of authentic waters spiked with CAPs by ZVI showed good linear correlations with initial concentrations of the three CAPs. This allows the formation of DCAcAm from the reduction of CAPs by ZVI to be predicted. Given that many wastewater and drinking water distribution networks contain unlined cast iron pipes, reactions between CAPs and ZVI may contribute to the formation of DCAcAm in such systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Synthesis of highly reactive subnano-sized zero-valent iron using smectite clay templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Cheng; Jia, Hanzhong; Li, Hui; Teppen, Brian J; Boyd, Stephen A

    2010-06-01

    A novel method was developed for synthesizing subnano-sized zero-valent iron (ZVI) using smectite clay layers as templates. Exchangeable Fe(III) cations compensating the structural negative charges of smectites were reduced with NaBH(4), resulting in the formation of ZVI. The unique structure of smectite clay, in which isolated exchangeable Fe(III) cations reside near the sites of structural negative charges, inhibited the agglomeration of ZVI resulting in the formation of subnanoscale ZVI particles in the smectite interlayer regions. X-ray diffraction revealed an interlayer spacing of approximately 5 A. The non-structural iron content of this clay yields a calculated ratio of two atoms of ZVI per three cation exchange sites, in full agreement with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) results since the diameter of elemental Fe is 2.5 A. The clay-templated ZVI showed superior reactivity and efficiency compared to other previously reported forms of ZVI as indicated by the reduction of nitrobenzene; structural Fe within the aluminosilicate layers was nonreactive. At a 1:3 molar ratio of nitrobenzene/non-structural Fe, a reaction efficiency of 83% was achieved, and over 80% of the nitrobenzene was reduced within one minute. These results confirm that non-structural Fe from Fe(III)-smectite was reduced predominantly to ZVI which was responsible for the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline. This new form of subnanoscale ZVI may find utility in the development of remediation technologies for persistent environmental contaminants, for example, as components of constructed reactive domains such as reactive caps for contaminated sediments.

  15. Arsenate removal from water by zero-valent iron/activated carbon galvanic couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xiaomin; Li, Rui; Zhao, Bei; Liang, Wenyan

    2010-10-15

    Galvanic couples composed of zero-valent iron and activated carbon (Fe(0)/AC) were investigated for As(V) removal from water. The effects of Fe(0) to AC mass ratio (FCR), solution pH, ionic strength and co-existing anions (phosphate, carbonate, silicate, nitrate, chloride and sulfate) and humic acid (HA) on As(V) removal were evaluated. The results showed that the optimum mass ratio was 1:1, and Fe(0)/AC with this ratio was more effective for As(V) removal than Fe(0) and AC alone at pH of 7 and ion strength of 0.03 M NaCl. The enhanced performance for As(V) removal was fulfilled through an accelerated corrosion process of Fe(0), which meant more corrosion products for efficient As(V) removal. The As(V) removal followed a pseudo-first order reaction. The rate constants (k) for 1:1 Fe(0)/AC and Fe(0) alone were 0.802 and 0.330 h(-1), respectively. Potentiodynamic polarization scans further confirmed that Fe(0) corrosion was promoted when Fe(0) was coupled with AC. Except silicates, other co-existing anions promoted As(V) removal. No reduction form of As (As(III) or As(0)) could be detected on iron corrosion products (ICPs) and in solutions. Identified ICPs included poorly crystallized lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) and magnetite/maghemite (Fe(3)O(4)/gamma-Fe(2)O(3)) for both of Fe(0)/AC and Fe(0) systems. In conclusion, the Fe(0)/AC couple exhibited higher As removal performance than that of Fe(0) alone from water. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron for Sulfide Removal from Digested Piggery Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Hsun Chaung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of dissolved sulfides in water and wastewater by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI was examined in the study. Both laboratory batch studies and a pilot test in a 50,000-pig farm were conducted. Laboratory studies indicated that the sulfide removal with nZVI was a function of pH where an increase in pH decreased removal rates. The pH effect on the sulfide removal with nZVI is attributed to the formation of FeS through the precipitation of Fe(II and sulfide. The saturated adsorption capacities determined by the Langmuir model were 821.2, 486.3, and 359.7 mg/g at pH values 4, 7, and 12, respectively, for nZVI, largely higher than conventional adsorbents such as activated carbon and impregnated activated carbon. The surface characterization of sulfide-laden nZVI using XPS and TGA indicated the formation of iron sulfide, disulfide, and polysulfide that may account for the high adsorption capacity of nZVI towards sulfide. The pilot study showed the effectiveness of nZVI for sulfide removal; however, the adsorption capacity is almost 50 times less than that determined in the laboratory studies during the testing period of 30 d. The complexity of digested wastewater constituents may limit the effectiveness of nZVI. Microbial analysis suggested that the impact of nZVI on the change of microbial species distribution was relatively noticeable after the addition of nZVI.

  17. Reaction pathway and oxidation mechanisms of dibutyl phthalate by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huanxuan [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wan, Jinquan, E-mail: ppjqwan@scut.edu.cn [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China); State Key Lab Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ma, Yongwen [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China); State Key Lab Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wang, Yan [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2016-08-15

    This study investigated reaction pathway and oxidation mechanisms of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) by persulfate (PS) activated with zero-valent iron (ZVI). The DBP degradation was studied at three pH values (acidic, neutral and basic) in the presence of different organic scavengers. Using a chemical probe method, both sulfate radical (SO{sub 4}·{sup −}) and hydroxyl radical (·OH) were found to be primary oxidants at pH 3.0 and pH 7.0, respectively while ·OH was the major specie to oxidize DBP at pH 11.0. A similar result was found in an experiment of Electron Spin Resonance spin-trapping where in addition to ·OH, superoxide radical (O{sub 2}·{sup −}) was detected at pH 11.0. The transformation of degradation products including dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), phthalic anhydride, and acetophenone exhibited diverse variation during the reaction processes. The phthalic anhydride concentration appeared to be maximum at all pHs. Another eleven intermediate products were also found at pH 3.0 by GC–MS and HPLC analysis, and their degradation mechanisms and pathways were proposed. It was suggested that dealkylation, hydroxylation, decarboxylation and hydrogen extraction were the dominant degradation mechanisms of DBP at pH 3.0. - Highlights: • Both SO{sub 4}{sup −}· and ·OH were found to be the major active species at pH 3.0 and pH 7.0. • ·OH and ·O2– were the primary oxidants pH 11.0. • The intermediate products were investigated as well as the degradation pathway. • Dealkylation, hydroxylation, decarboxylation, H-extraction were the major mechanisms.

  18. Phytotoxicity and uptake of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) by two plant species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xingmao, E-mail: ma@engr.siu.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States); Gurung, Arun [Civil and Environmental Engineering, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States); Deng, Yang [Earth and Environmental Studies, Montclair State University, NJ 07403 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Use of nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI) for the treatment of various environmental pollutants has been proven successful. However, large scale introduction of engineered nanomaterials such as nZVI into the environment has recently attracted serious concerns. There is an urgent need to investigate the environmental fate and impact of nZVI due to the scope of its application. The goal of this study was to evaluate the toxicity and accumulation of bare nZVI by two commonly encountered plant species: cattail (Typha latifolia) and hybrid poplars (Populous deltoids × Populous nigra). Plant seedlings were grown hydroponically in a greenhouse and dosed with different concentrations of nZVI (0–1000 mg/L) for four weeks. The nZVI exhibited strong toxic effect on Typha at higher concentrations (> 200 mg/L) but enhanced plant growth at lower concentrations. nZVI also significantly reduced the transpiration and growth of hybrid poplars at higher concentrations. Microscopic images indicated that large amount of nZVI coated on plant root surface as irregular aggregates and some nZVI penetrated into several layers of epidermal cells. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) confirmed the internalization of nZVI by poplar root cells but similar internalization was not observed for Typha root cells. The upward transport to shoots was minimal for both plant species. - Highlights: ► nZVI may exert phytotoxic effects on plants at concentrations (> 200 mg/L) often encountered in site remediation practices. ► nZVI deposits on plant root surface as aggregates and some could internalize in plant root cells. ► Plant uptake and accumulation of nZVI are plant species-dependent. ► Upward transport from roots to shoots was not observed.

  19. Nanoscale zero-valent iron functionalized Posidonia oceanica marine biomass for heavy metal removal from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubakri, Saber; Djebbi, Mohamed Amine; Bouaziz, Zaineb; Namour, Philippe; Ben Haj Amara, Abdesslem; Ghorbel-Abid, Ibtissem; Kalfat, Rafik

    2017-12-01

    Because of the excellent reducing capacity of nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI), it can be used as alternative materials for the removal of a variety of reducible water contaminants including toxic metals. The current paper reports the research results obtained for self-prepared biosorbent, Posidonia oceanica biomass, activated in alkaline medium and functionalized with NZVI particles. The structural characteristics, surface morphology, and binding properties of the resulting nanobiosorbent are presented. Batch comparative adsorption trials including adsorption kinetics and isothermals onto raw Posidonia, Posidonia-OH and Posidonia-OH-NZVI were investigated on three heavy metal ions: Cd(II), Pb(II), and Cu(II). The nanobiosorbent showed better properties, such as high reactivity and high uptake rate through the sorption process. The toxic metal removal has been monitored in terms of pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order kinetics, and both Langmuir- and Freundlich-type isotherm models have been used to describe the sorption mechanism. The experimental data of all studied systems showed that the uptake kinetics follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the equilibrium uptake can adopt the Langmuir-type isotherm model which assumes a monolayer coverage as the adsorption saturates and no further adsorption occurs. The thermodynamic results confirm that all sorption processes were feasible, spontaneous and thermodynamically favorable. Zeta potential data displayed that Cd(II), Pb(II), and Cu(II) tend to be reduced after exposure on the Posidonia-OH-NZVI surface. Furthermore, sorption competitions of the metals from binary and ternary systems were carried out onto Posidonia-OH-NZVI in order to gain further insight into the sorption efficiency of this material. Therefore, as a result, the proposed new nanobiosorbent could offer potential benefits in remediation of heavy metal-contaminated water as a green and environmentally friendly bionanocomposite.

  20. Degradation of perchloroethene by combined application of microorganisms and zero valent iron particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöftner, Philipp; Summer, Dorothea; Wimmer, Bernhard; Reichenauer, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) are especially toxic pollutants which are frequently found at contaminated sites in urban areas which are densely covered with buildings. In specific in such areas, in-situ technologies are favourable since conventional remediation technologies as excavation are often not applicable. This project examines a combination of two in-situ remediation methods, in which the biotic degradation via bacteria (dehalococcoides) is combined with abiotic degradation by zero-valent iron particles (ZVI). ZVI particles are injected into the aquifer where CHC-molecules are reductively dechlorinated. However Fe(0) is also oxidized by reaction with water leading to generation of H2 without any CHC degradation. To achieve biotic degradation often strictly anaerobic strains of the bacteria Dehalococcoides are used. These bacteria can dechlorinate CHC by utilizing H2. By combining these processes the H2, produced during the anaerobic corrosion of Fe(0), could be used by bacteria for further CHC degradation. Different Fe(0) particles (nano- and micro-scale) were combined with microbial dehalogenation for dehalogenation of perchloroethene (PCE) in batch experiments. PCE degradation rates and H2 production rates of the different particles and cultures were determined. Additionally an artificial aquifer (approximately 1.0 x 0.5 x 0.5 metres) was established. This aquifer was spiked with PCE and subsequently treated with Fe(0) particles and microbial. Molasses was added to facilitate microbial dehalogenation. Preliminary results showed that all H2 evolved during oxidation of Fe(0) were used by the associated microbial community. Nevertheless the overall dehalogenation of chlorinated compounds as well as the production of methane was hardly influenced by the addition of Fe(0), at least not over the experimental period of 28 days. Independent if Fe(0) was added or not all chlorinated compounds were dehalogenated whereby ethene and ethane were the only end

  1. Heavy metal removal using nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI): Theory and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shaolin, E-mail: lishaolin@tongji.edu.cn; Wang, Wei; Liang, Feipeng; Zhang, Wei-xian, E-mail: zhangwx@tongji.edu.cn

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • nZVI is able to perform fast and simultaneous removal of different heavy metal ions. • Fast separation and seeding effect of nZVI facilities its application in wastewater. • A novel process of E{sub h}-controlled reactor, nZVI separator and reuse is proposed. • E{sub h}-controlled system and nZVI recirculation increase material efficiency of nZVI. • The process produces stable effluent and is effective in wastewater treatment. - Abstract: Treatment of wastewater containing heavy metals requires considerations on simultaneous removal of different ions, system reliability and quick separation of reaction products. In this work, we demonstrate that nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) is an ideal reagent for removing heavy metals from wastewater. Batch experiments show that nZVI is able to perform simultaneous removal of different heavy metals and arsenic; reactive nZVI in uniform dispersion brings rapid changes in solution E{sub h}, enabling a facile way for reaction regulation. Microscope characterizations and settling experiments suggest that nZVI serves as solid seeds that facilitate products separation. A treatment process consisting of E{sub h}-controlled nZVI reaction, gravitational separation and nZVI recirculation is then demonstrated. Long-term (>12 months) operation shows that the process achieves >99.5% removal of As, Cu and a number of other toxic elements. The E{sub h}-controlled reaction system sustains a highly-reducing condition in reactor and reduces nZVI dosage. The process produces effluent of stable quality that meets local discharge guidelines. The gravitational separator shows high efficacy of nZVI recovery and the recirculation improves nZVI material efficiency, resulting in extraordinarily high removal capacities ((245 mg As + 226 mg-Cu)/g-nZVI). The work provides proof that nanomaterials can offer truly green and cost-effective solutions for wastewater treatment.

  2. Impact of nano zero valent iron (NZVI) on methanogenic activity and population dynamics in anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Guo, Jialiang; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2013-11-01

    Nano zero valent iron (NZVI), although being increasingly used for environmental remediation, has potential negative impact on methanogenesis in anaerobic digestion. In this study, NZVI (average size = 55 ± 11 nm) showed inhibition of methanogenesis due to its disruption of cell integrity. The inhibition was coincident with the fast hydrogen production and accumulation due to NZVI dissolution under anaerobic conditions. At the concentrations of 1 mM and above, NZVI reduced methane production by more than 20%. At the concentration of 30 mM, NZVI led to a significant increase in soluble COD (an indication of cell disruption) and volatile fatty acids in the mixed liquor along with an accumulation of H2, resulting in a reduction of methane production by 69% (±4% [standard deviation]). By adding a specific methanogenesis inhibitor-sodium 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) to the anaerobic sludge containing 30 mM NZVI, the amount of H2 produced was only 79% (±1%) of that with heat-killed sludge, indicating the occurrence of bacterially controlled hydrogen utilization processes. Quantitative PCR data was in accordance with the result of methanogenesis inhibition, as the level of methanogenic population (dominated by Methanosaeta) in the presence of 30 mM NZVI decreased significantly compared to that of the control. On the contrary, ZVI powder (average size production presumably due to hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis of hydrogen gas that was slowly released from the NZVI powder. While it is a known fact that NZVI disrupts cell membranes, which inhibited methanogenesis described herein, the results suggest that the rapid hydrogen production due to NZVI dissolution also contribute to methanogenesis inhibition and lead to bacterially controlled hydrogenotrophic processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hydrogen production from the dissolution of nano zero valent iron and its effect on anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Xi; Guo, Jialiang; Zhang, Chunyang; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Nano zero valent iron (NZVI) has shown inhibition on methanogenesis in anaerobic digestion due to its reductive decomposition of cell membrane. The inhibition was accompanied by the accumulation of hydrogen gas due to rapid NZVI dissolution. It is not clear whether and how rapid hydrogen release from NZVI dissolution directly affects anaerobic digestion. In this study, the hydrogen release kinetics from NZVI (average size = 55 ± 11 nm) dissolution in deionized water under anaerobic conditions was first evaluated. The first-order NZVI dissolution rate constant was 2.62 ± 0.26 h(-1) with its half-life of 0.26 ± 0.03 h. Two sets of anaerobic digestion experiments (i.e., in the presence of glucose or without any substrate but at different anaerobic sludge concentrations) were performed to study the impact of H2 release from rapid NZVI dissolution, in which H2 was generated in a separate water bottle containing NZVI (i.e., ex situ H2 or externally supplied from NZVI dissolution) before hydrogen gas was introduced to anaerobic digestion. The results showed that the H2 partial pressure in the headspace of the digestion bottle reached as high as 0.27 atm due to rapid NZVI dissolution, resulting in temporary inhibition of methane production. Nevertheless, the 5-d cumulative methane volume in the group with ex situ H2 production due to NZVI dissolution was actually higher than that of control, suggesting NZVI inhibition on methanogenesis is solely due to the reductive decomposition of cell membrane after direct contact with NZVI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ligand-assisted degradation of carbon tetrachloride by microscale zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianlan; Deng, Baolin; Guo, Jing; Wang, Yang; Lan, Yeqing

    2011-04-01

    Degradation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) by microscale zero-valent iron (ZVI) was investigated in batch systems with or without organic ligands (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid, tartaric acid, malic acid and oxalic acid) at pHs from 3.5 to 7.5. The results demonstrated that at 25°C, the dechlorination of CT by microscale ZVI is slow in the absence of organic ligands, with a pseudo-first-order rate constant of 0.0217 h(-1) at pH 3.5 and being further dropped to 0.0052 h(-1) at pH 7.5. However, addition of organic ligands significantly enhanced the rates and the extents of CT removal, as indicated by the rate constant increases of 39, 31, 32, 28 and 18 times in the presence of EDTA, citric acid, tartaric acid, malic acid and oxalic acid, respectively, at pH 3.5 and 25°C. The effect of EDTA was most significant; the dechlorination of CT at an initial concentration of 20 mg l(-1) increased from 16.3% (no ligands) to 89.1% (with EDTA) at the end of 8h reaction. The enhanced CT degradation in the presence of organic ligands was primarily attributed to the elimination of a surface passivation layer of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides on the microscale ZVI through chelating of organic ligands with Fe(III), which maintained the exposure of active sites on ZVI surface to CT. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of the uptake of aqueous Ni2+ ions on nanoparticles of zero-valent iron (nZVI)

    OpenAIRE

    Efecan, Nazlı; Shahwan, Talal; Eroğlu, Ahmet E.; Lieberwirth, Ingo

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the fixation of aqueous Ni2+ ions by nanoparticles of zero-valent iron (nZVI) prepared using the borohydride reduction method. The uptake of Ni2+ was tested under various experimental conditions like initial concentration, time, pH, and repetitive application of nZVI. Part of the experiments was devoted to comparing the extent of uptake of Ni2+ ions with those of Cu2+, Cd2+, Zn2+, and Sr2+ ions, which belong to a wide range of standard reduction potentials. Particle si...

  6. Graduated characterization method using a multi-well microplate for reducing reactivity of nanoscale zero valent iron materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, Yuhoon; Salatas, Apostolos; Mines, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Even though nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) has been intensively studied for the treatment of a plethora of pollutants through reductive reaction, quantification of nZVI reactivity has not yet been standardized. Here, we adapted colorimetric assays for determining reductive activity of n......ZVI and its composites with other metals. The assay quantifies reduction products to avoid interfering reactions, such as sorption and volatilization. Three different reaction products, ammonium, phenol, and aniline, generated as the result of reduction of nitrate, p-halophenols, and nitrobenzene...

  7. The application of illite supported nanoscale zero valent iron for the treatment of uranium contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, C; Landsberger, S; Li, Y L

    2017-09-01

    In this study, nanoscale zero valent iron I-NZVI was investigated as a remediation strategy for uranium contaminated groundwater from the former Cimarron Fuel Fabrication Site in Oklahoma, USA. The 1 L batch-treatment system was applied in the study. The result shows that 99.9% of uranium in groundwater was removed by I-NZVI within 2 h. Uranium concentration in the groundwater stayed around 27 μg/L, and there was no sign of uranium release into groundwater after seven days of reaction time. Meanwhile the release of iron was significantly decreased compared to NZVI which can reduce the treatment impact on the water environment. To study the influence of background pH of the treatment system on removal efficiency of uranium, the groundwater was adjusted from pH 2-10 before the addition of I-NZVI. The pH of the groundwater was from 2.1 to 10.7 after treatment. The removal efficiency of uranium achieved a maximum in neutral pH of groundwater. The desorption of uranium on the residual solid phase after treatment was investigated in order to discuss the stability of uranium on residual solids. After 2 h of leaching, 0.07% of the total uranium on residual solid phase was leached out in a HNO3 leaching solution with a pH of 4.03. The concentration of uranium in the acid leachate was under 3.2 μg/L which is below the EPA's maximum contaminant level of 30 μg/L. Otherwise, the concentration of uranium was negligible in distilled water leaching solution (pH = 6.44) and NaOH leaching solution (pH = 8.52). A desorption study shows that an acceptable amount of uranium on the residuals can be released into water system under strong acid conditions in short terms. For long term disposal management of the residual solids, the leachate needs to be monitored and treated before discharge into a hazardous landfill or the water system. For the first time, I-NZVI was applied for the treatment of uranium contaminated groundwater. These results provide proof that I-NZVI has

  8. Effect of coating on the environmental applications of zero valent iron nanoparticles: the lindane case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Román, I; Galdames, A; Alonso, M L; Bartolomé, L; Vilas, J L; Alonso, R M

    2016-09-15

    Commercial stabilized slurry of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) as well as laboratory-synthesized polymer-stabilized NZVI nanoparticles were used for lindane (γ-hexachlorocyclohexane) degradation studies in aqueous solution. In the present study, polymer-stabilized iron nanoparticles were stabilized using polyethylene glycol (PEG, Mn ~400 and ~950-1050) and polytetrahydrofuran (PTHF, Mn ~650). To study the effectiveness of the different nanoparticles, a quantitative monitorization of lindane degradation by using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and a qualitative measurement of generated volatile by-products by headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by GC/MS were carried out. The obtained data were compared and contrasted with the results obtained in previous work. Results showed that the nanoparticles studied in this work possess superior dechlorination performance compared with previous observations. The freshly prepared Fe(0)-PEG400, Fe(0)-PEG1050 and Fe(0)-PTHF exhibited high reactivity during the dechlorination process of lindane in a very short time. The results obtained with the synthesized nanoparticles were similar to those obtained with commercial nanoparticles. However, in all cases reactivity decreased at reaction's late stage. Degradation of lindane by the studied nanoparticles removed 99.9% of the lindane initial concentration after 72h, except for Fe(0)-PTHF nanoparticles, for which the reaction stopped after 5min. In all cases, the reaction followed a second order kinetics. Finally, comparing the results from this study with our previous work, where different nature polymers were considered (Fe(0)-CMC, Fe(0)-PAA and Fe(0)-PAP), more gradual degradation profile of lindane was observed for Fe(0)-PAA and Fe(0)-CMC. It should be noted that in the present case, the reaction of lindane was speeded up with commercial and Fe(0)-PEG nanoparticles. Nevertheless, in the later case, the composition of by-products was affected by the presence

  9. The removal of uranium onto carbon-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Richard A; Scott, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In the current work carbon-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron particles (CS nZVI), synthesised by the vacuum heat treatment of ferric citrate trihydrate absorbed onto carbon black, have been tested for the removal of uranium (U) from natural and synthetic waters. Two types of CS nZVI were tested, one vacuum annealed at 600 °C for 4 h and the other vacuum annealed at 700 °C for 4 h, with their U removal behaviour compared to nZVI synthesised via the reduction of ferrous iron using sodium borohydride. The batch systems were analysed over a 28-day reaction period during which the liquid and nanoparticulate solids were periodically analysed to determine chemical evolution of the solutions and particulates. Results demonstrate a well-defined difference between the two types of CS nZVI, with greater U removal exhibited by the nanomaterial synthesised at 700 °C. The mechanism has been attributed to the CS nZVI synthesised at 700 °C exhibiting (i) a greater proportion of surface oxide Fe(2+) to Fe(3+) (0.34 compared to 0.28); (ii) a greater conversion of ferric citrate trihydrate [2Fe(C6H5O7)·H2O] to Fe(0); and (iii) a larger surface area (108.67 compared to 88.61 m(2) g(-1)). Lower maximum U uptake was recorded for both types of CS nZVI in comparison with the borohydride-reduced nZVI. A lower decrease in solution Eh and DO was also recorded, indicating that less chemical reduction of U was achieved by the CS nZVI. Despite this, lower U desorption in the latter stages of the experiment (>7 days) was recorded for the CS nZVI synthesised at 700 °C, indicating that carbon black in the CS nZVI is likely to have contributed towards U sorption and retention. Overall, it can be stated that the borohydride-reduced nZVI were significantly more effective than CS nZVI for U removal over relatively short timescales (e.g. <48 h), however, they were more susceptible to U desorption over extended time periods.

  10. Generation of a high-valent iron imido corrolazine complex and NR group transfer reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeladee, Pannee; Jameson, Guy N L; Siegler, Maxime A; Kumar, Devesh; de Visser, Sam P; Goldberg, David P

    2013-04-15

    The generation of a new high-valent iron terminal imido complex prepared with a corrolazine macrocycle is reported. The reaction of [Fe(III)(TBP8Cz)] (TBP8Cz = octakis(4-tert-butylphenyl)corrolazinato) with the commercially available chloramine-T (Na(+)TsNCl(-)) leads to oxidative N-tosyl transfer to afford [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz(+•))(NTs)] in dichloromethane/acetonitrile at room temperature. This complex was characterized by UV-vis, Mössbauer (δ = -0.05 mm s(-1), ΔE(Q) = 2.94 mm s(-1)), and EPR (X-band (15 K), g = 2.10, 2.00) spectroscopies, and together with reactivity patterns and DFT calculations has been established as an iron(IV) species antiferromagnetically coupled with a Cz-π-cation-radical (S(total) = 1/2 ground state). Reactivity studies with triphenylphosphine as substrate show that [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz(+•))(NTs)] is an efficient NTs transfer agent, affording the phospharane product Ph3P═NTs under both stoichiometric and catalytic conditions. Kinetic analysis of this reaction supports a bimolecular NTs transfer mechanism with rate constant of 70(15) M(-1) s(-1). These data indicate that [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz(+•))(NTs)] reacts about 100 times faster than analogous Mn terminal arylimido corrole analogues. It was found that two products crystallize from the same reaction mixture of Fe(III)(TBP8Cz) + chloramine-T + PPh3, [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz)(NPPh3)] and [Fe(III)(TBP8Cz)(OPPh3)], which were definitively characterized by X-ray crystallography. The sequential production of Ph3P═NTs, Ph3P═NH, and Ph3P═O was observed by (31)P NMR spectroscopy and led to a proposed mechanism that accounts for all of the observed products. The latter Fe(III) complex was then rationally synthesized and structurally characterized from Fe(III)(TBP8Cz) and OPPh3, providing an important benchmark compound for spectroscopic studies. A combination of Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopies led to the characterization of both intermediate spin (S = 3/2 and low spin (S = 1/2) Fe(III) corrolazines, as

  11. Zero-valent iron and iron oxide-coated sand as a combination for removal of co-present chromate and arsenate from groundwater with humic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mak, Mark S.H.; Rao, Pinhua [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong); Lo, Irene M.C., E-mail: cemclo@ust.h [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong)

    2011-02-15

    The combination of zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) and iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS) was used to remove Cr(VI) and As(V) from groundwater in this study. The efficiency and the removal mechanism of Cr(VI) and As(V) by using this combination, with the influence of humic acid (HA), were investigated using batch experiments. Results showed that, compared to using Fe{sup 0} or IOCS alone, the Fe{sup 0}-IOCS can perform better on the removal of both Cr(VI) and As(V). Metal extraction studies showed that As(V) was mainly removed by IOCS and iron corrosion products while Cr(VI) was mainly removed by Fe{sup 0} and its corrosion products. Competition was found between Cr(VI) and As(V) for the adsorption sites on the iron corrosion products. HA had shown insignificant effects on Cr(VI) removal but some effects on As(V) removal kinetics. As(V) was adsorbed on IOCS at the earlier stage, but adsorbed/coprecipitated with the iron corrosion products at the later stage. - Research Highlights: Fe{sup 0}-IOCS is better reactive media for removing Cr(VI) and As(V) from groundwater. As(V) was mainly removed by the IOCS and the iron corrosion products. Cr(VI) was mainly removed by Fe{sup 0} and its corrosion products. As(V) adsorption was inhibited in the presence of HA, when using Fe{sup 0} alone. IOCS can provide the adsorption sites for As(V) that complement the weakness of Fe{sup 0}. - Chromate and arsenate-contaminated groundwater can be better treated by using combination of zero-valent iron and iron oxide-coated sand.

  12. Use of zero-valent iron biosand filters to reduce Escherichia coli O157:H12 in irrigation water applied to spinach plants in a field setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, D T; Callahan, M T; Ferguson, S; Hoover, D G; Chiu, P C; Shelton, D R; Millner, P D; Camp, M J; Patel, J R; Kniel, K E; Sharma, M

    2012-03-01

    Zero-valent iron (ZVI) filters may provide an efficient method to mitigate the contamination of produce crops through irrigation water. A field-scale system was utilized to evaluate the effectiveness of a biosand filter (S), a biosand filter with ZVI incorporated (ZVI) and a control (C, no treatment) in decontaminating irrigation water. An inoculum of c.8·5log CFU100ml(-1) of Escherichia coli O157:H12 was introduced to all three column treatments in 20-l doses. Filtered waters were subsequently overhead irrigated to 'Tyee' spinach plants. Water, spinach plant and soil samples were obtained on days 0, 1, 4, 6, 8, 10, 13 and 15 and analysed for E. coli O157:H12 populations. ZVI filters inactivated c.6logCFU100ml(-1) E. coli O157:H12 during filtration on day 0, significantly (Pspinach plants irrigated with ZVI-filtered water had significantly lower E. coli O157 counts (0·13logCFUg(-1)) than spinach irrigated with either S-filtered (4·37logCFUg(-1)) or control (5·23logCFUg(-1)) water. Soils irrigated with ZVI-filtered water contained E. coli O157:H12 populations below the detection limit (2logCFUg(-1)), while those irrigated with S-filtered water (3·56logCFUg(-1)) were significantly lower than those irrigated with control (4·64logCFUg(-1)). ZVI biosand filters were more effective in reducing E. coli O157:H12 populations in irrigation water than sand filters. Zero-valent ion treatment may be a cost-effective mitigation step to help small farmers reduce risk of foodborne E. coli infections associated with contamination of leafy greens. © 2011 No claim to US Government works. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. A field investigation on transport of carbon-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, J; Meißner, T; Potthoff, A; Bleyl, S; Georgi, A; Mackenzie, K; Trabitzsch, R; Werban, U; Oswald, S E

    2015-10-01

    The application of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) for subsurface remediation of groundwater contaminants is a promising new technology, which can be understood as alternative to the permeable reactive barrier technique using granular iron. Dechlorination of organic contaminants by zero-valent iron seems promising. Currently, one limitation to widespread deployment is the fast agglomeration and sedimentation of nZVI in colloidal suspensions, even more so when in soils and sediments, which limits the applicability for the treatment of sources and plumes of contamination. Colloid-supported nZVI shows promising characteristics to overcome these limitations. Mobility of Carbo-Iron Colloids (CIC) - a newly developed composite material based on finely ground activated carbon as a carrier for nZVI - was tested in a field application: In this study, a horizontal dipole flow field was established between two wells separated by 5.3m in a confined, natural aquifer. The injection/extraction rate was 500L/h. Approximately 1.2kg of CIC was suspended with the polyanionic stabilizer carboxymethyl cellulose. The suspension was introduced into the aquifer at the injection well. Breakthrough of CIC was observed visually and based on total particle and iron concentrations detected in samples from the extraction well. Filtration of water samples revealed a particle breakthrough of about 12% of the amount introduced. This demonstrates high mobility of CIC particles and we suggest that nZVI carried on CIC can be used for contaminant plume remediation by in-situ formation of reactive barriers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Conjunctive effect of CMC-zero-valent iron nanoparticles and FYM in the remediation of chromium-contaminated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavi, Vemula; Prasad, Tollamadugu Naga Venkata Krishna Vara; Reddy, Balam Ravindra; Reddy, Ambavaram Vijay Bhaskar; Gajulapalle, Madhavi

    2014-04-01

    Chromium is an important industrial metal used in various products and processes but at the same time causing lethal environmental hazards. Remediation of Cr-contaminated soils poses both technological and economic challenges, as conventional methods are often too expensive and difficult to operate. Zero-valent iron particles at nanoscale are proposed to be one of the important reductants of Cr(VI), transforming the same into nontoxic Cr(III). In the present investigation, soils contaminated with Cr(VI) are allowed to react with the various loadings of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (Fe0) for a reaction period of 24 h. Fe0 nanoparticles were synthesized by the reduction of ferrous sulfate in the presence of sodium borohydride and stabilized with carboxy methyl cellulose and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis spectrophotometer, Fourier transform-infra red spectrophotometer, Raman spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering technique and zeta potential. Further, this work demonstrates the potential utilization of farm yard manure (FYM) and Fe0 nanoparticles in combination and individually for the effective remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated soils. An increase in the reduction of Cr(VI) from 60 to 80 % was recorded with the increase in the loading of Fe0 nanoparticles from 0.1 to 0.3 mg/100 g individually and in combination with FYM ranging from 50 to 100 mg/100 g soil.

  15. Removal of heavy metals and dyes by supported nano zero-valent iron on barium ferrite microfibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinchun; Shen, Xiangqian; Jing, Maoxiang; Liu, Ruijiang; Lu, Yi; Xiang, Jun

    2014-07-01

    The binary nano zero-valent iron/barium ferrite (NZVI/BFO) microfibers with uniform diameters and high porosity were prepared by the organic gel-thermal selective reduction process. The composite microfibers are fabricated from nano zero-valent iron and nano BaFe12O19 grains. The effects of pH, adsorbent dosage, and contact time on the adsorption of heavy metals and dyes have been investigated. The adsorption isotherms of heavy metals and dyes on the microfibers are well described by the Langmuir model, in which the estimated adsorption capacities are 14.5, 29.9, 68.3 and 110.4 mg/g for Pb(II), As(V), Congo red and methylene blue, respectively. After five cycles, these microfibers still exhibit a high removal efficiency for As(V), Pb(II), Congo red and methylene blue. The enhanced adsorption characteristics can be attributed to the porous structure, strong surface activity and electronic hopping. Therefore, the magnetic NZVI/BFO microfibers can be used as an efficient, fast and high capacity adsorbent for heavy metals and dyes removal.

  16. Environmental benefits and risks of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI): risk mitigation or trade-off?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grieger, Khara Deanne; Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Hartmann, Nanna Isabella Bloch

    2009-01-01

    The use of nanoscaled particles in environmental remediation is gaining increasing amounts of attention in recent years, including the use of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) for soil and groundwater remediation. The main advantages of its use include high degrees of reactivity towards a wide...... range of contaminants, enhanced mobility of the often coated particles, and its cost-effective in situ applications. Numerous studies have shown that compared to larger sized iron particles nZVI may have some superior properties, due to high surface areas and small sizes associated with nanoscale...... dimensions. While the use and further development of nZVI is understandably heralded as an environmentally-beneficial technology, the potentials risks of introducing these nanoparticles into the environment also needs to be considered. To date most research has focused on the potential benefits of n...

  17. Influence of fulvic acid on the colloidal stability and reactivity of nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Haoran; Ahmad, Kito; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Zhongwu; Chen, Guiqiu; He, Qi; Xie, Yankai; Wu, Yanan; Zhao, Feng; Zeng, Yalan

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of fulvic acid (FA) on the colloidal stability and reactivity of nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) at pH 5, 7 and 9. The sedimentation behavior of nZVI differed at different pH. A biphasic model was used to describe the two time-dependent settling processes (i.e., a rapid settling followed by a slower settling) and the settling rates were calculated. Generally, the settling of nZVI was more significant at the point of zero charge (pHpzc), which could be varied in the presence of FA due to the adsorption of FA on the nZVI surface. More FA was adsorbed on the nZVI surface at pH 5-7 than pH 9, resulting in the varying sedimentation behavior of nZVI via influencing the electrostatic repulsion among particles. Moreover, it was found that there was a tradeoff between the stabilization and the reactivity of nZVI as affected by the presence of FA. When FA concentration was at a low level, the adsorption of FA on the nZVI surface could enhance the particle stabilization, and thus facilitating the Cr(VI) reduction by providing more available surface sites. However, when the FA concentrations were too high to occupy the active surface sites of nZVI, the Cr(VI) reduction could be decreased even though the FA enhanced the dispersion of nZVI particles. At pH 9, the FA improved the Cr(VI) reduction by nZVI. Given the adsorption of FA on the nZVI surface was insignificant and its effect on the settling behavior of nZVI particles was minimal, it was proposed that the FA formed soluble complexes with the produced Fe(III)/Cr(III) ions, and thus reducing the degree of passivation on the nZVI surface and facilitating the Cr(VI) reduction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nanoscale zero-valent iron for metal/metalloid removal from model hydraulic fracturing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuqing; Lei, Cheng; Khan, Eakalak; Chen, Season S; Tsang, Daniel C W; Ok, Yong Sik; Lin, Daohui; Feng, Yujie; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2017-06-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) was tested for the removal of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cr(VI), and As(V) in model saline wastewaters from hydraulic fracturing. Increasing ionic strength (I) from 0.35 to 4.10 M (Day-1 to Day-90 wastewaters) increased Cu(II) removal (25.4-80.0%), inhibited Zn(II) removal (58.7-42.9%), slightly increased and then reduced Cr(VI) removal (65.7-44.1%), and almost unaffected As(V) removal (66.7-75.1%) by 8-h reaction with nZVI at 1-2 g L-1. The removal kinetics conformed to pseudo-second-order model, and increasing I decreased the surface area-normalized rate coefficient (ksa) of Cu(II) and Cr(VI), probably because agglomeration of nZVI in saline wastewaters restricted diffusion of metal(loid)s to active surface sites. Increasing I induced severe Fe dissolution from 0.37 to 0.77% in DIW to 4.87-13.0% in Day-90 wastewater; and Fe dissolution showed a significant positive correlation with Cu(II) removal. With surface stabilization by alginate and polyvinyl alcohol, the performance of entrapped nZVI in Day-90 wastewater was improved for Zn(II) and Cr(VI), and Fe dissolution was restrained (3.20-7.36%). The X-ray spectroscopic analysis and chemical speciation modelling demonstrated that the difference in removal trends from Day-1 to Day-90 wastewaters was attributed to: (i) distinctive removal mechanisms of Cu(II) and Cr(VI) (adsorption, (co-)precipitation, and reduction), compared to Zn(II) (adsorption) and As(V) (bidentate inner-sphere complexation); and (ii) changes in solution speciation (e.g., from Zn2+ to ZnCl3- and ZnCl42-; from CrO42- to CaCrO4 complex). Bare nZVI was susceptible to variations in wastewater chemistry while entrapped nZVI was more stable and environmentally benign, which could be used to remove metals/metalloids before subsequent treatment for reuse/disposal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Zero-Valent Iron Enhances Biocathodic Carbon Dioxide Reduction to Methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykstra, Christy M; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2017-11-07

    Methanogenic bioelectrochemical systems (BESs), which convert carbon dioxide (CO2) directly to methane (CH4), promise to be an innovative technology for anaerobic digester biogas upgrading. Zero-valent iron (ZVI), which has previously been used to improve CH4 production in anaerobic digesters, has not been explored in methanogenic biocathodes. Thus, the objective of this study was to assess the effect of biocathode ZVI on BES performance at 1 and 2 g/L initial ZVI concentrations and at various cathode potentials (-0.65 to -0.80 V versus SHE). The total CH4 produced during a 7-day feeding cycle with 1 and 2 g/L initial ZVI was 2.8- and 2.9-fold higher, respectively, than the mean CH4 production in the four prior cycles without ZVI addition. Furthermore, CH4 production by the ZVI-amended biocathodes remained elevated throughout three subsequent feeding cycles, despite catholyte replacement and no new ZVI addition. The fourth cycle following a single ZVI addition of 1 g/L and 2 g/L yielded 123% and 231% more total CH4 than in the non-ZVI cycles, respectively. The higher CH4 production could not be fully explained by complete anaerobic oxidation of the ZVI and utilization of produced H2 by hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Microbial community analysis showed that the same phylotype, most closely related to Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus, dominated the archaeal community in the ZVI-free and ZVI-amended biocathodes. However, the bacterial community experienced substantial changes following ZVI exposure, with more Proteobacteria and fewer Bacteroidetes in the ZVI-amended biocathode. Furthermore, it is likely that a redox-active precipitate formed in the ZVI-amended biocathode, which sorbed to the electrode and/or biofilm, acted as a redox mediator, and enhanced electron transfer and CH4 production. Thus, ZVI may be used to increase biocathode CH4 production, assist in the start-up of an electromethanogenic biocathode, and/or maintain microbial activity during voltage

  20. Assessing the capacity of zero valent iron nanofluids to remediate NAPL-polluted porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsakiroglou, Christos, E-mail: ctsakir@iceht.forth.gr [Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas-Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences, Stadiou street, Platani, 26504 Patras (Greece); Terzi, Katerina; Sikinioti-Lock, Alexandra [Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas-Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences, Stadiou street, Platani, 26504 Patras (Greece); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Hajdu, Kata; Aggelopoulos, Christos [Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas-Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences, Stadiou street, Platani, 26504 Patras (Greece)

    2016-09-01

    A variety of aqueous suspensions (nanofluids) of zero-valent nano-particles (nZVI) are prepared by wet chemistry techniques, their stability and longevity is evaluated by physic-chemical methods of characterization, and their reactivity toward the dechlorination of per-chloro-ethylene (PCE) is examined with tests in batch reactors. For assessing the mobility, longevity and reactivity of nZVI suspensions (nanofluids), under flow-through conditions, visualization multiphase flow and transport tests are performed on a glass-etched pore network. The nZVI breakthrough curves are constructed by measuring the transient variation of the iron concentration in the effluent with atomic absorption spectroscopy. The capacity of nZVI to remediate the bulk phase of PCE is quantified by detecting the mass loss rate of PCE ganglia trapped in glass-etched pore networks during the continuous injection of nZVI suspension or pure water. The nZVI injection in porous media is simulated as an advection- dispersion process by accounting for the attachment/detachment of nanoparticles on the pore-walls, and describing the kinetics of PCE dissolution and reaction by 1st order equations. Visualization experiments reveal that the gradual elimination of PCE ganglia by the injected nZVI is associated with the preferential “erosion” of the upstream interfacial regions. The step controlling the overall process kinetics might be either (i) the enhanced PCE dissolution or (ii) the direct reaction of bulk PCE with the nZVI deposited upon the ganglia interfaces. Inverse modeling of the experiments under the simplifying assumption of one active mechanism indicates that the estimated kinetic coefficients are increasing functions of the flow rate. - Highlights: • The PCE remediation by nZVI is studied with visualization tests on pore networks. • The remediation of PCE ganglia by nZVI follows a non-uniform “erosion” pattern. • The preferential erosion of the upstream interfacial regions of

  1. Hydraulic and geochemical performance of a permeable reactive barrier containing zero-valent iron, Denver Federal Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, P.B.; Dennehy, K.F.; Sandstrom, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    The hydraulic and geochemical performance of a 366 m long permeable reactive barrier (PRB) at the Denver Federal Center; Denver, Colorado, was evaluated. The funnel and gate system, which was installed in 1996 to intercept and remediate ground water contaminated with chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs), contained four 12.2 m wide gates filled with zero-valent iron. Ground water mounding on the upgradient side of the PRB resulted in a tenfold increase in the hydraulic gradient and ground water velocity through the gates compared to areas of the aquifer unaffected by the PRB. Water balance calculations for April 1997 indicate that about 75% of the ground water moving toward the PRB from upgradient areas moved through the gates. The rest of the water either accumulated on the upgradient side of the PRB or bypassed the PRB. Chemical data from monitoring wells screened down-gradient, beneath, and at the ends of the PRB indicate that contaminants had not bypassed the PRB, except in a few isolated areas. Greater than 99% of the CAH mass entering the gates was retained by the iron. Fifty-one percent of the CAH carbon entering one gate was accounted for in dissolved C1 and C2 hydrocarbons, primarily ethane and ethene, which indicates that CAHs may adsorb to the iron prior to being dehalogenated. Treated water exiting the gates displaced contaminated ground water at a distance of at least 3 m downgradient from the PRB by the end of 1997. Measurements of dissolved inorganic ions in one gate indicate that calcite and siderite precipitation in the gate could reduce gate porosity by about 0.35% per year. Results from this study indicate that funnel and gate systems containing zero-valent iron can effectively treat ground water contaminated with CAHs. However, the hydrologic impacts of the PRB on the flow system need to be fully understood to prevent contaminants from bypassing the PRB.

  2. Zero Valent Iron Significantly Enhances Methane Production from Waste Activated Sludge by Improving Biochemical Methane Potential Rather Than Hydrolysis Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Qilin; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion has been widely applied for waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment. However, methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS is usually limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor biochemical methane potential of WAS. This work systematically studied the effects of three different types of zero valent iron (i.e., iron powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap) on methane production from WAS in anaerobic digestion, by using both experimental and mathematical approaches. The results demonstrated that both the clean and the rusty iron scrap were more effective than the iron powder for improving methane production from WAS. Model-based analysis showed that ZVI addition significantly enhanced methane production from WAS through improving the biochemical methane potential of WAS rather than its hydrolysis rate. Economic analysis indicated that the ZVI-based technology for enhancing methane production from WAS is economically attractive, particularly considering that iron scrap can be freely acquired from industrial waste. Based on these results, the ZVI-based anaerobic digestion process of this work could be easily integrated with the conventional chemical phosphorus removal process in wastewater treatment plant to form a cost-effective and environment-friendly approach, enabling maximum resource recovery/reuse while achieving enhanced methane production in wastewater treatment system.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF: LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS USING ZERO-VALENT IRON: AN EVALUATION AT TWO SITES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geochemical and microbiological factors that control long-term performance of subsurface permeable reactive barriers were evaluated at the Elizabeth City, NC and the Denver Federal Center, CO sites. These groundwater treatment systems use zero-valent iron filings to intercept an...

  4. Effect of the addition of zero valent iron (Fe0) on the batch biological sulphate reduction using grass cellulose as carbon source

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mulopo, J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available , a scarce commodity. The aim of the study presented here was to investigate the effect of zero valent iron (Fe0) on the biological removal of sulphate from AMD in batch reactors. The performance of the reactors was assessed by means of sulphate...

  5. High-valent iron (Fe(VI), Fe(V), and Fe(IV)) species in water: characterization and oxidative transformation of estrogenic hormones

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machalová-Šišková, K.; Jančula, Daniel; Drahoš, B.; Machala, L.; Babica, Pavel; Godoy Alonso, Paula; Trávníček, Z.; Tuček, J.; Maršálek, Blahoslav; Sharma, V. K.; Zbořil, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 28 (2016), s. 18802-18810 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI3/196 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : high-valent iron species * estrogenic hormones * oxidative transformation Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  6. Effects on nano zero-valent iron reactivity of interactions between hardness, alkalinity, and natural organic matter in reverse osmosis concentrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, Yuhoon; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) is considered to have potential to reduce nitrate in the concentrate generated by high pressure membrane processes aimed at water reuse. However, it is necessary to verify the effect of the matrix components in the concentrates on NZVI reactivity. In this study, ...

  7. Transformation impacts of dissolved and solid phase Fe(II) on trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction in an iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) mixed column system: a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yeunook; Kim, Dooil; Cho, Hyun-Hee; Singhal, Naresh; Park, Jae-Woo

    2012-12-01

    In this research, we conducted trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction in a column filled with iron and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) and developed a mathematical model to investigate the critical reactions between active species in iron/IRB/contaminant systems. The formation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) in this system with IRB and zero-valent iron (ZVI, Fe(0)) coated with a ferric iron (Fe(III)) crust significantly affected TCE reduction and IRB respiration in various ways. This study presents a new framework for transformation property and reducing ability of both dissolved (Fe(II)(dissolved)) and solid form ferrous iron (Fe(II)(solid)). Results showed that TCE reduction was strongly depressed by Fe(II)(solid) rather than by other inhibitors (e.g., Fe(III) and lactate), suggesting that Fe(II)(solid) might reduce IRB activation due to attachment to IRB cells. Newly exposed Fe(0) from the released Fe(II)(dissolved) was a strong contributor to TCE reduction compared to Fe(II)(solid). In addition, our research confirmed that less Fe(II)(solid) production strongly supported long-term TCE reduction because it may create an easier TCE approach to Fe(0) or increase IRB growth. Our findings will aid the understanding of the contributions of iron media (e.g., Fe(II)(solid), Fe(II)(dissolved), Fe(III), and Fe(0)) to IRB for decontamination in natural groundwater systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparisons of the reactivity, reusability and stability of four different zero-valent iron-based nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yingying; Fang, Zhanqiang; Qiu, Xinhong; Tsang, Eric Pokeung; Liang, Bin

    2014-08-01

    Our previous reports showed that nano zero-valent iron (nZVI), steel pickle liquor for the synthesis of nZVI (S-nZVI), nZVI immobilised in mesoporous silica microspheres (SiO2@FeOOH@Fe) and nano Ni/Fe bimetallic particles (Ni/Fe) have been proved to show good property for elimination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). However, it is necessary to compare their reactivity, reusability and stability when applied to in situ remediation. In this study, the performances of different iron-based nanoparticles were compared through reusability, sedimentation and iron dissolution experiments. The SiO2@FeOOH@Fe and Ni/Fe nanoparticles were shown to have higher reusability and stability, as they could be reused more than seven times, and that the SiO2@FeOOH@Fe can effectively avoid leaching iron ions into the solution and causing secondary pollution in the reaction. This study may serve as a reference for PBDE remediation in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hybrid zero valent iron (ZVI)/H2O2 oxidation process for landfill leachate treatment with novel nanosize metallic calcium/iron composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Son Dong; Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Lee, Byoung Ho

    2017-04-01

    A novel nanosize metallic calcium/iron dispersed reagent was synthesized and tested as coagulant/catalyst in a hybrid zero valent iron (ZVI)/H2O2 oxidation process to treat leachate. Two different types of leachates, one from municipal solid waste (MSW) tipping hall (MSWIL) and second from an MSW landfill site (MSWLL), were collected and characterized. The morphology, elemental composition, and mineral phases of the nano-Ca/CaO and nano-Fe/Ca/CaO were characterized by scanning electron microscopy-electron dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis. The coagulation process with 2.5 g L-1 nano-Ca/CaO attained 64.0, 56.0, and 20.7% removal of color, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and total suspended solids (TSS) in MSWLL. With only 1.0 g L-1 of nano-Fe/Ca/CaO, relatively high color, COD and TSS removal was achieved in MSWLL at 67.5, 60.2, and 37.7%, respectively. The heavy metal removal efficiency reached 91-99% after treatment with nano-Fe/Ca/CaO in both leachate samples. The coupling process, using 1.0 g L-1 of nano-Fe/Ca/CaO and 20 mM H2O2 doses, achieved enhancement removal of color, COD, and TSS, up to 95%, 96%, and 66%, respectively, without initial pH control. After this treatment, the color, COD, TSS, and heavy metals were significantly decreased, fitting the Korean discharge regulation limit. A hybrid coupled zero valent iron (ZVI)/H2O2 oxidation process with novel nanosized metallic calcium/iron dispersed reagent proved to be a suitable treatment for dealing with leachate samples. Conventional treatments (biological or physicochemical) are not sufficient anymore to reach the level of purification needed to fully reduce the negative impact of landfill leachates on the environment. This implies that new treatment alternatives species must be proposed. A coupled zero valent iron (ZVI)/H2O2 oxidation process proved to be a suitable treatment for dealing with leachate samples. Coagulation with nFe/Ca/CaO allows 91-99% of heavy

  10. Remediation of persistent organic pollutant-contaminated soil using biosurfactant-enhanced electrokinetics coupled with a zero-valent iron/activated carbon permeable reactive barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuchao; Gao, Ke; Zhang, Yun; Zou, Hua

    2017-10-10

    Zero-valent iron/activated carbon (Fe/C) particles can degrade persistent organic pollutants via micro-electrolysis and therefore, they may be used to develop materials for permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). In this study, surfactant-enhanced electrokinetics (EK) was coupled with a Fe/C-PRB to treat phenanthrene (PHE) and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) co-contaminated clay soil. An environment-friendly biosurfactant, rhamnolipid, was selected as the solubility-enhancing agent. Five bench-scale tests were conducted to investigate the performance of EK-PRB on PHE and TCP removal from soil as well as the impact of pH and rhamnolipid concentration. The results show that both PHE and TCP, driven by electro-osmotic flow (EOF), moved toward the cathode and reacted with the Fe/C-PRB. Catholyte acidification and rhamnolipid concentration increase improved the removal efficiencies of PHE and TCP. The highest removal efficiency of PHE in soil column was five times the efficiency of the control group on which only EK was applied (49.89 versus 9.40%). The highest removal efficiency of TCP in soil column was 4.5 times the efficiency of the control group (64.60 versus 14.30%). Desorption and mobility of PHE and TCP improved with the increase of rhamnolipid concentration when this exceeded the critical micelle concentration. This study indicates that the combination of EK and a Fe/C-PRB is efficient and promising for removing persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from contaminated soil with the enhancement of rhamnolipid.

