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Sample records for vaginal lactobacillus phages

  1. Analysis of Lactobacillus Products for Phages and Bacteriocins That Inhibit Vaginal Lactobacilli

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    Lin Tao

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bacterial vaginosis is associated with an unexplained loss of vaginal lactobacilli. Previously, we have identified certain vaginal lactobacilli-released phages that can inhibit in vitro other vaginal lactobacilli. However, there is no apparent route for phages to be transmitted among women. The purpose of this study was to identify whether certain Lactobacillus products commonly used by women release phages or bacteriocins that can inhibit vaginal lactobacilli.

  2. Lactobacillus for Vaginal Microflora Correction

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    Saule Saduakhasova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Despite the significant progress made in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, there is still a high rate of vaginal dysbiosis in Kazakh women. The use of antibiotics in the treatment of vaginal dysbiosis contributes to the elimination of pathogens as well as microflora, which can lead to a decrease in local immunity and more favorable conditions for infection spread. The most physiologically safe and promising method for the restoration of vaginal biocenosis is the use of probiotics administered by a vaginal route.Methods. We have allocated 64 of cultures of Lactobacillus from the vaginal epithelium of healthy women of reproductive age and women with diagnosed bacterial vaginosis (BV. Identification of cultures was performed by PCR analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA.  Evaluation of biological significance was determined by the following criteria: high antagonistic activity against Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella ozaenae, and Staphylococcus aureus; and production of hydrogen peroxide, resistance to antibiotics, adhesive activity. We studied the symbiotic relationship of selected biologically active of cultures to each other and received options for consortiums with  properties of  probiotics through co-cultivation.Results. Results of genotyping  showed that the isolated lactobacilli belong to the seven species: L. fermentum, L. salivarius, L. gasseri, L. crispatus, L. jensenii, L. plantarum, and L. delbrueskii. L. fermentum, L. salivarius, L. gasseri, and L. jensenii occur in women with suspected BV. The highest percentage of occurrence in the vagina of healthy women was L. fermentum (28%. Most strains of lactobacilli possess high inhibitory activity for all test-strains, except Candida albicans (37.5%. 56% of studied cultures revealed high adhesion to human erythrocytes. All lactobacillus strains were resistant to metronidazole, 80% to kanamycin, 57%  to vancomycin, and

  3. Biofilms of vaginal Lactobacillus in vitro test.

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    Wei, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Rui; Xiao, Bing-Bing; Liao, Qin-Ping

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on biofilms of Lactobacillus spp. - a type of normal flora isolated from healthy human vaginas of women of childbearing age; thereupon, it broadens the research scope of investigation of vaginal normal flora. The static slide culture method was adopted to foster biofilms, marked by specific fluorescence staining. Laser scanning confocal and scanning electron microscopy were used to observe the microstructure of the biofilms. Photographs taken from the microstructure were analysed to calculate the density of the biofilms. The body of Lactobacillus spp., though red, turned yellow when interacting with the green extracellular polysaccharides. The structure of the biofilm and aquaporin within the biofilm were imaged. Lactobacillus density increases over time. This study provides convincing evidence that Lactobacillus can form biofilms and grow over time in vitro. This finding establishes an important and necessary condition for selecting proper strains for the pharmaceutics of vaginal ecology.

  4. Characterization of Two Virulent Phages of Lactobacillus plantarum

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    Briggiler Marcó, Mariángeles; Garneau, Josiane E.; Tremblay, Denise; Quiberoni, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    We characterized two Lactobacillus plantarum virulent siphophages, ATCC 8014-B1 (B1) and ATCC 8014-B2 (B2), previously isolated from corn silage and anaerobic sewage sludge, respectively. Phage B2 infected two of the eight L. plantarum strains tested, while phage B1 infected three. Phage adsorption was highly variable depending on the strain used. Phage defense systems were found in at least two L. plantarum strains, LMG9211 and WCSF1. The linear double-stranded DNA genome of the pac-type phage B1 had 38,002 bp, a G+C content of 47.6%, and 60 open reading frames (ORFs). Surprisingly, the phage B1 genome has 97% identity with that of Pediococcus damnosus phage clP1 and 77% identity with that of L. plantarum phage JL-1; these phages were isolated from sewage and cucumber fermentation, respectively. The double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome of the cos-type phage B2 had 80,618 bp, a G+C content of 36.9%, and 127 ORFs with similarities to those of Bacillus and Lactobacillus strains as well as phages. Some phage B2 genes were similar to ORFs from L. plantarum phage LP65 of the Myoviridae family. Additionally, 6 tRNAs were found in the phage B2 genome. Protein analysis revealed 13 (phage B1) and 9 (phage B2) structural proteins. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing such high identity between phage genomes infecting different genera of lactic acid bacteria. PMID:23042172

  5. Vaginal Lactobacillus isolates inhibit uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

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    Atassi , Fabrice; Brassart , Dominique; Grob , Philipp; Graf , Federico; Servin , Alain ,

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activities of Lactobacillus jensenii KS119.1 and KS121.1, and Lactobacillus gasserii KS120.1 and KS124.3 strains isolated from the vaginal microflora of healthy women, against uropathogenic, diffusely adhering Afa/Dr Escherichia coli (Afa/Dr DAEC) strains IH11128 and 7372 involved in recurrent cystitis. We observed that some of the Lactobacillus isolates inhibited the growth and decreased the viability of E. coli IH11128 and 7372....

  6. Molecular Characterization of Three Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus Phages

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    Casey, Eoghan; Mahony, Jennifer; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; Bottacini, Francesca; Cornelissen, Anneleen; Neve, Horst; Heller, Knut J.; Noben, Jean-Paul; Dal Bello, Fabio; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2014-01-01

    In this study, three phages infecting Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, named Ld3, Ld17, and Ld25A, were isolated from whey samples obtained from various industrial fermentations. These phages were further characterized in a multifaceted approach: (i) biological and physical characterization through host range analysis and electron microscopy; (ii) genetic assessment through genome analysis; (iii) mass spectrometry analysis of the structural components of the phages; and (iv), for ...

  7. Molecular Characterization of Three Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus Phages

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    Casey, Eoghan; Mahony, Jennifer; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; Bottacini, Francesca; Cornelissen, Anneleen; Neve, Horst; Heller, Knut J.; Noben, Jean-Paul; Dal Bello, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    In this study, three phages infecting Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, named Ld3, Ld17, and Ld25A, were isolated from whey samples obtained from various industrial fermentations. These phages were further characterized in a multifaceted approach: (i) biological and physical characterization through host range analysis and electron microscopy; (ii) genetic assessment through genome analysis; (iii) mass spectrometry analysis of the structural components of the phages; and (iv), for one phage, transcriptional analysis by Northern hybridization, reverse transcription-PCR, and primer extension. The three obtained phage genomes display high levels of sequence identity to each other and to genomes of the so-called group b L. delbrueckii phages c5, LL-Ku, and phiLdb, where some of the observed differences are believed to be responsible for host range variations. PMID:25002431

  8. Molecular characterization of three Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus phages.

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    Casey, Eoghan; Mahony, Jennifer; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; Bottacini, Francesca; Cornelissen, Anneleen; Neve, Horst; Heller, Knut J; Noben, Jean-Paul; Dal Bello, Fabio; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2014-09-01

    In this study, three phages infecting Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, named Ld3, Ld17, and Ld25A, were isolated from whey samples obtained from various industrial fermentations. These phages were further characterized in a multifaceted approach: (i) biological and physical characterization through host range analysis and electron microscopy; (ii) genetic assessment through genome analysis; (iii) mass spectrometry analysis of the structural components of the phages; and (iv), for one phage, transcriptional analysis by Northern hybridization, reverse transcription-PCR, and primer extension. The three obtained phage genomes display high levels of sequence identity to each other and to genomes of the so-called group b L. delbrueckii phages c5, LL-Ku, and phiLdb, where some of the observed differences are believed to be responsible for host range variations. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. The genomes and comparative genomics of Lactobacillus delbrueckii phages.

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    Riipinen, Katja-Anneli; Forsman, Päivi; Alatossava, Tapani

    2011-07-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii phages are a great source of genetic diversity. Here, the genome sequences of Lb. delbrueckii phages LL-Ku, c5 and JCL1032 were analyzed in detail, and the genetic diversity of Lb. delbrueckii phages belonging to different taxonomic groups was explored. The lytic isometric group b phages LL-Ku (31,080 bp) and c5 (31,841 bp) showed a minimum nucleotide sequence identity of 90% over about three-fourths of their genomes. The genomic locations of their lysis modules were unique, and the genomes featured several putative overlapping transcription units of genes. LL-Ku and c5 virions displayed peptidoglycan hydrolytic activity associated with a ~36-kDa protein similar in size to the endolysin. Unexpectedly, the 49,433-bp genome of the prolate phage JCL1032 (temperate, group c) revealed a conserved gene order within its structural genes. Lb. delbrueckii phages representing groups a (a phage LL-H), b and c possessed only limited protein sequence homology. Genomic comparison of LL-Ku and c5 suggested that diversification of Lb. delbrueckii phages is mainly due to insertions, deletions and recombination. For the first time, the complete genome sequences of group b and c Lb. delbrueckii phages are reported.

  10. Characterization of Lipoteichoic Acids as Lactobacillus delbrueckii Phage Receptor Components

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    Räisänen, Liisa; Schubert, Karin; Jaakonsaari, Tiina; Alatossava, Tapani

    2004-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acids (LTAs) were purified from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis ATCC 15808 and its LL-H adsorption-resistant mutant, Ads-5, by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. L. delbrueckii phages (LL-H, the LL-H host range mutant, and JCL1032) were inactivated by these poly(glycerophosphate) type of LTAs in vitro in accordance to their adsorption to intact ATCC 15808 and Ads-5 cells.

  11. Characterization of Lipoteichoic Acids as Lactobacillus delbrueckii Phage Receptor Components

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    Räisänen, Liisa; Schubert, Karin; Jaakonsaari, Tiina; Alatossava, Tapani

    2004-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acids (LTAs) were purified from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis ATCC 15808 and its LL-H adsorption-resistant mutant, Ads-5, by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. L. delbrueckii phages (LL-H, the LL-H host range mutant, and JCL1032) were inactivated by these poly(glycerophosphate) type of LTAs in vitro in accordance to their adsorption to intact ATCC 15808 and Ads-5 cells. PMID:15292157

  12. Comparison of Lactobacillus crispatus isolates from Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiomes with isolates from microbiomes containing bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria

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    Abdelmaksoud, Abdallah A.; Koparde, Vishal N.; Sheth, Nihar U.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Glascock, Abigail L.; Fettweis, Jennifer M.; Strauss, Jerome F.; Buck, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal lactobacilli can inhibit colonization by and growth of other bacteria, thereby preventing development of bacterial vaginosis (BV). Amongst the lactobacilli, Lactobacillus crispatus appears to be particularly effective at inhibiting growth of BV-associated bacteria. Nonetheless, some women who are colonized with this species can still develop clinical BV. Therefore, we sought to determine whether strains of L. crispatus that colonize women with lactobacilli-dominated vaginal microbiomes are distinct from strains that colonize women who develop BV. The genomes of L. crispatus isolates from four women with lactobacilli-dominated vaginal microbiomes ( bacteria (>12 % 16S rRNA reads from bacterial taxa associated with BV) were sequenced and compared. Lactic acid production by the different strains was quantified. Phage induction in the strains was also analysed. There was considerable genetic diversity between strains, and several genes were exclusive to either the strains from Lactobacillus-dominated microbiomes or those containing BV-associated bacteria. Overall, strains from microbiomes dominated by lactobacilli did not differ from strains from microbiomes containing BV-associated bacteria with respect to lactic acid production. All of the strains contained multiple phage, but there was no clear distinction between the presence or absence of BV-associated bacteria with respect to phage-induced lysis. Genes found to be exclusive to the Lactobacillus-dominated versus BV-associated bacteria-containing microbiomes could play a role in the maintenance of vaginal health and the development of BV, respectively. PMID:26747455

  13. Characterisation of the vaginal Lactobacillus microbiota associated with preterm delivery.

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    Petricevic, Ljubomir; Domig, Konrad J; Nierscher, Franz Josef; Sandhofer, Michael J; Fidesser, Maria; Krondorfer, Iris; Husslein, Peter; Kneifel, Wolfgang; Kiss, Herbert

    2014-05-30

    The presence of an abnormal vaginal microflora in early pregnancy is a risk factor for preterm delivery. There is no investigation on vaginal flora dominated by lactic acid bacteria and possible association with preterm delivery. We assessed the dominant vaginal Lactobacillus species in healthy pregnant women in early pregnancy in relation to pregnancy outcome. We observed 111 low risk pregnant women with a normal vaginal microflora 11 + 0 to 14 + 0 weeks of pregnancy without subjective complaints. Vaginal smears were taken for the identification of lactobacilli using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Pregnancy outcome was recorded as term or preterm delivery (limit 36 + 6 weeks of gestation). The diversity of Lactobacillus species in term vs. preterm was the main outcome measure. L. iners alone was detected in 11 from 13 (85%) women who delivered preterm. By contrast, L. iners alone was detected in only 16 from 98 (16%) women who delivered at term (p vaginal Lactobacillus spp. at the same time. This study suggests that dominating L. iners alone detected in vaginal smears of healthy women in early pregnancy might be associated with preterm delivery.

  14. [The change of vaginal lactobacillus in patients with high-risk human papillomavirus infection].

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    Zhou, D; Cui, Y; Wu, F L; Deng, W H

    2016-07-05

    To study the distribution characteristics of lactobacillus in the vaginal mucosa of patients with HPV infection. The planting density of lactobacillus in vaginal secretions of 95 cases with HPV16/18 infection and 90 cases of normal women of childbearing age were observed by oil microscope. And the strains of vaginal lactobacilli in two groups were analyzed using species-specific polymerase chain reaction (Species-specific PCR) and the distribution of vaginal lactobacilli in patients with HPV16/18 infection were investigated. In HPV16/18 infective groups, the planting density of lactobacillus in the vaginal mucosa was 104 (68-186)/HP. It was significantly lower than that of the normal group (234 (161-326)/HP, Pinfection group (Pinfection is associated with the decreased number of lactobacillus and the imbalance of vaginal flora; Lactobacillus iners, lactobacillus crispatus, and lactobacillus gasseri may play a key role in maintaining the vaginal micro ecological environment.

  15. Novel phage group infecting Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis, as revealed by genomic and proteomic analysis of bacteriophage Ldl1.

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    Casey, Eoghan; Mahony, Jennifer; Neve, Horst; Noben, Jean-Paul; Dal Bello, Fabio; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2015-02-01

    Ldl1 is a virulent phage infecting the dairy starter Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis LdlS. Electron microscopy analysis revealed that this phage exhibits a large head and a long tail and bears little resemblance to other characterized phages infecting Lactobacillus delbrueckii. In vitro propagation of this phage revealed a latent period of 30 to 40 min and a burst size of 59.9 +/- 1.9 phage particles. Comparative genomic and proteomic analyses showed remarkable similarity between the genome of Ldl1 and that of Lactobacillus plantarum phage ATCC 8014-B2. The genomic and proteomic characteristics of Ldl1 demonstrate that this phage does not belong to any of the four previously recognized L. delbrueckii phage groups, necessitating the creation of a new group, called group e, thus adding to the knowledge on the diversity of phages targeting strains of this industrially important lactic acid bacterial species.

  16. [Progress in research of relationship between vaginal Lactobacillus and preterm delivery].

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    He, Y N; Xiong, H Y; Zheng, Y J

    2017-03-10

    The vaginal flora in most healthy women is dominated by Lactobacillus species. The absence of Lactobacillus species in vaginal flora might lead to a series of symptoms, especially in pregnant women causing adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as preterm delivery. This review focuses on the progress in the research of the relationship between vaginal Lactobacillus and preterm delivery, providing reference for the reduction of the incidence of preterm delivery.

  17. Free Glycogen in Vaginal Fluids Is Associated with Lactobacillus Colonization and Low Vaginal pH

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    Mirmonsef, Paria; Hotton, Anna L.; Gilbert, Douglas; Burgad, Derick; Landay, Alan; Weber, Kathleen M.; Cohen, Mardge; Ravel, Jacques; Spear, Gregory T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lactobacillus dominates the lower genital tract microbiota of many women, producing a low vaginal pH, and is important for healthy pregnancy outcomes and protection against several sexually transmitted pathogens. Yet, factors that promote Lactobacillus remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that the amount of free glycogen in the lumen of the lower genital tract is an important determinant of Lactobacillus colonization and a low vaginal pH. Methods Free glycogen in lavage samples was quantified. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was used to identify microbiota from 21 African American women collected over 8–11 years. Results Free glycogen levels varied greatly between women and even in the same woman. Samples with the highest free glycogen had a corresponding median genital pH that was significantly lower (pH 4.4) than those with low glycogen (pH 5.8; pglycogen versus those with low glycogen (median = 0.97 vs. 0.05, pglycogen. High concentrations of glycogen corresponded to higher levels of L. crispatus and L. jensenii, but not L. iners. Conclusion These findings show that free glycogen in genital fluid is associated with a genital microbiota dominated by Lactobacillus, suggesting glycogen is important for maintaining genital health. Treatments aimed at increasing genital free glycogen might impact Lactobacillus colonization. PMID:25033265

  18. Phage adsorption and lytic propagation in Lactobacillus plantarum: Could host cell starvation affect them?

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    Briggiler Marc?, Mari?ngeles; Reinheimer, Jorge; Quiberoni, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Bacteriophages constitute a great threat to the activity of lactic acid bacteria used in industrial processes. Several factors can influence the infection cycle of bacteriophages. That is the case of the physiological state of host cells, which could produce inhibition or delay of the phage infection process. In the present work, the influence of Lactobacillus plantarum host cell starvation on phage B1 adsorption and propagation was investigated. Result First, cell growth kinetics ...

  19. Vaginal suppositories containing Lactobacillus acidophilus: development and characterization.

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    Rodrigues, Francisca; Maia, Maria João; das Neves, José; Sarmento, Bruno; Amaral, Maria Helena; Oliveira, Maria Beatriz P P

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and characterize suppositories for vaginal delivery of Lactobacillus acidophilus. Formulations were performed in order to select suitable excipients based on suppository formation feasibility and cytotoxicity. Solid body and hollow-type suppositories were prepared by melting and molding using poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) 400 and 4000 or Witepsol (WIT) H12 as excipients. L. acidophilus was incorporated in the molten mass before molding solid body suppositories or added as suspension into the cavity of hollow-type suppositories and sealed molten excipients. Cytotoxicity of the selected excipients was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium and lactate dehydrogenase assays against VK2/E6E7, HEC-1-A and HeLa cells. Suppositories were characterized regarding organoleptic characteristics, mass uniformity, disintegration, breaking strength and L. acidophilus in vitro release. PEG 400, PEG 4000 and WIT H12 showed the absence of toxicity when tested using three different vaginal cell lines. Obtained vaginal suppositories presented uniform and mild texture, a content of about 1 × 10(8) colony-forming units, completely disintegrated in simulated vaginal environment in less than 60 min and provided sustained in vitro release of L. acidophilus. Release studies further demonstrated that incorporation of freeze-dried bacteria did not result in significant loss of viable bacteria, thus supporting that vaginal suppositories may possess good properties to promote the replacement of the vaginal flora in situations of urinary tract infection. Hollow-type suppositories showed to be promising delivery vehicles for vaginal delivery of probiotics.

  20. Free glycogen in vaginal fluids is associated with Lactobacillus colonization and low vaginal pH.

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    Paria Mirmonsef

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus dominates the lower genital tract microbiota of many women, producing a low vaginal pH, and is important for healthy pregnancy outcomes and protection against several sexually transmitted pathogens. Yet, factors that promote Lactobacillus remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that the amount of free glycogen in the lumen of the lower genital tract is an important determinant of Lactobacillus colonization and a low vaginal pH.Free glycogen in lavage samples was quantified. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was used to identify microbiota from 21 African American women collected over 8-11 years.Free glycogen levels varied greatly between women and even in the same woman. Samples with the highest free glycogen had a corresponding median genital pH that was significantly lower (pH 4.4 than those with low glycogen (pH 5.8; p<0.001. The fraction of the microbiota consisting of Lactobacillus was highest in samples with high glycogen versus those with low glycogen (median = 0.97 vs. 0.05, p<0.001. In multivariable analysis, having 1 vs. 0 male sexual partner in the past 6 months was negatively associated, while BMI ≥30 was positively associated with glycogen. High concentrations of glycogen corresponded to higher levels of L. crispatus and L. jensenii, but not L. iners.These findings show that free glycogen in genital fluid is associated with a genital microbiota dominated by Lactobacillus, suggesting glycogen is important for maintaining genital health. Treatments aimed at increasing genital free glycogen might impact Lactobacillus colonization.

