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Sample records for vaisala rs92 humidity

  1. Radiation Dry Bias of the Vaisala RS92 Humidity Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vomel, H.; Selkirk, H.; Miloshevich, L.; Valverde-Canossa, J.; Valdes, J.; Kyro, E.; Kivi, R.; Stolz, W.; Peng, G.; Diaz, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    The comparison of simultaneous humidity measurements by the Vaisala RS92 radiosonde and by the Cryogenic Frostpoint Hygrometer (CFH) launched at Alajuela, Cosla Rica, during July 2005 reveals a large solar radiation dry bias of the Vaisala RS92 humidity sensor and a minor temperature-dependent calibration error. For soundings launched at solar zenith angles between 10" and 30 , the average dry bias is on the order of 9% at the surface and increases to 50% at 15 km. A simple pressure- and temperature-dependent correction based on the comparison with the CFH can reduce this error to less than 7% at all altitudes up to 15.2 km, which is 700 m below the tropical tropopause. The correction does not depend on relative humidity, but is able to reproduce the relative humidity distribution observed by the CFH.

  2. Reference quality upper-air measurements: GRUAN data processing for the Vaisala RS92 radiosonde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Dirksen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The GCOS (Global Climate Observing System Reference Upper-Air Network (GRUAN data processing for the Vaisala RS92 radiosonde was developed to meet the criteria for reference measurements. These criteria stipulate the collection of metadata, the use of well-documented correction algorithms, and estimates of the measurement uncertainty. An important and novel aspect of the GRUAN processing is that the uncertainty estimates are vertically resolved. This paper describes the algorithms that are applied in version 2 of the GRUAN processing to correct for systematic errors in radiosonde measurements of pressure, temperature, humidity, and wind, as well as how the uncertainties related to these error sources are derived. Currently, the RS92 is launched on a regular basis at 13 out of 15 GRUAN sites. An additional GRUAN requirement for performing reference measurements with the RS92 is that the manufacturer-prescribed procedure for the radiosonde's preparation, i.e. heated reconditioning of the sensors and recalibration during ground check, is followed. In the GRUAN processing however, the recalibration of the humidity sensors that is applied during ground check is removed. For the dominant error source, solar radiation, laboratory experiments were performed to investigate and model its effect on the RS92's temperature and humidity measurements. GRUAN uncertainty estimates are 0.15 K for night-time temperature measurements and approximately 0.6 K at 25 km during daytime. The other uncertainty estimates are up to 6% relative humidity for humidity, 10–50 m for geopotential height, 0.6 hPa for pressure, 0.4–1 m s−1 for wind speed, and 1° for wind direction. Daytime temperature profiles for GRUAN and Vaisala processing are comparable and consistent within the estimated uncertainty. GRUAN daytime humidity profiles are up to 15% moister than Vaisala processed profiles, of which two-thirds is due to the radiation dry bias correction and one-third is due

  3. Reference quality upper-air measurements: GRUAN data processing for the Vaisala RS92 radiosonde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirksen, R. J.; Sommer, M.; Immler, F. J.; Hurst, D. F.; Kivi, R.; Vömel, H.

    2014-12-01

    The GCOS (Global Climate Observing System) Reference Upper-Air Network (GRUAN) data processing for the Vaisala RS92 radiosonde was developed to meet the criteria for reference measurements. These criteria stipulate the collection of metadata, the use of well-documented correction algorithms, and estimates of the measurement uncertainty. An important and novel aspect of the GRUAN processing is that the uncertainty estimates are vertically resolved. This paper describes the algorithms that are applied in version 2 of the GRUAN processing to correct for systematic errors in radiosonde measurements of pressure, temperature, humidity, and wind, as well as how the uncertainties related to these error sources are derived. Currently, the RS92 is launched on a regular basis at 13 out of 15 GRUAN sites. An additional GRUAN requirement for performing reference measurements with the RS92 is that the manufacturer-prescribed procedure for the radiosonde's preparation, i.e. heated reconditioning of the sensors and recalibration during ground check, is followed. In the GRUAN processing however, the recalibration of the humidity sensors that is applied during ground check is removed. For the dominant error source, solar radiation, laboratory experiments were performed to investigate and model its effect on the RS92's temperature and humidity measurements. GRUAN uncertainty estimates are 0.15 K for night-time temperature measurements and approximately 0.6 K at 25 km during daytime. The other uncertainty estimates are up to 6% relative humidity for humidity, 10-50 m for geopotential height, 0.6 hPa for pressure, 0.4-1 m s-1 for wind speed, and 1° for wind direction. Daytime temperature profiles for GRUAN and Vaisala processing are comparable and consistent within the estimated uncertainty. GRUAN daytime humidity profiles are up to 15% moister than Vaisala processed profiles, of which two-thirds is due to the radiation dry bias correction and one-third is due to an additional

  4. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Michael P.; Holdridge, Donna J.; Survo, Petteri; Lehtinen, Raisa; Baxter, Shannon; Toto, Tami; Johnson, Karen L.

    2016-07-01

    In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41 (fourth generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity, and pressure. In order to help characterize these improvements, an intercomparison campaign was undertaken at the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility site in north-central Oklahoma, USA. During 3-8 June 2014, a total of 20 twin-radiosonde flights were performed in a variety of atmospheric conditions representing typical midlatitude continental summertime conditions. The results show that for most of the observed conditions the RS92 and RS41 measurements agree much better than the manufacturer-specified combined uncertainties with notable exceptions when exiting liquid cloud layers where the "wet-bulbing" effect appears to be mitigated for several cases in the RS41 observations. The RS41 measurements of temperature and humidity, with applied correction algorithms, also appear to show less sensitivity to solar heating. These results suggest that the RS41 does provide important improvements, particularly in cloudy conditions. For many science applications - such as atmospheric process studies, retrieval development, and weather forecasting and climate modeling - the differences between the RS92 and RS41 measurements should have little impact. However, for long-term trend analysis and other climate applications, additional characterization of the RS41 measurements and their relation to the long-term observational records will be required.

  5. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 launched over the oceans from the Arctic to the tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Yoshimi; Katsumata, Masaki; Oshima, Kazuhiro; Hori, Masatake E.; Inoue, Jun

    2017-07-01

    To assess the differences between the RS92 radiosonde and its improved counterpart, the Vaisala RS41-SGP radiosonde version with a pressure sensor, 36 twin-radiosonde launches were made over the Arctic Ocean, Bering Sea, western North Pacific Ocean, and the tropical Indian Ocean during two cruises of R/V Mirai in 2015. The biases, standard deviations, and root mean squares (rms's) of the differences between the RS41 and RS92 data over all flights and altitudes were smaller than the nominal combined uncertainties of the RS41, except that the rms of the differences of pressure above 100 exceeded 0.6 hPa. A comparison between daytime and nighttime flights in the tropics revealed that the pressure difference was systematically larger during the day than at night above an altitude of 4.5 km, suggesting that there was some effect of solar heating on the pressure measurements, but the exact reason is unclear. The agreement between the RS41 and RS92 temperature measurements was better than the combined uncertainties. However, there were some noteworthy discrepancies presumably caused by the wet-bulbing effect on the RS92 radiosonde and the stagnation of the balloon. Although the median of the relative humidity differences was only a little more than 2 % of the relative humidity at all altitudes, the relative humidity of the RS92 was much lower than that of the RS41 at altitudes of about 17 km in the tropics. This dry bias might have been caused by the incomplete solar radiation correction of the RS92, and a correction table for the daytime RS92 humidity was calculated. This study showed that the RS41 measurements were consistent with the specifications of the manufacturer in most cases over both the tropical and polar oceans. However, further studies on the causes of the discrepancies are needed.

  6. Continuous quality assessment of atmospheric water vapour measurement techniques: FTIR, Cimel, MFRSR, GPS, and Vaisala RS92

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schneider

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available At the Izaña Observatory, water vapour amounts have been measured routinely by different techniques for many years. We intercompare the total precipitable water vapour (PWV amounts measured between 2005 and 2009 by a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectrometer, a Multifilter Rotating Shadow-band Radiometer (MFRSR, a Cimel sunphotometer, a Global Positioning System (GPS receiver, and daily radiosondes (Vaisala RS92. The long-term characteristics of our study allows a reliable and extensive empirical quality assessment of long-term validity, which is an important prerequisite when applying the data to climate research. We estimate a PWV precision of 1% for the FTIR, about 10% for the MFRSR, Cimel, and GPS (when excluding rather dry conditions, and significantly better than 15% for the RS92 (the detection of different airmasses avoids a better constrained estimation. We show that the MFRSR, Cimel and GPS data quality depends on the atmospheric conditions (humid or dry and that the restriction to clear-sky observations introduces a significant dry bias in the FTIR and Cimel data. In addition, we intercompare the water vapour profiles measured by the FTIR and the Vaisala RS92, which allows the conclusion that both experiments are able to detect lower to upper tropospheric water vapour mixing ratios with a precision of better than 15%.

  7. Extending the humidity measurements of the RS92 radiosonde to the tropopause region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirksen, R.; Hurst, D. F.; Kivi, R.; Sommer, M.; Voemel, H.

    2012-12-01

    For several decades radiosondes have been measuring profiles of atmospheric temperature and humidity up to 35-40 km at unmatched vertical resolution, thereby providing essential input to (numerical) weather prediction. In the lower range of the troposphere radiosondes provide accurate measurements of the atmospheric parameters, but above this region the accuracy of radiosonde profiles decreases with altitude, with the predominant error sources being the increased heating of the sensor by solar radiation at low pressures during daytime and the increase of the sensor's response time at low temperatures (time-lag). These effects substantially affect the relative humidity measurements in the upper troposphere and above. Yet, accurate profiles of both temperature and humidity in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) region are essential for monitoring climate change. The GCOS Reference Upper Air Network (GRUAN) project has developed a data product for the Vaisala RS92 radiosonde that incorporates best possible corrections for, amongst others, radiation and time-lag, as well as best possible uncertainty estimates for these corrections and the resulting profile. In this study we compare the performance of the Vaisala RS92 radiosonde in the UTLS with coincidently measured profiles from a cryogenic frostpoint hygrometer in order to estimate the altitude range in which RS92 humidity measurements are valid. Dual launches were performed at sites in different climate regions, ranging from tropical to arctic (Alajuela, Boulder, Lindenberg, Sodankyla and Yangjiang). We find that humidity measurements from RS92 and the frostpoint hygrometer agree within 5% up to the middle troposphere, and on average within 10% up to -80°C, where the RS92 profile exhibits a dry-bias with respect to the frostpoint hygrometer measurements.

  8. Development & Implementation of the Best Means of Correcting Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity & Temperature Measuremwnts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Miloshevich

    2004-07-26

    The first of two main goals of this project has been to develop and implement a correction procedure that maximizes the accuracy of relative humidity (RH) measurements from ARM (Vaisala) radiosondes, and to evaluate the correction algorithm using a dataset of simultaneous measurements from Vaisala radiosones and the reference-quality NOAA/CMDL cryogenic hygrometer. The second main goal has been to determine how comparison of radiosonde RH measurements to reference-quality RH measurements obtained routinely in the ventilated ''mailbox'' at the SGP launch site can be used to characterize and improve the accuracy of ARM radiosonde measurements. This project is important to a broad variety of ARM research areas, including initializing numerical models and evaluating model results, improving the accuracy of radiative transfer calculations and parameterizations, evaluating water vapor retrievals from ground-based or satellite instruments, and developing water vapor and cloud parameterizations. Tobin et al. (2003) showed that in order to achieve a target accuracy of 1 W/m2 in the downwelling and outgoing longwave flux, the water vapor profile must be known with an absolute accuracy of 2% in the total-column integrated water vapor, and 10% in the upper troposphere (UT).

  9. VAISALA US NLDN LIGHTNING FLASH DATA V2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The U.S. National Lightning Detection Network is a commercial lightning detection network operated by Vaisala. A network of over 100 antennae are connected to a...

  10. High resolution humidity, temperature and aerosol profiling with MeteoSwiss Raman lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinoev, Todor; Arshinov, Yuri; Bobrovnikov, Sergei; Serikov, Ilya; Calpini, Bertrand; van den Bergh, Hubert; Parlange, Marc B.; Simeonov, Valentin

    2010-05-01

    derive vertical profiles of aerosol backscatter ratio and aerosol extinction at 355 nm. Set of Stokes and anti-Stokes PRR lines are separated by the polychromator to derive temperature profiles. The humidity profiles have vertical resolution from 15 m (within the boundary layer) to 100-450 m (within the free troposphere), time resolution of 30 min and 5 km vertical range at daytime and 10 km at night-time. The aerosol backscatter ratio and extinction profiles have similar resolution with vertical range of approximately 10 km. The temperature profiles are derived from PRR lidar signals, simultaneously recorded in analog and photon counting mode, allowing vertical range of approximately 10 km. Vaisala RS-92 and Snow-White chilled mirror hygrometer radiosondes were used for calibration of the water vapor and temperature channels. Continuous temperature profiles were obtained and were coupled with the available water vapor mixing ratio profiles to obtain relative humidity time series. Lidar derived aerosol backscatter ratio profiles will be used for estimation of the boundary layer height and validation of NWP model results. Optical thickness time series are currently compared to independent measurements from a collocated sun photometer to assess the performance of the aerosol channel.

  11. Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational eXperiment (TARFOX) - Vaisala Radiosonde data from Wallops ground station

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TARFOX_WALLOPS_SONDE is the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational eXperiment (TARFOX) Vaisala radiosonde data set from balloons launched at Wallops...

  12. GPM GROUND VALIDATION VAISALA US NLDN LIGHTNING FLASH DATA MC3E V3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The U.S. National Lightning Detection Network is a commercial lightning detection network operated by Vaisala. A network of over 100 antennae are connected to a...

  13. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ENVIRONMENT CANADA (EC) VAISALA CEILOMETER GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Environment Canada (EC) VAISALA Ceilometer GCPEx dataset was collected during the GPM Cold-season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx) in...

  14. The Chilled-Mirror Humidity Sensor: Improved Radiosonde Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, F. J.

    1999-01-01

    Chilled-mirror humidity sensor technology recently was adapted for use with the VIZ radiosonde. The principle of the chilled-mirror operation is to lower its temperature until dew forms on the mirror, at that point the dew point temperature is noted and the mirror is then heated to evaporate the moisture. The cycle is repeated. Research conducted from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility has provided comparisons between the chilled-mirror sensor and the carbon hygristor of VIZ, and the capacitive sensors of AIR Inc. and Vaisala Co. We believe the chilled-mirror sensor is accurate and would serve as a reference standard for evaluating operational radiosonde relative humidity sensors. Thus, differences seen in the comparisons are beginning to furnish insight into developing better humidity sensors. We discuss these comparison results as well as reproducibility results from a dual chilled-mirror measurement.

  15. Recommendations for processing atmospheric attenuated backscatter profiles from Vaisala CL31 ceilometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotthaus, Simone; O'Connor, Ewan; Münkel, Christoph; Charlton-Perez, Cristina; Haeffelin, Martial; Gabey, Andrew M.; Grimmond, C. Sue B.

    2016-08-01

    Ceilometer lidars are used for cloud base height detection, to probe aerosol layers in the atmosphere (e.g. detection of elevated layers of Saharan dust or volcanic ash), and to examine boundary layer dynamics. Sensor optics and acquisition algorithms can strongly influence the observed attenuated backscatter profiles; therefore, physical interpretation of the profiles requires careful application of corrections. This study addresses the widely deployed Vaisala CL31 ceilometer. Attenuated backscatter profiles are studied to evaluate the impact of both the hardware generation and firmware version. In response to this work and discussion within the CL31/TOPROF user community (TOPROF, European COST Action aiming to harmonise ground-based remote sensing networks across Europe), Vaisala released new firmware (versions 1.72 and 2.03) for the CL31 sensors. These firmware versions are tested against previous versions, showing that several artificial features introduced by the data processing have been removed. Hence, it is recommended to use this recent firmware for analysing attenuated backscatter profiles. To allow for consistent processing of historic data, correction procedures have been developed that account for artefacts detected in data collected with older firmware. Furthermore, a procedure is proposed to determine and account for the instrument-related background signal from electronic and optical components. This is necessary for using attenuated backscatter observations from any CL31 ceilometer. Recommendations are made for the processing of attenuated backscatter observed with Vaisala CL31 sensors, including the estimation of noise which is not provided in the standard CL31 output. After taking these aspects into account, attenuated backscatter profiles from Vaisala CL31 ceilometers are considered capable of providing valuable information for a range of applications including atmospheric boundary layer studies, detection of elevated aerosol layers, and model

  16. EDITORIAL: Humidity sensors Humidity sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regtien, Paul P. L.

    2012-01-01

    All matter is more or less hygroscopic. The moisture content varies with vapour concentration of the surrounding air and, as a consequence, most material properties change with humidity. Mechanical and thermal properties of many materials, such as the tensile strength of adhesives, stiffness of plastics, stoutness of building and packaging materials or the thermal resistivity of isolation materials, all decrease with increasing environmental humidity or cyclic humidity changes. The presence of water vapour may have a detrimental influence on many electrical constructions and systems exposed to humid air, from high-power systems to microcircuits. Water vapour penetrates through coatings, cable insulations and integrated-circuit packages, exerting a fatal influence on the performance of the enclosed systems. For these and many other applications, knowledge of the relationship between moisture content or humidity and material properties or system behaviour is indispensable. This requires hygrometers for process control or test and calibration chambers with high accuracy in the appropriate temperature and humidity range. Humidity measurement methods can roughly be categorized into four groups: water vapour removal (the mass before and after removal is measured); saturation (the air is brought to saturation and the `effort' to reach that state is measured); humidity-dependent parameters (measurement of properties of humid air with a known relation between a specific property and the vapour content, for instance the refractive index, electromagnetic spectrum and acoustic velocity); and absorption (based on the known relation between characteristic properties of non-hydrophobic materials and the amount of absorbed water from the gas to which these materials are exposed). The many basic principles to measure air humidity are described in, for instance, the extensive compilations by Wexler [1] and Sonntag [2]. Absorption-type hygrometers have small dimensions and can be

  17. Assessing the quality of humidity measurements from operational radiosonde sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, I.; Arkin, P. A.; Ferraro, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    The quality of humidity measurements from global operational radiosonde sensors in upper, middle, and lower troposphere for the period 2000-2011 were investigated using satellite observations from three microwave water vapor channels. We first simulated the satellite brightness temperatures using radiosonde profiles and a radiative transfer model then carefully collocated simulated and observed satellite brightness temperatures. We partitioned the data into daytime and nighttime to evaluate the daytime radiation bias then separately evaluated the statistics for each sensor type. The error characteristics among different radiosondes vary significantly, which largely reflects the differences in sensor type. These differences are more evident in the mid-upper troposphere than in the lower troposphere, mainly because some of the sensors stop responding to tropospheric humidity somewhere in the upper or even in the middle troposphere. In the upper troposphere, most sensors have a dry bias but Russian sensors and a few other sensors including GZZ2, VZB2, and RS80H have a wet bias. In middle troposphere, Russian sensors still have a wet bias but all other sensors have a dry bias. All sensors, including Russian sensors, have a dry bias in lower troposphere. The systematic and random errors generally decrease from upper to lower troposphere. Sensors from China, India, Russia, and the U.S. have a large random error in upper troposphere, which indicates that these sensors are not suitable for upper tropospheric studies as they fail to respond to humidity changes in the upper and even middle troposphere. Overall, Vaisala sensors perform better than other sensors throughout the troposphere exhibiting the smallest systematic and random errors. Because of the large differences between different radiosonde humidity sensors, it is important for long-term trend studies to only use data measured using a single type of sensor at any given station. If multiple sensor types are used

  18. Testing and ground calibration of DREAMS-H relative humidity device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzer, Maria; Hieta, Maria; Nikkanen, Timo; Schmidt, Walter; Kemppinen, Osku; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri

    2015-04-01

    DREAMS (Dust Characterization, Risk Assessment and Environmental Analyzer on the Martian Surface) instrument suite is to be launched as part of the ESA ExoMars 2016/Schiaparelli lander. DREAMS consists of an environmental package for monitoring temperature, pressure, relative humidity, winds and dust opacity, as well as atmospheric electricity of Martian atmosphere. The DREAMS instruments and scientific goals are described in [1]. Here we describe testing and ground calibration of the relative humidity device, DREAMS-H, provided to the DREAMS payload by the Finnish Meteorological Institute and based on proprietary technology of Vaisala, Inc. The same kind of device is part of the REMS instrument package onboard MSL Curiosity Rover [2][3]. DREAMS-H is based on Vaisala Humicap® technology adapted for use in Martian environment by the Finnish Meteorological Institute. The device is very small and lightweighed, with total mass less than 20 g and consuming only 15 mW of power. The Humicap® sensor heads contain an active polymer film that changes its capacitance as function of relative humidity, with 0% to 100% RH measurement range. The dynamic range of the device gets smaller with sensor temperature, being in -70°C approximately 30% of the dynamic range in 0°C [3]. Good-quality relative humidity measurements require knowing the temperature of the environment in which relative humidity is measured. An important part of DREAMS-H calibration was temperature calibration of Vaisala Thermocap® temperature sensors used for housekeeping temperature measurements of the DREAMS-H device. For this, several temperature points in the desired operational range were measured with 0.1°C accuracy traceable to national standards. The main part of humidity calibration of DREAMS-H flight models was done in subzero temperatures in a humidity generator of the Finnish Center of Metrology and Accreditation (MIKES). Several relative humidity points ranging from almost dry to almost wet

  19. Humid coolers. Humid-Cooler (Feuchtekuehler)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, H. de (Vritex KG, Leinfelden-Echterdingen (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-01-01

    Some edibles as well as perishable goods and other goods to be cooled must be stored at low temperatures and a 100% relative moisture. Particular care must be taken to observe the latter requirement, and to cool down the goods concerned as rapidly as possible. Humid coolers exhibit a number of technical advantages in addition to those of conventional solutions. Using them, the gradients of cooling curves are particularly marked, and the gain in time compared with conventional methods is considerable. Humid coolers contribute to energy conservation for being coupled with ice storage systems. Since the refrigerator needed for such units may be combined both with the ice storage system and with the humid cooler, goods are cooled directly and cool-down phases are short. Examples, results, and comparisons with regard to energy conservation are given. (orig./HW).

  20. Humidity cycle at Gale crater through MSL/REMS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, Ari-Matti; Genzer, Maria; Gomez-Elvira, Javier; Savijarvi, Hannu; McConnochie, Tim; De la Torre, Manuel; Martinez, German; Haberle, Robert; Polkko, Jouni; Paton, Mark; Newman, Claire; Makinen, Terhi; Vazquez, Luis

    2017-04-01

    Since early August 2012 the Mars Science laboratory (MSL) has been operating successfully with the REMS instrument providing extremely valuable atmospheric observations of atmospheric pressure, temperature of the air, ground temperature, wind speed and direction, relative humidity (REMS-H), and UV measurements. The REMS-H relative humidity device is based on polymeric capacitive humidity sensors developed by Vaisala Inc. and it makes use of three (3) humidity sensor heads. The humidity device is mounted on the REMS boom providing ventilation with the ambient atmosphere through a filter protecting the device from airborne dust. The REMS-H humidity instrument has created an unprecedented data record of more than two full Martian years. It has measured the relative humidity and temperature at 1.6 m height for a period of 5 minutes every hour as part of the MSL/REMS instrument package. We focus on describing the annual in situ water cycle with the new REMS-H instrument calibration for the period of two Martian years. The results will be constrained through comparison with independent indirect observations and through modeling efforts. We inferred the hourly atmospheric VMR from the REMS-H observations and compared these VMR measurements with predictions of VMR from our 1D column Martian atmospheric model and regolith to investigate the local water cycle, exchange processes and the local climate in Gale Crater. The strong diurnal variation suggests there are surface-atmosphere exchange processes at Gale Crater during all seasons, which depletes moisture to the ground in the evening and nighttime and release the moisture back to the atmosphere during the daytime. On the other hand, these processes do not result in significant water deposition on the ground, because frost has not been detected in Gale Crater by any of the MSL observations. Hence, our modelling results presumably indicate that adsorption processes take place during the nighttime and desorption during the

  1. Humidity Sensing in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enjin, Anders; Zaharieva, Emanuela E; Frank, Dominic D; Mansourian, Suzan; Suh, Greg S B; Gallio, Marco; Stensmyr, Marcus C

    2016-05-23

    Environmental humidity influences the fitness and geographic distribution of all animals [1]. Insects in particular use humidity cues to navigate the environment, and previous work suggests the existence of specific sensory mechanisms to detect favorable humidity ranges [2-5]. Yet, the molecular and cellular basis of humidity sensing (hygrosensation) remains poorly understood. Here we describe genes and neurons necessary for hygrosensation in the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster. We find that members of the Drosophila genus display species-specific humidity preferences related to conditions in their native habitats. Using a simple behavioral assay, we find that the ionotropic receptors IR40a, IR93a, and IR25a are all required for humidity preference in D. melanogaster. Yet, whereas IR40a is selectively required for hygrosensory responses, IR93a and IR25a mediate both humidity and temperature preference. Consistent with this, the expression of IR93a and IR25a includes thermosensory neurons of the arista. In contrast, IR40a is excluded from the arista but is expressed (and required) in specialized neurons innervating pore-less sensilla of the sacculus, a unique invagination of the third antennal segment. Indeed, calcium imaging showed that IR40a neurons directly respond to changes in humidity, and IR40a knockdown or IR93a mutation reduced their responses to stimuli. Taken together, our results suggest that the preference for a specific humidity range depends on specialized sacculus neurons, and that the processing of environmental humidity can happen largely in parallel to that of temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Acoustic Humidity Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakkottai, Parthasarathy; Kwack, Eug Y.; Venkateshan, Shakkottai

    1990-01-01

    Industrial humidity sensor measures volume fraction of water in air via its effect on speed of sound. Only portion of sensor exposed to sensed atmosphere is pair of stainless-steel tubes, one containing dry air and other containing moist air. Counters measure intervals between reflected pulses. Sensor rugged enough for use in harsh environments like those used to control drying of paper in paper mills, where most humidity sensors do not survive.

  3. Optical humidity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarvin, Jeffrey A.

    1987-01-01

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors.

  4. Hands-on Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankiewicz, Philip R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents five hands-on activities that allow students to detect, measure, reduce, and eliminate moisture. Students make a humidity detector and a hygrometer, examine the effects of moisture on different substances, calculate the percent of water in a given food, and examine the absorption potential of different desiccants. (MDH)

  5. Methods of humidity determination Part II: Determination of material humidity

    OpenAIRE

    Rübner, Katrin; Balköse, Devrim; Robens, E.

    2008-01-01

    Part II covers the most common methods of measuring the humidity of solid material. State of water near solid surfaces, gravimetric measurement of material humidity, measurement of water sorption isotherms, chemical methods for determination of water content, measurement of material humidity via the gas phase, standardisation, cosmonautical observations are reviewed.

  6. Accuracy assessment of water vapour measurements from in situ and remote sensing techniques during the DEMEVAP 2011 campaign at OHP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Bock

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Development of Methodologies for Water Vapour Measurement (DEMEVAP project aims at assessing and improving humidity sounding techniques and establishing a reference system based on the combination of Raman lidars, ground-based sensors and GPS. Such a system may be used for climate monitoring, radiosonde bias detection and correction, satellite measurement calibration/validation, and mm-level geodetic positioning with Global Navigation Satellite Systems. A field experiment was conducted in September–October 2011 at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP. Two Raman lidars (IGN mobile lidar and OHP NDACC lidar, a stellar spectrometer (SOPHIE, a differential absorption spectrometer (SAOZ, a sun photometer (AERONET, 5 GPS receivers and 4 types of radiosondes (Vaisala RS92, MODEM M2K2-DC and M10, and Meteolabor Snow White participated in the campaign. A total of 26 balloons with multiple radiosondes were flown during 16 clear nights. This paper presents preliminary findings from the analysis of all these data sets. Several classical Raman lidar calibration methods are evaluated which use either Vaisala RS92 measurements, point capacitive humidity measurements, or GPS integrated water vapour (IWV measurements. A novel method proposed by Bosser et al. (2010 is also tested. It consists in calibrating the lidar measurements during the GPS data processing. The methods achieve a repeatability of 4–5%. Changes in the calibration factor of IGN Raman lidar are evidenced which are attributed to frequent optical re-alignments. When modelling and correcting the changes as a linear function of time, the precision of the calibration factors improves to 2–3%. However, the variations in the calibration factor, and hence the absolute accuracy, between methods and types of reference data remain at the level of 7%. The intercomparison of radiosonde measurements shows good agreement between RS92 and Snow White measurements up to 12 km. An overall dry bias is found

  7. Low-Cost Humidity Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laue, E. G.

    1986-01-01

    Electronic humidity sensor is simple, inexpensive, and produces output readily used by indicator or control circuits. Sensor operates at safe, low voltage and is relatively invulnerable to electrolysis effects. Sensor used to measure humidity in atmosphere, in soil, and industrial gases, for example.

  8. Radiosounding: Possible change in aerological data due to instrument change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, F.; Foti, F.; Vuerich, E.; Casu, G.

    2004-09-01

    A radiosounding system allows to measure the profile of some meteorological quantities (temperature, humidity, pressure) from the ground up to a certain altitude. Such systems are continuously used by meteorological services in order to perform periodical measurements during the day, at pre-determined times. The evolution of instrumentation technology leads to a fast obsolescence of equipment through time, so that, inevitably, new instrumentation replaces the old one. The new VAISALA Radiosound RS92 has been recently introduced to substitute previous model RS90. The RS90 is currently used by many national and international institutes, including the Italian Air Force Meteorological Service (Servizio Meteorologico dell'Aeronautica Militare). In order to assess the way in which the substitution of RS90s with the new RS92s would affect measures performed by the altitude observation network with regard also to the historical series, several comparative measurements have been conducted by the “Reparto Sperimentazioni di Meteorologia Aeronautica” at Vigna di Valle (Rome). During this testing series, Company VAISALA has given a remarkable level of cooperation by a continuous presence of technicians. The entire test has been performed according to WMO (World Meteorological Organization) protocols.

  9. Investigating soil water retention characteristics at high suctions using relative humidity control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantikos Vasileios

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A technique for controlling relative humidity (RH is presented, which involves supplying a sealed chamber with a continuous flow of air at a computer-regulated RH. The desired value of RH is achieved by mixing dry and wet air at appropriate volumes and is measured for servo-control at three locations in the chamber with capacitive RH sensors and checked with a sensitive VAISALA sensor. The setup is capable of controlling RH steadily and continuously with a deviation of less than 0.2% RH. The technique was adopted to determine wetting soil-water retention curves (SWRC of statically compacted London Clay, under both free-swelling and constant volume conditions. The RH within the chamber was increased in a step-wise fashion, with each step maintained until vapour equilibrium between the chamber atmosphere and the soil samples was established. Independent filter paper measurements further validate the method, while the obtained retention curves complement those available in the literature for lower ranges of suction.

  10. Humid free efficient solar panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjwani, Manoj Kumar; Panjwani, Suresh Kumar; Mangi, Fareed Hussain; Khan, Danish; Meicheng, Li

    2017-09-01

    The paper examines the impact of the humidity on the Solar panels which makes a space for the drastic variation in the power generated and makes the device less efficient. Humidity readily affects the efficiency of the solar cells and creates a minimal layer of water on its surface. It also decreases the efficiency by 10-20% of the total power output produced. Moreover, to handle this issue, all around characterized measures are required to be taken to guarantee the smooth working of the solar panels utilized in humid areas. In connection with this issue, Karachi, the biggest city of Pakistan which is located near the costal line touching Arabian Sea, was taken as a reference city to measure the humidity range. In Karachi, the average humidity lies between 25-70% (as per Pakistan Meteorological Department PMD), that indirectly leads in decreasing power acquired from a Solar Panel and develops various complexities for the solar system. The system on average experiences stability issues, such as those of power fluctuations etc., due to which, the whole solar system installed observes abnormal variations in acquired power. Silica Gel was used as a desiccant material in order to assure dryness over the solar panel. More than four experiments were conducted with the usage of water absorbent to improve the efficiency and to make system more power efficient.

  11. Fiber loop ringdown humidity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Haifa; Wang, Chuji

    2016-11-01

    An optical fiber relative humidity (RH) sensor based on the evanescent field-fiber loop ringdown (EF-FLRD) technique is demonstrated. The sensor was placed inside a chamber that provides a humidity reference and is monitored by a humidity meter. The presence of moisture in the chamber changes the refractive index of the medium; thus the ringdown time changes due to a change in the EF scattering loss induced in the sensor head. The sensor demonstrated a fast response (∼1  s), high sensitivity, and excellent reproducibility and reversibly. The EF-FLRD sensor can measure RH in a wide dynamic range of 4% to 100% at a constant temperature of 20±1°C.

  12. New planar trace humidity sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Tiebe, Carlo; Hübert, Thomas; Lorek, Andreas; Wernecke, Roland

    2012-01-01

    A new planar sensor element for continuous coulometric trace humidity measurements in industrial gases has been developed. In order to ensure precise measurements a calibration facility including a precision dew point hygrometer as a reference device was developed. The sensor can measure the humidity in the frost point temperature range of -20 °C to -80 °C and has an expanded uncertainty of 2 K, a fast reaction time and a settling time of the entire system from 15 to 30 min.

  13. Controlling arbitrary humidity without convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasnik, Priyanka S; N'guessan, Hartmann E; Tadmor, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we show a way that allows for the first time to induce arbitrary humidity of desired value for systems without convective flow. To enable this novelty we utilize a semi-closed environment in which evaporation is not completely suppressed. In this case, the evaporation rate is determined both by the outer (open) humidity and by the inner (semi-closed) geometry including the size/shape of the evaporating medium and the size/shape of the semi-closure. We show how such systems can be used to induce desired humidity conditions. We consider water droplet placed on a solid surface and study its evaporation when it is surrounded by other drops, hereon "satellite" drops and covered by a semi-closed hemisphere. The main drop's evaporation rate is proportional to its height, in agreement with theory. Surprisingly, however, the influence of the satellite drops on the main drop's evaporation suppression is not proportional to the sum of heights of the satellite drops. Instead, it shows proportionality close to the satellite drops' total surface area. The resultant humidity conditions in the semi-closed system can be effectively and accurately induced using different satellite drops combinations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. TEMPERATURE AND RELATIVE HUMIDITY REGINIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the suitability of water hyacinth as a bulk substrate for growing a newly domesticated local oyster mushroom, Pleurotus flabellatus. The performance of the mushroom was investigated under ambient temperature and relative humidity (RH) regimes of 18-. 25/27-29 OC and 55-85/78-93%, respectively.

  15. Air humidity requirements for human comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Fanger, Povl Ole

    1999-01-01

    Upper humidity limits for the comfort zone determined from two recently presented models for predicting discomfort due to skin humidity and insufficient respiratory cooling are proposed. The proposed limits are compared with the maximum permissible humidity level prescribed in existing standards...... for the thermal indoor environment. The skin humidity model predicts discomfort as a function of the relative humidity of the skin, which is determined by existing models for human heat and moisture transfer based on environmental parameters, clothing characteristics and activity level. The respiratory model...... predicts discomfort as a function of the driving forces for heat loss from the respiratory tract, namely the air temperature and humidity of the surrounding air. An upper humidity limit based on a relative skin humidity of 0.54, corresponding to 20% dissatisfied, results in a maximum permissible humidity...

  16. A Surface Micromachined CMOS MEMS Humidity Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Jian-Qiu Huang; Fei Li; Min Zhao; Kai Wang

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a CMOS MEMS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor micro electromechanical system) piezoresistive humidity sensor fabricated by a surface micromachining process. Both pre-CMOS and post-CMOS technologies were used to fabricate the piezoresistive humidity sensor. Compared with a bulk micromachined humidity sensor, the machining precision and the sizes of the surface micromachined humidity sensor were both improved. The package and test systems of the sensor were designed. A...

  17. Humidity and Buildings. Technical Paper No. 188.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheon, N. B.

    Modified and controlled relative humidity in buildings for certain occupancies is discussed. New criteria are used in determining the needs, desirability and problems associated with humidities in a building. Severe winter climate requires that special attention be given to the problems associated with increased indoor humidities during cold…

  18. VAB Temperature and Humidity Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Muktarian, Edward; Nurge, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, 17 data loggers were placed in the VAB to measure temperature and humidity at 10-minute intervals over a one-year period. In 2013, the data loggers were replaced with an upgraded model and slight adjustments to their locations were made to reduce direct solar heating effects. The data acquired by the data loggers was compared to temperature data provided by three wind towers located around the building. It was found that the VAB acts as a large thermal filter, delaying and reducing the thermal oscillations occurring outside of the building. This filtering is typically more pronounced at higher locations in the building, probably because these locations have less thermal connection with the outside. We surmise that the lower elevations respond more to outside temperature variations because of air flow through the doors. Temperatures inside the VAB rarely exceed outdoor temperatures, only doing so when measurements are made directly on a surface with connection to the outside (such as a door or wall) or when solar radiation falls directly on the sensor. A thermal model is presented to yield approximate filter response times for various locations in the building. Appendix A contains historical thermal and humidity data from 1994 to 2009.

  19. Passive Wireless SAW Humidity Sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the preliminary development of passive wireless surface acoustic wave (SAW) based humidity sensors for NASA application to distributed...

  20. Graphene based humidity-insensitive films

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong

    2017-09-08

    A humidity nonsensitive material based on reduced-graphene oxide (r-GO) and methods of making the same are provided, in an embodiment, the materia! has a resistance/humidity variation of about -15% to 15% based on different sintering time or temperature. In an aspect, the resistance variation to humidity can be close to zero or -0.5% to 0.5%, showing a humidity non sensitivity property. In an embodiment, a humidity nonsensitive material based on the r-GO and carbon nanotube (CNT) composites is provided, wherein the ratio of CNT to r-GO is adjusted. The ratio can be adjusted based on the combined contribution of carbon nanotube (positive resistance variation) and reduced- graphene oxide (negative resistance variation) behaviors.

  1. 40 CFR 89.326 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.326 Engine intake air humidity measurement. (a) Humidity conditioned air supply. Air that has had its absolute humidity altered is considered humidity- conditioned air. For this...

  2. Absolute Humidity and Pandemic Versus Epidemic Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaman, Jeffrey; Goldstein, Edward; Lipsitch, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiologic evidence indicates that variations of absolute humidity account for the onset and seasonal cycle of epidemic influenza in temperate regions. A role for absolute humidity in the transmission of pandemic influenza, such as 2009 A/H1N1, has yet to be demonstrated and, indeed, outbreaks of pandemic influenza during more humid spring, summer, and autumn months might appear to constitute evidence against an effect of humidity. However, here the authors show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions, as well as wintertime transmission of epidemic influenza. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility, and changes in population-mixing and contact rates. PMID:21081646

  3. Humid heat waves at different warming levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Simone; Sillmann, Jana; Sterl, Andreas

    2017-08-07

    The co-occurrence of consecutive hot and humid days during a heat wave can strongly affect human health. Here, we quantify humid heat wave hazard in the recent past and at different levels of global warming. We find that the magnitude and apparent temperature peak of heat waves, such as the ones observed in Chicago in 1995 and China in 2003, have been strongly amplified by humidity. Climate model projections suggest that the percentage of area where heat wave magnitude and peak are amplified by humidity increases with increasing warming levels. Considering the effect of humidity at 1.5° and 2° global warming, highly populated regions, such as the Eastern US and China, could experience heat waves with magnitude greater than the one in Russia in 2010 (the most severe of the present era). The apparent temperature peak during such humid-heat waves can be greater than 55 °C. According to the US Weather Service, at this temperature humans are very likely to suffer from heat strokes. Humid-heat waves with these conditions were never exceeded in the present climate, but are expected to occur every other year at 4° global warming. This calls for respective adaptation measures in some key regions of the world along with international climate change mitigation efforts.

  4. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...... and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6...

  5. Laboratory setup for temperature and humidity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Eimre, Kristjan

    2015-01-01

    In active particle detectors, the temperature and humidity conditions must be under constant monitoring and control, as even small deviations from the norm cause changes to detector characteristics and result in a loss of precision. To monitor the temperature and humidity, different kinds of sensors are used, which must be calibrated beforehand to ensure their accuracy. To calibrate the large number of sensors that are needed for the particle detectors and other laboratory work, a calibration system is needed. The purpose of the current work was to develop a laboratory setup for temperature and humidity sensor measurements and calibration.

  6. Positive impedance humidity sensors via single-component materials

    OpenAIRE

    Jingwen Qian; Zhijian Peng; Zhenguang Shen; Zengying Zhao; Guoliang Zhang; Xiuli Fu

    2016-01-01

    Resistivity-type humidity sensors have been investigated with great interest due to the increasing demands in industry, agriculture and daily life. To date, most of the available humidity sensors have been fabricated based on negative humidity impedance, in which the electrical resistance decreases as the humidity increases, and only several carbon composites have been reported to present positive humidity impedance. However, here we fabricate positive impedance humidity sensors only via sing...

  7. Temperature and Humidity Control in Livestock Stables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael; Andersen, Palle; Nielsen, Kirsten M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes temperature and humidity control of a livestock stable. It is important to have a correct air flow pattern in the livestock stable in order to achieve proper temperature and humidity control as well as to avoid draught. In the investigated livestock stable the air flow...... is controlled using wall mounted ventilation flaps. In the paper an algorithm for air flow control is presented meeting the needs for temperature and humidity while taking the air flow pattern in consideration. To obtain simple and realisable controllers a model based control design method is applied....... In the design dynamic models for temperature and humidity are very important elements and effort is put into deriving and testing the models. It turns out that non-linearities are dominating in both models making feedback linearization the natural design method. The air controller as well as the temperature...

  8. Thermal conductivity at different humidity conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Finn Harken; Rode, Carsten

    1999-01-01

    The thermal conductivity (the l-value) of several alternative insulation products and a traditional product is determined under different humidity conditions in a specially constructed hot plate apparatus.The hot plate apparatus is constructed with an air gap on each side of the test specimen where...... of the thermal conductivity is 3-8% because of the hygroscopic uptake of humidity from the ambient air....

  9. Gouvernance communautaire des milieux humides du bassin ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Gouvernance communautaire des milieux humides du bassin versant de la Sand River (Afrique du Sud). La collectivité de Craigieburn, dans la province du KwaZulu-Natal, en Afrique du Sud, est située dans un milieu humide couvrant 1 200 ha et jouant un rôle de premier plan dans la régulation et le maintien de la Sand ...

  10. Upper limits for air humidity based on human comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Fanger, Povl Ole; Jørgensen, Anette S.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the hypothesis that insufficient respiratory cooling and a high level of skin humidity are two reasons for thermal discomfort at high air humidities, and to prescribe upper limits for humidity based on discomfort due to elevated skin humidity and insufficient...... respiratory cooling. Human subjects perceived the condition of their skin to be less acceptable with increasing skin humidity. Inhaled air was rated warmer, more stuffy and less acceptable with increasing air humidity and temperature. Based on the subjects' comfort responses, new upper limits for air humidity...... are proposed. The limits relating to respiratory requirements are much more stringent than those relating to skin humidity....

  11. Study on the Correlation between Humidity and Material Strains in Separable Micro Humidity Sensor Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Yuan

    2017-05-08

    Incidents of injuries caused by tiles falling from building exterior walls are frequently reported in Taiwan. Humidity is an influential factor in tile deterioration but it is more difficult to measure the humidity inside a building structure than the humidity in an indoor environment. Therefore, a separable microsensor was developed in this study to measure the humidity of the cement mortar layer with a thickness of 1.5-2 cm inside the external wall of a building. 3D printing technology is used to produce an encapsulation box that can protect the sensor from damage caused by the concrete and cement mortar. The sensor is proven in this study to be capable of measuring temperature and humidity simultaneously and the measurement results are then used to analyze the influence of humidity on external wall tile deterioration.

  12. Study on the Correlation between Humidity and Material Strains in Separable Micro Humidity Sensor Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yuan Chang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Incidents of injuries caused by tiles falling from building exterior walls are frequently reported in Taiwan. Humidity is an influential factor in tile deterioration but it is more difficult to measure the humidity inside a building structure than the humidity in an indoor environment. Therefore, a separable microsensor was developed in this study to measure the humidity of the cement mortar layer with a thickness of 1.5–2 cm inside the external wall of a building. 3D printing technology is used to produce an encapsulation box that can protect the sensor from damage caused by the concrete and cement mortar. The sensor is proven in this study to be capable of measuring temperature and humidity simultaneously and the measurement results are then used to analyze the influence of humidity on external wall tile deterioration.

  13. Reversible Humidity Sensitive Clothing for Personal Thermoregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ying; Zhang, Fenghua; Wang, Meng; Gardner, Calvin J.; Kim, Gunwoo; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong; Jin, Sungho; Chen, Renkun

    2017-03-01

    Two kinds of humidity-induced, bendable smart clothing have been designed to reversibly adapt their thermal insulation functionality. The first design mimics the pores in human skin, in which pre-cut flaps open to produce pores in Nafion sheets when humidity increases, as might occur during human sweating thus permitting air flow and reducing both the humidity level and the apparent temperature. Like the smart human sweating pores, the flaps can close automatically after the perspiration to keep the wearer warm. The second design involves thickness adjustable clothes by inserting the bent polymer sheets between two fabrics. As the humidity increases, the sheets become thinner, thus reducing the gap between the two fabrics to reduce the thermal insulation. The insulation layer can recover its original thickness upon humidity reduction to restore its warmth-preservation function. Such humidity sensitive smart polymer materials can be utilized to adjust personal comfort, and be effective in reducing energy consumption for building heating or cooling with numerous smart design.

  14. The effects of excessive humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R B

    1998-06-01

    Humidification devices and techniques can expose the airway mucosa to a wide range of gas temperatures and humidities, some of which are excessive and may cause injury. Humidified gas is a carrier of both water and energy. The volume of water in the gas stream depends on whether the water is in a molecular form (vapor), particulate form (aerosol), or bulk form (liquid). The energy content of gas stream is the sum of the sensible heat (temperature) of the air and any water droplets in it and the heat of vaporization (latent energy) of any water vapor present. Latent heat energy is much larger than sensible heat energy, so saturated air contains much more energy than dry air. Thus every breath contains a water volume and energy (thermal) challenge to the airway mucosa. When the challenge exceeds the homeostatic mechanisms airway dysfunction begins, starting at the cellular and secretion level and progressing to whole airway function. A large challenge will result in quick progression of dysfunction. Early dysfunction is generally reversible, however, so large challenges with short exposure times may not cause irreversible injury. The mechanisms of airway injury owing to excess water are not well studied. The observation of its effects lends itself to some general conclusions, however. Alterations in the ventilation-perfusion ratio, decrease in vital capacity and compilance, and atelectasis are suggestive of partial or full occlusion of small airways. Changes in surface tension and alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient are consistent with flooding of alveoli. There also may be osmotic challenges to mucosal cell function as evidenced by the different reaction rates with hyper- and hypotonic saline. The reaction to nonisotonic saline also may partly explain increases in specific airway resistance. Aerosolized water and instilled water may be hazardous because of their demonstrated potential for delivering excessive water to the airway. Their use for airway humidification or

  15. Humidity effects on wire insulation breakdown strength.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelhans, Leah

    2013-08-01

    Methods for the testing of the dielectric breakdown strength of insulation on metal wires under variable humidity conditions were developed. Two methods, an ASTM method and the twisted pair method, were compared to determine if the twisted pair method could be used for determination of breakdown strength under variable humidity conditions. It was concluded that, although there were small differences in outcomes between the two testing methods, the non-standard method (twisted pair) would be appropriate to use for further testing of the effects of humidity on breakdown performance. The dielectric breakdown strength of 34G copper wire insulated with double layer Poly-Thermaleze/Polyamide-imide insulation was measured using the twisted pair method under a variety of relative humidity (RH) conditions and exposure times. Humidity at 50% RH and below was not found to affect the dielectric breakdown strength. At 80% RH the dielectric breakdown strength was significantly diminished. No effect for exposure time up to 140 hours was observed at 50 or 80%RH.

  16. 40 CFR 90.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.310 Engine intake air humidity measurement. This section refers to... for the engine intake air, the ambient test cell humidity measurement may be used. (a) Humidity...

  17. 40 CFR 91.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Provisions § 91.310 Engine intake air humidity measurement. This section refers to engines which are supplied... air, the ambient testcell humidity measurement may be used. (a) Humidity conditioned air supply. Air...

  18. Lanthanide-halide based humidity indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitz, James V [Hinsdale, IL; Williams, Clayton W [Chicago, IL

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses a lanthanide-halide based humidity indicator and method of producing such indicator. The color of the present invention indicates the humidity of an atmosphere to which it is exposed. For example, impregnating an adsorbent support such as silica gel with an aqueous solution of the europium-containing reagent solution described herein, and dehydrating the support to dryness forms a substance with a yellow color. When this substance is exposed to a humid atmosphere the water vapor from the air is adsorbed into the coating on the pore surface of the silica gel. As the water content of the coating increases, the visual color of the coated silica gel changes from yellow to white. The color change is due to the water combining with the lanthanide-halide complex on the pores of the gel.

  19. Silver nanoparticle polymer composite based humidity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Aoife C; Betts, Anthony J; Cassidy, John F

    2010-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles were synthesised by a chemical reduction process in order to produce an aqueous colloidal dispersion. The resulting colloids were then characterised by a combination of UV-Vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy and the nanoparticles were found to have an average diameter of 20-22 nm. The Ag/polymer nanocomposites were then applied to platinum interdigital electrodes as sensor coatings and the capability of the resulting sensor as a humidity detector investigated. With the application of 1 V, a current developed which was found to be directly proportional to humidity levels. The sensor gives a reversible, selective and rapid response which is proportional to levels of humidity within the range of 10% RH to 60% RH. An investigation into the mechanism of the sensor's response was conducted and the response was found to correlate well with a second order Langmuir adsorption model.

  20. NIS two-pressure humidity generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd El-Galil Doaa Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several techniques available to generate humidity references by using stream of saturated gas with well-known water vapor content. Two-pressure humidity generator (2-P is the most commonly used for the realization of temperature and relative humidity scales at National Institute for standards (NIS and for disseminating traceability. This generator has been shown to be highly reproducible when properly used. In order to obtain traceable measurements and best performance, the temperature sensors and pressure gauges of this generator should be calibrated. This paper explained the calibration of 2-P temperature sensors and pressure gauges and the analysis of their performance for the first time at NIS.

  1. Heat or humidity, which triggers tree phenology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Julia; Sparks, Tim H.; Estrella, Nicole; Menzel, Annette

    2014-05-01

    An overwhelming number of studies confirm that temperature is the main driver for phenological events such as leafing, flowering or fruit ripening, which was first discovered by Réaumur in 1735. Since then, several additional factors which influence onset dates have been identified, such as length of the chilling period, photoperiod, temperature of the previous autumn, nutrient availability, precipitation, sunshine and genetics (local adaptations). Those are supposed to capture some of the remaining, unexplained variance. But our ability to predict onset dates remains imprecise, and our understanding of how plants sense temperature is vague. From a climate chamber experiment on cuttings of 9 tree species we present evidence that air humidity is an important, but previously overlooked, factor influencing the spring phenology of trees. The date of median leaf unfolding was 7 days earlier at 90% relative humidity compared to 40% relative humidity. A second experiment with cuttings shows that water uptake by above-ground tissue might be involved in the phenological development of trees. A third climate chamber experiment suggests that winter dormancy and chilling might be linked to dehydration processes. Analysis of climate data from several meteorological stations across Germany proves that the increase in air humidity after winter is a reliable signal of spring, i.e. less variable or susceptible to reversal compared to temperature. Finally, an analysis of long-term phenology data reveals that absolute air humidity can even be used as a reliable predictor of leafing dates. Current experimental work tries to elucidate the involved foliar uptake processes by using deuterium oxide marked water and Raman spectroscopy. We propose a new framework, wherein plants' chilling requirements and frost tolerance might be attributed to desiccation processes, while spring development is linked to re-humidification of plant tissue. The influence of air humidity on the spring

  2. Humidity fluctuations in the marine boundary layer measured at a coastal site with an infrared humidity sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sempreviva, A.M.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1996-01-01

    An extensive set of humidity turbulence data has been analyzed from 22-m height in the marine boundary layer. Fluctuations of humidity were measured by an ''OPHIR'', an infrared humidity sensor with a 10 Hz scanning frequency and humidity spectra were produced. The shapes of the normalized spectra...... follow the established similarity functions. However the 10-min time averaged measurements underestimate the value of the absolute humidity. The importance of the humidity flux contribution in a marine environment in calculating the Obukhov stability length has been studied. Deviations from Monin......-Obukhov similarity theory seem to be connected to a low correlation between humidity and temperature....

  3. Biochars as Innovative Humidity Sensing Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Ziegler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, biochar-based humidity sensors were prepared by drop-coating technique. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP was added as an organic binder to improve the adhesion of the sensing material onto ceramic substrates having platinum electrodes. Two biochars obtained from different precursors were used. The sensors were tested toward relative humidity (RH at room temperature and showed a response starting around 5 RH%, varying the impedance of 2 orders of magnitude after exposure to almost 100% relative humidity. In both cases, biochar materials are behaving as p-type semiconductors under low amounts of humidity. On the contrary, for higher RH values, the impedance decreased due to water molecules adsorption. When PVP is added to SWP700 biochar, n-p heterojunctions are formed between the two semiconductors, leading to a higher sensitivity at low RH values for the sensors SWP700-10% PVP and SWP700-20% PVP with respect to pure SWP700 sensor. Finally, response and recovery times were both reasonably fast (in the order of 1 min.

  4. Soil erosion in humid regions: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Holz; Karl W.J. Williard; Pamela J. Edwards; Jon E. Schoonover

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion has significant implications for land productivity and surface water quality, as sediment is the leading water pollutant worldwide. Here, erosion processes are defined. The dominant factors influencing soil erosion in humid areas are reviewed, with an emphasis on the roles of precipitation, soil moisture, soil porosity, slope steepness and length,...

  5. Recent Developments in Fiber Optics Humidity Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascorbe, Joaquin; Corres, Jesus M.; Arregui, Francisco J.; Matias, Ignacio R.

    2017-01-01

    A wide range of applications such as health, human comfort, agriculture, food processing and storage, and electronic manufacturing, among others, require fast and accurate measurement of humidity. Sensors based on optical fibers present several advantages over electronic sensors and great research efforts have been made in recent years in this field. The present paper reports the current trends of optical fiber humidity sensors. The evolution of optical structures developed towards humidity sensing, as well as the novel materials used for this purpose, will be analyzed. Well-known optical structures, such as long-period fiber gratings or fiber Bragg gratings, are still being studied towards an enhancement of their sensitivity. Sensors based on lossy mode resonances constitute a platform that combines high sensitivity with low complexity, both in terms of their fabrication process and the equipment required. Novel structures, such as resonators, are being studied in order to improve the resolution of humidity sensors. Moreover, recent research on polymer optical fibers suggests that the sensitivity of this kind of sensor has not yet reached its limit. Therefore, there is still room for improvement in terms of sensitivity and resolution. PMID:28422074

  6. Recent Developments in Fiber Optics Humidity Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascorbe, Joaquin; Corres, Jesus M; Arregui, Francisco J; Matias, Ignacio R

    2017-04-19

    A wide range of applications such as health, human comfort, agriculture, food processing and storage, and electronic manufacturing, among others, require fast and accurate measurement of humidity. Sensors based on optical fibers present several advantages over electronic sensors and great research efforts have been made in recent years in this field. The present paper reports the current trends of optical fiber humidity sensors. The evolution of optical structures developed towards humidity sensing, as well as the novel materials used for this purpose, will be analyzed. Well-known optical structures, such as long-period fiber gratings or fiber Bragg gratings, are still being studied towards an enhancement of their sensitivity. Sensors based on lossy mode resonances constitute a platform that combines high sensitivity with low complexity, both in terms of their fabrication process and the equipment required. Novel structures, such as resonators, are being studied in order to improve the resolution of humidity sensors. Moreover, recent research on polymer optical fibers suggests that the sensitivity of this kind of sensor has not yet reached its limit. Therefore, there is still room for improvement in terms of sensitivity and resolution.