  11. Enhanced reductive dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated soil by in-vessel anaerobic composting with zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yu-Yang; Zhang, Chi; Du, Yao; Tao, Xiao-Qing; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2014-03-01

    Anaerobic dechlorination is an effective degradation pathway for higher chlorinated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The enhanced reductive dechlorination of PCB-contaminated soil by anaerobic composting with zero-valent iron (ZVI) was studied, and preliminary reasons for the enhanced reductive dechlorination with ZVI were investigated. The results show that the addition of nanoscale ZVI can enhance dechlorination during in-vessel anaerobic composting. After 140 days, the average number of removed Cl per biphenyl with 10 mg g(-1) of added nanoscale ZVI was 0.63, enhancing the dechlorination by 34 % and improving the initial dechlorination speed. The ZVI enhances dechlorination by providing a suitable acid base environment, reducing volatile fatty acid inhibition and stimulating the microorganisms. The C/N ratios for treatments with the highest rate of ZVI addition were smaller than for the control, indicating that ZVI addition can promote compost maturity.

  12. Synthesis of nanoscale zero-valent iron/ordered mesoporous carbon for adsorption and synergistic reduction of nitrobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xiaofeng; Li, Jiansheng; Zhu, Wen; Zhu, Yaoyao; Sun, Xiuyun; Shen, Jinyou; Han, Weiqing; Wang, Lianjun

    2012-05-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) supported on ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) was synthesized through liquid phase reduction route. The NZVI/OMC composite was characterized by X-ray diffraction, N(2) adsorption/desorption and transmission electron microscopy. Results reveal that the composite possesses ordered mesostructure with NZVI distributing homogeneously on the surface of OMC support. The removal effects of nitrobenzene (NB) in water with OMC, NZVI/OMC and non-supported NZVI were evaluated. Results indicate that NZVI/OMC shows enhanced removal efficiency, which is attributed to its adsorption and synergistic reduction for NB. The transformation process of NB was further investigated by HPLC. Nitrosobenzene and phenylhydroxylamine were detected as intermediate products and aniline was the final reductive product. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of pH buffer capacity of sediment on dechlorination of atrazine using zero valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Geonha; Jeong, Woohyeok; Choe, Seunghee

    2007-01-01

    This research investigated the role of the pH buffer capacity of sediment on the dechlorination of atrazine using zero valent iron (ZVI). The buffer capacity of the sediment was quantified by batch experiments and estimated to be 5.0 cmol OH(-) . pH(-1). The sediments were spiked with atrazine at 7.25-36.23 mg kg(-1) (6.21 x 10(-7)-3.09 x 10(-6) mol atrazine . g(-1) sediment) for the batch experiments. The buffer capacity of the sediment maintained the sediment suspension at neutral pH, thereby enabling continuous dechlorination until the buffer capacity of the sediment was depleted. The pseudo-first order dechlorination constants were estimated to be in the range of 1.19 x 10(-2)-7.04 x 10(-2) d(-1) for the atrazine-spiked sediments.

  14. Enhancing dewaterability of waste activated sludge by combined oxidative conditioning process with zero-valent iron and peroxymonosulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu; Jin, Wenbiao; Chen, Hongyi; Chen, Chuan; Han, Songfang; Tu, Renjie; Wei, Wei; Gao, Shu-Hong; Xie, Guo-Jun; Wang, Qilin

    2017-11-01

    The enhancement of sludge dewaterability is of great importance for facilitating the sludge disposal during the operation of wastewater treatment plants. In this study, a novel oxidative conditioning approach was applied to enhance the dewaterability of waste activated sludge by the combination of zero-valent iron (ZVI) and peroxymonosulfate (PMS). It was found that the dewaterability of sludge was significantly improved after the addition of ZVI (0-4 g/g TSS) (TSS: total suspended solids) and PMS (0-1 g/g TSS). The optimal addition amount of ZVI and PMS was 0.25 g/g TSS and 0.1 g/g TSS, respectively, under which the capillary suction time of the sludge was reduced by approximately 50%. The decomposition of sludge flocs could contribute to the improved sludge dewaterability. Economic analysis demonstrated that the proposed conditioning process with ZVI and PMS was more economical than the ZVI + peroxydisulfate and the traditional Fenton conditioning processes.

  15. A combined process of adsorption and Fenton-like oxidation for furfural removal using zero-valent iron residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Furong; Bao, Jianguo; Zhang, Tian C; Lei, Yutian

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the feasibility of using a combined adsorption and Fenton-like oxidation process (with zero-valent iron (ZVI) residue from heat wraps as an absorbent and catalyst) to remove furfural in the solution was evaluated. The influencing parameters (e.g. pH, H2O2 concentration, initial furfural concentration) and the reusability of ZVI residue (to replace the iron powder) were estimated. The ZVI residue was found to have much better adsorption effect on furfural at pH 2.0 compared with pH 6.7. For Fenton-like reaction alone with ZVI residue, the highest furfural removal of 97.5% was observed at the concentration of 0.176 mol/L H2O2, and all of the samples had >80% removal efficiency at different initial furfural concentrations of 2, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mmol/L. However, with a combined adsorption and Fenton-like oxidation, the removal efficiency of furfural was nearly 100% for all treatments. The ZVI residue used for furfural removal was much better than that of iron powder in the Fenton-like reaction at a seven-cycle experiment. This study suggests the combined process of adsorption and Fenton-like oxidation using ZVI residue is effective for the treatment of furfural in the liquid.

  16. Effect of injection velocity and particle concentration on transport of nanoscale zero-valent iron and hydraulic conductivity in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutz, Tessa J; Hornbruch, Götz; Dahmke, Andreas; Köber, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    Successful groundwater remediation by injecting nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles requires efficient particle transportation and distribution in the subsurface. This study focused on the influence of injection velocity and particle concentration on the spatial NZVI particle distribution, the deposition processes and on quantifying the induced decrease in hydraulic conductivity (K) as a result of particle retention by lab tests and numerical simulations. Horizontal column tests of 2m length were performed with initial Darcy injection velocities (q0) of 0.5, 1.5, and 4.1m/h and elemental iron input concentrations (Fe(0)in) of 0.6, 10, and 17g/L. Concentrations of Fe(0) in the sand were determined by magnetic susceptibility scans, which provide detailed Fe(0) distribution profiles along the column. NZVI particles were transported farther at higher injection velocity and higher input concentrations. K decreased by one order of magnitude during injection in all experiments, with a stronger decrease after reaching Fe(0) concentrations of about 14-18g/kg(sand). To simulate the observed nanoparticle transport behavior the existing finite-element code OGS has been successfully extended and parameterized for the investigated experiments using blocking, ripening, and straining as governing deposition processes. Considering parameter relationships deduced from single simulations for each experiment (e.g. deposition rate constants as a function of flow velocity) one mean parameter set has been generated reproducing the observations in an adequate way for most cases of the investigated realistic injection conditions. An assessment of the deposition processes related to clogging effects showed that the percentage of retention due to straining and ripening increased during experimental run time resulting in an ongoing reduction of K. Clogging is mainly evoked by straining which dominates particle deposition at higher flow velocities, while blocking and ripening play a

  17. Oxidation of nanoscale zero-valent iron under sufficient and limited dissolved oxygen: Influences on aggregation behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Danlie; Hu, Xialin; Wang, Rui; Yin, Daqiang

    2015-03-01

    Oxidations of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) under aerobic (dissolved oxygen≈8mgL(-1)) and anaerobic (dissolved oxygen oxygenated water) and LO-nZVI (nZVI oxidized in lowly oxygenated water) respectively. The metallic iron of the oxidized nZVI was almost exhausted (Fe(0)≈8±5%), thus magnetization mainly depended on magnetite content. Since sufficient dissolved oxygen led to the much less magnetite (∼15%) in HO-nZVI than that in LO-nZVI (>90%), HO-nZVI was far less magnetic (Ms=88kAm(-1)) than LO-nZVI (Ms=365kAm(-1)). Consequently, HO-nZVI formed small agglomerates (228±10nm), while LO-nZVI tended to form chain-like aggregations (>1μm) which precipitated rapidly. Based on the EDLVO theory, we suggested that dissolved oxygen level determined aggregation morphologies by controlling the degree of oxidation and the magnitude of magnetization. Then the chain-like alignment of LO-nZVI would promote further aggregation, but the agglomerate morphology of HO-nZVI would eliminate magnetic forces and inhibit the aggregation while HO-nZVI remained magnetic. Our results indicated the fine colloidal stability of HO-nZVI, which might lead to the great mobility in the environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effective adsorbent for arsenic removal: core/shell structural nano zero-valent iron/manganese oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Trung Huu; Kim, Choonsoo; Hong, Sung Pil; Yoon, Jeyong

    2017-11-01

    Recently, nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) has emerged as an effective adsorbent for the removal of arsenic from aqueous solutions. However, its use in various applications has suffered from reactivity loss resulting in a decreased efficiency. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop an effective arsenic adsorbent as a core/shell structural nZVI/manganese oxide (or nZVI/Mn oxide) to minimize the reactivity loss of the nZVI. As the major result, the arsenic adsorption capacities of the nZVI/Mn oxide for As(V) and As(III) were approximately two and three times higher than that of the nZVI, respectively. In addition, the As(V) removal efficiency of the nZVI/Mn oxide was maintained through 4 cycles of regeneration whereas that of the nZVI was decreased significantly. The enhanced reactivity and reusability of the nZVI/Mn oxide can be successfully explained by the synergistic interaction of the nZVI core and manganese oxide shell, in which the manganese oxides participate in oxidation reactions with corroded Fe(2+) and subsequently retard the release of aqueous iron providing additional surface sites for arsenic adsorption. In summary, this study reports the successful fabrication of a core/shell nZVI/Mn oxide as an effective adsorbent for the removal of arsenic from aqueous solutions.

  19. Mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction via micro-electrolysis at the powdered zero-valent iron/activated carbon interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jinghuan; Song, Guangyu; Liu, Jianyong; Qian, Guangren; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate reduction by zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) powder always works well only at controlled pH lower than 4 due to the formation of iron (hydr)oxides on its surface. Fe(0) powder combined with activated carbon (AC), i.e., Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis system, was first introduced to enhance nitrate reduction in aqueous solution. Comparative study was carried out to investigate nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC system and Fe(0) under near-neutral conditions, showing that the Fe(0)/AC system successfully reduced nitrate even at initial pH 6 with the reduction efficiency of up to 73%, whereas for Fe(0) only ∼10%. The effect of Fe(0) to AC mass ratio on nitrate reduction efficiency was examined. Easier nitrate reduction was achieved with more contact between Fe(0) and AC as the result of decreasing Fe(0) to AC mass ratio. Ferrous ion and oxidation-reduction potential were measured to understand the mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis. The results suggest that a relative potential difference drives much more electrons from Fe(0) to AC, thus generating adsorbed atomic hydrogen which makes it possible for nitrate to be reduced at near-neural pH. Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis thus presents a great potential for practical application in nitrate wastewater treatment without excessive pH adjustment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Removal of Cr(VI from Water Using a New Reactive Material: Magnesium Oxide Supported Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Siciliano

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The chromium pollution of water is an important environmental and health issue. Cr(VI removal by means of metallic iron is an attractive method. Specifically, nanoscopic zero valent iron (NZVI shows great reactivity, however, its applicability needs to be further investigated. In the present paper, NZVI was supported on MgO grains to facilitate the treatments for remediation of chromium-contaminated waters. The performances and mechanisms of the developed composite, in the removal of hexavalent chromium, were investigated by means of batch and continuous tests. Kinetic studies, under different operating conditions, showed that reduction of Cr(VI could be expressed by a pseudo second-order reaction kinetic. The reaction rate increased with the square of Fe(0 amount, while it was inversely proportional to the initial chromium concentration. The process performance was satisfactory also under uncontrolled pH, and a limited influence of temperature was observed. The reactive material was efficiently reusable for many cycles without any regeneration treatment. The performances in continuous tests were close to 97% for about 80 pore volume of reactive material.

  1. The application of zero-valent iron nanoparticles for the remediation of a uranium-contaminated waste effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Michelle; Scott, Thomas B

    2010-06-15

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles (INP) were investigated as a remediation strategy for a uranium-contaminated waste effluent from AWE, Aldermaston. Nanoparticles were introduced to the effluent, under both oxic and anoxic conditions, and allowed to react for a 28-d period during which the liquid and nanoparticle solids were periodically sampled. Analysis of the solution indicated that under both conditions U was removed to <1.5% of its initial concentration within 1h of introduction and remained at similar concentrations until approximately 48 h. A rapid release of Fe into solution was also recorded during this initial period; attributed to the limited partial dissolution of the INP. XPS analyses of the reacted nanoparticulate solids between 1 and 48 h showed an increased Fe(III):Fe(II) ratio, consistent with the detection of iron oxidation products (akaganeite and magnetite) by XRD and FIB. XPS analysis also recorded uranium on the recovered particulates indicating the chemical reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) within 1h. Following the initial retention period U-dissolution of U was recorded from 48 h, and attributed to reoxidation. The efficient uptake and retention of U on the INP for periods up to 48 h provide proof that INP may be effectively used for the remediation of complex U-contaminated effluents. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhanced ultrasound-assisted degradation of methyl orange and metronidazole by rectorite-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Na; Zhang, Gaoke; Guo, Sheng; Wan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the rectorite-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI/R) was synthesized through a reduction method. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the existence of the nZVI in the nZVI/R composite and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated that the nZVI particles were partly oxidized into iron oxide. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that the nZVI particles were highly dispersed on the surface of the rectorite. The specific surface area of the nZVI/R composite is 21.43 m(2)/g, which was higher than that of rectorite (4.30 m(2)/g) and nZVI (17.97 m(2)/g). In the presence of ultrasound (US), the degradation of methyl orange and metronidazole by the nZVI/R composite was over 93% and 97% within 20 min, respectively, which is much higher than that by the rectorite and the nZVI. The degradation ratio of methyl orange and metronidazole by the nZVI/R composite under US was 1.7 and 1.8 times as high as that by the nZVI/R composite without US, respectively. The mechanism of the enhanced degradation of methyl orange and metronidazole under US irradiation was studied. These results indicate that the US/nZVI/R process has great potential application value for treatment of dye wastewater and medicine wastewater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Recyclable nanoscale zero-valent iron-based magnetic polydopamine coated nanomaterials for the adsorption and removal of phenanthrene and anthracene

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jing; Zhou, Qingxiang; Liu, Yongli; Lei, Man

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In this study, nanoscale zero-valent iron nanoparticles (NZVIs) were coated with silica and polydopamine using a two-step process. The coated nanoparticles were applied as adsorbents for removal of two common polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons pollutants, phenanthrene (PHE) and anthracene (ANT) from aqueous system. Adsorption kinetics followed a pseudo-second-order model. Isotherms and thermodynamics were investigated and the results indicated that the adsorption process fit best to th...

  4. Oxidation of Orange G by persulfate activated by Fe(II), Fe(III) and zero valent iron (ZVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, S; Vasquez, L; Costa, D; Romero, A; Santos, A

    2014-04-01

    Persulfate (PS) was employed in the oxidation of Orange G (OG), an azo dye commonly found in textile wastewaters. Activation of PS was conducted with iron to generate sulfate free radicals (SO4(-)) with high redox potential capable to oxidize most of the organics in water. Identification of oxidation intermediates was carried out by analyzing at different times organic by-products generated from treatment of a concentrate dye solution (11.6 mM) with 153 mM of PS and 20 mM of Fe(II) at 20 °C. Intermediate reaction products (mainly phenol (PH) and benzoquinone (BQ), and in less extent aniline, phenolic compounds and naphthalene type compounds with quinone groups) were identified by GC/MS and HPLC, and an oxidation pathway was proposed for the oxidation of OG with iron activated PS. The effect of iron valence (0, II and III) in the oxidation of an aqueous solution of OG (containing 0.1 mM) was studied in a 0.5 L batch reactor at 20 °C. Initial activator and PS concentrations employed were both 1 mM. Complete pollutant removal was achieved within the first 30 min when iron II or III were employed as activators. Quinone intermediates generated during pollutant oxidation may act as electron shuttles, allowing the reduction of Fe(III) into Fe(II) in the redox cycling of iron. Therefore, activation of PS by Fe(III) allowed complete OG removal. When zero valent iron (ZVI) was employed (particle diameter size 0.74 mm) the limiting step in SO4(-) generation was the surface reaction between ZVI and the oxidant yielding a lower oxidation rate of the dye. An increase in the oxidant dosage (0.2 mM OG, 2 mM Fe(III) and 6 mM PS) allowed complete pollutant and ecotoxicity removal, as well as mineralization close to 75%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Degradation of bisphenol-A by dielectric barrier discharge system: influence of polyethylene glycol stabilized nano zero valent iron particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijani, Jimoh O.; Mouele, Massima E. S.; Fatoba, Ojo O.; Babajide, Omotola O.; Petrik, Leslie F.

    2017-09-01

    In this study we report the synthesis and catalytic properties of polyethylene glycol stabilized nano zero valent iron particles (PEG-nZVI) added to the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system to induce photo-Fenton process in the degradation of bisphenol A (BPA) in aqueous solution. The influence of operating parameters such as solution pH, initial concentration of the modelled pollutant and PEG-nZVI dosage on the extent of BPA degradation was investigated. The residual concentration of BPA and its intermediates were determined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS). The high resolution scanning electron microscope (HRSEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis confirmed the formation of filamentous, high surface area iron nanoparticles in the zero valent state. The BPA mineralization rate was monitored using total organic carbon (TOC) analyser. 100% BPA removal was achieved with DBD/PEG-nZVI system within 30 min compared to 67.9% (BPA) with DBD alone after 80 min. The complete BPA removal within a short reaction time was attributed to the existence of a synergetic effect in the combined DBD/PEG-nZVI system. Five new transformation products of BPA namely: 4-nitrophenol (C6H5NO3), 4-nitrosophenolate (C6H4NO2), 4-(prop-1-en-2-yl) cyclohexa-3,5-diene-1,2-dione, (C9H8O2), 4-(2-hydroxylpropan-2-yl)cyclohexane-3,5-diene-1,2-dione (C9H10O3), and 1,2-dimethyl-4-(2-nitropropan-2-yl)benzene (C9H10NO4) were identified. BPA degradation proceeded via ozonation, hydroxylation, dimerization, and decarboxylation and nitration step. The combined DBD/photo-Fenton-induced process was found to be the most efficient in the elimination of BPA in aqueous solutions and DBD alone.

  6. Emulsified Zero-Valent Nano-Scale Iron Treatment of Chlorinated Solvent DNAPL Source Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    value nZVI nano -scale ZVI O&M operation and maintenance ORP oxidation-reduction potential P&T pump -and-treat PCE tetrachloroethene PRB...grade surfactant, biodegradable oil, water, and ZVI particles (either nano - or micro -scale iron, nZVI, or mZVI), which form emulsion particles. The...is composed of food- grade surfactant, biodegradable oil, water, and ZVI particles (either nano - or micro -scale iron, nZVI, or mZVI), which form

  7. Linkage of iron elution and dissolved oxygen consumption with removal of organic pollutants by nanoscale zero-valent iron: Effects of pH on iron dissolution and formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Nanae; Suzuki, Moe; Kurosu, Shunji; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2016-02-01

    The iron elution and dissolved oxygen (DO) consumption in organic pollutant removal by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) was examined in the range of solution pH from 3.0 to 9.0. Their behaviors were linked with the removal of organic pollutant through the dissolution of iron and the formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer affected strongly by solution pH and DO. As an example of organic pollutants, azo-dye Orange II was chosen in this study. The chemical composition analyses before and after reaction confirmed the corrosion of nZVI into ions, the formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer on nZVI surface and the adsorption of the pollutant and its intermediates. The complete decolorization of Orange II with nZVI was accomplished very quickly. On the other hand, the total organic carbon (TOC) removal was considerably slow and the maximum TOC removal was around 40% obtained at pH 9.0. The reductive cleavage of azo-bond by emitted electrons more readily took place as compared with the cleavage of aromatic rings of Orange II leading to the degradation to smaller molecules and subsequently the mineralization. A reaction kinetic model based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood/Eley-Rideal approach was developed to elucidate mechanisms for organic pollutant removal controlled by the formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer, the progress of which could be characterized by considering the dynamic concentration changes in Fe(2+) and DO. The dynamic profiles of Orange II removal linked with Fe(2+) and DO could be reasonably simulated in the range of pH from 3.0 to 9.0. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An overview of preparation and applications of stabilized zero-valent iron nanoparticles for soil and groundwater remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao; Liu, Wen; Cai, Zhengqing; Han, Bing; Qian, Tianwei; Zhao, Dongye

    2016-09-01

    Nano-scale zero-valent iron (nZVI) is one of the most intensively studied materials for environmental cleanup uses over the past 20 years or so. Freshly prepared nZVI is highly reactive due to its high specific surface area and strong reducing power. Over years, the classic borohydride reduction method for preparing nZVI has been modified by use of various stabilizers or surface modifiers to acquire more stable and soil deliverable nZVI for treatment of different organic and inorganic contaminants in water and soil. While most studies have been focused on testing nZVI for water treatment, the greater potential or advantage of nZVI appears to be for in situ remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater by directly delivering stabilized nZVI into the contaminated subsurface as it was proposed from the beginning. Compared to conventional remediation practices, the in situ remediation technique using stabilized nZVI offers some unique advantages. This work provides an update on the latest development of stabilized nZVI for various environmental cleanup uses, and overviews the evolution and environmental applications of stabilized nZVI. Commonly used stabilizers are compared and the stabilizing mechanisms are discussed. The effectiveness and constraints of the nZVI-based in situ remediation technology are summarized. This review also reveals some critical knowledge gaps and research needs, such as interactions between delivered nZVI and the local biogeochemical conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Simulation of antimony adsorption on nano-zero valent iron and kaolinite and analyzing the influencing parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidnia, Setareh; Asadollahfardi, Gholamreza; Darban, Ahmad Khodadadi; Mohseni, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Antimony is one of the most toxic pollutants in industrial and mineral wastewaters threatening the life of humans and other creatures. We simulated the adsorption of antimony in the presence of nano-zero valent iron (nZVI) adsorbent, on kaolinite and in the presence of nZVI coated on kaolinite from mineral wastewater using VISUAL MINTEQ 3.1 software. Our aim was to determine the factors affecting the adsorption of antimony by applying simulation. The simulation was performed using an adsorption model of a diffuse layer model. The results of the simulation indicated that the nZVI concentration, initial concentrations of antimony and pH factor are effective on the adsorption of antimony. In the conducted stimulation, the optimum pH was 2-5 and the highest adsorption occurred in an acidic state. With increasing initial concentrations of antimony in the simulation, we concluded that nZVI had absorbed various concentrations above 90% and, by increasing the concentration of nZVI, antimony adsorption rate increased. The increased surface area of nZVI and the expansion of more interchangeable surfaces available for reaction with antimony ions causes more antimony ions to be adsorbed. In all cases, the coefficient of determination between the laboratory results and the model predictions that was obtained was more than 0.9.

  10. Assessing the impact of zero-valent iron (ZVI) nanotechnology on soil microbial structure and functionality: a molecular approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, C; Ortíz, L T; Rodríguez-Membibre, M L; Nande, M; Lobo, M C; Martin, M

    2012-02-01

    In this work, nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles have been used as an immobilisation strategy to reduce Pb and Zn availability and mobility in polluted soils. The application of NZVI to two soil microcosms (MPb and MZn) at a dose of 34 mg g(-1) soil efficiently immobilised Pb (25%) and zinc (20%). Exposure to NZVI had little impact on the microbial cellular viability and biological activity in the soils. Three bacterial genes (narG, nirS and gyrA) were used as treatment-related biomarkers. These biomarkers ruled out a broad bactericidal effect on the bulk soil microbial community. A transcriptome analysis of the genes did not reveal any changes in their expression ratios after the NZVI treatment: 1.6 (narG), 0.8 (nirS) and 0.7 (gyrA) in the MPb microcosm and 0.6 (narG), 1.2 (nirS) and 0.5 (gyrA) in the MZn microcosm. However, significant changes in the structure and composition of the soil bacteria population were detected by fluorescence in situ hybridisation. Thus, our results showed that NZVI toxicity could be highly dose and species dependent, and the effective applicability of the proposed molecular approach in assessing the impact of this immobilisation strategy on soil microbial population. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mapping fracture flow paths with a nanoscale zero-valent iron tracer test and a flowmeter test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Po-Yu; Chia, Yeeping; Chiu, Yung-Chia; Teng, Mao-Hua; Liou, Sofia Ya Hsuan

    2018-02-01

    The detection of preferential flow paths and the characterization of their hydraulic properties are important for the development of hydrogeological conceptual models in fractured-rock aquifers. In this study, nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles were used as tracers to characterize fracture connectivity between two boreholes in fractured rock. A magnet array was installed vertically in the observation well to attract arriving nZVI particles and identify the location of the incoming tracer. Heat-pulse flowmeter tests were conducted to delineate the permeable fractures in the two wells for the design of the tracer test. The nZVI slurry was released in the screened injection well. The arrival of the slurry in the observation well was detected by an increase in electrical conductivity, while the depth of the connected fracture was identified by the distribution of nZVI particles attracted to the magnet array. The position where the maximum weight of attracted nZVI particles was observed coincides with the depth of a permeable fracture zone delineated by the heat-pulse flowmeter. In addition, a saline tracer test produced comparable results with the nZVI tracer test. Numerical simulation was performed using MODFLOW with MT3DMS to estimate the hydraulic properties of the connected fracture zones between the two wells. The study results indicate that the nZVI particle could be a promising tracer for the characterization of flow paths in fractured rock.

  12. Enhanced degradation of acid red 1 dye using a coupled system of zero valent iron nanoparticles and sonolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Shoniya; Abraham, Sijumon V; Aravind, Usha K; Aravindakumar, Charuvila T

    2017-11-01

    The heterogeneous catalytic degradation of a model azo dye, acid red 1 (AR1), initiated by zero valent iron nanoparticles (ZVINP), and its synergic effect with ultrasound (US) have been investigated in the present study. The treatment of AR1 using ZVINP at pH 3 showed maximum efficiency in terms of colour removal (53.0%) and mineralization (48.5% TOC reduction) after 25 min of reaction. However, the coupling of this system with US showed an enhanced efficiency against the decolourization and mineralization of AR1. More than 95% colour removal was achieved within 5 min in the case of US/ZVINP system. Around 55% TOC reduction suggests the conversion of the parent molecules in to aromatic transformed products, and it is further supported by LC-Q-TOF analysis. The remarkably higher efficiency in the coupled system is attributed to the synergic effect of ZVINPs and ultrasound. The highest degradation rates observed at highly acidic (pH 3) and alkaline pH (pH 9) suggests that different mechanisms are operating at both pH. The products identified gave some insight into the mechanism. The ZVINPs prepared in the present study was easily recoverable (and reusable) and hence may be considered as an effective replacement for the conventional Fenton's reagent.

  13. Facile synthesis of zero valent iron magnetic biochar composites for Pb(II removal from the aqueous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rama Chandraiah

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available New zero valent iron magnetic biochar composites (ZVI-MBC were synthesized by facile method using Eucalyptus globules bark waste. The as-prepared ZVI-MBC was used as an adsorbent for the removal of Pb(II from aqueous solution. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS were used for characterization of ZVI-MBC. Effect of variable parameters including pH, contact time and initial concentration of metal ions was studied. The ZVI-MBC exhibited good adsorption performance over the initial pH at 6. The adsorption isotherm data were fitted well to Langmuir isotherm then Freundlich model, and the adsorption capacity was found to be 60.8 mg/g at 303 K. The kinetic data were studied by applying two adsorption kinetic models, pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order equations. The experimental kinetic data fitted very well to the pseudo-second-order model. The experimental results herein suggest that ZVI-MBC can be used as low cost-effective material for the removal of Pb(II from water systems with a simple magnetic separation process.

  14. Reductive transformation and detoxification mechanism of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene in combined zero valent iron and anaerobic-aerobic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jinyou; Zhou, Zongyuan; Ou, Changjin; Sun, Xiuyun; Li, Jiansheng; Han, Weiqing; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Lianjun

    2012-01-01

    A combined zero valent iron (ZVI) and anaerobic-aerobic process was adopted for the treatment of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-containing wastewater. The transformation pathway, reduction of acute toxicity and enhancement of biodegradability were investigated. After pretreatment by ZVI, DNCB in wastewater could be completely converted into 2,4-diaminochlorobenzene (DACB). The ratio of BOD5/COD increased from 0.005 +/- 0.001 to 0.168 +/- 0.007, while EC(50, 48 hr) (V/V) increased from 0.65% to 5.20%, indicating the enhancement of biodegradability and reduction of acute toxicity with the pretreatment by ZVI. DACB was further dechlorinated to m-phenylenediamine during the anaerobic process using methanol as electron donor, with EC(50, 48 hr) increasing from 5.20% to 48.2%. After the subsequent anaerobic-aerobic process, m-phenylenediamine was degraded completely, with effluent COD of 67.5 +/- 10.8 mg/L. This effluent of the subsequent anaerobic-aerobic process was not toxic to zebrafish. The combined ZVI and anaerobic-aerobic process offers bright prospects for the treatment of chlorinated nitroaromatic compound-containing wastewater.

  15. Oxalate-assisted oxidative degradation of 4-chlorophenol in a bimetallic, zero-valent iron-aluminum/air/water system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jinhong; Wang, Hongwu; Ma, Luming

    2016-08-01

    The reaction of zero-valent iron and aluminum with oxygen produced reactive oxidants that can oxidize 4-chlorophenol (4-CP). However, oxidant yield without metal surface cleaning to dissolve the native oxide layer or in the absence of ligands was too low for practical applications. The addition of oxalate (ox) to dissolved oxygen-saturated solution of Fe(0)-Al(0) significantly increased oxidant yield because of the dissolution, pH buffer, and complexing characteristics of ox. Ox-enhanced reactive oxidant generation was affected by ox concentration and solution pH. The critical effect of ox dosing was confirmed with the reactive species of [Fe(II)(ox)0] and [Fe(II)(ox)2 (2-)]. Systematic studies on the effect of the initial and in situ solution pH revealed that 4-CP oxidation was controlled by the continuous release of dissolved Fe(2+) and Al(3+), their fate, and the activation mechanisms of O2 reduction. The degradation pathway of 4-CP in ox-enhanced Fe(0)-Al(0)/O2 may follow the 4-chlorocatechol pathway. The robustness of the ox-enhanced Al(0)-Fe(0)-O2 process was determined with one-time dosing of ox. Therefore, ox is an ideal additive to enhancing the Fe(0)-Al(0)/O2 system for the oxidative degradation of aqueous organic pollutants.

  16. Effects of pH and particle size on kinetics of nitrobenzene reduction by zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun; Zhao, Yongsheng; Zhao, Ran; Zhou, Rui

    2010-01-01

    Nitrobenzene has been considered as a significant groundwater contaminant due to its wide usage in explosives, insecticides, herbicides, pharmaceuticals and dyes. Nitrobenzene is of environmental concern because of its toxicity. In the presence of zero-valent iron (ZVI), reduction of the nitro group is the dominant transformation process for nitrobenzene. A series of experiments were carried out to investigate the kinetics of nitrobenzene reduction by ZVI and the effects of pH and ZVI particle size on nitrobenzene removal in groundwater. The results indicated that nitrobenzene could be reduced to aniline by ZVI; the reduction of nitrobenzene by ZVI followed a pseudo first-order kinetics; the observed nitrobenzene reduction rate constant (k(obs)) was 0.0006 min(-1) and the half-life of nitrobenzene (t1/2) was 115.5 min; the mass balance achieved 87.5% for nitrobenzene reduction by the 1 mm ZVI particle and the final removal efficiency was 80.98%. In addition, the pH and ZVI particle size were found to exhibit significant influences on the nitrobenzene reduction. The observed nitrobenzene reduction rate constant linearly decreased with increase pH and the data fitted on polynomial regression equation for the observed nitrobenzene reduction rate constant and ZVI particle size. Therefore, use of ZVI based permeable reactive barrier technology to remedy nitrobenzene contaminated groundwater was feasible.

  17. Sequestration of Ag(I) from aqueous solution as Ag(0) nanostructures by nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yalei, E-mail: zhangyalei2003@163.com [Tongji University, State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse (China); Yan, Jing [Tongji University, Modern Agricultural Science and Engineering Institute (China); Dai, Chaomeng, E-mail: daichaomeng@163.com, E-mail: daichaomeng@tongji.edu.cn [Tongji University, College of Civil Engineering (China); Li, Yuting; Zhu, Yan [Tongji University, Modern Agricultural Science and Engineering Institute (China); Zhou, Xuefei [Tongji University, State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse (China)

    2015-11-15

    This study investigates the application of nanoparticle zero valent iron (nZVI) to sequester Ag(I) as Ag(0) nanostructures from aqueous solution. Batch experiments were performed with nZVI exposed to aqueous Ag(I) to investigate the effects of environmental parameters, including nZVI dose, temperature and pH. High temperature facilitates Ag(I) sequestration, and the rate constants are determined to be 0.02, 0.12, and 0.31 mg L/m{sup 2} at 30, 50, and 60 °C, respectively. Ag(I) sequestration was adversely affected by adding nitric acid to the solution due to significant acid washing, decreasing the available nZVI active sites. Characterization techniques including TEM, XRD, and HR-XPS revealed that nZVI is oxidized to lepidocrocite and magnetite/maghemite and confirmed the formation of nanocrystalline silver. HR-XPS analysis indicated that Ag{sub 2}O forms rapidly as an intermediate due to Ag(I) adsorption onto the FeOOH layer. The Ag(0) nanostructures that are formed are fractal, spherical, and dendritic or rod-like, respectively, in morphology by FE-TEM images at different Ag/Fe mass ratios. A general reaction model for the interaction Ag(I) with nZVI is proposed. Our results suggest that nZVI is effective for Ag(I) removal.

  18. Removal of para-nitrochlorobenzene from aqueous solution on surfactant-modified nanoscale zero-valent iron/graphene nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Luo, Hanjin; Wang, Hou

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrated a remarkably simple and efficient method for the synthesis of nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI)/graphene (GN) nanocomposites. In order to prevent the agglomeration and restack of nanocomposites, chemical functionalization of nanocomposites with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide was proposed. The adsorption performance of surfactant-modified NZVI/GN nanocomposites was evaluated for the removal of para-nitrochlorobenzene (p-NCB) from aqueous solutions. The characteristics of nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, BET surface area, Fourier transform infrared spectrum, thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The effect factors including initial solution pH, contact time, reaction temperature, dosage, initial concentration of humic acid (HA) on the adsorption property of p-NCB onto surfactant-modified nanocomposites were investigated. The adsorption kinetics fitted well with pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption capacity of p-NCB on surfactant-modified nanocomposites inferred from the Langmuir model was 105.15 mg/g at 293 K. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption of p-NCB onto surfactant-modified nanocomposites was an exothermic and spontaneous process. HA had a strong suppression effect on p-NCB uptake in the adsorption experiment.

  19. Influence of humic acid on the colloidal stability of surface-modified nano zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Haoran; Lo, Irene M C

    2013-01-01

    To enhance colloidal stability of nano zero-valent iron (NZVI) used for groundwater remediation, the surfaces of such NZVI can be modified via coating with organic stabilizers. These surface stabilizers can electrostatically, sterically, or electrosterically stabilize NZVI suspensions in water, but their efficacy is affected by the presence of humic acid (HA) in groundwater. In this study, the effect of HA on the colloidal stability of NZVI coated with three types of stabilizers (i.e., polyacrylic acid (PAA), Tween-20 and starch) was evaluated. Differing stability behaviors were observed for different surface-modified NZVIs (SM-NZVI) in the presence of HA. Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis probed the possible interactions at the SM-NZVI-HA interface, providing a better understanding of the effect of HA on SM-NZVI stability. The adsorption of HA on the surface of PAA-modified NZVI via complexation with NZVI (rather than the PAA stabilizer) enhanced the electrosteric repulsion effect, increasing the stability of the particles. However, for NZVI modified with Tween-20 or starch, HA could interact with the surface stabilizer and apparently play a "bridge" role among the particles, which might induce aggregation of the particles. Therefore, the stability behavior of NZVI modified with Tween-20 or starch might have resulted from the combined effect of "bridging" and "electrosteric" exerted by HA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhibiting excessive acidification using zero-valent iron in anaerobic digestion of food waste at high organic load rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xin; Wei, Yonghong; Xu, Shuang; Liu, Jianguo; Li, Huan; Liu, Yili; Yu, Shuyao

    2016-07-01

    Excessive acidification occurs frequently in food waste (FW) anaerobic digestion (AD) due to the high carbon-to-nitrogen ratio of FW. In this study, zero-valent iron (ZVI) was applied to prevent the excessive acidification. All of the control groups, without ZVI addition (pH∼5.3), produced little methane (CH4) and had high volatile fatty acids/bicarbonate alkalinity (VFA/ALK). By contrast, at OLR of 42.32gVS/Lreactor, the pH of effluent from the reactors with 0.4g/gVSFWadded of ZVI increased to 7.8-8.2, VFA/ALK decreased to <0.1, and the final CH4 yield was ∼380mL/gVSFWadded, suggesting inhibition of excessive acidification. After adding powdered or scrap metal ZVI to the acidogenic reactors, the fractional content of butyric acid changed from 30-40% to 0%, while, that of acetic acid increased. These results indicate that adding ZVI to FW digestion at high OLRs could eliminate excessive acidification by promoting butyric acid conversion and enhancing methanogen activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Improving dewaterability of waste activated sludge by combined conditioning with zero-valent iron and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu; Wang, Qilin; Jiang, Guangming; Zhang, Xiwang; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2014-12-01

    Improvement of sludge dewaterability is crucial for reducing the costs of sludge disposal in wastewater treatment plants. This study presents a novel method based on combined conditioning with zero-valent iron (ZVI) and hydrogen peroxide (HP) at pH 2.0 to improve dewaterability of a full-scale waste activated sludge (WAS). The combination of ZVI (0-750mg/L) and HP (0-750mg/L) at pH 2.0 substantially improved the WAS dewaterability due to Fenton-like reactions. The highest improvement in WAS dewaterability was attained at 500mg ZVI/L and 250mg HP/L, when the capillary suction time of the WAS was reduced by approximately 50%. Particle size distribution indicated that the sludge flocs were decomposed after conditioning. Economic analysis showed that combined conditioning with ZVI and HP was a more economically favorable method for improving WAS dewaterability than the classical Fenton reaction based method initiated by ferrous salts and HP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Zero-valent iron enhanced methanogenic activity in anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge after heat and alkali pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaobin; Feng, Yinghong; Quan, Xie

    2015-04-01

    Heat or alkali pretreatment is the effective method to improve hydrolysis of waste sludge and then enhance anaerobic sludge digestion. However the pretreatment may inactivate the methanogens in the sludge. In the present work, zero-valent iron (ZVI) was used to enhance the methanogenic activity in anaerobic sludge digester under two methanogens-suppressing conditions, i.e. heat-pretreatment and alkali condition respectively. With the addition of ZVI, the lag time of methane production was shortened, and the methane yield increased by 91.5% compared to the control group. The consumption of VFA was accelerated by ZVI, especially for acetate, indicating that the acetoclastic methanogenesis was enhanced. In the alkali-condition experiment, the hydrogen produced decreased from 27.6 to 18.8 mL when increasing the ZVI dosage from 0 to 10 g/L. Correspondingly, the methane yield increased from 1.9 to 32.2 mL, which meant that the H2-utilizing methanogenes was enriched. These results suggested that the addition of ZVI into anaerobic digestion of sludge after pretreated by the heat or alkali process could efficiently recover the methanogenic activity and increase the methane production and sludge reduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Simultaneous addition of zero-valent iron and activated carbon on enhanced mesophilic anaerobic digestion of waste-activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tongyu; Qin, Yujie; Cao, Yan; Han, Bin; Ren, Junyi

    2017-10-01

    The performance of biogas generation and sludge degradation was studied under different zero-valent iron/activated carbon (ZVI/AC) ratios in detail in mesophilic anaerobic digestion of sludge. A good enhancement of methane production was obtained at the 10:1 ZVI/AC ratio, and the cumulative methane production was 132.1 mL/g VS, 37.6% higher than the blank. The methane content at the 10:1 ZVI/AC ratio reached 68.8%, which was higher than the blank (55.2%) and the sludge-added AC alone (59.6%). For sludge degradation, the removal efficiencies of total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD), proteins, and polysaccharides were all the highest at the 10:1 ZVI/AC ratio. The concentration of available phosphorus (AP) decreased after anaerobic digestion process. On the other hand, the concentrations of available nitrogen (AN) and available potassium (AK) increased after the anaerobic digestion process and showed a gradually decreasing trend with increasing ZVI/AC ratio. The concentrations of AN and AK were 2303.1-4200.3 and 274.7-388.3 mg/kg, showing a potential for land utilization.

  4. The effect of granular ferric hydroxide amendment on the reduction of nitrate in groundwater by zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hocheol; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Chon, Chul-Min; Kim, Yongje; Nam, In-Hyun; Schwartz, Franklin W; Cho, Dong-Wan

    2013-11-01

    The feasibility of using granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) with zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) for its potential utility in enhancing nitrate reduction was investigated. The addition of 10gL(-1) GFH to 25gL(-1) Fe(0) significantly enhanced nitrate removal, resulting in 93% removal of 52.2mg-NL(-1) in 36-h as compared to 23% removal with Fe(0) alone. Surface analyses of the reacted Fe(0)/GFH revealed the presence of magnetite on the Fe(0) surface, which probably served as an electron mediator for nitrate reduction. Addition of GFH to Fe(0) also resulted in lower solution pH compared to Fe(0). The rate enhancing effect of GFH on nitrate reduction was attributed to the combined effects of magnetite formation and pH buffering by GFH. GFH amendment (100gL(-1)) significantly increased reduction capacity and longevity of Fe(0) to complete several nitrate reduction cycles before inactivation, giving a total nitrate removal of 205mg-NL(-1), while unamended Fe(0) gave only 20mg-NL(-1) before inactivation during the first reduction cycle. The overall result demonstrated the potential utility of Fe(0)/GFH system that may be developed into a viable technology for removal of nitrate from groundwater. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Termination of nanoscale zero-valent iron reactivity by addition of bromate as a reducing reactivity competitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mines, Paul D.; Kaarsholm, Kamilla M. S.; Droumpali, Ariadni; Andersen, Henrik R.; Lee, Wontae; Hwang, Yuhoon

    2017-09-01

    Remediation of contaminated groundwater by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) is widely becoming a leading environmentally friendly solution throughout the globe. Since a wide range of various nZVI-containing materials have been developed for effective remediation, it is necessary to determine an appropriate way to terminate the reactivity of any nZVI-containing material for a practical experimental procedure. In this study, bimetallic Ni/Fe-NPs were prepared to enhance overall reduction kinetics owing to the catalytic reactivity of nickel on the surface of nZVI. We have tested several chemical strategies in order to terminate nZVI reactivity without altering the concentration of volatile compounds in the solution. The strategies include surface passivation in alkaline conditions by addition of carbonate, and consumption of nZVI by a reaction competitor. Four halogenated chemicals, trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, atrazine, and 4-chlorophenol, were selected and tested as model groundwater contaminants. Addition of carbonate to passivate the nZVI surface was not effective for trichloroethylene. Nitrate and then bromate were applied to competitively consume nZVI by their faster reduction kinetics. Bromate proved to be more effective than nitrate, subsequently terminating nZVI reactivity for all four of the tested halogenated compounds. Furthermore, the suggested termination method using bromate was successfully applied to obtain trichloroethylene reduction kinetics. Herein, we report the simple and effective method to terminate the reactivity of nZVI by addition of a reducing reactivity competitor.

  6. The role of magnetite nanoparticles in the reduction of nitrate in groundwater by zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Dong-Wan; Song, Hocheol; Schwartz, Franklin W; Kim, Bokseong; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2015-04-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were used as an additive material in a zero-valent iron (Fe0) reaction to reduce nitrate in groundwater and its effects on nitrate removal were investigated. The addition of nano-sized magnetite (NMT) to Fe0 reactor markedly increased nitrate reduction, with the rate proportionally increasing with NMT loading. Field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that NMT aggregates were evenly distributed and attached on the Fe0 surface due to their magnetic properties. The rate enhancement effect of NMT is presumed to arise from its role as a corrosion promoter for Fe0 corrosion as well as an electron mediator that facilitated electron transport from Fe0 to adsorbed nitrate. Nitrate reduction by Fe0 in the presence of NMT proceeded much faster in groundwater (GW) than in de-ionized water. The enhanced reduction of nitrate in GW was attributed to the adsorption or formation of surface complex by the cationic components in GW, i.e., Ca2+ and Mg2+, in the Fe0-H2O interface that promoted electrostatic attraction of nitrate to the reaction sites. Moreover, the addition of NMT imparted superior longevity to Fe0, enabling completion of four nitrate reduction cycles, which otherwise would have been inactivated during the first cycle without an addition of NMT. The results demonstrate the potential applicability of a Fe0/NMT system in the treatment of nitrate-contaminated GW. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Reductive dechlorination of activated carbon-adsorbed trichloroethylene by zero-valent iron: carbon as electron shuttle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hao; Zhu, Dongqiang; Li, Tielong; Kong, Haonan; Chen, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Sequestration of organic contaminants in carbonaceous materials can significantly affect contaminant fate and transport. We investigated the reductive dechlorination of granular-activated carbon (GAC)-adsorbed trichloroethylene (TCE) by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) to understand the effect of sequestration on abiotic reactivity of organic contaminants. Significant reduction of TCE sequestered in GAC micropores was observed, even though direct contact with nZVI was unlikely. Reduction of sequestered TCE by reactive Fe(II) species or molecular hydrogen was ruled out as the reaction mechanisms. We propose that GAC served as the conductor for the transfer of electrons or atomic hydrogen from nZVI to the micropores, wherein adsorbed TCE molecules were reduced. An important implication for environmental remediation is that carbonaceous adsorbents not only function as a superb sink for organic contaminants but also allow them to be slowly degraded while being trapped. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  8. Removal of chromium(VI) from wastewater by nanoscale zero-valent iron particles supported on multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiaoshu; Xu, Jiang; Jiang, Guangming; Xu, Xinhua

    2011-11-01

    For the first time, nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI)-multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanocomposites were adopted to remove Cr(VI) from wastewater. Such composites were prepared through depositing nZVI particles onto MWCNTs by in situ reduction of ferrous sulfate and then characterized by TEM, SEM and XRD. The results showed that nZVI particles could disperse on the surface or into the network of MWCNTs. Compared to bare nZVI or nZVI-activated carbon composites, the nZVI-MWCNT nanocomposites exhibited around 36% higher efficiency on Cr(VI) removal. The mass ratio of nZVI to MWCNTs was optimized at 1:2, at ionic strength of 0.05M NaCl. The reaction followed a pseudo first-order model under different initial Cr(VI) concentrations and pHs. Low pH and initial Cr(VI) concentration could increase both removal efficiency and rate constants. Anions, such as SO(4)(2-), NO(3)(-) and HCO(3)(-), exhibited negative effects on the removal of Cr(VI), while the effects of PO(4)(3-) and SiO(3)(2-) were insignificant. Overall, nZVI-MWCNT nanocomposites offer a promising alternative material for the removal of Cr(VI) ions from wastewater. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dioxygen activation by nonheme iron enzymes with the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad that generate high-valent oxoiron oxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kal, Subhasree; Que, Lawrence

    2017-04-01

    The 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad is a widely used scaffold to bind the iron center in mononuclear nonheme iron enzymes for activating dioxygen in a variety of oxidative transformations of metabolic significance. Since the 1990s, over a hundred different iron enzymes have been identified to use this platform. This structural motif consists of two histidines and the side chain carboxylate of an aspartate or a glutamate arranged in a facial array that binds iron(II) at the active site. This triad occupies one face of an iron-centered octahedron and makes the opposite face available for the coordination of O2 and, in many cases, substrate, allowing the tailoring of the iron-dioxygen chemistry to carry out a plethora of diverse reactions. Activated dioxygen-derived species involved in the enzyme mechanisms include iron(III)-superoxo, iron(III)-peroxo, and high-valent iron(IV)-oxo intermediates. In this article, we highlight the major crystallographic, spectroscopic, and mechanistic advances of the past 20 years that have significantly enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms of O2 activation and the key roles played by iron-based oxidants.