  1. Effects of antibiotic treatment on the lactobacillus composition of vaginal microbiota.

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    Melkumyan, A R; Priputnevich, T V; Ankirskaya, A S; Murav'eva, V V; Lubasovskaya, L A

    2015-04-01

    We analyzed sensitivity of 123 vaginal lactobacillus strains to antibacterial substances. All lactobacillus strains were sensitive to ampicillin, cefazolin, cefotaxime, and vancomycin, and insensitive to metronidazole, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and levofloxacin. Lactobacillus strains demonstrated different sensitivity to gentamycin, clindamycin, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, and tetracycline. The phenomenon of preferential selective influence of antibacterial drugs on the composition of lactobacilli of the vaginal microbiota, in which some lactobacilli survive as part of the vaginal microbiota and have a selective advantage over other types of lactobacilli, should be taken into account during treatment of vaginal infections and dysbiosis.

  2. Effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus acidophilus on bacterial vaginal pathogens.

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    Bertuccini, Lucia; Russo, Rosario; Iosi, Francesca; Superti, Fabiana

    2017-06-01

    The human vagina is colonized by a variety of microbes. Lactobacilli are the most common, mainly in healthy women; however, the microbiota composition can change rapidly, leading to infection or to a state in which potential pathogenic microorganisms co-exist with other commensals. In premenopausal women, urogenital infections, such as bacterial vaginosis and aerobic vaginitis, remain an important health problem. Treatment of these infections involves different kind of antibiotics; however, the recurrence rate remains high, and it must be also underlined that antibiotics are unable to spontaneously restore normal flora characterized by an abundant community of Lactobacilli. The main limitation is the inability to offer a long-term defensive barrier, thus facilitating relapses and recurrences. We report here the antimicrobial activities of two commercially existing Lactobacillus strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Lactobacillus acidophilus GLA-14 strains and their combination (Respecta® probiotic blend) against four different pathogens responsible for both bacterial vaginosis ( Gardenerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae) and aerobic vaginitis ( Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli) by co-culturing assay. The probiotic combination, even if resulting in a different microbicidal activity against the different strains tested, demonstrated the efficacy of combined Lactobacillus strain treatment.

  3. Survey on the phage resistance mechanisms displayed by a dairy Lactobacillus helveticus strain.

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    Zago, Miriam; Orrù, Luigi; Rossetti, Lia; Lamontanara, Antonella; Fornasari, Maria Emanuela; Bonvini, Barbara; Meucci, Aurora; Carminati, Domenico; Cattivelli, Luigi; Giraffa, Giorgio

    2017-09-01

    In this study the presence and functionality of phage defence mechanisms in Lactobacillus helveticus ATCC 10386, a strain of dairy origin which is sensitive to ΦLh56, were investigated. After exposure of ATCC 10386 to ΦLh56, the whole-genome sequences of ATCC 10386 and of a phage-resistant derivative (LhM3) were compared. LhM3 showed deletions in the S-layer protein and a higher expression of the genes involved in the restriction/modification (R/M) system. Genetic data were substantiated by measurements of bacteriophage adsorption rates, efficiency of plaquing, cell wall protein size and by gene expression analysis. In LhM3 two phage resistance mechanisms, the inhibition of phage adsorption and the upregulation of Type I R/M genes, take place and explain its resistance to ΦLh56. Although present in both ATCC 10386 and LhM3 genomes, the CRISPR machinery did not seem to play a role in the phage resistance of LhM3. Overall, the natural selection of phage resistant strains resulted successful in detecting variants carrying multiple phage defence mechanisms in L. helveticus. The concurrent presence of multiple phage-resistance systems should provide starter strains with increased fitness and robustness in dairy ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Viability of lactobacillus acidophilus in various vaginal tablet formulations

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    Fazeli M.R.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The lactobacilli which are present in vaginal fluids play an important role in prevention of vaginosis and there are considerable interests in formulation of these friendly bacteria into suitable pharmaceutical dosage forms. Formulating these microorganisms for vaginal application is a critical issue as the products should retain viability of lactobacilli during formulation and also storage. The aim of this study was to examine the viability and release of Lactobacillus acidophilus from slow-release vaginal tablets prepared by using six different retarding polymers and from two effervescent tablets prepared by using citric or adipic acid. The Carbomer–based formulations showed high initial viablility compared to those based on HPMC-LV, HPMC-HV, Polycarbophil and SCMC polymers which showed one log decrease in viable cells. All retarding polymers in slow release formulations presented a strong bacterial release at about 2 h except Carbomer polymers which showed to be poor bacterial releasers. Although effervescent formulations produced a quick bacterial release in comparison with polymer based slow-release tablets, they were less stable in cold storage. Due to the strong chelating characteristic of citric acid, the viability was quickly lost for aqueous medium of citric acid in comparison with adipic acid based effervescent tablets.

  5. Lactobacillus species as biomarkers and agents that can promote various aspects of vaginal health

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    Mariya Ivanova Petrova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The human body is colonized by a vast number of microorganisms collectively referred to as the human microbiota. One of the main microbiota body sites is the female genital tract, commonly dominated by Lactobacillus spp., in approximately 70% of women. Each individual species can constitute approximately 99% of the ribotypes observed in any individual woman. The most frequently isolated species are Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus jensenii and Lactobacillus iners. Residing at the port of entry of bacterial and viral pathogens, the vaginal Lactobacillus species can create a barrier against pathogen invasion since mainly products of their metabolism secreted in the cervicovaginal fluid can play an important role in the inhibition of bacterial and viral infections. Therefore, a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota appears to be a good biomarker for a healthy vaginal ecosystem. This balance can be rapidly altered during processes such as menstruation, sexual activity, pregnancy and various infections. An abnormal vaginal microbiota is characterized by an increased diversity of microbial species, leading to a condition known as bacterial vaginosis. Information on the vaginal microbiota can be gathered from the analysis of cervicovaginal fluid, by using the Nugent scoring or the Amsel’s criteria, or at the molecular level by investigating the number and type of Lactobacillus species. However, when translating this to the clinical setting, it should be noted that the absence of a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota does not appear to directly imply a diseased condition or dysbiosis. Nevertheless, the widely documented beneficial role of vaginal Lactobacillus species demonstrates the potential of data on the composition and activity of lactobacilli as biomarkers for vaginal health. The substantiation and further validation of such biomarkers will allow the design of better targeted probiotic strategies.

  6. A Lactobacillus-Deficient Vaginal Microbiota Dominates Postpartum Women in Rural Malawi

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    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial community found in the vagina is an important determinant of a woman's health and disease status. A healthy vaginal microbiota is associated with low species richness and a high proportion of one of a number of different Lactobacillus spp. When disrupted, the resulting abnormal vaginal microbiota is associated with a number of disease states and poor pregnancy outcomes. Studies up until now have concentrated on relatively small numbers of American and European populations that may not capture the full complexity of the community or adequately predict what constitutes a healthy microbiota in all populations. In this study, we sampled and characterized the vaginal microbiota found on vaginal swabs taken postpartum from a cohort of 1,107 women in rural Malawi. We found a population dominated by Gardnerella vaginalis and devoid of the most common vaginal Lactobacillus species, even if the vagina was sampled over a year postpartum. This Lactobacillus-deficient anaerobic community, commonly labeled community state type (CST) 4, could be subdivided into four further communities. A Lactobacillus iners-dominated vaginal microbiota became more common the longer after delivery the vagina was sampled, but G. vaginalis remained the dominant organism. These results outline the difficulty in all-encompassing definitions of what a healthy or abnormal postpartum vaginal microbiota is. Previous identification of community state types and associations among bacterial species, bacterial vaginosis, and adverse birth outcomes may not represent the complex heterogeneity of the microbiota present. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT01239693.) IMPORTANCE A bacterial community in the vaginal tract is dominated by a small number of Lactobacillus species, and when not present there is an increased incidence of inflammatory conditions and adverse birth outcomes. A switch to a vaginal bacterial community lacking in Lactobacillus species is common

  7. Lactobacillus-deficient vaginal microbiota dominate post-partum women in rural Malawi.

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    Doyle, Ronan; Gondwe, Austridia; Fan, Yue-Mei; Maleta, Kenneth; Ashorn, Per; Klein, Nigel; Harris, Kathryn

    2018-01-05

    The bacterial community found in the vagina is an important determinant of a woman's health and disease. A healthy vaginal microbiota is associated with a lower species richness and high proportions of one of a number of different Lactobacillus spp.. When disrupted the resulting abnormal vaginal microbiota is associated with a number of disease states and poor pregnancy outcomes. Studies up until now have concentrated on relatively small numbers of American and European populations which may not capture the full complexity of the community, nor adequately predict what constitutes a healthy microbiota in all populations. In this study we sampled and characterised the vaginal microbiota from a cohort of 1107 women in rural Malawi found on vaginal swabs taken post-partum. We found a population dominated by Gardnerella vaginalis and devoid of the most common vaginal Lactobacillus species, even if the vagina was sampled over a year post-partum. The Lactobacillus -deficient anaerobic community commonly labelled community state type (CST) 4 could be sub-divided into four further communities. A Lactobacillus iners dominated vaginal microbiota became more common the longer after delivery the vagina was sampled, but G. vaginalis remained the dominant organism. These results outline the difficulty in all-encompassing definitions of what a healthy or abnormal vaginal microbiota is post-partum. Previous identification of community state types and associations between bacterial species, bacterial vaginosis and adverse birth outcomes may not represent the complex heterogeneity of the microbiota present. Importance A bacterial community in the vaginal tract that is dominated by small number of bacterial Lactobacillus species and when they are not present, there is a greater incidence of inflammatory conditions and adverse birth outcomes. A switch to a vaginal bacterial community lacking in Lactobacillus species is common after pregnancy. In this study we characterised the vaginal

  8. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to a combination of Lactobacillus fermentum 57A, Lactobacillus plantarum 57B and Lactobacillus gasseri 57C and defence against vaginal pathogens (ID 934, further

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    of Lactobacillus fermentum 57A, Lactobacillus plantarum 57B and Lactobacillus gasseri 57C and defence against vaginal pathogens. The food constituent that is the subject of the claim, a combination of Lactobacillus fermentum 57A, Lactobacillus plantarum 57B and Lactobacillus gasseri 57C, is sufficiently...... presented, the Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has not been established between the consumption of Lactobacillus fermentum 57A, Lactobacillus plantarum 57B and Lactobacillus gasseri 57C and defence against vaginal pathogens....

  9. Epifluorescence and atomic force microscopy: Two innovative applications for studying phage-host interactions in Lactobacillus helveticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Miriam; Scaltriti, Erika; Fornasari, Maria Emanuela; Rivetti, Claudio; Grolli, Stefano; Giraffa, Giorgio; Ramoni, Roberto; Carminati, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages attacking lactic acid bacteria (LAB) still represent a crucial problem in industrial dairy fermentations. The consequences of a phage infection against LAB can lead to fermentation delay, alteration of the product quality and, in most severe cases, the product loss. Phage particles enumeration and phage-host interactions are normally evaluated by conventional plaque count assays, but, in many cases, these methods can be unsuccessful. Bacteriophages of Lactobacillus helveticus, a LAB species widely used as dairy starter or probiotic cultures, are often unable to form lysis plaques, thus impairing their enumeration by plate assay. In this study, we used epifluorescence microscopy to enumerate L. helveticus phage particles from phage-infected cultures and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to visualize both phages and bacteria during the different stages of the lytic cycle. Preliminary, we tested the sensitivity of phage counting by epifluorescence microscopy. To this end, phage particles of ΦAQ113, a lytic phage of L. helveticus isolated from a whey starter culture, were stained by SYBR Green I and enumerated by epifluorescence microscopy. Values obtained by the microscopic method were 10 times higher than plate counts, with a lowest sensitivity limit of ≥6log phage/ml. The interaction of phage ΦAQ113 with its host cell L. helveticus Lh1405 was imaged by AFM after 0, 2 and 5h from phage-host adsorption. The lytic cycle was followed by epifluorescence microscopy counting and the concomitant cell wall changes were visualized by AFM imaging. Our results showed that these two methods can be combined for a reliable phage enumeration and for studying phage and host morphology during infection processes, thus giving a complete overview of phage-host interactions in L. helveticus strains involved in dairy productions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Lactobacillus raoultii’ sp. nov., a new bacterium isolated from the vaginal flora of a woman with bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Nicaise

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the isolation of a new bacterium species, ‘Lactobacillus raoultii’ strain Marseille P4006 (CSUR P4006, isolated from a vaginal sample of a 45-year-old woman with bacterial vaginosis. Keywords: Bacterial vaginosis, culturomics, emerging bacteria, human microbiota, Lactobacillus raoultii, vaginal microbiota

  11. Predominant Lactobacillus species types of vaginal microbiota in pregnant Korean women: quantification of the five Lactobacillus species and two anaerobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Hyun; Yoo, Seung Min; Sohn, Yong Hak; Jin, Chan Hee; Yang, Yun Suk; Hwang, In Taek; Oh, Kwan Young

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the predominant Lactobacillus species types (LSTs) of vaginal microbiota in pregnant Korean women by quantifying five Lactobacillus species and two anaerobes. In all, 168 pregnant Korean women under antenatal care at Eulji University Hospital and local clinics were enrolled in the prospective cohort study during pregnancy (10-14 weeks). Vaginal samples were collected with Eswab for Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and stored in a -80 °C freezer. qPCR was performed for five Lactobacillus species and two anaerobes. To identify the predominant LSTs, quantifications were analyzed by the Cluster and Tree View programs of Eisen Lab. Also the quantifications were compared among classified groups. L. crispatus and L. iners were most commonly found in pregnant Korean women, followed by L. gasseri and L. jensenii; L. vaginalis was nearly absent. Five types (four predominant LSTs and one predominant anaerobe type without predominant Lactobacillus species) were classified. Five predominant LSTs were identified in vaginal microbiota of pregnant Korean women. L. crispatus and L. iners predominant types comprised a large proportion.

  12. Biofilms of vaginal Lactobacillus reuteri CRL 1324 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL 1332: kinetics of formation and matrix characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leccese Terraf, María Cecilia; Juárez Tomás, María Silvina; Rault, Lucie; Le Loir, Yves; Even, Sergine; Nader-Macías, María Elena Fátima

    2016-09-01

    Adhesion and biofilm formation are strain properties that reportedly contribute to the permanence of lactobacilli in the human vagina. The kinetics of biofilm formation and the chemical nature of the biofilm matrix formed by Lactobacillus reuteri CRL (Centro de Referencia para Lactobacilos Culture Collection) 1324 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL 1332, vaginal beneficial strains, were evaluated in this work. Crystal violet-stained microplate assay and techniques of epifluorescence, electron and confocal microscopy were applied. The highest density and complexity of biofilms of both vaginal lactobacilli were observed at 72 h of incubation. Protease, proteinase K, α-chymotrypsin and trypsin treatments efficiently detached L. reuteri CRL 1324 biofilm that was also partially affected by α-amylase. However, L. rhamnosus CRL 1332 biofilm was slightly affected by protease, proteinase K and α-amylase. Confocal microscopy revealed greater amount of polysaccharides in L. rhamnosus CRL 1332 biofilm matrix than in L. reuteri CRL 1324 biofilm matrix. The results indicate that proteins are one of the main components of the L. reuteri CRL 1324 biofilm, while the biofilm matrix of L. rhamnosus CRL 1332 is composed of carbohydrates and proteins. The results obtained support the knowledge, understanding and characterization of two biofilm-forming vaginal Lactobacillus strains.

  13. Evaluation of antipathogenic activity and adherence properties of human Lactobacillus strains for vaginal formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdenelli, M C; Coman, M M; Cecchini, C; Silvi, S; Orpianesi, C; Cresci, A

    2014-05-01

    To test different Lactobacillus strains for their antipathogenic activity towards Candida strains and their adhesion properties for the preparation of vaginal ovules and douches to be used in vaginal candidiasis prevention. Five strains of lactobacilli were tested for their antimicrobial potential against different clinically isolated Candida strains. They were also screened for their ability to produce hydrogen peroxide and to coaggregate with pathogens. Adhesion properties of the five different Lactobacillus strains to HeLa cells and the presence of arcA gene were also assessed. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that all the five Lactobacillus strains tested possessed inhibitory action against the Candida strains using the radial streak method, but the effect is strain dependent. The same situation arises with regard to the ability of coaggregation that is present in all the strains into different degrees. Only Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501(®) and Lactobacillus paracasei IMC 502(®) were able to produce H2O2 and none of the strains possess arcA gene. The most adherent strains to HeLa cells were Lact. rhamnosus IMC 501(®), Lact. paracasei IMC 502(®) and also their combination SYNBIO(®). This latter was selected for the preparation of ovules and douches using different matrix. Witepsol(®) ovules have proved the best formulation in terms of probiotic viability. Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501(®), Lact. paracasei IMC 502(®) and SYNBIO(®) were able to produce H2O2, to coaggregate and to exert antimicrobial activity against pathogenic Candida strains and to strongly adhere to HeLa cells. All these properties together with those technological make these strains good candidates for the realization of formulations suitable for vaginal health. To develop new vaginal formulations taking into account the impact of probiotic strains on pathogens as well as the technological properties of the strains to validate their effectiveness in human health. © 2014 The

  14. Phages of Lactobacillus casei/paracasei: response to environmental factors and interaction with collection and commercial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, M L; Quiberoni, A; Reinheimer, J

    2006-02-01

    To investigate the influence of several environmental factors on the viability and cell-adsorption for two Lactobacillus casei/paracasei bacteriophages (PL-1 and J-1). Both phages showed a remarkably high specificity of species, sharing similar host spectra. Two phages and four sensitive strains were used to conform five phage/strain systems. Each showed a particular behaviour (burst size: ranging from 32 to 160 PFU/infective centre; burst time: 120-240 min and latent time: 5-90 min). For both phages, the viability was not significantly affected from pH 4 to 11 (room temperature) and from pH 5 to 10 (37 degrees C). Adsorption rates were not influenced by calcium ions, but decreased after the thermal inactivation of cells. Adsorption rates were high between 0 and 50 degrees C with maximum values at 30 degrees C and pH 6. System PL-1/Lact. paracasei A showed noticeable differences in comparison with the others, being times required to reach 90% of adsorption of 4 h and lower than 45 min, respectively. The data obtained in this work demonstrated that environmental parameters can influence the viability and cell adsorption rates of Lact. casei/paracasei phages. The extent of this influence was phage dependent. This work contributes to the enlargement of the currently scarce knowledge of phages of probiotic bacteria.

  15. The extracellular phage-host interactions involved in the bacteriophage LL-H infection of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. lactis ATCC 15808.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsch-Alatossava, Patricia; Alatossava, Tapani

    2013-12-24

    The complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus bacteriophage LL-H was determined in 1996. Accordingly, LL-H has been used as a model phage for the infection of dairy Lactobacillus, specifically for thermophilic Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. lactis host strains, such as ATCC 15808. One of the major goals of phage LL-H research consisted of the characterization of the first phage-host interactions at the level of phage adsorption and phage DNA injection steps to determine effective and practical methods to minimize the risks associated with the appearance and attack of phages in the manufacture of yogurt, and Swiss or Italian hard type cheeses, which typically use thermophilic lactic acid bacteria starter cultures containing L. delbrueckii strains among others. This mini review article summarizes the present data concerning (i) the special features, particle structure, and components of phage LL-H and (ii) the structure and properties of lipoteichoic acids (LTAs), which are the phage LL-H receptor components of L. delbrueckii ssp. lactis host strains. Moreover, a model of the first, extracellular, phage-host interactions for the infection of L. delbrueckii ssp. lactis ATCC 15808 by phage LL-H is presented and further discussed.