  7. Ambient humidity and the skin: the impact of air humidity in healthy and diseased states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goad, N; Gawkrodger, D J

    2016-08-01

    Humidity, along with other climatic factors such as temperature and ultraviolet radiation, can have an important impact on the skin. Limited data suggest that external humidity influences the water content of the stratum corneum. An online literature search was conducted through Pub-Med using combinations of the following keywords: skin, skin disease, humidity, dermatoses, dermatitis, eczema, and mist. Publications included in this review were limited to (i) studies in humans or animals, (ii) publications showing relevance to the field of dermatology, (iii) studies published in English and (iv) publications discussing humidity as an independent influence on skin function. Studies examining environmental factors as composite influences on skin health are only included where the impact of humidity on the skin is also explored in isolation of other environmental factors. A formal systematic review was not feasible for this topic due to the heterogeneity of the available research. Epidemiological studies indicated an increase in eczema with low internal (indoors) humidity and an increase in eczema with external high humidity. Other studies suggest that symptoms of dry skin appear with low humidity internal air-conditioned environments. Murine studies determined that low humidity caused a number of changes in the skin, including the impairment of the desquamation process. Studies in humans demonstrated a reduction in transepidermal water loss (TEWL) (a measure of the integrity of the skin's barrier function) with low humidity, alterations in the water content in the stratum corneum, decreased skin elasticity and increased roughness. Intervention with a humidifying mist increased the water content of the stratum corneum. Conversely, there is some evidence that low humidity conditions can actually improve the barrier function of the skin. Ambient relative humidity has an impact on a range of parameters involved in skin health but the literature is inconclusive. Further

  8. The influence of humidity fluxes on offshore wind speed profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, Rebecca Jane; Sempreviva, Anna Maria; Pryor, Sara

    2010-01-01

    extrapolation from lower measurements. With humid conditions and low mechanical turbulence offshore, deviations from the traditional logarithmic wind speed profile become significant and stability corrections are required. This research focuses on quantifying the effect of humidity fluxes on stability corrected...... wind speed profiles. The effect on wind speed profiles is found to be important in stable conditions where including humidity fluxes forces conditions towards neutral. Our results show that excluding humidity fluxes leads to average predicted wind speeds at 150 m from 10 m which are up to 4% higher...... than if humidity fluxes are included, and the results are not very sensitive to the method selected to estimate humidity fluxes....

  9. Raoult's law revisited: accurately predicting equilibrium relative humidity points for humidity control experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bowler, Michael G; Bowler, Matthew W

    2016-01-01

    The equilibrium relative humidity values for a number of the most commonly used precipitants in biological macromolecule crystallisation have been measured using a new humidity control device. A simple argument in statistical mechanics demonstrates that the saturated vapour pressure of a solvent is proportional to its mole fraction in an ideal solution (Raoult's Law). The same argument can be extended to the case where solvent and solute molecules are of different size.

  10. Standard practice for conducting cyclic humidity exposures

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for conducting cyclic humidity tests with a corrosive dip. It sets forth the conditions required in cyclic humidity testing. 1.2 This practice does not prescribe the type of test specimen or exposure periods nor the interpretation to be given to the results. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to consult and establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  11. Highly sensitive humidity sensor based on graphene oxide foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai-Lun; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Bao-Xun; Zhao, Quan-Liang

    2017-10-01

    Since sensitive humidity sensing is strongly desired, we present a highly sensitive humidity sensor fabricated from graphene oxide (GO) foam based on low-frequency dielectric properties. The GO foam shows humidity- and compression-dependent dielectric. Upon applying compression on GO foam, the humidity sensitivity increases and the maximum humidity sensitivity of dielectric loss is more than 12-fold higher than that of direct-current electrical conductivity. The highly sensitive humidity response originates from the generation of local conductive networks, which is the result of the connected isolated conductive regions by water cluster. Additionally, the dielectric properties of fabricated GO foam show a stable and repeatable humidity response, suggesting a carbon prototype with great potential in humidity sensors.

  12. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  13. A Passive Harmonic Tag for Humidity Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Lazaro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a passive harmonic tag for radio frequency identification (RFID and wireless sensor applications. The tag uses a dual polarized UHF patch antenna as an input antenna. One of the outputs is connected to a frequency doubler, which consists of a Schottky diode with its output connected to a patch tuned at twice the input frequency. The other output of the input antenna feeds a DC power harvested converter that drives an oscillator which modulates its output signal by controlling the bias point of the Schottky diode. The antenna’s output is also used as a humidity sensor. To achieve this, the antenna is loaded with an interdigital capacitor with humidity-dependent capacitance. The antenna is consequently detuned when humidity varies, and therefore the second harmonic power is received. The tag is manufactured using standard fiberglass substrate. The basic theory of harmonic tag operation is described and compared with the standard backscattering approach. Experimental results with a proof of concept using commercial components are presented.

  14. Lead Oxide- PbO Humidity Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sk. Khadeer Pasha

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol thermal route has been used to synthesize nanocrystalline PbO at a low temperature of 75 oC using lead acetate. The synthesized PbO (P75 was annealed in the temperatures ranging from 200-500 oC for 2 h to study the effect of crystal structure and phase changes and were labeled as P200, P300, P400 and P500, respectively. X-Ray diffraction and FT-IR spectroscopy were carried out to identify the structural phases and vibrational stretching frequencies respectively. The TEM images revealed the porous nature of P75 sample which is an important criterion for the humidity sensor. The dc resistance measurements were carried out in the relative humidity (RH range 5-98 %. Among the different prepared, P75 possessed the highest humidity sensitivity of 6250, while the heat treated sample P500 have a low sensitivity of 330. The response and recovery characteristics of the maximum sensitivity sample P75 were 170 s and 40 s respectively.

  15. 7 CFR 28.301 - Measurement: humidity; temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Measurement: humidity; temperature. 28.301 Section 28... for Length of Staple § 28.301 Measurement: humidity; temperature. The length of staple of any cotton... its fibers under a relative humidity of the atmosphere of 65 percent and a temperature of 70° F. ...

  16. A Standard CMOS Humidity Sensor without Post-Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Oleg Nizhnik; Kazusuke Maenaka; Kohei Higuchi

    2011-01-01

    A 2 µW power dissipation, voltage-output, humidity sensor accurate to 5% relative humidity was developed using the LFoundry 0.15 µm CMOS technology without post-processing. The sensor consists of a woven lateral array of electrodes implemented in CMOS top metal, a Intervia Photodielectric 8023-10 humidity-sensitive layer, and a CMOS capacitance to voltage converter.

  17. Fibre-optic sensor technologies for humidity and moisture measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Yeo, T. L.; Sun, T.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2008-01-01

    A review of the use of fibre-optic sensor technologies for humidity sensing is presented. The paper first provides a brief overview on the basic concept of what is meant by humidity and on conventional detection methods. This is followed by an extensive review on the various fibre-optic techniques reported for humidity sensing, covering both intrinsic and extrinsic sensor configurations.

  18. 40 CFR 86.344-79 - Humidity calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Humidity calculations. 86.344-79... Humidity calculations. (a) The following abbreviations (and units) are used in this section: BARO = barometric pressure (Pa) H = specific humidity, (gm H2O/gm of dry air) K = 0.6220 gm H2O/gm dry air M air...

  19. Development of a fiber shape polymeric humidity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yen-Tse; Chen, Ling-Chih; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a polymeric humidity sensor made of a cellulose based composite nanofiber. The device measures humidity via a humidity induced electrical impedance change. The compact, efficient design of the fiber makes it ideal to incorporate into textiles for biometrics applications such as body fluid monitoring. Initial test results show that the sensor can measure between 20 to 80% relative humidity with a sensitivity of about 2%. The impedance of the sensor material changes relatively linearly with relative humidity. The sensor also shows a relatively fast response ( 4s) compared to current commercial sensors.

  20. Sensitivity of honeybee hygroreceptors to slow humidity changes and temporal humidity variation detected in high resolution by mobile measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, Harald; Kallina, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The moist cell and the dry cell on the antenna of the male honeybee were exposed to humidities slowly rising and falling at rates between -1.5%/s and +1.5%/s and at varying amplitudes in the 10 to 90% humidity range. The two cells respond to these slow humidity oscillations with oscillations in impulse frequency which depend not only on instantaneous humidity but also on the rate with which humidity changes. The impulse frequency of each cell was plotted as a function of these two parameters and regression planes were fitted to the data points of single oscillation periods. The regression slopes, which estimate sensitivity, rose with the amplitude of humidity oscillations. During large-amplitude oscillations, moist and dry cell sensitivity for instantaneous humidity and its rate of change was high. During small-amplitude oscillations, their sensitivity for both parameters was low, less exactly reflecting humidity fluctuations. Nothing is known about the spatial and temporal humidity variations a honeybee may encounter when flying through natural environments. Microclimatic parameters (absolute humidity, temperature, wind speed) were measured from an automobile traveling through different landscapes of Lower Austria. Landscape type affected extremes and mean values of humidity. Differences between peaks and troughs of humidity fluctuations were generally smaller in open grassy fields or deciduous forests than in edge habitats or forest openings. Overall, fluctuation amplitudes were small. In this part of the stimulus range, hygroreceptor sensitivity is not optimal for encoding instantaneous humidity and the rate of humidity change. It seems that honeybee's hygroreceptors are specialized for detecting large-amplitude fluctuations that are relevant for a specific behavior, namely, maintaining a sufficiently stable state of water balance. The results suggest that optimal sensitivity of both hygroreceptors is shaped not only by humidity oscillation amplitudes but also

  1. Effect of relative humidity on solar potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soezen, Adnan [Gazi Univ., Mechanical Education Dept., Ankara (Turkey); Arcaklioglu, Erol [Kirikkale Univ., Mechanical Engineering Dept., Kirikkale (Turkey)

    2005-12-01

    In this study, the effect of relative humidity on solar potential is investigated using artificial neural-networks. Two different models are used to train the neural networks. Meteorological and geographical data (latitude, longitude, altitude, month, mean sunshine-duration, and mean temperature) are used in the input layer of the network (Model 1). But, relative humidity values are added to one network in model (Model 2). In other words, the only difference between the models is relative humidity. New formulae based on meteorological and geographical data, have been developed to determine the solar energy potential in Turkey using the networks' weights for both models. Scaled conjugate gradient (SCG) and Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) learning algorithms and a logistic sigmoid transfer-function were used in the network. The best approach was obtained by the SCG algorithm with nine neurons for both models. Meteorological data for the four years, 2000-2003, for 18 cities (Artvin, Cesme, Bozkurt, Malkara, Florya, Tosya, Kizilcahamam, Yenisehir, Edremit, Gediz, Kangal, Solhan, Ergani, Selcuk, Milas, Seydisehir, Siverek and Kilis) spread over Turkey have been used as data in order to train the neural network. Solar radiation is in output layer. One month for each city was used as test data, and these months have not been used for training. The maximum mean absolute percentage errors (MAPEs) for Tosya are 2.770394% and 2.8597% for Models 1 and 2, respectively. The minimum MAPEs for Seydisehir are 1.055205% and 1.041% with R2 (99.9862%, 99.9842%) for Models 1 and 2, respectively, in the SCG algorithm with nine neurons. The best value of R{sup 2} for Models 1 and 2 are for Seydisehir. The minimum value of R{sup 2} for Model 1 is 99.8855% for Tosya, and the value for Model 2 is 99.9001% for Yenisehir. Results show that the humidity has only a negligible effect upon the prediction of solar potential using artificial neural-networks. (Author)

  2. Degradation of chlorpyrifos in humid tropical soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Lian-Kuet; Wong, Mee-Hua; Bruun Hansen, Hans Christian

    2013-08-15

    The insecticide chlorpyrifos is extensively used in the humid tropics for insect control on crops and soils. Chlorpyrifos degradation and mineralization was studied under laboratory conditions to characterize the critical factors controlling the degradation and mineralization in three humid tropical soils from Malaysia. The degradation was fastest in moist soils (t1/2 53.3-77.0 days), compared to dry (t1/2 49.5-120 days) and wet soils (t1/2 63.0-124 days). Degradation increased markedly with temperature with activation energies of 29.0-76.5 kJ mol(-1). Abiotic degradation which is important for chlorpyrifos degradation in sub-soils containing less soil microbial populations resulted in t½ of 173-257 days. Higher chlorpyrifos dosages (5-fold) which are often applied in the tropics due to severe insects infestations caused degradation and mineralization rates to decrease by 2-fold. The mineralization rates were more sensitive to the chlorpyrifos application rates reflecting that degradation of metabolites is rate limiting and the toxic effects of some of the metabolites produced. Despite that chlorpyrifos is frequently used and often in larger amounts on tropical soils compared with temperate soils, higher temperature, moderate moisture and high activity of soil microorganisms will stimulate degradation and mineralization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Humidity Testing for Human Rated Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gary B.

    2009-01-01

    Determination that equipment can operate in and survive exposure to the humidity environments unique to human rated spacecraft presents widely varying challenges. Equipment may need to operate in habitable volumes where the atmosphere contains perspiration, exhalation, and residual moisture. Equipment located outside the pressurized volumes may be exposed to repetitive diurnal cycles that may result in moisture absorption and/or condensation. Equipment may be thermally affected by conduction to coldplate or structure, by forced or ambient air convection (hot/cold or wet/dry), or by radiation to space through windows or hatches. The equipment s on/off state also contributes to the equipment s susceptibility to humidity. Like-equipment is sometimes used in more than one location and under varying operational modes. Due to these challenges, developing a test scenario that bounds all physical, environmental and operational modes for both pressurized and unpressurized volumes requires an integrated assessment to determine the "worst-case combined conditions." Such an assessment was performed for the Constellation program, considering all of the aforementioned variables; and a test profile was developed based on approximately 300 variable combinations. The test profile has been vetted by several subject matter experts and partially validated by testing. Final testing to determine the efficacy of the test profile on actual space hardware is in the planning stages. When validation is completed, the test profile will be formally incorporated into NASA document CxP 30036, "Constellation Environmental Qualification and Acceptance Testing Requirements (CEQATR)."

  4. Temperature and humidity responses of the arctic-alpine seed bug Nysius groenlandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böcher, Jens J.; Nachman, Gösta

    2001-01-01

    Nysius groenlandicus, Heteroptera, Lygaeidae, temperature, humidity, preference, Atctic, Greenland......Nysius groenlandicus, Heteroptera, Lygaeidae, temperature, humidity, preference, Atctic, Greenland...

  5. A Trial Intercomparison of Humidity Generators at Extremes of Range Using Relative Humidity Transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, M.; Benyon, R.; Bell, S. A.; Vicente, T.

    2008-10-01

    In order to effectively implement the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA) of the International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM), national metrology institutes (NMIs) are required to support their claims of calibration and measurement capability (CMC) with a quality system compliant with ISO/IEC 17025, and with suitable evidence of participation in key or supplementary comparisons. The CMC review process, both at regional and inter-regional levels, uses criteria that combine the provisions mentioned above, together with additional evidence demonstrating scientific and technical competence of the institutes. For dew-point temperatures, there are key comparisons in progress under the Consultative Committee for Thermometry (CCT) and under the European regional metrology organisation (EUROMET), together with information available on past regional supplementary comparisons. However, for relative humidity there are, to date, no such comparisons available to support CMC entries. This paper presents and discusses the results of a preliminary investigation of the use of relative humidity and temperature transmitters in order to determine their suitability for the intercomparison of standard humidity generators in support of CMC claims for the calibration of relative humidity instruments. The results of a recent bilateral comparison between 2 NMIs at the extremes of the range up to 98%rh at 70 °C, and down to 1%rh at -40 °C are reported. Specific precautions and recommendations on the use of the devices as transfer standards are presented.

  6. Ultrafast response humidity sensor using supramolecular nanofibre and its application in monitoring breath humidity and flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogera, Umesha; Sagade, Abhay A; George, Subi J; Kulkarni, Giridhar U

    2014-02-17

    Measuring humidity in dynamic situations calls for highly sensitive fast response sensors. Here we report, a humidity sensor fabricated using solution processed supramolecular nanofibres as active resistive sensing material. The nanofibres are built via self- assembly of donor and acceptor molecules (coronene tetracarboxylate and dodecyl methyl viologen respectively) involved in charge transfer interactions. The conductivity of the nanofibre varied sensitively over a wide range of relative humidity (RH) with unprecedented fast response and recovery times. Based on UV-vis, XRD and AFM measurements, it is found that the stacking distance in the nanofibre decreases slightly while the charge transfer band intensity increases, all observations implying enhanced charge transfer interaction and hence the conductivity. It is demonstrated to be as a novel breath sensor which can monitor the respiration rate. Using two humidity sensors, a breath flow sensor was made which could simultaneously measure RH and flow rate of exhaled nasal breath. The integrated device was used for monitoring RH in the exhaled breath from volunteers undergoing exercise and alcohol induced dehydration.

  7. Ultrafast response humidity sensor using supramolecular nanofibre and its application in monitoring breath humidity and flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogera, Umesha; Sagade, Abhay A.; George, Subi J.; Kulkarni, Giridhar U.

    2014-01-01

    Measuring humidity in dynamic situations calls for highly sensitive fast response sensors. Here we report, a humidity sensor fabricated using solution processed supramolecular nanofibres as active resistive sensing material. The nanofibres are built via self- assembly of donor and acceptor molecules (coronene tetracarboxylate and dodecyl methyl viologen respectively) involved in charge transfer interactions. The conductivity of the nanofibre varied sensitively over a wide range of relative humidity (RH) with unprecedented fast response and recovery times. Based on UV-vis, XRD and AFM measurements, it is found that the stacking distance in the nanofibre decreases slightly while the charge transfer band intensity increases, all observations implying enhanced charge transfer interaction and hence the conductivity. It is demonstrated to be as a novel breath sensor which can monitor the respiration rate. Using two humidity sensors, a breath flow sensor was made which could simultaneously measure RH and flow rate of exhaled nasal breath. The integrated device was used for monitoring RH in the exhaled breath from volunteers undergoing exercise and alcohol induced dehydration. PMID:24531132

  8. Raoult's law revisited: accurately predicting equilibrium relative humidity points for humidity control experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Michael G; Bowler, David R; Bowler, Matthew W

    2017-04-01

    The humidity surrounding a sample is an important variable in scientific experiments. Biological samples in particular require not just a humid atmosphere but often a relative humidity (RH) that is in equilibrium with a stabilizing solution required to maintain the sample in the same state during measurements. The controlled dehydration of macromolecular crystals can lead to significant increases in crystal order, leading to higher diffraction quality. Devices that can accurately control the humidity surrounding crystals while monitoring diffraction have led to this technique being increasingly adopted, as the experiments become easier and more reproducible. Matching the RH to the mother liquor is the first step in allowing the stable mounting of a crystal. In previous work [Wheeler, Russi, Bowler & Bowler (2012). Acta Cryst. F68, 111-114], the equilibrium RHs were measured for a range of concentrations of the most commonly used precipitants in macromolecular crystallography and it was shown how these related to Raoult's law for the equilibrium vapour pressure of water above a solution. However, a discrepancy between the measured values and those predicted by theory could not be explained. Here, a more precise humidity control device has been used to determine equilibrium RH points. The new results are in agreement with Raoult's law. A simple argument in statistical mechanics is also presented, demonstrating that the equilibrium vapour pressure of a solvent is proportional to its mole fraction in an ideal solution: Raoult's law. The same argument can be extended to the case where the solvent and solute molecules are of different sizes, as is the case with polymers. The results provide a framework for the correct maintenance of the RH surrounding a sample.

  9. Temperature, humidity and time. Combined effects on radiochromic film dosimeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdel-Fattah, A.A.; Miller, A.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of both relative humidity and temperature during irradiation on the dose response of FWT-60-00 and Riso B3 radiochromic film dosimeters have been investigated in the relative humidity (RH) range 11-94% and temperature range 20-60 degrees C for irradiation by Co-60 photons and 10-Me......V electrons. The results show that humidity and temperature cannot be treated as independent variables, rather there appears to be interdependence between absorbed dose, temperature, and humidity. Dose rate does not seem to play a significant role. The dependence of temperature during irradiation is +0.......25 +/- 0.1% per degrees C for the FWT-60-00 dosimeters and +0.5 +/- 0.1% per degrees C For Riso B3 dosimeters at temperatures between 20 and 50 degrees C and at relative humidities between 20 and 53%. At extreme conditions both with respect to temperature and to humidity, the dosimeters show much stronger...

  10. A CMOS humidity sensor for passive RFID sensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Zhang, Chaolong; Feng, Wei

    2014-05-16

    This paper presents a low-cost low-power CMOS humidity sensor for passive RFID sensing applications. The humidity sensing element is implemented in standard CMOS technology without any further post-processing, which results in low fabrication costs. The interface of this humidity sensor employs a PLL-based architecture transferring sensor signal processing from the voltage domain to the frequency domain. Therefore this architecture allows the use of a fully digital circuit, which can operate on ultra-low supply voltage and thus achieves low-power consumption. The proposed humidity sensor has been fabricated in the TSMC 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurements show this humidity sensor exhibits excellent linearity and stability within the relative humidity range. The sensor interface circuit consumes only 1.05 µW at 0.5 V supply voltage and reduces it at least by an order of magnitude compared to previous designs.

  11. A CMOS Humidity Sensor for Passive RFID Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangming Deng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a low-cost low-power CMOS humidity sensor for passive RFID sensing applications. The humidity sensing element is implemented in standard CMOS technology without any further post-processing, which results in low fabrication costs. The interface of this humidity sensor employs a PLL-based architecture transferring sensor signal processing from the voltage domain to the frequency domain. Therefore this architecture allows the use of a fully digital circuit, which can operate on ultra-low supply voltage and thus achieves low-power consumption. The proposed humidity sensor has been fabricated in the TSMC 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurements show this humidity sensor exhibits excellent linearity and stability within the relative humidity range. The sensor interface circuit consumes only 1.05 µW at 0.5 V supply voltage and reduces it at least by an order of magnitude compared to previous designs.

  12. The use of ambient humidity conditions to improve influenza forecast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaman, Jeffrey; Kandula, Sasikiran; Yang, Wan; Karspeck, Alicia

    2017-11-01

    Laboratory and epidemiological evidence indicate that ambient humidity modulates the survival and transmission of influenza. Here we explore whether the inclusion of humidity forcing in mathematical models describing influenza transmission improves the accuracy of forecasts generated with those models. We generate retrospective forecasts for 95 cities over 10 seasons in the United States and assess both forecast accuracy and error. Overall, we find that humidity forcing improves forecast performance (at 1-4 lead weeks, 3.8% more peak week and 4.4% more peak intensity forecasts are accurate than with no forcing) and that forecasts generated using daily climatological humidity forcing generally outperform forecasts that utilize daily observed humidity forcing (4.4% and 2.6% respectively). These findings hold for predictions of outbreak peak intensity, peak timing, and incidence over 2- and 4-week horizons. The results indicate that use of climatological humidity forcing is warranted for current operational influenza forecast.

  13. Measurements of humidity and current distribution in a PEFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, H.; Kurihara, R.; Sukemori, S.; Sugawara, T.; Abe, S. [Department of Electrical Engineering Tokyo Denki University, 2-2 Kandanishiki-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8457 (Japan); Kobayasi, H.; Aoki, T.; Ogami, Y.; Matsunaga, A. [Fuel Cell Technology Development Department Toshiba Fuel Cell System,4-1 Ukishima-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa 210-0862 (Japan)

    2006-04-21

    Voltage decreases of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) are affected by the relative humidity of the reaction gas inside the cells. A study was conducted to establish a method for measuring relative humidity and current distribution inside PEFC cells in order to identify the factors affecting the voltage decay of such fuel cells. The humidity distribution was measured using a humidity sensor for directly monitoring the relative humidity of the reaction gas flowing through the air flow channel of the cathode separator. The current distribution was measured directly by attaching a current sensor to the rib of the cathode separator. Typical results of relative humidity and current distribution are described and interpretations are discussed. (author)

  14. The influence of humidity fluxes on offshore wind speed profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Barthelmie

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy developments offshore focus on larger turbines to keep the relative cost of the foundation per MW of installed capacity low. Hence typical wind turbine hub-heights are extending to 100 m and potentially beyond. However, measurements to these heights are not usually available, requiring extrapolation from lower measurements. With humid conditions and low mechanical turbulence offshore, deviations from the traditional logarithmic wind speed profile become significant and stability corrections are required. This research focuses on quantifying the effect of humidity fluxes on stability corrected wind speed profiles. The effect on wind speed profiles is found to be important in stable conditions where including humidity fluxes forces conditions towards neutral. Our results show that excluding humidity fluxes leads to average predicted wind speeds at 150 m from 10 m which are up to 4% higher than if humidity fluxes are included, and the results are not very sensitive to the method selected to estimate humidity fluxes.

  15. Optical Characterization and Humidity Sensing Properties of Praseodymium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. C. YADAV

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the humidity sensing properties of praseodymium oxide (99 % pure, Johnson & Matthey, London and its characterization. The pellet of praseodymium oxide was made under a pressure of 616 MPa and it was annealed at 200, 400, 600 and 800 oC for 2 hrs successively. After each step of annealing, the pellet was exposed to humidity. It was observed that as relative humidity (% RH increases, there is a decrease in the resistance for entire range of humidity. The highest sensitivity of the humidity sensor was found 6 MΩ/%RH at room temperature. Distribution of grains and pores were observed by SEM. XR D of sensing material revealed the phase and lattice structure of praseodymium oxide. Crystallite size of sensing material lies between 132-297 nm. The proposed investigation provides a new step in developing towards simple, reliable and sensitive humidity sensor.

  16. A standard CMOS humidity sensor without post-processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizhnik, Oleg; Higuchi, Kohei; Maenaka, Kazusuke

    2011-01-01

    A 2 μW power dissipation, voltage-output, humidity sensor accurate to 5% relative humidity was developed using the LFoundry 0.15 μm CMOS technology without post-processing. The sensor consists of a woven lateral array of electrodes implemented in CMOS top metal, a Intervia Photodielectric 8023-10 humidity-sensitive layer, and a CMOS capacitance to voltage converter.

  17. A CMOS Humidity Sensor for Passive RFID Sensing Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Fangming Deng; Yigang He; Chaolong Zhang; Wei Feng

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a low-cost low-power CMOS humidity sensor for passive RFID sensing applications. The humidity sensing element is implemented in standard CMOS technology without any further post-processing, which results in low fabrication costs. The interface of this humidity sensor employs a PLL-based architecture transferring sensor signal processing from the voltage domain to the frequency domain. Therefore this architecture allows the use of a fully digital circuit, which can operate ...

  18. Effects of Humidity and Surface on Photoalignment of Brilliant Yellow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-14

    b) Photograph of spin - coater area covered with a plastic bag filled with nitrogen gas and humid air to control the humidity. c) Schematic of four...coating (humidity at stage II), the spin - coater (Special Coating System model P6700) was tightly covered with a plastic bag (volume = 50L) filled with...of: substrate storage before coating; during the spin -coating process; between film coating and exposure; and after exposure. Surprising results

  19. Thermal Comfort and Optimum Humidity Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Jokl

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrothermal microclimate is the main component in indoor comfort. The optimum hydrothermal level can be ensured by suitable changes in the sources of heat and water vapor within the building, changes in the environment (the interior of the building and in the people exposed to the conditions inside the building. A change in the heat source and the source of water vapor involves improving the heat - insulating properties and the air permeability of the peripheral walls and especially of the windows. The change in the environment will bring human bodies into balance with the environment. This can be expressed in terms of an optimum or at least an acceptable globe temperature, an adequate proportion of radiant heat within the total amount of heat from the environment (defined by the difference between air and wall temperature, uniform cooling of the human body by the environment, defined a by the acceptable temperature difference between head and ankles, b by acceptable temperature variations during a shift (location unchanged, or during movement from one location to another without a change of clothing. Finally, a moisture balance between man and the environment is necessary (defined by acceptable relative air humidity. A change for human beings means a change of clothes which, of course, is limited by social acceptance in summer and by inconvenient heaviness in winter. The principles of optimum heating and cooling, humidification and dehumidification are presented in this paper.Hydrothermal comfort in an environment depends on heat and humidity flows (heat and water vapors, occurring in a given space in a building interior and affecting the total state of the human organism.

  20. Miniature Flexible Humidity Sensitive Patches for Space Suits Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced space suit technologies demand improved, simplified, long-life regenerative sensing technologies, including humidity sensors, that exceed the performance of...

  1. Climate change, humidity, and mortality in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreca, Alan I.

    2014-01-01

    This paper estimates the effects of humidity and temperature on mortality rates in the United States (c. 1973–2002) in order to provide an insight into the potential health impacts of climate change. I find that humidity, like temperature, is an important determinant of mortality. Coupled with Hadley CM3 climate-change predictions, I project that mortality rates are likely to change little on the aggregate for the United States. However, distributional impacts matter: mortality rates are likely to decline in cold and dry areas, but increase in hot and humid areas. Further, accounting for humidity has important implications for evaluating these distributional effects. PMID:25328254

  2. Energy-Efficient Management of Mechanical Ventilation and Relative Humidity in Hot-Humid Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Withers, Jr., Charles R. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    In hot and humid climates, it is challenging to energy-efficiently maintain indoor RH at acceptable levels while simultaneously providing required ventilation, particularly in high performance low cooling load homes. The fundamental problem with solely relying on fixed capacity central cooling systems to manage moisture during low sensible load periods is that they are oversized for cooler periods of the year despite being 'properly sized' for a very hot design cooling day. The primary goals of this project were to determine the impact of supplementing a central space conditioning system with 1) a supplemental dehumidifier and 2) a ductless mini-split on seasonal energy use and summer peak power use as well as the impact on thermal distribution and humidity control inside a completely furnished lab home that was continuously ventilated in accordance with ASHRAE 62.2-2013.

  3. Humidity sensor failure: a problem that should not be neglected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The problem of abnormally dry bias induced by radiosonde humidity sensor failure in the low and mid-troposphere is studied based on the global operational radiosonde relative humidity observations from December 2008 to November 2009. The concurrent humidity retrievals from the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC radio occultation mission are also used to assess the quality of the radiosonde humidity observations. It is found that extremely dry relative humidity are common in the low and mid-troposphere, with an annual globally averaged occurrence of 4.2%. These low-humidity observations usually exist between 20 and 40° latitude in both the Northern Hemisphere and Southern Hemisphere, and from heights of 700 to 450 hPa. Winter and spring are the favored seasons for their occurrence, with a maximum fraction of 9.53 % in the Northern Hemisphere and 16.82% in the Southern Hemisphere. The phenomenon does not result from natural atmospheric variability, but rather humidity sensor failure. If the performance of humidity sensors is not good, low-humidity observations occur easily, particularly when the radiosonde ascends through stratiform clouds with high moisture content. The humidity sensor cannot adapt to the huge change of the atmospheric environment inside and outside stratiform clouds, resulting in sensor failure and no response to atmospheric change. These extremely dry relative humidity observations are erroneous. However, they have been archived as formal data and applied in many research studies. This may seriously undermine the reliability of numerical weather prediction and the analysis of weather and climate if quality control is not applied before using these data.

  4. Effect of relative humidity on fungal colonization of fiberglass insulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeonu, I M; Noble, J A; Simmons, R B; Price, D L; Crow, S A; Ahearn, D G

    1994-06-01

    Fiberglass duct liners and fiberglass duct boards from eight buildings whose occupants complained of unacceptable or moldy odors in the air were found to be heavily colonized by fungi, particularly by Aspergillus versicolor. Unused fiberglass was found to be susceptible to fungal colonization in environmental chambers dependent upon relative humidity. No colonization was observed at relative humidities below 50%.

  5. Effect of relative humidity on fungal colonization of fiberglass insulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Ezeonu, I M; Noble, J A; Simmons, R B; D. L. Price; Crow, S A; Ahearn, D G

    1994-01-01

    Fiberglass duct liners and fiberglass duct boards from eight buildings whose occupants complained of unacceptable or moldy odors in the air were found to be heavily colonized by fungi, particularly by Aspergillus versicolor. Unused fiberglass was found to be susceptible to fungal colonization in environmental chambers dependent upon relative humidity. No colonization was observed at relative humidities below 50%.

  6. Acoustic method for measuring air temperature and humidity in rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanev, N. G.

    2014-05-01

    A method is proposed to determine air temperature and humidity in rooms with a system of sound sources and receivers, making it possible to find the sound velocity and reverberation time. Nomograms for determining the air temperature and relative air humidity are constructed from the found sound velocity and time reverberation values. The required accuracy of measuring these parameters is estimated.

  7. Relationship between relative humidity and the dew point ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research was aimed at determining the relationship between relative humidity and the dew point temperature in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria. The dew point temperature was approximated from the measured air temperature and relative humidity with the aid of a currently self-designed weather monitoring system.

  8. On the Humidity Sensitivity of Hot-Wire Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Ejling; Busch, N. E.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of humidity changes on hot-wire measurements is discussed. Indications are that the humidity sensitivity parameters obtained by the authors in an earlier paper should be changed. This means, however, that the agreement between predicted and measured sensitivities ceases to exist...

  9. The effects of lithographic residues and humidity on graphene field ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recently, unknown-manner changes in charge neutrality point (CNP) positioning were ascribed to humidity at graphene field effect transistors (GFETs). While the exactmeans of humidity interacting with hydrophobicgraphene remains unknown, this work examines pristine and lithographic-process-applied graphene ...

  10. Absolute Humidity and the Seasonality of Influenza (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaman, J. L.; Pitzer, V.; Viboud, C.; Grenfell, B.; Goldstein, E.; Lipsitch, M.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the observed wintertime increase of mortality in temperate regions is attributed to seasonal influenza. A recent re-analysis of laboratory experiments indicates that absolute humidity strongly modulates the airborne survival and transmission of the influenza virus. Here we show that the onset of increased wintertime influenza-related mortality in the United States is associated with anomalously low absolute humidity levels during the prior weeks. We then use an epidemiological model, in which observed absolute humidity conditions temper influenza transmission rates, to successfully simulate the seasonal cycle of observed influenza-related mortality. The model results indicate that direct modulation of influenza transmissibility by absolute humidity alone is sufficient to produce this observed seasonality. These findings provide epidemiological support for the hypothesis that absolute humidity drives seasonal variations of influenza transmission in temperate regions. In addition, we show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility and changes in population mixing and contact rates.

  11. Nanostructure composite film for sensor controls of humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalenko K. L.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Received nanostructure of the composite film allows to create integrated sensor controls of humidity with high sensitivity, stable in time, with linear dependence of capacity from relative humidity practically in all range of its change (3 to 100% and keeping working capacity at low temperatures up to –35°С.

  12. Coating based Fiber Bragg Grating humidity sensor array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Boersma, A.; Jansen, T.H.

    2012-01-01

    A coating based FBG humidity sensor is developed for distributed humidity sensing. The sensitivity of the coated FBG is optimized by varying the chemical composition and the thickness of the coating. A sensitivity of ~2 pm/%RH and a rapid response are demonstrated. The composition of the coating can

  13. Fibre optic humidity sensor designed for highly alkaline environments

    OpenAIRE

    K. Bremer; Wollweber, M.; Guenther, S.; Werner, G.; Sun, T.; Grattan, K. T. V.; Roth, B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a sensor packaging for a Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) based fibre optic humidity sensor. The evaluation of the developed fibre optic sensor was performed under experimental conditions and verified its capability to withstand highly alkaline environments. Therefore, the sensor can be applied to monitor the concrete humidity level and thus to indicate the maintenance of concrete structures.

  14. Overview of humidity driven reliability issues of electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan

    2017-01-01

    Electronic control units, power modules, and consumer electronics are used today in a wide variety of varying climatic conditions. Varying external climatic conditions of temperature and humidity can cause an uncontrolled local climate inside the device enclosure. Uncontrolled humidity together w...

  15. Variability in Rainfall, Temperature and Relative Humidity at Bahir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to assess change in rainfall, temperature and relative humidity at Bahir Dar city in relation to global climate change. The study focused on analyzing changes in meteorological data, specifically temperature, rainfall and relative humidity. Bahir Dar city was selected due to its proximity to Lake Tana ...

  16. A physically based analytical spatial air temperature and humidity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang Yang; Theodore A. Endreny; David J. Nowak

    2013-01-01

    Spatial variation of urban surface air temperature and humidity influences human thermal comfort, the settling rate of atmospheric pollutants, and plant physiology and growth. Given the lack of observations, we developed a Physically based Analytical Spatial Air Temperature and Humidity (PASATH) model. The PASATH model calculates spatial solar radiation and heat...

  17. Modeling of humidity-related reliability in enclosures with electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hygum, Morten Arnfeldt; Popok, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Reliability of electronics that operate outdoor is strongly affected by environmental factors such as temperature and humidity. Fluctuations of these parameters can lead to water condensation inside enclosures. Therefore, modelling of humidity distribution in a container with air and freely exposed...

  18. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ENVIRONMENT CANADA (EC) RADIOSONDE GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Environment Canada (EC) Radiosonde GCPEx dataset provides measurements of pressure, temperature, humidity, and winds collected by Vaisala...

  19. Humidity sensor based on intracavity sensing of fiber ring laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jia; Xu, Wei; Xu, Degang; Wang, Yuye; Zhang, Chao; Yan, Chao; Yan, Dexian; He, Yixin; Tang, Longhuang; Zhang, Weihong; Yao, Jianquan

    2017-10-01

    A humidity sensor based on the intracavity sensing of a fiber ring laser is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the fiber ring laser, a humidity-sensitive fiber-optic multimode interferometer (MMI), fabricated by the single-mode-no-core-single-mode (SNCS) fiber coated with Agarose, works as the wavelength-selective filter for intracavity wavelength-modulated humidity sensing. The experiment shows that the lasing wavelength of the fiber laser has a good linear response to ambient humidity from 35%RH to 95%RH. The humidity sensitivity of -68 pm/%RH is obtained with a narrow 3 dB bandwidth less than 0.09 nm and a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)  ∼60 dB. The time response of the sensor has been measured to be as fast as 93 ms. The proposed sensor possesses a good stability and low temperature cross-sensitivity.

  20. Water Collection from Air Humidity in Bahrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahman. Nidal A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Kingdom of Bahrain falls geographically in one of the driest regions in the world. Conventional fresh surface water bodies, such as rivers and lakes, are nonexistent and for water consumption, Bahrain prominently relies on the desalination of sea water. This paper presents an ongoing project that is being pursued by a group of student and their advising professors to investigate the viability of extracting water from air humidity. Dehumidifiers have been utilized as water extraction devices. Those devices have been distributed on six areas that were selected based on a rigorous geospatial modeling of historical meteorological data. The areas fall in residential and industrial neighborhoods that are located in the main island and the island of Muharraq. Water samples have been collected three times every week since May of 2016 and the collection process will continue until May of 2017. The collected water samples have been analyzed against numerous variables individually and in combinations including: amount of water collected per hour versus geographical location, amount of water collected per hour versus meteorological factors, suitability of collected water for potable human consumption, detection of air pollution in the areas of collection and the economy of this method of water collection in comparison to other nonconventional methods. An overview of the completed analysis results is presented in this paper.

  1. Durable microfabricated high-speed humidity sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuban, Petr; Berg, Jordan M; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2004-05-01

    We describe a durable microfabricated humidity sensor made of interdigitated rhodium electrodes on a silicon substrate covered with a sensing film of Nafion perfluorosulfonate ionomer. Rhodium electrodes are much less prone to oxidative degradation compared to previously described gold electrode-based sensors. Even with dc excitation, Rh electrode sensors exhibit excellent long-term response stability. It has been found that low-amplitude (+/-1 V) square wave excitation can prolong the usability of gold electrode-based sensors to at least several months; however, this mode of interrogation cannot provide subsecond response times. Rhodium deposition on the microsensors is much more difficult than that of gold. We were able to attain crack-free Rh deposits by adaptation of pulsed electroplating techniques. At excitation voltages of >2 V dc, the Rh sensors respond to moisture with 10 90% rise and fall times of 30-50 ms. These are the fastest microfabricated water vapor sensors reported to date. We demonstrate applications as a breath monitor. Such sensors should also be of utility in atmospheric eddy measurements. Short-term repeatability is better than 0.6% RSD (n = 7).

  2. A Novel Passive Wireless Sensor for Concrete Humidity Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuangxi; Deng, Fangming; Yu, Lehua; Li, Bing; Wu, Xiang; Yin, Baiqiang

    2016-09-20

    This paper presents a passive wireless humidity sensor for concrete monitoring. After discussing the transmission of electromagnetic wave in concrete, a novel architecture of wireless humidity sensor, based on Ultra-High Frequency (UHF) Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology, is proposed for low-power application. The humidity sensor utilizes the top metal layer to form the interdigitated electrodes, which were then filled with polyimide as the humidity sensing layer. The sensor interface converts the humidity capacitance into a digital signal in the frequency domain. A two-stage rectifier adopts a dynamic bias-voltage generator to boost the effective gate-source voltage of the switches in differential-drive architecture. The clock generator employs a novel structure to reduce the internal voltage swing. The measurement results show that our proposed wireless humidity can achieve a high linearity with a normalized sensitivity of 0.55% %RH at 20 °C. Despite the high losses of concrete, the proposed wireless humidity sensor achieves reliable communication performances in passive mode. The maximum operating distance is 0.52 m when the proposed wireless sensor is embedded into the concrete at the depth of 8 cm. The measured results are highly consistent with the results measured by traditional methods.

  3. Characterization of a sulfonated polycarbonate resistive humidity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinger, Carla P L; Calado, Hallen D R; Rubinger, Rero M; Oliveira, Henrique; Donnici, Claudio L

    2013-02-05

    In this work; resistive moisture sensors were obtained by dip coating sulfonated polycarbonate (SPC) onto silver interdigitated electrodes. Commercial polycarbonate was sulfonated with acetyl sulphate at two different sulfonation degrees corresponding to 9.0 and 18.0 mole %. Impedance spectroscopy was used to investigate the humidity sensing properties at controlled relative humidity (RH%) environments generated from standard saline solutions in the range of 11-90 RH%. For the highest sulfonated sample; in the RH% range investigated (11 to 90%); the sensor impedance changed from 4.7 MΩ to 18 kΩ. Humidity sensors made from sulfonated polycarbonate showed exponential decay behavior of the impedance at constant frequency with the environmental relative humidity. Sample 9SPC presented dielectric relaxation response for environmental humidity between 58 and 90 RH% while sample 18SPC presented dielectric relaxation response for the entire measured range between 11 and 90 RH%. Sulfonated polycarbonate could be a promising material for the fabrication of simple and cheap humidity-sensing sensors for the assessment of relative humidity of the surrounding environment, as suggested by experimental results.

  4. Temperature and Humidity Effects on Hospital Morbidity in Darwin, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldie, James; Sherwood, Steven C; Green, Donna; Alexander, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have explored the relationship between temperature and health in the context of a changing climate, but few have considered the effects of humidity, particularly in tropical locations, on human health and well-being. To investigate this potential relationship, this study assessed the main and interacting effects of daily temperature and humidity on hospital admission rates for selected heat-relevant diagnoses in Darwin, Australia. Univariate and bivariate Poisson generalized linear models were used to find statistically significant predictors and the admission rates within bins of predictors were compared to explore nonlinear effects. The analysis indicated that nighttime humidity was the most statistically significant predictor (P humidity (P humidity effect appeared to be strongly nonlinear: Hot days appeared to have higher admission rates when they were preceded by high nighttime humidity. From this analysis, we suggest that heat-health policies in tropical regions similar to Darwin need to accommodate the effects of temperature and humidity at different times of day. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Humidity sorption on natural building stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, C.; Mirwald, P.

    2003-04-01

    processes, physical, chemical or biological, depend on the presence of water. Like most porous materials building stone respond on humidity by water uptake. The sorption isotherm represents the equilibrium moisture, specific for each material. The determination of the isotherm for stone of low and small porosity like marble is difficult. With the help of a newly developed water sorption analysis chamber [2], which allows the simultaneous measurement of 11 samples, good results on stone/rock samples have been obtained. Even at marble species with pore volumes lower than 0.4 % isotherms are measured. This analytical method offers new insights in the pore behaviour of low porosity materials. The advantages of this technique which supplements other techniques (e.g. BET, Hg-porosimetry) are: i) the testing agent is identical to the weathering agent, water; ii) the atmospheric parameters at the measurement reflect the natural conditions - thus no changes to the material properties have to be considered; iii) due to the small diameter of the water molecule (~0.28 nm), smaller pores are reached than e.g. with N2 (~0.31 nm). Sorption isotherms of sandstone (Baumberg, Obernkirchen, Groeden), granite (Brixen), and marble (Sterzing, Laas) are presented. Particular as to marbles the resolution is considerably higher. A previously observed negative hysteresis [3] seems an effect due to limited data resolution. [1] Snethlage, R. (1984) Steinkonservierung, Bayer. LA Denkmalpflege, Ah. 22, 203 S. [2] Griesser, U.J., Dillenz, J. (2002) Neuartiges, vollautomatisches Feuchtesorptionsprüfgerät mit hohem Probendurchsatz, Feuchtetag 2002, Weimar, 85-93. [3] Fimmel, R. (1996) Verwitterungsverhalten der alpinen Marmore von Laas und Sterzing, Diss. Univ. Ibk, 116 S.

  6. Measure Guideline: Supplemental Dehumidification in Warm-Humid Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, A.

    2014-10-01

    This document covers a description of the need and applied solutions for supplemental dehumidification in warm-humid climates, especially for energy efficient homes where the sensible cooling load has been dramatically reduced. In older homes in warm-humid climates, cooling loads are typically high and cooling equipment runs a lot to cool the air. The cooling process also removes indoor moisture, reducing indoor relative humidity. However, at current residential code levels, and especially for above-code programs, sensible cooling loads have been so dramatically reduced that the cooling system does not run a lot to cool the air, resulting in much less moisture being removed. In these new homes, cooling equipment is off for much longer periods of time especially during spring/fall seasons, summer shoulder months, rainy periods, some summer nights, and some winter days. In warm-humid climates, those long off periods allow indoor humidity to become elevated due to internally generated moisture and ventilation air change. Elevated indoor relative humidity impacts comfort, indoor air quality, and building material durability. Industry is responding with supplemental dehumidification options, but that effort is really in its infancy regarding year-round humidity control in low-energy homes. Available supplemental humidity control options are discussed. Some options are less expensive but may not control indoor humidity as well as more expensive and comprehensive options. The best performing option is one that avoids overcooling and avoids adding unnecessary heat to the space by using waste heat from the cooling system to reheat the cooled and dehumidified air to room-neutral temperature.

  7. Measure Guideline: Supplemental Dehumidification in Warm-Humid Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, Armin [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This document covers a description of the need and applied solutions for supplemental dehumidification in warm-humid climates, especially for energy efficient homes where the sensible cooling load has been dramatically reduced. Cooling loads are typically high and cooling equipment runs a lot to cool the air in older homes in warm-humid climates. The cooling process also removes indoor moisture, reducing indoor relative humidity. However, at current residential code levels, and especially for above-code programs, sensible cooling loads have been so dramatically reduced that the cooling system does not run a lot to cool the air, resulting in much less moisture being removed. In these new homes, cooling equipment is off for much longer periods of time especially during spring/fall seasons, summer shoulder months, rainy periods, some summer nights, and winter days. In warm-humid climates, those long-off periods allow indoor humidity to become elevated due to internally generated moisture and ventilation air change. Elevated indoor relative humidity impacts comfort, indoor air quality, and building material durability. Industry is responding with supplemental dehumidification options, but that effort is really in its infancy regarding year-round humidity control in low-energy homes. Available supplemental humidity control options are discussed. Some options are less expensive but may not control indoor humidity as well as more expensive and comprehensive options. The best performing option is one that avoids overcooling and adding unnecessary heat to the space by using waste heat from the cooling system to reheat the cooled and dehumidified air to room-neutral temperature.

  8. Effects of temperature and relative humidity on DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bind, Marie-Abele; Zanobetti, Antonella; Gasparrini, Antonio; Peters, Annette; Coull, Brent; Baccarelli, Andrea; Tarantini, Letizia; Koutrakis, Petros; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have found relationships between DNA methylation and various environmental contaminant exposures. Associations with weather have not been examined. Because temperature and humidity are related to mortality even on non-extreme days, we hypothesized that temperature and relative humidity may affect methylation. We repeatedly measured methylation on long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE-1), Alu, and 9 candidate genes in blood samples from 777 elderly men participating in the Normative Aging Study (1999-2009). We assessed whether ambient temperature and relative humidity are related to methylation on LINE-1 and Alu, as well as on genes controlling coagulation, inflammation, cortisol, DNA repair, and metabolic pathway. We examined intermediate-term associations of temperature, relative humidity, and their interaction with methylation, using distributed lag models. Temperature or relative humidity levels were associated with methylation on tissue factor (F3), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), toll-like receptor 2 (TRL-2), carnitine O-acetyltransferase (CRAT), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and glucocorticoid receptor, LINE-1, and Alu. For instance, a 5°C increase in 3-week average temperature in ICAM-1 methylation was associated with a 9% increase (95% confidence interval: 3% to 15%), whereas a 10% increase in 3-week average relative humidity was associated with a 5% decrease (-8% to -1%). The relative humidity association with ICAM-1 methylation was stronger on hot days than mild days. DNA methylation in blood cells may reflect biological effects of temperature and relative humidity. Temperature and relative humidity may also interact to produce stronger effects.

  9. Effects of humidity during photoprocessing on thin film metallization adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norwood, D.P.

    1980-03-01

    Humidity effects during photoprocessing on tantalum/chromium/gold thin film networks (TFNs) were investigated. Humidity conditions at various process steps were controlled by placing either desiccant or water in handling containers for the TFNs. The TFNs photoprocessed in humid conditions had a much higher occurrence of metallization failures compared to TFNs processed in dry conditions. Ceramic surface defects were shown to cause pores in the thin films, and these pores enhanced corrosion susceptibility for the films. This study resulted in a desiccated storage process for production of TFNs.

  10. Liquid whispering-gallery-mode resonator as a humidity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrador-Páez, Lucía; Soler-Carracedo, Kevin; Hernández-Rodríguez, Miguel; Martín, Inocencio R; Carmon, Tal; Martin, Leopoldo L

    2017-01-23

    We experimentally demonstrate the high sensitivity of a novel liquid state, whispering-gallery-mode optical resonator to humidity changes. The optical resonator used consists of a droplet made of glycerol, a transparent liquid that enables high optical quality factor, doped with fluorescent material. As glycerol is highly hygroscopic, the refractive index and radius of the droplet change with ambient humidity. This produces a shift on the whispering gallery mode's wavelengths, which modulates the emission of the fluorescent material. This device shows an unpreceded sensitivity of 10-3 per relative humidity percent.

  11. Relative Humidity Sensor Based on Microfiber Loop Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangzi Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel relative humidity (RH sensor based on a microfiber loop resonator (MLR is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. As refractive index of the microfiber in the MLR is modified by environmental humidity, resonant wavelength of the MLR changes with RH level. By detecting this wavelength shift, RH measurement is realized with a linear response sensitivity of 1.8 pm/% RH. The obvious advantage of this technique over others is that no coating of humidity-sensitive material is required.

  12. Numerical Modelling Of Humid Air Flow Around A Porous Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohojło-Wiśniewska Aneta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an example of humid air flow around a single head of Chinese cabbage under conditions of complex heat transfer. This kind of numerical simulation allows us to create a heat and humidity transfer model between the Chinese cabbage and the flowing humid air. The calculations utilize the heat transfer model in porous medium, which includes the temperature difference between the solid (vegetable tissue and fluid (air phases of the porous medium. Modelling and calculations were performed in ANSYS Fluent 14.5 software.

  13. A geochemical examination of humidity cell tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maest, Ann; Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2017-01-01

    Humidity cell tests (HCTs) are long-term (20 to >300 weeks) leach tests that are considered by some to be the among the most reliable geochemical characterization methods for estimating the leachate quality of mined materials. A number of modifications have been added to the original HCT method, but the interpretation of test results varies widely. We suggest that the HCTs represent an underutilized source of geochemical data, with a year-long test generating approximately 2500 individual chemical data points. The HCT concentration peaks and valleys can be thought of as a “chromatogram” of reactions that may occur in the field, whereby peaks in concentrations are associated with different geochemical processes, including sulfate salt dissolution, sulfide oxidation, and dissolution of rock-forming minerals, some of which can neutralize acid. Some of these reactions occur simultaneously, some do not, and geochemical modeling can be used to help distinguish the dominant processes. Our detailed examination, including speciation and inverse modeling, of HCTs from three projects with different geology and mineralization shows that rapid sulfide oxidation dominates over a limited period of time that starts between 40 and 200 weeks of testing. The applicability of laboratory tests results to predicting field leachate concentrations, loads, or rates of reaction has not been adequately demonstrated, although early flush releases and rapid sulfide oxidation rates in HCTs should have some relevance to field conditions. Knowledge of possible maximum solute concentrations is needed to design effective treatment and mitigation approaches. Early flush and maximum sulfide oxidation results from HCTs should be retained and used in environmental models. Factors that complicate the use of HCTs include: sample representation, time for microbial oxidizers to grow, sample storage before testing, geochemical reactions that add or remove constituents, and the HCT results chosen for use

  14. HUMID AIR TURBINE CYCLE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Tuthill

    2002-07-18

    The Humid Air Turbine (HAT) Cycle Technology Development Program focused on obtaining HAT cycle combustor technology that will be the foundation of future products. The work carried out under the auspices of the HAT Program built on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work performed in the past by Pratt & Whitney (P&W). This Program is an integral part of technology base development within the Advanced Turbine Systems Program at the Department of Energy (DOE) and its experiments stretched over 5 years. The goal of the project was to fill in technological data gaps in the development of the HAT cycle and identify a combustor configuration that would efficiently burn high moisture, high-pressure gaseous fuels with low emissions. The major emphasis will be on the development of kinetic data, computer modeling, and evaluations of combustor configurations. The Program commenced during the 4th Quarter of 1996 and closed in the 4th Quarter of 2001. It teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) with P&W, the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), and a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, kraftWork Systems Inc. The execution of the program started with bench-top experiments that were conducted at UTRC for extending kinetic mechanisms to HAT cycle temperature, pressure, and moisture conditions. The fundamental data generated in the bench-top experiments was incorporated into the analytical tools available at P&W to design the fuel injectors and combustors. The NETL then used the hardware to conduct combustion rig experiments to evaluate the performance of the combustion systems at elevated pressure and temperature conditions representative of the HAT cycle. The results were integrated into systems analysis done by kraftWork to verify that sufficient understanding of the technology had been achieved and that large-scale technological application and demonstration could be undertaken as follow-on activity. An optional program extended the

  15. Temperature insensitive hysteresis free highly sensitive polymer optical fiber Bragg grating humidity sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Woyessa, Getinet; Nielsen, Kristian; Stefani, Alessio; Markos, Christos; Bang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    The effect of humidity on annealing of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) based microstructured polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (mPOFBGs) and the resulting humidity responsivity are investigated. Typically annealing of PMMA POFs is done in an oven without humidity control around 80°C and therefore at low humidity. We demonstrate that annealing at high humidity and high temperature improves the performances of mPOFBGs in terms of stability and sensitivity to humidity. PMMA POFBGs that are ...