  10. Capture and storage of hydrogen gas by zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Eric J

    2014-02-01

    Granular Fe(o), used to reductively degrade a variety of contaminants in groundwater, corrodes in water to produce H2(g). A portion enters the Fe(o) lattice where it is stored in trapping sites such as lattice defects and microcracks. The balance is dissolved by the groundwater where it may exsolve as a gas if its solubility is exceeded. Gas exsolution can reduce the effectiveness of the Fe(o) treatment zone by reducing contact of the contaminant with iron surfaces or by diverting groundwater flow. It also represents a lost electron resource that otherwise could be involved in reductive degradation of contaminants. It is advantageous to select an iron for remediation purposes that captures a large proportion of the H2(g) it generates. This study examines various aspects of the H2(g) uptake process and has found 1) H2(g) does not have to be generated at the water/iron interface to enter the lattice. It can enter directly from the gas/water phases, 2) exposure of granular sponge iron to H2(g) reduces the dormant period for the onset of iron corrosion, 3) the large quantities of H2(g) generated by nano-Fe(o) injected into a reactive barrier of an appropriate granular iron can be captured in the lattice of that iron, and 4) lattice-bound hydrogen represents an additional electron resource to Fe(o) for remediation purposes and may be accessible using physical or chemical means. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The dual effects of carboxymethyl cellulose on the colloidal stability and toxicity of nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Haoran; Xie, Yankai; Zeng, Guangming; Tang, Lin; Liang, Jie; He, Qi; Zhao, Feng; Zeng, Yalan; Wu, Yanan

    2016-02-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles are usually modified with surface coating to mitigate the particle stability in water during the environmental application. However, the surface coating may not only influence the particle stabilization but also the particle cytotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the dual effects of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) on the colloidal stability and cytotoxicity of NZVI towards gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and discussed the interrelation between particle stability and cytotoxicity. The effect of CMC concentration, ionic strength (Ca(2+)) and aging treatment on the particle cytotoxicity were also examined. Specifically, the aqueous stability of NZVI suspensions with CMC ratio dose-dependently strengthened within 1 h. The inactivation of E. coli by bare NZVI was significant and concentration- and time-dependent. On the contrary, an increasing reduction in cytotoxicity of NZVI with CMC ratio increasing was observed, even though the particles became more dispersed. TEM analysis demonstrates the membrane disruption and the cellular internalization of nanoparticles after exposure of E. coli to NZVI. However, in the case of CMC-modified NZVI (CNZVI), the bacterial cell wall displays an outer shell of a layer of nanoparticles attached around the outer membrane, but the cell membrane was kept intact. The presence of Ca(2+) can either increase or decrease the cytotoxicity of NZVI and CNZVI, depending on the concentration. The aged NZVI and CNZVI particles did not seem to present obvious bactericidal effect due to the transformation of Fe(0) to the less toxic or non-toxic iron oxides, as indicated by the XRD analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fine structure characterization of zero-valent iron nanoparticles for decontamination of nitrites and nitrates in wastewater and groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuen-Song Lin et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of the present study were to investigate the chemical reduction of nitrate or nitrite species by zero-valent iron nanoparticle (ZVIN in aqueous solution and related reaction kinetics or mechanisms using fine structure characterization. This work also exemplifies the utilization of field emission-scanning electron microscope (FE–SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and x-ray diffraction (XRD to reveal the speciation and possible reaction pathway in a very complex adsorption and redox reaction process. Experimentally, ZVIN of this study was prepared by sodium borohydride reduction method at room temperature and ambient pressure. The morphology of as-synthesized ZVIN shows that the nearly ball and ultrafine particles ranged of 20–50 nm were observed with FE–SEM or TEM analysis. The kinetic model of nitrites or nitrates reductive reaction by ZVIN is proposed as a pseudo first-order kinetic equation. The nitrite and nitrate removal efficiencies using ZVIN were found 65–83% and 51–68%, respectively, based on three different initial concentrations. Based on the XRD pattern analyses, it is found that the quantitative relationship between nitrite and Fe(III or Fe(II is similar to the one between nitrate and Fe(III in the ZVIN study. The possible reason is due to the faster nitrite reduction by ZVIN. In fact, the occurrence of the relative faster nitrite reductive reaction suggested that the passivation of the ZVIN have a significant contribution to iron corrosion. The extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS or x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES spectra show that the nitrites or nitrates reduce to N2 or NH3 while oxidizing the ZVIN to Fe2O3 or Fe3O4 electrochemically. It is also very clear that decontamination of nitrate or nitrite species in groundwater via the in-situ remediation with a ZVIN permeable reactive barrier would be environmentally attractive.

  13. Inhibition of Nitrate Reduction by NaCl Adsorption on a Nano-Zero-Valent Iron Surface during a Concentrate Treatment for Water Reuse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, Yuhoon; Kim, Dogun; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) has been considered as a possible material to treat water and wastewater. However, it is necessary to verify the effect of the matrix components in different types of target water. In this study, different effects depending on the sodium chloride (NaCl) concentra......Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) has been considered as a possible material to treat water and wastewater. However, it is necessary to verify the effect of the matrix components in different types of target water. In this study, different effects depending on the sodium chloride (Na......Cl) concentration on reductions of nitrates and on the characteristics of NZVI were investigated. Although NaCl is known as a promoter of iron corrosion, a high concentration of NaCl (>3 g/L) has a significant inhibition effect on the degree of NZVI reactivity toward nitrate. The experimental results were....../L). Though the surface was changed to permeable iron hydroxide, the Fe(0) in the core was not completely oxidized. Therefore, the inhibition effect of NaCl could be explained as the competitive adsorption of chloride and nitrate. Supplementary material....

  14. Removal of Nitrate by Zero Valent Iron in the Presence of H2O2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Samarghandi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Nitrate is the oxidation state of nitrogen compounds, which is founded in water resources that contaminated by municipal, industrial and agricultural waste water. If nitrate leek in to ground water resources, it can cause health problems. Material and Methods: Removal of nitrate from ground water by iron powder in the presence of H2O2 was investigated. Experiments have been done by use of 250 ml of water samples containing 100 mg/L nitrate in various condition. Various parameters such as pH (3, 5, 7, 9, iron dosage (10, 15, 20, 30 g/L, initial H2O2 concentration (5, 10, 15, 20 ml/L and contact time (10-120 min. Results: Obtained results shows the removal of nitrate was increased by pH reduction, increment of iron mass and contact time. In addition, nitrate reduction was increased by increment of initial H2O2 concentration up to 15 ml/L. High removal was observed at pH=3, iron mass=30 g/L, contact time equal 120 min and H2O2 concentration=15 ml/L. At above condition, upon 98% of nitrate was removed. Conclusion: In summary, this method is simple, low cost and effective for removal of nitrate from ground water and industrial activity.

  15. Zero Valent Iron Nanoparticle Assisted Electrocoagulation of Arsenic with electromagnetic Separation of Solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuñez P.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A new arsenic removal process was designed combining: 1 iron nanoparticle addition, b electrocoagulation, and c electromagnetic separation. Results showed that arsenic could be removed with more than 99 % efficiency from liquid waste samples. Parameters that were found to have importance on the process were: a nanoparticle dosage, b electric voltage drop during electrocoagulation, b pH of the solution, d arsenic concentration, and e electromagnetic field distribution during solid separation. Arsenic could efficiently be removed by iron nanoparticles during electrocoagulation. Afterwards the arsenic containing particles were separated from the solution by electromagnetic fields. This new process could be a feasible alternative to conventional arsenic treatment in liquid waste streams.

  16. Kinetics of nitrate adsorption and reduction by nano-scale zero valent iron (NZVI): Effect of ionic strength and initial pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Do-Gun; Hwang, Yuhoon; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic models for pollutants reduction by Nano-scale Zero Valent Iron (NZVI) were tested in this study to gain a better understanding and description of the reaction. Adsorption kinetic models and a heterogeneous catalytic reaction kinetic equation were proposed for nitrate removal and for ammonia...... generation, respectively. A widely used pseudo-first-order reaction model was a poor fit for nitrate removal in an iron-limiting condition and for ammonia generation in an excess iron condition. However, in this study, pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order adsorption kinetic equations were a good fit...... for nitrate removal; in addition, a Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic equation was able to successfully describe ammonia generation, regardless of the NZVI dose, the ionic strength, and the initial pH. These results strongly indicate that nitrate reduction by NZVI is a heterogeneous catalytic reaction...

  17. Investigation of washing and storage strategy on aging Of Mg-aminoclay (MgAC) coated nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, Yuhoon; Lee, Young-Chul; Mines, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    The tendency towards agglomeration and oxidation of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles limits its application for in situ groundwater and soil remediation. Although the effect of surface coatings on nanoparticle stabilization has been commonly practiced, the effect of preparation...... of repulsion between nZVI particles. On the other hand, pre-storage washing is essential, in order to retain nZVI reactivity, by removal of residual reactants in the synthesis mixture. The reactivity of nZVI is examined with three parameters: optical density at 508 nm as a measure of particle concentration......, reactive iron content measured by H2 generation with acid digestion, and nitrate reduction capacity. All three parameters decrease significantly for post-storage washed nZVI, which corresponds to XRD results that exhibit transformation of Fe(0) to iron oxides. The reactivity tests display high linear...

  18. Adsorptive removal of arsenate from aqueous solutions by biochar supported zero-valent iron nanocomposite: Batch and continuous flow tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shengsen [Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Gao, Bin, E-mail: bg55@ufl.edu [Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Li, Yuncong [Tropical Research and Education Center, University of Florida, Homestead, FL 33031 (United States); Creamer, Anne Elise [Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); He, Feng [College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310014 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Biochar supported nZVI (nZVI/BC) was synthesized. • nZVI/BC showed excellent As(V) removal efficiency in batch and CMR experiments. • 100% removal efficiency was achieved in CMRs. • Surface adsorption was the dominant removal mechanism. - Abstract: Arsenate (As(V)) removal ability by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) is compromised by aggregation of nZVI particles. In this work, pine derived biochar (PB) was used as a supporting material to stabilize nZVI for As(V) removal. The biochar supported nZVI (nZVI/BC) was synthesized by precipitating the nanoparticles on carbon surfaces. Experiments using batch and continuous flow, completely mixed reactors (CMRs) were carried out to investigate the removal of As(V) by the nZVI/BC from aqueous solutions. Batch experiments showed that nZVI/BC had high As(V) removal capacity in a wide range of pH (3–8). Kinetic data revealed that equilibrium was reached within 1 h and the isotherm data showed that the Langmuir maximum adsorption capacity of the nZVI/BC for As(V) at pH 4.1 was 124.5 g kg{sup −1}. As(V) (100 mg L{sup −1}) adsorption in anoxic condition was about 8% more than in oxic conditions, where As(V) reduction was observed in anoxic condition. The performance of the nZVI/BC in flowing condition was evaluated in CMRs at influent As(V) concentrations of 2.1 and 5.5 mg L{sup −1} and the adsorbent removed 100% and 90% of the As(V), respectively. Furthermore, the nZVI/BC composite is magnetic which facilitates collection from aqueous solutions.

  19. Implementation of zero-valent iron (ZVI) into drinking water supply - role of the ZVI and biological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Krzysztof P; Søgaard, Erik G

    2014-12-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is concerning millions of people around the world, even though many solutions to the problem have come up in recent years. One of the promising solutions for removing arsenic from water is by implementation of a zero-valent iron (ZVI) in the drinking water production. The purpose of this work was to study a treatment of As pollution based on the ZVI, aeration and sand filtration that was monitored for period of 45 months. In applied configuration and conditions ZVI was not able to remove arsenic alone, but it worked as a source of ferrous ions that during its oxidation enabled to co-precipitate arsenic compounds in the sand filter. The results show that after a lag phase of about 6 months, it was possible to achieve water production with an As content from 20 μg L(-1) to below 5 μg L(-1). The treatment also enabled to remove phosphates that were present in groundwater and affected As uptake by hindering its co-precipitation with Fe compounds. Determination of colony forming units on As amended agar helped to find arsenic resistant bacteria at each stage of treatment and also in the sand filter backwash sludge. Bacterial communities found in groundwater, containing low concentration of As, were found to have high As resistance. The results also indicate that the lag phase might have been also needed to initiate Fe ions release by corrosion from elemental Fe by help of microbial activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhibition or promotion of biodegradation of nitrate by Paracoccus sp. in the presence of nanoscale zero-valent iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Chenghong; Xu, Xuping [School of Life Science, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350108, Fujian Province (China); Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravendra [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Chen, Zuliang, E-mail: Zuliang.chen@unisa.edu.au [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007, Fujian Province (China); Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    To investigate the effect of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) on the growth of Paracoccus sp. strain and biodenitrification under aerobic conditions, specific factors were studied, pH, concentration of nitrate, Fe (II) and carbon dioxide. Low concentration of nZVI (50 mg/L) promoted both cell growth and biodegradation of nitrate which rose from 69.91% to 76.16%, while nitrate removal fell to 67.10% in the presence of high nZVI concentration (1000 mg/L). This may be attributed to the ions produced in nZVI corrosion being used as an electron source for the biodegradation of nitrate. However, the excess uptake of Fe (II) causes oxidative damage to the cells. To confirm this, nitrate was completely removed after 20 h when 100 mg/L Fe (II) was added to the solution, which is much faster than the control (86.05%, without adding Fe (II)). However, nitrate removal reached only 45.64% after 20 h, with low cell density (OD{sub 600} = 0.62) in the presence of 300 mg/L Fe (II). Characterization techniques indicated that nZVI adhered to microorganism cell membranes. These findings confirmed that nZVI could affect the activity of the strain and consequently change the biodenitrification. - Highlights: • Biodenitrification by Paracoccus sp. in the presence of nZVI was studied. • Biodegradation was promoted at a low nZVI concentration. • Biodegradation was inhibited at a high nZVI concentration. • nZVI that adhered to microorganism cell membranes was characterized.

  1. Remediation of Chlorpyrifos-Contaminated Soils by Laboratory-Synthesized Zero-Valent Nano Iron Particles: Effect of pH and Aluminium Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vijaya Bhaskar Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Degradation of the insecticide chlorpyrifos in contaminated soils was investigated using laboratory synthesized zero-valent nano iron (ZVNI particles. The synthesized ZVNI particles were characterized as nanoscale sized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The zero-valent state (Fe0 of iron was confirmed by EDAX analysis and the morphology of the ZVNI particles was studied by XRD. Batch experiments were conducted by treating the chlorpyrifos contaminated soil with ZVNI, our results indicate that 90% of chlorpyrifos was degraded after 10 days of incubation. Only 32% degradation was observed with micro zero-valent iron (mZVI and no considerable degradation was attained without ZVNI. The degradation of chlorpyrifos followed the first-order kinetics with a rate constant and a half-life of 0.245 day−1 and 2.82 days, respectively. Degradation was monitored at two different pH values, that is, pH 10 and pH 4. Chlorpyrifos degradation rate constant increased as the pH decreases from 10 to 4. The corresponding rate constant and half-lives were 0.43 day−1 and 1.57days for pH 4, 0.18 day−1 and 3.65 days for pH 10. In addition, an attempt was made by augmenting Al2(SO43 with ZVNI and it was found that the degradation rate of chlorpyrifos was greatly enhanced and the rate constant was rapidly increased from 0.245 day−1 to 0.60 day−1. Hydrolysis and stepwise dechlorination pathway of chlorpyrifos with ZVNI was the dominant reaction.

  2. Enhanced removal of ethanolamine from secondary system of nuclear power plant wastewater by novel hybrid nano zero-valent iron and pressurized ozone initiated oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Son Dong; Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Lee, Byoung Ho

    2017-07-01

    Monoethanolamine (shortly ethanolamine (ETA)), usually used as a corrosion inhibitor, is a contaminant of wastewater from the secondary cooling system of nuclear power plants (NPPs) and is not readily biodegradable. We conducted various experiments, including treatments with nano zero-valent iron (nZVI), nano-iron/calcium, and calcium oxide (nFe/Ca/CaO) with ozone (O3) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to reduce the concentration of ETA and to decrease the chemical demand of oxygen (COD) of these wastewaters. During this study, wastewater with ETA concentration of 7465 mg L-1 and COD of 6920 mg L-1 was used. As a result, the ETA concentration was reduced to 5 mg L-1 (a decrease of almost 100%) and COD was reduced to 2260 mg L-1, a reduction of 67%, using doses of 26.8 mM of nZVI and 1.5 mM of H2O2 at pH 3 for 3 h. Further treatment for 48 h allowed a decrease of COD by almost 97%. Some mechanistic considerations are proposed in order to explain the degradation pathway. The developed hybrid nano zero-valent iron-initiated oxidation process with H2O2 is promising in the treatment of ETA-contaminated wastewaters.

  3. Variability in carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene during degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron: Effects of inorganic anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunde; Zhou, Aiguo; Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis has the potential to be used for assessing the performance of in situ remediation of organic contaminants. Successful application of this isotope technique requires understanding the magnitude and variability in carbon isotope fractionation associated with the reactions under consideration. This study investigated the influence of inorganic anions (sulfate, bicarbonate, and chloride) on carbon isotope fractionation of trichloroethene (TCE) during its degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The results demonstrated that the significant carbon isotope fractionation (enrichment factors ε ranging from -3.4±0.3 to -4.3±0.3‰) was independent on the zero-iron dosage, sulfate concentration, and bicarbonate concentration. However, the ε values (ranging from -7.0±0.4 to -13.6±1.2‰) were dependent on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during TCE degradation by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron. The dependence of ε values on chloride concentration, indicated that TCE degradation mechanisms may be different from the degradation mechanism caused by sulfate radical (SO4(-)). Ignoring the effect of chloride on ε value may cause numerous uncertainties in quantitative assessment of the performance of the in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Preparation of nano zero-valent iron/Sargassum horneri based activated carbon for removal of Cr (VI) from aqueous solution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Gan-Ning; Wu, Xiao; Zheng, Lin; Wu, Xi; Tu, Mei-Ling; Wang, Tie-Gan; Ai, Ning

    2015-02-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron supported on Sargassum horneri activated carbon (NZVI/SAC) was synthesized by zinc chloride activation and incipient wetness method, and characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XRD confirmed the existence of nano zero-valent iron, and SEM revealed that the material consisted of mainly 30-150 nm spherical particles aggregated into chains of individual units. The valence state of iron conformed with the nuclear-shell model. The effects of NZVI loading on AC, pH and the initial concentration of Cr(VI) on the removal of Cr(VI) were investigated. The final Cr(VI) removal percentage was up to 100% under the following conditions: 30 degrees C, pH = 2, NZVI/SAC dosage of 2 g x L(-1) and the amounts of NZVI loaded on SAC of 30%. And the equilibrium time was 10 minutes. These results showed that NZVI/SAC could be potentially applied for removal of high concentration Cr(VI). By analyzing the chemical change of NZVI/ SAC, we demonstrated that Cr(VI) was mainly reduced to insoluble Cr (III) compound in the reaction when pH was less than 4, and adsorbed by NZVI and SAC when pH was over 4.

  5. Influence of riboflavin on nanoscale zero-valent iron reactivity during the degradation of carbon tetrachloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sungjun; Lee, Woojin

    2014-02-18

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of riboflavin on the reactivity of nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) during three reaction cycles of carbon tetrachloride (CT) degradation. The degradation kinetics of CT by NZVI without riboflavin (0.556 ± 0.044 h(-1)) was 1.5 times higher than that with riboflavin (0.370 ± 0.012 h(-1)) in the first cycle. Riboflavin was rapidly reduced (65.0 ± 7.0 h(-1)) by NZVI during CT degradation, resulting in the slow degradation kinetics of CT in the first cycle due to competition for electrons from NZVI between riboflavin and CT. These results indicate that riboflavin is not effective as an electron shuttle for reduction of CT by NZVI. On the other hand, the degradation kinetics of CT by NZVI without riboflavin decreased to 0.122 ± 0.033 h(-1) in the third cycle, while that with riboflavin was significantly enhanced (0.663 ± 0.005 h(-1)). The results from X-ray analyses and transmission electron microscopy suggest that the decline in reactivity of NZVI without riboflavin in the third cycle resulted from continuous Fe(0) oxidation to iron oxides on the NZVI surface. In contrast, riboflavin enhanced the reactivity of NZVI by reductive dissolution of passive iron oxides on NZVI surface by reduced riboflavin. The experimental results suggest that riboflavin can play a pivotal role in the prolongation of NZVI reactivity in long-term in situ and ex situ applications of NZVI.

  6. Recyclable nanoscale zero-valent iron-based magnetic polydopamine coated nanomaterials for the adsorption and removal of phenanthrene and anthracene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhou, Qingxiang; Liu, Yongli; Lei, Man

    2017-01-01

    In this study, nanoscale zero-valent iron nanoparticles (NZVIs) were coated with silica and polydopamine using a two-step process. The coated nanoparticles were applied as adsorbents for removal of two common polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons pollutants, phenanthrene (PHE) and anthracene (ANT) from aqueous system. Adsorption kinetics followed a pseudo-second-order model. Isotherms and thermodynamics were investigated and the results indicated that the adsorption process fit best to the Freundlich model and exhibited the characteristics of an exothermal physical adsorption process. Owing to their superparamagnetic characteristics and stability, these adsorbents could be easily collected and recycled for reuse.

  7. Degradation of Reactive Brilliant Red X-3B by zero-valent iron/activated carbon system in the presence of microwave irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fei; Luo, Yin; Zhang, Li-Rong; Fu, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Reactive Brilliant Red X-3B in aqueous solution could be degraded rapidly by zero-valent iron/activated carbon in the presence of microwave irradiation (ZVI/AC/MW). From the analysis of ultraviolet-visible adsorption, chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, infrared spectra and capillary electrophoresis, we found the degradation was complete and no intermediates remained in the final solution treated for 2 min. Considering the many advantages including high degradation ratios, short reaction time, low costs, no intermediates and no secondary pollution, this method might be fit for dealing with various azo dye wastewaters on a large scale.

  8. Copper increases reductive dehalogenation of haloacetamides by zero-valent iron in drinking water: Reduction efficiency and integrated toxicity risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Xin; Bond, Tom; Gao, Naiyun; Bin, Xu; Wang, Qiongfang; Ding, Shunke

    2016-12-15

    The haloacetamides (HAcAms), an emerging class of nitrogen-containing disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs), are highly cytotoxic and genotoxic, and typically occur in treated drinking waters at low μg/L concentrations. Since many drinking distribution and storage systems contain unlined cast iron and copper pipes, reactions of HAcAms with zero-valent iron (ZVI) and metallic copper (Cu) may play a role in determining their fate. Moreover, ZVI and/or Cu are potentially effective HAcAm treatment technologies in drinking water supply and storage systems. This study reports that ZVI alone reduces trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) to sequentially form dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) and then monochloroacetamide (MCAcAm), whereas Cu alone does not impact HAcAm concentrations. The addition of Cu to ZVI significantly improved the removal of HAcAms, relative to ZVI alone. TCAcAm and their reduction products (DCAcAm and MCAcAm) were all decreased to below detection limits at a molar ratio of ZVI/Cu of 1:1 after 24 h reaction (ZVI/TCAcAm = 0.18 M/5.30 μM). TCAcAm reduction increased with the decreasing pH from 8.0 to 5.0, but values from an integrated toxic risk assessment were minimised at pH 7.0, due to limited removal MCAcAm under weak acid conditions (pH = 5.0 and 6.0). Higher temperatures (40 °C) promoted the reductive dehalogenation of HAcAms. Bromine was preferentially removed over chlorine, thus brominated HAcAms were more easily reduced than chlorinated HAcAms by ZVI/Cu. Although tribromoacetamide was more easily reduced than TCAcAm during ZVI/Cu reduction, treatment of tribromoacetamide resulted in a higher integrated toxicity risk than TCAcAm, due to the formation of monobromoacetamide (MBAcAm). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Removal of Ni(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solutions using 'green' zero-valent iron nanoparticles produced by oak and mulberry leaf extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poguberović, S S; Krčmar, D M; Dalmacija, B D; Maletić, S P; Tomašević-Pilipović, D D; Kerkez, Dj V; Rončević, S D

    2016-11-01

    The production of zero-valent iron nanoparticles, using extracts from natural products, represents a green and environmentally friendly method. Synthesis of 'green' zero-valent nanoparticles (nZVI) using oak and mulberry leaf extracts (OL-nZVI and ML-nZVI) proved to be a promising approach for Ni(II) and Cu(II) removal from aqueous solutions. Characterization of the produced green nZVI materials had been conducted previously and confirmed the formation of nanosize zero-valent iron particles within the size range of 10-30 nm, spherical with minimum agglomeration observed by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscope morphology measurements. Batch experiments revealed that the adsorption kinetics followed a pseudo-second-order rate equation. The obtained adsorption isotherm data could be well described by the Freundlich model and OL-nZVI showed higher adsorption capacity for Ni(II) removal than ML-nZVI, while ML-nZVI adsorption capacity was higher for Cu(II). In addition, investigation of the pH effect showed that varying the initial pH value had a great effect on Ni(II) and Cu(II) removal. Adsorbed amounts of Ni(II) and Cu(II) increased with pH increase to pH 7.0 and 8.0. This study indicated that nZVI produced by a low-cost and non-toxic method with oak and mulberry leaf extracts could be used as a new material for remediation of water matrices contaminated with Ni(II) and Cu(II).

  10. Nanoscale zero-valent iron supported by biochars produced at different temperatures: Synthesis mechanism and effect on Cr(VI) removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Linbo; Zhang, Wenying; Yan, Jingchun; Han, Lu; Chen, Yun; Ouyang, Da; Chen, Mengfang

    2017-04-01

    Biochar-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) produced under different temperatures was studied to evaluate the effect of the nZVI-biochar composite on the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in solution. The structure of biochar-supported nZVI and its roles in Cr(VI) removal were investigated by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and batch experiments. The XRD revealed that the removal rate of Cr(VI) for the nZVI supported by rice straw pyrolyzed at 400 °C (RS400) was much greater than that for other supporting biochar, and the FTIR further indicated that the carboxyl groups and silicon mineral within the biochar served as dual support sites for nZVI. NZVI-RS400 exhibited the highest removal amount of Cr(VI) at approximately 40.0 mg/g under an initial pH of 4.0, possibly due to both the reduction and adsorption processes. Therefore, the RS400-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron could be a preferable material for Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Effective aqueous arsenic removal using zero valent iron doped MWCNT synthesized by in situ CVD method using natural α-Fe2O3 as a precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alijani, Hassan; Shariatinia, Zahra

    2017-03-01

    This research presents an efficient system for removing aqua's arsenic based on in situ zero valent iron doping onto multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) through MWCNT growth onto the natural α-Fe2O3 surface in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor. The as-synthesized magnetic nanohybrid was characterized by XRD, VSM, FE-SEM and TEM techniques. The result of XRD analysis revealed that MWCNT has been successfully generated on the surface of zero valent iron. Moreover, the material showed good superparamagnetic characteristic to be employed as a magnetic adsorbent. The hematite, nanohybrid and its air oxidized form were used for removing aqueous arsenite and arsenate; however, non oxidized material exhibited greater efficiency for the analytes uptake. Equilibrium times were 60 and 90 min for arsenate and arsenite adsorption using nanohybrid and oxidized sorbent but the equilibrium time was 1320 min using hematite. The adsorption efficiencies of hematite and oxidized sorbent were 18, 74% and 26, 77% for arsenite and arsenate, respectively, at initial concentration of 10 mg L(-1). At this situation, the removal efficiencies were 96 and 98.5% for arsenite and arsenate adsorption using raw nanohybrid. Thermodynamic study was also performed and results indicated that arsenic adsorption onto nanohybrid and oxidized sorbent was spontaneous however hematite followed a nonspontaneous path for the arsenic removal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evolution of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in water: Microscopic and spectroscopic evidence on the formation of nano- and micro-structured iron oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Airong, E-mail: liuairong@tongji.edu.cn; Liu, Jing; Han, Jinhao; Zhang, Wei-xian, E-mail: zhangwx@tongji.edu.cn

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A comprehensive study of corrosion products for nZVI under both oxic and anoxic conditions is performed. • Under anoxic conditions, the oxidation products contain a mixture of wustite (FeO), goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH). • Under oxic conditions, the final products are mainly crystalline lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) with acicular-shaped structures. • Morphological and structural evolution of nZVI under both oxic and anoxic conditions are substantially different. - Abstract: Knowledge on the transformation of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in water is essential to predict its surface chemistry including surface charge, colloidal stability and aggregation, reduction and sorption of organic contaminants, heavy metal ions and other pollutants in the environment. In this work, transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy are applied to study the compositional and structural evolution of nZVI under oxic and anoxic conditions. Under anoxic conditions, the core–shell structure of nZVI is well maintained even after 72 h, and the corrosion products usually contain a mixture of wustite (FeO), goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH). Under oxic conditions, the core–shell structure quickly collapses to flakes or acicular-shaped structures with crystalline lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) as the primary end product. This work provides detailed information and fills an important knowledge gap on the physicochemical characteristics and structural evolution of engineered nanomaterials in the environment.

  13. Comparison of U(VI) adsorption onto nanoscale zero-valent iron and red soil in the presence of U(VI)–CO{sub 3}/Ca–U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhibin [Key Laboratory of Radioactive Geology and Exploration Technology Fundamental Science for National Defense, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330013 (China); Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); Liu, Jun [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330013 (China); Cao, Xiaohong, E-mail: xhcao@ecit.cn [Key Laboratory of Radioactive Geology and Exploration Technology Fundamental Science for National Defense, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330013 (China); Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); Luo, Xuanping [Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); Hua, Rong; Liu, Yan [Key Laboratory of Radioactive Geology and Exploration Technology Fundamental Science for National Defense, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330013 (China); Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); Yu, Xiaofeng; He, Likai [Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); and others

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • NZVI can be used for adsorbing U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes. • Use of NZVI is feasible for remediation of uranium-contaminated soils. • The mechanism of U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes adsorbing onto NZVI has been explained. - Abstract: The influence of U(VI)–CO{sub 3} and Ca–U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes on U(VI) adsorption onto red soil and nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) was investigated using batch adsorption and fixed-bed column experiments to simulate the feasibility of NZVI as the reactive medium in permeable- reactive barriers (PRB) for in situ remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils. The adsorption capacity (q{sub e}) and distribution constant (K{sub d}) of NZVI and red soil decreased with increasing pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentrations, but the q{sub e} and K{sub d} values of NZVI were 5–10 times higher than those of red soil. The breakthrough pore volume (PV) values increased with the decrease of pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentration; however, the breakthrough PV values of the PRB column filled with 5% NZVI were 2.0–3.5 times higher than the 100% red soil column. The U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes adsorbed onto the surface of red soil/NZVI (≡SOH) to form SO–UO{sub 2}CO{sub 3}{sup −} or SO–UO{sub 2} (CO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 3−}. XPS and XRD analysis further confirmed the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) and the formation of FeOOH on NZVI surfaces. The findings of this study are significant to the remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils and the consideration of practical U(VI) species in the natural environment.

  14. Modeling Polymer Stabilized Nano-scale Zero Valent Iron Transport Experiments in Porous Media to Understand the Transport Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, P.; Krol, M.; Sleep, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    A wide variety of groundwater contaminants can be treated with nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI). However, delivery of nZVI in the subsurface to the treatment zones is challenging as the bare nZVI particles have a higher tendency to agglomerate. The subsurface mobility of nZVI can be enhanced by stabilizing nZVI with polymer, such as carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC). In this study, numerical simulations were conducted to evaluate CMC stabilized nZVI transport behavior in porous media. The numerical simulations were based on a set of laboratory-scale transport experiments that were conducted in a two-dimensional water-saturated glass-walled sandbox (length - 55 cm; height - 45 cm; width - 1.4 cm), uniformly packed with silica sand. In the transport experiments: CMC stabilized nZVI and a non-reactive dye tracer Lissamine Green B (LGB) were used; water specific discharge and CMC concentration were varied; movements of LGB, and CMC-nZVI in the sandbox were tracked using a camera, a light source and a dark box. The concentrations of LGB, CMC, and CMC-nZVI at the sandbox outlet were analyzed. A 2D multiphase flow and transport model was applied to simulate experimental results. The images from LGB dye transport experiments were used to determine the pore water velocities and media permeabilities in various layers in the sand box. These permeability values were used in the subsequent simulations of CMC-nZVI transport. The 2D compositional simulator, modified to include colloid filtration theory (CFT), treated CMC as a solute and nZVI as a colloid. The simulator included composition dependent viscosity to account for CMC injection and mixing, and attachment efficiency as a fitting parameter for nZVI transport modeling. In the experiments, LGB and CMC recoveries were greater than 95%; however, CMC residence time was significantly higher than the LGB residence time and the higher CMC concentration caused higher pressure drops in the sandbox. The nZVI recovery was lower than 40

  15. Degradation of soil-sorbed trichloroethylene by stabilized zero valent iron nanoparticles: effects of sorption, surfactants, and natural organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Man; He, Feng; Zhao, Dongye; Hao, Xiaodi

    2011-03-01

    Zero valent iron (ZVI) nanoparticles have been studied extensively for degradation of chlorinated solvents in the aqueous phase, and have been tested for in-situ remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater. However, little is known about its effectiveness for degrading soil-sorbed contaminants. This work studied reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) sorbed in two model soils (a potting soil and Smith Farm soil) using carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) stabilized Fe-Pd bimetallic nanoparticles. Effects of sorption, surfactants and dissolved organic matter (DOC) were determined through batch kinetic experiments. While the nanoparticles can effectively degrade soil-sorbed TCE, the TCE degradation rate was strongly limited by desorption kinetics, especially for the potting soil which has a higher organic matter content of 8.2%. Under otherwise identical conditions, ∼ 44% of TCE sorbed in the potting soil was degraded in 30 h, compared to ∼ 82% for Smith Farm soil (organic matter content = 0.7%). DOC from the potting soil was found to inhibit TCE degradation. The presence of the extracted SOM at 40 ppm and 350 ppm as TOC reduced the degradation rate by 34% and 67%, respectively. Four prototype surfactants were tested for their effects on TCE desorption and degradation rates, including two anionic surfactants known as SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) and SDBS (sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate), a cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) bromide, and a non-ionic surfactant Tween 80. All four surfactants were observed to enhance TCE desorption at concentrations below or above the critical micelle concentration (cmc), with the anionic surfactant SDS being most effective. Based on the pseudo-first-order reaction rate law, the presence of 1 × cmc SDS increased the reaction rate by a factor of 2.5 when the nanoparticles were used for degrading TCE in a water solution. SDS was effective for enhancing degradation of TCE sorbed in Smith Farm soil, the

  16. Degradation of soil-sorbed trichloroethylene by stabilized zero valent iron nanoparticles: Effects of sorption, surfactants, and natural organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Man [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; He, Feng [ORNL; Zhao, Dongye [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Hao, Xiaodi [Beijing University of Civil Engineering and Architecture

    2011-01-01

    Zero valent iron (ZVI) nanoparticles have been studied extensively for degradation of chlorinated solvents in the aqueous phase, and have been tested for in-situ remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater. However, little is known about its effectiveness for degrading soil-sorbed contaminants. This work studied reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) sorbed in two model soils (a potting soil and Smith Farm soil) using carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) stabilized Fe-Pd bimetallic nanoparticles. Effects of sorption, surfactants and dissolved organic matter (DOC) were determined through batch kinetic experiments. While the nanoparticles can effectively degrade soil-sorbed TCE, the TCE degradation rate was strongly limited by desorption kinetics, especially for the potting soil which has a higher organic matter content of 8.2%. Under otherwise identical conditions, {approx}44% of TCE sorbed in the potting soil was degraded in 30 h, compared to {approx}82% for Smith Farm soil (organic matter content = 0.7%). DOC from the potting soil was found to inhibit TCE degradation. The presence of the extracted SOM at 40 ppm and 350 ppm as TOC reduced the degradation rate by 34% and 67%, respectively. Four prototype surfactants were tested for their effects on TCE desorption and degradation rates, including two anionic surfactants known as SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) and SDBS (sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate), a cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) bromide, and a non-ionic surfactant Tween 80. All four surfactants were observed to enhance TCE desorption at concentrations below or above the critical micelle concentration (cmc), with the anionic surfactant SDS being most effective. Based on the pseudo-first-order reaction rate law, the presence of 1 x cmc SDS increased the reaction rate by a factor of 2.5 when the nanoparticles were used for degrading TCE in a water solution. SDS was effective for enhancing degradation of TCE sorbed in Smith Farm

  17. Zero-valent iron for the abatement of arsenate and selenate from flowback water of hydraulic fracturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuqing; Chen, Season S; Tsang, Daniel C W; Graham, Nigel J D; Ok, Yong Sik; Feng, Yujie; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Zero-valent iron (ZVI) was tested for the removal of 150 μg L-1 As(V) and 350 μg L-1 Se(VI) in high-salinity (ionic strength 0.35-4.10 M) flowback water of hydraulic fracturing. Over 90% As(V) and Se(VI) was removed by 2.5 g L-1 ZVI in Day-14 flowback water up to 96-h reaction, with the remaining concentration below the maximum contaminant level for As(V) and criterion continuous concentration for Se(VI) recommended by US EPA. The kinetics of As(V) and Se(VI) removal followed a pseudo-second-order rate expression with the observed rates of 4.51 × 10-2-4.91 × 10-1 and 3.48 × 10-2-6.58 × 10-1 h-1 (with 0.5-10 g L-1 ZVI), respectively. The results showed that Se(VI) removal significantly decreased with increasing ionic strength, while As(V) removal showed little variation. Common competing anions (nitrate, bicarbonate, silicate, and phosphate), present in shallow groundwater and stormwater, caused marginal Se(VI) desorption (2.42 ± 0.13%) and undetectable As(V) desorption from ZVI. The competition between As(V) and Se(VI) for ZVI removal depended on the initial molar ratio and surface sites, which occurred when the Se(VI) concentration was higher than the As(V) concentration in this study. The characterization of As(V)- and Se(VI)-loaded ZVI by X-ray diffraction and Raman analysis revealed that ZVI gradually converted to magnetite/maghemite corrosion products with lepidocrocite in flowback water over 30 days. Similar corrosion compositions were confirmed in aerobic and anaerobic conditions regardless of the molar ratio of As(V) to Se(VI). The high reactivity and stability of ZVI showed its suitability for in-situ prevention of As(V) and Se(VI) migration due to accidental leakage, spillage, or overflow of flowback water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Removal of chromium (VI) by acid-washed zero-valent iron under various groundwater geochemistry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Keith C K; Lo, Irene M C

    2008-02-15

    The hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) removal capacity of acid-washed zerovalent iron (AW-Fe0) was evaluated under different groundwater geochemistry conditions through column experiments. It was found that each gram of the AW-Fe0 could remove 0.65-1.76 mg of Cr(VI) from synthetic groundwater in the absence of bicarbonate (HCO3-), magnesium and/or calcium ions. Groundwater geochemistry was found to exert various degrees of impact on Cr(VI) removal by the AW-Fe0, in which HCO3- alone gave the mildest impact whereas the copresence of calcium and HCO3- exerted the greatest impact In comparison with the unwashed Fe0, the AW-Fe0 showed a poorer Cr(VI) removal capacity and was also more susceptible to the influence of the dissolved groundwater constituents on Cr(VI) removal,thereby indicating the unsuitability of using AW-Fe0 in permeable reactive barriers for remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater. On the AW-Fe0 surface, where the indigenous iron precipitates were almost erased, trivalent chromium including chromium (III) oxides, hydroxides, and oxyhydroxides in irregular strip, chick footmark-liked or boulder-liked forms as well as Cr(III)-Cr(VI) mixed oxides were detected.

  19. Inhibition of nitrate reduction by NaCl adsorption on a nano-zero-valent iron surface during a concentrate treatment for water reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yuhoon; Kim, Dogun; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) has been considered as a possible material to treat water and wastewater. However, it is necessary to verify the effect of the matrix components in different types of target water. In this study, different effects depending on the sodium chloride (NaCl) concentration on reductions of nitrates and on the characteristics of NZVI were investigated. Although NaCl is known as a promoter of iron corrosion, a high concentration of NaCl (>3 g/L) has a significant inhibition effect on the degree of NZVI reactivity towards nitrate. The experimental results were interpreted by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson reaction in terms of inhibition, and the decreased NZVI reactivity could be explained by the increase in the inhibition constant. As a result of a chloride concentration analysis, it was verified that 7.7-26.5% of chloride was adsorbed onto the surface of NZVI. Moreover, the change of the iron corrosion product under different NaCl concentrations was investigated by a surface analysis of spent NZVI. Magnetite was the main product, with a low NaCl concentration (0.5 g/L), whereas amorphous iron hydroxide was observed at a high concentration (12 g/L). Though the surface was changed to permeable iron hydroxide, the Fe(0) in the core was not completely oxidized. Therefore, the inhibition effect of NaCl could be explained as the competitive adsorption of chloride and nitrate.

  20. Enhanced degradation of ortho-nitrochlorobenzene by the combined system of zero-valent iron reduction and persulfate oxidation in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hai-bo; Zhao, Dao-yuan; Li, Yu-jiao; Liu, Pei-ya; Dong, Chang-xun

    2014-04-01

    ortho-Nitrochlorobenzene (o-NCB) in soil poses significant health risks to human because of its persistence and high toxicity. The removal of o-NCB by both zero-valent iron (ZVI) and chemical oxidation (persulfate) was investigated by batch experiments. The o-NCB removal rate increases significantly from 15.1 to 97.3 % with an increase of iron dosage from 0.1 to 1.0 mmol g(-1). The o-NCB removal rate increases with the decrease of the initial solution pH, and a removal efficiency of 90.3 % is obtained at an initial pH value of 6.8 in this combined system. It is found that temperature and soil moisture could also increase the o-NCB removal rate. The o-NCB degradation rate increases from 83.9 to 96.2 % and from 41.5 to 82.4 % with an increase of temperature (15 to 35 °C) and soil moisture (0.25 to 1.50 mL g(-1)), respectively. Compared to the persulfate oxidation system and ZVI system, the persulfate-iron system shows high o-NCB removal capacity. o-NCB removal rates of 41.5 and 62.4 % are obtained in both the persulfate oxidation system and the ZVI system, while the removal rate of o-NCB is 90.3 % in the persulfate-iron system.

  1. Effect of the addition of zero valent iron (Fe(0)) on the batch biological sulphate reduction using grass cellulose as carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulopo, Jean; Schaefer, L

    2013-12-01

    Mineral mining generates acidic, saline, metal-rich mine waters, often referred to as acid mine drainage (AMD). Treatment of AMD and recovering saleable products during the treatment process are a necessity since water is, especially in South Africa, a scarce commodity. The aim of the study presented here was to investigate the effect of zero valent iron (Fe(0)) on the biological removal of sulphate from AMD in batch reactors. The performance of the reactors was assessed by means of sulphate reduction, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acid (VFA) utilisation and volatile suspended solids (VSS) concentration. To this end, three batch reactors, A, B and C (volume 2.5 L), were operated similarly with the exception of the addition of grass cuttings and iron filings. Reactors A and B received twice as much grass (100 g) as C (50 g). Reactor A received no iron filings to act as a control, while reactors B and C received 50-g iron filings for the experimental duration. The results showed that Fe(0) appears to provide sustained sulphate removal when sufficient grass substrate is available. In reactors A and C, sulphate removal efficiency was higher when the COD concentration was lower due to utilisation. In reactor B, sulphate removal efficiency was accompanied by an accumulation of COD as hydrogen (H2) provided by the Fe(0) was utilised for sulphate reduction. Furthermore, these results showed the potential of Fe(0) to enhance the participation of microorganisms in sulphate reduction.

  2. Removal of selenite by zero-valent iron combined with ultrasound: Se(IV) concentration changes, Se(VI) generation, and reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Fenglian; Lu, Jianwei; Cheng, Zihang; Tang, Bing

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the performance and application of zero-valent iron (ZVI) assisted by ultrasonic irradiation for the removal of selenite (Se(IV)) in wastewater was evaluated and reaction mechanism of Se(IV) with ZVI in such systems was investigated. A series of batch experiments were conducted to determine the effects of ultrasound power, pH, ZVI concentration, N2 and air on Se(IV) removal. ZVI before and after reaction with Se(IV) was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results indicated that ultrasound can lead to a significant synergy in the removal of Se(IV) by ZVI because ultrasound can promote the generation of OH and accelerate the advanced Fenton process. The primary reaction products of ZVI and Se(IV) were Se(0), ferrihydrite, and Fe2O3. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) synthesis in a Mg-aminoclay solution exhibits increased stability and reactivity for reductive decontamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, Yuhoon; Lee, Young-Chul; Mines, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) has often been explored as a reductant for detoxification of pollutants in environmental clean-ups. Despite the large surface area and superior reactivity of nZVI, its limited stability is a major obstacle in applying nZVI for in situ subsurface remediation, e...... to be 7.5:1. The MgAC coated nZVI exhibited higher reactivity for nitrate reduction with the observed first order rate constants increasing from 1.17 to 42.0 h−1, and Fe(0)-normalized rate constants from 0.124 to 43.8 h−1 mg-Fe(0)−1. Consequently, the MgAC coated nZVI showed increased feasibility...

  4. Removal of benzotriazole by Photo-Fenton like process using nano zero-valent iron: response surface methodology with a Box-Behnken design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi Mehdi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the removal of benzotriazole (BTA was investigated by a Photo-Fenton process using nano zero valent iron (NZVI and optimization by response surface methodology based on Box-Behnken method. Effect of operating parameters affecting removal efficiency such as H2O2, NZVI, and BTA concentrations as well as pH was studied. All the experiments were performed in the presence of ultraviolet radiation. Predicted levels and BTA removal were found to be in good agreement with the experimental levels (R2 = 0. 9500. The optimal parameters were determined at 60 min reaction time, 15 mg L-1 BTA, 0.10 g L-1 NZVI, and 1.5 mmol L-1 H2O2 for Photo-Fenton-like reaction. NZVI was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscope (TEM images, and scanning electron microscope (SEM analysis.

  5. Removal of diazo dye Direct Red 23 from aqueous solution using zero-valent iron nanoparticles immobilized on multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza Sohrabi, Mahmoud; Mansouriieh, Nafiseh; Khosravi, Morteza; Zolghadr, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    The present study immobilized nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to enhance the reactivity of nZVI and prevent its aggregation. This novel composite (nZVI/MWCNT) was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that nZVI particles dispersed on the surface of the MWCNTs. The composite was used to remove the diazo dye Direct Red 23 from aqueous solution. The effects of nZVI to MWCNT mass ratio, nanocomposite content, solution pH, initial dye concentration and temperature were studied. The optimum nZVI/MWCNT mass ratio was 1:3. Batch experiments suggest that degradation efficiency decreased as the initial dye concentration increased and increased as the nanocomposite content increased, decreasing the pH from 8 to 4. The reaction followed a pseudo-first-order model under the operational conditions investigated in this study.

  6. DIRECT INFUSION ESI-MS APPLIED IN THE DETECTION OF BYPRODUCTS DUE TO REDUCTIVE DEGRADATION OF ACETAMIPRID BY ZERO-VALENT IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean C. Cruz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the reductive degradation of acetamiprid (5 mg L-1 in aqueous medium (at pH 2.0 induced by zero-valent iron (50 mg. The process was monitored using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC to determine the degradation rate as a function of reaction time, and direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DI-ESI-MS to search for (and potentially characterize any possible byproducts formed during degradation. The results obtained via HPLC showed that after 60 min, the degradation of the substrate reached nearly 100% in an acidic medium, whereas the mineralization rate (as determined by total organic carbon measurements was as low as 3%. Data obtained by DI-ESI-MS showed that byproducts were formed mainly by insertions of hydrogen atoms into the nitrile, imine, and pyridine ring moieties, in addition to the observation of chlorine substitution by hydrogen replacement (hydrodechlorination reactions.

  7. Distinct Iron-binding Ligands in the Upper Water Column at Station ALOHA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, R.; Boiteau, R.; Repeta, D.

    2016-02-01

    The distribution and chemical properties of iron-binding organic ligands at station ALOHA were examined using a combination of solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by high pressure liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICPMS). HPLC-ICPMS ligand measurements were complemented by competitive ligand exchange adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-ACSV) analysis using salicylaldoxime as the added ligand. By HPLC-ICPMS, we find enhanced concentrations of distinct naturally-occurring polar iron-binding ligands present at the surface and in the chlorophyll maximum. Lower concentrations were found in the subsurface, where a suite of non-polar ligands was detected. Siderophores were present at the deepest depths sampled at station ALOHA, down to 400m. Incubation studies provided evidence for the production of iron-binding ligands associated with nutrient amended phytoplankton growth in surface waters, and as a result of microbial particle remineralization in the subsurface water column. Ligands classes identified via SPE were then compared to CLE-ACSV ligand measurements, as well as the conditional stability constants measured from model polar and non-polar siderophores, yielding insight to the sources of iron-binding ligands throughout the water column at station ALOHA.

  8. Nitrogen activation of carbon-encapsulated zero-valent iron nanoparticles and influence of the activation temperature on heavy metals removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaiti, Stefania; Calderon, Blanca; Collina, Elena; Lasagni, Marina; Mezzanotte, Valeria; Aracil Saez, Nacho; Fullana, Andrés

    2017-05-01

    Nanoparticles of zero-valent iron (nZVI) represent a promising agent for environmental remediation. This is due to their core-shell structure which presents the characteristics of both metallic and oxidised iron, leading to sorption and reductive precipitation of metal ions. Nevertheless, nZVI application presents some limitations regarding their rapid oxidation and aggregation in the media which leads to the delivery of the ions after some hours (the “aging effect”). To address these issues, modifications of nZVI structure and synthesis methods have been developed in the last years. The aging problem was solved by using nZVI encapsulated inside carbon spheres (CE-nZVI), synthetized through Hydrothermal Carbonization (HTC). Results showed high heavy metals removal percentage. Furthermore, CE-nZVI were activated with nitrogen in order to increase the metallic iron content. The aim of this study was to test CE-nZVI post-treated with nitrogen at different temperatures in heavy metals removal, demonstrating that the influence of the temperature was negligible in nanoparticles removal efficiency.