  16. Phage-resistance linked to cell heterogeneity in the commercial strain Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis Ab1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Viviana B; Maciel, Natalia; Guglielmotti, Daniela; Zago, Miriam; Giraffa, Giorgio; Reinheimer, Jorge

    2008-12-10

    The aim of this work was to study the relationship between the cell morphological heterogeneity and the phage-resistance in the commercial strain Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis Ab1. Two morphological variants (named C and T) were isolated from this strain. Phage-resistant derivatives were isolated from them and the percentage of occurrence of confirmed phage-resistant cells was 0.001% of the total cellular population. Within these phage-resistant cell derivatives there were T (3 out of 4 total isolates) and C (1 out of 4 total isolates) variants. The study of some technological properties (e.g. proteolytic and acidifying activities) demonstrated that most of phage-resistant derivatives were not as good as the parental strain. However, for one derivative (a T variant), the technological properties were better than those of the parental strain. On the other hand, it was possible to determinate that the system of phage-resistance in the T variants was interference in adsorption step, with adsorption rates M.

  17. Characterization of a Bacteriocin-Like Substance Produced by a Vaginal Lactobacillus salivarius Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña, Virginia S.; Pesce de Ruiz Holgado, Aída A.; Nader-Macías, María Elena

    1999-01-01

    A novel bacteriocin-like substance produced by vaginal Lactobacillus salivarius subsp. salivarius CRL 1328 with activity against Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae was characterized. The highest level of production of this heat-resistant peptide or protein occurred during the late exponential phase. Its mode of action was shown to be bactericidal. L. salivarius subsp. salivarius CRL 1328 could be used for the design of a probiotic to prevent urogenital infections. PMID:10584033

  18. The extracellular phage-host interactions involved in the bacteriophage LL-H infection of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. lactis ATCC 15808

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eMunsch-Alatossava

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus bacteriophage LL-H was determined in 1996. Accordingly, LL-H has been used as a model phage for the infection of dairy Lactobacillus, specifically for thermophilic Lb. delbrueckii ssp. lactis host strains, such as ATCC 15808. One of the major goals of phage LL-H research consisted of the characterization of the the first phage-host interactions at the level of phage adsorption and phage DNA injection steps to determine effective and practical methods to minimise the risks associated with the appearance and attack of phages in the manufacture of yoghurt, and Swiss or Italian type hard cheeses, which typically use thermophilic LAB starter cultures containing Lb. delbrueckii strains among others. This mini review article summarises the present data concerning (i the special features, particle structure and components of phage LL-H and (ii the structure and properties of lipoteichoic acids (LTAs, which are the phage LL-H receptor components of Lb. delbrueckii ssp. lactis host strains. Moreover, a model of the first, extracellular, phage-host interactions for the infection of Lb. delbrueckii ssp. lactis ATCC 15808 by phage LL-H is presented and further discussed.

  19. Colicin E2 Expression in Lactobacillus brevis DT24, A Vaginal Probiotic Isolate, against Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Disha; Jena, Prasant Kumar; Seshadri, Sriram

    2014-01-01

    Novel therapeutic approaches are needed to combat the urinary tract infection in women. During menstruation elevated protein concentration and increase in oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations with decrease in vaginal Lactobacilli all together contribute to urinary tract infections. Lactobacillus species are a predominant member of the vaginal microflora and are critical in the prevention of a number of urogenital diseases. In order to increase antimicrobial potential of vaginal Lactobacil...

  20. Phase I Trial of a Lactobacillus crispatus Vaginal Suppository for Prevention of Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaja, Christopher A.; Stapleton, Ann E.; Yarova-Yarovaya, Yuliya; Stamm, Walter E.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: We performed a phase I trial to assess the safety and tolerance of a Lactobacillus vaginal suppository for prevention of recurrent UTI. Methods: Premenopausal women with a history of recurrent UTI were randomized to use L. crispatus CTV-05 or placebo vaginal suppositories daily for five days. Results: 30 women were randomized (15 to L. crispatus CTV-05). No severe adverse events occurred. Mild to moderate vaginal discharge and genital irritation were reported by women in both study arms. Seven women randomized to L. crispatus CTV-05 developed pyuria without associated symptoms. Most women had high concentrations of vaginal H202-producing lactobacilli before randomization. L. crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. gasseri were the most common Lactobacillus species identified, with stable prevalence over time. Conclusions: L. crispatus CTV-05 can be given as a vaginal suppository with minimal sideeffects to healthy women with a history of recurrent UTI. Mild inflammation of the urinary tract was noted in some women. PMID:18288237

  1. Vaginal Lactobacillus Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in Human Tissues Ex Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers A. Ñahui Palomino

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus species, which dominate vaginal microbiota of healthy reproductive-age women, lower the risks of sexually transmitted infections, including the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV acquisition. The exact mechanisms of this protection remain to be understood. Here, we investigated these mechanisms in the context of human cervico-vaginal and lymphoid tissues ex vivo. We found that all six Lactobacillus strains tested in these systems significantly suppressed HIV type-1 (HIV-1 infection. We identified at least three factors that mediated this suppression: (i Acidification of the medium. The pH of the undiluted medium conditioned by lactobacilli was between 3.8 and 4.6. Acidification of the culture medium with hydrochloric acid (HCl to this pH in control experiments was sufficient to abrogate HIV-1 replication. However, the pH of the Lactobacillus-conditioned medium (CM diluted fivefold, which reached ∼6.9, was also suppressive for HIV-1 infection, while in control experiments HIV-1 infection was not abrogated when the pH of the medium was brought to 6.9 through the use of HCl. This suggested the existence of other factors responsible for HIV-1 inhibition by lactobacilli. (ii Lactic acid. There was a correlation between the concentration of lactic acid in the Lactobacillus-CM and its ability to suppress HIV-1 infection in human tissues ex vivo. Addition of lactic acid isomers D and L to tissue culture medium at the concentration that corresponded to their amount released by lactobacilli resulted in HIV-1 inhibition. Isomer L was produced in higher quantities than isomer D and was mostly responsible for HIV-1 inhibition. These results indicate that lactic acid, in particular its L-isomer, inhibits HIV-1 independently of lowering of the pH. (iii Virucidal effect. Incubation of HIV-1 in Lactobacillus-CM significantly suppressed viral infectivity for human tissues ex vivo. Finally, lactobacilli adsorb HIV-1, serving as a sink

  2. Comparison of the vaginal environment in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques pre- and post-lactobacillus colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daggett, Gregory J; Zhao, Chunxia; Connor-Stroud, Fawn; Oviedo-Moreno, Patricia; Moon, Hojin; Cho, Michael W; Moench, Thomas; Anderson, Deborah J; Villinger, Francois

    2017-10-01

    Rhesus and cynomologus macaques are valuable animal models for the study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention strategies. However, for such studies focused on the vaginal route of infection, differences in vaginal environment may have deterministic impact on the outcome of such prevention, providing the rationale for this study. We tested the vaginal environment of rhesus and cynomolgus macaques longitudinally to characterize the normal microflora based on Nugent scores and pH. This evaluation was extended after colonization of the vaginal space with Lactobacilli in an effort to recreate NHP models representing the healthy human vaginal environment. Nugent scores and pH differed significantly between species, although data from both species were suggestive of stable bacterial vaginosis. Colonization with Lactobacilli was successful in both species leading to lower Nugent score and pH, although rhesus macaques appeared better able to sustain Lactobacillus spp over time. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A Phase II Clinical Trial Evaluating the Preventive Effectiveness of Lactobacillus Vaginal Suppositories in Patients with Recurrent Cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Koichiro; Uehara, Shinya; Ishii, Ayano; Sadahira, Takuya; Yamamoto, Masumi; Mitsuhata, Ritsuko; Takamoto, Atsushi; Araki, Motoo; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Masami; Watanabe, Toyohiko; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Nasu, Yasutomo

    2016-08-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common bacterial infections in women, and many patients experience frequent recurrence. The aim of this report is to introduce an on-going prospective phase II clinical trial performed to evaluate the preventive effectiveness of Lactobacillus vaginal suppositories for prevention of recurrent cystitis. Patients enrolled in this study are administered vaginal suppositories containing the GAI 98322 strain of Lactobacillus crispatus every 2 days or 3 times a week for one year. The primary endpoint is recurrence of cystitis and the secondary endpoints are adverse events. Recruitment began in December 2013 and target sample size is 20 participants.

  4. The potential of the endolysin Lysdb from Lactobacillus delbrueckii phage for combating Staphylococcus aureus during cheese manufacture from raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tingting; Xin, YongPing; Zhang, Chenchen; Ouyang, Xudong; Kong, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Phage endolysins have received increased attention in recent times as potential antibacterial agents and the biopreservatives in food production processes. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common pathogens in bacterial food poisoning outbreaks. In this study, the endolysin Lysdb, one of the two-component cell lysis cassette of Lactobacillus delbrueckii phage phiLdb, was shown to possess a muramidase domain and catalytic sites with homology to Chalaropsis-type lysozymes. Peptidoglycan hydrolytic bond specificity determination revealed that Lysdb was able to cleave the 6-O-acetylated peptidoglycans present in the cell walls of S. aureus. Turbidity reduction assays demonstrated that Lysdb could effectively lyse the S. aureus live cells under acidic and mesothermal conditions. To further evaluate the ability of Lysdb as a potential antibacterial agent against S. aureus in cheese manufacture, Lactobacillus casei BL23 was engineered to constitutively deliver active Lysdb to challenge S. aureus in lab-scale cheese making from raw milk. Compared with the raw milk, the viable counts of S. aureus were reduced by 10(5)-fold in the cheese inoculated with the engineered L. casei strain during the fermentation process, and the pathogenic bacterial numbers remained at a low level (10(4) CFU/g) after 6 weeks of ripening at 10 °C. Taken together, all results indicated that the Lysdb has the function as an effective tool for combating S. aureus during cheese manufacture from raw milk.

  5. Adherence of Lactobacillus crispatus to vaginal epithelial cells from women with or without a history of recurrent urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Louisa; Stapleton, Ann E; Stamm, Walter E; Hillier, Sharon L; Wobbe, Cheryl L; Gupta, Kalpana

    2006-11-01

    Lactobacillus crispatus strain CTV-05 is a vaginal probiotic proposed for use in women with recurrent urinary tract infection to reduce vaginal colonization with Escherichia coli and the risk of urinary tract infection. However, the ability of this probiotic strain to adhere to the target mucosa, vaginal epithelial cells, has not been assessed in women with recurrent urinary tract infection. We measured the adherence of L. crispatus strain CTV-05 to vaginal epithelial cells collected from more than 100 premenopausal women with (cases) and without (controls) a history of recurrent urinary tract infection. We also examined the effects of relevant host factors on bacterial adherence. Bacterial adherence assays were performed by combining L. crispatus CTV-05 with exfoliated vaginal epithelial cells collected from 51 case women and 51 controls. L. crispatus CTV-05 adhered in high numbers to vaginal epithelial cells from women with recurrent urinary tract infection (mean adherence of 50.5 lactobacilli per vaginal epithelial cell) and controls (mean adherence of 39.4 lactobacilli per vaginal epithelial cell). Adherence was significantly higher using vaginal epithelial cells from women with a maternal history of urinary tract infection (p = 0.036) and a nonsecretor phenotype (p urinary tract infection. These data strongly support further evaluation of this probiotic in clinical trials of women with recurrent urinary tract infection.

  6. Association of high-risk sexual behaviour with diversity of the vaginal microbiota and abundance of Lactobacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Jocelyn M; Lajoie, Julie; Vitali, Danielle; Omollo, Kenneth; Kimani, Joshua; Oyugi, Julius; Cheruiyot, Juliana; Kimani, Makubo; Mungai, John N; Akolo, Maureen; Stearns, Jennifer C; Surette, Michael G; Fowke, Keith R; Kaushic, Charu

    2017-01-01

    To compare the vaginal microbiota of women engaged in high-risk sexual behaviour (sex work) with women who are not engaged in high-risk sexual behaviour. Diverse vaginal microbiota, low in Lactobacillus species, like those in bacterial vaginosis (BV), are associated with increased prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition. Although high-risk sexual behaviour increases risk for STIs, the vaginal microbiota of sex workers is understudied. A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted comparing vaginal microbiota of women who are not engaged in sex work (non-sex worker controls, NSW, N = 19) and women engaged in sex work (female sex workers, FSW, N = 48), using Illumina sequencing (16S rRNA, V3 region). Bacterial richness and diversity were significantly less in controls, than FSW. Controls were more likely to have Lactobacillus as the most abundant genus (58% vs. 17%; P = 0.002) and composition of their vaginal microbiota differed from FSW (PERMANOVA, P = 0.001). Six microbiota clusters were detected, including a high diversity cluster with three sub-clusters, and 55% of women with low Nugent Scores fell within this cluster. High diversity was observed by 16S sequencing in FSW, regardless of Nugent Scores, suggesting that Nugent Score may not be capable of capturing the diversity present in the FSW vaginal microbiota. High-risk sexual behaviour is associated with diversity of the vaginal microbiota and lack of Lactobacillus. These factors could contribute to increased risk of STIs and HIV in women engaged in high-risk sexual behaviour.

  7. Association of high-risk sexual behaviour with diversity of the vaginal microbiota and abundance of Lactobacillus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn M Wessels

    Full Text Available To compare the vaginal microbiota of women engaged in high-risk sexual behaviour (sex work with women who are not engaged in high-risk sexual behaviour. Diverse vaginal microbiota, low in Lactobacillus species, like those in bacterial vaginosis (BV, are associated with increased prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV acquisition. Although high-risk sexual behaviour increases risk for STIs, the vaginal microbiota of sex workers is understudied.A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted comparing vaginal microbiota of women who are not engaged in sex work (non-sex worker controls, NSW, N = 19 and women engaged in sex work (female sex workers, FSW, N = 48, using Illumina sequencing (16S rRNA, V3 region.Bacterial richness and diversity were significantly less in controls, than FSW. Controls were more likely to have Lactobacillus as the most abundant genus (58% vs. 17%; P = 0.002 and composition of their vaginal microbiota differed from FSW (PERMANOVA, P = 0.001. Six microbiota clusters were detected, including a high diversity cluster with three sub-clusters, and 55% of women with low Nugent Scores fell within this cluster. High diversity was observed by 16S sequencing in FSW, regardless of Nugent Scores, suggesting that Nugent Score may not be capable of capturing the diversity present in the FSW vaginal microbiota.High-risk sexual behaviour is associated with diversity of the vaginal microbiota and lack of Lactobacillus. These factors could contribute to increased risk of STIs and HIV in women engaged in high-risk sexual behaviour.

  8. Association of high-risk sexual behaviour with diversity of the vaginal microbiota and abundance of Lactobacillus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Jocelyn M.; Lajoie, Julie; Vitali, Danielle; Omollo, Kenneth; Kimani, Joshua; Oyugi, Julius; Cheruiyot, Juliana; Kimani, Makubo; Mungai, John N.; Akolo, Maureen; Stearns, Jennifer C.; Surette, Michael G.; Fowke, Keith R.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare the vaginal microbiota of women engaged in high-risk sexual behaviour (sex work) with women who are not engaged in high-risk sexual behaviour. Diverse vaginal microbiota, low in Lactobacillus species, like those in bacterial vaginosis (BV), are associated with increased prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition. Although high-risk sexual behaviour increases risk for STIs, the vaginal microbiota of sex workers is understudied. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted comparing vaginal microbiota of women who are not engaged in sex work (non-sex worker controls, NSW, N = 19) and women engaged in sex work (female sex workers, FSW, N = 48), using Illumina sequencing (16S rRNA, V3 region). Results Bacterial richness and diversity were significantly less in controls, than FSW. Controls were more likely to have Lactobacillus as the most abundant genus (58% vs. 17%; P = 0.002) and composition of their vaginal microbiota differed from FSW (PERMANOVA, P = 0.001). Six microbiota clusters were detected, including a high diversity cluster with three sub-clusters, and 55% of women with low Nugent Scores fell within this cluster. High diversity was observed by 16S sequencing in FSW, regardless of Nugent Scores, suggesting that Nugent Score may not be capable of capturing the diversity present in the FSW vaginal microbiota. Conclusions High-risk sexual behaviour is associated with diversity of the vaginal microbiota and lack of Lactobacillus. These factors could contribute to increased risk of STIs and HIV in women engaged in high-risk sexual behaviour. PMID:29095928

  9. Human α-amylase present in lower-genital-tract mucosal fluid processes glycogen to support vaginal colonization by Lactobacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Gregory T; French, Audrey L; Gilbert, Douglas; Zariffard, M Reza; Mirmonsef, Paria; Sullivan, Thomas H; Spear, William W; Landay, Alan; Micci, Sandra; Lee, Byung-Hoo; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2014-10-01

    Lactobacillus colonization of the lower female genital tract provides protection from the acquisition of sexually transmitted diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus, and from adverse pregnancy outcomes. While glycogen in vaginal epithelium is thought to support Lactobacillus colonization in vivo, many Lactobacillus isolates cannot utilize glycogen in vitro. This study investigated how glycogen could be utilized by vaginal lactobacilli in the genital tract. Several Lactobacillus isolates were confirmed to not grow in glycogen, but did grow in glycogen-breakdown products, including maltose, maltotriose, maltopentaose, maltodextrins, and glycogen treated with salivary α-amylase. A temperature-dependent glycogen-degrading activity was detected in genital fluids that correlated with levels of α-amylase. Treatment of glycogen with genital fluids resulted in production of maltose, maltotriose, and maltotetraose, the major products of α-amylase digestion. These studies show that human α-amylase is present in the female lower genital tract and elucidates how epithelial glycogen can support Lactobacillus colonization in the genital tract. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Altered biomarkers of mucosal immunity and reduced vaginal Lactobacillus concentrations in sexually active female adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Pellett Madan

    Full Text Available Genital secretions collected from adult women exhibit in vitro activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV and Escherichia coli (E. coli, but prior studies have not investigated this endogenous antimicrobial activity or its mediators in adolescent females.Anti-HSV and anti-E.coli activity were quantified from cervicovaginal lavage (CVL specimens collected from 20 sexually active adolescent females (15-18 years. Soluble immune mediators that may influence this activity were measured in CVL, and concentrations of Lactobacillus jensenii and crispatus were quantified by PCR from vaginal swabs. Results for adolescents were compared to those obtained from 54 healthy, premenopausal adult women. Relative to specimens collected from adults, CVL collected from adolescent subjects had significantly reduced activity against E. coli and diminished concentrations of protein, IgG, and IgA but significantly increased anti-HSV activity and concentrations of interleukin (IL-1α, IL-6 and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Vaginal swabs collected from adolescent subjects had comparable concentrations of L. crispatus but significantly reduced concentrations of L. jensenii, relative to adult swabs.Biomarkers of genital mucosal innate immunity may differ substantially between sexually active adolescents and adult women. These findings warrant further study and may have significant implications for prevention of sexually transmitted infections in adolescent females.

  11. A Raman-spectroscopy-based approach for detection and discrimination of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus phages at low titer in raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayyarcan, Emine Kübra; Acar Soykut, Esra; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2018-04-11

    In this study, a method combining Raman spectroscopy with chemometric analysis was developed for detection of phage presence in raw milk and discrimination of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus phages which are among the main phages causing problems in dairy industry. For this purpose, S. thermophilus and L. bulgaricus phages were added into raw milk separately, and then some pretreatments such as fat separation, removal of casein, and filtration were applied to the raw milk samples. Raman spectra of the samples were collected and then analyzed using principal component analysis in order to discriminate these phages in raw milk. In the next step, dilutions of S. thermophilus phages in pretreated raw milk were prepared, and Raman spectra were collected. These spectra were analyzed by using partial least squares method to quantify phages in low titer. Consequently, it has been demonstrated that S. thermophilus and L. bulgaricus phages, which have titers sufficient to fail the fermentation (~ 10 7  pfu/mL) and have lower titers (10 2 -10 3  pfu/mL), could be discriminated from antibiotic and each other. Additionally, low concentrations of S. thermophilus phages (10 2  pfu/mL) could be detected through Raman spectroscopy with a short analysis time (60 min) and high coefficient of determination (R 2 ) values for both calibration (0.985) and validation (0.906) with a root mean square error of calibration of 70.54 and root mean square error of prediction of 165.47. However, a lower success was achieved with L. bulgaricus phages and the obtained coefficient of determination values were not sufficiently high (0.649).

