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Sample records for valence-limited colloidal system

  1. Lattice animals in diffusion limited binary colloidal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shireen, Zakiya; Babu, Sujin B.

    2017-08-01

    In a soft matter system, controlling the structure of the amorphous materials has been a key challenge. In this work, we have modeled irreversible diffusion limited cluster aggregation of binary colloids, which serves as a model for chemical gels. Irreversible aggregation of binary colloidal particles leads to the formation of a percolating cluster of one species or both species which are also called bigels. Before the formation of the percolating cluster, the system forms a self-similar structure defined by a fractal dimension. For a one component system when the volume fraction is very small, the clusters are far apart from each other and the system has a fractal dimension of 1.8. Contrary to this, we will show that for the binary system, we observe the presence of lattice animals which has a fractal dimension of 2 irrespective of the volume fraction. When the clusters start inter-penetrating, we observe a fractal dimension of 2.5, which is the same as in the case of the one component system. We were also able to predict the formation of bigels using a simple inequality relation. We have also shown that the growth of clusters follows the kinetic equations introduced by Smoluchowski for diffusion limited cluster aggregation. We will also show that the chemical distance of a cluster in the flocculation regime will follow the same scaling law as predicted for the lattice animals. Further, we will also show that irreversible binary aggregation comes under the universality class of the percolation theory.

  2. Detection of colloidal silver chloride near solubility limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, K. Y.; Adawiah, R.

    2018-03-01

    Detection of nanoparticles in solution has been made possible by several means; one of them is laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD). LIBD is able to distinguish colloids of various sizes and concentrations. This technique has been used in several solubility studies. In this study, the formation of colloids in a mixed system of silver nitrate and sodium chloride was observed by acoustic LIBD. Silver chloride has low solubility limit, therefore LIBD measurement is appropriate. Silver and chloride solutions with equal concentrations, set at below and above the solubility of silver chloride as the expected solid product, were mixed and the resulting colloids were observed. The result of LIBD measurement showed that larger particles were present as more silver and chloride introduced. However, once the concentrations exceeded the solubility limit of silver chloride, the detected particle size seemed to be decreasing, hence suggested the occurrence of coprecipitation process. This phenomenon indicated that the ability of LIBD to detect even small changes in colloid amounts might be a useful tool in study on formation and stability of colloids, i.e. to confirm whether nanoparticles synthesis has been successfully performed and whether the system is stable or not.

  3. Irreversible colloidal agglomeration in presence of associative inhibitors: Computer simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcenas, Mariana; Duda, Yurko

    2007-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is employed to study the irreversible particle-cluster agglomeration of valence-limited colloids affected by associative inhibitors. The cluster size distribution and number of connections between colloids are analyzed as a function of density and inhibitor concentration. The influence of colloid functionality on its aggregation is discussed

  4. Colloid-Associated Radionuclide Concentration Limits: ANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertz, C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose and scope of this report is to describe the analysis of available colloidal data from waste form corrosion tests at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to extract characteristics of these colloids that can be used in modeling their contribution to the source term for sparingly soluble radioelements (e.g., Pu). Specifically, the focus is on developing a useful description of the following waste form colloid characteristics: (1) composition, (2) size distribution, and (3) quantification of the rate of waste form colloid generation. The composition and size distribution information are intended to support analysis of the potential transport of the sparingly soluble radionuclides associated with the waste form colloids. The rate of colloid generation is intended to support analysis of the waste form colloid-associated radionuclide concentrations. In addressing the above characteristics, available data are interpreted to address mechanisms controlling colloid formation and stability. This report was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR'' (CRWMS M and O 2000). Because the end objective is to support the source term modeling we have organized the conclusions into two categories: (1) data analysis conclusions and (2) recommendations for colloid source term modeling. The second category is included to facilitate use of the conclusions from the data analysis in the abstraction of a colloid source term model. The data analyses and conclusions that are presented in this report are based on small-scale laboratory tests conducted on a limited number of waste glass compositions and spent fuel types

  5. Micro-rheology on (polymer-grafted) colloids using optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutsche, C; Elmahdy, M M; Kegler, K; Semenov, I; Stangner, T; Otto, O; Ueberschaer, O; Kremer, F; Keyser, U F; Krueger, M; Rauscher, M; Weeber, R; Harting, J; Kim, Y W; Lobaskin, V; Netz, R R

    2011-01-01

    Optical tweezers are experimental tools with extraordinary resolution in positioning (± 1 nm) a micron-sized colloid and in the measurement of forces (± 50 fN) acting on it-without any mechanical contact. This enables one to carry out a multitude of novel experiments in nano- and microfluidics, of which the following will be presented in this review: (i) forces within single pairs of colloids in media of varying concentration and valency of the surrounding ionic solution, (ii) measurements of the electrophoretic mobility of single colloids in different solvents (concentration, valency of the ionic solution and pH), (iii) similar experiments as in (i) with DNA-grafted colloids, (iv) the nonlinear response of single DNA-grafted colloids in shear flow and (v) the drag force on single colloids pulled through a polymer solution. The experiments will be described in detail and their analysis discussed.

  6. Get Beyond Limits: From Colloidal Tectonics Concept to the Engineering of Eco-Friendly Catalytic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Leclercq

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between two or more molecules or colloidal particles can be used to obtain a variety of self-assembled systems called supramolecules or supracolloids. There is a clear, but neglected, convergence between these two fields. Indeed, the packing of molecules into colloidal or supracolloidal particles emerges as a smart solution to build an infinite variety of reversible systems with predictable properties. In this respect, the molecular building blocks are called “tectons” whereas “colloidal tectonics” describes the spontaneous formation of (supracolloidal structures using tectonic subunits. As a consequence, a bottom-up edification is allowed from tectons into (supracolloidal particles with higher degrees of organization (Graphical Abstract. These (supracolloidal systems can be very useful to obtain catalysts with tunable amphiphilic properties. In this perspective, an overview of colloidal tectonics concept is presented as well as its use for the design of new, smart, and flexible catalytic systems. Finally, the advantages of these catalytic devices are discussed and the perspective of future developments is addressed especially in the context of “green chemistry.”

  7. Optical limiting in gelatin stabilized Cu-PVP nanocomposite colloidal suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamgadge, Y. S.; Gedam, P. P.; Thakare, N. B.; Talwatkar, S. S.; Sunatkari, A. L.; Muley, G. G.

    2018-05-01

    This article illustrates investigations on optical limiting properties of Cu-PVP nanocomposite colloidal suspension. Gelatin stabilized Cu nanoparticles have been synthesized using chemical reduction method and thin films in PVP matrix have been obtained using spin coating technique. Thin films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, etc. for structural and linear optical studies. Optical limiting properties of Colloidal Cu-PVP nanocomposites have been investigated at 808 nm diode CW laser. Minimum optical limiting threshold was found for GCu3-PVP nanocomposites sample. The strong optical limiting is thermal in origin as CW laser is used and effects are attributed to thermal lensing effect.

  8. Colloidal paradigm in supercapattery electrode systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kunfeng; Xue, Dongfeng

    2018-01-01

    Among decades of development, electrochemical energy storage systems are now sorely in need of a new design paradigm at the nano size and ion level to satisfy the higher energy and power demands. In this review paper, we introduce a new colloidal electrode paradigm for supercapattery that integrates multiple-scale forms of matter, i.e. ion clusters, colloidal ions, and nanosized materials, into one colloid system, coupled with multiple interactions, i.e. electrostatic, van der Waals forces, and chemical bonding, thus leading to the formation of many redox reactive centers. This colloidal electrode not only keeps the original ionic nature in colloidal materials, but also creates a new attribute of high electroactivity. Colloidal supercapattery is a perfect application example of the novel colloidal electrode, leading to higher specific capacitance than traditional electrode materials. The high electroactivity of the colloidal electrode mainly comes from the contribution of exposed reactive centers, owing to the confinement effect of carbon and a binder matrix. Systematic and thorough research on the colloidal system will significantly promote the development of fundamental science and the progress of advanced energy storage technology.

  9. Stability and aggregation of nanoscale titanium dioxide particle (nTiO2): Effect of cation valence, humic acid, and clay colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhong; Cheng, Tao

    2018-02-01

    Fate and transport of engineered nanoscale titanium dioxide (nTiO 2 ) have received much attention during the past decade. The aggregation and stability of nTiO 2 in water with complicated components, however, have not been fully examined. The objective of this paper is to determine the individual and synergistic effect of cation valence, humic acid, and clay colloids on nTiO 2 stability and aggregation, and elucidate the related mechanisms. We conducted systematic laboratory experiments to determine nTiO 2 stability and aggregation in NaCl and MgCl 2 solutions, both in the absence and presence of humic acid and illite colloids. Results showed that Mg 2+ , in comparison to Na + , could make the zeta potential of nTiO 2 more positive, and shift the point of zero charge of nTiO 2 (pH pzc,TiO2 ) towards higher pH. We also found that nTiO 2 are destabilized by illite colloids at pH < pH pzc,TiO2 through formation of illite-nTiO 2 hetero-aggregates, but are not interfered by illite colloids at higher pH. HA was found to make nTiO 2 stable via electrostatic and steric effects, both in the absence and presence of illite colloids. Calculated interaction energy based on DLVO theory revealed that instability of the nTiO 2 suspensions is mainly caused by primary minima, and that secondary minima normally do not destabilize the suspension, even though they are found to promote aggregation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Continuum limit of overlap valence quarks on a twisted mass sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cichy, Krzysztof; Herdoiza, Gregorio; Univ. Autonoma de Madrid; Jansen, Karl

    2010-12-01

    We study a lattice QCD mixed action with overlap valence quarks on two flavours of Wilson maximally twisted mass sea quarks. Employing three different matching conditions to relate both actions to each other, we investigate the continuum limit by using three values of the lattice spacing ranging from a∼0.05 fm to 0.08 fm. A particular emphasis is put on the effect on physical observables of the topological zero modes appearing in the valence overlap operator. We estimate the region of parameter space where the contribution from these zero modes is sufficiently small such that their effects can be safely controlled and a restoration of unitarity of the mixed action in the continuum limit is reached. (orig.)

  11. Continuum limit of overlap valence quarks on a twisted mass sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichy, Krzysztof [Adam Mickiewicz Univ., Poznan (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Herdoiza, Gregorio [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC; Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica; Jansen, Karl [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC

    2010-12-15

    We study a lattice QCD mixed action with overlap valence quarks on two flavours of Wilson maximally twisted mass sea quarks. Employing three different matching conditions to relate both actions to each other, we investigate the continuum limit by using three values of the lattice spacing ranging from a{approx}0.05 fm to 0.08 fm. A particular emphasis is put on the effect on physical observables of the topological zero modes appearing in the valence overlap operator. We estimate the region of parameter space where the contribution from these zero modes is sufficiently small such that their effects can be safely controlled and a restoration of unitarity of the mixed action in the continuum limit is reached. (orig.)

  12. Valence holes observed in nanodiamonds dispersed in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Tristan; Pflüger, Mika; Tolksdorf, Daniel; Xiao, Jie; Aziz, Emad F.

    2015-02-01

    Colloidal dispersion is essential for most nanodiamond applications, but its influence on nanodiamond electronic properties remains unknown. Here we have probed the electronic structure of oxidized detonation nanodiamonds dispersed in water by using soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies at the carbon and oxygen K edges. Upon dispersion in water, the π* transitions from sp2-hybridized carbon disappear, and holes in the valence band are observed.Colloidal dispersion is essential for most nanodiamond applications, but its influence on nanodiamond electronic properties remains unknown. Here we have probed the electronic structure of oxidized detonation nanodiamonds dispersed in water by using soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies at the carbon and oxygen K edges. Upon dispersion in water, the π* transitions from sp2-hybridized carbon disappear, and holes in the valence band are observed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental methods, details on XAS/XES normalization and background correction procedures. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06639a

  13. Intersite interactions and susceptibility in mixed valence systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiaoqian Wang; Gao Lin; Bingjian Ni; Fusui Liu.

    1985-10-01

    This paper considers the effect of intersite processes on the susceptibility in mixed valence system. The method of thermodynamical perturbation used in this paper can also be generalized to study other properties of mixed valence system. The general formula of partition function of two-site interactions for the mixed valence system is given. The numerical calculations show that the intersite interaction is large enough to explain the minimum of susceptibility discovered in experiments. The different types of our theoretical curves predict that the susceptibility should exhibit a rich variety of behaviour at low temperature for various materials. (author)

  14. Quantum-size colloid metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roldugin, V.I.

    2000-01-01

    In the review dealing with quantum-dimensional metallic colloid systems the methods of preparation, electronic, optical and thermodynamic properties of metal nanoparticles and thin films are considered, the effect of ionizing radiation on stability of silver colloid sols and existence of a threshold radiation dose affecting loss of stability being discussed. It is shown that sol stability loss stems from particles charge neutralization due to reduction of sorbed silver ions induced by radiation, which results in destruction of double electric layer on colloid particles boundary [ru

  15. Continuum-limit scaling of overlap fermions as valence quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cichy, Krzysztof; Herdoiza, Gregorio; Jansen, Karl

    2009-10-01

    We present the results of a mixed action approach, employing dynamical twisted mass fermions in the sea sector and overlap valence fermions, with the aim of testing the continuum limit scaling behaviour of physical quantities, taking the pion decay constant as an example. To render the computations practical, we impose for this purpose a fixed finite volume with lattice size L∼1.3 fm. We also briefly review the techniques we have used to deal with overlap fermions. (orig.)

  16. Colloid-facilitated effects on migration of radionuclides in fractured rock with a kinetic solubility-limited dissolution model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jen Chunping; Tien Nengchuan

    2010-01-01

    Nuclides can move with groundwater either as solutes or colloids, where the latter mechanism generally results in much shorter traveling time as the nuclides interact strongly with solid phases, such as actinides. In the performance assessment, it is therefore essential to assess the relative importance of these two transport mechanisms for different nuclides. The relative importance of colloids depends on the nature and concentration of the colloids in groundwater. Plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), uranium (U) and americium (Am) are four nuclides of concern for the long-term emplacement of nuclear wastes at potential repository sites. These four actinides have a high potential for migrating if attached to iron oxide, clay or silica colloids in the groundwater.Strong sorption of the actinides by colloids in the groundwater may facilitate the transport of these nuclides along potential flow paths. The solubility-limited dissolution model can be used to assess the safety of the release of nuclear waste in geological disposal sites. Usually, it has been assumed that the solubility of the waste form is constant. If a nuclide reaches its solubility limit at an inner location near the waste form, it is unlikely that the same nuclide will reach its solubility limit at an outer location unless this nuclide has a parent nuclide. It is unlikely that the daughter nuclides will exceed their solubility limit due to decay of their parent nuclide. The present study investigates the effect of colloids on the transport of solubility-limited nuclides under the kinetic solubility-limited dissolution (KSLD) boundary condition in fractured media. The release rate of the nuclides is proportional to the difference between the saturation concentration and the inlet aqueous concentration of the nuclides. The presence of colloids decreases the aqueous concentration of nuclides and, thus, increases the release flux of nuclides from the waste form. (authors)

  17. INTRODUCTION: New trends in simulating colloids and self-assembling systems New trends in simulating colloids and self-assembling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foffi, Giuseppe; Kahl, Gerhard

    2010-03-01

    relatively high number of contributions as an indicator that the topics presented at these workshops represent substantial scientific developments. The particular motivation to organize these two workshops came from the fact that experimental work in colloidal physics is advancing rapidly around the globe. In contrast, theoretical and simulation approaches to investigate the wide range of new and surprising physical phenomena of colloidal systems is lagging behind this experimental progress. This is the more deploring since theory and simulation might provide a more profound understanding of many phenomena in soft and bio-related physics, such as phase behaviour, self-assembly strategies, or rheological properties, to name but a few. Furthermore this insight might help to guide experiment to design new colloid-based materials with desired properties. The declared aim of the two workshops was thus to bring together scientists who have contributed in recent time to new developments in colloidal physics and to share and discuss their latest innovations. While CECAM workshops traditionally bring together scientists from the theoretical and simulator communities, from the very beginning the organizers considered it an indispensable necessity to invite experimentalists. And indeed, the organizers are happy to confirm that the participation of experimentalists, theoreticians, and simulators was highly fruitful and mutually inspiring: discussions between all communities did help to understand the possibilities and limitations imposed by experiment, theory, and simulations. Reuniting thus all forces, the workshop did contribute to a deeper understanding in colloidal physics and has helped to address future aspects that might lead to more applied problems of technological relevance. The first workshop, entitled 'Computer Simulation Approaches to Study Self-Assembly: From Patchy Nano-Colloids to Virus Capsides', (organized by Jonathan Doye—University Of Oxford, Ard A Louis

  18. Effective charge versus bare charge: an analytical estimate for colloids in the infinite dilution limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubouy, Miguel; Trizac, Emmanuel; Bocquet, Lyderic

    2003-01-01

    We propose an analytical approximation for the dependence of the effective charge on the bare charge for spherical and cylindrical macro-ions as a function of the size of the colloid and salt content, for the situation of a unique colloid immersed in a sea of electrolyte (where the definition of an effective charge is non-ambiguous). Our approach is based on the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) mean-field theory. Mathematically speaking, our estimate is asymptotically exact in the limit κa >> 1, where a is the radius of the colloid and κ is the inverse screening length. In practice, a careful comparison with effective charge parameters, obtained by numerically solving the full nonlinear PB theory, proves that our estimate is good down to κa ∼ 1. This is precisely the limit appropriate to treat colloidal suspensions. A particular emphasis is put on the range of parameters suitable to describe both single and double strand DNA molecules under physiological conditions

  19. Distribution of cesium between colloid-rock phases-establishment of experimental system and investigation of Cs distribution between colloid and rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Kotaro

    2006-01-01

    Distribution and re-distribution of cesium between 3-phases (colloid, rock and water) was investigated. Analcite and bentonite colloid ware used as colloid phase and muscovite was used as rock phase. Before investigating the distribution between 3-phases, sorption and desorption behavior of Cs on analcite colloid, bentonite colloid and muscovite was investigated. It was found some fraction of Cs sorbed irreversibly on analcite colloid, while Cs sorbed reversibly on bentonite colloid. The experimental system was established for assessment of the distribution of nuclides between 3-phases by using combination of membrane filter and experimental cell. Since colloid and muscovite were separated by membrane filter, sorption of colloid on muscovite could be prevented and we could obtain distribution of Cs as ion. The distribution of Cs between 3-phases were obtained by this experimental system. Furthermore, re-distribution experiment was also carried out by using this system. After 7 days contact of colloid with Cs, distribution of sorbed Cs on colloid to liquid or muscovite phase was investigated. Comparing sorption and desorption isotherm with the distribution of Cs between 3-phases, it was found that Kd value of colloid (ratio of Cs concentration in liquid phase to amount of sorbed Cs on colloid phase) estimated in 2-phases (water and colloid) is different from that in 3-phases. Furthermore, in the case of analcite colloid, Kd value of colloid obtained in 3-phases distribution experiment was different from that obtained in re-distribution experiment. This is considered because of the irreversibility of Cs sorption on analcite colloid. Thus, it was found distribution of Cs in 3-phases was not predictable from sorption and desorption isotherm or Kd value of 2-phases (water-rock, water-colloid). (author)

  20. Scattering from correlations in colloidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayter, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions typically exhibit spatial correlations over distances of order 10-10 4 A, corresponding either to the size of individual particles (e.g., polymer chains, surfactant micelles) or to the range of interaction between particles (e.g., charged polymer lattices at low ionic strength). Apart from having fundamental intrinsic interest, such systems are also extremely useful as model systems with which to study, for example, non-Newtonian hydrodynamics, since temporal correlations are generally much longer lived (10 -8 -10 -3 sec) than those found in simple atomic or small molecular systems (10 -13 -10 -10 sec). Colloids have long been the subject of macroscopic phenomenological research (on rheological properties, for example), but it is only recently that microscopic light, x-ray and neutron scattering techniques have been applied to their study, in large part because of theoretical difficulties in understanding the scattering from dense liquid-like systems of interacting particles. For spherical colloids, such theoretical problems have now been largely overcome, and for anisotropic colloids experimental techniques are being developed which circumvent the intractable theoretical areas. This paper will first review some static light and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) results on colloidal suspensions, both at equilibrium and in steady-state non-equilibrium situations, and will then discuss some dynamic measurements on polymer solutions and melts made using the neutron spin-echo (NSE) technique. Emphasis is placed on experiments which have a possible counterpart in synchrotron radiation studies. In particular, NSE extends the results of photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) to larger momentum transfers and shorter time-scales than are available with visible light, and the extension of PCS to short wavelength on a synchrotron source would be of similar fundamental interest

  1. Mode-coupling theory predictions for a limited valency attractive square well model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaccarelli, E; Saika-Voivod, I; Moreno, A J; Nave, E La; Buldyrev, S V; Sciortino, F; Tartaglia, P

    2006-01-01

    Recently we have studied, using numerical simulations, a limited valency model, i.e. an attractive square well model with a constraint on the maximum number of bonded neighbours. Studying a large region of temperatures T and packing fractions φ, we have estimated the location of the liquid-gas phase separation spinodal and the loci of dynamic arrest, where the system is trapped in a disordered non-ergodic state. Two distinct arrest lines for the system are present in the system: a (repulsive) glass line at high packing fraction, and a gel line at low φ and T. The former is essentially vertical φ controlled), while the latter is rather horizontal (T controlled) in the φ-T) plane. We here complement the molecular dynamics results with mode coupling theory calculations, using the numerical structure factors as input. We find that the theory predicts a repulsive glass line-in satisfactory agreement with the simulation results-and an attractive glass line, which appears to be unrelated to the gel line

  2. Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in the fractured rock: effects of decay chain and limited matrix diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. B.; Park, J. W.; Lee, E. Y.; Kim, C. R.

    2002-01-01

    Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in the fractured rock is studies by considering radioactive decay chain and limited matrix diffusion into surrounding porous media. Semi-analytical solution in the Laplace domain is obtained from the mass balance equation of radionuclides and colloid particles. Numerical inversion of the Laplace solution is used to get the concentration profiles both in a fracture and in rock matrix. There issues are analyzed for the radionuclide concentration in a fracture by 1) formation constant of pseudo-colloid, 2) filtration coefficient of radio-colloid and 3) effective diffusion depth into the surrounding porous rock media

  3. Spectroscopy of 211Rn approaching the valence limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, P.M.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Byrne, A.P.; Kibedi, T.; Fabricus, B.; Baxter, A.M.; Stuchbery, A.E.; Poletti, A.R.; Schiffer, K.J.

    1993-01-01

    High-spin states in 211 Rn were populated using the reaction 198 Pt( 18 O, 5n) at 96 MeV. Their decay was studied using γ-ray and electron spectroscopy. The known level scheme is extended up to a spin of greater than 69/2 and many non-yrast states are added. Semi-empirical shell-model calculations and the properties of related states in 210 Rn and 212 Rn are used to assign configurations to some of the non-yrast states. The properties of the high-spin states observed are compared to the predictions of the multi-particle octupole-coupling model and the semi-empirical shell model. The maximum reasonable spin available from the valence particles and holes in 77/2 and states are observed to near this limit. (orig.)

  4. Optical power limiting in ensembles of colloidal Ag{sub 2}S quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovchinnikov, O V; Smirnov, M S; Perepelitsa, A S; Shatskikh, T S [Voronezh State University, Voronezh (Russian Federation); Shapiro, B I [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State Academy of Fine Chemical Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-31

    The effect of power limiting for optical radiation at a wavelength of 660 nm with a pulse duration of 10 ms and operation threshold of 2.2 – 3.1 mJ cm{sup -2} is observed in ensembles of colloidal Ag{sub 2}S quantum dots (QDs). Using the z-scanning method in an open-aperture scheme it is found that the power is limited mainly due to reverse saturable absorption caused by two-photon optical transitions that involve energy levels of Ag{sub 2}S photoluminescence centres, related to structural impurity defects in colloidal Ag{sub 2}S QDs. At the same time, the z-scanning in a closed-aperture scheme demonstrates the formation of a thermal dynamic lens. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  5. RKKY interaction in mixed valence system and heavy fermion superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusui Liu; Gao Lin; Lin Zonghan

    1985-11-01

    The 1-D RKKY interaction of mixed valence system is given by using the thermodynamic perturbation theory. The numerical comparisons of 1-D and 3-D RKKY interaction between systems with localized magnetic moments of mixed valence and non-mixed valence show that the former is much stronger than the latter. From some analyses we propose that the heavy Fermion superconductivity comes from the RKKY interaction between two local f electrons which hop off the impurity site to become two continuum electrons. The source of the two impurity electrons hopping is the Coulomb interaction. It is also emphasized that the RKKY interaction does not disappear for the Kondo lattice, when the temperature is less than the Kondo temperature. (author)

  6. Spectroscopy of 211Rn approaching the valence limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, P.M.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Kibedi, T.; Fabricius, B.; Baxter, A.M.; Stuchbery, A.E.; Poletti, A.R.; Schiffer, K.J.

    1993-02-01

    High spin states in 211 Rn were populated using the reaction 198 Pt( 18 O,5n) at 96 MeV. The decay was studied using γ-ray and electron spectroscopy. The known level scheme is extended up to a spin of greater than 69/2 and many non-yrast states are added. Semi-empirical shell model calculations and the properties of related states in 210 Rn and 212 Rn are used to assign configurations to some of the non-yrast states. The properties of the high spin states observed are compared to the predictions of the Multi-Particle Octupole Coupling model and the semi-empirical shell model. The maximum reasonable spin available from the valence particles and holes is 77/2 and states are observed to near this limit. 12 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs

  7. Thermodynamics and vibrational modes of hard sphere colloidal systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zargar, R.

    2014-01-01

    The central question that we address in this thesis is the thermodynamics of colloidal glasses. The thermodynamics of colloidal hard sphere glasses are directly related to the entropy of the system, since the phase behavior of hard sphere systems is dictated only by entropic contributions, and also

  8. Valency state changes in lanthanide-contained systems under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaraman, A

    1980-08-01

    Changes in valency state induced by pressure in samarium sulphide SmS remind one of alchemy, as the mat black initial substance shines golden after the electron transition. The alchemist's dream is of course not realized, however the compound does exhibit an unusually interesting behaviour in the new state. The valency state of samarium as newly appeared fluctuated very rapidly between two electron configurations. Manipulation of the valency state by pressure or chemical substitution can basically change the physical properties of systems containing lanthanides. The phenomena are described and discussed in the following survey.

  9. Colloidal organization

    CERN Document Server

    Okubo, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal Organization presents a chemical and physical study on colloidal organization phenomena including equilibrium systems such as colloidal crystallization, drying patterns as an example of a dissipative system and similar sized aggregation. This book outlines the fundamental science behind colloid and surface chemistry and the findings from the author's own laboratory. The text goes on to discuss in-depth colloidal crystallization, gel crystallization, drying dissipative structures of solutions, suspensions and gels, and similar-sized aggregates from nanosized particles. Special emphas

  10. Colloid migration in groundwaters: Geochemical interactions of radionuclides with natural colloids. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.J.; Longworth, G.; Hasler, S.E.; Gardiner, M.; Fritz, P.; Klotz, D.; Lazik, D.; Wolf, M.; Geyer, S.; Alexander, J.L.; Read, D.; Thomas, J.B.

    1994-08-01

    In this joint research programme the significance of groundwater colloids in far field radionuclide migration has been studied. The characterization, quantification and theoretical interpretation of colloid-borne transport phenomena for radionuclides were the main objectives of this research programme. Groundwaters, colloids and sediments were sampled from aquifer system overlying a saltdome in the Gorleben area in northern Germany and were characterized by various analytical methods (ICP-MS, ICP-AES, neutron activation analysis (NAA), DOC-Analyser, HPIC, potentiometric titration). Different natural isotopes ( 2 H, 3 H, 13 C, 14 C, 18 O, 34 S, U/Th decay series) were determined and their ratios were compared with one another in the order to ascertain the provenance of the groundwater colloids. The investigated groundwaters contain substantial amounts of colloids mainly composed of humic and fulvic acids loaded with various metal ions. The chemical interaction of radionuclide ions of various oxidation states (Am, Eu, for M(III), Th, Pu for M(IV), Np for M(V) and U for M(VI)) with groundwater colloids was investigated in order to elucidate the colloid facilitated migration behaviour of actinides in a given aquifer system. Transport process studies with generated pseudocolloids of radionuclides in various oxidation states were undertaken in scaled column experiments, pre-equilibrated with colloid rich Gorleben groundwater. A modelling programme was developed to predict chemical transport of radionuclides in the presence of humic colloids using a modified version of the CHEMTARD code. Modelling predictions have generated acceptable results for Eu, Am and U and poorer agreement between experimental and modelling results for Th and Np as a result of more limited data. (orig.)

  11. Colloid migration in groundwaters: Geochemical interactions of radionuclides with natural colloids. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.J. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Delakowitz, B. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Zeh, P. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Probst, T. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Lin, X. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Ehrlicher, U. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Schauer, C. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Ivanovich, M. [AEA Environment and Energy, Harwell (United Kingdom); Longworth, G. [AEA Environment and Energy, Harwell (United Kingdom); Hasler, S.E. [AEA Environment and Energy, Harwell (United Kingdom); Gardiner, M. [AEA Decommissioning and Radwaste, Harwell (United Kingdom); Fritz, P. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Klotz, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Lazik, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Wolf, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Geyer, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Alexander, J.L. [Atkins (W.S.) Engineering Sciences, Epsom (United Kingdom); Read, D. [Atkins (W.S.) Engineering Sciences, Epsom (United Kingdom); Thomas, J.B. [Atkins (W.S.) Engineering Sciences, Epsom (United Kingdom)

    1994-08-01

    In this joint research programme the significance of groundwater colloids in far field radionuclide migration has been studied. The characterization, quantification and theoretical interpretation of colloid-borne transport phenomena for radionuclides were the main objectives of this research programme. Groundwaters, colloids and sediments were sampled from aquifer system overlying a saltdome in the Gorleben area in northern Germany and were characterized by various analytical methods (ICP-MS, ICP-AES, neutron activation analysis (NAA), DOC-Analyser, HPIC, potentiometric titration). Different natural isotopes ({sup 2}H, {sup 3}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 14}C, {sup 18}O, {sup 34}S, U/Th decay series) were determined and their ratios were compared with one another in the order to ascertain the provenance of the groundwater colloids. The investigated groundwaters contain substantial amounts of colloids mainly composed of humic and fulvic acids loaded with various metal ions. The chemical interaction of radionuclide ions of various oxidation states (Am, Eu, for M(III), Th, Pu for M(IV), Np for M(V) and U for M(VI)) with groundwater colloids was investigated in order to elucidate the colloid facilitated migration behaviour of actinides in a given aquifer system. Transport process studies with generated pseudocolloids of radionuclides in various oxidation states were undertaken in scaled column experiments, pre-equilibrated with colloid rich Gorleben groundwater. A modelling programme was developed to predict chemical transport of radionuclides in the presence of humic colloids using a modified version of the CHEMTARD code. Modelling predictions have generated acceptable results for Eu, Am and U and poorer agreement between experimental and modelling results for Th and Np as a result of more limited data. (orig.)

  12. Photochemical Synthesis and Properties of Colloidal Copper, Silver and Gold Adsorbed on Quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loginov, Anatoliy V.; Gorbunova, Valentina V.; Boitsova, Tatiana B.

    2002-01-01

    Original methods for the photochemical production of stable copper, silver and gold colloids in the form of films on quartz, and dispersion in liquids were devised. It is shown that photochemical synthesis of colloidal metals is a difficult multiphase process, and includes the formation of low-valence forms of Cu(I), Au(I) and nonmetal clusters, colloidal particles and their agglomerates. Cluster stabilization and further growth to colloidal particles are achieved by adsorption onto the solid surface (quartz) or by increasing the viscosity of photolyte. In the absence of these methods of stabilization, the processes of intermediate reoxidation to Cu(II) and Au(III) and agglomeration of Ag and Au colloids proceed in a photolyte. Adsorption and the rate of cluster growth on a quartz surface are speeded up by the action of monochromatic UV light. Experimental models of the mechanism of colloidal formation are suggested. The dependence of the growth rate and the properties of the colloids on conditions of the photochemical procedure (energy and light intensity, concentration of initial complex) has been established

  13. Long-term aging behaviors in a model soft colloidal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Peng, Xiaoguang; McKenna, Gregory B

    2017-02-15

    Colloidal and molecular systems share similar behaviors near to the glass transition volume fraction or temperature. Here, aging behaviors after volume fraction up-jump (induced by performing temperature down-jumps) conditions for a PS-PNIPAM/AA soft colloidal system were investigated using light scattering (diffusing wave spectroscopy, DWS). Both aging responses and equilibrium dynamics were investigated. For the aging responses, long-term experiments (100 000 s) were performed, and both equilibrium and non-equilibrium behaviors of the system were obtained. In the equilibrium state, as effective volume fraction increases (or temperature decreases), the colloidal dispersion displays a transition from the liquid to a glassy state. The equilibrium α-relaxation dynamics strongly depend on both the effective volume fraction and the initial mass concentration for the studied colloidal systems. Compared with prior results from our lab [X. Di, X. Peng and G. B. McKenna, J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 140, 054903], the effective volume fractions investigated spanned a wider range, to deeper into the glassy domain. The results show that the α-relaxation time τ α of the samples aged into equilibrium deviate from the classical Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT)-type expectations and the super-Arrhenius signature disappears above the glass transition volume fraction. The non-equilibrium aging response shows that the time for the structural evolution into equilibrium and the α-relaxation time are decoupled. The DWS investigation of the aging behavior after different volume fraction jumps reveals a different non-equilibrium or aging behavior for the considered colloidal systems compared with either molecular glasses or the macroscopic rheology of a similar colloidal dispersions.

  14. Microscopic dynamics of binary mixtures and quasi-colloidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smorenburg, H.E.

    1996-01-01

    In the study on the title subject two questions are addressed. One is whether the microscopic dynamics of binary mixtures and quasi-colloidal systems can be understood theoretically with kinetic theories for equivalent hard sphere mixtures. The other question that arises is whether the similarity in the dynamics of dense simple fluids and concentrated colloidal suspensions also holds for binary mixtures and quasi-colloidal systems. To answer these questions, we have investigated a number of binary gas mixtures and quasi-colloidal system with different diameter ratios and concentrations. We obtain the experimental dynamic structure factors S expt (κ,ω) of the samples from inelastic neutron scattering. We compare S expt (κ,ω) with the dynamic structure S HS (κ,ω) of an equivalent hard sphere fluid, that we calculate with the Enskog theory. In chapter 2, 3 and 4 we study dense He-Ar gas mixtures (diameter ratio R=1.4, and mass ratio M=10) at low and high Ar concentrations. Experiment and kinetic theory are in good agreement. In chapter 5 we study dilute quasi-colloidal suspensions of fullerene C60 molecules dissolved in liquid CS2. The diameter ratio R=2.2 is larger than in previous experiments while the mass ratio M=9.5 is more or less the same. We obtain the self diffusion coefficient D S of one C60 molecule in CS2 and find D s ≤D SE ≤D E , with D E obtained from kinetic theory and D SE from the Stokes-Einstein description. It appears that both descriptions are relevant but not so accurate. In chapter 6 we study three dense mixtures of neopentane in 40 Ar (diameter ratio R=1.7, mass ratio M=2) at low and high neopentane concentrations. At low concentration, we find a diffusion coefficient of neopentane in Ar, which is in good agreement with kinetic theory and in moderate agreement with the Stokes-Einstein description. At high concentration the collective translational dynamics of neopentane shows a similar behaviour as in dense colloids and simple fluids

  15. Transport of Silica Colloid through Saturated Porous Media under Different Hydrogeochemical and Hydrodynamic Conditions Considering Managed Aquifer Recharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Colloids may have an important role in regulating the structure and function of groundwater ecosystems, and may influence the migration of low solubility contaminants in groundwater. There is, however, a degree of uncertainty about how colloids behave under the variable hydrogeochemical and hydrodynamic conditions that occur during managed aquifer recharge. We used an online monitoring system to monitor the transport of silica colloid in saturated porous media under different hydrogeochemical conditions, including a range of pH values (5, 7, and 9, ionic strengths (<0.0005, 0.02, and 0.05 M, cation valences (Na+, Ca2+, flow rates (0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mL/min. The results showed that silica colloid was more likely to deposit on the surface of porous media in acidic conditions (pH = 5 than in alkaline conditions (pH = 9, indicating that the risks of pollution from colloidal interactions would be higher when the pH of the recharge water was higher. Colloid deposition occurred when the ionic strength of the colloidal suspension increased, and bivalent cations had a greater effect than monovalent cations. This suggests that bivalent cation-rich recharge water might affect the porosity of the porous medium because of colloid deposition during the managed aquifer recharge process. As the flow rate increased, the migration ability of silica colloid increased. We simulated the migration of silica colloid in porous media with the COMSOL Multiphysics model.

  16. Radio-active colloids in the functional exploration of the reticulo-endothelium system; Les colloides radioactifs dans l'exploration fonctionnelle du systeme reticulo-endothelial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chivot, J J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-03-01

    A historical review describes the reticulo-endothelial system (R.E.S.) and aims at defining it and at explaining its operation. The methods used for its examination and the colloids utilized are considered. The author has been led to prepare a special type of colloid: an albuminous complex containing radio-iodine, 'C.A. {sup 131}I', whose method of preparation and physical and biological examination are described. A human albumin, having a known optical density in solution, is heated until a change in the optical density indicates that an aggregation of the proteinic molecules has occurred. The denatured protein is iodated with {sup 131}I. Electrophoretic, ultracentrifuge and autoradiographic controls are then carried out. This atoxic and metabolisable preparation of biological origin is compared with the better defined colloidal gold which serves as reference. C.A.{sup 131}I is injected into mice. It is shown by radioactivity measurements, auto-radiographies on sections of the whole animal, and anthropo-gamma-metric detections that a high concentration occurs in the S.R.E. of the liver. These static results are only of limited importance however compared to those obtained from an in vivo study of the phenomenon. The author records the changes in the radioactivity of the blood derived from the carotid artery using a well-scintillator. He obtains directly a curve of the radioactivity of blood having a decreasing exponential form; the mathematical expression describing this curve is given. The biological half-life T 1/2 of the colloid in the blood is a measure of its phagocytosis by the S.R.E. cells. A supplementary check is provided by the direct recording of the hepatic activity using a suitably collimated exterior detector. A curve of increasing-exponential form is obtained and its parameters are corollary to the preceding curve. These tests carried out on guinea-pigs and rats make it possible to give to the S.R.E. a phagocytic index which is characteristic of its

  17. Formation and stability of aluminosilicate colloids by coprecipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putri, Kirana Yuniati

    2011-02-15

    Colloids are ubiquitous in natural waters. Colloid-facilitated migration is of importance in safety assessment of a nuclear waste disposal. Aluminosilicate colloids are considered to be the kernel of aquatic colloids. Their stability is affected by a number of geochemical parameters. This work aims to study qualitatively and quantitatively the stability of aluminosilicate colloids formed by coprecipitation under various geochemical conditions, i.e. pH, concentration of Al and Si metal ions, ionic strength, and omnipresent cations (Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, and Mg{sup 2+}). The work is performed by colorimetric method and laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD). Two consecutive phase separations at 450 nm and 1 kDa are applied to separate the precipitates and colloids from the ionic species. By means of colorimetry, Si and Al can be detected down to 5.8 x10{sup -8} M and 7.4x10{sup -7} M, respectively. On the other hand, LIBD is able to quantify the colloidal size and its number density down to several ppt. Depending on the concentration of Al and Si metal ions, the formation trend of aluminosilicate colloid changes following its solubility curve. The lower the concentration, the higher the pH range in which the colloids start to emerge. Furthermore, the colloids are stable at higher Al and Si concentration and at low ionic strength. In the low pH range, cations provide different effects at low and high ionic strengths. At high ionic strength, the colloids are stable in the presence of a larger cation, while all cations exhibit similar effects at low ionic strength. However, in the high pH range, valence seems to have a stronger effect than ionic radius; colloids are more stable in the presence of monovalent cations than divalent ones. Meanwhile, XRD shows non- and/or poor crystalline structure of the aluminosilicate species. Nevertheless, results from XPS may suggest that the chemical composition (Si/Al ∼ 0.6) of the aluminosilicate precipitates is sillimanite or

  18. Colloid formation during waste glass corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertz, C.J.; Buck, E.C.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    The long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass in a geologic repository may require a technical consideration of the role of colloids in the release and transport of radionuclides. The neglect of colloidal properties in assessing the near- and far-field migration behavior of actinides may lead to significant underestimates and poor predictions of biosphere exposure from high-level waste (HLW) disposal. Existing data on colloid-facilitated transport suggests that radionuclide migration may be enhanced, but the importance of colloids is not adequately assessed. Indeed, the occurrence of radionuclide transport, attributed to colloidal species, has been reported at Mortandad Canyon, Los Alamos and at the Nevada Test Site; both unsaturated regions are similar to the proposed HLW repository at Yucca Mountain. Although some developments have been made on understanding the transport characteristics of colloids, the characterization of colloids generated from the corrosion of the waste form has been limited. Colloids are known to incorporate radionuclides either from hydrolysis of dissolved species (real colloids) or from adsorption of dissolved species onto existing groundwater colloids (pseudocolloids); however, these colloids may be considered secondary and solubility limited when compared to the colloids generated during glass alteration

  19. Detection Limits of DLS and UV-Vis Spectroscopy in Characterization of Polydisperse Nanoparticles Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Tomaszewska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic light scattering is a method that depends on the interaction of light with particles. This method can be used for measurements of narrow particle size distributions especially in the range of 2–500 nm. Sample polydispersity can distort the results, and we could not see the real populations of particles because big particles presented in the sample can screen smaller ones. Although the theory and mathematical basics of DLS technique are already well known, little has been done to determine its limits experimentally. The size and size distribution of artificially prepared polydisperse silver nanoparticles (NPs colloids were studied using dynamic light scattering (DLS and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis spectroscopy. Polydisperse colloids were prepared based on the mixture of chemically synthesized monodisperse colloids well characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, DLS, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Analysis of the DLS results obtained for polydisperse colloids reveals that several percent of the volume content of bigger NPs could screen completely the presence of smaller ones. The presented results could be extremely important from nanoparticles metrology point of view and should help to understand experimental data especially for the one who works with DLS and/or UV-Vis only.

  20. Colloid process engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Peukert, Wolfgang; Rehage, Heinz; Schuchmann, Heike

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with colloidal systems in technical processes and the influence of colloidal systems by technical processes. It explores how new measurement capabilities can offer the potential for a dynamic development of scientific and engineering, and examines the origin of colloidal systems and its use for new products. The future challenges to colloidal process engineering are the development of appropriate equipment and processes for the production and obtainment of multi-phase structures and energetic interactions in market-relevant quantities. The book explores the relevant processes and for controlled production and how they can be used across all scales.

  1. Architectural Representation of Valence in the Limbic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namburi, Praneeth; Al-Hasani, Ream; Calhoon, Gwendolyn G; Bruchas, Michael R; Tye, Kay M

    2016-01-01

    In order to thrive, animals must be able to recognize aversive and appetitive stimuli within the environment and subsequently initiate appropriate behavioral responses. This assignment of positive or negative valence to a stimulus is a key feature of emotional processing, the neural substrates of which have been a topic of study for several decades. Until recently, the result of this work has been the identification of specific brain regions, such as the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc), as important to valence encoding. The advent of modern tools in neuroscience has allowed further dissection of these regions to identify specific populations of neurons signaling the valence of environmental stimuli. In this review, we focus upon recent work examining the mechanisms of valence encoding, and provide a model for the systematic investigation of valence within anatomically-, genetically-, and functionally defined populations of neurons. PMID:26647973

  2. Valence, arousal and cognitive control: A voluntary task switching study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle eDemanet

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study focused on the interplay between arousal, valence and cognitive control. To this end, we investigated how arousal and valence associated with affective stimuli influenced cognitive flexibility when switching between tasks voluntarily. Three hypotheses were tested. First, a valence hypothesis that states that the positive valence of affective stimuli will facilitate both global and task-switching performance because of increased cognitive flexibility. Second, an arousal hypothesis that states that arousal, and not valence, will specifically impair task-switching performance by strengthening the previously executed task-set. Third, an attention hypothesis that states that both cognitive and emotional control ask for limited attentional resources, and predicts that arousal will impair both global and task-switching performance. The results showed that arousal affected task-switching but not global performance, possibly by phasic modulations of the noradrenergic system that reinforces the previously executed task. In addition, positive valence only affected global performance but not task-switching performance, possibly by phasic modulations of dopamine that stimulates the general ability to perform in a multitasking environment.

  3. Interactions in Natural Colloid Systems "Biosolids" - Soil and Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinichenko, Kira V.; Nikovskaya, Galina N.; Ulberg, Zoya R.

    2016-04-01

    The "biosolids" are complex biocolloid system arising in huge amounts (mln tons per year) from biological municipal wastewater treatment. These contain clusters of nanoparticles of heavy metal compounds (in slightly soluble or unsoluble forms, such as phosphates, sulphates, carbonates, hydroxides, and etc.), cells, humic substances and so on, involved in exopolysaccharides (EPS) net matrix. One may consider that biosolids are the natural nanocomposite. Due to the presence of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and other macro- and microelements (heavy metals), vitamins, aminoacids, etc., the biosolids are a depot of bioelements for plant nutrition. Thus, it is generally recognized that most rationally to utilize them for land application. For this purpose the biocolloid process was developed in biosolids system by initiation of microbial vital ability followed by the synthesis of EPS, propagation of ecologically important microorganisms, loosening of the structure and weakening of the coagulation contacts between biosolids colloids, but the structure integrity maintaining [1,2]. It was demonstrated that the applying of biosolids with metabolizing microorganisms to soil provided the improving soil structure, namely the increasing of waterstable aggregates content (70% vs. 20%). It occurs due to flocculation ability of biosolids EPS. The experimental modelling of mutual interactions in systems of soils - biosolids (with metabolizing microorganisms) were realized and their colloid and chemical mechanisms were formulated [3]. As it is known, the most harmonious plant growth comes at a prolonged entering of nutrients under the action of plant roots exudates which include pool of organic acids and polysaccharides [4]. Special investigations showed that under the influence of exudates excreted by growing plants, the biosolids microelements can release gradually from immobilized state into environment and are able to absorb by plants. Thus, the biosolids can serve as an active

  4. Effect of attractive interactions between polymers on the effective force acting between colloids immersed in a polymer system: Analytic liquid-state theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervanyov, A I

    2016-12-28

    By making use of the polymer reference interaction site model, we analytically study the effect of attractive interactions between polymers on the effective forces acting between colloids immersed in a polymer system. The performed theoretical analysis has no restrictions with respect to the polymer density and relative sizes of the colloids and polymers. The polymer mediated (PM) potential acting between colloids is shown to significantly depend on the strength and range of the polymer-polymer interactions. In the nano-particle limit, where the colloid radius is much smaller than the polymer gyration radius, the presence of attractive polymer-polymer interactions causes only quantitative changes to the PM potential. In the opposite limit of relatively large colloids, the polymer-polymer interactions revert the sign of the total effective force acting between colloids so that this force becomes attractive at sufficiently large polymer densities. With the objective to study an intricate interplay between the attractive PM forces and steric repulsion in different polymer density regimes, we calculate the second virial coefficient B of the total effective potential acting between colloids. The dependence of B on the polymer density is discussed in detail, revealing several novel features of the PM interactions caused by the presence of attractive polymer-polymer interactions.

  5. Active colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aranson, Igor S

    2013-01-01

    A colloidal suspension is a heterogeneous fluid containing solid microscopic particles. Colloids play an important role in our everyday life, from food and pharmaceutical industries to medicine and nanotechnology. It is useful to distinguish two major classes of colloidal suspensions: equilibrium and active, i.e., maintained out of thermodynamic equilibrium by external electric or magnetic fields, light, chemical reactions, or hydrodynamic shear flow. While the properties of equilibrium colloidal suspensions are fairly well understood, active colloids pose a formidable challenge, and the research is in its early exploratory stage. One of the most remarkable properties of active colloids is the possibility of dynamic self-assembly, a natural tendency of simple building blocks to organize into complex functional architectures. Examples range from tunable, self-healing colloidal crystals and membranes to self-assembled microswimmers and robots. Active colloidal suspensions may exhibit material properties not present in their equilibrium counterparts, e.g., reduced viscosity and enhanced self-diffusivity, etc. This study surveys the most recent developments in the physics of active colloids, both in synthetic and living systems, with the aim of elucidation of the fundamental physical mechanisms governing self-assembly and collective behavior. (physics of our days)

  6. Radio-active colloids in the functional exploration of the reticulo-endothelium system; Les colloides radioactifs dans l'exploration fonctionnelle du systeme reticulo-endothelial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chivot, J.J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-03-01

    A historical review describes the reticulo-endothelial system (R.E.S.) and aims at defining it and at explaining its operation. The methods used for its examination and the colloids utilized are considered. The author has been led to prepare a special type of colloid: an albuminous complex containing radio-iodine, 'C.A. {sup 131}I', whose method of preparation and physical and biological examination are described. A human albumin, having a known optical density in solution, is heated until a change in the optical density indicates that an aggregation of the proteinic molecules has occurred. The denatured protein is iodated with {sup 131}I. Electrophoretic, ultracentrifuge and autoradiographic controls are then carried out. This atoxic and metabolisable preparation of biological origin is compared with the better defined colloidal gold which serves as reference. C.A.{sup 131}I is injected into mice. It is shown by radioactivity measurements, auto-radiographies on sections of the whole animal, and anthropo-gamma-metric detections that a high concentration occurs in the S.R.E. of the liver. These static results are only of limited importance however compared to those obtained from an in vivo study of the phenomenon. The author records the changes in the radioactivity of the blood derived from the carotid artery using a well-scintillator. He obtains directly a curve of the radioactivity of blood having a decreasing exponential form; the mathematical expression describing this curve is given. The biological half-life T 1/2 of the colloid in the blood is a measure of its phagocytosis by the S.R.E. cells. A supplementary check is provided by the direct recording of the hepatic activity using a suitably collimated exterior detector. A curve of increasing-exponential form is obtained and its parameters are corollary to the preceding curve. These tests carried out on guinea-pigs and rats make it possible to give to the S.R.E. a phagocytic index which is

  7. Exceeding Conventional Photovoltaic Efficiency Limits Using Colloidal Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pach, Gregory F.

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) are a widely investigated field of research due to their highly tunable nature in which the optical and electronic properties of the nanocrystal can be manipulated by merely changing the nanocrystal's size. Specifically, colloidal quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs) have become a promising candidate for future generation photovoltaic technology. Quantum dots exhibit multiple exciton generation (MEG) in which multiple electron-hole pairs are generated from a single high-energy photon. This process is not observed in bulk-like semiconductors and allows for QDSCs to achieve theoretical efficiency limits above the standard single-junction Shockley-Queisser limit. However, the fast expanding field of QDSC research has lacked standardization of synthetic techniques and device design. Therefore, we sought to detail methodology for synthesizing PbS and PbSe QDs as well as photovoltaic device fabrication techniques as a fast track toward constructing high-performance solar cells. We show that these protocols lead toward consistently achieving efficiencies above 8% for PbS QDSCs. Using the same methodology for building single-junction photovoltaic devices, we incorporated PbS QDs as a bottom cell into a monolithic tandem architecture along with solution-processed CdTe nanocrystals. Modeling shows that near-peak tandem device efficiencies can be achieved across a wide range of bottom cell band gaps, and therefore the highly tunable band gap of lead-chalcogenide QDs lends well towards a bottom cell in a tandem architecture. A fully functioning monolithic tandem device is realized through the development of a ZnTe/ZnO recombination layer that appropriately combines the two subcells in series. Multiple recent reports have shown nanocrystalline heterostructures to undergo the MEG process more efficiency than several other nanostrucutres, namely lead-chalcogenide QDs. The final section of my thesis expands upon a recent publication by Zhang et. al., which

  8. Clustering and self-assembly in colloidal systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smallenburg, F.

    2012-01-01

    A colloidal dispersion consists of small particles called colloids, typically tens of nanometers to a few micrometers in size, suspended in a solvent. Due to collisions with the much smaller particles in the solvent, colloids perform Brownian motion: randomly directed movements that cause the

  9. Poisson-Boltzmann theory of charged colloids: limits of the cell model for salty suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denton, A R

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties of charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions and polyelectrolyte solutions are commonly modelled by implementing the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory within a cell model. This approach models a bulk system by a single macroion, together with counterions and salt ions, confined to a symmetrically shaped, electroneutral cell. While easing numerical solution of the nonlinear PB equation, the cell model neglects microion-induced interactions and correlations between macroions, precluding modelling of macroion ordering phenomena. An alternative approach, which avoids the artificial constraints of cell geometry, exploits the mapping of a macroion-microion mixture onto a one-component model of pseudo-macroions governed by effective interparticle interactions. In practice, effective-interaction models are usually based on linear-screening approximations, which can accurately describe strong nonlinear screening only by incorporating an effective (renormalized) macroion charge. Combining charge renormalization and linearized PB theories, in both the cell model and an effective-interaction (cell-free) model, we compute osmotic pressures of highly charged colloids and monovalent microions, in Donnan equilibrium with a salt reservoir, over a range of concentrations. By comparing predictions with primitive model simulation data for salt-free suspensions, and with predictions from nonlinear PB theory for salty suspensions, we chart the limits of both the cell model and linear-screening approximations in modelling bulk thermodynamic properties. Up to moderately strong electrostatic couplings, the cell model proves accurate for predicting osmotic pressures of deionized (counterion-dominated) suspensions. With increasing salt concentration, however, the relative contribution of macroion interactions to the osmotic pressure grows, leading predictions from the cell and effective-interaction models to deviate. No evidence is found for a liquid

  10. Micro-Valences: Affective valence in neutral everyday objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eLebrecht

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Affective valence influences both our cognition and our perception of the world. Indeed, the speed and quality with which we recognize objects in a visual scene can vary dramatically depending on its affective content. However, affective processing of visual objects has been typically studied using only stimuli with strong affective valences (e.g., guns or roses. Here we explore whether affective valence must be strong or obvious to exert an effect on our perception. We conclude that the majority of objects carry some affective valence (micro-valences and, thus, nominally neutral objects are not really neutral. Functionally, the perception of valence in everyday objects facilitates perceptually-driven choice behavior, decision-making, and affective responses.

  11. Valence effects of sorption: laboratory control of valence state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; Case, F.I.

    1984-01-01

    Estimation of the rates of migration of nuclides from nuclear waste repositories required knowledge of the interaction of these nuclides with the components of the geological formations in the path of the migration. These interactions will be dependent upon the valence state and speciation of the nuclide. If the valence state is not known, then there can be little confidence in use of the data for safety analysis. An electrochemical method of valence state control was developed which makes use of a porous electrode in a flow system containing a column of the adsorbent. By use of this method and solvent extraction analyses of the valence states, a number of reactions of interest to HLW repositories were investigated. These include the reduction of Np(V) and Tc(VII) by crushed basalt and other minerals. For the reduction of Np(V) by basalt, the experiments indicate that sorption on basalt increases with pH and that most of the Np is reduced to Np(IV). The adsorbed Np(IV) is very difficult to remove from the basalt. For the experiments with Tc(VII), the results are considerably more complicated. The results of these experiments are used to assess some of the techniques and methods currently used in safety analyses of proposed HLW repositories. Perhaps the most important consideration is that predictive modeling of valence change reactions, such as the reduction of Np(V) and Tc(VII), must be used with considerable caution, and the occurrence of such reactions should be verified as best as possible with experiments using valence state control and analyses. 13 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  12. Nonequilibrium Equation of State in Suspensions of Active Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Ginot

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Active colloids constitute a novel class of materials composed of colloidal-scale particles locally converting chemical energy into motility, mimicking micro-organisms. Evolving far from equilibrium, these systems display structural organizations and dynamical properties distinct from thermalized colloidal assemblies. Harvesting the potential of this new class of systems requires the development of a conceptual framework to describe these intrinsically nonequilibrium systems. We use sedimentation experiments to probe the nonequilibrium equation of state of a bidimensional assembly of active Janus microspheres and conduct computer simulations of a model of self-propelled hard disks. Self-propulsion profoundly affects the equation of state, but these changes can be rationalized using equilibrium concepts. We show that active colloids behave, in the dilute limit, as an ideal gas with an activity-dependent effective temperature. At finite density, increasing the activity is similar to increasing adhesion between equilibrium particles. We quantify this effective adhesion and obtain a unique scaling law relating activity and effective adhesion in both experiments and simulations. Our results provide a new and efficient way to understand the emergence of novel phases of matter in active colloidal suspensions.

  13. Polymers at interfaces and in colloidal dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleer, Gerard J

    2010-09-15

    This review is an extended version of the Overbeek lecture 2009, given at the occasion of the 23rd Conference of ECIS (European Colloid and Interface Society) in Antalya, where I received the fifth Overbeek Gold Medal awarded by ECIS. I first summarize the basics of numerical SF-SCF: the Scheutjens-Fleer version of Self-Consistent-Field theory for inhomogeneous systems, including polymer adsorption and depletion. The conformational statistics are taken from the (non-SCF) DiMarzio-Rubin lattice model for homopolymer adsorption, which enumerates the conformational details exactly by a discrete propagator for the endpoint distribution but does not account for polymer-solvent interaction and for the volume-filling constraint. SF-SCF corrects for this by adjusting the field such that it becomes self-consistent. The model can be generalized to more complex systems: polydispersity, brushes, random and block copolymers, polyelectrolytes, branching, surfactants, micelles, membranes, vesicles, wetting, etc. On a mean-field level the results are exact; the disadvantage is that only numerical data are obtained. Extensions to excluded-volume polymers are in progress. Analytical approximations for simple systems are based upon solving the Edwards diffusion equation. This equation is the continuum variant of the lattice propagator, but ignores the finite segment size (analogous to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation without a Stern layer). By using the discrete propagator for segments next to the surface as the boundary condition in the continuum model, the finite segment size can be introduced into the continuum description, like the ion size in the Stern-Poisson-Boltzmann model. In most cases a ground-state approximation is needed to find analytical solutions. In this way realistic analytical approximations for simple cases can be found, including depletion effects that occur in mixtures of colloids plus non-adsorbing polymers. In the final part of this review I discuss a

  14. Levels of valence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera eShuman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The distinction between the positive and the negative is fundamental in our emotional life. In appraisal theories, in particular in the component process model of emotion (Scherer, 1984, 2010, qualitatively different types of valence are proposed based on appraisals of (unpleasantness, goal obstructiveness/conduciveness, low or high power, self- (incongruence, and moral badness/goodness. This multifaceted conceptualization of valence is highly compatible with the frequent observation of mixed feelings in real life. However, it seems to contradict the one-dimensional conceptualization of valence often encountered in psychological theories, and the notion of valence as a common currency used to explain choice behavior. Here, we propose a framework to integrate the seemingly disparate conceptualizations of multifaceted valence and one-dimensional valence by suggesting that valence should be conceived at different levels, micro and macro. Micro-valences correspond to qualitatively different types of evaluations, potentially resulting in mixed feelings, whereas one-dimensional macro-valence corresponds to an integrative common currency to compare alternatives for choices. We propose that conceptualizing levels of valence may focus research attention on the mechanisms that relate valence at one level (micro to valence at another level (macro, leading to new hypotheses and addressing various concerns that have been raised about the valence concept, such as the valence-emotion relation.

  15. Characterization of Complex Colloidal Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, J. C.; Guerin, M.; Jackson, B. P.; Ranville, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Surface chemical reactions play a major role in controlling contaminant fate and transport in the subsurface environment. Recent field and laboratory evidence suggests that mobile soil and groundwater colloids may facilitate the migration of sparingly soluble groundwater contaminants. Colloidal suspensions collected in the field or generated in laboratory column experiments tend to be fairly dilute in nature and comprised of relatively small particulates (reserved for studying ideal systems to the characterization of mobile colloids. However, many of these analytical techniques, including total/selective dissolution methods, dynamic light scattering, micro-electrophoresis, streaming potential, and even scanning electron microscopy (SEM), can be biased in of larger size fractions, and therefore, extremely sensitive to sampling, storage, and fractionation artifacts. In addition, surface modifiers such as sorbed oxides or organics can alter particulate appearance, composition, and behavior when compared to synthetic analogues or mineral standards. The current presentation will discuss the limitations and inherent biases associated with a number of analytical characterization techniques that are commonly applied to the study of mobile soil and groundwater colloids, including field flow fractionation (FFF) and acoustic based methods that have only recently become available.

  16. Beyond Valence and Magnitude: a Flexible Evaluative Coding System in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ruolei; Lei, Zhihui; Broster, Lucas; Wu, Tingting; Jiang, Yang; Luo, Yue-jia

    2013-01-01

    Outcome evaluation is a cognitive process that plays an important role in our daily lives. In most paradigms utilized in the field of experimental psychology, outcome valence and outcome magnitude are the two major features investigated. The classical “independent coding model” suggest that outcome valence and outcome magnitude are evaluated by separate neural mechanisms that may be mapped onto discrete event-related potential (ERP) components: feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P3, respectively. To examine this model, we presented outcome valence and magnitude sequentially rather than simultaneously. The results reveal that when only outcome valence or magnitude is known, both the FRN and the P3 encode that outcome feature; when both aspects of outcome are known, the cognitive functions of the two components dissociate: the FRN responds to the information available in the current context, while the P3 pattern depends on outcome presentation sequence. The current study indicates that the human evaluative system, indexed in part by the FRN and the P3, is more flexible than previous theories suggested. PMID:22019775

  17. Levels of Valence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Vera; Sander, David; Scherer, Klaus R.

    2013-01-01

    The distinction between the positive and the negative is fundamental in our emotional life. In appraisal theories, in particular in the component process model of emotion (Scherer, 1984, 2010), qualitatively different types of valence are proposed based on appraisals of (un)pleasantness, goal obstructiveness/conduciveness, low or high power, self-(in)congruence, and moral badness/goodness. This multifaceted conceptualization of valence is highly compatible with the frequent observation of mixed feelings in real life. However, it seems to contradict the one-dimensional conceptualization of valence often encountered in psychological theories, and the notion of valence as a common currency used to explain choice behavior. Here, we propose a framework to integrate the seemingly disparate conceptualizations of multifaceted valence and one-dimensional valence by suggesting that valence should be conceived at different levels, micro and macro. Micro-valences correspond to qualitatively different types of evaluations, potentially resulting in mixed feelings, whereas one-dimensional macro-valence corresponds to an integrative “common currency” to compare alternatives for choices. We propose that conceptualizing levels of valence may focus research attention on the mechanisms that relate valence at one level (micro) to valence at another level (macro), leading to new hypotheses, and addressing various concerns that have been raised about the valence concept, such as the valence-emotion relation. PMID:23717292

  18. Radio-active colloids in the functional exploration of the reticulo-endothelium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chivot, J.J.