  9. Lab-scale simulation of the fate and transport of nano zero-valent iron in subsurface environments: aggregation, sedimentation, and contaminant desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ke; Lo, Irene M C; Dong, Haoran; Rao, Pinhua; Mak, Mark S H

    2012-08-15

    Heavy metal removal using nano zero-valent iron (NZVI) has drawn growing attention due to the ease of application and high removal efficiency. However, uncertainties regarding its fate and transport in subsurface environments have raised concerns that require further exploration. In this study, aggregation, sedimentation, and Cr/As desorption of three types of NZVIs were investigated under various conditions. It was found that the aggregation behavior of the NZVIs differed from one another in regard to reaction time and ionic strength, associated with the respective critical size for sedimentation. Sedimentation of NZVIs was positively related to the concentrations and average particle sizes. The sedimentation kinetics of NZVI followed two concomitant processes, i.e., (1) direct sedimentation of larger particles, and (2) initial aggregation and then sedimentation of smaller particles. When loaded with Cr/As, NZVIs tended to deposit faster, possibly due to the precipitation of Cr/As onto the nanoparticle surfaces resulting in larger particle sizes. Moreover, desorption of Cr/As from Cr/As loaded NZVIs was detected in the presence of typical groundwater ions, as well as natural organic matter, and poses a potential risk to the subsurface environment. The desorption of Cr was linearly related to the release of iron ions, while As desorption was mitigated when the immobilization of Cr increased. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nanoscale zero-valent iron particles supported on reduced graphene oxides by using a plasma technique and their application for removal of heavy-metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Chen, Changlun; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-06-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron particles supported on reduced graphene oxides (NZVI/rGOs) from spent graphene oxide (GO)-bound iron ions were developed by using a hydrogen/argon plasma reduction method to improve the reactivity and stability of NZVI. The NZVI/rGOs exhibited excellent water treatment performance with excellent removal capacities of 187.16 and 396.37 mg g(-1) for chromium and lead, respectively. Moreover, the NZVI/rGOs could be regenerated by plasma treatment and maintained high removal ability after four cycles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis results implied that the removal mechanisms could be attributed to adsorption/precipitation, reduction, or both. Such multiple removal mechanisms by the NZVI/rGOs were attributed to the reduction ability of the NZVI particles and the role of dispersing and stabilizing abilities of the rGOs. The results indicated that the NZVI/rGOs prepared by a hydrogen/argon plasma reduction method might be an effective composite for heavy-metal-ion removal. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. DDT degradation efficiency and ecotoxicological effects of two types of nano-sized zero-valent iron (nZVI) in water and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Temsah, Yehia S; Sevcu, Alena; Bobcikova, Katerina; Cernik, Miroslav; Joner, Erik J

    2016-02-01

    Nano-scale zero-valent iron (nZVI) has been conceived for cost-efficient degradation of chlorinated pollutants in soil as an alternative to e.g permeable reactive barriers or excavation. Little is however known about its efficiency in degradation of the ubiquitous environmental pollutant DDT and its secondary effects on organisms. Here, two types of nZVI (type B made using precipitation with borohydride, and type T produced by gas phase reduction of iron oxides under H2) were compared for efficiency in degradation of DDT in water and in a historically (>45 years) contaminated soil (24 mg kg(-1) DDT). Further, the ecotoxicity of soil and water was tested on plants (barley and flax), earthworms (Eisenia fetida), ostracods (Heterocypris incongruens), and bacteria (Escherichia coli). Both types of nZVI effectively degraded DDT in water, but showed lower degradation of aged DDT in soil. Both types of nZVI had negative impact on the tested organisms, with nZVI-T giving least adverse effects. Negative effects were mostly due to oxidation of nZVI, resulting in O2 consumption and excess Fe(II) in water and soil. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Iron oxide nanoparticle coating of organic polymer-based monolithic columns for phosphopeptide enrichment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křenková, Jana; Foret, František

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 34, 16-17 (2011), s. 2106-2112 ISSN 1615-9306 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2055; GA ČR(CZ) GPP206/11/P004 Grant - others:Jihomoravský kraj(CZ) 2SGA2721 Program:2SGA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : iron oxide nanoparticles * monolithic column * phosphopeptide enrichment Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.733, year: 2011

  13. Synthesis of kaolin supported nanoscale zero-valent iron and its degradation mechanism of Direct Fast Black G in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xiaoying; Chen, Zhengxian [Fujian Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007, Fujian Province (China); Zhou, Rongbing [Institute of Environ Sci and Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310018 (China); Chen, Zuliang, E-mail: Zuliang.chen@unisa.edu.au [Fujian Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007, Fujian Province (China); Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: UV–visible spectra of DFBG solution using K-nZVI (1:1) nanoparticles. (a) Before reaction; (b) during reaction; (c) after reaction. - Highlights: • Kaolin-supported Fe{sup 0} nanoparticle (K-nZVI) was synthesized. • Degradation of Direct Fast Black by K-nZVI was studied. • K-nZVI was characterized by SEM, XRD, UV and FIIR. • Degradation mechanism of Direct Fast Black was proposed. - Abstract: Calcinated kaolin supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (K-nZVI) was synthesized and used for the removal of tetrad azo-group dye-Direct Fast Black G (DFBG) from aqueous solution. The results demonstrated that after reacting for 10 min with an initial concentration of DFBG 100 mg L{sup −1} (pH 9.49), 78.60% of DFBG was removed using K-nZVI, while only 41.39% and 12.56% of DFBG were removed using nZVI and kaolin, respectively. K-nZVI with a mass ratio of nZVI nanoparticles versus kaolin at 1:1 was found to have a high degree of reactivity. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed that nZVI was better dispersed when kaolin was present. XRD patterns indicated that iron oxides were formed after reaction. Fourier transforms infrared spectra (FTIR) and UV–visible demonstrated that the peak in the visible light region of DFBG was degraded and new bands were observed. Kinetics studies showed that the degradation of DFBG fitted well to the pseudo first-order model. The degradation of DFBG by K-nZVI was based on its adsorption onto kaolin and iron oxides, and subsequently reduction using nZVI was proposed. A significant outcome emerged in that 99.84% of DFBG in wastewater was removed using K-nZVI after reacting for 60 min.

  14. Zero-valent iron treatment of dark brown colored coffee effluent: Contributions of a core-shell structure to pollutant removals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Mayuka; Kurosu, Shunji; Kobayashi, Maki; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2016-12-01

    The decolorization and total organic carbon (TOC) removal of dark brown colored coffee effluent by zero-valent iron (ZVI) have been systematically examined with solution pH of 3.0, 4.0, 6.0 and 8.0 under oxic and anoxic conditions. The optimal decolorization and TOC removal were obtained at pH 8.0 with oxic condition. The maximum efficiencies of decolorization and TOC removal were 92.6 and 60.2%, respectively. ZVI presented potential properties for pollutant removal at nearly neutral pH because of its core-shell structure in which shell or iron oxide/hydroxide layer on ZVI surface dominated the decolorization and TOC removal of coffee effluent. To elucidate the contribution of the core-shell structure to removals of color and TOC at the optimal condition, the characterization of ZVI surface by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was conducted. It was confirmed that the core-shell structure was formed and the shell on ZVI particulate surface and the precipitates formed during the course of ZVI treatment consisted of iron oxides and hydroxides. They were significantly responsible for decolorization and TOC removal of coffee effluent via adsorption to shell on ZVI surface and inclusion into the precipitates rather than the oxidative degradation by OH radicals and the reduction by emitted electrons. The presence of dissolved oxygen (DO) enhanced the formation of the core-shell structure and as a result improved the efficiency of ZVI treatment for the removal of colored components in coffee effluents. ZVI was found to be an efficient material toward the treatment of coffee effluents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Removal of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) from wastewaters by zero-valent iron (ZVI): predominant removal mechanism for effective SDBS removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Akari; Kobayashi, Maki; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2017-03-01

    Mechanisms for removal of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) in wastewaters by zero-valent iron (ZVI) were systematically examined. The contributions of four removal mechanisms, i.e., reductive degradation, oxidative degradation, adsorption, and precipitation, changed significantly with solution pH were quantified and the effective removal of SDBS by ZVI was found to be attributed to the adsorption capability of iron oxides/hydroxides on ZVI surface at nearly neutral pH instead of the degradation at acidic condition. The fastest SDBS removal rate and the maximum TOC (total organic carbon) removal efficiency were obtained at pH 6.0. The maximum TOC removal at pH 6.0 was 77.8%, and the contributions of degradation, precipitation, and adsorption to TOC removal were 4.6, 14.9, and 58.3%, respectively. At pH 3.0, which is an optimal pH for oxidative degradation by the Fenton reaction, the TOC removal was only 9.8% and the contributions of degradation, precipitation, and adsorption to TOC removal were 2.3, 4.6, and 2.9%, respectively. The electrostatic attraction between dodecyl benzene sulfate anion and the iron oxide/hydroxide layer controlled the TOC removal of SDBS. The kinetic model based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood/Eley-Rideal approach could successfully describe the experimental results for SDBS removal by ZVI with the averaged correlation coefficient of 0.994. ZVI was found to be an efficient material toward the removal of anionic surfactant at nearly neutral pH under the oxic condition.

  16. SBA-15-incorporated nanoscale zero-valent iron particles for chromium(VI) removal from groundwater: Mechanism, effect of pH, humic acid and sustained reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xia, E-mail: lygsunxia@163.com [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huaihai Institute of Technology, Lianyungang 222005 (China); Yan, Yubo [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Li, Jiansheng, E-mail: lijsh@mail.njust.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Han, Weiqing [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Wang, Lianjun, E-mail: wanglj@mail.njust.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were incorporated in the pores of SBA-15 rods. • Mechanism of the Cr(VI) removal by NZVIs/SBA-15 was proposed. • A low pH value was in favor of the Cr(VI) removal. • Humic acid (HA) had a negligible effect on the reactivity of NZVIs/SBA-15. • The stable reduction of NZVIs/SBA-15 was observed within six cycles. -- Abstract: Nanoscale zero-valent iron particles (NZVIs) were incorporated inside the channels of SBA-15 rods by a “two solvents” reduction technique and used to remove Cr(VI) from groundwater. The resulting NZVIs/SBA-15 composites before and after reaction were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results helped to propose the mechanism of Cr(VI) removal by NZVIs/SBA-15, where Cr(VI) in aqueous was firstly impregnated into the channels of the silica, then adsorbed on the surfaces of the incorporated NZVIs and reduced to Cr(III) directly in the inner pores of the silica. Corrosion products included Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, FeO(OH), Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Cr{sub 2}FeO{sub 4}. Batch experiments revealed that Cr(VI) removal decreased from 99.7% to 92.8% when the initial solution pH increased from 5.5 to 9.0, accompanied by the decrease of the k{sub obs} from 0.600 to 0.024 min{sup −1}. Humic acid (HA) had a little effect on the removal efficiency of Cr(VI) by NZVIs/SBA-15 but could decrease the reduction rate. The stable reduction of NZVIs/SBA-15 was observed within six cycles. NZVIs/SBA-15 composites offer a promising alternative material to remove heavy metals from groundwater.

  17. Fabrication of hybrid biosorbent nanoscale zero-valent iron-Sargassum swartzii biocomposite for the removal of crystal violet from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerold, M; Vasantharaj, K; Joseph, Daisy; Sivasubramanian, V

    2017-03-04

    A novel nanoscale zero-valent iron-Sargassum swartzii (nZVI-SS) biocomposite was synthesized and evaluated for its ability to adsorb crystal violet (CV) from aqueous solutions. Involvement of various functional groups of the biosorbent in preferential adsorption of cationic dye was observed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Morphological changes occurring on the biocomposite materials were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Significant increase (∼90%) in the biosorption of cationic dye was observed with gradual increase in pH of the medium from 3 to 12. The effect of biosorbent concentration, initial pH, temperature, agitation rate, adsorption time, and initial dye concentration was studied for the biosorption of CV using nZVI biocomposite. During the optimization study, maximum biosorption capacity was observed at pH of 8. At various initial CV concentrations (20-100 mg/L), attainment of batch sorption equilibrium was observed within 120 min of reaction time. The Langmuir isotherm model expressed high coefficient of determination (R 2 = 0.999). The maximum dye uptake of 200 mg/g was reported at pH 8. Kinetics and temperature profiles were evaluated and reported. Desorption study was carried out with 0.1 M HCl. Investigations proved that nZVI-SS is an excellent biosorbent for the sequestration of CV in aqueous media.

  18. Integrating classical and molecular approaches to evaluate the impact of nanosized zero-valent iron (nZVI) on soil organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccà, Maria Ludovica; Fajardo, Carmen; Costa, Gonzalo; Lobo, Carmen; Nande, Mar; Martin, Margarita

    2014-06-01

    Nanosized zero-valent iron (nZVI) is a new option for the remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater, but the effect of nZVI on soil biota is mostly unknown. In this work, nanotoxicological studies were performed in vitro and in two different standard soils to assess the effect of nZVI on autochthonous soil organisms by integrating classical and molecular analysis. Standardised ecotoxicity testing methods using Caenorhabditis elegans were applied in vitro and in soil experiments and changes in microbial biodiversity and biomarker gene expression were used to assess the responses of the microbial community to nZVI. The classical tests conducted in soil ruled out a toxic impact of nZVI on the soil nematode C. elegans in the test soils. The molecular analysis applied to soil microorganisms, however, revealed significant changes in the expression of the proposed biomarkers of exposure. These changes were related not only to the nZVI treatment but also to the soil characteristics, highlighting the importance of considering the soil matrix on a case by case basis. Furthermore, due to the temporal shift between transcriptional responses and the development of the corresponding phenotype, the molecular approach could anticipate adverse effects on environmental biota. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Redox and catalytic properties of biochar-coated zero-valent iron for the removal of nitro explosives and halogenated phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seok-Young; Seo, Yong-Deuk; Ryu, Kwang-Sun; Park, Da-Jeong; Lee, Seung-Hun

    2017-05-24

    A novel biochar-coated zero-valent iron [Fe(0)], which was synthesized with rice straw and Fe(0), was applied to remove nitro explosives (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) and halogenated phenols (2,4-dibromophenol and 2,4-difluorophenol) from contaminated waters. Due to the presence of biochar on the outside, the removal of nitro explosives and halogenated phenols was significantly enhanced via sorption. The sorbed contaminants were further transformed into reductive products, indicating that the inner Fe(0) played the role of a reductant in the biochar-coated Fe(0). Compared to direct reduction with Fe(0), the reductive transformation with biochar-coated Fe(0) was markedly enhanced, suggesting that the biochar in biochar-coated Fe(0) may act as an electron transfer mediator. Further experiments showed that the surface functional groups of biochar were involved in the catalytic enhancement of electron transfer. Our results suggested that biomass could be used to synthesize a novel sorbent and catalyst for treating redox-sensitive contaminants in natural and engineered systems.

  20. Organic-coated nanoparticulate zero valent iron for remediation of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and dissolved metals from tropical landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesekara, S S R M D H R; Basnayake, B F A; Vithanage, Meththika

    2014-01-01

    The use of nanoparticulate zero valent iron (NZVI) in the treatment of inorganic contaminants in landfill leachate and polluted plumes has been the subject of many studies, especially in temperate, developed countries. However, NZVI's potential for reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and treatment of metal ion mixtures has not been explored in detail. We investigated the efficiency of NZVI synthesized in the presence of starch, mercaptoacetic, mercaptosuccinic, or mercaptopropenoic acid for the reduction of COD, nutrients, and metal ions from landfill leachate in tropical Sri Lanka. Synthesized NZVI were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermal gravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller. Of the samples tested, Starch-NZVI (S-NZVI) and mercaptoacetic-NZVI (MA-NZVI) performed well for treatment both COD and metal mixture. The removal percentages for COD, nitrate-nitrogen, and phosphate from S-NZVI were 50, 88, and 99 %, respectively. Heavy metal removal was higher in S-NZVI (>95 %) than others. MA-NZVI, its oxidation products, and functional groups of its coating showed the maximum removal amounts for both Cu (56.27 mg g(-1)) and Zn (28.38 mg g(-1)). All mercapto-NZVI showed well-stabilized nature under FTIR and XRD investigations. Therefore, we suggest mercapto acids as better agents to enhance the air stability for NZVI since chemically bonded thiol and carbonyl groups actively participation for stabilization process.

  1. Zero-valent iron supported on nitrogen-doped carbon xerogel as catalysts for the oxidation of phenol by fenton-like system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messele, S A; Soares, O S G P; Órfão, J J M; Bengoa, C; Font, J

    2017-09-03

    Nitrogen-free and nitrogen-doped carbon xerogel materials, from urea and melamine precursors, were prepared at different pH and evaluated as adsorbents/catalysts in the removal of phenol. Then, zero-valent iron (ZVI) was supported on these carbon xerogel materials and its activity was again evaluated for phenol removal by adsorption and catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO). The prepared samples were characterized by N2 adsorption at -196°C, pH at the point of zero charge (pHPZC) and elemental analysis. The textural properties of the N-free and N-doped carbon xerogels are strongly influenced by pH of the preparation solution and precursor used. The presence of ZVI on all carbon xerogel supports improved the phenol removal efficiency. ZVI supported on urea- and melamine-doped carbon xerogels show a good performance, reaching above 87% phenol conversion after 60 min of CWPO. On the contrary, pure adsorption and CWPO using the same materials without the presence of ZVI gives low phenol removal efficiency. A correlation was found between the activity of ZVI catalysts in CWPO and the N-content of the supports.

  2. Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from textile dyeing sludge by ultrasound combined zero-valent iron/EDTA/Air system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Xiaoyuan; Ning, Xun-An; Zou, Haiyuan; Liang, Jieying; Sun, Jian; Lu, Xingwen; Sun, Jiekui

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a combined ultrasound (US) and zero-valent iron/EDTA/Air (ZEA) system to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from textile dyeing sludge. The removal efficiencies of 16 PAHs using ZEA, US/Air (air injected into the US process), and US/ZEA treatments were investigated, together with the effects of various operating parameters. The enhanced mechanisms of US and the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in removing PAHs in the US/ZEA system were explored. Results showed that only 42.5% and 32.9% of ∑16 PAHs were removed by ZEA and US/Air treatments respectively, whereas 70.1% were removed by US/ZEA treatment, (with favorable operating conditions of 2.0 mM EDTA, 15 g/L ZVI, and 1.08 w/cm3 ultrasonic density). The US/ZEA system could be used with a wide pH range. US led to synergistic improvement of PAHs removal in the ZEA system by enhancing sludge disintegration to release PAHs and promoting ZVI corrosion and oxygen activation. In the US/ZEA system, PAHs could be degraded by ROS (namely OH, O2-/HO2, and Fe(IV)) and adsorbed by ZVI, during which the ROS made the predominant contribution. This study provides important insights into the application of a US/ZEA system to remove PAHs from sludge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nanoscale zero-valent iron/persulfate enhanced upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for dye removal: Insight into microbial metabolism and microbial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fei; Zhong, Xiaohan; Xia, Dongsheng; Yin, Xianze; Li, Fan; Zhao, Dongye; Ji, Haodong; Liu, Wen

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the efficiency of nanoscale zero-valent iron combined with persulfate (NZVI/PS) for enhanced degradation of brilliant red X-3B in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, and examined the effects of NZVI/PS on anaerobic microbial communities during the treatment process. The addition of NZVI (0.5 g/L) greatly enhanced the decolourization rate of X-3B from 63.8% to 98.4%. The Biolog EcoPlateTM technique was utilized to examine microbial metabolism in the reactor, and the Illumina MiSeq high-throughput sequencing revealed 22 phyla and 88 genera of the bacteria. The largest genera (Lactococcus) decreased from 33.03% to 7.94%, while the Akkermansia genera increased from 1.69% to 20.23% according to the abundance in the presence of 0.2 g/L NZVI during the biological treatment process. Meanwhile, three strains were isolated from the sludge in the UASB reactors and identified by 16 S rRNA analysis. The distribution of three strains was consistent with the results from the Illumina MiSeq high throughput sequencing. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated that Fe(0) was transformed into Fe(II)/Fe(III) during the treatment process, which are beneficial for the microorganism growth, and thus promoting their metabolic processes and microbial community.

  4. Continuous preparation of nanoscale zero-valent iron using impinging stream-rotating packed bed reactor and their application in reduction of nitrobenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Weizhou; Qin, Yuejiao; Luo, Shuai; Feng, Zhirong; Liu, Youzhi

    2017-02-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) was continuously prepared by high-gravity reaction precipitation through a novel impinging stream-rotating packed bed (IS-RPB). Reactant solutions of FeSO4 and NaBH4 were conducted into the IS-RPB with flow rates of 60 L/h and rotating speed of 1000 r/min for the preparation of nZVI. As-prepared nZVI obtained by IS-RPB were quasi-spherical morphology and almost uniformly distributed with a particle size of 10-20 nm. The reactivity of nZVI was estimated by the degradation of 100 ml nitrobenzene (NB) with initial concentration of 250 mg/L. The optimum dosage of nZVI obtained by IS-RPB was 4.0 g/L as the NB could be completely removed within 10 min, which reduced 20% compared with nZVI obtained by stirred tank reactor (STR). The reduction of NB and production of aniline (AN) followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, and the pseudo-first-order rate constants were 0.0147 and 0.0034 s-1, respectively. Furthermore, the as-prepared nZVI using IS-RPB reactor in this work can be used within a relatively wide range pH of 1-9.

  5. Removal of 4-chlorophenol from aqueous solution by granular activated carbon/nanoscale zero valent iron based on Response Surface Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majlesi Monireh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The phenolic compounds are known as priority pollutants, even in low concentrations, as a result of their toxicity and non-biodegradability. For this reason, strict standards have been established for them. In addition, chlorophenols are placed in the 38th to 43th in highest priority order of toxic pollutants. As a consequence, contaminated water or wastewaters with phenolic compounds have to be treated before discharging into the receiving water. In this study, Response Surface Methodology (RSM has been used in order to optimize the effect of main operational variables responsible for the higher 4-chlorophenol removal by Activated Carbon-Supported Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron (AC/NZVI. A Box-Behnken factorial Design (BBD with three levels was applied to optimize the initial concentration, time, pH, and adsorbent dose. The characterization of adsorbents was conducted by using SEM-EDS and XRD analyses. Furthermore, the adsorption isotherm and kinetics of 4-chlorophenol on AC and AC/NZVI under various conditions were studied. The model anticipated 100% removal efficiency for AC/NZVI at the optimum concentration (5.48 mg 4-chlorophenol/L, pH (5.44, contact time (44.7 min and dose (0.65g/L. Analysis of the response surface quadratic model signified that the experiments are accurate and the model is highly significant. Moreover, the synthetic adsorbent is highly efficient in removing of 4-chlorophenol.

  6. Integration of organohalide-respiring bacteria and nanoscale zero-valent iron (Bio-nZVI-RD): A perfect marriage for the remediation of organohalide pollutants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanquan; Chen, Siyuan; Wang, Yu; Low, Adrian; Lu, Qihong; Qiu, Rongliang

    2016-12-01

    Due to massive production and improper handling, organohalide compounds are widely distributed in subsurface environments, primarily in anoxic groundwater, soil and sediment. Compared to traditional pump-and-treat or dredging-and-disposal treatments, in situ remediation employing abiotic or biotic reductive dehalogenation represents a sustainable and economic solution for the removal of organohalide pollutants. Both nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) and organohalide-respiring bacteria remove halogens through reductive dehalogenation and have been extensively studied and successfully applied for the in situ remediation of chloroethenes and other organohalide pollutants. nZVI and microbial reductive dehalogenation (Bio-RD) complement each other to boost reductive dehalogenation efficiency, suggesting that the integration of nZVI with Bio-RD (Bio-nZVI-RD) may constitute an even more promising strategy for the in situ remediation of organohalide pollutants. In this review, we first provide an overview of the current literature pertaining to nZVI- and organohalide-respiring bacteria-mediated reductive dehalogenation of organohalide pollutants and compare the pros and cons of individual treatment methods. We then highlight recent studies investigating the implementation of Bio-nZVI-RD to achieve rapid and complete dehalogenation and discuss the halogen removal mechanism of Bio-nZVI-RD and its prospects for future remediation applications. In summary, the use of Bio-nZVI-RD facilitates opportunities for the effective in situ remediation of a wide range of organohalide pollutants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Reduced Graphene Oxide-Supported Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron (nZVI/rGO) Composites Used for Pb(II) Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Mingyi; Li, Tongjun; Hu, Jiwei; Cao, Rensheng; Wu, Qing; Wei, Xionghui; Li, Lingyun; Shi, Xuedan; Ruan, Wenqian

    2016-08-12

    Reduced graphene oxide-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI/rGO) composites were prepared by chemical deposition method and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, N₂-sorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Operating parameters for the removal process of Pb(II) ions, such as temperature (20-40 °C), pH (3-5), initial concentration (400-600 mg/L) and contact time (20-60 min), were optimized using a quadratic model. The coefficient of determination (R² > 0.99) obtained for the mathematical model indicates a high correlation between the experimental and predicted values. The optimal temperature, pH, initial concentration and contact time for Pb(II) ions removal in the present experiment were 21.30 °C, 5.00, 400.00 mg/L and 60.00 min, respectively. In addition, the Pb(II) removal by nZVI/rGO composites was quantitatively evaluated by using adsorption isotherms, such as Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, of which Langmuir isotherm gave a better correlation, and the calculated maximum adsorption capacity was 910 mg/g. The removal process of Pb(II) ions could be completed within 50 min, which was well described by the pseudo-second order kinetic model. Therefore, the nZVI/rGO composites are suitable as efficient materials for the advanced treatment of Pb(II)-containing wastewater.

  8. Treatment of simulated wastewater containing Reactive Red 195 by zero-valent iron/activated carbon combined with microwave discharge electrodeless lamp/sodium hypochlorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jie; Xu, Zhen; Li, Qing-Shan; Chen, Song; An, Shu-Qing; Zeng, Qing-Fu; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2010-01-01

    A comparative study of treatment of simulated wastewater containing Reactive Red 195 using zero-valent iron/activated carbon (ZVI/AC), microwave discharge electrodeless lamp/sodium hypochlorite (MDEL/NaClO) and the combination of ZVI/AC-MDEL/NaClO was conducted. The preliminary results showed the two steps method of ZVI/AC-MDEL/NaClO had much higher degradation efficiency than both single steps. The final color removal percentage was nearly up to 100% and the chemical oxygen demand reduction percentage was up to approximately 82%. The effects of operational parameters, including initial pH value of simulated wastewater, ZVI/AC ratio and particle size of ZVI were also investigated. In addition, from the discussion of synergistic effect between ZVI/AC and MEDL/NaClO, we found that in the ZVI/AC-MEDL/NaClO process, ZVI/AC could break the azo bond firstly and then MEDL/NaClO degraded the aromatic amine products effectively. Reversing the order would reduce the degradation efficiency.

  9. Investigation of heavy metal (Cu, Pb, Cd, and Cr) stabilization in river sediment by nano-zero-valent iron/activated carbon composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-fang; Zhang, Jinghui; Zhang, Xiaomao; Wang, Weiya; Li, Yuxiang

    2016-01-01

    Nano-zero-valent iron/activated carbon (nZVI/AC) composite was evaluated for its effectiveness in the stabilization of Cu, Pb, Cd, and Cr in dredged river sediment. Synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) were adopted to compare the effects of nZVI/AC dosage, particle size, time duration, and temperature on heavy metal leachability. The results show that leachability dropped considerably with the addition of nZVI/AC and powdered particles in the size of 0.075-0.18 mm was more effective in stabilization than granular ones. Stabilization effect was stable in long-term and robust against changes in temperature. Tessier sequential extraction revealed that heavy metals were associated with solid particle, inorganic or organic matters in sediment. The addition of nZVI/AC was able to convert relatively weakly bound heavy metals into more strongly bound species and thus reduce the bioavailability and toxicity. Also, the standard potential of heavy metals may decide the mechanism of stabilization process.

  10. Bio-beads with immobilized anaerobic bacteria, zero-valent iron, and active carbon for the removal of trichloroethane from groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ya-Zhen; Yang, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Li; Pan, Yue-Qing; Li, Hui; Zhou, Dong; Liu, Yong-Di; Wang, Ping; Gu, Ji-Dong; Lu, Qiang; Qiu, Yue-Feng; Lin, Kuang-Fei

    2014-10-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons are the most common organic pollutants in groundwater systems worldwide. In this study, we developed bio-beads with immobilized anaerobic bacteria, zero-valent iron (ZVI), and activated carbon (AC) powder and evaluated their efficacy in removing 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) from groundwater. Bio-beads were produced by polyvinyl alcohol, alginate, and AC powder. We found that the concentration of AC powder used significantly affected the mechanical properties of immobilized bio-beads and that 1.0 % (w/v) was the optimal concentration. The bio-beads effectively degraded TCA (160 mg L(-1)) in the anaerobic medium and could be reused up to six times. The TCA degradation rate of bio-beads was 1.5 and 2.3 times greater, respectively, than ZVI + AC treatment or microbes + AC treatment. Measuring FeS produced by microbial reactions indicated that TCA removal occurred via FeS-catalyzed dechlorination. Analysis of clonal libraries derived from bio-beads demonstrated that the dominant species in the community were Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, which may contribute to the long-term stability of ZVI reactivity during TCA dechlorination. This study shows that the combined use of immobilized anaerobic bacteria, ZVI, and AC in bio-beads is effective and practical for TCA dechlorination and suggests they may be applicable towards developing a groundwater treatment system for the removal of TCA.

  11. Development of new remediation technologies for contaminated soils based on the application of zero-valent iron nanoparticles and bioremediation with compost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Galdames

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop new techniques for the remediation of contaminated soils based on the application of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI and bioremediation with compost from organic wastes and a mixed technique of both. An assessment of the effectiveness of remediation in two soils contaminated with hydrocarbons and heavy metals was carried out, with the aim of looking for positive synergies by combining the two techniques, and demonstrating their viability on an industrial scale. The application of nZVI for in situ immobilization of As and Cr in two different soils (Soil I from a contaminated industrial site and Soil II, contaminated artificially showed a decrease in the concentration of As in Soil I and Soil II, as well as a decrease in Cr concentration for Soil I and Soil II in the leachate of both soils. The addition of compost and nanoparticles under uncontrolled environmental conditions in biopiles was able to produce a decrease in the concentration of aliphatic hydrocarbons of up to 60% in the two soils. Especially, degradation and transformation of longer chains occurred. A significant reduction of ecotoxicity was observed throughout the process in the biopile of soil II, not reaching the LC50 even with 100% of the sample after the treatment, in both earthworm and seeds growth tests.

  12. [Effects of particle size of zero-valent iron on the reactivity of activating persulfate and kinetics for the degradation of acid orange 7].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan-xuan; Wan, Jin-quan; Ma, Yong-wen; Huang, Ming-zhiz; Wang, Yan; Chen Yang, Mei

    2014-09-01

    This research described the heterogeneous reactions of persulfate with different particle sizes of zero-valent iron (including 1 mm-ZVI,150 μm-ZVI,50 nm-ZVI) for degradation of acid orange 7(AO7) , and studied the kinetics and intermediate products of AO7 under these systems. The results demonstrated that these three types of ZVI were efficient in promoting the degradation of AO7, the degradation efficiencies of AO7 were 43% , 97% , and 100% within 90 min respectively, in the 1 mm-ZVI,150 μm-ZVI and 50 nm- ZVI systems, respectively. With the results of kinetic fitting models, the pseudo first-order kinetics exhibited better fitting results in the 1 mm-ZVI,150 μm-ZVI systems, while the second-order kinetics exhibited better fitting results in the 50 nm-ZVI system. And the different ZVI types exhibited difference on the AO7 degradation rate constant, which ranged as 50 nm-ZVI > 150 μm-ZVI > 1 mm-ZVI. The iron corrosion products coating on the ZVI after reaction were composed of α-Fe2 O3 and some Fe3O4 in the 1 mm-ZVI system while that consisted of Fe3O4 and α-Fe2O3, FeOOH respectively, in thel50 μm-ZVI and 50 nm-ZVI systems,. Which were identified by scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and Raman spectroscopy. Some intermediate products, including 2-naphthalenol, 2-methylphenol, 4-ethyl- 3-methyl-phenol, isoindole- 1,3-dione and phthalic acid et al. were identified by GC/MS measurement. Both UV-vis absorbance spectra and GC/MS determination indicated that there was difference in degradation paths of AO7 between the three systems.

  13. Well-Dispersed Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron Supported in Macroporous Silica Foams: Synthesis, Characterization, and Performance in Cr(VI Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoxia Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Well-dispersed nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI supported inside the pores of macroporous silica foams (MOSF composites (Mx-NZVI has been prepared as the Cr(VI adsorbent by simply impregnating the MOSF matrix with ferric chloride, followed by the chemical reduction with NaHB4 in aqueous solution at ambient atmosphere. Through the support of MOSF, the reactivity and stability of NZVI are greatly improved. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM results show that NZVI particles are spatially well-dispersed with a typical core-shell structure and supported inside MOSF matrix. The N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms demonstrate that the Mx-NZVI composites can maintain the macroporous structure of MOSF and exhibit a considerable high surface area (503 m2·g−1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD measurements confirm the core-shell structure of iron nanoparticles composed of a metallic Fe0 core and an Fe(II/Fe(III species shell. Batch experiments reveal that the removal efficiency of Cr(VI can reach 100% when the solution contains 15.0 mg·L−1 of Cr(VI at room temperature. In addition, the solution pH and the composites dosage can affect the removal efficiency of Cr(VI. The Langmuir isotherm is applicable to describe the removal process. The kinetic studies demonstrate that the removal of Cr(VI is consistent with pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  14. Nanosized zero-valent iron as Fenton-like reagent for ultrasonic-assisted leaching of zinc from blast furnace sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhailov, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.mikhailov@misis.ru [National University of Science and Technology “MISiS”, 4 Leninskiy prospekt, Moscow, 119049 (Russian Federation); Komarov, Sergey [Tohoku University, 6-6-02 Aramaki Aza Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8576 (Japan); Levina, Vera; Gusev, Alexander; Issi, Jean-Paul; Kuznetsov, Denis [National University of Science and Technology “MISiS”, 4 Leninskiy prospekt, Moscow, 119049 (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • nZVI is used as Fenton-like reagent for activation of Zn leaching from the BFS. • nZVI has positive effect on kinetics of Zn leaching though with some loss of efficiency. • A complex ultrasonic-assisted method for BFS recycling is proposed. - Abstract: Ultrasonic-assisted sulphuric acid leaching combined with a Fenton-like process, utilizing nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI), was investigated to enhance the leaching of zinc from the blast furnace sludge (BFS). The leaching of iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) from the sludge was investigated using Milli-Q water/BFS ratio of 10 and varying the concentration of hydrogen peroxide, sulphuric acid, the temperature, the input energy for ultrasound irradiation, and the presence or absence of nZVI as a Fenton reagent. The results showed that with 1 g/l addition of nZVI and 0.05 M of hydrogen peroxide, the kinetic rate of Zn leaching increased with a maximum dissolution degree of 80.2%, after 5 min treatment. In the absence of nZVI, the maximum dissolution degree of Zn was 99.2%, after 15 min treatment with 0.1 M of hydrogen peroxide. The rate of Zn leaching at several concentrations of hydrogen peroxide is accelerated in the presence of nZVI although a reduction in efficiency was observed. The loss of Fe was no more than 3%. On the basis of these results, the possible route for BFS recycling has been proposed (BFS slurry mixed with sulphuric acid and hydrogen peroxide is recirculated under ultrasonic irradiation then separated).

  15. Photo degradation of methyl orange an azo dye by advanced Fenton process using zero valent metallic iron: influence of various reaction parameters and its degradation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomathi Devi, L; Girish Kumar, S; Mohan Reddy, K; Munikrishnappa, C

    2009-05-30

    Advanced Fenton process (AFP) using zero valent metallic iron (ZVMI) is studied as a potential technique to degrade the azo dye in the aqueous medium. The influence of various reaction parameters like effect of iron dosage, concentration of H(2)O(2)/ammonium per sulfate (APS), initial dye concentration, effect of pH and the influence of radical scavenger are studied and optimum conditions are reported. The degradation rate decreased at higher iron dosages and also at higher oxidant concentrations due to the surface precipitation which deactivates the iron surface. The rate constant for the processes Fe(0)/UV and Fe(0)/APS/UV is twice compared to their respective Fe(0)/dark and Fe(0)/APS/dark processes. The rate constant for Fe(0)/H(2)O(2)/UV process is four times higher than Fe(0)/H(2)O(2)/dark process. The increase in the efficiency of Fe(0)/UV process is attributed to the cleavage of stable iron complexes which produces Fe(2+) ions that participates in cyclic Fenton mechanism for the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The increase in the efficiency of Fe(0)/APS/UV or H(2)O(2) compared to dark process is due to continuous generation of hydroxyl radicals and also due to the frequent photo reduction of Fe(3+) ions to Fe(2+) ions. Though H(2)O(2) is a better oxidant than APS in all respects, but it is more susceptible to deactivation by hydroxyl radical scavengers. The decrease in the rate constant in the presence of hydroxyl radical scavenger is more for H(2)O(2) than APS. Iron powder retains its recycling efficiency better in the presence of H(2)O(2) than APS. The decrease in the degradation rate in the presence of APS as an oxidant is due to the fact that generation of free radicals on iron surface is slower compared to H(2)O(2). Also, the excess acidity provided by APS retards the degradation rate as excess H(+) ions acts as hydroxyl radical scavenger. The degradation of Methyl Orange (MO) using Fe(0) is an acid driven process shows higher efficiency at pH 3. The

  16. Advanced landfill leachate treatment using iron-carbon microelectrolysis- Fenton process: Process optimization and column experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liqun, E-mail: 691127317@qq.com [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Yang, Qi, E-mail: yangqi@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Wang, Dongbo [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Li, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmli121x@hotmail.com [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zeng, Guangming; Li, Zhijun; Deng, Yongchao; Liu, Jun; Yi, Kaixin [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Fe-C microelectrolysis-Fenton process is proposed to pretreat landfill leachate. • Operating variables are optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). • 3D-EEMs and MW distribution explain the mechanism of enhanced biodegradability. • Fixed-bed column experiments are performed at different flow rates. - Abstract: A novel hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor was proposed for the pretreatment of mature landfill leachate. This reactor, combining microelectrolysis with Fenton process, revealed high treatment efficiency. The operating variables, including Fe-C dosage, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and initial pH, were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM), regarding the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency and biochemical oxygen demand: chemical oxygen demand (BOD{sub 5}/COD) as the responses. The highest COD removal (74.59%) and BOD{sub 5}/COD (0.50) was obtained at optimal conditions of Fe-C dosage 55.72 g/L, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration 12.32 mL/L and initial pH 3.12. Three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix (3D-EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular weight (MW) distribution demonstrated that high molecular weight fractions such as refractory fulvic-like substances in leachate were effectively destroyed during the combined processes, which should be attributed to the combination oxidative effect of microelectrolysis and Fenton. The fixed-bed column experiments were performed and the breakthrough curves at different flow rates were evaluated to determine the practical applicability of the combined process. All these results show that the hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor is a promising and efficient technology for the treatment of mature landfill leachate.

  17. Degradation of bromothymol blue by 'greener' nano-scale zero-valent iron synthesized using tea polyphenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    A green single-step synthesis of iron nanoparticles using tea (Camellia sinensis) polyphenols is described that uses no added surfactants/polymers as a capping or reducing agents. The expeditious reaction between polyphenols and ferric nitrate occurs within few minutes at room te...

  18. Mg(OH)2 Supported Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron Enhancing the Removal of Pb(II) from Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minghui; Wang, Yonghao; Chen, Luntai; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Zhang

    2015-04-22

    In this article, a novel composite (Mg(OH)2 supported nanoscale zerovalent iron (denoted as nZVI@Mg(OH)2) was prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy method. The morphology analysis revealed that Mg(OH)2 appeared as self-supported flower-like spheres, and nano Fe0 particles were uniformly immobilized on the surface of their "flower petals", thus aggregation of Fe0 particles was minimized. Then the Pb(II) removal performance was tested by batch experiments. The composite presented exceptional removal capacity (1986.6 mg/g) compared with Mg(OH)2 and nanoscale zerovalent iron due to the synergistic effect. Mechanisms were also explored by a comparative study of the phase, morphology, and surface valence state of composite before and after reaction, indicating that at least three paths are involved in the synergistic removal process: (1) Pb(II) adsorption by Mg(OH)2 (companied with ion exchange reaction); (2) Pb(II) reduction to Pb0 by nanoscale zerovalent iron; and (3) Pb(II) precipitation as Pb(OH)2. The hydroxies provided by Mg(OH)2 can dramatically promote the role of nanoscale zerovalent iron as reducer, thus greatly enhancing the whole Pb(II) sequestration process. The excellent performance shown in our research potentially provides an alternative technique for Pb(II) pollution treatment.

  19. Effects of initial iron corrosion rate on long-term performance of iron permeable reactive barriers: column experiments and numerical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    suk O, Jin; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Gillham, Robert W; Gui, Lai

    2009-01-26

    Column experiments and numerical simulation were conducted to test the hypothesis that iron material having a high corrosion rate is not beneficial for the long-term performance of iron permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) because of faster passivation of iron and greater porosity loss close to the influent face of the PRBs. Four iron materials (Connelly, Gotthart-Maier, Peerless, and ISPAT) were used for the column experiments, and the changes in reactivity toward cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) degradation in the presence of dissolved CaCO3 were evaluated. The experimental results showed that the difference in distribution of the accumulated precipitates, resulting from differences in iron corrosion rate, caused a difference in the migration rate of the cis-DCE profiles and a significant difference in the pattern of passivation, indicating a faster passivation in the region close to the influent end for the material having a higher corrosion rate. For the numerical simulation, the accumulation of secondary minerals and reactivity loss of iron were coupled using an empirically-derived relationship that was incorporated into a multi-component reactive transport model. The simulation results provided a reasonable representation of the evolution of iron reactivity toward cis-DCE treatment and the changes in geochemical conditions for each material, consistent with the observed data. The simulations for long-term performance were also conducted to further test the hypothesis and predict the differences in performance over a period of 40 years under typical groundwater conditions. The predictions showed that the cases of higher iron corrosion rates had earlier cis-DCE breakthrough and more reduction in porosity starting from near the influent face, due to more accumulation of carbonate minerals in that region. Therefore, both the experimental and simulation results appear to support the hypothesis and suggest that reactivity changes of iron materials resulting from

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Reduced Graphene Oxide-Supported Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron (nZVI/rGO Composites Used for Pb(II Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyi Fan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Reduced graphene oxide-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI/rGO composites were prepared by chemical deposition method and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman spectroscopy, N2-sorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. Operating parameters for the removal process of Pb(II ions, such as temperature (20–40 °C, pH (3–5, initial concentration (400–600 mg/L and contact time (20–60 min, were optimized using a quadratic model. The coefficient of determination (R2 > 0.99 obtained for the mathematical model indicates a high correlation between the experimental and predicted values. The optimal temperature, pH, initial concentration and contact time for Pb(II ions removal in the present experiment were 21.30 °C, 5.00, 400.00 mg/L and 60.00 min, respectively. In addition, the Pb(II removal by nZVI/rGO composites was quantitatively evaluated by using adsorption isotherms, such as Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, of which Langmuir isotherm gave a better correlation, and the calculated maximum adsorption capacity was 910 mg/g. The removal process of Pb(II ions could be completed within 50 min, which was well described by the pseudo-second order kinetic model. Therefore, the nZVI/rGO composites are suitable as efficient materials for the advanced treatment of Pb(II-containing wastewater.

  1. Facile green synthesis of functional nanoscale zero-valent iron and studies of its activity toward ultrasound-enhanced decolorization of cationic dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangyu; Wang, Anqi; Ma, Jun; Fu, Minglai

    2017-01-01

    For the first time, an integrated green technology by coupling functional nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) with ultrasound (US) was innovatively developed for the enhanced decolorization of malachite green (MG) and methylene blue (MB). The functional NZVI (TP-Fe) was successfully fabricated via a facile, one-step and environmentally-benign approach by directly introducing high pure tea polyphenol (TP), where TP contenting abundant epicatechin was employed as reductant, dispersant and capping agent. Note that neither additional extraction procedure nor protection gas was needed during the entire synthesis process. Affecting factors (including US frequency, initial pH, dye concentration, and reaction temperature) were investigated. Results show that TP-Fe exhibited enhanced activity, antioxidizability and stability over the reaction course, which could be attributed to the functionalization of TP on NZVI and the invigorating effect of US (i.e., improving the mass transfer rate, breaking up the aggregates of TP-Fe nanoparticles, and maintaining the TP-Fe surface activity). The kinetics for MG and MB decolorization by the TP-Fe/US system could be well described by a two-parameter pseudo-first-order decay model, and the activation energies of MG and MB decolorization in this new system were determined to be 21 kJ mol-1 and 24 kJ mol-1, respectively. In addition, according to the identified reaction products, a possible mechanism associated with MG and MB decolorization with the TP-Fe/US system was proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of calcium ions on the colloidal stability of surface-modified nano zero-valent iron in the absence or presence of humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Haoran; Lo, Irene M C

    2013-05-01

    To decrease aggregation and enhance the mobility of nano zero-valent iron (NZVI) used for in-situ groundwater remediation, the surface of such NZVI must be modified using organic stabilizers, which can provide electrostatic repulsion, and steric or electrosteric stabilization. However, the stability of the nanoparticles can also be affected by groundwater components such as cations and humic acid (HA). In this study, the effect of Ca(2+) on the colloidal stability of NZVI coated with three types of stabilizers (i.e., polyacrylic acid (PAA), Tween-20 and starch) was evaluated in the absence or presence of HA. Differing stability behavior was observed for different surface-modified NZVIs. The presence of Ca(2+) exerted a slight influence on the settling of NZVI modified with PAA or Tween-20, in the absence or presence of HA. However, the presence of Ca(2+) caused significant aggregation and sedimentation for starch-modified NZVI in the absence of HA, and induced an even higher degree of aggregation and sedimentation in the presence of HA. It is presumed that, in the absence of HA, starch-modified NZVI particles undergo attachment with each other via Ca(2+) complexation with the coated starch molecules on the surface of the particles, thus enhancing the aggregation and the following sedimentation of starch-modified NZVI. However, in the presence of HA, spectroscopic analysis of the starch-modified NZVI aggregates indicated that the bridging interaction of HA with Ca(2+) was the predominant mechanism for the enhanced aggregation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhanced As(III) oxidation and removal by combined use of zero valent iron and hydrogen peroxide in aerated waters at neutral pH values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsoyiannis, Ioannis A; Voegelin, Andreas; Zouboulis, Anastasios I; Hug, Stephan J

    2015-10-30

    The oxidation and removal of As(III) by commercially available micro-scale zero-valent iron (mZVI) was studied in aerated synthetic groundwater with initially 6.7 μM As(III) at neutral pH values. Batch experiments were performed to investigate the influence of ZVI and H2O2 concentrations on As(III) oxidation and removal. Oxidation and removal kinetics was significantly increased by increasing ZVI concentration or by adding H2O2 in micromolar concentrations slightly higher than that of initial As(III). Observed half-lifes for arsenic removal without added H2O2 were 81-17 min at ZVI concentrations of 0.15-2.5 g/L, respectively. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) confirmed that almost all As(III) was converted to As(V) after 2 h of reaction in the pH range 5-9. Addition of 9.6 μM H2O2 to 0.15 g/L ZVI suspensions diminished half-lifes for arsenic removal from 81 to 32 min and for As(III) oxidation from 77 to 8 min, i.e., by approximately a factor of 10. The increased rate of As(III) oxidation is attributable to enhanced formation of oxidants by the Fenton reaction with higher initial concentrations of H2O2. In practice, results of this study suggest that addition of small amounts (oxidation and removal with ZVI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Exploring the Role of Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron and Bacteria on the Degradation of a Multi-component Chlorinated Solvent at the Field Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocur, C. M.; Lomheim, L.; Boparai, H.; Chowdhury, A. I.; Weber, K.; Austrins, L. M.; Sleep, B. E.; Edwards, E.; O'Carroll, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) has advanced as a technology for the remediation of priority source zone contaminants in response to early laboratory studies that showed rapid rates of compound degradation. The challenges associated with the delivery of nZVI particles (eg. rapid aggregation and settling) were partially resolved with the addition of a polyelectrolyte polymers, like Carboxymethyl cellulose, that significantly improves the colloidal stability of particles allowing for more controlled injection and transport in the subsurface. Following nZVI application and abiotic contaminant degradation nZVI oxidizes and yields reducing conditions. These reducing conditions are ideal for many dechlorinating bacteria. Given this, application of nZVI for abiotic contaminant degradation followed by bioremediation has become an area of active research interest. In this study nZVI was injected into a contaminated sandy subsurface area. Concentrations of a range of chlorinated compounds, including chlorinated ethenes, ethanes, and methanes were monitored in detail following nano-particle injection in order to access short term abiotic degradation. Monitoring continued over a 2 year period to evaluate the long term effects of nZVI injection on the bacterial communities and the biotic degradation of targeted chlorinated compounds. The study focusses on the degradation and evolution of intermediate compounds from reaction with targeted contaminant compounds along the nZVI flow path. Bacterial populations were quantified before injection to confirm that beneficial chloride reducing bacteria were present on site. The microbiological response to the injection of nZVI was studied and the performance of bacteria along the nZVI flow path and outside the nZVI affected area will be compared.

  5. Single and combined removal of Cr(VI) and Cd(II) by nanoscale zero-valent iron in the absence and presence of EDDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Haoran; Zeng, Yalan; Xie, Yankai; He, Qi; Zhao, Feng; Wang, Yang; Zeng, Guangming

    2017-09-01

    This study examined the feasibility of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) for the single and combined removal of Cr(VI) and Cd(II) with or without ethylene diamine disuccinic acid (EDDS). The effects of pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) on the removal process were investigated. Results show that the single removal of either Cr(VI) or Cd(II) by nZVI was pH dependent, where the higher Cr(VI) removal was achieved under acidic conditions, whereas the higher Cd(II) removal was achieved under alkaline conditions. The presence of DO enhanced Cd(II) removal but inhibited Cr(VI) removal under alkaline conditions. In the co-existence of Cr(VI) and Cd(II), it was found that Cd(II) exerted insignificant effect on Cr(VI) removal, while the presence of Cr(VI) remarkably enhanced the Cd(II) removal. The addition of EDDS exhibited different influences on Cr(VI) and Cd(II) removal, which were associated with pH and DO. The EDDS enhanced Cr(VI) removal at pH 5.6-9.0 in the absence of DO, but decreased Cr(VI) removal at pH 9.0 in the presence of DO. For the removal of Cd(II) at pH 5.6-7.0, either facilitation or inhibition effect of EDDS was observed, depending on EDDS concentration and the co-existence of Cr(VI). However, Cd(II) removal was always significantly inhibited by EDDS at pH 9.0.