  12. Probiotic lactobacillus and estrogen effects on vaginal epithelial gene expression responses to Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, R Doug; Johnson, Shemedia J

    2012-06-20

    Vaginal epithelial cells have receptors, signal transduction mechanisms, and cytokine secretion capabilities to recruit host defenses against Candida albicans infections. This research evaluates how probiotic lactobacilli affect the defensive epithelial response. This study used quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay (qRT-PCR), flow cytometry, and a multiplex immunoassay to observe changes in the regulation of gene expression related to cytokine responses in the VK2 (E6/E7) vaginal epithelial cell line treated with 17β-estradiol, exposed to probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1® and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14® and challenged with C. albicans. Data were statistically evaluated by repeated measures analysis of variance and paired t-tests where appropriate. C. albicans induced mRNA expression of genes related to inflammatory cytokine responses associated with nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathways. 17β-estradiol suppressed expression of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) mRNA. Probiotic lactobacilli suppressed C. albicans-induced nuclear factor-kappa B inhibitor kinase kinase alpha (Iκκα), Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2), TLR6, IL-8, and TNFα, also suggesting inhibition of NF-κB signaling. The lactobacilli induced expression of IL-1α, and IL-1β mRNA, which was not inhibited by curcumin, suggesting that they induce an alternate inflammatory signal transduction pathway to NF-κB, such as the mitogen activated protein kinase and activator protein-1 (MAPK/AP-1) signal transduction pathway. Curcumin inhibited IL-13 secretion, suggesting that expression of this cytokine is mainly regulated by NF-κB signaling in VK2 cells. The results suggest that C. albicans infection induces pro-inflammatory responses in vaginal epithelial cells, and estrogen and lactobacilli suppress expression of NF-κB-related inflammatory genes. Probiotic

  13. Host specific diversity in Lactobacillus johnsonii as evidenced by a major chromosomal inversion and phage resistance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinane, Caitriona M; Kent, Robert M; Norberg, Sarah; Hill, Colin; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul

    2011-04-20

    Genetic diversity and genomic rearrangements are a driving force in bacterial evolution and niche adaptation. We sequenced and annotated the genome of Lactobacillus johnsonii DPC6026, a strain isolated from the porcine intestinal tract. Although the genome of DPC6026 is similar in size (1.97 mbp) and GC content (34.8%) to the sequenced human isolate L. johnsonii NCC 533, a large symmetrical inversion of approximately 750 kb differentiated the two strains. Comparative analysis among 12 other strains of L. johnsonii including 8 porcine, 3 human and 1 poultry isolate indicated that the genome architecture found in DPC6026 is more common within the species than that of NCC 533. Furthermore a number of unique features were annotated in DPC6026, some of which are likely to have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and contribute to protection against phage infection. A putative type III restriction-modification system was identified, as were novel Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) elements. Interestingly, these particular elements are not widely distributed among L. johnsonii strains. Taken together these data suggest intra-species genomic rearrangements and significant genetic diversity within the L. johnsonii species and indicate towards a host-specific divergence of L. johnsonii strains with respect to genome inversion and phage exposure.

  14. Host specific diversity in Lactobacillus johnsonii as evidenced by a major chromosomal inversion and phage resistance mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitriona M Guinane

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity and genomic rearrangements are a driving force in bacterial evolution and niche adaptation. We sequenced and annotated the genome of Lactobacillus johnsonii DPC6026, a strain isolated from the porcine intestinal tract. Although the genome of DPC6026 is similar in size (1.97 mbp and GC content (34.8% to the sequenced human isolate L. johnsonii NCC 533, a large symmetrical inversion of approximately 750 kb differentiated the two strains. Comparative analysis among 12 other strains of L. johnsonii including 8 porcine, 3 human and 1 poultry isolate indicated that the genome architecture found in DPC6026 is more common within the species than that of NCC 533. Furthermore a number of unique features were annotated in DPC6026, some of which are likely to have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer (HGT and contribute to protection against phage infection. A putative type III restriction-modification system was identified, as were novel Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR elements. Interestingly, these particular elements are not widely distributed among L. johnsonii strains. Taken together these data suggest intra-species genomic rearrangements and significant genetic diversity within the L. johnsonii species and indicate towards a host-specific divergence of L. johnsonii strains with respect to genome inversion and phage exposure.

  15. Promising Prebiotic Candidate Established by Evaluation of Lactitol, Lactulose, Raffinose, and Oligofructose for Maintenance of a Lactobacillus-Dominated Vaginal Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Amy; Seney, Shannon; van der Veer, Charlotte; Kort, Remco; Sumarah, Mark W.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Perturbations to the vaginal microbiota can lead to dysbiosis, including bacterial vaginosis (BV), which affects a large portion of the female population. In a healthy state, the vaginal microbiota is characterized by low diversity and colonization by Lactobacillus spp., whereas in BV, these species are displaced by a highly diverse population of bacteria associated with adverse vaginal health outcomes. Since prebiotic ingestion has been a highly effective approach to invigorate lactobacilli for improved intestinal health, we hypothesized that these compounds could stimulate lactobacilli at the expense of BV organisms to maintain vaginal health. Monocultures of commensal Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus vaginalis, Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus johnsonii, Lactobacillus jensenii, and Lactobacillus iners, in addition to BV-associated organisms and Candida albicans, were tested for their ability to utilize a representative group of prebiotics consisting of lactitol, lactulose, raffinose, and oligofructose. The disaccharide lactulose was found to most broadly and specifically stimulate vaginal lactobacilli, including the strongly health-associated species L. crispatus, and importantly, not to stimulate BV organisms or C. albicans. Using freshly collected vaginal samples, we showed that exposure to lactulose promoted commensal Lactobacillus growth and dominance and resulted in healthy acidity partially through lactic acid production. This provides support for further testing of lactulose to prevent dysbiosis and potentially to reduce the need for antimicrobial agents in managing vaginal health. IMPORTANCE Bacterial vaginosis (BV) and other dysbioses of the vaginal microbiota significantly affect the quality of life of millions of women. Antimicrobial therapy is often poorly effective, causes side effects, and does not prevent recurrences. We report one of very few studies that have evaluated how prebiotics—compounds that are selectively fermented

  16. Homeostatic properties of Lactobacillus jensenii engineered as a live vaginal anti-HIV microbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hidemi S; Xu, Qiang; Fichorova, Raina N

    2013-01-08

    Vaginal probiotics are investigated as a binary strategy for prevention of bacterial vaginosis and HIV. We applied an innovative experimental model using primary and immortalized human cervical and vaginal epithelial cells to assess the functional properties of Lactobacillus jensenii, a predominant constituent of the healthy vaginal microbiome, engineered to express the HIV-1 entry inhibitor modified cyanovirin-N (mCV-N). In this model bacteria colonize the epithelial cells over a period of 24-72 h. Staurosporine and the Toll-like receptor 2/6 ligand macrophage-activating lipopeptide-2 (MALP-2) serve as positive controls for apoptosis and proinflammatory activation, respectively. In 24-hour intervals, the colonized epithelium is assessed microscopically, supernatants are collected for measurement of soluble immunoinflammatory mediators and production of CV-N, and cells are lysed for assessment of: 1) apoptosis by cleaved versus total caspase-3 assay; 2) NF-κB activation by a luciferase reporter assay; or 3) epithelia-associated colony forming units (CFU) in Brucella agar. Wild type (WT) L. jensenii 1153 consistently colonized cervical and vaginal cells in the absence of epithelial damage and apoptosis. The bioengineered derivatives expressing mCV-N or control plasmids showed the same stable colonization pattern, which was reproducible between technologists and bacterial batches (CFU coefficient of variation <10% within and between experiments and epithelial cell types). MALP-2 activated NF-κB and caused fold-increased levels of proinflammatory mediators with clinically established significance in the cervicovaginal environment (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-8, RANTES, MIP-3α, and ICAM-1), measured by a multiplex electrochemiluminescence assay. At the same time levels of protective anti-inflammatory mediators interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), both measured by ELISA, remained constant (IL-1RA) or

  17. Evaluation of lactitol, lactulose, raffinose, and oligofructose for maintenance of a Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota establishes a promising prebiotic candidate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collins, Stephanie L; McMillan, Amy; Seney, Shannon; van der Veer, Charlotte; Kort, Remco; Sumarah, Mark W; Reid, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Perturbations to the vaginal microbiota can lead to dysbiosis, including bacterial vaginosis (BV), which affects a large portion of the female population. In a healthy state, the vaginal microbiota is represented by low diversity and colonization by Lactobacillus spp., whereas in BV, these species

  18. Molecular Interaction between Lipoteichoic Acids and Lactobacillus delbrueckii Phages Depends on d-Alanyl and α-Glucose Substitution of Poly(Glycerophosphate) Backbones▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räisänen, Liisa; Draing, Christian; Pfitzenmaier, Markus; Schubert, Karin; Jaakonsaari, Tiina; von Aulock, Sonja; Hartung, Thomas; Alatossava, Tapani

    2007-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acids (LTAs) have been shown to act as bacterial counterparts to the receptor binding proteins of LL-H, LL-H host range mutant LL-H-a21, and JCL1032. Here we have used LTAs purified by hydrophobic interaction chromatography from different phage-resistant and -sensitive strains of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis. Nuclear magnetic resonance analyses revealed variation in the degree of α-glucosyl and d-alanyl substitution of the 1,3-linked poly(glycerophosphate) LTAs between the phage-sensitive and phage-resistant strains. Inactivation of phages was less effective if there was a high level of d-alanine residues in the LTA backbones. Prior incubation of the LTAs with α-glucose-specific lectin inhibited the LL-H phage inactivation. The overall level of decoration or the specific spatial combination of α-glucosyl-substituted, d-alanyl-substituted, and nonsubstituted glycerol residues may also affect phage adsorption. PMID:17416656

  19. Can Lactobacillus fermentum LF10 and Lactobacillus acidophilus LA02 in a slow-release vaginal product be useful for prevention of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis?: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murina, Filippo; Graziottin, Alessandra; Vicariotto, Franco; De Seta, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of the association of 2 specific strains, Lactobacillus fermentum LF10 (DSM 19187) and Lactobacillus acidophilus LA02 (DSM 21717), specifically formulated in slow-release effervescent tablets, in patients with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis. The study was a clinical trial of 58 women diagnosed with recurrent VVC (≥4 culture-confirmed episodes in a 12-mo period). All patients were given 200 mg of fluconazole orally as an induction dose for 3 alternate days during the first treatment week. Afterward, the patients were given a new product formulated in slow-release vaginal tablets containing at least 0.4 billion live cells of each of lactobacillus L. fermentum LF10 and L. acidophilus LA02 (first phase of the prophylactic period), on alternate days for 10 consecutive nights. Patients who were still free of symptoms were given 1 vaginal tablet every week for the next 10 weeks (second phase of the prophylactic period). Patients asymptomatic after the total duration of the observation phase (7 mo) were considered as responders. During the second 10-week prophylactic phase, 49 of 57 (86.0%) patients remained free of clinical recurrence, whereas symptomatic VVC occurred in 8 patients (14.0%). During the 7-month follow-up, 42 patients of 49 (85.7%) were symptom free at the end of the protocol, whereas clinical recurrences occurred in 7 women (14.3%). Overall, 42 of 58 women enrolled in the study (72.4%) experienced no clinical recurrence throughout the 7-month observation phase (responders). This study strengthens the evidence supporting the use of specific lactobacilli with well-demonstrated activities associated with the creation and maintenance of a vaginal biofilm that hinders the persistence of an infection caused by Candida.

  20. Selection of Lactobacillus plantarum strains to use as starters in fermented table olives: Oleuropeinase activity and phage sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Miriam; Lanza, Barbara; Rossetti, Lia; Muzzalupo, Innocenzo; Carminati, Domenico; Giraffa, Giorgio

    2013-05-01

    Fermented table olives (Olea europaea L.) are largely diffused in the Mediterranean area. Olives are picked at different stages of maturity and after harvesting, processed to eliminate the characteristic bitterness caused by the presence of the oleuropein glucoside and to become suitable for human consumption. The spontaneous fermentation of table olives mainly depends on lactic acid bacteria (LAB), and in particular on Lactobacillus plantarum which plays an important role in the degradation of oleuropein. The hydrolysis of oleuropein is attributed to the β-glucosidase and esterase activities of the indigenous LAB microflora. This study investigated the potential of L. plantarum strains isolated from dairy products and olives to be used as starters for fermented table olives. Forty-nine strains were typed by RAPD-PCR and investigated for the presence of the β-glucosidase (bglH) gene. The full sequence of the bglH gene was carried out. All the 49 L. plantarum strains were also tested for phage resistance. A total of six strains were selected on the basis of genotypic polymorphism, bglH gene sequence analysis, and phage resistance profile. These strains were further characterized to assess the acidifying capability, the growth at different temperatures, the tolerance to different NaCl concentrations, and the oleuropeinolytic activity. Although further characterizations are required, especially concerning the influence on sensory properties, L. plantarum proved to have the potential to be used as a debittering and fermentative agent in starter culture for fermented table olives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Application of Lactobacillus johnsonii expressing phage endolysin for control of Clostridium perfringens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervasi, T; Lo Curto, R; Minniti, E; Narbad, A; Mayer, M J

    2014-10-01

    Clostridium perfringens is frequently found in food and the environment and produces potent toxins that have a negative impact on both human and animal health and particularly on the poultry industry. Lactobacillus johnsonii FI9785, isolated from the chicken gastrointestinal tract, has been demonstrated to exclude Cl. perfringens in poultry. We have investigated the interaction of wild-type Lact. johnsonii FI9785 or an engineered strain expressing a cell wall-hydrolysing endolysin with Cl. perfringens in vitro, using a batch culture designed to simulate human gastrointestinal tract conditions. Co-culture experiments indicated that acid production by Lact. johnsonii is important in pathogen control. The co-culture of the endolysin-secreting Lact. johnsonii with Cl. perfringens showed that the engineered strain had the potential to control the pathogen, but the ability to reduce Cl. perfringens numbers was not consistent. Results obtained indicate that survival of high numbers of Lact. johnsonii will be essential for effective pathogen control. Significance and impact of the study: The bacterium Lactobacillus johnsonii FI9785 reduces numbers of the pathogen Clostridium perfringens in vitro. Biocontrol was improved by engineering the strain to produce and export a cell wall-hydrolysing endolysin, but good survival of the producer strain is essential. The production of bacteriophage endolysins by commensal bacteria has the potential to improve competitive exclusion of pathogens in the gastrointestinal tract. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. DNA Fingerprinting of Lactobacillus crispatus Strain CTV-05 by Repetitive Element Sequence-Based PCR Analysis in a Pilot Study of Vaginal Colonization

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio, May A. D.; Hillier, Sharon L.

    2003-01-01

    Lactobacillus crispatus is one of the predominant hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-producing species found in the vagina and is under development as a probiotic for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. In this study, we assessed whether DNA fingerprinting by repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) can be used to distinguish the capsule strain of L. crispatus (CTV-05) from other endogenous strains as well as other species of vaginal lactobacilli. Vaginal and rectal lactobacilli were identifie...

  3. Observational prospective study on Lactobacillus plantarum P 17630 in the prevention of vaginal infections, during and after systemic antibiotic therapy or in women with recurrent vaginal or genitourinary infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianci, Antonio; Cicinelli, Ettore; De Leo, Vincenzo; Fruzzetti, Franca; Massaro, Maria Giulia; Bulfoni, Alessandro; Parazzini, Fabio; Perino, Antonio

    2018-03-12

    We performed a prospective cohort parallel observational study on the use of Lactobacillus plantarum P 17630 in the prevention of vaginal infections. Eligible were women with a diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis (Lactobacillus plantarum P 17630 > 100.000.000 UFC one vaginal capsule per day for 6 days, then a capsule per week for 16 weeks. Eligible subjects were enrolled in two parallel cohorts: 85 women using (group A) and 39 not using (group B) Lactobacillus plantarum P 17630. The risk of recurrent infection within 4 months from the study entry, was higher among untreated women: multivariate OR 2.6 (95%CI 0.7-9.4). The modification of presence/intensity or symptoms was significant in both the study groups (p Lactobacillus plantarum P 17630 has been shown to be active in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis and vaginal candidiasis. No data are available on its efficacy in the prevention of recurrent vaginal or urological infection or as a prevention strategy during systemic treatment with antibiotics. What do the results of this study add? This observational study suggests that Lactobacillus plantarum given for 4 months may lower the risk of recurrent infection in women with recurrent vaginal or genitourinary infection or after antibiotic systemic treatment for bacterial respiratory tract infection. The finding, however, is not statistically significant, possibly due to the lower than expected rate of infection observed in our population and consequently the limited power of the study. What are the implications of these findings for clinical practice and/or further research? New studies are needed in order to evaluate in different populations the role of Lactobacillus plantarum in lowering the risk of recurrent infection in a high-risk populations.

  4. Ultra-low-dose estriol and Lactobacillus acidophilus vaginal tablets (Gynoflor(®)) for vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal breast cancer patients on aromatase inhibitors: pharmacokinetic, safety, and efficacy phase I clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donders, Gilbert; Neven, Patrick; Moegele, Maximilian; Lintermans, Anneleen; Bellen, Gert; Prasauskas, Valdas; Grob, Philipp; Ortmann, Olaf; Buchholz, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    Phase I pharmacokinetic (PK) study assessed circulating estrogens in breast cancer (BC) patients on a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor (NSAI) with vaginal atrophy using vaginal ultra-low-dose 0.03 mg estriol (E3) and Lactobacillus combination vaginal tablets (Gynoflor(®)). 16 women on NSAI with severe vaginal atrophy applied a daily vaginal tablet of Gynoflor(®) for 28 days followed by a maintenance therapy of 3 tablets weekly for 8 weeks. Primary outcomes were serum concentrations and PK of E3, estradiol (E2), and estrone (E1) using highly sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Secondary outcomes were clinical measures for efficacy and side effects; microscopic changes in vaginal epithelium and microflora; and changes in serum FSH, LH, and sex hormone-binding globulin. Compared with baseline, serum E1 and E2 did not increase in any of the women at any time following vaginal application. Serum E3 transiently increased after the first application in 15 of 16 women, with a maximum of 168 pg/ml 2-3 h post-insertion. After 4 weeks, serum E3 was slightly increased in 8 women with a maximum of 44 pg/ml. The vaginal atrophy resolved or improved in all women. The product was well tolerated, and discontinuation of therapy was not observed. The low-dose 0.03 mg E3 and Lactobacillus acidophilus vaginal tablets application in postmenopausal BC patients during AI treatment suffering from vaginal atrophy lead to small and transient increases in serum E3, but not E1 or E2, and therefore can be considered as safe and efficacious for treatment of atrophic vaginitis in BC patients taking NSAIs.

  5. The effect of an oral probiotic containing lactobacillus, bifidobacterium, and bacillus species on the vaginal microbiota of spayed female dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, R G; Bailey, C S; Jacob, M E; Harris, T L; Wood, M W; Saker, K E; Vaden, S L

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) are often difficult to treat. Vaginal colonization with lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB) is associated with reduced frequency of recurrent UTIs in women. Oral probiotics might help increase the prevalence of vaginal LAB and decrease the frequency of recurrent UTIs in dogs. Administration of an oral probiotic supplement containing Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Bacillus species will increase the prevalence of LAB in the vagina of dogs. Thirty-five healthy, spayed female dogs without history of recurrent UTIs. Prospective, controlled study. Enrolled dogs received an oral probiotic supplement for 14 or 28 days. A vaginal tract culture was obtained from each dog before and after oral probiotic administration. Twenty-three dogs received the oral probiotic supplement daily for a period of 14 days and 12 dogs received the oral probiotic supplement daily for a period of 28 days. Lactic acid-producing bacteria were isolated from 7 of 35 dogs prior to probiotic administration. After the treatment course, 6 of 35 dogs had LAB isolated. Only one of these dogs had LAB (Enterococcus canintestini) isolated for the first time. Enterococcus canintestini was the most common LAB isolated from all dogs in this study, although it was not included in the probiotic supplement. Lactic acid-producing bacteria are not a common isolate from the vaginal vault of dogs. Administration of this oral probiotic supplement for a 2- or 4-week period did not increase the prevalence of vaginal LAB in dogs. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. Lactobacillus crispatus dominant vaginal microbiome is associated with inhibitory activity of female genital tract secretions against Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeny P Ghartey

    Full Text Available Female genital tract secretions inhibit E. coli ex vivo and the activity may prevent colonization and provide a biomarker of a healthy microbiome. We hypothesized that high E. coli inhibitory activity would be associated with a Lactobacillus crispatus and/or jensenii dominant microbiome and differ from that of women with low inhibitory activity.Vaginal swab cell pellets from 20 samples previously obtained in a cross-sectional study of near-term pregnant and non-pregnant healthy women were selected based on having high (>90% inhibition or low (<20% inhibition anti-E. coli activity. The V6 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene was amplified and sequenced using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Filtered culture supernatants from Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus iners, and Gardnerella vaginalis were also assayed for E. coli inhibitory activity.Sixteen samples (10 with high and 6 with low activity yielded evaluable microbiome data. There was no difference in the predominant microbiome species in pregnant compared to non-pregnant women (n = 8 each. However, there were significant differences between women with high compared to low E. coli inhibitory activity. High activity was associated with a predominance of L. crispatus (p<0.007 and culture supernatants from L. crispatus exhibited greater E. coli inhibitory activity compared to supernatants obtained from L. iners or G. vaginalis. Notably, the E. coli inhibitory activity varied among different strains of L. crispatus.Microbiome communities with abundant L. crispatus likely contribute to the E. coli inhibitory activity of vaginal secretions and efforts to promote this environment may prevent E. coli colonization and related sequelae including preterm birth.