  16. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Daily, Relative Humidity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has daily Relative Humidity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  17. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Monthly, Relative Humidity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has monthly Relative Humidity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  18. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Quarterly, Relative Humidity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has quarterly Relative Humidity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  19. Passive Wireless SAW Humidity Sensors and System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase I demonstrated the technical feasibility of creating surface acoustic wave (SAW) based humidity sensors that respond rapidly (under 0.5 second) and reversibly...

  20. A method for high accuracy determination of equilibrium relative humidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, O.M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper treats a new method for measuring equilibrium relative humidity and equilibrium dew-point temperature of a material sample. The developed measuring device is described – a Dew-point Meter – which by means of so-called Dynamic Dew-point Analysis permits quick and very accurate determina......This paper treats a new method for measuring equilibrium relative humidity and equilibrium dew-point temperature of a material sample. The developed measuring device is described – a Dew-point Meter – which by means of so-called Dynamic Dew-point Analysis permits quick and very accurate...... determination of the equilibrium relative humidity. Potentially, the method can also be used for measuring air relative humidity....

  1. Bacterial pleomorphism and competition in a relative humidity gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goffau, Marcus C.; Yang, Xiaomei; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    The response of different bacterial species to reduced water availability was studied using a simple relative humidity gradient technique. Interestingly, distinct differences in morphology and growth patterns were observed between populations of the same species growing at different relative

  2. Humidity evolution (breathing effect) in enclosures with electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hygum, Morten Arnfeldt; Popok, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    of the dangerous parameters is high humidity of air. Moisture can inevitable reach the electronics either due to diffusion through the wall of an enclosure or small holes, which are designed for electrical or other connections. A driving force for humid air movement is the temperature difference between...... the operating electronics and the surrounding environment. This temperature, thus, gives rise to a natural convection, which we also refer to as breathing. Robust and intelligent enclosure designs must account for this breathing as it can significantly change the humidity distribution in the enclosure....... The approach is verified by measuring the temperature and humidity profiles in a test setup (container) while also considering the moisture flux outside the container. The test setup is a vertical cylinder enabling to simplify the modeling to 2D case. The experimental measurements are compared to simulations...

  3. Nanostructured Humidity Sensor for Spacecraft Life Support Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Humidity is a critical variable for monitoring and control on extended duration missions because it can affect the operation and efficiency of closed loop life...

  4. NOS CO-OPS Meteorological Data, Relative Humidity, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has Relative Humidity data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). WARNING: These preliminary data have not...

  5. Laboratory Connections: Gas Monitoring Transducers: Relative Humidity Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Michael H.; Hull, Stacey E.

    1988-01-01

    Explains the operation of five relative humidity sensors: psychrometer, hair hygrometer, resistance hygrometer, capacitance hygrometer, and resistance-capacitance hygrometer. Outlines the theory behind the electronic sensors and gives computer interfacing information. Lists sensor responses for calibration. (MVL)

  6. Computational Model for Internal Relative Humidity Distributions in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wondwosen Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A computational model is developed for predicting nonuniform internal relative humidity distribution in concrete. Internal relative humidity distribution is known to have a direct effect on the nonuniform drying shrinkage strains. These nonuniform drying shrinkage strains result in the buildup of internal stresses, which may lead to cracking of concrete. This may be particularly true at early ages of concrete since the concrete is relatively weak while the difference in internal relative humidity is probably high. The results obtained from this model can be used by structural and construction engineers to predict critical drying shrinkage stresses induced due to differential internal humidity distribution. The model uses finite elment-finite difference numerical methods. The finite element is used to space discretization while the finite difference is used to obtain transient solutions of the model. The numerical formulations are then programmed in Matlab. The numerical results were compared with experimental results found in the literature and demonstrated very good agreement.

  7. Humidity sensors printed on recycled paper and cardboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mraović, Matija; Muck, Tadeja; Pivar, Matej; Trontelj, Janez; Pleteršek, Anton

    2014-07-28

    Research, design, fabrication and results of various screen printed capacitive humidity sensors is presented in this paper. Two types of capacitive humidity sensors have been designed and fabricated via screen printing on recycled paper and cardboard, obtained from the regional paper and cardboard industry. As printing ink, commercially available silver nanoparticle-based conductive ink was used. A considerable amount of work has been devoted to the humidity measurement methods using paper as a dielectric material. Performances of different structures have been tested in a humidity chamber. Relative humidity in the chamber was varied in the range of 35%-80% relative humidity (RH) at a constant temperature of 23 °C. Parameters of interest were capacitance and conductance of each sensor material, as well as long term behaviour. Process reversibility has also been considered. The results obtained show a mainly logarithmic response of the paper sensors, with the only exception being cardboard-based sensors. Recycled paper-based sensors exhibit a change in value of three orders of magnitude, whereas cardboard-based sensors have a change in value of few 10s over the entire scope of relative humidity range (RH 35%-90%). Two different types of capacitor sensors have been investigated: lateral (comb) type sensors and modified, perforated flat plate type sensors. The objective of the present work was to identify the most important factors affecting the material performances with humidity, and to contribute to the development of a sensor system supported with a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) chip directly on the material, for use in smart packaging applications. Therefore, the authors built a passive and a battery-supported wireless module based on SL900A smart sensory tag's IC to achieve UHF-RFID functionality with data logging capability.

  8. Enhancement of humidity sensitivity of graphene through functionalization with polyethylenimine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Aziza, Zeineb [CINTRA CNRS/NTU/THALES, UMI 3288, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Border X Block, Level 6, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block S1, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); XLIM UMR 7252 Université de Limoges/CNRS, 123 Avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges (France); Zhang, Kang [School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block S1, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Baillargeat, Dominique [CINTRA CNRS/NTU/THALES, UMI 3288, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Border X Block, Level 6, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); XLIM UMR 7252 Université de Limoges/CNRS, 123 Avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges (France); Zhang, Qing [CINTRA CNRS/NTU/THALES, UMI 3288, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Border X Block, Level 6, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block S1, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-09-28

    In this work, we show that the sensing performance of graphene based humidity sensors can be largely improved through polymer functionalization. Chemical vapor deposited graphene is functionalized with amine rich polymer, leading to electron transfer from amine groups in the polymer to graphene. The functionalized graphene humidity sensor has demonstrated good sensitivity, recovery, and repeatability. Charge transfer between the functionalized graphene and water molecules and the sensing mechanism are studied systemically using field effect transistor geometry and scanning Kelvin probe microscopy.

  9. Low-cost personal cooling in hot humid offices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsen, Lars Bo; Santos, A.

    This report presents a low cost solution to avoid heat stress in a hot and humid environment based on a solar powered drying of supply air. The air drying facilities and a validation of the benefits through comprehensive human exposure studies are described. The study represents an example...... of applied participative research performed in a developing country. The report may be used as a background for the improvement of the indoor climate in poor, hot and humid regions without increased use of electricity....

  10. Humidity Sensors Printed on Recycled Paper and Cardboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matija Mraović

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Research, design, fabrication and results of various screen printed capacitive humidity sensors is presented in this paper. Two types of capacitive humidity sensors have been designed and fabricated via screen printing on recycled paper and cardboard, obtained from the regional paper and cardboard industry. As printing ink, commercially available silver nanoparticle-based conductive ink was used. A considerable amount of work has been devoted to the humidity measurement methods using paper as a dielectric material. Performances of different structures have been tested in a humidity chamber. Relative humidity in the chamber was varied in the range of 35%–80% relative humidity (RH at a constant temperature of 23 °C. Parameters of interest were capacitance and conductance of each sensor material, as well as long term behaviour. Process reversibility has also been considered. The results obtained show a mainly logarithmic response of the paper sensors, with the only exception being cardboard-based sensors. Recycled paper-based sensors exhibit a change in value of three orders of magnitude, whereas cardboard-based sensors have a change in value of few 10s over the entire scope of relative humidity range (RH 35%–90%. Two different types of capacitor sensors have been investigated: lateral (comb type sensors and modified, perforated flat plate type sensors. The objective of the present work was to identify the most important factors affecting the material performances with humidity, and to contribute to the development of a sensor system supported with a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID chip directly on the material, for use in smart packaging applications. Therefore, the authors built a passive and a battery-supported wireless module based on SL900A smart sensory tag’s IC to achieve UHF-RFID functionality with data logging capability.

  11. Humidity effects on scanning polarization force microscopy imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yue, E-mail: shenyue@isl.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhou, Yuan, E-mail: zhouy@isl.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); Sun, Yanxia; Zhang, Lijuan [Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Key Laboratory of Salt Lake Resources Chemistry of Qinghai Province, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, Qinghai 810008 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Ying; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yi [Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • The humidity dramatically affects the contrast of scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM) imaging on mica surface. • This influence roots in the sensitive dielectric constant of mica surface to the humidity change. • A strategy of controllable and repeatable imaging the local dielectric properties of nanomaterials with SPFM is proposed. - Abstract: Scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM) is a useful surface characterization technique to visually characterize and distinguish nanomaterial with different local dielectric properties at nanometer scale. In this paper, taking the individual one-atom-thick graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets on mica as examples, we described the influences of environmental humidity on SPFM imaging. We found that the apparent heights (AHs) or contrast of SPFM imaging was influenced significantly by relative humidity (RH) at a response time of a few seconds. And this influence rooted in the sensitive dielectric constant of mica surface to the RH change. While dielectric properties of GO and rGO sheets were almost immune to the humidity change. In addition, we gave the method to determine the critical humidity at which the contrast conversion happened under different conditions. And this is important to the contrast control and repeatable imaging of SPFM through RH adjusting. These findings suggest a strategy of controllable and repeatable imaging the local dielectric properties of nanomaterials with SPFM, which is critically important for further distinguishment, manipulation, electronic applications, etc.

  12. A Humidity Sensing Organic-Inorganic Composite for Environmental Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khasan S. Karimov

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the effect of varying humidity levels on the electrical parameters and the multi frequency response of the electrical parameters of an organic-inorganic composite (PEPC+NiPc+Cu2O-based humidity sensor. Silver thin films (thickness ~200 nm were primarily deposited on plasma cleaned glass substrates by the physical vapor deposition (PVD technique. A pair of rectangular silver electrodes was formed by patterning silver film through standard optical lithography technique. An active layer of organic-inorganic composite for humidity sensing was later spun coated to cover the separation between the silver electrodes. The electrical characterization of the sensor was performed as a function of relative humidity levels and frequency of the AC input signal. The sensor showed reversible changes in its capacitance with variations in humidity level. The maximum sensitivity ~31.6 pF/%RH at 100 Hz in capacitive mode of operation has been attained. The aim of this study was to increase the sensitivity of the previously reported humidity sensors using PEPC and NiPc, which has been successfully achieved.

  13. Variations of relative humidity in relation to meningitis in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seefeldt, M. W.; Hopson, T. M.

    2011-12-01

    The meningitis belt is a region covering Sub-Saharan Africa from the Sahel of West Africa eastward to western Ethiopia. The region is prone to meningitis epidemics during the dry season extending from approximately January to May, depending on the region. Relative humidity has been found to be a critical environmental factor indicating the susceptibility of a region to meningitis epidemics. This study evaluates the variation of relative humidity across West Africa over 30 dry-seasons (1979 - 2009) using the NASA-MERRA dataset. The method of self-organizing maps is employed to characterize the changes in relative humidity patterns across the region within a given dry season as well as changes over the 30 years. A general pattern of changes in relative humidity is indicated as the rainbelt retreats to the south at the onset of the dry season and then returns to the region at the end of the dry season. Within each dry season there is a unique pattern. The climatological conditions of relative humidity at the onset of the dry season provide an indication of the moisture environment for the entire dry season. Year to year variation in the relative humidity patterns are found to be gradual. Future applications involve using the results from the SOM evaluation to be used for future decisions involving prevention of meningitis epidemics.

  14. A CMOS smart temperature and humidity sensor with combined readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Clemens; Valente, Virgilio; Donaldson, Nick; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2014-09-16

    A fully-integrated complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor for combined temperature and humidity measurements is presented. The main purpose of the device is to monitor the hermeticity of micro-packages for implanted integrated circuits and to ensure their safe operation by monitoring the operating temperature and humidity on-chip. The smart sensor has two modes of operation, in which either the temperature or humidity is converted into a digital code representing a frequency ratio between two oscillators. This ratio is determined by the ratios of the timing capacitances and bias currents in both oscillators. The reference oscillator is biased by a current whose temperature dependency is complementary to the proportional to absolute temperature (PTAT) current. For the temperature measurement, this results in an exceptional normalized sensitivity of about 0.77%/°C at the accepted expense of reduced linearity. The humidity sensor is a capacitor, whose value varies linearly with relative humidity (RH) with a normalized sensitivity of 0.055%/% RH. For comparison, two versions of the humidity sensor with an area of either 0.2 mm2 or 1.2 mm2 were fabricated in a commercial 0.18 μm CMOS process. The on-chip readout electronics operate from a 5 V power supply and consume a current of approximately 85 µA.

  15. Effects of humidity on shear behavior of bamboo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Askarinejad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bamboo is a naturally occurring biological composite, however its microstructure and hence its properties are very complex compared to the manmade composites. Due to optimization, it can be assumed that the variation in properties along the thickness of the culm be a smooth transition for better bonding strength between layers and to prevent non uniformity in stress concentration. As a consequence, biological structures are complicated and functionally graded. Hence, a realistic model that can capture the mechanical performance of bamboo is valuable in future design of robust multifunctional composites. This paper presents the results of experimental and numerical studies on the torsional (shear properties of bamboo. The hierarchical and multi-scale structure of bamboo and the distribution of micro-scale fibers are revealed via laser scanning and atomic force microscopy. This information was incorporated into a finite element model to analyze the mechanical behavior of bamboo under torsion and to estimate the shear modulus of bamboo along the fibers. Moreover, the effects of humidity and therefore water content on the mechanical properties of bamboo were evaluated by performing torsion tests on samples maintained in environments with different humidities. Increasing the humidity does not cause a drop in the shear modulus, however, a jump in the shear modulus did occur at around 60% humidity. Results of this study indicate that the highest strength values in samples occurred in environments with humidity levels between 60% and 80% and undergo a significant drop after that. In higher humidities, the samples behave more ductile.

  16. Urban Outdoor Thermal Comfort of The Hot-Humid Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Bakar A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study on outdoor comfort is becoming popular due to the fact that the thermoregulatory model is seen as inadequate in explaining outdoor thermal comfort conditions. Hot-humid region can be said as experiencing a critical environmental condition because of its constantly high temperature and humidity throughout the year. Thus, this study focus on the assessment of thermal comfort of outdoor urban spaces in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (3° 9’N and 101° 44’E. Survey on human response towards outdoor thermal comfort in hot-humid climate of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia was carried out during day time between 0900h to 1800h along with measurement of environmental parameters such as air temperature (°C, wind velocity (m/s, radiant temperature (°C, relative humidity (% and solar radiation (lux. A total of 123 samples were involved in this study which took place within four sites around Kuala Lumpur. Survey results were then correlated with the environmental parameters to further develop the comfort zone for hot-humid outdoor environment specifically for Kuala Lumpur and, generally, for hot-humid regions.

  17. Development of Smart Ventilation Control Algorithms for Humidity Control in High-Performance Homes in Humid U.S. Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Less, Brennan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ticci, Sara [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-11

    Past field research and simulation studies have shown that high performance homes experience elevated indoor humidity levels for substantial portions of the year in humid climates. This is largely the result of lower sensible cooling loads, which reduces the moisture removed by the cooling system. These elevated humidity levels lead to concerns about occupant comfort, health and building durability. Use of mechanical ventilation at rates specified in ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2013 are often cited as an additional contributor to humidity problems in these homes. Past research has explored solutions, including supplemental dehumidification, cooling system operational enhancements and ventilation system design (e.g., ERV, supply, exhaust, etc.). This project’s goal is to develop and demonstrate (through simulations) smart ventilation strategies that can contribute to humidity control in high performance homes. These strategies must maintain IAQ via equivalence with ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2013. To be acceptable they must not result in excessive energy use. Smart controls will be compared with dehumidifier energy and moisture performance. This work explores the development and performance of smart algorithms for control of mechanical ventilation systems, with the objective of reducing high humidity in modern high performance residences. Simulations of DOE Zero-Energy Ready homes were performed using the REGCAP simulation tool. Control strategies were developed and tested using the Residential Integrated Ventilation (RIVEC) controller, which tracks pollutant exposure in real-time and controls ventilation to provide an equivalent exposure on an annual basis to homes meeting ASHRAE 62.2-2013. RIVEC is used to increase or decrease the real-time ventilation rate to reduce moisture transport into the home or increase moisture removal. This approach was implemented for no-, one- and two-sensor strategies, paired with a variety of control approaches in six humid climates (Miami

  18. Temperature insensitive hysteresis free highly sensitive polymer optical fiber Bragg grating humidity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Nielsen, Kristian; Stefani, Alessio; Markos, Christos; Bang, Ole

    2016-01-25

    The effect of humidity on annealing of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) based microstructured polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (mPOFBGs) and the resulting humidity responsivity are investigated. Typically annealing of PMMA POFs is done in an oven without humidity control around 80°C and therefore at low humidity. We demonstrate that annealing at high humidity and high temperature improves the performances of mPOFBGs in terms of stability and sensitivity to humidity. PMMA POFBGs that are not annealed or annealed at low humidity level will have a low and highly temperature dependent sensitivity and a high hysteresis in the humidity response, in particular when operated at high temperature. PMMA mPOFBGs annealed at high humidity show higher and more linear humidity sensitivity with negligible hysteresis. We also report how annealing at high humidity can blue-shift the FBG wavelength more than 230 nm without loss in the grating strength.

  19. Temperature insensitive hysteresis free highly sensitive polymer optical fiber Bragg grating humidity sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Nielsen, Kristian; Stefani, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    The effect of humidity on annealing of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) based microstructured polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (mPOFBGs) and the resulting humidity responsivity are investigated. Typically annealing of PMMA POFs is done in an oven without humidity control around 80°C...... and therefore at low humidity. We demonstrate that annealing at high humidity and high temperature improves the performances of mPOFBGs in terms of stability and sensitivity to humidity. PMMA POFBGs that are not annealed or annealed at low humidity level will have a low and highly temperature dependent...... sensitivity and a high hysteresis in the humidity response, in particular when operated at high temperature. PMMA mPOFBGs annealed at high humidity show higher and more linear humidity sensitivity with negligible hysteresis. We also report how annealing at high humidity can blue-shift the FBG wavelength more...

  20. Fabrication and Characterization of a CMOS-MEMS Humidity Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, John-Ojur; Ahmed, Abdelaziz-Yousif; Khir, Mohd-Haris

    2015-07-10

    This paper reports on the fabrication and characterization of a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor-Microelectromechanical System (CMOS-MEMS) device with embedded microheater operated at relatively elevated temperatures (40 °C to 80 °C) for the purpose of relative humidity measurement. The sensing principle is based on the change in amplitude of the device due to adsorption or desorption of humidity on the active material layer of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles deposited on the moving plate, which results in changes in the mass of the device. The sensor has been designed and fabricated through a standard 0.35 µm CMOS process technology and post-CMOS micromachining technique has been successfully implemented to release the MEMS structures. The sensor is operated in the dynamic mode using electrothermal actuation and the output signal measured using a piezoresistive (PZR) sensor connected in a Wheatstone bridge circuit. The output voltage of the humidity sensor increases from 0.585 mV to 30.580 mV as the humidity increases from 35% RH to 95% RH. The output voltage is found to be linear from 0.585 mV to 3.250 mV as the humidity increased from 35% RH to 60% RH, with sensitivity of 0.107 mV/% RH; and again linear from 3.250 mV to 30.580 mV as the humidity level increases from 60% RH to 95% RH, with higher sensitivity of 0.781 mV/% RH. On the other hand, the sensitivity of the humidity sensor increases linearly from 0.102 mV/% RH to 0.501 mV/% RH with increase in the temperature from 40 °C to 80 °C and a maximum hysteresis of 0.87% RH is found at a relative humidity of 80%. The sensitivity is also frequency dependent, increasing from 0.500 mV/% RH at 2 Hz to reach a maximum value of 1.634 mV/% RH at a frequency of 12 Hz, then decreasing to 1.110 mV/% RH at a frequency of 20 Hz. Finally, the CMOS-MEMS humidity sensor showed comparable response, recovery, and repeatability of measurements in three cycles as compared to a standard sensor that directly

  1. Fabrication and Characterization of a CMOS-MEMS Humidity Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John-Ojur Dennis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the fabrication and characterization of a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor-Microelectromechanical System (CMOS-MEMS device with embedded microheater operated at relatively elevated temperatures (40 °C to 80 °C for the purpose of relative humidity measurement. The sensing principle is based on the change in amplitude of the device due to adsorption or desorption of humidity on the active material layer of titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles deposited on the moving plate, which results in changes in the mass of the device. The sensor has been designed and fabricated through a standard 0.35 µm CMOS process technology and post-CMOS micromachining technique has been successfully implemented to release the MEMS structures. The sensor is operated in the dynamic mode using electrothermal actuation and the output signal measured using a piezoresistive (PZR sensor connected in a Wheatstone bridge circuit. The output voltage of the humidity sensor increases from 0.585 mV to 30.580 mV as the humidity increases from 35% RH to 95% RH. The output voltage is found to be linear from 0.585 mV to 3.250 mV as the humidity increased from 35% RH to 60% RH, with sensitivity of 0.107 mV/% RH; and again linear from 3.250 mV to 30.580 mV as the humidity level increases from 60% RH to 95% RH, with higher sensitivity of 0.781 mV/% RH. On the other hand, the sensitivity of the humidity sensor increases linearly from 0.102 mV/% RH to 0.501 mV/% RH with increase in the temperature from 40 °C to 80 °C and a maximum hysteresis of 0.87% RH is found at a relative humidity of 80%. The sensitivity is also frequency dependent, increasing from 0.500 mV/% RH at 2 Hz to reach a maximum value of 1.634 mV/% RH at a frequency of 12 Hz, then decreasing to 1.110 mV/% RH at a frequency of 20 Hz. Finally, the CMOS-MEMS humidity sensor showed comparable response, recovery, and repeatability of measurements in three cycles as compared to a standard sensor that

  2. Uncertainly Analysis of Two Types of Humidity Sensors by a Humidity Generator with a Divided-Flow System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling-Hsi; Chen, Chiachung

    2018-02-21

    Humidity measurement is an important technique for the agricultural, foods, pharmaceuticals, and chemical industries. For the sake of convenience, electrical relative humidity (RH) sensors have been widely used. These sensors need to be calibrated to ensure their accuracy and the uncertainty measurement of these sensors has become a major concern. In this study, a self-made divided-flow generator was established to calibrate two types of electrical humidity sensors. The standard reference humidity was calculated from dew-point temperature and air dry-bulb temperature measured by a chilled mirror monitor. This divided-flow generator could produce consistent result of RH measurement results. The uncertainty of the reference standard increased with the increase of RH values. The combined uncertainty with the adequate calibration equations were ranged from 0.82% to 1.45% RH for resistive humidity sensors and 0.63% to 1.4% for capacitive humidity sensors, respectively. This self-made, divided-flow generator, and calibration method are cheap, time-saving, and easy to be used. Thus, the proposed approach can easily be applied in research laboratories.

  3. Humidity Dependence of Adhesion for Silane Coated Microcantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; MAYER,THOMAS M.; CARPICK,ROBERT W.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; SRINIVASAN,U.; MABOUDIAN,R.

    1999-11-09

    This study examines adhesion between silane-coated micromachined surfaces that are exposed to humid conditions. Our quantitative values for interfacial adhesion energies are determined from an in-situ optical measurement of deformations in partly-adhered cantilever beams. We coated micromachined cantilevers with either ODTS (C{sub 18}H{sub 37}SiCl{sub 3}) or FDTS (C{sub 8}F{sub 17}C{sub 2}H{sub 4}SiCl{sub 3}) with the objective of creating hydrophobic surfaces whose adhesion would be independent of humidity. In both cases, the adhesion energy is significantly lower than for uncoated, hydrophilic surfaces. For relative humidities (RH) less than 95% (ODTS) and 80% (FDTS) the adhesion energy was extremely low and constant. In fact, ODTS-coated beams exposed to saturated humidity conditions and long (48 hour) exposures showed only a factor of two increase in adhesion energy. Surprisingly, FDTS coated beams, which initially have a higher contact angle (115{degree}) with water than do ODTS coated beams (112{degree}), proved to be much more sensitive to humidity. The FDTS coated surfaces showed a factor of one hundred increase in adhesion energy after a seven hour exposure to 90% RH. Atomic force microscopy revealed agglomerated coating material after exposed to high RH, suggesting a redistribution of the monolayer film. This agglomeration was more prominent for FDTS than ODTS. These findings suggest a new mechanism for uptake of moisture under high humidity conditions. At high humidities, the silane coatings can reconfigure from a surface to a bulk phase leaving behind locally hydrophilic sites which increase the average measured adhesion energy. In order for the adhesion increase to be observed, a significant fraction of the monolayer must be converted from the surface to the bulk phase.

  4. Examining the influence of humidity on reference ionization chamber performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Malcolm R; Taank, Jaswinder

    2017-02-01

    International dosimetry protocols require measurements made with a vented ionization chamber to be corrected for the influence of air density by using the standard temperature-pressure correction factor. The effect of humidity, on the other hand, is generally ignored with the provision that the relative humidity (RH) is within certain limits (typically 20% to 80%). However, there is little experimental data in the published literature as to the true effect of humidity on modern reference-class ionization chambers. This investigation used two different radiation beams - a Co-60 irradiator and an Sr-90 check source - to examine the effect of humidity on several Farmer-type ionization chambers. An environmental cabinet controlled the humidity. For the Co-60 beam, the irradiation was external, whereas for the Sr-90 measurements, the source itself was placed within the cabinet. Extensive measurements were carried out to ensure that the experimental setup provided reproducible readings. Four chamber types were investigated: IBA FC65-G, IBA FC65-P, PTW 30013 and Exradin A19. The different wall materials provided potentially different mechanical responses (i.e., in terms of expansion/contraction) to the water content in the air. The relative humidity was varied between 8% and 98% and measurements were made with both increasing and decreasing humidity to investigate any possible hysteresis effects. Measurements in Co-60 were consistent with the published data obtained with primary standard cavity chambers in ICRU Report 31 (i.e., a very small variation 10%). The measurements in the Sr-90 field showed no dependence with the relative humidity, within the measurement uncertainties (0.05%, k = 1). Very good repeatability of the ionization current was obtained over successive wet/dry cycles, no hysteresis was observed, and there was no dependence on chamber type. These results indicate that humidity has no significant effect on these particular types of ionization chambers

  5. Climate intercomparison of GPS radio occultation, RS90/92 radiosondes and GRUAN from 2002 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ladstädter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Observations from the GPS radio occultation (GPSRO satellite technique and from the newly established GCOS Reference Upper Air Network (GRUAN are both candidates to serve as reference observations in the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS. Such reference observations are key to decrease existing uncertainties in upper-air climate research. There are now more than 12 years of data available from GPSRO, with the recognized properties high accuracy, global coverage, high vertical resolution, and long-term stability. These properties make GPSRO a suitable choice for comparison studies with other upper-air observational systems. The GRUAN network consists of reference radiosonde ground stations (16 at present, which adhere to the GCOS climate monitoring principles. In this study, we intercompare GPSRO temperature and humidity profiles and Vaisala RS90/92 data from the "standard" global radiosonde network over the whole 2002 to 2013 time frame. Additionally, we include the first years of GRUAN data (using Vaisala RS92, available since 2009. GPSRO profiles which occur within 3 h and 300 km of radiosonde launches are used. Overall very good agreement is found between all three data sets with temperature differences usually less than 0.2 K. In the stratosphere above 30 hPa, temperature differences are larger but still within 0.5 K. Day/night comparisons with GRUAN data reveal small deviations likely related to a warm bias of the radiosonde data at high altitudes, but also residual errors from the GPSRO retrieval process might play a role. Vaisala RS90/92 specific humidity exhibits a dry bias of up to 40% in the upper troposphere, with a smaller bias at lower altitudes within 15%. GRUAN shows a marked improvement in the bias characteristics, with less than 5% difference to GPSRO, up to 300 hPa. GPSRO dry temperature and physical temperature are validated using radiosonde data as reference. We find that GPSRO provides valuable long-term stable reference

  6. Percolated carbon nanotube networks for high-speed humidity sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo Suk; Jung, Kyung Hoon; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Lee, Myung Jin; Min, Nam Ki

    2013-09-01

    Improving the response time for polyimide (PI)-based capacitive humidity sensors is critical for real-time sensing. Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films were used to form the upper electrode of humidity sensor to realize an extremely short response times. MWCNT films were spray-deposited on a moisture-sensitive PI layer and subsequently patterned by oxygen plasma. Random-network MWCNT electrodes have a well-entangled and open porous structure that is almost impossible to obtain with conventional metal electrodes. Compared with porous metal electrode-based sensors as an upper electrode, the fabricated capacitive humidity sensors with MWCNT electrodes showed an exceptionally short response time of less than 2.5 s and a good linearity of 0.998. An analysis of the long-term (100 days) stability data revealed that the MWCNT electrode humidity sensors showed little drift even after 100 days aging, indicating that they are suitable for practical and reliable humidity measurements. These improvements in performance may stem from their interconnected microscopic porous structure, which is more accessible to water molecules through the conductive electrode.

  7. Application for temperature and humidity monitoring of data center environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Ş.; Truşcǎ, M. R. C.; Soran, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    The technology and computer science registered a large development in the last years. Most systems that use high technologies require special working conditions. The monitoring and the controlling are very important. The temperature and the humidity are important parameters in the operation of computer systems, industrial and research, maintaining it between certain values to ensure their proper functioning being important. Usually, the temperature is maintained in the established range using an air conditioning system, but the humidity is affected. In the present work we developed an application based on a board with own firmware called "AVR_NET_IO" using a microcontroller ATmega32 type for temperature and humidity monitoring in Data Center of INCDTIM. On this board, temperature sensors were connected to measure the temperature in different points of the Data Center and outside of this. Humidity monitoring is performed using data from integrated sensors of the air conditioning system, thus achieving a correlation between humidity and temperature variation. It was developed a software application (CM-1) together with the hardware, which allows temperature monitoring and register inside Data Center and trigger an alarm when variations are greater with 3°C than established limits of the temperature.

  8. Fabrication of Porous Silicon Based Humidity Sensing Elements on Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tero Jalkanen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A roll-to-roll compatible fabrication process of porous silicon (pSi based sensing elements for a real-time humidity monitoring is described. The sensing elements, consisting of printed interdigitated silver electrodes and a spray-coated pSi layer, were fabricated on a coated paper substrate by a two-step process. Capacitive and resistive responses of the sensing elements were examined under different concentrations of humidity. More than a three orders of magnitude reproducible decrease in resistance was measured when the relative humidity (RH was increased from 0% to 90%. A relatively fast recovery without the need of any refreshing methods was observed with a change in RH. Humidity background signal and hysteresis arising from the paper substrate were dependent on the thickness of sensing pSi layer. Hysteresis in most optimal sensing element setup (a thick pSi layer was still noticeable but not detrimental for the sensing. In addition to electrical characterization of sensing elements, thermal degradation and moisture adsorption properties of the paper substrate were examined in connection to the fabrication process of the silver electrodes and the moisture sensitivity of the paper. The results pave the way towards the development of low-cost humidity sensors which could be utilized, for example, in smart packaging applications or in smart cities to monitor the environment.

  9. The effect of mold sensitization and humidity upon allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Don; Jhaveri, Manan A; Mannino, David M; Strawbridge, Heather; Temprano, James

    2013-04-01

    Humidity is commonly associated with increased airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma. To examine mold sensitization in patients with allergic asthma or allergic rhinitis and self-reports of humidity as exacerbating factors of clinical symptoms. A retrospective, cross-sectional study at a University hospital outpatient allergy and asthma clinic was performed. A total of 106 patients with either allergic asthma or allergic rhinitis completed standard prick-puncture skin testing with 17 allergens and controls and completed standardized forms addressing trigger factors for clinical symptoms. Allergic asthmatics sensitized to Cladosporium were more likely to have a more severe asthma severity class (odds ratio = 4.26, confidence interval = 1.30-16.93). Sensitization to Alternaria, Cladosporium, Helminthosporium, Aspergillus and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus in asthma was associated with higher likelihood for previous hospitalization, while sensitization to Cladosporium, Helminthosporium, Aspergillus, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and cockroach in asthma was associated with higher likelihood of having reduced pulmonary function based on forced expiratory volume in 1s. Furthermore, allergic asthmatics more commonly reported humidity as an exacerbating factor of symptoms than did patients only with allergic rhinitis (68.42% vs 42.86%, respectively; P Mold sensitization is highly associated with more severe asthma, while humidity is more of an exacerbating factor in patients with allergic asthma as compared with allergic rhinitis alone. Further delineation between mold sensitization and humidity is needed to determine whether these are independent factors in asthma. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Discomfort due to skin humidity with different fabric textures and materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Rasmussen, Leif Winsnes; Mackeprang, Jørgen

    2000-01-01

    discomfort. Thirty-eight subjects (18 females and 20 males) were exposed to three levels of skin relative humidity (30%, 50% and 70%) at sedentary activity, at low stepping activity and at high stepping activity. At moderate temperatures and activity levels, neither material nor texture significantly...... impacted the clothing comfort, perceived skin humidity or humidity of clothing, or the acceptability of skin humidity. Clothing comfort and acceptability deteriorated significantly with increasing skin humidity. In addition, the subjects perceived their skin or clothing as being more humid with increasing...... skin humidity. Based on the experimental results, a model was developed that predicts the percentage of persons dissatisfied due to humid skin or clothing. At different combinations of air humidity, air and mean radiant temperature, air velocity and clothing, the skin humidity model predicts discomfort...

  11. Effect of environmental humidity on static foam stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueliang; Karakashev, Stoyan I; Evans, Geoffrey M; Stevenson, Paul

    2012-03-06

    The quality of foaming products (such as beer and shampoo) and the performance of industrial processes that harness foam (such as the froth flotation of minerals or the foam fractionation of proteins) depend upon foam stability. In this study, experiments are performed to study the effect of environmental humidity on the collapse of static foams. The dependency of the rate at which a foam collapses upon humidity is demonstrated, and we propose a hypothesis for bubble bursting due to Marangoni instability induced by nonuniform evaporation to help explain the dependency. This hypothesis is supported by direct experimental observations of the bursting process of isolated bubbles by high speed video recording and the thinning of isolated foam films under different values of humidity and temperature by microinterferometric methods.

  12. Humidity insensitive TOPAS polymer fiber Bragg grating sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Khan, Lutul; Webb, David J.

    2011-01-01

    We report the first experimental demonstration of a humidity insensitive polymer optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG), as well as the first FBG recorded in a TOPAS polymer optical fiber in the important low loss 850nm spectral region. For the demonstration we have fabricated FBGs with resonance...... wavelength around 850 nm and 1550 nm in single-mode microstructured polymer optical fibers made of TOPAS and the conventional poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Characterization of the FBGs shows that the TOPAS FBG is more than 50 times less sensitive to humidity than the conventional PMMA FBG in both...... wavelength regimes. This makes the TOPAS FBG very appealing for sensing applications as it appears to solve the humidity sensitivity problem suffered by the PMMA FBG....

  13. Bacterial survival responses to extreme desiccation and high humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yinjie; Yokobori, Shinichi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    The presence of water is thought to be essential for life and strongly considered in life searching operation on extraterrestrial planets. In this study we show different survival responses of bacterial species to water availability and temperatures (25, 4 and - 70 o C). At these temperatures, E.coli lost viability much faster under extreme desiccation than under high humidity. Deinococcus radiodurans exhibited much higher survival rate under desiccation than under high humidity at 25 o C, while its survivals under desiccation and high humidity increased to the same level at 4 and - 70 o C. Bacillus pumilus spores generally survived well under all tested conditions. Water is favorable for the survival of most microorganisms but not a "safeguard" for all microorganisms. Microbial survival at low temperatures may not be affected by water availability. Water absence should not preclude us from seeking life on other planets.

  14. Humidity Data for 9975 Shipping Packages with Softwood Fiberboard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-12

    The 9975 surveillance program is developing a technical basis to support extending the storage period of 9975 packages in K-Area Complex beyond the currently approved 15 years. A key element of this effort is developing a better understanding of degradation of the fiberboard assembly under storage conditions. This degradation is influenced greatly by the moisture content of the fiberboard, which is not well characterized on an individual package basis. Direct measurements of humidity and fiberboard moisture content have been made on two test packages with softwood fiberboard and varying internal heat levels from 0 up to 19W. Comparable measurements with cane fiberboard have been reported previously. With an internal heat load, a temperature gradient in the fiberboard assembly leads to varying relative humidity in the air around the fiberboard. However, the absolute humidity tends to remain approximately constant throughout the package, especially at lower heat loads.

  15. Humidity insensitive TOPAS polymer fiber Bragg grating sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wu; Khan, Lutful; Webb, David J; Kalli, Kyriacos; Rasmussen, Henrik K; Stefani, Alessio; Bang, Ole

    2011-09-26

    We report the first experimental demonstration of a humidity insensitive polymer optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG), as well as the first FBG recorded in a TOPAS polymer optical fiber in the important low loss 850 nm spectral region. For the demonstration we have fabricated FBGs with resonance wavelength around 850 nm and 1550 nm in single-mode microstructured polymer optical fibers made of TOPAS and the conventional poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Characterization of the FBGs shows that the TOPAS FBG is more than 50 times less sensitive to humidity than the conventional PMMA FBG in both wavelength regimes. This makes the TOPAS FBG very appealing for sensing applications as it appears to solve the humidity sensitivity problem suffered by the PMMA FBG. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  16. Humidity Testing of PME and BME Ceramic Capacitors with Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.; Herzberger, Jaemi

    2014-01-01

    Cracks in ceramic capacitors are one of the major causes of failures during operation of electronic systems. Humidity testing has been successfully used for many years to verify the absence of cracks and assure quality of military grade capacitors. Traditionally, only precious metal electrode (PME) capacitors were used in high reliability applications and the existing requirements for humidity testing were developed for this type of parts. With the advance of base metal electrode (BME) capacitors, there is a need for assessment of the applicability of the existing techniques for the new technology capacitors. In this work, variety of different PME and BME capacitors with introduced cracks were tested in humid environments at different voltages and temperatures. Analysis of the test results indicates differences in the behavior and failure mechanisms for BME and PME capacitors and the need for different testing conditions.

  17. ANN Modeling of a Chemical Humidity Sensing Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souhil KOUDA

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to achieve a modeling of a resistive-type humidity sensing mechanism (RHSM. This model takes into account the parameters of non-linearity, hysteresis, temperature, frequency, substrate type. Furthermore, we investigated the TiO2 and PMAPTAC concentrations effects on the humidity sensing properties in our model. Using neuronal networks and Matlab environment, we have done the training to realize an analytical model ANN and create a component, accurately express the above parameters variations, for our sensing mechanism model in the PSPICE simulator library. Simulation has been used to evaluate the effect of variations of non-linearity, hysteresis, temperature, frequency, substrate type and TiO2 and PMAPTAC concentrations effects, where the output of this model is identical to the output of the chemical humidity sensing mechanism used.

  18. Humidity Responsive Photonic Sensor based on a Carboxymethyl Cellulose Mechanical Actuator

    OpenAIRE

    Hartings, Matthew; Douglass, Kevin O.; Neice, Claire; Ahmed, Zeeshan

    2017-01-01

    We describe an intuitive and simple method for exploiting humidity-driven volume changes in carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to fabricate a humidity responsive actuator on a glass fiber substrate. We optimize this platform to generate a photonic-based humidity sensor where CMC coated on a fiber optic containing a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) actuates a mechanical strain in response to humidity changes. The humidity-driven mechanical deformation of the FBG results in a large lin...

  19. The study of aerosol and ozone measurements in lower boundary layer with UAV helicopter platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Po-hsiung; Chen, Wen-nai

    2013-04-01

    This study describes the aerosol and ozone measurement in the lower atmospheric boundary layer of highly polluted region at Kao-hsiung, Taiwan with a small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) helicopter platform. This UAV helicopter, modified from Gaui-X7 electronic-power model helicopter with autopilot AHRS (Altitude-Head-Reference System) kit, has fast climb speed up to 700 m height and keeps stable status for atmospheric measurements in five-minute fly leg. Several quick-replaced battery packages are ready on ground for field intensive observation. The payload rack under this UAV helicopter carries a micro-Aethalometer (black carbon concentration), ozone meter, temperature-humidity sensor, barometer and a time-lapse digital camera. The field measurement site closes to Linyuan Petrochemical Industrial Park, where is one of the heavy polluted regions in Taiwan. Balloon-borne Vaisala RS-92 radiosonde and CL31 Lidar Ceilometer are used to provide the background of the atmosphere at the same time. More data analysis measured by UAV helicopter and its potential application will be discussed.

  20. Humidity distribution affected by freely exposed water surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hygum, Morten Arnfeldt; Popok, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Accurate models for the water vapor flux at a water-air interface are required in various scientific, reliability and civil engineering aspects. Here, a study of humidity distribution in a container with air and freely exposed water is presented. A model predicting a spatial distribution and time...... evolution of relative humidity based on statistical rate theory and computational fluid dynamics is developed. In our approach we use short-term steady-state steps to simulate the slowly evolving evaporation in the system. Experiments demonstrate considerably good agreement with the computer modeling...

  1. Temperature, Humidity, Wind and Pressure Sensors (THWAPS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-01-17

    The temperature, humidity, wind, and pressure system (THWAPS) provide surface reference values of these measurements for balloon-borne sounding system (SONDE) launches. The THWAPS is located adjacent to the SONDE launch site at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility. The THWAPS system is a combination of calibration-quality instruments intended to provide accurate measurements of meteorological conditions near the surface. Although the primary use of the system is to provide accurate surface reference values of temperature, pressure, relative humidity (RH), and wind velocity for comparison with radiosonde readings, the system includes a data logger to record time series of the measured variables.

  2. Humidity Buildup in Electronic Enclosures Exposed to Constant Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conseil, Helene; Staliulionis, Zygimantas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2017-01-01

    Electronic components and devices are exposed to a wide variety of climatic conditions, therefore the protection of electronic devices from humidity is becoming a critical factor in the system design. The ingress of moisture into typical electronic enclosures has been studied with defined...... parameters such as openings in the enclosure (drain holes, intentional openings or leak) and sealing and casing material. Related corrosion reliability issues due to humidity buildup have been evaluated using an interdigitated surface insulation resistance pattern placed inside the enclosure during exposure...

  3. Humidity and pressure sensor based on internal reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenegueti, J F M; Zilio, S C

    2014-03-10

    A low-cost humidity and pressure optical sensor, based on the internal reflection phenomenon, is presented. It takes advantage of the phase difference acquired by s- and p-polarized light undergoing internal reflection to generate an easily detectable minimum in the reflected profile, in a position corresponding to the critical angle. The apparatus presents good sensitivity to relative humidity changes above 70% and a response time below one second. The same device is also capable of measuring changes in pressure and can be used as a vacuum gauge between 1 and 1000 mbar.

  4. Encapsulation for smart textile electronics - humidity and temperature sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Andreas; Tran, Thanh-Nam; Aasmundtveit, Knut E; Seeberg, Trine M

    2015-01-01

    A combined humidity and temperature sensor was packaged by vacuum casting onto three different types of textiles; cotton, nylon and a waterproof fabric. This was done in order to integrate the sensor in a jacket in a soft and reliable way without changing the sensor performance. A membrane was custom made and integrated into the device to protect the sensor from the environment. The packaged sensors performance was characterized in a climate chamber were the relative humidity and temperature ranged from 25 % to 95 % and -10 °C to 75 °C respectively. The packaged sensors showed insignificant to limited performance degradation.

  5. Influence of Temperature and Humidity on Bakelite Resistivity

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaldi, R; Barret, V; Bastid, N; Blanchard, G; Chiavassa, E; Cortese, P; Crochet, Philippe; Dellacasa, G; De Marco, N; Dupieux, P; Espagnon, B; Fargeix, J; Ferretti, A; Gallio, M; Lamoine, L; Luquin, Lionel; Manso, F; Mereu, P; Métivier, V; Musso, A; Oppedisano, C; Piccotti, A; Rahmani, A; Royer, L; Roig, O; Scalas, E; Scomparin, E; Vercellin, Ermanno

    1999-01-01

    Presentation made at RPC99 and submitted to Elsevier PreprintThe use of phenolic or melaminic bakelite as RPC electrodes is widespread. The electrode resistivity is an important parameter for the RPC performance. As recent studies have pointed out, the bakelite resistivity changes with temperature and is influenced by humidity. In order to gain a quantitative understanding on the influence of temperature and humidity on RPC electrodes, we assembled an apparatus to measure resistivity in well-controlled conditions. A detailed description of the experimental set-up as well as the first resistivity measurements for various laminates in different environmental conditions are presented.

  6. Temperature-dependent deliquescence relative humidities and water activities using humidity controlled thermogravimetric analysis with application to malonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Keith D; Schroeder, Jason R; Kissinger, Jared A

    2014-04-03

    We utilize a new experimental technique, humidity-controlled thermogravimetric analysis (HTGA), to determine temperature-dependent deliquescence relative humidities (DRH) and to determine the equilibrium concentration of a solution at a given temperature and relative humidity. To that end, we have investigated the malonic acid/water system determining the DRH and concentration/RH relationship in the temperature range 303-278 K. Excellent agreement is found with literature values for the DRH of malonic acid as a function of temperature and for the concentration/RH relationship at several temperatures. Thus, we extend the DRH and concentration/RH relationship to a broader temperature range and are using the HTGA experiments to investigate other organic acids.

  7. Effects of Single Film, Packaging Methods and Relative Humidity on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine the effect of single film packaging and relative humidity (RH) on the moisture content and water activity of Kilishi during storage. Polypropylene (PP) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) films were used for the packaging. Kilishi was prepared by trimming off blood vessels, fat and ...

  8. Humidity sensing behaviour of polyaniline/magnesium chromate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... resistance was observed when the polymer composites were exposed to the broad range of relative humidity (ranging between 20 and 95% RH). This decrease is due to increase in surface electrical conduc- tivity resulting from moisture absorption and due to capillary condensation of water causing change in conductivity.

  9. aspects of temperature and humidity in preferred hibernation sites of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the highveld where the ambient and cave temperatures are lower than in the lowveld. In two highveld caves, mating and hibernating colonies were resident from January to the end of July, but only one cave was occupied for hibernating during the winter. In the cave selected for hibernation humidity was lower, and ...

  10. Stochastic characteristics and modeling of relative humidity of Ogun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extreme events of atmospheric phenomena are often non deterministic in nature, and this has been a major constraint in achieving agricultural sustainability in most developing countries.To facilitate this study, 29 years information of the observed relative humidity of Ogun basin was obtained from the Federal Ministry of ...

  11. Humidity affects the performance of von Frey monofilaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, M U; Nielsen, Per Rotbøll; Ellehuus-Hilmersson, C

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of tactile and nociceptive thresholds of the skin with calibrated polyamide monofilaments is an established testing method both in animal and in human research. It is known that changes in relative humidity may affect the physical properties of the monofilaments. As this effect has only...

  12. Semmes-Weinstein Monofilaments: Influence of Temperature, Humidity, and Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haloua, Max H.; Sierevelt, Inger; Theuvenet, Willem J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the buckling force of Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments is influenced by changes in temperature, humidity, and aging. Methods: We tested 16 Semmes-Weinstein monofflaments from North Coast Medical, varying in age from new to 12 years old. From each kit, we used the

  13. Pressure and Relative Humidity Measurement Devices for Mars 2020 Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieta, M.; Genzer, M.; Nikkanen, T.; Haukka, H.; Harri, A.-M.; Polkko, J.; Rodriguez-Manfredi, J. A.

    2017-09-01

    One of the scientific payloads onboard the NASA Mars 2020 rover mission is Mars Environmental Dynamic Analyzer (MEDA): a set of environmental sensors for Mars surface weather measurements. Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) provides a pressure measurement device (MEDA PS) and a relative humidity measurement device (MEDA HS) for MEDA.

  14. Cosmic rays intensity and atmosphere humidity at near earth surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskomov, V. V.; Sedov, A. N.; Saduyev, N. O.; Kalikulov, O. A.; Naurzbayeva, A. Zh; Alimgazinova, N. Sh; Kenzhina, I. E.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental studies of estimation the mutual influence of humidity and flux of cosmic rays in first approximation were carried out. Normalized cross-correlation function of time series of neutron monitors count rate and level of relative atmosphere humidity near cosmic rays registration point is studied. Corrected and uncorrected on pressure minute and hour data of 6NM64 neutron monitor count rate were used for the study. Neutron monitor is located in Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, at an altitude of 850 m above sea level. Also, data from NM64 neutron monitor of Tien Shan mountain research station of Institute of Ionosphere, located at an altitude of 3340 m above sea level were used. Uncorrected on pressure cosmic rays intensity better reflects the changes in relative atmosphere humidity. Average and sometimes strong relationship is often observed by time changes of atmosphere humidity near the point of cosmic rays detection and their intensity: the value of normalized cross-correlation function of respective signals, even in case of their long duration and a large number of data (eg, for minute changes at intervals of up to several months) covers 0.5 - 0.75 range, sometimes falling to ∼⃒ 0.4.

  15. Effects of temperature and relative humidity on the egg laying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of temperature and relative humidity on the egg laying pattern of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Koch, 1844) infesting sheep in semi-arid region of Nigeria. ... The pre-oviposition days under belljar conditions (11.1±9.15) was significantly shorter (p<0.05) than ambient conditions (14.5±14.9 days), each having post ...

  16. Effect of compression force, humidity and disintegrant concentration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ac-Di-Sol® was an efficient disintegrant for furosomide tablets at low concentrations of 1.25% - 10% because it rapidly released the hydrophobic drug particles from tablets. However, tablets containing 10 % disintegrant must be protected from atmospheric moisture because storage at 60-70 % relative humidity led to ...

  17. Humidity effects on scanning polarization force microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yue; Zhou, Yuan; Sun, Yanxia; Zhang, Lijuan; Wang, Ying; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yi

    2017-08-01

    Scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM) is a useful surface characterization technique to visually characterize and distinguish nanomaterial with different local dielectric properties at nanometer scale. In this paper, taking the individual one-atom-thick graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets on mica as examples, we described the influences of environmental humidity on SPFM imaging. We found that the apparent heights (AHs) or contrast of SPFM imaging was influenced significantly by relative humidity (RH) at a response time of a few seconds. And this influence rooted in the sensitive dielectric constant of mica surface to the RH change. While dielectric properties of GO and rGO sheets were almost immune to the humidity change. In addition, we gave the method to determine the critical humidity at which the contrast conversion happened under different conditions. And this is important to the contrast control and repeatable imaging of SPFM through RH adjusting. These findings suggest a strategy of controllable and repeatable imaging the local dielectric properties of nanomaterials with SPFM, which is critically important for further distinguishment, manipulation, electronic applications, etc.

  18. Influence of relative humidity on tensile and compressive creep of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents an experimental study on the influence of ambient relative humidity on tensile creep of plain concrete amended with Ground Granulated Blast - furnace Slag and compares it with its influence on compressive creep. Tensile and compressive creep tests were carried out on concrete specimens of 34.49 ...

  19. Effects of relative humidity on banana fruit drop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saengpook, C.; Ketsa, S.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2007-01-01

    Commercial ripening of banana fruit occurs at high relative humidity (RH), which prevents browning of damaged skin areas. In experiments with ripening at high RH (94 ± 1%) the individual fruit (fingers) of `Sucrier¿ (Musa acuminata, AA Group) banana exhibited a high rate of drop. The falling off of

  20. Retrieval of humidity and temperature profiles over the oceans from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, retrieval of temperature and humidity profiles of atmosphere from INSAT 3D-observed radiances has been accomplished. As the first step, a fast forward radiative transfer model using an Artificial neural network has been developed and it was proven to be highly effective, giving a correlationcoefficient of 0.97.

  1. Retrieval of humidity and temperature profiles over the oceans from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to provide a quantitative estimate of the temper- ature and humidity, and. • for satellite aided search and rescue services. The payload is an advanced very high resolution infrared imager and a 19-channel sounder. The sounder has 18 channels spanning in the infrared region from 3.74 to 14.71 µm and one channel in the.

  2. Microindentation Hardness of Protein Crystals under Controlled Relative Humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeharu Kishi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Vickers microindentation hardness of protein crystals was investigated on the (110 habit plane of tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme crystals containing intracrystalline water at controlled relative humidity. The time evolution of the hardness of the crystals exposed to air with different humidities exhibits three stages such as the incubation, transition, and saturation stages. The hardness in the incubation stage keeps a constant value of 16 MPa, which is independent of the humidity. The incubation hardness can correspond to the intrinsic one in the wet condition. The increase of the hardness in the transition and saturation stages is well fitted with the single exponential curve, and is correlated with the reduction of water content in the crystal by the evaporation. The saturated maximum hardness also strongly depends on the water content equilibrated with the humidity. The slip traces corresponding to the (11 ̅0[110] slip system around the indentation marks are observed in not only incubation but also saturation stages. It is suggested that the plastic deformation in protein crystals by the indentation can be attributed to dislocation multiplication and motion inducing the slip. The indentation hardness in protein crystals is discussed in light of dislocation mechanism with Peierls stress and intracrystalline water.

  3. Relation between moisture content of fine fuels and relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold K. Steen

    1963-01-01

    Measurements indicate a relation between diurnal curves of relative humidity and moisture content of some important fuels of Oregon and Washington. Some of these measurements were made in early years of forest fire research in this region. The data in this note were collected at intervals throughout 4 days (in September 1938) at the Wind River Experimental Forest near...

  4. Intrinsic and Ionic Conduction in Humidity-Sensitive Sulfonated Polyaniline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doan, D.C.T.; Ramaneti, R.; Baggerman, J.; Tong, H.D.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Rijn, van C.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of humidity on the conductivity of sulfonated polyaniline (SPANI) and polyaniline (PANI) is investigated with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Separation of intrinsic (q) and ionic charge (i) mobility was observed using combination of ac and dc impedance measurements at

  5. Storage life of sesame ( Sesamum indicum L.) seeds under humid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Storage life of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) seeds under humid tropical conditions. MA Adebisi, JA Ola, DAC Akintobi, IO Daniel. Abstract. No Abstract. Nigeria Agricultural Journal Vol. 38 2007: pp. 62-69. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Article Metrics.