  6. SBA-15-incorporated nanoscale zero-valent iron particles for chromium(VI) removal from groundwater: mechanism, effect of pH, humic acid and sustained reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xia; Yan, Yubo; Li, Jiansheng; Han, Weiqing; Wang, Lianjun

    2014-02-15

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron particles (NZVIs) were incorporated inside the channels of SBA-15 rods by a "two solvents" reduction technique and used to remove Cr(VI) from groundwater. The resulting NZVIs/SBA-15 composites before and after reaction were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results helped to propose the mechanism of Cr(VI) removal by NZVIs/SBA-15, where Cr(VI) in aqueous was firstly impregnated into the channels of the silica, then adsorbed on the surfaces of the incorporated NZVIs and reduced to Cr(III) directly in the inner pores of the silica. Corrosion products included Fe2O3, FeO(OH), Fe3O4 and Cr2FeO4. Batch experiments revealed that Cr(VI) removal decreased from 99.7% to 92.8% when the initial solution pH increased from 5.5 to 9.0, accompanied by the decrease of the kobs from 0.600 to 0.024 min(-1). Humic acid (HA) had a little effect on the removal efficiency of Cr(VI) by NZVIs/SBA-15 but could decrease the reduction rate. The stable reduction of NZVIs/SBA-15 was observed within six cycles. NZVIs/SBA-15 composites offer a promising alternative material to remove heavy metals from groundwater. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In situ remediation-released zero-valent iron nanoparticles impair soil ecosystems health: A C. elegans biomarker-based risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ying-Fei; Cheng, Yi-Hsien; Liao, Chung-Min, E-mail: cmliao@ntu.edu.tw

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Fe{sup 0} NPs induced infertility risk in C. elegans. • A C.elegans-based probabilistic risk assessment model is developed. • In situ remediation-released Fe{sup 0} NPs impair soil ecosystems health. - Abstract: There is considerable concern over the potential ecotoxicity to soil ecosystems posed by zero-valent iron nanoparticles (Fe{sup 0} NPs) released from in situ environmental remediation. However, a lack of quantitative risk assessment has hampered the development of appropriate testing methods used in environmental applications. Here we present a novel, empirical approach to assess Fe{sup 0} NPs-associated soil ecosystems health risk using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism. A Hill-based dose-response model describing the concentration–fertility inhibition relationships was constructed. A Weibull model was used to estimate thresholds as a guideline to protect C. elegans from infertility when exposed to waterborne or foodborne Fe{sup 0} NPs. Finally, the risk metrics, exceedance risk (ER) and risk quotient (RQ) of Fe{sup 0} NPs in various depths and distances from remediation sites can then be predicted. We showed that under 50% risk probability (ER = 0.5), upper soil layer had the highest infertility risk (95% confidence interval: 13.18–57.40%). The margins of safety and acceptable criteria for soil ecosystems health for using Fe{sup 0} NPs in field scale applications were also recommended. Results showed that RQs are larger than 1 in all soil layers when setting a stricter threshold of ∼1.02 mg L{sup −1} of Fe{sup 0} NPs. This C. elegans biomarker-based risk model affords new insights into the links between widespread use of Fe{sup 0} NPs and environmental risk assessment and offers potential environmental implications of metal-based NPs for in situ remediation.

  8. The removal of lead and nickel from the composted municipal waste and sewage sludge using nanoscale zero-valent iron fixed on quartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemzadeh, Parisa; Bostani, Amir

    2017-11-01

    Reducing the concentration of heavy metals including lead (Pb) and nickel (Ni) in organic contaminants such as municipal wastes and sewage sludge is of health and environmental importance. Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles can effectively remove heavy metals from contaminated aqueous and solid media. It was accordingly hypothesized that it is possible to recycle and detoxify organic waste materials containing heavy metals using NZVI and NZVI fixed on quartz (QNZVI). The objective was to investigate the effects of NZVI type, concentration (2% and 5%) and contact time on the removal of Pb and Ni from raw compost, compost fermented with beet molasses, and leachate using a factorial design. The results indicated the significant reduction of DTPA- Pb and DTPA-Ni concentration, in all the organic compounds treated with NZVI and QNZVI (P= 0.01), compared with control. Increased concentration of NZVI in all treatments, increased the rate of DTPA-Pb and DTPA-Ni (P= 0.01) at 113.1% and 180% for Pb (NZVI at 2% and 5%), and at 16.3% and 23.3% for Ni, irrespective of the NZVI type. The reducing trend of extractable Pb and Ni in all the organic compounds was the same, quick reduction at the beginning, followed by a negligible rate. The highest reduction rates for Pb (at one hour) and Ni (at 672h) were equal to 72.93% and 23.27%, respectively. NZVI at 2% was more efficient than NZVI at 5%. There were not any significant differences between NZVI and QNZVI on the removal of Pb and Ni from the organic contaminants. It is possible to immobilize and reduce the concentration of heavy metals such as Pb and Ni in organic contaminants using NZVI, which is affected by NZVI properties, concentration, and contact time, as well as by organic contaminant type. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Carbothermal synthesis of ordered mesoporous carbon-supported nano zero-valent iron with enhanced stability and activity for hexavalent chromium reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying; Hu, Yuchen; Jiang, Baojiang; Zou, Jinlong; Tian, Guohui; Fu, Honggang

    2016-05-15

    Composites of nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) and ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) are prepared by using simultaneous carbothermal reduction methods. The reactivity and stability of nZVI are expected to be enhanced by embedding it in the ordered pore channels. The structure characteristics of nZVI/OMC and the removal pathway for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) by nZVI/OMC are investigated. Results show that nZVI/OMC with a surface area of 715.16 m(2) g(-1) is obtained at 900 °C. nZVI with particle sizes of 20-30 nm is uniformly embedded in the OMC skeleton. The stability of nZVI is enhanced by surrounding it with a broad carbon layer and a little γ-Fe is derived from the passivation of α-Fe. Detection of ferric state (Fe 2p3/2, around 711.2eV) species confirms that part of the nZVI on the outer surface is inevitably oxidized by O2, even when unused. The removal efficiency of Cr(VI) (50 mg L(-1)) by nZVI/OMC is near 99% within 10 min through reduction (dominant mechanism) and adsorption. nZVI/OMC has the advantage in removal efficiency and reusability in comparison to nZVI/C, OMC and nZVI. This study suggests that nZVI/OMC has the potential for remediation of heavy metal pollution in water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of degradation products of ionic liquids in an ultrasound assisted zero-valent iron activated carbon micro-electrolysis system and their degradation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haimei; Lv, Ping; Shen, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jianji; Fan, Jing

    2013-06-15

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have potential applications in many areas of chemical industry because of their unique properties. However, it has been shown that the ILs commonly used to date are toxic and not biodegradable in nature, thus development of efficient chemical methods for the degradation of ILs is imperative. In this work, degradation of imidazolium, piperidinium, pyrrolidinium and morpholinium based ILs in an ultrasound and zero-valent iron activated carbon (ZVI/AC) micro-electrolysis system was investigated, and some intermediates generated during the degradation were identified. It was found that more than 90% of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([Cnmim]Br, n = 2, 4, 6, 8, 10) could be degraded within 110 min, and three intermediates 1-alkyl-3-methyl-2,4,5-trioxoimidazolidine, 1-alkyl-3-methylurea and N-alkylformamide were detected. On the other hand, 1-butyl-1-methylpiperidinium bromide ([C4mpip]Br), 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bromide ([C4mpyr]Br) and N-butyl-N-methylmorpholinium bromide ([C4mmor]Br) were also effectively degraded through the sequential oxidization into hydroxyl, carbonyl and carboxyl groups in different positions of the butyl side chain, and then the N-butyl side chain was broken to form the final products of N-methylpiperidinium, N-methylpyrrolidinium and N-methylmorpholinium, respectively. Based on these intermediate products, degradation pathways of these ILs were suggested. These findings may provide fundamental information on the assessment of the factors related to the environmental fate and environmental behavior of these commonly used ILs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of co-application of nano-zero valent iron and biochar on the total and freely dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons removal and toxicity of contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleszczuk, Patryk; Kołtowski, Michał

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate co-application of biochar and nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) in order to increase the degradation of PAHs and reduce the toxicity of soils historically contaminated with these compounds. To performed the experiment biochar, biochar with nZVI (2 g kg(-1) or 10 g kg(-1) soil), or nZVI alone (2 g kg(-1) or 10 g kg(-1) soil) were added to the PAHs contaminated soils. The soils alone and soils with amendments were aged by mixing for 7 and 30 days. After that the chemical analysis were carried out and total (Ctot) and Cfree PAH content in the samples were determined. Moreover, the toxicity of aqueous extracts were investigated using the Microtox(®) (Vibrio fischeri) method. Results showed that any of used nZVI dose did not reduce the content of Ctot or Cfree PAHs in contaminated soils, but biochar applied both alone and together with the nZVI significantly reduced Ctot and Cfree PAHs. However, no significant differences in PAH reduction were found between biochar alone and biochar with nZVI addition. This indicates that the observed reduction was mostly associated with the sorption properties of biochar. Moreover, only in the case of co-application of biochar and nZVI reduction of the toxicity of nZVI to V. fischeri was observed. The toxic effect was different and depend on the type of soil and their properties including total organic carbon and black carbon content, which may affect the PAHs reduction efficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of nano-sized zero-valent iron (nZVI) on DDT degradation in soil and its toxicity to collembola and ostracods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Temsah, Yehia S; Joner, Erik J

    2013-06-01

    Nano-sized zero valent iron (nZVI) has been studied for in situ remediation of contaminated soil and ground water. However, little is known about its effects on organisms in soil and aquatic ecosystems. In this study, the effect of nZVI on degradation of DDT and its ecotoxicological effects on collembola (Folsomia candida) and ostracods (Heterocypris incongruens) were investigated. Two soils were used in suspension incubation experiments lasting for 7 and 30 d; a spiked (20 mg DDT kg(-1)) sandy soil and an aged (>50 years) DDT-polluted soil (24 mg DDT kg(-1)). These were incubated with 1 or 10 g nZVI kg(-1), and residual toxicity in soil and the aqueous phase tested using ecotoxicological tests with collembola or ostracods. Generally, addition of either concentration of nZVI to soil led to about 50% degradation of DDT in spiked soil at the end of 7 and 30 d incubation, while the degradation of DDT was less in aged DDT-polluted soil (24%). Severe negative effects of nZVI were observed on both test organisms after 7 d incubation, but prolonged incubation led to oxidation of nZVI which reduced its toxic effects on the tested organisms. On the other hand, DDT had significant negative effects on collembolan reproduction and ostracod development. We conclude that 1 g nZVI kg(-1) was efficient for significant DDT degradation in spiked soil, while a higher concentration was necessary for treating aged pollutants in soil. The adverse effects of nZVI on tested organisms seem temporary and reduced after oxidation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Decolorization of Methyl Orange by a new clay-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron: Synergetic effect, efficiency optimization and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Ying; Xi, Beidou; Meng, Xiaoguang; Gong, Bin; Li, Rui; Peng, Xing; Liu, Hongliang

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a novel nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) composite material was successfully synthesized using a low-cost natural clay, "Hangjin 2 # clay" (HJ clay) as the support and tested for the decolorization of the azo dye Methyl Orange (MO) in aqueous solution by nZVI particles. According to the characterization and MO decolorization experiments, the sample with 5:1 HJ clay-supported nZVI (HJ/nZVI) mass ratio (HJ-nZVI5) showed the best dispersion and reactivity and the highest MO decolorization efficiency. With the same equivalent Fe 0 dosage, the HJ-nZVI1 and HJ-nZVI5 samples demonstrated a synergetic effect for the decolorization of MO: their decolorization efficiencies were much higher than that achieved by physical mixing of HJ clay and nZVIs, or the sum of HJ clay and nZVIs alone. The synergetic effect was primarily due to the improved dispersion and more effective utilization of the nZVI particles on/in the composite materials. Higher decolorization efficiency of MO was obtained at larger HJ-nZVI dosage, higher temperature and under N 2 atmosphere, while the MO initial concentration and pH were negatively correlated to the efficiency. HJ clay not only works as a carrier for nZVI nanoparticles, but also contributes to the decolorization through an "adsorption-enhanced reduction" mechanism. The high efficiency of HJ-nZVI for decontamination gives it great potential for use in a variety of remediation applications. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. The effect of ascorbic acid-stabilized zero valent iron nanoparticles on the distribution of different forms of cadmium in three spiked soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohaddese Savasari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Increases in pollution of water resources due to the contaminants have made researchers to develop the various methods in the remediation and the reuses of polluted resources contamination of soils with heavy metals is one of great environmental concerns for the human beings. Cadmium (Cd as a toxic heavy metal is of significant environmental and occupational concern. Contamination of soils with heavy metals is one of great environmental concerns for the human beings. The numbers of sorbents that have been used for Cd (II reductive removal are biopolymers, fly ash, activated carbon, metal oxides, clays, zeolites, dried plant parts, microorganisms, and sewage sludge. However, most of the mentioned sorbents had limitations of cost and durability that call a needed approach by cost effective remediation technique with high efficiency. Application of zero valent iron nanoparticles (ZVINs as a promising technique for remediation of heavy metals are being increasingly considered by researchers. This study was conducted to synthesis and characterize the ZVINs stabilized with ascorbic acid (AAS - ZVIN in aerobic conditions and to assess their ability for removal efficiency of cadmium (Cd from the soils and changes in different fraction of Cd in three spiked soils including sandy, acidity and calcareous soils were also studied. Materials and Methods: The stabilized ZVINs were prepared in cold distilled water by reducing Fe (III to Fe0 using sodium borohydride in the presence of ascorbic acid as stabilizer and reducing agent. The freshly synthesized AAS-ZVIN washed three times and then used for the subsequent analysis. Characterization of the synthesized AAS-ZVIN was carried out by scanning electron microscope (SEM. X-ray diffraction (XRD was performed using a Philips D500 diffract meter with Ni-filtered Cu ka radiation. To determine the availability of Cd, the DTPA-extractable amounts of Cd in the spiked soils so sandy, acid and calcareous

  15. Zero-valent iron doped carbons readily developed from sewage sludge for lead removal from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yiming; Sun, Xiaoya; Zhou, Xuefei; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhang, Yalei

    2015-10-01

    Low-cost but high-efficiency composites of iron-containing porous carbons were prepared using sewage sludge and ferric salts as raw materials. Unlike previous time- and energy-consuming manufacturing procedures, this study shows that pyrolyzing a mixture of sludge and ferric salt can produce suitable composites for lead adsorption. The specific surface area, the total pore volume and the average pore width of the optimal composite were 321m(2)/g, 0.25cm(3)/g, and 3.17nm, respectively. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that ferric salt favored the formation of metallic iron, while Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the formation of hydroxyl and carboxylic groups. The result of batch tests indicated that the adsorption capacity of carbons activated with ferric salt could be as high as 128.9mg/g, while that of carbons without activation was 79.1mg/g. The new manufacturing procedure used in this study could save at least 19.5kJ of energy per gram of activated carbon. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Immobilization of chromate from coal fly ash leachate using an attenuating barrier containing zero-valent iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas; Stipp, S. L. S.; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was (i) to test the effectiveness of a barrier engineered to remove Cr(VI) from leachates of higher pH and salinity typical of coal burning ashes and (ii) to determine which geochemical processes control Cr immobilization. Laboratory column and batch desorption...... experiments show that a barrier composed of sand, Fe(0), and bentonite irreversibly immobilizes Cr. Concentrations fall from 25 mg Cr L-1 in the leachate to below detection limits (0.0025 mg Cr L-1) and solution pH increases by about two units. Solid-phase analytical techniques such as SEM, EDS, XPS...... to traditional liners and leachate collection systems at coal ash storage and disposal sites....

  17. Effects of pH on the Kinetics of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Degradation by Oxidation Process (H2O2/Nano Zero-Valent Iron/Ultrasonic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaei

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background In advanced oxidation processes, pH has a significant effect on the removal efficiency of organic compounds. This study examined the effect of pH changes on the removal efficiency and kinetics of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE concentration in aquatic environment. Objectives The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pH changes on removal kinetics of the mentioned compound, using H2O2/nZVI (nano zero-valent iron/ultrasonic process, and its impact on the reaction rate. Materials and Methods In order to create the right conditions for oxidation, first of all iron nanoparticles combined with H2O2 oxidizer were synthesized, and then they were subjected to ultrasound waves and used in MTBE oxidation. In MTBE removal via H2O2/nZVI/Ultrasonic process, the effects of some parameters such as contact time (2 to 60 minutes, concentration of hydrogen peroxide (5 to 20 mL/L, concentrations of nZVI (0.15 to 0.45 g/L, MTBE concentrations (50 to 750 mg/L, and pH (2 to 9 were investigated. MTBE concentration analysis was performed using gas chromatography (GC. Results According to this study, the best removal efficiency of 50 mg/L MTBE concentration in 89.56% under oxidation condition occurred when H2O2 level equals to 10 mL/L, nZVI is 0.25 g/L at pH 3.5. The results showed that the increase or decrease of pH from 3.5 results in a loss of oxidation efficiency as well as reduction in the amount of kap. In addition, the logarithmic changes curve of MTBE concentration showed that MTBE oxidation in H2O2/nZVI/ultrasonic method follows pseudo first order reactions. Conclusions Changes of pH could remarkably affect the efficiency and oxidation rate of MTBE. In particular, the amount of kap in terms of oxidation declines substantially by moving away from the optimum pH range. In this study, pH 3.5 was considered as the optimal pH in H2O2/nZVI/ultrasonic oxidation process, with the elimination of about 89.56% of the high MTBE

  18. Hybrid composites of nano-sized zero valent iron and covalent organic polymers for groundwater contaminant degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mines, Paul D.; Byun, J.; Hwang, Yuhoon

    of chemicals such as azo dyes and trichloroethylene (TCE). However, stabilization and immobilization of nZVI is a key parameter in its effectiveness as a chemical degradation agent for both in-situ and ex-situ applications. Most importantly, this inhibits unwanted iron oxidation from the environment...... and prevents particle agglomeration; but also still allows for contaminant diffusion into the composite matrix, leading to degradation. In this study, the effect of various covalent organic polymers (COPs) as effective supporting materials for nZVI for optimal pollutant degradation was assessed. These COPs...... were on average approximately 6nm, with extremes at 2.5nm and 24nm. Composite lengths exhibited much more variance, and although the average was approximately 110nm, many lengths were observed as low as 50-70nm and as high as 260-280nm ranges. BET surface areas of the polymers were as small as 1.8m2/g...

  19. Removal of Nitrate from Aqueous Solutions by Starch Stabilized nano Zero-Valent Iron(nZVI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Yaghmaeian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Nitrate is one of the inorganic anions derived as a result of oxidation of elemental nitrogen. Urban and industrial wastewater, animal and vegetable waste products in large cities that have organic nitrogen are excreted along the soil. The primary risk of Nitrate in drinking water occurs when nitrate in the gastrointestinal tract switch to nitrite. Nitrite causes the oxidation of iron in hemoglobin of red blood cells, result in red blood cells could not carry the oxygen, a condition called methemoglobinemia. Therefore, achieving the new technologies for nitrate removal is necessary. Material and Methods: The present study was conducted at laboratory Scale in non-continuous batches. Stabilized adsorbent was produced through reducing Iron sulfate by sodium borohydride (NaBH4 in presence of Starch (0.2W % as a stabilizer. At first, the effect of various parameters such as contact time (10-90min, pH (3-11, adsorbent dose (0.5-3 g/L and initial concentration of arsenate (50-250 mg/L were investigated on process efficiency. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm model equilibrium constant, were calculated. Residual nitrate were measured by using the DR5000 spectrophotometer. Results: The optimum values based on RSM for pH, absorbent dose, contact time, and initial concentration of nitrate were 5.87, 2.25 g/L, 55.7 min, and 110.35 mg/L respectively. Langmuir isotherm with R2= 0.9932 for nitrate was the best graph for the experimental data. The maximum amount of nitrate adsorption was 138.88mg/g. Conclusion: Stabilized absorbent due to have numerous absorption sites and Fe0 as a reducing agent could have great potential in nitrate removal from water.

  20. Monitoring the injection of microscale zero-valent iron particles for groundwater remediation by means of complex electrical conductivity imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Orozco, A.; Velimirovic, M.; Tosco, T.; Kemna, A.; Sapion, H.; Klaas, N.; Sethi, R.; Bastiaens, L.

    2015-12-01

    The injection of nano- and microscale zerovalent iron (ZVI) particles has emerged as a promising technique for groundwater remediation. In particular, ZVI injections offer a suitable alternative for the remediation of areas not accessible with other techniques, such as areas characterized by low hydraulic conductivity. In such cases, the injection is performed at high pressure in order to create preferential flow paths (i.e., fractures). Particle injection via fracturing demands an adequate monitoring of the ZVI delivery to track the migration path of the particles as well as to delineate the extension and distribution of the iron slurry. However, characterization of ZVI injections is to date based mainly on the analysis of groundwater and soil samples, thus, limiting the spatio-temporal resolution of the investigation and making it not suitable for real-time monitoring. To overcome this, here we present the application of the complex conductivity (CC) imaging method to characterize the delivery of guar gum stabilized microscale ZVI (GG-mZVI) particles during a field-scale injection by hydraulic fracturing. Our results demonstrated that CC images provide not only an improved characterization of the contaminant distribution, but also valuable information to identify the migration pathway of the injected GG-mZVI. The relatively short acquisition time of CC datasets permitted to obtain monitoring data with enhanced temporal resolution, i.e., after each injection (every ~15 minutes), while still covering an extended area of investigation in comparison to conventional geochemical monitoring by means of soil and water samples. As presented in Figure 1, the CC images revealed an increase (~20%) in the induced electrical polarization (Φ), upon delivery of ZVI into the targeted area, due to the accumulation of ZVI. Furthermore, larger changes (>50%) occurred in shallow sediments, a few meters away from the injection, suggesting the migration of particles through

  1. Synthesis of granular activated carbon/zero valent iron composites for simultaneous adsorption/dechlorination of trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hui-Hsin; Su, Jhih-Gang; Liang, Chenju

    2011-08-30

    The coupling adsorption and degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) through dechlorination using synthetic granular activated carbon and zerovalent iron (GAC-ZVI) composites was studied. The GAC-ZVI composites were prepared from aqueous Fe(2+) solutions by impregnation with and without the use of a PEG dispersant and then heated at 105°C or 700°C under a stream of N(2). Pseudo-first-order rate constant data on the removal of TCE demonstrates that the adsorption kinetics of GAC is similar to those of GAC-ZVI composites. However, the usage of GAC-ZVI composites liberated a greater amount of Cl than when ZVI was used alone. The highest degree of reductive dechlorination of TCE was achieved using a GAC-ZVI700P composite (synthesized using PEG under 700°C). A modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate law was employed to depict the behavior of Cl liberation. As a result, a zero-order Cl liberation reaction was observed and the desorption limited TCE degradation rate constant decreased as the composite dosage was increased. The GAC-ZVI composites can be employed as a reactive GAC that is not subject to the limitations of using GAC and ZVI separately. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Metal(loid)s behaviour in soils amended with nano zero-valent iron as a function of pH and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vítková, Martina; Rákosová, Simona; Michálková, Zuzana; Komárek, Michael

    2017-01-15

    Nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) is currently investigated as a stabilising amendment for contaminated soils. The effect of pH (4-8) and time (48 and 192 h) on the behaviour of nZVI-treated Pb-Zn and As-contaminated soil samples was assessed. Additionally, soil leachates were subsequently used to study the direct interaction between soil solution components and nZVI particles in terms of mineralogical changes and contaminant retention. A typical U-shaped leaching trend as a function of pH was observed for Cd, Pb and Zn, while As was released predominantly under alkaline conditions. Oxidising conditions prevailed, so pH was the key controlling parameter rather than redox conditions. Generally, longer contact time resulted in increased soluble concentrations of metal(loid)s. However, the stabilisation effect of nZVI was only observed after the direct soil leachate-nZVI interactions, showing enhanced redox and sorption processes for the studied metals. A significant decrease of dissolved As concentrations was observed for both experimental soils, but with different efficiencies depending on neutralisation capacity, organic matter content or solid fractionation of As related to the origin of the soils. Scorodite (FeAsO4·2H2O) was predicted as a potential solubility-controlling mineral phase for As. Sorption of metal(loid)s onto secondary Fe- and Al-(oxyhydr)oxides (predicted to precipitate at pH > 5) represents an important scavenger mechanism. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy confirmed the retention of Zn and Pb under near-neutral and alkaline conditions by newly formed Fe oxides or aluminosilicates. This study shows that the efficiency of nZVI application strongly depends not only on soil pH-Eh conditions and contaminant type, but also on the presence of organic matter and other compounds such as Al/Fe/Mn oxyhydroxides and clay minerals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of humic acid and transition metal ions on the debromination of decabromodiphenyl by nano zero-valent iron: kinetics and mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lei; Liang, Bin; Fang, Zhanqiang, E-mail: sunmoon124@163.com; Xie, Yingying [South China Normal University, School of Chemistry and Environment (China); Tsang, Eric Pokeung [Guangdong Technology Research Centre for Ecological Management and Remediation of Water System (China)

    2014-12-15

    E-waste sites are one of the main sources of the pollutant decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209); contaminated farmland and water bodies urgently need to be remediated. As a potential in situ remediation technology, nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) technology effectively removes PBDEs. However, the humic acid (HA) and heavy metals in the contaminated sites affect the remediation effects. In this study, we explored the influence of HA and transition metals on the removal of PBDEs by nZVI. The specific surface area and average size of the nZVI particles we prepared were 35 m{sup 2}/g and 50–80 nm, respectively. The results showed that HA inhibited the removal of PBDEs; as the concentration of HA increased, its inhibitory effect intensified and the k{sub obs} decreased. However, the three metal ions (Cu{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, and Ni{sup 2+}) enhanced the removal of PBDEs. The enhancement effect was followed the order Ni{sup 2+} > Cu{sup 2+} > Co{sup 2+}. As the concentration of metal ions increased, the promotion effect improved. The synergistic effect of HA and the metal ions was manifested in the combination of the inhibitory effect and the enhancement effect. The values of the first-order kinetic constants (k{sub obs}) under the combined effect were between the values of the rate constants under the individual components. The inhibitory mechanism was the chemisorption of HA, i.e., the benzene carboxylic and phenolic hydroxyl groups in HA occupied the surfactant reactive sites of nZVI, thus inhibiting the removal of BDE209. The promotion mechanism of Cu{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, and Ni{sup 2+} can be explained by their reduction to zero valence on the nZVI surface; furthermore, Ni{sup 2+} strongly affects the debromination and dehydrogenation of BDE209, leading to a stronger promotability than Cu{sup 2+}or Co{sup 2+}.

  4. Aging effects on chemical transformation and metal(loid) removal by entrapped nanoscale zero-valent iron for hydraulic fracturing wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuqing; Lei, Cheng; Khan, Eakalak; Chen, Season S; Tsang, Daniel C W; Ok, Yong Sik; Lin, Daohui; Feng, Yujie; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2018-02-15

    In this study, alginate and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-alginate entrapped nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) was tested for structural evolution, chemical transformation, and metals/metalloids removal (Cu(II), Cr(VI), Zn(II), and As(V)) after 1-2month passivation in model saline wastewaters from hydraulic fracturing. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed successful prevention of Fe0 corrosion by polymeric entrapment. Increasing ionic strength (I) from 0 to 4.10M (deionized water to Day-90 fracturing wastewater (FWW)) with prolonged aging time induced chemical instability of alginate due to dissociation of carboxyl groups and competition for hydrogen bonding with nZVI, which caused high Na (7.17%) and total organic carbon (24.6%) dissolution from PVA-alginate entrapped nZVI after 2-month immersion in Day-90 FWW. Compared to freshly-made beads, 2-month aging of PVA-alginate entrapped nZVI in Day-90 FWW promoted Cu(II) and Cr(VI) uptake in terms of the highest removal efficiency (84.2% and 70.8%), pseudo-second-order surface area-normalized rate coefficient ksa (2.09×10-1Lm-2h-1 and 1.84×10-1Lm-2h-1), and Fe dissolution after 8-h reaction (13.9% and 8.45%). However, the same conditions inhibited Zn(II) and As(V) sequestration in terms of the lowest removal efficiency (31.2% and 39.8%) by PVA-alginate nZVI and ksa (4.74×10-2Lm-2h-1 and 6.15×10-2Lm-2h-1) by alginate nZVI. The X-ray spectroscopic analysis and chemical speciation modelling demonstrated that the difference in metals/metalloids removal by entrapped nZVI after aging was attributed to distinctive removal mechanisms: (i) enhanced Cu(II) and Cr(VI) removal by nZVI reduction with accelerated electron transfer after pronounced dissolution of non-conductive polymeric immobilization matrix; (ii) suppressed Zn(II) and As(V) removal by nZVI adsorption due to restrained mass transfer after blockage of surface-active micropores. Entrapped nZVI was chemically fragile and should be properly stored and regularly replaced

  5. Assessing degradation rates of chlorinated ethylenes in column experiments with commercial iron materials used in permeable reactive barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Markus; Köber, Ralf; Parbs, Anika; Plagentz, Volkmar; Schäfer, Dirk; Dahmke, Andreas

    2006-03-15

    Multiple column experiments were performed using two commercial iron materials to evaluate the necessity and usefulness of preliminary investigations in permeable reactive barrier (PRB) design for chlorinated organics. Experiments were performed with contaminated groundwater and involved fresh iron granules or altered iron material excavated from PRBs. The determination of first-order rate coefficients by global nonlinear least-squares fittings indicated a variability in rate coefficients on 1 or 2 orders of magnitude. Geometric mean values of surface area normalized rate coefficients (in 10(-5) L m(-2) h(-1)) for fresh gray cast iron and iron sponge, respectively, are: tetrachloroethene (4.5, 2.6), trichloroethene (8.1, 3.3), cis-1,2-dichloroethene (3.1, 2.9), trans-1,2-dichloroethene (9.5, 5.3), 1,1-dichloroethene (4.0, 4.4), and vinyl chloride (1.6, 6.1). The increasing rate coefficients with decreasing grade of chlorination, which characterize degradation at iron sponge are linearly related to diffusion coefficients in water, suggesting diffusion limitation in the degradation process for this particular material, possibly due to a high inner surface. The variability in rate coefficients seems to be too high to use mean rate coefficients from published studies in the design procedure of PRBs, and variabilities cannot be related to groundwater characteristics, waterflow through the reactive cells, or secondary corrosion reactions.

  6. Manganese and iron as indicators of the processes at the water column redox interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomova, Svetlana; Yakushev, Evgeniy

    2010-05-01

    this zone must be an aerobic process. The highly organic nature of the water column in the fjords suggests that the breakdown of humic acids may be critical in the early redox cycling of manganese. All mentioned above concerns the iron cycle too. The appearance of Fe(II) started in the Baerumsbassenget and Hunnbunn not from the sulfidic boundary as in the Black Sea. It started both in the upper part of the suboxic layer, 1 m deeper than the disappearance of oxygen and at the same depth with manganese at oxic conditions. The primary factors influencing the redox cycling of elements in these basins are limited vertical advective-mediated mixing and the rates of microbially-mediated redox reactions across relatively stable oxic/anoxic boundaries. The flushing events, river input and increased mixing from time to time and anoxygenic photosynthesis play an important role in the formation of redox zone. These processes generally operate on time scales of hours to days to months and could have seasonal character. Response time for changes in the microbial processes involved in reduction and/or reoxidation of Mn and Fe lags behind that for oxygen injection into water. Concentrations of redox-sensitive species of Mn and Fe should thus be useful as a tracer to inter prior hypoxic/anoxic conditions not apparent from oxygen levels at the time of sampling.

  7. Iron removal, energy consumption and operating cost of electrocoagulation of drinking water using a new flow column reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Khalid S; Shaw, Andy; Al Khaddar, Rafid; Pedrola, Montserrat Ortoneda; Phipps, David

    2017-03-15

    The goal of this project was to remove iron from drinking water using a new electrocoagulation (EC) cell. In this research, a flow column has been employed in the designing of a new electrocoagulation reactor (FCER) to achieve the planned target. Where, the water being treated flows through the perforated disc electrodes, thereby effectively mixing and aerating the water being treated. As a result, the stirring and aerating devices that until now have been widely used in the electrocoagulation reactors are unnecessary. The obtained results indicated that FCER reduced the iron concentration from 20 to 0.3 mg/L within 20 min of electrolysis at initial pH of 6, inter-electrode distance (ID) of 5 mm, current density (CD) of 1.5 mA/cm2, and minimum operating cost of 0.22 US $/m3. Additionally, it was found that FCER produces H2 gas enough to generate energy of 10.14 kW/m3. Statistically, it was found that the relationship between iron removal and operating parameters could be modelled with R2 of 0.86, and the influence of operating parameters on iron removal followed the order: C0>t>CD>pH. Finally, the SEM (scanning electron microscopy) images showed a large number of irregularities on the surface of anode due to the generation of aluminium hydroxides. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Arsenic removal from water using natural iron mineral-quartz sand columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huaming; Stüben, Doris; Berner, Zolt

    2007-05-15

    The study has investigated the feasibility of using siderite-coated quartz sand and/or hematite-coated quartz sand columns for removing As from water. Arsenic-spiked tap water and synthetic As solution with As concentrations from 200 to 500 mug/L were used for the experiments. Since three coating methods employed to prepare siderite-coated quartz sand and hematite-coated quartz sand had no significant impact on As adsorption in batch tests, the column fillings were produced by means of the simplest one involving mechanically mixing the Fe mineral with quartz sand. Fixed bed tests show that the combination of siderite-coated quartz sand and hematite-coated quartz sand greatly promoted the column performance in removing As and the presence of As(III) in the influent improved the removal efficiency of the column. The relatively low capacity in treating As-spiked tap water arose from the suppression of FeCO(3) dissolution in the presence of high HCO(3)(-) concentration (333 mg/L), which consequently limited the formation of fresh Fe(III) oxides. However, the H(2)O(2)-conditioning greatly increased As adsorption capacity of the column for remediating As-spiked tap water. The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test shows that the spent adsorbents were not hazardous and could be safely disposed of to landfill.

  9. One-pot synthesis of ternary zero-valent iron/phosphotungstic acid/g-C3N4 composite and its high performance for removal of arsenic(V) from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunhua; Xu, Jia; Yang, Zhihua; Zhang, Li; Cao, Chunhua; Xu, Zhihua; Liu, Jiyan

    2017-12-01

    Ternary zero-valent iron/phos photungstic acid/g-C3N4 composite (Fe0@PTA/g-C3N4) was synthesized via photoreduction of iron (II) ions assisted by phosphotungstic acid (PTA) over g-C3N4 flakes. The as-prepared Fe0@PTA/g-C3N4 was investigated for removal of As(III) and As(V) species from water. The result showed that Fe0@PTA/g-C3N4 exhibited a better performance for As(V) removal than As(III) species from water, and the maximum adsorption capacity for As(V) was 70.3 mg/g, much higher than most of the reported adsorbents. As(V) removal by the Fe0@PTA/g-C3N4 adsorbent is mainly via a chemical process, synergistically occurring of reduction of As(V) and oxidation of Fe0. Moreover, the Fe0@PTA/g-C3N4 adsorbent showed effective As(V) removal from the simulated industrial wastewater and underground water. This study demonstrates that Fe0@PTA/g-C3N4 can be a potential adsorbent for As(V) removal due to its high performance, and simple one-pot synthesis process.

  10. Column study of enhanced Cr(VI) removal and longevity by coupled abiotic and biotic processes using Fe0 and mixed anaerobic culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhong, Jiawei; Yin, Weizhao; Li, Yongtao

    2017-01-01

    In this study, Fe(0) and mixed anaerobic culture were integrated in one column to investigate the coupled abiotic and biotic effects on hexa-valent chromium (Cr(VI)) removal and column longevity with an abiotic Fe(0) column in the control experiments. According to the breakthrough study, a slower...... by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that this enhancement was attributed to the higher consumption of iron and greater production of diverse reactive minerals (e.g., green rust, magnetite and lepidocrocite) induced by the synergistic...... interaction of Fe(0) and anaerobic culture, providing more reactive sites for Cr(VI) adsorption, reduction and co-precipitation. Furthermore, the decreasing breakthrough rates and growing iron corrosion along the biotic Fe(0) column demonstrated an inhomogeneous distribution of reactive zones in the column...

  11. The role of zero valent iron on the fate of tetracycline resistance genes and class 1 integrons during thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of waste sludge and kitchen waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pin; Gu, Chaochao; Wei, Xin; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hong; Jia, Hanzhong; Liu, Zhenhong; Xue, Gang; Ma, Chunyan

    2017-03-15

    Activated sludge has been identified as a potential significant source of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) to the environment. Anaerobic digestion is extensively used for sludge stabilization and resource recovery, and represents a crucial process for controlling the dissemination of ARGs prior to land application of digested sludge. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of zero valent iron (Fe 0 ) on the attenuation of seven representative tetracycline resistance genes (tet, tet(A), tet(C), tet(G), tet(M), tet(O), tet(W), and tet(X)), and the integrase gene intI1 during thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of waste sludge and kitchen waste. Significant decrease (P genes was observed at Fe 0 dosage of 5 g/L, whereas no significant differences (P > 0.05) were found for all gene targets between digesters with Fe 0 dosages of 5 and 60 g/L. A first-order kinetic model favorably described the trends in concentrations of tet and intI1 gene targets during thermophilic anaerobic digestion with or without Fe 0 . Notably, tet genes encoding different resistance mechanisms behaved distinctly in anaerobic digesters, although addition of Fe 0 could enhance their reduction. The overall results of this research suggest that thermophilic anaerobic digestion with Fe 0 can be a potential alternative technology for the attenuation of tet and intI1 genes in waste sludge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Artificial Neural Network Modeling and Genetic Algorithm Optimization for Cadmium Removal from Aqueous Solutions by Reduced Graphene Oxide-Supported Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron (nZVI/rGO) Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Mingyi; Li, Tongjun; Hu, Jiwei; Cao, Rensheng; Wei, Xionghui; Shi, Xuedan; Ruan, Wenqian

    2017-05-17

    Reduced graphene oxide-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI/rGO) composites were synthesized in the present study by chemical deposition method and were then characterized by various methods, such as Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nZVI/rGO composites prepared were utilized for Cd(II) removal from aqueous solutions in batch mode at different initial Cd(II) concentrations, initial pH values, contact times, and operating temperatures. Response surface methodology (RSM) and artificial neural network hybridized with genetic algorithm (ANN-GA) were used for modeling the removal efficiency of Cd(II) and optimizing the four removal process variables. The average values of prediction errors for the RSM and ANN-GA models were 6.47% and 1.08%. Although both models were proven to be reliable in terms of predicting the removal efficiency of Cd(II), the ANN-GA model was found to be more accurate than the RSM model. In addition, experimental data were fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherms. It was found that the Cd(II) adsorption was best fitted to the Langmuir isotherm. Examination on thermodynamic parameters revealed that the removal process was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Furthermore, the pseudo-second-order model can better describe the kinetics of Cd(II) removal with a good R² value than the pseudo-first-order model.

  13. Scaling-up of a zero valent iron packed anaerobic reactor for textile dye wastewater treatment: a potential technology for on-site upgrading and rebuilding of traditional anaerobic wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Jingxin; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie

    2017-08-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a cost-effective technology for the treatment of textile dye wastewater with clear environmental benefits. However, the need to improve process feasibility of high treatment efficiency as well as to shorten hydraulic retention time has raised interest on several intensification techniques. Zero valent iron (ZVI) packed anaerobic digesters have the potential to become an on-site upgrading wastewater treatment technology through building a ZVI bed in a traditional AD plant. However, the experiences and knowledge of scale-up are limited. In this study, a pilot-scale ZVI packed upflow anaerobic sludge bed (ZVI-UASB) was built up and operated for actual dye wastewater treatment in a textile dye industrial park. Results showed that the treatment performance of this digester is higher than that of a traditional AD plant in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and color removal. During 90 days of operation, the average COD removal and color removal in ZVI-UASB was maintained at around 19% and 40%, respectively, while it was only 10% and 20%, respectively, in the traditional AD plant.

  14. Unraveling the electronic structures of low-valent naphthalene and anthracene iron complexes: X-ray, spectroscopic, and density functional theory studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnoeckelborg, E.M.; Khusniyarov, M.M.; de Bruin, B.; Hartl, F.; Langer, T.; Eul, M.; Schulz, S.; Poettgen, R.; Wolf, R.

    2012-01-01

    Naphthalene and anthracene transition metalates are potent reagents, but their electronic structures have remained poorly explored. A study of four Cp*-substituted iron complexes (Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) now gives rare insight into the bonding features of such species. The highly oxygen-

  15. Gum karaya (Sterculia urens) stabilized zero-valent iron nanoparticles: characterization and applications for the removal of chromium and volatile organic pollutants from water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vinod, V.T.P.; Waclawek, S.; Senan, Ch.; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Pešková, K.; Černík, M.; Somashekarappa, H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 23 (2017), s. 13997-14009 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015073 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : nanoscale zerovalent iron * ray photoelectron-spectroscopy * groundwater remediation * hexavalent chromium * xanthan gum * guar gum * waste - water Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 3.108, year: 2016

  16. Uranium(VI) reduction by nanoscale zero-valent iron in anoxic batch systems: The role of Fe(II) and Fe(III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Sen; Chen, Yongheng; Xiang, Wu; Bao, Zhengyu; Liu, Chongxuan; Deng, Baolin

    2014-12-01

    The role of Fe(II) and Fe(III) on U(VI) reduction by nanoscale zerovalent iron (nanoFe0) was investigated using two iron chelators 1,10-phenanthroline and triethanolamine (TEA) under a CO2-free anoxic condition. The results showed U(VI) reduction was strongly inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline and TEA in a pH range from 6.92 to 9.03. For instance, at pH 6.92 the observed U(VI) reduction rates decreased by 80.7% and 82.3% in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline and TEA, respectively. The inhibition was attributed to the formation of stable complexes between 1,10-phenanthroline and Fe(II) or TEA and Fe(III). In the absence of iron chelators, U(VI) reduction can be enhanced by surface-bound Fe(II) on nanoFe0. Our results suggested that Fe(III) and Fe(II) probably acted as an electron shuttle to mediate the transfer of electrons from nanoFe0 to U(VI), therefore a combined system with Fe(II), Fe(III) and nanoFe0 can facilitate the U(VI) reductive immobilization in the contaminated groundwater.

  17. The short-term reduction of uranium by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI): role of oxide shell, reduction mechanism and the formation of U( v )-carbonate phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsarev, Sergey; Collins, Richard N.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Fahy, Adam; Waite, T. David

    2017-01-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) is a potential remediation agent for uranium-contaminated groundwaters, however, a complete mechanistic understanding of the processes that lead to uranium immobilization has yet to be achieved. In this study, the short-term anoxic reaction of U(VI) with fresh, (anoxic) aged and corroded nZVI particles was investigated under aqueous conditions conducive to the formation of thermodynamically stable U(VI)-Ca-CO3 ternary aqueous complexes. The first stage of the reaction between U(VI) and nZVI was assigned to sorption processes with the formation of surface U(VI)-carbonate complexes. Aged nZVI removed U(VI) faster than either fresh or corroded nZVI and it is hypothesized that U reduction initially occurs through the transfer of one electron from Fe(II) in the nZVI surface oxide layer. Evidence for reduction to U(V) was obtained through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and by determination of U-O bond distances of ~2.05 Å and 2.27 Å by U LIII-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy detection of U-O bond distances at ~2.05 Å and 2.27 Å with these distances , similar to thoseat observed for the U(V) site in the mixed U(V)/U(VI) carbonate mineral wyartite. Scanning transmission electron microscopy also demonstrated that U was present as a nanoparticulate phase after one day of reaction, rather than a surface complex. Further reduction to U(IV), as observed in previous studies, would appear to be rate-limiting and coincident with the transformation of this meta-stable U-carbonate phase to uraninite (UO2).

  18. Artificial Neural Network Modeling and Genetic Algorithm Optimization for Cadmium Removal from Aqueous Solutions by Reduced Graphene Oxide-Supported Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron (nZVI/rGO Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyi Fan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Reduced graphene oxide-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI/rGO composites were synthesized in the present study by chemical deposition method and were then characterized by various methods, such as Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The nZVI/rGO composites prepared were utilized for Cd(II removal from aqueous solutions in batch mode at different initial Cd(II concentrations, initial pH values, contact times, and operating temperatures. Response surface methodology (RSM and artificial neural network hybridized with genetic algorithm (ANN-GA were used for modeling the removal efficiency of Cd(II and optimizing the four removal process variables. The average values of prediction errors for the RSM and ANN-GA models were 6.47% and 1.08%. Although both models were proven to be reliable in terms of predicting the removal efficiency of Cd(II, the ANN-GA model was found to be more accurate than the RSM model. In addition, experimental data were fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R isotherms. It was found that the Cd(II adsorption was best fitted to the Langmuir isotherm. Examination on thermodynamic parameters revealed that the removal process was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Furthermore, the pseudo-second-order model can better describe the kinetics of Cd(II removal with a good R2 value than the pseudo-first-order model.

  19. A new PC(sp(3))P ligand and its coordination chemistry with low-valent iron, cobalt and nickel complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Gengyu; Li, Xiaoyan; Xu, Guoqiang; Wang, Lin; Sun, Hongjian

    2014-06-21

    A new PC(sp(3))P ligand N,N'-bis(diphenylphosphino)dipyrromethane [PCH2P] (1) was prepared and its iron, cobalt and nickel chemistry was explored. Two pincer-type complexes [PCHP]Fe(H)(PMe3)2 (2) and [PCHP]Co(PMe3)2 (4) were synthesized in the reaction of with Fe(PMe3)4 and Co(Me)(PMe3)4. 1 reacted with Co(PMe3)4 and Ni(PMe3)4 to afford Co(0) and Ni(0) complexes [PCH2P]Co(PMe3)2 (3) and [PCH2P]Ni(PMe3)2 (5). The structures of complexes 2-5 were determined by X-ray diffraction.

  20. Degradação de espécies nitroaromáticas e remediação de efluentes da indústria de explosivos, utilizando-se processos redutivos-oxidativos fundamentados no uso de ferro metálico Degradation of nitroaromatic compounds and remediation of residues from the explosive production by reductive-oxidative processes based on zero-valent iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Rocha Cavalotti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work the potentiality of reductive-oxidative processes based on zero-valent iron was studied aiming the degradation of nitroaromatic compounds and the remediation of residues from the explosive industry. The reductive process was applied as a continuous treatment system, using steel-wool as zero-valent iron source. The process permitted an almost total degradation of nitrobenzene, nitrophenol, nitrotoluene, dinitrotoluene and trinitrotoluene, probably with generation of the respective amine-derivative. The yellow-water residue, containing soluble trinitrotoluene, was notably modified by the reductive process, a fact that permitted a substantial enhancement of its biodegradability. Furthermore, the subsequent photo-Fenton process allowed TOC removal of about 80%.

  1. Preparation of nanoscale iron (oxide, oxyhydroxides and zero-valent) particles derived from blueberries: Reactivity, characterization and removal mechanism of arsenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manquián-Cerda, Karen; Cruces, Edgardo; Angélica Rubio, María; Reyes, Camila; Arancibia-Miranda, Nicolás

    2017-11-01

    The application of iron nanoparticles (FeNPs) to the removal of various pollutants has received wide attention over the last few decades. A synthesis alternative to obtain these nanoparticles without using harmful chemical reagents, such as NaBH 4 , is the use of extracts from different natural sources that allow a lesser degree of agglomeration, in a process known as green synthesis. In this study, FeNPs were synthesized by 'green' (hereafter, BB-Fe NPs) and 'chemical' (hereafter, nZVI) methods. Extracts of leaves and blueberry shoots (Vaccinium corymbosum) were used as reducing agents for FeCl 3 ·6H 2 O solution in the green synthesis method. FeNPs were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrophoretic migration, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD) and evaluated for the removal of As(V) from aqueous systems. In both synthesis methods, XRD analysis confirmed the presence of the different kinds of iron nanoparticles. SEM analysis showed that the average size of BB-Fe NPs was 52.4nm and that a variety of nanoparticles of different forms and associated structures, such as lepidocrocite, magnetite, and nZVI, were present, while the dimensions of nZVI were 80.2nm. Comparatively significant differences regarding the electrophoretic mobility were found between both materials pre- and post-sorption of As(V). The velocity of As(V) removal by BB-Fe NPs was slower than that by nZVI, reaching equilibrium at 120min compared to 60min for nZVI. The removal kinetics of As(V) were adequately described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the maximum adsorbed amounts of this analyte are in close accordance with the experimental results. The Langmuir-Freundlich model is in good agreement with our experimental data, where the sorption capacity of nZVI and BB-Fe NPs was found to be 52.23 ± 6.06 and 50.40 ± 5.90 (mg·g -1 ), respectively. The use of leaves of Vaccinium

  2. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  3. Reduction of Mn-oxides by ferrous iron in a flow system: column experiment and reactive transport modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Appelo, C. A. J.

    2000-01-01

    of the experiment. A model containing surface complexation coupled to varying concentrations of birnessite and ferrihydrite and a constant charge exchanger in addition to mineral equilibria provided a satisfactory description of the distribution of all solutes in time and space. However, the observed concentration......The reduction of Mn-oxide by Fe21 was studied in column experiments, using a column filled with natural Mn-oxide coated sand. Analysis of the Mn-oxide indicated the presence of both Mn(III) and Mn(IV) in the Mn-oxide. The initial exchange capacity of the column was determined by displacement...... Science Ltd...