    1967-03-01

    A historical review describes the reticulo-endothelial system (R.E.S.) and aims at defining it and at explaining its operation. The methods used for its examination and the colloids utilized are considered. The author has been led to prepare a special type of colloid: an albuminous complex containing radio-iodine, 'C.A. 131 I', whose method of preparation and physical and biological examination are described. A human albumin, having a known optical density in solution, is heated until a change in the optical density indicates that an aggregation of the proteinic molecules has occurred. The denatured protein is iodated with 131 I. Electrophoretic, ultracentrifuge and autoradiographic controls are then carried out. This atoxic and metabolisable preparation of biological origin is compared with the better defined colloidal gold which serves as reference. C.A. 131 I is injected into mice. It is shown by radioactivity measurements, auto-radiographies on sections of the whole animal, and anthropo-gamma-metric detections that a high concentration occurs in the S.R.E. of the liver. These static results are only of limited importance however compared to those obtained from an in vivo study of the phenomenon. The author records the changes in the radioactivity of the blood derived from the carotid artery using a well-scintillator. He obtains directly a curve of the radioactivity of blood having a decreasing exponential form; the mathematical expression describing this curve is given. The biological half-life T 1/2 of the colloid in the blood is a measure of its phagocytosis by the S.R.E. cells. A supplementary check is provided by the direct recording of the hepatic activity using a suitably collimated exterior detector. A curve of increasing-exponential form is obtained and its parameters are corollary to the preceding curve. These tests carried out on guinea-pigs and rats make it possible to give to the S.R.E. a phagocytic index which is characteristic of its state of

  19. Colloidal glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Colloidal glasses. Glassy state is attained when system fails to reach equilibrium due to crowding of constituent particles. In molecular glasses, glassy state is reached by rapidly lowering the temperature. In colloidal glasses, glassy state is reached by increasing the ...

  20. Stabilization through precipitation in a system of colloidal iron(III) pyrophosphate salts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Y.M.; Velikov, K.P.; Kegel, W.K.

    2012-01-01

    The ionic strength of a solution decreases during the precipitation of an insoluble salt, which can cause an initially unstable colloidal system to stabilize during its formation. We show this effect in the precipitation and aging of colloidal iron(III) pyrophosphate, where we observe two distinct

  1. Impact of colloid formation on safety assessment of waste disposal in brine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, S.

    2014-01-01

    The transport model, which had been developed at low ionic strength in an ion - colloid - solid ternary system, was applied to the transport of Np(V) (NpO 2 + ) and humic acid through a quartz-packed column at 2 M NaCl. It was found that the model was useful to simulate the transport behaviors of Np(V) and humic acid by the modification of filtration coefficient which depends on the colloid size. Using this model, the impact of colloids on the transport of actinides was evaluated. It was found that the influence of the colloids in brine is limited or negligible. (author)

  2. Colloid chemistry: available sorption models and the question of colloid adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1990-05-01

    A safety analysis of a radioactive waste repository should consider the possibility of nuclide transport by colloids. This would involve describing the sorption properties of the colloids and their transport in porous and fissured media. This report deals with a few selected aspects of the chemistry of this complex subject. Because the mechanisms of ion adsorption onto surfaces are material-specific, increased attention should be paid to identifying the material constitution of aquatic colloids. Suitable models already exist for describing reversible adsorption; these models describe sorption using mass action equations. The surface coordination model, developed for hydrous oxide surfaces, allows a uniform approach to be adopted for different classes of materials. This model is also predictive and has been applied successfully to natural systems. From the point of view of nuclide transport by colloids, irreversible sorption represents the most unfavourable situation. There is virtually no information available on the extent of reversibility and on the desorption kinetics of important nuclide/colloid combinations. Experimental investigations are therefore necessary in this respect. The only question considered in connection with colloid transport and its modelling is that of colloid sticking. Natural colloids, and the surfaces of the rock on which they may be collected, generally have negative surface charges so that colloid sticking will be difficult. The DLVO theory contains an approach for calculating the sticking factor from the surface potentials of the solid phases and the ionic strength of the water. However, it has been shown that this theory is inapplicable because of inherent shortcomings which lead to completely unrealistic predictions. The sticking probability of colloids should therefore be determined experimentally for systems which correspond as closely as possible to reality. (author) 66 figs., 12 tabs., 204 refs

  3. A review on colloidal systems in general and in respect of nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuorinen, Ulla

    1987-04-01

    Recently the possible importance of colloids in connection with nuclear waste disposal, especially in radionuclide migration has been emphasized. Several studies have been or are going to be initiated to investigate the occurrence of natural groundwater colloids and their properties as well as formation and properties of radiocolloids, especially pseudoradiocolloids. If colloids are found to be important, they also have to considered in the safety assessments of nuclear waste disposal. In order to do so, additional theory and equations have to be added to present codes and models. This study is a literature survey consisting first a general approach on colloidal systems and their properties. Then a review on natural groundwater colloids (clays and organs) is given following descriptions of several methods to study colloids. Lastly the role of colloids in nuclear waste disposal is discussed including especially some information about possible actinide colloids and some current research going on in this field. 96 refs

  4. Universality class of non-Fermi liquid behaviour in mixed valence systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guangming; Su Zhaobin; Lu Yu

    1995-11-01

    A generalized Anderson single-impurity model with off-site Coulomb interactions is derived from the extended three-band Hubbard model, originally proposed to describe the physics of the copper-oxides. Using the abelian bosonization technique and canonical transformations, an effective Hamiltonian is derived in the strong coupling limit, which is essentially analogous to the Toulouse limit of the ordinary Kondo problem. In this limit, the effective Hamiltonian can be exactly solved, with a mixed valence quantum critical point separating two different Fermi liquid phases, i.e. the Kondo phase and the empty orbital phase. In the mixed valence quantum critical regime, the local moment is only partially quenched and X-ray edge singularities are generated. Around the quantum critical point, a new type of non-Fermi liquid behaviour is predicted with an extra specific heat C imp ∼ T 1/4 and a singular spin-susceptibility χ imp ∼ T -3/4 . At the same time, the effective Hamiltonian under single occupancy is transformed into a resonant-level model, from which the correct Kondo physical properties (specific heat, spin susceptibility, and an enhanced Wilson ratio) are easily rederived. Finally, a brief discussion is given to relate these theoretical results to observations in U Pd x Cu 5-x (x=1, 1.5) alloys, which show single-impurity critical behaviour consistent with our predictions. (author). 30 refs

  5. Universality class of non-Fermi-liquid behavior in mixed-valence systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-Ming; Su, Zhao-Bin; Yu, Lu

    1996-01-01

    A generalized Anderson single-impurity model with off-site Coulomb interactions is derived from the extended three-band Hubbard model, originally proposed to describe the physics of the copper oxides. Using the Abelian bosonization technique and canonical transformations, an effective Hamiltonian is derived in the strong-coupling limit, which is essentially analogous to the Toulouse limit of the ordinary Kondo problem. In this limit, the effective Hamiltonian can be exactly solved, with a mixed-valence quantum critical point separating two different Fermi-liquid phases, i.e., the Kondo phase and the empty orbital phase. In the mixed-valence quantum critical regime, the local moment is only partially quenched and x-ray edge singularities are generated. Around the quantum critical point, a type of non-Fermi-liquid behavior is predicted with an extra specific heat Cimp~T1/4 and a singular spin susceptibility χimp~T-3/4. At the same time, the effective Hamiltonian under single occupancy is transformed into a resonant-level model, from which the correct Kondo physical properties (specific heat, spin susceptibility, and an enhanced Wilson ratio) are easily rederived. Finally, a brief discussion is given to relate these theoretical results to observations in UPdxCu5-x (x=1,1.5) alloys, which show single-impurity critical behavior consistent with our predictions.

  6. Localized description of valence fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alascio, B.; Allub, R.; Aligia, A.

    1979-07-01

    The authors set up a model for intermediate valence equivalent to the ''atomic'' limit of the Anderson Hamiltonian. Detailed analysis of this model shows that most of the essential characteristics of valence fluctuators are already present in this crudely simplified Hamiltonian. The spin-spin and the 4f charge-charge correlation functions are studied and it is shown that it is possible to define a spin fluctuation frequency ωsub(s.f.) and a charge fluctuation frequency ωsub(ch.f.).ωsub(s.f.) and ωsub(ch.f.) can differ considerably for some values of the parameters of the model. The magnetic susceptibility and the specific heat are calculated as functions of temperature and it is shown how the results simulate the behaviour found in valence fluctuators. (author)

  7. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degueldre, Claude, E-mail: c.degueldre@lancaster.ac.uk [Engineering Department, University of Lancaster, LA1 4YW Lancaster (United Kingdom); ChiAM & Institute of Environment, University of Geneva, 1211 Genève 4, Swizerland (Switzerland); Earlier, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Cloet, Veerle [NAGRA, Hardstrasse 73, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland)

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the colloid nature, concentration and size distribution in the pore water of Opalinus Clay and other sedimentary host rocks identified for a potential radioactive waste repository in Switzerland. Because colloids could not be measured in representative undisturbed porewater of these host rocks, predictive modelling based on data from field and laboratory studies is applied. This approach allowed estimating the nature, concentration and size distributions of the colloids in the pore water of these host rocks. As a result of field campaigns, groundwater colloid concentrations are investigated on the basis of their size distribution quantified experimentally using single particle counting techniques. The colloid properties are estimated considering data gained from analogue hydrogeochemical systems ranging from mylonite features in crystalline fissures to sedimentary formations. The colloid concentrations were analysed as a function of the alkaline and alkaline earth element concentrations. Laboratory batch results on clay colloid generation from compacted pellets in quasi-stagnant water are also reported. Experiments with colloids in batch containers indicate that the size distribution of a colloidal suspension evolves toward a common particle size distribution independently of initial conditions. The final suspension size distribution was found to be a function of the attachment factor of the colloids. Finally, calculations were performed using a novel colloid distribution model based on colloid generation, aggregation and sedimentation rates to predict under in-situ conditions what makes colloid concentrations and size distributions batch- or fracture-size dependent. The data presented so far are compared with the field and laboratory data. The colloid occurrence, stability and mobility have been evaluated for the water of the considered potential host rocks. In the pore water of the considered sedimentary host rocks, the clay

  8. Influence of Humic Acid on the Transport and Deposition of Colloidal Silica under Different Hydrogeochemical Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Zhou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The transport and deposition of colloids in aquifers plays an important role in managed aquifer recharge (MAR schemes. Here, the processes of colloidal silica transport and deposition were studied by displacing groundwater with recharge water. The results showed that significant amounts of colloidal silica transport occurred when native groundwater was displaced by HA solution. Solution contains varying conditions of ionic strength and ion valence. The presence of humic acid could affect the zeta potential and size of the colloidal silica, which led to obvious colloidal silica aggregation in the divalent ion solution. Humic acid increased colloidal silica transport by formation of non-adsorbing aqueous phase silica–HA complexes. The experimental and modeling results showed good agreement, indicating that the essential physics were accurately captured by the model. The deposition rates were less than 10−8 s−1 in deionized water and monovalent ion solution. Moreover, the addition of Ca2+ and increase of IS resulted in the deposition rates increasing by five orders of magnitude to 10−4 s−1. In all experiments, the deposition rates decreased in the presence of humic acid. Overall, the promotion of humic acid in colloidal silica was strongly associated with changes in water quality, indicating that they should receive greater attention during MAR.

  9. Silica colloids and their effect on radionuclide sorption. A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoelttae, P.; Hakanen, M.

    2008-05-01

    Silica sol, commercial colloidal silica manufactured by Eka Chemicals in Bohus, Sweden is a promising inorganic grout material for sealing small fractures in low permeable rock. This literature review collects information about the use of silica sol as an injection grout material, the properties of inorganic, especially silica colloids, colloid contents in granitic groundwater conditions, essential characterization methods and colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides. Objective was to evaluate the release and mobility of silica sol colloids, the effect of the groundwater conditions, the amount of colloids compared with natural colloids in Olkiluoto conditions, radionuclide sorption on colloids and their contribution to radionuclide transport. Silica sol seems to be a feasible material to seal fractures with an aperture as small as 10 μm in low permeable rock. The silica sol gel is sufficiently stable to limit to water ingress during the operational phase, the requirement that the pH should be below 11 is fulfilled and the compatibility with Engineered Barrier System (EBS) materials is expected to be good. No significant influence on the bentonite properties caused by the silica sol is expected when calcium chloride is used as an accelerator but the influence of sodium chloride has not been examined. No significant release of colloids is expected under prevailing groundwater conditions. The long-term (100 y) stability of silica sol gel has not yet been clearly demonstrated and a long-term release of silica colloids cannot be excluded. The question is the amount of colloids, how mobile they are and the influence of possible glacial melt waters. The bentonite buffer used in the EBS system is assumed to be a potential source of colloids. In a study in Olkiluoto, bentonite colloids were found only in low salinity groundwater. In general, low salinity water (total dissolved solids -1 ) favours colloid stability and bentonite colloids can remain stable over long

  10. Field-induced valence transition in rare-earth system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhaya, A.; Ghatak, S.K.

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic field-induced valence transition in rare-earth compound has been examined based on a pseudospin S=1 Ising model proposed earlier for valence transition. The model includes finite mixing between two pertinent ionic configurations (magnetic and non-magnetic) separated by an energy gap and with intersite interaction between rare-earth ions. Using the mean field approximation the magnetic behaviour and the critical field (H c ) for transition are obtained as a function of energy gap and temperature. The phase boundary defined in terms of reduced field H c /H co and reduced temperature T/T v (T v being valence transition temperature in absence of field) is nearly independent of energy gap. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental observation in Yb- and Eu-compounds

  11. Microrheology of colloidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puertas, A M; Voigtmann, T

    2014-01-01

    Microrheology was proposed almost twenty years ago as a technique to obtain rheological properties in soft matter from the microscopic motion of colloidal tracers used as probes, either freely diffusing in the host medium, or subjected to external forces. The former case is known as passive microrheology, and is based on generalizations of the Stokes–Einstein relation between the friction experienced by the probe and the host-fluid viscosity. The latter is termed active microrheology, and extends the measurement of the friction coefficient to the nonlinear-response regime of strongly driven probes. In this review article, we discuss theoretical models available in the literature for both passive and active microrheology, focusing on the case of single-probe motion in model colloidal host media. A brief overview of the theory of passive microrheology is given, starting from the work of Mason and Weitz. Further developments include refined models of the host suspension beyond that of a Newtonian-fluid continuum, and the investigation of probe-size effects. Active microrheology is described starting from microscopic equations of motion for the whole system including both the host-fluid particles and the tracer; the many-body Smoluchowski equation for the case of colloidal suspensions. At low fluid densities, this can be simplified to a two-particle equation that allows the calculation of the friction coefficient with the input of the density distribution around the tracer, as shown by Brady and coworkers. The results need to be upscaled to agree with simulations at moderate density, in both the case of pulling the tracer with a constant force or dragging it at a constant velocity. The full many-particle equation has been tackled by Fuchs and coworkers, using a mode-coupling approximation and the scheme of integration through transients, valid at high densities. A localization transition is predicted for a probe embedded in a glass-forming host suspension. The

  12. Impact of colloid formation on safety assessment of waste disposal in brine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaki, S. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The transport model, which had been developed at low ionic strength in an ion - colloid - solid ternary system, was applied to the transport of Np(V) (NpO{sub 2}{sup +} ) and humic acid through a quartz-packed column at 2 M NaCl. It was found that the model was useful to simulate the transport behaviors of Np(V) and humic acid by the modification of filtration coefficient which depends on the colloid size. Using this model, the impact of colloids on the transport of actinides was evaluated. It was found that the influence of the colloids in brine is limited or negligible. (author)

  13. Clusters in attractive colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coniglio, A [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, via Cintia 80126 Naples (Italy); Arcangelis, L de [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione and CNISM II Universita di Napoli, Aversa (CE) (Italy); Candia, A de [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, via Cintia 80126 Naples (Italy); Gado, E Del [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, via Cintia 80126 Naples (Italy); Fierro, A [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, via Cintia 80126 Naples (Italy); Sator, N [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique de la Matiere Condensee, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris6, UMR (CNRS) 7600 Case 121, 4 Place Jussieu 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2006-09-13

    We discuss how the anomalous increase of the viscosity in colloidal systems with short-range attraction can be related to the formation of long-living clusters. Based on molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo numerical simulations of different models, we propose a similar picture for colloidal gelation at low and intermediate volume fractions. On this basis, we analyze the distinct role played by the formation of long-living bonds and the crowding of the particles in the slow dynamics of attractive colloidal systems.

  14. The physics of the colloidal glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary L; Weeks, Eric R

    2012-06-01

    As one increases the concentration of a colloidal suspension, the system exhibits a dramatic increase in viscosity. Beyond a certain concentration, the system is said to be a colloidal glass; structurally, the system resembles a liquid, yet motions within the suspension are slow enough that it can be considered essentially frozen. For several decades, colloids have served as a valuable model system for understanding the glass transition in molecular systems. The spatial and temporal scales involved allow these systems to be studied by a wide variety of experimental techniques. The focus of this review is the current state of understanding of the colloidal glass transition, with an emphasis on experimental observations. A brief introduction is given to important experimental techniques used to study the glass transition in colloids. We describe features of colloidal systems near and in glassy states, including increases in viscosity and relaxation times, dynamical heterogeneity and ageing, among others. We also compare and contrast the glass transition in colloids to that in molecular liquids. Other glassy systems are briefly discussed, as well as recently developed synthesis techniques that will keep these systems rich with interesting physics for years to come.

  15. The physics of the colloidal glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, Gary L; Weeks, Eric R

    2012-01-01

    As one increases the concentration of a colloidal suspension, the system exhibits a dramatic increase in viscosity. Beyond a certain concentration, the system is said to be a colloidal glass; structurally, the system resembles a liquid, yet motions within the suspension are slow enough that it can be considered essentially frozen. For several decades, colloids have served as a valuable model system for understanding the glass transition in molecular systems. The spatial and temporal scales involved allow these systems to be studied by a wide variety of experimental techniques. The focus of this review is the current state of understanding of the colloidal glass transition, with an emphasis on experimental observations. A brief introduction is given to important experimental techniques used to study the glass transition in colloids. We describe features of colloidal systems near and in glassy states, including increases in viscosity and relaxation times, dynamical heterogeneity and ageing, among others. We also compare and contrast the glass transition in colloids to that in molecular liquids. Other glassy systems are briefly discussed, as well as recently developed synthesis techniques that will keep these systems rich with interesting physics for years to come. (review article)

  16. Valence-to-core-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Eleanor R.; Pollock, Christopher J.; Bendix, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can provide detailed insight into the electronic and geometric structures of transition-metal active sites in metalloproteins and chemical catalysts. However, standard XAS spectra inherently represent an average contribution from the entire coordination...... environment with limited ligand selectivity. To address this limitation, we have investigated the enhancement of XAS features using valence-to-core (VtC)-detected XAS, whereby XAS spectra are measured by monitoring fluorescence from valence-to-core X-ray emission (VtC XES) events. VtC emission corresponds...... to transitions from filled ligand orbitals to the metal 1s core hole, with distinct energetic shifts for ligands of differing ionization potentials. VtC-detected XAS data were obtained from multiple valence emission features for a series of well-characterized Mn model compounds; taken together, these data...

  17. Formation, characterization, and stability of plutonium (IV) colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobart, D.E.; Morris, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Newton, T.W.

    1989-01-01

    Plutonium is expected to be a major component of the waste element package in any high-level nuclear waste repository. Plutonium(IV) is known to form colloids under chemical conditions similar to those found in typical groundwaters. In the event of a breach of a repository, these colloids represent a source of radionuclide transport to the far-field environment, in parallel with the transport of dissolved waste element species. In addition, the colloids may decompose or disaggregate into soluble ionic species. Thus, colloids represent an additional term in determining waste element solubility limits. A thorough characterization of the physical and chemical properties of these colloids under relevant conditions is essential to assess the concentration limits and transport mechanisms for the waste elements at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository site. This report is concerned primarily with recent results obtained by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Solubility Determination Task pertaining to the characterization of the structural and chemical properties of Pu(IV) colloid. Important results will be presented which provides further evidence that colloidal plutonium(IV) is structurally similar to plutonium dioxide and that colloidal plutonium(IV) is electrochemically reactive. 13 refs., 7 figs

  18. Wetting in a colloidal liquid-gas system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijting, W.K.; Besseling, N.A.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    We present first observations of wetting phenomena in depletion interaction driven, phase separated colloidal dispersions (coated silica-cyclohexane-polydimethylsiloxane). The contact angle of the colloidal liquid-gas interface at a solid substrate (coated glass) was determined for a series of

  19. Colloid characterization and in situ release in shallow groundwater under different hydrogeology conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jingjing; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Wenjing; Chen, Xuequn; Huan, Ying; Yu, Xipeng

    2017-06-01

    Changes to groundwater hydrodynamics and chemistry can lead to colloid release that can have a major impact on the groundwater environment. To analyze the effects of colloid release caused by artificial groundwater recharge, field and laboratory tests on colloid characterization and colloid release were conducted. The field tests were carried out at an artificial recharge test site in Shandong Province. In the field investigation, one recharge water sample and five groundwater samples were collected and filtered through three levels of ultrafiltration membranes, with pore sizes of 0.45 μm, 100 kDa, and 50 kDa. The field results indicated that the colloid mass concentrations in groundwater retained between membranes with pore sizes of 100 kDa-0.45 μm and 50 kDa-100 kDa were 19 and 62 mg/L, respectively. In recharge water, the colloid mass concentrations retained by 100-kDa-0.45-μm and 50-kDa-100-kDa membranes were 3 and 99 mg/L, respectively. Colloids detected on the ultrafiltration membranes were mainly inorganic between 100 kDa and 0.45 μm, and mainly organic between 50 and 100 kDa. Based on the field colloid investigation results, the organic colloid was chosen in the laboratory experiments to reveal its release behavior under different conditions. Porous media diameter, flux, ionic strength (IS), and ion valence were changed to determine their influences on organic colloid concentration outflow from undisturbed porous media. The experiment's results indicate that decreasing the diameter, and increasing the flux, ionic strength, and the number of divalent cations, can promote organic colloid release. The organic colloid release rate in the early stage was high and is thus likely to affect the quality of groundwater. The results provide a useful scientific basis for minimizing changes to hydrodynamic and hydrochemical conditions during artificial recharge, thus safeguarding groundwater quality.

  20. Valence instabilities as a source of actinide system inconsistencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandenaw, T.A.

    1979-01-01

    Light actinide elements alone, and in some of their alloys, may exist as a static or dynamic mixture of two configurations. Such a state can explain both a resistivity maximum and lack of magnetic order observed in so many actinide materials, and still be compatible with the existence of f-electrons in narrow bands. Impurity elements may stabilize slightly different intermediate valence states in U, Np, and Pu, thus contributing to inconsistencies in published results. The physical property behavior of mixed-valence, rare-earth compounds is very much like that observed in development of antiphase (martensitic) structures. Martensitic transformations in U, Np, and Pu, from high-temperature b. c. c. to alpha phase, may be a way of ordering an alloy-like metal of mixed or intermediate valence. The relative stability of each phase structure may depend upon its electron-valence ratio. A Hubbard model for electron correlations in a narrow energy band has been invoked in most recent theories for explaining light actinide behavior. Such a model may also be applicable to crystal symmetry changes in martensitic transformations in actinides

  1. Actinide colloid generation in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.

    1990-05-01

    The progress made in the investigation of actinide colloid generation in groundwaters is summarized and discussed with particular examples relevant to an understanding of the migration behaviour of actinides in natural aquifer systems. The first part deals with the characterization of colloids: groundwater colloids, actinide real-colloids and actinide pseudocolloids. The second part concentrates on the generation processes and migration behaviour of actinide pseudocolloids, which are discussed with some notable experimental examples. Importance is stressed more on the chemical aspects of the actinide colloid generation in groundwater. This work is a contribution to the CEC project MIRAGE II, particularly, to research area: complexation and colloids. (orig.)

  2. Grimsel colloid exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, C.; Longworth, G.; Vilks, P.

    1989-11-01

    The Grimsel Colloid Exercise was an intercomparison exercise which consisted of an in situ sampling phase followed by a colloid characterisation step. The goal of this benchmark exercise, which involved 12 laboratories, was to evaluate both sampling and characterisation techniques with emphasis on the colloid specific size distribution. The sampling phase took place at the Grimsel Test Site between February 1 and 13, 1988 and the participating groups produced colloid samples using the following methods: 1. Cross-flow ultrafiltration with production of membranes loaded with colloids. 2. Tangential diaultrafiltration and production of colloid concentrates. 3. Filtrates produced by each group. 4. Unfiltered water was also collected by PSI in glass bottles, under controlled anaerobic conditions, and by the other sampling groups in various plastic bottles. In addition, on-line monitoring of pH, χ, [O-2] and T of the water and of [O-2] in the atmosphere of the sampling units was carried out routinely. All samples were shipped according to the CoCo Club scheme for characterisation, with emphasis on the size distribution. The exercise differentiates the colloid samples produced on site from those obtained after transfer of the fluid samples to the laboratories. The colloid concentration and size distribution can be determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), gravimetry (GRAV), chemical analysis of fluid samples after micro/ultrafiltration (MF/UF) and by transmission single particle counting (PC). The colloid concentration can also be evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), static and dynamic light scattering (SLS,DLS) and by laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS). The results are discussed on the basis of the detection limit, lateral resolution and counting conditions of the technique (precision) as well as sample preparation, artefact production and measurement optimisation (accuracy). A good agreement between size distribution results was

  3. Micro-Valences: Affective valence in neutral everyday objects

    OpenAIRE

    Sophie eLebrecht; Moshe eBar; Lisa F Barrett; Michael J Tarr

    2012-01-01

    Affective valence influences both our cognition and our perception of the world. Indeed, the speed and quality with which we recognize objects in a visual scene can vary dramatically depending on its affective content. However, affective processing of visual objects has been typically studied using only stimuli with strong affective valences (e.g., guns or roses). Here we explore whether affective valence must be strong or obvious to exert an effect on our perception. We conclude that the maj...

  4. Hard-sphere fluid adsorbed in an annular wedge: The depletion force of hard-body colloidal physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, A. R.; Henderson, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    Many important issues of colloidal physics can be expressed in the context of inhomogeneous fluid phenomena. When two large colloids approach one another in solvent, they interact at least partly by the response of the solvent to finding itself adsorbed in the annular wedge formed between the two colloids. At shortest range, this fluid mediated interaction is known as the depletion force/interaction because solvent is squeezed out of the wedge when the colloids approach closer than the diameter of a solvent molecule. An equivalent situation arises when a single colloid approaches a substrate/wall. Accurate treatment of this interaction is essential for any theory developed to model the phase diagrams of homogeneous and inhomogeneous colloidal systems. The aim of our paper is a test of whether or not we possess sufficient knowledge of statistical mechanics that can be trusted when applied to systems of large size asymmetry and the depletion force in particular. When the colloid particles are much larger than a solvent diameter, the depletion force is dominated by the effective two-body interaction experienced by a pair of solvated colloids. This low concentration limit of the depletion force has therefore received considerable attention. One route, which can be rigorously based on statistical mechanical sum rules, leads to an analytic result for the depletion force when evaluated by a key theoretical tool of colloidal science known as the Derjaguin approximation. A rival approach has been based on the assumption that modern density functional theories (DFT) can be trusted for systems of large size asymmetry. Unfortunately, these two theoretical predictions differ qualitatively for hard sphere models, as soon as the solvent density is higher than about 2/3 that at freezing. Recent theoretical attempts to understand this dramatic disagreement have led to the proposal that the Derjaguin and DFT routes represent opposite limiting behavior, for very large size asymmetry

  5. Spin--orbit configuration-interaction study of valence and Rydberg states of LiBe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, M.M.; Ermler, W.C.; Kern, C.W.; Bondybey, V.E.

    1992-01-01

    Ab initio spin--orbit full configuration-interaction calculations in the context of relativistic effective core potentials are reported for the weakly bound metal dimer LiBe, a three-valence-electron system. The effects of basis set on the energies of valence and Rydberg states of the cluster are discussed, as are the effects of configuration space selection on the energy of the latter states. Results at the dissociative limit are compared to the experimental atomic spectra. Potential-energy curves and spectroscopic constants are presented for the ground state and fourteen excited states, which includes the Li and Be 2p valence states, the Li 3s, 3p, 3d, and 4s Rydberg states, as well as three low-lying states of the molecular cation

  6. Ab initio valence calculations in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, D B

    1974-01-01

    Ab Initio Valence Calculations in Chemistry describes the theory and practice of ab initio valence calculations in chemistry and applies the ideas to a specific example, linear BeH2. Topics covered include the Schrödinger equation and the orbital approximation to atomic orbitals; molecular orbital and valence bond methods; practical molecular wave functions; and molecular integrals. Open shell systems, molecular symmetry, and localized descriptions of electronic structure are also discussed. This book is comprised of 13 chapters and begins by introducing the reader to the use of the Schrödinge

  7. Interface colloidal robotic manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Igor; Snezhko, Oleksiy

    2015-08-04

    A magnetic colloidal system confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters. The colloidal system exhibits locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, structures can capture, transport, and position target particles.

  8. Light scattering studies of lower dimensional colloidal particle and critical fluid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, W.J.; Mockler, R.C.

    1984-09-01

    The authors have studied the response to compression of colloidal particle crystals in monolayers on the surface of water. The crystals deform elastically as the crystals are compressed in a Langmuir trough from a lattice spacing of ten microns to spacings less than two microns. A phase transition to a close packed triangular lattice phase occurs at very high densities, when the attractive van der Waals/steric interations between particles dominate. The authors have found that the aggregates formed, when a colloidal particle monolayer coagulates following switching off of the repulsive electric dipole-dipole interactions, show scale invariance with a fractal dimension consistent with the prediction of a theory of diffusion limited aggregation in two dimensions. The authors have made progress toward the development of a computer processed array detector-spectrometer to be used in studies of melting and crystallization of two dimensional colloidal particle films. Stable black bilipid membranes have been produced, both spherical and planar, with and without embedded microparticles. We have modified our heterodyne autocorrelation spectrometer, used for studies of the dynamic response of critical fluid films, to enable us to measure the intensity autocorrelation of light scattered at forward angles. Rayleigh linewidth data has been gathered from a 1.9 micron film of a 2,6-lutidine+water critical mixture, taken at a scattering angle of ten degrees. The preliminary results indicate that the film dynamical response remains that of an equivalent three dimensional system, in apparent disgreement with recent theoretical predictions of Calvo and Ferrell

  9. Wetting in a Colloidal Liquid-Gas System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijting, W. K.; Besseling, N. A.; Stuart, M. A.

    2003-05-01

    We present first observations of wetting phenomena in depletion interaction driven, phase separated colloidal dispersions (coated silica cyclohexane-polydimethylsiloxane). The contact angle of the colloidal liquid-gas interface at a solid substrate (coated glass) was determined for a series of compositions. Upon approach to the critical point, a transition occurs from partial to complete wetting.

  10. Wetting in a colloidal liquid-gas system

    OpenAIRE

    Wijting, W.K.; Besseling, N.A.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    We present first observations of wetting phenomena in depletion interaction driven, phase separated colloidal dispersions (coated silica-cyclohexane-polydimethylsiloxane). The contact angle of the colloidal liquid-gas interface at a solid substrate (coated glass) was determined for a series of compositions. Upon approach to the critical point, a transition occurs from partial to complete wetting.

  11. Modeling for Colloid and Chelator Facilitated Nuclide Transport in Radioactive Waste Disposal System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Jeong, Jong Tae

    2010-08-01

    A modeling study and development of a total system performance assessment (TSPA) program template, by which assessment of safety and performance for a radioactive waste repository with normal and/or abnormal nuclide release cases can be made has been developed. Colloid and chelator facilitated transport that is believed to result for faster nuclide transport in various mediabothinthegeosphereandbiospherehas been evaluated deterministically and probabilistically to demonstrate the capability of the template developed through this study. To this end colloid and chelator facilitated nuclide transport has been modeled rather strainghtforwardly with assumed data through this study by utilizing some powerful function offered by GoldSim. An evaluation in view of apparent influence of colloid and chelator on the nuclide transport in the various media in and around a repository system with data assumed are illustrated

  12. Flux dependency of particulate/colloidal fouling in seawater reverse osmosis systems

    KAUST Repository

    Salinas Rodríguez, S. G.

    2012-01-01

    Fouling is the main operational problem in seawater reverse osmosis systems (SWRO). Particulate fouling is traditionally measured through the silt density index (SDI) and through the modified fouling index (MFI). In recent years, ultrafiltration membranes were used successfully at constant flux-MFI-UF-to measure particulate/colloidal fouling potential and tested in sea water applications. Furthermore, constant flux operation allows predicting the rate of fouling in RO systems. The objectives of this study are: (1) to measure the flux effect in MFI-UF with different membranes (100, 30 and 10 kDa) for raw seawater and pre-treated water before reverse osmosis in three different locations; (2) to study the particulate and colloidal fouling potential of seawater in reverse osmosis systems; (3) to project the increase in pressure due to cake resistance in reverse osmosis systems. In this research, flat ultrafiltration membranes (100, 50, 30 and 10 kDa) are used in a con- stant flux filtration mode to test and compare real seawaters from various locations (North and Mediterranean Sea) and from various full scale facilities including different pre-treatments (i.e., ultrafiltration and coagulation + dual media filtration). The operated fluxes range from 350 down to values close to real RO operation, 15l(m2h)-1. After each filtration test, the MFI-UF is calculated to assess the particulate fouling potential. The obtained results showed that: (1) the particulate and colloidal fouling potential is directly proportional to the applied flux during filtration. This proportionality is related to the compression of the cake deposit occurring at high flux values; (2) the higher the flux, the higher the required pressure, the less porous the cake and therefore the higher the specific cake resistance; (3) particulate and colloidal fouling potential of seawater is site specific and is influenced by pre-treatment. © 2012 Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  13. Long-Ranged Oppositely Charged Interactions for Designing New Types of Colloidal Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Faik Demirörs

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Getting control over the valency of colloids is not trivial and has been a long-desired goal for the colloidal domain. Typically, tuning the preferred number of neighbors for colloidal particles requires directional bonding, as in the case of patchy particles, which is difficult to realize experimentally. Here, we demonstrate a general method for creating the colloidal analogs of molecules and other new regular colloidal clusters without using patchiness or complex bonding schemes (e.g., DNA coating by using a combination of long-ranged attractive and repulsive interactions between oppositely charged particles that also enable regular clusters of particles not all in close contact. We show that, due to the interplay between their attractions and repulsions, oppositely charged particles dispersed in an intermediate dielectric constant (4<ϵ<10 provide a viable approach for the formation of binary colloidal clusters. Tuning the size ratio and interactions of the particles enables control of the type and shape of the resulting regular colloidal clusters. Finally, we present an example of clusters made up of negatively charged large and positively charged small satellite particles, for which the electrostatic properties and interactions can be changed with an electric field. It appears that for sufficiently strong fields the satellite particles can move over the surface of the host particles and polarize the clusters. For even stronger fields, the satellite particles can be completely pulled off, reversing the net charge on the cluster. With computer simulations, we investigate how charged particles distribute on an oppositely charged sphere to minimize their energy and compare the results with the solutions to the well-known Thomson problem. We also use the simulations to explore the dependence of such clusters on Debye screening length κ^{−1} and the ratio of charges on the particles, showing good agreement with experimental observations.

  14. Valence evaluation with approaching or withdrawing cues: directly testing valence-arousal conflict theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan Mei; Li, Ting; Li, Lin

    2017-07-19

    The valence-arousal conflict theory assumes that both valence and arousal will trigger approaching or withdrawing tendencies. It also predicts that the speed of processing emotional stimuli will depend on whether valence and arousal trigger conflicting or congruent motivational tendencies. However, most previous studies have provided evidence of the interaction between valence and arousal only, and have not provided direct proof of the interactive links between valence, arousal and motivational tendencies. The present study provides direct evidence for the relationship between approach-withdrawal tendencies and the valence-arousal conflict. In an empirical test, participants were instructed to judge the valence of emotional words after visual-spatial cues that appeared to be either approaching or withdrawing from participants. A three-way interaction (valence, arousal, and approach-withdrawal tendency) was observed such that the response time was shorter if participants responded to a negative high-arousal stimulus after a withdrawing cue, or to a positive low-arousal stimulus after an approaching cue. These findings suggest that the approach-withdrawal tendency indeed plays a crucial role in valence-arousal conflict, and that the effect depends on the congruency of valence, arousal and tendency at an early stage of processing.

  15. Hydrodynamic interactions in active colloidal crystal microrheology

    OpenAIRE

    Weeber, R; Harting, JDR Jens

    2012-01-01

    In dense colloids it is commonly assumed that hydrodynamic interactions do not play a role. However, a found theoretical quantification is often missing. We present computer simulations that are motivated by experiments where a large colloidal particle is dragged through a colloidal crystal. To qualify the influence of long-ranged hydrodynamics, we model the setup by conventional Langevin dynamics simulations and by an improved scheme with limited hydrodynamic interactions. This scheme signif...

  16. Colloidal drug delivery system: amplify the ocular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Javed; Fazil, Mohd; Qumbar, Mohd; Khan, Nazia; Ali, Asgar

    2016-01-01

    The ocular perceivers are the most voluntarily accessible organs in terms of location in the body, yet drug distribution to these tissues is one of the most intriguing and challenging endeavors and problematic to the pharmaceutical scientist. The most of ocular diseases are treated with topical application of conventional formulation, i.e. solutions, suspensions and ointment. Typically on installation of these conventional formulations, only <5% of the applied dose penetrates the cornea and reaches intraocular tissues, while a major fraction of the instilled dose is wastage due to the presence of many ocular barriers like external barriers, rapid loss of the instilled solution from the precorneal area and nasolacrimal drainage system. Systemic absorption caused systemic side effects varying from mild to life-threatening events. The main objective of this review is to explore the role of colloidal delivery of drug to minimize the drawbacks associated with them. This review provides an insight into the various constraints associated with ocular drug delivery, summarizes recent findings and applications of colloidal delivery systems, i.e. nanoparticles, nanosuspensions, liposomes, niosomes, dendrimers and contact lenses containing nanoparticles have the capacity to distribute ocular drugs to categorical target sites and hold promise to revolutionize the therapy of many ocular perceiver diseases and minimized the circumscription of conventional delivery. Form the basis of literature review, it has been found that the novel delivery system have greater impact to maximize ocular drug absorption, and minimize systemic absorption and side effects.

  17. Experimental investigation on the use of highly charged nanoparticles to improve the stability of weakly charged colloidal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubir, Mohd Nashrul Mohd; Badarudin, A; Kazi, S N; Misran, Misni; Amiri, Ahmad; Sadri, Rad; Khalid, Solangi

    2015-09-15

    The present work highlighted on the implementation of a unique concept for stabilizing colloids at their incipiently low charge potential. A highly charged nanoparticle was introduced within a coagulated prone colloidal system, serving as stabilizer to resist otherwise rapid flocculation and sedimentation process. A low size asymmetry of nanoparticle/colloid serves as the new topic of investigation in addition to the well-established large size ratio nanoparticle/microparticle study. Highly charged Al2O3 nanoparticles were used within the present research context to stabilize TiO2 and Fe3O4 based colloids via the formation of composite structures. It was believed, based on the experimental evidence, that Al2O3 nanoparticle interact with the weakly charged TiO2 and Fe3O4 colloids within the binary system via absorption and/or haloing modes to increase the overall charge potential of the respective colloids, thus preventing further surface contact via van der Waal's attraction. Series of experimental results strongly suggest the presence of weakly charged colloids in the studied bimodal system where, in the absence of highly charged nanoparticle, experience rapid instability. Absorbance measurement indicated that the colloidal stability drops in accordance to the highly charged nanoparticle sedimentation rate, suggesting the dominant influence of nanoparticles to attain a well-dispersed binary system. Further, it was found that the level of colloidal stability was enhanced with increasing nanoparticle fraction within the mixture. Rheological observation revealed that each hybrid complexes demonstrated behavior reminiscence to water with negligible increase in viscosity which serves as highly favorable condition particularly in thermal transport applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dynamics of highly polydisperse colloidal suspensions as a model system for bacterial cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jiye; Kim, Jeongmin; Sung, Bong June

    2016-08-01

    There are various kinds of macromolecules in bacterial cell cytoplasm. The size polydispersity of the macromolecules is so significant that the crystallization and the phase separation could be suppressed, thus stabilizing the liquid state of bacterial cytoplasm. On the other hand, recent experiments suggested that the macromolecules in bacterial cytoplasm should exhibit glassy dynamics, which should be also affected significantly by the size polydispersity of the macromolecules. In this work, we investigate the anomalous and slow dynamics of highly polydisperse colloidal suspensions, of which size distribution is chosen to mimic Escherichia coli cytoplasm. We find from our Langevin dynamics simulations that the diffusion coefficient (D_{tot}) and the displacement distribution functions (P(r,t)) averaged over all colloids of different sizes do not show anomalous and glassy dynamic behaviors until the system volume fraction ϕ is increased up to 0.82. This indicates that the intrinsic polydispersity of bacterial cytoplasm should suppress the glass transition and help maintain the liquid state of the cytoplasm. On the other hand, colloids of each kind show totally different dynamic behaviors depending on their size. The dynamics of colloids of different size becomes non-Gaussian at a different range of ϕ, which suggests that a multistep glass transition should occur. The largest colloids undergo the glass transition at ϕ=0.65, while the glass transition does not occur for smaller colloids in our simulations even at the highest value of ϕ. We also investigate the distribution (P(θ,t)) of the relative angles of displacement for macromolecules and find that macromolecules undergo directionally correlated motions in a sufficiently dense system.

  19. Investigation on the Stability of Aluminosilicate Colloids by Various Analytical Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putri, Kirana Y.; Lee, D. H.; Yun, J. I. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Colloids are ubiquitous in natural aquatic systems. Aquatic colloids may play a significant carrier role for radionuclide migration in aquifer systems. Being omnipresent in natural aquatic systems, aluminosilicate colloids are considered as a kernel for various aquatic colloids. Characterization of aluminosilicate colloids formed under various geochemical conditions is of importance to understand their chemical behavior in natural aquatic systems. In this work, a preliminary study on the formation of aluminosilicate colloids with a help of colorimetry and other colloid detection techniques is presented

  20. Quantum computational capability of a 2D valence bond solid phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Akimasa

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Our model is the 2D valence bond solid phase of a quantum antiferromagnet. → Universal quantum computation is processed by measurements of quantum correlations. → An intrinsic complexity of strongly-correlated quantum systems could be a resource. - Abstract: Quantum phases of naturally-occurring systems exhibit distinctive collective phenomena as manifestation of their many-body correlations, in contrast to our persistent technological challenge to engineer at will such strong correlations artificially. Here we show theoretically that quantum correlations exhibited in the 2D valence bond solid phase of a quantum antiferromagnet, modeled by Affleck, Kennedy, Lieb, and Tasaki (AKLT) as a precursor of spin liquids and topological orders, are sufficiently complex yet structured enough to simulate universal quantum computation when every single spin can be measured individually. This unveils that an intrinsic complexity of naturally-occurring 2D quantum systems-which has been a long-standing challenge for traditional computers-could be tamed as a computationally valuable resource, even if we are limited not to create newly entanglement during computation. Our constructive protocol leverages a novel way to herald the correlations suitable for deterministic quantum computation through a random sampling, and may be extensible to other ground states of various 2D valence bond phases beyond the AKLT state.

  1. Radioactive colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, L.

    1987-01-01

    Different techniques for the characterization of radioactive colloids, used in nuclear medicine, have been evaluated and compared. Several radioactive colloids have been characterized in vitro and in vivo and tested experimentally. Colloid biokinetics following interstitial or intravenous injection were evaluated with a scintillation camera technique. Lymphoscintigraphy with a Tc-99-labelled antimony sulphur colloid was performed in 32 patients with malignant melanoma in order to evaluate the technique. Based on the biokinetic results, absorbed doses in tissues and organs were calculated. The function of the reticuloendothelial system has been evaluated in rats after inoculation with tumour cells. Microfiltration and photon correlation spectroscopy were found to be suitable in determining activity-size and particle size distributions, respectively. Maximal lymph node uptake following subcutaneous injection was found to correspond to a colloid particle size between 10 and 50 nm. Lymphoscintigraphy was found to be useful in the study of lymphatic drainage from the primary tumour site in patients with malignant melanoma on the trunk. Quantitative analysis of ilio-inguinal lymph node uptake in patients with malignant melanoma on the lower extremities was, however, found to be of no value for the detection of metastatic disease in lymph nodes. High absorbed doses may be received in lymph nodes (up to 1 mGy/MBq) and at the injection site (about 10 mGy/MBq). In an experimental study it was found that the relative colloid uptake in bone marrow and spleen depended on the total number of intravenously injected particles. This may considerably affect the absorbed dose in these organs. (author)

  2. The dynamical crossover in attractive colloidal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallamace, Francesco [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Corsaro, Carmelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Stanley, H. Eugene [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Mallamace, Domenico [Dipartimento di Scienze dell’Ambiente, della Sicurezza, del Territorio, degli Alimenti e della Salute, Università di Messina, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Chen, Sow-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2013-12-07

    We study the dynamical arrest in an adhesive hard-sphere colloidal system. We examine a micellar suspension of the Pluronic-L64 surfactant in the temperature (T) and volume fraction (ϕ) phase diagram. According to mode-coupling theory (MCT), this system is characterized by a cusp-like singularity and two glassy phases: an attractive glass (AG) phase and a repulsive glass (RG) phase. The T − ϕ phase diagram of this system as confirmed by a previous series of scattering data also exhibits a Percolation Threshold (PT) line, a reentrant behavior (AG-liquid-RG), and a glass-to-glass transition. The AG phase can be generated out of the liquid phase by using T and ϕ as control parameters. We utilize viscosity and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. NMR data confirm all the characteristic properties of the colloidal system phase diagram and give evidence of the onset of a fractal-like percolating structure at a precise threshold. The MCT scaling laws used to study the shear viscosity as a function of ϕ and T show in both cases a fragile-to-strong liquid glass-forming dynamic crossover (FSC) located near the percolation threshold where the clustering process is fully developed. These results suggest a larger thermodynamic generality for this phenomenon, which is usually studied only as a function of the temperature. We also find that the critical values of the control parameters, coincident with the PT line, define the locus of the FSC. In the region between the FSC and the glass transition lines the system dynamics are dominated by clustering effects. We thus demonstrate that it is possible, using the conceptual framework provided by extended mode-coupling theory, to describe the way a system approaches dynamic arrest, taking into account both cage and hopping effects.

  3. Lie algebraic approach to valence bond theory of π-electron systems: a preliminary study of excited states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paldus, J.; Li, X.

    1992-10-01

    Following a brief outline of various developments and exploitations of the unitary group approach (UGA), and its extension referred to as Clifford algebra UGA (CAUGA), in molecular electronic structure calculations, we present a summary of a recently introduced implementation of CAUGA for the valence bond (VB) method based on the Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP)-type Hamiltonian. The existing applications of this PPP-VB approach have been limited to groundstates of various π-electron systems or, at any rate, to the lowest states of a given multiplicity. In this paper the method is applied to the low-lying excited states of several archetypal models, namely cyclobutadiene and benzene, representing antiaromatic and aromatic systems, hexatriene, representing linear polyenic systems and, finally, naphthalene, representing polyacenes.

  4. Colloid migration in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.R.; McDowell-Boyer; Sitar, N.

    1985-01-01

    Retention of radionuclides for long periods near waste repositories depends upon multiple barriers, one of which is adsorption to immobile solid surfaces. Since small particles and colloidal matter have high adsorption capacities per unit mass and can be mobile in subsurface flows, colloidal transport of waste components requires analysis. Theories for predicting colloid migration through porous media have been developed in the filtration literature. The applicability of filtration theories for predicting particle and colloid transport. Emphasis is on suspended matter much smaller than pore sizes, where physical and chemical forces control migration rather than size dependent physical straining. In general, experimentally verifiable theories exist for particle filtration by clean media, and a sensitivity analysis is possible on particle and media properties and fluid flow rate. When particle aggregates accumulate within pores, media permeability decreases, resulting in flow field alteration and possible radionuclide isolation. An analysis of the limited experimental data available indicates that present theories cannot predict long-term colloid transport when permeability reduction occurs. The coupling of colloid attachment processes and the hydrologic flow processes requires more extensive laboratory field research than has currently been carried out. An emphasis on the fundamental mechanisms is necessary to enhance long-term predictability

  5. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-01-01

    sorbed onto this fraction of colloids also transport without retardation. The transport times for these radionuclides will be the same as those for nonsorbing radionuclides. The fraction of nonretarding colloids developed in this analysis report is used in the abstraction of SZ and UZ transport models in support of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This analysis report uses input from two Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) analysis reports. This analysis uses the assumption from ''Waste Form and In-Drift Colloids-Associated Radionuclide Concentrations: Abstraction and Summary'' that plutonium and americium are irreversibly sorbed to colloids generated by the waste degradation processes (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025]). In addition, interpretations from RELAP analyses from ''Saturated Zone In-Situ Testing'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170010]) are used to develop the retardation factor distributions in this analysis

  6. Actinide colloid generation in groundwater. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    The progress made in the investigation of actinide colloid generation in groundwater is summarized and discussed with particular examples relevant to an understanding of the migration behaviour of actinides in natural aquifer systems. The first part deals with the characterization of colloids: groundwater colloids, actinide real-colloids and actinide pseudocolloids. The second part concentrates on the generation processes and migration behaviour of actinide pseudo colloids, which are discussed with some notable experimental examples. Importance is stressed more on the chemical aspects of the actinide colloid generation in groundwater. This work is a contribution to the CEC Mirage II project, in particular the complexation and colloids research area

  7. Intermediate valence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnarsson, O.; Schoenhammer, K.

    1987-01-01

    Spectroscopic properties of intermediate valence compounds are studied using the Anderson model. Due to the large orbital and spin degeneracy N/sub f/ of the 4f-level, 1/N/sub f/ can be treated as a small parameter. This approach provides exact T = 0 results for the Anderson impurity model in the limit N/sub f/ → ∞, and by adding 1/N/sub f/ corrections some properties can be calculated accurately even for N/sub f/ = 1 or 2. In particular valence photoemission and resonance photoemission spectroscopies are studied. A comparison of theoretical and experimental spectra provides an estimate of the parameters in the model. Core level photoemission spectra provide estimates of the coupling between the f-level and the conduction states and of the f-level occupancy. With these parameters the model gives a fair description of other electron spectroscopies. For typical parameters the model predicts two structures in the f-spectrum, namely one structure at the f-level and one at the Fermi energy. The resonance photoemission calculation gives a photon energy dependence for these two peaks in fair agreement with experiment. The peak at the Fermi energy is partly due to a narrow Kondo resonance, resulting from many-body effects and the presence of a continuous, partly filled conduction band. This resonance is related to a large density of low-lying excitations, which explains the large susceptibility and specific heat observed for these systems at low temperatures. 38 references, 11 figures, 2 tables

  8. Size effects of solvent molecules on the phase behavior and effective interaction of colloidal systems with the bridging attraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Xuewu; Kline, Steven R; Liu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    There has been much recent research interest towards understanding the phase behavior of colloidal systems interacting with a bridging attraction, where the small solvent particles and large solute colloidal particles can be reversibly associated with each other. These systems show interesting phase behavior compared to the more widely studied depletion attraction systems. Here, we use Baxter’s two-component sticky hard sphere model with a Percus–Yevick closure to solve the Ornstein–Zernike equation and study the size effect on colloidal systems with bridging attractions. The spinodal decomposition regions, percolation transition boundaries and binodal regions are systematically investigated as a function of the relative size of the small solvent and large solute particles as well as the attraction strength between the small and large particles. In the phase space determined by the concentrations of small and large particles, the spinodal and binodal regions form isolated islands. The locations and shapes of the spinodal and binodal regions sensitively depend on the relative size of the small and large particles and the attraction strength between them. The percolation region shrinks by decreasing the size ratio, while the binodal region slightly expands with the decrease of the size ratio. Our results are very important in understanding the phase behavior for a bridging attraction colloidal system, a model system that provides insight into oppositely charged colloidal systems, protein phase behavior, and colloidal gelation mechanisms. (paper)

  9. Size effects of solvent molecules on the phase behavior and effective interaction of colloidal systems with the bridging attraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Xuewu; Kline, Steven R; Liu, Yun

    2016-11-16

    There has been much recent research interest towards understanding the phase behavior of colloidal systems interacting with a bridging attraction, where the small solvent particles and large solute colloidal particles can be reversibly associated with each other. These systems show interesting phase behavior compared to the more widely studied depletion attraction systems. Here, we use Baxter's two-component sticky hard sphere model with a Percus-Yevick closure to solve the Ornstein-Zernike equation and study the size effect on colloidal systems with bridging attractions. The spinodal decomposition regions, percolation transition boundaries and binodal regions are systematically investigated as a function of the relative size of the small solvent and large solute particles as well as the attraction strength between the small and large particles. In the phase space determined by the concentrations of small and large particles, the spinodal and binodal regions form isolated islands. The locations and shapes of the spinodal and binodal regions sensitively depend on the relative size of the small and large particles and the attraction strength between them. The percolation region shrinks by decreasing the size ratio, while the binodal region slightly expands with the decrease of the size ratio. Our results are very important in understanding the phase behavior for a bridging attraction colloidal system, a model system that provides insight into oppositely charged colloidal systems, protein phase behavior, and colloidal gelation mechanisms.

  10. Colloid formation in groundwater by subsurface aeration: characterisation of the geo-colloids and their counterparts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolthoorn, Anke; Temminghoff, Erwin J.M.; Riemsdijk, Willem H. van

    2004-01-01

    Subsurface aeration is used to oxidise Fe in situ in groundwater to make the water potable. In a groundwater system with pH > 7, subsurface aeration results in a non-mobile Fe precipitate and mobile Fe colloids. Since originally the goal of subsurface aeration is to remove Fe in situ, the formation of non-mobile Fe precipitate is the desired result. In addition to this intended effect, subsurface aeration may also strongly enhance the microbiological removal of NH 4 in the purification station. A hypothesis is that mobile Fe colloids may be the link between subsurface aeration and the positive effect on the microbiological removal of NH 4 . The objective of this study is to characterise the mobile Fe colloids and to derive a synthetic substitute for the naturally formed Fe colloids in order to be able to apply the Fe colloids as a management tool to enhance the removal of NH 4 in the process of producing drinking water from groundwater. At a purification station in The Netherlands natural Fe colloids from an aerated well were sampled. Furthermore, eight synthetic Fe colloids were prepared by oxidising synthetic solutions differing in elemental composition. The colloids were analysed using chemical analysis and electron microscopy (SEM and SEM-EDAX). The Fe colloids sampled in the field contained Fe, Ca, Na, PO 4 and Mn. Also in the synthetic Fe colloids PO 4 , Ca, Na and Mn were the most important elements next to Fe. Phosphate and dissolved organic C strongly influenced the morphology of the synthetic Fe colloids. When both the elemental composition and the morphology of the Fe colloids are taken into account, the synthetic Fe colloids formed in the synthetic solution containing Fe, Mn, PO 4 , SiO 4 and dissolved organic matter best match the Fe colloids from the field

  11. Colloid formation in groundwater by subsurface aeration: characterisation of the geo-colloids and their counterparts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolthoorn, Anke; Temminghoff, Erwin J.M.; Riemsdijk, Willem H. van

    2004-09-01

    Subsurface aeration is used to oxidise Fe in situ in groundwater to make the water potable. In a groundwater system with pH > 7, subsurface aeration results in a non-mobile Fe precipitate and mobile Fe colloids. Since originally the goal of subsurface aeration is to remove Fe in situ, the formation of non-mobile Fe precipitate is the desired result. In addition to this intended effect, subsurface aeration may also strongly enhance the microbiological removal of NH{sub 4} in the purification station. A hypothesis is that mobile Fe colloids may be the link between subsurface aeration and the positive effect on the microbiological removal of NH{sub 4}. The objective of this study is to characterise the mobile Fe colloids and to derive a synthetic substitute for the naturally formed Fe colloids in order to be able to apply the Fe colloids as a management tool to enhance the removal of NH{sub 4} in the process of producing drinking water from groundwater. At a purification station in The Netherlands natural Fe colloids from an aerated well were sampled. Furthermore, eight synthetic Fe colloids were prepared by oxidising synthetic solutions differing in elemental composition. The colloids were analysed using chemical analysis and electron microscopy (SEM and SEM-EDAX). The Fe colloids sampled in the field contained Fe, Ca, Na, PO{sub 4} and Mn. Also in the synthetic Fe colloids PO{sub 4}, Ca, Na and Mn were the most important elements next to Fe. Phosphate and dissolved organic C strongly influenced the morphology of the synthetic Fe colloids. When both the elemental composition and the morphology of the Fe colloids are taken into account, the synthetic Fe colloids formed in the synthetic solution containing Fe, Mn, PO{sub 4}, SiO{sub 4} and dissolved organic matter best match the Fe colloids from the field.

  12. Colloidal nematostatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Pergamenshchik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We give a review of the theory of large distance colloidal interaction via the nematic director field. The new area of nematic colloidal systems (or nematic emulsions has been guided by the analogy between the colloidal nematostatics and electrostatics. The elastic charge density representation of the colloidal nematostatics [V.M. Pergamenshchik, V.O. Uzunova, Eur. Phys. J. E, 2007, 23, 161; Phys. Rev. E, 2007, 76, 011707] develops this analogy at the level of charge density and Coulomb interaction. The analogy is shown to lie in common mathematics based on the solutions of Laplace equation. However, the 3d colloidal nematostatics substantially differs from electrostatics both in its mathematical structure and physical implications. The elastic charge is a vector fully determined by the torque exerted upon colloid, the role of Gauss' theorem is played by conservation of the torque components. Elastic multipoles consist of two tensors (dyads. Formulas for the elastic multipoles, the Coulomb-like, dipole-dipole, and quadrupole-quadrupole pair interaction potentials are derived and illustrated by particular examples. Based on the tensorial structure, we list possible types of elastic dipoles and quadrupoles. An elastic dipole is characterized by its isotropic strength, anisotropy, chirality, and its longitudinal component. An elastic quadrupole can be uniaxial and biaxial. Relation between the multipole type and its symmetry is discussed, sketches of some types of multipoles are given. Using the mirror image method of electrostatics as a guiding idea, we develop the mirror image method in nematostatics for arbitrary director tilt at the wall. The method is applied to the charge-wall and dipole-wall interaction.

  13. Glass/Jamming Transition in Colloidal Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segre, Philip N.; Prasad, Vikram; Weitz, David A.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have studied colloidal aggregation in a model colloid plus polymer system with short-range attractive interactions. By varying the colloid concentration and the strength of the attraction, we explored regions where the equilibrium phase is expected to consist of colloidal crystallites in coexistance with colloidal gas (i.e. monomers). This occurs for moderate values of the potential depth, U approximately equal to 2-5 kT. Crystallization was not always observed. Rather, over an extended sub-region two new metastable phases appear, one fluid-like and one solid-like. These were examined in detail with light scattering and microscopy techniques. Both phases consist of a near uniform distribution of small irregular shaped clusters of colloidal particles. The dynamical and structural characteristics of the ergodic-nonergodic transition between the two phases share much in common with the colloidal hard sphere glass transition.

  14. Flocking ferromagnetic colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S

    2017-02-01

    Assemblages of microscopic colloidal particles exhibit fascinating collective motion when energized by electric or magnetic fields. The behaviors range from coherent vortical motion to phase separation and dynamic self-assembly. Although colloidal systems are relatively simple, understanding their collective response, especially under out-of-equilibrium conditions, remains elusive. We report on the emergence of flocking and global rotation in the system of rolling ferromagnetic microparticles energized by a vertical alternating magnetic field. By combing experiments and discrete particle simulations, we have identified primary physical mechanisms, leading to the emergence of large-scale collective motion: spontaneous symmetry breaking of the clockwise/counterclockwise particle rotation, collisional alignment of particle velocities, and random particle reorientations due to shape imperfections. We have also shown that hydrodynamic interactions between the particles do not have a qualitative effect on the collective dynamics. Our findings shed light on the onset of spatial and temporal coherence in a large class of active systems, both synthetic (colloids, swarms of robots, and biopolymers) and living (suspensions of bacteria, cell colonies, and bird flocks).

  15. Liquid crystal colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Muševič, Igor

    2017-01-01

    This book brings together the many concepts and discoveries in liquid crystal colloids contributed over the last twenty years and scattered across numerous articles and book chapters. It provides both a historical overview of the development of the field and a clear perspective on the future applications in photonics. The book covers all phenomena observed in liquid crystal colloids with an emphasis on experimental tools and applications of topology in condensed matter, as well as practical micro-photonics applications. It includes a number of spectacular manifestations of new topological phenomena not found or difficult to observe in other systems. Starting from the early works on nematic colloids, it explains the basics of topological defects in ordered media, charge and winding, and the elastic forces between colloidal particles in nematics. Following a detailed description of experimental methods, such as optical tweezing and particle tracking, the book eases the reader into the theoretical part, which de...

  16. Liquid Crystal Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2018-03-01

    Colloids are abundant in nature, science, and technology, with examples ranging from milk to quantum dots and the colloidal atom paradigm. Similarly, liquid crystal ordering is important in contexts ranging from biological membranes to laboratory models of cosmic strings and liquid crystal displays in consumer devices. Some of the most exciting recent developments in both of these soft matter fields emerge at their interface, in the fast-growing research arena of liquid crystal colloids. Mesoscale self-assembly in such systems may lead to artificial materials and to structures with emergent physical behavior arising from patterning of molecular order and nano- or microparticles into precisely controlled configurations. Liquid crystal colloids show exceptional promise for new discovery that may impinge on composite material fabrication, low-dimensional topology, photonics, and so on. Starting from physical underpinnings, I review the state of the art in this fast-growing field, with a focus on its scientific and technological potential.