  6. Cubic mesoporous Ag@CN: a high performance humidity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, Vijay K; Thangaraj, Nishanthi; Gahlot, Sweta; Kailasam, Kamalakannan

    2016-12-01

    The fabrication of highly responsive, rapid response/recovery and durable relative humidity (%RH) sensors that can precisely monitor humidity levels still remains a considerable challenge for realizing the next generation humidity sensing applications. Herein, we report a remarkably sensitive and rapid %RH sensor having a reversible response using a nanocasting route for synthesizing mesoporous g-CN (commonly known as g-C3N4). The 3D replicated cubic mesostructure provides a high surface area thereby increasing the adsorption, transmission of charge carriers and desorption of water molecules across the sensor surfaces. Owing to its unique structure, the mesoporous g-CN functionalized with well dispersed catalytic Ag nanoparticles exhibits excellent sensitivity in the 11-98% RH range while retaining high stability, negligible hysteresis and superior real time %RH detection performances. Compared to conventional resistive sensors based on metal oxides, a rapid response time (3 s) and recovery time (1.4 s) were observed in the 11-98% RH range. Such impressive features originate from the planar morphology of g-CN as well as unique physical affinity and favourable electronic band positions of this material that facilitate water adsorption and charge transportation. Mesoporous g-CN with Ag nanoparticles is demonstrated to provide an effective strategy in designing high performance %RH sensors and show great promise for utilization of mesoporous 2D layered materials in the Internet of Things and next generation humidity sensing applications.

  7. Design of a Humidity Sensor Tag for Passive Wireless Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiang; Deng, Fangming; Hao, Yong; Fu, Zhihui; Zhang, Lihua

    2015-10-07

    This paper presents a wireless humidity sensor tag for low-cost and low-power applications. The proposed humidity sensor tag, based on radio frequency identification (RFID) technology, was fabricated in a standard 0.18 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The top metal layer was deposited to form the interdigitated electrodes, which were then filled with polyimide as the humidity sensing layer. A two-stage rectifier adopts a dynamic bias-voltage generator to boost the effective gate-source voltage of the switches in differential-drive architecture, resulting in a flat power conversion efficiency curve. The capacitive sensor interface, based on phase-locked loop (PLL) theory, employs a simple architecture and can work with 0.5 V supply voltage. The measurement results show that humidity sensor tag achieves excellent linearity, hysteresis and stability performance. The total power-dissipation of the sensor tag is 2.5 μW, resulting in a maximum operating distance of 23 m under 4 W of radiation power of the RFID reader.

  8. Humidity Sensors Principle, Mechanism, and Fabrication Technologies: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Hamid; Wagiran, Rahman; Hamidon, Mohd Nizar

    2014-01-01

    Humidity measurement is one of the most significant issues in various areas of applications such as instrumentation, automated systems, agriculture, climatology and GIS. Numerous sorts of humidity sensors fabricated and developed for industrial and laboratory applications are reviewed and presented in this article. The survey frequently concentrates on the RH sensors based upon their organic and inorganic functional materials, e.g., porous ceramics (semiconductors), polymers, ceramic/polymer and electrolytes, as well as conduction mechanism and fabrication technologies. A significant aim of this review is to provide a distinct categorization pursuant to state of the art humidity sensor types, principles of work, sensing substances, transduction mechanisms, and production technologies. Furthermore, performance characteristics of the different humidity sensors such as electrical and statistical data will be detailed and gives an added value to the report. By comparison of overall prospects of the sensors it was revealed that there are still drawbacks as to efficiency of sensing elements and conduction values. The flexibility offered by thick film and thin film processes either in the preparation of materials or in the choice of shape and size of the sensor structure provides advantages over other technologies. These ceramic sensors show faster response than other types. PMID:24784036

  9. Whey protein concentrate storage at elevated temperature and humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dairy processors are finding new export markets for whey protein concentrate (WPC), a byproduct of cheesemaking, but they need to know if full-sized bags of this powder will withstand high temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels during unrefrigerated storage under tropical conditions. To answ...

  10. Agro-morphological variation in lowland humid forest accessions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In year 2004 Ninety-height maize accessions (eighty-six landraces and twelve improved varieties) were collected from the lowland humid forest zone of Cameroon and evaluated on the basis of fifteen agro-morphological characters in a randomized complete block design with three replications. The objectives of this study ...

  11. Hydrological drought and wildfire in the humid tropics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taufik, Muh

    2017-01-01

    Drought is a recurrent hazard, which has happened throughout human history, and it is anticipated to become more severe in multiple regions across the world. Drought occurs in all climate regimes from humid to dry and from hot to cold. Drought is often viewed through its impact on environment and

  12. PMMA Solid bottle optical microresonator for measure relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, D. A.; Horta, S. D.; Torres, C. O.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we studied experimentally the performance of an solid bottle optical resonator made of PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) for measure the relative humidity of the medium. In the developed device, the WGMs modes within the microcavity are excited by the proximity of an optical fiber taper with an outer diameter of the order of 3-5 microns made from stretching a standard optical fiber of Silica by the flame brushing technique. In the resonant device, the field produced by a laser system tunable TLS is guided through the fiber taper and is coupled into the microcavity by the approach of the fiber taper to the equatorial zone of the microbottle, causing the excitation of the WGMs resonant modes inside the same. When the device is subjected to changes in relative humidity of the medium, the wavelengths of resonance of WGMs modes that have been coupled in the microresonator are shifted spectrally depending on the external humidity, showing an experimental sensitivity in the resonator due to changes in the relative humidity of the medium. In the experiment, it was possible to produce different samples of optical resonators with a profile shaped bottle with different maximum diameters achieving a maximum sensitivity of 0.032 nm/% RH for a resonator with equatorial diameter of 1250 μm.

  13. Dip-coated hydrotungstite thin films as humidity sensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Keywords. Tungsten oxide; hydrotungstite; humidity sensing. 1. Introduction. Tungsten oxides have been studied extensively because of applications in electrochromic devices. Tungsten oxide and binary systems of tungsten oxide with other transition metal oxides are also being studied for their gas sensing applications.

  14. CMOS integration of inkjet-printed graphene for humidity sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, S.; Hu, G.; Howe, R. C. T.; De Luca, A.; Ali, S. Z.; Udrea, F.; Gardner, J. W.; Ray, S. K.; Guha, P. K.; Hasan, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the integration of inkjet-printed graphene with a CMOS micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) microhotplate for humidity sensing. The graphene ink is produced via ultrasonic assisted liquid phase exfoliation in isopropyl alcohol (IPA) using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) polymer as the stabilizer. We formulate inks with different graphene concentrations, which are then deposited through inkjet printing over predefined interdigitated gold electrodes on a CMOS microhotplate. The graphene flakes form a percolating network to render the resultant graphene-PVP thin film conductive, which varies in presence of humidity due to swelling of the hygroscopic PVP host. When the sensors are exposed to relative humidity ranging from 10–80%, we observe significant changes in resistance with increasing sensitivity from the amount of graphene in the inks. Our sensors show excellent repeatability and stability, over a period of several weeks. The location specific deposition of functional graphene ink onto a low cost CMOS platform has the potential for high volume, economic manufacturing and application as a new generation of miniature, low power humidity sensors for the internet of things. PMID:26616216

  15. Low-cost personal cooling in hot humid offices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsen, Lars Bo; Santos, A.

    This report presents a low cost solution to avoid heat stress in a hot and humid environment based on a solar powered drying of supply air. The air drying facilities and a validation of the benefits through comprehensive human exposure studies are described. The study represents an example of app...

  16. Statistical analysis of the effects of relative humidity and temperature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meteorological data from the Department of Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CMSAF), DWD Germany have been used to study and investigate the effect of relative humidity and temperature on refractivity in twenty six locations grouped into for climatic regions aloft Nigeria (Coastal, Guinea savannah, ...

  17. Low-cost personal cooling in hot humid offices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsen, Lars Bo; Santos, A.

    This report presents a low cost solution to avoid heat stress in a hot and humid environment based on a solar powered drying of supply air. The air drying facilities and a validation of the benefits through comprehensive human exposure studies are described. The study represents an example...

  18. Microstructure Changes in Polyester Polyurethane upon Thermal and Humid Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Tian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of compression molded Estane 5703 films exposed to 11%, 45%, and 80% relative humidity and 70 °C for 1 and 2 months has been studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Scattering data indicated increase of the interdomain distance and domain size with a higher humidity and longer aging time. GPC data showed a progressive shortening of polyurethane chains with increasing humidity and aging time. The shortening of the polyurethane chains caused a drop of the glass transition temperature of soft segments, and promoted crystallization of the soft segments during long-time storage of the aged samples at room temperature. FTIR showed a substantial increase in the number of inter-urethane H-bonds in the aged samples. This correlates with the increase of the hard domain size and the degree of phase separation as measured by SANS. The data collected reveals that the reduced steric hindrance caused by hydrolysis of ester links in polybutylene adipate residues promotes the organization of hard segments into domains, leading to the increase of domain size and distance, as well as phase segregation in aged Estane. These findings provide insight into the effects of humidity and thermal aging on the microstructure of aged polyester urethane from molecular to nanoscale level.

  19. Humidity Sensor Based on Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Cao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of the humidity sensors made of chemically treated and untreated multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT thin films are investigated systematically. It shows that both the chemically treated and untreated MWCNT thin films demonstrate humidity sensitive properties, but the former have stronger sensitivity than the latter. In the range of 11%–98% relative humidity (RH, the resistances of the chemically treated and untreated MWCNT humidity sensors increase 120% and 28%, respectively. Moreover, the treated humidity sensors showed higher sensitivity and better stability. In addition, the response and recover properties, and stabilization of the humidity sensors are measured, and the humidity sensitive mechanisms of the sensors are analyzed. The humidity sensitivity of carbon nanotube thin films indicates it promise as a kind of humidity sensitive material.

  20. The effect of humidity on annealing of polymer optical fibre bragg gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Nielsen, Kristian; Bang, Ole

    2015-01-01

    The effect of humidity on annealing of PMMA based microstructured polymer optical fiber (mPOF) Bragg gratings is studied. Polymer optical fibers (POFs) are annealed in order to release stress formed during the fabrication process. Un-annealed fibers will have high hysteresis and low sensitivity...... to humidity, particularly when operated at high temperature. Typically annealing of PMMA POFs is done at 80oC in an oven with no humidity control and therefor at low humidity. The response to humidity of PMMA FBGs annealed at different levels of humidity at the same temperature has also been studied. PMMA...... FBGs annealed at high humidity have response with no hysteresis and an improved sensitivity which are independent of temperature compared to FBGs annealed at the same temperature but at lower humidity. In addition, PMMA FBG annealed at high humidity showed a permanent blue shift more than 200nm, which...

  1. Calculation principles of humid air in a reversed Brayton cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backman, J. [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology (Finland). Dept. of Energy Technology

    1997-12-31

    The article presents a calculation method for reversed Brayton cycle that uses humid air as working medium. The reversed Brayton cycle can be employed as an air dryer, a heat pump or a refrigerating machine. In this research the use of humid air as a working fluid has an environmental advantage, as well. In this method especially the expansion process in the turbine is important because of the condensation of the water vapour in the humid air. This physical phenomena can have significant effects on the level of performance of the application. The expansion process differs physically from the compression process, when the water vapour in the humid air begins to condensate. In the thermodynamic equilibrium of the flow, the water vapour pressure in humid air cannot exceed the pressure of saturated water vapour in corresponding temperature. Expansion calculation during operation around the saturation zone is based on a quasistatic expansion, in which the system after the turbine is in thermodynamical equilibrium. The state parameters are at every moment defined by the equation of state, and there is no supercooling in the vapour. Following simplifications are used in the calculations: The system is assumed to be adiabatic. This means that there is no heat transfer to the surroundings. This is a common practice, when the temperature differences are moderate as here; The power of the cooling is omitted. The cooling construction is very dependent on the machine and the distribution of the losses; The flow is assumed to be one-dimensional, steady-state and homogenous. The water vapour condensing in the turbine can cause errors, but the errors are mainly included in the efficiency calculation. (author) 11 refs.

  2. Highly Sensitive and Fast Response Colorimetric Humidity Sensors Based on Graphene Oxides Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Hong; Liu, Yan Jun; Wang, FuKe; He, Chaobin

    2015-09-16

    Uniform graphene oxide (GO) film for optical humidity sensing was fabricated by dip-coating technique. The resulting GO thin film shows linear optical shifts in the visible range with increase of humidity in the whole relative humidity range (from dry state to 98%). Moreover, GO films exhibit ultrafast sensing to moisture within 250 ms because of the unique atomic thinness and superpermeability of GO sheets. The humidity sensing mechanism was investigated using XRD and computer simulation. The ultrasensitive humidity colorimetric properties of GOs film may enable many potential applications such as disposable humidity sensors for packaging, health, and environmental monitoring.

  3. Humidity: A review and primer on atmospheric moisture and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Robert E; McGregor, Glenn R; Enfield, Kyle B

    2016-01-01

    Research examining associations between weather and human health frequently includes the effects of atmospheric humidity. A large number of humidity variables have been developed for numerous purposes, but little guidance is available to health researchers regarding appropriate variable selection. We examine a suite of commonly used humidity variables and summarize both the medical and biometeorological literature on associations between humidity and human health. As an example of the importance of humidity variable selection, we correlate numerous hourly humidity variables to daily respiratory syncytial virus isolates in Singapore from 1992 to 1994. Most water-vapor mass based variables (specific humidity, absolute humidity, mixing ratio, dewpoint temperature, vapor pressure) exhibit comparable correlations. Variables that include a thermal component (relative humidity, dewpoint depression, saturation vapor pressure) exhibit strong diurnality and seasonality. Humidity variable selection must be dictated by the underlying research question. Despite being the most commonly used humidity variable, relative humidity should be used sparingly and avoided in cases when the proximity to saturation is not medically relevant. Care must be taken in averaging certain humidity variables daily or seasonally to avoid statistical biasing associated with variables that are inherently diurnal through their relationship to temperature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Limiting criteria for human exposure to low humidity indoors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyon, David; Fang, Lei; Meyer, H.

    2002-01-01

    Thirty subjects (17 female) were exposed for 5 hours to clean air at 5%, 15%, 25% and 35% RH at 22 deg.C. Another 30 subjects (15 female) were similarly exposed to air polluted by carpet and linoleum at 18, 22 and 26 deg.C with humidity 2.4 g/kg dry air (=15% RH at 22 deg.C), and at 22 deg.C, 35......% RH. The subjects performed simulated office work throughout each exposure. Building Related Symptom (BRS) intensity was reported on visual-analogue scales. Tests of eye, nose and skin function were applied. In these short exposures subjective discomfort, though significantly increased by low humidity...

  5. Global bounds on nitrogen gas emissions from humid tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookshire, E. N. J.; Gerber, S.; Greene, W.; Jones, R. T.; Thomas, S. A.

    2017-03-01

    Denitrification and hydrologic leaching are the two major pathways by which nitrogen (N) is lost from the terrestrial biosphere. Humid tropical forests are thought to dominate denitrification losses from unmanaged lands globally, but there is large uncertainty about the range and key drivers of total N gas emissions across the biome. We combined pantropical measures of small watershed stream chemistry with ecosystem modeling to determine total N gas losses and associated uncertainty across humid tropical forests. Our calculations reveal that denitrification in soils and along hydrologic flow paths contributes on average >45% of total watershed N losses. However, when denitrification occurs exclusively in shallow soils, simulations indicate that gas emissions would exceed N inputs and render plants severely N limited, which contradicts observations of widespread N sufficiency in tropical forests. Our analyses suggest an upper bound on soil denitrification of 80% of total external N losses beyond which tropical plant growth would be compromised.

  6. A High Temperature Capacitive Humidity Sensor Based on Mesoporous Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Tiemann

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Capacitive sensors are the most commonly used devices for the detection of humidity because they are inexpensive and the detection mechanism is very specific for humidity. However, especially for industrial processes, there is a lack of dielectrics that are stable at high temperature (>200 °C and under harsh conditions. We present a capacitive sensor based on mesoporous silica as the dielectric in a simple sensor design based on pressed silica pellets. Investigation of the structural stability of the porous silica under simulated operating conditions as well as the influence of the pellet production will be shown. Impedance measurements demonstrate the utility of the sensor at both low (90 °C and high (up to 210 °C operating temperatures.

  7. A high temperature capacitive humidity sensor based on mesoporous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Thorsten; Krotzky, Sören; Weiss, Alexander; Sauerwald, Tilman; Kohl, Claus-Dieter; Roggenbuck, Jan; Tiemann, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Capacitive sensors are the most commonly used devices for the detection of humidity because they are inexpensive and the detection mechanism is very specific for humidity. However, especially for industrial processes, there is a lack of dielectrics that are stable at high temperature (>200 °C) and under harsh conditions. We present a capacitive sensor based on mesoporous silica as the dielectric in a simple sensor design based on pressed silica pellets. Investigation of the structural stability of the porous silica under simulated operating conditions as well as the influence of the pellet production will be shown. Impedance measurements demonstrate the utility of the sensor at both low (90 °C) and high (up to 210 °C) operating temperatures.

  8. Toward a New Generation of Photonic Humidity Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpakov, Stanislav A.; Gordon, Neil T.; Mou, Chengbo; Zhou, Kaiming

    2014-01-01

    This review offers new perspectives on the subject and highlights an area in need of further research. It includes an analysis of current scientific literature mainly covering the last decade and examines the trends in the development of electronic, acoustic and optical-fiber humidity sensors over this period. The major findings indicate that a new generation of sensor technology based on optical fibers is emerging. The current trends suggest that electronic humidity sensors could soon be replaced by sensors that are based on photonic structures. Recent scientific advances are expected to allow dedicated systems to avoid the relatively high price of interrogation modules that is currently a major disadvantage of fiber-based sensors. PMID:24577524

  9. Embedded DAQ System Design for Temperature and Humidity Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarique Rafique Memon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have proposed a cost effective DAQ (Data Acquisition system design useful for local industries by using user friendly LABVIEW (Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Electronic Workbench. The proposed system can measure and control different industrial parameters which can be presented in graphical icon format. The system design is proposed for 8-channels, whereas tested and recorded for two parameters i.e. temperature and RH (Relative Humidity. Both parameters are set as per upper and lower limits and controlled using relays. Embedded system is developed using standard microcontroller to acquire and process the analog data and plug-in for further processing using serial interface with PC using LABVIEW. The designed system is capable of monitoring and recording the corresponding linkage between temperature and humidity in industrial unit's and indicates the abnormalities within the process and control those abnormalities through relays

  10. A High Temperature Capacitive Humidity Sensor Based on Mesoporous Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Thorsten; Krotzky, Sören; Weiß, Alexander; Sauerwald, Tilman; Kohl, Claus-Dieter; Roggenbuck, Jan; Tiemann, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Capacitive sensors are the most commonly used devices for the detection of humidity because they are inexpensive and the detection mechanism is very specific for humidity. However, especially for industrial processes, there is a lack of dielectrics that are stable at high temperature (>200 °C) and under harsh conditions. We present a capacitive sensor based on mesoporous silica as the dielectric in a simple sensor design based on pressed silica pellets. Investigation of the structural stability of the porous silica under simulated operating conditions as well as the influence of the pellet production will be shown. Impedance measurements demonstrate the utility of the sensor at both low (90 °C) and high (up to 210 °C) operating temperatures. PMID:22163790

  11. Toward a New Generation of Photonic Humidity Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav A. Kolpakov

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This review offers new perspectives on the subject and highlights an area in need of further research. It includes an analysis of current scientific literature mainly covering the last decade and examines the trends in the development of electronic, acoustic and optical-fiber humidity sensors over this period. The major findings indicate that a new generation of sensor technology based on optical fibers is emerging. The current trends suggest that electronic humidity sensors could soon be replaced by sensors that are based on photonic structures. Recent scientific advances are expected to allow dedicated systems to avoid the relatively high price of interrogation modules that is currently a major disadvantage of fiber-based sensors.

  12. Influence of Humidity on Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ander Montero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the influence of the relative humidity (RH on the wavelength of fiber Bragg grating sensors (FBGS, performing tests with five FBGS at different humidity and temperature conditions. These tests were performed in a climate chamber whose RH changes according to a scheduled profile from 30% to 90%, in steps of 10%. These profiles were repeated for a wide range of temperatures from 10∘C to 70∘C, in steps of 10∘C. Two different types of instrumentation methods have been tested, spot welding and epoxy bonding, in two different materials, steel and carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP. We discuss the results for each type of sensor and instrumentation method by analyzing the linearity of the Bragg wavelength with RH and temperature.

  13. Retrieval of relative humidity from CSIR-NLC mobile LIDAR backscatter measurements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tesfaye, M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available data was collected over 23 hours. The above data sets were used to determine the retrieved relative humidity and compared with Irene (near to Pretoria) weather balloon humidity measurements. The results of the comparative study are presented...

  14. Compact Buried Ducts in a Hot-Humid Climate House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallay, Dave [Home Innovation Research Labs, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2016-01-07

    "9A system of compact, buried ducts provides a high-performance and cost-effective solution for delivering conditioned air throughout the building. This report outlines research activities that are expected to facilitate adoption of compact buried duct systems by builders. The results of this research would be scalable to many new house designs in most climates and markets, leading to wider industry acceptance and building code and energy program approval. The primary research question with buried ducts is potential condensation at the outer jacket of the duct insulation in humid climates during the cooling season. Current best practices for buried ducts rely on encapsulating the insulated ducts with closed-cell spray polyurethane foam insulation to control condensation and improve air sealing. The encapsulated buried duct concept has been analyzed and shown to be effective in hot-humid climates. The purpose of this project is to develop an alternative buried duct system that performs effectively as ducts in conditioned space - durable, energy efficient, and cost-effective - in a hot-humid climate (IECC warm-humid climate zone 3A) with three goals that distinguish this project: 1) Evaluation of design criteria for buried ducts that use common materials and do not rely on encapsulation using spray foam or disrupt traditional work sequences; 2) Establishing design criteria for compact ducts and incorporate those with the buried duct criteria to further reduce energy losses and control installed costs; 3) Developing HVAC design guidance for performing accurate heating and cooling load calculations for compact buried ducts.

  15. Performance Evaluation of a Hot-Humid Climate Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osser, R.; Kerrigan, P.

    2012-02-01

    Project Home Again is a development in New Orleans, LA created to provide new homes to victims of Hurricane Katrina. Building Science Corporation acted as a consultant for the project, advocating design strategies for durability, flood resistance, occupant comfort, and low energy use while maintaining cost effectiveness. These techniques include the use of high density spray foam insulation, LoE3 glazing, and supplemental dehumidification to maintain comfortable humidity levels without unnecessary cooling.

  16. Effect of Temperature and Relative Humidity on the Growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of temperature and relative humidity on the growth of Helminthosporium fulvum were investigated. Various temperature regimes of 10oC, 15oC, 20oC, 25oC, 30oC, 35oC and 40¢ªC were used to determine the temperature effect on the growth of H. fulvum. Maximum growth of H. fulvum was obtained at 25¢ªC ...

  17. Effect of Temperature and Relative Humidity on the Growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: The effects of temperature and relative humidity on the growth of Helminthosporium fulvum were investigated. Various temperature regimes of 10oC, 15oC, 20oC, 25oC, 30oC, 35oC and 40˚C were used to determine the temperature effect on the growth of H. fulvum. Maximum growth of H. fulvum was obtained ...

  18. The influence of humidity, temperature, and oral contraceptive in tear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Raul A. R. C.; Ribeiro, Tânia L. C.; Moreira, Sandra M. B.; Baptista, António M. G.

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study is to ascertain whether the quantity and quality of tear and eye subjective comfort are influenced by the temperature, humidity and oral Contraceptives Taking or Non-taking (CTNT). Forty-one students, females, from the University of Minho, Braga, Portugal, aged (mean+/-1standard deviation) of 21.51+/-1.85 years, ranging from 20 to 30 years, participated in this study. The McMonnies Questionnaire (MMQ), Break Up Time (BUT) and Phenol Red Test (PRT) were accessed between 14-17 hours in four sets of visits throughout the year: Visit 1, Visit 2, Visit 3 and Visit 4. The PRT and BUT values (mean+/-1standard deviation) for Visit 1, Visit 2, Visit 3 and Visit 4 were respectively 23.88+/-6.50mm, 22.29+/-8.00mm, 23.61+/-6.75mm, 22.88+/-7.00mm and 6.02+/-1.58s, 5.62+/-1.22s, 5.23+/-0.88s, 5.53+/-1. 42s. The MMQ scores for Visit 1, Visit 2, Visit 3 and Visit 4 ranged from 2-13, 2-15, 1-14 and 2-14 with medians of 6, 7, 6 and 6, respectively. The influence of temperature, humidity and CTNT on PRT, BUT and MMQ were evaluated using generalized linear mixed model. For BUT and MMQ statistical significant effects were found regarding temperature and humidity. The temperature and humidity influenced the tear quality and subjective comfort but did not influence the tear quantity. The CTNT did not influence tear quantity, quality or subjective eye comfort.

  19. Energy Efficient Crawlspace Foundation Retrofit: Mixed Humid Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Bianco, M. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Wiehagen, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Residential quality management systems have most often been designed for new home construction. To address quality in existing homes in the form of Scopes of Work (SOW), the NAHB Research Center began with a new construction scope of work and applied it to an existing home project. This document is intended to outline the steps of translating a new home construction SOW to SOW for retrofit and addressed crawlspace foundations in a mixed-humid climate.

  20. Optical sensor for measuring humidity, strain and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to an optical sensor (100) adapted to measure at least three physical parameters, said optical sensor comprising a polymer-based optical waveguide structure comprising a first Bragg grating structure (101) being adapted to provide information about a first, a second...... relates to a method for measuring the first, the second and the third physical parameter. Preferably, the first, the second and the third physical parameter, are humidity, strain and temperature, respectively....

  1. Energy efficient air inlet humidity control; Energiezuinige inblaasvochtregeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gielen, J.H. [C Point, DLV Plant, Horst (Netherlands)

    2005-03-15

    This project report describes the results of research conducted on the control of the inlet, humidification and dehumidification, based on the air inlet humidity rate. The project was carried out at a mushroom cultivation business in Heijen, the Netherlands [Dutch] Deze projectrapportage geeft de resultaten van het onderzoek naar het regelen van de luchtklep, bevochtiging en ontvochtiging, op basis van het inblaasvochtgehalte. Het project werd uitgevoerd op een champignonkwekerij in Heijen.

  2. Impact of Ambient Humidity on Child Health: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinghong; Sun, Yunzong; Lu, Yaogui; Li, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Changes in relative humidity, along with other meteorological factors, accompany ongoing climate change and play a significant role in weather-related health outcomes, particularly among children. The purpose of this review is to improve our understanding of the relationship between ambient humidity and child health, and to propose directions for future research. Methods A comprehensive search of electronic databases (PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, OvidSP and EBSCO host) and review of reference lists, to supplement relevant studies, were conducted in March 2013. All identified records were selected based on explicit inclusion criteria. We extracted data from the included studies using a pre-designed data extraction form, and then performed a quality assessment. Various heterogeneities precluded a formal quantitative meta-analysis, therefore, evidence was compiled using descriptive summaries. Results Out of a total of 3797 identified records, 37 papers were selected for inclusion in this review. Among the 37 studies, 35% were focused on allergic diseases and 32% on respiratory system diseases. Quality assessment revealed 78% of the studies had reporting quality scores above 70%, and all findings demonstrated that ambient humidity generally plays an important role in the incidence and prevalence of climate-sensitive diseases among children. Conclusions With climate change, there is a significant impact of ambient humidity on child health, especially for climate-sensitive infectious diseases, diarrhoeal diseases, respiratory system diseases, and pediatric allergic diseases. However, some inconsistencies in the direction and magnitude of the effects are observed. PMID:25503413

  3. Humidity insensitive TOPAS polymer fiber Bragg grating sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Khan, Lutul; Webb, David J.; Kalli, Kyriacos; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Stefani, Alessio; Bang, Ole

    2011-01-01

    We report the first experimental demonstration of a humidity insensitive polymer optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG), as well as the first FBG recorded in a TOPAS polymer optical fiber in the important low loss 850nm spectral region. For the demonstration we have fabricated FBGs with resonance wavelength around 850 nm and 1550 nm in single-mode microstructured polymer optical fibers made of TOPAS and the conventional poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Characterization of the FBGs shows that the...

  4. Radon measurements with charcoal canisters temperature and humidity considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović Miloš Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radon testing by using open-faced charcoal canisters is a cheap and fast screening method. Many laboratories perform the sampling and measurements according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency method - EPA 520. According to this method, no corrections for temperature are applied and corrections for humidity are based on canister mass gain. The EPA method is practiced in the Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences with recycled canisters. In the course of measurements, it was established that the mass gain of the recycled canisters differs from mass gain measured by Environmental Protection Agency in an active atmosphere. In order to quantify and correct these discrepancies, in the laboratory, canisters were exposed for periods of 3 and 4 days between February 2015 and December 2015. Temperature and humidity were monitored continuously and mass gain measured. No significant correlation between mass gain and temperature was found. Based on Environmental Protection Agency calibration data, functional dependence of mass gain on humidity was determined, yielding Environmental Protection Agency mass gain curves. The results of mass gain measurements of recycled canisters were plotted against these curves and a discrepancy confirmed. After correcting the independent variable in the curve equation and calculating the corrected mass gain for recycled canisters, the agreement between measured mass gain and Environmental Protection Agency mass gain curves was attained. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43009: New Technologies for Monitoring and Protection of Environment from Harmful Chemical Substances and Radiation Impact

  5. SAW Humidity Sensor Sensitivity Enhancement via Electrospraying of Silver Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar Irani, Farid; Tunaboylu, Bahadir

    2016-11-30

    In this research, we investigated the influence of the surface coatings of silver nanowires on the sensitivity of surface acoustic wave (SAW) humidity sensors. Silver nanowires, with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), which is a hydrophilic capping agent, were chemically synthesized, with an average length of 15 µm and an average diameter of 60 nm. Humidity sensors, with 433 MHz frequency dual-port resonator Rayleigh-SAW devices, were coated by silver nanowires (AgNWs) using the electrospray coating method. It was demonstrated that increasing thickness of coated AgNW on the surfaces of SAW devices results in increased sensitivity. The highest frequency shift (262 kHz) in these SAW devices was obtained with an injection of 0.5 mL of the AgNW solution with a concentration of 0.5 mg/mL at an injection rate of 1 mL/h. It also showed the highest humidity sensitivity among the other prepared SAW devices.

  6. Humidity Detection Using Metal Organic Framework Coated on QCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmoji Kosuru

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM coated with poly-4-vinylpyridine (PVP and metal organic framework HKUST-1 are investigated and compared for humidity sensing. Drop casting method is employed to coat the PVP and HKUST-1 solutions onto the surface of a quartz crystal microbalance. The resonance frequencies of these sensors with varying relative humidity (RH from 22% RH to 69% RH are measured using impedance analysis method. The sensitivity, humidity hysteresis, response, and recovery times of these sensors are studied. The sensitivities of uncoated, PVP, and HKUST-1 coated QCM sensors are 7 Hz, 48 Hz, and 720 Hz, respectively, in the range of 22% RH–69% RH. The extraction of desorption rate and adsorption energy associated with the adsorption and desorption of water molecules on these surfaces reveals that HKUST-1 has better sensing properties than PVP and uncoated QCM sensors. In this work, the HKUST-1 coated QCM is shown to be a promising material for moisture detection.

  7. Effects of Temperature and Humidity on Major League Baseballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstman, Victoria; Raue, Brian

    2003-11-01

    In a study inspired by the famous humidor of the Colorado Rockies of Major League Baseball, we have measured the effects of temperature and humidity on the elasticity of official Major League baseballs. The elasticity, e, also referred to as the coefficient of restitution (COR), of the baseballs was determined by dropping the balls from a fixed height onto a concrete floor and determining the speed of the ball after the initial impact. Corrections for air drag were made to the measured COR. Measurements were done for baseballs stored under a wide variety of conditions that included storage in the freezer compartment of a household refrigerator, storage in an 80^rcC oven with varying humidity conditions, and storage in a crude humidor. The balls were tested over a period of several hours after removal to nominal conditions. Our results show a linear increase of the COR with increasing temperature, as well as a nearly linear decrease in the COR as water mass is increased. Using the results of our measurements, we have determined the effects of temperature and humidity on batted-ball speeds and flight distances at the Rockies' home field.

  8. Application of Humidity Data for Predictions of Influenza Outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, J.; Thrastarson, H. T.; Yeo, E.

    2016-12-01

    Seasonal influenza outbreaks infect millions of people, cause hundreds of thousands of deaths worldwide, and leave an immense economic footprint. Potential forecasting of the timing and intensity of these outbreaks can help mitigation and response efforts (e.g., the management and organization of vaccines, drugs and other resources). Absolute (or specific) humidity has been identified as an important driver of the seasonal behavior of influenza outbreaks in temperate regions. Building upon this result, we incorporate humidity data from both NASA's AIRS (Atmospheric Infra-Red Sounder) instrument and ERA-Interim re-analysis into a SIRS (Susceptible-Infectious-Recovered-Susceptible) type numerical epidemiological model, comprising a prediction system for influenza outbreaks. Data for influenza activity is obtained from sources such as Google Flu Trends and the CDC (Center for Disease Control) and used for comparison and assimilation. The accuracy and limitations of the prediction system are tested with hindcasts of outbreaks in the United States for the years 2005-2015. Our results give support to the hypothesis that local weather conditions drive the seasonality of influenza in temperate regions. The implementation of influenza forecasts that make use of NCEP humidity forecasts is also discussed.

  9. The response of poly (vinyl alcohol) to humidity

    CERN Document Server

    Spindura, J

    2000-01-01

    material that swells, although it has been shown that not all the amorphous material swells to the same extent. The glass transition temperature (T sub g) could not be followed with DSC as the semicrystalline nature of the samples masked this transition and hence DMA was used to follow the changes in T sub g with both annealing and moisture content. A decrease in T sub g with increasing humidity was clearly observed. An interesting observation was the increase in T sub g for films exposed to humidity and then dried before analysis as XRD showed no corresponding increase in crystallinity. For fibre samples the crystallinity was found to be greatly increased by the orientation processes which gave rise to very large melting enthalpies in the DSC suggesting that there is more and/or stronger bonding opportunities within the fibre samples. This thesis aims to investigate the effects of heat treatments, humidity and hydrogen bonding on thin film and fibre samples of poly (vinyl alcohol). A number of different tech...

  10. Humidity Detection Using Metal Organic Framework Coated on QCM

    KAUST Repository

    Kosuru, Lakshmoji

    2016-06-28

    Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) coated with poly-4-vinylpyridine (PVP) and metal organic framework HKUST-1 are investigated and compared for humidity sensing. Drop casting method is employed to coat the PVP and HKUST-1 solutions onto the surface of a quartz crystal microbalance. The resonance frequencies of these sensors with varying relative humidity (RH) from 22% RH to 69% RH are measured using impedance analysis method. The sensitivity, humidity hysteresis, response, and recovery times of these sensors are studied. The sensitivities of uncoated, PVP, and HKUST-1 coated QCM sensors are 7 Hz, 48 Hz, and 720 Hz, respectively, in the range of 22% RH–69% RH. The extraction of desorption rate and adsorption energy associated with the adsorption and desorption of water molecules on these surfaces reveals that HKUST-1 has better sensing properties than PVP and uncoated QCM sensors. In this work, the HKUST-1 coated QCM is shown to be a promising material for moisture detection.

  11. Humidity : a review and primer on atmospheric moisture and human health.

    OpenAIRE

    David, R.E.; McGregor, G.R.; Enfield, K.B.

    2016-01-01

    Research examining associations between weather and human health frequently includes the effects of atmospheric humidity. A large number of humidity variables have been developed for numerous purposes, but little guidance is available to health researchers regarding appropriate variable selection. We examine a suite of commonly used humidity variables and summarize both the medical and biometeorological literature on associations between humidity and human health. As an example of the importa...

  12. Effect of relative humidity on foliar absorption of P and Rb by Chrysanthemum and Pilea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczepan Marczyński

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Air humidity differentially affected the foliar absorption of 33P and 86Rb by Chrysanthemum morifolium 'Giant # 4 Indianapolis White' and Pilea cardierei. As the relative humidity increased from 47 to 80% in most cases, there was in increase in uptake. Further raising of humidity to 92% increased uptake of Rb and P by Chrysanthemum leaves only when guttation did not occure . Air humidity influenced most strongly the uptake of calcium phosphate probably due to its low solubility.

  13. Temperature and relative humidity dependence of radiochromic film dosimeter response to gamma electron radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Puhl, J.M.; Miller, A.

    1995-01-01

    on some earlier studies, their response functions have been reported to be dependent on the temperature and relative humidity during irradiation. The present study investigates differences in response over practical ranges of temperature, relative humidity, dose, and for different recent batches of films...... humidity) and should be calibrated under environmental conditions (temperature) at which they will be used routinely....

  14. Density of loose-fill insulation material exposed to cyclic humidity conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    the granulated loose-fill material is exposed to a climate that is characterised as cyclic humidity conditions (a constant temperature and a relative humidity alternating between two predetermined constant relative humidity levels). A better understanding of the behaviour of granulated loose-fill material...

  15. Humidity Effects on Fragmentation in Plasma-Based Ambient Ionization Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, G Asher; Ackerman, Luke K; Johnson, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Post-plasma ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) sources are fundamentally dependent on surrounding water vapor to produce protonated analyte ions. There are two reports of humidity effects on ADI spectra. However, it is unclear whether humidity will affect all ADI sources and analytes, and by what mechanism humidity affects spectra. Flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization and direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectra of various surface-deposited and gas-phase analytes were acquired at ambient temperature and pressure across a range of observed humidity values. A controlled humidity enclosure around the ion source and mass spectrometer inlet was used to create programmed humidity and temperatures. The relative abundance and fragmentation of molecular adduct ions for several compounds consistently varied with changing ambient humidity and also were controlled with the humidity enclosure. For several compounds, increasing humidity decreased protonated molecule and other molecular adduct ion fragmentation in both FAPA and DART spectra. For others, humidity increased fragment ion ratios. The effects of humidity on molecular adduct ion fragmentation were caused by changes in the relative abundances of different reagent protonated water clusters and, thus, a change in the average difference in proton affinity between an analyte and the population of water clusters. Control of humidity in ambient post-plasma ion sources is needed to create spectral stability and reproducibility.

  16. Building America Case Study: Energy Efficient Management of Mechanical Ventilation and Relative Humidity in Hot-Humid Climates, Cocoa, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-01-01

    In hot and humid climates, it is challenging to energy-efficiently maintain indoor RH at acceptable levels while simultaneously providing required ventilation, particularly in high performance low cooling load homes. The fundamental problem with solely relying on fixed capacity central cooling systems to manage moisture during low sensible load periods is that they are oversized for cooler periods of the year despite being 'properly sized' for a very hot design cooling day. The primary goals of this project were to determine the impact of supplementing a central space conditioning system with 1) a supplemental dehumidifier and 2) a ductless mini-split on seasonal energy use and summer peak power use as well as the impact on thermal distribution and humidity control inside a completely furnished lab home that was continuously ventilated in accordance with ASHRAE 62.2-2013.

  17. Study of dew water collection in humid tropical islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clus, O.; Ortega, P.; Muselli, M.; Milimouk, I.; Beysens, D.

    2008-10-01

    SummaryAn assessment of the potential for dew water to serve as a potable water source during a rainless season in a humid tropical climate was carried out in the Pacific islands of French Polynesia. The climate of these islands, in terms of diurnal and seasonal variations, wind and energy balance, is representative of the climate of the tropical Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Measurements were obtained at two characteristic sites of this region; a mountainous island (Punaauia, Tahiti Island) and an atoll (Tikehau, Tuamotu Archipelago). Dew was measured daily on a 30° tilted, 1 m 2 plane collector equipped with a thermally insulated radiative foil. In addition, an electronic balance placed at 1 m above the ground with a horizontal 0.16 m 2 condensing plate made of PolyTetraFluoroEthylene (Teflon) was used in Tahiti. Dew volume data, taken during the dry season from 16/5/2005 to 14/10/2005, were correlated with air temperature and relative humidity, wind speed, cloud cover and visible plus infrared radiometer measurements. The data were also fitted to a model. Dew formation in such a tropical climate is characterized by high absolute humidity, weak nocturnal temperature drop and strong Trade winds. These winds prevent dew from forming unless protected e.g. by natural vegetal windbreaks. In protected areas, dew can then form with winds as large as 7 m/s. Such strong winds also hamper at night the formation near the ground of a calm and cold air layer with high relative humidity. As the cooling power is lower than in the Mediterranean islands because of the high absolute humidity of the atmosphere, both effects combine to generate modest dew yields. However, dew events are frequent and provide accumulated amounts of water attractive for dew water harvesting. Slight modifications of existing rain collection devices on roofs can enhance dew formation and collection. Dew harvesting thus appears as an attractive possibility to provide the local population with a

  18. The ASSET intercomparison of stratosphere and lower mesosphere humidity analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Thornton

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from the first detailed intercomparison of stratosphere-lower mesosphere water vapour analyses; it builds on earlier results from the EU funded framework V "Assimilation of ENVISAT Data" (ASSET project. Stratospheric water vapour plays an important role in many key atmospheric processes and therefore an improved understanding of its daily variability is desirable. With the availability of high resolution, good quality Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS water vapour profiles, the ability of four different atmospheric models to assimilate these data is tested. MIPAS data have been assimilated over September 2003 into the models of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF, the Belgian Institute for Space and Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB, the French Service d'Aéronomie (SA-IPSL and the UK Met Office. The resultant middle atmosphere humidity analyses are compared against independent satellite data from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE, the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM III and the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II. The MIPAS water vapour profiles are generally well assimilated in the ECMWF, BIRA-IASB and SA systems, producing stratosphere-mesosphere water vapour fields where the main features compare favourably with the independent observations. However, the models are less capable of assimilating the MIPAS data where water vapour values are locally extreme or in regions of strong humidity gradients, such as the southern hemisphere lower stratosphere polar vortex. Differences in the analyses can be attributed to the choice of humidity control variable, how the background error covariance matrix is generated, the model resolution and its complexity, the degree of quality control of the observations and the use of observations near the model boundaries. Due to the poor performance of the Met Office analyses the results are not included in

  19. Influence of temperature and humidity manipulation on chicken embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noiva, Rute M; Menezes, António C; Peleteiro, Maria C

    2014-10-01

    Temperature and relative humidity (RH) are very important factors affecting embryo development, hatchability, and posthatch performance. This study aimed at characterizing embryonic metabolic and behavioural response to a harsh incubation environment generated by manipulations (elevations and drops) in these two key factors. This study was aimed at establishing patterns of metabolic and behavioural response, as well as mortality and the development of malformations, all of which can potentially be used in monitoring incubating operations and diagnosing problems with faulty equipment. Of all the parameters monitored throughout embryonic development the ones shown to be most affected were: albumen-weight to egg-weight ratio (AR); yolk-weight to egg-weight ratio (YR); embryo-weight to egg-weight ratio (ER); heart rate (HR); voluntary movements per minute (VMM); mortality rates; malformation prevalence and type. The most significant changes in the evolution of AR and YR throughout incubation involved delay and reduction in the amplitude of the expected drop in albumen and yolk levels, reflecting lower nutrient consumption by the embryo. ER tended to grow more slowly and remain lower than the established normal, especially in embryos challenged with temperature treatments. HR and VMM were considered to be strong indicators of embryonic stress, as all treatments applied resulted in elevated heart rate and decreased embryo movement. Mortality rates for both temperature-related treatments were higher during the first four days of incubation. Changes in relative humidity have produced less radical effects on mortality. Malformation rates were higher for embryos subjected to high incubation temperatures and were most prominently related to the abdominal wall, head, skull and limbs. Overall, manipulations in environmental (incubator) temperature during incubation produced more drastic changes in embryo development than humidity-related manipulations, especially where

  20. Roller compaction: Effect of relative humidity of lactose powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Chalak S; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Palzer, Stefan; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2016-09-01

    The effect of storage at different relative humidity conditions, for various types of lactose, on roller compaction behaviour was investigated. Three types of lactose were used in this study: anhydrous lactose (SuperTab21AN), spray dried lactose (SuperTab11SD) and α-lactose monohydrate 200M. These powders differ in their amorphous contents, due to different manufacturing processes. The powders were stored in a climatic chamber at different relative humidity values ranging from 10% to 80% RH. It was found that the roller compaction behaviour and ribbon properties were different for powders conditioned to different relative humidities. The amount of fines produced, which is undesirable in roller compaction, was found to be different at different relative humidity. The minimum amount of fines produced was found to be for powders conditioned at 20-40% RH. The maximum amount of fines was produced for powders conditioned at 80% RH. This was attributed to the decrease in powder flowability, as indicated by the flow function coefficient ffc and the angle of repose. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was also applied to determine the velocity of primary particles during ribbon production, and it was found that the velocity of the powder during the roller compaction decreased with powders stored at high RH. This resulted in less powder being present in the compaction zone at the edges of the rollers, which resulted in ribbons with a smaller overall width. The relative humidity for the storage of powders has shown to have minimal effect on the ribbon tensile strength at low RH conditions (10-20%). The lowest tensile strength of ribbons produced from lactose 200M and SD was for powders conditioned at 80% RH, whereas, ribbons produced from lactose 21AN at the same condition of 80% RH showed the highest tensile strength. The storage RH range 20-40% was found to be an optimum condition for roll compacting three lactose powders, as it resulted in a minimum amount of fines in the

  1. Humidity sensation requires both mechanosensory and thermosensory pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Joshua; Vidal-Gadea, Andrés G; Makay, Alex; Lanam, Carolyn; Pierce-Shimomura, Jonathan T

    2014-06-03

    All terrestrial animals must find a proper level of moisture to ensure their health and survival. The cellular-molecular basis for sensing humidity is unknown in most animals, however. We used the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to uncover a mechanism for sensing humidity. We found that whereas C. elegans showed no obvious preference for humidity levels under standard culture conditions, worms displayed a strong preference after pairing starvation with different humidity levels, orienting to gradients as shallow as 0.03% relative humidity per millimeter. Cell-specific ablation and rescue experiments demonstrate that orientation to humidity in C. elegans requires the obligatory combination of distinct mechanosensitive and thermosensitive pathways. The mechanosensitive pathway requires a conserved DEG/ENaC/ASIC mechanoreceptor complex in the FLP neuron pair. Because humidity levels influence the hydration of the worm's cuticle, our results suggest that FLP may convey humidity information by reporting the degree that subcuticular dendritic sensory branches of FLP neurons are stretched by hydration. The thermosensitive pathway requires cGMP-gated channels in the AFD neuron pair. Because humidity levels affect evaporative cooling, AFD may convey humidity information by reporting thermal flux. Thus, humidity sensation arises as a metamodality in C. elegans that requires the integration of parallel mechanosensory and thermosensory pathways. This hygrosensation strategy, first proposed by Thunberg more than 100 y ago, may be conserved because the underlying pathways have cellular and molecular equivalents across a wide range of species, including insects and humans.

  2. [Research on optical fiber SPR humidity sensor and resonance spectrum characteristic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-hua; Zeng, Jie; Sun, Xiao-ming; Mu, Hao; Liang, Da-kai

    2012-02-01

    A new type of humidity sensor based on optical fiber SPR sensor probe was introduced and manufactured. Firstly the sensitivity of optical fiber SPR sensor probe to environment humidity was studied. On this basis, coating with thin PVA film of different thickness and with capacity of adsorbing water molecule on the surface of optical fiber SPR sensor probe, for the purpose of monitoring relative humidity was proposed. The research shows that the SPR sensor probe coated with double layers of thin PVA film gets better detection result, and humidity measurement sensitivity is 1.59%/%RH, being improved notably compared with SPR optical fiber probe. The SPR sensor coated with single layer of thin PVA film has relative humidity measuring sensitivity of 2.411 nm/%RH related to resonance wavelength in high humidity area. In addition, the new type of optical fiber humidity-sensitive probe with PVA film losing efficiency can be reusable after special treatment.

  3. Gelatin as a new humidity sensing material: Characterization and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Shapardanis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work is to assert the utility of collagen and its denatured counterpart gelatin as cost-effective alternatives to existing sensing layers comprised of polymers. Rather than producing a material that will need to be discarded or recycled, collagen, as a by-product of the meat and leather industry, could be repurposed. This work examines the feasibility of using collagen as a sensing layer. Planar electrodes were patterned with lift-off process to work with the natural characteristics of gelatin by utilizing metal vapor deposition, spin coating, and photolithography. Characterization methods have also been optimized through the creation of specialized humidity chambers that isolate specific characteristics such as response time, accuracy, and hysteresis. Collagen-based sensors are found to have a sensitivity to moisture in the range of 0.065 pF/%RH. Diffusion characteristics were also analyzed with the diffusion coefficient found to be 2.5 × 10−5 cm2/s. Absorption and desorption times were found to be 20 seconds and 8 seconds, respectively. Hysteresis present in the data is attributed to temperature cross-sensitivity. Ultimately, the utility of collagen as a dielectric sensing material is, in part, due to its fibrous macrostructures as well its hydrophilic sites along the peptide chains. Gelatin was patterned between and below interdigitated copper electrodes and tested as a relative humidity sensor. This work shows that gelatin, which is inexpensive, widely available, and easy to process, can be an effective dielectric sensing polymer for capacitive-type relative humidity sensors.

  4. Ionic composition of a humid air plasma under ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, A. V.; Derbenev, I. N.; Dyatko, N. A.; Kurkin, S. A.; Lopantseva, G. B.; Pal', A. F.; Starostin, A. N.

    2017-08-01

    A kinetic model is proposed for ion-molecular processes involving charged particles of a humid air plasma produced by a fast electron beam. The model includes more than 600 processes involving electrons and 41 positive and 14 negative ions, including hydrated ions H3O+ (H2O) n and O 2 - (H2O) n with n = 1, 2, …, 12. The energy costs of production of electron-ion pairs and electronic and vibrational (for water molecules, also rotational) excitation of molecules are calculated in nitrogen, oxygen, water vapor, air, and humid air. A method is proposed for calculating the energy costs in mixtures by the calculation data in pure gases. The evolution of the plasma composition is studied by the numerical solution of a system of 56 time-dependent balance equations for the number of charged particles of plasma by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The steady-state composition of plasma is determined by solving nonlinear steady-state balance equations for the ionization rates of humid air from 10 to 1016 cm-3/s and the fraction of water molecules from 10-3% to 1.5%. It is established that, for water vapor content (the ratio of the number density of water molecules to the total number density of air molecules) of 0.015-1.5% in air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, the main ion species are two types of positive ions H3O+ (H2O) n with the number of water molecules n = 5, 6 and three species of negative ions O 2 - (H2O) n with n = 5, 8, 9.

  5. Gelatin as a new humidity sensing material: Characterization and limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapardanis, Steven [School of Engineering and Technology, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, 48859 (United States); Hudpeth, Mathew [Department of Physics, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, 48859 (United States); Kaya, Tolga, E-mail: kaya2t@cmich.edu [School of Engineering and Technology, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, 48859 (United States); Science of Advanced Materials Program, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, 48859 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The goal of this work is to assert the utility of collagen and its denatured counterpart gelatin as cost-effective alternatives to existing sensing layers comprised of polymers. Rather than producing a material that will need to be discarded or recycled, collagen, as a by-product of the meat and leather industry, could be repurposed. This work examines the feasibility of using collagen as a sensing layer. Planar electrodes were patterned with lift-off process to work with the natural characteristics of gelatin by utilizing metal vapor deposition, spin coating, and photolithography. Characterization methods have also been optimized through the creation of specialized humidity chambers that isolate specific characteristics such as response time, accuracy, and hysteresis. Collagen-based sensors are found to have a sensitivity to moisture in the range of 0.065 pF/%RH. Diffusion characteristics were also analyzed with the diffusion coefficient found to be 2.5 × 10{sup −5} cm{sup 2}/s. Absorption and desorption times were found to be 20 seconds and 8 seconds, respectively. Hysteresis present in the data is attributed to temperature cross-sensitivity. Ultimately, the utility of collagen as a dielectric sensing material is, in part, due to its fibrous macrostructures as well its hydrophilic sites along the peptide chains. Gelatin was patterned between and below interdigitated copper electrodes and tested as a relative humidity sensor. This work shows that gelatin, which is inexpensive, widely available, and easy to process, can be an effective dielectric sensing polymer for capacitive-type relative humidity sensors.

  6. Ordination et classificcation de la vegetation des zones humides du ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    des communautés végétales des zones humides. Le type de végétation dominante (herbacée ou boisée), l'hydromorphie, la salinité et le type de sol ont été les gradients environnementaux ayant permis de discriminer les communautés végétales étudiées. Ainsi, 22 communautés végétales ont été discriminées.

  7. Hygromechanical behaviour of CFRP under cyclic humidity loadings

    CERN Document Server

    Hauviller, Claude

    2001-01-01

    Stable lightweight structures are key issues in the design and construction of the LHC high precision particle detectors. This paper presents the results of long term measurements performed on plates manufactured in Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastics (CFRP), material selected for these structures, subjected to cyclic humidity loadings. Test procedures are detailed; results on moisture absorption are described together with the related displacement measurements. These results indicate that cycling composites in the operating conditions of the LHC trackers does not provoke any major internal damage.

  8. HUMIDITY AND VENTILATION OF AN UNDERGRAUND EXPLOSIVE MATERIALS STOREHOUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Rendulić

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Underground storehouse for explosives situated in the adit of an abandoned bench of quarry has to have a secure artificial air flow in accordance with appropriate humidity of the outside air. Besides the corresponding protective measures which have to be taken during the manipulation in future storehouse, it is important to consider the evaporation from wet materials and that is possible only when air is not saturated with moisture. Ventilation system should be operated from outside the storehouse (the paper is published in Croatian.

  9. CONSIDERATIONS ON ELECTROMAGNETIC HUMIDITY MEASUREMENT IN SIMPLE MASONRY WALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor BURLAN-ROTAR

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Humidity measurement in thick walls indicate under what conditions is exploited a building. Any type of moisture walls, superficial or deep, give information about possible cracks or infiltration of water. The electromagnetic techniques for measuring soil humidity (by resistivity has been known for a long time. It can be used to measure walls moisture. Conductivity is preferable in inductive techniques, as instrumentation readings are generally directly proportional to conductivity and inversely proportional to resistivity. The operating principle of this method is: a Tx coil transmitter, supplied with alternatingcurrent at an audio frequency, is placed on the wall. An Rx coil receiver is located at a short distance, s, (on the wall away from the Tx coil. The magnetic field varies in time and the Tx coil induces very small currents in the wall. These currents generate a secondary magnetic field, Hs, which is sensed by the Rx receiver coil, together, with primary magnetic field Hp. The ratio of the secondary field, Hs, to the primary magnetic field, Hp, (Hs/Hp is directly proportional to wall conductivity. Measuring this ratio, it is possible to construct a device which measures the wall conductivity by contactless, direct-reading electromagnetic technique (linear meter. This technique for measuring conductivity by electromagnetic induction, using Very Low Frequency (VLF, is a non-intrusive, non-destructive sampling method. The measurements can be done quickly and are not expensive.

  10. Decrease of Building’s Humidity with Epiphyte and Xerophyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlina Laksmiani Wahjutami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is part of the research phase in Environmental Sciences Doctoral study program that is interdisciplinary research, ongoing. Architecture disciplines collaborate with the disciplines of biology to solve the problem of the microclimate in the built. Paradigm used as benchmarks is bioclimatic architecture in which there is a relationship between elements of the building, climate, and living organisms. Living organisms - in this case the plant - used as a tool to solve the problem of the microclimate in buildings. Plant is one of the living organisms that grow and thrive in their respective habitats and the climate of each character. Several studies have shown that plants are able to lower both ambient temperature and the temperature inside the building. In this study, the problem is the existence of a higher humidity levels in small type of dwelling (STD that has been totally renovated. Meanwhile Epiphytic and Xerophyte are plants that live by absorbing surrounding moisture. In the next stage of research, it is expected that the capability of Epiphyte and Xerophyte’s plants to reduce the building’s humidity proven. From the interpretation Q.S. 23: 17, implied that: Allah has bring down the water to the earth to grow a variety of plants [1]. The diversity of these plants would be useful for people who have sense. Building as the built environment will become sustainable environment when the human capable of utilizing plants as part of it.