  4. On the use of iron radio-isotopes to study iron speciation kinetics in seawater: A column separation and off-line counting approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, A.C. [Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)]. E-mail: science@astrid.thatsme.nl; Wolterbeek, H.Th. [Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Kroon, J.J. [Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Gerringa, L.J.A. [Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), Department of Marine Chemistry and Geology, P.O. Box 59, 1790 AB Den Burg, Texel (Netherlands); Timmermans, K.R. [Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), Department of Marine Chemistry and Geology, P.O. Box 59, 1790 AB Den Burg, Texel (Netherlands); Elteren, J.T. van [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Teunissen, T. [Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2006-06-01

    The determination of unidirectional fluxes of Fe in the seawater Fe-pools requires the use of Fe (radio)isotopes, which in turn necessitates off-line iron counting. To implement new off-line counting approaches, methods by King et al. (1991) [King DW, Lin J, Kester DR. Spectrophotometric determination of iron(II) in seawater at nanomolar concentrations. Anal Chim Acta 1991;247:125-32] were adapted for use with radio-iron for Fe(II) and total Fe analysis. The approach consists of passing samples through preloaded SepPak (registered) C{sub 18} cartridges with either ferrozine (FZ) for Fe(II) measurement or 1-nitroso-2-naphthol (1N2N) for total iron analysis. Cartridges are afterwards eluted with methanol and the eluate subsequently counted for radio-iron. A series of experiments was carried out to investigate the new method's applicability. This included loading and extraction behaviour, selectivity for the targeted iron species, iron species recovery, memory effects and the influence of iron concentration. The FZ-preloaded cartridge showed 85% Fe(II) recovery in seawater by direct determination. Recoveries of about 60% for Fe(II) in seawater were found when including 10-15 min waiting time and sample loops, which was probably caused by the instability of Fe(II) due to oxidation. Using 1N2N cartridges for total dissolved iron measurement, recovery was obtained as nearly 100%, but with high variability which was probably caused by the interaction time of Fe with the 1N2N-preloaded cartridges. The cartridges showed only small memory effects. Remaining radio-iron could only be removed from the cartridges with 0.5 M HCl, which destroyed the functionality of the cartridge. This result suggests that the Fe fraction, which could not be eluted by methanol, was irreversibly bound to the cartridge. Desferrioxamine B was applied as a model ligand to test for interference from naturally occurring organic ligands; the results indicate that interferences may occur and should

  5. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the role of ferrous iron in diabetes pathophysiology has been revived by recent evidence of iron as an important determinant of pancreatic islet inflammation and as a biomarker of diabetes risk and mortality. The iron metabolism in the β-cell is complex. Excess free iron is toxic......, but at the same time, iron is required for normal β-cell function and thereby glucose homeostasis. In the pathogenesis of diabetes, iron generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by participating in the Fenton chemistry, which can induce oxidative damage and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to present...... and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...

  6. Rapid speciation of iron by on-line coupling of short column capillary electrophoresis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with the collision cell technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-Hui; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2007-04-01

    A method for rapid speciation analysis of iron was developed by on-line coupling of short column capillary electrophoresis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The collision cell technique was used to eliminate argon-based polyatomic interferences and a Micromist nebulizer was employed to increase the nebulization efficiency. Rapid speciation analysis of Fe(II) and Fe(III) was achieved within 1 min by short column capillary electrophoresis in a 14 cm x 50 microm id capillary at 28 kV voltage with a mixture of 15 mmol/L tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane + 1 mmol/L 1,10-phenanthroline + 1 mmol/L EDTA (pH 8.6) as running electrolyte. The precisions (RSD, n = 5) of migration time and peak area for Fe(II) and Fe(III) were in the range of 1.0 - 2.6 and 1.9 - 3.9%, respectively. The limits of detection (3sigma) of Fe(II) and Fe(III) were 10.0 and 8.3 microg/L, respectively.

  7. Synchrotron speciation data for zero-valent iron nanoparticles: Linear combination fitting table(#6) and figure(#9), and extended x-ray absorption fine structure figure(#10) and table(#7)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data set encompasses a complete analysis of synchrotron speciation data for 5 iron nanoparticle samples (P1, P2, P3, S1, S2, and metallic iron) to include...

  8. The Influence of Water Column Hypoxia on the Behaviour of Manganese and Iron in Sandy Coastal Marine Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, K. D.; Kristensen, E.; Jensen, E. M. H.

    2002-10-01

    The influence of bottom water hypoxia on manganese, iron and sulfur biogeochemistry was examined in sandy sediment from the shallow coastal lagoon, Fællesstrand, Denmark. The organic-poor sediment at Fællesstrand experiences occasional coverage of floating macroalgae and variable degrees of hypoxia at the sediment-water interface, resulting in dramatic changes in metal behaviour. The narrow peaks and steep gradients in Mn and Fe oxides as well as porewater Mn 2+ and Fe 2+ observed in the upper 2-3 cm of the sediment under fully oxic conditions indicate intense metal reduction-oxidation cycles. The Fe zones were generally displaced about 1 cm downwards compared with the Mn zones due to differences in reactivity. At lowered O 2 conditions in the overlying water, Mn oxides gradually disappeared followed by Fe oxides. The subsequent diffusive loss of Mn 2+ and Fe 2+ to the overlying water was inversely related to the O 2 concentration in the overlying water. The ability of the sediment to retain upward diffusion of H 2S (sulfide retaining capacity) gradually disappeared at lowered O 2 concentrations in a temporal pattern closely related to the changes in reactive Mn and Fe present. The sulfide retaining capacity is sustained for about 14 days under anoxia in Fællesstrand sediment. After 28 days of anoxia, 30-35% of the total Mn and Fe pools initially present in the sediment was lost. Despite the relatively low metal content, this organic-poor sediment may withstand hypoxic conditions in the bottom water (e.g. caused by coverage with floating macroalgae) and is thus capable of maintaining an intact benthic community for extended periods of time.

  9. Laboratory Evaluation of Sulfur Modified Iron for Use as a Filter Material to Treat Agricultural Drainage Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, B. J.

    2009-12-01

    Where subsurface drainage practices are employed, fertilizer nutrients and pesticides applied on farm fields and municipal locations are commonly intercepted by the buried drainage pipes and then discharged into local streams and lakes, oftentimes producing adverse environmental impacts on these surface water bodies. On-site water filter treatment systems can be employed to prevent the release of agricultural nutrients/pesticides into adjacent waterways. Sulfur modified iron is a relatively unknown industrial product that may have promise for use as a filter material to remove contaminants from subsurface drainage waters. Sulfur modified iron (SMI) is a high surface area iron powder (zero valent iron) that has been altered via chemical reaction with pure sulfur to produce a sulfur/iron surface coating on the iron particles. A laboratory investigation was conducted with contaminant removal batch tests, saturated falling-head hydraulic conductivity tests, and saturated solute transport column experiments to evaluate the feasibility for using SMI to treat subsurface drainage waters. Contaminant removal batch tests showed that three SMI samples were much more effective removing nitrate (> 94% nitrate removed) than three zero valent iron samples (removed). Batch test results additionally showed that SMI removed greater that 94% of dissolved phosphate, but was not particularly effective removing the pesticide, atrazine (removed). Hydraulic conductivity tests indicated that all three SMI samples that were evaluated had sufficient hydraulic conductivity, much greater than the 1 x 10-3 cm/s standard used for stormwater sand filters. The saturated solute transport tests confirmed that SMI can be effective removing nitrate and phosphate from drainage waters. Analysis of column effluent also showed that the large majority of nitrate removed by SMI was converted to ammonium. Consequently, these laboratory findings support the use of SMI in agricultural drainage water filter

  10. Does a higher metal oxidation state necessarily imply higher reactivity toward H-atom transfer? A computational study of C-H bond oxidation by high-valent iron-oxo and -nitrido complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Caiyun; Ye, Shengfa; Neese, Frank

    2014-04-28

    In this work, the reactions of C-H bond activation by two series of iron-oxo ( (Fe(IV)), (Fe(V)), (Fe(VI))) and -nitrido model complexes ( (Fe(IV)), (Fe(V)), (Fe(VI))) with a nearly identical coordination geometry but varying iron oxidation states ranging from iv to vi were comprehensively investigated using density functional theory. We found that in a distorted octahedral coordination environment, the iron-oxo species and their isoelectronic nitrido analogues feature totally different intrinsic reactivities toward C-H bond cleavage. In the case of the iron-oxo complexes, the reaction barrier monotonically decreases as the iron oxidation state increases, consistent with the gradually enhanced electrophilicity across the series. The iron-nitrido complex is less reactive than its isoelectronic iron-oxo species, and more interestingly, a counterintuitive reactivity pattern was observed, i.e. the activation barriers essentially remain constant independent of the iron oxidation states. The detailed analysis using the Polanyi principle demonstrates that the different reactivities between these two series originate from the distinct thermodynamic driving forces, more specifically, the bond dissociation energies (BDEE-Hs, E = O, N) of the nascent E-H bonds in the FeE-H products. Further decomposition of the BDEE-Hs into the electron and proton affinity components shed light on how the oxidation states modulate the BDEE-Hs of the two series.

  11. Iron coated pottery granules for arsenic removal from drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liangjie; Zinin, Pavel V; Cowen, James P; Ming, Li Chung

    2009-09-15

    A new media, iron coated pottery granules (ICPG) has been developed for As removal from drinking water. ICPG is a solid phase media that produces a stable Fe-Si surface complex for arsenic adsorption. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to document the physical attributes (grain size, pore size and distribution, surface roughness) of the ICPG media. Several advantages of the ICPG media such as (a) its granular structure, (b) its ability to absorb As via the F(0) coating on the granules' surface; (c) the inexpensive preparation process for the media from clay material make ICPG media a highly effective media for removing arsenic at normal pH. A column filtration test demonstrated that within the stability region (flow rate lower than 15L/h, EBCT >3 min), the concentration of As in the influent was always lower than 50 microg/L. The 2-week system ability test showed that the media consistently removed arsenic from test water to below the 5 microg/L level. The average removal efficiencies for total arsenic, As(III), and As(V) for a 2-week test period were 98%, 97%, and 99%, respectively, at an average flow rate of 4.1L/h and normal pH. Measurements of the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms at normal pH show that the Freundlich constants of the ICPG are very close to those of ferric hydroxide, nanoscale zero-valent iron and much higher than those of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide. The parameter 1/n is smaller than 0.55 indicating a favorable adsorption process [K. Hristovski, A. Baumgardner, P. Westerhoff, Selecting metal oxide nanomaterials for arsenic removal in fixed bed columns: from nanopowders to aggregated nanoparticle media, J. Hazard. Mater. 147 (2007) 265-274]. The maximum adsorption capacity (q(e)) of the ICPG from the Langmuir isotherm is very close to that of nanoscale zero-valent indicating that zero-valent iron is involved in the process of the As removal from the water. The results of the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP

  12. Batch and column studies of the stabilization of toxic heavy metals in dredged marine sediments by hematite after bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamindy-Pajany, Yannick; Geret, Florence; Hurel, Charlotte; Marmier, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    The management of dredged sediments is an important issue in coastal regions where the marine sediments are highly polluted by metals and organic pollutants. In this paper, mineral-based amendments (hematite, zero-valent iron and zeolite) were used to stabilize metallic pollutants (As, Cd, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in a contaminated marine sediment sample. Mineral-based amendments were tested at three application rates (5 %, 10 %, and 15 %) in batch experiments in order to select the best amendment to perform column experiments. Batch tests have shown that hematite was the most efficient amendment to stabilize inorganic pollutants (As, Cd, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in the studied sediment. Based on batch tests, hematite was used at one application rate equal to 5 % to conduct column experiments. Column tests confirmed that hematite was able to decrease metal concentrations in leachates from stabilized sediment. The stabilization rates were particularly high for Cd (67 %), Mo (80 %), and Pb (90 %). The Microtox solid phase test showed that hematite could decrease significantly the toxicity of stabilized sediment. Based on batch and column experiments, it emerged that hematite could be a suitable adsorbent to stabilize metals in dredged marine sediment.

  13. Adsorption of Arsenic from Aqueous Solutions by Iron Filings and the Effect of Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranzadeh M.B. PhD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims: Arsenic contamination of natural water resources has become an important environmental problem in the world. The adsorption method by iron filings adsorbent or zero-valent iron was used. The study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of iron filings in arsenite removal from polluted water and to investigate the effect of magnetic field on the process. Materials & Methods: This interventional study was conducted in synthetically polluted water samples with certain arsenic concentrations. With regard to the initial arsenic concentration (0.5 and 2mg/l, iron filings dosages (0, 2.5 and 5g/l, contact times (5, 10 and 15min and considering the samples before and after magnetic column, 108 samples were prepared. Data was analyzed by paired sample T and one-way ANOVA tests. Findings: The highest mean of removal efficiency at the initial arsenic concentration of 0.5mg/l was seen at the iron filings of 5g/l and 10min contact time (87.7±10.0 and at the initial arsenic concentration of 2mg/l was seen at the iron filings of 5g/l and 15min contact time (86.3±8.4. At the initial arsenic concentration of 0.5mg/l, magnetic field increased the removal efficiency of arsenite at the iron filings dosage of 0g/l and decreased it at the iron filings dosage of 5g/l. The same happened at the initial arsenic concentration of 2mg/l. Conclusion: Arsenic is reduced from the water samples with the iron filings dosage of 5g/l at natural pH. Magnetic field increases the arsenic removal efficiency in the absence of the iron filings and decreases the arsenic removal efficiency in the presence of the iron filings.

  14. Creative columns

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoff, Diane

    2017-01-01

      Here, Hoff presents creative columns. As her seventh-graders began learning about ancient Greece in social studies, in art they observed ancient Greek architecture, paying attention to the orders of Pork, Ionic, and Corinthian...

  15. Reciprocal classes of p-valently spirallike and p-valently Robertson functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiraishi Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For p-valently spirallike and p-valently Robertson functions in the open unit disk U , reciprocal classes S p ( α , β , and C p ( α , β are introduced. The object of the present paper is to discuss some interesting properties for functions f(z belonging to the classes Sp(α,β and Cp(α,β . 2010 Mathematics Subject Classification Primary 30C45

  16. COLUMN TESSELLATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linh Ngoc Nguyen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new class of non facet-to-facet random tessellations in three-dimensional space is introduced -- the so-called column tessellations. The spatial construction is based on a stationary planar tessellation; each cell of the spatial tessellation is a prism whose base facet is  congruent to a cell of the planar tessellation. Thus intensities, topological and metric mean values of the spatial tessellation can be calculated from suitably chosen parameters of the planar tessellation.

  17. Chemical stabilization of metals in mine wastes by transformed red mud and other iron compounds: laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardau, C; Lattanzi, P; Peretti, R; Zucca, A

    2014-01-01

    A series of static and kinetic laboratory-scale tests were designed in order to evaluate the efficacy of transformed red mud (TRM) from bauxite refining residues, commercial zero-valent iron, and synthetic iron (III) hydroxides as sorbents/reagents to minimize the generation of acid drainage and the release of toxic elements from multi-contaminant-laden mine wastes. In particular, in some column experiments the percolation of meteoric water through a waste pile, alternated with periods of dryness, was simulated. Wastes were placed in columns together with sorbents/reagents in three different set-ups: as blended amendment (mixing method), as a bed at the bottom of the column (filtration method), or as a combination of the two previous methods. The filtration methods, which simulate the creation of a permeable reactive barrier downstream of a waste pile, are the most effective, while the use of sorbents/reagents as amendments leads to unsatisfactory results, because of the selective removal of only some contaminants. The efficacy of the filtration method is not significantly affected by the periods of dryness, except for a temporary rise of metal contents in the leachates due to dissolution of soluble salts formed upon evaporation in the dry periods. These results offer original information on advantages/limits in the use of TRM for the treatment of multi-contaminant-laden mine wastes, and represent the starting point for experimentation at larger scale.

  18. Permeability of iron sulfide (FeS)-based materials for groundwater remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Andrew D; Demond, Avery H

    2013-03-01

    Iron sulfide (FeS) has been extensively assessed as a reactive medium to remove both metals and halogenated organics from groundwater. However, to address its suitability as a material for permeable reactive barriers (PRBs), its propensity for solids and gas production, which result in reduced permeability, must be evaluated. The reduction in permeability for sands coated with FeS (as mackinawite), under the anoxic conditions often encountered at contaminated groundwater sites, was examined through column experiments and geochemical modeling under conditions of high calcium and nitrate, which have been previously shown to cause significant permeability reduction in zero-valent iron (ZVI) systems. The column experiments showed negligible production of both solids and gases. The geochemical modeling predicted a maximum reduction in permeability of 1% due to solids and about 30% due to gas formation under conditions for which a complete loss of permeability was predicted for ZVI systems. This difference in permeability reduction is driven by the differences in thermodynamic stability of ZVI and FeS in aqueous solutions. The results suggest that geochemical conditions that result in high permeability losses for ZVI systems will likely not be problematic for FeS-based reactive materials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Indefinitely stable iron(IV) cage complexes formed in water by air oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomyn, Stefania; Shylin, Sergii I.; Bykov, Dmytro; Ksenofontov, Vadim; Gumienna-Kontecka, Elzbieta; Bon, Volodymyr; Fritsky, Igor O.

    2017-01-01

    In nature, iron, the fourth most abundant element of the Earth's crust, occurs in its stable forms either as the native metal or in its compounds in the +2 or +3 (low-valent) oxidation states. High-valent iron (+4, +5, +6) compounds are not formed spontaneously at ambient conditions, and the ones obtained synthetically appear to be unstable in polar organic solvents, especially aqueous solutions, and this is what limits their studies and use. Here we describe unprecedented iron(IV) hexahydrazide clathrochelate complexes that are assembled in alkaline aqueous media from iron(III) salts, oxalodihydrazide and formaldehyde in the course of a metal-templated reaction accompanied by air oxidation. The complexes can exist indefinitely at ambient conditions without any sign of decomposition in water, nonaqueous solutions and in the solid state. We anticipate that our findings may open a way to aqueous solution and polynuclear high-valent iron chemistry that remains underexplored and presents an important challenge.

  20. Mixed-valent, heteroleptic homometallic diketonates as templates for the design of volatile heterometallic precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Craig M; Filatov, Alexander S; Wei, Zheng; Rogachev, Andrey Yu; Abakumov, Artem M; Dikarev, Evgeny V

    2015-05-01

    A novel series of mixed-valent, heteroleptic transition metal diketonates that can be utilized as prospective single-source precursors for the low-temperature preparation of oxide materials are reported. The first mixed-valent iron β-diketonates with different FeIII/FeII ratios have been synthesized by applying the mixed-ligand approach. Based on nearly quantitative reaction yields and analysis of iron-oxygen bonds, these compounds were formulated as [FeIII(acac)3][FeII(hfac)2] (1) and [FeII(hfac)2][FeIII(acac)3][FeII(hfac)2] (2). In the above heteroleptic complexes, the Lewis acidic, coordinatively unsaturated FeII centers chelated by two hfac (hexafluoroacetylacetonate) ligands with electron-withdrawing substituents maintain bridging interactions with oxygen atoms of electron-donating acac (acetylacetonate) groups that chelate the neighboring FeIII atoms. Switching the ligands on FeIII and FeII atoms in starting reagents resulted in the instant ligand exchange between iron centers and in yet another polynuclear homometallic diketonate [FeII(hfac)2][FeIII(acac)2(hfac)][FeII(hfac)2] (3) that adheres to the same bonding pattern as in complexes 1 and 2. The proposed synthetic methodology has been extended to design heterometallic diketonates with different M : M' ratios. Homometallic parent molecules have been used as templates to obtain heterometallic mixed-valent [FeIII(acac)3][MnII(hfac)2] (4) and [NiII(hfac)2][FeIII(acac)3][NiII(hfac)2] (5) complexes. The combination of two different diketonate ligands with electron-donating and electron-withdrawing substituents was found to be crucial for maintaining the above mixed-valent heterometallic assemblies. Theoretical investigation of two possible "isomers", [FeIII(acac)3][MnII(hfac)2] (4) and [MnIII(acac)3][FeII(hfac)2] (4') provided an additional support for the metal site assignment giving a preference of 9.78 kcal mol-1 for the molecule 4. Heterometallic complexes obtained in the course of this study have been

  1. Remediation of leachate by composite NZVI-activated carbon in packed column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Yusmartini Eka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Improper solid waste management at final disposal site can cause in environtmental problem. The surrounding water bodies could be affected by leachate from the solid waste decomposition process because leachate contains high concentration of BOD5, COD, ammonia, hydrocarbon suspended solid, and heavy metals. This problem has affected a final disposal site (named Sukawinatan in Palembang, Indonesia, which did not implement leachate management system. This paper propose a method to reduce BOD5, COD, Ammonia concentrations of the leachate in by applying composite nano zero valent iron (NZVI – activated carbon for the remediation system of the surrounding area of Sukawinatan final disposal. The performance of the method was evaluated in this study using laboratory porous column apparatus. The results showed that the composite NZVI-activated carbon can be used to reduce concentration of pollutants from water bodies. The removal efficiency of this method on BOD5, COD and ammonia are 94.81 %, 92.81 % dan 95.58 % respectively.

  2. Reactive iron in Black Sea Sediments: implications for iron cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijsman, J.W.M.; Middelburg, J.J.; Heip, C.H.R.

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of reactive iron in sediments of the northwestern shelf, the shelf edge and the abyssal part of the Black Sea has been studied. In the euxinic Black Sea, iron sulfides (pyrite and iron monosulfide) are formed in the upper part of the anoxic water column and sink to the deep-sea

  3. Invasive pneumococcal infection despite 7-valent conjugated vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Joye

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite good cover with 7-valent vaccination, invasive pneumococcal infections may still be misdiagnosed and may lead to lifethreatening situations or death in young children. New serotypes are emerging and, therefore, clinicians must keep a high level of suspicion in young children regardless of their vaccination status. We report three cases of invasive pneumococcal infection due to new serotypes not covered by the 7-valent conjugated vaccine, two of which led children to death.

  4. Dielectrical and structural characterization of iron oxide added to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Dielectrical and structural characterization of iron oxide added to hydroxyapatite. C C SILVA*, F P FILHO, M F P GRAÇA, M A VALENTE and A S B SOMBRA. Physics Department, Aveiro University, Aveiro, Portugal. MS received 10 July 2007; revised 19 May 2008. Abstract. In this work we report preparation, structural ...

  5. Column test-based optimization of the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technique for remediating groundwater contaminated by landfill leachates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Yinbo; Zhang, Chang; Li, Xiongfei; Chen, Zhiliang; Huang, Junyi; Li, Xia; Flores, Giancarlo; Kamon, Masashi

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the optimum composition of permeable reactive barrier (PRB) materials for remediating groundwater heavily contaminated by landfill leachate, in column tests using various mixtures of zero-valent iron (ZVI), zeolite (Zeo) and activated carbon (AC) with 0.01-0.25, 3.0-5.0 and 0.7-1.0 mm grain sizes, respectively. The main contributors to the removal of organic/inorganic contaminants were ZVI and AC, and the optimum weight ratio of the three PRB materials for removing the contaminants and maintaining adequate hydraulic conductivity was found to be 5:1:4. Average reductions in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and contents of total nitrogen (TN), ammonium, Ni, Pb and 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from test samples using this mixture were 55.8%, 70.8%, 89.2%, 70.7%, 92.7% and 94.2%, respectively. We also developed a systematic method for estimating the minimum required thickness and longevity of the PRB materials. A ≥ 309.6 cm layer with the optimum composition is needed for satisfactory longevity, defined here as meeting the Grade III criteria (the Chinese National Bureau of Standards: GB/T14848/93) for in situ treatment of the sampled groundwater for ≥ 10 years.

  6. Microscale speciation of arsenic and iron in ferric-based sorbents subjected to simulated landfill conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Robert A.; Fathordoobadi, Sahar; Alday, Fernando; Ela, Wendell; Chorover, Jon

    2013-01-01

    During treatment for potable use, water utilities generate arsenic-bearing ferric wastes that are subsequently dispatched to landfills. The biogeochemical weathering of these residuals in mature landfills affects the potential mobilization of sorbed arsenic species via desorption from solids subjected to phase transformations driven by abundant organic matter and bacterial activity. Such processes are not simulated with the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) currently used to characterize hazard. To examine the effect of sulfate on As retention in landfill leachate, columns of As(V) loaded amorphous ferric hydroxide were reacted biotically at two leachate sulfate concentrations (0.064 mM and 2.1 mM). After 300 d, ferric sorbents were reductively dissolved. Arsenic released to porewaters was partially co-precipitated in mixed-valent secondary iron phases whose speciation was dependent on sulfate concentration. As and Fe XAS showed that, in the low sulfate column, 75–81% of As(V) was reduced to As(III), and 53–68% of the Fe(III) sorbent was transformed, dominantly to siderite and green rust. In the high sulfate column, Fe(III) solids were reduced principally to FeS(am), whereas As(V) was reduced to a polymeric sulfide with local atomic structure of realgar. Multi-energy micro-X-ray fluorescence (ME-μXRF) imaging at Fe and As K-edges showed that As formed surface complexes with ferrihydrite > siderite > green rust in the low sulfate column; while discrete realgar-like phases formed in the high sulfate systems. Results indicate that landfill sulfur chemistry exerts strong control over the potential mobilization of As from ferric sorbent residuals by controlling secondary As and Fe sulfide co-precipitate formation. PMID:24102155

  7. A SYSTEMATIC APPROACH FOR THE SEPERATION OF IRON PARTICLES IN SOLUBLE STATE USING LEAF EXTRACT

    OpenAIRE

    G. K. Monica Nandini; M. Chris Sheba

    2017-01-01

    The discharge of waste water, which contains many minerals like iron, magnesium, zinc etc., from various foundries, steel, dyeing and chemical industries; and treatment plants have substantial effects on the environment and the agricultural lands. Among these metallic elements, iron nanoparticles (FeNPs) have promising advantage that can combat environmental pollution. The interest in nano scale zero-valent iron in environmental remediation is increasing due to the reactivity of nanoscale iro...

  8. Iron Chelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Menu Donate Treatments Therapies Iron Chelation Iron chelation therapy is the main treatment ... have iron overload and need treatment. What is iron overload? Iron chelation therapy is used when you ...

  9. Formation of high nuclearity mixed-valent polyoxovanadates in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2 crystallised in a tetragonal system with space group 4/, = 15.113(1) and = 18.542(3) Å, and = 2. Mixed-valent vanadium ions in structures 1 and 2 have been established both by magnetisation and bond-length bondvalence measurements. Chemistry of formation of high nuclearity polyoxovanadate clusters is ...

  10. b-Cyclodextrin-assisted intervalence charge transfer in mixed- valent

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    b-Cyclodextrin-assisted intervalence charge transfer in mixed- valent [2]rotaxane complexes having metal centres linked by interrupted p-electron systems. ATINDRA D SHUKLA, H C BAJAJ and AMITAVA DAS. Silicates and Catalysis Discipline, Central Salt and Marine Chemicals. Research Institute, Bhavnagar 364 002, ...

  11. electrocardiographic findings in ethiopians on penta valent antimony ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East Africa Medical Journal Vol. 78 No. 11 November 2001. ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC FINDINGS IN ETHIOPIANS ON PENTA VALENT ANTIMONY THERAPY FOR VISCERAL LEISHMANIASIS. N. Berhe, MD, DTMH, Institute of Pathobiology, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Y. Abraham, ...

  12. Bio-inspired Iron Catalysts for Hydrocarbon Oxidations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Que, Jr., Lawrence [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-03-22

    Stereoselective oxidation of C–H and C=C bonds are catalyzed by nonheme iron enzymes. Inspired by these bioinorganic systems, our group has been exploring the use of nonheme iron complexes as catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons using H2O2 as an environmentally friendly and atom-efficient oxidant in order to gain mechanistic insights into these novel transformations. In particular, we have focused on clarifying the nature of the high-valent iron oxidants likely to be involved in these transformations.

  13. Modeling Stone Columns

    OpenAIRE

    Castro Gonzalez, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the main modeling techniques for stone columns, both ordinary stone columns and geosynthetic-encased stone columns. The paper tries to encompass the more recent advances and recommendations in the topic. Regarding the geometrical model, the main options are the "unit cell", longitudinal gravel trenches in plane strain conditions, cylindrical rings of gravel in axial symmetry conditions, equivalent homogeneous soil with improved properties and three-dimensional models, eith...

  14. Slender CRC Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarup, Bendt; Jensen, Lars Rom; Ellegaard, Peter

    2005-01-01

    CRC is a high-performance steel fibre reinforced concrete with a typical compressive strength of 150 MPa. Design methods for a number of structural elements have been developed since CRC was invented in 1986, but the current project set out to further investigate the range of columns for which...... current design guides can be used. The columns tested had a slenderness varying from 1.11 to 12.76 and a reinforcement ratio (area of rebar to area of concrete) ranging from 0 to 8.8 %. A total of 77 tests were carried out - 61 columns were tested in ambient conditions and 16 columns were tested...

  15. Removal of H2S from Biogas by Iron (Fe3+ Doped MgO on Ceramic Honeycomb Catalyst using Double Packed Columns System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntima Chungsiriporn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide is a toxic and corrosive in nature, gas should be safely removed from the biogas streams before subjecting into the fuel cell. Fe3+ doped magnesium oxide was synthesized using sol-gel technique and dip coating process of Fe3+ doped MgO on foam ceramic honeycomb. XRD and SEM indicate that Fe3+ in Fe3+ doped MgO on foam ceramic honeycomb catalyst is finely dispersed in the MgO support. Performance of the synthesized Fe3+ doped magnesium oxide on the honeycomb catalyst was examined for hydrogen sulfide (H2S oxidation by double packed column scrubbers. The absorption column was used for H2S scrubbing from biogas by deionized water absorption and catalytic column was used as catalyst bed for degradation of absorbed H2S in scrubbing water. In the catalytic column, counter current flow of the scrubbing water and air through the catalyst pack was performed for H2S oxidation accompany with catalyst regeneration. System capacity for H2S removal from gas stream showed 98% constant along 3 hr testing time at room temperature.

  16. THE EFFECT OF SMECTITE ON THE CORROSION OF IRON METAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balko, Barbara A.; Bosse, Stephanie A.; Cade, Anne E.; Jones-Landry, Elise F.; Amonette, James E.; Daschbach, John L.

    2012-04-24

    The combination of zero-valent iron and a clay-type amendment is often observed to have a synergistic effect on the rate of reduction reactions. In this paper, electrochemical techniques are used to determine the mechanism of interaction between the iron and smectite clay minerals. Iron electrodes coated with an evaporated smectite suspension (clay-modified iron electrodes, CMIEs) were prepared using five different smectites: SAz-1, SWa-1, STx-1, SWy-1, and SHCa-1. All the smectites were exchanged with Na+ and one sample of SWy-1 was also exchanged with Mg2+. Potentiodynamic potential scans and cyclic voltammograms were taken using the CMIEs and uncoated but passivated iron electrodes. These electrochemical experiments, along with measurements of the amount of Fe2+ and Fe3+ sorbed in the smectite coating, suggested that the smectite removed the passive layer of the underlying iron electrode during the evaporation process. Cyclic voltammograms taken after the CMIEs were biased at the active-passive transition potential for varying amounts of time suggested that the smectite limited growth of a passive layer, preventing passivation. These results are attributed to the Broensted acidity of the smectite as well as to its ability to sorb iron cations. Oxides that did form on the surface of the iron in the presence of the smectite when it was biased anodically seemed to be different than those that form on the surface of an uncoated iron electrode under otherwise similar conditions; this difference suggested that the smectite reacted with the Fe2+ formed from the oxidation of the underlying iron. No significant correlation could be found between the ability of the smectite to remove the iron passive film and the smectite type. The results have implications for the mixing of sediments and iron particles in permeable reactive barriers, underground storage of radioactive waste in steel canisters, and the use of smectite supports in preventing aggregation of nano-sized zero-valent

  17. Inflatable Column Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Lightweight structural member easy to store. Billowing between circumferential loops of fiber inflated column becomes series of cells. Each fiber subjected to same tension along entire length (though tension is different in different fibers). Member is called "isotensoid" column. Serves as jack for automobiles or structures during repairs. Also used as support for temporary bleachers or swimming pools.

  18. JCE Feature Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-05-01

    The Features area of JCE Online is now readily accessible through a single click from our home page. In the Features area each column is linked to its own home page. These column home pages also have links to them from the online Journal Table of Contents pages or from any article published as part of that feature column. Using these links you can easily find abstracts of additional articles that are related by topic. Of course, JCE Online+ subscribers are then just one click away from the entire article. Finding related articles is easy because each feature column "site" contains links to the online abstracts of all the articles that have appeared in the column. In addition, you can find the mission statement for the column and the email link to the column editor that I mentioned above. At the discretion of its editor, a feature column site may contain additional resources. As an example, the Chemical Information Instructor column edited by Arleen Somerville will have a periodically updated bibliography of resources for teaching and using chemical information. Due to the increase in the number of these resources available on the WWW, it only makes sense to publish this information online so that you can get to these resources with a simple click of the mouse. We expect that there will soon be additional information and resources at several other feature column sites. Following in the footsteps of the Chemical Information Instructor, up-to-date bibliographies and links to related online resources can be made available. We hope to extend the online component of our feature columns with moderated online discussion forums. If you have a suggestion for an online resource you would like to see included, let the feature editor or JCE Online (jceonline@chem.wisc.edu) know about it. JCE Internet Features JCE Internet also has several feature columns: Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Equipment Buyers Guide, Hal's Picks, Mathcad

  19. Nuclear reactor control column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachovchin, Dennis M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  20. Health and Economic Impact of Switching from a 4-Valent to a 9-Valent HPV Vaccination Program in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, Marc; Laprise, Jean-François; Chesson, Harrell W; Drolet, Mélanie; Malagón, Talía; Boily, Marie-Claude; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2016-01-01

    Randomized clinical trials have shown the 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to be highly effective against types 31/33/45/52/58 compared with the 4-valent. Evidence on the added health and economic benefit of the 9-valent is required for policy decisions. We compare population-level effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of 9- and 4-valent HPV vaccination in the United States. We used a multitype individual-based transmission-dynamic model of HPV infection and disease (anogenital warts and cervical, anogenital, and oropharyngeal cancers), 3% discount rate, and societal perspective. The model was calibrated to sexual behavior and epidemiologic data from the United States. In our base-case, we assumed 95% vaccine-type efficacy, lifelong protection, and a cost/dose of $145 and $158 for the 4- and 9-valent vaccine, respectively. Predictions are presented using the mean (80% uncertainty interval [UI] = 10(th)-90(th) percentiles) of simulations. Under base-case assumptions, the 4-valent gender-neutral vaccination program is estimated to cost $5500 (80% UI = 2400-9400) and $7300 (80% UI = 4300-11 000)/quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained with and without cross-protection, respectively. Switching to a 9-valent gender-neutral program is estimated to be cost-saving irrespective of cross-protection assumptions. Finally, the incremental cost/QALY gained of switching to a 9-valent gender-neutral program (vs 9-valent girls/4-valent boys) is estimated to be $140 200 (80% UI = 4200->1 million) and $31 100 (80% UI = 2100->1 million) with and without cross-protection, respectively. Results are robust to assumptions about HPV natural history, screening methods, duration of protection, and healthcare costs. Switching to a 9-valent gender-neutral HPV vaccination program is likely to be cost-saving if the additional cost/dose of the 9-valent is less than $13. Giving females the 9-valent vaccine provides the majority of benefits of a gender-neutral strategy. © The Author

  1. Application of iron-based nanostructures to contaminant remediation

    OpenAIRE

    Calderón Roca, Blanca

    2017-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the synthesis and applications of nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) in the environmental remediation of contaminants. The polyvalent characteristics of this nanomaterial are evaluated in this work with the study of its application in a wide range of contaminants: heavy metals and pesticides in water medium, and malodorous sulfur compounds present in air streams. Moreover, a novel method of synthesis of encapsulated nZVI from a waste material is presented, which meets th...

  2. Labile iron in parenteral iron formulations: a quantitative and comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wyck, David; Anderson, Jaime; Johnson, Kevin

    2004-03-01

    Evidence of iron-mediated oxidative stress, neutrophil dysfunction and enhanced bacterial growth after intravenous (IV) iron administration has been ascribed to a labile or bioactive iron fraction present in all IV iron agents. To quantify and compare the size of the labile fraction in several classes of IV iron agents, we examined iron donation to transferrin (Tf) in vitro. We added dilutions of ferric gluconate, iron sucrose and each of two iron dextran preparations to serum in vitro, passed the resulting samples through alumina columns to remove iron agent and free organic iron, and measured Tf-bound iron in the resulting eluates. Comparing results to serum samples without added iron, we calculated delta Tf-bound iron for each agent at each concentration. Finally, we compared delta Tf-bound iron to the concentration of added agent and calculated the percent iron donation to Tf. We found that Tf-bound iron increased with added iron concentration for each agent: delta Tf-bound iron was directly related to the concentration and type of iron agent (Piron donation to Tf ranged from 2.5 to 5.8% with the following progression: iron dextran-Dexferrumiron dextran-INFeDiron sucroseiron donation were statistically significant (Piron dextran agents, and between iron sucrose and iron dextran-Dexferrum. Approximately 2-6% of total iron in commonly used IV iron compounds is available for in vitro iron donation to Tf. This fraction may contribute to evidence of bioactive iron in patients after IV iron administration.

  3. Bioremediation of PAH polluted soils: column studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallberg, R.O. [Dept. of Geology and Geochemistry, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Trepte, B.S. [Angpannefoereningen AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-07-01

    Background. Due to spills, discharges and leakage, the gaswork site at Husarviken in Stockholm is today the largest (36 ha) creosote-contaminated site in Sweden. The main pollutants are creosote, lead and mercury. The remediation costs are estimated to be as high as US $125 million. It is thus of great interest to find more cost effective remediation methods. Objectives. The aim of this study was to investigate i) if the addition of NTA, EDTA, nitrate, iron and dry yeast would enhance the bioremediation rate of a complex organic pollutant like PAH and, if so, at what concentrations they would be most efficient, ii) the effect on PAH reduction when larger dimensions of the column is used to diminish the effect of water passing along the sides of the column, iii) long-term effects on the reduction of PAH in field-contaminated soil with high concentrations. Materials and Methods. Creosote-contaminated soil from the Husarviken gaswork site was treated with aerated water in column experiments at room temperature. Three column experiments were performed in 2 and 100 L of homogenised soil samples percolated by recirculating flushing water. Fluoranthene was analysed as a representative of the overall degradation of PAH in the columns. (orig.)

  4. Microminiature gas chromatographic column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, R. W., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Techniques commonly used for fabrication of integrated circuits are utilized to produce long capillary tubes for microminiature chromatographs. Method involves bonding of flat silicon plate to top of spirally grooved silicon chip to close groove and form capillary column.

  5. Towards Atomic Column-by-Column Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, S.J.; Rafferty, B.

    1998-09-06

    The optical arrangement of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is ideally suited for performing analysis of individual atomic columns in materials. Using the incoherent Z-contrast image as a reference, and arranging incoherent conditions also for the spectroscopy, a precise correspondence is ensured between features in the inelastic image and elastic signals. In this way the exact probe position needed to maximise the inelastic signal from a selected column can be located and monitored during the analysis using the much higher intensity elastic signal. Although object functions for EELS are typically less than 1 {Angstrom} full width at half maximum, this is still an order of magnitude larger than the corresponding object functions for elastic (or diffuse) scattering used to form the Z-contrast image. Therefore the analysis is performed with an effective probe that is significantly broader than that used for the reference Z-contrast image. For a 2.2 {Angstrom} probe the effective probe is of the order of 2.5 {Angstrom}, while for a 1.3 {Angstrom} probe the effective probe is 1.6 {Angstrom}. Such increases in effective probe size can significantly reduce or even eliminate contrast between atomic columns that are visible in the image. However, this is only true if we consider circular collector apertures. Calculations based upon the theory of Maslen and Rossouw (Maslen and Rossouw 1984; Rossouw and Maslen 1984) show that employing an annular aperture can reduce the FWHM of the inelastic object function down to values close 0.1 {Angstrom}. With practical aperture sizes it should be possible to achieve this increased spatial resolution without loosing too much signal.

  6. Rapid decolorization of textile wastewater by green synthesized iron nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Z Y; Cakirgoz, M; Kaymak, E S; Erdim, E

    2018-01-01

    The effectiveness of green tea (Camellia sinensis) and pomegranate (Punica granatum) extracts for the production of iron nanoparticles and their application for color removal from a textile industry wastewater was investigated. Polyphenols in extracts act as reducing agents for iron ions in aqueous solutions, forming iron nanoparticles. Pomegranate extract was found to have almost a 10-fold higher polyphenolic content than the same amount of green tea extract on a mass basis. However, the size of the synthesized nanoparticles did not show a correlation with the polyphenolic content. 100 ppm and 300 ppm of iron nanoparticles were evaluated in terms of color removal efficiency from a real textile wastewater sample. 300 ppm of pomegranate nanoscale zero-valent iron particles showed more than 95% color removal and almost 80% dissolved organic carbon removal. The degradation mechanisms are is considered to be adsorption and precipitation to a major extent, and mineralization to a minor extent.

  7. The use of Apatite II™ to remove divalent metal ions zinc(II), lead(II), manganese(II) and iron(II) from water in passive treatment systems: column experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Josep; De Pablo, Joan; Cortina, José-Luis; Cama, Jordi; Ayora, Carlos

    2010-12-15

    The conventional passive treatments for remediation of acid mine drainage using calcite are not totally efficient in the removal of certain heavy metal ions. Although pH increases to 6-7 and promotes the precipitation of trivalent and some divalent metals as hydroxides and carbonates, the remaining concentrations of some divalent metals ions do not fulfill the environmental regulations. In this study, Apatite II™, a biogenic hydroxyapatite, is used as an alternative reactive material to remove Zn(II), Pb(II), Mn(II) and Fe(II). Apatite II™ reacted with acid water releasing phosphate and increasing pH up to 6.5-7, inducing metals to precipitate mainly as metal-phosphates: zinc precipitated as hopeite, Zn(3)(PO(4))(2)·4H(2)O, lead as pyromorfite, Pb(5)(PO(4))(3)OH, manganese as metaswitzerite, Mn(3)(PO(4))(2)·4H(2)O and iron as vivianite, Fe(3)(PO(4))(2)·8H(2)O. Thus, metal concentrations from 30 to 75 mg L(-1) in the inflowing water were depleted to values below 0.10 mg L(-1). Apatite II™ dissolution is sufficiently fast to treat flows as high as 50 m/a. For reactive grain size of 0.5-3mm, the treatment system ends due to coating of the grains by precipitates, especially when iron and manganese are present in the solution. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of Ligand Architecture in Tuning Reaction Bifurcation Pathways for Chlorite Oxidation by Non-Heme Iron Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barman, Prasenjit; Faponle, Abayomi S; Vardhaman, Anil Kumar; Angelone, Davide; Löhr, Anna-Maria; Browne, Wesley R; Comba, Peter; Sastri, Chivukula V; de Visser, Sam P

    2016-01-01

    Reaction bifurcation processes are often encountered in the oxidation of substrates by enzymes and generally lead to a mixture of products. One particular bifurcation process that is common in biology relates to electron transfer versus oxygen atom transfer by high-valent iron(IV)-oxo complexes,

  9. Hybridized reactive iron-containing nano-materials for water purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mines, Paul D.

    Groundwater is an important source for drinking water in all corners of the globe, and in places like Denmark, it is the primary source for drinking water. Climate change and population growth will only lead to further dependence on groundwater as the supply for drinking water. However......, the expanding population and industrialization of human civilization also leads to environmental consequences affecting groundwater sources. Storm-water and agricultural runoff, industrial spillage and dumping, acid mine drainage, and leakage from landfills are a few prime examples of routes of contamination...... for pollutants to enter groundwater systems. In order to make these contaminated water sources viable for human consumption, the use of reactive iron (i.e. Fe0 or zero-valent iron), and in particular nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI), is being employed to reductively degrade and/or adsorb many...

  10. High-Valent Organometallic Copper and Palladium in Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Amanda J.; Sanford, Melanie S.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Copper and palladium catalysts are critically important for numerous commercial chemical processes. Improvements in the activity, selectivity, and scope of these catalysts have the potential to dramatically reduce the environmental impact and increase the sustainability of chemical reactions. One rapidly emerging strategy to achieve these goals is to exploit “high-valent” copper and palladium intermediates in catalysis. This review describes exciting recent advances involving both the fundamental chemistry and the applications of these high-valent metal complexes in numerous synthetically useful catalytic transformations. PMID:22498623

  11. Columns in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  12. Practical column design guide

    CERN Document Server

    Nitsche, M

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the aspects that need to be considered when designing distillation columns in practice. It discusses the influencing parameters as well as the equations governing them, and presents several numerical examples. The book is intended both for experienced designers and for those who are new to the subject.

  13. Iron Coordination and Halogen-Bonding Assisted Iodosylbenzene Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegeberg, Christina; Poulsen de Sousa, David; McKenzie, Christine

    The iron complex of the hexadentate ligand N,N,N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylendiamine-N'-acetate (tpena) efficiently catalyzes selective oxidations of electron-rich olefins and sulfides by insoluble iodosylbenzene (PhIO). Surprisingly, these reactions are faster and more selective than homogenous...... catalytic mixtures using soluble terminal oxygen transfer agents. Isolation of a reactive iron-terminal oxidant adduct, an unique Fe(III)-OIPh complex, is facilitated by strong stabilizing supramolecular halogen-bonding. L3-edge XANES suggests +1.6 for the average oxidation state for the iodine atom3...... in the iron(III)-coordinated PhIO. This represents a reduction of iodine relative to the original “hypervalent” (+3) PhIO. The equivalent of electron density must be removed from the {(tpena)Fe(III)O} moiety, however Mössbauer spectroscopy shows that the iron atom is not high valent....

  14. Nine Words - Nine Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trempe Jr., Robert B.; Buthke, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This book records the efforts of a one-week joint workshop between Master students from Studio 2B of Arkitektskolen Aarhus and Master students from the Harbin Institute of Technology in Harbin, China. The workshop employed nine action words to instigate team-based investigation into the effects o...... as formwork for the shaping of wood veneer. The resulting columns ‘wear’ every aspect of this design pipeline process and display the power of process towards an architectural resolution....

  15. Behavior of Columns During Earthquakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The behavior of columns during earthquakes is very important since column failures may lead to additional structural failures and result in total building collapses....

  16. Column solid phase extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese(II) and iron(III) ions in water, food and biological samples using 3-(1-methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid on synthesized graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza; Sehat, Ali Akbari; Arabieh, Masoud; Yousefi, Seyed Reza; Hosseini, Majid Haji; Rezaee, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    A modified, selective, highly sensitive and accurate procedure for the determination of trace amounts of manganese and iron ions is established in the presented work. 3-(1-Methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid (MPPC) and graphene oxide (GO) were used in a glass column as chelating reagent and as adsorbent respectively prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The adsorption mechanism of titled metals complexes on GO was investigated by using computational chemistry approach based on PM6 semi-empirical potential energy surface (PES). The effect of some parameters including pH, flow rate and volume of sample and type, volume and concentration of eluent, as well as the adsorption capacity of matrix ions on the recovery of Mn(II) and Fe(III) was investigated. The limit of detection was 145 and 162 ng L(-1) for Mn(II) and Fe(III), respectively. Calibration was linear over the range of 0.31-355 μg L(-1) for Mn(II) and 0.34-380 μg L(-1) for Fe(III) ions. The method was successfully applied for the determination of understudied ions in water, food and biological samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Column: Every Last Byte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Garfinkel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Inheritance powder is the name that was given to poisons, especially arsenic, that were commonly used in the 17th and early 18th centuries to hasten the death of the elderly. For most of the 17th century, arsenic was deadly but undetectable, making it nearly impossible to prove that someone had been poisoned. The first arsenic test produced a gas—hardly something that a scientist could show to a judge. Faced with a growing epidemic of poisonings, doctors and chemists spent decades searching for something better.(see PDF for full column

  18. Safety profile of the 9-valent HPV vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, Edson D; Block, Stan L; Ferris, Daron G

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The overall safety profile of the 9-valent human papillomavirus (9vHPV) vaccine was evaluated across 7 Phase III studies, conducted in males and females (nonpregnant at entry), 9 to 26 years of age. METHODS: Vaccination was administered as a 3-dose regimen at day 1, and months 2 and 6....... More than 15 000 subjects received ≥1 dose of 9vHPV vaccine. In 2 of the studies, >7000 control subjects received ≥1 dose of quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccine. Serious and nonserious adverse events (AEs) and new medical conditions were recorded throughout the study. Subjects testing positive...... for pregnancy at day 1 were not vaccinated; those who became pregnant after day 1 were discontinued from further vaccination until resolution of the pregnancy. Pregnancies detected after study start (n = 2950) were followed to outcome. RESULTS: The most common AEs (≥5%) experienced by 9vHPV vaccine recipients...

  19. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    , a situation unique in the Solar System. In such a world, iron metal is unstable and, as we all know, oxidizes to the ferric iron compounds we call 'rust'. If we require iron metal it must be produced at high temperatures by reacting iron ore, usually a mixture of ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) oxides (Fe2O3......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost...... unique examples of iron metal, otherwise called 'native iron' or 'telluric iron', occur naturally....

  20. Iron Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adrenocorticotropic hormone) can decrease them. Stress and sleep deprivation can temporarily decrease serum iron levels. Is iron ... Home About This Site Contact Us Terms Of Use In The News Policies Editorial Review Board Partner | ...

  1. of reinforced concrete columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Szcześniak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the modification of the dynamic relaxation method in order to increase its effectiveness in the range of the post-critical analysis. For this purpose, the arc-length parameter on the equilibrium path was introduced into the computational procedure. The additional constraints equation that combines increment of load parameter and the vector of displacement increments with the arc-length increment on the solution path was incorporated to analysis of the equations of motion. Solution of nonlinear equilibrium equations is obtained recursively in subsequent pseudo-time instants. The proposed method allows for tracking the global softening phenomenon of the structural element in the post-critical range, which leads to failure. We ran numerical experiments for the reinforced concrete eccentrically loaded column. Our comparative analysis with previously published numerical results demonstrated that the proposed computational method is effective.[b]Keywords[/b]: reinforced concrete columns, dynamic relaxation method, arc-length method, load-carrying capacity

  2. Electroremediation of PCB contaminated soil combined with iron nanoparticles: Effect of the soil type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, Helena I.; Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    as windows sealants. Saponin, a natural surfactant, was also tested to increase the PCB desorption from soils and enhance dechlorination. Remediation of Soil 1 (with highest pH, carbonate content, organic matter and PCB concentrations) obtained the maximum 83% and 60% PCB removal with the two......Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) are carcinogenic and persistent organic pollutants that accumulate in soils and sediments. Currently, there is no cost-effective and sustainable remediation technology for these contaminants. In this work, a new combination of electrodialytic remediation and zero...... valent iron particles in a two-compartment cell is tested and compared to a more conventional combination of electrokinetic remediation and nZVI in a three-compartment cell. In the new two-compartment cell, the soil is suspended and stirred simultaneously with the addition of zero valent iron...