  17. Colloids in Flatland: a perspective on 2D phase-separated systems, characterisation methods, and lineactant.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardini, C.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Arnaudov, L.N.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    In 1861 Thomas Graham gave birth to a new field of science, today known as colloid science. Nowadays, the notion “colloid” is often used referring to systems consisting of two immiscible phases, one of which is finely dispersed into the other. Research on colloids deals mostly with sols (solids

  18. Cluster electric spectroscopy of colloid chemical oxyhydrate systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sucharev, Yu I

    2015-01-01

    This monograph deals with the shape of Liesegang operator and its respective phase diagrams of spontaneous surges and analyzed properties of cluster attractors. It describes the influence of pulsation noise or self-organization current of gel systems in a magnetic field on singularities of optic parameters of yttrium oxyhydrate, as well as on kinetic curves of changes in optic density of oxyhydrate systems, sorptive properties of d- and f-elements, and the structural organization of their colloids. This monograph is meant for postgraduate students, magisters, researchers, and those interested

  19. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    retardation. Radionuclides irreversibly sorbed onto this fraction of colloids also transport without retardation. The transport times for these radionuclides will be the same as those for nonsorbing radionuclides. The fraction of nonretarding colloids developed in this analysis report is used in the abstraction of SZ and UZ transport models in support of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This analysis report uses input from two Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) analysis reports. This analysis uses the assumption from ''Waste Form and In-Drift Colloids-Associated Radionuclide Concentrations: Abstraction and Summary'' that plutonium and americium are irreversibly sorbed to colloids generated by the waste degradation processes (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025]). In addition, interpretations from RELAP analyses from ''Saturated Zone In-Situ Testing'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170010]) are used to develop the retardation factor distributions in this analysis.

  20. Colloidal behavior of Np(V) in aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xin; Zhang Yingjie; Wei Liansheng; Lin Zhangji

    2004-01-01

    The speciation of Np(V) in solutions is measured by means of FT-Raman spectrometer. The formation of colloid of Np(V) in aqueous solutions is studied with the variation of pH(2-12), ionic strength (0.01 mol/L, 0.1 mol/L, 1.0 mol/L), storage time (6h, 30h, 1 week, 6 weeks) and neptunium concentration. The adsorption behavior of Np(V) on granite and its rock-forming minerals (quartz, microcline, albite, biotite and hornblende) is also studied in an aqueous phase of artificial ground water. The experiments are performed at ambient temperature. Experimental results show that a small fraction of Np removed from the solution is adsorbed on the walls of container at the pH above 6 due to the formation of colloid of Np. The formation of colloid of Np depends on its hydrolytic extent, ionic strength, and storage time. The adsorption of Np on granite and the individual mineral depends strongly on the formation of the colloids with the variation of pH in solutions. (author)

  1. Valencies of the lanthanides

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, David A.; Nelson, Peter G.

    2018-01-01

    The valencies of the lanthanides vary more than was once thought. In addition to valencies associated with a half-full shell, there are valencies associated with a quarter- and three-quarter-full shell. This can be explained on the basis of Slater’s theory of many-electron atoms. The same theory explains the variation in complexing constants in the trivalent state (the “tetrad effect”). Valency in metallic and organometallic compounds is also discussed.

  2. Saturated Zone Colloid-Facilitated Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfsberg, A.; Reimus, P.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the Saturated Zone Colloid-Facilitated Transport Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR), as outlined in its Work Direction and Planning Document (CRWMS MandO 1999a), is to provide retardation factors for colloids with irreversibly-attached radionuclides, such as plutonium, in the saturated zone (SZ) between their point of entrance from the unsaturated zone (UZ) and downgradient compliance points. Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this AMR especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and perhaps other radionuclides may be irreversibly attached to colloids. This report establishes the requirements and elements of the design of a methodology for calculating colloid transport in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain. In previous Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) analyses, radionuclide-bearing colloids were assumed to be unretarded in their migration. Field experiments in fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain and in porous media at other sites indicate that colloids may, in fact, experience retardation relative to the mean pore-water velocity, suggesting that contaminants associated with colloids should also experience some retardation. Therefore, this analysis incorporates field data where available and a theoretical framework when site-specific data are not available for estimating plausible ranges of retardation factors in both saturated fractured tuff and saturated alluvium. The distribution of retardation factors for tuff and alluvium are developed in a form consistent with the Performance Assessment (PA) analysis framework for simulating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone. To improve on the work performed so far for the saturated-zone flow and transport modeling, concerted effort has been made in quantifying colloid retardation factors in both fractured tuff and alluvium. The fractured tuff analysis used recent data

  3. Aqueous Colloid + Polymer Depletion System for Confocal Microscopy and Rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Nayoung; Umanzor, Esmeralda J.; Conrad, Jacinta C.

    2018-05-01

    We developed a model depletion system with colloidal particles that were refractive index- and density-matched to 80 (w/w)% glycerol in water, and characterized the effect of interparticle interactions on the structure and dynamics of non-equilibrium phases. 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate-co-tert-butyl methacrylate copolymer particles were synthesized following Kodger et al. (Sci. Rep. 5, 14635 (2015)). Particles were dispersed in glycerol/water solutions to generate colloidal suspensions with good control over electrostatic interactions and a moderately high background viscosity of 55 mPa-s. To probe the effects of charge screening and depletion attractions on the suspension phase behavior, we added NaCl and polyacrylamide (M_w = 186 kDa) at various concentrations to particle suspensions formulated at volume fractions of phi = 0.05 and 0.3 and imaged the suspensions using confocal microscopy. The particles were nearly hard spheres at a NaCl concentration of 20 mM, but aggregated when the concentration of NaCl was further increased. Changes in the particle structure and dynamics with increasing concentration of the depletant polyacrylamide followed the trends expected from earlier experiments on depletion-driven gelation. Additionally, we measured the viscosity and corrected first normal stress difference of suspensions formulated at phi = 0.4 with and without added polymer. The solvent viscosity was suitable for rheology measurements without the onset of instabilities such as secondary flows or edge fracture. These results validate this system as an alternative to one common model system, suspensions of poly(methyl methacrylate) particles and polystyrene depletants in organic solvents, for investigating phase behavior and flow properties in attractive colloidal suspensions.

  4. Search for an optimal colloid for sentinel node imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imam, S.K.; Killingsworth, M.

    2005-01-01

    This study aims at finding a cost-effective and stable colloid of appropriate size to replace antimony sulfide colloid which is now in routine use in Australia for sentinel lymph node (SLN) imaging. For this reason we evaluated three colloids; namely phytate, hepatate and stannous fluoride (SnF 2 ). As colloids of particle size of 100-200 nm seem to be appropriate for sentinel node imaging, the three radiolabelled colloid preparations were filtered through 0.1 and 0.22 μm filters and then studied on electron microscope. Electron microscopy showed that unlike phytate, the particle size of the hepatate and SnF 2 colloids did not increase beyond the size limit of 200 nm over a period of as long as 26 hours. Instead, they remained well within the size limits chosen. The stability of particle size is required for intra-operative gamma probe lymphatic mapping that sometimes may be performed on the following day. Hepatate and SnF 2 colloids appeared to be more suited for sentinel lymph node imaging, the latter being an inhouse product is more cost-effective. Further studies based on nodal uptake and the behavior of these two radiopharmaceuticals in animals is suggested in order to evaluate their potential for future wide-spread application in human sentinel node imaging. (author)

  5. Spin Dynamics and Magnetic Ordering in Mixed Valence Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, S. M.; Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Axe, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    . 0 meV at the transition to the alpha phase. The temperature independence of the susceptibility within the gamma phase cannot be simply reconciled with the temperature dependence of the valence within the gamma phase. TmSe is shown to order in a type I antiferromagnetic structure below T//N similar 3....... 2 K. The magnetic phase diagram is understood as a successive domain reorientation and a metamagnetic phase transition for T less than 3 K with increasing field. The mixed valence nature manifests itself in a reduced moment and a markedly altered crystal field. Another sample of TmSe with a lattice...

  6. Prediction of valence and arousal from music features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Brinker, A.C.; Van Dinther, C.H.B.A.; Skowronek, J.

    2011-01-01

    Mood is an important attribute of music and knowledge on mood can beused as a basic ingredient in music recommender and retrieval systems. Moods are assumed to be dominantly determined by two dimensions:valence and arousal. An experiment was conducted to attain data forsong-based ratings of valence

  7. Liquid crystal boojum-colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasinkevych, M; Silvestre, N M; Telo da Gama, M M

    2012-01-01

    Colloidal particles dispersed in a liquid crystal (LC) lead to distortions of the director field. The distortions are responsible for long-range effective colloidal interactions whose asymptotic behaviour is well understood. The short-distance behaviour depends on the structure and dynamics of the topological defects nucleated near the colloidal particles and a full nonlinear theory is required to describe it. Spherical colloidal particles with strong planar degenerate anchoring nucleate a pair of antipodal surface topological defects, known as boojums. We use the Landau-de Gennes theory to resolve the mesoscopic structure of the boojum cores and to determine the pairwise colloidal interactions. We compare the results in three (3D) and two (2D) spatial dimensions for spherical and disc-like colloidal particles, respectively. The corresponding free energy functionals are minimized numerically using finite elements with adaptive meshes. Boojums are always point-like in 2D, but acquire a rather complex structure in 3D, which depends on the combination of the anchoring potential, the radius of the colloid, the temperature and the LC elastic anisotropy. We identify three types of defect cores in 3D that we call single, double and split-core boojums, and investigate the associated structural transitions. The split-core structure is favoured by low temperatures, strong anchoring and small twist to splay or bend ratios. For sufficiently strong anchoring potentials characterized by a well-defined uniaxial minimum, the split-core boojums are the only stable configuration. In the presence of two colloidal particles, we observe substantial re-arrangements of the inner defects in both 3D and 2D. These re-arrangements lead to qualitative changes in the force-distance profile when compared to the asymptotic quadrupole-quadrupole interaction. In line with the experimental results, the presence of the defects prevents coalescence of the colloidal particles in 2D, but not in 3D

  8. Structural properties of dendrimer-colloid mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenz, Dominic A; Blaak, Ronald; Likos, Christos N

    2012-01-01

    We consider binary mixtures of colloidal particles and amphiphilic dendrimers of the second generation by means of Monte Carlo simulations. By using the effective interactions between monomer-resolved dendrimers and colloids, we compare the results of simulations of mixtures stemming from a full monomer-resolved description with the effective two-component description at different densities, composition ratios, colloid diameters and interaction strengths. Additionally, we map the two-component system onto an effective one-component model for the colloids in the presence of the dendrimers. Simulations based on the resulting depletion potentials allow us to extend the comparison to yet another level of coarse graining and to examine under which conditions this two-step approach is valid. In addition, a preliminary outlook into the phase behavior of this system is given. (paper)

  9. Quantitative uptake of colloidal particles by cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feliu, Neus [Department of Physics, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Department for Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC),Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Hühn, Jonas; Zyuzin, Mikhail V.; Ashraf, Sumaira; Valdeperez, Daniel; Masood, Atif [Department of Physics, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Said, Alaa Hassan [Department of Physics, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, South Valley University (Egypt); Escudero, Alberto [Department of Physics, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC — Universidad de Sevilla, Seville (Spain); Pelaz, Beatriz [Department of Physics, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Gonzalez, Elena [Department of Physics, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); University of Vigo, Vigo (Spain); Duarte, Miguel A. Correa [University of Vigo, Vigo (Spain); Roy, Sathi [Department of Physics, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Chakraborty, Indranath [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Lim, Mei L.; Sjöqvist, Sebastian [Department for Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC),Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Jungebluth, Philipp [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Thoraxklinik, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (Germany); Parak, Wolfgang J., E-mail: wolfgang.parak@physik.uni-marburg.de [Department of Physics, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); CIC biomaGUNE, San Sebastian (Spain)

    2016-10-15

    The use of nanotechnologies involving nano- and microparticles has increased tremendously in the recent past. There are various beneficial characteristics that make particles attractive for a wide range of technologies. However, colloidal particles on the other hand can potentially be harmful for humans and environment. Today, complete understanding of the interaction of colloidal particles with biological systems still remains a challenge. Indeed, their uptake, effects, and final cell cycle including their life span fate and degradation in biological systems are not fully understood. This is mainly due to the complexity of multiple parameters which need to be taken in consideration to perform the nanosafety research. Therefore, we will provide an overview of the common denominators and ideas to achieve universal metrics to assess their safety. The review discusses aspects including how biological media could change the physicochemical properties of colloids, how colloids are endocytosed by cells, how to distinguish between internalized versus membrane-attached colloids, possible correlation of cellular uptake of colloids with their physicochemical properties, and how the colloidal stability of colloids may vary upon cell internalization. In conclusion three main statements are given. First, in typically exposure scenarios only part of the colloids associated with cells are internalized while a significant part remain outside cells attached to their membrane. For quantitative uptake studies false positive counts in the form of only adherent but not internalized colloids have to be avoided. pH sensitive fluorophores attached to the colloids, which can discriminate between acidic endosomal/lysosomal and neutral extracellular environment around colloids offer a possible solution. Second, the metrics selected for uptake studies is of utmost importance. Counting the internalized colloids by number or by volume may lead to significantly different results. Third, colloids

  10. Valence fluctuations between two magnetic configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzaferro, J.O.

    1982-01-01

    The subject of this work is the study of a microscopic model which describes TmSe through its most important feature, i.e.: the valence fluctuations between two magnetic configurations. Chapter I is a general review of the most important physical properties of rare-earth systems with intermediate valence (I.V.) and a general description of experimental results and theoretical models on Tm compounds. In Chapter II the Hamiltonian model is discussed and the loss of rotational invariance is also analyzed. Chapter III is devoted to the study of non-stoichiometric Tsub(x)Se compounds. It is shown that these compounds can be considered as a mixture of TmSe (I.V. system) and Tm 3+ 0.87Se. Chapter IV is devoted to the calculation of spin-and charge susceptibilities. The results obtained permit to explain the essential features of the neutron scattering spectrum in TmSe. In Chapter V, an exactly solvable periodic Hamiltonian is presented. From the experimental results, some fundamental features are deduced to describe TmSe as an intermediate valence system whose two accessible ionic configurations are magnetic (degenerated fundamental state). (M.E.L) [es

  11. Hydrodynamic interactions in active colloidal crystal microrheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeber, R; Harting, J

    2012-11-01

    In dense colloids it is commonly assumed that hydrodynamic interactions do not play a role. However, a found theoretical quantification is often missing. We present computer simulations that are motivated by experiments where a large colloidal particle is dragged through a colloidal crystal. To qualify the influence of long-ranged hydrodynamics, we model the setup by conventional Langevin dynamics simulations and by an improved scheme with limited hydrodynamic interactions. This scheme significantly improves our results and allows to show that hydrodynamics strongly impacts the development of defects, the crystal regeneration, as well as the jamming behavior.

  12. Cation colloidal particles in alkaline-earth halides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcala, R; Orera, V M [Zaragoza Univ. (Spain). Facultad da Ciencias

    1976-01-01

    The formation of calcium, strontium and barium colloids both in heavily electron irradiated samples and in additively colored crystals of CaF/sub 2/, SrF/sub 2/ and BaF/sub 2/ has been investigated. Detailed data on the temperature dependence of the efficiency of colloid formation by irradiation have been obained. The growth of metallic particles in additively colored samples containing F and M centers has been studied for different color center concentrations and annealing temperatures. The optical absorption bands due to metallic colloids have been calculated using the theory of Mie. To take account of the pressure exerted by the matrix on the metallic particles several corrections to the optical constants of the metals have been introduced. A good agreement between theoretical calculations and experimental results has been obtained. The evolution of colloids along several thermal annealing experiments has also been investigated. A diffusion-limited model has been used which accounts for the dependence of the colloid radii with the annealing time.

  13. Human Amygdala Represents the Complete Spectrum of Subjective Valence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jingwen; Zelano, Christina; Gottfried, Jay A.

    2015-01-01

    Although the amygdala is a major locus for hedonic processing, how it encodes valence information is poorly understood. Given the hedonic potency of odor stimuli and the amygdala's anatomical proximity to the peripheral olfactory system, we combined high-resolution fMRI with pattern-based multivariate techniques to examine how valence information is encoded in the amygdala. Ten human subjects underwent fMRI scanning while smelling 9 odorants that systematically varied in perceived valence. Representational similarity analyses showed that amygdala codes the entire dimension of valence, ranging from pleasantness to unpleasantness. This unidimensional representation significantly correlated with self-reported valence ratings but not with intensity ratings. Furthermore, within-trial valence representations evolved over time, prioritizing earlier differentiation of unpleasant stimuli. Together, these findings underscore the idea that both spatial and temporal features uniquely encode pleasant and unpleasant odor valence in the amygdala. The availability of a unidimensional valence code in the amygdala, distributed in both space and time, would create greater flexibility in determining the pleasantness or unpleasantness of stimuli, providing a mechanism by which expectation, context, attention, and learning could influence affective boundaries for guiding behavior. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our findings elucidate the mechanisms of affective processing in the amygdala by demonstrating that this brain region represents the entire valence dimension from pleasant to unpleasant. An important implication of this unidimensional valence code is that pleasant and unpleasant valence cannot coexist in the amygdale because overlap of fMRI ensemble patterns for these two valence extremes obscures their unique content. This functional architecture, whereby subjective valence maps onto a pattern continuum between pleasant and unpleasant poles, offers a robust mechanism by which context

  14. Iron colloids reduce the bioavailability of phosphorus to the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baken, Stijn; Nawara, Sophie; Van Moorleghem, Christoff; Smolders, Erik

    2014-08-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a limiting nutrient in many aquatic systems. The bioavailability of P in natural waters strongly depends on its speciation. In this study, structural properties of iron colloids were determined and related to their effect on P sorption and P bioavailability. The freshwater green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata was exposed to media spiked with radiolabelled (33)PO4, and the uptake of (33)P was monitored for 1 h. The media contained various concentrations of synthetic iron colloids with a size between 10 kDa and 0.45 μm. The iron colloids were stabilised by natural organic matter. EXAFS spectroscopy showed that these colloids predominantly consisted of ferrihydrite with small amounts of organically complexed Fe. In colloid-free treatments, the P uptake flux by the algae obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In the presence of iron colloids at 9 or 90 μM Fe, corresponding to molar P:Fe ratios between 0.02 and 0.17, the truly dissolved P (<10 kDa) was between 4 and 60% of the total dissolved P (<0.45 μm). These colloids reduced the P uptake flux by R. subcapitata compared to colloid-free treatments at the same total dissolved P concentration. However, the P uptake flux from colloid containing solutions equalled that from colloid-free ones when expressed as truly dissolved P. This demonstrates that colloidal P did not contribute to the P uptake flux. It is concluded that, on the short term, phosphate adsorbed to ferrihydrite colloids is not available to the green alga R. subcapitata. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hard x-ray photoemission study of the temperature-induced valence transition system EuNi2(Si1-xGex) 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiki, Katsuya; Mimura, Kojiro; Anzai, Hiroaki; Uozumi, Takayuki; Sato, Hitoshi; Utsumi, Yuki; Ueda, Shigenori; Mitsuda, Akihiro; Wada, Hirofumi; Taguchi, Yukihiro; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the bulk-derived electronic structure of the temperature-induced valence transition system EuNi2(Si1 -xGex )2 (x =0.70 , 0.79, and 0.82) by means of hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES). The HAXPES spectra clearly show distinct temperature dependencies in the spectral intensities of the Eu2 + and Eu3 +3 d components. For x =0.70 , the changes in the Eu2 + and Eu3 +3 d spectral components with temperature reflect a continuous valence transition, whereas the sudden changes for x =0.79 and 0.82 reflect first-order valence transitions. The Eu 3 d spectral shapes for all x and particularly the drastic changes in the Eu3 +3 d feature with temperature are validated by a theoretical calculation based on the single-impurity Anderson model (SIAM). SIAM analysis reveals that the valence transition for each x is controlled by the c -f hybridization strength and the charge-transfer energy. Furthermore, the c -f hybridization strength governs the valence transition of this system, which is either first order or continuous, consistent with Kondo volume collapse.

  16. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    fluid-fluid interface [2]. Together with Remco Tuinier, Henk has recently completed a book in this area which is to appear later this year. A major theme in Henk's research is that of phase transitions in lyotropic liquid crystals. Henk, together with Daan Frenkel and Alain Stroobants, realized in the 1980s that a smectic phase in dispersions of rod-like particles can be stable without the presence of attractive interactions, similar to nematic ordering as predicted earlier by Onsager [3]. Together with Gert-Jan Vroege he wrote a seminal review in this area [4]. Henk once said that 'one can only truly develop one colloidal model system in one's career' and in his case this must be that of gibbsite platelets. Initially Henk's group pursued another polymorph of aluminium hydroxide, boehmite, which forms rod-like particles [5], which already displayed nematic liquid crystal phases. The real breakthrough came when the same precursors treated the produced gibbsite platelets slightly differently. These reliably form a discotic nematic phase [6] and, despite the polydispersity in their diameter, a columnar phase [7]. A theme encompassing a wide range of soft matter systems is that of colloidal dynamics and phase transition kinetics. Many colloidal systems have a tendency to get stuck in metastable states, such as gels or glasses. This is a nuisance if one wishes to study phase transitions, but it is of great practical significance. Such issues feature in many of Henk's publications, and with Valerie Anderson he wrote a highly cited review in this area [8]. Henk Lekkerkerker has also invested significant effort into the promotion of synchrotron radiation studies of colloidal suspensions. He was one of the great supporters of the Dutch-Belgian beamline 'DUBBLE' project at the ESRF [9]. He attended one of the very first experiments in Grenoble in 1999, which led to a Nature publication [7]. He was strongly involved in many other experiments which followed and also has been a

  17. Wave oscillations in colloid oxyhydrates wave oscillations in colloid oxyhydrates

    CERN Document Server

    Sucharev, Yuri I

    2010-01-01

    The importance of coherent chemistry, that is, the chemistry of periodic oscillatory processes, is increasing at a rapid rate in specific chemical disciplines. While being perfectly understood and highly developed in the fields of physical chemistry, chemical physics and biological chemistry, the periodic developmental paradigm of processes and phenomena still remains poorly developed and misunderstood in classical inorganic chemistry and related branches, such as colloid chemistry. The probability is that we miss subtle colloid chemical phenomena that could be of utmost importance if taken into consideration when catalysis or adsorption is involved. The author here reveals all of the astonishing vistas that periodic wave paradigms open up to researchers in certain colloid chemical systems, and will doubtless stimulate researchers to look at them in a new light.Review from Book News Inc.: Coherent chemistry, the chemistry of periodical oscillatory processes, is well established in physical chemistry, chemical...

  18. The self-assembly of particles with isotropic interactions: Using DNA coated colloids to create designer nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R. B.; Dion, S.; Konigslow, K. von

    2014-01-01

    Self-consistent field theory equations are presented that are suitable for use as a coarse-grained model for DNA coated colloids, polymer-grafted nanoparticles and other systems with approximately isotropic interactions. The equations are generalized for arbitrary numbers of chemically distinct colloids. The advantages and limitations of such a coarse-grained approach for DNA coated colloids are discussed, as are similarities with block copolymer self-assembly. In particular, preliminary results for three species self-assembly are presented that parallel results from a two dimensional ABC triblock copolymer phase. The possibility of incorporating crystallization, dynamics, inverse statistical mechanics and multiscale modelling techniques are discussed

  19. Photoinduced charge separation in a colloidal system of exfoliated layered semiconductor controlled by coexisting aluminosilicate clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakato, Teruyuki; Yamada, Yoshimi; Miyamoto, Nobuyoshi

    2009-02-05

    We investigated photoinduced charge separation occurring in a multicomponent colloidal system composed of oxide nanosheets of photocatalytically active niobate and photochemically inert clay and electron accepting methylviologen dications (MV2+). The inorganic nanosheets were obtained by exfoliation of layered hexaniobate and hectorite clay. The niobate and clay nanosheets were spatially separated in the colloidally dispersed state, and the MV2+ molecules were selectively adsorbed on the clay platelets. UV irradiation of the colloids led to electron transfer from the niobate nanosheets to the MV2+ molecules adsorbed on clay. The photoinduced electron transfer produced methylviologen radical cations (MV*+), which was characterized by high yield and long lifetime. The yield and stability of the MV*+ species were found to depend strongly on the clay content of the colloid: from a few mol % to approximately 70 mol % of the yield and several tens of minutes to more than 40 h of the lifetime. The contents of the niobate nanosheets and MV2+ molecules and the aging of the colloid also affected the photoinduced charge separation. In the absence of MV2+ molecules in the colloid, UV irradiation induced electron accumulation in the niobate nanosheets. The stability of the electron-accumulated state also depended on the clay content. The variation in the photochemical behavior is discussed in relation to the viscosity of the colloid.

  20. EDITORIAL: Colloidal dispersions in external fields Colloidal dispersions in external fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    Colloidal dispersions have long been proven as pivotal model systems for equilibrium phase transition such as crystallization, melting and liquid-gas phase transition. The last decades have revealed that this is also true for nonequilibrium phenomena. In fact, the fascinating possibility to track the individual trajectories of colloidal particles has greatly advanced our understanding of collective behaviour in classical many-body systems and has helped to reveal the underlying physical principles of glass transition, crystal nucleation, and interfacial dynamics (to name just a few typical nonequilibrium effects). External fields can be used to bring colloids out of equilibrium in a controlled way. Different kinds of external fields can be applied to colloidal dispersions, namely shear flow, electric, magnetic and laser-optical fields, and confinement. Typical research areas can be sketched with the by now traditional complexity diagram (figure 1). The complexity of the colloidal system itself as embodied in statistical degrees of freedom is shown on the x-axis while the complexity of the problem posed, namely bulk, an inhomogeneity in equilibrium, steady state nonequilibrium and full time-dependent nonequilibrium are shown on the y-axis. The different external fields which can be imposed are indicated by the different hatched areas. figure1 Figure 1. Diagram of complexity for colloidal dispersions in external fields: while the x-axis shows the complexity of the system, the y-axis shows the complexity of the problem. Regions which can be accessed by different kinds of external fields are indicated. The arrows indicate recent research directions. Active particles are also indicated with a special complexity of internal degrees of freedom [1]. This collection of papers reflects the scientific programme of the International Conference on Colloidal Dispersions in External Fields III (CODEF III) which took place in Bonn-Bad Godesberg from 20-23 March 2012. This was the

  1. Overlap valence quarks on a twisted mass sea. A case study for mixed action lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cichy, Krzysztof; Herdoiza, Gregorio; UAM/CSIC Univ. Autonoma de Madrid

    2012-11-01

    We discuss a Lattice QCD mixed action investigation employing Wilson maximally twisted mass sea and overlap valence fermions. Using four values of the lattice spacing, we demonstrate that the overlap Dirac operator assumes a point-like locality in the continuum limit. We also show that by adopting suitable matching conditions for the sea and valence theories a consistent continuum limit for the pion decay constant and light baryon masses can be obtained. Finally, we confront results for sea-valence mixed meson masses and the valence scalar correlator with corresponding expressions of chiral perturbation theory. This allows us to extract low energy constants of mixed action chiral perturbation which characterize the strength of unitarity violations in our mixed action setup.

  2. Overlap valence quarks on a twisted mass sea. A case study for mixed action lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichy, Krzysztof [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Poznan Univ. (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Drach, Vincent; Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Garcia-Ramos, Elena [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany); Herdoiza, Gregorio [UAM/CSIC Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica; UAM/CSIC Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Teorica; Collaboration: European Twisted Mass Collaboration

    2012-11-15

    We discuss a Lattice QCD mixed action investigation employing Wilson maximally twisted mass sea and overlap valence fermions. Using four values of the lattice spacing, we demonstrate that the overlap Dirac operator assumes a point-like locality in the continuum limit. We also show that by adopting suitable matching conditions for the sea and valence theories a consistent continuum limit for the pion decay constant and light baryon masses can be obtained. Finally, we confront results for sea-valence mixed meson masses and the valence scalar correlator with corresponding expressions of chiral perturbation theory. This allows us to extract low energy constants of mixed action chiral perturbation which characterize the strength of unitarity violations in our mixed action setup.

  3. Priming for performance: valence of emotional primes interact with dissociable prototype learning systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marissa A Gorlick

    Full Text Available Arousal Biased Competition theory suggests that arousal enhances competitive attentional processes, but makes no strong claims about valence effects. Research suggests that the scope of enhanced attention depends on valence with negative arousal narrowing and positive arousal broadening attention. Attentional scope likely affects declarative-memory-mediated and perceptual-representation-mediated learning systems differently, with declarative-memory-mediated learning depending on narrow attention to develop targeted verbalizable rules, and perceptual-representation-mediated learning depending on broad attention to develop a perceptual representation. We hypothesize that negative arousal accentuates declarative-memory-mediated learning and attenuates perceptual-representation-mediated learning, while positive arousal reverses this pattern. Prototype learning provides an ideal test bed as dissociable declarative-memory and perceptual-representation systems mediate two-prototype (AB and one-prototype (AN prototype learning, respectively, and computational models are available that provide powerful insights on cognitive processing. As predicted, we found that negative arousal narrows attentional focus facilitating AB learning and impairing AN learning, while positive arousal broadens attentional focus facilitating AN learning and impairing AB learning.

  4. Priming for performance: valence of emotional primes interact with dissociable prototype learning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlick, Marissa A; Maddox, W Todd

    2013-01-01

    Arousal Biased Competition theory suggests that arousal enhances competitive attentional processes, but makes no strong claims about valence effects. Research suggests that the scope of enhanced attention depends on valence with negative arousal narrowing and positive arousal broadening attention. Attentional scope likely affects declarative-memory-mediated and perceptual-representation-mediated learning systems differently, with declarative-memory-mediated learning depending on narrow attention to develop targeted verbalizable rules, and perceptual-representation-mediated learning depending on broad attention to develop a perceptual representation. We hypothesize that negative arousal accentuates declarative-memory-mediated learning and attenuates perceptual-representation-mediated learning, while positive arousal reverses this pattern. Prototype learning provides an ideal test bed as dissociable declarative-memory and perceptual-representation systems mediate two-prototype (AB) and one-prototype (AN) prototype learning, respectively, and computational models are available that provide powerful insights on cognitive processing. As predicted, we found that negative arousal narrows attentional focus facilitating AB learning and impairing AN learning, while positive arousal broadens attentional focus facilitating AN learning and impairing AB learning.

  5. Conductivity maximum in a charged colloidal suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastea, S

    2009-01-27

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension in the salt-free regime show that the system exhibits an electrical conductivity maximum as a function of colloid charge. We attribute this behavior to two main competing effects: colloid effective charge saturation due to counterion 'condensation' and diffusion slowdown due to the relaxation effect. In agreement with previous observations, we also find that the effective transported charge is larger than the one determined by the Stern layer and suggest that it corresponds to the boundary fluid layer at the surface of the colloidal particles.

  6. Solid colloids with surface-mobile linkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Meulen, Stef A J; Helms, Gesa; Dogterom, Marileen

    2015-01-01

    In this report we review the possibilities of using colloids with surface mobile linkers for the study of colloidal self-assembly processes. A promising route to create systems with mobile linkers is the use of lipid (bi-)layers. These lipid layers can be either used in the form of vesicles or as coatings for hard colloids and emulsion droplets. Inside the lipid bilayers molecules can be inserted via membrane anchors. Due to the fluidity of the lipid bilayer, the anchored molecules remain mobile. The use of different lipid mixtures even allows creating Janus-like particles that exhibit directional bonding if linkers are used which have a preference for a certain lipid phase. In nature mobile linkers can be found e.g. as receptors in cells. Therefore, towards the end of the review, we also briefly address the possibility of using colloids with surface mobile linkers as model systems to mimic cell–cell interactions and cell adhesion processes. (topical review)

  7. Colloid suspension stability and transport through unsaturated porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGraw, M.A.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1997-04-01

    Contaminant transport is traditionally modeled in a two-phase system: a mobile aqueous phase and an immobile solid phase. Over the last 15 years, there has been an increasing awareness of a third, mobile solid phase. This mobile solid phase, or mobile colloids, are organic or inorganic submicron-sized particles that move with groundwater flow. When colloids are present, the net effect on radionuclide transport is that radionuclides can move faster through the system. It is not known whether mobile colloids exist in the subsurface environment of the Hanford Site. Furthermore, it is not known if mobile colloids would likely exist in a plume emanating from a Low Level Waste (LLW) disposal site. No attempt was made in this study to ascertain whether colloids would form. Instead, experiments and calculations were conducted to evaluate the likelihood that colloids, if formed, would remain in suspension and move through saturated and unsaturated sediments. The objectives of this study were to evaluate three aspects of colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides as they specifically relate to the LLW Performance Assessment. These objectives were: (1) determine if the chemical conditions likely to exist in the near and far field of the proposed disposal site are prone to induce flocculation (settling of colloids from suspension) or dispersion of naturally occurring Hanford colloids, (2) identify the important mechanisms likely involved in the removal of colloids from a Hanford sediment, and (3) determine if colloids can move through unsaturated porous media

  8. Anisotropic Model Colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kats, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    The driving forces for fundamental research in colloid science are the ability to manage the material properties of colloids and to unravel the forces that play a role between colloids to be able to control and understand the processes where colloids play an important role. Therefore we are

  9. Composition inversion in mixtures of binary colloids and polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Isla; Pinchaipat, Rattachai; Wilding, Nigel B.; Faers, Malcolm A.; Bartlett, Paul; Evans, Robert; Royall, C. Patrick

    2018-05-01

    Understanding the phase behaviour of mixtures continues to pose challenges, even for systems that might be considered "simple." Here, we consider a very simple mixture of two colloidal and one non-adsorbing polymer species, which can be simplified even further to a size-asymmetrical binary mixture, in which the effective colloid-colloid interactions depend on the polymer concentration. We show that this basic system exhibits surprisingly rich phase behaviour. In particular, we enquire whether such a system features only a liquid-vapor phase separation (as in one-component colloid-polymer mixtures) or whether, additionally, liquid-liquid demixing of two colloidal phases can occur. Particle-resolved experiments show demixing-like behaviour, but when combined with bespoke Monte Carlo simulations, this proves illusory, and we reveal that only a single liquid-vapor transition occurs. Progressive migration of the small particles to the liquid phase as the polymer concentration increases gives rise to composition inversion—a maximum in the large particle concentration in the liquid phase. Close to criticality, the density fluctuations are found to be dominated by the larger colloids.

  10. Valence bond model potential energy surface for H4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, D.M.; Brown, N.J.

    1980-01-01

    Potential energy surfaces for the H 4 system are derived using the valence bond procedure. An ab initio evaluation of the valence bond energy expression is described and some of its numerical properties are given. Next, four semiempirical evaluations of the valence bond energy are defined and parametrized to yield reasonable agreement with various ab initio calculations of H 4 energies. Characteristics of these four H 4 surfaces are described by means of tabulated energy minima and equipotential contour maps for selected geometrical arrangements of the four nuclei

  11. Magnetic and optical holonomic manipulation of colloids, structures and topological defects in liquid crystals for characterization of mesoscale self-assembly and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varney, Michael C. M.

    Colloidal systems find important applications ranging from fabrication of photonic crystals to direct probing of phenomena encountered in atomic crystals and glasses; topics of great interest for physicists exploring a broad range of scientific, industrial and biomedical fields. The ability to accurately control particles of mesoscale size in various liquid host media is usually accomplished through optical trapping methods, which suffer limitations intrinsic to trap laser intensity and force generation. Other limitations are due to colloid properties, such as optical absorptivity, and host properties, such as viscosity, opacity and structure. Therefore, alternative and/or novel methods of colloidal manipulation are of utmost importance in order to advance the state of the art in technical applications and fundamental science. In this thesis, I demonstrate a magnetic-optical holonomic control system to manipulate magnetic and optical colloids in liquid crystals and show that the elastic structure inherent to nematic and cholesteric liquid crystals may be used to assist in tweezing of particles in a manner impossible in other media. Furthermore, I demonstrate the utility of this manipulation in characterizing the structure and microrheology of liquid crystals, and elucidating the energetics and dynamics of colloids interacting with these structures. I also demonstrate the utility of liquid crystal systems as a table top model system to probe topological defects in a manner that may lead to insights into topologically related phenomena in other fields, such as early universe cosmology, sub-atomic and high energy systems, or Skrymionic structures. I explore the interaction of colloid surface anchoring with the structure inherent in cholesteric liquid crystals, and how this affects the periodic dynamics and localization metastability of spherical colloids undergoing a "falling" motion within the sample. These so called "metastable states" cause colloidal dynamics to

  12. Waste Form and Indrift Colloids-Associated Radionuclide Concentrations: Abstraction and Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, R.

    2003-01-01

    This Model Report describes the analysis and abstractions of the colloids process model for the waste form and engineered barrier system components of the total system performance assessment calculations to be performed with the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application model. Included in this report is a description of (1) the types and concentrations of colloids that could be generated in the waste package from degradation of waste forms and the corrosion of the waste package materials, (2) types and concentrations of colloids produced from the steel components of the repository and their potential role in radionuclide transport, and (3) types and concentrations of colloids present in natural waters in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain. Additionally, attachment/detachment characteristics and mechanisms of colloids anticipated in the repository are addressed and discussed. The abstraction of the process model is intended to capture the most important characteristics of radionuclide-colloid behavior for use in predicting the potential impact of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport on repository performance

  13. Waste Form and Indrift Colloids-Associated Radionuclide Concentrations: Abstraction and Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Aguilar

    2003-06-24

    This Model Report describes the analysis and abstractions of the colloids process model for the waste form and engineered barrier system components of the total system performance assessment calculations to be performed with the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application model. Included in this report is a description of (1) the types and concentrations of colloids that could be generated in the waste package from degradation of waste forms and the corrosion of the waste package materials, (2) types and concentrations of colloids produced from the steel components of the repository and their potential role in radionuclide transport, and (3) types and concentrations of colloids present in natural waters in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain. Additionally, attachment/detachment characteristics and mechanisms of colloids anticipated in the repository are addressed and discussed. The abstraction of the process model is intended to capture the most important characteristics of radionuclide-colloid behavior for use in predicting the potential impact of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport on repository performance.

  14. Colloidal superballs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, L.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is organized in four parts as follows. Part 1 focuses on the synthetic aspects of the colloidal model systems that will be used throughout the work described in this thesis. In Chapter 2 we describe synthetic procedures for the preparation of polycrystalline hematite superballs and

  15. Colloid Thruster for Attitude Control Systems (ACS) and Tip-off Control Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek proposes to develop and deliver a complete engineering model colloid thruster system, capable of thrust levels and lifetimes required for spacecraft...

  16. Spectrum of antimicrobial activity associated with ionic colloidal silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Kira; May, Kathleen; Leek, Daniel; Langland, Nicole; Jeane, La Deana; Ventura, Jose; Skubisz, Corey; Scherer, Sean; Lopez, Eric; Crocker, Ephraim; Peters, Rachel; Oertle, John; Nguyen, Krystine; Just, Scott; Orian, Michael; Humphrey, Meaghan; Payne, David; Jacobs, Bertram; Waters, Robert; Langland, Jeffrey

    2013-03-01

    Silver has historically and extensively been used as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent. However, the Food and Drug Administration currently does not recognize colloidal silver as a safe and effective antimicrobial agent. The goal of this study was to further evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of colloidal silver. Several strains of bacteria, fungi, and viruses were grown under multicycle growth conditions in the presence or absence of ionic colloidal silver in order to assess the antimicrobial activity. For bacteria grown under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, significant growth inhibition was observed, although multiple treatments were typically required. For fungal cultures, the effects of ionic colloidal silver varied significantly between different genera. No viral growth inhibition was observed with any strains tested. The study data support ionic colloidal silver as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent against aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, while having a more limited and specific spectrum of activity against fungi.

  17. Observation particle morphology of colloidal system by conventional SEM with an improved specimen preparation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Hou, Zhaosheng; Yuan, Xiaojiao; Guo, Hong

    2011-08-01

    On the basis of our previous report that polymer emulsion with different viscosity can be investigated by conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we have developed an improved specimen preparation technique for obtaining particle morphology and size of colloidal silver, collagen, glutin, and polymer microspheres. In this study, we expect to provide a means for charactering the three-dimensional surface microstructure of colloidal particles. Dilution of the samples with appropriate volatile solvent like ethanol is effective for SEM specimen preparation. At a proper ratio between sample and ethanol, the colloidal particles are dispersed uniformly in ethanol and then deposited evenly on the substrate. Different drying methods are studied to search a proper drying condition, in which the small molecule solvent is removed without destroying the natural particle morphology. And the effects of ethanol in the specimen preparation process are described by analyzing the physicochemical properties of ethanol. The specimen preparation technique is simple and can be achieved in common laboratory for charactering the particle morphology of colloidal system. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Magnetic Assisted Colloidal Pattern Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye

    Pattern formation is a mysterious phenomenon occurring at all scales in nature. The beauty of the resulting structures and myriad of resulting properties occurring in naturally forming patterns have attracted great interest from scientists and engineers. One of the most convenient experimental models for studying pattern formation are colloidal particle suspensions, which can be used both to explore condensed matter phenomena and as a powerful fabrication technique for forming advanced materials. In my thesis, I have focused on the study of colloidal patterns, which can be conveniently tracked in an optical microscope yet can also be thermally equilibrated on experimentally relevant time scales, allowing for ground states and transitions between them to be studied with optical tracking algorithms. In particular, I have focused on systems that spontaneously organize due to particle-surface and particle-particle interactions, paying close attention to systems that can be dynamically adjusted with an externally applied magnetic or acoustic field. In the early stages of my doctoral studies, I developed a magnetic field manipulation technique to quantify the adhesion force between particles and surfaces. This manipulation technique is based on the magnetic dipolar interactions between colloidal particles and their "image dipoles" that appear within planar substrate. Since the particles interact with their own images, this system enables massively parallel surface force measurements (>100 measurements) in a single experiment, and allows statistical properties of particle-surface adhesion energies to be extracted as a function of loading rate. With this approach, I was able to probe sub-picoNewton surface interactions between colloidal particles and several substrates at the lowest force loading rates ever achieved. In the later stages of my doctoral studies, I focused on studying patterns formed from particle-particle interaction, which serve as an experimental model of

  19. Characterization of colloids in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.; Buckau, G.; Klenze, R.

    1987-07-01

    Natural colloids in the Gorleben aquifer systems have been investigated as for their chemical composition, quantification and size distribution. Humic substances appear to be the major organic materials in these groundwaters, generating humic colloids which are analysed to be humic acid (and fulvic acid) loaded with a large number of trace heavy metal ions. These metal ions include natural homologues of actinides and some fission products in trivalent, tetravalent and hexavalent state. Concentrations of trivalent and tetravalent heavy metal ions are linearly correlated with the dissolved organic carbon (DDC) concentration in different groundwaters. The DOC is found to be present as humic colloids. The Am 3+ ions introduced in such a groundwater readily undergo the generation of its pseudocolloids through sorption or ion exchange reactions with humic colloids. The chemical behaviour of Am(III), being similar to the trivalent metal ions, e.g. Fe 3+ , REE etc. found in natural colloids, has been investigated by laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS). Groundwaters from Ispra, Markham Clinton and Felslabor Grimsel. Bidistilled water and one of Gorleben groundwaters, Gohy 1011, are taken for the purpose of comparison. This groundwater contains the least amount of natural colloids of all Gorleben groundwaters hitherto investigated. An indirect quantification is made by comparison of the LPAS results with experiment from Latex solution. (orig./IRB)

  20. Calculation of fluctuations and photoemission properties in a tetrahedral-cluster model for an intermediate-valence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, A.; Falicov, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    An exact solution of a four-site tetrahedral-crystal model, the smallest face-centered-cubic crystal, is presented in the case of an intermediate-valence system. The model consists of the following: (a) one extended orbital and one localized orbital per atom, (b) an interatomic transfer term between extended orbitals, (c) an interatomic hybridization between the localized and extended orbitals, (d) strong intra-atomic Coulomb repulsion between opposite-spin localized states, and (e) intermediate-strength intra-atomic Coulomb repulsion between the localized and extended states. These competing effects are examined as they manifest themselves in the intermediate-valence, photoemission, inverse-photoemission, and thermodynamic properties

  1. The Langevin and generalised Langevin approach to the dynamics of atomic, polymeric and colloidal systems

    CERN Document Server

    Snook, Ian

    2007-01-01

    The Langevin and Generalised Langevin Approach To The Dynamics Of Atomic, Polymeric And Colloidal Systems is concerned with the description of aspects of the theory and use of so-called random processes to describe the properties of atomic, polymeric and colloidal systems in terms of the dynamics of the particles in the system. It provides derivations of the basic equations, the development of numerical schemes to solve them on computers and gives illustrations of application to typical systems.Extensive appendices are given to enable the reader to carry out computations to illustrate many of the points made in the main body of the book.* Starts from fundamental equations* Gives up-to-date illustration of the application of these techniques to typical systems of interest* Contains extensive appendices including derivations, equations to be used in practice and elementary computer codes

  2. Glass transition of soft colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Adrian-Marie; Truzzolillo, Domenico; Galvan-Myoshi, Julian; Dieudonné-George, Philippe; Trappe, Véronique; Berthier, Ludovic; Cipelletti, Luca

    2018-04-01

    We explore the glassy dynamics of soft colloids using microgels and charged particles interacting by steric and screened Coulomb interactions, respectively. In the supercooled regime, the structural relaxation time τα of both systems grows steeply with volume fraction, reminiscent of the behavior of colloidal hard spheres. Computer simulations confirm that the growth of τα on approaching the glass transition is independent of particle softness. By contrast, softness becomes relevant at very large packing fractions when the system falls out of equilibrium. In this nonequilibrium regime, τα depends surprisingly weakly on packing fraction, and time correlation functions exhibit a compressed exponential decay consistent with stress-driven relaxation. The transition to this novel regime coincides with the onset of an anomalous decrease in local order with increasing density typical of ultrasoft systems. We propose that these peculiar dynamics results from the combination of the nonequilibrium aging dynamics expected in the glassy state and the tendency of colloids interacting through soft potentials to refluidize at high packing fractions.

  3. Colloid generation and solid-liquid distribution of transuranic elements in natural aquifier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rommel, H.; Kim, J.I.

    1986-01-01

    The sorption and desorption behaviour of transuranic elements in the presence of their pseudocolloids has been investigated in deep geological aquifer systems at Gorleben area. The generation of transuranic colloids and their influence on the determination of distribution coefficients in a laboratory experimental system are evaluated quantitatively. Discussion is made on the possible extrapolation of laboratory results to natural systems. (author)

  4. Colloid generation and solid-liquid distribution of transuranic elements in natural aquifer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.; Rommel, H.

    1986-01-01

    The sorption and desorption behaviour of transuranic elements in the presence of their pseudocolloids has been investigated in deep geological aquifer systems at Gorleben area. The generation of transuranic colloids and their influence on the determination of distribution coefficients in a laboratory experimental system are evaluated quantitatively. Discussion is made on the possible extrapolation of laboratory results to natural systems. (orig.)

  5. Spin dynamics and magnetic ordering in mixed valence systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, S.M.; Moller, H.B.; Axe, J.D.; Birgeneau, R.J.; Bucher, E.

    1977-01-01

    Neutron scattering measurements are reported on the mixed valence compounds Ce/sub 1-x/Th/sub x/ and TmSe. The Chi''(Q,ω) as derived from the inelastic spectra of Ce 0 . 74 Th 0 . 26 shows a peak in the γ phase near 20.0 meV and shifts abruptly to greater than 70.0 meV at the transition to the α phase. The temperature independence of the susceptibility within the γ phase cannot be simply reconciled with the temperature dependence of the valence within the γ phase. TmSe is shown to order in a type I antiferromagnetic structure below T/sub N/ approx. 3.2 K. The magnetic phase diagram is understood as a successive domain reorientation and a metamagnetic phase transition for T 3+ orders in a type II structure but never achieves long range order

  6. Long-term kinetic effects and colloid formations in dissolution of LWR spent fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, T.M.

    1996-11-01

    This report evaluates continuous dissolution and colloid formation during spent-fuel performance under repository conditions in high-level waste disposal. Various observations suggest that reprecipitated layers formed on spent-fuel surfaces may not be protective. This situation may lead to continuous dissolution of highly soluble radionuclides such as C-14, Cl-36, Tc-99, I-129, and Cs-135. However, the diffusion limits of various species involved may retard dissolution significantly. For low-solubility actinides such as Pu-(239+240) or Am-(241+243), various processes regarding colloid formation have been analyzed. The processes analyzed are condensation, dispersion, and sorption. Colloid formation may lead to significant releases of low-solubility actinides. However, because there are only limited data available on matrix dissolution, colloid formation, and solubility limits, many uncertainties still exist. These uncertainties must be addressed before the significance of radionuclide releases can be determined. 118 refs.

  7. Long-term kinetic effects and colloid formations in dissolution of LWR spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, T.M.

    1996-11-01

    This report evaluates continuous dissolution and colloid formation during spent-fuel performance under repository conditions in high-level waste disposal. Various observations suggest that reprecipitated layers formed on spent-fuel surfaces may not be protective. This situation may lead to continuous dissolution of highly soluble radionuclides such as C-14, Cl-36, Tc-99, I-129, and Cs-135. However, the diffusion limits of various species involved may retard dissolution significantly. For low-solubility actinides such as Pu-(239+240) or Am-(241+243), various processes regarding colloid formation have been analyzed. The processes analyzed are condensation, dispersion, and sorption. Colloid formation may lead to significant releases of low-solubility actinides. However, because there are only limited data available on matrix dissolution, colloid formation, and solubility limits, many uncertainties still exist. These uncertainties must be addressed before the significance of radionuclide releases can be determined. 118 refs

  8. Valence electronic properties of porphyrin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenuit, G; Castellarin-Cudia, C; Plekan, O; Feyer, V; Prince, K C; Goldoni, A; Umari, P

    2010-09-28

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the valence electronic structure of porphyrin-derived molecules. The valence photoemission spectra of the free-base tetraphenylporphyrin and of the octaethylporphyrin molecule were measured using synchrotron radiation and compared with theoretical spectra calculated using the GW method and the density-functional method within the generalized gradient approximation. Only the GW results could reproduce the experimental data. We found that the contribution to the orbital energies due to electronic correlations has the same linear behavior in both molecules, with larger deviations in the vicinity of the HOMO level. This shows the importance of adequate treatment of electronic correlations in these organic systems.

  9. Valenced cues and contexts have different effects on event-based prospective memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Peter; Yu, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the separate influence and joint influences on event-based prospective memory task performance due to the valence of cues and the valence of contexts. We manipulated the valence of cues and contexts with pictures from the International Affective Picture System. The participants, undergraduate students, showed higher performance when neutral compared to valenced pictures were used for cueing prospective memory. In addition, neutral pictures were more effective as cues when they occurred in a valenced context than in the context of neutral pictures, but the effectiveness of valenced cues did not vary across contexts that differed in valence. The finding of an interaction between cue and context valence indicates that their respective influence on event-based prospective memory task performance cannot be understood in isolation from each other. Our findings are not consistent with by the prevailing view which holds that the scope of attention is broadened and narrowed, respectively, by positively and negatively valenced stimuli. Instead, our findings are more supportive of the recent proposal that the scope of attention is determined by the motivational intensity associated with valenced stimuli. Consistent with this proposal, we speculate that the motivational intensity associated with different retrieval cues determines the scope of attention, that contexts with different valence values determine participants' task engagement, and that prospective memory task performance is determined jointly by attention scope and task engagement.

  10. Valenced cues and contexts have different effects on event-based prospective memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Graf

    Full Text Available This study examined the separate influence and joint influences on event-based prospective memory task performance due to the valence of cues and the valence of contexts. We manipulated the valence of cues and contexts with pictures from the International Affective Picture System. The participants, undergraduate students, showed higher performance when neutral compared to valenced pictures were used for cueing prospective memory. In addition, neutral pictures were more effective as cues when they occurred in a valenced context than in the context of neutral pictures, but the effectiveness of valenced cues did not vary across contexts that differed in valence. The finding of an interaction between cue and context valence indicates that their respective influence on event-based prospective memory task performance cannot be understood in isolation from each other. Our findings are not consistent with by the prevailing view which holds that the scope of attention is broadened and narrowed, respectively, by positively and negatively valenced stimuli. Instead, our findings are more supportive of the recent proposal that the scope of attention is determined by the motivational intensity associated with valenced stimuli. Consistent with this proposal, we speculate that the motivational intensity associated with different retrieval cues determines the scope of attention, that contexts with different valence values determine participants' task engagement, and that prospective memory task performance is determined jointly by attention scope and task engagement.

  11. A column experiment for the study of colloidal radionuclide migration in Gorleben aquifer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.; Delakowitz, B.; Zeh, P.; Klotz, D.; Lazik, D.

    1994-01-01

    A column experiment is performed for the assessment of the migration behaviour of trivalent 152 Eu, 241 Am and tetra- and pentavalent 237 Np, 233 Pa in the presence of humic colloids. Groundwater of an organic rich aquifer from the geological site at Gorleben is chosen for the experiment, as this has been well characterized during the earlier work and contains a substantial amount of humic colloids. The chemical and mineralogical composition of the pleistocene quartz-sand used in the column experiment is characterized by various analytical and mineralogical methods. Prior to the actinide migration experiment, the hydraulic properties (flow velocity, effective porosity, longitudinal dispersion coefficient) are determined in order to ascertain stable conditions for the experiment. In addition, the microstructure parameters (sediment surface, pore size distribution) of the groundwater-sand system in the column are determined. Radiotracers used for the determination of the hydraulic properties are 3 HHO and 82 Br - . Results obtained to date indicate a relatively high mobility of the lanthanide and actinide ions loaded on aquatic humic colloids. The recovery of injected radiotracer ions in eluates is found to depend on the flow velocity of groundwater through the column. The results help to elucidate the actinide migration behaviour in the presence of natural humic colloids. (orig.)

  12. Colloid Transport and Retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    related to historical prospective, synthesis, characterization, theoretical modeling and application of unique class of colloidal materials starting from colloidal gold to coated silica colloid and platinum, titania colloids. This book is unique in its design, content, providing depth of science about...

  13. Transport of synthetic colloids through single saturated fractures: A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, P.W.

    1995-07-01

    Colloids having the same surface charge sign as the bulk of the geologic media in a groundwater system may be able to travel through the system faster than soluble species because they will follow fluid streamlines more closely and they should have less tendency to diffuse into pores or dead spaces in the media than soluble species. Synthetic colloids with uniform, controlled properties may be ideal for serving as open-quotes worst-caseclose quotes tracers that provide lower-bound estimates of contaminant travel times in hydrologic systems. This report discusses a review of the literature pertaining to colloid transport in single saturated natural fractures. After a brief background discussion to put the literature review in perspective, the phenomenon of colloid transport in saturated fractures is divided into three major topics, each of which is reviewed in detail: (1) saturated fluid flow through fractures; (2) colloid transport by convection, diffusion, and force fields; and (3) colloid interactions with surfaces. It is suggested that these phenomena be accounted for in colloid transport models by using (1) lubrication theory to describe water flow through fractures, (2) particle tracking methods to describe colloid transport in fractures, and (3) a kinetic boundary layer approximation to describe colloid interactions with fracture walls. These methods offer better computational efficiency and better experimental accessibility to model parameters than rigorously solving the complete governing equations

  14. Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Mena; Hueckel, Theodore; Yi, Gi-Ra; Sacanna, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reconfigure elementary building blocks from one structure to another is key to many biological systems. Bringing the intrinsic adaptability of biological systems to traditional synthetic materials is currently one of the biggest scientific challenges in material engineering. Here we introduce a new design concept for the experimental realization of self-assembling systems with built-in shape-shifting elements. We demonstrate that dewetting forces between an oil phase and solid colloidal substrates can be exploited to engineer shape-shifting particles whose geometry can be changed on demand by a chemical or optical signal. We find this approach to be quite general and applicable to a broad spectrum of materials, including polymers, semiconductors and magnetic materials. This synthetic methodology can be further adopted as a new experimental platform for designing and rapidly prototyping functional colloids, such as reconfigurable micro swimmers, colloidal surfactants and switchable building blocks for self-assembly. PMID:27426418

  15. Formation and transport of radioactive colloids in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, J.Y.; Lee, K.J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of the presence of colloids in natural groundwater on radionuclide transport. The system considered here treats groundwater as a dispersing medium and colloid or finely divided solid material resulting from several different repository sources as a dispersed phase. Evaluation of the radionuclides adsorption on colloid, concepts of effective transport velocity and migration distance, and mathematical formulation of the filtration equation were driven, along with the case studies using typical parameter values of a conceptual radioactive waste repository and concentration on the effect of poly dispersed colloid on radionuclide transport. This paper also introduces the three phase analysis to treat the radionuclide transport more practically. When compared with the previously published experimental data, the modified filtration equation gives a satisfactory result. Results of the case studies show that the reduction of colloidal size enhances the corresponding colloid concentration when colloidal transport is only affected by diffusion phenomena. However, the three phase analysis shows that this trend can be reversed if the colloidal filtration becomes a dominant mechanism in the colloidal transport. Consequently, these results show that colloid could play a very important role in radionuclide transport under a repository environment

  16. Colloid transport in porous media: impact of hyper-saline solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magal, Einat; Weisbrod, Noam; Yechieli, Yoseph; Walker, Sharon L; Yakirevich, Alexander

    2011-05-01

    The transport of colloids suspended in natural saline solutions with a wide range of ionic strengths, up to that of Dead Sea brines (10(0.9) M) was explored. Migration of microspheres through saturated sand columns of different sizes was studied in laboratory experiments and simulated with mathematical models. Colloid transport was found to be related to the solution salinity as expected. The relative concentration of colloids at the columns outlet decreased (after 2-3 pore volumes) as the solution ionic strength increased until a critical value was reached (ionic strength > 10(-1.8) M) and then remained constant above this level of salinity. The colloids were found to be mobile even in the extremely saline brines of the Dead Sea. At such high ionic strength no energetic barrier to colloid attachment was presumed to exist and colloid deposition was expected to be a favorable process. However, even at these salinity levels, colloid attachment was not complete and the transport of ∼ 30% of the colloids through the 30-cm long columns was detected. To further explore the deposition of colloids on sand surfaces in Dead Sea brines, transport was studied using 7-cm long columns through which hundreds of pore volumes were introduced. The resulting breakthrough curves exhibited a bimodal shape whereby the relative concentration (C/C(0)) of colloids at the outlet rose to a value of 0.8, and it remained relatively constant (for the ∼ 18 pore volumes during which the colloid suspension was flushed through the column) and then the relative concentration increased to a value of one. The bimodal nature of the breakthrough suggests different rates of colloid attachment. Colloid transport processes were successfully modeled using the limited entrapment model, which assumes that the colloid attachment rate is dependent on the concentration of the attached colloids. Application of this model provided confirmation of the colloid aggregation and their accelerated attachment during

  17. Accumulation of Colloidal Particles in Flow Junctions Induced by Fluid Flow and Diffusiophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sangwoo; Ault, Jesse T.; Warren, Patrick B.; Stone, Howard A.

    2017-10-01

    The flow of solutions containing solutes and colloidal particles in porous media is widely found in systems including underground aquifers, hydraulic fractures, estuarine or coastal habitats, water filtration systems, etc. In such systems, solute gradients occur when there is a local change in the solute concentration. While the effects of solute gradients have been found to be important for many applications, we observe an unexpected colloidal behavior in porous media driven by the combination of solute gradients and the fluid flow. When two flows with different solute concentrations are in contact near a junction, a sharp solute gradient is formed at the interface, which may allow strong diffusiophoresis of the particles directed against the flow. Consequently, the particles accumulate near the pore entrance, rapidly approaching the packing limit. These colloidal dynamics have important implications for the clogging of a porous medium, where particles that are orders of magnitude smaller than the pore width can accumulate and block the pores within a short period of time. We also show that this effect can be exploited as a useful tool for preconcentrating biomolecules for rapid bioassays.

  18. Accumulation of Colloidal Particles in Flow Junctions Induced by Fluid Flow and Diffusiophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sangwoo [Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI (United States); Ault, Jesse T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Warren, Patrick B. [Unilever R& D Port Sunlight, Wirral (United Kingdom); Stone, Howard A. [Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2017-11-16

    The flow of solutions containing solutes and colloidal particles in porous media is widely found in systems including underground aquifers, hydraulic fractures, estuarine or coastal habitats, water filtration systems, etc. In such systems, solute gradients occur when there is a local change in the solute concentration. While the effects of solute gradients have been found to be important for many applications, we observe an unexpected colloidal behavior in porous media driven by the combination of solute gradients and the fluid flow. When two flows with different solute concentrations are in contact near a junction, a sharp solute gradient is formed at the interface, which may allow strong diffusiophoresis of the particles directed against the flow. Consequently, the particles accumulate near the pore entrance, rapidly approaching the packing limit. These colloidal dynamics have important implications for the clogging of a porous medium, where particles that are orders of magnitude smaller than the pore width can accumulate and block the pores within a short period of time. As a result, we also show that this effect can be exploited as a useful tool for preconcentrating biomolecules for rapid bioassays.