  7. Vaginitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... change in discharge. What treatments are available for vaginal yeast infection? Yeast infections can be treated either by placing ... of organisms that are normally found in the vagina. Candidiasis: Also called yeast infection or moniliasis, a type ...

  8. Individual and co-operative roles of lactic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the killing activity of enteric strain Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC933 and vaginal strain Lactobacillus gasseri KS120.1 against enteric, uropathogenic and vaginosis-associated pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atassi, Fabrice; Servin, Alain L

    2010-03-01

    The mechanism underlying the killing activity of Lactobacillus strains against bacterial pathogens appears to be multifactorial. Here, we investigate the respective contributions of hydrogen peroxide and lactic acid in killing bacterial pathogens associated with the human vagina, urinary tract or intestine by two hydrogen peroxide-producing strains. In co-culture, the human intestinal strain Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC933 and human vaginal strain Lactobacillus gasseri KS120.1 strains killed enteric Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL1344, vaginal Gardnerella vaginalis DSM 4944 and urinary tract Escherichia coli CFT073 pathogens. The cell-free culture supernatants (CFCSs) produced the same reduction in SL1344, DSM 4944 and CFT073 viability, whereas isolated bacteria had no effect. The killing activity of CFCSs was heat-stable. In the presence of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's minimum essential medium inhibiting the lactic acid-dependent killing activity, CFCSs were less effective at killing of the pathogens. Catalase-treated CFCSs displayed a strong decreased activity. Tested alone, hydrogen peroxide triggered a concentration-dependent killing activity against all three pathogens. Lactic acid alone developed a killing activity only at concentrations higher than that present in CFCSs. In the presence of lactic acid at a concentration present in Lactobacillus CFCSs, hydrogen peroxide displayed enhanced killing activity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that for hydrogen peroxide-producing Lactobacillus strains, the main metabolites of Lactobacillus, lactic acid and hydrogen peroxide, act co-operatively to kill enteric, vaginosis-associated and uropathogenic pathogens.

  9. α-Amylase in Vaginal Fluid: Association With Conditions Favorable to Dominance of Lactobacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasioudis, Dimitrios; Beghini, Joziani; Bongiovanni, Ann Marie; Giraldo, Paulo C; Linhares, Iara M; Witkin, Steven S

    2015-11-01

    Vaginal glycogen is degraded by host α-amylase and then converted to lactic acid by Lactobacilli. This maintains the vaginal pH at ≤4.5 and prevents growth of other bacteria. Therefore, host α-amylase activity may promote dominance of Lactobacilli. We evaluated whether the α-amylase level in vaginal fluid is altered in women with bacterial vaginosis (BV) and vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) and whether its concentration was associated with levels of lactic acid isomers and host mediators. Vaginal fluid was obtained from 43 women with BV, 50 women with VVC, and 62 women with no vulvovaginal disorders. Vaginal fluid concentrations of α-amylase, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), hyaluronan, hyaluronidase-1, β-defensin, and elafin were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Vaginal concentrations of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 8, and d- and l-lactic acid levels in these patients were previously reported. The median vaginal fluid α-amylase level was 1.83 mU/mL in control women, 1.45 mU/mL in women with VVC, and 1.07 mU/mL in women with BV. Vaginal levels of α-amylase were correlated with d-lactic acid (P = .003) but not with l-lactic acid (P > .05) and with SLPI (P vaginal lumen by hyaluronidase-1 and MMP-8 may increase glycogen availability and promote α-amylase activity. The subsequent enhanced availability of glycogen breakdown products would favor proliferation of Lactobacilli, the primary producers of d-lactic acid in the vagina. Concomitant production of NGAL and SLPI would retard growth of BV-related bacteria. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Adhesion of Human Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus to Cervical and Vaginal Cells and Interaction with Vaginosis-Associated Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Coudeyras

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The ability of a probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain (Lcr35 to adhere to cervical and vaginal cells and to affect the viability of two main vaginosis-associated pathogens, Prevotella bivia, Gardnerella vaginalis, as well as Candida albicans was investigated. Methods. Adhesion ability was determined in vitro with immortalized epithelial cells from the endocervix, ectocervix, and vagina. Coculture experiments were performed to count viable pathogens cells in the presence of Lcr35. Results. Lcr35 was able to specifically and rapidly adhere to the three cell lines. In coculture assays, a decrease in pathogen cell division rate was observed as from 4 hours of incubation and bactericidal activity after a longer period of incubation, mostly with P. bivia. Conclusion. The ability of Lcr35 to adhere to cervicovaginal cells and its antagonist activities against vaginosis-associated pathogens suggest that this probiotic strain is a promising candidate for use in therapy.

  11. Lactobacillus crispatus L1: high cell density cultivation and exopolysaccharide structure characterization to highlight potentially beneficial effects against vaginal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnarumma, Giovanna; Molinaro, Antonio; Cimini, Donatella; De Castro, Cristina; Valli, Vivien; De Gregorio, Vincenza; De Rosa, Mario; Schiraldi, Chiara

    2014-05-30

    Vaginal lactic acid bacteria defend the host against pathogens through a combination of competitive exclusion, competition for nutrients, production of antimicrobial substances and through the activation of the immune system. A new human isolate named Lactobacillus crispatus L1 was characterized in this work, and a preliminary evaluation of its probiotic potential is described together with a process to obtain a high productivity of viable biomass. In a simulated digestion process 1.8⋅10(10) cells∙ml(-1) survived the gastric environment with 80% viability, without being affected by small intestine juices. Experiments on six different C sources were performed to analyze growth and organic acids production and, glucose, provided the best performances. A microfiltration strategy was exploited to improve the cellular yield in 2 L-fermentation processes, reaching 27 g · l(-1) of dry biomass. Moreover, L. crispatus L1 demonstrated a greater stability to high concentrations of lactic acid, compared to other lactobacilli. The specific L. crispatus L1 exopolysaccharide was purified from the fermentation broth and characterized by NMR showing structural features and similarity to exopolysaccharides produced by pathogenic strains. Live L. crispatus L1 cells strongly reduced adhesion of a yeast pathogenic strain, Candida albicans in particular, in adherence assays. Interestingly a higher expression of the human defensin HBD-2 was also observed in vaginal cells treated with the purified exopolysaccharide, indicating a possible correlation with C. albicans growth inhibition. The paper describes the evaluation of L. crispatus L1 as potential vaginal probiotic and the fermentation processes to obtain high concentrations of viable cells.

  12. Vaginal microbiota in menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Martinus Tarina; Larisa Paramitha; Evita Halim Effendi; Shannaz Nadia Yusharyahya; Hanny Nilasari; Wresti Indriatmi

    2016-01-01

    The human vagina together with its resident, microbiota, comprise a dynamic ecosystem. Normal microbiota is dominated by Lactobacillus species, and pathogen microbiota such as Gardnerella species and Bacteroides species can occur due to decrease in Lactobacillus domination. Lactobacillus plays an essential role in keeping normal vaginal microbiota in balance. Vaginal microbiota adapts to pH change and hormonal value. Changes in the vaginal microbiota over a woman’s lifespan will influence the...

  13. Lactobacillus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and also for other types of infections including urinary tract infections (UTIs), vaginal yeast infections, to prevent the common cold and flu, to prevent ear infections in children, and to prevent respiratory infections in children attending ...

  14. Lactobacillus crispatus Modulates Vaginal Epithelial Cell Innate Response to Candida albicans

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    Xiao-Xi Niu

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: L. crispatus can attenuate the virulence of C. albicans, modulate the secretion of cytokines and chemokines, and enhance the immune response of VK2/E6E7 cells in vitro. The vaginal mucosa has a potential function in the local immune responses against pathogens that can be promoted by L. crispatus.

  15. Restoring vaginal microbiota: biological control of bacterial vaginosis. A prospective case-control study using Lactobacillus rhamnosus BMX 54 as adjuvant treatment against bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recine, Nadia; Palma, Ettore; Domenici, Lavinia; Giorgini, Margherita; Imperiale, Ludovica; Sassu, Carolina; Musella, Angela; Marchetti, Claudia; Muzii, Ludovico; Benedetti Panici, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most prevalent lower genital tract infection in reproductive-age women worldwide. BV is an ecological disorder of the vaginal microbiota characterized microbiologically by replacement of the lactobacilli, predominant vaginal microbiota. It is characterized by a high rate of relapse in sexual active women, and these patients show three or more relapses each year. A healthy vagina is characterized by hydrogen peroxide and acid-producing lactobacilli, which are crucial to maintain the physiological vaginal ecosystem and their depletion speeds up bacterial overgrowth with pH elevation, salidase and amine production, leading to the observed signs and symptoms of BV. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of long-term vaginal lactobacilli's implementation in restoring and maintaining vaginal microflora and pH and to collect data about prophylactic approach based on probiotics supplementation with lactobacilli. This is a prospective case-control study, performed between January 2013 and September 2014 at Department of Gynecological Obstetrics and Urologic Sciences of "Sapienza" University of Rome. 250 non-pregnant sexually active women with diagnoses of BV were collected. Patients selected were divided in Group A (125 patients assigned to standard treatment for BV-metronidazole 500 mg orally twice a day for 7 days) and Group B (125 women undergoing the same standard antibiotic regimen followed by vaginal tablets containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus BMX 54). Patients were evaluated after 2, 6, and 9 months (T0, T2, T6, and T9) in term of recurrences rates of BV, vaginal symptoms, re-establishment of healthy vaginal flora, vaginal pH, and treatment tolerability. Vaginal flora was significantly replaced in Group B patients after 2 months comparing with Group A (p = 0.014). These data were confirmed at 6 and 9 months follow-up: patients that underwent prophylactic therapy with NORMOGIN(®) experienced significantly low rate of

  16. The lectin-like protein 1 in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 mediates tissue-specific adherence to vaginal epithelium and inhibits urogenital pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Mariya I.; Lievens, Elke; Verhoeven, Tine L. A.; Macklaim, Jean M.; Gloor, Gregory; Schols, Dominique; Vanderleyden, Jos; Reid, Gregor; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 has been documented to survive implantation onto the vaginal epithelium and interfere with urogenital pathogens. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are largely unknown. Here, we report for the first time the construction of dedicated knock-out mutants in L. rhamnosus GR-1 to enable the study of gene functions. In a search for genes responsible for the adherence capacity of L. rhamnosus GR-1, a genomic region encoding a protein with homology to lectin-like proteins was identified. Phenotypic analyses of the knock-out mutant of L. rhamnosus GR-1 revealed a two-fold decreased adhesion to the vaginal and ectocervical epithelial cell lines compared to wild-type. In contrast, the adhesion to gastro-intestinal epithelial (Caco2) and endocervical cell lines (Hela and End1/E6E7) was not drastically affected by the mutation, suggesting that the LGR-1_Llp1 lectins mediates tissue tropism. The purified LGR-1_Llp1 protein also inhibited biofilm formation and adhesion of uropathogenic Escherichia coli. For the first time, an important role for a novel lectin-like protein in the adhesion capacity and host cell-specific interaction of a vaginal probiotic Lactobacillus strain has been discovered, with an additional role in pathogen inhibition. PMID:27869151

  17. Long-term Lactobacillus rhamnosus BMX 54 application to restore a balanced vaginal ecosystem: a promising solution against HPV-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Ettore; Recine, Nadia; Domenici, Lavinia; Giorgini, Margherita; Pierangeli, Alessandra; Panici, Pierluigi Benedetti

    2018-01-05

    Over recent years, a growing interest has developed in microbiota and in the concept of maintaining a special balance between Lactobacillus and other bacteria species in order to promote women's well-being. The aim of our study was to confirm that vaginal Lactobacilli long-lasting implementation in women with HPV-infections and concomitant bacterial vaginosis or vaginitis might be able to help in solving the viral infection, by re-establishing the original eubiosis. A total of 117 women affected by bacterial vaginosis or vaginitis with concomitant HPV-infections were enrolled at Department of Gynecological Obstetrics and Urological Sciences, La Sapienza University, Rome, Italy between February 2015 and March 2016. Women were randomized in two groups, standard treatment (metronidazole 500 mg twice a day for 7 days or fluconazole 150 mg orally once a day for 2 consecutive days) plus short-term (3 months) vaginal Lactobacillus implementation (group 1, short probiotics treatment protocol group, n = 60) versus the same standard treatment plus long-lasting (6 months) vaginal Lactobacillus rhamnosus BMX 54 administration (group 2, treatment group, n = 57). After a median follow up of 14 months (range 9-30 months) the chance to solve HPV-related cytological anomalies was twice higher in probiotic long-term users (group 2) versus short probiotics implementation group (group 1) (79.4% vs 37.5%, p = 0.041). Moreover, a total HPV-clearance was shown in 11.6% of short schedule probiotics implementation patients compared to a percentage of 31.2% in vaginal Lactobacilli long term users (p = 0.044), assessed as negative HPV-DNA test documented at the end of the study period. The consistent percentage of clearance of PAP-smear abnormalities and HPV-clearance obtained in long-term treatment group has been interestingly high and encouraging. Obviously, larger and randomized studies are warranted to confirm these encouraging results, but we believe that eubiosis

  18. Stability of freeze-dried vaginal Lactobacillus strains in the presence of different lyoprotectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez Tomás, María Silvina; Bru, Elena; Martos, Gladys; Nader-Macías, María Elena

    2009-05-01

    The industrial use of lactic acid bacteria as probiotic cultures depends on the preservation techniques employed, which are required to guarantee stable cultures in terms of viability and functional activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of 12% lactose and 12% sucrose suspended in water or reconstituted skim milk on the survival and expression of beneficial characteristics during freeze-drying and subsequent storage of 6 vaginal lactobacilli strains. A cubic polynomial model was also used for the first time to evaluate the effects of different protectors on survival behavior during storage. Different survival patterns were observed among the strains considered. The presence of both lactose and sucrose in water or in 6% skim milk as the suspension medium proved to be effective in maintaining a high degree of survival and expression of potentially probiotic characteristics (production of antimicrobial substances or auto-aggregation capabilities) of most strains after lyophilization and long-term storage. This study constitutes a valuable step to obtain concentrated cultures with the highest stability of microorganisms for pharmaceutical purposes.

  19. The significance of Lactobacillus crispatus and L. vaginalis for vaginal health and the negative effect of recent sex: a cross-sectional descriptive study across groups of African women

    OpenAIRE

    Jespers, Vicky; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Cools, Piet; Verhelst, Rita; Verstraelen, Hans; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Mwaura, Mary; Ndayisaba, Gilles F; Mandaliya, Kishor; Menten, Joris; Hardy, Liselotte; Crucitti, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Background Women in sub-Saharan Africa are vulnerable to acquiring HIV infection and reproductive tract infections. Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a disruption of the vaginal microbiota, has been shown to be strongly associated with HIV infection. Risk factors related to potentially protective or harmful microbiota species are not known. Methods We present cross-sectional quantitative polymerase chain reaction data of the Lactobacillus genus, five Lactobacillus species, and three BV-related bacter...

  20. Phase I Trial of a Lactobacillus crispatus Vaginal Suppository for Prevention of Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. Czaja

    2007-01-01

    Conclusions: L. crispatus CTV-05 can be given as a vaginal suppository with minimal sideeffects to healthy women with a history of recurrent UTI. Mild inflammation of the urinary tract was noted in some women.

  1. Vaginal Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendling, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge about the normal and abnormal vaginal microbiome has changed over the last years. Culturing techniques are not suitable any more for determination of a normal or abnormal vaginal microbiota. Non culture-based modern technologies revealed a complex and dynamic system mainly dominated by lactobacilli.The normal and the abnormal vaginal microbiota are complex ecosystems of more than 200 bacterial species influenced by genes, ethnic background and environmental and behavioral factors. Several species of lactobacilli per individuum dominate the healthy vagina. They support a defense system together with antibacterial substances, cytokines, defensins and others against dysbiosis, infections and care for an normal pregnancy without preterm birth.The numbers of Lactobacillus (L.) iners increase in the case of dysbiosis.Bacterial vaginosis (BV) - associated bacteria (BVAB), Atopobium vaginae and Clostridiales and one or two of four Gardnerella vaginalis - strains develop in different mixtures and numbers polymicrobial biofilms on the vaginal epithelium, which are not dissolved by antibiotic therapies according to guidelines and, thus, provoke recurrences.Aerobic vaginitis seems to be an immunological disorder of the vagina with influence on the microbiota, which is here dominated by aerobic bacteria (Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli). Their role in AV is unknown.Vaginal or oral application of lactobacilli is obviously able to improve therapeutic results of BV and dysbiosis.

  2. Effectiveness of the two microorganisms Lactobacillus fermentum LF15 and Lactobacillus plantarum LP01, formulated in slow-release vaginal tablets, in women affected by bacterial vaginosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicariotto, Franco; Mogna, Luca; Del Piano, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common reason for abnormal vaginal discharge in reproductive-age women and one of its most important causative agents is the gram-variable bacterium Gardnerella vaginalis. BV is not accompanied by significant local inflammation, whereas the "fishy odor" test is always positive. In contrast, aerobic vaginitis (AV) is predominantly associated with Escherichia coli, but Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus are also involved. Standard treatment of BV consists of oral or intravaginal antibiotics, although these are unable to spontaneously restore normal flora characterized by a high concentration of lactobacilli. The main limitation is the inability to offer a long-term defensive barrier, thus facilitating relapses and recurrences. This study was undertaken firstly to assess the ability of selected lactobacilli to in vitro antagonize G. vaginalis to determine an association with a strain able to inhibit E. coli, thus identifying a possible use in AV. The second step of the study was to conduct a human pilot trial in women affected by BV using an association of the most promising and active bacteria. For this purpose, neutralized supernatants of individual lactobacilli were tested at percentages ranging from 0.5% to 4% to determine their ability to hinder the growth of G. vaginalis American Type Culture Collection 10231. The bacterium that was able to exert the strongest inhibition was subsequently tested with Lactobacillus plantarum LP01 in a human intervention, placebo-controlled, pilot trial involving 34 female subjects (aged between 18 and 50, mean 34.7±8.9, no menopausal women) diagnosed with BV. The 2 microorganisms Lactobacillus fermentum LF15 (DSM 26955) and L. plantarum LP01 (LMG P-21021) were delivered to the vagina by means of slow-release vaginal tablets, also containing 50 mg of tara gum. The amount of each strain was 400 million live cells per dose. The women were instructed to apply a vaginal tablet once

  3. First Steps towards the Pharmaceutical Development of Ovules Containing Lactobacillus Strains: Viability and Antimicrobial Activity as Basic First Parameters in Vaginal Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilletti, A L; Ruíz, F O; Pascual, L M; Barberis, I L

    2018-02-01

    In the majority of Latin-American countries, including Argentina, there is a limited availability of vaginal bioproducts containing probiotics in the market. In addition, the conventional treatments of genital tract infections in women represent a high cost to the public health systems. The future development of this type of bioproducts that employ specific lactobacilli strains would not only have a meaningful impact on women's health but would also represent a significant challenge to the pharmaceutical industry. The aims of the work described in this paper were (i) to study different pharmaceutical formulations of vaginal ovules containing Lactobacillus fermentum L23 and L. rhamnosus L60, to determine in which formulation lactobacilli viability was sustained for longer time and (ii) to evaluate if probiotic strains maintained both the antimicrobial activity and biofilm-producing ability after being recovered from the ovules. In this study, we developed and characterized three pharmaceutical formulations containing different glycerol amounts and specific lactobacilli strains. Three relevant parameters, cell viability, antimicrobial activity, and biofilm production, by lactobacilli recovered from the ovules were tested. Although the viability of L23 and L60 strains was mainly influenced by high ovule's glycerol proportion, they survived at 4 °C during the 180 days. Both lactobacilli's antimicrobial activity and biofilm-producing ability were maintained for all treatments. In conclusion, employing a much reduced number of components, we were able to select the most suitable pharmaceutical formulation which maintained not only lactobacilli viability for a long period of time but also their antimicrobial activity and biofilm-producing ability.