  11. Use of self-rescuers in hot and humid mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, B.; Brenkley, D.; Jozefowicz, R.R.; Whitaker, D.; Shotton, J.; Booth, A.P. [Mine Rescue Service Ltd. (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    The concept of self-rescue is premised on the assumption that underground mineworkers have the physical and mental capacities required for self-rescue and in-seam rescue. There is a recognised research 'gap' concerning the practical limitations, and ultimately personal endurance limits, associated with the extended wearing of mining industry respiratory protective devices particularly under high physiological stress conditions. This has important implications for emergency response strategies predicated on seeking to evacuate hot and humid mines. In response to these issues, a programme of research was defined, consisting of: a literature review; an audit of climatic conditions; laboratory investigations; and a programme of climatic chamber wearing trials. The wearing trial component of the programme, which involved volunteers being subject to controlled heat stress, was reviewed by and received the approval of HSE's Research Ethics Committee. This work has provided a wider base of fundamental knowledge on physiological response to the wearing of escape respiratory protective devices under hot and humid conditions, and contributes to available guidance on the selection and use of self-rescuers appropriate to prevailing deep mine environments in the UK.

  12. Significant accumulation of nitrate in Chinese semi-humid croplands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junyu; Gu, Baojing; Schlesinger, William H.; Ju, Xiaotang

    2016-04-01

    Soil nitrate is important for crop growth, but it can also leach to groundwater causing nitrate contamination, a threat to human health. Here, we report a significant accumulation of soil nitrate in Chinese semi-humid croplands based upon more than 7000 samples from 141 sites collected from 1994 to 2015. In the 0-4 meters depth of soil, total nitrate accumulation reaches 453 ± 39, 749 ± 75, 1191 ± 89, 1269 ± 114, 2155 ± 330 kg N ha-1 on average in wheat, maize, open-field vegetables (OFV), solar plastic-roofed greenhouse vegetables (GHV) and orchard fields, respectively. Surprisingly, there is also a comparable amount of nitrate accumulated in the vadose-zone deeper than 4 meters. Over-use of N fertilizer (and/or manure) and a declining groundwater table are the major causes for this huge nitrate reservoir in the vadose-zone of semi-humid croplands, where the nitrate cannot be denitrified due to the presence of oxygen and lack of carbon sources. Future climatic change with more extreme rainfall events would increase the risk of accumulated nitrate moving downwards and threatening groundwater nitrate contamination.

  13. An optical humidity sensor based on Ag nanodendrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Juncui, E-mail: xxjjcz20000214@yahoo.cn [School of Chemical Engineering, Hefei University of Technology and Anhui Key Laboratory of Controllable Chemical Reaction and Material Chemical Engineering, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hefei Normal University, Hefei, Anhui 230601 (China); Zhang, Weixin, E-mail: wxzhang@hfut.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering, Hefei University of Technology and Anhui Key Laboratory of Controllable Chemical Reaction and Material Chemical Engineering, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China); Yang, Zeheng [School of Chemical Engineering, Hefei University of Technology and Anhui Key Laboratory of Controllable Chemical Reaction and Material Chemical Engineering, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China)

    2013-09-01

    Cubic Ag dendritic nanostructure with ordered branches and Ag particles have been successfully prepared by soaking pretreated Zn plate into silver ammonia ion solution at 80 °C and reducing the silver ammonia ion solution with ascorbic acid in the presence of PVP, respectively. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images show that the overall length of the Ag nanodendrites is 3–10 μm, and the average diameter of the stems and branches are 100 nm and 50 nm, severally. The size of the Ag particles is in the range of 100–500 nm. The photoluminescence (PL) property of the samples reveals that the Ag dendritic nanostructures show stronger PL intensity than the Ag particles. A room temperature photoluminescence-type gas sensing device based on the pure Ag nanodendrites has been established to investigate their humidity sensing properties. For comparison, pure Ag particles-based sensors were also fabricated in the same condition. Compared with their counterparts, possibly due to its large surface area, Ag nanodendrites present better sensitivity, more excellent linearity and quicker recovery in a very wide humidity range at room temperature.

  14. Effects of humidity on the mechanical properties of gecko setae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prowse, Michael S; Wilkinson, Matt; Puthoff, Jonathan B; Mayer, George; Autumn, Kellar

    2011-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that an increase in relative humidity (RH) causes changes in the mechanical properties of the keratin of adhesive gecko foot hairs (setae). We measured the effect of RH on the tensile deformation properties, fracture, and dynamic mechanical response of single isolated tokay gecko setae and strips of the smooth lamellar epidermal layer. The mechanical properties of gecko setae were strongly affected by RH. The complex elastic modulus (measured at 5 Hz) of a single seta at 80% RH was 1.2 GPa, only 39% of the value when dry. An increase in RH reduced the stiffness and increased the strain to failure. The loss tangent increased significantly with humidity, suggesting that water absorption produces a transition to a more viscous type of deformation. The influence of RH on the properties of the smooth epidermal layer was comparable with that of isolated seta, with the exception of stress at rupture. These values were two to four times greater for the setae than for the smooth layer. The changes in mechanical properties of setal keratin were consistent with previously reported increases in contact forces, supporting the hypothesis that an increase in RH softens setal keratin, which increases adhesion and friction. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sticky gecko feet: the role of temperature and humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiarowski, Peter H; Lopez, Stephanie; Ge, Liehui; Hagan, Emily; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-05-14

    Gecko adhesion is expected to be temperature insensitive over the range of temperatures typically experienced by geckos. Previous work is limited and equivocal on whether this expectation holds. We tested the temperature dependence of adhesion in Tokay and Day geckos and found that clinging ability at 12 degrees C was nearly double the clinging ability at 32 degrees C. However, rather than confirming a simple temperature effect, our data reveal a complex interaction between temperature and humidity that can drive differences in adhesion by as much as two-fold. Our findings have important implications for inferences about the mechanisms underlying the exceptional clinging capabilities of geckos, including whether performance of free-ranging animals is based solely on a dry adhesive model. An understanding of the relative contributions of van der Waals interactions and how humidity and temperature variation affects clinging capacities will be required to test hypotheses about the evolution of gecko toepads and is relevant to the design and manufacture of synthetic mimics.

  16. Sticky gecko feet: the role of temperature and humidity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H Niewiarowski

    Full Text Available Gecko adhesion is expected to be temperature insensitive over the range of temperatures typically experienced by geckos. Previous work is limited and equivocal on whether this expectation holds. We tested the temperature dependence of adhesion in Tokay and Day geckos and found that clinging ability at 12 degrees C was nearly double the clinging ability at 32 degrees C. However, rather than confirming a simple temperature effect, our data reveal a complex interaction between temperature and humidity that can drive differences in adhesion by as much as two-fold. Our findings have important implications for inferences about the mechanisms underlying the exceptional clinging capabilities of geckos, including whether performance of free-ranging animals is based solely on a dry adhesive model. An understanding of the relative contributions of van der Waals interactions and how humidity and temperature variation affects clinging capacities will be required to test hypotheses about the evolution of gecko toepads and is relevant to the design and manufacture of synthetic mimics.

  17. Sticky Gecko Feet: The Role of Temperature and Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Lopez, Stephanie; Ge, Liehui; Hagan, Emily; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-01-01

    Gecko adhesion is expected to be temperature insensitive over the range of temperatures typically experienced by geckos. Previous work is limited and equivocal on whether this expectation holds. We tested the temperature dependence of adhesion in Tokay and Day geckos and found that clinging ability at 12°C was nearly double the clinging ability at 32°C. However, rather than confirming a simple temperature effect, our data reveal a complex interaction between temperature and humidity that can drive differences in adhesion by as much as two-fold. Our findings have important implications for inferences about the mechanisms underlying the exceptional clinging capabilities of geckos, including whether performance of free-ranging animals is based solely on a dry adhesive model. An understanding of the relative contributions of van der Waals interactions and how humidity and temperature variation affects clinging capacities will be required to test hypotheses about the evolution of gecko toepads and is relevant to the design and manufacture of synthetic mimics. PMID:18478106

  18. Using Relative Humidity Forecasts to Manage Meningitis in the Sahel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, R. E.; Adams-Forgor, A.; Akweogno, P.; Awine, T.; Dalaba, M.; Dukic, V.; Dumont, A.; Hayden, M.; Hodgson, A.; Hopson, T. M.; Hugonnet, S.; Yoksas, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    Meningitis epidemics in the Sahel occur quasi-regularly and with devastating impact. In 2008, for example, eighty-eight thousand people contracted meningitis and over five thousand died. Until very recently, the protection provided by the only available vaccine was so limited and short-lived that the only practical strategy for vaccination was reactive: waiting until an epidemic occurred in the region and then vaccinating in that region to prevent the epidemic's further growth. Even with that strategy, there were still times when demand outpaced available vaccine. While a new vaccine has recently been developed that is effective and inexpensive enough to be used more broadly and proactively, it is only effective against the strain of bacteria that causes the most common kind of bacterial meningitis. As a result, there will likely be continued need for reactive vaccination strategies. It is widely known that meningitis epidemics in the Sahel occur only in the dry season. Our project investigated this relationship, and several independent lines of evidence demonstrate a robust relationship between the onset of the rainy season, as marked by weekly average relative humidity above 40%, and the end of meningitis epidemics. These lines of evidence include statistical analysis of two years of weekly meningitis and weather data across the Sahel, cross-correlation of ten years of meningitis and weather data in the Upper East region of northern Ghana, and high-resolution weather simulations of past meningitis seasons to interpolate available weather data. We also adapted two techniques that have been successfully used in public health studies: generalized additive models, which have been used to relate air quality and health, and a linearized version of the compartmental epidemics model that has been used to understand MRSA. Based on these multiple lines of evidence, average weekly relative humidity forecast two weeks in advance appears consistently and strongly related to

  19. Colorimetric humidity sensor based on liquid composite materials for the monitoring of food and pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgeman, Devon; Corral, Javier; Quach, Ashley; Xian, Xiaojun; Forzani, Erica

    2014-09-09

    Using supported ionic-liquid membrane (SILM)-inspired methodologies, we have synthesized, characterized, and developed a humidity sensor by coating a liquid composite material onto a hygroscopic, porous substrate. Similar to pH paper, the sensor responds to the environment's relative humidity and changes color accordingly. The humidity indicator is prepared by casting a few microliters of low-toxicity reagents on a nontoxic substrate. The sensing material is a newly synthesized liquid composite that comprises a hygroscopic medium for environmental humidity capture and a color indicator that translates the humidity level into a distinct color change. Sodium borohydride was used to form a liquid composite medium, and DenimBlu30 dye was used as a redox indicator. The liquid composite medium provides a hygroscopic response to the relative humidity, and DenimBlu30 translates the chemical changes into a visual change from yellow to blue. The borate-redox dye-based humidity sensor was prepared, and then Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and image analysis methods were used to characterize the chemical composition, optimize synthesis, and gain insight into the sensor reactivity. Test results indicated that this new sensing material can detect relative humidity in the range of 5-100% in an irreversible manner with good reproducibility and high accuracy. The sensor is a low-cost, highly sensitive, easy-to-use humidity indicator. More importantly, it can be easily packaged with products to monitor humidity levels in pharmaceutical and food packaging.

  20. Tack Measurements of Prepreg Tape at Variable Temperature and Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Christopher; Palmieri, Frank L.; Forghani, Alireza; Hickmott, Curtis; Bedayat, Houman; Coxon, Brian; Poursartip, Anoush; Grimsley, Brian

    2017-01-01

    NASA’s Advanced Composites Project has established the goal of achieving a 30 percent reduction in the timeline for certification of primary composite structures for application on commercial aircraft. Prepreg tack is one of several critical parameters affecting composite manufacturing by automated fiber placement (AFP). Tack plays a central role in the prevention of wrinkles and puckers that can occur during AFP, thus knowledge of tack variation arising from a myriad of manufacturing and environmental conditions is imperative for the prediction of defects during AFP. A full design of experiments was performed to experimentally characterize tack on 0.25-inch slit-tape tow IM7/8552-1 prepreg using probe tack testing. Several process parameters (contact force, contact time, retraction speed, and probe diameter) as well as environmental parameters (temperature and humidity) were varied such that the entire parameter space could be efficiently evaluated. Mid-point experimental conditions (i.e., parameters not at either extrema) were included to enable prediction of curvature in relationships and repeat measurements were performed to characterize experimental error. Collectively, these experiments enable determination of primary dependencies as well as multi-parameter relationships. Slit-tape tow samples were mounted to the bottom plate of a rheometer parallel plate fixture using a jig to prevent modification of the active area to be interrogated with the top plate, a polished stainless steel probe, during tack testing. The probe surface was slowly brought into contact with the pre-preg surface until a pre-determined normal force was achieved (2-30 newtons). After a specified dwell time (0.02-10 seconds), during which the probe substrate interaction was maintained under displacement control, the probe was retracted from the surface (0.1-50 millimeters per second). Initial results indicated a clear dependence of tack strength on several parameters, with a particularly

  1. Badlands in humid regions - redbed desertification in Nanxiong Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Luobin; Hua, Peng; Simonson, Scott

    2016-04-01

    The redbed badlands in Nanxiong City, China, well represent badlands in humid regions. The erosion rate in humid regions is much higher than that in arid regions and can reach 1 cm per month during the summer. The purpose of this study is to introduce the research of badlands in China, which have not been extensively studied so far, and to compare the badlands between arid and humid regions. Furthermore, the aim is to study the impact of mineralogical and chemical composition on the disintegration of soft rock in Nanxiong Basin badlands. For the purpose of this study field observations, sampling, and digging profiles were done. The mineralogical and chemical compositions of the Nanxiong Basin badland lithologies were determined by XRD, XRF and thin sections. Weathering resistance, process of weathering, and disintegration features were studied by weathering experiments under natural conditions. Weathering profiles can be easily divided into four layers: regolith, a strongly weathered layer, a poorly weathered layer, and an unweathered sediment. The depth of the weathering profile is influenced by the weathering resistance of the soft rock. Weathering resistance affects the erosion rate and evolution of landforms in badlands by influencing the rate from unweathered rock to regolith. Analyzed sediments have high content of illite and illite-smectite interstratifications. This composition of clay minerals together with poor sediment consolidation jointly leads to weathering prone sediment. The weathering and disintegration of soft rock in Nanxiong Basin badlands has a close relationship with rainfall. Sheet erosion, a kind of solid-liquid phase flow, formed in the regolith of the badland during rainfall events and can be the most instrumental to erosion. The mineral composition and liquidity plasticity index were also analyzed, and the results show that the regolith are low liquid limit silts with liquid limit of 21%-25%, plastic limit of 13%-18% and plasticity index

  2. Clouds and relative humidity in climate models; or what really regulates cloud cover?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walcek, C. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The response and impact of clouds remains one of the largest outstanding questions in GCMs. Clouds are not homogeneous, though they are treated as such in the models. When averaged over areas typically used as numerical grid elements by GCMs, observations suggest that there are some clouds at all relative humidities. Fractional cloud cover at 100% relative humidity is rarely 100%, and totally clear skies rarely occur, even for low relative humidities. Relative humidity is the best single indicator of cloud coverage. However, if there is a relationship between cloud coverage and relative humidity, our current models and observations are inadequate to reveal exactly what that relationship is. It does appear that cloud coverage decreases exponentially as humidity falls below 100%. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Effect of Humidity in Air on Performance and Long-Term Durability of SOFCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Anke; Chen, Ming; Neufeld, Kai

    2009-01-01

    Anode supported SOFCs based on Ni-YSZ anodes, YSZ electrolytes, and LSM-YSZ cathodes were studied with respect to durability in humid air (~4%) over typically 1500 hours. Operating temperature and current density were varied between 750 and 850 oC and 0.25-0.75 A/cm2, respectively. It was found...... that the introduction of humidity affected the cell voltage under polarization of the cell and that this effect was (at least partly) reversible upon switching off the humidity, probably related to a segregation of impurities towards the three phase boundary in the presence of humidity. Generally, the studied cells...... were successfully operated in humid air under technologically relevant conditions. Improvements at the cathode/electrolyte interface made it possible to obtain highly stable cells, which can be operated under high current density and at 750 oC in humid air - conditions that are known to cause...

  4. Development of La3+ Doped CeO2 Thick Film Humidity Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjie Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The humidity sensitive characteristics of the sensor fabricated from 10 mol% La2O3 doped CeO2 nanopowders with particle size 17.26 nm synthesized via hydrothermal method were investigated at different frequencies. It was found that the sensor shows high humidity sensitivity, rapid response-recovery characteristics, and narrow hysteresis loop at 100 Hz in the relative humidity range from 11% to 95%. The impedance of the sensor decreases by about five orders of magnitude as relative humidity increases. The maximum humidity hysteresis is about 6% RH, and the response and recovery time is 12 and 13 s, respectively. These results indicate that the nanosized La2O3 doped CeO2 powder has potential application as high-performance humidity sensor.

  5. Understanding decreases in land relative humidity with global warming: conceptual model and GCM simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Byrne, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Climate models simulate a strong land-ocean contrast in the response of near-surface relative humidity to global warming: relative humidity tends to increase slightly over oceans but decrease substantially over land. Surface energy balance arguments have been used to understand the response over ocean but are difficult to apply over more complex land surfaces. Here, a conceptual box model is introduced, involving moisture transport between the land and ocean boundary layers and evapotranspiration, to investigate the decreases in land relative humidity as the climate warms. The box model is applied to idealized and full-complexity (CMIP5) general circulation model simulations, and it is found to capture many of the features of the simulated changes in land relative humidity. The box model suggests there is a strong link between fractional changes in specific humidity over land and ocean, and the greater warming over land than ocean then implies a decrease in land relative humidity. Evapotranspiration is of sec...

  6. Online Soft Sensor of Humidity in PEM Fuel Cell Based on Dynamic Partial Least Squares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Long

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Online monitoring humidity in the proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell is an important issue in maintaining proper membrane humidity. The cost and size of existing sensors for monitoring humidity are prohibitive for online measurements. Online prediction of humidity using readily available measured data would be beneficial to water management. In this paper, a novel soft sensor method based on dynamic partial least squares (DPLS regression is proposed and applied to humidity prediction in PEM fuel cell. In order to obtain data of humidity and test the feasibility of the proposed DPLS-based soft sensor a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL test system is constructed. The time lag of the DPLS-based soft sensor is selected as 30 by comparing the root-mean-square error in different time lag. The performance of the proposed DPLS-based soft sensor is demonstrated by experimental results.

  7. Online soft sensor of humidity in PEM fuel cell based on dynamic partial least squares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Rong; Chen, Qihong; Zhang, Liyan; Ma, Longhua; Quan, Shuhai

    2013-01-01

    Online monitoring humidity in the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is an important issue in maintaining proper membrane humidity. The cost and size of existing sensors for monitoring humidity are prohibitive for online measurements. Online prediction of humidity using readily available measured data would be beneficial to water management. In this paper, a novel soft sensor method based on dynamic partial least squares (DPLS) regression is proposed and applied to humidity prediction in PEM fuel cell. In order to obtain data of humidity and test the feasibility of the proposed DPLS-based soft sensor a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) test system is constructed. The time lag of the DPLS-based soft sensor is selected as 30 by comparing the root-mean-square error in different time lag. The performance of the proposed DPLS-based soft sensor is demonstrated by experimental results.

  8. Tungsten disulfide (WS2) based all-fiber-optic humidity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yunhan; Chen, Chaoying; Xia, Kai; Peng, Shuihua; Guan, Heyuan; Tang, Jieyuan; Lu, Huiui; Yu, Jianhui; Zhang, Jun; Xiao, Yi; Chen, Zhe

    2016-04-18

    We demonstrate a novel all-fiber-optic humidity sensor comprised of a WS2 film overlay on a side polished fiber (SPF). This sensor can achieve optical power variation of up to 6 dB in a relative humidity (RH) range of 35%-85%. In particular, this novel humidity fiber sensor has a linear correlation coefficient of 99.39%, sensitivity of 0.1213 dB/%RH, and a humidity resolution of 0.475%RH. Furthermore, this sensor shows good repeatability and reversibility, and fast response to breath stimulus. This WS2 based all-fiber optic humidity sensor is easy to fabricate, is compatible with pre-established fiber optic systems, and holds great potential in photonics applications such as in all-fiber optic humidity sensing networks.

  9. Distributed Humidity Sensing in PMMA Optical Fibers at 500 nm and 650 nm Wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liehr, Sascha; Breithaupt, Mathias; Krebber, Katerina

    2017-03-31

    Distributed measurement of humidity is a sought-after capability for various fields of application, especially in the civil engineering and structural health monitoring sectors. This article presents a method for distributed humidity sensing along polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) polymer optical fibers (POFs) by analyzing wavelength-dependent Rayleigh backscattering and attenuation characteristics at 500 nm and 650 nm wavelengths. Spatially resolved humidity sensing is obtained from backscatter traces of a dual-wavelength optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR). Backscatter dependence, attenuation dependence as well as the fiber length change are characterized as functions of relative humidity. Cross-sensitivity effects are discussed and quantified. The evaluation of the humidity-dependent backscatter effects at the two wavelength measurements allows for distributed and unambiguous measurement of relative humidity. The technique can be readily employed with low-cost standard polymer optical fibers and commercial OTDR devices.

  10. The impact of temperature and humidity on perception and emission of indoor air pollutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lei; Clausen, Geo; Fanger, Povl Ole

    1996-01-01

    Sensory response to air polluted by five building materials under different combinations of temperature and humidity in the ranges 18°C-28°C and 30%-70% was studied in the laboratory. The experiments were designed to study separately the impact of temperature and humidity on the perception of air...... polluted by materials, and on the emission of pollutants from the materials. At all tested pollution levels of the five materials, the air was perceived significantly less acceptable with increasing temperature and humidity, and the impact of temperature and humidity on perception decreased with increasing...... pollution level. A significant linear correlation between acceptability and enthalpy of the air was found to describe the influence of temperature and humidity on perception. The impact of temperature and humidity on sensory emission was less significant than the impact on perception; however, the sensory...

  11. Distributed Humidity Sensing in PMMA Optical Fibers at 500 nm and 650 nm Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liehr, Sascha; Breithaupt, Mathias; Krebber, Katerina

    2017-01-01

    Distributed measurement of humidity is a sought-after capability for various fields of application, especially in the civil engineering and structural health monitoring sectors. This article presents a method for distributed humidity sensing along polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) polymer optical fibers (POFs) by analyzing wavelength-dependent Rayleigh backscattering and attenuation characteristics at 500 nm and 650 nm wavelengths. Spatially resolved humidity sensing is obtained from backscatter traces of a dual-wavelength optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR). Backscatter dependence, attenuation dependence as well as the fiber length change are characterized as functions of relative humidity. Cross-sensitivity effects are discussed and quantified. The evaluation of the humidity-dependent backscatter effects at the two wavelength measurements allows for distributed and unambiguous measurement of relative humidity. The technique can be readily employed with low-cost standard polymer optical fibers and commercial OTDR devices. PMID:28362339

  12. Contamination, potential bias and humidity effects on electrical performance and corrosion reliability of electronic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piotrowska, Kamila; Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the interactions between flux contamination, humidity and po-tential bias and their effect on corrosion reliability. Water layer formation on laminate surfaces and behavior of different solder flux chemistries with humid conditions have been studied, together......-sponse of electronics is estimated as a function of contamination type under cycling humid conditions. The results show the correlation between the ionic contamination type and water layer formation on surfaces in the presence of the flux residue....

  13. Influence of environment factors on humidity conditions of selected external wall solutions in a heated building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Contemporary single-family houses in Poland are often built during 3 quarters of a year (spring to autumn) are usually settled in a winter season. It is a special case when exploitation humidity coincides with technological one, causing unfavourable humidity conditions during the first years of exploitation. In consequence, thermal parameters of partitions differ from those assumed in the project. In construction stage the humidity state of a wall stabilizes as a result of water: associated with storage, entered technologically during wall construction and plastering, coming from rainfall. Thermo-insulation materials are built-in at dry state. During erection and exploitation of a building their thermal conductivity is changing depending on humidity conditions. According to building rules, construction humidity should be removed from a partition before the building transfer to usage, because it lowers the thermal partition insulation ability and increases air humidity of building interior. Walls are plastered and insulated in condition of simultaneous presence of atmospheric and technological humidity which cause special humidity condition during first years of exploitation. As a consequence, heating costs are substantially higher. In this article the results of simulation are shown performed with WUFI ®PRO 5 software, which was intended to define the time necessary for reaching the stabilised humidity in selected solutions of two-layer walls applied in a heated building. In the research performed, the partition orientation along geographic directions, short and long wave radiation, and environment humidity (air humidity, driving rain) coincidence with technological humidity in assumed wall solutions were taken into account.

  14. Self-calibrated humidity sensor in CMOS without post-processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizhnik, Oleg; Higuchi, Kohei; Maenaka, Kazusuke

    2012-01-01

    A 1.1 μW power dissipation, voltage-output humidity sensor with 10% relative humidity accuracy was developed in the LFoundry 0.15 μm CMOS technology without post-processing. The sensor consists of a woven lateral array of electrodes implemented in CMOS top metal, a humidity-sensitive layer of Intervia Photodielectric 8023D-10, a CMOS capacitance to voltage converter, and the self-calibration circuitry.

  15. Self-Calibrated Humidity Sensor in CMOS without Post-Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Kazusuke Maenaka; Kohei Higuchi; Oleg Nizhnik

    2011-01-01

    A 1.1 µW power dissipation, voltage-output humidity sensor with 10% relative humidity accuracy was developed in the LFoundry 0.15 µm CMOS technology without post-processing. The sensor consists of a woven lateral array of electrodes implemented in CMOS top metal, a humidity-sensitive layer of Intervia Photodielectric 8023D-10, a CMOS capacitance to voltage converter, and the self-calibration circuitry.

  16. Apparatus for investigating the reactions of soft-bodied invertebrates to controlled humidity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Joshua; Pierce-Shimomura, Jonathan T

    2014-11-30

    While many studies have assayed behavioral responses of animals to chemical, temperature and light gradients, fewer studies have assayed how animals respond to humidity gradients. Our novel humidity chamber has allowed us to study the neuromolecular basis of humidity sensation in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (Russell et al., 2014). We describe an easy-to-construct, low-cost humidity chamber to assay the behavior of small animals, including soft-bodied invertebrates, in controlled humidity gradients. We show that our humidity-chamber design is amenable to soft-bodied invertebrates and can produce reliable gradients ranging 0.3-8% RH/cm across a 9-cm long × 7.5-cm wide gel-covered arena. Previous humidity chambers relied on circulating dry and moist air to produce a steep humidity gradient in a small arena (e.g. Sayeed and Benzer, 1996). To remove the confound of moving air that may elicit mechanical responses independent of humidity responses, our chamber controlled the humidity gradient using reservoirs of hygroscopic materials. Additionally, to better observe the behavioral mechanisms for humidity responses, our chamber provided a larger arena. Although similar chambers have been described previously, these approaches were not suitable for soft-bodied invertebrates or for easy imaging of behavior because they required that animals move across wire or fabric mesh. The general applicability of our humidity chamber overcomes limitations of previous designs and opens the door to observe the behavioral responses of soft-bodied invertebrates, including genetically powerful C. elegans and Drosophila larvae. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A Radiosonde Using a Humidity Sensor Array with a Platinum Resistance Heater and Multi-Sensor Data Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Yadong Wang; Chunxue Shang; Wenjie Zhao; Yi Luo; Yunbo Shi; Yinsheng Chen

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a radiosonde which can measure the meteorological temperature, humidity, pressure, and other atmospheric data. The system is composed of a CPU, microwave module, temperature sensor, pressure sensor and humidity sensor array. In order to effectively solve the humidity sensor condensation problem due to the low temperatures in the high altitude environment, a capacitive humidity sensor including four humidity sensors to collect meteorologica...

  18. Mechanical Properties of Spider Dragline Silk: Humidity, Hysteresis, and Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehoff, T.; Glišović, A.; Schollmeyer, H.; Zippelius, A.; Salditt, T.

    2007-01-01

    Spider silk is well-known for its outstanding mechanical properties. However, there is a significant variation of these properties in literature and studies analyzing large numbers of silk samples to explain these variations are still lacking. To fill this gap, the following work examines the mechanical properties of major ampullate silk based on a large ensemble of threads from Nephila clavipes and Nephila senegalensis. In addition, the effect of relative humidity (RH) on the mechanical properties was quantified. The large effect of RH on the mechanical properties makes it plausible that the variation in the literature values can to a large extent be attributed to changes in RH. Spider silk's most remarkable property—its high tenacity—remains unchanged. In addition, this work also includes hysteresis as well as relaxation measurements. It is found that the relaxation process is well described by a stretched exponential decay. PMID:17766337

  19. Influence of relative humidity on VOC concentrations in indoor air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowicz, Pawel; Larsson, Lennart

    2015-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) may be emitted from surfaces indoors leading to compromised air quality. This study scrutinized the influence of relative humidity (RH) on VOC concentrations in a building that had been subjected to water damage. While air samplings in a damp room at low RH (21-22%) only revealed minor amounts of 2-ethylhexanol (3 μg/m(3)) and 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate (TXIB, 8 μg/m(3)), measurements performed after a rapid increase of RH (to 58-75%) revealed an increase in VOC concentrations which was 3-fold for 2-ethylhexanol and 2-fold for TXIB. Similar VOC emission patterns were found in laboratory analyses of moisture-affected and laboratory-contaminated building materials. This study demonstrates the importance of monitoring RH when sampling indoor air for VOCs in order to avoid misleading conclusions from the analytical results.

  20. Conductivity at Low Humidity of Materials Derived from Ferroxane Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Lapina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carboxylic-acid-stabilised γ-FeOOH particles (ferroxanes are synthesized using a precipitation from aqueous solution, and a following reaction with acetic acid. The materials produced with these powders are investigated by XRD, SEM, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, and impedance spectroscopy. Conductivity of both sintered and unsintered materials decreases strongly with a decrease in water partial pressure in the atmosphere during the test. The highest conductivity (7·10−3 S cm−1 is measured in air (pH2O = 0.037 atm at room temperature on sintered material. The conductivity values are compared with other works in the literature and the dependence of conductivity on surface area and pore size is discussed. It is suggested that both unsintered and sintered materials act as proton conductors at room temperature under moderate humidity conditions.

  1. Desiccation Stress and the Effect of Humidity in Mosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aina Arinola FAJUKE

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Mosses show fair degree of structural adaptations to different environmental conditions. The effects caused by desiccation were determined in the shoots of six moss species, collected from various locations of the Obafemi Awolowo University Ile-Ife campus, Osun State, Nigeria. Using 0.1 g of fresh weights, desiccation of moss species over time at 0%, 52%, and 100% relative humidity, were determined by putting the shoots into desiccators and reweighing at intervals of 15 min, 30 min, 1 hr and on the 8th day. It was concluded that the locations of the moss species, and the fact that the cell walls of all the mosses were thick, were regarded as the adaptations which helped these mosses survived desiccation stress.

  2. Creep Behavior of ABS Polymer in Temperature-Humidity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Teagen; Selvaraj, Ramya; Hong, Seokmoo; Kim, Naksoo

    2017-04-01

    Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene (ABS), also known as a thermoplastic polymer, is extensively utilized for manufacturing home appliances products as it possess impressive mechanical properties, such as, resistance and toughness. However, the aforementioned properties are affected by operating temperature and atmosphere humidity due to the viscoelasticity property of an ABS polymer material. Moreover, the prediction of optimum working conditions are the little challenging task as it influences the final properties of product. This present study aims to develop the finite element (FE) models for predicting the creep behavior of an ABS polymeric material. In addition, the material constants, which represent the creep properties of an ABS polymer material, were predicted with the help of an interpolation function. Furthermore, a comparative study has been made with experiment and simulation results to verify the accuracy of developed FE model. The results showed that the predicted value from FE model could agree well with experimental data as well it can replicate the actual creep behavior flawlessly.

  3. The glass transition process in humid biopolymers. DSC study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunina, N A; Belopolskaya, T V; Tsereteli, G I [V.A. Fock Research Institute for Physics of Saint-Petersburg State University, 198504, Petrodvorets (Russian Federation)

    2006-05-15

    Thermal properties of native and denatured biopolymers with quite different chemical and steric structure (globular and fibrillar proteins, DNA, starches) were studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry in a wide range of temperatures and concentrations of water. It was shown that both native and denatured humid biopolymers are glassy systems. The glass transition temperature of these systems strongly depends on percentage of water, with water being simultaneously an intrinsic element of systems' ordered structure and a plasticizer of its amorphous state. On the base of the absolute values of heat capacities for biopolymer-water systems as a whole, heat capacities for biopolymers themselves were calculated as functions on water concentration at fixed temperatures. The S-shaped change of heat capacity observed on diagrams of state both for native and denatured biopolymers is the manifestation of biopolymers' passing through the vitrification region, as it occurs for denatured samples at heating.

  4. Climate variability and dengue fever in warm and humid Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-González, Felipe J; Lake, Iain R; Bentham, Graham

    2011-05-01

    Multiple linear regression models were fitted to look for associations between changes in the incidence rate of dengue fever and climate variability in the warm and humid region of Mexico. Data were collected for 12 Mexican provinces over a 23-year period (January 1985 to December 2007). Our results show that the incidence rate or risk of infection is higher during El Niño events and in the warm and wet season. We provide evidence to show that dengue fever incidence was positively associated with the strength of El Niño and the minimum temperature, especially during the cool and dry season. Our study complements the understanding of dengue fever dynamics in the region and may be useful for the development of early warning systems.

  5. The temperature and humidity monitoring system for PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuemmel, Miriam [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik I, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) of the PANDA detector to be constructed at FAIR consists of lead tungstate (PWO) crystals, which have a temperature dependent light yield. To achieve the design energy resolution, the EMC must be operated at -25 {sup circle} C, where temperature fluctuations of at most 0.1 {sup circle} C are acceptable. This results in high demands on the precision and resolution of the temperature monitoring. Ultra-thin platinum resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) are needed to measure the temperature in the densely packed EMC. The RTDs are read out by the temperature and humidity monitoring system for PANDA (THMP). Both have been developed at Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum. Not only the RTDs, but also the readout electronics has to be calibrated individually to suffice the high demands. Both, the calibration procedure and improvements in the electronic read out system are presented.

  6. Humidity Sensing Properties of Surface Modified Polyaniline Metal Oxide Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Nagaraju

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyaniline- (PANI praseodymium Oxide (Pr2O3 composites have been synthesized by in situ polymerization method with different weight percentages. The synthesized composites have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The temperature dependent conductivity shows that the conductivity is due to the hopping of polarons and bipolarons. These composites show negative thermal coefficient (α behavior as a function of temperature, which is characteristic behavior of semiconducting materials. Sensor studies have been carried out by two-probe method and found that the sensitivity increases with increase in % RH. It is noticed that stability increase is due to the presence of Pr2O3 in polyaniline up to 30 wt%. A fast recovery and response time along with high sensitivity make these composites suitable for humidity sensors.

  7. Hydrologic Evaluation of a Humid Climate Poplar Phytoremediation Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swensen, K.; Rabideau, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    The emplacement of hybrid poplar trees to function as phytoremediation barriers is an appealing and sustainable groundwater management strategy because of low maintenance costs and the potential to extract large amounts of groundwater without pumping. While the effectiveness of poplar barriers has been assessed by groundwater quality monitoring, less attention has been given to physical hydrologic evaluations needed to improve barrier designs. In this research, a five year hydrologic evaluation was conducted at a poplar phytoremediation site in western NY, with the goal of quantifying ETg (evapotranspiration from groundwater) as a measure of the barrier's effectiveness in a humid climate. To consider transpiration from both vadose zone and groundwater, the hydrologic evaluation included four components: physical ET measurements, theoretical ET calculations, analysis of diurnal groundwater table fluctuations, and vadose zone modeling. The direct measurements of ETT (total) were obtained using sap flow meters installed on multiple trees within the barrier. These data were interpreted using a regression model that included theoretical ET calculations and site-specific measurements of weather parameters and poplar trunk area. Application of this model was challenged by the spatial variation in rooting depth as determined by tree excavations. To further quantify the removal of groundwater by the phytobarrier (ETg), the White Method was applied to interpret diurnal groundwater fluctuations from monitoring wells located within the barrier, in conjunction with a variably saturated-saturated flow model configured to confirm water extraction from ETg. Taken together, the results of this five year hydrologic evaluation highlight the complexity in quantifying humid climate groundwater extraction, as a large number of variables were found to influence these rates. Improved understanding of these controls will contribute to improved barrier designs that maximize ETg.

  8. Single-Antenna Temperature- and Humidity-Sounding Microwave Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Pukala, David M.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Soria, Mary M.; Owen, Heather R.; Tanner, Alan B.; Bruneau, Peter J.; Johnson, Alan K.; Kagaslahti, Pekka P.; Gaier, Todd C.

    2011-01-01

    For humidity and temperature sounding of Earth s atmosphere, a single-antenna/LNA (low-noise amplifier) is needed in place of two separate antennas for the two frequency bands. This results in significant mass and power savings for GeoSTAR that is comprised of hundreds of antennas per frequency channel. Furthermore, spatial anti-aliasing would reduce the number of horns. An anti-aliasing horn antenna will enable focusing the instrument field of view to the hurricane corridor by reducing spatial aliasing, and thus reduce the number of required horns by up to 50 percent. The single antenna/receiver assembly was designed and fabricated by a commercial vendor. The 118 183-GHz horn is based upon a profiled, smooth-wall design, and the OMT (orthomode transducer) on a quad-ridge design. At the input end, the OMT presents four ver y closely spaced ridges [0.0007 in. (18 m)]. The fabricated assembly contains a single horn antenna and low-noise broadband receiver front-end assembly for passive remote sensing of both temperature and humidity profiles in the Earth s atmosphere at 118 and 183 GHz. The wideband feed with dual polarization capability is the first broadband low noise MMIC receiver with the 118 to 183 GHz bandwidth. This technology will significantly reduce PATH/GeoSTAR mass and power while maintaining 90 percent of the measurement capabilities. This is required for a Mission-of-Opportunity on NOAA s GOES-R satellite now being developed, which in turn will make it possible to implement a Decadal-Survey mission for a fraction of the cost and much sooner than would otherwise be possible.

  9. Noise performance of microwave humidity sounders over their lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Imke; Burgdorf, Martin; John, Viju O.; Mittaz, Jonathan; Buehler, Stefan A.

    2017-12-01

    The microwave humidity sounders Special Sensor Microwave Water Vapor Profiler (SSMT-2), Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B (AMSU-B) and Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) to date have been providing data records for 25 years. So far, the data records lack uncertainty information essential for constructing consistent long time data series. In this study, we assess the quality of the recorded data with respect to the uncertainty caused by noise. We calculate the noise on the raw calibration counts from the deep space views (DSVs) of the instrument and the noise equivalent differential temperature (NEΔT) as a measure for the radiometer sensitivity. For this purpose, we use the Allan deviation that is not biased from an underlying varying mean of the data and that has been suggested only recently for application in atmospheric remote sensing. Moreover, we use the bias function related to the Allan deviation to infer the underlying spectrum of the noise. As examples, we investigate the noise spectrum in flight for some instruments. For the assessment of the noise evolution in time, we provide a descriptive and graphical overview of the calculated NEΔT over the life span of each instrument and channel. This overview can serve as an easily accessible information for users interested in the noise performance of a specific instrument, channel and time. Within the time evolution of the noise, we identify periods of instrumental degradation, which manifest themselves in an increasing NEΔT, and periods of erratic behaviour, which show sudden increases of NEΔT interrupting the overall smooth evolution of the noise. From this assessment and subsequent exclusion of the aforementioned periods, we present a chart showing available data records with NEΔT Fidelity and Uncertainty in Climate data records from Earth Observation (FIDUCEO).

  10. Land Degradation Processes in the Humid Ethiopian highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenhuis, Tammo; Tebebu, Tigist; Belachew, Meseret; Langendoen, Eddy; Giri, Shree; Tilahun, Seifu

    2017-04-01

    Land degradation after forest clearing forces a distinct pattern on agricultural production starting with high yields just after clearing to poor productivity or even abandonment after 30-40 years. In the humid Ethiopian highlands forest soils have initial a high organic matter content that decreases with time after clearing. When the organic matter becomes less than 3%, aggregates break up, other cementing elements are being leached out and the texture becomes finer. Since settling velocity in water is related to particle size, the finer soil increases sediment concentration in the infiltration water and hardpan formation accelerates restricting deep percolation of water. This in turn affect the hydrology in which an excess water flows more rapidly as lateral flow to valley bottoms which become wetter with gully formation starting to transmit the additional water down slope approximately 10 years after the initial clearing. This degradation pattern occurs in all soils in the Ethiopian highlands, but the severity varies with climate and parent material. Although we do not yet understand to what degree these factors influence the degradation pattern, it is important to recognize the process because it directly affects the effectiveness of imposed management practices. In this presentation, we will highlight the degradation process for two watersheds in the semi humid Ethiopian highlands. We will document how soil properties changes and discuss hardpan formation and gully development. In addition, we will consider the effect of presently implemented governmental sponsored conservation practices and alternative management practices that might be more beneficial. We are looking forward to discussions on combating the effect of soil degradation in tropical monsoonal regions.

  11. The effect of environmental humidity and temperature on skin barrier function and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engebretsen, K A; Johansen, J D; Kezic, S

    2016-01-01

    existing dermatoses. We searched the literature for studies that evaluated the mechanisms behind this phenomenon. Commonly used meteorological terms such as absolute humidity, relative humidity and dew point are explained. Furthermore, we review the negative effect of low humidity, low temperatures...... and different seasons on the skin barrier and on the risk of dermatitis. We conclude that low humidity and low temperatures lead to a general decrease in skin barrier function and increased susceptible towards mechanical stress. Since pro-inflammatory cytokines and cortisol are released by keratinocytes...

  12. [Effects of urban river width on the temperature and humidity of nearby green belts in summer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peng; Zhu, Chun-Yang; Li, Shu-Hua

    2012-03-01

    As an important part of urban ecosystem, urban river plays a vital role in improving urban ecological environment. By the methods of small scale quantitative measurement, this paper analyzed the effects of seven urban rivers with different widths along the Third to Fifth Ring in Beijing on the air temperature and relative humidity of nearby green belts. The results showed that urban river width was the main factor affecting the temperature and humidity of nearby green belts. When the river had a width of 8 m, it had no effects in decreasing temperature but definite effects in increasing humidity; when the river width was 14-33 m, obvious effects were observed in decreasing temperature and increasing humidity; when the river had a width larger than 40 m, the effects in decreasing temperature and increasing humidity were significant and tended to be stable. There existed significant differences in the temperature and humidity between the green belts near the seven rivers and the corresponding controls. The critical width of urban river for the obvious effects in decreasing temperature and increasing humidity was 44 m. The regression equation of the temperature (x) and humidity (y) for the seven green belts nearby the urban rivers in summer was y = 173.191-3.247x, with the relative humidity increased by 1.0% when the air temperature decreased by about 0.3 degrees C.

  13. Kinetics of Size Changes of Individual Bacillus thuringiensis Spores in Response to Changes in Relative Humidity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrew J. Westphal; P. Buford Price; Terrance J. Leighton; Katherine E. Wheeler

    2003-01-01

    Using an automated scanning microscope, we report the surprising result that individual dormant spores of Bacillus thuringiensis grow and shrink in response to increasing and decreasing relative humidity...

  14. Black P/graphene hybrid: A fast response humidity sensor with good reversibility and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Duy-Thach; Park, Inyong; Park, Ah-Ram; Park, Cheol-Min; Jeon, Ki-Joon

    2017-09-05

    Black phosphorus (BP) materials have attracted considerable attention owing to their ultra-sensitive humidity sensing characteristics because of the natural absorption of water (H2O) molecules on the BP surface caused by the specific 2D layer-crystalline structure. On the other hand, the BP-based humidity sensor is less repeatable due to the instability of BP with water molecules and the stability of the sensor is reduced. In this study, this limitation of the BP-based humidity sensor was overcome by preparing a BP/graphene hybrid as a novel humidity sensing nanostructure. The BP/graphene interface improved the stability of the humidity sensor after a few weeks with a linear response within the relative humidity (RH) range of 15-70%. The sensor's response/recovery speed of the humidity sensor was extremely fast within few seconds. The response (S) of the humidity sensor based on the BP/graphene hybrid is 43.4% at RH = 70%. The estimated response and recovery time of the sensor is only 9 and 30 seconds at RH = 70% at room temperature. The experimental investigation reveals that the BP/graphene hybrid not only improves the reversibility and hysteresis factors but also enhances the stability of the humidity sensor.

  15. System-in Package of Integrated Humidity Sensor Using CMOS-MEMS Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Pil

    2015-10-01

    Temperature/humidity microchips with micropump were fabricated using a CMOS-MEMS process and combined with ZigBee modules to implement a sensor system in package (SIP) for a ubiquitous sensor network (USN) and/or a wireless communication system. The current of a diode temperature sensor to temperature and a normalized current of FET humidity sensor to relative humidity showed linear characteristics, respectively, and the use of the micropump has enabled a faster response. A wireless reception module using the same protocol as that in transmission systems processed the received data within 10 m and showed temperature and humidity values in the display.

  16. Evaluating fluid flow and thermal effects for fuel cell humidity sensor design

    OpenAIRE

    Reitz, S.; Wilde, A.; Bretschneider, J.; Sager, K.; Richter, G.; Woschech, S.

    2010-01-01

    Modern fuel cells require high relative humidity (RH) of about 90% of the reactant gases hydrogen and oxygen/air in a temperature range of 70°C-90°C for optimum efficiency. Especially RH must be kept within tight tolerances, as condensed water would reduce effective area of the fuel cell electrodes, while lower humidity would dry out the fuel cell's membrane and lead to permanent damage. Humidity sensors should enable effective measurement and control of the reactants' relative humidity. Howe...

  17. Frost Growth and Densification on a Flat Surface in Laminar Flow with Variable Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, M.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments are performed concerning frost growth and densification in laminar flow over a flat surface under conditions of constant and variable humidity. The flat plate test specimen is made of aluminum-6031, and has dimensions of 0.3 mx0.3 mx6.35 mm. Results for the first variable humidity case are obtained for a plate temperature of 255.4 K, air velocity of 1.77 m/s, air temperature of 295.1 K, and a relative humidity continuously ranging from 81 to 54%. The second variable humidity test case corresponds to plate temperature of 255.4 K, air velocity of 2.44 m/s, air temperature of 291.8 K, and a relative humidity ranging from 66 to 59%. Results for the constant humidity case are obtained for a plate temperature of 263.7 K, air velocity of 1.7 m/s, air temperature of 295 K, and a relative humidity of 71.6 %. Comparisons of the data with the author's frost model extended to accommodate variable humidity suggest satisfactory agreement between the theory and the data for both constant and variable humidity.

  18. Impact of Humidity on In Vitro Human Skin Permeation Experiments for Predicting In Vivo Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Endo, Hiromi; Yamaguchi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-12-01

    In vitro skin permeation studies have been commonly conducted to predict in vivo permeability for the development of transdermal therapeutic systems (TTSs). We clarified the impact of humidity on in vitro human skin permeation of two TTSs having different breathability and then elucidated the predictability of in vivo permeability based on in vitro experimental data. Nicotinell(®) TTS(®) 20 and Frandol(®) tape 40mg were used as model TTSs in this study. The in vitro human skin permeation experiments were conducted under humidity levels similar to those used in clinical trials (approximately 50%) as well as under higher humidity levels (approximately 95%). The skin permeability values of drugs at 95% humidity were higher than those at 50% humidity. The time profiles of the human plasma concentrations after TTS application fitted well with the clinical data when predicted based on the in vitro permeation parameters at 50% humidity. On the other hand, those profiles predicted based on the parameters at 95% humidity were overestimated. The impact of humidity was higher for the more breathable TTS; Frandol(®) tape 40mg. These results show that in vitro human skin permeation experiments should be investigated under realistic clinical humidity levels especially for breathable TTSs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  19. Quantifying the effects of altering ambient humidity on ionic composition of vocal fold surface fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasankar, M Preeti; Carroll, Thomas L; Kosinski, Aaron M; Rosen, Clark A

    2013-07-01

    Vocal fold surface fluid (VFSF) is important in hydration and defense of underlying epithelial cells. The objective of this study was to quantify changes in the ionic composition of VFSF after altering the humidity of inhaled air. We tested the hypothesis that low humidity exposure would increase the concentration of VFSF sodium (Na(+)) and chloride (Cl(-)) ions but that high humidity exposure would decrease the concentration of VFSF Na(+) and Cl(-) ions as compared to the low humidity challenge. Prospective design. Eighteen healthy adults participated in this study. VFSF was collected from each subject at baseline and following exposure to low humidity and high humidity environments. VFSF Na(+) concentration was assessed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. VFSF Cl(-) concentration was measured with indirect potentiometry. All analyses were completed by personnel blinded to the hypothesis being tested. The low humidity environment increased Na(+) concentration in the majority of the subjects. Data for changes in Cl(-) concentrations were variable. Overall the data did not reach statistical significance (P > .05). Subjective impressions suggested that VFSF collection was more difficult in low humidity as compared to the high humidity and baseline conditions. This study is the first attempt to measure the ionic concentration of VFSF. The results from the current study have important implications for future programmatic research quantifying the effects of pollutants and laryngopharyngeal reflux on VFSF composition, epithelial hydration, and vocal fold defense. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. A Supramolecular Nanofiber-Based Passive Memory Device for Remembering Past Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogera, Umesha; Gedda, Murali; George, Subi J; Kulkarni, Giridhar U

    2017-09-20

    Memorizing the magnitude of a physical parameter such as relative humidity in a consignment may be useful for maintaining recommended conditions over a period of time. In relation to cost and energy considerations, it is important that the memorizing device works in the unpowered passive state. In this article, we report the fabrication of a humidity-responsive device that can memorize the humidity condition it had experienced while being unpowered. The device makes use of supramolecular nanofibers obtained from the self-assembly of donor-acceptor (D-A) molecules, coronene tetracarboxylate salt (CS) and dodecyl methyl viologen (DMV), respectively, from aqueous medium. The fibers, while being highly sensitive to humidity, tend to develop electrically induced disorder under constant voltage, leading to increased resistance with time. The conducting state can be regained via self-assembly by exposing the device to humidity in the absence of applied voltage, the extent of recovery depending on the magnitude of the humidity applied under no bias. This nature of the fibers has been exploited in reading the humidity memory state, which interestingly is independent of the lapsed time since the humidity exposure as well as the duration of exposure. Importantly, the device is capable of differentiating the profiles of varying humidity conditions from its memory. The device finds use in applications requiring stringent condition monitoring.

  1. Autogenous Deformation and Change of the Relative Humidity in Silica Fume-Modified Cement Paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben

    1996-01-01

    Even during sealed curing and at a constant temperature a hardening cement paste will deform and the relative humidity within its pores will lower. This autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change may be so significant that the cement paste cracks if the deformation is restrained....... This article focuses on the influence of silica fume addition on autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change. Continuous measurement of autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change for more than 1 year and 1« years, respectively, was performed. The investigations show...

  2. The anthropogenic influence on heat and humidity in the US Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda Diaz, H. A.; O'Brien, T. A.; Stone, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Heatwaves, and extreme temperatures in general, have a wide range of negative impacts on society, and particularly on human health. In addition to temperature, humidity plays a key role in regulating human body temperature, with higher humidities tending to reduce the effectiveness of perspiration. There is recent theoretical and observational evidence that co-occurring extreme heat and humidity can potentially have a much more dramatic impact on human health than either extreme in isolation. There is an abundance of observational evidence indicating that anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing have contributed to an increase in the intensity and frequency of temperature extremes on a global scale. However, aside from purely thermodynamically-driven increases in near-surface humidity, there is a paucity of similar evidence for anthropogenic impacts on humidity. Thermodynamic scaling would suggest that air masses originating from the ocean would be associated with higher specific humidity in a warmer world, and transpiration from irrigated crops could further increase humidity in warm air masses. In order to explore the role of anthropogenic GHG forcing on the co-occurrence of temperature and humidity extremes in the Midwestern United States (US), we evaluate a large ensemble of global climate model simulations with and without anthropogenic GHG forcing. In particular, we examine differences between the probability distributions of near-surface temperature, humidity, wet-bulb temperature, and the joint distribution of temperature and humidity in this ensemble. Finally, we explore augmenting this experimental framework with additional simulations to explore the role of anthropogenic changes in the land surface, and in particular irrigated crops, on co-occurring extreme heat and humidity.

  3. Adjustment of web-building initiation to high humidity: a constraint by humidity-dependent thread stickiness in the spider Cyrtarachne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Yuki G; Kusahara, Miki; Maezono, Yasunori; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2014-07-01

    Cyrtarachne is an orb-weaving spider belonging to the subfamily Cyrtarachninae (Araneidae) which includes triangular-web-building Pasilobus and bolas spiders. The Cyrtarachninae is a group of spiders specialized in catching moths, which is thought to have evolved from ordinary orb-weaving araneids. Although the web-building time of nocturnal spiders is in general related to the time of sunset, anecdotal evidence has suggested variability of web-building time in Cyrtarachne and its closely related genera. This study has examined the effects of temperature, humidity, moonlight intensity, and prey (moths) availability on web-building time of Cyrtarachne bufo, Cyrtarachne akirai, and Cyrtarachne nagasakiensis. Generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) have revealed that humidity, and not prey availability, was the essential variable that explained the daily variability of web-building time. Experiments measuring thread stickiness under different humidities showed that, although the thread of Cyrtarachne was found to have strong stickiness under high humidity, low humidity caused a marked decrease of thread stickiness. By contrast, no obvious change in stickiness was seen in an ordinary orb-weaving spider, Larinia argiopiformis. These findings suggest that Cyrtarachne adjusts its web-building time to favorable conditions of high humidity maintaining strong stickiness, which enables the threads to work efficiently for capturing prey.

  4. Effect of relative humidity on lipid oxidation in freezedried emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinachoti, P.