  3. Column-to-column packing variation of disposable pre-packed columns for protein chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Susanne; Hinterberger, Stephan; Jungbauer, Alois

    2017-12-08

    In the biopharmaceutical industry, pre-packed columns are the standard for process development, but they must be qualified before use in experimental studies to confirm the required performance of the packed bed. Column qualification is commonly done by pulse response experiments and depends highly on the experimental testing conditions. Additionally, the peak analysis method, the variation in the 3D packing structure of the bed, and the measurement precision of the workstation influence the outcome of qualification runs. While a full body of literature on these factors is available for HPLC columns, no comparable studies exist for preparative columns for protein chromatography. We quantified the influence of these parameters for commercially available pre-packed and self-packed columns of disposable and non-disposable design. Pulse response experiments were performed on 105 preparative chromatography columns with volumes of 0.2-20ml. The analyte acetone was studied at six different superficial velocities (30, 60, 100, 150, 250 and 500cm/h). The column-to-column packing variation between disposable pre-packed columns of different diameter-length combinations varied by 10-15%, which was acceptable for the intended use. The column-to-column variation cannot be explained by the packing density, but is interpreted as a difference in particle arrangement in the column. Since it was possible to determine differences in the column-to-column performance, we concluded that the columns were well-packed. The measurement precision of the chromatography workstation was independent of the column volume and was in a range of±0.01ml for the first peak moment and±0.007 ml 2 for the second moment. The measurement precision must be considered for small columns in the range of 2ml or less. The efficiency of disposable pre-packed columns was equal or better than that of self-packed columns. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. SPIRAL CONTACTOR FOR SOLVENT EXTRACTION COLUMN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, C.R.

    1961-06-13

    The patented extraction apparatus includes a column, perforated plates extending across the column, liquid pulse means connected to the column, and an imperforate spiral ribbon along the length of the column.

  5. Improving Capture of Vaccine History: Case Study from an Evaluation of 10-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Introduction in Kenya

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harris, Aaron M; Aol, George; Ouma, Dominic; Bigogo, Godfrey; Montgomery, Joel M; Whitney, Cynthia G; Breiman, Robert F; Kim, Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    .... We sought to improve immunization history acquisition from Ministry of Health vaccination cards during a vaccine impact study of 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on pneumococcal carriage...

  6. European Analytical Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlberg, B.; Grasserbauer, M.; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2009-01-01

    The European Analytical Column has once more invited a guest columnist to give his views on various matters related to analytical chemistry in Europe. This year, we have invited Professor Manfred Grasserbauer of the Vienna University of Technology to present some of the current challenges...... for European analytical chemistry. During the period 2002–07, Professor Grasserbauer was Director of the Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Joint Research Centre of the European Commission (EC), Ispra, Italy. There is no doubt that many challenges exist at the present time for all of us representing...... a major branch of chemistry, namely analytical chemistry. The global financial crisis is affecting all branches of chemistry, but analytical chemistry, in particular, since our discipline by tradition has many close links to industry. We have already noticed decreased industrial commitment with respect...

  7. Column: File Cabinet Forensics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Garfinkel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers can spend their time reverse engineering, performing reverse analysis, or making substantive contributions to digital forensics science. Although work in all of these areas is important, it is the scientific breakthroughs that are the most critical for addressing the challenges that we face.Reverse Engineering is the traditional bread-and-butter of digital forensics research. Companies like Microsoft and Apple deliver computational artifacts (operating systems, applications and phones to the commercial market. These artifacts are bought and used by billions. Some have evil intent, and (if society is lucky, the computers end up in the hands of law enforcement. Unfortunately the original vendors rarely provide digital forensics tools that make their systems amenable to analysis by law enforcement. Hence the need for reverse engineering.(see PDF for full column

  8. Optimization of Synthesis Condition for Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron Immobilization on Granular Activated Carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mines, Paul D.; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus; Hwang, Yuhoon

    2016-01-01

    economical loss, but also potential risk to human health and environment. Thus, the immobilization onto coarse or structured support is essential. In this study, two representative processes for nZVI immobilization on granular activated carbon (GAC) were evaluated, and optimized conditions for synthesizing...

  9. Nanoporous networks as effective stabilisation matrices for nanoscale zero-valent iron and groundwater pollutant removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mines, Paul D.; Byun, J.; Hwang, Yuhoon

    2015-01-01

    networks, in particular Covalent Organic Polymers (COPs), we dramatically improved its stability and adsorption capacity, while still maintaining its reactivity. We probed the nZVI activity by monitoring azo bond reduction and Fenton type degradation of the naphthol blue black azo dye. We found...... that depending on the wettability of the host COP, the adsorption kinetics and dye degradation capacities changed. The hierarchical porous network of the COP structures enhanced the transport by temporarily holding azo dyes giving enough time and contact for the nZVI to act to break them. nZVI was also found...

  10. Nanoscale zero-valent iron impregnation of covalent organic polymer grafted activated carbon for water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mines, Paul D.; Uthuppu, Basil; Thirion, Damien

    2016-01-01

    , the effectiveness of nZVI has its limitations, due to its high reactivity and subsequent loss of degradative ability. Therefore, nZVI must be stabilized in a matrix allowing for the maintaining of reactivity, as well as the protection from the effects of the surrounding environment. By employing a nanoporous...

  11. Bactericidal effect of starch-stabilized zero-valent iron nanoparticles on Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mosaferi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study showed that nonstabilized Fe 0 nanoparticles have higher bactericidal efficiency than that of S-NZVI. This investigation also suggests that NZVI can be used as an effective and strong agent for antimicrobial applications.

  12. Photo Degradation of Methyl Orange by Persulfate Activated with Zero Valent Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkoeva, V. A.; Sizykh, M. R.; Batoeva, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    The oxidative degradation of Methyl Orange (MO) subjected to direct photolysis (Solar) and various oxidative systems was studied. The comparative experiments have shown that MO conversion and mineralization increases in the following order: Solar ∼ Solar/Fe0 ∼ Solar/S2O82- concentrations of MO:S2O82-:Fe0, pH and temperature of the reaction medium) on the degree of MO conversion and mineralization was studied. The optimal pH and temperature of the reaction medium were 5.8 and 25°C, respectively. The rate of MO decomposition and mineralization increased proportionally to the initial concentration of the oxidant at the molar ratios [S2O82-] :[MO] ≤ 12. Judging by the nature of the kinetic curves, a further increase of this ratio is impractical. However, an increase in the oxidant concentration had a positive effect on the degrees of conversion and mineralization of total organic carbon (TOC). Thus, at the ratios of 12:1 and 48:1, the conversion efficiency of TOC was 23 and 60 %, respectively. The optimal concentration of Fe0 was 100 mg/l.

  13. Influence of hydrogeochemical processes on zero-valent iron reactive barrier performance: A field investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liyuan; Moline, Gerilynn R.; Kamolpornwijit, Wiwat; West, Olivia R.

    2005-08-01

    Geochemical and mineralogical changes were evaluated at a field Fe 0-PRB at the Oak Ridge Y-12 site concerning operation performance during the treatment of U in high NO 3- groundwater. In the 5-year study period, the Fe 0 remained reactive as shown in pore-water monitoring data, where increases in pH and the removal of certain ionic species persisted. However, coring revealed varying degrees of cementation. After 3.8-year treatment, porosity reduction of up to 41.7% was obtained from mineralogical analysis on core samples collected at the upgradient gravel-Fe 0 interface. Elsewhere, Fe 0 filings were loose with some cementation. Fe 0 corrosion and pore volume reduction at this site are more severe due to the presence of NO 3- at a high level. Tracer tests indicate that hydraulic performance deteriorated: the flow distribution was heterogeneous and under the influence of interfacial cementation a large portion of water was diverted around the Fe 0 and transported outside the PRB. Based on the equilibrium reductions of NO 3- and SO 42- by Fe 0 and mineral precipitation, geochemical modeling predicted a maximum of 49% porosity loss for 5 years of operation. Additionally, modeling showed a spatial distribution of mineral precipitate volumes, with the maximum advancing from the interface toward downgradient with time. This study suggests that water quality monitoring, coupled with hydraulic monitoring and geochemical modeling, can provide a low-cost method for assessing PRB performance.

  14. Dehalogenation of aromatic halides by polyaniline/zero-valent iron composite nanofiber: Kinetics and mechanisms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Giri, S

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available that there is no additional induction period was involved in the catalytic cycle. Activation energy (Ea) was calculated to be 56.3 kJ/mol through Arrhenius plot. Several deuteration experiments were conducted with different Grignard reagents to understand the mechanism...

  15. Influence of hydrogeochemical processes on zero-valent iron reactive barrier performance: a field investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liyuan; Moline, Gerilynn R; Kamolpornwijit, Wiwat; West, Olivia R

    2005-11-01

    Geochemical and mineralogical changes were evaluated at a field Fe0-PRB at the Oak Ridge Y-12 site concerning operation performance during the treatment of U in high NO3- groundwater. In the 5-yr study period, the Fe0 remained reactive as shown in pore water monitoring data, where increases in pH and the removal of certain ionic species persisted. However, coring revealed varying degrees of cementation. After 3.8-yr treatment, porosity reduction of up to 41.7% was obtained from mineralogical analysis on core samples collected at the upgradient gravel-Fe0 interface. Elsewhere, Fe0 filings were loose with some cementation. Fe0 corrosion and pore volume reduction at this site are more severe due to the presence of NO3- at a high level. Tracer tests indicate that hydraulic performance deteriorated: the flow distribution was heterogeneous and under the influence of interfacial cementation a large portion of water was diverted around the Fe0 and transported outside the PRB. Based on the equilibrium reductions of NO3- and SO4(2-) by Fe0 and mineral precipitation, geochemical modeling predicted a maximum of 49% porosity loss for 5 yr of operation. Additionally, modeling showed a spatial distribution of mineral precipitate volumes, with the maximum advancing from the interface toward downgradient with time. This study suggests that water quality monitoring, coupled with hydraulic monitoring and geochemical modeling, can provide a low-cost method for assessing PRB performance.

  16. Reactivity of nano zero-valent iron in permeable reactive barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawluk Katarzyna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the ability of nZVI to remove heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn from multicomponent aqueous solutions was investigated through batch experiments. The experimental data were fitted to a second-order kinetic model based on solid capacity. The data for copper and lead fitted well into the second-order kinetic model, thus suggesting that the adsorption had a physical character. The values of the removal ratio and the second-order rate constant indicated that the order of adsorption priority of nZVI was as follows: Pb>Cu>Zn>Cd>Ni. The adsorption isotherm data were described by the most conventional models (Henry, Freundlich, and Langmuir. Equilibrium tests showed that copper and zinc were removed from the solution by adsorption processes, i.e., complexation and competitive adsorption. The test results suggested that the removal processes using nZVI are more kinetic than equilibrium. The study demonstrated that nZVI is favorable reactive material; however, comprehensive investigation should be performed for further in situ applications in PRB technology.

  17. Reductive Degradation of Perfluorinated Compounds in Water using Mg-aminoclay coated Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvaniti, Olga S.; Hwang, Yuhoon; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs) are extremely persistent micropollutants that are detected worldwide. We studied the removal of PFCs (perfluorooctanoic acid; PFOA, perfluorononanoic acid; PFNA, perfluorodecanoic acid; PFDA and perfluorooctane sulfonate; PFOS) from water by different types...... of the nZVI. A maximum removal was observed for all PFCs with high nZVI concentration, freshly synthesized nZVI, low pH and low temperature. A mass balance experiment with PFOS in a higher concentration of nZVI revealed that the removal was due to both sorption and degradation. Fluoride production...

  18. Dechlorination of Hexachloroethane in Water Using Iron Shavings and Amended Iron Shavings: Kinetics and Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to previous studies which employed zero-valent iron powder, this paper investigated reductive dechlorination of hexachloroethane (HCA using iron shavings and bimetallic iron shavings modified with Cu, Ag, or Pd. Results clearly show that iron shavings offer superior reductive dechlorination of HCA. In addition, surface-normalized pseudo first-order dechlorination rates of 0.0073 L·m−2·h−1, 0.0136 L·m−2·h−1, 0.0189 L·m−2·h−1, and 0.0084 L·m−2·h−1 were observed in the presence of iron shavings (Fe0 and the bimetallic iron shavings Cu/Fe, Ag/Fe, and Pd/Fe, respectively. Bimetallic iron shavings consisting of Cu/Fe and Ag/Fe could greatly enhance the reductive reaction rate; Pd/Fe was used to achieve complete dechlorination of HCA within 5 hours. The additives of Ag and Pd shifted product distributions, and the reductive dechlorination of HCA occurred via β reductive elimination and sequential hydrogenolysis in the presence of all iron shavings. This study consequently designed a reaction pathway diagram which reflected the reaction pathway and most prevalent dechlorination products. Iron shavings are a common byproduct of mechanical processing plants. While the purity of such Fe metals may be low, these shavings are readily available at low costs and could potentially be used in engineering applications such as contamination control technologies.

  19. Trivalent iron induced gelation in lambda-carrageenan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Running, Cordelia A.; Falshaw, Ruth; Janaswamy, Srinivas (Purdue)

    2012-05-24

    This communication reports gelation of lambda-carrageenan, for the first time, in the presence of trivalent iron ions. Kappa-, iota- and lambda-carrageenans are sulfated polysaccharides used extensively in food, pharmaceutical and medical applications. Kappa- and iota-carrageenans show gelation in the presence of mono- and di-valent ions, but lambda-carrageenan yields only viscous solutions. Our results show that gelation in lambda-carrageenan indeed is possible, but with trivalent ions. X-ray fiber diffraction patterns of iron (III)-lambda-carrageenan are characteristic of highly oriented and polycrystalline fibers containing well resolved Bragg reflections. The elastic modulus (G*) of the product is far greater than the loss modulus (G*) indicating the thermal stability of lambda-carrageenan in the presence of iron (III) ions. This novel finding has potential to expand lambda-carrageenan's current utility beyond a viscosifying agent.

  20. Formation of ferrihydrite and associated iron corrosion products in permeable reactive barriers of zero-valent iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Yoko; Kim, Jin-Wook; Watkins, Janet; Wilkin, Richard T.

    2002-01-01

    Ferrihydrite, which is known to form in the presence of oxygen and to be stabilized by the adsorption of Si, PO4 and SO4, is ubiquitous in the fine-grained fractions of permeable reactive barrier (PRB) samples from the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center (Elizabeth City, NC) and the Denver Federal Center (Lakewood, CO) studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The concurrent energy-dispersive X-ray data indicate a strong association between ferrihydrite and metals such as Si, Ca, and Cr. Magnetite, green rust 1, aragonite, calcite, mackinawite, greigite and lepidocrocite were also present, indicative of a geochemical environment that is temporally and spatially heterogeneous. Whereas magnetite, which is known to form due to anaerobic Fe0 corrosion, passivates the Fe0 surface, ferrihydrite precipitation occurs away from the immediate Fe0 surface, forming small (<0.1 microm) discrete clusters. Consequently, Fe0-PRBs may remain effective for a longer period of time in slightly oxidized groundwater systems where ferrihydrite formation occurs compared to oxygen-depleted systems where magnetite passivation occurs. The ubiquitous presence of ferrihydrite suggests that the use of Fe0-PRBs may be extended to applications that require contaminant adsorption rather than, or in addition to, redox-promoted contaminant degradation.

  1. Formation of ferrihydrite and associated iron corrosion products in permeable reactive barriers of zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Yoko; Kim, Jin-Wook; Watkins, Janet; Wilkin, Richard T

    2002-12-15

    Ferrihydrite, which is known to form in the presence of oxygen and to be stabilized by the adsorption of Si, PO4 and SO4, is ubiquitous in the fine-grained fractions of permeable reactive barrier (PRB) samples from the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center (Elizabeth City, NC) and the Denver Federal Center (Lakewood, CO) studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The concurrent energy-dispersive X-ray data indicate a strong association between ferrihydrite and metals such as Si, Ca, and Cr. Magnetite, green rust 1, aragonite, calcite, mackinawite, greigite and lepidocrocite were also present, indicative of a geochemical environment that is temporally and spatially heterogeneous. Whereas magnetite, which is known to form due to anaerobic Fe0 corrosion, passivates the Fe0 surface, ferrihydrite precipitation occurs away from the immediate Fe0 surface, forming small (<0.1 microm) discrete clusters. Consequently, Fe0-PRBs may remain effective for a longer period of time in slightly oxidized groundwater systems where ferrihydrite formation occurs compared to oxygen-depleted systems where magnetite passivation occurs. The ubiquitous presence of ferrihydrite suggests that the use of Fe0-PRBs may be extended to applications that require contaminant adsorption rather than, or in addition to, redox-promoted contaminant degradation.

  2. Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation limits iron transport in anoxic ocean regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholz, Florian; Löscher, Carolin; Fiskal, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for life on Earth and limits primary production in large parts of the ocean. Oxygen-free continental margin sediments represent an important source of bioavailable iron to the ocean, yet little of the iron released from the seabed reaches the productive sea surface....... Even in the anoxic water of oxygen minimum zones, where iron solubility should be enhanced, most of the iron is rapidly re-precipitated. To constrain the mechanism(s) of iron removal in anoxic ocean regions we explored the sediment and water in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru. During our sampling...... campaign the water column featured two distinct redox boundaries separating oxic from nitrate-reducing (i.e., nitrogenous) water and nitrogenous from weakly sulfidic water. The sulfidic water mass in contact with the shelf sediment contained elevated iron concentrations>300 nM. At the boundary between...

  3. Safety barriers and lighting columns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1972-01-01

    Problems arising from the sitting of lighting columns on the central reserve are reviewed, and remedial measures such as break-away lighting supports and installation of safety fences on the central reserve on both sides of the lighting columns are examined.

  4. Developing the bundled glass column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oikonomopoulou, F.; Bristogianni, T; Veer, F.A.; Nijsse, R.; da Sousa Cruz, Paulo J.

    In this paper a bundled glass column is presented as a promising solution for a completely transparent, almost dematerialized structural compressive element. The aim is to ob-tain a glass column that can safely carry loads, achieve a high visual result and be relatively eas-ily manufactured.

  5. Investigating the potential for long-term permeable reactive barrier (PRB) monitoring from the electrical signatures associated with the reduction in reactive iron performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, Lee D.; Korte, N.; Baker, J.

    2005-12-14

    The objective of this work was to conduct laboratory and field experiments to determine the sensitivity of low frequency electrical measurements (resistivity and induced polarization) to the processes of corrosion and precipitation that are believed to limit permeable reactive barrier (PRB) performance. The research was divided into four sets of experiments that were each written up and submitted to a peer-reviewed journal: [1] A laboratory experiment to define the controls of aqueous chemistry (electrolyte activity; pH; valence) and total zero valent iron (Fe0) available surface area on the electrical properties of Fe0 columns. [2] A laboratory experiment to determine the impact of corrosion and precipitation on the electrical response of synthetic Fe0 columns as a result of geochemical reactions with NaSO4 and NaCO3 electrolytes. [3] Laboratory experiments on a sequence of cores retrieved from the Kansas City PRB to determine the magnitude of electrical and geochemical changes within a field active PRB after eight years of operation [4] Field-scale cross borehole resistivity and induced polarization monitoring of the Kansas City PRB to evaluate the potential of electrical imaging as a technology for non-invasive, long-term monitoring of indicators of reduced PRB performance This report first summarizes the findings of the four major experiments conducted under this research. The reader is referred to the four papers in Appendices 1-4 for a full description of each experiment, including motivation and significance, technical details, findings and implications. The deliverables of the project, including the publications, conference papers and new collaborative arrangements that have resulted are then described. Appendices 5-6 contain two technical reports written by co-PI Korte describing (1) supporting geochemical measurements, and (2) the coring procedure, conducted at the Kansas City PRB as part of this project.

  6. A mixed valent Keggin polyoxometallate involving molybdenum and tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclaire, A.; Borel, M.M.; Chardon, J.; Raveau, B. [Universite de Caen (France). Laboratoire CRISMAT

    1995-09-01

    A new mixed valent ``Mo-W`` polyoxometallate K{sub 6}Mo{sub 3}W{sub 9}PO{sub 40}{center_dot}13H{sub 2}O has been synthesized in the form of single crystals. The structure determination of this cubic phase (a = 21.381 {angstrom}) shows that it is isotypic to K{sub 5.5}Na{sub 1.5}PW{sub 10}Cu{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}O{sub 38{center_dot}}13H{sub 2}O. The two structures differ by the nature of the ligands that form the Keggin units ``PMo{sub 3}W{sub 9}O{sub 40}`` and ``PW{sub 10}Cu{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}O{sub 38},`` respectively, and by the stoichiometry and distribution of the alkaline cations located outside the Keggin units.

  7. Assessment of health benefits and cost-effectiveness of 10-valent and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in Kenyan children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayieko, Philip; Griffiths, Ulla K; Ndiritu, Moses; Moisi, Jennifer; Mugoya, Isaac K; Kamau, Tatu; English, Mike; Scott, J Anthony G

    2013-01-01

    The GAVI Alliance supported 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) introduction in Kenya. We estimated the cost-effectiveness of introducing either PCV10 or the 13-valent vaccine (PCV13) from a societal perspective and explored the incremental impact of including indirect vaccine effects. The costs and effects of pneumococcal vaccination among infants born in Kenya in 2010 were assessed using a decision analytic model comparing PCV10 or PCV13, in turn, with no vaccination. Direct vaccine effects were estimated as a reduction in the incidence of pneumococcal meningitis, sepsis, bacteraemic pneumonia and non-bacteraemic pneumonia. Pneumococcal disease incidence was extrapolated from a population-based hospital surveillance system in Kilifi and adjustments were made for variable access to care across Kenya. We used vaccine efficacy estimates from a trial in The Gambia and accounted for serotype distribution in Kilifi. We estimated indirect vaccine protection and serotype replacement by extrapolating from the USA. Multivariable sensitivity analysis was conducted using Monte Carlo simulation. We assumed a vaccine price of US$ 3.50 per dose. The annual cost of delivering PCV10 was approximately US$14 million. We projected a 42.7% reduction in pneumococcal disease episodes leading to a US$1.97 million reduction in treatment costs and a 6.1% reduction in childhood mortality annually. In the base case analysis, costs per discounted DALY and per death averted by PCV10, amounted to US$ 59 (95% CI 26-103) and US$ 1,958 (95% CI 866-3,425), respectively. PCV13 introduction improved the cost-effectiveness ratios by approximately 20% and inclusion of indirect effects improved cost-effectiveness ratios by 43-56%. The break-even prices for introduction of PCV10 and PCV13 are US$ 0.41 and 0.51, respectively. Introducing either PCV10 or PCV13 in Kenya is highly cost-effective from a societal perspective. Indirect effects, if they occur, would significantly improve the cost-effectiveness.

  8. Evaluation of impact of 23 valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine following 7 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Australian Indigenous children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Sanjay; Chiu, Clayton; Menzies, Rob; Lehmann, Deborah; Cook, Heather; Giele, Carolien; Krause, Vicki; McIntyre, Peter

    2015-11-27

    High incidence and serotype diversity of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in Indigenous children in remote Australia led to rapid introduction of 7-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (7vPCV) at 2, 4 and 6 months in 2001, followed by 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (23vPPV) in the second year of life. All other Australian children were offered 3 doses of 7vPCV without a booster from 2005. This study evaluated the impact of the unique pneumococcal vaccine schedule of 7vPCV followed by the 23vPPV booster among Indigenous Australian children. Changes in IPD incidence derived from population-based passive laboratory surveillance in Indigenous children vaccine introduction period (Indigenous 1994-2000; non-Indigenous 2002-2004) to the post-vaccine period (2008-2010 in both groups) using incidence rate ratios (IRRs) stratified by age into serotype groupings of vaccine (7v and 13vPCV and 23vPPV) and non-vaccine types. Vaccine coverage was assessed from the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register. At baseline, total IPD incidence per 100,000 was 216 (n=230) in Indigenous versus 55 (n=1993) in non-Indigenous children. In 2008-2010, IRRs for 7vPCV type IPD were 0.03 in both groups, but for 23v-non7v type IPD 1.2 (95% CI 0.8-1.8) in Indigenous versus 3.1 (95% CI 2.5-3.7) in non-Indigenous, difference driven primarily by serotype 19A IPD (IRR 0.6 in Indigenous versus 4.3 in non-Indigenous). For non-7vPCV type IPD overall, IRR was significantly higher in those age-eligible for 23vPPV booster compared to those younger, but in both age groups was lower than for non-Indigenous children. These ecologic data suggest a possible "serotype replacement sparing" effect of 23vPPV following 7vPCV priming, especially for serotype 19A with supportive evidence from other immunogenicity and carriage studies. Applicability post 10vPCV or 13v PCV priming in similar settings would depend on local serotype distribution of IPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  9. Assessment of health benefits and cost-effectiveness of 10-valent and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in Kenyan children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Ayieko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The GAVI Alliance supported 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10 introduction in Kenya. We estimated the cost-effectiveness of introducing either PCV10 or the 13-valent vaccine (PCV13 from a societal perspective and explored the incremental impact of including indirect vaccine effects. METHODS: The costs and effects of pneumococcal vaccination among infants born in Kenya in 2010 were assessed using a decision analytic model comparing PCV10 or PCV13, in turn, with no vaccination. Direct vaccine effects were estimated as a reduction in the incidence of pneumococcal meningitis, sepsis, bacteraemic pneumonia and non-bacteraemic pneumonia. Pneumococcal disease incidence was extrapolated from a population-based hospital surveillance system in Kilifi and adjustments were made for variable access to care across Kenya. We used vaccine efficacy estimates from a trial in The Gambia and accounted for serotype distribution in Kilifi. We estimated indirect vaccine protection and serotype replacement by extrapolating from the USA. Multivariable sensitivity analysis was conducted using Monte Carlo simulation. We assumed a vaccine price of US$ 3.50 per dose. FINDINGS: The annual cost of delivering PCV10 was approximately US$14 million. We projected a 42.7% reduction in pneumococcal disease episodes leading to a US$1.97 million reduction in treatment costs and a 6.1% reduction in childhood mortality annually. In the base case analysis, costs per discounted DALY and per death averted by PCV10, amounted to US$ 59 (95% CI 26-103 and US$ 1,958 (95% CI 866-3,425, respectively. PCV13 introduction improved the cost-effectiveness ratios by approximately 20% and inclusion of indirect effects improved cost-effectiveness ratios by 43-56%. The break-even prices for introduction of PCV10 and PCV13 are US$ 0.41 and 0.51, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Introducing either PCV10 or PCV13 in Kenya is highly cost-effective from a societal perspective. Indirect

  10. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  11. Iron isotope biogeochemistry of Neoproterozoic marine shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzmann, Marcus; Gibson, Timothy M.; Halverson, Galen P.; Hodgskiss, Malcolm S. W.; Bui, Thi Hao; Carozza, David A.; Sperling, Erik A.; Poirier, André; Cox, Grant M.; Wing, Boswell A.

    2017-07-01

    Iron isotopes have been widely applied to investigate the redox evolution of Earth's surface environments. However, it is still unclear whether iron cycling in the water column or during diagenesis represents the major control on the iron isotope composition of sediments and sedimentary rocks. Interpretation of isotopic data in terms of oceanic redox conditions is only possible if water column processes dominate the isotopic composition, whereas redox interpretations are less straightforward if diagenetic iron cycling controls the isotopic composition. In the latter scenario, iron isotope data is more directly related to microbial processes such as dissimilatory iron reduction. Here we present bulk rock iron isotope data from late Proterozoic marine shales from Svalbard, northwestern Canada, and Siberia, to better understand the controls on iron isotope fractionation in late Proterozoic marine environments. Bulk shales span a δ 56Fe range from -0.45 ‰ to +1.04 ‰ . Although δ 56Fe values show significant variation within individual stratigraphic units, their mean value is closer to that of bulk crust and hydrothermal iron in samples post-dating the ca. 717-660 Ma Sturtian glaciation compared to older samples. After correcting for the highly reactive iron content in our samples based on iron speciation data, more than 90% of the calculated δ 56Fe compositions of highly reactive iron falls in the range from ca. -0.8 ‰ to +3 ‰ . An isotope mass-balance model indicates that diagenetic iron cycling can only change the isotopic composition of highly reactive iron by water column processes, namely the degree of oxidation of the ferrous seawater iron reservoir, control the isotopic composition of highly reactive iron. Considering a long-term decrease in the isotopic composition of the iron source to the dissolved seawater Fe(II) reservoir to be unlikely, we offer two possible explanations for the Neoproterozoic δ 56Fe trend. First, a decreasing supply of Fe

  12. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  13. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  14. Column-Oriented Database Systems (Tutorial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Abadi; P.A. Boncz (Peter); S. Harizopoulos

    2009-01-01

    textabstractColumn-oriented database systems (column-stores) have attracted a lot of attention in the past few years. Column-stores, in a nutshell, store each database table column separately, with attribute values belonging to the same column stored contiguously, compressed, and densely packed, as

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your body doesn't have enough iron to build healthy red blood cells. Without enough iron, your ... Supplements Iron You may need iron supplements to build up your iron levels as quickly as possible. ...

  16. Flow-through Column Experiments and Modeling of Microbially Mediated Cr(VI) Reduction at Hanford 100H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L.; Molins, S.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.; Steefel, C.; Nico, P. S.; Han, R.

    2010-12-01

    Microbially mediated Cr(VI) reduction at the Hanford 100H area was investigated by flow-through column experiments. Three separate experiments were conducted to promote microbial activities associated with denitrification, iron and sulfate reduction, respectively. Replicate columns packed with natural sediments from the site under anaerobic environment were injected with 5mM Lactate as the electron donor and 5 μM Cr(VI) in all experiments. Sulfate and nitrate solutions were added to act as the main electron acceptors in the respective experiments, while iron columns relied on the indigenous sediment iron (and manganese) oxides as electron acceptors. Column effluent solutions were analyzed by IC and ICP-MS to monitor the microbial consumption/conversion of lactate and the associated Cr(VI) reduction. Biogeochemical reactive transport modeling was performed to gain further insights into the reaction mechanisms and Cr(VI) bioreduction rates. All experimental columns showed a reduction of the injected Cr(VI). Columns under denitrifying conditions showed the least Cr(VI) reduction at early stages (adverse effect on Cr(VI) reduction rates. Reactive transport simulations indicated that biomass growth completely depleted influent ammonium, and called for an additional source of N to account for the measured reduction rates. Iron columns were the least active with undetectable consumption of the injected lactate, slowest cell growth, and the smallest change in Cr(VI) concentrations during the course of the experiment. In contrast, columns under sulfate-reducing/fermentative conditions exhibited the greatest Cr(VI) reduction capacity. Two sulfate columns evolved to complete lactate fermentation with acetate and propionate produced in the column effluent after 40 days of experiments. These fermenting columns showed a complete removal of injected Cr(VI), visible precipitation of sulfide minerals, and a significant increase in effluent Fe and Mn concentrations. Reactive

  17. Water Column Sonar Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The collection and analysis of water column sonar data is a relatively new avenue of research into the marine environment. Primary uses include assessing biological...

  18. From the monovalent to the nine-valent HPV vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pils, S; Joura, E A

    2015-09-01

    An investigational monovalent human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 virus-like particle vaccine has been shown to prevent persistent infection and cervical disease related to HPV 16 and was proof of concept (2002). Designed to prevent the bulk of invasive cervical cancer, quadrivalent (HPV 6/11/16/18) and bivalent (HPV 16/18) vaccines have been available since 2006 and 2007, respectively. They are highly effective in preventing HPV 16/18-related cervical precancer; the quadrivalent version also prevents genital warts related to HPV 6/11. It has been shown that the precursors of vulvar, vaginal and anal cancer related to the vaccine types are effectively prevented. This led to a paradigm shift from a female-only cervical cancer vaccine to a vaccine for the prevention of HPV-related disease and cancer for both sexes. Vaccination before the start of sexual activity is most effective, and consequently most programs target 9- to 12-year-olds. Additionally, recent studies have proven the noninferior immunoresponse of a two-dose schedule in these age cohorts. Gender-neutral vaccination has become more common; it improves coverage and also provides protection to all males. Recently a nine-valent HPV vaccine (HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) was licensed; it provides high and consistent protection against infections and diseases related to these types, with ∼90% of cervical and other HPV-related cancers and precancers potentially being avoided. Coverage is key. Efforts must be made to provide HPV vaccination in low-resource countries that lack screening programs. In countries with cervical cancer screening, HPV vaccination will greatly affect screening algorithms. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. High-valent imido complexes of manganese and chromium corroles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nicola Y; Eikey, Rebecca A; Loring, Megan I; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2005-05-16

    The oxidation reaction of M(tpfc) [M = Mn or Cr and tpfc = tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole] with aryl azides under photolytic or thermal conditions gives the first examples of mononuclear imido complexes of manganese(V) and chromium(V). These complexes have been characterized by NMR, mass spectrometry, UV-vis, EPR, elemental analysis, and cyclic voltammetry. Two X-ray structures have been obtained for Mn(tpfc)(NMes) and Cr(tpfc)(NMes) [Mes = 2,4,6-(CH(3))(3)C(6)H(2)]. Short metal-imido bonds (1.610 and 1.635 Angstroms) as well as nearly linear M-N-C angles are consistent with triple M triple-bond NR bond formation. The kinetics of nitrene [NR] group transfer from manganese(V) corroles to various organic phosphines have been defined. Reduction of the manganese(V) corrolato complex affords phosphine imine and Mn(III) with reaction rates that are sensitive to steric and electronic elements of the phosphine substrate. An analogous manganese complex with a variant corrole ligand containing bromine atoms in the beta-pyrrole positions, Mn(Br(8)tpfc)(NAr), has been prepared and studied. Its reaction with PEt(3) is 250x faster than that of the parent tpfc complex, and its Mn(V/IV) couple is shifted by 370 mV to a more positive potential. The EPR spectra of chromium(V) imido corroles reveal a rich signal at ambient temperature consistent with Cr(V) triple-bond NR (d(1), S = 1/2) containing a localized spin density in the d(xy) orbital, and an anisotropic signal at liquid nitrogen temperature. Our results demonstrate the synthetic utility of organic aryl azides in the preparation of mononuclear metal imido complexes previously considered elusive, and suggest strong sigma-donation as the underlying factor in stabilizing high-valent metals by corrole ligands.

  20. Environmental transformations and ecological effects of iron-based nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Cheng; Sun, Yuqing; Tsang, Daniel C W; Lin, Daohui

    2018-01-01

    The increasing application of iron-based nanoparticles (NPs), especially high concentrations of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI), has raised concerns regarding their environmental behavior and potential ecological effects. In the environment, iron-based NPs undergo physical, chemical, and/or biological transformations as influenced by environmental factors such as pH, ions, dissolved oxygen, natural organic matter (NOM), and biotas. This review presents recent research advances on environmental transformations of iron-based NPs, and articulates their relationships with the observed toxicities. The type and extent of physical, chemical, and biological transformations, including aggregation, oxidation, and bio-reduction, depend on the properties of NPs and the receiving environment. Toxicities of iron-based NPs to bacteria, algae, fish, and plants are increasingly observed, which are evaluated with a particular focus on the underlying mechanisms. The toxicity of iron-based NPs is a function of their properties, tolerance of test organisms, and environmental conditions. Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species is considered as the primary toxic mechanism of iron-based NPs. Factors influencing the toxicity of iron-based NPs are addressed and environmental transformations play a significant role, for example, surface oxidation or coating by NOM generally lowers the toxicity of nZVI. Research gaps and future directions are suggested with an aim to boost concerted research efforts on environmental transformations and toxicity of iron-based NPs, e.g., toxicity studies of transformed NPs in field, expansion of toxicity endpoints, and roles of laden contaminants and surface coating. This review will enhance our understanding of potential risks of iron-based NPs and proper uses of environmentally benign NPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Iron isotopes in an Archean ocean analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busigny, Vincent; Planavsky, Noah J.; Jézéquel, Didier; Crowe, Sean; Louvat, Pascale; Moureau, Julien; Viollier, Eric; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2014-05-01

    Iron isotopes have been extensively used to trace the history of microbial metabolisms and the redox evolution of the oceans. Archean sedimentary rocks display greater variability in iron isotope ratios and more markedly negative values than those deposited in the Proterozoic and Phanerozoic. This increased variability has been linked to changes in either water column iron cycling or the extent of benthic microbial iron reduction through time. We tested these contrasting scenarios through a detailed study of anoxic and ferruginous Lac Pavin (France), which can serve as a modern analogue of the Archean ocean. A depth-profile in the water column of Lac Pavin shows a remarkable increase in dissolved Fe concentration (0.1-1200 μM) and δ56Fe values (-2.14‰ to +0.31‰) across the oxic-anoxic boundary to the lake bottom. The largest Fe isotope variability is found at the redox boundary and is related to partial oxidation of dissolved ferrous iron, leaving the residual Fe enriched in light isotopes. The analysis of four sediment cores collected along a lateral profile (one in the oxic layer, one at the redox boundary, one in the anoxic zone, and one at the bottom of the lake) indicates that bulk sediments, porewaters, and reactive Fe mostly have δ56Fe values near 0.0 ± 0.2‰, similar to detrital iron. In contrast, pyrite δ56Fe values in sub-chemocline cores (60, 65, and 92 m) are highly variable and show significant deviations from the detrital iron isotope composition (δ56Fepyrite between -1.51‰ and +0.09‰; average -0.93‰). Importantly, the pyrite δ56Fe values mirror the δ56Fe of dissolved iron at the redox boundary—where near quantitative sulfate and sulfide drawdown occurs—suggesting limited iron isotope fractionation during iron sulfide formation. This finding has important implications for the Archean environment. Specifically, this work suggests that in a ferruginous system, most of the Fe isotope variability observed in sedimentary pyrites can

  2. Iron Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol Heavy Metals Helicobacter pylori Testing Hematocrit Hemoglobin Hemoglobin A1c Hemoglobinopathy Evaluation ... not enough iron is taken in from the diet, blood levels will drop; thus, over time, the ...

  3. COMPARISON OF THE NEW IRON DOSAGE METHODS FOR DRINKING WATER PRODUCTION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalski, Krysztof; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    Arsenic is considered as one of the most concerned pollutants in the world due to its adverse health effects. Therefore, its content in drinking water has been recommended to be limited to 10 μg/L (WHO 2006). On of the conventional methods for arsenic removal is based on the addition of ferrous...... and iron electrodissolution has been implemented for arsenic removal....... salts that remove it with in a coprecipitation process. Recently, an extra focus has been put on other possibilities to add iron ions during the process, which can be done with help of zero-valent iron (ZVI) or electrolytic iron dissolution. Both techniques has been implemented for removal of heavy...

  4. Green Synthesis of Iron Nanoparticles and Their Environmental Applications and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, Sadia; Tahir, Arifa; Chen, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in nanoscience and nanotechnology have also led to the development of novel nanomaterials, which ultimately increase potential health and environmental hazards. Interest in developing environmentally benign procedures for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles has been increased. The purpose is to minimize the negative impacts of synthetic procedures, their accompanying chemicals and derivative compounds. The exploitation of different biomaterials for the synthesis of nanoparticles is considered a valuable approach in green nanotechnology. Biological resources such as bacteria, algae fungi and plants have been used for the production of low-cost, energy-efficient, and nontoxic environmental friendly metallic nanoparticles. This review provides an overview of various reports of green synthesised zero valent metallic iron (ZVMI) and iron oxide (Fe2O3/Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) and highlights their substantial applications in environmental pollution control. This review also summarizes the ecotoxicological impacts of green synthesised iron nanoparticles opposed to non-green synthesised iron nanoparticles. PMID:28335338

  5. Green Synthesis of Iron Nanoparticles and Their Environmental Applications and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Saif

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in nanoscience and nanotechnology have also led to the development of novel nanomaterials, which ultimately increase potential health and environmental hazards. Interest in developing environmentally benign procedures for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles has been increased. The purpose is to minimize the negative impacts of synthetic procedures, their accompanying chemicals and derivative compounds. The exploitation of different biomaterials for the synthesis of nanoparticles is considered a valuable approach in green nanotechnology. Biological resources such as bacteria, algae fungi and plants have been used for the production of low-cost, energy-efficient, and nontoxic environmental friendly metallic nanoparticles. This review provides an overview of various reports of green synthesised zero valent metallic iron (ZVMI and iron oxide (Fe2O3/Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs and highlights their substantial applications in environmental pollution control. This review also summarizes the ecotoxicological impacts of green synthesised iron nanoparticles opposed to non-green synthesised iron nanoparticles.

  6. A selective stepwise heme oxygenase model system: an iron(IV)-oxo porphyrin π-cation radical leads to a verdoheme-type compound via an isoporphyrin intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Bosch, Isaac; Sharma, Savita K; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2013-11-06

    The selective oxidation of the α-position of two heme-Fe(III) tetraarylporphryinate complexes occurs when water(hydroxide) attacks their oxidized Cmpd I-type equivalents, high-valent Fe(IV)═O π-cation radical species ((P(+•))Fe(IV)═O). Stepwise intermediate formation occurs, as detected by UV-vis spectroscopic monitoring or mass spectrometric interrogation, being iron(III) isoporphyrins, iron(III) benzoyl-biliverdins, and the final verdoheme-like products. Heme oxygenase (HO) enzymes could proceed through heterolytic cleavage of an iron(III)-hydroperoxo intermediate to form a transient Cmpd I-type species.

  7. Rapid hydrogen and oxygen atom transfer by a high-valent nickel-oxygen species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corona, Teresa; Draksharapu, Apparao; Padamati, Sandeep K; Gamba, Ilaria; Martin-Diaconescu, Vlad; Acuña-Parés, Ferran; Browne, Wesley R; Company, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Terminal high-valent metal-oxygen species are key reaction intermediates in the catalytic cycle of both enzymes (e.g., oxygenases) and synthetic oxidation catalysts. While tremendous efforts have been directed towards the characterization of the biologically relevant terminal manganese-oxygen and

  8. Zero-Valent Metallic Treatment System and Its Application for Removal and Remediation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (Pcbs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jacqueline W. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian A. (Inventor); Geiger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen B. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    PCBs are removed from contaminated media using a treatment system including zero-valent metal particles and an organic hydrogen donating solvent. The treatment system may include a weak acid in order to eliminate the need for a coating of catalytic noble metal on the zero-valent metal particles. If catalyzed zero-valent metal particles are used, the treatment system may include an organic hydrogen donating solvent that is a non-water solvent. The treatment system may be provided as a "paste-like" system that is preferably applied to natural media and ex-situ structures to eliminate PCBs.

  9. Green rust formation controls nutrient availability in a ferruginous water column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zegeye, Asfaw; Bonneville, Steeve; Benning, Liane G.

    2013-01-01

    a mechanism for reconstructing ancient ocean chemistry. Such reconstructions depend, however, on precise knowledge of the iron minerals formed in the water column. Here, we combine mineralogical and geochemical analyses to demonstrate formation of the mixed-valence iron mineral, green rust, in ferruginous......Iron-rich (ferruginous) conditions were a prevalent feature of the ocean throughout much of Earth's history. The nature of elemental cycling in such settings is poorly understood, however, thus hampering reconstruction of paleoenvironmental conditions during key periods in Earth evolution...

  10. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron dextran injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood ... be treated with iron supplements taken by mouth. Iron dextran injection is in a class of medications called ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... re more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ... which are the best sources of iron. However, vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ... which are the best sources of iron. However, vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can provide enough iron if you eat the right foods. For example, good nonmeat sources of iron ... can provide enough iron if you eat the right foods. For example, good nonmeat sources of iron ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of iron include iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark ... of iron include iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... enough iron, your body starts using the iron it has stored. Soon, the stored iron gets used ... fewer red blood cells. The red blood cells it does make have less hemoglobin than normal. Iron- ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... good nonmeat sources of iron include iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach ... good nonmeat sources of iron include iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods (foods that have iron ... you: Follow a diet that excludes meat and fish, which are the best sources of iron. However, ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sources of iron include iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other ... sources of iron include iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drawings also can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Poor Diet The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, ... more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat the ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ... Treatment may need to be done in a hospital. The goals of treating iron-deficiency anemia are ...

  1. Bubble columns : Structures or stability?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harteveld, W.K.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to contribute to the understanding of the hydrodynamics of the gravity driven bubbly flow that can be found in bubble columns. Special attention is paid to the large scale structures that have a strong impact on several key parameters such as the degree of mixing, mass and

  2. Editorial/Associate Editor's Column

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 2. Editorial / Associate Editor's Column. Rajaram Nityananda. Editorial Volume 5 Issue 2 February 2000 pp 1-1. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/005/02/0001-0001. Author Affiliations.

  3. Ferrous iron content of intravenous iron formulations

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ajay; Pratt, Raymond D; Crumbliss, Alvin L.

    2016-01-01

    The observed biological differences in safety and efficacy of intravenous (IV) iron formulations are attributable to physicochemical differences. In addition to differences in carbohydrate shell, polarographic signatures due to ferric iron [Fe(III)] and ferrous iron [Fe(II)] differ among IV iron formulations. Intravenous iron contains Fe(II) and releases labile iron in the circulation. Fe(II) generates toxic free radicals and reactive oxygen species and binds to bacterial siderophores and oth...

  4. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  5. Soft chemical control of the crystal and magnetic structure of a layered mixed valent manganite oxide sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack N. Blandy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative deintercalation of copper ions from the sulfide layers of the layered mixed-valent manganite oxide sulfide Sr2MnO2Cu1.5S2 results in control of the copper-vacancy modulated superstructure and the ordered arrangement of magnetic moments carried by the manganese ions. This soft chemistry enables control of the structures and properties of these complex materials which complement mixed-valent perovskite and perovskite-related transition metal oxides.

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have enough iron stored in your body to make up for the lost iron, you'll develop iron- ... by mouth. This therapy also is given to people who need immediate treatment for iron-deficiency ... have iron-deficiency anemia, get ongoing care to make sure your iron levels are improving. At your ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. Causes Not having enough iron in your body causes iron-deficiency anemia. Lack of iron usually is due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can provide enough iron if you eat the right foods. For example, good nonmeat sources of iron include iron-fortified breads and cereals, ... can provide enough iron if you eat the right foods. For example, good nonmeat sources of iron include iron-fortified breads and cereals, ...

  9. Affective priming in the valent/neutral categorisation task is due to affective matching, not encoding facilitation: reply to Spruyt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothermund, Klaus; Werner, Benedikt

    2014-04-01

    Spruyt obtained an affective congruency effect in a valent/neutral categorisation task, which contrasts with the absence of such an effect in the same task that was reported by Werner and Rothermund. The crucial difference between the two studies is that Spruyt presented only valent primes, whereas Werner and Rothermund presented equal amounts of valent and neutral primes and targets in their experiments. Removing the neutral primes introduces a confound of affective matches with the required response. Affective congruency effects in Spruyt's study can be explained straightforwardly in terms of such an affective matching strategy. To demonstrate the influence of matching strategies in the valent/neutral task without neutral primes, we conducted an experiment in which we induced an affective mismatching strategy. In support of our reasoning, this study revealed an affective incongruency effect in the valent/neutral categorisation task. We conclude that affective congruency as well as incongruency effects in the valent/neutral categorisation task reflect post-lexical affective (mis-)matching strategies rather than encoding facilitation.

  10. Hexavalent chromium reduction with scrap iron in continuous-flow system. Part 2: Effect of scrap iron shape and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheju, M; Balcu, I

    2010-10-15

    Hexavalent chromium reduction with scrap iron has the advantage that two wastes are treated simultaneously. The reduction of hexavalent chromium by scrap iron was investigated in continuous system, using as reducing agent the following scrap iron shapes and sizes: (1) spiral fibers, (2) shavings, and (3) powder. The shape and size of scrap iron were found to have a significant influence on chromium and iron species concentration in column effluent, on column effluent pH and on Cr(VI) reduction mechanism. While for large scrap iron particles (spiral fibers) homogeneous reduction is the dominant Cr(VI) reduction process, for small scrap iron particles (powder) heterogeneous reduction appears to be the dominant reaction contributing to Cr(VI) reduction. All three shapes and sizes investigated in this work have both advantages and disadvantages. If found in sufficient quantities, scrap iron powder seem to be the optimum shape and size for the continuous reduction of Cr(VI), due to the following advantages: (1) the greatest reduction capacity, (2) the most important pH increase in column effluent (up to 6.3), (3) no chromium was detected in the column effluent during the first 60 h of the experiment, and (4) the lowest steady-state Cr(VI) concentration observed in column effluent (3.7 mg/L). But, despite of a lower reduction capacity in comparison with powder particles, spiral fibers and shavings have the advantage to result in large quantities from the mechanic processing of steel. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Modeling of column apparatus processes

    CERN Document Server

    Boyadjiev, Christo; Boyadjiev, Boyan; Popova-Krumova, Petya

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a new approach for the modeling of chemical and interphase mass transfer processes in industrial column apparatuses, using convection-diffusion and average-concentration models. The convection-diffusion type models are used for a qualitative analysis of the processes and to assess the main, small and slight physical effects, and then reject the slight effects. As a result, the process mechanism can be identified. It also introduces average concentration models for quantitative analysis, which use the average values of the velocity and concentration over the cross-sectional area of the column. The new models are used to analyze different processes (simple and complex chemical reactions, absorption, adsorption and catalytic reactions), and make it possible to model the processes of gas purification with sulfur dioxide, which form the basis of several patents.

  12. Revaccination with a 23-Valent Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine Induces Elevated and Persistent Functional Antibody Responses in Adults Aged ⩾65 Years

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Susan B. Manoff; Charles Liss; Michael J. Caulfield; Rocio D. Marchese; Jeffrey Silber; John Boslego; Sandra Romero-Steiner; Gowrisankar Rajam; Nina E. Glass; Cynthia G. Whitney; George M. Carlone

    2010-01-01

    .... We compared revaccination with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PN23) with primary vaccination for eliciting initial and persistent functional antibody responses. Methods. Subjects aged...