  4. Vaginal microbiota in menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinus Tarina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The human vagina together with its resident, microbiota, comprise a dynamic ecosystem. Normal microbiota is dominated by Lactobacillus species, and pathogen microbiota such as Gardnerella species and Bacteroides species can occur due to decrease in Lactobacillus domination. Lactobacillus plays an essential role in keeping normal vaginal microbiota in balance. Vaginal microbiota adapts to pH change and hormonal value. Changes in the vaginal microbiota over a woman’s lifespan will influence the colonization of pathogenic microbes. They include changes in child, puberty, reproductive state, menopause, and postmenopause. Estrogen levels change will affect the colonization of pathogenic microbium, leading to genitourinary syndrome of menopause. Vulvovaginal atrophy is often found in postmenopausal women, and dominated by L. iners, Anaerococcus sp, Peptoniphilus sp, Prevotella sp, and Streptococcus sp. The normal vaginal microbiota’s imbalance in menopause will cause diseases such as bacterial vaginosis, and recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis due to hormonal therapies. Changes in the vaginal microbiota due to bacterial vaginosis are characterized by decrease in H2O2-producing Lactobacillus. They are also caused by the increase in numbers and concentration of Gardnerella vaginalis, Mycoplasma hominis, and other anaerob species such as Peptostreptococci, Prevotella spp, and Mobiluncus spp.

  5. Current taxonomy of phages infecting lactic acid bacteria

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    Jennifer eMahony

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phages infecting lactic acid bacteria have been the focus of significant research attention over the past three decades. Through the isolation and characterization of hundreds of phage isolates, it has been possible to classify phages of the dairy starter and adjunct bacteria Lactococus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Leuconostoc spp. and Lactobacillus spp. Among these, phages of L. lactis have been most thoroughly scrutinized and serve as an excellent model system to address issues that arise when attempting taxonomic classification of phages infecting other LAB species. Here, we present an overview of the current taxonomy of phages infecting LAB genera of industrial significance, the methods employed in these taxonomic efforts and how these may be employed for the taxonomy of phages of currently underrepresented and emerging phage species.

  6. The Vaginal Microbiota of Guinea Pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Hafner, L. M.; Rush, C. M.; Timms, P.

    2011-01-01

    The vaginae of four guinea pigs were swabbed and samples cultured aerobically on horse blood agar, in 5 per cent carbon dioxide on MRS agar or anaerobically on anaerobic horse blood agar. Vaginal microbiota consisted almost exclusively of gram-positive bacteria including Corynebacterium, Streptococcus, Enterococcus, Staphylococcus and Lactobacillus species.Keywords: guinea pigs, vaginal microbiota, vaginal vaccines.

  7. The significance of Lactobacillus crispatus and L. vaginalis for vaginal health and the negative effect of recent sex: a cross-sectional descriptive study across groups of African women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespers, Vicky; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Cools, Piet; Verhelst, Rita; Verstraelen, Hans; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Mwaura, Mary; Ndayisaba, Gilles F; Mandaliya, Kishor; Menten, Joris; Hardy, Liselotte; Crucitti, Tania

    2015-03-04

    Women in sub-Saharan Africa are vulnerable to acquiring HIV infection and reproductive tract infections. Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a disruption of the vaginal microbiota, has been shown to be strongly associated with HIV infection. Risk factors related to potentially protective or harmful microbiota species are not known. We present cross-sectional quantitative polymerase chain reaction data of the Lactobacillus genus, five Lactobacillus species, and three BV-related bacteria (Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, and Prevotella bivia) together with Escherichia coli and Candida albicans in 426 African women across different groups at risk for HIV. We selected a reference group of adult HIV-negative women at average risk for HIV acquisition and compared species variations in subgroups of adolescents, HIV-negative pregnant women, women engaging in traditional vaginal practices, sex workers and a group of HIV-positive women on combination antiretroviral therapy. We explored the associations between presence and quantity of the bacteria with BV by Nugent score, in relation to several factors of known or theoretical importance. The presence of species across Kenyan, South African and Rwandan women was remarkably similar and few differences were seen between the two groups of reference women in Kenya and South Africa. The Rwandan sex workers and HIV-positive women had the highest G. vaginalis presence (p = 0.006). Pregnant women had a higher Lactobacillus genus mean log (7.01 genome equivalents (geq)/ml) compared to the reference women (6.08 geq/ml). L. vaginalis (43%) was second to L. iners (81.9%) highly present in women with a normal Nugent score. Recent sexual exposure negatively affected the presence of L. crispatus (studied African countries was similar, the presence of protective species i.e. L. crispatus and L. vaginalis in women with a normal Nugent score appeared lower compared to non-African studies. Furthermore, Lactobacillus species were negatively

  8. Prevalência e caracterização de espécies de lactobacilos vaginais em mulheres em idade reprodutiva sem vulvovaginites Prevalence and characterization of vaginal lactobacillus species in women at reproductive age without vulvovaginitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Melo Brolazo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: identificar espécies de lactobacilos isolados do conteúdo vaginal de mulheres saudáveis e assintomáticas; determinar as espécies mais prevalentes e caracterizá-las fenotipicamente. MÉTODOS: lactobacilos foram isolados em meio seletivo a partir de amostras de conteúdo vaginal de 135 mulheres, sem queixa de corrimento e com diagnóstico laboratorial negativo para infecções vaginais, acompanhadas em um ambulatório de Planejamento Familiar. Os isolados foram identificados por PCR multiplex e, quando necessário, submetidos ao sequenciamento do gene RNAr 16S. Foram também avaliados quanto à acidificação do meio de cultura, à produção de ácido láctico, de H2O2, bacteriocinas e a capacidade de adesão às células epiteliais. RESULTADOS: oitenta e três cepas de lactobacilos foram isoladas e identificadas, sendo as espécies predominantes L. crispatus (30,1%, L. jensenii (26,5%, L. gasseri (22,9% e L. vaginalis (8,4%. Apenas 20 destes isolados não produziram H2O2 em quantidades detectáveis. Das 37 linhagens selecionadas para teste de adesão a células epiteliais, 12 apresentaram adesão entre 50 a 69%, 10 apresentaram 70% ou mais, e as restantes pouca ou nenhuma adesão. Nenhum dos isolados produziu bacteriocinas. CONCLUSÕES: as espécies de lactobacilos mais prevalentes em mulheres sem vulvovaginites, isoladas em meio de cultura seletivo e identificadas por métodos moleculares, foram L. crispatus, L. jensenii e L. gasseri. Além de mais frequentes, tais linhagens também apresentaram melhor produção de H2O2 e atingiram menores valores de pH em meio de cultura.PURPOSE: to identify species of lactobacillus isolated from the vaginal contents of healthy and asymptomatic women, determining the most prevalent species and characterizing them phenotypically. METHODS: lactobacillus have been isolated in selective milieu from samples of the vaginal contents of 135 women without complaints of vaginal secretion, and with

  9. Menopause and the vaginal microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhleisen, Alicia L; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M

    2016-09-01

    For over a century it has been well documented that bacteria in the vagina maintain vaginal homeostasis, and that an imbalance or dysbiosis may be associated with poor reproductive and gynecologic health outcomes. Vaginal microbiota are of particular significance to postmenopausal women and may have a profound effect on vulvovaginal atrophy, vaginal dryness, sexual health and overall quality of life. As molecular-based techniques have evolved, our understanding of the diversity and complexity of this bacterial community has expanded. The objective of this review is to compare the changes that have been identified in the vaginal microbiota of menopausal women, outline alterations in the microbiome associated with specific menopausal symptoms, and define how hormone replacement therapy impacts the vaginal microbiome and menopausal symptoms; it concludes by considering the potential of probiotics to reinstate vaginal homeostasis following menopause. This review details the studies that support the role of Lactobacillus species in maintaining vaginal homeostasis and how the vaginal microbiome structure in postmenopausal women changes with decreasing levels of circulating estrogen. In addition, the associated transformations in the microanatomical features of the vaginal epithelium that can lead to vaginal symptoms associated with menopause are described. Furthermore, hormone replacement therapy directly influences the dominance of Lactobacillus in the microbiota and can resolve vaginal symptoms. Oral and vaginal probiotics hold great promise and initial studies complement the findings of previous research efforts concerning menopause and the vaginal microbiome; however, additional trials are required to determine the efficacy of bacterial therapeutics to modulate or restore vaginal homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Vaginal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ Home Body Your reproductive health Vaginal infections Vaginal infections Help for infections If you have pain, ... infections and how to prevent them. Types of vaginal infections top Two common vaginal infections are bacterial ...

  11. Vaginal Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an Endocrinologist Search Featured Resource Menopause Map™ View Vaginal Atrophy October 2017 Download PDFs English Editors Christine ... during this time, including vaginal dryness. What is vaginal atrophy? Vaginal atrophy (also referred to as vulvovaginal ...

  12. Vaginal Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... urinary signs and symptoms: Vaginal dryness Vaginal burning Vaginal discharge Genital itching Burning with urination Urgency with urination ... others). Also make an appointment if you have vaginal symptoms, such as unusual ... burning or soreness. Causes Genitourinary syndrome of menopause ( ...

  13. Bactericidal activity of culture fluid components of Lactobacillus fermentum strain 90 TS-4 (21) clone 3, and their capacity to modulate adhesion of Candida albicans yeast-like fungi to vaginal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anokhina, I V; Kravtsov, E G; Protsenko, A V; Yashina, N V; Yermolaev, A V; Chesnokova, V L; Dalin, M V

    2007-03-01

    Antagonistic activities of L. fermentum strain 90 TS-4 (21), L. casei ATCC 27216, and L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 and bactericidal activity of lactobacillus culture fluid towards E. coli strain K12, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis test cultures were studied. The bactericidal effect of L. fermentum strain 90 TS-4 (21) clone 3 culture fluid preparation (pH 6.0) on the test cultures was dose-dependent. Adhesion of C. albicans yeast-like fungi to vaginal epitheliocytes was more pronounced for strains isolated from women with asymptomatic infection than for strains isolated from women with manifest forms. L. fermentum strain 90 TS-4 (21) clone 3 culture fluid preparation modulated adhesion of yeast-like fungi only if the fungal strain was initially highly adherent.

  14. [Aerobic vaginitis--diagnostic problems and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanik, Małgorzata; Wojciechowska-Wieja, Anna; Martirosian, Gayane

    2007-06-01

    The diagnostic criteria and treatment of aerobic vaginitis--AV--have been summarized in this review. An expansion of mixed aerobic microflora, especially Group B Streptococcus--GBS, Escherichia coli--E. coli, Enterococcus spp., and the development of inflammation of the vaginal mucous membrane due to a decreasing amount of Lactobacillus spp., have been observed in women with AV. Disruptions of the vaginal ecosystem during AV cause an increase in pH to >6, a decrease in lactates concentration and an increase in proinflammatory cytokines concentration in vaginal discharge. An optimal treatment scheme for AV, which includes antibacterial agents and simultaneously normalizes the vaginal ecosystem, has not been established until today.

  15. Vaginal Odor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normally occurring vaginal bacteria — is the most common vaginal infection that causes a vaginal odor. Trichomoniasis — a sexually transmitted infection — also can lead to vaginal odor. Chlamydia and gonorrhea infections usually don't cause vaginal odors. Neither do ...

  16. Basic Phage Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedon, Stephen T; Katsaounis, Tena I

    2018-01-01

    Basic mathematical descriptions are useful in phage ecology, applied phage ecology such as in the course of phage therapy, and also toward keeping track of expected phage-bacterial interactions as seen during laboratory manipulation of phages. The most basic mathematical descriptor of phages is their titer, that is, their concentration within stocks, experimental vessels, or other environments. Various phenomena can serve to modify phage titers, and indeed phage titers can vary as a function of how they are measured. An important aspect of how changes in titers can occur results from phage interactions with bacteria. These changes tend to vary in degree as a function of bacterial densities within environments, and particularly densities of those bacteria that are susceptible to or at least adsorbable by a given phage type. Using simple mathematical models one can describe phage-bacterial interactions that give rise particularly to phage adsorption events. With elaboration one can consider changes in both phage and bacterial densities as a function of both time and these interactions. In addition, phages along with their impact on bacteria can be considered as spatially constrained processes. In this chapter we consider the simpler of these concepts, providing in particular detailed verbal explanations toward facile mathematical insight. The primary goal is to stimulate a more informed use and manipulation of phages and phage populations within the laboratory as well as toward more effective phage application outside of the laboratory, such as during phage therapy. More generally, numerous issues and approaches to the quantification of phages are considered along with the quantification of individual, ecological, and applied properties of phages.

  17. Influência da co-agregação entre Candida. albicans e Lactobacillus acidophilus na capacidade de adesão destes microrganismos às células epiteliais vaginais humanas (CEVH = Influence of the co-aggregation between Candida. albicans e Lactobacillus acidophilus on the adhesion capacity these microorganisms in the human ephitelial vaginal cells (HEVC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Américo Etgeton

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar a influência da co-agregação in vitro entre Candida albicans e Lactobacillus acidophilus na capacidade de adesão destes microrganismos às células epiteliais vaginais humanas (CEVH. Foram utilizados um isolado vaginal de C. albicans e uma cepa ATCC de L. acidophilus. Uma suspensão de cada microrganismo isoladamente e do coagregado foram incubados com as CEVH obtidas de uma doadora saudável. Foram feitos esfregaços por cristal violeta e Papanicolaou, e o número de leveduras, lactobacilos ou coagregados aderidos às células foi contado (em 300 células superficiais-CS e 300 intermediárias-CI. A Microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV foi realizada em todas as situações dos ensaios.Leveduras e lactobacilos aderiram fortemente as CEVH, tanto em CS quanto em CI. A coagregação levou a um aumento na capacidade de adesão das leveduras (p 0,05. Havendo correlação com o que acontece in vivo, probióticos à base de L. acidophillus e mesmo uma flora lactobacilar vaginal não surtiriam efeito protetor contra a adesão de C. albicans as CEVH e do possível desenvolvimento de candidíase vulvovaginal.This work has aimed to evaluate the influence of the L. acidophilus and Candida albicans co-aggregation on the adhesion capacity this microorganisms in the human ephitelial vaginal cells (HEVC. One vaginal isolated of C. albicans and one ATCC strain of L. acidophilus was used. A suspension of the isolated and co-aggregated microorganisms was incubated with HVEC obtained from a healthy donor. After one hour, smears were made with crystal violet and Papanicolaou, and the number of yeasts adhered to HVEC was evaluated (300 superficial-SC and 300 intermediate cells-IC. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was made in all situations of the assays. Yeasts and lactobacilli adhered strongly to the HEVC, both SC and IC. The co-aggregation there was an increase in the adhesion capacity of the yeasts (p 0

  18. [Analysis of diversity of vaginal microbiota in healthy Chinese women by using DNA-fingerprinting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bing-bing; Liao, Qin-ping

    2012-04-18

    To analyze the diversity of healthy women's vaginal dominant flora in different physiological states with PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), to establish the basis for the future study of lower genital tract infections, and to provide a theoretical basis for the development of vaginal probiotics adapted to Chinese females. Women who underwent routine gynecologic examinations in Peking University First Hospital from October 2009 to January 2010 were enrolled, including 30 at reproductive age and 30 at post menopause age. Vaginal samples were collected and then total bacterial DNA was extracted. Universal bacterial primers were used to amplify the V3 region of 16S rDNA gene. PCR products were analyzed by denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Featured bands on DGGE were recovered, cloned and sequenced. Alignment with known sequence was made by using Blast on GenBank to identify bacterial strains so as to analyze the diversity of healthy women's vaginal dominant flora in different physiological states. (1) Vaginal flora in healthy Chinese women at their reproductive age were relatively simple, Lactobacillus were the dominant bacteria. Common bacteria included: Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus iners,and Lactobacillus gasseri. While L. iners were the dominant vaginal bacteria that could not be recognized by traditional method. (2) Vaginal bacteria in the women at post menopause age were more complex than in those at reproductive age. Common bacteria included: Lactobacillus iners, Lactobacillus crispatus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus gallolyticus, Veillonella sp., Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus anginosus, Prevotella sp., Anaerococcus lactolyticus and Bacteroides fragilis. Based on the DGGE analysis, the most common vaginal bacteria in Chinese healthy women at reproductive age are Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus iners,and Lactobacillus gasseri. the most common vaginal bacteria in healthy post

  19. Vaginal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, S F

    1986-05-01

    Chronic vaginitis is the most common vaginal disorder. Dogs with vaginitis show no signs of systemic illness but often lick at the vulva and have purulent or hemorrhagic vaginal discharges. Vaginitis is most commonly secondary to a noninfectious inciting factor such as congenital vaginal anomalies, clitoral hypertrophy, foreign bodies, trauma to the vaginal mucosa, or vaginal tumors. Inspection of the caudal vagina and vestibule both visually and digitally will often reveal the source of vaginal irritation. Vaginal cytology is used to establish the stage of the estrous cycle as well as distinguish uterine from vaginal sources of discharge. Vaginal cultures are used to establish the predominant offending organism associated with vaginal discharges and may be used as a guide for selection of a therapeutic agent. Vaginitis is best managed by removing the inciting cause and treating the area locally with antiseptic douches. Congenital malformations at the vestibulovaginal or vestibulovulvar junction may prevent normal intromission. Affected bitches may be reluctant to breed naturally because of pain. Such defects are detected best by digital examination. Congenital vaginal defects may be corrected by digital or surgical means. Prolapse of tissue through the lips of the vulva may be caused by clitoral hypertrophy, vaginal hyperplasia, or vaginal tumors. Enlargement of clitoral tissue is the result of endogenous or exogenous sources of androgens. Treatment of this condition includes removal of the androgen source and/or surgical removal of clitoral tissue. Vaginal hyperplasia is detected during proestrus or estrus of young bitches. Hyperplastic tissue will regress during diestrus. Tissue that is excessively traumatized and/or prolapse of the entire vaginal circumference may be removed surgically. Ovariohysterectomy may be used to prevent recurrence. Vaginal tumors are detected most often in older intact bitches. Such tumors are generally of smooth muscle or fibrous

  20. Engineered phages for electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue

    2016-11-15

    Phages are traditionally widely studied in biology and chemistry. In recent years, engineered phages have attracted significant attentions for functionalization or construction of electronic devices, due to their specific binding, catalytic, nucleating or electronic properties. To apply the engineered phages in electronics, these are a number of interesting questions: how to engineer phages for electronics? How are the engineered phages characterized? How to assemble materials with engineered phages? How are the engineered phages micro or nanopatterned? What are the strategies to construct electronics devices with engineered phages? This review will highlight the early attempts to address these questions and explore the fundamental and practical aspects of engineered phages in electronics, including the approaches for selection or expression of specific peptides on phage coat proteins, characterization of engineered phages in electronics, assembly of electronic materials, patterning of engineered phages, and construction of electronic devices. It provides the methodologies and opens up ex-cit-ing op-por-tu-ni-ties for the development of a variety of new electronic materials and devices based on engineered phages for future applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Vaginal lactobacilli profile in pregnant women with normal & abnormal vaginal flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeruva, Thirupathaiah; Rajkumar, Hemalatha; Donugama, Vasundhara

    2017-10-01

    Lactobacilli species that are better adapted to vaginal environment of women may colonize better and offer protection against vaginal pathogenic bacteria. In this study, the distribution of common Lactobacillus species was investigated in pregnant women. Sixty seven pregnant women were included in the study and vaginal samples were collected for Gram staining. Women were classified as normal vaginal flora, intermediate flora and bacterial vaginosis (BV) based on Nugent's score. Vaginal samples were also collected for the identification of Lactobacillus spp. by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) profiling of 16S rDNA amplification method. Lactobacillus crispatus (100%) was the most predominant Lactobacillus spp. present in pregnant women with normal flora, followed by L. iners (77%), L. jensenii (74%) and L. helveticus (60%). While, L. iners was commonly present across groups in women with normal, intermediate or BV flora, L. crispatus, L. jensenii and L. helveticus decreased significantly as the vaginal flora changed to intermediate and BV. In women with BV, except L. iners other species of lactobacilli was less frequently prevalent. Species such as L. rhamnosus, L. fermentum, L. paracasei and L. casei were not detected in any vaginal sample. L. crispatus, L. jensinii and L. helveticus were predominant species in women with normal flora. L. crispatus alone or in combination with L. jensinii and L. helveticus may be evaluated for probiotic properties for the prevention and treatment of BV.