  19. Statistical Physics of Colloidal Dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canessa, E.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis is concerned with the equilibrium statistical mechanics of colloidal dispersions which represent useful model systems for the study of condensed matter physics; namely, charge stabilized colloidal dispersions and polymer stabilized colloidal dispersions. A one-component macroparticle approach is adopted in order to treat the macroscopic and microscopic properties of these systems in a simple and comprehensive manner. The thesis opens with the description of the nature of the colloidal state before reviewing some basic definitions and theory in Chapter II. In Chapter III a variational theory of phase equilibria based on the Gibbs-Bogolyobov inequality is applied to sterically stabilized colloidal dispersions. Hard spheres are chosen as the reference system for the disordered phases while an Einstein model is used for the ordered phases. The new choice of pair potential, taken for mathematical convenience, is a superposition of two Yukawa functions. By matching a double Yukawa potential to the van der Waals attractive potential at different temperatures and introducing a purely temperature dependent coefficient to the repulsive part, a rich variety of observed phase separation phenomena is qualitatively described. The behaviour of the potential is found to be consistent with a small decrease of the polymer layer thickness with increasing temperature. Using the same concept of a collapse transition the non-monotonic second virial coefficient is also explained and quantified. It is shown that a reduction of the effective macroparticle diameter with increasing temperature can only be partially examined from the point of view of a (binary-) polymer solution theory. This chapter concludes with the description of the observed, reversible, depletion flocculation behaviour. This is accomplished by using the variational formalism and by invoking the double Yukawa potential to allow

  20. Temperature-Triggered Colloidal Gelation through Well-Defined Grafted Polymeric Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Maarten van Doorn

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sufficiently strong interparticle attractions can lead to aggregation of a colloidal suspension and, at high enough volume fractions, form a mechanically rigid percolating network known as a colloidal gel. We synthesize a model thermo-responsive colloidal system for systematically studying the effect of surface properties, grafting density and chain length, on the particle dynamics within colloidal gels. After inducing an attraction between particles by heating, aggregates undergo thermal fluctuation which we observe and analyze microscopically; the magnitude of the variance in bond angle is larger for lower grafting densities. Macroscopically, a clear increase of the linear mechanical behavior of the gels on both the grafting density and chain length arises, as measured by rheology, which is inversely proportional to the magnitude of local bond angle fluctuations. This colloidal system will allow for further elucidation of the microscopic origins to the complex macroscopic mechanical behavior of colloidal gels including bending modes within the network.

  1. The electrostatic interaction between interfacial colloidal particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, A. J.

    1985-11-01

    The electrostatic interaction between charged, colloidal particles trapped at an air-water interface is considered using linearised Poisson-Boltzmann results for point particles. In addition to the expected screened-Coulomb contribution, which decays exponentially, an algebraic dipole-dipole interaction occurs that may account for long-range interactions in interfacial colloidal systems.

  2. Studies of colloids and their importance for repository performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksoharju, M.; Skaarman, C.; Degueldre, C.

    1995-12-01

    The processes, parameters and data used to evaluate the potential of nuclide transport by a colloid facilitated mechanism are reviewed and discussed in this report. Both steady-state (present situation) and possible future non-steady-state hydrogeochemistry in the geosphere are covered. In the steady-state scenario, the colloid (clay, silica, iron(III)hydroxide) concentration is around 20-45 micrograms/l which is considered to be a low value. The low colloid concentration is justified by the large attachment factor to the rock which reduces the stability of the colloids in the aquifer. Both reversible and irreversible sorption processes are reviewed. In the non-steady-state scenario, changes of hydrogeochemical properties may induce larger colloid concentrations. The increase of concentration is however limited and relaxation is always observed after any change. Emphasis is placed on the glaciation-deglaciation scenario. 53 refs, 12 figs, 3 tabs

  3. Charge-extraction strategies for colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Lan, Xinzheng

    2014-02-20

    The solar-power conversion efficiencies of colloidal quantum dot solar cells have advanced from sub-1% reported in 2005 to a record value of 8.5% in 2013. Much focus has deservedly been placed on densifying, passivating and crosslinking the colloidal quantum dot solid. Here we review progress in improving charge extraction, achieved by engineering the composition and structure of the electrode materials that contact the colloidal quantum dot film. New classes of structured electrodes have been developed and integrated to form bulk heterojunction devices that enhance photocharge extraction. Control over band offsets, doping and interfacial trap state densities have been essential for achieving improved electrical communication with colloidal quantum dot solids. Quantum junction devices that not only tune the optical absorption spectrum, but also provide inherently matched bands across the interface between p-and n-materials, have proven that charge separation can occur efficiently across an all-quantum-tuned rectifying junction. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  4. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degueldre, Claude; Cloet, Veerle

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the colloid nature, concentration and size distribution in the pore water of Opalinus Clay and other sedimentary host rocks identified for a potential radioactive waste repository in Switzerland. Because colloids could not be measured in representative undisturbed porewater of these host rocks, predictive modelling based on data from field and laboratory studies is applied. This approach allowed estimating the nature, concentration and size distributions of the colloids in the pore water of these host rocks. As a result of field campaigns, groundwater colloid concentrations are investigated on the basis of their size distribution quantified experimentally using single particle counting techniques. The colloid properties are estimated considering data gained from analogue hydrogeochemical systems ranging from mylonite features in crystalline fissures to sedimentary formations. The colloid concentrations were analysed as a function of the alkaline and alkaline earth element concentrations. Laboratory batch results on clay colloid generation from compacted pellets in quasi-stagnant water are also reported. Experiments with colloids in batch containers indicate that the size distribution of a colloidal suspension evolves toward a common particle size distribution independently of initial conditions. The final suspension size distribution was found to be a function of the attachment factor of the colloids. Finally, calculations were performed using a novel colloid distribution model based on colloid generation, aggregation and sedimentation rates to predict under in-situ conditions what makes colloid concentrations and size distributions batch- or fracture-size dependent. The data presented so far are compared with the field and laboratory data. The colloid occurrence, stability and mobility have been evaluated for the water of the considered potential host rocks. In the pore water of the considered sedimentary host rocks, the clay

  5. Sampling and analysis of groundwater colloids. A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takala, M.; Manninen, P.

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this literature study was to give basic information of colloids: their formation, colloid material, sampling and characterisation of groundwater colloids. Colloids are commonly refereed to as particles in the size range of 1 nm to 1000 nm. They are defined as a suspension of solid material in a liquid that does not appear to separate even after a long period of time. Colloids can be formed from a variety of inorganic or organic material. Inorganic colloids in natural groundwaters are formed by physical fragmentation of the host rock or by precipitation. The water chemistry strongly controls the stability of colloids. The amount of colloid particles in a solution tends to decrease with the increasing ionic strength of the solution. Increases in pH and organic material tend to increase the stability of colloids. The mobility of colloids in a porous medium is controlled mainly by groundwater movement, sedimentation, diffusion and interception. Factors controlling sampling artefacts are oxygen diffusion: leads to e.g. calcite precipitation, pumping rates and filtering techniques. Efforts to minimise artefact formation should be taken if the scope of the sampling programme is to study the colloid particles. The colloid phase size distribution can be determined by light scattering systems, laser induced break down or by single particle analysis using SEM micrographs. Elemental compositions can be analysed with EDS spectrometry from single colloid particles. Bulk compositions of the colloid phase can be analysed with e.g. ICP-MS analyser. The results of this study can be used as guidelines for groundwater colloid samplings. Recommendations for future work are listed in the conclusions of this report. (orig.)

  6. Bentonite as a colloid source in groundwaters at Olkiluoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuorinen, U.; Hirvonen, H.

    2005-02-01

    In this work bentonite was studied as a potential source of colloids in Olkiluoto groundwaters. Samples were collected at two groundwater stations, PVA1 at 37.5 m dept and PVA3 at 95.6 m depth, in the VLJ-tunnel. The deeper groundwater at PVA3 was more saline (2.6g/L of Cl-) than the shallow at PVA1 (0.8g/L of Cl-). A bentonite source had been assembled at each groundwater station so that two sample lines were available for water samples; one for collecting a sample before and the other for collecting a sample after interaction with bentonite. Before starting the actual colloid sampling groundwaters from both sample lines at both stations were analysed. Only minor alterations, mostly within the uncertainty limits of the analysis methods, were brought about in the water chemistries after interaction with the bentonite sources. The only clear changes were seen in the concentration of iron which decreased after interaction with bentonite in the groundwaters at both stations. After groundwater sampling the actual colloid sampling was performed. The water samples were collected and treated inside a movable nitrogen filled glove-box. The samples could be collected from each sampling line directly in the glove-box via two quick-couplings that had been assembled on the front face of the box. The sample lines had been assembled with 0.45 μm filters before entering the glove-box, because only colloids smaller than 0.45 μm were of interest, as they are not prone to sedimentation in slow groundwater flows and therefore could act as potential radionuclide carriers. Colloid samples were collected and treated similarly from both sampling lines at both groundwater stations. For estimating the colloid content the groundwater samples were filtered with centrifugal ultrafiltration tubes of different cut-off values (0.3 μm, 300kD and 10kD). The ultrafiltrations produced the colloid-containing concentrate fractions and the soluble substances-containing filtrate fractions. In

  7. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hersman, L.

    1995-11-01

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs

  8. Colloid Titration--A Rapid Method for the Determination of Charged Colloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Keihei; Kina, Ken'yu

    1985-01-01

    "Colloid titration" is a volumetric method for determining charged polyelectrolytes in aqueous solutions. The principle of colloid titration, reagents used in the procedure, methods of endpoint detection, preparation of reagent solutions, general procedure used, results obtained, and pH profile of colloid titration are considered. (JN)

  9. Behavior of colloids in radionuclide migration in deep geologic formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Takuji

    1994-01-01

    In case high level waste is isolated in deep strata, it is important to elucidate the behavior of movement that radionuclides take in the strata. Recently, it has been recognized that the participation of colloids is very important, and it has been studied actively. In this study, as to the mechanism of the adsorption of colloids to geological media or buffers, analysis was carried out for a number of systems, and it was clarified in what case they are caught or they move without being caught. Also it is considered what research is necessary hereafter. First, the kinds of colloids are shown. As the properties of colloids that control the movement of colloids in groundwater in deep strata, the surface potential, shape, size and so on of colloids are conceivable. These properties are briefly discussed. As the interaction of colloids and geological media, the interaction by electrostatic attraction, the fast and slow movement of colloids through rock crevices, and the filtration of colloids in buffers and porous media are described. The experimental results on the movement of colloids are reported. (K.I.)

  10. Characteristics of colloids generated during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.; Buck, E.C.; Mertz, C.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.; Chaiko, D.

    1993-10-01

    Aqueous colloidal suspensions were generated by reacting nuclear waste glasses with groundwater at 90 degrees C at different ratios of the glass surface area to solution volume (S/V). The colloids have been characterized in terms of size, charge, identity, and stability with respect to salt concentration, pH, and time, by examination using dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility, and transmission electron microscopy. The colloids are predominately produced by precipitation from solution, possibly with contribution from reacted layers that have spallated from the glass. These colloids are silicon-rich minerals. The colloidal suspensions agglomerate when the salinity of the solutions increase. The following implications for modeling the colloidal transport of contaminants have been derived from this study: (1) The sources of the colloids are not only solubility-limited real colloids and the pseudo colloids formed by adsorption of radionuclides onto a groundwater colloid, but also from the spalled surface layers of reacted waste glasses. (2) In a repository, the local environment is likely to be glass-reaction dominated and the salt concentration is likely to be high, leading to rapid colloid agglomeration and settling; thus, colloid transport may be insignificant. (3) If large volumes of groundwater contact the glass reaction site, the precipitated colloids may become resuspended, and colloid transport may become important. (4) Under most conditions, the colloids are negatively charged and will deposit readily on positively charged surfaces. Negatively charged surfaces will, in general, facilitate colloid stability and transport

  11. Colloid migration in groundwaters: Geochemical interactions of radionuclides with natural colloids. 5. progress report. Period covered: July - December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.I. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Delakowitz, B. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Zeh, P. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Probst, T. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Lin, X. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Ehrlicher, U. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Schauer, C. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Ivanovich, M. [Harwell Lab., AEA Environment and Energy, Oxon (United Kingdom); Longworth, G. [Harwell Lab., AEA Environment and Energy, Oxon (United Kingdom); Hasler, S.E. [Harwell Lab., AEA Environment and Energy, Oxon (United Kingdom); Gardiner, M. [Harwell Lab., AEA Decommissioning and RadWaste, Oxon (United Kingdom); Fritz, P. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany); Klotz, D. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany); Lazik, D. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany); Wolf, M. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany); Geyer, S. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany); Alexander, J.L. [Atkins (W.S.) Engineering Sciences, Epsom (United Kingdom); Read, D. [Atkins (W.S.) Engineering Sciences, Epsom (United Kingdom); Thomas, J.B. [Atkins (W.S.) Engineering Sciences, Epsom (United Kingdom)

    1994-02-01

    The aim of the joint research programme is to determine the significance of groundwater colloids in far field radionuclide migration. The characterization, quantification and theoretical interpretation of colloid-borne transport phenomena of radionuclides in selected Gorleben aquifer systems are the main objectives of the present research programme. Gorleben aquifer systems are chosen because they are well characterized in terms of their hydrological and geological properties and because they contain substantial amounts of colloids of different chemical compositions as well as considerable quantities of chemical homologues and natural analogues of radionuclides, e.g. M(III), M(IV), M(VI), and Th and U decay series. The research tasks are investigated jointly by the four laboratories (listed below) in close coordination of experimental capacities of each laboratory. (orig.)

  12. Magnetic-field-induced valence transition in rare-earth systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present work we investigate the scaling behavior observed experimentally based on an electronic model which has not yet been attempted. 2. The model and approximation. The Hamiltonian of the periodic Anderson model (PAM) with Falicov–Kimball term used to describe both continuous and discontinuous valence ...

  13. CTCN: Colloid transport code -- nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, R.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the CTCN computer code, designed to solve the equations of transient colloidal transport of radionuclides in porous and fractured media. This Fortran 77 package solves systems of coupled nonlinear differential-algebraic equations with a wide range of boundary conditions. The package uses the Method of Lines technique with a special section which forms finite-difference discretizations in up to four spatial dimensions to automatically convert the system into a set of ordinary differential equations. The CTCN code then solves these equations using a robust, efficient ODE solver. Thus CTCN can be used to solve population balance equations along with the usual transport equations to model colloid transport processes or as a general problem solver to treat up to four-dimensional differential-algebraic systems

  14. Conduction Mechanism of Valence Change Resistive Switching Memory: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ee Wah Lim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Resistive switching effect in transition metal oxide (TMO based material is often associated with the valence change mechanism (VCM. Typical modeling of valence change resistive switching memory consists of three closely related phenomena, i.e., conductive filament (CF geometry evolution, conduction mechanism and temperature dynamic evolution. It is widely agreed that the electrochemical reduction-oxidation (redox process and oxygen vacancies migration plays an essential role in the CF forming and rupture process. However, the conduction mechanism of resistive switching memory varies considerably depending on the material used in the dielectric layer and selection of electrodes. Among the popular observations are the Poole-Frenkel emission, Schottky emission, space-charge-limited conduction (SCLC, trap-assisted tunneling (TAT and hopping conduction. In this article, we will conduct a survey on several published valence change resistive switching memories with a particular interest in the I-V characteristic and the corresponding conduction mechanism.

  15. Analysis of colloid transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, B.J.; Nuttall, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    The population balance methodology is described and applied to the transport and capture of polydispersed colloids in packed columns. The transient model includes particle growth, capture, convective transport, and dispersion. We also follow the dynamic accumulation of captured colloids on the solids. The multidimensional parabolic partial differential equation was solved by a recently enhanced method of characteristics technique. This computational technique minimized numerical dispersion and is computationally very fast. The FORTRAN 77 code ran on a VAX-780 in less than a minute and also runs on an IBM-AT using the Professional FORTRAN compiler. The code was extensively tested against various simplified cases and against analytical models. The packed column experiments by Saltelli et al. were re-analyzed incorporating the experimentally reported size distribution of the colloid feed material. Colloid capture was modeled using a linear size dependent filtration function. The effects of a colloid size dependent filtration factor and various initial colloid size distributions on colloid migration and capture were investigated. Also, we followed the changing colloid size distribution as a function of position in the column. Some simple arguments are made to assess the likelihood of colloid migration at a potential NTS Yucca Mountain waste disposal site. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  16. Continuous separation of colloidal particles using dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Nurul Amziah Md; Nili, Hossein; Green, Nicolas G

    2013-04-01

    Dielectrophoresis is the movement of particles in nonuniform electric fields and has been of interest for application to manipulation and separation at and below the microscale. This technique has the advantages of being noninvasive, nondestructive, and noncontact, with the movement of particle achieved by means of electric fields generated by miniaturized electrodes and microfluidic systems. Although the majority of applications have been above the microscale, there is increasing interest in application to colloidal particles around a micron and smaller. This paper begins with a review of colloidal and nanoscale dielectrophoresis with specific attention paid to separation applications. An innovative design of integrated microelectrode array and its application to flow-through, continuous separation of colloidal particles is then presented. The details of the angled chevron microelectrode array and the test microfluidic system are then discussed. The variation in device operation with applied signal voltage is presented and discussed in terms of separation efficiency, demonstrating 99.9% separation of a mixture of colloidal latex spheres. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Equivalence of Brownian dynamics and dynamic Monte Carlo simulations in multicomponent colloidal suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuetos, Alejandro; Patti, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    We propose a simple but powerful theoretical framework to quantitatively compare Brownian dynamics (BD) and dynamic Monte Carlo (DMC) simulations of multicomponent colloidal suspensions. By extending our previous study focusing on monodisperse systems of rodlike colloids, here we generalize the formalism described there to multicomponent colloidal mixtures and validate it by investigating the dynamics in isotropic and liquid crystalline phases containing spherical and rodlike particles. In order to investigate the dynamics of multicomponent colloidal systems by DMC simulations, it is key to determine the elementary time step of each species and establish a unique timescale. This is crucial to consistently study the dynamics of colloidal particles with different geometry. By analyzing the mean-square displacement, the orientation autocorrelation functions, and the self part of the van Hove correlation functions, we show that DMC simulation is a very convenient and reliable technique to describe the stochastic dynamics of any multicomponent colloidal system. Our theoretical formalism can be easily extended to any colloidal system containing size and/or shape polydisperse particles.

  18. Chromium valences in ureilite olivine and implications for ureilite petrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, C. A.; Sutton, S. R.; Wirick, S.; Jercinovic, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    basaltic melt composition), consistent with fO2 values obtained by assuming olivine-silica-iron metal (OSI) equilibrium. For the primary chromite-bearing-ureilites, the corresponding fO2 were estimated (again, assuming basaltic melt composition) to be ∼IW to IW+1.0, i.e., several orders of magnitude more oxidizing than the conditions estimated for the chromite-free ureilites. In terms of Fo and Cr valence properties, ureilites appear to form two groups rather than a single “Cr-valence (or fO2) vs. Fo” trend. The chromite-bearing ureilites show little variation in Fo (∼74-76) but significant variation in Cr valence, while the non-chromite-bearing ureilites show significant variation in Fo (∼77-95) and little variation in Cr valence. These groups are unrelated to petrologic type (i.e., olivine-pigeonite, olivine-orthopyroxene, or augite-bearing). The chromite-bearing ureilites also have lower contents of Cr in olivine than most non-chromite-bearing ureilites, consistent with predictions based on Cr olivine/melt partitioning in spinel saturated vs. non-spinel-saturated systems. Under the assumption that at magmatic temperatures graphite-gas equilibria controlled fO2 at all depths on the ureilite parent body, we conclude: (1) that ureilite precursor materials having the Fo and Cr valence properties now observed in ureilites are unlikely to have been preserved during planetary processing; and (2) that the Fo and Cr valence properties now observed in ureilites are consistent with having been established by high-temperature carbon redox control over a range of depths on a plausible-sized ureilite parent body. The apparent limit on ureilite Fo values around 74-76 suggests that the precursor material(s) had bulk mg# ⩾ that of LL chondrites.

  19. Sodium caseinate stabilized zein colloidal particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashok R; Bouwens, Elisabeth C M; Velikov, Krassimir P

    2010-12-08

    The present work deals with the preparation and stabilization of zein colloidal particles using sodium caseinate as electrosteric stabilizer. Colloidal particles with well-defined size range (120-150 nm) and negative surface potential (-29 to -47 mV) were obtained using a simple antisolvent precipitation method. Due to the presence of caseinate, the stabilized colloidal particles showed a shift of isoelectric point (IEP) from 6.0 to around pH 5.0 and thus prevent the aggregation of zein near its native IEP (pH 6.2). The particles also showed good stability to varying ionic strength (15 mM-1.5 M NaCl). Furthermore, stabilized particles retained the property of redispersibility after drying. In vitro protein hydrolysis study confirmed that the presence of caseinate did not alter the digestibility of zein. Such colloidal particles could potentially serve as all-natural delivery systems for bioactive molecules in food, pharmaceutical, and agricultural formulations.

  20. Valence skipping driven superconductivity and charge Kondo effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Takashi; Hase, Izumi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Valence skipping in metallic compounds can give rise to an unconventional superconductivity. •Several elements in the periodic table show valence skipping (or valence missing), for example, Bi forms the compounds in valence states +3 and +5. •The doping of valence skipping elements will induce superconductivity and this will lead to a possibility of high temperature superconductivity. •We consider the Wolf model with negative-U impurities, and show a phase diagram including superconducting phase. •There is a high temperature region near the boundary. -- Abstract: Valence skipping in metallic compounds can give rise to an unconventional superconductivity. Several elements in the periodic table show valence skipping (or valence missing), for example, Bi forms the compounds in valence states +3 and +5. The doping of valence skipping elements will induce superconductivity and this will lead to a possibility of high temperature superconductivity. We consider the Wolf model with negative-U impurities, and show a phase diagram including superconducting phase. The superconducting state is changed into a metallic state with a local singlet as the attractive interaction |U| increases. There is a high temperature region near the boundary

  1. Migration of colloids of radionuclides in geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoru; Ogawa, Hiromichi

    2001-01-01

    Radionuclide migration in underground environment is affected by the presence of colloids in ground water. As the colloids in flow systems may be trapped or collected to solid surfaces, filtration effect results from. In the present study, dependence of collector efficiency on flow velocity and on heterogeneity of solid surfaces were theoretically and experimentally investigated using DLVO (Electric double-layer and Van der Waals force) and Smoluchowski-Levich approximation and the following results were obtained: Effluent to inflow ratio of colloids obtained from the column experiments can be analyzed to give collector efficiency for single particle. The dependence of collector efficiency on flow velocity was found to be smaller than that deduced from the previously proposed models. A model in which flow system affects the Brownian motion of colloids gives a smaller flow-velocity dependence of collector efficiency. On the contrary, the heterogeneity of solid surface taken into consideration in the model increases the flow velocity dependence. (S. Ohno)

  2. Simultaneous conditioning of valence and arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawronski, Bertram; Mitchell, Derek G V

    2014-01-01

    Evaluative conditioning (EC) refers to the change in the valence of a conditioned stimulus (CS) due to its pairing with a positive or negative unconditioned stimulus (US). To the extent that core affect can be characterised by the two dimensions of valence and arousal, EC has important implications for the origin of affective responses. However, the distinction between valence and arousal is rarely considered in research on EC or conditioned responses more generally. Measuring the subjective feelings elicited by a CS, the results from two experiments showed that (1) repeated pairings of a CS with a positive or negative US of either high or low arousal led to corresponding changes in both CS valence and CS arousal, (2) changes in CS arousal, but not changes in CS valence, were significantly related to recollective memory for CS-US pairings, (3) subsequent presentations of the CS without the US reduced the conditioned valence of the CS, with conditioned arousal being less susceptible to extinction and (4) EC effects were stronger for high arousal than low arousal USs. The results indicate that the conditioning of affective responses can occur simultaneously along two independent dimensions, supporting evidence in related areas that calls for a consideration of both valence and arousal. Implications for research on EC and the acquisition of emotional dispositions are discussed.

  3. Ageing in dense colloids as diffusion in the logarithm of time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettcher, Stefan; Sibani, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The far-from-equilibrium dynamics of glassy systems share important phenomenological traits. A transition is generally observed from a time-homogeneous dynamical regime to an ageing regime where physical changes occur intermittently and, on average, at a decreasing rate. It has been suggested that a global change of the independent time variable to its logarithm may render the ageing dynamics homogeneous: for colloids, this entails diffusion but on a logarithmic timescale. Our novel analysis of experimental colloid data confirms that the mean square displacement grows linearly in time at low densities and shows that it grows linearly in the logarithm of time at high densities. Correspondingly, pairs of particles initially in close contact survive as pairs with a probability which decays exponentially in either time or its logarithm. The form of the probability density function of the displacements shows that long-ranged spatial correlations are very long-lived in dense colloids. A phenomenological stochastic model is then introduced which relies on the growth and collapse of strongly correlated clusters ('dynamic heterogeneity'), and which reproduces the full spectrum of observed colloidal behaviors depending on the form assumed for the probability that a cluster collapses during a Monte Carlo update. In the limit where large clusters dominate, the collapse rate is ∝1/t, implying a homogeneous, log-Poissonian process that qualitatively reproduces the experimental results for dense colloids. Finally, an analytical toy-model is discussed to elucidate the strong dependence of the simulation results on the integrability (or lack thereof) of the cluster collapse probability function.

  4. The influence of colloids on the migration of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seher, Holger

    2011-01-01

    For a concept of deep geological disposal of high level nuclear waste, the repository will be designed as a multiple-barrier system including bentonite as the buffer/backfill material and the host rock formation as the geological barrier. The engineered barrier (compacted bentonite) will be in contact with the host rock formation (e.g. granite). Consequently the bentonite will be saturated over time with formation groundwater, which will induce swelling and gel formation of the bentonite. At the gel-groundwater boundary, colloid detachment might be a possible colloid source and therefore might enhance the mobility of strong sorbing actinides. This work will focus on three aspects of colloidal transport: (a) Colloid stability in the mixing zone between granite groundwater and bentonite pore water, including its description with an extended DLVO model. (b) Colloid generation and erosion of the bentonite at the interface between compacted bentonite and granitic groundwater, as well as formation of new colloids in the mixing zone between the bentonite porewater and the granitic groundwater. (c) Colloid transport and the interaction of U, Th, Hf, Tb, Eu and Cm with bentonite colloids and fracture filling material, as well as their mobility in a natural fracture.

  5. Coupled cluster valence bond theory for open-shell systems with application to very long range strong correlation in a polycarbene dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, David W; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2017-07-14

    The Coupled Cluster Valence Bond (CCVB) method, previously presented for closed-shell (CS) systems, is extended to open-shell (OS) systems. The theoretical development is based on embedding the basic OS CCVB wavefunction in a fictitious singlet super-system. This approach reveals that the OS CCVB amplitude equations are quite similar to those of CS CCVB, and thus that OS CCVB requires the same level of computational effort as CS CCVB, which is an inexpensive method. We present qualitatively correct CCVB potential energy curves for all low-lying spin states of P 2 and Mn 2 + . CCVB is successfully applied to the low-lying spin states of some model linear polycarbenes, systems that appear to be a hindrance to standard density functionals. We examine an octa-carbene dimer in a side-by-side orientation, which, in the monomer dissociation limit, exhibits maximal strong correlation over the length of the polycarbene.

  6. Lying about the valence of affective pictures: an fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatia M C Lee

    Full Text Available The neural correlates of lying about affective information were studied using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI methodology. Specifically, 13 healthy right-handed Chinese men were instructed to lie about the valence, positive or negative, of pictures selected from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS while their brain activity was scanned by a 3T Philip Achieva scanner. The key finding is that the neural activity associated with deception is valence-related. Comparing to telling the truth, deception about the valence of the affectively positive pictures was associated with activity in the inferior frontal, cingulate, inferior parietal, precuneus, and middle temporal regions. Lying about the valence of the affectively negative pictures, on the other hand, was associated with activity in the orbital and medial frontal regions. While a clear valence-related effect on deception was observed, common neural regions were also recruited for the process of deception about the valence of the affective pictures. These regions included the lateral prefrontal and inferior parietal regions. Activity in these regions has been widely reported in fMRI studies on deception using affectively-neutral stimuli. The findings of this study reveal the effect of valence on the neural activity associated with deception. Furthermore, the data also help to illustrate the complexity of the neural mechanisms underlying deception.

  7. Automated preparation method for colloidal crystal arrays of monodisperse and binary colloid mixtures by contact printing with a pintool plotter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkert, Klaus; Neumann, Thomas; Wang, Jianjun; Jonas, Ulrich; Knoll, Wolfgang; Ottleben, Holger

    2007-03-13

    Photonic crystals and photonic band gap materials with periodic variation of the dielectric constant in the submicrometer range exhibit unique optical properties such as opalescence, optical stop bands, and photonic band gaps. As such, they represent attractive materials for the active elements in sensor arrays. Colloidal crystals, which are 3D gratings leading to Bragg diffraction, are one potential precursor of such optical materials. They have gained particular interest in many technological areas as a result of their specific properties and ease of fabrication. Although basic techniques for the preparation of regular patterns of colloidal crystals on structured substrates by self-assembly of mesoscopic particles are known, the efficient fabrication of colloidal crystal arrays by simple contact printing has not yet been reported. In this article, we present a spotting technique used to produce a microarray comprising up to 9600 single addressable sensor fields of colloidal crystal structures with dimensions down to 100 mum on a microfabricated substrate in different formats. Both monodisperse colloidal crystals and binary colloidal crystal systems were prepared by contact printing of polystyrene particles in aqueous suspension. The array morphology was characterized by optical light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, which revealed regularly ordered crystalline structures for both systems. In the case of binary crystals, the influence of the concentration ratio of the large and small particles in the printing suspension on the obtained crystal structure was investigated. The optical properties of the colloidal crystal arrays were characterized by reflection spectroscopy. To examine the stop bands of the colloidal crystal arrays in a high-throughput fashion, an optical setup based on a CCD camera was realized that allowed the simultaneous readout of all of the reflection spectra of several thousand sensor fields per array in parallel. In agreement with

  8. Analytical phase diagrams for colloids and non-adsorbing polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleer, Gerard J; Tuinier, Remco

    2008-11-04

    We review the free-volume theory (FVT) of Lekkerkerker et al. [Europhys. Lett. 20 (1992) 559] for the phase behavior of colloids in the presence of non-adsorbing polymer and we extend this theory in several aspects: (i) We take the solvent into account as a separate component and show that the natural thermodynamic parameter for the polymer properties is the insertion work Pi(v), where Pi is the osmotic pressure of the (external) polymer solution and v the volume of a colloid particle. (ii) Curvature effects are included along the lines of Aarts et al. [J. Phys.: Condens. Matt. 14 (2002) 7551] but we find accurate simple power laws which simplify the mathematical procedure considerably. (iii) We find analytical forms for the first, second, and third derivatives of the grand potential, needed for the calculation of the colloid chemical potential, the pressure, gas-liquid critical points and the critical endpoint (cep), where the (stable) critical line ends and then coincides with the triple point. This cep determines the boundary condition for a stable liquid. We first apply these modifications to the so-called colloid limit, where the size ratio q(R)=R/a between the radius of gyration R of the polymer and the particle radius a is small. In this limit the binodal polymer concentrations are below overlap: the depletion thickness delta is nearly equal to R, and Pi can be approximated by the ideal (van't Hoff) law Pi=Pi(0)=phi/N, where phi is the polymer volume fraction and N the number of segments per chain. The results are close to those of the original Lekkerkerker theory. However, our analysis enables very simple analytical expressions for the polymer and colloid concentrations in the critical and triple points and along the binodals as a function of q(R). Also the position of the cep is found analytically. In order to make the model applicable to higher size ratio's q(R) (including the so-called protein limit where q(R)>1) further extensions are needed. We

  9. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  10. Oppositely charged colloids out of equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissers, T.

    2010-11-01

    Colloids are particles with a size in the range of a few nanometers up to several micrometers. Similar to atomic and molecular systems, they can form gases, liquids, solids, gels and glasses. Colloids can be used as model systems because, unlike molecules, they are sufficiently large to be studied directly with light microscopy and move sufficiently slow to study their dynamics. In this thesis, we study binary systems of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) colloidal particles suspended in low-polar solvent mixtures. Since the ions can still partially dissociate, a surface charge builds up which causes electrostatic interactions between the colloids. By carefully tuning the conditions inside the suspension, we make two kinds of particles oppositely charged. To study our samples, we use Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). The positively and negatively charged particles can be distinguished by a different fluorescent dye. Colloids constantly experience a random motion resulting from random kicks of surrounding solvent molecules. When the attractions between the oppositely charged particles are weak, the particles can attach and detach many times and explore a lot of possible configurations and the system can reach thermodynamic equilibrium. For example, colloidal ‘ionic’ crystals consisting of thousands to millions of particles can form under the right conditions. When the attractions are strong, the system can become kinetically trapped inside a gel-like state. We observe that when the interactions change again, crystals can even emerge again from this gel-like phase. By using local order parameters, we quantitatively study the crystallization of colloidal particles and identify growth defects inside the crystals. We also study the effect of gravity on the growth of ionic crystals by using a rotating stage. We find that sedimentation can completely inhibit crystal growth and plays an important role in crystallization from the gel-like state. The surface

  11. Valence, magnetism and conduction in the intermediate valence compounds: the case SmB6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derr, J.

    2006-09-01

    In some rare earth based compounds, the 4f level is situated so close to the Fermi level that the valence of the compound can become intermediate between two integer values. The so called 'intermediate valence' compound of Samarium hexaboride (SmB 6 ) is one typical example of the exciting physics which can result from this quantum equilibrium between two valence configurations. The first configuration (Sm 2+ ) corresponds to an insulating and non magnetic state whereas the second one (Sm 3+ ) would theoretically give a magnetic and metallic ground state. This dissertation deals with the influence of pressure on this equilibrium. Specific heat measurements under pressure evidenced a new long range magnetic ordering for pressures higher than p c ∼ 10 GPa. On another hand, transport measurements measured for the first time in good conditions of hydrostatics found a reliable and reproducible critical pressure for the insulator to metal transition equal to p c . The phase diagram of SmB 6 is now well known and the observation for the first time of a magnetic anomaly in the high pressure resistivity curves certifies that the onset of the magnetic phase really coincide with the closure of the gap. This change at the critical pressure p c is discussed in a general frame taking into account the Kondo lattice temperature as a key parameter for the renormalization of the wavefunction from one integer configuration to the other whereas the valence itself is still intermediate. This general idea seems to be valid also for other systems studied in this dissertation like SmS or TmSe and could even be valid for more general cases (Ytterbium, Cerium). In the same time, resistivity measurements under uniaxial stress were undertaken. The result is a strong anisotropy effect observed on the pressure dependence of the residual resistivity in the compound SmB 6 . The comparison with the transport under hydrostatic conditions enables us to consider a new idea for the nature of the gap

  12. Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, Methods Of Making Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, And Methods Of Using Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2015-04-09

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of making a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of using a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, and the like.

  13. Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, Methods Of Making Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, And Methods Of Using Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Saharoui; Mughal, Asad Jahangir

    2015-01-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of making a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of using a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, and the like.

  14. Three-particle correlation functions of quasi-two-dimensional one-component and binary colloid suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hau My; Lin, Binhua; Rice, Stuart A

    2006-11-14

    We report the results of experimental determinations of the triplet correlation functions of quasi-two-dimensional one-component and binary colloid suspensions in which the colloid-colloid interaction is short ranged. The suspensions studied range in density from modestly dilute to solid. The triplet correlation function of the one-component colloid system reveals extensive ordering deep in the liquid phase. At the same density the ordering of the larger diameter component in a binary colloid system is greatly diminished by a very small amount of the smaller diameter component. The possible utilization of information contained in the triplet correlation function in the theory of melting of a quasi-two-dimensional system is briefly discussed.

  15. Colloid transport in saturated porous media: Elimination of attachment efficiency in a new colloid transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landkamer, Lee L.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Ryan, Joseph N.

    2013-01-01

    A colloid transport model is introduced that is conceptually simple yet captures the essential features of colloid transport and retention in saturated porous media when colloid retention is dominated by the secondary minimum because an electrostatic barrier inhibits substantial deposition in the primary minimum. This model is based on conventional colloid filtration theory (CFT) but eliminates the empirical concept of attachment efficiency. The colloid deposition rate is computed directly from CFT by assuming all predicted interceptions of colloids by collectors result in at least temporary deposition in the secondary minimum. Also, a new paradigm for colloid re-entrainment based on colloid population heterogeneity is introduced. To accomplish this, the initial colloid population is divided into two fractions. One fraction, by virtue of physiochemical characteristics (e.g., size and charge), will always be re-entrained after capture in a secondary minimum. The remaining fraction of colloids, again as a result of physiochemical characteristics, will be retained “irreversibly” when captured by a secondary minimum. Assuming the dispersion coefficient can be estimated from tracer behavior, this model has only two fitting parameters: (1) the fraction of the initial colloid population that will be retained “irreversibly” upon interception by a secondary minimum, and (2) the rate at which reversibly retained colloids leave the secondary minimum. These two parameters were correlated to the depth of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) secondary energy minimum and pore-water velocity, two physical forces that influence colloid transport. Given this correlation, the model serves as a heuristic tool for exploring the influence of physical parameters such as surface potential and fluid velocity on colloid transport.

  16. Valence effects on adsorption: a preliminary assessment of the effects on valence state control on sorption measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; Case, F.; Shiao, S.Y.; Palmer, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Electrochemical arguments are advanced to illustrate that what is usually measured in practice is a mixed potential determined by the kinetics of the electrode processes occurring at the indicator electrode. Valence states can be altered electrochemically or by use of added chemical reagents, including redox couples which can hold the potential to relatively specific potentials. The disadvantage of added chemical reagents is that they may alter the characteristics of the sorption reactions by interaction with the sorbent. Electrochemical methods are versatile and do not add reagents, but in some caes the nuclide can adsorb on the electrode itself. A description is given of the application of the electrochemical method of valence control to determination of sorption of Np(V) on alumina. Valence state control and analysis can be used to study possible redox reactions on materials which might be used as backfill materials. A description is given of survey experiments with a number of sulfides and iron-containing materials. Valence state analysis is used on the initial solutions and leachate from acid leaches of the sorbent after the sorption experiment to help determine whether valence state change is occurring. The preliminary results indicate that on the sulfides tested, sorption occurs both with and without valence state change

  17. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGraw, M.

    2000-01-01

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations

  18. LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; Fred Zhang; Glendon W. Gee; Earl D. Mattson; Peter C. L

    2012-08-01

    The main purpose of this project was to improve the fundamental mechanistic understanding and quantification of long-term colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone, with special emphasis on the semi-arid Hanford site. While we focused some of the experiments on hydrogeological and geochemical conditions of the Hanford site, many of our results apply to colloid and colloid-facilitated transport in general. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the mechanisms of colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in undisturbed Hanford sediments under unsaturated flow, (2) to quantify in situ colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclidetransport from Hanford sediments under field conditions, and (3) to develop a field-scale conceptual and numerical model for colloid mobilization and transport at the Hanford vadose zone, and use that model to predict long-term colloid and colloid- facilitated radionuclide transport. To achieve these goals and objectives, we have used a combination of experimental, theoretical, and numerical methods at different spatial scales, ranging from microscopic investigationsof single particle attachment and detachment to larger-scale field experiments using outdoor lysimeters at the Hanford site. Microscopic and single particle investigations provided fundamental insight into mechanisms of colloid interactions with the air-water interface. We could show that a moving air water interface (such as a moving water front during infiltration and drainage) is very effective in removing and mobilizing particles from a stationary surface. We further demonstrated that it is particularly the advancing air-water interface which is mainly responsible for colloid mobilization. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborated our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface

  19. Hemocompatibility of ultrafine systems on the basis of chitosan and its derivatives polymer-colloid complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Bazunova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of the development process for the preparation of micro and nano-sized polymer-colloid com-plexes (РСС on the basis of water-soluble natural polymer chitosan (СTZ and the sodium salt of chitosan succinylamid (SСTZ with silver halide sols in aqueous media. Results of research of СTZ, sodium salt of SСTZ solutions and PСС of CTZ and SСTZ with colloidal parti-cles of silver iodide influence on structurally-functional properties of erythrocytes’ membranes on model of acidic hemolisis are presented in the article. Their influence on the nature of erythrocytes distribution by degree of their stability and on kinetic parameters (the beginning, intensity and completion of process of their destruction under the influence of the damaging agent (HCl is shown. The comparative analysis of results convinces that СTZ, SСTZ solutions and disperse systems on the basis of PСС of СTZ and SСTZ with colloidal particles of the silver iodide are capable of modulating variously matrix properties of erythrocytes of blood.

  20. Evaluation of colloid transport issues and recommendations for SKI performance assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickham, S. M.; Bennett, D. G.; Higgo, J. J. W. [Galson Sciences Ltd., Oakham (United Kingdom)

    2000-08-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop recommendations to SKI for evaluating the potential significance of colloids in performance assessment (PA) studies by: Updating a previous review of the treatment of colloids in PA studies for radioactive waste repositories and to include information on PAs published in the period 1997-1999. We have reviewed sixteen PAs conducted in nine countries and have made the following observations: All PAs include colloid formation and colloid transport in their FEP list. Although some programmes have deferred consideration of colloidal radionuclide transport until further research has been performed, more recent PAs do account for the effects of colloids. PAs of disposal systems in which the waste canister is surrounded by a bentonite buffer do not consider the effect of colloids on the source term. These PAs assume that all colloids are filtered by the bentonite buffer and cannot escape from the near-field. PAs of disposal systems with no bentonite buffer have to account for mobilisation of radionuclides from the waste by colloids. The concentration of colloids that may form in the repository is a key uncertainty. Many PA programmes have modelled colloidal radionuclide transport in the geosphere using one-dimensional transport equations. No PA has included a comprehensive treatment of colloid transport using mechanistic modelling. Some PAs have not undertaken modelling of colloid transport in the geosphere, but have relied instead on arguments that such transport processes will be of low consequence to the performance of the disposal system. Five PAs have shown the effects of colloid transport through the geosphere to be potentially significant. For the disposal of spent nuclear fuel, SKB has developed the KBS-3 concept. For the disposal of long-lived low-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste, SKB has developed the SFL 3-5 concept. In the SFL 3-5 concept, waste is placed in underground disposal caverns and

  1. Colloid transport code-nuclear user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the CTCN computer code, designed to solve the equations of transient colloidal transport of radionuclides in porous and fractured media. This Fortran 77 package solves systems of coupled nonlinear differential equations with a wide range of boundary conditions. The package uses the Method of Lines technique with a special section which forms finite-difference discretizations in up to four spatial dimensions to automatically convert the system into a set of ordinary differential equations. The CTCN code then solves these equations using a robust, efficient ODE solver. Thus CTCN can be used to solve population balance equations along with the usual transport equations to model colloid transport processes or as a general problem solver to treat up to four-dimensional differential systems

  2. Spin manipulation and spin-lattice interaction in magnetic colloidal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Fabrizio; Turyanska, Lyudmila; Granwehr, Josef; Patanè, Amalia

    2014-11-01

    We report on the spin-lattice interaction and coherent manipulation of electron spins in Mn-doped colloidal PbS quantum dots (QDs) by electron spin resonance. We show that the phase memory time,TM , is limited by Mn-Mn dipolar interactions, hyperfine interactions of the protons (1H) on the QD capping ligands with Mn ions in their proximity (limit and at low temperature, we achieve a long phase memory time constant TM˜0.9 μ s , thus enabling the observation of Rabi oscillations. Our findings suggest routes to the rational design of magnetic colloidal QDs with phase memory times exceeding the current limits of relevance for the implementation of QDs as qubits in quantum information processing.

  3. From the depletion attraction to the bridging attraction: the effect of solvent molecules on the effective colloidal interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Kline, Steven R; Liu, Yun

    2015-02-28

    Depletion attraction induced by non-adsorbing polymers or small particles in colloidal solutions has been widely used as a model colloidal interaction to understand aggregation behavior and phase diagrams, such as glass transitions and gelation. However, much less attention has been paid to study the effective colloidal interaction when small particles/molecules can be reversibly attracted to large colloidal particles. At the strong attraction limit, small particles can introduce bridging attraction as it can simultaneously attach to neighbouring large colloidal particles. We use Baxter's multi-component method for sticky hard sphere systems with the Percus-Yevick approximation to study the bridging attraction and its consequence to phase diagrams, which are controlled by the concentration of small particles and their interaction with large particles. When the concentration of small particles is very low, the bridging attraction strength increases very fast with the increase of small particle concentration. The attraction strength eventually reaches a maximum bridging attraction (MBA). Adding more small particles after the MBA concentration keeps decreasing the attraction strength until reaching a concentration above which the net effect of small particles only introduces an effective repulsion between large colloidal particles. These behaviors are qualitatively different from the concentration dependence of the depletion attraction on small particles and make phase diagrams very rich for bridging attraction systems. We calculate the spinodal and binodal regions, the percolation lines, the MBA lines, and the equivalent hard sphere interaction line for bridging attraction systems and have proposed a simple analytic solution to calculate the effective attraction strength using the concentrations of large and small particles. Our theoretical results are found to be consistent with experimental results reported recently.

  4. Programming Hierarchical Self-Assembly of Patchy Particles into Colloidal Crystals via Colloidal Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphew, Daniel; Shaw, James; Avins, Christopher; Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan

    2018-03-27

    Colloidal self-assembly is a promising bottom-up route to a wide variety of three-dimensional structures, from clusters to crystals. Programming hierarchical self-assembly of colloidal building blocks, which can give rise to structures ordered at multiple levels to rival biological complexity, poses a multiscale design problem. Here we explore a generic design principle that exploits a hierarchy of interaction strengths and employ this design principle in computer simulations to demonstrate the hierarchical self-assembly of triblock patchy colloidal particles into two distinct colloidal crystals. We obtain cubic diamond and body-centered cubic crystals via distinct clusters of uniform size and shape, namely, tetrahedra and octahedra, respectively. Such a conceptual design framework has the potential to reliably encode hierarchical self-assembly of colloidal particles into a high level of sophistication. Moreover, the design framework underpins a bottom-up route to cubic diamond colloidal crystals, which have remained elusive despite being much sought after for their attractive photonic applications.

  5. Particle Trapping and Banding in Rapid Colloidal Solidification

    KAUST Repository

    Elliott, J. A. W.

    2011-10-11

    We derive an expression for the nonequilibrium segregation coefficient of colloidal particles near a moving solid-liquid interface. The resulting kinetic phase diagram has applications for the rapid solidification of clay soils, gels, and related colloidal systems. We use it to explain the formation of bandlike defects in rapidly solidified alumina suspensions. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  6. A Navier-Stokes phase-field crystal model for colloidal suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praetorius, Simon; Voigt, Axel

    2015-04-21

    We develop a fully continuous model for colloidal suspensions with hydrodynamic interactions. The Navier-Stokes Phase-Field Crystal model combines ideas of dynamic density functional theory with particulate flow approaches and is derived in detail and related to other dynamic density functional theory approaches with hydrodynamic interactions. The derived system is numerically solved using adaptive finite elements and is used to analyze colloidal crystallization in flowing environments demonstrating a strong coupling in both directions between the crystal shape and the flow field. We further validate the model against other computational approaches for particulate flow systems for various colloidal sedimentation problems.

  7. Colloid migration in fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Field studies at the Nevada Test Site by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have demonstrated that radionuclides are being transported by colloidal material suspended in groundwater. This observation is counter to most predictions from contaminant transport models because the models assume adsorbed species are immobile. The purpose of this research is to quantify the transport processes for colloidal materials and develop the mechanistic understanding necessary to predict radionuclide transport in fractured media. There were three areas of investigation during this year that have addressed these issues: chemical control of colloid deposition on clean mineral surfaces, colloid accumulation on fracture surfaces, and the influence of deposited colloids on colloid and tracer migration. 7 refs

  8. Evaluation of colloid transport issues and recommendations for SKI performance assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, S. M.; Bennett, D. G.; Higgo, J. J. W.

    2000-08-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop recommendations to SKI for evaluating the potential significance of colloids in performance assessment (PA) studies by: Updating a previous review of the treatment of colloids in PA studies for radioactive waste repositories and to include information on PAs published in the period 1997-1999. We have reviewed sixteen PAs conducted in nine countries and have made the following observations: All PAs include colloid formation and colloid transport in their FEP list. Although some programmes have deferred consideration of colloidal radionuclide transport until further research has been performed, more recent PAs do account for the effects of colloids. PAs of disposal systems in which the waste canister is surrounded by a bentonite buffer do not consider the effect of colloids on the source term. These PAs assume that all colloids are filtered by the bentonite buffer and cannot escape from the near-field. PAs of disposal systems with no bentonite buffer have to account for mobilisation of radionuclides from the waste by colloids. The concentration of colloids that may form in the repository is a key uncertainty. Many PA programmes have modelled colloidal radionuclide transport in the geosphere using one-dimensional transport equations. No PA has included a comprehensive treatment of colloid transport using mechanistic modelling. Some PAs have not undertaken modelling of colloid transport in the geosphere, but have relied instead on arguments that such transport processes will be of low consequence to the performance of the disposal system. Five PAs have shown the effects of colloid transport through the geosphere to be potentially significant. For the disposal of spent nuclear fuel, SKB has developed the KBS-3 concept. For the disposal of long-lived low-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste, SKB has developed the SFL 3-5 concept. In the SFL 3-5 concept, waste is placed in underground disposal caverns and

  9. Mesoscopic electrohydrodynamic simulations of binary colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Nicolas; Frijters, Stefan; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Harting, Jens

    2018-04-01

    A model is presented for the solution of electrokinetic phenomena of colloidal suspensions in fluid mixtures. We solve the discrete Boltzmann equation with a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision operator using the lattice Boltzmann method to simulate binary fluid flows. Solvent-solvent and solvent-solute interactions are implemented using a pseudopotential model. The Nernst-Planck equation, describing the kinetics of dissolved ion species, is solved using a finite difference discretization based on the link-flux method. The colloids are resolved on the lattice and coupled to the hydrodynamics and electrokinetics through appropriate boundary conditions. We present the first full integration of these three elements. The model is validated by comparing with known analytic solutions of ionic distributions at fluid interfaces, dielectric droplet deformations, and the electrophoretic mobility of colloidal suspensions. Its possibilities are explored by considering various physical systems, such as breakup of charged and neutral droplets and colloidal dynamics at either planar or spherical fluid interfaces.

  10. Electronic structure robustness and design rules for 2D colloidal heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Audrey; Livache, Clément; Ithurria, Sandrine; Lhuillier, Emmanuel

    2018-01-01

    Among the colloidal quantum dots, 2D nanoplatelets present exceptionally narrow optical features. Rationalizing the design of heterostructures of these objects is of utmost interest; however, very little work has been focused on the investigation of their electronic properties. This work is organized into two main parts. In the first part, we use 1D solving of the Schrödinger equation to extract the effective masses for nanoplatelets (NPLs) of CdSe, CdS, and CdTe and the valence band offset for NPL core/shell of CdSe/CdS. In the second part, using the determined parameters, we quantize how the spectra of the CdSe/CdS heterostructure get affected by (i) the application of an electric field and (ii) by the presence of a dull interface. We also propose design strategies to make the heterostructure even more robust.

  11. Colloids in Biotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Fanun, Monzer

    2010-01-01

    Colloids have come a long way from when Thomas Graham coined the term colloid to describe 'pseudo solutions'. This book enables scientists to close the gap between extensive research and translation into commercial options in biomedicine and biotechnology. It covers biosurfactants and surface properties, phase behavior, and orientational change of surfactant mixtures with peptides at the interface. It also covers adsorption of polymers and biopolymers on the surface and interface, discusses colloidal nanoparticles and their use in biotechnology, and delves into bioadhesion and microencapsulati

  12. A study on the characteristics of colloid-associated radionuclide transport in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yun Chang

    1997-02-01

    Recently, the radionuclide transport in the form of colloids has been focused intensively in the safety assessment of a radioactive waste repository. As colloids are considered to be able to increase the transport rate of radionuclide through geologic media, the transport of radionuclide should be adjusted by the presence of colloids. The migration of dissolved radionuclide is expected to depend on various process such as advection, dispersion and interactions with soils, and, in addition, the transport of colloid-mediated radionuclide is considered to be more complicated because of the interactions between radionuclides and colloids. In this paper the migration behavior of colloid-associated radionuclides within subsurface are reviewed and studied in detail. The colloid-mediated transport system was modelled and simulated in order to illustrate the effects of colloids on the transport of radionuclide in the aquifer system. The transport rate of radionuclide is mainly controlled by a retardation factor which is controlled by colloidal behaviors, degree of adsorption, and the related geologic parameters. Therefore it is necessary to carefully understand the accelerating tendency of the retardation difference factor, and in this study the trends are analyzed, described and the retardation difference factor is mathematically defined, simplified and applied practically to the safety and performance assessment of a future repository

  13. Clustering of low-valence particles: structure and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, Olga; Alberts, Jonathan; Munro, Edwin; Lenne, Pierre-François

    2014-08-01

    We compute the structure and kinetics of two systems of low-valence particles with three or six freely oriented bonds in two dimensions. The structure of clusters formed by trivalent particles is complex with loops and holes, while hexavalent particles self-organize into regular and compact structures. We identify the elementary structures which compose the clusters of trivalent particles. At initial stages of clustering, the clusters of trivalent particles grow with a power-law time dependence. Yet at longer times fusion and fission of clusters equilibrates and clusters form a heterogeneous phase with polydispersed sizes. These results emphasize the role of valence in the kinetics and stability of finite-size clusters.

  14. Colloidal nanocrystals for photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadiyar, Chethana; Loiudice, Anna; Buonsanti, Raffaella

    2017-02-01

    Colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) are among the most modular and versatile nanomaterial platforms for studying emerging phenomena in different fields thanks to their superb compositional and morphological tunability. A promising, yet challenging, application involves the use of colloidal NCs as light absorbers and electrocatalysts for water splitting. In this review we discuss how the tunability of these materials is ideal to understand the complex phenomena behind storing energy in chemical bonds and to optimize performance through structural and compositional modification. First, we describe the colloidal synthesis method as a means to achieve a high degree of control over single material NCs and NC heterostructures, including examples of the role of the ligands in modulating size and shape. Next, we focus on the use of NCs as light absorbers and catalysts to drive both the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), together with some of the challenges related to the use of colloidal NCs as model systems and/or technological solution in water splitting. We conclude with a broader prospective on the use of colloidal chemistry for new material discovery.

  15. Manipulating semiconductor colloidal stability through doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleharty, Mark E; van Swol, Frank; Petsev, Dimiter N

    2014-10-10

    The interface between a doped semiconductor material and electrolyte solution is of considerable fundamental interest, and is relevant to systems of practical importance. Both adjacent domains contain mobile charges, which respond to potential variations. This is exploited to design electronic and optoelectronic sensors, and other enabling semiconductor colloidal materials. We show that the charge mobility in both phases leads to a new type of interaction between semiconductor colloids suspended in aqueous electrolyte solutions. This interaction is due to the electrostatic response of the semiconductor interior to disturbances in the external field upon the approach of two particles. The electrostatic repulsion between two charged colloids is reduced from the one governed by the charged groups present at the particles surfaces. This type of interaction is unique to semiconductor particles and may have a substantial effect on the suspension dynamics and stability.

  16. Dimensionality and its effects upon the valence electronic structure of ordered metallic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, J.G.

    1983-07-01

    The system c(10x2)Ag/Cu(001) was investigated with Angle-Resolved Photoemission (ARP), Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). LEED and AES provided the calibration of a quartz microbalance used to measure the amount of silver evaporated onto the copper single crystal and also established the monolayer geometrical structure at one monolayer exposure. An off-normal ARP bandmapping study performed with polarized HeI and NeI radiation demonstrated the electronically two-dimensional nature of the silver d-bands at coverages of near one monolayer. The states at the surface Brillouin Zone center were assigned upon the basis of their polarization dependences and a structural model of hexagonal symmetry. A normal emission ARP experiment was performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) over the photon energy range of 6 to 32 eV. Data from it documented the evolution of the valence electronic structure of the silver overlayer from a two-dimensional hexagonal valence to a three-dimensional behavior converging towards that of bulk Ag(111). A structural study was attempted using the ARP technique of Normal Emission Photoelectron Diffraction over the photon energy range of 3.4 to 3.7 keV at SSRL, the results of which are inconclusive

  17. Growth and Interaction of Colloid Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Michael-Angelo; Khusid, Boris; Meyer, William; Kondic, Lou

    2017-11-01

    We study evolution of colloid systems under zero-gravity conditions. In particular, we focus on the regime where there is a coexistence between a liquid and a solid state. Under zero gravity, the dominating process in the bulk of the fluid phase and the solid phase is diffusion. At the moving solid/liquid interface, osmotic pressure is balanced by surface tension, as well as balancing fluxes (conservation of mass) with the kinematics of nuclei growth (Wilson-Frenkel law). Due to the highly nonlinear boundary condition at the moving boundary, care has to be taken when performing numerical simulations. In this work, we present a nonlinear model for colloid nuclei growth. Numerical simulations using a finite volume method are compared with asymptotic analysis of the governing equation and experimental results for nuclei growth. Novel component in our numerical simulations is the inclusion of nonlinear (collective) diffusion terms that depend on the chemical potentials of the colloid in the solid and fluid phase. The results include growth and dissolution of a single colloidal nucleus, as well as evolution of multiple interacting nuclei. Supported by NASA Grant No. NNX16AQ79G.

  18. The electrochemical reduction rate of colloidal particles of silver halides as a function of the electrolyte composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selivanov, V.N.

    1997-01-01

    Influence of silver halide colloid particles concentration (AgI), electrolyte composition and signs of the electrode and colloids charges on their reduction threshold current densities has been studied. It has been discovered that reduction threshold current densities of positively charged colloid particles exceed by a factor of 3-4 the threshold densities of silver ions diffusion current. It is shown that the threshold density of colloids reduction current is limited by the rates of their electrophoretic transfer and diffusion

  19. Emotional valence and the free-energy principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffily, Mateus; Coricelli, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    The free-energy principle has recently been proposed as a unified Bayesian account of perception, learning and action. Despite the inextricable link between emotion and cognition, emotion has not yet been formulated under this framework. A core concept that permeates many perspectives on emotion is valence, which broadly refers to the positive and negative character of emotion or some of its aspects. In the present paper, we propose a definition of emotional valence in terms of the negative rate of change of free-energy over time. If the second time-derivative of free-energy is taken into account, the dynamics of basic forms of emotion such as happiness, unhappiness, hope, fear, disappointment and relief can be explained. In this formulation, an important function of emotional valence turns out to regulate the learning rate of the causes of sensory inputs. When sensations increasingly violate the agent's expectations, valence is negative and increases the learning rate. Conversely, when sensations increasingly fulfil the agent's expectations, valence is positive and decreases the learning rate. This dynamic interaction between emotional valence and learning rate highlights the crucial role played by emotions in biological agents' adaptation to unexpected changes in their world.

  20. Emotional valence and the free-energy principle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Joffily

    Full Text Available The free-energy principle has recently been proposed as a unified Bayesian account of perception, learning and action. Despite the inextricable link between emotion and cognition, emotion has not yet been formulated under this framework. A core concept that permeates many perspectives on emotion is valence, which broadly refers to the positive and negative character of emotion or some of its aspects. In the present paper, we propose a definition of emotional valence in terms of the negative rate of change of free-energy over time. If the second time-derivative of free-energy is taken into account, the dynamics of basic forms of emotion such as happiness, unhappiness, hope, fear, disappointment and relief can be explained. In this formulation, an important function of emotional valence turns out to regulate the learning rate of the causes of sensory inputs. When sensations increasingly violate the agent's expectations, valence is negative and increases the learning rate. Conversely, when sensations increasingly fulfil the agent's expectations, valence is positive and decreases the learning rate. This dynamic interaction between emotional valence and learning rate highlights the crucial role played by emotions in biological agents' adaptation to unexpected changes in their world.

  1. Behavioral and Neurodevelopmental Precursors to Binge-Type Eating Disorders: Support for the Role of Negative Valence Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, Anna; Nelson, Eric E.; Bongiorno, Diana M.; Pine, Daniel S.; Yanovski, Jack A.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatric loss-of-control eating is a robust behavioral precursor to binge-type eating disorders. Elucidating precursors to loss-of-control eating and binge-type eating disorders may refine developmental risk models of eating disorders and inform interventions. Method We review evidence within constructs of the Negative Valence Systems (NVS)-domain, as specified by the Research Domain Criteria framework. Based on published studies, we propose an integrated NVS model of binge-type eating disorder risk. Results Data implicate altered corticolimbic functioning, neuroendocrine dysregulation, and self-reported negative affect as possible risk-factors. However, neuroimaging and physiological data in children and adolescents are sparse, and most prospective studies are limited to self-report measures. Conclusions We discuss a broad NVS framework for conceptualizing early risk for binge-type eating disorders. Future neural and behavioral research on the developmental trajectory of loss-of-control and binge-type eating disorders is required. PMID:26040923

  2. The preparation and stability of homodisperse colloidal haematite (alpha-Fe2-O3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penners, N.H.G.

    1985-01-01

    Since the foundation of colloid chemistry as a branch of science, much attention has been paid to the subject of colloid stability, i.e. the stability of colloid systems against aggregation. Gradually, our knowledge of the mechanisms involved has improved and models were developed,

  3. Sorption behavior of cesium onto bentonite colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, Kazuki; Masuda, Tsuguya; Tomura, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    It is considered that bentonite colloid might be generated from bentonite which will be used as buffer material in geological disposal system, and can facilitate the migration of radionuclides by means of sorption. In order to examine this characteristic, sorption and desorption experiments of Cs onto bentonite colloid were carried out to obtain its distribution coefficient (Kd) and information on the reversibility of its sorption. In addition, particle size distribution and shape of colloid were investigated and their effect on the sorption behavior was discussed. Kds for Cs were around 20 m 3 /kg for sorption and 30 m 3 /kg for desorption, in which sorbed Cs was desorbed by 8.4x10 -4 mol/l of NaCl solution. These values did not show any dependencies on Cs concentration and duration of sorption and desorption. The first 20% of sorbed Cs was desorbed reversibly at least. Most of colloidal particles were larger than 200 nm and TEM micrographs showed they had only several sheets of the clay crystal. Obtained Kds for colloidal bentonite were larger than those for powdered bentonite. This can be caused by difference of competing ions in the solution, characteristics of contained smectite, or sorption site density. (author)

  4. Interference Conditions of the Reconsolidation Process in Humans: The Role of Valence and Different Memory Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Rodrigo S; Bavassi, Luz; Kaczer, Laura; Forcato, Cecilia; Pedreira, María E

    2016-01-01

    Following the presentation of a reminder, consolidated memories become reactivated followed by a process of re-stabilization, which is referred to as reconsolidation. The most common behavioral tool used to reveal this process is interference produced by new learning shortly after memory reactivation. Memory interference is defined as a decrease in memory retrieval, the effect is generated when new information impairs an acquired memory. In general, the target memory and the interference task used are the same. Here we investigated how different memory systems and/or their valence could produce memory reconsolidation interference. We showed that a reactivated neutral declarative memory could be interfered by new learning of a different neutral declarative memory. Then, we revealed that an aversive implicit memory could be interfered by the presentation of a reminder followed by a threatening social event. Finally, we showed that the reconsolidation of a neutral declarative memory is unaffected by the acquisition of an aversive implicit memory and conversely, this memory remains intact when the neutral declarative memory is used as interference. These results suggest that the interference of memory reconsolidation is effective when two task rely on the same memory system or both evoke negative valence.