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stability was studied in a freeze-dried emulsion consisting of linoleic acid (LA, Tween-20, sucrose and maltodextrin in the presence of a catalyst (FeSO4/ascorbic acid. Changes in residual LA and conjugated dienes as a function of time were monitored at 0, 32, 43 and 75% relative humidities (RH. Based on GC analyses, LA oxidation was more significant in the surface fraction than the entrapped. The loss of surface oil upon storage may also be due to partial entrapment. However faster oxidation of the surface oil was confirmed by measurement of diene conjugation. Oxidation was more rapid at the lower relative humidities (0 and 32% RH and decreased with increasing RH. At high moisture, physical modifications in the sample were observed, including reduced porosity, structural collapse, reduction of the surface oil and coalescence of oil droplets triggered by sucrose crystallization. These may be responsible for the decreased oxidation. Sucrose crystallization at the higher humidities inhibited oxidation. In addition, while samples with similar glass transition temperature (Tg range behaved differently, samples with different glass transition range showed similar oxidative behaviour. Microstructural changes leading to oil entrapment and oil droplet coalescence were found to be significant, in this case.Se ha estudiado la estabilidad oxidativa en una emulsión liofilizada compuesta de ácido linoleico (LA, Tween-20, sacarosa y maltodextrina en presencia de un catalizador (FeSO4/ácido ascórbico. Los cambios en ácido linoleico remanente (LA y dienos conjugados en función del tiempo fueron monitorizados a humedades relativas (RH del 0, 32, 43 y 75%. Basado en análisis por cromatografía gaseosa, la oxidación de LA fue más significativa en la fracción superficial que en la encapsulada. La pérdida de aceite superficial con el almacenamiento puede deberse también al encapsulado parcial. Sin embargo, la más rápida oxidación del aceite

  5. A cloud filtering method for microwave upper tropospheric humidity measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Buehler

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a cloud filtering method for upper tropospheric humidity (UTH measurements at 183.31±1.00 GHz. The method uses two criteria: a viewing angle dependent threshold on the brightness temperature at 183.31±1.00 GHz, and a threshold on the brightness temperature difference between another channel and 183.31±1.00 GHz. Two different alternatives, using 183.31±3.00 GHz or 183.31±7.00 GHz as the other channel, are studied. The robustness of this cloud filtering method is demonstrated by a mid-latitudes winter case study.

    The paper then studies different biases on UTH climatologies. Clouds are associated with high humidity, therefore the possible dry bias introduced by cloud filtering is discussed and compared to the wet biases introduced by the clouds radiative effect if no filtering is done. This is done by means of a case study, and by means of a stochastic cloud database with representative statistics for midlatitude conditions.

    Both studied filter alternatives perform nearly equally well, but the alternative using 183.31±3.00 GHz as other channel is preferable, because that channel is less likely to see the Earth's surface than the one at 183.31±7.00 GHz.

    The consistent result of all case studies and for both filter alternatives is that both cloud wet bias and cloud filtering dry bias are modest for microwave data. The recommended strategy is to use the cloud filtered data as an estimate for the true all-sky UTH value, but retain the unfiltered data to have an estimate of the cloud induced uncertainty.

    The focus of the paper is on midlatitude data, since atmospheric data to test the filter for that case were readily available. The filter is expected to be applicable also to subtropical and tropical data, but should be further validated with case studies similar to the one presented here for those cases.

  6. High-resolution measurements of humidity and temperature with lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Spaeth, Florian; Hammann, Eva; Muppa, Shravan Kumar; Metzendorf, Simon; Riede, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    3-dimensional thermodynamic fields of temperature and moisture including their turbulent fluctuations have been observed with the two scanning lidar systems of University of Hohenheim in three field campaigns in 2013 and 2014. In this contribution, we will introduce these two self-developed instruments and illustrate their performance with measurement examples. Finally, an outlook to envisioned future research activities with the new data sets of the instruments is given. Our temperature lidar is based on the rotational Raman technique. The scanning rotational Raman lidar (RRL) uses a seeded frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 355 nm. A two-mirror scanner with a 40-cm telescope collects the atmospheric backscatter signals. Humidity measurements are made with a scanning water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) which uses a titanium sapphire laser at 820 nm as transmitter. This laser is pumped with a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and injection-seeded for switching between the online and offline wavelengths. The DIAL receiver consists of a scanning 80-cm telescope. The measured temperature and humidity profiles of both instruments have typical resolutions of only a few seconds and 100 m in the atmospheric boundary layer both in day- and night-time. Recent field experiments with the RRL and the DIAL of University of Hohenheim were (1) the HD(CP)2 Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in spring 2013 in western Germany - this activity is embedded in the project HD(CP)2 (High-definition clouds and precipitation for advancing climate prediction); (2) a measurement campaign in Hohenheim in autumn 2013; (3) the campaign SABLE (Surface Atmospheric Boundary Layer Exchange) in south-western Germany in summer 2014. The collected moisture and temperature data will serve as initial thermodynamic fields for forecast experiments related to the formation of clouds and precipitation. Due to their high resolution and high precision, the systems are capable of resolving

  7. Noise performance of microwave humidity sounders over their lifetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hans

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The microwave humidity sounders Special Sensor Microwave Water Vapor Profiler (SSMT-2, Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B (AMSU-B and Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS to date have been providing data records for 25 years. So far, the data records lack uncertainty information essential for constructing consistent long time data series. In this study, we assess the quality of the recorded data with respect to the uncertainty caused by noise. We calculate the noise on the raw calibration counts from the deep space views (DSVs of the instrument and the noise equivalent differential temperature (NEΔT as a measure for the radiometer sensitivity. For this purpose, we use the Allan deviation that is not biased from an underlying varying mean of the data and that has been suggested only recently for application in atmospheric remote sensing. Moreover, we use the bias function related to the Allan deviation to infer the underlying spectrum of the noise. As examples, we investigate the noise spectrum in flight for some instruments. For the assessment of the noise evolution in time, we provide a descriptive and graphical overview of the calculated NEΔT over the life span of each instrument and channel. This overview can serve as an easily accessible information for users interested in the noise performance of a specific instrument, channel and time. Within the time evolution of the noise, we identify periods of instrumental degradation, which manifest themselves in an increasing NEΔT, and periods of erratic behaviour, which show sudden increases of NEΔT interrupting the overall smooth evolution of the noise. From this assessment and subsequent exclusion of the aforementioned periods, we present a chart showing available data records with NEΔT  <  1 K. Due to overlapping life spans of the instruments, these reduced data records still cover without gaps the time since 1994 and may therefore serve as a first step for constructing long time

  8. Effects of humidity and filter material on diffusive sampling of isocyanates using reagent-coated filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henneken, H.; Vogel, M.; Karst, U.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusive sampling of methyl isocyanate (MIC) on 4-nitro-7-piperazinobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBDPZ)-coated glass fibre (GF) filters is strongly affected by high relative humidity (RH) conditions. It is shown that the humidity interference is a physical phenomenon, based on displacement of reagent

  9. Effects of humidity and dew on the early growth of jatropha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the effects of Humidity and Dew on the early growth of Jatropha curcas seedlings in Kano, Nigeria. The experiment was conducted between 20 April, 2014 and 14 July, 2014. Humidity and Dew values were recorded using two Lascar EL- USB data loggers one at each of the two treatments (shade and ...

  10. Computer-generated versus nurse-determined strategy for incubator humidity and time to regain birthweight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helder, Onno K.; Mulder, Paul G. H.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2008-01-01

    To compare effects on premature infants' weight gain of a computer-generated and a nurse-determined incubator humidity strategy. An optimal humidity protocol is thought to reduce time to regain birthweight. Prospective randomized controlled design. Level IIIC neonatal intensive care unit in the

  11. Effect of relative humidity on crack propagation in barrier films for flexible electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellinga, W. P.; De Hosson, J. Th M.; Bouten, P. C. P.

    2012-01-01

    A set of propagating cracks in a SiN barrier film on poly ethylene naphthalate (PEN) were subjected to differing levels of relative humidity. It was observed that the propagation speed of the cracks increased for increasing levels of relative humidity. This was shown using two independent,

  12. The effects of temperature and relative humidity on the growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of temperature and relative humidity on the growth of three isolated fungi from rice ( Oryza sativa L.) seedlings in Dadin Kowa Irrigation Scheme, Dadin Kowa, Gombe. ... There were significant differences (P≤0.05) in the growth of these fungi at different temperature and relative humidity regimes. Keywords: ...

  13. Human-Finger Electronics Based on Opposing Humidity-Resistance Responses in Carbon Nanofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong

    2017-01-09

    Carbon nanomaterials have excellent humidity sensing properties. Here, it is demonstrated that multiwalled carbon-nanotube (MWCNT)- and reduced-graphene-oxide (rGO)-based conductive films have opposite humidity/electrical resistance responses: MWCNTs increase their electrical resistance (positive response) and rGOs decrease their electrical resistance (negative response). The authors propose a new phenomenology that describes a

  14. Synergistic effects of temperature and humidity on the symptoms of COPD patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Zhe; Chen, Pei-Li; Geng, Fu-Hai; Ren, Lei; Gu, Wen-Chao; Ma, Jia-Yun; Peng, Li; Li, Qing-Yun

    2017-11-01

    This panel study investigates how temperature, humidity, and their interaction affect chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients' self-reported symptoms. One hundred and six COPD patients from Shanghai, China, were enrolled, and age, smoking status, St. George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) score, and lung function index were recorded at baseline. The participants were asked to record their indoor temperature, humidity, and symptoms on diary cards between January 2011 and June 2012. Altogether, 82 patients finished the study. There was a significant interactive effect between temperature and humidity ( p COPD patients. When the indoor humidity was low, moderate, and high, the indoor temperature ORs were 0.969 (95% CI 0.922 to 1.017), 0.977 (0.962 to 0.999), and 0.920 (95% CI 0.908 to 0.933), respectively. Low temperature was a risk factor for COPD patients, and high humidity enhanced its risk on COPD. The indoor temperature should be kept at least on average at 18.2 °C, while the humidity should be less than 70%. This study demonstrates that temperature and humidity were associated with COPD patients' symptoms, and high humidity would enhance the risk of COPD due to low temperature.

  15. Impact of individually controlled facially applied air movement on perceived air quality at high humidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Kaczmarczyk, J.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of facially applied air movement on perceived air quality (PAQ) at high humidity was studied. Thirty subjects (21 males and 9 females) participated in three, 3-h experiments performed in a climate chamber. The experimental conditions covered three combinations of relative humidity...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.670 - NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... temperature corrections. 1065.670 Section 1065.670 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... NOX intake-air humidity and temperature corrections. See the standard-setting part to determine if you may correct NOX emissions for the effects of intake-air humidity or temperature. Use the NOX intake...

  17. Temperature and Humidity Dependence of a Polymer-Based Gas Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, M. A.; Buehler, M. G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper quantifies the temperature and humidity dependence of a polymer-based gas sensor. The measurement and analysis of three polymers indicates that resistance changes in the polymer films, due to temperature and humidity, can be positive or negative. The temperature sensitivity ranged from +1600 to -320 ppm/nd the relative sensitivity ranged from +1100 to -260 ppm/%.

  18. Dynamics of adaptation of stomatal behaviour to moderate or high relative air humidity in Tradescantia virginiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rezaei Nejad, A.; Meeteren, van U.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging was used to measure stomatal closure in response to desiccation of Tradescantia virginiana leaves grown under high (90%) and moderate (55%) relative humidities (RHs), or transferred between these humidities. Stomata in leaves grown at high RH were less responsive to

  19. Strongly Accelerated and Humidity-Independent Drying of Nanochannels Induced by Sharp Corners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Dan, B.; Reemeijer, H.W.; Hermes, D.C.; Bomer, Johan G.; van den Berg, Albert

    2005-01-01

    Measurements are shown indicating that the drying rate of nanochannels can be enhanced by up to 3 orders of magnitude relative to drying by vapor diffusion, and that the drying rate is independent of the relative humidity of the environment up to a relative humidity of more than 90%. Micromachined

  20. Humidity and illumination organic semiconductor copper phthalocyanine sensor for environmental monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimov, K S; Qazi, I; Khan, T A; Draper, P H; Khalid, F A; Mahroof-Tahir, M

    2008-06-01

    In this investigation properties of organic semiconductor copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) capacitive humidity and illumination sensors were studied. Organic thin film was deposited by vacuum evaporation on a glass substrate with silver surface-type electrodes to form the Ag/CuPc/Ag sensor. The capacitance of the samples was evaluated at room temperature in the relative humidity range of 35-92%. It was observed that capacitance of the Ag/CuPc/Ag sensor increases with increase in humidity. The ratio of the relative capacitance to relative humidity was about 200. It is assumed that in general the capacitive response of the sensor is associated with polarization due to absorption of water molecules and transfer of charges (electrons and holes). It was observed that under filament lamp illumination of up to 1,000 lx the capacitance of the Ag/CuPc/Ag photo capacitive detectors increased continuously by 20% as compared to dark condition. It is assumed that photo capacitive response of the sensor is associated with polarization due to transfer of photo-generated electrons and holes. An equivalent circuit of the Ag/CuPc/Ag capacitive humidity and illumination sensor was developed. Humidity and illumination dependent capacitance properties of this sensor make it attractive for use in humidity and illumination multi-meters. The sensor may be used in instruments for environmental monitoring of humidity and illumination.

  1. Effect of Air Relative Humidity Harvest on Soil Moisture Content under Moroccan Climatic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Khadir Lakhal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we aim to analyse the effect of the harvest of air relative humidity on soil water content. Some experiments were conducted on hilly areas with various hypsographic and microclimatic conditions greatly affecting daily fluctuations of air relative humidity. The metrological data’s were obtained by using a Campbell Scientific equipments station recorder on data loggers every half hour. Time Domain Reflectometers (TDR is used for calculating water content at different soil layers. The effect of many parameters such as: minimal and maximal air atmospheric humidity, potential of soil water and minimal temperature of air on harvesting air relative humidity is also discussed. The experimental results indicate that soil moisture content in the upper soil layer fluctuates with the same manner to diurnal fluctuation of relative air humidity. These fluctuations due to the harvest of relative air humidity decreased with increasing soil depth and daily amplitude of relative air humidity. The water adsorbed according to this phenomenon increased with increasing maximal relative and decreasing minimal temperature. The contribution of this soil water collected is about 40% of losses due to evaporation process. The correlation between principal climatic data and soil water adsorption by harvest relative air humidity is presented in this paper in order to incorporate it in the total water balance during water infiltration.

  2. Effect of Three-Dimensional Printed Personalized Moisture Chamber Spectacles on the Periocular Humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Hee Moon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the effect of three-dimensional (3D printed personalized moisture chamber spectacles (PMCS on the periocular humidity. Methods. Facial computed tomography (CT scanning was conducted on 10 normal subjects. PMCS was designed based on volume rendered CT images and produced using a 3D printer. Periocular humidity of PMCS and commercially available uniformed moisture chamber spectacles (UMCS were measured for 30 minutes via microhydrometer. Results. The mean ambient humidity was 15.76±1.18%. The mean periocular humidity was 52.14±3.00% in PMCS and 37.67±8.97% in UMCS. The difference was significant (P<0.001. Additionally, PMCS always demonstrated lower humidity than dew points. Conclusion. PMCS made by 3D printer provides appropriate fitness for the semiclosed humid chamber. PMCS showed higher performance than UMCS. The wearing of PMCS would be an effective method to provide high enough periocular humidity in low humidity environment.

  3. Dynamics of Airborne influenza A viruses indoors and dependence on humidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Yang (Wan); L.C. Marr (Linsey); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThere is mounting evidence that the aerosol transmission route plays a significant role in the spread of influenza in temperate regions and that the efficiency of this route depends on humidity. Nevertheless, the precise mechanisms by which humidity might influence transmissibility via

  4. Effect of land use on water discharge in humid regions: An example ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of land use on water discharge is one of the most important environmental problems of our times, particularly in the humid regions. However, there exists controversy over the hydrological effects of land use in the humid tropics. This paper therefore examines the effect of land use on water discharge in southern ...

  5. The impact of relative humidity and atmospheric pressure on mortality in Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Chun Quan; Yang, Jun; Ou, Qiao Qun; Liu, Hua Zhang; Lin, Guo Zhen; Chen, Ping Yan; Qian, Jun; Guo, Yu Ming

    2014-12-01

    Although many studies have examined the effects of ambient temperatures on mortality, little evidence is on health impacts of atmospheric pressure and relative humidity. This study aimed to assess the impacts of atmospheric pressure and relative humidity on mortality in Guangzhou, China. This study included 213,737 registered deaths during 2003-2011 in Guangzhou, China. A quasi-Poisson regression with a distributed lag non-linear model was used to assess the effects of atmospheric pressure/relative humidity. We found significant effect of low atmospheric pressure/relative humidity on mortality. There was a 1.79% (95% confidence interval: 0.38%-3.22%) increase in non-accidental mortality and a 2.27% (0.07%-4.51%) increase in cardiovascular mortality comparing the 5th and 25th percentile of atmospheric pressure. A 3.97% (0.67%-7.39%) increase in cardiovascular mortality was also observed comparing the 5th and 25th percentile of relative humidity. Women were more vulnerable to decrease in atmospheric pressure and relative humidity than men. Age and education attainment were also potential effect modifiers. Furthermore, low atmospheric pressure and relative humidity increased temperature-related mortality. Both low atmospheric pressure and relative humidity are important risk factors of mortality. Our findings would be helpful to develop health risk assessment and climate policy interventions that would better protect vulnerable subgroups of the population. Copyright © 2014 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of relative humidity on germination of Sporangia of Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporangia of three isolates of P. ramorum representing three different clonal lineages were subjected to relative humidity (RH) levels between 80 and 100% for exposure periods ranging from 1 to 24 h at 20°C in darkness. Airtight snap-lid plastic containers (21.5 x 14.5 x 5 cm) were used as humidity ...

  7. The impact of humidity on evaporative cooling in small desert birds exposed to high air temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Alexander R; Smith, Eric Krabbe; Smit, Ben; McKechnie, Andrew E; Wolf, Blair O

    2014-01-01

    Environmental temperatures that exceed body temperature (Tb) force endothermic animals to rely solely on evaporative cooling to dissipate heat. However, evaporative heat dissipation can be drastically reduced by environmental humidity, imposing a thermoregulatory challenge. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of humidity on the thermoregulation of desert birds and to compare the sensitivity of cutaneous and respiratory evaporation to reduced vapor density gradients. Rates of evaporative water loss, metabolic rate, and Tb were measured in birds exposed to humidities ranging from ∼2 to 30 g H2O m(-3) (0%-100% relative humidity at 30°C) at air temperatures between 44° and 56°C. In sociable weavers, a species that dissipates heat primarily through panting, rates of evaporative water loss were inhibited by as much as 36% by high humidity at 48°C, and these birds showed a high degree of hyperthermia. At lower temperatures (40°-44°C), evaporative water loss was largely unaffected by humidity in this species. In Namaqua doves, which primarily use cutaneous evaporation, increasing humidity reduced rates of evaporative water loss, but overall rates of water loss were lower than those observed in sociable weavers. Our data suggest that cutaneous evaporation is more efficient than panting, requiring less water to maintain Tb at a given temperature, but panting appears less sensitive to humidity over the air temperature range investigated here.

  8. Sealed Attics Exposed to Two Years of Weathering in a Hot and Humid Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, William A [ORNL; Railkar, Sudhir [GAF; Shiao, Ming C [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Field studies in a hot, humid climate were conducted to investigate the thermal and hygrothermal performance of ventilated attics and non-ventilated semi-conditioned attics sealed with open-cell and with closed-cell spray polyurethane foam insulation. Moisture pin measurements made in the sheathing and absolute humidity sensor data from inside the foam and from the attic air show that moisture is being stored in the foam. The moisture in the foam diffuses to and from the sheathing dependent on the pressure gradient at the foam-sheathing interface which is driven by the irradiance and night-sky radiation. Ventilated attics in the same hot, humid climate showed less moisture movement in the sheathing than those sealed with either open- or closed-cell spray foam. In the ventilated attics the relative humidity drops as the attic air warms; however, the opposite was observed in the sealed attics. Peaks in measured relative humidity in excess of 80 90% and occasionally near saturation (i.e., 100%) were observed from solar noon till about 8 PM on hot, humid days. The conditioned space of the test facility is heated and cooled by an air-to-air heat pump. Therefore the partial pressure of the indoor air during peak irradiance is almost always less than that observed in the sealed attics. Field data will be presented to bring to light the critical humidity control issues in sealed attics exposed to hot, humid climates.

  9. Effects of some humidity and IBA hormone dose applicatıons on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-26

    Apr 26, 2010 ... ratio of cutting callus formation was found in control group (58%) in 95 - 100% humidity level and 2500 ppm IBA hormone dose ... Key words: M9, sooftwood top cutting, misting system, humidity, hormone, rooting. INTRODUCTION. Anatolia ... Turkey produced about 6 million pieces of apple saplings in 2007 ...

  10. Suspension of Egg Hatching Caused by High Humidity and Submergence in Spider Mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubara, Masashi; Osakabe, Masahiro

    2015-08-01

    We tested the effects of high humidity and submergence on egg hatching of spider mites. In both the high humidity and submergence treatments, many Tetranychus and Panonychus eggs did not hatch until after the hatching peak of the lower humidity or unsubmerged controls. However, after humidity decreased or water was drained, many eggs hatched within 1-3 h. This was observed regardless of when high humidity or submergence treatments were implemented: either immediately after oviposition or immediately before hatching was due. Normal eyespot formation was observed in most eggs in the high humidity and submergence treatments, which indicates that spider mite embryos develop even when eggs are underwater. Therefore, delays in hatching are not caused by delayed embryonic development. A delay in hatching was always observed in Panonychus citri (McGregor) but was more variable in Tetranychus urticae Koch and Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida. The high humidity and submergence treatments affected but did not suppress larval development in these species. In contrast, many Oligonychus eggs died following the high humidity treatments. In Tetranychus and Panonychus spider mites, suspension of egg hatching may mitigate the adverse effects of rainfall. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Effect of Humidity in Air on Performance and Long-Term Durability of SOFCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Anke; Neufeld, Kai; Liu, Yi-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) based on Ni–yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anodes, YSZ electrolytes, and lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM)–YSZ cathodes were studied with respect to durability in humid air (~4%) typically over 1500 h. Operating temperature and current density were...... varied between 750 and 850°C and 0.25–0.75 A/cm2, respectively. The introduction of humidity affected the cell voltage under polarization of the cell, and this effect was (at least partly) reversible upon switching off the humidity. Generally, the studied cells were operated in humid air under...... technologically relevant conditions over more than 1500 h. Improvements at the cathode/electrolyte interface made it possible to obtain highly stable cells, which can be operated under high current density and at 750°C in humid air, conditions that cause significant cell voltage degradation in dry air on cells...

  12. Modeling Validation and Control Analysis for Controlled Temperature and Humidity of Air Conditioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jing-Nang; Lin, Tsung-Min

    2014-01-01

    This study constructs an energy based model of thermal system for controlled temperature and humidity air conditioning system, and introduces the influence of the mass flow rate, heater and humidifier for proposed control criteria to achieve the controlled temperature and humidity of air conditioning system. Then, the reliability of proposed thermal system model is established by both MATLAB dynamic simulation and the literature validation. Finally, the PID control strategy is applied for controlling the air mass flow rate, humidifying capacity, and heating, capacity. The simulation results show that the temperature and humidity are stable at 541 sec, the disturbance of temperature is only 0.14°C, 0006 kgw/kgda in steady-state error of humidity ratio, and the error rate is only 7.5%. The results prove that the proposed system is an effective controlled temperature and humidity of an air conditioning system. PMID:25250390

  13. Modeling validation and control analysis for controlled temperature and humidity of air conditioning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jing-Nang; Lin, Tsung-Min; Chen, Chien-Chih

    2014-01-01

    This study constructs an energy based model of thermal system for controlled temperature and humidity air conditioning system, and introduces the influence of the mass flow rate, heater and humidifier for proposed control criteria to achieve the controlled temperature and humidity of air conditioning system. Then, the reliability of proposed thermal system model is established by both MATLAB dynamic simulation and the literature validation. Finally, the PID control strategy is applied for controlling the air mass flow rate, humidifying capacity, and heating, capacity. The simulation results show that the temperature and humidity are stable at 541 sec, the disturbance of temperature is only 0.14 °C, 0006 kg(w)/kg(da) in steady-state error of humidity ratio, and the error rate is only 7.5%. The results prove that the proposed system is an effective controlled temperature and humidity of an air conditioning system.

  14. The Impact of Upper Tropospheric Humidity from Microwave Limb Sounder on the Midlatitude Greenhouse Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hua; Liu, W. Timothy

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of upper tropospheric humidity, as measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder, and the impact of the humidity on the greenhouse effect in the midlatitudes. Enhanced upper tropospheric humidity and an enhanced greenhouse effect occur over the storm tracks in the North Pacific and North Atlantic. In these areas, strong baroclinic activity and the large number of deep convective clouds transport more water vapor to the upper troposphere, and hence increase greenhouse trapping. The greenhouse effect increases with upper tropospheric humidity in areas with a moist upper troposphere (such as areas over storm tracks), but it is not sensitive to changes in upper tropospheric humidity in regions with a dry upper troposphere, clearly demonstrating that there are different mechanisms controlling the geographical distribution of the greenhouse effect in the midlatitudes.

  15. Preparation and Characteristic of Relative-Humidity Sensors Based on Laterally Grown ZnO Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Fu-Shou; Wang, Shui-Jinn; Tu, Yung-Chun; Lin, Tseng-Hsing

    2013-06-01

    The use of laterally oriented zinc oxide nanowires (ZnO NWs) grown by a hydrothermal growth (HTG) method for relative-humidity (RH) sensing devices at room temperature (RT) is demonstrated. Sensing response under various RH conditions (12-96%) at RT is presented and discussed. A humidity sensor based on laterally oriented ZnO NWs with a sensing response (R12%/R96%) as high as 2.2 was obtained at RT. The RT-operable humidity-sensing characteristics with comparably good sensitivity of the proposed humidity sensors is attributed to the full utilization of the entire NW surface, because the current path is aligned with the orientation of the bridged lateral ZnO NWs during the humidity sensing application, thus making possible.

  16. Warehouse multipoint temperature and humidity monitoring system design based on Kingview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Yanghui; Wang, Xifu; Liu, Jingyun

    2017-04-01

    Storage is the key link of modern logistics. Warehouse environment monitoring is an important part of storage safety management. To meet the storage requirements of different materials, guarantee their quality in the greatest extent, which has great significance. In the warehouse environment monitoring, the most important parameters are air temperature and relative humidity. In this paper, a design of warehouse multipoint temperature and humidity monitoring system based on King view, which realizes the multipoint temperature and humidity data real-time acquisition, monitoring and storage in warehouse by using temperature and humidity sensor. Also, this paper will take the bulk grain warehouse as an example and based on the data collected in real-time monitoring, giving the corresponding expert advice that combined with the corresponding algorithm, providing theoretical guidance to control the temperature and humidity in grain warehouse.

  17. Using Relative Humidity Indicator Paper to Measure Seed and Commodity Moisture Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent J. Bradford

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Declines of seed viability in storage and losses of stored commodities due to fungal spoilage and insect pests are promoted by high moisture content. However, measuring seed or grain moisture content in the field can be difficult, particularly in rural locations in developing countries. Because seed/commodity moisture content is uniquely related to equilibrium relative humidity at a given temperature, moisture content can be estimated by measuring the relative humidity of a sample enclosed in a sealed container. Relative humidity can be measured using electronic meters, or even more inexpensively using indicator paper that changes color in response to relative humidity. We describe this method and provide a spreadsheet to convert relative humidity to moisture content for many common seeds and commodities. This simple method can be used in the field for quickly estimating seed or commodity moisture content to determine whether further drying is needed or is suitable for storage, milling or other uses.

  18. Bullet Optical Fiber Humidity Sensor Based on Ag Nanoparticles Dispersed in Leaf Extract of Alstonia Scholaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu VIJAYAN

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available An optical fiber with a clad of Ag nanoparticles dispersed in leaf extract of Alstonia Scholaris is used as an optical humidity sensor. The fabricated sensor showed response to humidity in the range of 40-95%. The specialty of this sensor is that it can be used when stored at room temperature (25 oC up to a maximum of 25 days with 90% retention of original sensitivity. These humidity sensing bio-films showed good operational efficiency for 5 cycles. The plastic optical fiber is versatile and can be used easily for humidity measurement with high sensitivity. The sensor exhibited a short response time of 4-5 sec. and recovery time of 45 sec with repeatability, reproducibility and low hysteresis effect. This Ag dispersed in leaf extract of Alstonia Scholaris showed higher humidity response compared to response shown by the leaf extract alone.

  19. A Capacitive Humidity Sensor Based on an Electrospun PVDF/Graphene Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Rivera, Daniel; Rodríguez-Roldán, Grissel; Mora-Martínez, Rodrigo; Suaste-Gómez, Ernesto

    2017-05-03

    Humidity sensors have been widely used in areas such as agriculture, environmental conservation, medicine, instrumentation and climatology. Hydrophobicity is one of the important factors in capacitive humidity sensors: recent research has shown that the inclusion of graphene (G) in polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) improves its hydrophobicity. In this context, a methodology to fabricate electrospun membranes of PVDF blended with G was developed in order to improve the PVDF properties allowing the use of PVDF/G membrane as a capacitive humidity sensor. Micrographs of membranes were obtained by scanning electron microscopy to analyze the morphology of the fabricated samples. Subsequently, the capacitive response of the membrane, which showed an almost linear and directly proportional response to humidity, was tested. Results showed that the response time of PVDF/G membrane was faster than that of a commercial DHT11 sensor. In summary, PVDF/G membranes exhibit interesting properties as humidity sensors.

  20. Immobilization of Bovine Serum Albumin Upon Multiwall Carbon Nanotube for High Speed Humidity Sensing Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sankhya; Sasmal, Milan

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-speed humidity sensor based on immobilization of bovine serum albumin upon multiwall carbon nanotube (IBC). A simple and versatile drop casting technique was employed to make the humidity sensor using novel material IBC at room temperature. IBC was synthesized using easy solution process technique. The working principle of the IBC humidity sensor depends upon the variation of output current or conductance with the exposure of different humidity level. Humidity sensing properties of our device is explained on the basis of charge transfer from water molecules to IBC and bovine serum albumin to multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT). Our sensor exhibits faster response time around 1.2 s and recovery time 1.5 s respectively.

  1. Modeling Validation and Control Analysis for Controlled Temperature and Humidity of Air Conditioning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Nang Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study constructs an energy based model of thermal system for controlled temperature and humidity air conditioning system, and introduces the influence of the mass flow rate, heater and humidifier for proposed control criteria to achieve the controlled temperature and humidity of air conditioning system. Then, the reliability of proposed thermal system model is established by both MATLAB dynamic simulation and the literature validation. Finally, the PID control strategy is applied for controlling the air mass flow rate, humidifying capacity, and heating, capacity. The simulation results show that the temperature and humidity are stable at 541 sec, the disturbance of temperature is only 0.14°C, 0006 kgw/kgda in steady-state error of humidity ratio, and the error rate is only 7.5%. The results prove that the proposed system is an effective controlled temperature and humidity of an air conditioning system.

  2. AIR HUMIDITY AND EVAPORATION CONDITIONS IN POLAND IN RELATION TO ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION PATTERNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. WYPYCH

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The issue describing the amount of water vapour in the atmosphere and its backgrounds seems to be very important because of water vapour role among meteorological processes which are taking place within the atmosphere. The principal aim of this study is to examine the atmospheric circulation conditionings of evaporation and air humidity differentiation in Poland. Research was based on data for the period 1981-2010. The temporal and spatial differentiation of evaporation and air humidity in relation to atmospheric circulation patterns were examined by analysis of evaporation, evapotranspiration as well as specific humidity and saturation deficit values. The circulation factor was determined by a local atmospheric circulation calendar by Niedzwiedz. The results showed that atmospheric circulation is an important factor for humidity and evaporation conditions with the most significant: water vapour content and air mass temperature. Both air humidity and evaporation report temporal and spatial differentiation modified by particular synoptic situations. It is proved mainly by the extremes.

  3. Humid air corrosion of YMP waste package candidate material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdowski, G.E.

    1998-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is evaluating candidate materials for high level nuclear waste containers (Waste Packages) for a potential deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The potential repository is located above the water table in the unsaturated zone. The rock contains nominally 10% by volume water and gas pressure in the emplacement drifts of the repository is expected to remain near the ambient atmospheric pressure. The heat generated by the radioactive decay of the waste will raise the temperature of the waste packages and the surrounding rock. Waste Package temperatures above the ambient boiling point of water are anticipated for the waste emplacement scenarios. Because the repository emplacement drifts are expected to remain at the ambient atmospheric pressure, the maximum relative humidity obtainable decreases above the boiling point of water. Temperatures of the Waste Packages and the surrounding rock are expected to reach maximum temperature within 100`s of years and then gradually decrease with time. Episodic liquid water contact with the WPs is also expected; this will result in the deposition of salts and mineral scale.

  4. Flexible Nanowire Cluster as a Wearable Colorimetric Humidity Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Zhang-Kai; Li, Qiuyu; Xue, Jiancai; Di Falco, Andrea; Yang, Zhongjian; Zhou, Jianhua; Wang, Xuehua

    2017-07-01

    Wearable plasmonic devices combine the advantages of high flexibility, ultrathinness, light weight, and excellent integration with the optical benefits mediated by plasmon-enhanced electric fields. However, two obstacles severely hinder further developments and applications of a wearable plasmonic device. One is the lack of efficient approach to obtaining devices with robust antimotion-interference property, i.e., the devices can work independently on the morphology changes of their working structures caused by arbitrary wearing conditions. The other issue is to seek a facile and high-throughput fabrication method to satisfy the financial requirement of industrialization. In order to overcome these two challenges, a functional flexible film of nanowire cluster is developed, which can be easily fabricated by taking the advantages of both conventional electrochemical and sputtering methods. Such flexible plasmonic films can be made into wearable devices that work independently on shape changes induced by various wearing conditions (such as bending, twisting and stretching). Furthermore, due to plasmonic advantages of color controlling and high sensitivity to environment changes, the flexible film of nanowire cluster can be used to fabricate wearable items (such as bracelet, clothes, bag, or even commercial markers), with the ability of wireless visualization for humidity sensing. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Relative humidity and activity patterns of Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, K.A.; Ginsberg, Howard S.; Gonzalez, L.; Mather, T.N.

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory studies have shown clear relationships between relative humidity (RH) and the activity and survival of Ixodes scapularis Say (blacklegged tick). However, field studies have produced conflicting results. We examined this relationship using weekly tick count totals and hourly RH observations at three field sites, stratified by latitude, within the state of Rhode Island. Records of nymphal tick abundance were compared with several RH-related variables (e.g., RH at time of sampling and mean weekly daytime RH). In total, 825 nymphs were sampled in 2009, a year of greater precipitation, with a weighted average leaf litter RH recorded at time of sampling of 85.22%. Alternatively, 649 nymphs were collected in 2010, a year of relatively low precipitation, and a weighted average RH recorded at time of sampling was 75.51%. Negative binomial regression analysis of tick count totals identified cumulative hours <82% RH threshold as a significant factor observed in both years (2009: P = 0.0037; 2010: P < 0.0001). Mean weekly daytime RH did not significantly predict tick activity in either year. However, mean weekly daytime RH recorded with 1-wk lag before sample date was a significant variable (P = 0.0016) in 2010. These results suggest a lag effect between moisture availability and patterns of tick activity and abundance. Differences in the relative importance of each RH variable between years may have been due to abnormally wet summer conditions in 2009.

  6. Soil variations on hillslopes in humid temperate climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Gerrard, A.

    1990-09-01

    Considerable insight into the nature and causes of soil variations on hillslopes has been provided by studies which have incorporated both pedological and geomorphological concepts into their methodology. Even so, there is still a great deal of uncertainty concerning the relationships between soils and landforms. This paper attempts to outline the conceptual and methodological issues involved in such a synthesis by examining the nature of soil variation on specific examples of landscapes in humid temperate climates. It has not been possible to examine soils across the whole of this region but soil-landform relationships on the Chalk of southeast England, the granite uplands of Dartmoor and in the Wyre Forest of England have been used to examine a number of well-established principles. One of these principles is that many landscapes possess slopes with easily identifiable toposequences. The hillslopes analysed have shown that relationships do exist between soils and landforms but the idea that many slopes are integrated along their entire length is not necessarily true. Individual components of slopes possess soil characteristics that appear to be related to the morphological nature of those components but the slopes, as a whole, do not possess integrated soil systems. Different parts of the slope appear to act independently. This questions the validity of employing traditional concepts such as that of the catena in soil-landform relationships.

  7. Scanning Mechanism of the FY-3 Microwave Humidity Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Manfred; Jing, Li; Hehr, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Astrium GmbH Germany, developed the scanning equipment for the instrument package of the MicroWave Humidity Sounder (MWHS) flying on the FY-3 meteorological satellite (FY means Feng Yun, Wind and Cloud) in a sun-synchronized orbit of 850-km altitude and at an inclination of 98.8 . The scanning mechanism rotates at variable velocity comprising several acceleration / deceleration phases during each revolution. The Scanning Mechanism contains two output shafts, each rotating a parabolic offset Antenna Reflector. The mechanism is operated in closed loop by means of redundant control electronics. MWHS is a sounding radiometer for measurement of global atmospheric water vapour profiles. An Engineering Qualification Model was developed and qualified and a first Flight Model was launched early 2008. The system is now working for more than two years successful in orbit. A second Flight Model of the Antenna Scanning Mechanism and of its associated control electronics was built and delivered to the customer for application on the follow-on spacecraft that will be launched by the end of 2010.

  8. Submm-Wave Radiometry for Cloud/Humidity/Precipitation Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong L.

    2011-01-01

    Although active sensors can provide cloud profiles at good vertical resolution, clouds are often coupled with dynamics to form fast and organized structures. Lack of understanding of these organized systems leads to great challenge for numerical models. The deficiency is partly reflected, for example, in poorly modeled intraseasonal variations (e.g., MJD). Remote sensing clouds in the middle and upper troposphere has been challenging from space. Vis/IR sensors are sensitive to the topmost cloud layers whereas low-frequency MW techniques are sensitivity to liquid and precipitation at the bottom of cloud layers. The middle-level clouds, mostly in the ice phase, require a sensor that has moderate penetration and sensitivity to cloud scattering, in order to measure cloud water content. Sensors at submm wavelengths provide promising sensitivity and coverage with the spatial resolution needed to measure cloud water content floating in the upper air. In addition, submm-wave sensors are able to provide better measurements of upper-tropospheric humidity than traditional microwave instruments.

  9. Building America Indoor Temperature and Humidity Measurement Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engebrecht-Metzger, Cheryn [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Norton, Paul [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-02-01

    When modeling homes using simulation tools, the heating and cooling set points can have a significant impact on home energy use. Every 4 years the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) asks homeowners about their heating and cooling set points. Unfortunately, no temperature data is measured, and most of the time, the homeowner may be guessing at this number. Even one degree Fahrenheit difference in heating set point can make a 5% difference in heating energy use! So, the survey-based RECS data cannot be used as the definitive reference for the set point for the 'average occupant' in simulations. The purpose of this document is to develop a protocol for collecting consistent data for heating/cooling set points and relative humidity so that an average set point can be determined for asset energy models in residential buildings. This document covers the decision making process for researchers to determine how many sensors should be placed in each home, where to put those sensors, and what kind of asset data should be taken while they are in the home. The authors attempted to design the protocols to maximize the value of this study and minimize the resources required to achieve that value.

  10. The Building America Indoor Temperature and Humidity Measurement Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzger, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Norton, Paul [Norton Energy Research & Development, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-02-01

    When modeling homes using simulation tools, the heating and cooling set points can have a significant impact on home energy use. Every four years, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) asks homeowners about their heating and cooling set points. Unfortunately, no temperature data is measured, and most of the time, the homeowner may be guessing at this number. Even one degree Fahrenheit difference in heating set point can make a 5% difference in heating energy use! So, the survey-based RECS data cannot be used as the definitive reference for the set point for the "average occupant" in simulations. The purpose of this document is to develop a protocol for collecting consistent data for heating/cooling set points and relative humidity so that an average set point can be determined for asset energy models in residential buildings. This document covers the decision making process for researchers to determine how many sensors should be placed in each home, where to put those sensors, and what kind of asset data should be taken while they are in the home. The authors attempted to design the protocols to maximize the value of this study and minimize the resources required to achieve that value.

  11. The effect of relative humidity on binary gas diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrath, Nelson G C; Shen, Jun; Song, Datong; Rohling, Jurandir H; Astrath, Francine B G; Zhou, Jianqin; Navessin, Titichai; Liu, Zhong Sheng Simon; Gu, Caikang E; Zhao, Xinsheng

    2009-06-18

    The dependence of diffusion coefficient of O2-N2 mixture in the presence of water vapor was experimentally determined as a function of relative humidity (RH) with different temperatures using an in-house made Loschmidt diffusion cell. The experimental results showed that O2-N2 diffusion coefficient increased more than 17% when RH increased from 0% to 80% at 79 degrees C. In the experiments, the RH in both top and bottom chambers of the diffusion cell were the same, and the pressure inside the diffusion cell was kept as ambient pressure (1 atm.). Maxwell-Stefan theory was employed to analyze the mass transport in the diffusion cell, and found that there was no effective water vapor diffusion taking place, indicating that the gas diffusion in this ternary (O2-N2-water vapor) system could be considered binary gas (O2-N2) diffusion. The Fuller, Schettler, and Giddings (FSG) empirical equation of the kinetic theory of gases was generalized to accommodate the dependence of the binary diffusion coefficient on the RH. The prediction of the generalized equation was found to be consistent with experimental results with the difference of less than 1.5%, showing that the generalized equation could be applied to calculate the diffusion coefficients of the binary gaseous mixture with different temperature and RH values. The effect of water vapor on the increase of O2-N2 diffusion coefficient was discussed using molecule theory.

  12. Analysis of Skin Humidity Variation Between Sasang Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon-Oh Jung

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between variations in skin humidity (SH induced by perspiration across Sasang types and to identify novel and effective Sasang classification factors. We also analyzed the responses of each Sasang type to sweating-related QSCC II items. The results revealed a significant difference in SH across gender and significant differences in SH before and after perspiration between Tae-Eum and So-Eum men. In addition, Tae-Eum women showed significant differences in SH compared with women classified as another Sasang type. Furthermore, evaluation of the items related to sweating in the QSCC II and their relationship to each constitution revealed a significant difference between Tae-Eum and other Sasang types. Overall, the results of this study indicate that there is a distinct SH difference following perspiration between Tae-Eum and other Sasang types. Such findings may aid in Sasang typology diagnostic testing with the support of further sophisticated clinical studies.

  13. Environmental dust effects on aluminum surfaces in humid air ambient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Hassan, Ghassan; Ali, Haider; Al-Aqeeli, Nasser

    2017-04-01

    Environmental dusts settle on surfaces and influence the performance of concentrated solar energy harvesting devices, such as aluminum troughs. The characteristics of environmental dust and the effects of mud formed from the dust particles as a result of water condensing in humid air conditions on an aluminum wafer surface are examined. The dissolution of alkaline and alkaline earth compounds in water condensate form a chemically active mud liquid with pH 8.2. Due to gravity, the mud liquid settles at the interface of the mud and the aluminum surface while forming locally scattered patches of liquid films. Once the mud liquid dries, adhesion work to remove the dry mud increases significantly. The mud liquid gives rise to the formation of pinholes and local pit sites on the aluminum surface. Morphological changes due to pit sites and residues of the dry mud on the aluminum surface lower the surface reflection after the removal of the dry mud from the surface. The characteristics of the aluminum surface can address the dust/mud-related limitations of reflective surfaces and may have implications for the reductions in the efficiencies of solar concentrated power systems.

  14. Effect of humidity and temperature on the survival of Listeria monocytogenes on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, J; Verran, J

    2017-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogenic bacterium, with human disease and infection linked to dairy products, seafood, ready-to-eat meat and raw & undercooked meats. Stainless steel is the most common food preparation surface and therefore, it is important to understand how food storage conditions such as surface materials, temperature and relative humidity can affect survival of L. monocytogenes. In this study, survival of L. monocytogenes on stainless steel was investigated at three temperatures (4, 10 and 21°C), each approx. 11, 50 and 85% humidity. Results indicate that the lower the temperature, the more cells were recovered in all three humidity environments, while medium humidity enhances survival, irrespective of temperature. Lower humidity decreases recovery at all temperatures. These data support the guidance noted above that humidity control is important, and that lower humidity environments are less likely to support retention of viable L. monocytogenes on a stainless steel surface. Understanding survival of potential food-borne pathogens is essential for the safe production and preparation of food. While it has long been 'common knowledge' that relative humidity can affect the growth and survival of micro-organisms, this study systematically describes the survival of L. monocytogenes on stainless steel under varying humidity and temperatures for the first time. The outcomes from this paper will allow those involved with food manufacture and preparation to make informed judgement on environmental conditions relating to humidity control, which is lacking in the food standards guidelines. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Comparison of land surface humidity between observations and CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert J. H.; Willett, Kate M.; Ciavarella, Andrew; Stott, Peter A.

    2017-08-01

    We compare the latest observational land surface humidity dataset, HadISDH, with the latest generation of climate models extracted from the CMIP5 archive and the ERA-Interim reanalysis over the period 1973 to present. The globally averaged behaviour of HadISDH and ERA-Interim are very similar in both humidity measures and air temperature, on decadal and interannual timescales. The global average relative humidity shows a gradual increase from 1973 to 2000, followed by a steep decline in recent years. The observed specific humidity shows a steady increase in the global average during the early period but in the later period it remains approximately constant. None of the CMIP5 models or experiments capture the observed behaviour of the relative or specific humidity over the entire study period. When using an atmosphere-only model, driven by observed sea surface temperatures and radiative forcing changes, the behaviour of regional average temperature and specific humidity are better captured, but there is little improvement in the relative humidity. Comparing the observed climatologies with those from historical model runs shows that the models are generally cooler everywhere, are drier and less saturated in the tropics and extra-tropics, and have comparable moisture levels but are more saturated in the high latitudes. The spatial pattern of linear trends is relatively similar between the models and HadISDH for temperature and specific humidity, but there are large differences for relative humidity, with less moistening shown in the models over the tropics and very little at high latitudes. The observed drying in mid-latitudes is present at a much lower magnitude in the CMIP5 models. Relationships between temperature and humidity anomalies (T-q and T-rh) show good agreement for specific humidity between models and observations, and between the models themselves, but much poorer for relative humidity. The T-q correlation from the models is more steeply positive than

  16. Comparison of land surface humidity between observations and CMIP5 models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. H. Dunn

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We compare the latest observational land surface humidity dataset, HadISDH, with the latest generation of climate models extracted from the CMIP5 archive and the ERA-Interim reanalysis over the period 1973 to present. The globally averaged behaviour of HadISDH and ERA-Interim are very similar in both humidity measures and air temperature, on decadal and interannual timescales. The global average relative humidity shows a gradual increase from 1973 to 2000, followed by a steep decline in recent years. The observed specific humidity shows a steady increase in the global average during the early period but in the later period it remains approximately constant. None of the CMIP5 models or experiments capture the observed behaviour of the relative or specific humidity over the entire study period. When using an atmosphere-only model, driven by observed sea surface temperatures and radiative forcing changes, the behaviour of regional average temperature and specific humidity are better captured, but there is little improvement in the relative humidity. Comparing the observed climatologies with those from historical model runs shows that the models are generally cooler everywhere, are drier and less saturated in the tropics and extra-tropics, and have comparable moisture levels but are more saturated in the high latitudes. The spatial pattern of linear trends is relatively similar between the models and HadISDH for temperature and specific humidity, but there are large differences for relative humidity, with less moistening shown in the models over the tropics and very little at high latitudes. The observed drying in mid-latitudes is present at a much lower magnitude in the CMIP5 models. Relationships between temperature and humidity anomalies (T–q and T–rh show good agreement for specific humidity between models and observations, and between the models themselves, but much poorer for relative humidity. The T–q correlation from the models is more

  17. Effect of feed-gas humidity on nitrogen atmospheric-pressure plasma jet for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Karl D; McLean, Robert J C; DeLeon, Gian; Melnikov, Vadim

    2016-11-14

    We investigate the effect of feed-gas humidity on the oxidative properties of an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet using nitrogen gas. Plasma jets operating at atmospheric pressure are finding uses in medical and biological settings for sterilization and other applications involving oxidative stress applied to organisms. Most jets use noble gases, but some researchers use less expensive nitrogen gas. The feed-gas water content (humidity) has been found to influence the performance of noble-gas plasma jets, but has not yet been systematically investigated for jets using nitrogen gas. Low-humidity and high-humidity feed gases were used in a nitrogen plasma jet, and the oxidation effect of the jet was measured quantitatively using a chemical dosimeter known as FBX (ferrous sulfate-benzoic acid-xylenol orange). The plasma jet using high humidity was found to have about ten times the oxidation effect of the low-humidity jet, as measured by comparison with the addition of measured amounts of hydrogen peroxide to the FBX dosimeter. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using nitrogen as a feed gas have a greater oxidizing effect with a high level of humidity added to the feed gas.

  18. Comparison of land-surface humidity between observations and CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert; Willett, Kate; Ciavarella, Andrew; Stott, Peter; Jones, Gareth

    2017-04-01

    We compare the latest observational land-surface humidity dataset, HadISDH, with the CMIP5 model archive spatially and temporally over the period 1973-2015. None of the CMIP5 models or experiments capture the observed temporal behaviour of the globally averaged relative or specific humidity over the entire study period. When using an atmosphere-only model, driven by observed sea-surface temperatures and radiative forcing changes, the behaviour of regional average temperature and specific humidity are better captured, but there is little improvement in the relative humidity. Comparing the observed and historical model climatologies show that the models are generally cooler everywhere, are drier and less saturated in the tropics and extra tropics, and have comparable moisture levels but are more saturated in the high latitudes. The spatial pattern of linear trends are relatively similar between the models and HadISDH for temperature and specific humidity, but there are large differences for relative humidity, with less moistening shown in the models over the Tropics, and very little at high atitudes. The observed temporal behaviour appears to be a robust climate feature rather than observational error. It has been previously documented and is theoretically consistent with faster warming rates over land compared to oceans. Thus, the poor replication in the models, especially in the atmosphere only model, leads to questions over future projections of impacts related to changes in surface relative humidity.

  19. Fabrication and Evaluation of a Graphene Oxide-Based Capacitive Humidity Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinfeng; Kang, Xiaoxu; Zuo, Qingyun; Yuan, Chao; Wang, Weijun; Zhao, Yuhang; Zhu, Limin; Lu, Hanwei; Chen, Juying

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a CMOS compatible capacitive humidity sensor structure was designed and fabricated on a 200 mm CMOS BEOL Line. A top Al interconnect layer was used as an electrode with a comb/serpent structure, and graphene oxide (GO) was used as sensing material. XRD analysis was done which shows that GO sensing material has a strong and sharp (002) peak at about 10.278°, whereas graphite has (002) peak at about 26°. Device level CV and IV curves were measured in mini-environments at different relative humidity (RH) level, and saturated salt solutions were used to build these mini-environments. To evaluate the potential value of GO material in humidity sensor applications, a prototype humidity sensor was designed and fabricated by integrating the sensor with a dedicated readout ASIC and display/calibration module. Measurements in different mini-environments show that the GO-based humidity sensor has higher sensitivity, faster recovery time and good linearity performance. Compared with a standard humidity sensor, the measured RH data of our prototype humidity sensor can match well that of the standard product.

  20. Fabrication and Evaluation of a Graphene Oxide-Based Capacitive Humidity Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinfeng Feng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a CMOS compatible capacitive humidity sensor structure was designed and fabricated on a 200 mm CMOS BEOL Line. A top Al interconnect layer was used as an electrode with a comb/serpent structure, and graphene oxide (GO was used as sensing material. XRD analysis was done which shows that GO sensing material has a strong and sharp (002 peak at about 10.278°, whereas graphite has (002 peak at about 26°. Device level CV and IV curves were measured in mini-environments at different relative humidity (RH level, and saturated salt solutions were used to build these mini-environments. To evaluate the potential value of GO material in humidity sensor applications, a prototype humidity sensor was designed and fabricated by integrating the sensor with a dedicated readout ASIC and display/calibration module. Measurements in different mini-environments show that the GO-based humidity sensor has higher sensitivity, faster recovery time and good linearity performance. Compared with a standard humidity sensor, the measured RH data of our prototype humidity sensor can match well that of the standard product.

  1. Crystallization speed of salbutamol as a function of relative humidity and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellnitz, Sarah; Narygina, Olga; Resch, Christian; Schroettner, Hartmuth; Urbanetz, Nora Anne

    2015-07-15

    Spray dried salbutamol sulphate and salbutamol base particles are amorphous as a result of spray drying. As there is always the risk of recrystallization of amorphous material, the aim of this work is the evaluation of the temperature and humidity dependent recrystallization of spray dried salbutamol sulphate and base. Therefore in-situ Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD) studies of the crystallization process at various temperature (25 and 35 °C) and humidity (60%, 70%, 80%, 90% relative humidity) conditions were performed. It was shown that the crystallization speed of salbutamol sulphate and base is a non-linear function of both temperature and relative humidity. The higher the relative humidity the higher is the crystallization speed. At 60% relative humidity salbutamol base as well as salbutamol sulphate were found to be amorphous even after 12 h, however samples changed optically. At 70% and 90% RH recrystallization of salbutamol base is completed after 3 h and 30 min and recrystallization of salbutamol sulphate after 4h and 1h, respectively. Higher temperature (35 °C) also leads to increased crystallization speeds at all tested values of relative humidity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of relative humidity on analyzing electric field exposure using ELF electric field measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpinen, Leena H; Kuisti, Harri A; Tarao, Hiroo; Elovaara, Jarmo A

    2013-07-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the influence of humidity on analyzing electric field exposure using extremely low frequency (ELF) electric field measurements. The study included 322 measurements in a climate room. We used two commercial three-axis meters, EFA-3 and EFA-300, and employed two measurement techniques in the climate room where we varied the temperature from 15 to 25 °C, the relative humidity from 55% to 95%, and the electric field from 1 to 25 kV/m. We calculated Pearson correlations between humidity and percentage errors for all data and for data at different levels of humidity. When the relative humidity was below 70%, the results obtained by the different measurement methods in terms of percentage errors were of the same order of magnitude for the considered temperatures and field strength, but the results were less reliable when the relative humidity was higher than 80%. In the future, it is important to take humidity into account when electric field measurement results will be compared to the values given in different exposure guidelines. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. CFD Modeling of LNG Spill: Humidity Effect on Vapor Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannissi, S. G.; Venetsanos, A. G.; Markatos, N.

    2015-09-01

    The risks entailed by an accidental spill of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) should be indentified and evaluated, in order to design measures for prevention and mitigation in LNG terminals. For this purpose, simulations are considered a useful tool to study LNG spills and to understand the mechanisms that influence the vapor dispersion. In the present study, the ADREA-HF CFD code is employed to simulate the TEEX1 experiment. The experiment was carried out at the Brayton Fire Training Field, which is affiliated with the Texas A&M University system and involves LNG release and dispersion over water surface in open- obstructed environment. In the simulation the source was modeled as a two-phase jet enabling the prediction of both the vapor dispersion and the liquid pool spreading. The conservation equations for the mixture are solved along with the mass fraction for natural gas. Due to the low prevailing temperatures during the spill ambient humidity condenses and this might affect the vapor dispersion. This effect was examined in this work by solving an additional conservation equation for the water mass fraction. Two different models were tested: the hydrodynamic equilibrium model which assumes kinetic equilibrium between the phases and the non hydrodynamic equilibrium model, in order to assess the effect of slip velocity on the prediction. The slip velocity is defined as the difference between the liquid phase and the vapor phase and is calculated using the algebraic slip model. Constant droplet diameter of three different sizes and a lognormal distribution of the droplet diameter were applied and the results are discussed and compared with the measurements.