  2. Vaginal cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001509.htm Vaginal cysts To use the sharing features on this ... with air, fluid, pus, or other material. A vaginal cyst occurs on or under the lining of ...

  3. Vaginal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaginal problems are some of the most common reasons women go to the doctor. They may have ... common problem is vaginitis, an inflammation of the vagina. Other problems that affect the vagina include sexually ...

  4. Vaginal microbiology of women with acute recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    OpenAIRE

    Sobel, J D; Chaim, W

    1996-01-01

    Alterations in the autochthonous vaginal microflora can predispose women to recurring attacks of Candida vaginitis. Quantitative aerobic and anaerobic cultures were obtained from 24 premenopausal women with acute recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis and from 21 healthy asymptomatic premenopausal women. Lactobacillus species constituted the predominant flora in both groups, with a mean log10 CFU/ml of 8.7, a total isolation rate of 96%, and a mean of 1.6 Lactobacillus species isolated per patien...

  5. Bacteria, phages and septicemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausra Gaidelyte

    Full Text Available The use of phages is an attractive option to battle antibiotic resistant bacteria in certain bacterial infections, but the role of phage ecology in bacterial infections is obscure. Here we surveyed the phage ecology in septicemia, the most severe type of bacterial infection. We observed that the majority of the bacterial isolates from septicemia patients spontaneously secreted phages active against other isolates of the same bacterial strain, but not to the strain causing the disease. Such phages were also detected in the initial blood cultures, indicating that phages are circulating in the blood at the onset of sepsis. The fact that most of the septicemic bacterial isolates carry functional prophages suggests an active role of phages in bacterial infections. Apparently, prophages present in sepsis-causing bacterial clones play a role in clonal selection during bacterial invasion.

  6. Genetic Variation of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis Bacteriophages Isolated from Cheese Processing Plants in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsman, Päivi; Alatossava, Tapani

    1991-01-01

    The genomes of four Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis bacteriophages were characterized by restriction endonuclease mapping, Southern hybridization, and heteroduplex analysis. The phages were isolated from different cheese processing plants in Finland between 1950 and 1972. All four phages had a small isometric head and a long noncontractile tail. Two different types of genome (double-stranded DNA) organization existed among the different phages, the pac type and the cos type, corresponding to alternative types of phage DNA packaging. Three phages belonged to the pac type, and a fourth was a cos-type phage. The pac-type phages were genetically closely related. In the genomes of the pac-type phages, three putative insertion/deletions (0.7 to 0.8 kb, 1.0 kb, and 1.5 kb) and one other region (0.9 kb) containing clustered base substitutions were discovered and localized. At the phenotype level, three main differences were observed among the pac-type phages. These concerned two minor structural proteins and the efficiency of phage DNA packaging. The genomes of the pac-type phages showed only weak homology with that of the cos-type phage. Phage-related DNA, probably a defective prophage, was located in the chromosome of the host strain sensitive to the cos-type phage. This DNA exhibited homology under stringent conditions to the pac-type phages. Images PMID:16348513

  7. Effect of Bacteriocin-like Inhibitory Substances Produced by Vaginal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reduction of vaginal Lactobacillus population leads to overgrowth of opportunistic organisms such as Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS), which causes life threatening neonatal infections. The activities of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS) produced by Lactobacillus species isolated from the ...

  8. Vaginal microbiota and viral sexually transmitted diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardis, C; Mosca, L; Mastromarino, P

    2013-01-01

    Healthy vaginal microbiota is an important biological barrier to pathogenic microorganisms. When this predominantly Lactobacillus community is disrupted, decreased in abundance and replaced by different anaerobes, bacterial vaginosis (BV) may occur. BV is associated with prevalence and incidence of several sexually transmitted infections. This review provides background on BV, discusses the epidemiologic data to support a role of altered vaginal microbiota for acquisition of sexually transmitted diseases and analyzes mechanisms by which lactobacilli could counteract sexually transmitted viral infections.

  9. Biodiversity of Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages isolated from cheese whey starters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Miriam; Bonvini, Barbara; Rossetti, Lia; Meucci, Aurora; Giraffa, Giorgio; Carminati, Domenico

    2015-05-01

    Twenty-one Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages, 18 isolated from different cheese whey starters and three from CNRZ collection, were phenotypically and genetically characterised. A biodiversity between phages was evidenced both by host range and molecular (RAPD-PCR) typing. A more detailed characterisation of six phages showed similar structural protein profiles and a relevant genetic biodiversity, as shown by restriction enzyme analysis of total DNA. Latent period, burst time and burst size data evidenced that phages were active and virulent. Overall, data highlighted the biodiversity of Lb. helveticus phages isolated from cheese whey starters, which were confirmed to be one of the most common phage contamination source in dairy factories. More research is required to further unravel the ecological role of Lb. helveticus phages and to evaluate their impact on the dairy fermentation processes where whey starter cultures are used.

  10. The interaction between vaginal microbiota, cervical length, and vaginal progesterone treatment for preterm birth risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindinger, Lindsay M; Bennett, Phillip R; Lee, Yun S; Marchesi, Julian R; Smith, Ann; Cacciatore, Stefano; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Teoh, T G; MacIntyre, David A

    2017-01-19

    Preterm birth is the primary cause of infant death worldwide. A short cervix in the second trimester of pregnancy is a risk factor for preterm birth. In specific patient cohorts, vaginal progesterone reduces this risk. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we undertook a prospective study in women at risk of preterm birth (n = 161) to assess (1) the relationship between vaginal microbiota and cervical length in the second trimester and preterm birth risk and (2) the impact of vaginal progesterone on vaginal bacterial communities in women with a short cervix. Lactobacillus iners dominance at 16 weeks of gestation was significantly associated with both a short cervix vaginal dysbiosis. A longitudinal characterization of vaginal microbiota (vaginal progesterone (400 mg/OD, n = 25) versus controls (n = 42). Progesterone did not alter vaginal bacterial community structure nor reduce L. iners-associated preterm birth (vaginal microbiota at 16 weeks of gestation is a risk factor for preterm birth, whereas L. crispatus dominance is protective against preterm birth. Vaginal progesterone does not appear to impact the pregnancy vaginal microbiota. Patients and clinicians who may be concerned about "infection risk" associated with the use of a vaginal pessary during high-risk pregnancy can be reassured.

  11. Pregnancy's stronghold on the vaginal microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina R S Walther-António

    Full Text Available To assess the vaginal microbiome throughout full-term uncomplicated pregnancy.Vaginal swabs were obtained from twelve pregnant women at 8-week intervals throughout their uncomplicated pregnancies. Patients with symptoms of vaginal infection or with recent antibiotic use were excluded. Swabs were obtained from the posterior fornix and cervix at 8-12, 17-21, 27-31, and 36-38 weeks of gestation. The microbial community was profiled using hypervariable tag sequencing of the V3-V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene, producing approximately 8 million reads on the Illumina MiSeq.Samples were dominated by a single genus, Lactobacillus, and exhibited low species diversity. For a majority of the patients (n = 8, the vaginal microbiome was dominated by Lactobacillus crispatus throughout pregnancy. Two patients showed Lactobacillus iners dominance during the course of pregnancy, and two showed a shift between the first and second trimester from L. crispatus to L. iners dominance. In all of the samples only these two species were identified, and were found at an abundance of higher than 1% in this study. Comparative analyses also showed that the vaginal microbiome during pregnancy is characterized by a marked dominance of Lactobacillus species in both Caucasian and African-American subjects. In addition, our Caucasian subject population clustered by trimester and progressed towards a common attractor while African-American women clustered by subject instead and did not progress towards a common attractor.Our analyses indicate normal pregnancy is characterized by a microbiome that has low diversity and high stability. While Lactobacillus species strongly dominate the vaginal environment during pregnancy across the two studied ethnicities, observed differences between the longitudinal dynamics of the analyzed populations may contribute to divergent risk for pregnancy complications. This helps establish a baseline for investigating the role of the microbiome in

  12. Testing of viscous anti-HIV microbicides using Lactobacillus

    OpenAIRE

    Moncla, B.J.; Pryke, K.; Rohan, L. C.; Yang, H.

    2011-01-01

    The development of topical microbicides for intravaginal use to prevent HIV infection requires that the drugs and formulated products be nontoxic to the endogenous vaginal Lactobacillus. In 30 min exposure tests we found dapivirine, tenofovir and UC781 (reverse transcriptase inhibitor anti-HIV drugs) as pure drugs or formulated as film or gel products were not deleterious to Lactobacillus species; however, PSC-RANTES (a synthetic CCR5 antagonist) killed 2 strains of Lactobacillus jensenii. To...

  13. The effects of lactobacillus suppositories in the recovery and recur-rence of bacterial vaginosis: a double-blind randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soror Roozafzay

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: The protective effects of lactobacillus in dealing with anaerobic patho-gens as well as the negative impact of metronidazole on lactobacillus of vaginal flora, use of lactobacillus along with metronidazole especially in patients with recurrent infec-tions is recommended. In other words, using lactobacillus with metronidazole for treatment of bacterial vaginosis is more effective than metronidazole alone.

  14. The Vaginal Microbiota and Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Ann E

    2016-12-01

    The vagina is a key anatomical site in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection (UTI) in women, serving as a potential reservoir for infecting bacteria and a site at which interventions may decrease the risk of UTI. The vaginal microbiota is a dynamic and often critical factor in this pathogenic interplay, because changes in the characteristics of the vaginal microbiota resulting in the loss of normally protective Lactobacillus spp. increase the risk of UTI. These alterations may result from the influence of estrogen deficiency, antimicrobial therapy, contraceptives, or other causes. Interventions to reduce adverse effects on the vaginal microbiota and/or to restore protective lactobacilli may reduce the risks of UTI.

  15. Proinflammatory Cytokines as Regulators of Vaginal Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremleva, E A; Sgibnev, A V

    2016-11-01

    It was shown that IL-1β, IL-8, and IL-6 in concentrations similar to those in the vagina of healthy women stimulated the growth of normal microflora (Lactobacillus spp.) and suppressed the growth and biofilm production by S. aureus and E. coli. On the contrary, these cytokines in higher concentrations typical of vaginal dysbiosis suppressed normal microflora and stimulated the growth of opportunistic microorganisms. TGF-β1 in both doses produced a stimulating effects on study vaginal microsymbionts. It is hypothesized that pro-inflammatory cytokines serve as the molecules of interspecies communication coordinating the interactions of all components of the vaginal symbiotic system.

  16. Thermal and chemical resistance of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus paracasei bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, M L; Quiberoni, A; Reinheimer, J A

    2004-01-01

    The survival of two collection Lactobacillus casei and L. paracasei bacteriophages when subjected to thermal and chemical treatments was investigated. Thermal resistance was evaluated by heating phage suspensions at 63, 72 and 90 degrees C in three different media [Tris-magnesium gelatin (TMG) buffer: 10 mmol l(-1) Tris-Cl, 10 mmol l(-1) MgSO(4) and 0.1% w/v gelatin; Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) broth and reconstituted nonfat dry skim milk (RSM)]. A marked heat sensitivity was evident in both phages, as 15 min at 72 degrees C was enough to completely inactivate (6 log(10) reduction) them. No clear influence was demonstrated by the suspension media. The phages also showed similar resistance to biocides. Peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite (800 ppm) were the most effective ones, destroying the phages within 5 min. Concentrations of 75 and 100% ethanol were not suitable to inactivate phage particles even after 45 min. Isopropanol did not show an effect on phage viability. The data obtained in this work are important to design more effective control procedures in order to inactivate phages in dairy plants and laboratories. This work will contribute to enhance the background knowledge about phages of probiotic bacteria.

  17. A longitudinal analysis of the vaginal microbiota and vaginal immune mediators in women from sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Jespers, V.; Kyongo, J.; Joseph, S.; Hardy, L.; Cools, P.; Crucitti, T.; Mwaura, M.; Ndayisaba, G.; Delany-Moretlwe, S.; Buyze, J.; Vanham, G.; van de Wijgert, JHHM

    2017-01-01

    In cross-sectional studies increased vaginal bacterial diversity has been associated with vaginal inflammation which can be detrimental for health. We describe longitudinal changes at 5 visits over 8 weeks in vaginal microbiota and immune mediators in African women. Women (N = 40) with a normal Nugent score at all visits had a stable lactobacilli dominated microbiota with prevailing Lactobacillus iners. Presence of prostate-specific antigen (proxy for recent sex) and being amenorrhoeic (due t...

  18. Phage transposon mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegrist, M Sloan; Rubin, Eric J

    2009-01-01

    Phage transduction is an attractive method of genetic manipulation in mycobacteria. PhiMycoMarT7 is well suited for transposon mutagenesis as it is temperature sensitive for replication and contains T7 promoters that promote transcription, a highly active transposase gene, and an Escherichia coli oriR6 K origin of replication. Mycobacterial transposon mutant libraries produced by PhiMycoMarT7 transduction are amenable to both forward and reverse genetic studies. In this protocol, we detail the preparation of PhiMycoMarT7, including a description of the phage, reconstitution of the phage, purification of plaques, preparation of phage stock, and titering of phage stock. We then describe the transduction procedure and finally outline the isolation of individual transposon mutants.

  19. Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaginal cancer is a rare type of cancer. It is more common in women 60 and older. You are also more likely to get it if you have had a human ... test can find abnormal cells that may be cancer. Vaginal cancer can often be cured in its ...

  20. Vaginal Fistula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaginal fistula Overview A vaginal fistula is an abnormal opening that connects your vagina to another organ, such as your bladder, colon or rectum. Your ... describe the condition as a hole in your vagina that allows stool or urine to pass through ...

  1. Effects of intrauterine contraception on the vaginal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassis, Christine M; Allsworth, Jenifer E; Wahl, Heather N; Sack, Daniel E; Young, Vincent B; Bell, Jason D

    2017-09-01

    There have been conflicting reports of altered vaginal microbiota and infection susceptibility associated with contraception use. The objectives of this study were to determine if intrauterine contraception altered the vaginal microbiota and to compare the effects of a copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD) and a levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) on the vaginal microbiota. DNA was isolated from the vaginal swab samples of 76 women using Cu-IUD (n=36) or LNG-IUS (n=40) collected prior to insertion of intrauterine contraception (baseline) and at 6 months. A third swab from approximately 12 months following insertion was available for 69 (Cu-IUD, n=33; LNG-IUS, n=36) of these women. The V4 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA-encoding gene was amplified from the vaginal swab DNA and sequenced. The 16S rRNA gene sequences were processed and analyzed using the software package mothur to compare the structure and dynamics of the vaginal bacterial communities. The vaginal microbiota from individuals in this study clustered into 3 major vaginal bacterial community types: one dominated by Lactobacillus iners, one dominated by Lactobacillus crispatus and one community type that was not dominated by a single Lactobacillus species. Changes in the vaginal bacterial community composition were not associated with the use of Cu-IUD or LNG-IUS. Additionally, we did not observe a clear difference in vaginal microbiota stability with Cu-IUD versus LNG-IUS use. Although the vaginal microbiota can be highly dynamic, alterations in the community associated with the use of intrauterine contraception (Cu-IUD or LNG-IUS) were not detected over 12 months. We found no evidence that intrauterine contraception (Cu-IUD or LNG-IUS) altered the vaginal microbiota composition. Therefore, the use of intrauterine contraception is unlikely to shift the composition of the vaginal microbiota such that infection susceptibility is altered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. In Vitro Activity of Tea Tree Oil Vaginal Suppositories against Candida spp. and Probiotic Vaginal Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Vito, Maura; Mattarelli, Paola; Modesto, Monica; Girolamo, Antonietta; Ballardini, Milva; Tamburro, Annunziata; Meledandri, Marcello; Mondello, Francesca

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the in vitro microbicidal activity of vaginal suppositories (VS) containing tea tree oil (TTO-VS) towards Candida spp. and vaginal probiotics. A total of 20 Candida spp. strains, taken from patients with vaginitis and from an established type collection, including reference strains, were analysed by using the CLSI microdilution method. To study the action of VS towards the beneficial vaginal microbiota, the sensitivity of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (DSM 10140) and Lactobacillus spp. (Lactobacillus casei R-215 and Lactobacillus acidophilus R-52) was tested. Both TTO-VS and TTO showed fungicidal activity against all strains of Candida spp. whereas placebo-VS or the Aloe gel used as controls were ineffective. The study of fractional fungicidal concentrations (FFC) showed synergistic interaction with the association between Amphotericin B and TTO (0.25 to 0.08 µg/ml, respectively) against Candida albicans. Instead, the probiotics were only affected by TTO concentration ≥ 4% v/v, while, at concentrations vaginal microbiota. In vivo studies are needed to confirm the efficacy to prevent acute or recurrent vaginal candidiasis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Lactobacillus iners: Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Mariya I; Reid, Gregor; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Lebeer, Sarah

    2017-03-01

    The vaginal microbial community is typically characterized by abundant lactobacilli. Lactobacillus iners, a fairly recently detected species, is frequently present in the vaginal niche. However, the role of this species in vaginal health is unclear, since it can be detected in normal conditions as well as during vaginal dysbiosis, such as bacterial vaginosis, a condition characterized by an abnormal increase in bacterial diversity and lack of typical lactobacilli. Compared to other Lactobacillus species, L. iners has more complex nutritional requirements and a Gram-variable morphology. L. iners has an unusually small genome (ca. 1 Mbp), indicative of a symbiotic or parasitic lifestyle, in contrast to other lactobacilli that show niche flexibility and genomes of up to 3-4 Mbp. The presence of specific L. iners genes, such as those encoding iron-sulfur proteins and unique σ-factors, reflects a high degree of niche specification. The genome of L. iners strains also encodes inerolysin, a pore-forming toxin related to vaginolysin of Gardnerella vaginalis. Possibly, this organism may have clonal variants that in some cases promote a healthy vagina, and in other cases are associated with dysbiosis and disease. Future research should examine this friend or foe relationship with the host. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Associations between vaginal pathogenic community and bacterial vaginosis in Chinese reproductive-age women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongxin Ling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial vaginosis (BV is one of the most common urogenital infections among women of reproductive age that represents shifts in microbiota from Lactobacillus spp. to diverse anaerobes. The aim of our study was to evalute the diagnostic values of Gardnerella, Atopobium, Eggerthella, Megasphaera typeI, Leptotrichia/Sneathia and Prevotella, defined as a vaginal pathogenic community for BV and their associations with vaginal pH and Nugent scores. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We investigated the vaginal pathogenic bacteria and Lactobacillus spp. with species-specific real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR in 50 BV-positive and 50 BV-negative Chinese women of reproductive age. Relative to BV-negative subjects, a siginificant decline in Lactobacillus and an obvious increase in bacteria in the vaginal pathogenic community were observed in BV-postive subjects (P<0.05. With the exception of Megasphaera typeI, other vaginal pathogenic bacteria were highly predictable for BV with a better sensitivity and specificity. The vaginal pathogenic community was positively associated with vaginal pH and Nugent scores, while Lactobacillus spp., such as L. iners and L. crispatus was negatively associated with them (P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Our data implied that the prevalance of vaginal pathogenic bacteria as well as the depletion of Lactobacillus was highly accurate for BV diagnosis. Vaginal microbiota shifts, especially the overgrowth of the vaginal pathogenic community, showed well diagnostic values in predicting BV. Postive correlations between those vaginal pathogenic bacteria and vaginal pH, Nugent score indicated the vaginal pathogenic community rather than a single vaginal microorganism, was participated in the onset of BV directly.