  5. Limitations of the colloidal silica method in mapping the endothelial plasma membrane proteome of the mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, Selvam; Reinartz, Michael; Emde, Barbara; Zanger, Klaus; Schrader, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    The endothelial cell (EC) membrane is an important interface, which plays a crucial role in signal transduction. Our aim was to selectively purify luminal EC membrane proteins from the coronary vasculature of the isolated perfused mouse heart and analyze its composition with mass spectrometry (MS). To specifically label coronary ECs in the intact heart, the colloidal silica method was applied, which is based on the binding of positively charged colloidal silica to the surface of EC membranes. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the specific labeling of ECs of macro and microvessels. Two different methods of tissue homogenization (Teflon pestle and ultra blade) together with density centrifugation were used for membrane protein enrichment. Enrichment and purity was controlled by Western blot analysis using the EC-specific protein caveolin 1 and various intracellular marker proteins. The ultra blade method resulted in a tenfold enrichment of caveolin 1, while there was negligible contamination as judged by Western blot. However, protein yield was low and required pooling of ten hearts for MS. When enriched endothelial membrane proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by LC-MS, a total of 56 proteins could be identified, of which only 12 were membrane proteins. We conclude that coronary endothelial membranes can be conveniently labeled with colloidal silica. However, due to the ionic nature of interaction of colloidal silica with the EC membrane the shear rate required for cardiac homogenization resulted in a substantial loss of specificity.

  6. Sodium deoxycholate-decorated zein nanoparticles for a stable colloidal drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Agnese; Paolino, Donatella; Iannone, Michelangelo; Palma, Ernesto; Fresta, Massimo; Cosco, Donato

    2018-01-01

    The use of biopolymers is increasing in drug delivery, thanks to the peculiar properties of these compounds such as their biodegradability, availability, and the possibility of modulating their physico-chemical characteristics. In particular, protein-based systems such as albumin are able to interact with many active compounds, modulating their biopharmaceutical properties. Zein is a protein of 20-40 kDa made up of many hydrophobic amino acids, generally regarded as safe (GRAS) and used as a coating material. In this investigation, zein was combined with various surfactants in order to obtain stable nanosystems by means of the nanoprecipitation technique. Specific parameters, eg, temperature, pH value, Turbiscan Stability Index, serum stability, in vitro cytotoxicity and entrapment efficiency of various model compounds were investigated, in order to identify the nanoformulation most useful for a systemic drug delivery application. The use of non-ionic and ionic surfactants such as Tween 80, poloxamer 188, and sodium deoxycholate allowed us to obtain nanoparticles characterized by a mean diameter of 100-200 nm when a protein concentration of 2 mg/mL was used. The surface charge was modulated by means of the protein concentration and the nature of the stabilizer. The most suitable nanoparticle formulation to be proposed as a colloidal drug delivery system was obtained using sodium deoxycholate (1.25% w/v) because it was characterized by a narrow size distribution, a good storage stability after freeze-drying and significant feature of retaining lipophilic and hydrophilic compounds. The sodium deoxycholate-coated zein nanoparticles are stable biocompatible colloidal carriers to be used as useful drug delivery systems.

  7. Using Potentiometric Free Drug Sensors to Determine the Free Concentration of Ionizable Drugs in Colloidal Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Thuy; Chakraborty, Anjan; Xi, Xi

    2018-01-01

    The present study investigates the use of free drug sensors (FDS) to measure free ionized drug concentrations in colloidal systems, including micellar solutions, emulsions, and lipid formulations during in vitro lipolysis. Diphenhydramine hydrochloride (DPH) and loperamide hydrochloride (LOP) wer...

  8. Colloids in the mortar backfill of a cementitious repository for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, E.; Spieler, P.

    1999-01-01

    Colloids are present in groundwater aquifers and water-permeable engineered barrier systems and may facilitate the migration of radionuclides. A careful evaluation of colloid concentrations is required to assess the potential effect of colloids on nuclide migration and, consequently, on the safety of a repository for radioactive waste. A highly permeable mortar is foreseen to be used as backfill for the engineered barrier of the Swiss repository for low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW). The backfill is considered to be a chemical environment with a potential for colloid generation and, due to its high porosity, for colloid mobility. In this contribution a novel in-house built particle counting device is described, and measurements of colloid concentrations in the pore water of backfill mortar are presented. (author)

  9. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE) Science Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ronald J.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Luna, Unique J.; Chaiken, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Andrew; Secanna, Stefano; Weitz, David; Lu, Peter; Yodh, Arjun; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Colloids Experiment is being conducted on the International Space Station (ISS) using the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) in the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR). Work to date will be discussed and future plans and opportunities will be highlighted. The LMM is a microscope facility designed to allow scientists to process, manipulate, and characterize colloidal samples in micro-gravity where the absence of gravitational settling and particle jamming enables scientists to study such things as:a.The role that disordered and ordered-packing of spheres play in the phase diagram and equation of state of hard sphere systems,b.crystal nucleation and growth, growth instabilities, and the glass transition, c.gelation and phase separation of colloid polymer mixtures,d.crystallization of colloidal binary alloys,e.competition between crystallization and phase separation,f.effects of anisotropy and specific interactions on packing, aggregation, frustration and crystallization,g.effects of specific reversible and irreversible interactions mediated in the first case by hybridization of complementary DNA strands attached to separate colloidal particles,h.Lock and key interactions between colloids with dimples and spheres which match the size and shape of the dimples,i.finding the phase diagrams of isotropic and interacting particles,j.new techniques for complex self-assembly including scenarios for self-replication, k.critical Casimir forces,l.biology (real and model systems) in microgravity,m.etc. By adding additional microscopy capabilities to the existing LMM, NASA will increase the tools available for scientists that fly experiments on the ISS enabling scientists to observe directly what is happening at the particle level. Presently, theories are needed to bridge the gap between what is being observed (at a macroscopic level when photographing samples) with what is happening at a particle (or microscopic) level. What is happening at a microscopic level will be directly

  10. Stability enhancement of an electrically tunable colloidal photonic crystal using modified electrodes with a large electrochemical potential window

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, HongShik [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Gyun Shin, Chang; Heo, Chul-Joon; Jeon, Seog-Jin; Jin, Haishun; Woo Kim, Jung; Jin, YongWan; Lee, SangYoon; Gyu Han, Moon, E-mail: moongyu.han@samsung.com, E-mail: jinklee@snu.ac.kr [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Joohyun; Lee, Jin-Kyu, E-mail: moongyu.han@samsung.com, E-mail: jinklee@snu.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-03

    The color tuning behavior and switching stability of an electrically tunable colloidal photonic crystal system were studied with particular focus on the electrochemical aspects. Photonic color tuning of the colloidal arrays composed of monodisperse particles dispersed in water was achieved using external electric field through lattice constant manipulation. However, the number of effective color tuning cycle was limited due to generation of unwanted ions by electrolysis of the water medium during electrical switching. By introducing larger electrochemical potential window electrodes, such as conductive diamond-like carbon or boron-doped diamond, the switching stability was appreciably enhanced through reducing the number of ions generated.

  11. In Vitro Evaluation of Colloidal Silver on Immune Function: Antilymphoproliferative Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Franco-Molina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal silver (AgC is currently used by humans and it can be internalized through inhalation, injection, ingestion, and dermal contact. However, there is limited information about immunological activity; more investigations using colloidal silver are needed. In the present study, the effects of AgC (17.5 ng/mL on immunological parameters (proliferation and immunophenotyping using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and macrophages (phagocytosis and cytotoxicity on leukemia and lymphoma cancer cell lines (1.75 to 17.5 ng/mL were investigated. AgC was observed to significantly (p<0.05 decrease interleukin-2 (IL-2 production and proliferation induced by phytohemagglutinin or concanavalin A in PBMC without affecting its cell viability but with cytotoxic effect on cancer cells. IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, INF-γ, and IL-17A cytokines production and CD3+, CD3−CD19+, CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+, and CD16+CD56+ PBMC phenotypes were not affected by AgC. The present study demonstrates that colloidal silver is harmless and nontoxic to the immune system cells and its ability to interfere with the immune response by decreasing cell proliferation when stimulated with mitogens demonstrated the antilymphoproliferative potential of AgC.

  12. Generation of colloidal granules and capsules from double emulsion drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Kathryn S.

    Assemblies of colloidal particles are extensively used in ceramic processing, pharmaceuticals, inks and coatings. In this project, the aim was to develop a new technique to fabricate monodispersed colloidal assemblies. The use of microfluidic devices and emulsion processing allows for the fabrication of complex materials that can be used in a variety of applications. A microfluidic device is used to create monodispersed water/oil/water (w/o/w) double emulsions with interior droplets of colloidal silica suspension ranging in size from tens to hundreds of microns. By tailoring the osmotic pressure using glycerol as a solute in the continuous and inner phases of the emulsion, we can control the final volume size of the monodispersed silica colloidal crystals that form in the inner droplets of the double emulsion. Modifying the ionic strength in the colloidal dispersion can be used to affect the particle-particle interactions and crystal formation of the final colloidal particle. This w/o/w technique has been used with other systems of metal oxide colloids and cellulose nanocrystals. Encapsulation of the colloidal suspension in a polymer shell for the generation of ceramic-polymer core-shell particles has also been developed. These core-shell particles have spawned new research in the field of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials. Systems and chemistries for creating cellulose hydrogels within the double emulsions have also been researched. Water in oil single emulsions and double emulsions have been used to create cellulose hydrogel spheres in the sub-100 micron diameter range. Oil/water/oil double emulsions allow us to create stable cellulose capsules. The addition of a second hydrogel polymer, such as acrylate or alginate, further strengthens the cellulose gel network and can also be processed into capsules and particles using the microfluidic device. This work could have promising applications in acoustic metamaterials, personal care products, pharmaceuticals

  13. Valency and molecular structure

    CERN Document Server

    Cartmell, E

    1977-01-01

    Valency and Molecular Structure, Fourth Edition provides a comprehensive historical background and experimental foundations of theories and methods relating to valency and molecular structures. In this edition, the chapter on Bohr theory has been removed while some sections, such as structures of crystalline solids, have been expanded. Details of structures have also been revised and extended using the best available values for bond lengths and bond angles. Recent developments are mostly noted in the chapter on complex compounds, while a new chapter has been added to serve as an introduction t

  14. Measuring the osmotic pressure of active colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael; Soni, Vishal; Magkiriadou, Sofia; Ferrari, Melissa; Youssef, Mina; Driscoll, Michelle; Sacanna, Stefano; Chaikin, Paul; Irvine, William

    We study the behavior of a system of colloidal spinners, consisting of weakly magnetic colloids driven by a rotating magnetic field. First the particles are allowed to sediment to an equilibrium density profile in a gravitational field, from which we measure the equilibrium equation of state. By spinning the particles at various frequencies, we introduce activity into the system through the hydrodynamic interactions between particles. We observe that the activity expands the sedimentation profile to a new steady state, from which we measure the pressure as a function of the density and activity. We compare the effects of activity on the pressure and mean-squared displacement of spinners and tracer particles.

  15. [Emotional valence of words in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalenques, I; Enjolras, J; Izaute, M

    2013-06-01

    Emotion recognition is a domain in which deficits have been reported in schizophrenia. A number of emotion classification studies have indicated that emotion processing deficits in schizophrenia are more pronounced for negative affects. Given the difficulty of developing material suitable for the study of these emotional deficits, it would be interesting to examine whether patients suffering from schizophrenia are responsive to positively and negatively charged emotion-related words that could be used within the context of remediation strategies. The emotional perception of words was examined in a clinical experiment involving schizophrenia patients. This emotional perception was expressed by the patients in terms of the valence associated with the words. In the present study, we investigated whether schizophrenia patients would assign the same negative and positive valences to words as healthy individuals. Twenty volunteer, clinically stable, outpatients from the Psychiatric Service of the University Hospital of Clermont-Ferrand were recruited. Diagnoses were based on DSM-IV criteria. Global psychiatric symptoms were assessed using the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS). The patients had to evaluate the emotional valence of a set of 300 words on a 5-point scale ranging from "very unpleasant" to "very pleasant". . The collected results were compared with those obtained by Bonin et al. (2003) [13] from 97 University students. Correlational analyses of the two studies revealed that the emotional valences were highly correlated, i.e. the schizophrenia patients estimated very similar emotional valences. More precisely, it was possible to examine three separate sets of 100 words each (positive words, neutral words and negative words). The positive words that were evaluated were the more positive words from the norms collected by Bonin et al. (2003) [13], and the negative words were the more negative examples taken from these norms. The neutral words

  16. Patchy particles made by colloidal fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhe; Hueckel, Theodore; Yi, Gi-Ra; Sacanna, Stefano

    2017-10-01

    Patches on the surfaces of colloidal particles provide directional information that enables the self-assembly of the particles into higher-order structures. Although computational tools can make quantitative predictions and can generate design rules that link the patch motif of a particle to its internal microstructure and to the emergent properties of the self-assembled materials, the experimental realization of model systems of particles with surface patches (or `patchy' particles) remains a challenge. Synthetic patchy colloidal particles are often poor geometric approximations of the digital building blocks used in simulations and can only rarely be manufactured in sufficiently high yields to be routinely used as experimental model systems. Here we introduce a method, which we refer to as colloidal fusion, for fabricating functional patchy particles in a tunable and scalable manner. Using coordination dynamics and wetting forces, we engineer hybrid liquid-solid clusters that evolve into particles with a range of patchy surface morphologies on addition of a plasticizer. We are able to predict and control the evolutionary pathway by considering surface-energy minimization, leading to two main branches of product: first, spherical particles with liquid surface patches, capable of forming curable bonds with neighbouring particles to assemble robust supracolloidal structures; and second, particles with a faceted liquid compartment, which can be cured and purified to yield colloidal polyhedra. These findings outline a scalable strategy for the synthesis of patchy particles, first by designing their surface patterns by computer simulation, and then by recreating them in the laboratory with high fidelity.

  17. Colloid transport code-nuclear user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-04-03

    This report describes the CTCN computer code, designed to solve the equations of transient colloidal transport of radionuclides in porous and fractured media. This Fortran 77 package solves systems of coupled nonlinear differential equations with a wide range of boundary conditions. The package uses the Method of Lines technique with a special section which forms finite-difference discretizations in up to four spatial dimensions to automatically convert the system into a set of ordinary differential equations. The CTCN code then solves these equations using a robust, efficient ODE solver. Thus CTCN can be used to solve population balance equations along with the usual transport equations to model colloid transport processes or as a general problem solver to treat up to four-dimensional differential systems.

  18. Driving dynamic colloidal assembly using eccentric self-propelled colloids

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Zhan; Lei, Qun-li; Ni, Ran

    2017-01-01

    Designing protocols to dynamically direct the self-assembly of colloidal particles has become an important direction in soft matter physics because of the promising applications in fabrication of dynamic responsive functional materials. Here using computer simulations, we found that in the mixture of passive colloids and eccentric self-propelled active particles, when the eccentricity and self-propulsion of active particles are high enough, the eccentric active particles can push passive coll...

  19. Crystallization of DNA-coated colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yufeng; Zheng, Xiaolong; Ducrot, Étienne; Yodh, Jeremy S.; Weck, Marcus; Pine, David J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-coated colloids hold great promise for self-assembly of programmed heterogeneous microstructures, provided they not only bind when cooled below their melting temperature, but also rearrange so that aggregated particles can anneal into the structure that minimizes the free energy. Unfortunately, DNA-coated colloids generally collide and stick forming kinetically arrested random aggregates when the thickness of the DNA coating is much smaller than the particles. Here we report DNA-coated colloids that can rearrange and anneal, thus enabling the growth of large colloidal crystals from a wide range of micrometre-sized DNA-coated colloids for the first time. The kinetics of aggregation, crystallization and defect formation are followed in real time. The crystallization rate exhibits the familiar maximum for intermediate temperature quenches observed in metallic alloys, but over a temperature range smaller by two orders of magnitude, owing to the highly temperature-sensitive diffusion between aggregated DNA-coated colloids. PMID:26078020

  20. Manipulating colloids with charges and electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leunissen, M. E.

    2007-02-01

    This thesis presents the results of experimental investigations on a variety of colloidal suspensions. Colloidal particles are at least a hundred times larger than atoms or molecules, but suspended in a liquid they display the same phase behavior, including fluid and crystalline phases. Due to their relatively large size, colloids are much easier to investigate and manipulate, though. This makes them excellent condensed matter model systems. With this in mind, we studied micrometer-sized perspex (‘PMMA’) spheres, labeled with a fluorescent dye for high-resolution confocal microscopy imaging, and suspended in a low-polar mixture of the organic solvents cyclohexyl bromide and cis-decalin. This system offered us the flexibility to change the interactions between the particles from ‘hard-sphere-like’ to long-ranged repulsive (between like-charged particles), long-ranged attractive (between oppositely charged particles) and dipolar (in an electric field). We investigated the phase behavior of our suspensions as a function of the particle concentration, the ionic strength of the solvent and the particles’ charges. In this way, we obtained new insight in the freezing and melting behavior of like-charged and oppositely charged colloids. Interestingly, we found that the latter can readily form large crystals, thus defying the common belief that plus-minus interactions inevitably lead to aggregation. Moreover, we demonstrated that these systems can serve as a reliable model system for classical ionic matter (‘salts’), and that opposite-charge interactions can greatly facilitate the self-assembly of new structures with special properties for applications. On a slightly different note, we also studied electrostatic effects in mixtures of the cyclohexyl bromide solvent and water, both with and without colloidal particles present. This provided new insight in the stabilization mechanisms of oil-water emulsions and gave us control over the self-assembly of various

  1. A Study on Liver Scan using 113mIn Colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Chang Soon; Rhee, Chong Hoen; Chang, Kochang; Hong, Chang Gi

    1969-01-01

    There have been reported numberous cases of liver scanning in use of 198 Au colloid by many investigators, however, one in use of 113m In colloid has not been reported as yet in this country. The dose of 113 mIn for high diagnostic value in examination of each organ was determined and the diagnostic interpretability of liver scanning with the use of 113m In was carefully evaluated in comparison with the results of the liver scanning by the conventionally applied radioisotope. The comparative study of both figures of liver scanning with the use of 113m In colloid and 198 Au colloid delivered following results:1) The liver uptake rate and clearance into peripheral blood were accentuated more in case of 113m In colloid than in case of 198 Au colloid. 2) The interpretability of space occupying lesion in liver scanning with 113m In was also superior to one with 198 Au. 3) The figure of liver scanning with 113m In colloid corresponds not always to the figure with 198 Au. This difference can be explained by difference of phagocytic ability of reticuloendothelial system within liver. 4) In the liver scanning with 113m In colloid, the spleen is also visualized even in normal examine. 5) In the cases of disturbed liver function, uptake is more decreased in use of 113m In colloid than in 198 Au, in the spleen, however, the way is contrary. 6) With use of 113m In colloid, the time required for scanning could be shortened in comparison with 198 Au. 7) The filtration of 113m In colloid for scanning prior to human administration gives an expectation for better scanning figure.

  2. Radiation formation of colloidal metallic particles in aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuba, Vaclav; Nemec, Mojmir; Gbur, Tomas; John, Jan; Pospisil, Milan; Mucka, Viliam

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Radiation and photochemical methods have been successfully utilized in various steps of nanoparticles preparation. Presented study deals with formation of silver nanoparticles in various aqueous solutions initiated by UV and gamma radiation. Silver nitrate and silver cyanide were used as precursors for radiation and/or photochemical reduction of Ag + ions to the metallic form. Influence of various parameters (dose of radiation, dose rate, exposition time) on nucleation and formation of colloid particles was studied. Attention was also focused on composition of irradiated solution. Aliphatic alcohols were used as scavengers of OH radicals and other oxidizing species. Various organic stabilizers of formed nanoparticles were used, among others ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, citric acid and polyvinyl alcohol. Irradiation effects were evaluated using UV/Vis absorption spectra in colloid solution, solid phase formed after long-term irradiation was analysed via X-ray structural analysis

  3. Revisiting the Fundamentals in the Design and Control of Nanoparticulate Colloids in the Frame of Soft Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uskoković, Vuk

    2013-10-01

    This review presents thoughts on some of the fundamental features of conceptual models applied in the design of fine particles in the frames of colloid and soft chemistry. A special emphasis is placed on the limitations of these models, an acknowledgment of which is vital in improving their intricacy and effectiveness in predicting the outcomes of the corresponding experimental settings. Thermodynamics of self-assembly phenomena illustrated on the examples of protein assembly and micellization is analyzed in relation to the previously elaborated thesis that each self-assembly in reality presents a co-assembly, since it implies a mutual reorganization of the assembling system and its immediate environment. Parameters used in the design of fine particles by precipitation are discussed while referring to solubility product, various measures of supersaturation levels, induction time, nucleation and crystal growth rates, interfacial energies, and the Ostwald-Lussac law of phases. Again, the main drawbacks and inadequacies of using the aforementioned parameters in tailoring the materials properties in a soft and colloidal chemical setting were particularly emphasized. The basic and practical limitations of zeta-potential analyses, routinely used to stabilize colloidal dispersions and initiate specific interactions between soft chemical entities, were also outlined. The final section of the paper reiterates the unavoidable presence of practical qualitative models in the design and control of nanoparticulate colloids, which is supported by the overwhelming complexity of quantitative relationships that govern the processes of their formation and assembly.

  4. Ground state and elementary excitations of a model valence-fluctuation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandow, B.H.

    1979-01-01

    The nature of the valence fluctuation problem is described, and motivations are given for an Anderson-lattice model Hamiltonian. A simple trial wave function is posed for the ground state, and the variational problem is solved. This demonstrates clearly that there is no Kondo-like divergence; the present concentrated Kondo problem is thus more simple mathematically than the sngle-impurity problem. Elementary excitations are studies by the Green's function techniques of Zubarev and Hubbard. Quenching of local moments and a large specific heat are found at low temperatures. The quasi-particle spectrum exhibits a gap, but epsilon/sub F/ does not lie in this gap. The insulation-like feature of SmB 6 , SmS, and TmSe at very low temperatures is explained in terms of a strongly reduced mobility for states near the gap, and reasons are given why this feature is not observed in other valence-fluctuation compounds. 73 references

  5. Open channels in fractures maintained by deposition and erosion of colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, J.H.; Hunt, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Material in the colloidal size range is present in many natural groundwater systems at existing or proposed radioactive waste storage locations. Colloids initially suspended in the water in fractures can deposit onto the fracture surfaces, and will partially or fully clog the fracture. The amount of clogging will depend on whether the deposited colloidal material can erode from the fracture surfaces. If the fracture remains only partially clogged the unclogged regions take the form of open channels. The purpose of this paper is to assess under what conditions these open channels form. An analytical model of a steady state, average open channel width is presented which is a function of the fluid flow rate and viscosity, fracture aperture, and the permeability and shear strength of the deposited colloidal material. The implications of the presence of open channels for colloidal transport is also discussed. However, for most repository conditions the fractures are expected to fully clog with colloids

  6. Colloidal systems with attractive interaction: Evaluation of scattering data using the generalized indirect fourier transformation method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Innerlohinger, J.; Wyss, H.M.; Glatter, O.

    2004-01-01

    Different attractive interacting colloidal systems are characterized by means of static light scattering. As most of these samples are rather concentrated, multiple scattering is suppressed by partial contrast match and the use of very a thin sample cell (13 mum). This is possible with the

  7. Sampling and physical and actinide characterization of colloids from the Grimsel test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longworth, G.; Ivanovich, M.

    1990-01-01

    Samples of groundwater from a granite fracture at the Grimsel test site in Switzerland have been collected as part of a second intercomparison of groundwater colloid sampling and characterization techniques carried out by members of the Coco Club (colloids and complexes) sponsored by the CEC. This report describes the Harwell contribution to this exercise. The bulk of naturally occurring actinides were found to reside in solution with 10 particles/I (detection limit ∼50 nm) for samples determined by three laboratories. The colloids were shown to be negatively charged using microelectrophoresis and to be relatively stable. There was evidence of a reduction in the pH of the water after storage due to air contamination. This work has served to identify the problems associated with colloid sampling and characterization techniques

  8. Study of groundwater colloids and their ability to transport radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjus, K.; Wikberg, P.

    1987-03-01

    Natural occurring colloids in groundwater can adsorb and transport released radionuclides. In this work groundwater colloids have been investigated with zeta potential measurements and dynamic light scattering. The goal was i) to estimate the detection limits of the Institute's equipment for particle size estimation with dynamic light scattering and zeta potential with dynamic light scattering combined with estimation of Doppler shift in the scattered light frequency; ii) to examine several different groundwaters (Stripa, Kamlunge, Svartboberget). The possibility to apply a theoretical adsorption model for interpreting the results is also discussed. (orig.)

  9. Synthesis of colloids based on gold nanoparticles dispersed in castor oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, E. C. da; Silva, M. G. A. da; Meneghetti, S. M. P.; Machado, G.; Alencar, M. A. R. C.; Hickmann, J. M.; Meneghetti, M. R.

    2008-01-01

    New colloidal solutions of gold nanoparticles (AuNP), using castor oil as a nontoxic organic dispersant agent, were prepared via three different methods. In all three cases, tetrachloroauric(III) acid was employed as the gold source. The colloids were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The AuNP produced by the three methods were quasispherical in shape, however with different average sizes. The individual characteristics of the nanoparticles presented in each colloidal system were also confirmed by observation of absorption maxima at different wavelengths of visible light. Each method of synthesis leads to colloids with different grades of stability with respect to particle agglomeration.

  10. A short textbook of colloid chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Jirgensons, B

    1962-01-01

    A Short Textbook of Colloid Chemistry, Second Revised Edition details the factual aspect of colloid chemistry that includes the basic facts, established empirical and mathematical relationships, and practical applications. The chapters of the title are organized into two parts. In the first part, the text discusses the general concepts of colloid chemistry, such as the history and scope, basic terms, and basic methods in experiment with colloids. Part Two covers the technical aspect of colloid chemistry, such as the optical properties, electrical properties, and viscosity. The book will be of

  11. Mesoscopic model of temporal and spatial heterogeneity in aging colloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Nikolaj; Sibani, Paolo; Boettcher, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We develop a simple and effective description of the dynamics of dense hard sphere colloids in the aging regime deep in the glassy phase. Our description complements the many efforts to understand the onset of jamming in low density colloids, whose dynamics is still time-homogeneous. Based...... scattering function and particle mean-square displacements for jammed colloidal systems, and we predict a growth for the peak of the χ4 mobility correlation function that is logarithmic in waiting-time. At the same time, our model suggests a novel unified description for the irreversible aging dynamics...

  12. Filtration of polydispersed colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuttall, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    In this study, the dynamic microscopic form of the population balance model is applied to the problem of polydispersed particle capture in one spatial diffusion. This mathematical modeling approach can be applied to the difficult and potentially important problem of particulate (radiocolloid) transport in the groundwater surrounding a nuclear waste disposal site. To demonstrate the population balance methodology, the equations were developed and used to investigate transport and capture of polydispersed colloids in packed columns. Modeling simulations were compared to experimental column data. The multidimensional form of the population balance equation was used to analyze the transport and capture of polydispersed colloids. A numerical model was developed to describe transport of polydispersed colloids through a one-dimensional porous region. The effects of various size distributions were investigated in terms of capture efficiency. For simulating the column data, it was found by trial and error that as part of the population balance model a linear size dependent filtration function gave a good fit to the measured colloid concentration profile. The effects of constant versus size dependent filtration coefficients were compared and the differences illustrated by the calculated colloid profile within the column. Also observed from the model calculations was the dramatically changing liquid-phase colloid-size distribution which was plotted as a function of position down the column. This modeling approach was excellent for describing and understanding microscopic filtration in porous media

  13. Individual differences in emotion-cognition interactions: Emotional valence interacts with serotonin transporter genotype to influence brain systems involved in emotional reactivity and cognitive control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie eStollstorff

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR influences emotional reactivity and attentional bias towards or away from emotional stimuli and has been implicated in psychopathological states, such as depression and anxiety disorder. The short allele is associated with increased reactivity and attention towards negatively-valenced emotional information, whereas the long allele is associated with that towards positively-valenced emotional information. The neural basis for individual differences in the ability to exert cognitive control over these bottom-up biases in emotional reactivity and attention is unknown, an issue investigated in the present study. Two groups, homozygous 5-HTTLPR long allele carriers or homozygous short allele carriers, underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI while completing an Emotional Stroop-like task that varied with regards to the congruency of task-relevant and task-irrelevant information and the emotional valence of the task-irrelevant information. Behaviorally, participants demonstrated the classic Stroop effect (slower responses for incongruent than congruent trials, which did not differ by 5-HTTLPR genotype. However, fMRI results revealed that genotype influenced the degree to which neural systems were engaged depending on the valence of the conflicting task-irrelevant information. While the Long group recruited prefrontal control regions and superior temporal sulcus during conflict when task-irrelevant information was positively-valenced, the "Short" group recruited these regions when task-irrelevant information was negatively-valenced. Thus, participants successfully engaged cognitive control to overcome conflict in an emotional context using similar neural circuitry, but the engagement of this circuitry depended on emotional valence and 5-HTTLPR status. These results suggest that the interplay between emotion and cognition is modulated, in part, by a genetic polymorphism that influences serotonin

  14. Exchange Coupling Interactions from the Density Matrix Renormalization Group and N-Electron Valence Perturbation Theory: Application to a Biomimetic Mixed-Valence Manganese Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemelt, Michael; Krewald, Vera; Pantazis, Dimitrios A

    2018-01-09

    The accurate description of magnetic level energetics in oligonuclear exchange-coupled transition-metal complexes remains a formidable challenge for quantum chemistry. The density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) brings such systems for the first time easily within reach of multireference wave function methods by enabling the use of unprecedentedly large active spaces. But does this guarantee systematic improvement in predictive ability and, if so, under which conditions? We identify operational parameters in the use of DMRG using as a test system an experimentally characterized mixed-valence bis-μ-oxo/μ-acetato Mn(III,IV) dimer, a model for the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. A complete active space of all metal 3d and bridge 2p orbitals proved to be the smallest meaningful starting point; this is readily accessible with DMRG and greatly improves on the unrealistic metal-only configuration interaction or complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) values. Orbital optimization is critical for stabilizing the antiferromagnetic state, while a state-averaged approach over all spin states involved is required to avoid artificial deviations from isotropic behavior that are associated with state-specific calculations. Selective inclusion of localized orbital subspaces enables probing the relative contributions of different ligands and distinct superexchange pathways. Overall, however, full-valence DMRG-CASSCF calculations fall short of providing a quantitative description of the exchange coupling owing to insufficient recovery of dynamic correlation. Quantitatively accurate results can be achieved through a DMRG implementation of second order N-electron valence perturbation theory (NEVPT2) in conjunction with a full-valence metal and ligand active space. Perspectives for future applications of DMRG-CASSCF/NEVPT2 to exchange coupling in oligonuclear clusters are discussed.

  15. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-A.; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-08-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles.

  16. Colloid remediation in groundwater by polyelectrolyte capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuttall, H.E.; Rao, S.; Jain, R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an ongoing study to characterize groundwater colloids, to understand the geochemical factors affecting colloid transport in groundwater, and to develop an in-situ colloid remediation process. The colloids and suspended particulate matter used in this study were collected from a perched aquifer site that has radiation levels several hundred times the natural background and where previous researchers have measured and reported the presence of radiocolloids containing plutonium and americium. At this site, radionuclides have spread over several kilometers. Inorganic colloids collected from water samples are characterized with respect to concentration, mineralogy, size distribution, electrophoretic mobility (zeta potential), and radioactivity levels. Presented are the methods used to investigate the physiochemical factors affecting colloid transport and the preliminary analytical results. Included below are a description of a colloid transport model and the corresponding computational code, water analyses, characterization of the inorganic colloids, and a conceptual description of a process for in-situ colloid remediation using the phenomenon of polyelectrolyte capture

  17. Positive valence music restores executive control over sustained attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Carryl L; Lewis, Bridget A

    2017-01-01

    Music sometimes improves performance in sustained attention tasks. But the type of music employed in previous investigations has varied considerably, which can account for equivocal results. Progress has been hampered by lack of a systematic database of music varying in key characteristics like tempo and valence. The aims of this study were to establish a database of popular music varying along the dimensions of tempo and valence and to examine the impact of music varying along these dimensions on restoring attentional resources following performance of a sustained attention to response task (SART) vigil. Sixty-nine participants rated popular musical selections that varied in valence and tempo to establish a database of four musical types: fast tempo positive valence, fast tempo negative valence, slow tempo positive valence, and slow tempo negative valence. A second group of 89 participants performed two blocks of the SART task interspersed with either no break or a rest break consisting of 1 of the 4 types of music or silence. Presenting positive valence music (particularly of slow tempo) during an intermission between two successive blocks of the SART significantly decreased miss rates relative to negative valence music or silence. Results support an attentional restoration theory of the impact of music on sustained attention, rather than arousal theory and demonstrate a means of restoring sustained attention. Further, the results establish the validity of a music database that will facilitate further investigations of the impact of music on performance.

  18. Using colloidal silica as isolator, diverter and blocking agent for subsurface geological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourcier, William L.; Roberts, Sarah K.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Ezzedine, Souheil M.; Hunt, Jonathan D.

    2018-03-06

    A system for blocking fast flow paths in geological formations includes preparing a solution of colloidal silica having a nonviscous phase and a solid gel phase. The solution of colloidal silica is injected into the geological formations while the solution of colloidal silica is in the nonviscous phase. The solution of colloidal silica is directed into the fast flow paths and reaches the solid gel phase in the fast flow paths thereby blocking flow of fluid in the fast paths.

  19. Dissociable modulation of overt visual attention in valence and arousal revealed by topology of scan path.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguang Ni

    Full Text Available Emotional stimuli have evolutionary significance for the survival of organisms; therefore, they are attention-grabbing and are processed preferentially. The neural underpinnings of two principle emotional dimensions in affective space, valence (degree of pleasantness and arousal (intensity of evoked emotion, have been shown to be dissociable in the olfactory, gustatory and memory systems. However, the separable roles of valence and arousal in scene perception are poorly understood. In this study, we asked how these two emotional dimensions modulate overt visual attention. Twenty-two healthy volunteers freely viewed images from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS that were graded for affective levels of valence and arousal (high, medium, and low. Subjects' heads were immobilized and eye movements were recorded by camera to track overt shifts of visual attention. Algebraic graph-based approaches were introduced to model scan paths as weighted undirected path graphs, generating global topology metrics that characterize the algebraic connectivity of scan paths. Our data suggest that human subjects show different scanning patterns to stimuli with different affective ratings. Valence salient stimuli (with neutral arousal elicited faster and larger shifts of attention, while arousal salient stimuli (with neutral valence elicited local scanning, dense attention allocation and deep processing. Furthermore, our model revealed that the modulatory effect of valence was linearly related to the valence level, whereas the relation between the modulatory effect and the level of arousal was nonlinear. Hence, visual attention seems to be modulated by mechanisms that are separate for valence and arousal.

  20. Grimsel colloid exercise, an international intercomparison exercise on the sampling and characterization of groundwater colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, C.

    1990-01-01

    The Grimsel colloid exercise was an intercomparison exercise which consisted of an in situ sampling phase followed by a colloid characterization step. The goal of this benchmark exercise, which involved 12 laboratories, was to evaluate both sampling and characterization techniques with emphasis on the colloid specific size distribution. The sampling phase took place at the Grimsel test site between 1 and 13 February 1988 and the participating groups produced colloid samples using various methods. This work was carried out within the Community COCO Club, as a component of the Mirage project (second phase)

  1. Moessbauer spectroscopic study on valence-detrapping and trapping of mixed-valence trinuclear iron (III, III, II) fluorine-substitute benzoate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Y.; Onaka, S.; Ogiso, R.; Takayama, T.; Takahashi, M.; Nakamoto, T.

    2012-01-01

    Four mixed-valence trinuclear iron(III, III, II) fluorine-substituted benzoate complexes were synthesized; Fe 3 O(C 6 F 5 COO) 6 (C 5 H 5 N) 3 ·CH 2 Cl 2 (1), Fe 3 O(C 6 F 5 COO) 6 (C 5 H 5 N) 3 (2), Fe 3 O(2H-C 6 F 4 COO) 6 (C 5 H 5 N) 3 (3), and Fe 3 O(4H-C 6 F 4 COO) 6 (C 5 H 5 N) 3 (4). By means of 57 Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy, valence-detrapping and trapping phenomena have been investigated for the four mixed-valence complexes. The valence state of three iron ions is trapped at lower temperatures while it is fully detrapped at higher temperatures for 1. Valence detrapping is not observed for 2, 3, and 4 even at room temperature, although Moessbauer spectra for 3 and 4 show a complicated temperature dependence. (author)

  2. Dissolved and colloidal trace elements in the Mississippi River delta outflow after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Moo-Joon; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Shiller, Alan M.

    2012-07-01

    The Mississippi River delta outflow region is periodically disturbed by tropical weather systems including major hurricanes, which can terminate seasonal bottom water hypoxia and cause the resuspension of shelf bottom sediments which could result in the injection of trace elements into the water column. In the summer of 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita passed over the Louisiana Shelf within a month of each other. Three weeks after Rita, we collected water samples in the Mississippi River delta outflow, examining the distributions of trace elements to study the effect of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. We observed limited stratification on the shelf and bottom waters that were no longer hypoxic. This resulted, for instance, in bottom water dissolved Mn being lower than is typically observed during hypoxia, but with concentrations still compatible with Mn-O2 trends previously reported. Interestingly, for no element were we able to identify an obvious effect of sediment resuspension on its distribution. In general, elemental distributions were compatible with previous observations in the Mississippi outflow system. Co and Re, which have not been reported for this system previously, showed behavior consistent with other systems: input for Co likely from desorption and conservative mixing for Re. For Cs, an element for which there is little information regarding its estuarine behavior, conservative mixing was also observed. Our filtration method, which allowed us to distinguish the dissolved (<0.02 μm) from colloidal (0.02-0.45 μm) phase, revealed significant colloidal fractions for Fe and Zn, only. For Fe, the colloidal phase was the dominant fraction and was rapidly removed at low salinity. Dissolved Fe, in contrast, persisted out to mid-salinities, being removed in a similar fashion to nitrate. This ability to distinguish the smaller Fe (likely dominantly organically complexed) from larger colloidal suspensates may be useful in better interpreting the bioavailablity

  3. Removing grain boundaries from three-dimensional colloidal crystals using active dopants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, B.; Dijkstra, M.; Filion, L.C.

    2016-01-01

    Using computer simulations we explore how grain boundaries can be removed from three-dimensional colloidal crystals by doping with a small fraction of active colloids. We show that for sufficient selfpropulsion, the system is driven into a crystal-fluid coexistence. In this phase separated regime,

  4. Colloid transport in dual-permeability media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leij, Feike J.; Bradford, Scott A.

    2013-07-01

    It has been widely reported that colloids can travel faster and over longer distances in natural structured porous media than in uniform structureless media used in laboratory studies. The presence of preferential pathways for colloids in the subsurface environment is of concern because of the increased risks for disease caused by microorganisms and colloid-associated contaminants. This study presents a model for colloid transport in dual-permeability media that includes reversible and irreversible retention of colloids and first-order exchange between the aqueous phases of the two regions. The model may also be used to describe transport of other reactive solutes in dual-permeability media. Analytical solutions for colloid concentrations in aqueous and solid phases were obtained using Laplace transformation and matrix decomposition. The solutions proved convenient to assess the effect of model parameters on the colloid distribution. The analytical model was used to describe effluent concentrations for a bromide tracer and 3.2- or 1-μm-colloids that were observed after transport through a composite 10-cm long porous medium made up of a cylindrical lens or core of sand and a surrounding matrix with sand of a different grain size. The tracer data were described very well and realistic estimates were obtained for the pore-water velocity in the two flow domains. An accurate description was also achieved for most colloid breakthrough curves. Dispersivity and retention parameters were typically greater for the larger 3.2-μm-colloids while both reversible and irreversible retention rates tended to be higher for the finer sands than the coarser sand. The relatively small sample size and the complex flow pattern in the composite medium made it difficult to reach definitive conclusions regarding transport parameters for colloid transport.

  5. In Vitro Evaluation of Colloidal Silver on Immune Function: Anti lymphoproliferative Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco-Molina, M. A.; Mendoza-Gamboa, E.; Zarate-Trivino, D. G.; Coronado-Cerda, E.E.; Alcocer-Gonzalez, J. M.; Resendez-Perez, D.; Rodriguez-Salazar, M.C.; Rivera-Morales, L.G.; Tamez-Guerra, R.; Rodriguez-Padilla, C.

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal silver (AgC) is currently used by humans and it can be internalized through inhalation, injection, ingestion, and dermal contact. However, there is limited information about immunological activity; more investigations using colloidal silver are needed. In the present study, the effects of AgC (17.5 ng/m L) on immunological parameters (proliferation and immuno phenotyping) using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and macrophages (phagocytosis) and cytotoxicity on leukemia and lymphoma cancer cell lines (1.75 to 17.5 ng/m L) were investigated. AgC was observed to significantly ρ) decrease interleukin-2 (I L-2) production and proliferation induced by phytohemagglutinin or concanavalin A in PBMC without affecting its cell viability but with cytotoxic effect on cancer cells. IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, INF-γ, and IL_-17 A cytokines production and CD3"+, CD3"-CD19"+, CD3"+CD4"+, CD3"+CD8"+, and CD16"+CD56"+ PBMC phenotypes were not affected by AgC. The present study demonstrates that colloidal silver is harmless and nontoxic to the immune system cells and its ability to interfere with the immune response by decreasing cell proliferation when stimulated with mitogens demonstrated the anti lymphoproliferative potential of AgC

  6. Colloid properties in groundwaters from crystalline formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    Colloids are present in all groundwaters. The role they may play in the migration of safety-relevant radionuclides in the geosphere therefore must be studied. Colloid sampling and characterisation campaigns have been carried out in Switzerland. On the bases of the results from studies in the Grimsel area, Northern Switzerland and the Black Forest, as well as those obtained by other groups concerned with crystalline waters, a consistent picture is emerging. The groundwater colloids in crystalline formations are predominantly comprised of phyllosilicates and silica originating from the aquifer rock. Under constant hydrogeochemical conditions, the colloid concentration is not expected to exceed 100 ng.ml -1 when the calcium concentration is greater than 10 -4 . However, under transient chemical or physical conditions, such as geothermal or tectonic activity, colloid generation may be enhanced and the colloid concentration may reach 10 μg.ml -1 or more, if both the calcium and sodium concentrations are low. In the Nagra Crystalline Reference Water the expected colloid concentration is -1 . This can be compared, for example, to a colloid concentration of about 10 ng.ml -1 found in Zurzach water. The small colloid concentration in the reference water is a consequence of an attachment factor for clay colloids (monmorillonite) close to 1. A model indicates that at pH 8, the nuclide partition coefficients between water and colloid (K p ) must be smaller than 10 7 ml.g -1 if sorption takes place by surface complexation on colloids, = AIOH active groups forming the dominant sorption sites. This pragmatic model is based on the competition between the formation of nuclide hydroxo complexes in solution and their sorption on colloids. Experimental nuclide sorption data on colloids are compared with those obtained by applying this model. For a low colloid concentration, a sorption capacity of the order of 10 -9 M and reversible surface complexation, their presence in the

  7. Spinodal decomposition in a food colloid-biopolymer mixture: evidence for a linear regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Suresh [Department of Physics and Fribourg Center for Nanomaterials, University of Fribourg, 1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Tuinier, Remco [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Schurtenberger, Peter [Department of Physics and Fribourg Center for Nanomaterials, University of Fribourg, 1700 Fribourg (Switzerland)

    2006-07-05

    We investigate phase separation and structural evolution in a complex food colloid (casein micelles) and biopolymer (xanthan) mixture using small-angle light scattering. We demonstrate that phase separation is induced by a depletion mechanism, and that the resulting coexistence curve can be described by osmotic equilibrium theory for mixtures of colloids and polymer chains in a background solvent, taking into account interactions between the polymer chains in the excluded volume limit. We show that the light scattering pattern of an unstable mixture exhibits the typical behaviour of spinodal decomposition, and we are able to confirm the validity of dynamic similarity scaling. We find three distinct regimes (initial or linear, intermediate and transition stage) for the decomposition kinetics that differ in the time dependence of the peak position of the structure factor. In particular we find clear evidence for the existence of an initial linear regime, where the peak position remains constant and the amplitude grows. The existence of spinodal-like decomposition and the validity of universal scaling in the intermediate and transition stages have been found in previous studies of phase separation in attractive colloidal suspensions. However, to our knowledge the initial linear regime has never been observed in colloidal suspensions, and we attribute this at least partly to the effect of hydrodynamic interactions which are efficiently screened in our system due to the fact that the measurements were performed at high polymer concentrations, i.e. in the semi-dilute regime. (letter to the editor)

  8. Fabricating colloidal crystals and construction of ordered nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zhiqiang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractColloidal crystals of polymeric or inorganic microspheres are of extensive interest due to their potential applications in such as sensing, optics, photonic bandgap and surface patterning. The article highlights a set of approaches developed in our group, which are efficient to prepare colloidal crystals with ordered voids, patterned colloidal crystals on non-planar surfaces, heterogeneous colloidal crystals of different building blocks, colloidal crystals composed of non-spherical polyhedrons, and colloidal crystals of non-close-packed colloidal microspheres in particular. The use of these colloidal crystals as templates for different microstructures range from nanoscale to micron-scale is also summarized.

  9. On triangle meshes with valence dominant vertices

    KAUST Repository

    Morvan, Jean-Marie

    2018-02-16

    We study triangulations $\\\\cal T$ defined on a closed disc $X$ satisfying the following condition: In the interior of $X$, the valence of all vertices of $\\\\cal T$ except one of them (the irregular vertex) is $6$. By using a flat singular Riemannian metric adapted to $\\\\cal T$, we prove a uniqueness theorem when the valence of the irregular vertex is not a multiple of $6$. Moreover, for a given integer $k >1$, we exhibit non isomorphic triangulations on $X$ with the same boundary, and with a unique irregular vertex whose valence is $6k$.

  10. On triangle meshes with valence dominant vertices

    KAUST Repository

    Morvan, Jean-Marie

    2018-01-01

    We study triangulations $\\cal T$ defined on a closed disc $X$ satisfying the following condition: In the interior of $X$, the valence of all vertices of $\\cal T$ except one of them (the irregular vertex) is $6$. By using a flat singular Riemannian metric adapted to $\\cal T$, we prove a uniqueness theorem when the valence of the irregular vertex is not a multiple of $6$. Moreover, for a given integer $k >1$, we exhibit non isomorphic triangulations on $X$ with the same boundary, and with a unique irregular vertex whose valence is $6k$.

  11. Revisiting the Fundamentals in the Design and Control of Nanoparticulate Colloids in the Frame of Soft Chemistry1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uskoković, Vuk

    2013-01-01

    This review presents thoughts on some of the fundamental features of conceptual models applied in the design of fine particles in the frames of colloid and soft chemistry. A special emphasis is placed on the limitations of these models, an acknowledgment of which is vital in improving their intricacy and effectiveness in predicting the outcomes of the corresponding experimental settings. Thermodynamics of self-assembly phenomena illustrated on the examples of protein assembly and micellization is analyzed in relation to the previously elaborated thesis that each self-assembly in reality presents a co-assembly, since it implies a mutual reorganization of the assembling system and its immediate environment. Parameters used in the design of fine particles by precipitation are discussed while referring to solubility product, various measures of supersaturation levels, induction time, nucleation and crystal growth rates, interfacial energies, and the Ostwald–Lussac law of phases. Again, the main drawbacks and inadequacies of using the aforementioned parameters in tailoring the materials properties in a soft and colloidal chemical setting were particularly emphasized. The basic and practical limitations of zeta-potential analyses, routinely used to stabilize colloidal dispersions and initiate specific interactions between soft chemical entities, were also outlined. The final section of the paper reiterates the unavoidable presence of practical qualitative models in the design and control of nanoparticulate colloids, which is supported by the overwhelming complexity of quantitative relationships that govern the processes of their formation and assembly. PMID:24490052

  12. Colloids as a sink for certain pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskaoui, Khalid; Zhou, John L

    2010-05-01

    The occurrence and fate of pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment is recognized as one of the emerging issues in environmental chemistry and as a matter of public concern. Existing data tend to focus on the concentrations of pharmaceuticals in the aqueous phase, with limited studies on their concentrations in particulate phase such as sediments. Furthermore, current water quality monitoring does not differentiate between soluble and colloidal phases in water samples, hindering our understanding of the bioavailability and bioaccumulation of pharmaceuticals in aquatic organisms. In this study, an investigation was conducted into the concentrations and phase association (soluble, colloidal, suspended particulate matter or SPM) of selected pharmaceuticals (propranolol, sulfamethoxazole, meberverine, thioridazine, carbamazepine, tamoxifen, indomethacine, diclofenac, and meclofenamic acid) in river water, effluents from sewage treatment works (STW), and groundwater in the UK. The occurrence and phase association of selected pharmaceuticals propranolol, sulfamethoxazole, meberverine, thioridazine, carbamazepine, tamoxifen, indomethacine, diclofenac, and meclofenamic acid in contrasting aquatic environments (river, sewage effluent, and groundwater) were studied. Colloids were isolated by cross-flow ultrafiltration (CFUF). Water samples were extracted by solid-phase extraction (SPE), while SPM was extracted by microwave. All sample extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in the multiple reaction monitoring. Five compounds propranolol, sulfamethoxazole, carbamazepine, indomethacine, and diclofenac were detected in all samples, with carbamazepine showing the highest concentrations in all phases. The highest concentrations of these compounds were detected in STW effluents, confirming STW as a key source of these compounds in the aquatic environments. The calculation of partition coefficients of pharmaceuticals between SPM and

  13. Transport of radionuclides by bentonite and silica colloids in a GR-3 synthetic groundwater-interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ames, L.L.; McGarrah, J.E.; Walker, B.A.

    1983-08-01

    Radionuclide distributions in groundwater-colloid-basalt systems were measured using GR-3 groundwater and crushed Umtanum basalt at 60 degree C. The objective was to estimate the potential for radionuclide transport from a nuclear waste repository in basalt by colloids suspended in groundwater. Three colloids were studied -- a bentonite colloid representing a potential component of packing or backfill materials in the repository, and two hydrated silica colloids which might represent those generated from a glass waste form. The radioelements studied included isotopes of neptunium, uranium, selenium, technetium, and radium. Measurements of radionuclide distributions in experiments with the bentonite colloid showed that uranium was sorbed strongly on the colloid (under both oxidizing and reducing conditions) but was readily transferred to basalt when it was added to the system. Sorption of neptunium, technetium, and selenium on the colloid was greatly enhanced by using reducing conditions. Only small amounts of neptunium and technetium were transferred to the basalt under reducing conditions, but most of the selenium was readily transferred under these conditions

  14. Preparation, definition and stabilisation of an inorganic sol by an organic macromolecule: case of an aluminium hydroxide colloid; Preparation, definition et stabilisation par une macromolecule organique d'un sol mineral: cas d'un colloide d'hydroxyde d'aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurbin-Faucon, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1966-07-01

    An attempt has been made in this work to define an aluminium colloid which is resistant as a high ionic force and to analyse, in the case of this system, the possibilities. and the limits of certain techniques used in the physical chemistry of colloids. The aluminium colloid is obtained by peptization of an aluminium hydroxide precipitate. The physical characterisation of the micelle is effected using the light scattering method which makes it possible to define the colloid from the point of view of size and shape. An interesting characteristic, arising from the low refractive index of the colloid studied, has led us to use not only the general MIE methods but also the methods normally used in macro-molecular chemistry; these latter involve fewer hypotheses and thus make it possible to carry out a more complete analysis of the sol. Since the aluminium hydroxide colloid is sensitive to a high ionic force, we have begun to study the possibility of making it more stable by means of a macromolecule: gelatin. After characterizing this macromolecule by means of potentiometric and light scattering measurements, we have shown the existence of a chemical interaction which occurs when aluminium hydroxide is brought into contact with gelatin; this interaction leads to the production of an inorganic-organic entity which is stable when the ionic force increases. We have established some of the characteristics of the complex thus formed, in particular the pH range of the solution necessary for its formation, its stability. in the presence of electrolytes and some hypotheses concerning its size and shape, Finally we have tried to define the influence of. the molecular weight and the respective dimensions of each constituent on the formation of the complex and thus on the stabilization. (author) [French] Dans cette etude nous avons essaye de definir un colloide d'aluminium resistant a une force ionique elevee et tente, a propos de ce systeme, d'analyser les possibilites et les

  15. Magnetically actuated and controlled colloidal sphere-pair swimmer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ran, Sijie; Guez, Allon; Friedman, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Magnetically actuated swimming of microscopic objects has been attracting attention partly due to its promising applications in the bio-medical field and partly due to interesting physics of swimming in general. While colloidal particles that are free to move in fluid can be an attractive swimming system due it its simplicity and ability to assemble in situ , stability of their dynamics and the possibility of stable swimming behavior in periodically varying magnetic fields has not been considered. Dynamic behavior of two magnetically interacting colloidal particles subjected to rotating magnetic field of switching frequency is analyzed here and is shown to result in stable swimming without any stabilizing feedback. A new mechanism of swimming that relies only on rotations of the particles themselves and of the particle pair axis is found to dominate the swimming dynamics of the colloidal particle pair. Simulation results and analytical arguments demonstrate that this swimming strategy compares favorably to dragging the particles with an external magnetic force when colloidal particle sizes are reduced. (paper)

  16. Contribution to the study of higher valency states of americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlet, Jean.

    1976-01-01

    Study of the chemistry of the higher valencies of americium in aqueous solutions and especially the autoreduction phenomenon. First a purification method of americium solutions is studied by precipitation, solvent extraction and ion exchange chromatography. Studies of higher valency states chemical properties are disturbed by the autoreduction phenomenon changing Am VI and Am V in Am III more stable. Stabilization of higher valency states, characterized by a steady concentration of Am VI in solution, can be done by complexation of Am VI and Am V ions or by a protecting effect of foreign ions. The original medium used has a complexing effect by SO 4 2- ions and a protecting effect by the system S 2 O 8 2- -Ag + consuming H 2 O 2 main reducing agent produced by water radiolysis. These effects are shown by the study of Am VI in acid and basic solutions. A mechanism of the stabilization effect is given [fr

  17. Social learning modulates the lateralization of emotional valence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamay-Tsoory, Simone G; Lavidor, Michal; Aharon-Peretz, Judith

    2008-08-01

    Although neuropsychological studies of lateralization of emotion have emphasized valence (positive vs. negative) or type (basic vs. complex) dimensions, the interaction between the two dimensions has yet to be elucidated. The purpose of the current study was to test the hypothesis that recognition of basic emotions is processed preferentially by the right prefrontal cortex (PFC), whereas recognition of complex social emotions is processed preferentially by the left PFC. Experiment 1 assessed the ability of healthy controls and patients with right and left PFC lesions to recognize basic and complex emotions. Experiment 2 modeled the patient's data of Experiment 1 on healthy participants under lateralized displays of the emotional stimuli. Both experiments support the Type as well as the Valence Hypotheses. However, our findings indicate that the Valence Hypothesis holds for basic but less so for complex emotions. It is suggested that, since social learning overrules the basic preference of valence in the hemispheres, the processing of complex emotions in the hemispheres is less affected by valence.

  18. Measurements of colloid concentrations in the fracture zone, Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledin, A.; Dueker, A.; Karlsson, Stefan; Allard, B.

    1995-06-01

    The applicability of light scattering in combination with photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) for determination of concentration and size distribution of colloidal matter in a deep groundwater was tested in situ and on-line. Well-defined reference colloids of Fe 2 O 3 , Al(OH) 3 , SiO 2 , kaolinite, illite and a high molecular humic acid in aqueous media were used as model substances for calibration of the PCS instrument. The intensity of scattered light was found to be dependent on the composition of the colloids. The colloid concentration in the rather saline groundwater was below the detection limit for the PCS equipment used, which corresponds to a colloid concentration not higher than 0.5 mg/l and probably below 0.1 mg/l according to the measurements on-line and in situ at Aespoe and in comparison to the calibrations performed with reference colloids. The results clearly demonstrated that the stability, concentration and composition of a colloid-size suspended phase in the anoxic groundwater with high content of Fe(II), like the one in Aespoe, is extremely sensitive to exposure to atmospheric conditions during sample handling and preparation. Diffusion of air into the closed measuring cuvette was enough to alter the colloid content significantly within 6 hours. A particle fraction with the size distribution in the range 170-700 nm was formed within 45 min when air was allowed to diffuse into the aqueous phase from the air filled upper part of the cuvette. The corresponding time to generate a significant colloid precipitate was less than 1 min when a stream of air was bubbled through the water samples. The precipitated colloid phase consisted of a mixture of ferric (hydr)oxide and calcium carbonate in all three cases. 53 refs, 8 figs, 2 tabs

  19. Valence and Magnetic Transitions in YbMn2Ge2-Applied Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, M.; Link, P.; Campbell, S.J.; Goncharenko, I.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Rare-earth intermetallic compounds containing ytterbium exhibit a wide range of interesting and unusual physical and magnetic properties. This occurs mainly as a result of their mixed valence states (II/III) or changes from one valence state to the other. We have recently determined the magnetic structures of tetragonal YbMn 2 Ge 2 (I4/mmm) by powder neutron diffraction experiments and demonstrated that YbMn 2 Ge 2 has a planar antiferromagnetic structure below T N1 ∼ 510 K with a canted antiferromagnetic structure below T N2 ∼ 185 K. As applied pressure favours changes in the valence character of intermediate valence systems and correspondingly influences the magnetic behaviour, we have investigated the effects of applied pressure on YbMn 2 Ge 2 . Analyses of our in situ neutron diffraction experiments (T=1.5-300 K; p=0-2.7 GPa), reveal a distinct change in magnetic structure and a sharp drop in the a-lattice parameter above ∼ 1.4 GPa with the changes associated with a valence transition. A full account of these effects will be discussed in relation to our current photoelectron spectroscopy measurements of YbMn 2 Ge 2 . (authors)

  20. Table-top deterministic and collective colloidal assembly using videoprojector lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordeiro, J.; Zelsmann, M.; Honegger, T.; Picard, E.; Hadji, E.; Peyrade, D.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Micrometric resolution substrates are made at low cost using a videoprojector. • Fabricated patterns could be used as substrates for capillary force assembly. • Arrays of organized particles are made using a table-top capillary assembly tool. • This process offers a new bridge between the colloidal domain and the chip world. - Abstract: In the field of micro- and nanotechnology, most lithography and fabrication tools coming from the microelectronic industry are expensive, time-consuming and may need some masks that have to be subcontracted. Such approach is not suitable for other fields that require rapid prototyping such as chemistry, life science or energy and may hinder research creativity. In this work, we present two table-top equipments dedicated to the fabrication of deterministic colloidal particles assemblies onto micro-structured substrates. We show that, with a limited modification of the optics of a standard videoprojector, it is possible to quickly obtain substrates with thousands of micrometric features. Then, we combine these substrates with thermodynamic colloidal assembly and generate arrays of particles without defects. This work opens the way to a simple and table-top fabrication of devices based on colloidal particles

  1. Table-top deterministic and collective colloidal assembly using videoprojector lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordeiro, J. [Univ Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LTM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Zelsmann, M., E-mail: marc.zelsmann@cea.fr [Univ Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LTM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Honegger, T. [Univ Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LTM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Picard, E.; Hadji, E. [Univ Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Peyrade, D. [Univ Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LTM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Micrometric resolution substrates are made at low cost using a videoprojector. • Fabricated patterns could be used as substrates for capillary force assembly. • Arrays of organized particles are made using a table-top capillary assembly tool. • This process offers a new bridge between the colloidal domain and the chip world. - Abstract: In the field of micro- and nanotechnology, most lithography and fabrication tools coming from the microelectronic industry are expensive, time-consuming and may need some masks that have to be subcontracted. Such approach is not suitable for other fields that require rapid prototyping such as chemistry, life science or energy and may hinder research creativity. In this work, we present two table-top equipments dedicated to the fabrication of deterministic colloidal particles assemblies onto micro-structured substrates. We show that, with a limited modification of the optics of a standard videoprojector, it is possible to quickly obtain substrates with thousands of micrometric features. Then, we combine these substrates with thermodynamic colloidal assembly and generate arrays of particles without defects. This work opens the way to a simple and table-top fabrication of devices based on colloidal particles.

  2. Pharmacological study of radioactive-gold colloid transport by blood and by serous exudate; Contribution a l'etude pharmacologique du transport des colloides d'or radioactif par le sang et les exsudats sereux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousselet, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-06-01

    After giving the essential physico-chemical properties of the colloids, the author considers the biological role of these substances and, in connection with their transport by the blood, their capture by elements of the reticula-endothelial system. A summary is given of present knowledge concerning the role of serous proteins in the transport of substances, particularly that of radio-active colloidal gold. The blood fractions which can take part in colloidal gold transport are the red blood corpuscles, the leukocytes and histiocytic elements as well as the plasma. The radioactive distribution in these various fractions is obtained by autoradiography of blood sediments. After showing the importance of the role of the plasma in radioactive particle transport, the author, describes the attempts made to detect a possible of colloidal gold 198 on the various serous proteins using various methods of separation. The ''in vitro'' and ''in vivo'' bonds between colloidal gold-198 particles and either the serous proteins or healthy specimens or the effusion liquids of pathological origin in man, or due to an experimental inflammation with carregenin in the rat, have been studied. The bonding appears to be effective because of the protective macromolecular layer formed by the gelatine. The different positions of the colloidal grains on the electrophoregram can only be explained by their different physico-chemical characteristics. Gold in the ionic form, on the other hand, is combined only with the albumen is the amount metal present does not exceed a certain value. (author) [French] Apres avoir enonce les proprietes physicochimiques essentielles des colloides nous etudions le devenir biologique de ces substances et, en relation avec leur transport par le sang, leur captation par les elements du Systeme Reticulo-Endothelial. Nous resumons les connaissances acquises jusqu'alors sur le role des proteines seriques dans le transport des substances et particulierement dans le

  3. Metastable and unstable cellular solidification of colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Sylvain; Maire, Eric; Bernard-Granger, Guillaume; Lasalle, Audrey; Bogner, Agnès; Gauthier, Catherine; Leloup, Jérôme; Guizard, Christian

    2009-12-01

    Colloidal particles are often seen as big atoms that can be directly observed in real space. They are therefore becoming increasingly important as model systems to study processes of interest in condensed-matter physics such as melting, freezing and glass transitions. The solidification of colloidal suspensions has long been a puzzling phenomenon with many unexplained features. Here, we demonstrate and rationalize the existence of instability and metastability domains in cellular solidification of colloidal suspensions, by direct in situ high-resolution X-ray radiography and tomography observations. We explain such interface instabilities by a partial Brownian diffusion of the particles leading to constitutional supercooling situations. Processing under unstable conditions leads to localized and global kinetic instabilities of the solid/liquid interface, affecting the crystal morphology and particle redistribution behaviour.