  4. Non-Venting Thermal and Humidity Control for EVA Suits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izenson, Mike; Chen, Weibo; Bue, Grant

    2011-01-01

    Future EVA suits need processes and systems to control internal temperature and humidity without venting water to the environment. This paper describes an absorption-based cooling and dehumidification system as well as laboratory demonstrations of the key processes. There are two main components in the system: an evaporation cooling and dehumidification garment (ECDG) that removes both sensible heat and latent heat from the pressure garment, and an absorber radiator that absorbs moisture and rejects heat to space by thermal radiation. This paper discusses the overall design of both components, and presents recent data demonstrating their operation. We developed a design and fabrication approach to produce prototypical heat/water absorbing elements for the ECDG, and demonstrated by test that these elements could absorb heat and moisture at a high flux. Proof-of-concept tests showed that an ECDG prototype absorbs heat and moisture at a rate of 85 W/ft under conditions that simulate operation in an EVA suit. The heat absorption was primarily due to direct absorption of water vapor. It is possible to construct large, flexible, durable cooling patches that can be incorporated into a cooling garment with this system. The proof-of-concept test data was scaled to calculate area needed for full metabolic loads, thus showing that it is feasible to use this technology in an EVA suit. Full-scale, lightweight absorber/radiator modules have also been built and tested. They can reject heat at a flux of 33 W/ft while maintaining ECDG operation at conditions that will provide a cool and dry environment inside the EVA suit.

  5. Assessment of the combination of temperature and relative humidity on kidney stone presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Michelle E; Vicedo-Cabrera, Ana M; Kopp, Robert E; Song, Lihai; Goldfarb, David S; Pulido, Jose; Warner, Steven; Furth, Susan L; Tasian, Gregory E

    2017-12-28

    Temperature and relative humidity have opposing effects on evaporative water loss, the likely mediator of the temperature-dependence of nephrolithiasis. However, prior studies considered only dry-bulb temperatures when estimating the temperature-dependence of nephrolithiasis. We used distributed lag non-linear models and repeated 10-fold cross-validation to determine the daily temperature metric and corresponding adjustment for relative humidity that most accurately predicted kidney stone presentations during hot and cold periods in South Carolina from 1997 to 2015. We examined three metrics for wet-bulb temperatures and heat index, both of which measure the combination of temperature and humidity, and for dry-bulb temperatures: (1) daytime mean temperature; (2) 24-h mean temperature; and (3) most extreme 24-h temperature. For models using dry-bulb temperatures, we considered four treatments of relative humidity. Among 188,531 patients who presented with kidney stones, 24-h wet bulb temperature best predicted kidney stone presentation during summer. Mean cross-validated residuals were generally lower in summer for wet-bulb temperatures and heat index than the corresponding dry-bulb temperature metric, regardless of type of adjustment for relative humidity. Those dry-bulb models that additionally adjusted for relative humidity had higher mean residuals than other temperature metrics. The relative risk of kidney stone presentations at the 99th percentile of each temperature metric compared to the respective median temperature in summer months differed by temperature metric and relative humidity adjustment, and ranged from an excess risk of 8-14%. All metrics performed similarly in winter. The combination of temperature and relative humidity determine the risk of kidney stone presentations, particularly during periods of high heat and humidity. These results suggest that metrics that measure moist heat stress should be used to estimate the temperature-dependence of

  6. Developmental acclimation to low or high humidity conditions affect starvation and heat resistance of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkash, Ravi; Ranga, Poonam; Aggarwal, Dau Dayal

    2014-09-01

    Several Drosophila species originating from tropical humid localities are more resistant to starvation and heat stress than populations from high latitudes but mechanistic bases of such physiological changes are largely unknown. In order to test whether humidity levels affect starvation and heat resistance, we investigated developmental acclimation effects of low to high humidity conditions on the storage and utilization of energy resources, body mass, starvation survival, heat knockdown and heat survival of D. melanogaster. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity (85% RH) stored significantly higher level of lipids and showed greater starvation survival hours but smaller in body size. In contrast, lines reared at low humidity evidenced reduced levels of body lipids and starvation resistance. Starvation resistance and lipid storage level were higher in females than males. However, the rate of utilization of lipids under starvation stress was lower for lines reared under higher humidity. Adult flies of lines reared at 65% RH and acclimated under high or low humidity condition for 200 hours also showed changes in resistance to starvation and heat but such effects were significantly lower as compared with developmental acclimation. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity showed greater heat knockdown time and heat-shock survival. These laboratory observations on developmental and adult acclimation effects of low versus high humidity conditions have helped in explaining seasonal changes in resistance to starvation and heat of the wild-caught flies of D. melanogaster. Thus, we may suggest that wet versus drier conditions significantly affect starvation and heat resistance of D. melanogaster. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Floral humidity as a reliable sensory cue for profitability assessment by nectar-foraging hawkmoths

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Arx, Martin; Goyret, Joaquín; Davidowitz, Goggy; Raguso, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Most research on plant–pollinator communication has focused on sensory and behavioral responses to relatively static cues. Floral rewards such as nectar, however, are dynamic, and foraging animals will increase their energetic profit if they can make use of floral cues that more accurately indicate nectar availability. Here we document such a cue—transient humidity gradients—using the night blooming flowers of Oenothera cespitosa (Onagraceae). The headspace of newly opened flowers reaches levels of about 4% above ambient relative humidity due to additive evapotranspirational water loss through petals and water-saturated air from the nectar tube. Floral humidity plumes differ from ambient levels only during the first 30 min after anthesis (before nectar is depleted in wild populations), whereas other floral traits (scent, shape, and color) persist for 12–24 h. Manipulative experiments indicated that floral humidity gradients are mechanistically linked to nectar volume and therefore contain information about energy rewards to floral visitors. Behavioral assays with Hyles lineata (Sphingidae) and artificial flowers with appropriate humidity gradients suggest that these hawkmoth pollinators distinguish between subtle differences in relative humidity when other floral cues are held constant. Moths consistently approached and probed flowers with elevated humidity over those with ambient humidity levels. Because floral humidity gradients are largely produced by the evaporation of nectar itself, they represent condition-informative cues that facilitate remote sensing of floral profitability by discriminating foragers. In a xeric environment, this level of honest communication should be adaptive when plant reproductive success is pollinator limited, due to intense competition for the attention of a specialized pollinator. PMID:22645365

  8. Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives under the Influence of Relative Humidity: Inner Structure and Failure Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Markus; Koller, Manuel; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-06-17

    Model pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) films of the statistical copolymer P(EHA-stat-20MMA), which comprises 80% ethylhexyl acrylate (EHA) and 20% methyl methacrylate (MMA), are studied. The PSA films are stored under different relative humidities from adhesive bond are found by adjusting the relative humidity. XRR measurements evidence enrichment layers in vicinity to and at the surface depending on the provided relative humidity during the postproduction treatment, which also influence the tack performance. This finding is supported by tack measurements using punches with different roughness.

  9. Integrated passive and wireless sensor for magnetic fields, temperature and humidity

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a surface acoustic wave-based passive and wireless sensor that can measure magnetic field, temperature and humidity. A thin film giant magnetoimpedance sensor, a thermally sensitive LiNbO3 substrate and a humidity sensitive hydrogel are integrated together with a surface acoustic wave transducer to realize the multifunctional sensor. The device is characterized using a network analyzer under sequentially changing humidity, temperature and magnetic field conditions. The first hand results show the sensor response to all three sensing parameters with small temperature interference on the magnetic signals. © 2013 IEEE.

  10. Extended Pulse-Powered Humidity-Freeze Cycling for Testing Module-Level Power Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacke, Peter L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rodriguez, Miguel [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kempe, Michael D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Repins, Ingrid L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-28

    An EMI suppression capacitor (polypropylene film type) failed by 'popcorning' due to vapor outgassing in pulse powered humidity-freeze cycles. No shorts or shunts could be detected despite mildly corroded metallization visible in the failed capacitor. Humidity-freeze cycling is optimized to break into moisture barriers. However, further studies will be required on additional module level power electronic (MLPE) devices to optimize the stress testing for condensation to precipitate any weakness to short circuiting and other humidity/bias failure modes.

  11. The effect of changing ambient humidity on moisture condition in timber elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hozjan, Tomaž; Turk, Goran; Srpcic, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of the changing ambient humidity on moisture conditions in timber elements. The naturally varying humidity is possible to model as a relative combination of different harmonic cycles, with different periods and amplitudes. For the determination of the moisture field...... fully coupled transport model including a model for the influential sorption hysteresis of wood is used. The coupled model accounts for both vapor transport in pores and bound water transport in wood tissue. Moisture state history influences relationship between moisture state of wood and air humidity...

  12. Energy efficient ventilation based on demand humidity control. Demonstration project with 49 apartments in Soenderborg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The aim of the project is to demonstrate how the overall energy consumption in apartment buildings can be reduced through a combination of: 1) Energy efficient ventilation based on demand humidity control; 2) Energy efficient design of the building shell including passive solar and seasonally flexible sunspaces; 3) Use of low temperature heating system. The 3 blocks in the project, each with 16 apartments, are furnished with 3 different ventilation systems: 1) Standard exhaust system according to building codes; 2) Ventilation system with humidity control. Each room is furnished with an air inlet valve controlled by a processor, which monitors the humidity; 3) Standard ventilation system with heat recovery. (au)

  13. Exergy analysis of air cooling systems in buildings in hot humid climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alpuche, M.G. [UNAM, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico). Posgrado en Ingenieria; Heard, C. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico DF (Mexico); Best, R.; Rojas, J. [UNAM, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico). Centro de Investigacion en Energia

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the influence of using air cooling desiccant systems on reaching thermal comfort conditions in the interior of a building, supposing this to be an open system. Exergy analysis has been carried out for the different design temperatures and relative humidity conditions within those established for ASHRAE summer thermal comfort conditions. The climatic conditions of a hot humid climate such as Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico, are used as an example. A novel reference state has been used for the exergy analysis, since this varies according to the fluctuation of the ambient temperature and humidity. (author)

  14. How to Use the DHT22 Sensor for Measuring Temperature and Humidity with the Arduino Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Mihai

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to achieve a functional system in terms of hardware and software, to measure temperature and humidity. Also, this system will allow to monitoring the time. In this, we use an Arduino board with interfacing a sensor placed in local environment to measure temperature and humidity. The paper aims to achieve the following goals: achieving a functional system in terms of hardware and software that allows measuring and monitoring temperature, humidity and the time; using a development board for the communication with the sensor and clock; implementation a program that allows requirements.

  15. Black P/graphene hybrid: A fast response humidity sensor with good reversibility and stability

    OpenAIRE

    Phan, Duy-Thach; Park, Inyong; Park, Ah-Ram; Park, Cheol-Min; Jeon, Ki-Joon

    2017-01-01

    Black phosphorus (BP) materials have attracted considerable attention owing to their ultra-sensitive humidity sensing characteristics because of the natural absorption of water (H2O) molecules on the BP surface caused by the specific 2D layer-crystalline structure. On the other hand, the BP-based humidity sensor is less repeatable due to the instability of BP with water molecules and the stability of the sensor is reduced. In this study, this limitation of the BP-based humidity sensor was ove...

  16. A nafion coated capacitive humidity sensor on a flexible PET substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Sapsanis, Christos

    2017-03-07

    This paper reports a simple and low-cost technique for fabricating low-power capacitive humidity sensors without the use of a cleanroom environment. A maskless laser engraving system was utilized to fabricate two different gold electrode structures, interdigitated electrodes and Hilbert\\'s fifth-order fractal. The capacitive structures were implemented on a flexible PET substrate. The usage of Nafion, a well-known polymer for its hydrophilic properties as a sensing film, was attempted on the PET and outperformed the current efforts in flexible substrates. Its humidity sensing properties were evaluated in an automated gas setup with a relative humidity (RH %) ranging from 15% to 95 %.

  17. Effects of chemical and physical defects on the humidity sensitivity of graphene surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Young Jun; Chun, Kyoung-Yong; Kim, Jun-Sik; Lee, Jong-Heun; Han, Chang-Soo

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the effect of the chemical and physical defects on the humidity sensitivity of graphene. For this we apply reactive ion etching for physical defects and the poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) coating for chemical defects to the CVD graphene. The tendency of humidity sensing is hardly found by the physical defects while the distinct changes are observed with chemical defects by control of the thickness and the coverage area of the PMMA on the graphene surface. The graphenes covered with thinner or smaller area of PMMA show an enhanced humidity sensitivity, indicating the possibility of H2O sensing.

  18. Impact behaviour of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene after temperature and humidity load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hylova Lenka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS which was subjected the drop-weight test before and after temperature and humidity load. ABS is an engineering plastic and also an important engineering terpolymer, which has butadiene part uniformly distributed through the acrylonitrile-styrene matrix and is commonly used in production of automotive interior components. The injection moulded ABS samples were subjected the penetration test at fall height 100 J before and after temperature and humidity load and the results were subsequently evaluated and discussed. It was found out that ABS after temperature and humidity load has lower impact resistance.

  19. Chemistry and kinetics of I2 loss in urine distillate and humidity condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwater, James E.; Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Olivadoti, J. T.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved molecular absorption spectrophotometry of iodinated ersatz humidity condensates and iodinated ersatz urine distillates across the UV and visible spectral regions are used to investigate the chemistry and kinetics of I2 loss in urine distillate and humidity condensate. Single contaminant systems at equivalent concentrations are also employed to study rates of iodine. Pseudo-first order rate constants are identified for ersatz contaminant model mixtures and for individual reactive constituents. The second order bimolecular reaction of elemental iodine with formic acid, producing carbon dioxide and iodine anion, is identified as the primary mechanism underlying the decay of residual I2 in ersatz humidity concentrate.

  20. Reconstructing Past Humidity Conditions Using Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Ritika; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Pokharia, Anil K.

    2017-04-01

    Variation of the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) in the perspective of climate change is a subject of concern given its pivotal role in sustaining the food and economic security of the Indian subcontinent. In this context, reconstruction of variation in moisture conditions (relative humidity (RH) and rainfall) associated with ISM has been carried out using tree ring archives located primarily over the Tibetan plateau [1,2]. However, limited studies have documented past variation of monsoonal RH over the main Indian landmass [3]. Here we present the potential of rice, the staple food of many ancient civilisations in Asia, to infer atmospheric moisture conditions prevalent over north-western India during 4,600 - 3500 years BP. Since rainfall associated with ISM is a crucial factor which governs rice productivity over Indian subcontinent, the rice crop is cultivated primarily during the ISM season. The sensitivity of oxygen and carbon isotope composition in the organic matter of rice and other plants (δ18OOM,δ13COM) to RH has been studied [4,5]. Thus, the present study uses stable isotope technique to decipher paleo-RH conditions using rice grains retrieved from archaeological sites belonging to the Mature Harappan phase and Chalcolithic period. The archaeo-samples were subjected to SEM/EDAX analysis to identify the morphology and elemental composition, followed by analysis for both δ18OOMgnd δ13COMafter treatment for carbonateremoval. The results obtained were compared with the observations of δ18OOM and δ13COMmeasured on modern day rice grains sampled across twenty three sites across India which experienced RH ranging from 67% to 89% (Kaushal and Ghosh (under review)). The study showed that decrease in RH was manifested as significant increase in δ18OOMvalues together with increase in the crop's intrinsic water use efficiency, as calculated from δ13COM. Based on this comparison; we inferred that the regional climate during the cultivation of the archaeo

  1. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, 5-Day, Relative Humidity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has 5-day Relative Humidity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  2. Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption for CO2, Thermal and Humidity Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MTSA technology specifically addresses the thermal, CO2 and humidity control challenges faced by Portable Life Support Systems (PLSS) to be used in NASA's...

  3. Simulation of electronic circuit sensitivity towards humidity using electrochemical data on water layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshy, Salil; Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    Climatic conditions like temperature and humidity have direct influence on the operation of electronic circuits. The effects of temperature on the operation of electronic circuits have been widely investigated, while the effect of humidity and solder flux residues are not well understood including...... the effect on circuit and PCBA (printed circuit board assembly) layout design. This paper elucidates a methodology for analyzing the sensitivity of an electronic circuit based on parasitic circuit analysis using data on electrical property of the water layer formed under humid as well as contaminated...... conditions. Some commonly used circuits are analyzed as case studies and flux related contaminations of PCBA from process is used as an example to show how different flux chemistry and humidity together compromise the circuit functionality....

  4. The effect of changing ambient humidity on moisture condition in timber elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hozjan, Tomaẑ; Turk, Goran; Srpĉiĉ, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of the changing ambient humidity on moisture conditions in timber elements. The naturally varying humidity is possible to model as a relative combination of different harmonic cycles, with different periods and amplitudes. For the determination of the moisture field...... a fully coupled transport model including a model for the influential sorption hysteresis of wood is used. The coupled model accounts for both vapor transport in pores and bound water transport in wood tissue. Moisture state history influences relationship between moisture state of wood and air humidity......, it must therefore be taken into account. In order to include history dependency, a hysteresis model is used here. Results from numerical calculations for timber specimen exposed to combined daily and annually cyclic variation of outside humidity are presented. Copyright © (2012) by WCTE 2012 Committee....

  5. Polymer Optical Fibre Bragg Grating Humidity Sensor at 100ºC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Fasano, Andrea; Markos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    We have demonstrated a polymer optical fibre Bragg grating humidity sensor that can be operated up to 100ºC. The sensor has been fabricated from a polycarbonate (PC) microstructured polymer optical fibre Bragg grating (mPOFBG). PC mPOFBG gave a relative humidity (RH) sensitivity of 6.95±0.83 pm....../% RH in the range 10-90% RH at 100ºC and a temperature sensitivity of 25.94±0.47 pm/ºC in the range 20 - 100 ºC at 90% RH. Despite PC mPOFBGs shows smaller humidity sensitivity compared to PMMA mPOFBGs, they can be used to sense humidity beyond the operating temperature limit of PMMA mPOFBGs....

  6. The Effects of the Heat and Moisture Exchanger on Humidity, Airway Temperature, and Core Body Temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delventhal, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Findings from several studies have demonstrated that the use of a heat and moisture exchanger increases airway humidity, which in turn increases mean airway temperature and prevents decreases in core body temperature...

  7. On the Temperature and Humidity Dissimilarity in the Marine Surface Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Kelly, Mark C.; Sempreviva, Anna Maria

    2014-01-01

    The dissimilarity of temperature and humidity transfer in the marine surface layer (MSL) is investigated through the relative transport efficiency and correlation coefficient of these two scalars. We examine their variability and relationship with mean values, as well as spectral characteristics....... It is shown that the dissimilarity between these two scalars in the MSL is a function of stability, the boundary-layer depth, and flow steadiness. In general the temperature and humidity are less correlated in shallow marine boundary layers compared to deep marine boundary layers, due to the stronger impact...... there is an efficient latent heat transfer but negligible sensible heat transfer. Our data suggest that parametrization of humidity fluxes via similarity theory could still be reliable when the correlation coefficient >0.5, and in near-neutral conditions the humidity flux can be estimated without use of the sensible...

  8. Ultra-compact TDLAS humidity measurement cell with advanced signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, A.; Strzoda, R.; Schrobenhauser, R.; Weigel, R.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy humidity measurements with an ultra-compact measurement cell are presented. The optical path length is 2 cm. The system uses a vertical cavity surface emitting laser at 1.854 μm. The main limiting factor of the humidity resolution is not the noise but interference fringes produced by reflecting surfaces. Next to the system setup, a novel rejection method to eliminate these fringes, based on Fourier domain analysis of the absorption line, is described. In contrast to other fringe rejection methods, the presented method is able to handle fringes, whose free spectral range is in the range of the half width of the absorption line. The achievable humidity resolution for the presented cell is below 0.25 % relative humidity at room temperature.

  9. Water Vapor Sorption Properties of Polyethylene Terephthalate over a Wide Range of Humidity and Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubelley, Florence; Planes, Emilie; Bas, Corine; Pons, Emmanuelle; Yrieix, Bernard; Flandin, Lionel

    2017-03-02

    The dynamic and equilibrium water vapor sorption properties of amorphous polyethylene terephthalate were determined via gravimetric analysis over a wide range of temperatures (23-70 °C) and humidities (0-90% RH). At low temperature and relative humidity, the dynamics of the sorption process was Fickian. Increasing the temperature or relative humidity induced a distinct up-swing effect, which was associated with a plasticization/clustering phenomenon. For high temperatures and relative humidity, a densification of the polymer was evidenced. In addition to the classical Fickian diffusion, a new parameter was introduced to express the structural modifications of PET. Finally, two partial pressures were defined as thresholds that control the transition between these three phases. A simplified state diagram was finally proposed. In addition, the thermal dependence of these sorption modes was also determined and reported. The enthalpy of Henry's water sorption and the activation energy of diffusion were independent of vapor pressure and followed an Arrhenius law.

  10. PECULIAR FEATURES OF HEAT-HUMIDITY MODE PERTAINING TO POROUS LAYERS OF ASPHALT CONCRETE PAVEMENTS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    V. Verenko; V. Sizov

    2012-01-01

    ... asphalt concrete on compact bedding can cause some deformations and destructions initiated due to humidity migration in large internal material pores and lead to material destruction during warm season...

  11. Antioxidant capacity and meat quality of broilers exposed to different ambient humidity and ammonia concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, F X; Hu, X F; Sa, R N; Liu, F Z; Li, S Y; Sun, Q Y

    2014-04-17

    To investigate the effect of humidity and ammonia on the antioxidative capacities and meat qualities of broilers, 192 broilers were divided into 2 groups: high (H, 70 ppm) and low (L, 30 ppm) ammonia concentration. These groups were divided into 30% (Treatment humidity, T) and 60% (Control humidity, C) humidity, giving 4 treatments: C+L, C+H, T+L, and T+H. Blood and muscle antioxidative capacities and meat quality were measured. In the H group, body weight (BW), average daily feed intake (ADFI), average daily weight gain (ADG), blood and muscle antioxidative capacities, and postmortem pectoral muscle a* of broilers were significantly decreased (P meat quality of broilers; T intensified these negative effects.

  12. A Capacitive Humidity Sensor Based on Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Wei-Ping; Zhao, Zhen-Gang; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Zhang, Zhong-Xin; Suo, Chun-Guang

    2009-01-01

    A new type of capacitive humidity sensor is introduced in this paper. The sensor consists of two plate electrodes coated with MWCNT films and four pieces of isolating medium at the four corners of the sensor...

  13. Highly sensitive optical detection of humidity on polymer/metal nanoparticle hybrid films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luechinger, Norman A; Loher, Stefan; Athanassiou, Evagelos K; Grass, Robert N; Stark, Wendelin J

    2007-03-13

    Porous metal films for optical humidity sensing were prepared from copper nanoparticles protected by a 2-3 nm carbon coating, a silicon tenside, and a polymeric wetting agent. Exposure to water or solvent vapor revealed an exceptional sensitivity with optical shifts in the visible light range of up to 50 nm for a change of 1% in relative humidity. These properties could be attributed to a combination of surface plasmon resonance effects at low humidity and thin film interference at higher water or solvent concentration in the surrounding air. The simple concept and use of ultra-low-cost materials suggests application of such porous metal-film-based optical humidity sensors in large-scale applications for food handling, storage, and transport.

  14. Refractive-index and absorption fluctuations in the infrared caused by temperature, humidity, and pressure fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R. J.; Clifford, S. F.; Lawrence, R. S.

    1980-10-01

    The dependence of fluctuations in atmospheric absorption and refraction upon fluctuations in temperature, humidity, and pressure is found for infrared frequencies. This dependence has contributions from line and continuum absorption and from anomalous refraction by water vapor. The functions that relate these fluctuations are necessary for evaluating degradation of electromagnetic radiation by turbulence. They are computed for a given choice of mean atmospheric conditions and graphed as functions of frequency in the wavelength range 5.7 microns to radio waves. It is found that turbulent fluctuations in total pressure give a negligible contribution to absorption and refraction fluctuations. Humidity fluctuations dominate absorption fluctuations, but contributions by temperature and humidity affect refraction fluctuations. Sufficiently strong humidity fluctuations can dominate the refraction fluctuations for some infrared frequencies but not for visible frequencies. The variance of log amplitude is examined for scintillation of infrared light to determine whether absorption or refraction fluctuations dominate under several conditions.

  15. The design of multi temperature and humidity monitoring system for incubator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junyu; Xu, Peng; Peng, Zitao; Qiang, Haonan; Shen, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-01

    Currently, there is only one monitor of the temperature and humidity in an incubator, which may cause inaccurate or unreliable data, and even endanger the life safety of the baby. In order to solve this problem,we designed a multi-point temperature and humidity monitoring system for incubators. The system uses the STC12C5A60S2 microcontrollers as the sender core chip which is connected to four AM2321 temperature and humidity sensors. We select STM32F103ZET6 core development board as the receiving end,cooperating with Zigbee wireless transmitting and receiving module to realize data acquisition and transmission. This design can realize remote real-time observation data on the computer by communicating with PC via Ethernet. Prototype tests show that the system can effectively collect and display the information of temperature and humidity of multiple incubators at the same time and there are four monitors in each incubator.

  16. Amplification of wildfire area burnt by hydrological drought in the humid tropics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muh, Taufik; Torfs, Paul J.J.F.; Uijlenhoet, Remko; Jones, Philip D.; Murdiyarso, Daniel; Lanen, van Henny A.J.

    2017-01-01

    Borneo's diverse ecosystems, which are typical humid tropical conditions, are deteriorating rapidly, as the area is experiencing recurrent large-scale wildfires, affecting atmospheric composition and influencing regional climate processes. Studies suggest that climate-driven drought regulates

  17. Tilted Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor with Graphene Oxide Coating for Humidity Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yung-Da; Wu, Chao-Wei; Chiang, Chia-Chin

    2017-09-15

    In this study, we propose a tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) humidity sensor fabricated using the phase mask method to produce a TFBG that was then etched with five different diameters of 20, 35, 50, 55 and 60 μm, after which piezoelectric inkjet technology was used to coat the grating with graphene oxide. According to the experimental results, the diameter of 20 μm yielded the best sensitivity. In addition, the experimental results showed that the wavelength sensitivity was -0.01 nm/%RH and the linearity was 0.996. Furthermore, the measurement results showed that when the relative humidity was increased, the refractive index of the sensor was decreased, meaning that the TFBG cladding mode spectrum wavelength was shifted. Therefore, the proposed graphene oxide film TFBG humidity sensor has good potential to be an effective relative humidity monitor.

  18. Paper as Active Layer in Inkjet-Printed Capacitive Humidity Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Cristina; Olkkonen, Juuso; Passoja, Soile; Smolander, Maria

    2017-01-01

    An inkjet-printed relative humidity sensor based on capacitive changes which responds to different humidity levels in the environment is presented in this work. The inkjet-printed silver interdigitated electrodes configuration on the paper substrate allowed for the fabrication of a functional proof-of-concept of the relative humidity sensor, by using the paper itself as a sensing material. The sensor sensitivity in terms of relative humidity changes was calculated to be around 2 pF/RH %. The response time against different temperature steps from 3 to 85 °C was fairly constant (about 4–5 min), and it was considered fast for the aimed application, a smart label. PMID:28640182

  19. Durability Improvement of Solid Electrolyte CO2 Sensor Against Humidity Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung-Kun; Choi, Nak-Jin; Moon, Seung Eon; Heo, Jin Ah; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Jongdae

    2015-01-01

    The sensing materials of potentiometric CO2 sensors utilize alkali/alkali-earth metal carbonates or their combinations. However, lithium carbonate easily responds to humidity resulting in incorrect information regarding CO2 concentration. Herein, the authors report a new sensing material combination (Li2CO3/BaCO3/LiOH/Ba(OH)2 (1:2:0.05:0.1 molar ratio)) for a potentiometric CO2 sensor that is not affected by humidity. The electromotive force (EMF) of the sensor using a combination of Li2CO3, BaCO3, LiOH, and Ba(OH)2 drifted by 1.5% when the relative humidity was changed from 25% to 70%, which is superior to a drift of 6% of a sensor using Li2CO3 and BaCO3, as this sensing material is known to be robust to changes in humidity.

  20. MLS/Aura L2 Relative Humidity With Respect To Ice V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2RHI is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for relative humidity with respect to ice derived from radiances measured by the 118 and 190 GHz...

  1. Influence of Air Temperature and Humidity on Dehydration Equilibria and Kinetics of Theophylline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Touil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of hygrothermal conditions (air temperature and relative humidity on the dehydration of theophylline monohydrate was investigated. Firstly, the equilibrium states of theophylline were investigated. The data from gravimetric analysis at constant temperature and humidity were reported as desorption isotherms. The PXRD analysis was used to identify the different polymorphic forms of theophylline: the monohydrate, the metastable anhydrate, and the stable anhydrate. Solid-solid phase diagrams for two processing times were proposed. Secondly, the dehydration kinetics were studied. The water content evolutions with time were recorded at several temperatures from 20°C to 80°C and several relative humidities from 4% to 50%. Different mathematical models were used to fit the experimental data. The spatially averaged solution of 2D Fickian transient diffusion equation best represented the water mass loss versus time experimental relationship. The dehydration rate constant was found to increase exponentially with air temperature and to decrease exponentially with air relative humidity.

  2. Temperature and humidity independent control (THIC) of air-conditioning system

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xiaohua; Zhang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the main components of the Temperature and Humidity Independent Control (THIC) of air-conditioning systems, including dehumidification devices, high-temperature cooling devices and indoor terminal devices.

  3. Estimating irrigation water use in the humid eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Sara B.; Zarriello, Phillip J.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate accounting of irrigation water use is an important part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Use Information Program and the WaterSMART initiative to help maintain sustainable water resources in the Nation. Irrigation water use in the humid eastern United States is not well characterized because of inadequate reporting and wide variability associated with climate, soils, crops, and farming practices. To better understand irrigation water use in the eastern United States, two types of predictive models were developed and compared by using metered irrigation water-use data for corn, cotton, peanut, and soybean crops in Georgia and turf farms in Rhode Island. Reliable metered irrigation data were limited to these areas. The first predictive model that was developed uses logistic regression to predict the occurrence of irrigation on the basis of antecedent climate conditions. Logistic regression equations were developed for corn, cotton, peanut, and soybean crops by using weekly irrigation water-use data from 36 metered sites in Georgia in 2009 and 2010 and turf farms in Rhode Island from 2000 to 2004. For the weeks when irrigation was predicted to take place, the irrigation water-use volume was estimated by multiplying the average metered irrigation application rate by the irrigated acreage for a given crop. The second predictive model that was developed is a crop-water-demand model that uses a daily soil water balance to estimate the water needs of a crop on a given day based on climate, soil, and plant properties. Crop-water-demand models were developed independently of reported irrigation water-use practices and relied on knowledge of plant properties that are available in the literature. Both modeling approaches require accurate accounting of irrigated area and crop type to estimate total irrigation water use. Water-use estimates from both modeling methods were compared to the metered irrigation data from Rhode Island and Georgia that were used to

  4. Experimental drying shrinkage of hardened cement pastes as a function of relative humidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Baroghel, V.B.

    1996-01-01

    The results of an experimental study concerning drying shrinkage measured as a function of relative humidity on thin specimens of mature hardened cement pastes are presented. The results obtained at two laboratories are compared.......The results of an experimental study concerning drying shrinkage measured as a function of relative humidity on thin specimens of mature hardened cement pastes are presented. The results obtained at two laboratories are compared....

  5. Effect of relative humidity on migration of BP from paperboard into a food simulant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Line Lundbæk; Petersen, Jens Højslev

    In the scientific literature it is obligatory to control and report the test time and temperature applied when testing migration but it is not current practice to either control or report the relative humidity (RH).......In the scientific literature it is obligatory to control and report the test time and temperature applied when testing migration but it is not current practice to either control or report the relative humidity (RH)....

  6. A Physically Based Spatial Expansion Algorithm for Surface Air Temperature and Humidity

    OpenAIRE

    Hongbo Su; Jing Tian; Renhua Zhang; Shaohui Chen; Yongmin Yang; Yuan Rong; Sujuan Mi; Jianwei Qi

    2013-01-01

    An algorithm was developed to expand the surface air temperature and air humidity to a larger spatial domain, based on the fact that the variation of surface air temperature and air humidity is controlled jointly by the local turbulence and the horizontal advection. This study proposed an algorithm which considers the advective driving force outside the thermal balance system and the turbulent driving force and radiant driving force inside the thermal balance system. The surface air temperatu...

  7. Kinetics of size changes of individual Bacillus thuringiensis spores in response to changes in relative humidity

    OpenAIRE

    Westphal, Andrew J.; Price, P. Buford; Leighton, Terrance J.; Wheeler, Katherine E.

    2003-01-01

    Using an automated scanning microscope, we report the surprising result that individual dormant spores of Bacillus thuringiensis grow and shrink in response to increasing and decreasing relative humidity. We simultaneously monitored the size of inorganic calibration particles. We found that the spores consistently swell in response to increased relative humidity, and shrink to near their original size on reexposure to dry air. Although the dispersion of swelling amplitudes within an ensemble ...

  8. Expert Meeting: Recommended Approaches to Humidity Control in High Performance Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, A.

    2013-07-01

    The topic of this Building America expert meeting was 'Recommended Approaches to Humidity Control in High Performance Homes,' which was held on October 16, 2012, in Westford, MA, and brought together experts in the field of residential humidity control to address modeling issues for dehumidification. The presentations and discussions centered on computer simulation and field experience with these systems, with the goal of developing foundational information to support the development of a Building America Measure Guideline on this topic.

  9. Using Relative Humidity Indicator Paper to Measure Seed and Commodity Moisture Contents

    OpenAIRE

    Kent J. Bradford; Peetambar Dahal; Pedro Bello

    2016-01-01

    Declines of seed viability in storage and losses of stored commodities due to fungal spoilage and insect pests are promoted by high moisture content. However, measuring seed or grain moisture content in the field can be difficult, particularly in rural locations in developing countries. Because seed/commodity moisture content is uniquely related to equilibrium relative humidity at a given temperature, moisture content can be estimated by measuring the relative humidity of a sample enclosed in...

  10. In optics humidity compensation in NDIR exhaust gas measurements of NO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine Kirstine; Buchner, Rainer; Clausen, Sønnik

    2015-01-01

    NDIR is proposed for monitoring of air pollutants emitted by ship engines. Careful optical filtering overcomes the challenge of optical detection of NO2 in humid exhaust gas, despite spectroscopic overlap with the water vapour band. © 2014 OSA.......NDIR is proposed for monitoring of air pollutants emitted by ship engines. Careful optical filtering overcomes the challenge of optical detection of NO2 in humid exhaust gas, despite spectroscopic overlap with the water vapour band. © 2014 OSA....

  11. Hydrochloric acid aerosol formation by the interaction of hydrogen chloride with humid air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The conditions in which hydrochloric acid aerosol is predicted by the interaction of hydrogen chloride gas with the water vapor in humid air are analyzed. The liquid gas phase equilibrium for the HCL-H2O system is expressed in terms of relative humidity and hydrogen chloride concentration as parts per million, units commonly used in pollution studies. Presented are the concentration (wt %) of HC1 in the aerosol and the concentration of aerosol (ppm) predicted.

  12. The role of absorbent building materials in moderating changes of relative humidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padfield, Tim

    The problem studied in this work is, how porous, absorbent materials surroundning or placed in a room influence the relative humidity of the room. This is of interest in designing precautions and machinery to monitor the indoor climate in museums and dwelling rooms. - A novel technique for the in...... for the investigation of the moisture buffering capacity of building materials is introduced, measuring the resulting flux in the system instead of the resulting relative humidity....

  13. Comparison of Single-Point and Continuous Sampling Methods for Estimating Residential Indoor Temperature and Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James D; Magnusson, Brianna M; Eggett, Dennis; Collingwood, Scott C; Bernhardt, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    Residential temperature and humidity are associated with multiple health effects. Studies commonly use single-point measures to estimate indoor temperature and humidity exposures, but there is little evidence to support this sampling strategy. This study evaluated the relationship between single-point and continuous monitoring of air temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity, and absolute humidity over four exposure intervals (5-min, 30-min, 24-hr, and 12-days) in 9 northern Utah homes, from March-June 2012. Three homes were sampled twice, for a total of 12 observation periods. Continuous data-logged sampling was conducted in homes for 2-3 wks, and simultaneous single-point measures (n = 114) were collected using handheld thermo-hygrometers. Time-centered single-point measures were moderately correlated with short-term (30-min) data logger mean air temperature (r = 0.76, β = 0.74), apparent temperature (r = 0.79, β = 0.79), relative humidity (r = 0.70, β = 0.63), and absolute humidity (r = 0.80, β = 0.80). Data logger 12-day means were also moderately correlated with single-point air temperature (r = 0.64, β = 0.43) and apparent temperature (r = 0.64, β = 0.44), but were weakly correlated with single-point relative humidity (r = 0.53, β = 0.35) and absolute humidity (r = 0.52, β = 0.39). Of the single-point RH measures, 59 (51.8%) deviated more than ±5%, 21 (18.4%) deviated more than ±10%, and 6 (5.3%) deviated more than ±15% from data logger 12-day means. Where continuous indoor monitoring is not feasible, single-point sampling strategies should include multiple measures collected at prescribed time points based on local conditions.

  14. Towards a new proxy of continental atmospheric humidity: the triple oxygen isotopic composition of plant biosilica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, A. E.; Pauchet, S.; Landais, A.; Piel, C.; Devidal, S.; Roy, J.; Vallet-Coulomb, C.; Sonzogni, C.; Pasturel, M.; Cornuault, P.; Xin, J.; Mazur, J. C.; Prie, F.; Bentaleb, I.

    2016-12-01

    There is a serious lack of proxy suitable for reconstructing, in a quantitative way, past changes of continental atmospheric humidity. This reduces the possibility to make model-data comparisons necessary for the implementation of climate models. Over the past 10 years, analytical developments have enabled a few laboratories to reach sufficient precision for measuring the triple oxygen isotopes, expressed by the 17O-excess, in water, water vapor, atmospheric oxygen, and minerals. The 17O-excess represents an alternative to d-excess for investigating relative humidity conditions that prevail during water evaporation. The 17O-excess of water results from the increase of kinetic isotopic fractionation at evaporative sites as a function of decreasing relative humidity. This mechanism occurs at large scales, i.e. during seawater evaporation or during plant canopies transpiration. Unlike deuterium-excess, 17O-excess is supposed to be insensitive to temperature and less sensitive than δD and δ18O to equilibrium fractionation during transport and precipitation. Additionally, the 17O-excess is recorded in biogenic minerals less prone to weathering than organic compounds. Here, we calibrate the 17O-excess of plant biosilica as a new air humidity proxy. First, we examined the behavior of the 17O-excess in soil water, leaf water and phytoliths in growth chambers in response to changes in relative humidity. Second, we measured the 17O-excess of soil phytolith assemblages from inter-tropical savannas and forests distributed along humidity transects. Both approaches show similar dependency of phytolith 17O-excess to relative humidity. The results allow to discuss future calibration directions aimed at estimating the precision of the obtained relationship and at quantifying the successive isotopic fractionations in play at the soil-plant-atmosphere interface, to provide a strong proxy of past atmospheric relative humidity.

  15. Gestion des milieux humides en vue d'une plus grande sécurité ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Vu l'insécurité alimentaire croissante en Ouganda, des pressions s'exercent de plus en plus en vue de l'utilisation des milieux humides aux fins de l'agriculture. On en sait toutefois encore bien peu sur l'apport que peuvent avoir les ressources des milieux humides dans la sécurité alimentaire des ménages et sur les ...

  16. Development Requirements for the Exploration PLSS (xPLSS) Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control Unit (CDHCU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chullen, Cinda

    2017-01-01

    Functional Requirements for the Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control Unit (CDHCU): The CDHCU is a component of the Exploration Portable Life Support System (xPLSS) to provide carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity control within the spacesuit for a crewmember to perform extravehicular activities (EVA) in vacuum (micro-g), lunar, and Mars environments for up to 8 hours continuous, and during EVA preparation in airlocks or support vehicles for an additional 2 hours (TBR) continuous.

  17. Temperature and humidity dependence of bulk resistivity of bakelite for resistive plate chambers in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, S H; Bahk, S Y; Gapienko, V A; Hong, B; Hong, S J; Jung, S Y; Kim, J Y; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y U; Koo, D G; Lee, K S; Lee, S J; Lee, Y L; Lim, I T; Nam, S K; Pac, M Y; Park, S K; Ra, Y S; Rhee, J T; Seo, S W; Sim, K S

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents data obtained in a systematic study on the bulk resistivity of Korean bakelike as a function of temperature in the range 20-30 degrees C and relative humidity in the range 35-65%. Strong dependence of resistivity on both temperature and humidity was observed. Measurements were carried out in the framework of R&D work on resistive plate chambers which will be used in the CMS detector. (4 refs).

  18. State-of-the-art in humidity sensing. Topical report, January-October 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yudow, B.D.; Zawacki, T.S.

    1987-12-01

    A state-of-the-art assessment of the science and technology of humidity sensing and measurement was carried out by means of a literature search and a survey of manufacturers. The purpose of the study was to determine suitable humidity sensors and instrumentation applicable to gas appliance and space-conditioning functions that could result in enhanced product quality, improved comfort, reduced spoilage, increased efficiency, etc.

  19. Proposition of Regression Equations to Determine Outdoor Thermal Comfort in Tropical and Humid Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Sangkertadi Sangkertadi; Reny Syafriny

    2012-01-01

    This study is about field experimentation in order to construct regression equations of perception of thermalcomfort for outdoor activities under hot and humid environment. Relationships between thermal-comfort perceptions, micro climate variables (temperatures and humidity) and body parameters (activity, clothing, body measure) have been observed and analyzed. 180 adults, men, and women participated as samples/respondents. This study is limited for situation where wind velocity is about 1 m/...

  20. Fast Response and High Sensitivity ZnO/glass Surface Acoustic Wave Humidity Sensors Using Graphene Oxide Sensing Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Weipeng; He, Mei; Meng, Nan; He, Xingli; Wang, Wenbo; Chen, Jinkai; Shi, Tianjin; Hasan, Tawfique; Xu, Zhen; Xu, Yang; Luo, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    We report ZnO/glass surface acoustic wave (SAW) humidity sensors with high sensitivity and fast response using graphene oxide sensing layer. The frequency shift of the sensors is exponentially correlated to the humidity change, induced mainly by mass loading effect rather than the complex impedance change of the sensing layer. The SAW sensors show high sensitivity at a broad humidity range from 0.5%RH to 85%RH with humidity sensors, complemented with full humidity range measurement, highlights their potential in a wide range of applications. PMID:25425458

  1. Humidity does not appear to trigger leaf out in woody plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipf, Lucy; Primack, Richard B.

    2017-08-01

    In order to anticipate the ecological impacts of climate change and model changes to forests, it is important to understand the factors controlling spring leaf out. Leaf out phenology in woody trees and shrubs is generally considered to be strongly controlled by a combination of spring warming, winter chilling requirement, and photoperiod. However, researchers have recently suggested that temperature-related air humidity, rather than temperature itself, might be the main trigger of the spring leaf-out of woody plants. Here, we sought to examine the relationship between air humidity and leaf-out across a range of humidities and plant functional groups. We did not find any consistent, measurable effect of high humidity advancing leaf-out in the 15 woody shrubs and trees examined in this study, and we did not see progressive patterns of earlier leaf-out in successively higher humidities. Our results indicate that more work must be done on this topic before researchers can properly determine the effect of humidity on the leafing out process for woody species.

  2. Effects of Ambient Humidity on Plant Growth Enhancement by Atmospheric Air Plasma Irradiation to Plant Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarinont, Thapanut; Amano, Takaaki; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    Humidity is an important factor for plasma-bio applications because composition of species generated by atmospheric pressure plasmas significantly depends on the humidity. Here we have examined effects of humidity on the growth enhancement to study the mechanism. Experiments were carried out with a scalable DBD device. 10 seeds of Raphanus sativus L. were set for x = 5 mm and y = 3 mm below the electrodes. The humidity Hair was 10 - 90 %Rh. The ratio of length of plants with plasma irradiation to that of control increases from 1.2 for Hair = 10 %Rh to 2.5 for Hair = 50 %Rh. The ratio is 2.5 for Hair = 50-90 %Rh. This humidity dependence is similar to the humidity dependence of O2+-H2O,H3O*, NO2--H2Oand NO3--H2Odensities, whereas it is different from that of other species such as O3, NO, and so on. The similarity gives information on key species for the growth enhancement.

  3. Humidity does not appear to trigger leaf out in woody plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipf, Lucy; Primack, Richard B.

    2017-12-01

    In order to anticipate the ecological impacts of climate change and model changes to forests, it is important to understand the factors controlling spring leaf out. Leaf out phenology in woody trees and shrubs is generally considered to be strongly controlled by a combination of spring warming, winter chilling requirement, and photoperiod. However, researchers have recently suggested that temperature-related air humidity, rather than temperature itself, might be the main trigger of the spring leaf-out of woody plants. Here, we sought to examine the relationship between air humidity and leaf-out across a range of humidities and plant functional groups. We did not find any consistent, measurable effect of high humidity advancing leaf-out in the 15 woody shrubs and trees examined in this study, and we did not see progressive patterns of earlier leaf-out in successively higher humidities. Our results indicate that more work must be done on this topic before researchers can properly determine the effect of humidity on the leafing out process for woody species.

  4. Prediction of concrete compressive strength considering humidity and temperature in the construction of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Seung Hee; Jang, Kyung Pil [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Myongji University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Jin-Wook [Department of Civil Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jang Hwa [Structural Engineering Research Division, Korea Institute of Construction Technology (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun Yong, E-mail: yunkim@cnu.ac.kr [Structural Engineering Research Division, Korea Institute of Construction Technology (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Compressive strength tests for three concrete mixes were performed. • The parameters of the humidity-adjusted maturity function were determined. • Strength can be predicted considering temperature and relative humidity. - Abstract: This study proposes a method for predicting compressive strength developments in the early ages of concretes used in the construction of nuclear power plants. Three representative mixes with strengths of 6000 psi (41.4 MPa), 4500 psi (31.0 MPa), and 4000 psi (27.6 MPa) were selected and tested under various curing conditions; the temperature ranged from 10 to 40 °C, and the relative humidity from 40 to 100%. In order to consider not only the effect of the temperature but also that of humidity, an existing model, i.e. the humidity-adjusted maturity function, was adopted and the parameters used in the function were determined from the test results. A series of tests were also performed in the curing condition of a variable temperature and constant humidity, and a comparison between the measured and predicted strengths were made for the verification.

  5. Graphene Oxide Dielectric Permittivity at GHz and Its Applications for Wireless Humidity Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xianjun; Leng, Ting; Georgiou, Thanasis; Abraham, Jijo; Raveendran Nair, Rahul; Novoselov, Kostya S; Hu, Zhirun

    2018-01-08

    In this work, the relative dielectric permittivity of graphene oxide (GO), both its real and imaginary parts, have been measured under various humidity conditions at GHz. It is demonstrated that the relative dielectric permittivity increases with increasing humidity due to water uptake. This finding is very different to that at a couple of MHz or lower frequency, where the relative dielectric permittivity increases with decreasing humidity. This GO electrical property was used to create a battery-free wireless radio-frequency identification (RFID) humidity sensor by coating printed graphene antenna with the GO layer. The resonance frequency as well as the backscattering phase of such GO/graphene antenna become sensitive to the surrounding humidity and can be detected by the RFID reader. This enables battery-free wireless monitoring of the local humidity with digital identification attached to any location or item and paves the way for low-cost efficient sensors for Internet of Things (IoTs) applications.

  6. Evaluation of Temperature and Humidity Profiles of Unified Model and ECMWF Analyses Using GRUAN Radiosonde Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Chan Noh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and water vapor profiles from the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA and the United Kingdom Met Office (UKMO Unified Model (UM data assimilation systems and from reanalysis fields from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF were assessed using collocated radiosonde observations from the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS Reference Upper-Air Network (GRUAN for January–December 2012. The motivation was to examine the overall performance of data assimilation outputs. The difference statistics of the collocated model outputs versus the radiosonde observations indicated a good agreement for the temperature, amongst datasets, while less agreement was found for the relative humidity. A comparison of the UM outputs from the UKMO and KMA revealed that they are similar to each other. The introduction of the new version of UM into the KMA in May 2012 resulted in an improved analysis performance, particularly for the moisture field. On the other hand, ECMWF reanalysis data showed slightly reduced performance for relative humidity compared with the UM, with a significant humid bias in the upper troposphere. ECMWF reanalysis temperature fields showed nearly the same performance as the two UM analyses. The root mean square differences (RMSDs of the relative humidity for the three models were larger for more humid conditions, suggesting that humidity forecasts are less reliable under these conditions.

  7. Sensitive and Fast Humidity Sensor Based on A Redox Conducting Supramolecular Ionic Material for Respiration Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hailong; Zhang, Li; Yu, Ping; Mao, Lanqun

    2017-01-03

    Real-time monitoring of respiratory rate (RR) is highly important for human health, clinical diagnosis, and fundamental scientific research. Exhaled humidity-based RR monitoring has recently attracted increased attention because of its accuracy and portability. Here, we report a new design of an exhaled humidity sensor for the real-time monitoring of the RR based on a synthetic redox conducting supramolecular ionic material (SIM). The humidity-dependent conducting SIM is prepared by ionic self-assembly in aqueous solutions of electroactive 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 1,10-bis(3-methylimidazolium-1-yl) decane (C10(mim)2). By taking full advantage of the high hygroscopicity and water stability arising from the ionic and hydrophobic interactions between two building blocks (i.e., ABTS and C10(mim)2), the SIM-based humidity sensor exhibits both high sensitivity (less than 0.1% relative humidity) and fast response time (∼37 ms). These excellent properties allow this humidity sensor to noninvasively monitor the RRs of not only humans but also rats that have a much faster RR and much smaller tidal volume than humans. Moreover, this sensor could also be efficiently used for the real-time monitoring of the recovery process of rats from anesthesia.

  8. Bilayer-structured nanocomposite of Ag and crosslinked polyelectrolyte for the detection of humidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yang, E-mail: liyang@zju.edu.cn; Wu, Taotao; Yang, Mujie

    2015-03-01

    Nanocomposites of quaternized and crosslinked poly(4-vinylpyridine) (QC-P4VP) and silver nanoparticles were prepared by a two-step procedure, and characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, Ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Bilayer-structured humidity sensors based on the nanocomposites were fabricated, and the effects of the concentration of silver salt precursor and poly(4-vinylpyridine), the method for the reduction of silver salt, the deposition order of the sensitive layers and environmental temperature on the humidity sensing characteristics of the composite sensor have been examined at room temperature. The composite sensor exhibited low impedance under dry atmosphere due to the introduction of Ag nanoparticles, and could detect very low relative humidity (RH) (down to 1% RH) with good sensitivity (impedance change of 2000% from 1% to 30% RH). In addition, the composite sensor demonstrated very wide measuring range (1–98% RH), and revealed faster response and smaller hysteresis than the sensor based on QC-P4VP alone. The complex impedance spectra of the composite sensor in the environments with different RH levels were investigated to explore its humidity sensing mechanism. - Highlights: • Bilayer-structured nanocomposite of Ag and polyelectrolyte are facilely prepared. • Nanocomposite could measure humidity as low as 1% RH and show small hysteresis. • Nanocomposite is capable of detecting full-range humidity with high sensitivity.

  9. Humidity effect on organic semiconductor NiPc films deposited at different gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, N.; Ahmed, M. M.; Karimov, Kh. S.; Ahmedov, Kh.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, thin films of Nickel Phthalocyanine (NiPc) were deposited by centrifugation at high gravity (70g), and also at normal gravity (1g) conditions to fabricate humidity sensors. Ceramic alumina sheet, coated with silver electrodes, having interelectrode distance of 0.2l mm were used to assess the electrical properties of the sensors. Room temperature capacitance and impedance variations were measured as a function of relative humidity ranging from 25% ∼⃒ 95% at 1 kHz frequency. It was observed that sensors fabricated at 70g were more sensitive compared to sensors fabricated at 1g. Sensors fabricated at 70g exhibited 1.8 times decrease in their impedance and1.5 times increase in their capacitance at peak ambient humidity. SEM images showed more roughness for the films deposited at 70g compared to films deposited at 1g. It was assumed that surface irregularities might have increased active surface area of 70g sensors hence changed the electrical response. Impedance-humidity and capacitance-humidity relationships were modeled and a good agreement was observed between experimental and modeled data. Experimental data showed that NiPc films could be useful for instrumentation industry to fabricate organic humidity sensors.

  10. The Importance of Humidity in the Relationship between Heat and Population Mental Health: Evidence from Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Ding

    Full Text Available Despite many studies on the effects of heat on mental health, few studies have examined humidity. In order to investigate the relationship among heat, humidity and mental health, we matched data from the Social, Economic and Environmental Factors (SEEF project with gridded daily temperature and water vapour pressure data from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Logit models were employed to describe the associations among heat (assessed using temperature, °C, humidity (assessed using vapour pressure, hPa and two measures of mental health, (i high or very high distress (assessed using K10 scores ≥ 22 and (ii having been treated for depression or anxiety. We found a one-unit increase in temperature and vapour pressure was associated with an increase in the occurrence of high or very high distress by 0.2% (p < 0.001, 99% CI: 0.1-0.3% and 0.1% (p < 0.001, 99% CI: 0.0-0.3% respectively. However, when humidity rose to the 99th percentile of the sample, the estimated marginal effect of heat was more than doubled (0.5%, p < 0.001, 99% CI: 0.2-0.7%. Neither heat nor humidity was related to having been treated for depression or anxiety in the last month. Humidity compounds the negative association between hot weather and mental health and thus should be taken into account when reforming the health care system to respond to the challenge of climate change.

  11. Mapping relative humidity, average and extreme temperature in hot summer over China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Zha, Yong

    2018-02-15

    Air temperature and relative humidity are the key variables in environmental health research. Both of them are difficult to map especially at national scale because of spatial heterogeneity. This paper presents a methodology for mapping relative humidity, average and extreme temperature in hot summer (June to August) over China. Several data as explanatory variables were applied to random forest regression models to predict relative humidity and temperatures, including surface reflectance, land cover, digital elevation model (DEM), enhanced vegetation index (EVI), latitude, nighttime lights (NLs), as well as buffer zones of road, railroad, river system and administration center. Results based on cross-validation reflect acceptable prediction errors in estimating relative humidity (RMSE=7.4%), average temperature (RMSE=2.4°C), average maximum temperature (RMSE=2.5°C), and extreme maximum temperature (RMSE=2.6°C). Despite the strong correlation between average and extreme temperatures, significant differences exist in their spatial distribution along the latitude direction, especially in the areas such as Hebei, Szechwan, Hubei, Henan, Shandong, and Inner Mongolia. Specifically, social economic activity, relative humidity and vegetation tend to affect extreme heat events, and both latitude and DEM (i.e., geographical position) determine the average level of temperature. Compared with interpolation technology and statistical methods, the proposed methodology demonstrates the ability to generate relative humidity and temperature maps with finer gradients in hot summer over China. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Importance of Humidity in the Relationship between Heat and Population Mental Health: Evidence from Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ning; Berry, Helen L; Bennett, Charmian M

    2016-01-01

    Despite many studies on the effects of heat on mental health, few studies have examined humidity. In order to investigate the relationship among heat, humidity and mental health, we matched data from the Social, Economic and Environmental Factors (SEEF) project with gridded daily temperature and water vapour pressure data from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Logit models were employed to describe the associations among heat (assessed using temperature, °C), humidity (assessed using vapour pressure, hPa) and two measures of mental health, (i) high or very high distress (assessed using K10 scores ≥ 22) and (ii) having been treated for depression or anxiety. We found a one-unit increase in temperature and vapour pressure was associated with an increase in the occurrence of high or very high distress by 0.2% (p humidity rose to the 99th percentile of the sample, the estimated marginal effect of heat was more than doubled (0.5%, p humidity was related to having been treated for depression or anxiety in the last month. Humidity compounds the negative association between hot weather and mental health and thus should be taken into account when reforming the health care system to respond to the challenge of climate change.