  13. Nanoscale zero valent supported by Zeolite and Montmorillonite: Template effect of the removal of lead ion from an aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arancibia-Miranda, Nicolás, E-mail: nicolas.arancibia@usach.cl [Facultad de Química y Biología, CEDENNA, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, USACH, Casilla 40, Santiago C.P. 33 (Chile); Baltazar, Samuel E. [Departamento de Física, CEDENNA, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, USACH, Av. Ecuador 3493, Santiago 9170124 (Chile); García, Alejandra [CIMAV, S.C. Alianza Norte 202, Carretera Monterrey-Aeropuerto Km 10, C.P. 66600, Apodaca Nuevo León (Mexico); University of Texas at San Antonio, Physics and Astronomy Department, One UTSA circle 78249, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Muñoz-Lira, Daniela [Facultad de Química y Biología, CEDENNA, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, USACH, Casilla 40, Santiago C.P. 33 (Chile); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, UCH, Las Palmeras 3425, Santiago 7800024 (Chile); Sepúlveda, Pamela; Rubio, María A. [Facultad de Química y Biología, CEDENNA, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, USACH, Casilla 40, Santiago C.P. 33 (Chile); Altbir, Dora [Departamento de Física, CEDENNA, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, USACH, Av. Ecuador 3493, Santiago 9170124 (Chile)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • The Z–nZVI and Mt–nZVI composites showed a high efficiency in the removal of Pb{sup 2+} present in aqueous solutions. • The fastest removal of Pb{sup 2+} was obtained with Mt–nZVI. • The adsorption intensity increased 300 times in the composites, respect to the pristine materials. • The magnetic behavior of the composites reveals a high presence of nZVI particles. • These composites have potential industrial and environmental applications. - Abstract: In this work, we have studied the Pb{sup 2+} sorption capacity of Zeolite (Z) and Montmorillonite (Mt) functionalized with nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI), at 50% w/w, obtained by means of an impregnating process with a solvent excess. The composites were characterized by several techniques including X-ray diffraction; scanning electron microscopy (SEM); BET area; isoelectric point (IEP); and, finally a magnetic response. Comparatively significant differences in terms of electrophoretic and magnetic characteristics were found between the pristine materials and the composites. Both structures show a high efficiency and velocity in the removal of Pb{sup 2+} up to 99.0% (200.0 ppm) after 40 min of reaction time. The removal kinetics of Pb{sup 2+} is adequately described by the pseudo second-order kinetic model, and the maximum adsorbed amounts (q{sub e}) of this analyte are in close accordance with the experimental results. The intraparticle diffusion model shows that this is not the only rate-limiting step, this being the Langmuir model which was well adjusted to our experimental data. Therefore, maximum sorption capacities were found to be 115.1 ± 11.0, 105.5 ± 9.0, 68.3 ± 1.3, 54.2 ± 1.3, and 50.3 ± 4.2 mg g{sup −1}, for Mt–nZVI, Z–nZVI, Zeolite, Mt, and nZVI, respectively. The higher sorption capacities can be attributed to the synergetic behavior between the clay and iron nanoparticles, as a consequence of the clay coating process with nZVI. These results suggest that both

  14. Fekete-Szegö inequalities for p-valent starlike and convex functions of complex order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. Aouf

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we obtain Fekete-Szegö inequalities for certain class of analytic p-valent functions f(z for which 1+1b1pz(f∗g′(z+λz2(f∗g″(z(1-λ(f∗g(z+λz(f∗g′(z-1≺φ(z(b∈C∗=C⧹{0}. Sharp bounds for the Fekete-Szegö functional |ap+2-μap+12| are obtained.

  15. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzicka, Alex M.; Haack, Henning; Chabot, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    By far most of the melted and differentiated planetesimals that have been sampled as meteorites are metal-rich iron meteorites or stony iron meteorites. The parent asteroids of these meteorites accreted early and differentiated shortly after the solar system formed, producing some of the oldest...... and interpretations for iron and stony iron meteorites (Plate 13.1). Such meteorites provide important constraints on the nature of metal-silicate separation and mixing in planetesimals undergoing partial to complete differentiation. They include iron meteorites that formed by the solidification of cores...... (fractionally crystallized irons), irons in which partly molten metal and silicates of diverse types were mixed together (silicate-bearing irons), stony irons in which partly molten metal and olivine from cores and mantles were mixed together (pallasites), and stony irons in which partly molten metal...

  16. [Iron dysregulation and anemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Katsuya

    2015-10-01

    Most iron in the body is utilized as a component of hemoglobin that delivers oxygen to the entire body. Under normal conditions, the iron balance is tightly regulated. However, iron dysregulation does occasionally occur; total iron content reductions cause iron deficiency anemia and overexpression of the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin disturbs iron utilization resulting in anemia of chronic disease. Conversely, the presence of anemia may ultimately lead to iron overload; for example, thalassemia, a common hereditary anemia worldwide, often requires transfusion, but long-term transfusions cause iron accumulation that leads to organ damage and other poor outcomes. On the other hand, there is a possibility that iron overload itself can cause anemia; iron chelation therapy for the post-transfusion iron overload observed in myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia improves dependency on transfusions in some cases. These observations reflect the extremely close relationship between anemias and iron metabolism.

  17. Iron and manganese oxide mineralization in the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, J. R.; Koschinsky, A.; Halbach, P.; Manheim, F. T.; Bau, M.; Jung-Keuk, Kang; Lubick, N.

    1997-01-01

    Iron, manganese, and iron-manganese deposits occur in nearly all geomorphologic and tectonic environments in the ocean basins and form by one or more of four processes: (1) hydrogenetic precipitation from cold ambient seawater, (2) precipitation from hydrothermal fluids, (3) precipitation from sediment pore waters that have been modified from bottom water compositions by diagenetic reactions in the sediment column and (4) replacement of rocks and sediment. These processes are discussed.

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  19. Axisymmetric collapses of granular columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lube, Gert; Huppert, Herbert E.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Hallworth, Mark A.

    2004-06-01

    Experimental observations of the collapse of initially vertical columns of small grains are presented. The experiments were performed mainly with dry grains of salt or sand, with some additional experiments using couscous, sugar or rice. Some of the experimental flows were analysed using high-speed video. There are three different flow regimes, dependent on the value of the aspect ratio a {=} h_i/r_i, where h_i and r_i are the initial height and radius of the granular column respectively. The differing forms of flow behaviour are described for each regime. In all cases a central, conically sided region of angle approximately 59(°) , corresponding to an aspect ratio of 1.7, remains undisturbed throughout the motion. The main experimental results for the final extent of the deposit and the time for emplacement are systematically collapsed in a quantitative way independent of any friction coefficients. Along with the kinematic data for the rate of spread of the front of the collapsing column, this is interpreted as indicating that frictional effects between individual grains in the bulk of the moving flow only play a role in the last instant of the flow, as it comes to an abrupt halt. For a {reach r_infty is given by t_infty {=} 3(h_i/g)(1/2} {=} 3(r_i/g)({1/2}a^{1/2)) , where g is the gravitational acceleration. The insights and conclusions gained from these experiments can be applied to a wide range of industrial and natural flows of concentrated particles. For example, the observation of the rapid deposition of the grains can help explain details of the emplacement of pyroclastic flows resulting from the explosive eruption of volcanoes.

  20. pH-Dependent reactivity of oxidants formed by iron and copper-catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hongshin; Lee, Hye-Jin; Sedlak, David L; Lee, Changha

    2013-07-01

    The decomposition of hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by iron and copper leads to the generation of reactive oxidants capable of oxidizing various organic compounds. However, the specific nature of the reactive oxidants is still unclear, with evidence suggesting the production of hydroxyl radical or high-valent metal species. To identify the reactive species in the Fenton system, the oxidation of a series of different compounds (phenol, benzoic acid, methanol, Reactive Black 5 and arsenite) was studied for iron- and copper-catalyzed reactions at varying pH values. At lower pH values, more reactive oxidants appear to be formed in both iron and copper-catalyzed systems. The aromatic compounds, phenol and benzoic acid, were not oxidized under neutral or alkaline pH conditions, whereas methanol, Reactive Black 5, and arsenite were oxidized to a different degree, depending on the catalytic system. The oxidants responsible for the oxidation of compounds at neutral and alkaline pH values are likely to be high-valent metal complexes of iron and copper (i.e., ferryl and cupryl ions). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of gamma column scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Bum; Jung, Sung Hee; Jun, Jong Kyu; Kim, Jin Sup

    2004-11-01

    Distillation column is important unit in petro-chemical industries, and its on-line diagnose is important. To get density profile measured by the radiation transmitted through column is well method for on-line diagnose to find out missing tray or flooding. In many cases the distance from radiation detector to detection circuit is up to 100m long. Conventional radiation detection method that is to transmit analog signal by co axial cable directly to detection circuit couldn't give good result because of its long cable. In this case the system is sensitive to electric noise because of long cable and interface between the radiation circuit and the controller for mechanical system. The radiation detection system introduced here is using digital modulated signal and loop coil to transmit signal instead of slip ring and analog signal. In detail detection part of automatic gamma scanner consists of high voltage circuit, PHA circuit FSK modem and battery. This method isolates power system and gives good solution for automatic gamma scanning by isolating the controlling circuit of mechanical system from radiation detecting circuit which is sensitive to noise.

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia What Is Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  3. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extra iron in their diets. People following a vegetarian diet might also need added iron. What's Iron ... as Whole Milk? About Anemia Minerals What's a Vegetarian? Word! Anemia Anemia Food Labels Vitamins and Minerals ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of red blood cells, hemoglobin, and iron. Dietary Changes and Supplements Iron You may need iron supplements ... are improving. At your checkups, your doctor may change your medicines or supplements. He or she also ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your doctor may advise you to eat more foods that are rich in iron. The best source ... iron from meat better than iron from nonmeat foods. However, some nonmeat foods also can help you ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ... because your need for iron increases during these times of growth and development. Inability To Absorb Enough ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or iron supplements, when used properly, can help prevent iron-deficiency anemia in infants and young children. ... in the diet. Too much milk also may prevent children's bodies from absorbing iron from other foods. ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have iron-deficiency anemia, you'll have a high level of transferrin that has no iron. Other ... may include dietary changes and supplements, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require a blood ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs and ... much of the transferrin in your blood isn't carrying iron. If you have iron-deficiency anemia, ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Blood Loss When you lose blood, you lose ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron in your body (a condition called iron overload). Too much iron in your body can damage ... talk about their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ... beans. Other lifestyle changes, such as getting enough sleep and exercising, also have helped Susan feel better. ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is low in iron. For this and other reasons, cow's milk isn't recommended for babies in ... iron in your body is low. For this reason, other iron tests also are done. Serum ferritin. ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... been used. Transferrin level, or total iron-binding capacity. Transferrin is a protein that carries iron in your blood. Total iron-binding capacity measures how much of the transferrin in your ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to select: the entire site, the ... enough iron. Your child's doctor may recommend iron drops. However, giving a child too much iron can ...

  17. Characterising the reactivity of metallic iron in Fe0/As-rock/H O ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-03

    Jun 3, 2011 ... Characterising the reactivity of metallic iron in Fe0/As-rock/H. 2. O systems by long-term column experiments. C Noubactep*. Angewandte Geologie, Universität Göttingen, Goldschmidtstraße 3, D - 37077 Göttingen, Germany. Abstract. The intrinsic reactivity of 4 metallic iron materials (Fe0) was investigated ...

  18. Attrition resistant bulk iron catalysts and processes for preparing and using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jothimurugesan, Kandaswamy; Goodwin, Jr., James G.; Gangwal, Santosh K.

    2007-08-21

    An attrition resistant precipitated bulk iron catalyst is prepared from iron oxide precursor and a binder by spray drying. The catalysts are preferably used in carbon monoxide hydrogenation processes such as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. These catalysts are suitable for use in fluidized-bed reactors, transport reactors and, especially, slurry bubble column reactors.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  20. Encapsulation of iron nanoparticles in alginate biopolymer for trichloroethylene remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezbaruah, Achintya N.; Shanbhogue, Sai Sharanya; Simsek, Senay; Khan, Eakalak

    2011-12-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles (10-90 nm) were encapsulated in biodegradable calcium-alginate capsules for the first time for application in environmental remediation. Encapsulation is expected to offers distinct advances over entrapment. Trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation was 89-91% in 2 h, and the reaction followed pseudo first order kinetics for encapsulated NZVI systems with an observed reaction rate constant ( k obs) of 1.92-3.23 × 10-2 min-1 and a surface normalized reaction rate constant ( k sa) of 1.02-1.72 × 10-3 L m-2 min-1. TCE degradation reaction rates for encapsulated and bare NZVI were similar indicating no adverse affects of encapsulation on degradation kinetics. The shelf-life of encapsulated NZVI was found to be four months with little decrease in TCE removal efficiency.

  1. Redox control of iron biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie Rhianon

    Magnetotactic bacteria have evolved complex subcellular machinery to construct linear chains of magnetite nanocrystals that allow the host cell to sense direction. Each mixed-valent iron nanoparticle is mineralized from soluble iron within a membrane-encapsulated vesicle termed the magnetosome, which serves as a specialized compartment that regulates the iron, redox, and pH environment of the growing mineral. In order to dissect the biological components that control this process, we have carried out genetic and biochemical studies of proteins proposed to function in iron mineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. As iron biomineralization by magnetotactic bacteria represents a particularly interesting case for understanding how the production of nanomaterials can be programmed at the genetic level, we also apply synthetic biology techniques towards the production of new cellular materials and new cellular functions. As the production of magnetite requires both the formation of Fe(II) and Fe(III), the redox components of the magnetosome play an essential role in this process. Using genetic complementation studies, we show that the redox cofactors or heme sites of the two putative redox partners, MamP and MamT, are required for magnetite biomineralization in vivo and that removal of one or both sites leads to defects in mineralization. We develop and optimize a heterologous expression method in the E. coli periplasm to cleanly isolate fully heme-loaded MamP for biochemical studies. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the reduction potential of MamP lies in a different range than other c-type cytochrome involved in either Fe(III) reduction or Fe(II) oxidation. Nonetheless, in vitro mineralization studies with MamP and Fe(II) show that it is able to catalyze the formation of mixed-valent Fe(II)/Fe(III) oxides such as green rust. Biomineralization also requires lattice-templating proteins that guide the growth of the functional crystalline material. We

  2. Professional IronPython

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, John Paul

    2010-01-01

    Part I: Introducing IronPython. This short part is designed to get the reader started using IronPython. It answers basic installation and usage questions, how to get help, and what makes IronPython different from other languages. The reader also discovers how to use familiar tools such as Visual Studio to work with IronPython and creates a very simple IronPython example. Most importantly, the reader becomes familiar with the IronPython environment and discovers how to use it.; Part II: Using the IronPython Language. In this part, the reader learns the IronPython language. It assumes that the r

  3. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...... to that continuing on Earth – although on much smaller length- and timescales – with melting of the metal and silicates; differentiation into core, mantle, and crust; and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth...

  4. Structure and electrical resistivity of mixed-valent EuNi2P2 at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, S. A.; Naumov, P.; Barkalov, O.; Shekhar, C.; Palasyuk, T.; Ksenofontov, V.; Wortmann, G.; Felser, C.

    2014-08-01

    The structural properties and electrical resistivity of homogeneous mixed-valent EuNi2P2 are studied at pressures up to 45 GPa. No structural phase transition is observed in the whole pressure range and the overall pressure behavior of the structural parameters is similar to that of related compounds in the collapsed tetragonal ThCr2Si2-type structure. Electrical resistivity measured up to 31 GPa at temperatures between 4 and 300 K exhibits continuous changes from the behavior typical for a mixed-valent Eu system to that of a normal metallic system at pressures above 20 GPa, indicating a transition of the strongly mixed-valent Eu atoms with a valence ~2.5 towards a pure trivalent state. No superconductivity was observed in the whole studied pressure-temperature range.

  5. Environmental application of millimetre-scale sponge iron (s-Fe{sup 0}) particles (I): Pretreatment of cationic triphenylmethane dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Yongming, E-mail: juyongming@scies.org [South China Institute of Environmental Sciences, the Ministry of Environmental Protection of PRC, Guangzhou 510655 (China); Liu, Xiaowen, E-mail: liuxiaowen@scies.org [South China Institute of Environmental Sciences, the Ministry of Environmental Protection of PRC, Guangzhou 510655 (China); Li, Zhaoyong; Kang, Juan; Wang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yukui; Fang, Jiande [South China Institute of Environmental Sciences, the Ministry of Environmental Protection of PRC, Guangzhou 510655 (China); Dionysiou, Dionysios D., E-mail: dionysios.d.dionysiou@uc.edu [Environmental Engineering and Science Program, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0012 (United States)

    2015-02-11

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Millimetric s-Fe{sup 0} particles effectively reduce BG, MG, CV, and EV dyes. • s-Fe{sup 0} displays similar contaminant removal efficiency compared to nZVI. • s-Fe{sup 0} shows greater economic advantages than nZVI, iron powder, and iron scurf. • The reductive mechanism of BG over s-Fe{sup 0} under US condition is elucidated. - Abstract: To investigate the removal capability of millimetric zero valent iron (mmZVI), sponge iron (s-Fe{sup 0}) particles were characterized with XRD, XPS, TEM, HRSEM and EDS techniques. Moreover, the roles of particle size, catalyst dosage, dye concentration, mixing conditions (e.g. ultrasound (US), stirring or shaking), and regeneration treatment were studied with the removal of cationic triphenylmethane dyes. Notably, the reduction process was also revealed as compared to nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI), microscale iron power, and iron scurf. Furthermore, the reductive mechanism was exemplified with brilliant green. The results demonstrated that (1) the synergetic effect between US and s-Fe{sup 0} greatly enhanced the removal of dyes, (2) the dosage of preferred s-Fe{sup 0} (1–3 mm) particles was optimized as 30.0 g/L; (3) reuse cycles of s-Fe{sup 0} catalyst were enhanced with the assistance of diluted HCl solution; (4) the main degradation routes included the cleavage of conjugated structure reactions, N-de-ethylation reactions, hydroxylation reactions, the removal of benzene ring reactions, and opening ring reactions. Accordingly, the pretreatment of aqueous solution over s-Fe{sup 0} was hypothesized to achieve mainly through direct reduction reaction by electron transfer and indirect reductive reactions by the highly activated hydrogen atom. Additionally, decoration with noble metals was utilized to reveal the reaction mechanism.

  6. Oscillating water column structural model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, Guild [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bull, Diana L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jepsen, Richard Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gordon, Margaret Ellen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    An oscillating water column (OWC) wave energy converter is a structure with an opening to the ocean below the free surface, i.e. a structure with a moonpool. Two structural models for a non-axisymmetric terminator design OWC, the Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) are discussed in this report. The results of this structural model design study are intended to inform experiments and modeling underway in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated Reference Model Project (RMP). A detailed design developed by Re Vision Consulting used stiffeners and girders to stabilize the structure against the hydrostatic loads experienced by a BBDB device. Additional support plates were added to this structure to account for loads arising from the mooring line attachment points. A simplified structure was designed in a modular fashion. This simplified design allows easy alterations to the buoyancy chambers and uncomplicated analysis of resulting changes in buoyancy.

  7. Performance Evaluation of In-Situ Iron Reactive Barriers at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, D.B.

    2003-12-30

    In November 1997, a permeable iron reactive barrier trench was installed at the S-3 Ponds Pathway 2 Site located at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The overall goal of the project is to evaluate the ability of permeable reactive barrier technology to remove uranium, nitrate, and other inorganic contaminants in groundwater and to assess impacts of biogeochemical interactions on long-term performance of the treatment system. Zero-valent iron (Fe0) was used as the reactive medium, which creates a localized zone of reduction or low oxidation reduction potential (ORP), elevated pH, and dissolved H{sub 2} as Fe{sup 0} corrodes in groundwater. These conditions favor the removal of metals and radionuclides (such as uranium and technetium) through redox-driven precipitation and/or sorption to iron corrosion byproducts, such as iron oxyhydroxides. The technology is anticipated to be economical and low in maintenance as compared with conventional pump-and-treat technology. Groundwater monitoring results indicate that the iron barrier is effectively removing uranium and technetium, the primary contaminants of concern, as anticipated from our previous laboratory studies. In addition to uranium and technetium, nitrate, sulfate, bicarbonate, calcium, and magnesium are also found to be removed, either partially or completely by the iron barrier. Elevated concentrations of ferrous ions and sulfide, and pH were observed within the iron barrier. Although ferrous iron concentrations were initially very high after barrier installation, ferrous ion concentrations have decreased to low to non-detectable levels as the pH within the iron has increased over time (as high as 9 or 10). Iron and soil core samples were taken in February 1999 and May 2000 in order to evaluate the iron surface passivation, morphology, mineral precipitation and cementation, and microbial activity within and in the vicinity of the iron barrier. Results indicate that most of the iron filings collected in cores

  8. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  9. Decreased immune response to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine after 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdardottir, Sigurveig Th; Center, Kimberly J; Davidsdottir, Katrin; Arason, Vilhjalmur A; Hjalmarsson, Bjorn; Elisdottir, Ragnheidur; Ingolfsdottir, Gunnhildur; Northington, Robert; Scott, Daniel A; Jonsdottir, Ingileif

    2014-01-09

    Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) is used in children at high risk of IPD. PPV is generally not considered to induce immunologic memory, whereas pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) elicit protective antibody responses in infants and induce immunologic memory. Little is known about the characteristics of immune responses to PCV in children who previously received PCV and PPV in series. To characterize immune responses to 13-valent pneumococcal CRM197 conjugate vaccine (PCV13; serotypes 1, 3, 4, 5, 6A, 6B, 7F, 9V, 14, 18C, 19A, 19F, and 23F) in children vaccinated in infancy with 9-valent pneumococcal-meningococcal C-CRM197 conjugate combination vaccine (PCV9-MnCC), followed by a toddler dose of PCV9-MnCC or 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23). Children (n=89) who received PCV9-MnCC in infancy and PPV23 or PCV9-MnCC at age 12 months in a previous (2002-2003) study were vaccinated at age 7.5 years with PCV13; groups PPV23/PCV13 (n=50) and PCV9/PCV13 (n=39). Immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies, avidity, and opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) were measured before and at 1 and 4 weeks postvaccination. One week postvaccination, IgG levels increased significantly for all serotypes in both groups, and >97% of vaccinees achieved IgG ≥0.35μg/ml 4 weeks after PCV13 vaccination. The PCV9/PCV13 group had higher IgG responses compared with the PPV23/PCV13 group. The upper limits of the 95% confidence intervals of the PPV23/PCV13:PCV9/PCV13 IgG geometric mean concentration ratios were vaccination of toddlers may compromise subsequent responses to pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. The clinical relevance of this finding is unclear. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ecoturismo y desarrollo comunitario: el caso de “Valentín Natural” en el sureste de México

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Isaac Márquez; María Esther Ayala Arcipreste; Jorge Luis Sandoval Valladares; Francisco C. Burgos Salazar; Marco Antonio Arteaga Aguilar; Angélica P. Isaac Márquez; María Consuelo Sánchez González; Luis A. Manzanero Acevedo

    2016-01-01

    Se presenta el estudio de caso de “Valentín Natural”, promocionado por el Gobierno mexicano como un proyecto exitoso de ecoturismo comunitario en el sureste de México. Desde la perspectiva de los pobladores locales, se describe la manera como el ecoturismo ha modificado sus condiciones de vida, particularmente como fuente de empleo y de ingresos para la población. Los resultados indican que más allá de la retórica oficial, “Valentín Natural” no puede considerarse como un caso de éxito. La act...

  11. High-Density Chemical Intercalation of Zero-Valent Copper into Bi 2 Se 3 Nanoribbons

    KAUST Repository

    Koski, Kristie J.

    2012-05-09

    A major goal of intercalation chemistry is to intercalate high densities of guest species without disrupting the host lattice. Many intercalant concentrations, however, are limited by the charge of the guest species. Here we have developed a general solution-based chemical method for intercalating extraordinarily high densities of zero-valent copper metal into layered Bi 2Se 3 nanoribbons. Up to 60 atom % copper (Cu 7.5Bi 2Se 3) can be intercalated with no disruption to the host lattice using a solution disproportionation redox reaction. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  12. Biogeochemical gradients and microbial communities in Winogradsky columns established with polluted wetland sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcsányi, Izabella; Meite, Fatima; Imfeld, Gwenaël

    2017-08-01

    A Winogradsky column is a miniature ecosystem established with enriched sediments that can be used to study the relationship between biogeochemical gradients, microbial diversity and pollutant transformation. Biogeochemical processes and microbial communities changed with time and depth in Winogradsky columns incubated with heavy-metal-polluted wetland sediments for 520 days. 16S rRNA surveys were complemented by geochemical analyses, including heavy metal proportioning, to evaluate gradients in the mostly anoxic columns. Oxygen was depleted below the water-sediment interface (WSI), while NH4+, Fe2+, S2- and acetate increased by one order of magnitude at the bottom. Microbial niche differentiation occurred mainly by depth and from the light-exposed surface to the interior of the columns. Chemical gradients resulting from nutrient uptake by algae, and from iron and sulphate reduction mainly drove diversification. Heavy-metal proportioning did not significantly influence microbial diversity as Cu and Zn were immobilised at all depths. Proteobacteria were abundant in the top water and the WSI layers, whereas Firmicutes and Bacteroida dominated down-core. Together with low diversity and richness of communities at the WSI and column bottom, changes in the bacterial community coincided with algal-derived carbon sources and cellulose fermentation, respectively. We expect this study to be the starting point for the use Winogradsky columns to study microbial and geochemical dynamics in polluted sediments. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Soil column leaching of pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    In this review, I address the practical and theoretical aspects of pesticide soil mobility.I also address the methods used to measure mobility, and the factors that influence it, and I summarize the data that have been published on the column leaching of pesticides.Pesticides that enter the unsaturated soil profile are transported downwards by the water flux, and are adsorbed, desorbed, and/or degraded as they pass through the soil. The rate of passage of a pesticide through the soil depends on the properties of the pesticide, the properties of the soil and the prevailing environmental conditions.Because large amounts of many different pesticides are used around the world, they and their degradates may sometimes contaminate groundwater at unacceptable levels.It is for this reason that assessing the transport behavior and soil mobility of pesticides before they are sold into commerce is important and is one indispensable element that regulators use to assess probable pesticide safety. Both elementary soil column leaching and sophisticated outdoor lysimeter studies are performed to measure the leaching potential for pesticides; the latter approach more reliably reflects probable field behavior, but the former is useful to initially profile a pesticide for soil mobility potential.Soil is physically heterogeneous. The structure of soil varies both vertically and laterally, and this variability affects the complex flow of water through the soil profile, making it difficult to predict with accuracy. In addition, macropores exist in soils and further add to the complexity of how water flow occurs. The degree to which soil is tilled, the density of vegetation on the surface, and the type and amounts of organic soil amendments that are added to soil further affect the movement rate of water through soil, the character of soil adsorption sites and the microbial populations that exist in the soil. Parameters that most influence the rate of pesticide mobility in soil are

  14. Serum iron test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fe+2; Ferric ion; Fe++; Ferrous ion; Iron - serum; Anemia - serum iron; Hemochromatosis - serum iron ... A blood sample is needed. Iron levels are highest in the morning. Your health care provider will likely have you do this test in the morning.

  15. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  16. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as larger, full-term infants. Iron-fortified baby food or iron supplements, when used properly, can help prevent iron-deficiency ... Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources Anemia (MedlinePlus) "Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Iron" (Office of Dietary Supplements, National ...

  18. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium by Green Tea Polyphenols and Green Tea Nano Zero-Valent Iron (GT-nZVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysochoou, M; Reeves, K

    2017-03-01

    This study reports on the direct reduction of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] by green tea polyphenols, including a green tea solution and pure epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) solution. A linear trend was observed between the amount of reduced Cr(VI) and the amount of added polyphenols. The green tea solution showed a continued decrease in the observed stoichiometry with increasing pH, from a maximum of 1.4 mol per gallic acid equivalent (GAE) of green tea at pH 2.5, to 0.2 mol/GAE at pH 8.8. The EGCG solution exhibited different behavior, with a maximum stoichiometry of 2 at pH 7 and minimum of 1.6 at pH 4.4 and 8.9. When green tea was used to first react with Fe 3+ and form GT-nZVI, the amount of Cr(VI) reduced by a certain volume of GT-nZVI was double compared to green tea, and 6 times as high considering that GT-nZVI only contains 33 % green tea.

  19. Termination of nanoscale zero-valent iron reactivity by addition of bromate as a reducing reactivity competitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mines, Paul D.; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Droumpali, Ariadni

    2017-01-01

    an appropriate way to terminate the reactivity of any nZVI-containing material for a practical experimental procedure. In this study, bimetallic Ni/Fe-NPs were prepared to enhance overall reduction kinetics owing to the catalytic reactivity of nickel on the surface of nZVI. We have tested several chemical...

  20. Column: Factors Affecting Data Decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Fairbanks

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear physics, the phrase decay rate is used to denote the rate that atoms and other particles spontaneously decompose. Uranium-235 famously decays into a variety of daughter isotopes including Thorium and Neptunium, which themselves decay to others. Decay rates are widely observed and wildly different depending on many factors, both internal and external. U-235 has a half-life of 703,800,000 years, for example, while free neutrons have a half-life of 611 seconds and neutrons in an atomic nucleus are stable.We posit that data in computer systems also experiences some kind of statistical decay process and thus also has a discernible decay rate. Like atomic decay, data decay fluctuates wildly. But unlike atomic decay, data decay rates are the result of so many different interplaying processes that we currently do not understand them well enough to come up with quantifiable numbers. Nevertheless, we believe that it is useful to discuss some of the factors that impact the data decay rate, for these factors frequently determine whether useful data about a subject can be recovered by forensic investigation.(see PDF for full column

  1. Synthesis of iron nanoparticles with poly(1-vinylpyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate) and its application to nitrate reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Nara; Choi, Kyunghoon; Uthuppu, Basil

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to synthesize dispersed and reactive nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) with poly(1-vinylpyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate) (PVP/VA), nontoxic and biodegradable stabilizer. The nZVI used for the experiments was prepared by reduction of ferric solution in the presence of PVP/VA with spe......This study aimed to synthesize dispersed and reactive nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) with poly(1-vinylpyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate) (PVP/VA), nontoxic and biodegradable stabilizer. The nZVI used for the experiments was prepared by reduction of ferric solution in the presence of PVP....../VA with specific weight ratios to iron contents. Colloidal stability was investigated based on the rate of sedimentation, hydrodynamic radius and zeta potential measurement. The characteristic time, which demonstrated dispersivity of particles resisting aggregation, increased from 21.2 min (bare nZVI) to 97.8 min...... with increasing amount of PVP/VA (the ratios of 2). For the most stable nZVI coated by PVP/VA, its reactivity was examined by nitrate reduction in a closed batch system. The pseudo-first-order kinetic rate constants for the nitrate reduction by the nanoparticles with PVP/VA ratios of 0 and 2 were 0.1633 and 0...

  2. Multinuclear metalladithiolenes: focusing on electronic communication in mixed-valent states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Ryota; Tsukada, Satoru; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2012-09-14

    This Perspective addresses our recent studies relating to metalladithiolenes and their cluster complexes that exhibit peculiar electronic communication in mixed-valent (MV) states. Chapter 1 provides an introduction for the Perspective. Chapter 2 enumerates a series of phenylene-annulated π-conjugated trinuclear metalladithiolenes with intense electronic communication in the MV states. Chapter 3 treats heterometal cluster complexes synthesized by integrating zero-valent metal carbonyls on mononuclear metalladithiolenes, taking advantage of the coordination unsaturation of the latter. In the field of MV chemistry, their electronic communication through metal-metal bonds and potential inversion behavior are intriguing properties. Chapter 4 describes hexanuclear and nonanuclear heterometal cluster complexes created in combination with the methods introduced in Chapters 2 and 3. The resultant heterometal cluster complexes feature electronic communication through the vast phenylene-annulated π-conjugated trinuclear metalladithiolene frameworks, the intensity of which correlates with their planarity. Each chapter describes the synthesis, structural features, and electrochemical properties of the relevant compounds.

  3. Oligonuclear ferrocene amides: mixed-valent peptides and potential redox-switchable foldamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebler, Daniel; Linseis, Michael; Gasi, Teuta; Carrella, Luca M; Winter, Rainer F; Förster, Christoph; Heinze, Katja

    2011-04-11

    Trinuclear ferrocene tris-amides were synthesized from an Fmoc- or Boc-protected ferrocene amino acid, and hydrogen-bonded zigzag conformations were determined by NMR spectroscopy, molecular modelling, and X-ray diffraction. In these ordered secondary structures orientation of the individual amide dipole moments approximately in the same direction results in a macrodipole moment similar to that of α-helices composed of α-amino acids. Unlike ordinary α-amino acids, the building blocks in these ferrocene amides with defined secondary structure can be sequentially oxidized to mono-, di-, and trications. Singly and doubly charged mixed-valent cations were probed experimentally by Vis/NIR, paramagnetic ¹H NMR and Mössbauer spectroscopy and investigated theoretically by DFT calculations. According to the appearance of intervalence charge transfer (IVCT) bands in solution, the ferrocene/ferrocenium amides are described as Robin-Day class II mixed-valent systems. Mössbauer spectroscopy indicates trapped valences in the solid state. The secondary structure of trinuclear ferrocene tris-amides remains intact (coiled form) upon oxidation to mono- and dications according to DFT calculations, while oxidation to the trication should break the intramolecular hydrogen bonding and unfold the ferrocene peptide (uncoiled form).

  4. A rapid microwave-assisted solvothermal approach to lower-valent transition metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead-Rosenberg, Zachary; Harrison, Katharine L; Turner, Travis; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2013-11-18

    A green, rapid microwave-assisted solvothermal process using tetraethylene glycol (TEG) as a reducing agent has been explored as a soft-chemistry route for the preparation of various lower-valent transition metal oxides. To demonstrate the feasibility of the approach, lower-valent binary oxides such as V4O9, Mn3O4 or MnO, CoO, and Cu2O have been obtained within a short reaction time of 30 min by reducing, respectively, V2O5, MnO2, Co3O4, and CuO with TEG at LaCoO3, LaNiO3, and La4Ni3O10. The oxidation state of the transition metal ions and the oxygen content in these ternary oxides could be tuned by precisely controlling the reaction temperatures from 160 to 300 °C. The products have been characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and iodometric titration. The versatility of this novel technique is demonstrated by the facile synthesis of V4O9, which has only been produced recently in single-phase form.

  5. Dynamic Effects of Diabatization in Distillation Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic eects of diabatization in distillation columns are investigated in simulation with primary focus on the heat-integrated distillation column (HIDiC). A generic, dynamic, rst-principle model has been formulated, which is exible to describe various diabatic distillation congurations. Dyn...

  6. Stunting correlates with high salivary and serum antibody levels after 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination of Venezuelan Amerindian children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, L.M.; Hermsen, M.; Rivera-Olivero, I.; Sisco, M.C.; Pinelli, E.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Berbers, G.A.; Waard, J.H. de; Jonge, M.I. de

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of pre-vaccination nutritional status on vaccine responses in Venezuelan Warao Amerindian children vaccinated with the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) and to investigate whether saliva can be used as read-out for these vaccine responses. METHODS: A

  7. Antigen-specific IgA titres after 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine indicate transient antibody deficiency disease in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Willemijn J M; Nierkens, Stefan; Sanders, Elisabeth A; Boes, Marianne; van Montfrans, Joris M

    2015-01-01

    Paediatric patients with antibody deficiency may either be delayed in development of humoral immunity or may be persistently deficient in antibody production. To differentiate between these entities, we examined the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide (PnPS) vaccine-induced IgM-, IgG- and IgA

  8. Chemical removal of nitrate from water by aluminum-iron alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Pu, Yuan; Qi, Wei-Kang; Yang, Xiao Jin; Tang, Yang; Wan, Pingyu; Fisher, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Zero-valent iron has been intensively investigated in chemical reduction of nitrate in water, but the reduction requires acidic or weak acidic pH conditions and the product of the reduction is exclusively ammonium, an even more toxic substance. Zero-valent aluminum is a stronger reductant than iron, but its use for the reduction of aqueous nitrate requires considerably alkaline pH conditions. In this study, aluminum-iron alloys with an iron content of 10%, 20% and 58% (termed Al-Fe10, Al-Fe20 and Al-Fe58, respectively) were investigated for the reduction of aqueous nitrate. Al-Fe alloys were efficient to reduce nitrate in water in an entire pH range of 2-12 and the reduction proceeded in a pseudo-first order at near neutral pH conditions. The observed reaction rate constant (Kobs) of Al-Fe10 was 3 times higher than that of Fe and the Kobs of Al-Fe20 doubled that of Al-Fe10. The nitrogen selectivity of the reduction by Al-Fe10, Al-Fe20 and Al-Fe58 was 17.6%, 23.9% and 40.3%, respectively at pH 7 and the nitrogen selectivity by Al-Fe20 increased from 18.9% at pH 2-60.3% at pH 12. The enhanced selectivity and reactivity of Al-Fe alloys were likely due to the presence of an intermetallic Al-Fe compound (Al13Fe4). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Oprensning af forureningen på depotet ved Høfde 42 ved hjælp af nul-valent jern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Kjeldsen, Peter; Petersen, Peter Alfred

    Rapporten beskriver forsøg med nul-valent jern på forurenet vand og sediment fra depotet ved Høfde 42 på Harboøre Tange. Resultaterner viser, at parathion og malathion hurtigt og fuldstændigt bliver omdannet til langt mindre toksiske forbindelser, og endvidere nedbrydes mange af de tilstedeværende...... nedbrydningsprodukter betydeligt. Desuden beskrives oprensningsmetoder med nul-valent jern, herunder ZVI-clay teknologien, der her er identificeret som den bedst måde at anvende nul-valent jern til oprensning af forureningen ved Høfde 42....

  10. The effects of metamorphism on iron mineralogy and the iron speciation redox proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotznick, Sarah P.; Eiler, John M.; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2018-03-01

    As the most abundant transition metal in the Earth's crust, iron is a key player in the planetary redox budget. Observations of iron minerals in the sedimentary record have been used to describe atmospheric and aqueous redox environments over the evolution of our planet; the most common method applied is iron speciation, a geochemical sequential extraction method in which proportions of different iron minerals are compared to calibrations from modern sediments to determine water-column redox state. Less is known about how this proxy records information through post-depositional processes, including diagenesis and metamorphism. To get insight into this, we examined how the iron mineral groups/pools (silicates, oxides, sulfides, etc.) and paleoredox proxy interpretations can be affected by known metamorphic processes. Well-known metamorphic reactions occurring in sub-chlorite to kyanite rocks are able to move iron between different iron pools along a range of proxy vectors, potentially affecting paleoredox results. To quantify the effect strength of these reactions, we examined mineralogical and geochemical data from two classic localities where Silurian-Devonian shales, sandstones, and carbonates deposited in a marine sedimentary basin with oxygenated seawater (based on global and local biological constraints) have been regionally metamorphosed from lower-greenschist facies to granulite facies: Waits River and Gile Mountain Formations, Vermont, USA and the Waterville and Sangerville-Vassalboro Formations, Maine, USA. Plotting iron speciation ratios determined for samples from these localities revealed apparent paleoredox conditions of the depositional water column spanning the entire range from oxic to ferruginous (anoxic) to euxinic (anoxic and sulfidic). Pyrrhotite formation in samples highlighted problems within the proxy as iron pool assignment required assumptions about metamorphic reactions and pyrrhotite's identification depended on the extraction techniques

  11. Emerging pneumococcal carriage serotypes in a high-risk population receiving universal 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine since 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stubbs Liz

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Australia in June 2001, a unique pneumococcal vaccine schedule commenced for Indigenous infants; seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7PCV given at 2, 4, and 6 months of age and 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (23PPV at 18 months of age. This study presents carriage serotypes following this schedule. Methods We conducted cross sectional surveys of pneumococcal carriage in Aboriginal children 0 to 6 years of age living in remote Aboriginal communities (RACs in 2003 and 2005. Nasal secretions were collected and processed according to published methods. Results 902 children (mean age 25 months living in 29 communities in 2003 and 818 children (mean age 35 months in 17 communities in 2005 were enrolled. 87% children in 2003 and 96% in 2005 had received two or more doses of 7PCV. From 2003 to 2005, pneumococcal carriage was reduced from 82% to 76% and reductions were apparent in all age groups; 7PCV-type carriage was reduced from 11% to 8%, and 23PPV-non-7PCV-type carriage from 31% to 25% respectively. Thus non-23PPV-type carriage increased from 57% to 67%. All these changes were statistically significant, as were changes for some specific serotypes. Shifts could not be attributed to vaccination alone. The top 10 of 40 serotypes identified were (in descending order 16F, 19A, 11A, 6C, 23B, 19F, 6A, 35B, 6B, 10A and 35B. Carriage of penicillin non-susceptible (MIC > = 0.12 μg/mL strains (15% overall was detected in serotypes (descending order 19A, 19F, 6B, 16F, 11A, 9V, 23B, and in 4 additional serotypes. Carriage of azithromycin resistant (MIC > = 2 μg/mL strains (5% overall, was detected in serotypes (descending order 23B, 17F, 9N, 6B, 6A, 11A, 23F, and in 10 additional serotypes including 6C. Conclusion Pneumococcal carriage remains high (~80% in this vaccinated population. Uptake of both pneumococcal vaccines increased, and carriage was reduced between 2003 and 2005. Predominant serotypes in combined

  12. General health, otitis media, nasopharyngeal carriage and middle ear microbiology in Northern Territory Aboriginal children vaccinated during consecutive periods of 10-valent or 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Amanda J; Wigger, Christine; Beissbarth, Jemima; Woltring, Donna; Andrews, Ross; Chatfield, Mark D; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi; Morris, Peter S

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to monitor the prevalence of suppurative otitis media in remote Indigenous communities after introduction of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in October 2011. We previously reported a decline in suppurative OM following replacement of PCV7 by 10-valent pneumococcal Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV10) in October 2009. We continued regular surveillance in remote Indigenous communities between February 2010 and August 2013. This analysis reports the general health, otitis media (OM), nasopharyngeal (NP) carriage and middle ear microbiology in children less than 36 months of age who received a primary course of at least two doses of PHiD-CV10 or PCV13, and not more than one dose of another pneumococcal vaccine. Mean ages of 511 PHiD-CV10- and 140 PCV13-vaccinated children were 19 and 13 months, respectively. Most children received 3-dose non-mixed PCV schedules. At the time of assessment, general health was poor and prevalence of risk factors was high in both groups: overall, around 14% of children had scabies, 20% had impetigo, 59% had runny nose and 39% had cough. Average household size was 8 persons, and 60% of the mothers smoked. Bilaterally normal middle ears were detected in 10% and 7%, respectively. OM with effusion (OME), almost all bilateral, was diagnosed in 52% and 50%, any suppurative OM (acute OM or any tympanic membrane perforation [TMP]) in 37% and 41%, and TMP in 14% and 12%, respectively. Children in the PCV13 group had significantly less NP carriage of combined Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) and non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) (62% versus 51%) but significantly more polymicrobial (Spn and NTHi) middle ear cultures (12% versus 43%), and significantly less Staphylococcus aureus-positive middle ears (40% versus 7%). Although NP carriage of pneumococcal serotype 19A was low in the PCV13 group, serotypes 19F and 23F persist. The general health, particularly ear health, of little children

  13. Mining iron: Iron uptake and transport in plants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Sun A; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2007-01-01

    .... Iron transport within plants is also tightly controlled. New information has emerged on transporters that play a role in xylem loading and phloem loading/unloading of iron, and on the iron chelators involved in iron homeostasis...

  14. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  15. Collapse of tall granular columns in fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Krishna; Soga, Kenichi; Delenne, Jean-Yves

    2017-06-01

    Avalanches, landslides, and debris flows are geophysical hazards, which involve rapid mass movement of granular solids, water, and air as a multi-phase system. In order to describe the mechanism of immersed granular flows, it is important to consider both the dynamics of the solid phase and the role of the ambient fluid. In the present study, the collapse of a granular column in fluid is studied using 2D LBM - DEM. The flow kinematics are compared with the dry and buoyant granular collapse to understand the influence of hydrodynamic forces and lubrication on the run-out. In the case of tall columns, the amount of material destabilised above the failure plane is larger than that of short columns. Therefore, the surface area of the mobilised mass that interacts with the surrounding fluid in tall columns is significantly higher than the short columns. This increase in the area of soil - fluid interaction results in an increase in the formation of turbulent vortices thereby altering the deposit morphology. It is observed that the vortices result in the formation of heaps that significantly affects the distribution of mass in the flow. In order to understand the behaviour of tall columns, the run-out behaviour of a dense granular column with an initial aspect ratio of 6 is studied. The collapse behaviour is analysed for different slope angles: 0°, 2.5°, 5° and 7.5°.

  16. Single column locking plate fixation is inadequate in two column acetabular fractures. A biomechanical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellino Michael J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to determine whether one can achieve stable fixation of a two column (transverse acetabular fracture by only fixing a single column with a locking plate and unicortical locking screws. We hypothesized that a locking plate applied to the anterior column of a transverse acetabular fracture would create a construct that is more rigid than a non-locking plate, and that this construct would be biomechanically comparable to two column fixation. Methods Using urethane foam models of the pelvis, we simulated transverse acetabular fractures and stabilized them with 1 an anterior column plate with bicortical screws, 2 an anterior locking plate with unicortical screws, 3 an anterior plate and posterior column lag screw, and 4 a posterior plate with an anterior column lag screw. These constructs were mechanically loaded on a servohydraulic material testing machine. Construct stiffness and fracture displacement were measured. Result and Discussion We found that two column fixation is 54% stiffer than a single column fixation with a conventional plate with bicortical screws. There was no significant difference between fixation with an anterior column locking plate with unicortical screws and an anterior plate with posterior column lag screw. We detected a non-significant trend towards more stiffness for the anterior locking plate compared to the anterior non-locking plate. Conclusion In conclusion, a locking plate construct of the anterior column provides less stability than a traditional both column construct with posterior plate and anterior column lag screw. However, the locking construct offers greater strength than a non-locking, bicortical construct, which in addition often requires extensive contouring and its application is oftentimes accompanied by the risk of neurovascular damage.

  17. Removal of iron and arsenic (III) from drinking water using iron oxide-coated sand and limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Rashmi R.; Umlong, Iohborlang M.; Das, Bodhaditya; Borah, Kusum; Thakur, Ashim J.; Raul, Prasanta K.; Banerjee, Saumen; Singh, Lokendra

    2014-06-01

    A method for removal of iron and arsenic (III) from contaminated water using iron oxide-coated sand and limestone has been developed for drinking water. For the intended use, sand was coated with ferric chloride and used as filtering media. Limestone was added onto the coated sand and the effect of limestone addition on removal efficiency of iron and arsenic was monitored. Both batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the efficiency of coated sand and limestone as filtering media. Maximum removal of iron (99.8 %) was obtained with coated sand at a dose of 5 g/100 ml and by adding 0.2 g/100 ml of limestone at pH 7.3. Arsenic (III) removal efficiency increased with the increased dose of coated sand and was best removed at pH 7.12. The maximum adsorption capacity for arsenic (III) obtained from Langmuir model was found to be 0.075 mg/g and the kinetics data followed pseudo-first order better than pseudo-second order. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis and FT-IR study proved the removal of iron and arsenic. Column experiment showed removal of iron and arsenic (III) to arsenic).

  18. Dynamic effects of diabatization in distillation columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic effects of diabatization in distillation columns are investigated in simulation emphasizing the heat-integrated distillation column (HIDiC). A generic, dynamic, first-principle model has been formulated, which is flexible enough to describe various diabatic distillation configurations....... Dynamic Relative Gain Array and Singular Value Analysis have been applied in a comparative study of a conventional distillation column and a HIDiC. The study showed increased input-output coupling due to diabatization. Feasible SISO control structures for the HIDiC were also found and control...

  19. Cost-effectiveness analysis of 10- and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezones-Holguin, Edward; Canelo-Aybar, Carlos; Clark, Andrew David; Janusz, Cara Bess; Jaúregui, Bárbara; Escobedo-Palza, Seimer; Hernandez, Adrian V; Vega-Porras, Denhiking; González, Marco; Fiestas, Fabián; Toledo, Washington; Michel, Fabiana; Suárez, Víctor J

    2015-05-07

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of introducing the 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) versus the 13-valent PCV (PCV13) to the National Immunization Schedule in Peru for prevention of pneumococcal disease (PD) in children <5 years of age. The integrated TRIVAC vaccine cost-effectiveness model from the Pan American Health Organization's ProVac Initiative (version 2.0) was applied from the perspective of the Government of Peru. Twenty successive cohorts of children from birth to 5 years were evaluated. Clinical outcomes were pneumococcal pneumonia (PP), pneumococcal meningitis (PM), pneumococcal sepsis (PS) and acute otitis media from any causes (AOM). Measures included prevention of cases, neurological sequelae (NS), auditory sequelae (AS), deaths and disability adjusted life years (DALYs). A sensitivity analyses was also performed. For the 20 cohorts, net costs with PCV10 and PCV13 were US$ 363.26 million and US$ 408.26 million, respectively. PCV10 prevented 570,273 AOM; 79,937 PP; 2217 PM; 3049 PS; 282 NS; 173 AS; and 7512 deaths. PCV13 prevented 419,815 AOM; 112,331 PN; 3116 PM; 4285 PS; 404 NS; 248 AS; and 10,386 deaths. Avoided DALYs were 226,370 with PCV10 and 313,119 with PCV13. Saved treatment costs were US$ 37.39 million with PCV10 and US$ 47.22 million with PCV13. Costs per DALY averted were US$ 1605 for PCV10, and US$ 1304 for PCV13. Sensitivity analyses showed similar results. PCV13 has an extended dominance over PCV10. Both pneumococcal vaccines are cost effective in the Peruvian context. Although the net cost of vaccination with PCV10 is lower, PCV13 prevented more deaths, pneumococcal complications and sequelae. Costs per each prevented DALY were lower with PCV13. Thus, PCV13 would be the preferred policy; PCV10 would also be reasonable (and cost-saving relative to the status quo) if for some reason 13-valent were not feasible. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. US assessment of HPV types in cancers: implications for current and 9-valent HPV vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiya, Mona; Unger, Elizabeth R; Thompson, Trevor D; Lynch, Charles F; Hernandez, Brenda Y; Lyu, Christopher W; Steinau, Martin; Watson, Meg; Wilkinson, Edward J; Hopenhayn, Claudia; Copeland, Glenn; Cozen, Wendy; Peters, Edward S; Huang, Youjie; Saber, Maria Sibug; Altekruse, Sean; Goodman, Marc T

    2015-06-01

    This study sought to determine the prevaccine type-specific prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers in the United States to evaluate the potential impact of the HPV types in the current and newly approved 9-valent HPV vaccines. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention partnered with seven US population-based cancer registries to obtain archival tissue for cancers diagnosed from 1993 to 2005. HPV testing was performed on 2670 case patients that were fairly representative of all participating cancer registry cases by age and sex. Demographic and clinical data were evaluated by anatomic site and HPV status. Current US cancer registry data and the detection of HPV types were used to estimate the number of cancers potentially preventable through vaccination. HPV DNA was detected in 90.6% of cervical, 91.1% of anal, 75.0% of vaginal, 70.1% of oropharyngeal, 68.8% of vulvar, 63.3% of penile, 32.0% of oral cavity, and 20.9% of laryngeal cancers, as well as in 98.8% of cervical cancer in situ (CCIS). A vaccine targeting HPV 16/18 potentially prevents the majority of invasive cervical (66.2%), anal (79.4%), oropharyngeal (60.2%), and vaginal (55.1%) cancers, as well as many penile (47.9%), vulvar (48.6%) cancers: 24 858 cases annually. The 9-valent vaccine also targeting HPV 31/33/45/52/58 may prevent an additional 4.2% to 18.3% of cancers: 3944 cases annually. For most cancers, younger age at diagnosis was associated with higher HPV 16/18 prevalence. With the exception of oropharyngeal cancers and CCIS, HPV 16/18 prevalence was similar across racial/ethnic groups. In the United States, current vaccines will reduce most HPV-associated cancers; a smaller additional reduction would be contributed by the new 9-valent vaccine. Published by Oxford University Press 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.