  4. Structure of colloidal sphere-plate mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doshi, N; Cinacchi, G; Van Duijneveldt, J S; Cosgrove, T; Prescott, S W; Grillo, I; Phipps, J; Gittins, D I

    2011-01-01

    In addition to containing spherical pigment particles, coatings usually contain plate-like clay particles. It is thought that these improve the opacity of the paint film by providing an efficient spacing of the pigment particles. This observation is counterintuitive, as suspensions of particles of different shapes and sizes tend to phase separate on increase of concentration. In order to clarify this matter a model colloidal system is studied here, with a sphere-plate diameter ratio similar to that found in paints. For dilute suspensions, small angle neutron scattering revealed that the addition of plates leads to enhanced density fluctuations of the spheres, in agreement with new theoretical predictions. On increasing the total colloid concentration the plates and spheres phase separate due to the disparity in their shape. This is in agreement with previous theoretical and experimental work on colloidal sphere-plate mixtures, where one particle acts as a depleting agent. The fact that no large scale phase separation is observed in coatings is ascribed to dynamic arrest in intimately mixed, or possibly micro-phase separated structures, at elevated concentration.

  5. Structure of colloidal sphere-plate mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doshi, N; Cinacchi, G; Van Duijneveldt, J S; Cosgrove, T; Prescott, S W [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Grillo, I [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Phipps, J [Imerys Minerals Ltd, Par Moor Centre, Par Moor Road, Par, Cornwall PL24 2SQ (United Kingdom); Gittins, D I, E-mail: Giorgio.Cinacchi@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: J.S.van-Duijneveldt@bristol.ac.uk [Imerys Performance and Filtration Minerals Ltd, 130 Castilian Drive, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States)

    2011-05-18

    In addition to containing spherical pigment particles, coatings usually contain plate-like clay particles. It is thought that these improve the opacity of the paint film by providing an efficient spacing of the pigment particles. This observation is counterintuitive, as suspensions of particles of different shapes and sizes tend to phase separate on increase of concentration. In order to clarify this matter a model colloidal system is studied here, with a sphere-plate diameter ratio similar to that found in paints. For dilute suspensions, small angle neutron scattering revealed that the addition of plates leads to enhanced density fluctuations of the spheres, in agreement with new theoretical predictions. On increasing the total colloid concentration the plates and spheres phase separate due to the disparity in their shape. This is in agreement with previous theoretical and experimental work on colloidal sphere-plate mixtures, where one particle acts as a depleting agent. The fact that no large scale phase separation is observed in coatings is ascribed to dynamic arrest in intimately mixed, or possibly micro-phase separated structures, at elevated concentration.

  6. Overlap valence quarks on an twisted mass sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichy, K. [Adam Mickiewicz Univ., Poznan (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Drach, V.; Garcia-Ramos, E.; Herdoiza, G.; Jansen, K. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC

    2010-12-15

    We present the results of an investigation of a mixed action approach of overlap valence and maximally twisted mass sea quarks. Employing a particular matching condition on the pion mass, we analyze the continuum limit scaling of the pion decay constant and the role of chiral zero modes of the overlap operator in this process. We employ gauge field configurations generated by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration with linear lattice size L ranging from 1.3 to 1.9 fm. The continuum limit is taken at a fixed value of L=1.3 fm, employing three values of the lattice spacing and two values of the pion mass constructed from sea quarks only. (orig.)

  7. Folded-light-path colloidal quantum dot solar cells.

    KAUST Repository

    Koleilat, Ghada I; Kramer, Illan J; Wong, Chris T O; Thon, Susanna M; Labelle, André J; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics combine low-cost solution processing with quantum size-effect tuning to match absorption to the solar spectrum. Rapid advances have led to certified solar power conversion efficiencies of over 7%. Nevertheless, these devices remain held back by a compromise in the choice of quantum dot film thickness, balancing on the one hand the need to maximize photon absorption, mandating a thicker film, and, on the other, the need for efficient carrier extraction, a consideration that limits film thickness. Here we report an architecture that breaks this compromise by folding the path of light propagating in the colloidal quantum dot solid. Using this method, we achieve a substantial increase in short-circuit current, ultimately leading to improved power conversion efficiency.

  8. Improvement of colloid sampling techniques in groundwater and actinide characterisation of the groundwater systems at Gorleben (FRG) and El Berrocal (E)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearlove, J.P.L.; Longworth, G.; Ivanovich, M.

    1990-08-01

    Two sites, the Gorleben site (FRG) and the El Berrocal Experimental station (E) have been studied to evaluate different sampling and analytical techniques for the characterisation of particulates (> 1000 nm size), colloids (1-1000 nm size) and the solution phase (<1 nm) in groundwaters in terms of their physical, chemical and actinide composition. The uptake characteristics of the field ultrafiltration system used to separate the colloid fraction from the solution phase in the groundwater have also been studied. (Author)

  9. Colloid mobilization and transport during capillary fringe fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L

    2014-07-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead-filled column. We studied four specific conditions: (1) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase, (2) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially wet porous medium, (3) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially dry porous medium, and (4) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase with the presence of a static air bubble. Confocal images confirmed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively charged and hydrophilic positively charged colloids did. Our results demonstrate that capillary fringe fluctuations are an effective means for colloid mobilization.

  10. Colloidal phytosterols: synthesis, characterization and bioaccessibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, L.; Seijen ten Hoorn, J.W.M.; Melnikov, S.M.; Velikov, K.P.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the synthesis of phytosterol colloidal particles using a simple food grade method based on antisolvent precipitation in the presence of a non-ionic surfactant. The resulting colloidal particles have a rod-like shape with some degree of crystallinity. The colloidal dispersions display

  11. An evaluation of acute toxicity of colloidal silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneewattanapinyo, Pattwat; Banlunara, Wijit; Thammacharoen, Chuchaat; Ekgasit, Sanong; Kaewamatawong, Theerayuth

    2011-11-01

    Tests for acute oral toxicity, eye irritation, corrosion and dermal toxicity of colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were conducted in laboratory animals following OECD guidelines. Oral administration of AgNPs at a limited dose of 5,000 mg/kg produced neither mortality nor acute toxic signs throughout the observation period. Percentage of body weight gain of the mice showed no significant difference between control and treatment groups. In the hematological analysis, there was no significant difference between mice treated with AgNPs and controls. Blood chemistry analysis also showed no differences in any of the parameter examined. There was neither any gross lesion nor histopathological change observed in various organs. The results indicated that the LD(50) of colloidal AgNPs is greater than 5,000 mg/kg body weight. In acute eye irritation and corrosion study, no mortality and toxic signs were observed when various doses of colloidal AgNPs were instilled in guinea pig eyes during 72 hr observation period. However, the instillation of AgNPs at 5,000 ppm produced transient eye irritation during early 24 hr observation time. No any gross abnormality was noted in the skins of the guinea pigs exposed to various doses of colloidal AgNPs. In addition, no significant AgNPs exposure relating to dermal tissue changes was observed microscopically. In summary, these findings of all toxicity tests in this study suggest that colloidal AgNPs could be relatively safe when administered to oral, eye and skin of the animal models for short periods of time.

  12. Valence nucleons in self-consistent fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Toro, M.; Lomnitz-Adler, J.

    1978-01-01

    An iterative approach to determine directly the best Hartree-Fock one-body density rho is extended by expressing rho in terms of a core and a valence part and allowing for general crossings of occupied and unoccupied levels in the valence part. Results are shown for 152 Sm and a microscopic analysis of the core structure of deformed light nuclei is carried out. (author)

  13. Impact of colloids on uranium transport in groundwater applied to the Aube radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Cointe, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The presence of colloids, known vectors of radionuclides and chemical contaminants in groundwater, has been identified in groundwater at the Aube radioactive waste disposal in 2004. This thesis aims to characterize these colloids, and to determine their potential impact in the transport of Uranium, chosen as the element of interest for this study. The identified 60 nm in diameter clay colloids and the fulvic and humic acids can move in Aptian groundwater, as indirectly evidenced by column experiments. A feasibility study of a in situ test has been done through a transport modeling to confirm the colloid mobility at the field scale. Using the conditions of the study, the clay colloids do not influence Uranium transport. Even with the greatest concentration assumed on site, they have a very limited impact on the mobilization of Uranium, in the pH range measured on site. On the contrary, the organic colloids, despite their low concentration, can facilitate Uranium transport, the uranyl - organic acid chemical bond being exceptionally strong. Therefore their low concentration in groundwater makes their impact on uranium mobility equally insignificant. (author)

  14. Colloids Versus Albumin in Large Volume Paracentesis to Prevent Circulatory Dysfunction: Evidence-based Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widjaja, Felix F; Khairan, Paramita; Kamelia, Telly; Hasan, Irsan

    2016-04-01

    Large volume paracentesis may cause paracentesis induced circulatory dysfunction (PICD). Albumin is recommended to prevent this abnormality. Meanwhile, the price of albumin is too expensive and there should be another alternative that may prevent PICD. This report aimed to compare albumin to colloids in preventing PICD. Search strategy was done using PubMed, Scopus, Proquest, dan Academic Health Complete from EBSCO with keywords of "ascites", "albumin", "colloid", "dextran", "hydroxyethyl starch", "gelatin", and "paracentesis induced circulatory dysfunction". Articles was limited to randomized clinical trial and meta-analysis with clinical question of "In hepatic cirrhotic patient undergone large volume paracentesis, whether colloids were similar to albumin to prevent PICD". We found one meta-analysis and four randomized clinical trials (RCT). A meta analysis showed that albumin was still superior of which odds ratio 0.34 (0.23-0.51). Three RCTs showed the same results and one RCT showed albumin was not superior than colloids. We conclude that colloids could not constitute albumin to prevent PICD, but colloids still have a role in patient who undergone paracentesis less than five liters.

  15. Colloidal silver fabrication using the spark discharge system and its antimicrobial effect on Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, Der-Chi; Tseng, Kuo-Hsiung; Liao, Chih-Yu; Tsung, Tsing-Tshih

    2008-10-01

    Nanoscale techniques for silver production may assist the resurgence of the medical use of silver, especially given that pathogens are showing increasing resistance to antibiotics. Traditional chemical synthesis methods for colloidal silver (CS) may lead to the presence of toxic chemical species or chemical residues, which may inhibit the effectiveness of CS as an antibacterial agent. To counter these problems a spark discharge system (SDS) was used to fabricate a suspension of colloidal silver in deionized water with no added chemical surfactants. SDS-CS contains both metallic silver nanoparticles (Ag(0)) and ionic silver forms (Ag(+)). The antimicrobial affect of SDS-CS on Staphylococcus aureus was studied. The results show that CS solutions with an ionic silver concentration of 30 ppm or higher are strong enough to destroy S. aureus. In addition, it was found that a solution's antimicrobial potency is directly related to its level of silver ion concentration.

  16. Colloid formation in groundwater by subsurface aeration: characterisation of the geo-colloids and their counterparts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthoorn, A.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2004-01-01

    Subsurface aeration is used to oxidise Fe in situ in groundwater to make the water potable. In a groundwater system with pH > 7, subsurface aeration results in a non-mobile Fe precipitate and mobile Fe colloids. Since originally the goal of subsurface aeration is to remove Fe in situ, the

  17. Colloidal stability of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in the central nervous system: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Pierre-Olivier; Westwick, Harrison; Bouthillier, Alain; Sawan, Mohamad

    2018-06-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) consist of nanosized metallic-based particles with unique magnetic properties. Their potential in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications in the CNS is at the source of an expanding body of the literature in recent years. Colloidal stability of nanoparticles represents their ability to resist aggregation and is a central aspect for the use of SPION in biological environment such as the CNS. This review gives a comprehensive update of the recent developments and knowledge on the determinants of colloidal stability of SPIONs in the CNS. Factors leading to aggregate formation and the repercussions of colloidal instability of SPION are reviewed in detail pertaining to their use in the CNS.

  18. Shear-induced partial translational ordering of a colloidal solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, B. J.; Clark, N. A.

    1984-08-01

    Highly charged submicrometer plastic spheres suspended in water at low ionic strength will order spontaneously into bcc crystals or polycrystals. A simple linear shear orients and disorders these crystals by forcing (110) planes to stack normal to the shear gradient and to slide relative to each other with a direction parallel to the solvent flow. In this paper we analyze in detail the disordering and flow processes occurring beyond the intrinsic elastic limit of the bcc crystal. We are led to a model in which the flow of a colloidal crystal is interpreted as a fundamentally different process from that found in atomic crystals. In the colloidal crystal the coupling of particle motion to the background fluid forces a homogeneous flow, where every layer is in motion relative to its neighboring layers. In contrast, the plastic flow in an atomic solid is defect mediated flow. At the lowest applied stress, the local bcc order in the colloidal crystal exhibits shear strains both parallel and perpendicular to the direction of the applied stress. The magnitude of these deformations is estimated using the configurational energy for bcc and distorted bcc crystals, assuming a screened Coulomb pair interaction between colloidal particles. As the applied stress is increased, the intrinsic elastic limit of the crystal is exceeded and the crystal begins to flow with adjacent layers executing an oscillatory path governed by the balance of viscous and screened Coulomb forces. The path takes the structure from the bcc1 and bcc2 twins observed at zero shear to a distorted two-dimensional hcp structure at moderate shear rates, with a loss of interlayer registration as the shear is increased. This theoretical model is consistent with other experimental observations, as well.

  19. Kekulé-based Valence Bond Model.I. The Ground-state Properties of Conjugated π-Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Shu-Hua(黎书华); MA,Jing(马晶); JIANG,Yuan-Sheng(江元生)

    2002-01-01

    The Kekulé-based valence bond ( VB ) method, in which the VB model is solved using covalent Kekulé structures as basis functions, is justified in the present work. This method is dimonstrated to provide satisfactory descriptions for resoance energies and bond ang lengths of benzenoid hydrocarbons, being in good agreement with SCF-MO and experimental results. In additicn, an alternative way of discyssing characters of localizedsubstructures within a polyclic benzenoid system is suggested based upon such sunokufied VB calculations. Finally,the symmetries of VB ground states for nonalternant conjugated systems are also illustrated to be obtainable through these calculations, presenting very useful information for understanding the chemical behaviors of some nonalternant conjugated molecules.

  20. Simulation of bentonite colloid migration through granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosicka, Dana; Hokr, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Colloidal bentonite particles generate at the interface of buffer and host rock in spent nuclear fuel repository due to an erosion process and migrate through granite by the water flow. Stability of these colloids and their migration possibilities have been studied on account of radionuclide transport possibility as colloid could carry adsorbed radionuclides in groundwater through granite. That is why a simulation of bentonite colloid migration in the surrounding of a repository might be requested. According to chemical condition as ionic strength and pH, the colloidal particles coagulate into clusters and that influence the migration of particles. The coagulation kinetics of natural bentonite colloids were experimentally studied in many articles, for example by light scattering techniques. We created a model of coagulation of bentonite colloids and simulation of a chosen experiment with use of the multicomponent reactive transport equation. The coagulation model describes clustering of particles due to attractive van der Waals forces as result of collision of particles due to heat fluctuation and different velocity of particles during sedimentation and velocity gradient of water flow. Next, the model includes influence of repulsive electrostatic forces among colloidal particles leading to stability of particles provided high surface charge of colloids. In the model, each group of clusters is transported as one solution component and the kinetics of coagulation are implemented as reactions between the components: a shift of particles among groups of particles with similar migration properties, according to size of the clusters of colloids. The simulation of migration of bentonite colloid through granite using the coagulation model was calibrated according to experiment results. On the basis of the simulation, one can estimate the basic processes that occur during bentonite colloid

  1. Antimicrobial Peptide-Driven Colloidal Transformations in Liquid-Crystalline Nanocarriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontsarik, Mark; Buhmann, Matthias T; Yaghmur, Anan

    2016-01-01

    Designing efficient colloidal systems for the delivery of membrane active antimicrobial peptides requires in-depth understanding of their structural and morphological characteristics. Using dispersions of inverted type bicontinuous cubic phase (cubosomes), we examine the effect of integrating...... structure, inducing colloidal transformations to sponge and lamellar phases and micelles in a concentration-dependent manner. These investigations, together with in vitro evaluation studies using a clinically relevant bacterial strain, established the composition-nanostructure-activity relationship that can...

  2. Vector assembly of colloids on monolayer substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingxiang; Yang, Shenyu; Tsang, Boyce; Tu, Mei; Granick, Steve

    2017-06-01

    The key to spontaneous and directed assembly is to encode the desired assembly information to building blocks in a programmable and efficient way. In computer graphics, raster graphics encodes images on a single-pixel level, conferring fine details at the expense of large file sizes, whereas vector graphics encrypts shape information into vectors that allow small file sizes and operational transformations. Here, we adapt this raster/vector concept to a 2D colloidal system and realize `vector assembly' by manipulating particles on a colloidal monolayer substrate with optical tweezers. In contrast to raster assembly that assigns optical tweezers to each particle, vector assembly requires a minimal number of optical tweezers that allow operations like chain elongation and shortening. This vector approach enables simple uniform particles to form a vast collection of colloidal arenes and colloidenes, the spontaneous dissociation of which is achieved with precision and stage-by-stage complexity by simply removing the optical tweezers.

  3. Self-assembly of patchy colloidal dumbbells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avvisati, Guido|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/407630198; Vissers, Teun|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829943; Dijkstra, Marjolein|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123538807

    2015-01-01

    We employ Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the self-assembly of patchy colloidal dumbbells interacting via a modified Kern-Frenkel potential by probing the system concentration and dumbbell shape. We consider dumbbells consisting of one attractive sphere with diameter sigma(1) and one

  4. Stabilized super-thermite colloids: A new generation of advanced highly energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbasuney, Sherif; Gaber Zaky, M.; Radwan, Mostafa; Mostafa, Sherif F.

    2017-10-01

    One of the great impetus of nanotechnology on energetic materials is the achievement of nanothermites (metal-oxide/metal) which are characterized by massive heat output. Yet, full exploitation of super-thermites in highly energetic systems has not been achieved. This manuscript reports on the sustainable fabrication of colloidal Fe2O3 and CuO nanoparticles for thermite applications. TEM micrographs demonstrated mono-dispersed Fe2O3 and CuO with an average particle size of 3 and 15 nm respectively. XRD diffractograms demonstrated highly crystalline materials. SEM micrographs demonstrated a great tendency of the developed oxides to aggregate over drying process. The effective integration and dispersion of mono-dispersed colloidal thermite particles into energetic systems are vital for enhanced performance. Aluminum is of interest as highly energetic metal fuel. In this paper, synthesized Fe2O3 and CuO nanoparticles were re-dispersed in isopropyl alcohol (IPA) with aluminum nanoparticles using ultrasonic prope homogenizer. The colloidal thermite peraticles can be intgegrated into highly energetic system for subsequent nanocomposite development. Thanks to stabilization of colloidal CuO nanoparticles in IPA which could offer intimate mixing between oxidizer and metal fuel. The stabilization mechanism of CuO in IPA was correlated to steric stabilization with solvent molecules. This approach eliminated nanoparticle drying and the re-dispersion of dry aggregates into energetic materials. This manuscript shaded the light on the real development of colloidal thermite mixtures and their integration into highly energetic systems.

  5. Self-Assembly of Colloidal Spheres into One, Two, and Three Dimensional Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis is to increase our understanding of colloidal self-assembly processes and develop new strategies to assemble colloidal building blocks into more sophisticated and well-defined super-structures. Self-assembly is a spontaneous process in which a disordered system of

  6. Self-Assembly of Faceted Colloidal Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gantapara, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    A colloidal dispersion consists of insoluble microscopic particles that are suspended in a solvent. Typically, a colloid is a particle for which at least one of its dimension is within the size range of a nanometer to a micron. Due to collisions with much smaller solvent molecules, colloids perform

  7. New innovative electrocoagulation (EC) treatment technology for BWR colloidal iron utilizing the seeding and filtration electronically (SAFETTM) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denton, Mark S.; Bostick, William D.

    2007-01-01

    is 1) to break the colloid (i.e., break the outer radius repulsive charges of the similar charged colloidal particles), 2) allow these particles to now flocculate (floc), and 3) form a type of floc that is more readily filterable, and, thus, de-waterable. This task has been carried out with the innovative application of electronically seeding the feed stream with the metal of choice, and without the addition of chemicals common to ferri-flocking, or polymer addition. This patent-pending new system and technique is called Seeding And Filtration Electronically, or the SAFE TM System. Once the colloid has been broken and flocking has begun, removal of the resultant floc can be carried out by standard, back-washable (or, in simple cases, dead-end) filters; or simply in de-waterable HICs or liners. Such applications include low level radwaste (LLW) from both PWRs and BWRs, fuel pools, storage basins, salt water collection tanks, etc. For the removal of magnetic materials, such as some BWR irons, an Electro Magnetic Filter (EMF) was developed to couple with the Electro Coagulation (EC), (or metal-Flocking) Unit. In the advent that the waste stream primarily contains magnetic materials (e.g., boiler condensates and magnetite, and he-magnetite from BWRs), the material was simply filtered using the EMF. Bench-, pilot- and full-scale systems have been assembled and applied on actual plant waste samples quite successfully. The effects of initial feed pH and conductivity, as well as flocculation retention times was examined prior to applying the production equipment into the field. Since the initial studies (Denton, et al, EPRI, 2006), the ultimate success of field applications is now being demonstrated as the next development phase. For such portable field demonstrations and demand systems, a fully self enclosed (secondary containment) EC system was first developed and assembled in a modified B 25 Box (Floc-In-A-Box) and is being deployed to a number of NPP sites. Finally, a

  8. Voice and Valency in San Luis Potosi Huasteco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz Ledo Yanez, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents an analysis of the system of transitivity, voice and valency alternations in Huasteco of San Luis Potosi (Mayan) within a functional-typological framework. The study is based on spoken discourse and elicited data collected in the municipalities of Aquismon and Tancanhuitz de Santos in the state of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. The…

  9. Time-resolved imaging of purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hockett, Paul; Bisgaard, Christer Z.; Clarkin, Owen J.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reactions are manifestations of the dynamics of molecular valence electrons and their couplings to atomic motions. Emerging methods in attosecond science can probe purely electronic dynamics in atomic and molecular systems(1-6). By contrast, time-resolved structural-dynamics methods...... such as electron(7-10) or X-ray diffraction(11) and X-ray absorption(12) yield complementary information about the atomic motions. Time-resolved methods that are directly sensitive to both valence-electron dynamics and atomic motions include photoelectron spectroscopy(13-15) and high-harmonic generation(16......,17): in both cases, this sensitivity derives from the ionization-matrix element(18,19). Here we demonstrate a time-resolved molecular-frame photoelectron-angular-distribution (TRMFPAD) method for imaging the purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction. Specifically, the TRMFPADs measured during...

  10. Theory for the mixed-valence state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, C.M.

    1979-01-01

    A theory is presented which explains why mixed-valence compounds behave as two component Fermi liquids, and why TmSe orders magnetically while the other known mixed-valence compounds do not. The variation of Tsub(N) and the field Hsub(T) to obtain ferromagnetic alignment with changing Tm 2+ /Tm 3+ ratio is quantitatively explained. For Tm 2+ concentration > = 0.3, TmSe is predicted to order ferromagnetically

  11. Preparation of radioactive colloidal gold 198Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cammarosano, S.A.

    1979-01-01

    The preparation with simple equipment of radioactive colloidal gold of particle size about approximately 300 A from seed colloid stabilized by gelatine is described. Some physico-chemical parameters which can affect the process of formation of these colloidal particles are analysed; particle size has been meassured with an electron microscope. The colloid stability has been studied as a function of dilution, age and pH. Nucleation and growth of radioactive colloidal gold have been studied using spectrophotometry. Absorption spectra of the two ones are presented and compared. Quality control of the production process is verified through measurement of parameters, such as radioactive and radiochemical purity and biological distribution in laboratorial animals. This distribution was evalusted for rats injected endovenously with the gold colloidal solution.(Author) [pt

  12. Experimental studies on the inventory of cement-derived colloids in the pore water of a cementitious backfill material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, E.

    2001-06-01

    The potential role of near-field colloids for the colloid-facilitated migration of radionuclides has stimulated investigations concerning the generation and presence of colloids in the near-field of a repository for low- and intermediate level waste (L/ILW). The highly gas permeable mortar (Nagra designation: mortar M1) is currently favoured as backfill material for the engineered barrier of the planned Swiss L/ILW repository. The cementitious backfill is considered to be a chemical environment with some potential for colloid generation. In a series of batch-style laboratory experiments the physico-chemical processes controlling the inventory of colloids in cement pore water of the backfill were assessed for chemical conditions prevailing in the initial stage of the cement degradation. In these experiments, backfill mortar M1 or quartz, respectively, which may be used as aggregate material for the backfill, were immersed in artificial cement pore water (a NaOH/KOH rich cement fluid). Colloid concentrations in the cement pore water were recorded as a function of time for different experimental settings. The results indicate that a colloid-colloid interaction process (coagulation) controlled the colloid inventory. The mass concentration of dispersed colloids was found to be typically lower than 0.02 ppm in undisturbed batch systems. An upper-bound value was estimated to be 0.1 ppm taking into account uncertainties on the measurements. To assess the potential for colloid generation in a dynamic system, colloid concentrations were determined in the pore water of a column filled with backfill mortar. The chemical conditions established in the mortar column corresponded to conditions observed in the second stage of the cement degradation (a Ca(OH) 2 - controlled cement system). In this dynamic system, the upper-bound value for the colloid mass concentration was estimated to be 0.1 ppm. Implications for radionuclide mobility were deduced taking into account the

  13. Positron Tomographic Imaging Of The Liver With Ga-68 Iron Hydroxide Colloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Bharath; Miller, Tom R.; Siegel, Barry A.; Mathias, Carla J.; Markham, Joanne; Ehrhardt, Gary J.; Welch, Michael J.

    1980-08-01

    A new radiopharmaceutical, 68Ga-iron hydroxide colloid, for hepatic imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) was prepared from the eluate of a "Ge-68Ga solvent extraction generator. In rats, 84% of the administered dose of colloid localized in the liver and 4.6% accumulated in the spleen. Initial imaging studies in normal dogs showed close correspondence of the findings by PET and transmission computed tomography (CT). PET with 68Ga-colloid was performed in 10 patients with hepatic metastases demonstrated by conventional scintigraphy with 99mTc-sulfur colloid. All focal defects noted on the conventional scintigrams were easily identified and generally seen more clearly by PET. In one patient, lesions not identified on the initial 99mTc-sulfur colloid images were demonstrated by PET. The positron tomographic images were compared with those obtained by CT in 7 patients; the two studies showed comparable findings in 5 patients, whereas PET more clearly showed multiple lesions in 2. Our results suggest that PET is a suitable technique for obtaining high-contrast, cross-sectional images of large abdominal organs. Emission computed tomography with positron-emitting radionuclides shows promise as an important new tool for clinical research (1-4). Unfortunately, wide clinical application of positron-emission tomography (PET) is presently limited by the need for an expensive, hospital-based cyclotron facility and highly trained professional and technical personnel to synthesize the radiopharmaceuticals labeled with the very short-lived radionuclides 11c, 13N, 150 and 18 F that are employed most commonly in such studies. These difficulties may be circumvented in part by the use of a simple generator system that produces the positron-emitting radionuclide 68Ga (T1/2 = 68 min) from the long-lived parent 68Ge (T1/2 = 275 days) (5-7). A large number of radiopharmaceuticals of potential clinical interest may be prepared readily from the eluate of such a generator (6

  14. Active structuring of colloidal armour on liquid drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommersnes, Paul; Rozynek, Zbigniew; Mikkelsen, Alexander; Castberg, Rene; Kjerstad, Knut; Hersvik, Kjetil; Otto Fossum, Jon

    2013-06-01

    Adsorption and assembly of colloidal particles at the surface of liquid droplets are at the base of particle-stabilized emulsions and templating. Here we report that electrohydrodynamic and electro-rheological effects in leaky-dielectric liquid drops can be used to structure and dynamically control colloidal particle assemblies at drop surfaces, including electric-field-assisted convective assembly of jammed colloidal ‘ribbons’, electro-rheological colloidal chains confined to a two-dimensional surface and spinning colloidal domains on that surface. In addition, we demonstrate the size control of ‘pupil’-like openings in colloidal shells. We anticipate that electric field manipulation of colloids in leaky dielectrics can lead to new routes of colloidosome assembly and design for ‘smart armoured’ droplets.

  15. Thermophoretic torque in colloidal particles with mass asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olarte-Plata, Juan; Rubi, J. Miguel; Bresme, Fernando

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the response of anisotropic colloids suspended in a fluid under a thermal field. Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics computer simulations and nonequilibrium thermodynamics theory, we show that an anisotropic mass distribution inside the colloid rectifies the rotational Brownian motion and the colloids experience transient torques that orient the colloid along the direction of the thermal field. This physical effect gives rise to distinctive changes in the dependence of the Soret coefficient with colloid mass, which features a maximum, unlike the monotonic increase of the thermophoretic force with mass observed in homogeneous colloids.

  16. Solvent-Free Patterning of Colloidal Quantum Dot Films Utilizing Shape Memory Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hohyun Keum

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal quantum dots (QDs with properties that can be tuned by size, shape, and composition are promising for the next generation of photonic and electronic devices. However, utilization of these materials in such devices is hindered by the limited compatibility of established semiconductor processing techniques. In this context, patterning of QD films formed from colloidal solutions is a critical challenge and alternative methods are currently being developed for the broader adoption of colloidal QDs in functional devices. Here, we present a solvent-free approach to patterning QD films by utilizing a shape memory polymer (SMP. The high pull-off force of the SMP below glass transition temperature (Tg in conjunction with the conformal contact at elevated temperatures (above Tg enables large-area, rate-independent, fine patterning while preserving desired properties of QDs.

  17. Equilibrium and kinetic models for colloid release under transient solution chemistry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A; Torkzaban, Saeed; Leij, Feike; Simunek, Jiri

    2015-10-01

    We present continuum models to describe colloid release in the subsurface during transient physicochemical conditions. Our modeling approach relates the amount of colloid release to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. Equilibrium, kinetic, equilibrium and kinetic, and two-site kinetic models were developed to describe various rates of colloid release. These models were subsequently applied to experimental colloid release datasets to investigate the influence of variations in ionic strength (IS), pH, cation exchange, colloid size, and water velocity on release. Various combinations of equilibrium and/or kinetic release models were needed to describe the experimental data depending on the transient conditions and colloid type. Release of Escherichia coli D21g was promoted by a decrease in solution IS and an increase in pH, similar to expected trends for a reduction in the secondary minimum and nanoscale chemical heterogeneity. The retention and release of 20nm carboxyl modified latex nanoparticles (NPs) were demonstrated to be more sensitive to the presence of Ca(2+) than D21g. Specifically, retention of NPs was greater than D21g in the presence of 2mM CaCl2 solution, and release of NPs only occurred after exchange of Ca(2+) by Na(+) and then a reduction in the solution IS. These findings highlight the limitations of conventional interaction energy calculations to describe colloid retention and release, and point to the need to consider other interactions (e.g., Born, steric, and/or hydration forces) and/or nanoscale heterogeneity. Temporal changes in the water velocity did not have a large influence on the release of D21g for the examined conditions. This insensitivity was likely due to factors that reduce the applied hydrodynamic torque and/or increase the resisting adhesive torque; e.g., macroscopic roughness and grain-grain contacts. Our analysis and models improve our understanding and ability to describe the amounts

  18. Probing Transient Valence Orbital Changes with Picosecond Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    March, Anne Marie; Assefa, Tadesse A.; Boemer, Christina

    2017-01-01

    We probe the dynamics of valence electrons in photoexcited [Fe(terpy)2]2+ in solution to gain deeper insight into the Fe ligand bond changes. We use hard X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), which combines element specificity and high penetration with sensitivity to orbital structure, making...... valence orbitals to the nascent core-hole. Vtc-XES offers particular insight into the molecular orbitals directly involved in the light-driven dynamics; a change in the metal ligand orbital overlap results in an intensity reduction and a blue energy shift in agreement with our theoretical calculations...... and more subtle features at the highest energies reflect changes in the frontier orbital populations....

  19. Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport: a regulatory perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, W. L.; Pickett, D. A.; Codell, R. B.; Nicholson, T. J.

    2001-12-01

    What hydrogeologic-geochemical-microbial conditions and processes affect migration of radionuclides sorbed onto microparticles or native colloid-sized radionuclide particles? The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for protecting public health, safety, and the environment at numerous nuclear facilities including a potential high-level nuclear waste disposal site. To fulfill these obligations, NRC needs to understand the mechanisms controlling radionuclide release and transport and their importance to performance. The current focus of NRC staff reviews and technical interactions dealing with colloid-facilitated transport relates to the potential nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. NRC staff performed bounding calculations to quantify radionuclide releases available for ground-water transport to potential receptors from a Yucca Mountain repository. Preliminary analyses suggest insignificant doses of plutonium and americium colloids could be derived from spent nuclear fuel. Using surface complexation models, NRC staff found that colloids can potentially lower actinide retardation factors by up to several orders of magnitude. Performance assessment calculations, in which colloidal transport of plutonium and americium was simulated by assuming no sorption or matrix diffusion, indicated no effect of colloids on human dose within the 10,000 year compliance period due largely to long waste-package lifetimes. NRC staff have identified information gaps and developed technical agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure sufficient information will be presented in any potential future Yucca Mountain license application. DOE has agreed to identify which radionuclides could be transported via colloids, incorporate uncertainties in colloid formation, release and transport parameters, and conceptual models, and address the applicability of field data using synthetic microspheres as colloid analogs. NRC is currently

  20. Importance-truncated shell model for multi-shell valence spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpf, Christina; Vobig, Klaus; Roth, Robert [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The valence-space shell model is one of the work horses in nuclear structure theory. In traditional applications, shell-model calculations are carried out using effective interactions constructed in a phenomenological framework for rather small valence spaces, typically spanned by one major shell. We improve on this traditional approach addressing two main aspects. First, we use new effective interactions derived in an ab initio approach and, thus, establish a connection to the underlying nuclear interaction providing access to single- and multi-shell valence spaces. Second, we extend the shell model to larger valence spaces by applying an importance-truncation scheme based on a perturbative importance measure. In this way, we reduce the model space to the relevant basis states for the description of a few target eigenstates and solve the eigenvalue problem in this physics-driven truncated model space. In particular multi-shell valence spaces are not tractable otherwise. We combine the importance-truncated shell model with refined extrapolation schemes to approximately recover the exact result. We present first results obtained in the importance-truncated shell model with the newly derived ab initio effective interactions for multi-shell valence spaces, e.g., the sdpf shell.

  1. Quantitative Assessment of the Potential Significance of Colloids to the KBS-3 Disposal Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klos, R.A.; White, M.J.; Wickham, S.M.; Bennett, D.G.; Hicks, T.W.

    2002-06-01

    Colloids are minute particles in the size range 1 nm to 1 μm that can remain suspended in water, and may influence radionuclide transport in radioactive waste disposal systems. Galson Sciences Ltd (GSL) has undertaken a quantitative assessment of the impact that colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport may have on the performance of the Swedish KBS-3 concept for disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel. This assessment has involved the evaluation and application of SKI's colloid transport model, COLLAGE II, modelling of km-scale Pu transport at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), USA, and identification of circumstances under which colloid-facilitated transport could be important for a KBS-3-type environment. Colloids bearing traces of plutonium from the BENHAM underground nuclear test have been detected in samples obtained from Nevada Test Site (NTS) groundwater wells 1.3 km from the detonation point. Plutonium is generally fairly immobile in groundwater systems, and it has been suggested that colloids may have caused the plutonium from the BENHAM test to be transported 1.3 km in only 30 years. This hypothesis has been tested by modelling plutonium transport in a fracture with similar characteristics to those present in the vicinity of the BENHAM test. SKI's colloid transport code, COLLAGE II, considers radionuclide transport in a one-dimensional planar fracture and represents radionuclide-colloid sorption and desorption assuming first-order, linear kinetics. Recently published data from both the ongoing NTS site investigation and from the associated Yucca Mountain Project have been used to define a COLLAGE II dataset. The kinetics of radionuclide-colloid sorption and desorption have been found to be crucial in explaining the transport of plutonium associated with colloids, as inferred at the NTS. Specifically, it has been found that for plutonium to have been transported by colloids over the full 1.3 km transport path, it is likely that the plutonium

  2. Tuning plasmons layer-by-layer for quantitative colloidal sensing with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William J; Nowinska, Kamila; Hutter, Tanya; Mahajan, Sumeet; Fischlechner, Martin

    2018-04-19

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is well known for its high sensitivity that emerges due to the plasmonic enhancement of electric fields typically on gold and silver nanostructures. However, difficulties associated with the preparation of nanostructured substrates with uniform and reproducible features limit reliability and quantitation using SERS measurements. In this work we use layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly to incorporate multiple functional building blocks of collaborative assemblies of nanoparticles on colloidal spheres to fabricate SERS sensors. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are packaged in discrete layers, effectively 'freezing nano-gaps', on spherical colloidal cores to achieve multifunctionality and reproducible sensing. Coupling between layers tunes the plasmon resonance for optimum SERS signal generation to achieve a 10 nM limit of detection. Significantly, using the layer-by-layer construction, SERS-active AuNP layers are spaced out and thus optically isolated. This uniquely allows the creation of an internal standard within each colloidal sensor to enable highly reproducible self-calibrated sensing. By using 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA) as the internal standard adenine concentrations are quantified to an accuracy of 92.6-99.5%. Our versatile approach paves the way for rationally designed yet quantitative colloidal SERS sensors and their use in a variety of sensing applications.

  3. Transport of 152Eu colloids in a system of fine sand and water containing humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, D.

    1995-01-01

    The migration of 152 Eu in a system of fine sand and water containing humic substances was investigated in a flow column system under realistic conditions. In this system, the trivalent Eu forms colloids with the water. These Eu humates are transported without retardation at recovery rates significantly below 100 per cent. Recovery is more or less a measure of the physical process of filtration of Eu bonded to particulates. In the range of natural filtering rates, the recovery rates decrease with decreasing filtering rate. (orig.) [de

  4. Emergent structures and dynamics in suspensions of self-phoretic colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scagliarini, Andrea; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2013-11-01

    Active fluids, such as suspensions of self-propelled particles , are a fascinating example of Soft Matter displaying complex collective behaviours which provide challenges in non-equilibrium Statistical Physics. The recent development of techniques to assemble miniaturized devices has led to a growing interest for micro and nanoscale engines that can perform autonomous motion (``microrobots''), as, for instance, self-phoretic colloids, for which the propulsion is induced by the generation of a chemical species in a reaction catalyzed at the particle surface. We perform a mesoscopic numerical study of suspensions of self-phoretic colloids. We show that, at changing the sign of the phoretic mobility (which accounts for the colloid-solute interactions), the system switches from a cluster phase to a state with slowed dynamics. We find that the cluster size distribution follows an exponential behaviour, with a characteristic size growing linearly with the colloid activity, while the density fluctuations grow as a power-law with an exponent depending on the cluster fractal dimension.We single out hydrodynamic interactions, showing that their effect is to work against cluster formation. For positive μ, we observe that colloids tend to reach an ordered state on a triangular lattice.

  5. Recommendations for plutonium colloid size determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosiewicz, S.T.

    1984-02-01

    This report presents recommendations for plutonium colloid size determination and summarizes a literature review, discussions with other researchers, and comments from equipment manufacturers. Four techniques suitable for plutonium colloid size characterization are filtration and ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, diffusion methods, and high-pressure liquid chromatography (conditionally). Our findings include the following: (1) Filtration and ultrafiltration should be the first methods used for plutonium colloid size determination because they can provide the most rapid results with the least complicated experimental arrangement. (2) After expertise has been obtained with filtering, gel permeation chromatography should be incorporated into the colloid size determination program. (3) Diffusion methods can be used next. (4) High-pressure liquid chromatography will be suitable after appropriate columns are available. A plutonium colloid size characterization program with filtration/ultrafiltration and gel permeation chromatography has been initiated

  6. Valence-Dependent Belief Updating: Computational Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Kuzmanovic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available People tend to update beliefs about their future outcomes in a valence-dependent way: they are likely to incorporate good news and to neglect bad news. However, belief formation is a complex process which depends not only on motivational factors such as the desire for favorable conclusions, but also on multiple cognitive variables such as prior beliefs, knowledge about personal vulnerabilities and resources, and the size of the probabilities and estimation errors. Thus, we applied computational modeling in order to test for valence-induced biases in updating while formally controlling for relevant cognitive factors. We compared biased and unbiased Bayesian models of belief updating, and specified alternative models based on reinforcement learning. The experiment consisted of 80 trials with 80 different adverse future life events. In each trial, participants estimated the base rate of one of these events and estimated their own risk of experiencing the event before and after being confronted with the actual base rate. Belief updates corresponded to the difference between the two self-risk estimates. Valence-dependent updating was assessed by comparing trials with good news (better-than-expected base rates with trials with bad news (worse-than-expected base rates. After receiving bad relative to good news, participants' updates were smaller and deviated more strongly from rational Bayesian predictions, indicating a valence-induced bias. Model comparison revealed that the biased (i.e., optimistic Bayesian model of belief updating better accounted for data than the unbiased (i.e., rational Bayesian model, confirming that the valence of the new information influenced the amount of updating. Moreover, alternative computational modeling based on reinforcement learning demonstrated higher learning rates for good than for bad news, as well as a moderating role of personal knowledge. Finally, in this specific experimental context, the approach based on

  7. Emotion and language: Valence and arousal affect word recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brysbaert, Marc; Warriner, Amy Beth

    2014-01-01

    Emotion influences most aspects of cognition and behavior, but emotional factors are conspicuously absent from current models of word recognition. The influence of emotion on word recognition has mostly been reported in prior studies on the automatic vigilance for negative stimuli, but the precise nature of this relationship is unclear. Various models of automatic vigilance have claimed that the effect of valence on response times is categorical, an inverted-U, or interactive with arousal. The present study used a sample of 12,658 words, and included many lexical and semantic control factors, to determine the precise nature of the effects of arousal and valence on word recognition. Converging empirical patterns observed in word-level and trial-level data from lexical decision and naming indicate that valence and arousal exert independent monotonic effects: Negative words are recognized more slowly than positive words, and arousing words are recognized more slowly than calming words. Valence explained about 2% of the variance in word recognition latencies, whereas the effect of arousal was smaller. Valence and arousal do not interact, but both interact with word frequency, such that valence and arousal exert larger effects among low-frequency words than among high-frequency words. These results necessitate a new model of affective word processing whereby the degree of negativity monotonically and independently predicts the speed of responding. This research also demonstrates that incorporating emotional factors, especially valence, improves the performance of models of word recognition. PMID:24490848

  8. Towards conducting inks: Polypyrrole–silver colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omastová, Mária; Bober, Patrycja; Morávková, Zuzana; Peřinka, Nikola; Kaplanová, Marie; Syrový, Tomáš; Hromádková, Jiřina; Trchová, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Composite colloidal particles combining conducting polymer and metal have been prepared. • Conducting colloids are suitable for printing applications. • Polypyrrole/silver colloids are prepared in a single reaction step. • The conductivity control is discussed and still needs improvement. - Abstract: The oxidation of pyrrole with silver nitrate in the presence of suitable water-soluble polymers yields composite polypyrrole–silver colloids. The polypyrrole–silver nanoparticles stabilized with poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) have a typical size around 350 nm and polydispersity index 0.20, i.e. a moderate polydispersity in size. Similar results have been obtained with poly(vinyl alcohol) as stabilizer. The effect of stabilizer concentration on the particle size is marginal. In the present study, several types of stabilizers have been tested in addition to currently used poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone). Transmission electron microscopy and optical microscopy revealed the gemini morphology of polypyrrole and silver colloidal nanoparticles and confirmed their size and size-distribution determined by dynamic light scattering. The use of colloidal dispersions provides an efficient tool for the UV–vis and FT Raman spectroscopic characterization of polypyrrole, including the transition between polypyrrole salt and corresponding polypyrrole base. The dispersions were used for the preparation of coatings on polyethylene terephthalate foils, and the properties for polypyrrole–silver composites have been compared with those produced from polypyrrole colloids alone

  9. Nonlinear-Optical and Fluorescent Properties of Ag Aqueous Colloid Prepared by Silver Nitrate Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiang Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear-optical properties of metal Ag colloidal solutions, which were prepared by the reduction of silver nitrate, were investigated using Z-scan method. Under picosecond 532 nm excitation, the Ag colloidal solution exhibited negative nonlinear refractive index (n2=−5.17×10−4 cm2/W and reverse saturable absorption coefficient (β=4.32 cm/GW. The data fitting result of optical limiting (OL response of metal Ag colloidal solution indicated that the nonlinear absorption was attributed to two-photon absorption effect at 532 nm. Moreover, the fluorescence emission spectra of Ag colloidal solution were recorded under excitations at both 280 nm and 350 nm. Two fluorescence peaks, 336 nm and 543 nm for 280 nm excitation, while 544 nm and 694 nm for 350 nm excitation, were observed.

  10. PHASE DIAGRAM OF GELATINE-POLYURONATE COLLOIDS: ITS APPLICATION FOR MICROENCAPSULATION AND NOT ONLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Baerle

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Phase state and the charge of colloidal particles in the gelatine-polyuronate system were studied. A method for comparative evaluation of molecular weight of colloids by means of viscosimetric measurements and electrophoresis was developed. It is shown that the Diagram {Phase state = f (composition, pH} contains six well-defined regions. The diagram explains and predicts the behaviour of protein-polysaccharide colloids, which are included in beverages or forms the shells of oil-containing microcapsules.

  11. Experimental studies on the inventory of cement-derived colloids in the pore water of a cementitious backfill material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieland, E

    2001-06-01

    The potential role of near-field colloids for the colloid-facilitated migration of radionuclides has stimulated investigations concerning the generation and presence of colloids in the near-field of a repository for low- and intermediate level waste (L/ILW). The highly gas permeable mortar (Nagra designation: mortar M1) is currently favoured as backfill material for the engineered barrier of the planned Swiss L/ILW repository. The cementitious backfill is considered to be a chemical environment with some potential for colloid generation. In a series of batch-style laboratory experiments the physico-chemical processes controlling the inventory of colloids in cement pore water of the backfill were assessed for chemical conditions prevailing in the initial stage of the cement degradation. In these experiments, backfill mortar M1 or quartz, respectively, which may be used as aggregate material for the backfill, were immersed in artificial cement pore water (a NaOH/KOH rich cement fluid). Colloid concentrations in the cement pore water were recorded as a function of time for different experimental settings. The results indicate that a colloid-colloid interaction process (coagulation) controlled the colloid inventory. The mass concentration of dispersed colloids was found to be typically lower than 0.02 ppm in undisturbed batch systems. An upper-bound value was estimated to be 0.1 ppm taking into account uncertainties on the measurements. To assess the potential for colloid generation in a dynamic system, colloid concentrations were determined in the pore water of a column filled with backfill mortar. The chemical conditions established in the mortar column corresponded to conditions observed in the second stage of the cement degradation (a Ca(OH){sub 2{sup -}} controlled cement system). In this dynamic system, the upper-bound value for the colloid mass concentration was estimated to be 0.1 ppm. Implications for radionuclide mobility were deduced taking into account the

  12. The Kinetics of Crystallization of Colloids and Proteins: A Light Scattering Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClymer, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Hard-sphere colloidal systems serve as model systems for aggregation, nucleation, crystallization and gelation as well as interesting systems in their own right.There is strong current interest in using colloidal systems to form photonic crystals. A major scientific thrust of NASA's microgravity research is the crystallization of proteins for structural determination. The crystallization of proteins is a complicated process that requires a great deal of trial and error experimentation. In spite of a great deal of work, "better" protein crystals cannot always be grown in microgravity and conditions for crystallization are not well understood. Crystallization of colloidal systems interacting as hard spheres and with an attractive potential induced by entropic forces have been studied in a series of static light scattering experiments. Additionally, aggregation of a protein as a function of pH has been studied using dynamic light scattering. For our experiments we used PMMA (polymethylacrylate) spherical particles interacting as hard spheres, with no attractive potential. These particles have a radius of 304 nanometers, a density of 1.22 gm/ml and an index of refraction of 1.52. A PMMA colloidal sample at a volume fraction of approximately 54% was index matched in a solution of cycloheptyl bromide (CHB) and cis-decalin. The sample is in a glass cylindrical vial that is placed in an ALV static and dynamic light scattering goniometer system. The vial is immersed in a toluene bath for index matching to minimize flair. Vigorous shaking melts any colloidal crystals initially present. The sample is illuminated with diverging laser light (632.8 nanometers) from a 4x microscope objective placed so that the beam is approximately 1 cm in diameter at the sample location. The sample is rotated about its long axis at approximately 3.5 revolutions per minute (highest speed) as the colloidal crystal system is non-ergodic. The scattered light is detected at various angles using the

  13. Dissolved and colloidal trace elements in the Mississippi River Delta outflow after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Moo-Joon; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Shiller, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    The Mississippi River delta outflow region is periodically disturbed by tropical weather systems including major hurricanes, which can terminate seasonal bottom water hypoxia and cause the resuspension of shelf bottom sediments which could result in the injection of trace elements into the water column. In the summer of 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita passed over the Louisiana Shelf within a month of each other. Three weeks after Rita, we collected water samples in the Mississippi River delta outflow, examining the distributions of trace elements to study the effect of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. We observed limited stratification on the shelf and bottom waters that were no longer hypoxic. This resulted, for instance, in bottom water dissolved Mn being lower than is typically observed during hypoxia, but with concentrations still compatible with Mn–O2 trends previously reported. Interestingly, for no element were we able to identify an obvious effect of sediment resuspension on its distribution. In general, elemental distributions were compatible with previous observations in the Mississippi outflow system. Co and Re, which have not been reported for this system previously, showed behavior consistent with other systems: input for Co likely from desorption and conservative mixing for Re. For Cs, an element for which there is little information regarding its estuarine behavior, conservative mixing was also observed. Our filtration method, which allowed us to distinguish the dissolved (<0.02 μm) from colloidal (0.02–0.45 μm) phase, revealed significant colloidal fractions for Fe and Zn, only. For Fe, the colloidal phase was the dominant fraction and was rapidly removed at low salinity. Dissolved Fe, in contrast, persisted out to mid-salinities, being removed in a similar fashion to nitrate. This ability to distinguish the smaller Fe (likely dominantly organically complexed) from larger colloidal suspensates may be useful in better interpreting the

  14. FEBEX bentonite colloid stability in ground water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seher, H.; Schaefer, T.; Geckeis, H. [Inst. fuer Nukleare Entsorgung (INE), Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)]. e-mail: holger.seher@ine.fzk .de; Fanghaenel, T. [Ruprecht-Karls-Univ. Heidelberg, Physikalisch-Chemisches In st., D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-06-15

    Coagulation experiments are accomplished to identify the geochemical conditions for the stability of Febex bentonite colloids in granite ground water. The experiments are carried out by varying pH, ionic strength and type of electrolyte. The dynamic light scattering technique (photon correlation spectroscopy) is used to measure the size evolution of the colloids with time. Agglomeration rates are higher in MgCl{sub 2} and CaCl{sub 2} than in NaCl solution. Relative agglomeration rates follow approximately the Schulze-Hardy rule. Increasing agglomeration rates at pH>8 are observed in experiments with MgCl{sub 2} and CaCl{sub 2} which are, however, caused by coprecipitation phenomena. Bentonite colloid stability fields derived from the colloid agglomeration experiments predict low colloid stabilization in granite ground water taken from Aespoe, Sweden, and relatively high colloid stability in Grimsel ground water (Switzerland)

  15. The influence of image valence on visual attention and perception of risk in drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M P; Chapman, P; Bailey, K

    2014-12-01

    Currently there is little research into the relationship between emotion and driving in the context of advertising and distraction. Research that has looked into this also has methodological limitations that could be affecting the results rather than emotional processing (Trick et al., 2012). The current study investigated the relationship between image valence and risk perception, eye movements and physiological reactions. Participants watched hazard perception clips which had emotional images from the international affective picture system overlaid onto them. They rated how hazardous or safe they felt, whilst eye movements, galvanic skin response and heart rate were recorded. Results suggested that participants were more aware of potential hazards when a neutral image had been shown, in comparison to positive and negative valenced images; that is, participants showed higher subjective ratings of risk, larger physiological responses and marginally longer fixation durations when viewing a hazard after a neutral image, but this effect was attenuated after emotional images. It appears that emotional images reduce sensitivity to potential hazards, and we suggest that future studies could apply these findings to higher fidelity paradigms such as driving simulators. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Lymph node scintigraphy with sup(99m)Tc-rhenium colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuhata, Naoki; Suyama, Bunzo; Matsumura, Yosuke; Ohmori, Hiroyuki

    1981-01-01

    Lymph node scintigraphy with sup(99m)Tc-rhenium colloid in evaluation of nodal involvement by urological malignancy were performed on twelve cases (4 bladder cancer, 3 prostatic cancer, 2 penile cancer and 3 testicular tumor). These cases had been examined the extent of disease on the basis of findings at pedal lymphangiography, urography, computed tomography or laparotomy. sup(99m)Tc-rhenium colloid in a volume of 0.2 ml (2 mCi) was injected into the first interdigital webs of each foot without local anesthesia. In one case of penile cancer radioactive colloid was directly injected into the glans penis and prepuce including tumor area. Our clinical experience reported here reveals that lymph node scintigraphy with sup(99m)Tc-rhenium colloid can provide a useful method of investigating the lymphatic system. This technique is reproducible and can be performed in poor risk patients or pediatric patients readily and safely. (author)

  17. A GoldSim Model for Colloid Facilitated Nuclide Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Jeong, Jong Tae

    2010-01-01

    Recently several total system performance assessment (TSPA) programs, called 'template' programs, ready for the safety assessment of radioactive waste repository systems which are conceptually modeled have been developed by utilizing GoldSim and AMBER at KAERI. It is generally believed that chelating agents (chelators) that could be disposed of together with radioactive wastes in the repository and natural colloids available in the geological media affect on nuclides by enhancing their transport in the geological media. A simple GoldSim module to evaluate such quantitative effects, by which colloid and chelator-facilitated nuclide release cases could be modeled and evaluated is introduced. Effects of the chelators alone are illustrated with the case associated with well pumping scenario in a hypothetical repository system

  18. Reply to Isgur's comments on valence QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, K.F.

    2000-01-01

    With the goal of understanding the complexity of QCD and the role of symmetry in dynamics, the authors studied a field theory called Valence QCD (VQCD) in which the Z graphs are forbidden so that the Fock space is limited to the valence quarks. The authors calculated nucleon form factors, matrix elements, and hadron masses both with this theory and with quenched QCD on a set of lattices with the same gauge background. Comparing the results of the lattice calculations in these two theories, the authors drew conclusions regarding the SU(6) valence quark model and chiral symmetry. While recognizing the goal of VQCD, Nathan Isgur disagrees on some of the conclusions the authors have drawn. The foremost objection raised in section 2 is to their suggestion that the major part of the hyperfine splittings in baryons is due to Goldstone boson exchange and not one-gluon-exchange (OGE) interactions. The logic of Isgur's objection is that VQCD yields a spectroscopy vastly different from quenched QCD and therefore the structure of the hadrons (to which hyperfine splittings in a quark model are intimately tied) is also suspect so no definite conclusions are possible. To put this into perspective it should be emphasized at the outset that spectroscopy is only one aspect of hadron physics examined in section 1. The authors have studied the axial and scalar couplings of nucleon in terms of F A /D A and F S /D S , the neutron to proton magnetic moment ratio μn/μp, and various form factors. None of these results reveal any pathologies of hadron structure and turn out to be close to the SU(6) relations, as expected. In fact this is what motivated the study of valence degrees of freedom via VQCD. In section 2 the authors address specific issues related to spectroscopy in VQCD. Isgur also presented more general arguments against the idea of boson exchange as a contributor to hyperfine effects. A cornerstone of his discussion is the unifying aspect of OGE in a quark model picture. The

  19. Qgui: A high-throughput interface for automated setup and analysis of free energy calculations and empirical valence bond simulations in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Andberg, Tor Arne Heim; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2015-07-01

    Structural information and activity data has increased rapidly for many protein targets during the last decades. In this paper, we present a high-throughput interface (Qgui) for automated free energy and empirical valence bond (EVB) calculations that use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for conformational sampling. Applications to ligand binding using both the linear interaction energy (LIE) method and the free energy perturbation (FEP) technique are given using the estrogen receptor (ERα) as a model system. Examples of free energy profiles obtained using the EVB method for the rate-limiting step of the enzymatic reaction catalyzed by trypsin are also shown. In addition, we present calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots to obtain the thermodynamic activation enthalpy and entropy with Qgui from running a large number of EVB simulations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mixed-order phase transition in a colloidal crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alert, Ricard; Tierno, Pietro; Casademunt, Jaume

    2017-12-01

    Mixed-order phase transitions display a discontinuity in the order parameter like first-order transitions yet feature critical behavior like second-order transitions. Such transitions have been predicted for a broad range of equilibrium and nonequilibrium systems, but their experimental observation has remained elusive. Here, we analytically predict and experimentally realize a mixed-order equilibrium phase transition. Specifically, a discontinuous solid-solid transition in a 2D crystal of paramagnetic colloidal particles is induced by a magnetic field H. At the transition field Hs, the energy landscape of the system becomes completely flat, which causes diverging fluctuations and correlation length ξ∝|H2-Hs2|-1/2. Mean-field critical exponents are predicted, since the upper critical dimension of the transition is du=2. Our colloidal system provides an experimental test bed to probe the unconventional properties of mixed-order phase transitions.

  1. Mixed-order phase transition in a colloidal crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alert, Ricard; Tierno, Pietro; Casademunt, Jaume

    2017-12-05

    Mixed-order phase transitions display a discontinuity in the order parameter like first-order transitions yet feature critical behavior like second-order transitions. Such transitions have been predicted for a broad range of equilibrium and nonequilibrium systems, but their experimental observation has remained elusive. Here, we analytically predict and experimentally realize a mixed-order equilibrium phase transition. Specifically, a discontinuous solid-solid transition in a 2D crystal of paramagnetic colloidal particles is induced by a magnetic field [Formula: see text] At the transition field [Formula: see text], the energy landscape of the system becomes completely flat, which causes diverging fluctuations and correlation length [Formula: see text] Mean-field critical exponents are predicted, since the upper critical dimension of the transition is [Formula: see text] Our colloidal system provides an experimental test bed to probe the unconventional properties of mixed-order phase transitions.

  2. Molecular Recognition in the Colloidal World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elacqua, Elizabeth; Zheng, Xiaolong; Shillingford, Cicely; Liu, Mingzhu; Weck, Marcus

    2017-11-21

    Colloidal self-assembly is a bottom-up technique to fabricate functional nanomaterials, with paramount interest stemming from programmable assembly of smaller building blocks into dynamic crystalline domains and photonic materials. Multiple established colloidal platforms feature diverse shapes and bonding interactions, while achieving specific orientations along with short- and long-range order. A major impediment to their universal use as building blocks for predesigned architectures is the inability to precisely dictate and control particle functionalization and concomitant reversible self-assembly. Progress in colloidal self-assembly necessitates the development of strategies that endow bonding specificity and directionality within assemblies. Methodologies that emulate molecular and polymeric three-dimensional (3D) architectures feature elements of covalent bonding, while high-fidelity molecular recognition events have been installed to realize responsive reconfigurable assemblies. The emergence of anisotropic 'colloidal molecules', coupled with the ability to site-specifically decorate particle surfaces with supramolecular recognition motifs, has facilitated the formation of superstructures via directional interactions and shape recognition. In this Account, we describe supramolecular assembly routes to drive colloidal particles into precisely assembled architectures or crystalline lattices via directional noncovalent molecular interactions. The design principles are based upon the fabrication of colloidal particles bearing surface-exposed functional groups that can undergo programmable conjugation to install recognition motifs with high fidelity. Modular and versatile by design, our strategy allows for the introduction and integration of molecular recognition principles into the colloidal world. We define noncovalent molecular interactions as site-specific forces that are predictable (i.e., feature selective and controllable complementary bonding partners

  3. Sex, Age, and Emotional Valence: Revealing Possible Biases in the 'Reading the Mind in the Eyes' Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kynast, Jana; Schroeter, Matthias L

    2018-01-01

    The 'Reading the Mind in the Eyes' test (RMET) assesses a specific socio-cognitive ability, i.e., the ability to identify mental states from gaze. The development of this ability in a lifespan perspective is of special interest. Whereas former investigations were limited mainly to childhood and adolescence, the focus has been shifted towards aging, and psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases recently. Although the RMET is frequently applied in developmental psychology and clinical settings, stimulus characteristics have never been investigated with respect to potential effects on test performance. Here, we analyzed the RMET stimulus set with a special focus on interrelations between sex, age and emotional valence. Forty-three persons rated age and emotional valence of the RMET picture set. Differences in emotional valence and age ratings between male and female items were analyzed. The linear relation between age and emotional valence was tested over all items, and separately for male and female items. Male items were rated older and more negative than female stimuli. Regarding male RMET items, age predicted emotional valence: older age was associated with negative emotions. Contrary, age and valence were not linearly related in female pictures. All ratings were independent of rater characteristics. Our results demonstrate a strong confound between sex, age, and emotional valence in the RMET. Male items presented a greater variability in age ratings compared to female items. Age and emotional valence were negatively associated among male items, but no significant association was found among female stimuli. As personal attributes impact social information processing, our results may add a new perspective on the interpretation of previous findings on interindividual differences in RMET accuracy, particularly in the field of developmental psychology, and age-associated neuropsychiatric diseases. A revision of the RMET might be afforded to overcome confounds

  4. Yielding and flow of sheared colloidal glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petekidis, G; Vlassopoulos, D; Pusey, P N

    2004-01-01

    We have studied some of the rheological properties of suspensions of hard-sphere colloids with particular reference to behaviour near the concentration of the glass transition. First we monitored the strain on the samples during and after a transient step stress. We find that, at all values of applied step stress, colloidal glasses show a rapid, apparently elastic, recovery of strain after the stress is removed. This recovery is found even in samples which have flowed significantly during stressing. We attribute this behaviour to 'cage elasticity', the recovery of the stress-induced distorted environment of any particle to a more isotropic state when the stress is removed. Second, we monitored the stress as the strain rate dot γ of flowing samples was slowly decreased. Suspensions which are glassy at rest show a stress which becomes independent of dot γ as dot γ →0. This limiting stress can be interpreted as the yield stress of the glass and agrees well both with the yield stress deduced from the step stress and recovery measurements and that predicted by a recent mode coupling theory of sheared suspensions. Thus, the behaviours under steady shearing and transient step stress both support the idea that colloidal glasses have a finite yield stress. We note however that the samples do exhibit a slow accumulation of strain due to creep at stresses below the yield stress

  5. Characterisation of colloidal drug delivery systems from the naked eye to Cryo-FESEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krauel, Karen; Girvan, Liz; Hook, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Poly(ethylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles prepared by interfacial polymerisation on the basis of microemulsions were prepared in this study and both colloidal systems, nanoparticles and microemulsions, were analysed by visual observation and several microscopic techniques. Phase boundaries...... for the microemulsions of the two pseudoternary systems ethyloleate, polyoxyethylene 20 sorbitan mono-oleate/sorbitan monolaurate and water with and without butanol as a cosurfactant were determined by visual observation of the samples. Microemulsions containing liquid crystals were determined by polarisation light...... microscopy. Using freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy and Cryo-field emission scanning electron microscopy the type of microemulsion (w/o droplet, bicontinuous, solution) was characterised. Nanoparticles prepared from the different types of microemulsion were additionally observed...