  13. Insect hygroreceptor responses to continuous changes in humidity and air pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, H.; Kallina, W.

    2011-01-01

    The most favored model of humidity transduction views the cuticular wall of insect hygroreceptive sensilla as a hygromechanical transducer. Hygroscopic swelling or shrinking alters the geometry of the wall, deforming the dendritic membranes of the moist and dry cells. The small size the sensilla and their position surrounded by elevated structures creates technical difficulties to mechanically stimulate them by direct contact. The present study investigated hygroreceptors on the antennae of the cockroach and the stick insect. Accurately controlled, homogeneous mechanical input was delivered by modulating air pressure. Both the moist and dry cells responded not only to changes in air pressure, but also in the opposite direction, as observed during changes in air humidity. The moist-cell’s excitatory response to increasing humidity and increasing air pressure implies that swelling of the hygroscopic cuticle compresses the dendrites, and the dry-cell’s excitatory response to decreasing humidity and decreasing air pressure implies that shrinking of the hygroscopic cuticle expands the dendrites. The moist and dry cells of the stick insect are more sensitive to pressure changes than those of the cockroach, but the responses to air pressure are generally weaker than to humidity. Therefore, the hygroreceptive sensilla differ in their physical properties and constitutions. Furthermore, the mechanical parameters associated with homogeneous changes in air pressure on the sensillum surface can only partially account for the responses of the moist and dry cells of both species to humidity stimulation. PMID:20375249

  14. Effect of wind speed and relative humidity on atmospheric dust concentrations in semi-arid climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csavina, Janae; Field, Jason; Félix, Omar; Corral-Avitia, Alba Y; Sáez, A Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A

    2014-07-15

    Atmospheric particulate have deleterious impacts on human health. Predicting dust and aerosol emission and transport would be helpful to reduce harmful impacts but, despite numerous studies, prediction of dust events and contaminant transport in dust remains challenging. In this work, we show that relative humidity and wind speed are both determinants in atmospheric dust concentration. Observations of atmospheric dust concentrations in Green Valley, AZ, USA, and Juárez, Chihuahua, México, show that PM10 concentrations are not directly correlated with wind speed or relative humidity separately. However, selecting the data for high wind speeds (>4m/s at 10 m elevation), a definite trend is observed between dust concentration and relative humidity: dust concentration increases with relative humidity, reaching a maximum around 25% and it subsequently decreases with relative humidity. Models for dust storm forecasting may be improved by utilizing atmospheric humidity and wind speed as main drivers for dust generation and transport. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of vulcanization temperature and humidity on the properties of RTV silicone rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xutao; Li, Xiuguang; Hao, Lu; Wen, Xishan; Lan, Lei; Yuan, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Qingping

    2017-06-01

    In order to study the difference in performance of room temperature vulcanized (RTV) silicone rubber in vulcanization environment with different temperature and humidity, static contact angle method, FTIR and TG is utilized to depict the properties of hydrophobicity, transfer of hydrophobicity, functional groups and thermal stability of RTV silicone rubber. It is found that different vulcanization conditions have effects on the characteristics of RTV silicone rubber, which shows that the hydrophobicity of RTV silicone rubber changes little with the vulcanization temperature but a slight increase with the vulcanization humidity. Temperature and humidity have obvious effects on the hydrophobicity transfer ability of RTV silicone rubber, which is better when vulcanization temperature is 5°C or vulcanization humidity is 95%. From the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, it can be concluded that humidity and temperature of vulcanization conditions have great effect on the functional groups of silicone rubber, and vulcanization conditions also have effect on thermal stability of RTV silicone rubber. When vulcanization temperature is 5°C or vulcanization humidity is 15% or 95%, the thermal stability of silicone rubber becomes worse.

  16. High-speed sterilization technique using dielectric barrier discharge plasmas in atmospheric humid air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamae, M.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2010-11-01

    The inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma produced by an ac voltage application of 1 kHz in atmospheric humid air was investigated in order to develop low-temperature, low-cost and high-speed plasma sterilization technique. The biological indicators covered with a Tyvek sheet were set just outside the DBD plasma region, where the air temperature and humidity as a discharge gas were precisely controlled by an environmental test chamber. The results show that the inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores was found to be dependent strongly on the humidity, and was completed within 15 min at a relative humidity of 90 % and a temperature of 30 C. The treatment time for sterilization is shorter than those of conventional sterilization methods using ethylene oxide gas and dry heat treatment. It is considered that reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals that are effective for the inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores could be produced by the DBD plasma in the humid air. Repetitive micro-pulsed discharge plasmas in the humid air will be applied for the sterilization experiment to enhance the sterilization efficiency.

  17. High humidity leads to loss of infectious influenza virus from simulated coughs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Noti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of relative humidity in the aerosol transmission of influenza was examined in a simulated examination room containing coughing and breathing manikins. METHODS: Nebulized influenza was coughed into the examination room and Bioaerosol samplers collected size-fractionated aerosols (4 µM aerodynamic diameters adjacent to the breathing manikin's mouth and also at other locations within the room. At constant temperature, the RH was varied from 7-73% and infectivity was assessed by the viral plaque assay. RESULTS: Total virus collected for 60 minutes retained 70.6-77.3% infectivity at relative humidity ≤23% but only 14.6-22.2% at relative humidity ≥43%. Analysis of the individual aerosol fractions showed a similar loss in infectivity among the fractions. Time interval analysis showed that most of the loss in infectivity within each aerosol fraction occurred 0-15 minutes after coughing. Thereafter, losses in infectivity continued up to 5 hours after coughing, however, the rate of decline at 45% relative humidity was not statistically different than that at 20% regardless of the aerosol fraction analyzed. CONCLUSION: At low relative humidity, influenza retains maximal infectivity and inactivation of the virus at higher relative humidity occurs rapidly after coughing. Although virus carried on aerosol particles 40% will significantly reduce the infectivity of aerosolized virus.

  18. Coupled effects of the temperature and the relative humidity on gecko adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhilong; Yang, Yazheng; Chen, Shaohua

    2017-08-01

    To explain the inconsistent results of experiments on temperature-dependent gecko adhesion, a theoretical peeling model is established wherein a nano-thin film is adopted to simulate a gecko spatula. The model considers not only the respective effects of temperature and environmental humidity on the peel-off force but also the coupled effect of both factors. Increasing temperature is found to lead to a decreasing peel-off force if the environmental humidity is uncontrolled. However, if the environmental humidity is constant, the peel-off force is insensitive to the temperature and remains almost constant. The synthetic theoretical analysis demonstrates that the seemingly contradictory results of temperature-dependent gecko adhesion experiments are actually consistent under their respective experimental conditions. This inconsistency is mainly due to the environmental humidity, which varies with the changing temperature if it is not artificially controlled. The results cannot only reasonably explain the different experimental results for the effect of temperature on gecko adhesion but can also facilitate the design of temperature-controlled or humidity-controlled adhesion sensors by tuning the environmental humidity or temperature.

  19. Effect of pharmaceutical excipients on the stability of trichlormethiazide tablets under humid conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraoka, Reiko; Matsushima, Yuki; Sugimoto, Isao; Inoue, Kana; Morita, Shin-ya; Kitagawa, Shuji

    2009-12-01

    The stability of trichlormethiazide (TCM) and the drug in the nine products available on the market (the original tablet (B) and 8 generic tablets (G1-G8)) were investigated under humid conditions. TCM was non-hygroscopic and was not degraded under humid conditions. Drug degradation in aqueous ethanol was accelerated with increased water concentration, and the drug stability in buffer solution was improved with decreased pH. TCM decomposition was not detected in each unwrapped tablet at low relative humidity. However, rapid degradation was observed for products G1 and G2, while product B and G7 showed higher stability at high relative humidity. The stability of products G1 and G2 decreased with increasing humidity. The same results were observed for the tablets in press-through packages (PTP), but the degradation rate was much slower than tablets without PTP packages. These results suggested that the adsorbed moisture by excipients cause TCM degradation. Various pharmaceutical excipients are added to TCM tablets and these vary between different pharmaceutical companies. Intact drug and pharmaceutical excipients, including lactose, microcrystalline cellulose, corn starch, hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC), low substituted HPC (L-HPC), calcium stearate, and light anhydrous silicic acid, were mixed, and the sample mixtures were stored in humid conditions. It was found that the TCM content decreased significantly in a binary mixture of TCM/HPC 1 : 1.

  20. Airflow-induced triboelectric nanogenerator as a self-powered sensor for detecting humidity and airflow rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hengyu; Chen, Jie; Tian, Li; Leng, Qiang; Xi, Yi; Hu, Chenguo

    2014-10-08

    Humidity sensors are commonly based on the resistance change of metal oxide semiconductors, which show high sensitivity in low humidity but low sensitivity in high humidity. In this work, we design a novel humidity sensor based on the airflow-induced triboelectric nanogenerator (ATNG) that can serve as a self-powered sensor to detect humidity (especially in high humidity) and airflow rate. The output current or voltage change is investigated under different humidity (20-100% relative humidity) at fixed airflow rate and different airflow rates (15-25 L/min) at a fixed humidity. The working principle of the ATNG-based sensor is illustrated. We find that both output current and voltage can serve as a variable for detecting humidity, while only the output current can serve as a variable for determining airflow rate. Our study demonstrates an innovative approach toward detection of humidity and airflow rate with advantages of self-power, multifunction, low cost, simple fabrication, and high sensitivity.

  1. [Evaluation of the influence of humidity and temperature on the drug stability by initial average rate experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ning; Sun, Hechun; Dai, Miaomiao

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the influence of temperature and humidity on the drug stability by initial average rate experiment, and to obtained the kinetic parameters. The effect of concentration error, drug degradation extent, humidity and temperature numbers, humidity and temperature range, and average humidity and temperature on the accuracy and precision of kinetic parameters in the initial average rate experiment was explored. The stability of vitamin C, as a solid state model, was investigated by an initial average rate experiment. Under the same experimental conditions, the kinetic parameters obtained from this proposed method were comparable to those from classical isothermal experiment at constant humidity. The estimates were more accurate and precise by controlling the extent of drug degradation, changing humidity and temperature range, or by setting the average temperature closer to room temperature. Compared with isothermal experiments at constant humidity, our proposed method saves time, labor, and materials.

  2. Evaluation of humidity sensing properties of TMBHPET thin film embedded with spinel cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Qayyum; Azmer, Mohamad Izzat; Al-Sehemi, Abdullah G.; Al-Assiri, Mohammad S.; Kalam, Abul; Sulaiman, Khaulah

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report the enhanced sensing parameters of previously reported TMBHPET-based humidity sensor. Significant improved sensing performance has been demonstrated by coupling of TMBHPET moisture sensing thin film with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (synthesized by eco-benign ultrasonic method). The mean size of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles has been estimated to be 6.5 nm. It is assumed that the thin film of organic-ceramic hybrid matrix (TMBHPET:CoFe2O4) is a potential candidate for humidity sensing utility by virtue of its high specific surface area and porous surface morphology (as evident from TEM, FESEM, and AFM images). The hybrid suspension has been drop-cast onto the glass substrate with preliminary deposited coplanar aluminum electrodes separated by 40 µm distance. The influence of humidity on the capacitance of the hybrid humidity sensor (Al/TMBHPET:CoFe2O4/Al) has been investigated at three different frequencies of the AC applied voltage ( V rms 1 V): 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz. It has been observed that at 100 Hz, under a humidity of 99 % RH, the capacitance of the sensor increased by 2.61 times, with respect to 30 % RH condition. The proposed sensor exhibits significantly improved sensitivity 560 fF/ % RH at 100 Hz, which is nearly 7.5 times as high as that of pristine TMBHPET-based humidity sensor. Further, the capacitive sensor exhibits improved dynamic range (30-99 % RH), small hysteresis ( 2.3 %), and relatively quicker response and recovery times ( 12 s, 14 s, respectively). It is assumed that the humidity response of the sensor is associated with the diffusion kinetics of water vapors and doping of the semiconductor nanocomposite by water molecules.

  3. Cold temperature and low humidity are associated with increased occurrence of respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Tiina M; Juvonen, Raija; Jokelainen, Jari; Harju, Terttu H; Peitso, Ari; Bloigu, Aini; Silvennoinen-Kassinen, Sylvi; Leinonen, Maija; Hassi, Juhani

    2009-03-01

    The association between cold exposure and acute respiratory tract infections (RTIs) has remained unclear. The study examined whether the development of RTIs is potentiated by cold exposure and lowered humidity in a northern population. A population study where diagnosed RTI episodes, outdoor temperature and humidity among conscripts (n=892) were analysed. Altogether 643 RTI episodes were diagnosed during the follow-up period. Five hundred and ninety-five episodes were upper (URTI) and 87 lower (LRTI) RTIs. The mean average daily temperature preceding any RTIs was -3.7+/-10.6; for URTI and LRTI they were -4.1+/-10.6 degrees C and -1.1+/-10.0 degrees C, respectively. Temperature was associated with common cold (p=0.017), pharyngitis (p=0.011) and LRTI (p=0.048). Absolute humidity was associated with URTI (pcold by 2.1% (p=0.004), for pharyngitis by 2.8% (p=0.019) and for LRTI by 2.1% (p=0.039). A decrease of 1g/m(-3) in absolute humidity increased the estimated risk for URTI by 10.0% (pcold. The temperature for the preceding 14 days also showed a linear decrease for any RTI, URTI or common cold. Absolute humidity decreased linearly during the preceding three days before the onset of common cold, and during the preceding 14 days for all RTIs, common cold and LRTI. Cold temperature and low humidity were associated with increased occurrence of RTIs, and a decrease in temperature and humidity preceded the onset of the infections.

  4. [A Surface Plasmon Micro-Ring Sensor Suitable for Humidity Sensing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-quan; An, Dong-yang; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Ling-ling; Sha, Xiao-peng; Guo, Shi-liang; Li, Wen-chao

    2015-09-01

    Temperature is a very important parameter in scientific research, production and life. Almost all the properties of materials are related to temperature. The precise measurement of the temperature is a very important task, so the temperature sensor is widely used as a core part in the temperature measuring instrument. A novel surface plasmon micro-ring sensor suitable for humidity sensing is presented in this paper. The sensor uses a multi-layered surface plasmon waveguide structure and choosing Polyimide (Polyimide, PI) as the moisture material. We get the transfer function of surface plasmon micro-ring sensor by using transfer matrix method. Refractive indexes of Polyimide and the multilayer waveguide structure change as environment relative humidity changes, thus leading to an obvious peak drift of output spectrum. The paper mainly discusses the influence of the changes of the refractive index of humidity-sensing parts on the output spectrum, and the transmission characteristics of multilayer waveguide structure. Through the finite element method and the theoretical simulation of Matlab, We can draw: When the length between the two coupling points of the U-shaped waveguide is an integer multiple of circumference of the micro-ring, an obvious drift in the horizontal direction appears, the free spectral range (FSR) doubled and the sensitivity is 0.0005 μm/%RH; When the external environment relative humidity RH changes from 10% to 100% RH, scatter is change between including (including 0.005 m to 0.005 m, compared to other humidity sensor, the Sensitivity of sensor improves 10~50 times and the transmission is very stable. Results show that the design of surface plasma micro ring sensors has better sensitivity, stable performance and can be used in the humidity measurement, achieving a high sensitivity in the sense of humidity when the wide range of filter frequency selection is taken into account, and providing a theoretical basis for the preparation of micro-optics.

  5. Influence of Ambient Humidity on the Voltage Response of Ionic Polymer-Metal Composite Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zicai; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Kruusamäe, Karl; Chang, Longfei; Asaka, Kinji

    2016-03-31

    Electrical potential based on ion migration exists not only in natural systems but also in ionic polymer materials. In order to investigate the influence of ambient humidity on voltage response, classical Au-Nafion IPMC was chosen as the reference sample. Voltage response under a bending deformation was measured in two ways: first, continuous measurement of voltage response in the process of absorption and desorption of water to study the tendency of voltage variation at all water states; second, measurements at multiple fixed ambient humidity levels to characterize the process of voltage response quantitatively. Ambient humidity influences the voltage response mainly by varying water content in ionic polymer. Under a step bending, the amplitude of initial voltage peak first increases and then decreases as the ambient humidity and the inherent water content decrease. This tendency is explained semiquantitatively by mass storage capacity related to the stretchable state of the Nafion polymer network. Following the initial peak, the voltage shows a slow decay to a steady state, which is first characterized in this paper. The relative voltage decay during the steady state always decreases as the ambient humidity is lowered. It is ascribed to progressive increase of the ratio between the water molecules in the cation hydration shell to the free water. Under sinusoidal mechanical bending excitation in the range of 0.1-10 Hz, the voltage magnitude increases with frequency at high ambient humidity but decreases with frequency at low ambient humidity. The relationship is mainly controlled by the voltage decay effect and the response speed.

  6. Inspired gas humidity and temperature during mechanical ventilation with the Stephanie ventilator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preo, Bianca L; Shadbolt, Bruce; Todd, David A

    2013-11-01

    To measure inspired gas humidity and temperature delivered by a Stephanie neonatal ventilator with variations in (i) circuit length; (ii) circuit insulation; (iii) proximal airway temperature probe (pATP) position; (iv) inspiratory temperature (offset); and (v) incubator temperatures. Using the Stephanie neonatal ventilator, inspired gas humidity and temperature were measured during mechanical ventilation at the distal inspiratory limb and 3 cm down the endotracheal tube. Measurements were made with a long or short circuit; with or without insulation of the inspiratory limb; proximal ATP (pATP) either within or external to the incubator; at two different inspiratory temperature (offset) of 37(-0.5) and 39(-2.0)°C; and at three different incubator temperatures of 32, 34.5, and 37°C. Long circuits produced significantly higher inspired humidity than short circuits at all incubator settings, while only at 32°C was the inspired temperature higher. In the long circuits, insulation further improved the inspired humidity especially at 39(-2.0)°C, while only at incubator temperatures of 32 and 37°C did insulation significantly improve inspired temperature. Positioning the pATP outside the incubator did not result in higher inspired humidity but did significantly improve inspired temperature. An inspiratory temperature (offset) of 39(-2.0)°C delivered significantly higher inspired humidity and temperature than the 37(-0.5)°C especially when insulated. Long insulated Stephanie circuits should be used for neonatal ventilation when the infant is nursed in an incubator. The recommended inspiratory temperature (offset) of 37(-0.5)°C produced inspired humidity and temperature below international standards, and we suggest an increase to 39(-2.0)°C. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Humidity independent mass spectrometry for gas phase chemical analysis via ambient proton transfer reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hongying; Huang, Guangming, E-mail: gmhuang@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-03-31

    Graphical abstract: Direct and humidity independent mass spectrometry analysis of gas phase chemicals could be achieved via ambient proton transfer ionization, ion intensity was found to be stable with humidity ranged from ∼10% to ∼100%. - Highlights: • A humidity independent mass spectrometric method for gas phase samples analysis. • A universal and good sensitivity method. • The method can real time identify plant released raw chemicals. - Abstract: In this work, a humidity independent mass spectrometric method was developed for rapid analysis of gas phase chemicals. This method is based upon ambient proton transfer reaction between gas phase chemicals and charged water droplets, in a reaction chamber with nearly saturate humidity under atmospheric pressure. The humidity independent nature enables direct and rapid analysis of raw gas phase samples, avoiding time- and sample-consuming sample pretreatments in conventional mass spectrometry methods to control sample humidity. Acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene were used to evaluate the analytical performance of present method. The limits of detection for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene are in the range of ∼0.1 to ∼0.3 ppbV; that of benzene is well below the present European Union permissible exposure limit for benzene vapor (5 μg m{sup −3}, ∼1.44 ppbV), with linear ranges of approximately two orders of magnitude. The majority of the homemade device contains a stainless steel tube as reaction chamber and an ultrasonic humidifier as the source of charged water droplets, which makes this cheap device easy to assemble and facile to operate. In addition, potential application of this method was illustrated by the real time identification of raw gas phase chemicals released from plants at different physiological stages.

  8. Field evaluation of polymer capacitive humidity sensors for Bowen ratio energy balance flux measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of reliable, reasonably accurate and relatively inexpensive estimates of sensible heat and latent energy fluxes was investigated using a commercial combination thin-film polymer capacitive relative humidity and adjacent temperature sensor instrument. Long-term and unattended water vapour pressure profile difference measurements using low-power combination instruments were compared with those from a cooled dewpoint mirror hygrometer, the latter often used with Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) systems. An error analysis, based on instrument relative humidity and temperature errors, was applied for various capacitive humidity instrument models. The main disadvantage of a combination capacitive humidity instrument is that two measurements, relative humidity and temperature, are required for estimation of water vapour pressure as opposed to one for a dewpoint hygrometer. In a laboratory experiment using an automated procedure, water vapour pressure differences generated using a reference dewpoint generator were measured using a commercial model (Dew-10) dewpoint hygrometer and a combination capacitive humidity instrument. The laboratory measurement comparisons showed that, potentially, an inexpensive model combination capacitive humidity instrument (CS500 or HMP50), or for improved results a slightly more expensive model (HMP35C or HMP45C), could substitute for the more expensive dewpoint hygrometer. In a field study, in a mesic grassland, the water vapour pressure measurement noise for the combination capacitive humidity instruments was greater than that for the dewpoint hygrometer. The average water vapour pressure profile difference measured using a HMP45C was highly correlated with that from a dewpoint hygrometer with a slope less than unity. Water vapour pressure measurements using the capacitive humidity instruments were not as accurate, compared to those obtained using a dewpoint hygrometer, but the resolution magnitudes for the profile

  9. Dynamic temperature and humidity environmental profiles: impact for future emergency and disaster preparedness and response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, William J; Louie, Richard F; Tang, Chloe S; Paw U, Kyaw Tha; Kost, Gerald J

    2014-02-01

    During disasters and complex emergencies, environmental conditions can adversely affect the performance of point-of-care (POC) testing. Knowledge of these conditions can help device developers and operators understand the significance of temperature and humidity limits necessary for use of POC devices. First responders will benefit from improved performance for on-site decision making. To create dynamic temperature and humidity profiles that can be used to assess the environmental robustness of POC devices, reagents, and other resources (eg, drugs), and thereby, to improve preparedness. Surface temperature and humidity data from the National Climatic Data Center (Asheville, North Carolina USA) was obtained, median hourly temperature and humidity were calculated, and then mathematically stretched profiles were created to include extreme highs and lows. Profiles were created for: (1) Banda Aceh, Indonesia at the time of the 2004 Tsunami; (2) New Orleans, Louisiana USA just before and after Hurricane Katrina made landfall in 2005; (3) Springfield, Massachusetts USA for an ambulance call during the month of January 2009; (4) Port-au-Prince, Haiti following the 2010 earthquake; (5) Sendai, Japan for the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami with comparison to the colder month of January 2011; (6) New York, New York USA after Hurricane Sandy made landfall in 2012; and (7) a 24-hour rescue from Hawaii USA to the Marshall Islands. Profiles were validated by randomly selecting 10 days and determining if (1) temperature and humidity points fell inside and (2) daily variations were encompassed. Mean kinetic temperatures (MKT) were also assessed for each profile. Profiles accurately modeled conditions during emergency and disaster events and enclosed 100% of maximum and minimum temperature and humidity points. Daily variations also were represented well with 88.6% (62/70) of temperature readings and 71.1% (54/70) of relative humidity readings falling within diurnal patterns. Days

  10. Lower-tropospheric humidity: climatology, trends and the relation to the ITCZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Läderach

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The tropical region is an area of maximum humidity and serves as the major humidity source of the globe. Among other phenomena, it is governed by the so-called Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ which is commonly defined by converging low-level winds or enhanced precipitation. Given its importance as a humidity source, we investigate the humidity fields in the tropics in different reanalysis data sets, deduce the climatology and variability and assess the relationship to the ITCZ. Therefore, a new analysis method of the specific humidity distribution is introduced which allows detecting the location of the humidity maximum, the strength and the meridional extent. The results show that the humidity maximum in boreal summer is strongly shifted northward over the warm pool/Asia Monsoon area and the Gulf of Mexico. These shifts go along with a peak in the strength in both areas; however, the extent shrinks over the warm pool/Asia Monsoon area, whereas it is wider over the Gulf of Mexico. In winter, such connections between location, strength and extent are not found. Still, a peak in strength is again identified over the Gulf of Mexico in boreal winter. The variability of the three characteristics is dominated by inter-annual signals in both seasons. The results using ERA-interim data suggest a positive trend in the Gulf of Mexico/Atlantic region from 1979 to 2010, showing an increased northward shift in the recent years. Although the trend is only weakly confirmed by the results using MERRA reanalysis data, it is in phase with a trend in hurricane activity – a possible hint of the importance of the new method on hurricanes. Furthermore, the position of the maximum humidity coincides with one of the ITCZ in most areas. One exception is the western and central Pacific, where the area is dominated by the double ITCZ in boreal winter. Nevertheless, the new method enables us to gain more insight into the humidity distribution, its variability and

  11. Humidity Sensitivity of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Networks Deposited by Dielectrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhong Cui

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation on the humidity sensitivity of deposited multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT networks using ac dielectrophoresis (DEP between interdigitated electrodes (IDEs. MWCNTs dispersed in ethanol were trapped and enriched between IDEs on a Si/SiO2 substrate under a positive DEP force. After the DEP process, the ethanol was evaporated and the MWCNT network on a substrate with IDEs was put into a furnace for repeated thermal annealing. It was found that the resistance stability of the network was effectively improved through thermal annealing. The humidity sensitivity was obtained by measuring the resistance of the MWCNT network with different relative humidity at room temperature. The experimental results show the resistance increases linearly with increasing the relative humidity from 25% to 95% RH with a sensitivity of 0.5%/%RH. The MWCNT networks have a reversible humidity sensing capacity with response time and recovery time of about 3 s and 25 s, respectively. The resistance is dependent on temperature with a negative coefficient of about -0.33%/K in a temperature range from 293 K to 393 K.

  12. Combining the Converse Humidity/Resistance Response Behaviors of RGO Films for Flexible Logic Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong

    2017-03-23

    Carbon nanomaterials have excellent humidity sensing performance. Here, we demonstrate that reduced-graphene-oxide- (rGO) based conductive films with different thermal reduction times have gradient and invertible humidity/electrical resistance responses: rGO films (< 11 h, negative response, regarded as a signal of “0”), rGO films (around 11-13 h, balance point) and rGO films (> 13 h, negative response, regarded as a signal of “1”). We propose a new mechanism that describes a “scale”-like model for rGO films to explain these behaviors based on contributions from Ohm-contact resistance and capacitive reactance at interplate junctions, and intrinsic resistances of the nanoplates, respectively. This mechanism is accordingly validated via a series of experiments and electrical impedance spectroscopies, which complement more classical models based on proton conductivity. To explore the practical applications of the converse humidity/resistance responses, three simple flexible logic devices were developed, i) a rGO pattern for humidity-insensitive conductive film, which has the potential to greatly improve the stability of carbon-based electrical device to humidity; ii) a Janus pattern of rGO films for gesture recognition, which is very useful to human/machine interactions; iii) a sandwich pattern of rGO films for 3-dimensional (3D) noncontact sensing, which will be complementary to existing 3D touch technique.

  13. The effect of humidity and temperature on visual outcomes after myopic corneal laser refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Christopher T; Shtein, Roni M; Veldheer, Daniel; Hussain, Munira; Niziol, Leslie M; Musch, David C; Mian, Shahzad I

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether procedure room environmental conditions are associated with outcomes after myopic laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) or laser-assisted keratomileusis (LASEK). Retrospective chart review. Eight hundred sixty-three eyes of 458 consecutive patients at a university-based academic practice. We reviewed the medical records of consecutive patients who underwent LASIK or LASEK over a 3-year period. Linear mixed regression models were used to investigate the association of laser room temperature and humidity with the outcomes of visual acuity and postoperative manifest spherical equivalent refraction. Repeated measures logistic regression models were used for the outcomes of diffuse lamellar keratitis (DLK) and need for enhancement surgery. Subjects were on an average 38.6 years old at the time of surgery (standard deviation [SD] =10.3) and the average spherical equivalent refraction of eyes was 3.8 diopters (SD =2.03). Regression models did not reveal a significant association between temperature and uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) or corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), or between humidity and UDVA (P>0.05 for all). However, increased humidity was associated with a small but statistically significant improvement in CDVA after LASIK at 1 day, 1 month, 3 months, and 1 year postoperatively (Prefraction. While increased laser room humidity was consistently associated with small improvements in CDVA after myopic LASIK over time, variations in room temperature and humidity were not associated with UDVA, the need for enhancement, the incidence of DLK, or refraction after myopic LASIK or LASEK.

  14. Effects of Humidity and Surfaces on the Melt Crystallization of Ibuprofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il Won Kim

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Melt crystallization of ibuprofen was studied to understand the effects of humidity and surfaces. The molecular self-assembly during the amorphous-to-crystal transformation was examined in terms of the nucleation and growth of the crystals. The crystallization was on Al, Au, and self-assembled monolayers with –CH3, –OH, and –COOH functional groups. Effects of the humidity were studied at room temperature (18–20 °C with relative humidity 33%, 75%, and 100%. Effects of the surfaces were observed at −20 °C (relative humidity 36% to enable close monitoring with slower crystal growth. The nucleation time of ibuprofen was faster at high humidity conditions probably due to the local formation of the unfavorable ibuprofen melt/water interface. The crystal morphologies of ibuprofen were governed by the nature of the surfaces, and they could be associated with the growth kinetics by the Avrami equation. The current study demonstrated the effective control of the melt crystallization of ibuprofen through the melt/atmosphere and melt/surface interfaces.

  15. A Resistive Humidity Sensor Based on Nanostructured WO3-ZnO Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunesh Tiwari

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Paper reports morphological and humidity sensing studies of WO3 and WO3-ZnO composite pellets prepared in the weight % ratio of 10:1, 4:1 and 2:1 by solid-state reaction route. The pellets have been annealed at temperatures of 300-500 °C. XRD pattern shows peaks of ZnWO4 formed due to solid state reaction between WO3 and ZnO. SEM micrographs show that the sensing elements manifest porous structure. Granulation and tendency to agglomerate seen in the SEM micrograph are due to the presence of zinc ions in ZnWO4. Nanoparticles are having their sizes in the range 37-182 nm. The average Kelvin radius at 20˚C room temperature is 27 Ả. Humidity sensing application of the pellets has been studied in a humidity control cabinet. It is observed that as relative humidity increases, there is decrease in the resistance of pellets in the range 10-85 % RH. Sensing element of WO3-ZnO in 2:1 weight % ratio shows best results in 10-85 % relative humidity range. The average sensitivity of this sample is 1.25 MΩ/%RH. This sensing element shows good reproducibility, low hysteresis and less effect of aging.

  16. A Low-Power Integrated Humidity CMOS Sensor by Printing-on-Chip Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Hung Lee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A low-power, wide-dynamic-range integrated humidity sensing chip is implemented using a printable polymer sensing material with an on-chip pulse-width-modulation interface circuit. By using the inkjet printing technique, poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene/polystyrene sulfonate that has humidity sensing features can be printed onto the top metal layer of a 0.35 μm CMOS IC. The developed printing-on-chip humidity sensor achieves a heterogeneous three dimensional sensor system-on-chip architecture. The humidity sensing of the implemented printing-on-chip sensor system is experimentally tested. The sensor shows a sensitivity of 0.98% to humidity in the atmosphere. The maximum dynamic range of the readout circuit is 9.8 MΩ, which can be further tuned by the frequency of input signal to fit the requirement of the resistance of printed sensor. The power consumption keeps only 154 μW. This printing-on-chip sensor provides a practical solution to fulfill an ultra-small integrated sensor for the applications in miniaturized sensing systems.

  17. Anomalies in relative humidity profile in the boundary layer during convective rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Rohit; Talukdar, Shamitaksha; Saha, Upal; Jana, Soumyajyoti; Maitra, Animesh

    2017-07-01

    Radiometric observations of relative humidity profile at Kolkata show a significant fall at around 1 to 2 km height during convective rain events. An extensive investigation shows that the fall of relative humidity is not seen during calm conditions but is strongly related to the characteristics of temperature lapse rate profiles. Moreover, the phenomenon may have strong association with boundary layer structure. The reason for such anomalies in the planetary boundary layer humidity profile might be due to the release of latent heat at the mentioned altitude. The abundance of pollutant aerosols in urban regions has also been found to contribute to this relative humidity anomaly. It has also been reported that this boundary layer relative humidity is accompanied by high latent heat release and condensation of vapour to liquid which is not much prominent in other rain types as observed in stratiform rain. Hence, convective rain produces some unique boundary layer characteristics which have also been partially supported with allied satellite and multi-station observations.

  18. AC Response to Humidity and Propane of Sprayed Fe-Zn Oxide Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro AVILA-GARCÍA

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron-zinc oxide films with different Zn contents were ultrasonically sprayed on glass substrates and inter-digital gold electrodes were evaporated upon them. Films were deposited from solutions containing 2, 10 and 30 at. % Zn. Hematite, amorphous and Franklinite structures turned out, respectively. They were assessed as humidity and propane detectors under alternating-current conditions for frequencies from 1 to 105 Hz and temperatures 30 and 250 oC. Their impedances in dry air, humid air and humid air plus propane were determined from voltage measurements with a Lock-In amplifier. Sensitivities to humidity (53 % RH. and 189, 500 and 786 ppm of propane from the response of the resistance, reactance and also the total impedance were determined as functions of frequency. The maximum sensitivity to humidity ranges from 24 % up to 308 %. For propane, the maximum sensitivity ranges from 45 % up to 711 %. The largest sensitivity values correspond in all cases to reactance. From the dynamical response, the response and recovery times are determined, along with the concentration-dependence of the sensitivity. The sensing mechanisms are commented.

  19. Modelling of the humidity effect on the barrier height in SnO{sub 2} varistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuratovsky, I. [Department of Radioelectronics, Dniepropetrovsk National University, Dniepropetrovsk 49050 (Ukraine); Glot, A. [Division de Estudios de Posgrado, Universidad Tecnologica de la Mixteca, Huajuapan de Leon, Oaxaca 69000 (Mexico)]. E-mail: alexglot@mixteco.utm.mx; Traversa, E. [Dip. di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' , Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2006-03-15

    Tin dioxide based SnO{sub 2}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic device with combined varistor and humidity-sensitive properties is studied. This varistor-sensor has high humidity sensitivity coefficient of about 420 at low electric field and high non-linearity coefficient of about 50 at electric field 3500 V cm{sup -1}. Current-voltage characteristics of the samples with separate electrodes for the central and the peripheral parts are studied in air with different relative humidity. It is shown that current through the peripheral part of a sample is increased much stronger than through the central part. The observed increase of low-field current on relative humidity is explained by the decrease of the barrier height. The estimations of the lowering of the barrier height in a humid air is performed using the suggested models.

  20. Temperature Effect on Capacitive Humidity Sensors and its Compensation Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarikul ISLAM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the study of the effect of temperature on different capacitive humidity sensors used in practice. Capacitance of the humidity sensor, which is a function of concentration of water vapor, also depends on ambient temperature. This variation of ambient temperature causes error in the performance of sensor outputs and its compensation is essential. In this paper, we have used an artificial neural network to compensate the effect of ambient temperature error. The proposed artificial neural network technique is based on inverse model of the sensor. The technique is applicable for compensation of linear or nonlinear temperature effect of humidity sensor. It can also compensate the nonlinearity of the capacitive humidity response which is an issue for all most all types of humidity sensor. Our simulation studies show the sensor output and artificial neural network model output matches closely. Even though sensor characteristics change with temperature, the proposed model performs well irrespective of any change in temperature. It can be extended for the temperature compensation of other sensors. The maximum error for nonlinearity using the ANN technique are 0.2 % and temperature error of 0.08 % for temperature range between 10 0C to 60 0C of Sensor 3 and 0.01 % for temperature range between 25 0C to 85 0C of Sensor 4 respectively.

  1. Influence of Curing Humidity on the Compressive Strength of Gypsum-Cemented Similar Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiming Guan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The analogous simulation experiment is widely used in geotechnical and mining engineering. However, systematic errors derived from unified standard curing procedure have been underestimated to some extent. In this study, 140 gypsum-cemented similar material specimens were chosen to study their curing procedure with different relative humidity, which is 10%–15%, 40%, 60%, and 80%, respectively. SEM microstructures and XRD spectra were adopted to detect the correlation between microstructures and macroscopic mechanical strength during curing. Our results indicated that the needle-like phases of similar materials began to develop in the early stage of the hydration process through intersecting with each other and eventually transformed into mat-like phases. Increase of humidity may inhibit the development of needle-like phases; thus the compressive strength changes more smoothly, and the time required for the material strength to reach the peak value will be prolonged. The peak strength decreases along with the increase of humidity while the humidity is higher than 40%; however, the reverse tendency was observed if the humidity was lower than 40%. Finally, we noticed that the material strength usually reaches the peak value when the water content continuously reduces and tends towards stability. Based on the above observation, a curing method determination model and experimental strength predication method for gypsum-cemented similar materials were proposed.

  2. Kinetics of size changes of individual Bacillus thuringiensis spores in response to changes in relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Andrew J; Price, P Buford; Leighton, Terrance J; Wheeler, Katherine E

    2003-03-18

    Using an automated scanning microscope, we report the surprising result that individual dormant spores of Bacillus thuringiensis grow and shrink in response to increasing and decreasing relative humidity. We simultaneously monitored the size of inorganic calibration particles. We found that the spores consistently swell in response to increased relative humidity, and shrink to near their original size on reexposure to dry air. Although the dispersion of swelling amplitudes within an ensemble of spores is wide (approximately 30% of the average amplitude), amplitudes for individual spores are highly correlated between different swelling episodes, suggesting that individual spores respond consistently to changes in humidity. We find evidence for two distinct time scales for swelling: one with a time scale of no more than approximately 50 s, and another with a time scale of approximately 8 min. We speculate that these two mechanisms may be due to rapid diffusion of water into the spore coat + cortex, followed by slower diffusion of water into the spore core, respectively. Humidity-dependent swelling may account for the greater kill effectiveness of spores by gas-phase chlorine dioxide, formaldehyde, and ethylene oxide at very high relative humidity.

  3. Exploiting the igloo principle and greenhouse effect to regulate humidity and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu Karthick

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Toxic epidermal necrolysis can be fatal and nursing care with careful monitoring of temperature and humidity can improve survival rate. We adapted the greenhouse and igloo principle using a common hood to monitor the temperature and humidity. Methods: A small heater with a regulator was placed in a mini hood and temperature was recorded inside the uncovered hood and hood covered with green cloth and aluminium foil separately. The regular hood was placed over a volunteer and the temperature was measured inside the open hood and hood covered with green cloth and aluminium foil separately. The relative humidity was also monitored using Zeal mercury dry - wet bulb hygrometer. Results: Temperature increase was most marked in the foil-covered hood followed by cloth-covered hood, both with the heater and the volunteer. Similarly, in the volunteer study, the humidity was best maintained inside the aluminium foil-covered hood. Conclusion: We recommend the use of regular hood with suitable cover to monitor the humidity and temperature of patients with toxic epidermal necrolysis.

  4. A low-power integrated humidity CMOS sensor by printing-on-chip technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Hung; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Cowan, Melissa A; Wu, Wen-Jung; Lin, Chih-Ting

    2014-05-23

    A low-power, wide-dynamic-range integrated humidity sensing chip is implemented using a printable polymer sensing material with an on-chip pulse-width-modulation interface circuit. By using the inkjet printing technique, poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene)/polystyrene sulfonate that has humidity sensing features can be printed onto the top metal layer of a 0.35 μm CMOS IC. The developed printing-on-chip humidity sensor achieves a heterogeneous three dimensional sensor system-on-chip architecture. The humidity sensing of the implemented printing-on-chip sensor system is experimentally tested. The sensor shows a sensitivity of 0.98% to humidity in the atmosphere. The maximum dynamic range of the readout circuit is 9.8 MΩ, which can be further tuned by the frequency of input signal to fit the requirement of the resistance of printed sensor. The power consumption keeps only 154 μW. This printing-on-chip sensor provides a practical solution to fulfill an ultra-small integrated sensor for the applications in miniaturized sensing systems.

  5. Effects of Ce doping and humidity on UV sensing properties of electrospun ZnO nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Di; Zhang, Jun; Li, Shuo; Zhang, Jun-Cheng; Zhu, Jian-Wei; Gong, Mao-Gang; Wang, Xiao-Xiong; Long, Yun-Ze

    2017-09-01

    Pure ZnO and Ce-doped ZnO nanofibers were synthesized via electrospinning-calcination technique. The morphology, composition, structure, humidity sensing and photoelectric properties were characterized. The field-effect curves showed that a single pure ZnO nanofiber is an n-type semiconductor and an individual Ce-ZnO nanofiber is a p-type semiconductor. The Ce doping and humidity have strong influence on the UV sensing properties of ZnO-based nanofibers. In the dark, the responses [(IVarious RH - I43% RH)/I43% RH] of pure ZnO increased gradually with the increase of humidity, while the responses of Ce-doped ZnO nanofibers decreased. When exposed to UV radiation, the response of pure ZnO nanofibers decreased with increasing humidity, while that of Ce-doped ZnO increased. And the highest responses are around 88.44 and 683.67 at 97% humidity for pure ZnO and Ce-ZnO nanofibers under UV irradiation. In addition, the UV response of Ce-ZnO with good stability and repeatability increases by two orders of magnitude than that of pure ZnO. The sensing mechanism relevant to oxygen and water-related conduction was discussed briefly. These results exhibit that the application prospects of p-type Ce-ZnO nanofibers are promising in the field of photoelectric devices.

  6. Relationship between humidity and influenza A viability in droplets and implications for influenza's seasonality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Yang

    Full Text Available Humidity has been associated with influenza's seasonality, but the mechanisms underlying the relationship remain unclear. There is no consistent explanation for influenza's transmission patterns that applies to both temperate and tropical regions. This study aimed to determine the relationship between ambient humidity and viability of the influenza A virus (IAV during transmission between hosts and to explain the mechanisms underlying it. We measured the viability of IAV in droplets consisting of various model media, chosen to isolate effects of salts and proteins found in respiratory fluid, and in human mucus, at relative humidities (RH ranging from 17% to 100%. In all media and mucus, viability was highest when RH was either close to 100% or below ∼50%. When RH decreased from 84% to 50%, the relationship between viability and RH depended on droplet composition: viability decreased in saline solutions, did not change significantly in solutions supplemented with proteins, and increased dramatically in mucus. Additionally, viral decay increased linearly with salt concentration in saline solutions but not when they were supplemented with proteins. There appear to be three regimes of IAV viability in droplets, defined by humidity: physiological conditions (∼100% RH with high viability, concentrated conditions (50% to near 100% RH with lower viability depending on the composition of media, and dry conditions (<50% RH with high viability. This paradigm could help resolve conflicting findings in the literature on the relationship between IAV viability in aerosols and humidity, and results in human mucus could help explain influenza's seasonality in different regions.

  7. Designing and adjusting the thickness of polyvinylpyrrolidone waveguide layer on plasmonic nanofilm for humidity sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhiqing; Bai, Lan; Guo, Lijiao; Cao, Baosheng; Wu, Jinlei; He, Yangyang

    2017-01-01

    We developed a fast response and high-resolution plasmonic waveguide sensor for sensing environmental humidity by converting the optical signal in the visible light region. The sensor was designed as a layer-on-layer film structure in which the hydrophilic polymer of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) film served as the waveguide layer and was dip-coated onto the plasmonic gold (Au) nanofilm for sensing the environmental humidity. The amount of the absorbed water molecules on the PVP layer could affect the refractive index and thickness of the PVP, leading to a shift of the surface plasmon resonance peak position of Au nanofilm at the different order modes of the waveguide. The theoretic calculations indicated that the optimal thickness of the waveguide layer on the Au nanofilm ranged from 550 to 650 nm. By adjusting the thickness of the PVP layer to 560 nm, the high-resolution optical signals were observed in the visible light region with the humidity shifts ranging from 11% to 85% relative humidity (RH). Our work details a successful attempt to design and prepare the plasmonic waveguide sensor with the lost-cost polymer as the sensing layer for real-time detection of environmental humidity.

  8. The Brunt-Vaisala frequency of rotating tokamak plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkort, J. W.; de Blank, H. J.; Koren, B.

    2012-01-01

    The continuous spectrum of analytical toroidally rotating magnetically confined plasma equilibria is investigated analytically and numerically. In the presence of purely toroidal flow, the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations leave the freedom to specify which thermodynamic quantity is constant on

  9. Humidity Build-Up in a Typical Electronic Enclosure Exposed to Cycling Conditions and Effect on Corrosion Reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conseil, Helene; Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2016-01-01

    The design of electronic device enclosures plays a major role in determining the humidity build-up inside the device as a response to the varying external humidity. Therefore, the corrosion reliability of electronic devices has direct connection to the enclosure design. This paper describes...... the internal humidity build-up in a typical enclosure prescribed for electronic applications as a function of external humidity conditions and enclosure-related parameters. Investigated parameters include external temperature and humidity conditions, the temperature and time of the internal heating cycle......, thermal mass, and port/opening size. The effect of the internal humidity build-up on corrosion reliability has been evaluated by measuring the leakage current (LC) on interdigitated test comb patterns, which are precontaminated with sodium chloride and placed inside the enclosure. The results showed...

  10. Humidity Sensing Properties of Paper Substrates and Their Passivation with ZnO Nanoparticles for Sensor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niarchos, Georgios; Dubourg, Georges; Afroudakis, Georgios; Georgopoulos, Markos; Tsouti, Vasiliki; Makarona, Eleni; Crnojevic-Bengin, Vesna; Tsamis, Christos

    2017-03-04

    In this paper, we investigated the effect of humidity on paper substrates and propose a simple and low-cost method for their passivation using ZnO nanoparticles. To this end, we built paper-based microdevices based on an interdigitated electrode (IDE) configuration by means of a mask-less laser patterning method on simple commercial printing papers. Initial resistive measurements indicate that a paper substrate with a porous surface can be used as a cost-effective, sensitive and disposable humidity sensor in the 20% to 70% relative humidity (RH) range. Successive spin-coated layers of ZnO nanoparticles then, control the effect of humidity. Using this approach, the sensors become passive to relative humidity changes, paving the way to the development of ZnO-based gas sensors on paper substrates insensitive to humidity.

  11. Effects of High-Humidity Aging on Platinum, Palladium, and Gold Loaded Tin Oxide—Volatile Organic Compound Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko Nishibori

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is an investigation of high-humidity aging effects on the total volatile organic compound (T–VOC gas-sensing properties of platinum, palladium, and gold-loaded tin oxide (Pt,Pd,Au/SnO2 thick films. The sensor responses of the high-humidity aged Pt,Pd,Au/SnO2, a non-aged Pt,Pd,Au/SnO2, and a high-humidity aged Pt/SnO2 to T–VOC test gas have been measured. The high-humidity aging is an effective treatment for resistance to humidity change for the Pt,Pd,Au/SnO2 but not effective for the Pt/SnO2. The mechanism of the high-humidity aging effects is discussed based on the change of surface state of the SnO2 particles.

  12. Sol-gel zinc oxide humidity sensors integrated with a ring oscillator circuit on-a-chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Zhi; Dai, Ching-Liang; Wu, Chyan-Chyi

    2014-10-28

    The study develops an integrated humidity microsensor fabricated using the commercial 0.18 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The integrated humidity sensor consists of a humidity sensor and a ring oscillator circuit on-a-chip. The humidity sensor is composed of a sensitive film and branch interdigitated electrodes. The sensitive film is zinc oxide prepared by sol-gel method. After completion of the CMOS process, the sensor requires a post-process to remove the sacrificial oxide layer and to coat the zinc oxide film on the interdigitated electrodes. The capacitance of the sensor changes when the sensitive film adsorbs water vapor. The circuit is used to convert the capacitance of the humidity sensor into the oscillation frequency output. Experimental results show that the output frequency of the sensor changes from 84.3 to 73.4 MHz at 30 °C as the humidity increases 40 to 90%RH.

  13. Sol-Gel Zinc Oxide Humidity Sensors Integrated with a Ring Oscillator Circuit On-a-Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Zhi Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The study develops an integrated humidity microsensor fabricated using the commercial 0.18 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS process. The integrated humidity sensor consists of a humidity sensor and a ring oscillator circuit on-a-chip. The humidity sensor is composed of a sensitive film and branch interdigitated electrodes. The sensitive film is zinc oxide prepared by sol-gel method. After completion of the CMOS process, the sensor requires a post-process to remove the sacrificial oxide layer and to coat the zinc oxide film on the interdigitated electrodes. The capacitance of the sensor changes when the sensitive film adsorbs water vapor. The circuit is used to convert the capacitance of the humidity sensor into the oscillation frequency output. Experimental results show that the output frequency of the sensor changes from 84.3 to 73.4 MHz at 30 °C as the humidity increases 40 to 90%RH.

  14. Effect of relative humidity on the migration of benzophenone from paperboard into the food simulant Tenax and modelling hereof

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Line Lundbæk; Petersen, Jens Højslev

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of relative humidity on the migration of benzophenone from paperboard into the food simulant Tenax®. Kinetic migration investigations were carried out with three relative humidities in the interval between 39% and >73%. All investigations were...... carried out at a constant temperature of 34°C. It was found that the migration of benzophenone after more than 30 days was 4.8 times higher at a relative humidity of 64%-71%, and 7.3 times higher at a relative humidity of >73%, compared with that at a relative humidity of 39%-49%. Diffusion and partition...... coefficients were derived from the results by using a software for modelling migration in multilayer materials. Both the diffusion coefficient and the partition coefficient, between paperboard and Tenax®, decrease with increasing relative humidity. The experimental results were correctly modelled only when...

  15. Elimination of Coffee-Ring Formation by Humidity Cycling: A Numerical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eales, Adam D; Routh, Alexander F

    2016-01-19

    Periodically switching between evaporation and condensation, or "humidity cycling", has potential for controlling the film shape that results from volatile droplets containing a nonvolatile material. It does not require adaptation of material properties nor the introduction of an external field to achieve a change in film shape. It was shown experimentally by Doi and coworkers [Kajiya et al. Langmuir 2010, 26, pp 10429-10432] that ring-shaped deposits can be removed through careful selection of the atmospheric conditions. We present a model, based on lubrication theory, that can predict the final film shape resulting from the humidity cycling process. We confirm that the refluidization of gelled regions during condensation and the subsequent inward flow is the mechanism responsible for the improved profiles. Furthermore, we find that an increase in the time spent condensing to that spent evaporating results in flatter films and that an optimal humidity cycling frequency exists.

  16. Study on heat and mass transfer characteristics of humid air-flow in a fin bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Hwi [Air-Conditioner Research Laboratory, LG Electronics, Seoul 153-082 (Korea); Koyama, Shigeru; Kuwahara, Ken [Department of Energy and Environmental Engineering, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Kwon, Jeong-Tae [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan, Chungnam 336-795 (Korea); Park, Byung-Duck [School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Sangju, Gyeongbuk 742-711 (Korea)

    2010-11-15

    This paper deals with the heat and mass transfer characteristics of humid air-flow under frosting conditions. A slit fin bundle was used for the simulation of fins of a heat exchanger. The effects of the cooling block temperature, air humidity and air velocity on the frosting characteristics were experimentally investigated. The frosted mass was affected considerably by the cooling block temperature and air humidity. However, the effect of air velocity on it was not so large. The pressure drop was affected remarkably by all experimental parameters in this study. Local heat flux distribution and frost thickness distribution on each fin were predicted from the measured fin temperatures and the mass and energy conservation equations on the frost surface and inside the frost layer. (author)

  17. Indonesian Throughflow drove Australian climate from humid Pliocene to arid Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Beth A.; Renema, Willem; Henderiks, Jorijntje; De Vleeschouwer, David; Groeneveld, Jeroen; Castañeda, Isla S.; Reuning, Lars; Bogus, Kara; Auer, Gerald; Ishiwa, Takeshige; McHugh, Cecilia M.; Gallagher, Stephen J.; Fulthorpe, Craig S.

    2017-07-01

    Late Miocene to mid-Pleistocene sedimentary proxy records reveal that northwest Australia underwent an abrupt transition from dry to humid climate conditions at 5.5 million years (Ma), likely receiving year-round rainfall, but after 3.3 Ma, climate shifted toward an increasingly seasonal precipitation regime. The progressive constriction of the Indonesian Throughflow likely decreased continental humidity and transferred control of northwest Australian climate from the Pacific to the Indian Ocean, leading to drier conditions punctuated by monsoonal precipitation. The northwest dust pathway and fully established seasonal and orbitally controlled precipitation were in place by 2.4 Ma, well after the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. The transition from humid to arid conditions was driven by changes in Pacific and Indian Ocean circulation and regional atmospheric moisture transport, influenced by the emerging Maritime Continent. We conclude that the Maritime Continent is the switchboard modulating teleconnections between tropical and high-latitude climate systems.

  18. Influence of temperature and humidity on the detection of benzene vapor by piezoelectric crystal sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Chan-Hyon; Yun, Jong-Ho; Sin, Kye-Ryong

    2016-01-01

    The effects of temperature and humidity on the estimation of air pollution by benzene by using the piezoelectric crystal gas sensor were studied. Polyvinylchloride films were used as substrate for the immobilization of polymethylphenylsiloxane onto the electrode surface of the piezoelectric crystal. The sensing layer consisting of polymethylphenylsiloxane and polyvinylchloride was used for real-time monitoring of benzene, one of the atmospheric pollutants. According to the humidity from 35% to 75%, the upper limit of detection by this sensor was decreased and the response time and frequency recovery time for detecting benzene were long. On the other hand, as increasing the temperature, the response time and the frequency recovery time of the sensor were short, but its sensitivity got worse. The models for the correlation between the benzene concentration and temperature (or humidity) were presented.

  19. Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Qinggang; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Lucas, Ivan T.; Clark, Kyle; Weber, Adam Z.; Kostecki, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this effort was to correlate the local surface ionic conductance of a Nafion? 212 proton-exchange membrane with its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a function of water content. Both macroscopic and microscopic proton conductivities were investigated at different relative humidity levels, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CSAFM). We were able to identify small ion-conducting domains that grew with humidity at the surface of the membrane. Numerical analysis of the surface ionic conductance images recorded at various relative humidity levels helped determine the fractional area of ion-conducting active sites. A simple square-root relationship between the fractional conducting area and observed interfacial mass-transport resistance was established. Furthermore, the relationship between the bulk ionic conductivity and surface ionic conductance pattern of the Nafion? membrane was examined.

  20. Climatic Reliability of Electronics: Early Prediction and Control of Contamination and humidity effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdingovas, Vadimas

    This PhD project is motivated by the demand for the deeper understanding of the effects of humidity and contamination on corrosion related issues and overall reliability of electronic devices. The information available today is limited and incoherent, thus the directions for the research subtopics...... were to a significant extent guided by the climatic reliability issues the electronic companies are currently facing. The research in this thesis is focused on the synergistic effects of process related contamination, humidity, potential bias, and PCBA design related aspects, while various tests...... methods suitable for electrical measurements are attempted and compared with standardized test methods. The focus is also placed on the methods for corrosion prediction on a PCBA layout with the aim of profiling corrosion prone regions or simulating the possible humidity effects on a circuit design...