  6. On Determination of the Equation of State of Colloidal Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirorattanakul, Krittanon; Huang, Hao; Uhl, Christopher; Ou-Yang, Daniel

    Colloidal suspensions are the main ingredients for a variety of materials in our daily life, e.g., milk, salad dressing, skin lotions and paint for wall coatings. Material properties of these systems require an understanding of the equation of state of these materials. Our project aims to experimentally determine the equation of state of colloidal suspensions by microfluidics, dielectrophoresis (DEP) and optical imaging. We use fluorescent polystyrene latexes as a model system for this study. Placing semi-permeable membranes between microfluidics channels, which made from PDMS, we control the particle concentration and ionic strengths of the suspension. We use osmotic equilibrium equation to analyze the particle concentration distribution in a potential force field created by DEP. We use confocal optical imaging to measure the spatial distribution of the particle concentration. We compare the results of our experimental study with data obtained by computer simulation of osmotic equilibrium of interacting colloids. NSF DMR-0923299, Emulsion Polymer Institute, Department of Physics, Bioengineering Program of Lehigh University.

  7. The role of colloids in the transport of radionuclides in geological media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, V.

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of this programme is to understand how colloids could influence the migration behaviour of radionuclides in geological formations. This is being achieved firstly, by identifying the retention mechanisms of colloids and pseudocolloids (association of radionuclides with colloids) on mineral surfaces by static and dynamic experiments, and secondly by investigating the formation of pseudocolloids. Moreover, these studies will be focused on model systems (surfaces, colloids) selected from studies carried out on the El Berrocal site (characterization of the granite, of the colloids). Two types of experiments are planned: for the study of pseudocolloid formation, sorption experiments (batch tests) with radionuclides will be conducted either with model inorganic colloidal suspensions or with mineral monoliths as macroscopic surfaces of colloids. Dynamic experiments will be performed using well-defined packings of both synthetic and natural minerals (major constituents of granite). Moreover, a particular attention will be devoted to the organic coatings (in static and dynamic conditions). These studies will provide data directly usable by migration models to predict colloid transport under conditions relevant to geological disposals. This programme will be carried out in collaboration with the different partners of this contract: CEA (Fontenay-aux-Roses/F), CIEMAT (Madrid/S), CNRS (Orsay/F), GERMETRAD (Nantes/F), GSF (Munich/G), INFM (Padua/I), INTERA (London/UK) with Dr V. Moulin, Dr P. Rivas, Dr J.C. Dran, Pr Pieri, Dr C. Wolfrum, Pr G. Della Mea and Dr P. Grindrod as project leaders respectively. 4 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  8. Decoding emotional valence from electroencephalographic rhythmic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celikkanat, Hande; Moriya, Hiroki; Ogawa, Takeshi; Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Kawanabe, Motoaki; Hyvarinen, Aapo

    2017-07-01

    We attempt to decode emotional valence from electroencephalographic rhythmic activity in a naturalistic setting. We employ a data-driven method developed in a previous study, Spectral Linear Discriminant Analysis, to discover the relationships between the classification task and independent neuronal sources, optimally utilizing multiple frequency bands. A detailed investigation of the classifier provides insight into the neuronal sources related with emotional valence, and the individual differences of the subjects in processing emotions. Our findings show: (1) sources whose locations are similar across subjects are consistently involved in emotional responses, with the involvement of parietal sources being especially significant, and (2) even though the locations of the involved neuronal sources are consistent, subjects can display highly varying degrees of valence-related EEG activity in the sources.

  9. verbal extensions: valency decreasing extensions in the basà ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Finance

    London: Hodder. Education. Imoh, P.M., 2013. Verbal extensions: Valency increasing operations in Basà verbal system. Paper presented at the West African Languages Congress (WALC) and 26th Annual. Conference of the Linguistic Association of Nigeria (26th CLAN), 29th July to 2nd August. 2013, University of Ibadan, ...

  10. On the aging and colloid properties of AgI soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despotovicj, R.; Kapetanovicj, J.

    1977-01-01

    A study of the changes of silver iodide sol properties has shown the role of the ageing process in the characterization of the colloid system. An analysis of the critical coagulation concentration changes and of the sedimentation rates with time and electrophoretic mobility of sols has revealed, that sols in the presence of various counter ions do not exhibit strictly equal colloid properties, although counter ions are present at the critical coagulation concentration

  11. Valence properties of tellurium in different chemical systems and its determination in refractory environmental samples using hydride generation – Atomic fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Wei; Alzahrani, Ali [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); Deng, Tian-Long [College of Marine Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin (China); Belzile, Nelson, E-mail: nbelzile@laurentian.ca [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); Cooperative Freshwater Ecology Unit, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2016-01-28

    Using HG – AFS as a powerful tool to study valence transformations of Te, we found that, in presence of HCl and at high temperature, Te can form volatile species and be lost during sample digestion and pre-reduction steps. It was also noticed that the chemical valences of Te can be modified under different chemical and digestion conditions and even by samples themselves with certain matrices. KBr can reduce Te(VI) to Te(IV) in 3.0 M HCl at 100 °C, but when HNO{sub 3} was >5% (v/v) in solution, Br{sub 2} was formed and caused serious interference to Te measurements. HCl alone can also pre-reduce Te(VI) to Te(IV), only when its concentration was ≥6.0 M (100 °C for 15min). Among 10 studied chemical elements, only Cu{sup 2+} caused severe interference. Thiourea is an effective masking agent only when Cu{sup 2+} concentration is equal or lower than 10 mg/L. Chemical reagents, chemical composition of sample, as well as the modes of digestion can greatly affect Te valences, reagent blanks and analytical precisions. A protocol of 2–step–digestion followed by an elimination of HF is proposed to minimize reagent blank and increase the signal/noise ratios. It is important to perform a preliminary test to confirm whether a pre-reduction step is necessary; this is especially true for samples with complex matrices such as those with high sulfide content. The analytical detection limits of this method in a pure solution and a solid sample were 100 ng/L and 0.10 ± 0.02 μg/g, respectively. - Highlights: • HG–AFS is a powerful tool in studies of chemical valences and forms of Te in different conditions. • Te can be lost in form of volatile species in presence of HCl at high temperature. • Metal ions can be classified into 3 categories of interference; thiourea can effectively mask Cu{sup 2+}. • A 2-step digestion allows to eliminate HF, reduce background and improve analytical precision. • Matrix of sample can strongly influence Te chemical valence

  12. Virtual Distance and Soundstage, and their Impacts on Experienced Emotional Valence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Justin

    2015-01-01

    stimuli should cause stronger valenced responses in the nearfield than at a distance. Thus, music experienced as being negatively valenced at a distance should be more negatively valenced in nearfield, and music that is experienced as having a positive valence at a distance should be more positively......Research from animal ethology and affective neuroscience suggest that a listener’s perceived distance from a signal source can alter their experienced emotional valence of the music. Furthermore, appraisal theories of emotion suggest that emotionally valenced responses will diverge according...... to the type of emotion presented. For these exploratory investigations, subjects listen to selected musical excerpts on speakers in combination with a tactile transducer attached to their chair. The listening sessions are recorded on EEG supported by subject feedback responses. My hypothesis is that musical...

  13. Seniority Number in Valence Bond Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenhua; Zhou, Chen; Wu, Wei

    2015-09-08

    In this work, a hierarchy of valence bond (VB) methods based on the concept of seniority number, defined as the number of singly occupied orbitals in a determinant or an orbital configuration, is proposed and applied to the studies of the potential energy curves (PECs) of H8, N2, and C2 molecules. It is found that the seniority-based VB expansion converges more rapidly toward the full configuration interaction (FCI) or complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) limit and produces more accurate PECs with smaller nonparallelity errors than its molecular orbital (MO) theory-based analogue. Test results reveal that the nonorthogonal orbital-based VB theory provides a reverse but more efficient way to truncate the complete active Hilbert space by seniority numbers.

  14. Natural analogue studies of the role of colloids, natural organics and microorganisms on radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Colloids may be important as a geochemical transport mechanism for radionuclides at geological repositories if they are (1) present in the groundwater, (2) stable with respect to both colloidal and chemical stabilities, (3) capable of adsorbing radionuclides, especially if the sorption is irreversible, and (4) mobile in the subsurface. The available evidence from natural analogue and other field studies relevant to these issues is reviewed, as is the potential role of mobile microorganisms (open-quotes biocolloidsclose quotes) on radionuclide migration. Studies have demonstrated that colloids are ubiquitous in groundwater, although colloid concentrations in deep, geochemically stable systems may be too low to affect radionuclide transport. However, even low colloid populations cannot be dismissed as a potential concern because colloids appear to be stable, and many radionuclides that adsorb to colloids are not readily desorbed over long periods. Field studies offer somewhat equivocal evidence concerning colloid mobility and cannot prove or disprove the significance of colloid transport in the far-field environment. Additional research is needed at new sites to properly represent a repository far-field. Performance assessment would benefit from natural analogue studies to examine colloid behavior at sites encompassing a suite of probable groundwater chemistries and that mimic the types of formations selected for radioactive waste repositories

  15. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides Through The Vadose Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; John F. McCarthy' Peter C. Lichtner; John M. Zachara

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of this project was to advance the basic scientific understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated Cs transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone. We focused our research on the hydrological and geochemical conditions beneath the leaking waste tanks at the USDOE Hanford reservation. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the lability and thermodynamic stability of colloidal materials, which form after reacting Hanford sediments with simulated Hanford Tank Waste, (2) to characterize the interactions between colloidal particles and contaminants, i.e., Cs and Eu, (3) to determine the potential of Hanford sediments for in situ mobilization of colloids, (4) to evaluate colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through sediments under unsaturated flow, (5) to implement colloid-facilitated contaminant transport mechanisms into a transport model, and (6) to improve conceptual characterization of colloid-contaminant-soil interactions and colloid-facilitated transport for clean-up procedures and long-term risk assessment

  16. Space-Valence Priming with Subliminal and Supraliminal Words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich eAnsorge

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available To date it is unclear whether (1 awareness-independent non-evaluative semantic processes influence affective semantics and whether (2 awareness-independent affective semantics influence non-evaluative semantic processing. In the current study, we investigated these questions with the help of subliminal (masked primes and visible targets in a space-valence across-category congruence effect. In line with (1, we found that subliminal space prime words influenced valence classification of supraliminal target words (Experiment 1: Classifications were faster with a congruent prime (e.g., the prime ‘up’ before the target ‘happy’ than with an incongruent prime (e.g., the prime ‘up’ before the target ‘sad’. In contrast to (2, no influence of subliminal valence primes on the classification of supraliminal space targets into up- and down-words was found (Experiment 2. Control conditions showed that standard masked response-priming effects were found with both subliminal prime types, and that an across-category congruence effect was also found with supraliminal valence primes and spatial target words. The final Experiment 3 confirmed that the across-category congruence effect indeed reflected priming of target categorization of a relevant meaning category. Together, the data jointly confirmed prediction (1 that awareness-independent non-evaluative semantic priming influences valence judgments.

  17. Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics: A Path Forward

    KAUST Repository

    Kramer, Illan J.

    2011-11-22

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) offer a path toward high-efficiency photovoltaics based on low-cost materials and processes. Spectral tunability via the quantum size effect facilitates absorption of specific wavelengths from across the sun\\'s broad spectrum. CQD materials\\' ease of processing derives from their synthesis, storage, and processing in solution. Rapid advances have brought colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic solar power conversion efficiencies of 6% in the latest reports. These achievements represent important first steps toward commercially compelling performance. Here we review advances in device architecture and materials science. We diagnose the principal phenomenon-electronic states within the CQD film band gap that limit both current and voltage in devices-that must be cured for CQD PV devices to fulfill their promise. We close with a prescription, expressed as bounds on the density and energy of electronic states within the CQD film band gap, that should allow device efficiencies to rise to those required for the future of the solar energy field. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  18. Polymer depletion-driven cluster aggregation and initial phase separation in charged nanosized colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gögelein, Christoph; Nägele, Gerhard; Buitenhuis, Johan; Tuinier, Remco; Dhont, Jan K. G.

    2009-05-01

    We study polymer depletion-driven cluster aggregation and initial phase separation in aqueous dispersions of charge-stabilized silica spheres, where the ionic strength and polymer (dextran) concentration are systematically varied, using dynamic light scattering and visual observation. Without polymers and for increasing salt and colloid content, the dispersions become increasingly unstable against irreversible cluster formation. By adding nonadsorbing polymers, a depletion-driven attraction is induced, which lowers the stabilizing Coulomb barrier and enhances the cluster growth rate. The initial growth rate increases with increasing polymer concentration and decreases with increasing polymer molar mass. These observations can be quantitatively understood by an irreversible dimer formation theory based on the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek pair potential, with the depletion attraction modeled by the Asakura-Oosawa-Vrij potential. At low colloid concentration, we observe an exponential cluster growth rate for all polymer concentrations considered, indicating a reaction-limited aggregation mechanism. At sufficiently high polymer and colloid concentrations, and lower salt content, a gas-liquidlike demixing is observed initially. Later on, the system separates into a gel and fluidlike phase. The experimental time-dependent state diagram is compared to the theoretical equilibrium phase diagram obtained from a generalized free-volume theory and is discussed in terms of an initial reversible phase separation process in combination with irreversible aggregation at later times.

  19. Polyion-induced aggregation of oppositely charged liposomes and charged colloidal particles: the many facets of complex formation in low-density colloidal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cametti, C

    2008-10-01

    This review focusses on recent developments in the experimental study of polyion-induced charged colloidal particle aggregation, with particular emphasis on the formation of cationic liposome clusters induced by the addition of anionic adsorbing polyions. These structures can be considered, under certain points of view, a new class of colloidal systems, with intriguing properties that opens interesting and promising new opportunities in various biotechnological applications. Lipidic structures of different morphologies and different structural complexities interacting with oppositely charged polyions give rise to a rich variety of self-assembled structures that present various orders of hierarchy in the sense that, starting from a basic level, for example a lipid bilayer, they arrange themselves into superstructures as, for example, multilamellar stacks or liquid-crystalline structures. These structures can be roughly divided into two classes according to the fact that the elementary structure, involved in building a more complex one, keeps or does not keeps its basic arrangement. To the first one, belong those aggregates composed by single structures that maintain their integrity, for example, lipidic vesicles assembled together by an appropriate external agent. The second one encompasses structures that do not resemble the ones of the original objects which form them, but, conversely, derive from a deep restructuring and rearrangement process, where the original morphology of the initial constitutive elements is completely lost. In this review, I will only briefly touch on higher level hierarchy structures and I will focus on the assembling processes involving preformed lipid bilayer vesicles that organize themselves into clusters, the process being induced by the adsorption of oppositely charged polyions. The scientific interest in polyion-induced liposome aggregates is two-fold. On the one hand, in soft-matter physics, they represent an interesting colloidal

  20. Colloids from the aqueous corrosion of uranium nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, M. D.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Mertz, C. J.; Goldberg, M. M.

    2005-12-01

    Colloids may enhance the subsurface transport of radionuclides and potentially compromise the long-term safe operation of the proposed radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Little data is available on colloid formation for the many different waste forms expected to be buried in the repository. This work expands the sparse database on colloids formed during the corrosion of metallic uranium nuclear fuel. We characterized spherical UO 2 and nickel-rich montmorilonite smectite-clay colloids formed during the corrosion of uranium metal fuel under bathtub conditions at 90 °C. Iron and chromium oxides and calcium carbonate colloids were present but were a minor population. The estimated upper concentration of the UO 2 and clays was 4 × 10 11 and 7 × 10 11-3 × 10 12 particles/L, respectively. However, oxygen eventually oxidized the UO 2 colloids, forming long filaments of weeksite K 2(UO 2) 2Si 6O 15 · 4H 2O that settled from solution, reducing the UO 2 colloid population and leaving predominantly clay colloids. The smectite colloids were not affected by oxygen. Plutonium was not directly observed within the UO 2 colloids but partitioned completely to the colloid size fraction. The plutonium concentration in the colloidal fraction was slightly higher than the value used in the viability assessment model, and does not change in concentration with exposure to oxygen. This paper provides conclusive evidence for single-phase radioactive colloids composed of UO 2. However, its impact on repository safety is probably small since oxygen and silica availability will oxidize and effectively precipitate the UO 2 colloids from concentrated solutions.

  1. Crust formation in drying colloidal suspensions

    KAUST Repository

    Style, R. W.

    2010-06-30

    During the drying of colloidal suspensions, the desiccation process causes the suspension near the air interface to consolidate into a connected porous matrix or crust. Fluid transport in the porous medium is governed by Darcy\\'s law and the equations of poroelasticity, while the equations of colloid physics govern processes in the suspension. We derive new equations describing this process, including unique boundary conditions coupling the two regions, yielding a moving-boundary model of the concentration and stress profiles during drying. A solution is found for the steady-state growth of a nedimensional crust during constant evaporation rate from the surface. The solution is used to demonstrate the importance of the system boundary conditions on stress profiles and diffusivity in a drying crust. © 2011 The Royal Society.

  2. Hole energy and momentum distributions in valence bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, G. van der.

    1982-01-01

    In order to understand the electrical and magnetic properties of solids, the knowledge of the density of states and the dispersion relation of the valence bands is indispensable. This thesis offers some alternative methods to obtain information about the nature of the valence band. Part A deals with the energy distribution of the photoelectrons. A simple model, which explains the core hole satellite structure in compounds with large correlation effects between the valence band holes and the created photo-hole, is outlined. CuCl, CuX 2 (X = F Cl and Br) are studied, by photoemission and Auger electron spectroscopies in determining the valence band properties. Part B deals with the simultaneous measurement of the energy and the wave vector of the emitted electrons. A practical example is given for the determination of the dispersion relation in copper. The measurements of a surface resonance band and the distribution of the secondary electrons are also reported. (Auth.)

  3. Effect of valence on the electromigration in silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Van Doan

    1970-01-01

    It is shown that the apparent effective valence Z B ** of a solute deduced from experiments differs from the true effective valence Z B * defined in the atomic models by a corrective term due to the 'vacancy flow effect'. The experimental results suggest that this corrective term is very important and that it is negative for transition elements; this hypothesis is confirmed for the case of iron in a copper matrix. For the elements to the right of silver in the periodic table, where the correction can be neglected, the effective valence of the solute varies linearly with z (z + 1), z being the difference between the valency of the solute and the solvent; in contrast, the further the solute is from the solvent in the periodic table the more nearly the electronic structure of the ion at the saddle point resembles that of the ion at the equilibrium position. (author) [fr

  4. Distinguishing advective and powered motion in self-propelled colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Young-Moo; Lammert, Paul E.; Hong, Yiying; Sen, Ayusman; Crespi, Vincent H.

    2017-11-01

    Self-powered motion in catalytic colloidal particles provides a compelling example of active matter, i.e. systems that engage in single-particle and collective behavior far from equilibrium. The long-time, long-distance behavior of such systems is of particular interest, since it connects their individual micro-scale behavior to macro-scale phenomena. In such analyses, it is important to distinguish motion due to subtle advective effects—which also has long time scales and length scales—from long-timescale phenomena that derive from intrinsically powered motion. Here, we develop a methodology to analyze the statistical properties of the translational and rotational motions of powered colloids to distinguish, for example, active chemotaxis from passive advection by bulk flow.

  5. Mn valence state and electrode performance of perovskite-type ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    increase in the oxidation state of Mn ions was due to the formation of Mn4+ ions and oxygen vacancies. The addition of Cu ions to LSM systems could lead to enhanced electrode performance for oxygen reduction reactions originating from the change in valence of Mn ions. Keywords. Cu-doped LSM; electrical conductivity; ...

  6. Dynamic Colloidal Molecules Maneuvered by Light-Controlled Janus Micromotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yirong; Mou, Fangzhi; Feng, Yizheng; Che, Shengping; Li, Wei; Xu, Leilei; Guan, Jianguo

    2017-07-12

    In this work, we propose and demonstrate a dynamic colloidal molecule that is capable of moving autonomously and performing swift, reversible, and in-place assembly dissociation in a high accuracy by manipulating a TiO 2 /Pt Janus micromotor with light irradiation. Due to the efficient motion of the TiO 2 /Pt Janus motor and the light-switchable electrostatic interactions between the micromotor and colloidal particles, the colloidal particles can be captured and assembled one by one on the fly, subsequently forming into swimming colloidal molecules by mimicking space-filling models of simple molecules with central atoms. The as-demonstrated dynamic colloidal molecules have a configuration accurately controlled and stabilized by regulating the time-dependent intensity of UV light, which controls the stop-and-go motion of the colloidal molecules. The dynamic colloidal molecules are dissociated when the light irradiation is turned off due to the disappearance of light-switchable electrostatic interaction between the motor and the colloidal particles. The strategy for the assembly of dynamic colloidal molecules is applicable to various charged colloidal particles. The simulated optical properties of a dynamic colloidal molecule imply that the results here may provide a novel approach for in-place building functional microdevices, such as microlens arrays, in a swift and reversible manner.

  7. Reductive and oxidative reactions with inorganic colloids in aqueous solution initiated by ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulvaney, P.C.; Sostaric, J.Z.; Ashokkumar, M.; Grieser, F.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The absorption of ultrasound in an aqueous solution can lead to the formation of H and OH radicals which can act as redox species or react with solutes to produce secondary radicals which themselves may participate in electron transfer reactions. The radical formation occurs through the growth then rapid collapse of microbubbles a process that produces localised hot spots with an internal temperature of the order of 5000 K. We have examined two colloidal systems one involving the reductive dissolution of MnO 2 colloids and the other the oxidative dissolution of CdS colloids. In the case of MnO 2 dissolution we found that the reduction of the colloidal metal oxide was considerably enhanced in the presence of aliphatic alcohols in solution and the longer the alkyl chain length on the alcohol the greater its effect. The dissolution of CdS colloids which we ascribe to the reaction of H 2 O 2 and O 2 - with the metal sulfide lo yield Cd 2+ and S could be significantly retarded by the presence of excess S 2- in solution. The mechanisms involved in these two dissolution processes will he presented. Our results clearly show that sonochemical reactions are quite efficient in colloidal solutions and this fact needs to be considered when using sonication to disperse colloidal material in solution, a common practice among colloid chemists

  8. The acoustic correlates of valence depend on emotion family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyk, Michel; Brown, Steven

    2014-07-01

    The voice expresses a wide range of emotions through modulations of acoustic parameters such as frequency and amplitude. Although the acoustics of individual emotions are well understood, attempts to describe the acoustic correlates of broad emotional categories such as valence have yielded mixed results. In the present study, we analyzed the acoustics of emotional valence for different families of emotion. We divided emotional vocalizations into "motivational," "moral," and "aesthetic" families as defined by the OCC (Ortony, Clore, and Collins) model of emotion. Subjects viewed emotional scenarios and were cued to vocalize congruent exclamations in response to them, for example, "Yay!" and "Damn!". Positive valence was weakly associated with high-pitched and loud vocalizations. However, valence interacted with emotion family for both pitch and amplitude. A general acoustic code for valence does not hold across families of emotion, whereas family-specific codes provide a more accurate description of vocal emotions. These findings are consolidated into a set of "rules of expression" relating vocal dimensions to emotion dimensions. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Isotopic investigation of the colloidal mobility of depleted uranium in a podsolic soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harguindeguy, S.; Crancon, P.; Pointurier, F.; Potin-Gautier, M.; Lespes, G.

    2014-01-01

    The mobility and colloidal migration of uranium were investigated in a soil where limited amounts of anthropogenic uranium (depleted in the "2"3"5U isotope) were deposited, adding to the naturally occurring uranium. The colloidal fraction was assumed to correspond to the operational fraction between 10 kDa and 1.2 μm after (ultra)filtration. Experimental leaching tests indicate that approximately 8-15% of uranium is desorbed from the soil. Significant enrichment of the leachate in the depleted uranium (DU) content indicates that uranium from recent anthropogenic DU deposit is weakly bound to soil aggregates and more mobile than geologically occurring natural uranium (NU). Moreover, 80% of uranium in leachates was located in the colloidal fractions. Nevertheless, the percentage of DU in the colloidal and dissolved fractions suggests that NU is mainly associated with the non-mobile coarser fractions of the soil. A field investigation revealed that the calculated percentages of DU in soil and groundwater samples result in the enhanced mobility of uranium downstream from the deposit area. Colloidal uranium represents between 10% and 32% of uranium in surface water and between 68% and 90% of uranium in groundwater where physicochemical parameters are similar to those of the leachates. Finally, as observed in batch leaching tests, the colloidal fractions of groundwater contain slightly less DU than the dissolved fraction, indicating that DU is primarily associated with macromolecules in dissolved fraction. (authors)

  10. Colloidal CdSe Quantum Rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedin, Igor; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2016-08-10

    Semiconductor quantum rings are of great fundamental interest because their non-trivial topology creates novel physical properties. At the same time, toroidal topology is difficult to achieve for colloidal nanocrystals and epitaxially grown semiconductor nanostructures. In this work, we introduce the synthesis of luminescent colloidal CdSe nanorings and nanostructures with double and triple toroidal topology. The nanorings form during controlled etching and rearrangement of two-dimensional nanoplatelets. We discuss a possible mechanism of the transformation of nanoplatelets into nanorings and potential utility of colloidal nanorings for magneto-optical (e.g., Aharonov-Bohm effect) and other applications.

  11. Magnetic re-entrance in intermediate valence compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allub, R.; Machiavelli, O.; Balseiro, C.; Alascio, B.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility is explored of magnetic re-entrance in intermediate valence compounds. Using a simplified Anderson-Lattice model the pressure-temperature magnetic phase diagram is obtained. This diagram shows that for some value of the microscopic parameters the temperature induced two transitions (non-magnetic to magnetically ordered to paramagnetic). The magnetization and the average occupation number of the localized state are calculated. Estimations of the observability of the effect in systems like CeAl 2 are made. (author)

  12. Shape-tailored polymer colloids on the road to become structural motifs for hierarchically organized materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plüisch, Claudia Simone; Wittemann, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Anisometric polymer colloids are likely to behave differently when compared with centrosymmetric particles. Their study may not only shine new light on the organization of matter; they may also serve as building units with specific symmetries and complexity to build new materials from them. Polymer colloids of well-defined complex geometries can be obtained by packing a limited number of spherical polymer particles into clusters with defined configurations. Such supracolloidal architectures can be fabricated at larger scales using narrowly dispersed emulsion droplets as templates. Assemblies built from at least two different types of particles as elementary building units open perspectives in selective targeting of colloids with specific properties, aiming for mesoscale building blocks with tailor-made morphologies and multifunctionality. Polymer colloids with defined geometries are also ideal to study shape-dependent properties such as the diffusion of complex particles. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Theoretical calculations of valence states in Fe-Mo compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada, F; Navarro, O; Noverola, H; Suárez, J R; Avignon, M

    2014-01-01

    The half-metallic ferromagnetic double perovskite compound Sr 2 FeMoO 6 is considered as an important material for spintronic applications. It appears to be fundamental to understand the role of electronic parameters controlling the half-metallic ground state. Fe-Mo double perovskites usually present some degree of Fe/Mo disorder which generally increases with doping. In this work, we study the valence states of Fe-Mo cations in the off-stoichiometric system Sr 2 Fe 1+x Mo 1−x O 6 (−1 ≤ x ≤ 1/3) with disorder. Our results for Fe and Mo valence states are obtained using the Green functions and the renormalization perturbation expansion method. The model is based on a correlated electron picture with localized Fe-spins and conduction Mo-electrons interacting with the local spins via a double-exchange-type mechanism

  14. Valence photoelectron spectrum of KBr: Effects of electron correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calo, A.; Huttula, M.; Patanen, M.; Aksela, H.; Aksela, S.

    2008-01-01

    The valence photoelectron spectrum has been measured for molecular KBr. Experimental energies of the main and satellite structures have been compared with the results of ab initio calculations based on molecular orbital theory including configuration and multiconfiguration interaction approaches. Comparison between the experimental KBr spectrum and previously reported Kr valence photoelectron spectrum has also been performed in order to find out if electron correlation is of the same importance in the valence ionized state of KBr as in the corresponding state of Kr

  15. Engineering colloidal quantum dot solids within and beyond the mobility-invariant regime

    KAUST Repository

    Zhitomirsky, David; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Levina, Larissa; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Kemp, Kyle W.; Ip, Alexander H.; Thon, Susanna M.; Sargent, Edward H.

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. Colloidal quantum dots are attractive materials for efficient, low-cost and facile implementation of solution-processed optoelectronic devices. Despite impressive mobilities (1-30 cm2V-1 s-1) reported for new

  16. Colloid electrochemistry of conducting polymer: towards potential-induced in-situ drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankoh, Supannee; Vagin, Mikhail Yu.; Sekretaryova, Alina N.; Thavarungkul, Panote; Kanatharana, Proespichaya; Mak, Wing Cheung

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pulsed electrode potential induced an in-situ drug release from dispersion of conducting polymer microcapsules. • Fast detection of the released drug within the colloid microenvironment. • Improved the efficiency of localized drug release at the electrode interface. - Abstract: Over the past decades, controlled drug delivery system remains as one of the most important area in medicine for various diseases. We have developed a new electrochemically controlled drug release system by combining colloid electrochemistry and electro-responsive microcapsules. The pulsed electrode potential modulation led to the appearance of two processes available for the time-resolved registration in colloid microenvironment: change of the electronic charge of microparticles (from 0.5 ms to 0.1 s) followed by the drug release associated with ionic equilibration (1–10 s). The dynamic electrochemical measurements allow the distinction of drug release associated with ionic relaxation and the change of electronic charge of conducting polymer colloid microparticles. The amount of released drug (methylene blue) could be controlled by modulating the applied potential. Our study demonstrated a surface-potential driven controlled drug release of dispersion of conducting polymer carrier at the electrode interfaces, while the bulk colloids dispersion away from the electrode remains as a reservoir to improve the efficiency of localized drug release. The developed new methodology creates a model platform for the investigations of surface potential-induced in-situ electrochemical drug release mechanism.

  17. Valence QCD: Connecting QCD to the quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, K.F.; Dong, S.J.; Draper, T.; Sloan, J.; Leinweber, D.; Woloshyn, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    A valence QCD theory is developed to study the valence quark properties of hadrons. To keep only the valence degrees of freedom, the pair creation through the Z graphs is deleted in the connected insertions, whereas the sea quarks are eliminated in the disconnected insertions. This is achieved with a new 'valence QCD' Lagrangian where the action in the time direction is modified so that the particle and antiparticle decouple. It is shown in this valence version of QCD that the ratios of isovector to isoscalar matrix elements (e.g., F A /D A and F S /D S ratios) in the nucleon reproduce the SU(6) quark model predictions in a lattice QCD calculation. We also consider how the hadron masses are affected on the lattice and discover new insights into the origin of dynamical mass generation. It is found that, within statistical errors, the nucleon and the Δ become degenerate for the quark masses we have studied (ranging from 1 to 4 times the strange mass). The π and ρ become nearly degenerate in this range. It is shown that valence QCD has the C, P, T symmetries. The lattice version is reflection positive. It also has the vector and axial symmetries. The latter leads to a modified partially conserved axial Ward identity. As a result, the theory has a U(2N F ) symmetry in the particle-antiparticle space. Through lattice simulation, it appears that this is dynamically broken down to U q (N F )xU bar q (N F ). Furthermore, the lattice simulation reveals spin degeneracy in the hadron masses and various matrix elements. This leads to an approximate U q (2N F )xU bar q (2N F ) symmetry which is the basis for the valence quark model. In addition, we find that the masses of N, Δ,ρ,π,a 1 , and a 0 all drop precipitously compared to their counterparts in the quenched QCD calculation. This is interpreted as due to the disappearance of the 'constituent' quark mass which is dynamically generated through tadpole diagrams. The origin of the hyperfine splitting in the baryon is

  18. Processing negative valence of word pairs that include a positive word.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itkes, Oksana; Mashal, Nira

    2016-09-01

    Previous research has suggested that cognitive performance is interrupted by negative relative to neutral or positive stimuli. We examined whether negative valence affects performance at the word or phrase level. Participants performed a semantic decision task on word pairs that included either a negative or a positive target word. In Experiment 1, the valence of the target word was congruent with the overall valence conveyed by the word pair (e.g., fat kid). As expected, response times were slower in the negative condition relative to the positive condition. Experiment 2 included target words that were incongruent with the overall valence of the word pair (e.g., fat salary). Response times were longer for word pairs whose overall valence was negative relative to positive, even though these word pairs included a positive word. Our findings support the Cognitive Primacy Hypothesis, according to which emotional valence is extracted after conceptual processing is complete.

  19. Live Imaging of Cellular Internalization of Single Colloidal Particle by Combined Label-Free and Fluorescence Total Internal Reflection Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Gerard D; Vllasaliu, Driton; Falcone, Franco H; Somekh, Michael G; Stolnik, Snjezana

    2015-11-02

    In this work we utilize the combination of label-free total internal reflection microscopy and total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRM/TIRF) microscopy to achieve a simultaneous, live imaging of single, label-free colloidal particle endocytosis by individual cells. The TIRM arm of the microscope enables label free imaging of the colloid and cell membrane features, while the TIRF arm images the dynamics of fluorescent-labeled clathrin (protein involved in endocytosis via clathrin pathway), expressed in transfected 3T3 fibroblasts cells. Using a model polymeric colloid and cells with a fluorescently tagged clathrin endocytosis pathway, we demonstrate that wide field TIRM/TIRF coimaging enables live visualization of the process of colloidal particle interaction with the labeled cell structure, which is valuable for discerning the membrane events and route of colloid internalization by the cell. We further show that 500 nm in diameter model polystyrene colloid associates with clathrin, prior to and during its cellular internalization. This association is not apparent with larger, 1 μm in diameter colloids, indicating an upper particle size limit for clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

  20. Non-Fermi Liquid Behavior in the Single-Impurity Mixed Valence Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-Ming; Su, Zhao-Bin; Yu, Lu

    An effective Hamiltonian of the Anderson single-impurity model with finite-range Coulomb interactions is derived near a particular limit, which is analogous to the Toulouse limit of the ordinary Kondo problem, and the physical properties around the mixed valence quantum critical point are calculated. At this quantum critical point, the local moment is only partially quenched and X-ray edge singularities are exhibited. Around this point, a new type of non-Fermi liquid behavior is predicted with an extra specific heat Cimp ~ T1/4 + AT ln T and spin-susceptibility χimp ~T-3/4 + B ln T.

  1. Sex, Age, and Emotional Valence: Revealing Possible Biases in the ‘Reading the Mind in the Eyes’ Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Kynast

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The ‘Reading the Mind in the Eyes’ test (RMET assesses a specific socio-cognitive ability, i.e., the ability to identify mental states from gaze. The development of this ability in a lifespan perspective is of special interest. Whereas former investigations were limited mainly to childhood and adolescence, the focus has been shifted towards aging, and psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases recently. Although the RMET is frequently applied in developmental psychology and clinical settings, stimulus characteristics have never been investigated with respect to potential effects on test performance. Here, we analyzed the RMET stimulus set with a special focus on interrelations between sex, age and emotional valence. Forty-three persons rated age and emotional valence of the RMET picture set. Differences in emotional valence and age ratings between male and female items were analyzed. The linear relation between age and emotional valence was tested over all items, and separately for male and female items. Male items were rated older and more negative than female stimuli. Regarding male RMET items, age predicted emotional valence: older age was associated with negative emotions. Contrary, age and valence were not linearly related in female pictures. All ratings were independent of rater characteristics. Our results demonstrate a strong confound between sex, age, and emotional valence in the RMET. Male items presented a greater variability in age ratings compared to female items. Age and emotional valence were negatively associated among male items, but no significant association was found among female stimuli. As personal attributes impact social information processing, our results may add a new perspective on the interpretation of previous findings on interindividual differences in RMET accuracy, particularly in the field of developmental psychology, and age-associated neuropsychiatric diseases. A revision of the RMET might be afforded to

  2. Sex, Age, and Emotional Valence: Revealing Possible Biases in the ‘Reading the Mind in the Eyes’ Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kynast, Jana; Schroeter, Matthias L.

    2018-01-01

    The ‘Reading the Mind in the Eyes’ test (RMET) assesses a specific socio-cognitive ability, i.e., the ability to identify mental states from gaze. The development of this ability in a lifespan perspective is of special interest. Whereas former investigations were limited mainly to childhood and adolescence, the focus has been shifted towards aging, and psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases recently. Although the RMET is frequently applied in developmental psychology and clinical settings, stimulus characteristics have never been investigated with respect to potential effects on test performance. Here, we analyzed the RMET stimulus set with a special focus on interrelations between sex, age and emotional valence. Forty-three persons rated age and emotional valence of the RMET picture set. Differences in emotional valence and age ratings between male and female items were analyzed. The linear relation between age and emotional valence was tested over all items, and separately for male and female items. Male items were rated older and more negative than female stimuli. Regarding male RMET items, age predicted emotional valence: older age was associated with negative emotions. Contrary, age and valence were not linearly related in female pictures. All ratings were independent of rater characteristics. Our results demonstrate a strong confound between sex, age, and emotional valence in the RMET. Male items presented a greater variability in age ratings compared to female items. Age and emotional valence were negatively associated among male items, but no significant association was found among female stimuli. As personal attributes impact social information processing, our results may add a new perspective on the interpretation of previous findings on interindividual differences in RMET accuracy, particularly in the field of developmental psychology, and age-associated neuropsychiatric diseases. A revision of the RMET might be afforded to overcome confounds

  3. Active structuring of colloidal armour on liquid drops

    OpenAIRE

    Dommersnes, Paul; Rozynek, Zbigniew; Mikkelsen, Alexander; Castberg, Rene; Kjerstad, Knut; Hersvik, Kjetil; Fossum, Jon Otto

    2013-01-01

    Adsorption and assembly of colloidal particles at the surface of liquid droplets are at the base of particle-stabilized emulsions and templating. Here we report that electrohydrodynamic and electro-rheological effects in leaky-dielectric liquid drops can be used to structure and dynamically control colloidal particle assemblies at drop surfaces, including electric-fieldassisted convective assembly of jammed colloidal ‘ribbons’, electro-rheological colloidal chains confined to a...

  4. Radiolytic reduction reaction of colloidal silver bromide solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Yasuhisa; Zushi, Takehiro; Hasegawa, Kunihiko; Matsuura, Tatsuo.

    1995-01-01

    The reduction reaction of colloidal silver bromide (AgBr 3 ) 2- in nitrous oxide gas saturated solution of some alcohols: methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol and 2-methyl-2-propanol by γ-irradiation was studied spectrophotometrically in order to elucidate the mechanism of the formation of colloidal silver bromide (AgBr 3 ) 3- at ambient temperature. The amount of colloidal silver bromide formed increases in the order: i-PrOH, EtOH, MeOH. In t-BuOH, colloidal silver bromide did not form. The relative reactivities of alcohols for colloidal silver bromide was also studied kinetically. (author)

  5. Dynamic behaviour of river colloidal and dissolved organic matter through cross-flow ultrafiltration system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, Andrew; Liu, Ruixia; Zhou, John L

    2005-07-01

    Through cross-flow filtration (CFF) with a 1-kDa regenerated cellulose Pellicon 2 module, the ultrafiltration characteristics of river organic matter from Longford Stream, UK, were investigated. The concentration of organic carbon (OC) in the retentate in the Longford Stream samples increased substantially with the concentration factor (cf), reaching approximately 40 mg/L at cf 15. The results of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and colloidal organic carbon (COC) analysis, tracking the isolation of colloids from river waters, show that 2 mg/L of COC was present in those samples and good OC mass balance (77-101%) was achieved. Fluorescence measurements were carried out for the investigation of retentate and permeate behaviour of coloured dissolved organic materials (CDOM). The concentrations of CDOM in both the retentate and permeate increased with increasing cf, although CDOM were significantly more concentrated in the retentate. The permeation model expressing the correlation between log[CDOM] in the permeate and logcf was able to describe the permeation behaviour of CDOM in the river water with regression coefficients (r(2)) of 0.94 and 0.98. Dry weight analysis indicated that the levels of organic colloidal particles were from 49 to 71%, and between 29 and 51% of colloidal particles present were inorganic. COC as a percentage of DOC was found to be 10-16% for Longford Stream samples.

  6. Colloid Thrusters, Physics, Fabrication and Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel; Akinwande, Akintunde I

    2005-01-01

    ... discovered pure ionic mode, the microfabrication in Silicon of two types of arrays of colloid or electrospray emitters, and the development of a quantitative theory for the colloidal regime (no ions...

  7. Determination of a natural valence-band offset - The case of HgTe and CdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, C. K.; Spicer, W. E.

    1987-01-01

    A method to determine a natural valence-band offset (NVBO), i.e., the change in the valence-band maximum energy which is intrinsic to the bulk band structures of semiconductors is proposed. The HgTe-CdTe system is used as an example in which it is found that the valence-band maximum of HgTe lies 0.35 + or - 0.06 eV above that of CdTe. The NVBO of 0.35 eV is in good agreement with the X-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurement of the heterojunction offset. The procedure to determine the NVBO between semiconductors, and its implication on the heterojunction band lineup and the electronic structures of semiconductor alloys, are discussed.

  8. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides through the Vadose Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B.; Zachara, John M.; McCarthy, John F.; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2006-01-01

    This project seeks to improve the basic understanding of the role of colloids in facilitating the transport of contaminants in the vadose zone. We focus on three major thrusts: (1) thermodynamic stability and mobility of colloids formed by reactions of sediments with highly alkaline tank waste solutions, (2) colloid-contaminant interactions, and (3) in-situ colloid mobilization and colloid facilitated contaminant transport occurring in both contaminated and uncontaminated Hanford sediments

  9. Impact of Redox Reactions on Colloid Transport in Saturated Porous Media: An Example of Ferrihydrite Colloids Transport in the Presence of Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Peng; Yuan, Songhu; Wang, Dengjun

    2016-10-18

    Transport of colloids in the subsurface is an important environmental process with most research interests centered on the transport in chemically stable conditions. While colloids can be formed under dynamic redox conditions, the impact of redox reactions on their transport is largely overlooked. Taking the redox reactions between ferrihydrite colloids and sulfide as an example, we investigated how and to what extent the redox reactions modulated the transport of ferrihydrite colloids in anoxic sand columns over a range of environmentally relevant conditions. Our results reveal that the presence of sulfide (7.8-46.9 μM) significantly decreased the breakthrough of ferrihydrite colloids in the sand column. The estimated travel distance of ferrihydrite colloids in the absence of sulfide was nearly 7-fold larger than that in the presence of 46.9 μM sulfide. The reduced breakthrough was primarily attributed to the reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite colloids by sulfide in parallel with formation of elemental sulfur (S(0)) particles from sulfide oxidation. Reductive dissolution decreased the total mass of ferrihydrite colloids, while the negatively charged S(0) decreased the overall zeta potential of ferrihydrite colloids by attaching onto their surfaces and thus enhanced their retention in the sand. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical role of redox reactions on the transport of redox-sensitive colloids in saturated porous media.

  10. Reducing the negative valence of stressful memories through emotionally valenced, modality-specific tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tadmor, Avia; McNally, Richard J; Engelhard, Iris M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: People who perform a cognitively demanding secondary task while recalling a distressing memory often experience the memory as less emotional, vivid, or accurate during subsequent recollections. In this experiment, we tested whether the emotional valence (positive versus

  11. Aging of a Binary Colloidal Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Jennifer M.; Cianci, Gianguido C.; Weeks, Eric R.

    2008-03-01

    After having undergone a glass transition, a glass is in a non-equilibrium state, and its properties depend on the time elapsed since vitrification. We study this phenomenon, known as aging. In particular, we study a colloidal suspension consisting of micron-sized particles in a liquid --- a good model system for studying the glass transition. In this system, the glass transition is approached by increasing the particle concentration, instead of decreasing the temperature. We observe samples composed of particles of two sizes (d1= 1.0μm and d2= 2.0μm) using fast laser scanning confocal microscopy, which yields real-time, three-dimensional movies deep inside the colloidal glass. We then analyze the trajectories of several thousand particles as the glassy suspension ages. Specifically, we look at how the size, motion and structural organization of the particles relate to the overall aging of the glass. We find that areas richer in small particles are more mobile and therefore contribute more to the structural changes found in aging glasses.

  12. Colloid transport in model fracture filling materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, S.; Garcia-Garcia, S.; Jonsson, M.

    2010-12-01

    Colloid transport in model fracture filling materials Susanna Wold*, Sandra García-García and Mats Jonsson KTH Chemical Science and Engineering Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden *Corresponding author: E-mail: wold@kth.se Phone: +46 8 790 6295 In colloid transport in water-bearing fractures, the retardation depends on interactions with the fracture surface by sorption or filtration. These mechanisms are difficult to separate. A rougher surface will give a larger area available for sorption, and also when a particle is physically hindered, it approaches the surface and enables further sorption. Sorption can be explained by electrostatics were the strongest sorption on minerals always is observed at pH below pHpzc (Filby et al., 2008). The adhesion of colloids to mineral surfaces is related to the surface roughness according to a recent study (Darbha et al., 2010). There is a large variation in the characteristics of water-bearing fractures in bedrock in terms of aperture distribution, flow velocity, surface roughness, mineral distributions, presence of fracture filling material, and biological and organic material, which is hard to implement in modeling. The aim of this work was to study the transport of negatively charged colloids in model fracture filling material in relation to flow, porosity, mineral type, colloid size, and surface charge distribution. In addition, the impact on transport of colloids of mixing model fracture filling materials with different retention and immobilization capacities, determined by batch sorption experiments, was investigated. The transport of Na-montmorillonite colloids and well-defined negatively charged latex microspheres of 50, 100, and 200 nm diameter were studied in either columns containing quartz or quartz mixed with biotite. The ionic strength in the solution was exclusively 0.001 and pH 6 or 8.5. The flow rates used were 0.002, 0.03, and 0.6 mL min-1. Sorption of the colloids on the model fracture

  13. Biodistribution of 99MTc-antimony trisulphide colloid in a species of squamate versus rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, C.; Cooter, R.D.; Tsopelas, C.; Chatterton, B.E.; Munns, S.; Daniels, C.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We were interested in visualising the lymphatic system of dragon lizards, as a prelude to a study investigating regenerating lymphatics in other squamate models. Subcutaneous injection of 99m Tc-antimony trisulphide colloid (AC) intradermally of the tail resulted in rapid migration to the pelvic plexus, with subsequent visualisation of the blood pool and intraabdominal organs. Thirty minutes after intravenous administration of 99m Tc-AC in dragon lizards, there was high blood activity of 7.50% dose/g, liver uptake of 0.27% dose/g, spleen uptake of 0.33% dose/g and femur uptake of 0.03% dose/g. In comparison to a mammalian model of similar size, intravenous injection of this tracer in rats resulted in far lower blood activity of 0.46% dose/g, and substantially higher liver uptake of 9.70% dose/g, spleen uptake of 22.30% dose/g and femur uptake of 1.72% dose/g. These results agree with the British Pharmacopoeial test limits set for the distribution of 99m Tc-AC in mice. In summary, results show the cold blooded lizards to have rapidly migrating lymph in the tail, appearing to enter the circulation near the pelvic plexus. A low metabolic rate of the squamate retained 99m Tc-AC in slowly circulating blood, gradually depositing this colloid in liver and spleen. In contrast, rats have much faster yet typical colloidal uptake by the reticuloendothelial system. Copyright (2003) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  14. Colloids related to low level and intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsay, J.D.F.; Russell, P.J.; Avery, R.G.

    1991-03-01

    A comprehensive investigation has been undertaken to improve the understanding of the potential role of colloids in the context of disposal and storage of low and intermediate level waste immobilised in cement. Several topics have been investigated using a wide range of advanced physico-chemical and analytical techniques. These include: (a) the study of formation and characteristics of colloids in cement leachates, (b) the effects of the near-field aqueous chemistry on the characteristics of colloids in repository environments, (c) colloid sorption behaviour, (d) interactions of near-field materials with leachates, and (e) preliminary assessment of colloid migration behaviour. It has been shown that the generation of colloids in cement leachates can arise from a process of nucleation and growth leading to an amorphous phase which is predominantly calcium silicate hydrate. Such colloidal material has a capacity for association with polyvalent rare earths and actinides and these may be significant in the source term and processes involving radionuclide retention in the near field. It has also been shown that the near-field aqueous chemistry (pH, Ca 2+ concentration) has a marked effect on colloid behaviour (deposition and stability). A mechanistic approach to predict colloid sorption affinity has been developed which highlights the importance of colloid characteristics and the nature of the ionic species. (author)

  15. Pharmacology of colloids and crystalloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffel, M I; Kaufman, B S

    1992-04-01

    We have attempted to review body fluid distribution by compartments so that the reader understands the physiology of ICF and ECF, and the relationship between interstitial and intravascular fluids. Crystalloids such as NS and RL are distributed to the ECF, whereas colloids primarily remain intravascular for longer periods. Although effective, crystalloids tend to require larger volumes for infusion, and edema remains a problem. Colloids as a group are extremely effective volume expanders, but none is ideal. Albumin, hetastarch, dextran, and the less commonly used colloids each have significant toxicities that must be considered when using them. Intelligent choices can be made to optimize use of these fluids.

  16. Valence-bond theory of linear Hubbard and Pariser-Parr-Pople models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soos, Z. G.; Ramasesha, S.

    1984-05-01

    The ground and low-lying states of finite quantum-cell models with one state per site are obtained exactly through a real-space basis of valence-bond (VB) diagrams that explicitly conserve the total spin. Regular and alternating Hubbard and Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) chains and rings with Ne electrons on N(PPP models, but differ from mean-field results. Molecular PPP parameters describe well the excitations of finite polyenes, odd polyene ions, linear cyanine dyes, and slightly overestimate the absorption peaks in polyacetylene (CH)x. Molecular correlations contrast sharply with uncorrelated descriptions of topological solitons, which are modeled by regular polyene radicals and their ions for both wide and narrow alternation crossovers. Neutral solitons have no midgap absorption and negative spin densities, while the intensity of the in-gap excitation of charged solitons is not enhanced. The properties of correlated states in quantum-cell models with one valence state per site are discussed in the adiabatic limit for excited-state geometries and instabilities to dimerization.

  17. Incremental validity of positive and negative valence in predicting personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Leonard J; Yufik, Tom; Gros, Daniel F

    2010-04-01

    The Big Seven model of personality includes five dimensions similar to the Big Five model as well as two evaluative dimensions—Positive Valence (PV) and Negative Valence (NV)—which reflect extremely positive and negative person descriptors, respectively. Recent theory and research have suggested that PV and NV predict significant variance in personality disorder (PD) above that predicted by the Big Five, but firm conclusions have not been possible because previous studies have been limited to only single measures of PV, NV, and the Big Five traits. In the present study, we replicated and extended previous findings using three markers of all key constructs—including PV, NV, and the Big Five—in a diverse sample of 338 undergraduates. Results of hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that PV incrementally predicted Narcissistic and Histrionic PDs above the Big Five and that NV nonspecifically incremented the prediction of most PDs. Implications for dimensional models of personality pathology are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Preparation, definition and stabilisation of an inorganic sol by an organic macromolecule: case of an aluminium hydroxide colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurbin-Faucon, A.

    1966-01-01

    An attempt has been made in this work to define an aluminium colloid which is resistant as a high ionic force and to analyse, in the case of this system, the possibilities. and the limits of certain techniques used in the physical chemistry of colloids. The aluminium colloid is obtained by peptization of an aluminium hydroxide precipitate. The physical characterisation of the micelle is effected using the light scattering method which makes it possible to define the colloid from the point of view of size and shape. An interesting characteristic, arising from the low refractive index of the colloid studied, has led us to use not only the general MIE methods but also the methods normally used in macro-molecular chemistry; these latter involve fewer hypotheses and thus make it possible to carry out a more complete analysis of the sol. Since the aluminium hydroxide colloid is sensitive to a high ionic force, we have begun to study the possibility of making it more stable by means of a macromolecule: gelatin. After characterizing this macromolecule by means of potentiometric and light scattering measurements, we have shown the existence of a chemical interaction which occurs when aluminium hydroxide is brought into contact with gelatin; this interaction leads to the production of an inorganic-organic entity which is stable when the ionic force increases. We have established some of the characteristics of the complex thus formed, in particular the pH range of the solution necessary for its formation, its stability. in the presence of electrolytes and some hypotheses concerning its size and shape, Finally we have tried to define the influence of. the molecular weight and the respective dimensions of each constituent on the formation of the complex and thus on the stabilization. (author) [fr

  19. Testing the paradigms of the glass transition in colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Roseanna; Wang, Jialun; Peng, Xiaoguang; Li, Qi; McKenna, Gregory

    2017-11-01

    Many molecular liquids freeze upon fast enough cooling. This so-called glass state is path dependent and out of equilibrium, as measured by the Kovacs signature experiments, i.e. intrinsic isotherms, asymmetry of approach and memory effect. The reasons for this path- and time-dependence are not fully understood, due to fast molecular relaxations. Colloids provide a natural way to model such behavior, owing to disparity in colloidal versus solvent time scales that can slow dynamics. To shed light on the ambiguity of glass transition, we study via large-scale dynamic simulation of hard-sphere colloidal glass after volume-fraction jumps, where particle size increases at fixed system volume followed by protocols of the McKenna-Kovacs signature experiments. During and following each jump, the positions, velocities, and particle-phase stress are tracked and utilized to characterize relaxation time scales. The impact of both quench depth and quench rate on arrested dynamics and ``state'' variables is explored. In addition, we expand our view to various structural signatures, and rearrangement mechanism is proposed. The results provide insight into not only the existence of an ``ideal'' glass transition, but also the role of structure in such a dense amorphous system.

  20. Explaining the effect of event valence on unrealistic optimism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ron S; Brown, Mark G

    2009-05-01

    People typically exhibit 'unrealistic optimism' (UO): they believe they have a lower chance of experiencing negative events and a higher chance of experiencing positive events than does the average person. UO has been found to be greater for negative than positive events. This 'valence effect' has been explained in terms of motivational processes. An alternative explanation is provided by the 'numerosity model', which views the valence effect simply as a by-product of a tendency for likelihood estimates pertaining to the average member of a group to increase with the size of the group. Predictions made by the numerosity model were tested in two studies. In each, UO for a single event was assessed. In Study 1 (n = 115 students), valence was manipulated by framing the event either negatively or positively, and participants estimated their own likelihood and that of the average student at their university. In Study 2 (n = 139 students), valence was again manipulated and participants again estimated their own likelihood; additionally, group size was manipulated by having participants estimate the likelihood of the average student in a small, medium-sized, or large group. In each study, the valence effect was found, but was due to an effect on estimates of own likelihood, not the average person's likelihood. In Study 2, valence did not interact with group size. The findings contradict the numerosity model, but are in accord with the motivational explanation. Implications for health education are discussed.

  1. Measurement of correlations between low-frequency vibrational modes and particle rearrangements in quasi-two-dimensional colloidal glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ke; Manning, M L; Yunker, Peter J; Ellenbroek, Wouter G; Zhang, Zexin; Liu, Andrea J; Yodh, A G

    2011-09-02

    We investigate correlations between low-frequency vibrational modes and rearrangements in two-dimensional colloidal glasses composed of thermosensitive microgel particles, which readily permit variation of the sample packing fraction. At each packing fraction, the particle displacement covariance matrix is measured and used to extract the vibrational spectrum of the "shadow" colloidal glass (i.e., the particle network with the same geometry and interactions as the sample colloid but absent damping). Rearrangements are induced by successive, small reductions in the packing fraction. The experimental results suggest that low-frequency quasilocalized phonon modes in colloidal glasses, i.e., modes that present low energy barriers for system rearrangements, are spatially correlated with rearrangements in this thermal system.

  2. The radiation chemistry of colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellers, R.M.

    1976-08-01

    One of the most important problems associated with water cooled reactors is the accumulation on the pipework of radio-active deposits. These are formed from corrosion products which become activated during their passage through the reactor core. The first step of the activation process involves the deposition of the corrosion products, which are present as either colloidal or particulate matter, onto surfaces in the reactor core, i.e. within the radiation zone. A review of the literature on the effect of radiation on colloids is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the dependence of colloidal parameters such as particle size, turbidity and electrophoretic mobility on radiation dose. Most of the data available is of a qualitative nature only. Evidence is presented that colloids of iron are affected (in some cases precipitated) by radiation, and it is suggested that this process plays a part in the deposition of corrosion products in nuclear reactor cores. The bulk of the information available can be rationalized in terms of the radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions, and the interaction of the radicals produced with the atoms or molecules at the surface of the colloidal particles. This approach is very successful in explaining the variation of the mean particle size of monodisperse sulphur hydrosols with dose, for which quantitative experimental data are available. (author)

  3. Aging near the wall in colloidal glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Cong; Huang, Xinru; Weeks, Eric

    In a colloidal glass system, particles move slower as sample ages. In addition, their motions may be affected by their local structure, and this structure will be different near a wall. We examine how the aging process near a wall differs from that in the bulk of the sample. In particular, we use a confocal microscope to observe 3D motion in a bidisperse colloidal glass sample. We find that flat walls induce the particles to organize into layers. The aging process behaves differently near the boundary, especially within the first three layers. Particle motion near the wall is noticeably slower but also changes less dramatically with age. We compare and contrast aging seen in samples with flat and rough walls.

  4. Slow Auger Relaxation in HgTe Colloidal Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnychuk, Christopher; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2018-05-03

    The biexciton lifetimes in HgTe colloidal quantum dots are measured as a function of particle size. Samples produced by two synthetic methods, leading to partially aggregated or well-dispersed particles, exhibit markedly different dynamics. The relaxation characteristics of partially aggregated HgTe inhibit reliable determinations of the Auger lifetime. In well-dispersed HgTe quantum dots, the biexciton lifetime increases approximately linearly with particle volume, confirming trends observed in other systems. The extracted Auger coefficient is three orders of magnitude smaller than that for bulk HgCdTe materials with similar energy gaps. We discuss these findings in the context of understanding Auger relaxation in quantum-confined systems and their relevance to mid-infrared optoelectronic devices based on HgTe colloidal quantum dots.

  5. Colloidal silver nanoparticles prepared by UV-light induced citrate reduction technique for the quantitative detection of uric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Anupam; Panda, Sovan Kumar

    2018-04-01

    Reddish-yellow color colloid consisting of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) has been synthesized by reducing aqueous AgNO3 solution by photo-induced citrate reduction technique under UV light. As prepared colloid exhibits single and intense plasmonic absorption peak in the violet region of the visible spectra with the peak centered at 405 nm. The NPs are fine and spherical with diameter ranging from 5 to 10 nm. These colloidal NPs have been used for the quantitative detection of uric acid by UV-VIS spectroscopy. A linear red shifting of the characteristics Plasmonic absorption peak of Ag NPs is observed with uric acid concentration. Uric acid can be detected by UV-VIS spectroscopy down to 5 nM limit using the prepared colloid.

  6. Structure and stability of charged colloid-nanoparticle mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight, Braden M.; Denton, Alan R.

    2018-03-01

    Physical properties of colloidal materials can be modified by addition of nanoparticles. Within a model of like-charged mixtures of particles governed by effective electrostatic interactions, we explore the influence of charged nanoparticles on the structure and thermodynamic phase stability of charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions. Focusing on salt-free mixtures of particles of high size and charge asymmetry, interacting via repulsive Yukawa effective pair potentials, we perform molecular dynamics simulations and compute radial distribution functions and static structure factors. Analysis of these structural properties indicates that increasing the charge and concentration of nanoparticles progressively weakens correlations between charged colloids. We show that addition of charged nanoparticles to a suspension of like-charged colloids can induce a colloidal crystal to melt and can facilitate aggregation of a fluid suspension due to attractive van der Waals interactions. We attribute the destabilizing influence of charged nanoparticles to enhanced screening of electrostatic interactions, which weakens repulsion between charged colloids. This interpretation is consistent with recent predictions of an effective interaction theory of charged colloid-nanoparticle mixtures.

  7. Development of COLLAGE 3; Role for colloids in the transport of radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klos, Richard (Aleksandria Sciences, Sheffield (United Kingdom)); Bath, Adrian (Intellisci Ltd., Loughborough (United Kingdom))

    2010-03-15

    The issue of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (CFRT) was last addressed by the Swedish nuclear regulators in 2001 - 2002. SKI had commissioned the Collage code with subsequent development as Collage 2. This code was employed to investigate the potential role for colloids to have been involved in the transport of radionuclides at the Nevada Test Site and to examine the implications for CFRT in the Swedish disposal programme. It was concluded that colloids could not be ruled out as a mechanism for rapid transport and early release from the geosphere. Recently the 'bentonite erosion scenario' has become of concern. In it the generation of large quantities of bentonite colloids in fractures as a result of fresh water ingress at repository depth is possible. Potentially, these could carry radiologically significant quantities of radionuclides to an early release to the surface system. The objectives of this work are to update the knowledge of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through a fractured geosphere and to provide review capability within the SSM. Recent developments in CFRT (reviewed here) indicate that additional parameters needed to be added to the existing Collage 2 plus code in order to adequately represent colloid transport in fractures. This report looks at modifications to the model and discusses the implications of the implementation of the new processes. Authors conclude that the process of colloid filtration is an important mitigating mechanism. A new code - Collage 3 - is demonstrated and suggestions for further work are given

  8. Colloid and radionuclide retention mechanisms in fractured rock under near-natural flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delos, A.; Schaefer, T.; Geckeis, H.; Guimera, J.; Carrera, J.; Fanghaenel, T.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Experiments in fractured host rock (Grimsel Test Site, GTS, Switzerland) revealed that the colloid relevance for actinide migration is high due to the specific geochemical groundwater conditions [1]. However, even under such conditions it is found that retention of colloids and colloid-borne actinides becomes significant under near-natural groundwater flow rates (1-10 m/a) [2]. Underlying mechanisms of colloid and radionuclide retention are not well understood up to now. The present study co-funded by the NoE ACTINET-6 focuses on (i) the kinetics of actinide-colloid interactions and (ii) the relevance of matrix diffusion as a competition process to other retention mechanisms which affect the actinides behavior in fractured rock systems such as the Grimsel granodiorite. Colloid migration is studied with well defined model colloids as e.g. fluorescence dyed carboxylated polystyrene particles, and natural colloids extracted from bentonite (FEBEX) and from fracture filling material (GTS). In order to study the influence of matrix porosity on actinides migration, those experiments are performed in columns of well defined geometry filled with microporous unmodified silica spheres, porous ceramic material and natural fracture filling material from the GTS. The behaviour of actinides (Pu(IV) and Am(III)) sorbed onto bentonite colloids is investigated in column and batch experiments. All experiments are performed under anoxic conditions. Colloid characterization methods used in this study include the combination of photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD), fluorimetry and field flow fractionation (FFF). Experimental results and their application to the parametrisation of reactive colloid transport models are discussed. [1] Geckeis H, Schaefer T, Hauser W, Rabung T, Missana T, Degueldre C, Moeri A, Eikenberg J, Fierz T, Alexander WR (2004) Results of the Colloid and Radionuclide Retention experiment

  9. Experimental Constraints on the Partitioning and Valence of V and Cr in Garnet and Coexisting Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Sutton, S.; Berthet, S.; Newville, M.

    2008-01-01

    A series of experiments with garnet and coexisting melt have been carried out across a range of oxygen fugacities (near hematite-magnetite (HM) to below the iron-wustite (IW) buffers) at 1.7 GPa to study the partitioning and valence of Cr and V in both phases. Experiments were carried out in a non end loaded piston cylinder apparatus, and the run products were analyzed with electron microprobe and xray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis at beamline 13-ID at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Lab. The valence of vanadium and chromium were determined using the position and intensity of the Ka pre-edge peaks, calibrated on a series of Cr and Vbearing standard glasses. This technique has been applied to V and Cr in glasses and V in spinels previously, and in these isotropic phases there are no orientational effects on the XANES spectra (Righter et al., 2006, Amer. Mineral. 91, 1643-1656). We also now demonstrate this to be true for V and Cr in garnet. Also, previous work has shown that V has a higher valence in the glass (or melt) than in the coexisting spinel. This is also true for V in garnet-glass pairs in this study. Vanadium valence in garnets varies from 2.7 below the IW buffer to 3.7 near HM, and for coexisting glass it varies from 3.2 to 4.3. Vanadium valence measured in some natural garnets from mantle localities indicates V in the more reduced range at 2.5. Comparisons will be made between fO2 estimated from V valence and other methods for garnet-bearing mantle samples. In contrast, Cr valence measured in garnet and coexisting glass for all experimental and natural samples is 2.9- 3.0, suggesting that the valence of Cr does not vary within either phase across a large fO2 range. These results demonstrate that while V varies from 2+ to 3+ to 4+ in garnet-melt systems, Cr does not, and this will ultimately affect the partitioning behavior of these two elements in natural systems. Garnet/melt D(Cr) are between 12 and 17 across this range

  10. Pharmacological study of radioactive-gold colloid transport by blood and by serous exudate; Contribution a l'etude pharmacologique du transport des colloides d'or radioactif par le sang et les exsudats sereux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousselet, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-06-01

    After giving the essential physico-chemical properties of the colloids, the author considers the biological role of these substances and, in connection with their transport by the blood, their capture by elements of the reticula-endothelial system. A summary is given of present knowledge concerning the role of serous proteins in the transport of substances, particularly that of radio-active colloidal gold. The blood fractions which can take part in colloidal gold transport are the red blood corpuscles, the leukocytes and histiocytic elements as well as the plasma. The radioactive distribution in these various fractions is obtained by autoradiography of blood sediments. After showing the importance of the role of the plasma in radioactive particle transport, the author, describes the attempts made to detect a possible of colloidal gold 198 on the various serous proteins using various methods of separation. The ''in vitro'' and ''in vivo'' bonds between colloidal gold-198 particles and either the serous proteins or healthy specimens or the effusion liquids of pathological origin in man, or due to an experimental inflammation with carregenin in the rat, have been studied. The bonding appears to be effective because of the protective macromolecular layer formed by the gelatine. The different positions of the colloidal grains on the electrophoregram can only be explained by their different physico-chemical characteristics. Gold in the ionic form, on the other hand, is combined only with the albumen is the amount metal present does not exceed a certain value. (author) [French] Apres avoir enonce les proprietes physicochimiques essentielles des colloides nous etudions le devenir biologique de ces substances et, en relation avec leur transport par le sang, leur captation par les elements du Systeme Reticulo-Endothelial. Nous resumons les connaissances acquises jusqu'alors sur le role des proteines seriques dans le transport des

  11. Influences on physicians' choices of intravenous colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletin, Michael S; Stewart, Thomas E; Norton, Peter G

    2002-07-01

    Controversy over the optimal intravenous fluid for volume resuscitation continues unabated. Our objectives were to characterize the demographics of physicians who prescribe intravenous colloids and determine factors that enter into their decision to choose a colloid. Questionnaire with 61 items. Ten percent ( n = 364) of frequent intravenous fluid prescribers in the province of Ontario, Canada. The response rate was 74%. Colloid use in the past year was reported by 79% of the responding physicians. Important reasons for choosing a colloid included blood loss and manipulation of oncotic pressure. Physicians tended to prefer either albumin or pentastarch, but no important reasons were found for choosing between the two. Albumin with or without crystalloid was preferred in 5/13 scenarios by more than 50% of the respondents, whereas pentastarch was not favored by more than 50% of respondents in any scenario. Physicians practising in critical care areas and teaching hospitals generally preferred pentastarch to albumin. Physicians reporting pentastarch as representing greater than 90% of total colloid use were more likely to have been visited by a drug detailer for pentastarch than those who used less synthetic colloid (54 vs 22%, p distribution. Although albumin appeared to be preferred in more clinical niches, most physicians did not state reasons for choosing between products. Marketing, specialty, location of practice and clinical scenario appear to play significant roles in the utilization of colloid products.

  12. Dissipative particle dynamics: Effects of thermostating schemes on nano-colloid electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh Afrouzi, Hamid; Moshfegh, Abouzar; Farhadi, Mousa; Sedighi, Kurosh

    2018-05-01

    A novel fully explicit approach using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method is introduced in the present study to model the electrophoretic transport of nano-colloids in an electrolyte solution. Slater type charge smearing function included in 3D Ewald summation method is employed to treat electrostatic interaction. Performance of various thermostats are challenged to control the system temperature and study the dynamic response of colloidal electrophoretic mobility under practical ranges of external electric field (0 . 072 relationships respectively with electric field and colloidal repulsion; although they each respectively behave direct and inverse trends with salt concentration under various thermostats. Nosé-Hoover-Lowe-Andersen and Lowe-Andersen thermostats are found to function more effectively under high electric fields (E > 0 . 145[v/nm ]) while thermal equilibrium is maintained. Reasonable agreements are achieved by benchmarking the system radial distribution function with available EW3D modellings, as well as comparing reduced mobility against conventional Smoluchowski and Hückel theories, and numerical solution of Poisson-Boltzmann equation.

  13. In-medium pion valence distributions in a light-front model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, J.P.B.C. de, E-mail: joao.mello@cruzeirodosul.edu.br [Laboratório de Física Teórica e Computacional – LFTC, Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, 01506-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Tsushima, K. [Laboratório de Física Teórica e Computacional – LFTC, Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, 01506-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Ahmed, I. [Laboratório de Física Teórica e Computacional – LFTC, Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, 01506-000 São Paulo (Brazil); National Center for Physics, Quaidi-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2017-03-10

    Pion valence distributions in nuclear medium and vacuum are studied in a light-front constituent quark model. The in-medium input for studying the pion properties is calculated by the quark-meson coupling model. We find that the in-medium pion valence distribution, as well as the in-medium pion valence wave function, are substantially modified at normal nuclear matter density, due to the reduction in the pion decay constant.

  14. Joint Mapping of Mobility and Trap Density in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solids

    KAUST Repository

    Stadler, Philipp; Sutherland, Brandon R.; Ren, Yuan; Ning, Zhijun; Simchi, Arash; Thon, Susanna M.; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H.

    2013-01-01

    to be harnessed. Here, we deploy nanodielectric field-effect transistors to map the energy landscape within the band gap of a colloidal quantum dot solid. We exploit the self-limiting nature of the potentiostatic anodization growth mode to produce the thinnest

  15. Characterization of magnetic colloids by means of magnetooptics

    OpenAIRE

    Baraban, Larysa; Erbe, Artur; Leiderer, Paul

    2007-01-01

    A new, efficient method for the characterization of magnetic colloids based on the Faraday effect is proposed. According to the main principles of this technique, it is possible to detect the stray magnetic field of the colloidal particles induced inside the magnetooptical layer. The magnetic properties of individual particles can be determined providing measurements in a wide range of magnetic fields. The magnetization curves of capped colloids and paramagnetic colloids were measured by mean...

  16. Bletilla colloid as a vascular embolization agent: experimental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Chuansheng; Feng Gansheng; Zhang Yanfang

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To study the efficacy, safety and related characteristics of bletilla colloid as a vascular embolization agent. Materials and methods: The authors prepared bletilla colloid as a vascular embolization agent from the stem tubers of bletilla of Chinese medicinal herb. Related characteristics of bletilla colloid were studied. In four pigs hepatic arterial embolization was performed with the bletilla colloid. Results: The bletilla colloid was a homogenous viscous colloid whose relative viscosity was 2324.6 mm 2 /s. It was easily injected through 4-F catheter and hyperattenuating under fluoroscopy, meanwhile, with good histocompatibility and hemo-compatibility, without pyrogenetic response and toxicity. In vitro, the mixture of bletilla colloid and MMC did not produce separation and suspension phenomena but released 50% of MMC at 1.8h and 100% at 3.4h. The bletilla colloid mainly embolized peripheral arteries, maintaining occlusion for 5 weeks and without formation of collateral circulation. The injuries of normal hepatic tissues were slight, without hepatic cytonecrosis. Conclusions: Bletilla colloid, safe and effective in use with angioembolic function and characteristics of carrier and slow-release, is a potential peripheral embolization agent

  17. A pilot test of methods for determination of trace metals bound to colloids in surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Kersti (Geosigma AB (Sweden))

    2011-01-15

    Two methods have been tested for the determination of trace metals associated with colloid species in surface waters, using test water from Eckarfjaerden (PFM000070) in Forsmark; 1) fractionation (ultra filtration) using special membrane filters with cut-offs of 1 kD and 5 kD and 2) filtration using a system of standard membrane filters with varying pore sizes connected in series. Both methods were somewhat modified compared to previous methods for colloid determination in groundwater within the site investigations at Forsmark and Laxemar (PLU). The results show that, in general, the largest amounts of metals associated with a colloid phase were recovered in the fraction between 1kD and 5 kD which indicates that the metal ions are associated with low molecular weight organic acids. Similar amounts were recovered on the filters in the filtration experiment. A minor part of the colloidal phase metals was recovered in the fraction larger than 5 kD i.e. metal ions associated with larger organic acids or colloidal size clay minerals. The metals present preferably as colloids in the fractionation experiment were: iron, thorium, cerium, uranium, neodymium, titanium, zirconium and yttrium. The filtering experiment showed larger parts of titanium and aluminum in the colloid phase than the fractionation experiment while the iron and cerium portions were equal and the uranium, yttrium and neodymium portions were lower. The results from the fractionation test showed that the dissolved parts were large for barium, manganese, strontium and rubidium. In the filtration test, uranium, yttrium and rubidium, were also present mainly as dissolved ions. The detection limit for filter analysis of thorium was high, and the part of thorium present as colloids was determined to <50%. Issues and methodological problems: - Severe contamination caused interpretation difficulties for several metal ions, especially chromium, nickel and zinc. - Both methods are time consuming and difficult to

  18. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Associated Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Column transport experiments were conducted in which water from the Chancellor nuclear test cavity was transported through crushed volcanic tuff from Pahute Mesa. In one experiment, the cavity water was spiked with solute 137Cs, and in another it was spiked with 239/240Pu(IV) nanocolloids. A third column experiment was conducted with no radionuclide spike at all, although the 137Cs concentrations in the water were still high enough to quantify in the column effluent. The radionuclides strongly partitioned to natural colloids present in the water, which were characterized for size distribution, mass concentration, zeta potential/surface charge, critical coagulation concentration, and qualitative mineralogy. In the spiked water experiments, the unanalyzed portion of the high-concentration column effluent samples were combined and re-injected into the respective columns as a second pulse. This procedure was repeated again for a third injection. Measurable filtration of the colloids was observed after each initial injection of the Chancellor water into the columns, but the subsequent injections (spiked water experiments only) exhibited no apparent filtration, suggesting that the colloids that remained mobile after relatively short transport distances were more resistant to filtration than the initial population of colloids. It was also observed that while significant desorption of 137Cs from the colloids occurred after the first injection in both the spiked and unspiked waters, subsequent injections of the spiked water exhibited much less 137Cs desorption (much greater 137Cs colloid-associated transport). This result suggests that the 137Cs that remained associated with colloids during the first injection represented a fraction that was more strongly adsorbed to the mobile colloids than the initial 137Cs associated with the colloids. A greater amount of the 239/240

  19. Transport of Intrinsic Plutonium Colloids in Saturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, D.; Abdel-Fattah, A.; Boukhalfa, H.; Ware, S. D.; Tarimala, S.; Keller, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    Actinide contaminants were introduced to the subsurface environment as a result of nuclear weapons development and testing, as well as for nuclear power generation and related research activities for defense and civilian applications. Even though most actinide species were believed to be fairly immobile once in the subsurface, recent studies have shown the transport of actinides kilometers away from their disposal sites. For example, the treated liquid wastes released into Mortandad Canyon at the Los Alamos National Laboratory were predicted to travel less than a few meters; however, plutonium and americium have been detected 3.4 km away from the waste outfall. A colloid-facilitated mechanism has been suggested to account for this unexpected transport of these radioactive wastes. Clays, oxides, organic matters, and actinide hydroxides have all been proposed as the possible mobile phase. Pu ions associated with natural colloids are often referred to as pseudo-Pu colloids, in contrast with the intrinsic Pu colloids that consist of Pu oxides. Significant efforts have been made to investigate the role of pseudo-Pu colloids, while few studies have evaluated the environmental behavior of the intrinsic Pu colloids. Given the fact that Pu (IV) has extremely low solubility product constant, it can be inferred that the transport of Pu in the intrinsic form is highly likely at suitable environmental conditions. This study investigates the transport of intrinsic Pu colloids in a saturated alluvium material packed in a cylindrical column (2.5-cm Dia. x 30-cm high) and compares the results to previous data on the transport of pseudo Pu colloids in the same material. A procedure to prepare a stable intrinsic Pu colloid suspension that produced consistent and reproducible electrokinetic and stability data was developed. Electrokinetic properties and aggregation stability were characterized. The Pu colloids, together with trillium as a conservative tracer, were injected into the

  20. Colloidal Characteristics of Water Systems of Rhamnolipid Biocomplex of Strain Pseudomonas sp. PS-17 with Tween-80 and their Prospects for Biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Karpenko

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions. The peculiarities of colloid-chemical characteristics of RBC and Tween-80 systems are determined, the prospects of their use for increasing efficiency of emulsification and sunflower growth stimulation are determined.

  1. Developmental Reversals in False Memory: Effects of Emotional Valence and Arousal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainerd, C. J.; Holliday, R. E.; Reyna, V. F.; Yang, Y.; Toglia, M. P.

    2010-01-01

    Do the emotional valence and arousal of events distort children's memories? Do valence and arousal modulate counterintuitive age increases in false memory? We investigated those questions in children, adolescents, and adults using the Cornell/Cortland Emotion Lists, a word list pool that induces false memories and in which valence and arousal can…

  2. Colloidal silver iodide characterization within the framework of nuclear spent fuel dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard-Mozziconacci, O.; Devisme, F.; Marignier, JL.; Belloni, J.

    2004-01-01

    Iodine-129 partitioning during the dissolution stage of the Purex reprocessing, based on volatile molecular iodine formation and stripping, is mainly limited by dissolved oxidized species such as iodate and insoluble forms such as colloidal silver iodide. The study of their formation and stability, not completely clarified, requires to prepare the colloid in a reproducible way under various conditions and to characterize it. The work reported here describes a first step towards this objective. Carried out under simplified operating conditions, speciation and physical characterization (spectrophotometry and TEM) made it possible to evaluate, for the first time, the molar extinction coefficient of the colloid per monomer and its variation with the nuclearity, ε(n), on the basis of a simplified coalescence model: ε(n) = ε max (1 - e -αn ) where ε max ∼ 7000 L mol -1 cm -1 and α = 4.3 x 10 -6 per monomer number in a particle. (authors)

  3. Phosphate binding by natural iron-rich colloids in streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baken, S.; Moens, C.; Griffioen, J.J.; Smolders, E.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) in natural waters may be bound to iron (Fe) bearing colloids. However, the natural variation in composition and P binding strength of these colloids remain unclear. We related the composition of "coarse colloids" (colloids in the 0.1-1.2 μm size range) in 47 Belgian streams to the

  4. Comparison of photon correlation spectroscopy with photosedimentation analysis for the determination of aqueous colloid size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Terry F.

    1990-01-01

    Colloidal materials, dispersed phases with dimensions between 0.001 and 1 μm, are potential transport media for a variety of contaminants in surface and ground water. Characterization of these colloids, and identification of the parameters that control their movement, are necessary before transport simulations can be attempted. Two techniques that can be used to determine the particle-size distribution of colloidal materials suspended in natural waters are compared. Photon correlation Spectroscopy (PCS) utilizes the Doppler frequency shift of photons scattered off particles undergoing Brownian motion to determine the size of colloids suspended in water. Photosedimentation analysis (PSA) measures the time-dependent change in optical density of a suspension of colloidal particles undergoing centrifugation. A description of both techniques, important underlying assumptions, and limitations are given. Results for a series of river water samples show that the colloid-size distribution means are statistically identical as determined by both techniques. This also is true of the mass median diameter (MMD), even though MMD values determined by PSA are consistently smaller than those determined by PCS. Because of this small negative bias, the skew parameters for the distributions are generally smaller for the PCS-determined distributions than for the PSA-determined distributions. Smaller polydispersity indices for the distributions are also determined by PCS.

  5. Evaluation of the liver scintigraphy with sup(99m)Tc-Sn-colloid, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Kazufumi; Kusumi, Yoshimi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Takeda, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Toshiyuki

    1975-01-01

    sup(99m)Tc-Sn-colloid, supplied by Dinabot Radioisotope Lab. in a kit ''Auto vial; Sn-colloid'', was compared with 198 Au-colloid as a liver scanning agent by the electrolysis method. The preparation procedure was short and very simple, and the labelling efficiency was more than 99.7% in the authors chromatographic studies. Sequential whole body and liver radioactivities after intravenous administration of sup(99m)Tc-Sn-colloid were measured for a period of 24 hours. Because radioactivity in the whole body and liver was diminished only by the decay of sup(99m)Tc. So, the excretion of sup(99m)Tc-Sn-colloid from the whole body and the liver was thought to be negligible. Phantom studies showed that tumor models of 2 cm in diameter in the superficial layers could be detected more cleary than those in the deep layers by using sup(99m)Tc-Sn-colloid. Using 2-3 mCi of sup(99m)Tc-Sn-colloid, a scintiphoto of 50,000 counts was taken in about ten seconds. So, it was possible to obtain motionless liver scintigrams with breath-holding. Blood disappearance curves of both colloids were measured by a scintillation counter and radioisotope accumulation curves in the liver and the spleen were measured by an Anger camera with data processing system. sup(99m)Tc-Sn-colloid was eliminated from the blood more rapidly than 198 Au-colloid and was accumulated in the liver more rapidly than 198 Au-colloid. The splenic uptake of the former exceeded that of the latter. As seen in these studies, the agents differ appreciably from each other in their behavior. These differences were discussed to be due to the character of the particle such as size, etc. And other reasons may lie in the differences of phagocytic activities of the liver and the spleen. (Evans, J.)

  6. Bond-Valence Constraints on Liquid Water Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickmore, Barry R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Brown, I. David; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2009-01-01

    The recent controversy about the structure of liquid water pits a new model involving water molecules in relatively stable rings-and-chains structures against the standard model that posits water molecules in distorted tetrahedral coordination. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations 'both classical and ab initio' almost uniformly support the standard model, but since none of them can yet reproduce all the anomalous properties of water, they leave room for doubt. We argue that it is possible to evaluate these simulations by testing them against their adherence to the bond-valence model, a well known, and quantitatively accurate, empirical summary of the behavior of atoms in the bonded networks of inorganic solids. Here we use the results of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of ice, water, and several solvated aqueous species to show that the valence sum rule (the first axiom of the bond-valence model,) is followed in both solid and liquid bond networks. We then test MD simulations of water, employing several popular potential models, against this criterion and the experimental O-O radial distribution function. It appears that most of those tested cannot satisfy both criteria well, except TIP4P and TIP5P. If the valence sum rule really can be applied to simulated liquid structures, then it follows that the bonding behaviors of atoms in liquids are in some ways identical to those in solids. We support this interpretation by showing that the simulations produce O-H-O geometries completely consistent with the range of geometries available in solids, and the distributions of instantaneous valence sums reaching the atoms in both the ice and liquid water simulations are essentially identical. Taken together, this is powerful evidence in favor of the standard distorted tetrahedral model of liquid water structure

  7. Macaque cardiac physiology is sensitive to the valence of passively viewed sensory stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Bliss-Moreau

    Full Text Available Autonomic nervous system activity is an important component of affective experience. We demonstrate in the rhesus monkey that both the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system respond differentially to the affective valence of passively viewed video stimuli. We recorded cardiac impedance and an electrocardiogram while adult macaques watched a series of 300 30-second videos that varied in their affective content. We found that sympathetic activity (as measured by cardiac pre-ejection period increased and parasympathetic activity (as measured by respiratory sinus arrhythmia decreased as video content changes from positive to negative. These findings parallel the relationship between autonomic nervous system responsivity and valence of stimuli in humans. Given the relationship between human cardiac physiology and affective processing, these findings suggest that macaque cardiac physiology may be an index of affect in nonverbal animals.

  8. Suspensions of colloidal particles and aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Babick, Frank

    2016-01-01

    This book addresses the properties of particles in colloidal suspensions. It has a focus on particle aggregates and the dependency of their physical behaviour on morphological parameters. For this purpose, relevant theories and methodological tools are reviewed and applied to selected examples. The book is divided into four main chapters. The first of them introduces important measurement techniques for the determination of particle size and interfacial properties in colloidal suspensions. A further chapter is devoted to the physico-chemical properties of colloidal particles—highlighting the interfacial phenomena and the corresponding interactions between particles. The book’s central chapter examines the structure-property relations of colloidal aggregates. This comprises concepts to quantify size and structure of aggregates, models and numerical tools for calculating the (light) scattering and hydrodynamic properties of aggregates, and a discussion on van-der-Waals and double layer interactions between ...

  9. Pressure-induced valence change and moderate heavy fermion state in Eu-compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Fuminori; Okauchi, Keigo; Sato, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Ai; Akamine, Hiromu; Ashitomi, Yosuke; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Valenta, Jaroslav; Prchal, Jiri; Sechovský, Vladimir; Aoki, Dai; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2018-05-01

    A pressure-induced valence transition has attracted much attention in Eu-compounds. Among them, EuRh2Si2, EuNi2Ge2, and EuCo2Ge2 reveal the valence transition around 1, 2, and 3 GPa, respectively. We have succeeded in growing single crystals of EuT2X2 (T: transition metal, X: Si, Ge) and studied electronic properties under pressure. EuRh2Si2 indicates a first-order valence transition between 1 and 2 GPa, with a large and prominent hysteresis in the electrical resistivity. At higher pressures, the first-order valence transition changes to a cross-over regime with an intermediate valence state. Tuning of the valence state with pressure is reflected in a drastic change of the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity in EuRh2Si2 single crystals. Effect of pressure on the valence states on EuRh2Si2, EuIr2Si2, EuNi2Ge2, and EuCo2Ge2, as well as an isostructural related compound EuGa4, are reviewed.

  10. Size determinations of plutonium colloids using autocorrelation photon spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triay, I.R.; Rundberg, R.S.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.; Hobart, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Newton, T.W.; Thompson, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Autocorrelation Photon Spectroscopy (APS) is a light-scattering technique utilized to determine the size distribution of colloidal suspensions. The capabilities of the APS methodology have been assessed by analyzing colloids of known sizes. Plutonium(IV) colloid samples were prepared by a variety of methods including: dilution; peptization; and alpha-induced auto-oxidation of Pu(III). The size of theses Pu colloids was analyzed using APS. The sizes determined for the Pu colloids studied varied from 1 to 370 nanometers. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  11. The colloid hematite particle migration through the unsaturated porous bed at the presence of biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowska, Agnieszka; Sznajder, Izabela; Sadowski, Zygmunt

    2017-07-01

    Colloidal particles have an ability to sorb heavy metals, metalloids, and organic compounds (e.g. biosurfactants) present in soil and groundwater. The pH and ionic strength changes may promote release of such particles causing potential contaminant transport. Therefore, it is very important to know how a colloid particle-mineral particle and colloid-mineral-biosurfactant system behaves in the natural environment. They can have negative impact on the environment and human health. This study highlighted the influence of biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the transport of colloidal hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) through porous bed (materials collected from the Szklary and Zloty Stok solid waste heaps from Lower Silesia, Poland). Experiments were conducted using column set in two variants: colloid solution with porous bed and porous bed with adsorbed biosurfactants, in the ionic strengths of 5 × 10 -4 and 5 × 10 -3  M KCl. The zeta potential of mineral materials and colloidal hematite, before and after adsorption of biosurfactant, was determined. Obtained results showed that reduction in ionic strength facilitates colloidal hematite transport through the porous bed. The mobility of colloidal hematite was higher when the rhamnolipid adsorbed on the surface of mineral grain.

  12. Two-dimensional melting of colloids with long-range attractive interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Di; Doxastakis, Manolis; Hilou, Elaa; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2017-02-22

    The solid-liquid melting transition in a two-dimensional (2-D) attractive colloidal system is visualized using superparamagnetic colloids that interact through a long-range isotropic attractive interaction potential, which is induced using a high-frequency rotating magnetic field. Various experiments, supported by Monte Carlo simulations, are carried out over a range of interaction potentials and densities to determine structure factors, Lindermann parameters, and translational and orientational order parameters. The system shows a first-order solid-liquid melting transition. Simulations and experiments suggest that dislocations and disclinations simultaneously unbind during melting. This is in direct contrast with reports of 2-D melting of paramagnetic particles that interact with a repulsive interaction potential.

  13. Determination of radiochemical purity and pharmacokinetic parameters of sup(99m)Tc-sulphur colloid and sup(99m)Tc-tin colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, V.; Konstantinovska, D.; Milivojevic, K.; Bzenic, J.

    1981-01-01

    Labelling yield and radiochemical purity, higher than 95%, of sup(99m)Tc-colloid preparations were determined by using the paper chromatography method. Less than 3% of labelled citric acid, added to the preparation as a buffer solution, has been found in sup(99m)Tc-sulphur colloid. High radiochemical purity and optimum size of colloid particles has also been proved by biodistribution studies on experimental animals. The analysis performed has shown that more than 50% of sup(99m)Tc-colloid preparations excreted by urine is sup(99m)TcO - , the remaining past 50% being protein bound sup(99m)Tc. Biological half-time of excretion of the fast phase is the same for both preparations, i.e. 10 min, while for the slow component it is 120 min in sup(99m)Tc-S-colloid and 160 min in sup(99m)Tc-Sn colloid. (orig.) [de

  14. Plutonium valence state distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1974-01-01

    A calculational method for ascertaining equilibrium valence state distributions of plutonium in acid solutions as a function of the plutonium oxidation number and the solution acidity is illustrated with an example. The method may be more practical for manual use than methods based upon polynomial equations. (T.G.)

  15. CzEngVallex: a Bilingual Czech-English Valency Lexicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urešová Zdeňka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a new bilingual Czech-English verbal valency lexicon (called CzEng-Vallex representing a relatively large empirical database. It includes 20,835 aligned valency frame pairs (i.e., verb senses which are translations of each other and their aligned arguments. This new lexicon uses data from the Prague Czech-English Dependency Treebank and also takes advantage of the existing valency lexicons for both languages: the PDT-Vallex for Czech and the EngVallex for English. The CzEngVallex is available for browsing as well as for download in the LINDAT/CLARIN repository.

  16. A Colloidal-Quantum-Dot-Based Self-Charging System via the Near-Infrared Band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Se-Woong; Cho, Jungmin; Kim, Joo-Seong; Kim, Changjo; Na, Kwangmin; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Jun, Sunhong; Song, Jung Hoon; Jeong, Sohee; Choi, Jang Wook; Lee, Jung-Yong

    2018-05-11

    A novel self-charging platform is proposed using colloidal-quantum-dot (CQD) photovoltaics (PVs) via the near-infrared (NIR) band for low-power electronics. Low-bandgap CQDs can convert invisible NIR light sources to electrical energy more efficiently than wider spectra because of reduced thermalization loss. This energy-conversion strategy via NIR photons ensures an enhanced photostability of the CQD devices. Furthermore, the NIR wireless charging system can be concealed using various colored and NIR-transparent fabric or films, providing aesthetic freedom. Finally, an NIR-driven wireless charging system is demonstrated for a wearable healthcare bracelet by integrating a CQD PVs receiver with a flexible lithium-ion battery and entirely embedding them into a flexible strap, enabling permanent self-charging without detachment. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Fast technetium Eigen-colloid determination: preparative CPC combined with suspension liquid scintillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breynaert, E.; Maes, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Both medical and environmental studies concerned with the solubility and the complexation chemistry of technetium have encountered colloidal Tc(IV)-forms. Although the existence of the Tc colloids has been proven by various techniques [1-6], their determination still remains an issue. Recently a Column Precipitation Chromatography (CPC) technique was developed which enabled the quantitative determination of technetium Eigen-colloids. Based on this technique, a solid phase extraction (SPE)-like methodology was developed that can be used in combination with suspension liquid scintillation to provide a fast analysis of the Eigen-colloid content of a sample. The CPC technique is a thorough analysis methodology for the quantitative determination of the Eigen-colloid content of a sample containing reduced technetium species. This technique requires a relative long elution scheme and fractionation of the eluate. The fractionation also implies a relatively long counting time to determine the Eigen-colloid activity of a sample. Currently an SPE-like analysis methodology was developed which combines a good estimate of the Eigen-colloid content with fast analysis times. To construct a methodology providing both features a specialized extraction apparatus was constructed and a quantitative suspension liquid scintillation technique was developed. This combination enables the Eigen-colloid determination within a short experimental time (15 min) and a limited counting time (60 min). The authors acknowledge a grant from KULeuven University and financial support from the KULeuven Geconcerteerde Onderzoeksacties (GOA2000/007). We also kindly acknowledge NIRAS/ONDRAF for financial support from Contract CCHO 20004004862 [1] Grossmann, B. and R. Muenze, Relationship between complex formation by 99 Tc(IV) and the chemical structure of aliphatic carboxylic acid ligands. The International Journal of Applied Radiation and Isotopes, 1982. 33(3): p. 189

  18. Analysis report for WIPP colloid model constraints and performance assessment parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariner, Paul E.; Sassani, David Carl

    2014-03-01

    An analysis of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) colloid model constraints and parameter values was performed. The focus of this work was primarily on intrinsic colloids, mineral fragment colloids, and humic substance colloids, with a lesser focus on microbial colloids. Comments by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) concerning intrinsic Th(IV) colloids and Mg-Cl-OH mineral fragment colloids were addressed in detail, assumptions and data used to constrain colloid model calculations were evaluated, and inconsistencies between data and model parameter values were identified. This work resulted in a list of specific conclusions regarding model integrity, model conservatism, and opportunities for improvement related to each of the four colloid types included in the WIPP performance assessment.

  19. Review on influences of colloids on geologic disposal of high level radioactive waste. For better understanding of natural colloidal materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Yutaka; Suzuki, Masaya; Kamioka, Hikari; Yoshida, Takahiro; Suko, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    Although the influences of colloidal materials on radionuclide transport in geological media are pointed out, their behaviors in natural environment have not yet been well elucidated and therefore their influences on the geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) are not fully estimated quantitatively. This paper reviewed the studies on natural colloids, especially focused on inorganic, organic and biological colloids, and discussed the future works to be carried out. Much attention should be paid to the sampling and analysis. Excellent techniques for in-situ observation, concentration without changing the state of colloid, standard procedure for analysis, are necessary to be developed. More research studies on the behaviors of colloids are required in not only far- and near-fields but also items on effects of the environments and its evolution. (author)

  20. Production of 99mTc-anatomy sulfide colloid for lymphoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabani, G. A.; Hamzeh, H.; Najafi, R.

    2002-01-01

    The lymphatic system provides one of the chief paths for the spread (metastasis) of cancer from one part of body to another. Hodgkin's diseases, lymphocytic leukemia, various metastatic diseases and many lymph ode disorders can be assessed by lymphoscintigraphy. Radionuclide lymphoscintigraphy has been used for many years to define the lymphatic drainage of melanoma. The most common radiopharmaceuticals used for lymphoscintigraphy are 99 mTc-Sc, 99 mTc-antimony sulfide colloid has been chosen between other colloids. For antimony sulfide colloid preparation, hydrogen sulfide gas was passed through D.E. until saturation. Antimony potassium tartrate is then added to the solution to form Sb 2 S 3 ol lide. The colloid was stabilized with P.V.P. Excess H 2 S was removed by bubbling with nitrogen. The preparation was then filtered through a 0.22 μm membrane filter and aliquots containing 1.017 mg Sb 2 S 3 were dispensed into the reaction vials. Labeling was accomplished by adding 99 mTcO 4 and HCl to the vial and then heating it at 100 deg C in boiling water bath for 10 min. The P H was adjust by adding a phosphate buffer. The radiochemical purity of 99 mTc-antimony disulfide colloid by I TLC-S G/normal saline was more than 95 percent. The amount of Sb in reaction vial was 0. 729 mg. The study demonstrated that our formulation of antimony-sulfide which has 0.0486 mg (Sb) in 0.2 ml of 99 mTc-Sb 2 S 3 colloid per patient (total volume after labeling with 99 mTc is 3 ml)

  1. THE VALENCE OF CORPUSCULAR PROTEINS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, M H; Mover, L S

    1942-07-20

    BY THE USE OF TWO EXTREME MODELS: a hydrated sphere and an unhydrated rod the valence (net charge) of corpuscular proteins can be successfully calculated from electric mobility data by the Debye-Hückel theory (modified to include the effect of the ions in the ion atmosphere) in conjunction with the electrophoretic theory of Henry. As pointed out by Abramson, this permits a comparison with values for the valence from titration data. Electrometric titration measurements of serum albumin B (Kekwick) have been determined at several ionic strengths. These results, together with the available data in the literature for serum albumin B, egg albumin, and beta-lactoglobulin have been used to compare values for the valence calculated from measurements of titration, electrophoresis, and membrane potentials. The results indicate that the usual interpretation of titration curves is open to serious question. By extrapolation of the titration data to zero ionic strength and protein concentration, there results an "intrinsic" net charge curve describing the binding of H(+) (OH(-)) ion alone. This curve agrees closely, in each case, with values of the valence calculated from mobility data (which in turn are in close accord with those estimated from membrane potential measurements). The experimental titration curves in the presence of appreciable quantities of ions and protein deviate widely from the ideal curve. It is suggested that, under these conditions, binding of undissociated acid (base) leads to erroneous values for the net charge. This binding would not affect the electrophoretic mobility. Values of the net charge obtained by the two extreme models from electrophoretic data are in agreement within 15 to 20 per cent. The agreement between the cylindrical model and the titration data is somewhat better in each case than with the sphere; i.e., this comparison enables a choice to be made between asymmetry and hydration in the interpretation of results from sedimentation and

  2. Interaction between colloidal particles. Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longcheng Liu; Neretnieks, Ivars (Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology)

    2010-02-15

    This report summarises the commonly accepted theoretical basis describing interaction between colloidal particles in an electrolyte solution. The two main forces involved are the van der Waals attractive force and the electrical repulsive force. The report describes in some depth the origin of these two forces, how they are formulated mathematically as well as how they interact to sometimes result in attraction and sometimes in repulsion between particles. The report also addresses how the mathematical models can be used to quantify the forces and under which conditions the models can be expected to give fair description of the colloidal system and when the models are not useful. This report does not address more recent theories that still are discussed as to their applicability, such as ion-ion correlation effects and the Coulombic attraction theory (CAT). These and other models will be discussed in future reports

  3. Simulating colloid hydrodynamics with lattice Boltzmann methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cates, M E; Stratford, K; Adhikari, R; Stansell, P; Desplat, J-C; Pagonabarraga, I; Wagner, A J

    2004-01-01

    We present a progress report on our work on lattice Boltzmann methods for colloidal suspensions. We focus on the treatment of colloidal particles in binary solvents and on the inclusion of thermal noise. For a benchmark problem of colloids sedimenting and becoming trapped by capillary forces at a horizontal interface between two fluids, we discuss the criteria for parameter selection, and address the inevitable compromise between computational resources and simulation accuracy

  4. Magnetic SiO2/Fe3O4 colloidal crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C-K; Hou, C-H; Chen, C-C; Tsai, Y-L; Chang, L-M; Wei, H-S; Hsieh, K-H; Chan, C-H

    2008-01-01

    We proposed a novel technique to fabricate colloidal crystals by using monodisperse SiO 2 coated magnetic Fe 3 O 4 (SiO 2 /Fe 3 O 4 ) microspheres. The magnetic SiO 2 /Fe 3 O 4 microspheres with a diameter of 700 nm were synthesized in the basic condition with ferric sulfate, ferrous sulfate, tartaric acid and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) in the reaction system. Monodisperse SiO 2 /Fe 3 O 4 superparamagnetic microspheres have been successfully used to fabricate colloidal crystals under the existing magnetic field

  5. Evaluation of the liver scintigraphy with /sup 99m/Tc-Sn-colloid. II. C Clinical studies by comparison with /sup 198/Au-colloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, K; Nishimura, T; Takeda, H; Furukawa, T [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Kajiya, Fumihiko

    1975-08-01

    Clinical significance of the liver scintigraphy with sup(99m)Tc-Sn-colloid was evaluated in comparison with those with /sup 198/Au-colloid. The liver scintigrams with sup(99m)Tc-Sn-colloid and /sup 198/Au-colloid were done in 36 cases of various hepatic diseases and RI accumulation curves in the liver and the spleen, and the blood disapearance curves were also obtained. The conclusions were as follows. The liver scintigrams with sup(99m)Tc-Sn-colloid proved to be more sensitive in the detection of tumors, especially, in the lower margin, left lobe and superficial layers of the liver than those with /sup 198/Au-colloid. In all cases, including normal and cirrhotic subjects, visualizations of the spleen were seen on the scintigrams with sup(99m)Tc-Sn-colloid. In diffuse hepatic diseases, comparing both radiopharmaceuticals, the splenic accumulations were studied qualitatively and quantitatively. As a result, the ratio (spleen/liver) was thought to be useful for the differentiation of diffuse hepatic diseases concerned with splenic function and/or size. It was also shown that sup(99m)Tc-Sn-colloid was useful as a spleen scanning agent. The Tl/2 in the liver accumulation curves with sup(99m)Tc-Sn-colloid were not as clearly differentiated in the various hepatic diseases as those with /sup 198/Au-colloid where those indexes were useful in the evaluation of liver functions.

  6. 5th International Conference on Valence Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Malik, S

    1987-01-01

    During the Koln meeting (August 28-31, 1984), Irdia was chosen as the venue for the next International Conference on Valence Fluctuations. lhis was in recognition ard appreciation of the work done, both experimental ard theoretical, by the Irdian scientists in this area during the last decade. We decided to hold this Conference in the month of January, 1987 at Bangalore. lhe subject of Valence Fluctuations has kept itself alive ard active as it has provided many shocks ard suprises particularly among the Ce- ard U-based intermetallies. lhe richness of many interesting physical phenomena occurring in mixed valent materials, the flexibility of modifying their physical properties (by alloying, for example) ard the possibility of synthesizing a wide variety of new such materials seem to be the key factors in this regard. Barely six months before this Conference, an International Conference on Anomalous Rare Earths and Actinides (ICAREA) had been held at Grenoble (July, 1986) which also focussed on mixed valence a...

  7. In search for an optimal methodology to calculate the valence electron affinities of temporary anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puiatti, Marcelo; Vera, D Mariano A; Pierini, Adriana B

    2009-10-28

    Recently, we have proposed an approach for finding the valence anion ground state, based on the stabilization exerted by a polar solvent; the methodology used standard DFT methods and relatively inexpensive basis sets and yielded correct electron affinity (EA) values by gradually decreasing the dielectric constant of the medium. In order to address the overall performance of the new methodology, to find the best conditions for stabilizing the valence state and to evaluate its scope and limitations, we gathered a pool of 60 molecules, 25 of them bearing the conventional valence state as the ground anion and 35 for which the lowest anion state found holds the extra electron in a diffuse orbital around the molecule (non valence state). The results obtained by testing this representative set suggest a very good performance for most species having an experimental EA less negative than -3.0 eV; the correlation at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,p) level being y = 1.01x + 0.06, with a correlation index of 0.985. As an alternative, the time dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach was also tested with both B3LYP and PBE0 functionals. The methodology we proposed shows a comparable or better accuracy with respect to TD-DFT, although the TD-DFT approach with the PBE0 functional is suggested as a suitable estimate for species with the most negative EAs (ca.-2.5 to -3.5 eV), for which stabilization strategies can hardly reach the valence state. As an application, a pool of 8 compounds of key biological interest with EAs which remain unknown or unclear were predicted using the new methodology.

  8. Entropy favours open colloidal lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiaoming; Chen, Qian; Granick, Steve

    2013-03-01

    Burgeoning experimental and simulation activity seeks to understand the existence of self-assembled colloidal structures that are not close-packed. Here we describe an analytical theory based on lattice dynamics and supported by experiments that reveals the fundamental role entropy can play in stabilizing open lattices. The entropy we consider is associated with the rotational and vibrational modes unique to colloids interacting through extended attractive patches. The theory makes predictions of the implied temperature, pressure and patch-size dependence of the phase diagram of open and close-packed structures. More generally, it provides guidance for the conditions at which targeted patchy colloidal assemblies in two and three dimensions are stable, thus overcoming the difficulty in exploring by experiment or simulation the full range of conceivable parameters.

  9. Colloid facilitated transport in fractured rocks: parameter estimation and comparison with experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanthan, H.S.; Wolfsberg, A.V.; Reimus, P.W.; Ware, D.; Lu, G.

    2003-01-01

    Colloid-facilitated migration of plutonium in fractured rock has been implicated in both field and laboratory studies. Other reactive radionuclides may also experience enhanced mobility due to groundwater colloids. Model prediction of this process is necessary for assessment of contaminant boundaries in systems for which radionuclides are already in the groundwater and for performance assessment of potential repositories for radioactive waste. Therefore, a reactive transport model is developed and parameterized using results from controlled laboratory fracture column experiments. Silica, montmorillonite and clinoptilolite colloids are used in the experiments along with plutonium and Tritium. The goal of the numerical model is to identify and parameterize the physical and chemical processes that affect the colloid-facilitated transport of plutonium in the fractures. The parameters used in this model are similar in form to those that might be used in a field-scale transport model

  10. A functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide colloid as a receptor directed MR contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josephson, L.; Groman, E.V.; Menz, E.; Lewis, J.M.; Bengele, H.

    1990-01-01

    We have synthesized a surface functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide colloid whose clearance from the vascular compartment was inhibited by asialofetuin but not fetuin. Unlike other particulate or colloidal magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents, the agent of the current communication is not withdrawn from the vascular compartment by cells of the macrophage-monocyte phagocytic system, as indicated by its selective increase in hepatic relaxation rates. Because of this we refer to this colloid as a hepatic selective (HS) MR contrast agent. At 20 mumol Fe/kg the HS MR agent darkened MR images of liver. The HS MR agent exhibited no acute toxicity when injected into rats at 1800 mumol Fe/kg. Based on these observations, surface functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide colloids may be the basis of MR contrast agents internalized by receptor mediated endocytosis generally, and by the asialoglycoprotein receptor in particular

  11. Future Research Directions in the Positive Valence Systems: Measurement, Development, and Implications for Youth Unipolar Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olino, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    The Positive Valence Systems (PVS) have been introduced by the National Institute of Mental Health as a domain to help organize multiple constructs focusing on reward-seeking behaviors. However, the initial working model for this domain is strongly influenced by adult constructs and measures. Thus, the present review focuses on extending the PVS into a developmental context. Specifically, the review provides some hypotheses about the structure of the PVS, how PVS components may change throughout development, how family history of depression may influence PVS development, and potential means of intervening on PVS function to reduce onsets of depression. Future research needs in each of these areas are highlighted.

  12. Super-resolution optical microscopy resolves network morphology of smart colloidal microgels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Stephan; Wrede, Oliver; Huser, Thomas; Hellweg, Thomas

    2018-02-14

    We present a new method to resolve the network morphology of colloidal particles in an aqueous environment via super-resolution microscopy. By localization of freely diffusing fluorophores inside the particle network we can resolve the three dimensional structure of one species of colloidal particles (thermoresponsive microgels) without altering their chemical composition through copolymerization with fluorescent monomers. Our approach utilizes the interaction of the fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G with the polymer network to achieve an indirect labeling. We calculate the 3D structure from the 2D images and compare the structure to previously published models for the microgel morphology, e.g. the fuzzy sphere model. To describe the differences in the data an extension of this model is suggested. Our method enables the tailor-made fabrication of colloidal particles which are used in various applications, such as paints or cosmetics, and are promising candidates for drug delivery, smart surface coatings, and nanocatalysis. With the precise knowledge of the particle morphology an understanding of the underlying structure-property relationships for various colloidal systems is possible.

  13. Patterned Colloidal Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jue; Li, Mingzhu; Song, Yanlin

    2018-03-01

    Colloidal photonic crystals (PCs) have been well developed because they are easy to prepare, cost-effective, and versatile with regards to modification and functionalization. Patterned colloidal PCs contribute a novel approach to constructing high-performance PC devices with unique structures and specific functions. In this review, an overview of the strategies for fabricating patterned colloidal PCs, including patterned substrate-induced assembly, inkjet printing, and selective immobilization and modification, is presented. The advantages of patterned PC devices are also discussed in detail, for example, improved detection sensitivity and response speed of the sensors, control over the flow direction and wicking rate of microfluidic channels, recognition of cross-reactive molecules through an array-patterned microchip, fabrication of display devices with tunable patterns, well-arranged RGB units, and wide viewing-angles, and the ability to construct anti-counterfeiting devices with different security strategies. Finally, the perspective of future developments and challenges is presented. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Compartmental analysis of colloidal radiogold kinetics in liver and spleen of patients with hypersplenism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristanovic, D.; Kostic, K.; Djokic, D.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematical model of colloidal substance kinetics in a five-compartment system is presented. If colloidal radioactive gold sup(198)Au is used, the model can be applied to the patient with enlarged and very active spleen. Radiogold activities in blood samples taken from patient's peripheral vein were measured. An indirect method of finding four out of five rate constants of the system is proposed. The facts presented by this study can be summarized as follows: in hypersplenism, the amount of radiogold, removed from the blood stream by the liver reticuloendothelial system, is about four times higher than the one coursing back from the liver through the hepatic vein into the systemic circulation. The radiogold amount, entering the liver in a given time, is twice as much as the substance amount passing from the systemic circulation to the spleen for the same period of time. The amount of the colloid injected before splenectomy is distributed in such a manner that, on an average, 60% is stored in liver and the rest, in the reticuloendothelial system of the spleen

  15. The olfactory tubercle encodes odor valence in behaving mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadziola, Marie A; Tylicki, Kate A; Christian, Diana L; Wesson, Daniel W

    2015-03-18

    Sensory information acquires meaning to adaptively guide behaviors. Despite odors mediating a number of vital behaviors, the components of the olfactory system responsible for assigning meaning to odors remain unclear. The olfactory tubercle (OT), a ventral striatum structure that receives monosynaptic input from the olfactory bulb, is uniquely positioned to transform odor information into behaviorally relevant neural codes. No information is available, however, on the coding of odors among OT neurons in behaving animals. In recordings from mice engaged in an odor discrimination task, we report that the firing rate of OT neurons robustly and flexibly encodes the valence of conditioned odors over identity, with rewarded odors evoking greater firing rates. This coding of rewarded odors occurs before behavioral decisions and represents subsequent behavioral responses. We predict that the OT is an essential region whereby odor valence is encoded in the mammalian brain to guide goal-directed behaviors. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354515-13$15.00/0.

  16. Breakdown of rotational symmetry at semiconductor interfaces; a microscopic description of valence subband mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortez, S.; Krebs, O.; Voisin, P.

    2000-01-01

    The recently discovered in-plane optical anisotropy of [001]-grown quantum wells offers a new theoretical and experimental insight into the electronic properties of semiconductor interfaces. We first discuss the coupling of X and Y valence bands due to the breakdown of rotation inversion symmetry at a semiconductor hetero-interface, with special attention to its dependence on effective parameters such as valence band offset. The intracell localization of Bloch functions is explained from simple theoretical arguments and evaluated numerically from a pseudo-potential microscopic model. The role of envelope functions is considered, and we discuss the specific case of non-common atom interfaces. Experimental results and applications to interface characterization are presented. These calculations give a microscopic justification, and establish the limits of the heuristic 'H BF ' model. (author)

  17. Colloidal chirality in wormlike micellar systems exclusively originated from achiral species: Role of secondary assembly and stimulus responsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenrong; Hao, Jingcheng

    2016-09-15

    Colloidal chirality in wormlike micellar systems exclusively originated from achiral species and discussion of the role of secondary assembly of fiber-like aggregates in chirality generation were presented in this paper. Herein, formation of colloidal wormlike micelles for the first time incorporated chirality and redox-responsiveness into one design via noncovalent interaction. A dual-stimuli-responsive gel of wormlike micelles which were designed by employing a dual-responsive cationic surfactant (FTMA) and a strong gelator (AzoNa4) and regulated by redox reaction and host-guest inclusion is presented. Both the redox and host-guest interaction play an important role in regulating the viscosity and supramolecular chirality of gels of the wormlike micelles. The supramolecular chirality and viscosity of the wormlike micelle gels were switched reversibly by exerting chemical redox onto the ferrocenyl groups. For the amphiphile FTMA containing redox-active ferrocenyl group, reversible control of the oxidation state of ferrocenyl groups leads to the charge and hydrophobicity changes of FTMA, therefore change its self-assembly behavior. Of equal interest, β-CD successfully detached the wormlike micelles via the recognition-inclusion behavior with FTMA and invalidate the H-bond and hydrophobic interaction between FTMA and AzoH4. This designed system provides a new strategy to tune the supramolecular chirality of colloidal aggregates and explore the specific packing mode detail within the micelles or the secondary assembly of the inter-micelles. We anticipate this dual-responsive H-bond-directed chiral gel switch could propose a new strategy when researchers designing new, multi-responsive functional gel materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fractal Aggregates in Tennis Ball Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, J.; Bandin, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the…

  19. Computer simulations and the use of radiolabelled sulphur colloid to measure the efficiency of the mononuclear phagocyte system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, A.H.; Rutishauser, S.C.B.; Williams, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques are described whereby the clearance of the radiolabelled blood borne colloid can be continuously and reproducibly measured non-invasively from the same animal in vivo or from the isolated perfused intact liver in vitro. Using these techniques, the rate of removal of radiolabelled sulphur colloid by the mononuclear phagocytes in vivo and in vitro was shown to be biexponential. The pattern of clearance of colloid and the factors contributing to this were analysed with the aid of a computer program which mimicked the in vitro liver perfusion. (Auth.)

  20. Extraction and characterisation of colloids in waste repository leachate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verrall, K.E.

    1998-10-01

    Inorganic colloids are ubiquitous in environmental waters and are thought to be potential transporters of radionuclides and other toxic metals. Colloids present large surface areas to pollutants and contaminants present in waters and are therefore capable of sorbing and transporting them via groundwater and surface water movement. Much research has been and is currently being undertaken to understand more fully the stability of colloids in different water chemistries, factors which affect metal sorption onto colloids, and the processes which affect metal-colloid transport. This thesis first investigates groundwater and surface water sampling and characterisation techniques for the investigation of the colloids present in and around a low-level waste repository. Samples were collected anaerobically using micro-purge low-flow methodology (MPLF) and then subjected to sequential ultrafiltration, again anaerobically. After separation into size fractions the solids were analysed for radiochemical content, colloid population and morphology. It was found that colloids were present in large numbers in the groundwaters extracted from the trench waste burial area (anaerobic environment), but in the surface drain waters (aerobic environment) colloid population was comparable to levels found in waters extracted from above the trenches. There was evidence that the non-tritium activity was associated with the colloids and particulates in the trenches, but outside of the trenches the evidence was not conclusive because the activity and colloid concentrations were low. Secondly this thesis investigates the stability of inorganic colloids, mainly haematite, in the presence of humic acid, varying pH and electrolyte concentrations. The applicability of the SchuIze-Hardy rule to haematite and haematite/humic acid mixtures was investigated using photon correlation spectroscopy to measure the rate of fast and slow coagulation after the addition of mono, di and trivalent ions. It was

  1. Dynamical density functional theory for arbitrary-shape colloidal fluids including inertia and hydrodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Goddard, Ben; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2015-11-01

    Over the last few decades the classical density-functional theory (DFT) and its dynamic extensions (DDFTs) have become a remarkably powerful tool in the study of colloidal fluids. Recently there has been extensive research to generalise all previous DDFTs finally yielding a general DDFT equation (for spherical particles) which takes into account both inertia and hydrodynamic interactions (HI) which strongly influence non-equilibrium properties. The present work will be devoted to a further generalisation of such a framework to systems of anisotropic particles. To this end, the kinetic equation for the Brownian particle distribution function is derived starting from the Liouville equation and making use of Zwanzig's projection-operator techniques. By averaging over all but one particle, a DDFT equation is finally obtained with some similarities to that for spherical colloids. However, there is now an inevitable translational-rotational coupling which affects the diffusivity of asymmetric particles. Lastly, in the overdamped (high friction) limit the theory is notably simplified leading to a DDFT equation which agrees with previous derivations. We acknowledge financial support from European Research Council via Advanced Grant No. 247031.

  2. Bonding assembled colloids without loss of colloidal stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vutukuri, H.R.; Stiefelhagen, J.C.P.; Vissers, T; Imhof, A.; van Blaaderen, A.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years the diversity of self-assembled colloidal structures has strongly increased, as it is fueled by a wide range of applications in materials science and also in soft condensed-matter physics.[1–4] Some potential applications include photonic bandgap (PBG) crystals, materials for

  3. Real-time observation of template-assisted colloidal aggregation and colloidal dispersion under an alternating electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao-Rong, Li; Shu-Wen, Li; Jie, Mei; Qing, Xu; Ying-Ying, Zheng; Wen-Jun, Dong

    2011-01-01

    A fascinating colloid phenomenon was observed in a specially designed template-assisted cell under an alternating electrical field. Most colloidal particles experienced the processes of aggregation, dispersion and climbing up to the plateaus of the patterns pre-lithographed on the indium tin oxide glass as the frequency of the alternating electrical field increased. Two critical frequencies f crit1 ≈ 15 kHz and f crit2 ≈ 40 kHz, corresponding to the transitions of the colloid behaviour were observed. When f < 15 kHz, the particles were forced to aggregate along the grooves of the negative photoresist patterned template. When 15 kHz < f < 40 kHz, the particle clusters became unstable and most particles started to disperse and were blocked by the fringes of the negative photoresist patterns. As the frequency increased to above 40 kHz, the majority of particles started to climb up to the plateaus of the patterns. Furthermore, the dynamics analysis for the behaviour of the colloids was given and we found out that positive or negative dielectrophoresis force, electrohydrodynamic force, particle—particle interactions and Brownian motion change with the frequency of the alternating electric field. Thus, changes of the related forces affect or control the behaviour of the colloids. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  4. Fast Formation of Opal-like Columnar Colloidal Crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Beek, D.; Radstake, P.B.; Petukhov, A.V.; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate that highly polydisperse colloidal gibbsite platelets easily form an opal-like columnar crystal with striking iridescent Bragg reflections. The formation process can be accelerated by orders of magnitude under a centrifugation force of 900g without arresting the system in a disordered

  5. Nucleation of colloidal crystals on configurable seed structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, M; Vermolen, E.C.M.; Leunissen, M.E.; Vossen, D.L.J.; van Oostrum, P.D.J.; Dijkstra, M.; van Blaaderen, A.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleation is an important stage in the growth of crystals. During this stage, the structure and orientation of a crystal are determined. However, short time- and length-scales make nucleation poorly understood. Micrometer-sized colloidal particles form an ideal model system to study nucleation due

  6. Work Valence as a Predictor of Academic Achievement in the Family Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porfeli, Erik; Ferrari, Lea; Nota, Laura

    2013-01-01

    This study asserts a theoretical model of academic and work socialization within the family setting. The presumed associations between parents' work valences, children's work valences and valence perceptions, and children's academic interest and achievement are tested. The results suggest that children's perceptions of parents mediate the…

  7. Colloid Mobilization in Two Atlantic Coastal Plain Aquifers: Field Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Joseph N.; Gschwend, Philip M.

    1990-02-01

    The geochemical mechanisms leading to the mobilization of colloids in groundwater were investigated in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey and in rural central Delaware by sampling pairs of wells screened in oxic and anoxic groundwaters in the same geologic formations. Samples were carefully taken at very low flow rates (˜100 mL min-1) to avoid suspending immobilized particles. The colloidal matter was characterized by light-scattering photometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X ray analysis, microelectrophoresis, and Fe, Al, Si, and organic carbon analyses. The colloids, composed primarily of clays, were observed at high concentrations (up to 60 mg colloids/L) in the anoxic groundwaters, while the oxic groundwaters exhibited ≤1 mg colloids/L. Colloidal organic carbon was present in all groundwaters; but under anoxic conditions, one-third to one-half of the total organic carbon was associated with the inorganic colloids. The field evidence indicates that anoxic conditions cause the mobilization of soil colloids by dissolving the ferric oxyhydroxide coatings cementing the clay particles to the aquifer solids. The depletion of oxidized iron on the surfaces of immobile particles and the addition of organic carbon coatings on the soil particles and colloids apparently stabilizes the colloidal suspension in the anoxic groundwaters.

  8. The Improvement of Communication and Inference Skills in Colloid System Material by Problem Solving Learning Model

    OpenAIRE

    maisarera, yunita; diawati, chansyanah; fadiawati, noor

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research is to describe the effectiveness of problem solving learning in improving communication and inference skills in colloid system material. Subjects in this research were students of XIIPA1 and XI IPA2 classrooms in Persada Junior High School in Bandar Lampung in academic year 2011-2012 where students of both classrooms had the same characteristics. This research used quasi experiment method and pretest-posttest control group design. Effectiveness of problem solving le...

  9. Discontinuous nature of the repulsive-to-attractive colloidal glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Laar, T; Higler, R; Schroën, K; Sprakel, J

    2016-03-04

    In purely repulsive colloidal systems a glass transition can be reached by increasing the particle volume fraction beyond a certain threshold. The resulting glassy state is governed by configurational cages which confine particles and restrict their motion. A colloidal glass may also be formed by inducing attractive interactions between the particles. When attraction is turned on in a repulsive colloidal glass a re-entrant solidification ensues. Initially, the repulsive glass melts as free volume in the system increases. As the attraction strength is increased further, this weakened configurational glass gives way to an attractive glass in which motion is hindered by the formation of physical bonds between neighboring particles. In this paper, we study the transition from repulsive-to-attractive glasses using three-dimensional imaging at the single-particle level. We show how the onset of cage weakening and bond formation is signalled by subtle changes in local structure. We then demonstrate the discontinuous nature of the solid-solid transition, which is marked by a critical onset at a threshold bonding energy. Finally, we highlight how the interplay between bonding and caging leads to complex and heterogeneous dynamics at the microscale.

  10. Colloid cyst in pituitary gland: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Hee Youn; Lee, Myung Jun; Lee, Chang Joon; Yoo, Jeong Hyun

    2001-01-01

    Colloid cyst is a congenital lesion which is thought to be derived from the primitive neuro epithelium, and is most frequently located in the anterior half of the third ventricle. Colloid cysts rarely occur in the pituitary gland, and we describe a case of pituitary colloid cyst, including the CT, MRI and pathologic findings