  5. Molecular comparison of the structural proteins encoding gene clusters of two related Lactobacillus delbrueckii bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasala, A; Dupont, L; Baumann, M; Ritzenthaler, P; Alatossava, T

    1993-01-01

    Virulent phage LL-H and temperate phage mv4 are two related bacteriophages of Lactobacillus delbrueckii. The gene clusters encoding structural proteins of these two phages have been sequenced and further analyzed. Six open reading frames (ORF-1 to ORF-6) were detected. Protein sequencing and Western immunoblotting experiments confirmed that ORF-3 (g34) encoded the main capsid protein Gp34. The presence of a putative late promoter in front of the phage LL-H g34 gene was suggested by primer extension experiments. Comparative sequence analysis between phage LL-H and phage mv4 revealed striking similarities in the structure and organization of this gene cluster, suggesting that the genes encoding phage structural proteins belong to a highly conservative module. Images PMID:8497043

  6. Vaginal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or period, is a woman's monthly bleeding.Abnormal vaginal bleeding is different from normal menstrual periods. It ... therapy) Cancer of the cervix, ovaries, uterus or vagina Thyroid problems Bleeding during pregnancy can have several ...

  7. Estrogen Vaginal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... menopause (change of life; the end of monthly menstrual periods). Femring® brand estradiol vaginal ring is also ... applicator. Ask your pharmacist or doctor for a copy of the manufacturer's information for the patient.

  8. Vaginal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker NF. Vulvar and vaginal cancer. In: Hacker NF, Gambone JC, Hobel CJ, eds. Hacker and Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 40. Jhingran ...

  9. Vaginal microbial flora and outcome of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Laura; Di Vico, Augusto; Nucci, Marta; Quagliozzi, Lorena; Spagnuolo, Terryann; Labianca, Antonietta; Bracaglia, Marina; Ianniello, Francesca; Caruso, Alessandro; Paradisi, Giancarlo

    2010-04-01

    The vaginal microflora of a healthy asymptomatic woman consists of a wide variety of anaerobic and aerobic bacterial genera and species dominated by the facultative, microaerophilic, anaerobic genus Lactobacillus. The activity of Lactobacillus is essential to protect women from genital infections and to maintain the natural healthy balance of the vaginal flora. Increasing evidence associates abnormalities in vaginal flora during pregnancy with preterm labor and delivery with potential neonatal sequelae due to prematurity and poor perinatal outcome. Although this phenomenon is relatively common, even in populations of women at low risk for adverse events, the pathogenetic mechanism that leads to complications in pregnancy is still poorly understood. This review summarizes the current knowledge and uncertainties in defining alterations of vaginal flora in non-pregnant adult women and during pregnancy, and, in particular, investigates the issue of bacterial vaginosis and aerobic vaginitis. This could help specialists to identify women amenable to treatment during pregnancy leading to the possibility to reduce the preterm birth rate, preterm premature rupture of membranes, chorioamnionitis, neonatal, puerperal and maternal-fetal infectious diseases. Vaginal ecosystem study with the detection of pathogens is a key instrument in the prevention of preterm delivery, pPROM, chorioamnionitis, neonatal, puerperal and maternal-fetal infections.

  10. Vaginal reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesavoy, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Vaginal reconstruction can be an uncomplicated and straightforward procedure when attention to detail is maintained. The Abbe-McIndoe procedure of lining the neovaginal canal with split-thickness skin grafts has become standard. The use of the inflatable Heyer-Schulte vaginal stent provides comfort to the patient and ease to the surgeon in maintaining approximation of the skin graft. For large vaginal and perineal defects, myocutaneous flaps such as the gracilis island have been extremely useful for correction of radiation-damaged tissue of the perineum or for the reconstruction of large ablative defects. Minimal morbidity and scarring ensue because the donor site can be closed primarily. With all vaginal reconstruction, a compliant patient is a necessity. The patient must wear a vaginal obturator for a minimum of 3 to 6 months postoperatively and is encouraged to use intercourse as an excellent obturator. In general, vaginal reconstruction can be an extremely gratifying procedure for both the functional and emotional well-being of patients

  11. Hysterectomy - vaginal - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; Laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; LAVH - discharge ... you were in the hospital, you had a vaginal hysterectomy. Your surgeon made a cut in your ...

  12. Characterization of the genome of the dairy Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophage {Phi}AQ113.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Miriam; Scaltriti, Erika; Rossetti, Lia; Guffanti, Alessandro; Armiento, Angelarita; Fornasari, Maria Emanuela; Grolli, Stefano; Carminati, Domenico; Brini, Elena; Pavan, Paolo; Felsani, Armando; D'Urzo, Annalisa; Moles, Anna; Claude, Jean-Baptiste; Grandori, Rita; Ramoni, Roberto; Giraffa, Giorgio

    2013-08-01

    The complete genomic sequence of the dairy Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophage ΦAQ113 was determined. Phage ΦAQ113 is a Myoviridae bacteriophage with an isometric capsid and a contractile tail. The final assembled consensus sequence revealed a linear, circularly permuted, double-stranded DNA genome with a size of 36,566 bp and a G+C content of 37%. Fifty-six open reading frames (ORFs) were predicted, and a putative function was assigned to approximately 90% of them. The ΦAQ113 genome shows functionally related genes clustered together in a genome structure composed of modules for DNA replication/regulation, DNA packaging, head and tail morphogenesis, cell lysis, and lysogeny. The identification of genes involved in the establishment of lysogeny indicates that it may have originated as a temperate phage, even if it was isolated from natural cheese whey starters as a virulent phage, because it is able to propagate in a sensitive host strain. Additionally, we discovered that the ΦAQ113 phage genome is closely related to Lactobacillus gasseri phage KC5a and Lactobacillus johnsonii phage Lj771 genomes. The phylogenetic similarities between L. helveticus phage ΦAQ113 and two phages that belong to gut species confirm a possible common ancestral origin and support the increasing consideration of L. helveticus as a health-promoting organism.

  13. Evidence for the presence of restriction/modification systems in Lactobacillus delbrueckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Viviana; Zago, Miriam; Giraffa, Giorgio; Reinheimer, Jorge; Quiberoni, Andrea

    2009-11-01

    The bacteriophages Cb1/204 and Cb1/342 were obtained by induction from the commercial strain Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis Cb1, and propagated on Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis 204 (Lb.l 204) and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 342 (Lb.b 342), respectively. By cross sensitivity, it was possible to detect a delay in the lysis of Lb.l 204 with Cb1/342 phage, while the adsorption rate was high (99.5%). Modified and unmodified phages were isolated using phage Cb1/342 and strain Lb.l 204. The EOP (Efficiency of Plaquing) values for the four phages (Cb1/204, Cb1/342, Cb1/342modified and Cb1/342unmodified) suggested that an R/M system modified the original temperate phage, and the BglII-DNA restriction patterns of these phages might point out the presence of a Type II R/M system. Also, the existence of a Type I R/M system was demonstrated by PCR and nucleotide sequence, being the percentages of alignment homology with Type I R/M systems reported previously higher than 95%. In this study it was possible to demonstrate that the native phage resistant mechanisms and the occurrence of prophages in commercial host strains, contribute strongly to diversify the phage population in a factory environment.

  14. Assisted Vaginal Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Assisted Vaginal Delivery Home For Patients Search FAQs Assisted Vaginal ... Vaginal Delivery FAQ192, February 2016 PDF Format Assisted Vaginal Delivery Labor, Delivery, and Postpartum Care What is ...

  15. Stumbling across the same phage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalatzis, Panagiotis; Rørbo, Nanna Iben; Castillo Bermúdez, Daniel Elías

    2017-01-01

    46,006 and 54,201 bp. All 19 phages showed high genetic similarity, and 13 phages were genetically identical. Apart from sporadically distributed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), genetic diversifications were located in three variable regions (VR1, VR2 and VR3) in six of the phage genomes...... was lysogenized by the temperate phages and a genomic analysis of a collection of 31 virulent V. anguillarum showed that the isolated phages were present as prophages in >50% of the strains covering large geographical distances. Further, phage sequences were widely distributed among CRISPR-Cas arrays of publicly...... available sequenced Vibrios. The observed distribution of these specific temperate Vibriophages across large geographical scales may be explained by efficient dispersal of phages and bacteria in the marine environment combined with a mutualistic interaction between temperate phages and their hosts which...

  16. Phage inactivation by triplet acetone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The exposure of lambda phage to triplet acetone is studied. The triplet acetone is obtained from aerobic oxidation of isobutanal catalysed by peroxidase. A decrease of lambda phage ability to infect Escherichia coli is reported, perhaps, partially due to the possible production of lesions in the phage genome. (M.A.C.) [pt

  17. [Diversity of Lactobacillus in vagina of vulvovaginal candidiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-07

    To investigate the Lactobacillus species in the vaginas of vulvovaginal candidiasis and to assess the prevalence of each Lactobacillus species in vulvovaginal candidiasis. 154 vaginal samples were analyzed, 92 of which were from fertile healthy women, and 62 of which were from women with vulvovaginal candidiasis; and species-specific PCR showed the prevalence of each Lactobacillus species Species-specific PCR was used to investigate the prevalence of each Lactobacillus species in healthy Chinese women and the women with vulvovaginal candidiasis. In women with vulvovaginal candidiasis: L. iners (6.5%), L. cripatus (79.0%), L. gasseri (37.1%), L. jensenii (74.2%), L. acidophilus (16.1%), L. brevis (19.4%), L. plantarum (1.6%), L. johnsonii (51.6%), L. fermentum (8.1%), L. salivarius (9.7%), L. reuter (1.6%), L. paracasei (8.1%), L. delbrueckii (3. 2% ) ; More than two different Lactobacillus species coexisted in 98% of women with vulvovaginal candidiasis, and no anyone species existed in 2% of them; In fertile women: L. iners (82.6%), L. cripatus (70.7%), L. gasseri (67.4%), L. jensenii (40.2%), L. acidophilus (39.1%), L. brevis (23.9%), L. plantarum (5.4%), L. rhamnosus (1.1%), L. paracasei (1.1%), L. reuter (1.1%) i, L. johnsonii (3.3%), L. fermentum (2.2%), L. salivarius (2.2%); More than two different Lactobacillus species coexisted in 97% of fertile women, and only one species existed in 3% of fertile women. Species of lactobacillus in women with vulvovaginal candidiasis did not significantly reduced compared with healthy women. Lactobacillus inert may be a marker of the change of vaginal microenvironment; Lactobacillus crispatus is a dominant lactobacillus in the vaginal of fertile healthy women, pregnant women and women with vulvovaginal candidiasis.

  18. Diagnosis of aerobic vaginitis by quantitative real-time PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Rumyantseva, T. A.; Bellen, G.; Savochkina, Y. A.; Guschin, A. E.; Donders, G.G.G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Purpose To evaluate a real-time PCR-based technique to quantify bacteria associated with aerobic vaginitis (AV) as a potential test. Methods Vaginal samples from 100 women were tested by wet-mount microscopy, gram stain and quantitative real-time PCR targeting Enterobacteriacea, Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Enterococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, S. aureus; Lactobacillus spp. AV diagnosis obtained by wet-mount microscopy was used as reference. Resu...

  19. Lactobacilli require physical contact to reduce staphylococcal TSST-1 secretion and vaginal epithelial inflammatory response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Younes, Jessica A.; Reid, Gregor; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilms can be found on vaginal epithelia, secreting toxins and causing inflammation. The co-vaginal species Lactobacillus can alter staphylococcal-induced epithelial secretion of inflammatory cytokines and quench staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 secretion. It is

  20. 16S rRNA gene sequence and phylogenetic tree of lactobacillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... processed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Phylogenetic tree was constructed with the sequences of the V2-V3 region of 16S rRNA gene. Results show two distinct divisions among the Lactobacillus species. The study presents a new understanding of the nature of the Lactobacillus vaginal microbiota ...

  1. Prevotella as a Hub for Vaginal Microbiota under the Influence of Host Genetics and Their Association with Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jiyeon; You, Hyun Ju; Yu, Junsun; Sung, Joohon; Ko, GwangPyo

    2017-01-11

    While the vaginal ecosystem is maintained through mutualistic relationships between the host and the vaginal bacteria, the effect of host genetics on the vaginal microbiota has not been well characterized. We examined the heritability of vaginal microbiota and its association with obesity in 542 Korean females, including 222 monozygotic and 56 dizygotic twins. The vaginal microbiota significantly varied depending on host menopausal status and bacterial vaginosis. Lactobacillus and Prevotella, whose relative abundances are strongly associated with bacterial vaginosis, were the most heritable bacteria among the beneficial and potentially pathogenic vaginal microbiota, respectively. Candidate gene analysis revealed an association between genetic variants of interleukin-5 and the abundance of Prevotella sp. Furthermore, host obesity significantly increased the diversity of the vaginal microbiota in association with Prevotella. Our results provide insight into the effect of host genetics on the vaginal microbiota and their association with both vaginal and non-vaginal health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of a One Year Reusable Contraceptive Vaginal Ring on Vaginal Microflora and the Risk of Vaginal Infection: An Open-Label Prospective Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yongmei; Merkatz, Ruth B; Hillier, Sharon L; Roberts, Kevin; Blithe, Diana L; Sitruk-Ware, Régine; Creinin, Mitchell D

    2015-01-01

    A contraceptive vaginal ring (CVR) containing Nestorone® (NES) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) that is reusable for 1- year (13 cycles) is under development. This study assessed effects of this investigational CVR on the incidence of vaginal infections and change in vaginal microflora. There were 120 women enrolled into a NES/EE CVR Phase III trial and a microbiology sub-study for up to 1- year of cyclic product use. Gynecological examinations were conducted at baseline, the first week of cycle 6 and last week of cycle 13 (or during early discontinuation visits). Vaginal swabs were obtained for wet mount microscopy, Gram stain and culture. The CVR was removed from the vagina at the last study visit and cultured. Semi-quantitative cultures for Lactobacillus, Gardnerella vaginalis, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, anaerobic gram negative rods (GNRs), Candida albicans and other yeasts were performed on vaginal and CVR samples. Vaginal infections were documented throughout the study. Over 1- year of use, 3.3% of subjects were clinically diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis, 15.0% with vulvovaginal candidiasis, and 0.8% with trichomoniasis. The detection rate of these three infections did not change significantly from baseline to either Cycle 6 or 13. Nugent scores remained stable. H2O2-positive Lactobacillus dominated vaginal flora with a non-significant prevalence increase from 76.7% at baseline to 82.7% at cycle 6 and 90.2% at cycle 13, and a median concentration of 107 colony forming units (cfu) per gram. Although anaerobic GNRs prevalence increased significantly, the median concentration decreased slightly (104 to 103cfu per gram). There were no significant changes in frequency or concentrations of other pathogens. High levels of agreement between vaginal and ring surface microbiota were observed. Sustained use of the NES/EE CVR did not increase the risk of vaginal infection and was not disruptive to the vaginal ecosystem. Clinical

  3. Synergy as a rationale for phage therapy using phage cocktails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerer, Matthew; Molineux, Ian J; Bull, James J

    2014-01-01

    Where phages are used to treat bacterial contaminations and infections, multiple phages are typically applied at once as a cocktail. When two or more phages in the cocktail attack the same bacterium, the combination may produce better killing than any single phage (synergy) or the combination may be worse than the best single phage (interference). Synergy is of obvious utility, especially if it can be predicted a priori, but it remains poorly documented with few examples known. This study addresses synergy in which one phage improves adsorption by a second phage. It first presents evidence of synergy from an experimental system of two phages and a mucoid E. coli host. The synergy likely stems from a tailspike enzyme produced by one of the phages. We then offer mathematical models and simulations to understand the dynamics of synergy and the enhanced magnitude of bacterial control possible. The models and observations complement each other and suggest that synergy may be of widespread utility and may be predictable from easily observed phenotypes.

  4. The vaginal microbiome: rethinking health and diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bing; Forney, Larry J.; Ravel, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Vaginal microbiota form a mutually beneficial relationship with their host and have major impact on health and disease. In recent years our understanding of vaginal bacterial community composition and structure has significantly broadened as a result of investigators using cultivation-independent methods based on the analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences. In asymptomatic, otherwise healthy women, several kinds of vaginal microbiota exist, the majority often dominated by species of Lactobacillus, while others comprise a diverse array of anaerobic microorganisms. Bacterial vaginosis is the most common vaginal conditions and is vaguely characterized as the disruption of the equilibrium of the ‘normal’ vaginal microbiots. A better understanding of ‘normal’ and ‘healthy’ vaginal ecosystems that is based on its ‘true’ function and not simply on its composition would help better define health and further improve disease diagnostics as well as the development of more personalized regimens to promote health and treat diseases. PMID:22746335

  5. Vaginal sponge and spermicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... counter; Contraceptives - over the counter; Family planning - vaginal sponge; Contraception - vaginal sponge ... Spermicides and vaginal sponges do not work as well at preventing pregnancy as some other forms of birth control. However, using a spermicide ...

  6. Vaginal bleeding in pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregnancy - vaginal bleeding; Maternal blood loss - vaginal ... Up to 1 in 4 women have vaginal bleeding at some time during their pregnancy. Bleeding is more common in the first 3 months (first trimester), especially with twins.

  7. Vaginal yeast infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts ...

  8. Role of Lactobacillus in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang X

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Xi Yang,1 Miao Da,2 Wenyuan Zhang,3 Quan Qi,4 Chun Zhang,5 Shuwen Han4 1Department of Intervention and Radiotherapy, Huzhou Central Hospital, 2Medical College of Nursing, Huzhou University, 3Department of Gynaecology, 4Department of Medical Oncology, 5Department of Infectious Diseases, Huzhou Central Hospital, Huzhou, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Cervical cancer is a common malignant cancer among women worldwide. Changes in the vaginal microecological environment lead to multiple gynecological diseases, including cervical cancer. Recent research has shown that Lactobacillus may play an important role in the occurrence and development of cervical cancer. This review explores the role of Lactobacillus in cervical cancer. A total of 29 articles were included after identification and screening. The pertinent literature on Lactobacillus in cervical cancer from two perspectives, including clinical studies and experimental studies, was analyzed. An association network for the mechanism by which Lactobacillus induces cervical cancer was constructed. In addition, we provide direction and insight for further research on the role of Lactobacillus in cervical cancer. Keywords: CIN, cervical cancer, Lactobacillus, microorganism

  9. Directed shift of vaginal microbiota induced by vaginal application of sucrose gel in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kai-tao; Zheng, Jin-xin; Yu, Zhi-jian; Chen, Zhong; Cheng, Hang; Pan, Wei-guang; Yang, Wei-zhi; Wang, Hong-yan; Deng, Qi-wen; Zeng, Zhong-ming

    2015-04-01

    Sucrose gel was used to treat bacterial vaginosis in a phase III clinical trial. However, the changes of vaginal flora after treatment were only examined by Nugent score in that clinical trial, While the vaginal microbiota of rhesus macaques is characterized by anaerobic, Gram-negative bacteria, few lactobacilli, and pH levels above 4.6, similar to the microbiota of patients with bacterial vaginosis. This study is aimed to investigate the change of the vaginal microbiota of rehsus macaques after topical use of sucrose gel to reveal more precisely the bacterial population shift after the topical application of sucrose gel. Sixteen rhesus macaques were treated with 0.5 g sucrose gel vaginally and three with 0.5 g of placebo gel. Vaginal swabs were collected daily following treatment. Vaginal pH levels and Nugent scores were recorded. The composition of the vaginal micotbiota was tested by V3∼V4 16S rDNA metagenomic sequencing. Dynamic changes in the Lactobacillus genus were analyzed by qPCR. The vaginal microbiota of rhesus macaques are dominated by anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria, with few lactobacilli and high pH levels above 4.6. After five days' treatment with topical sucrose gel, the component percentage of Lactobacillus in vaginal microbiota increased from 1.31% to 81.59%, while the component percentage of Porphyromonas decreased from 18.60% to 0.43%, Sneathia decreased from 15.09% to 0.89%, Mobiluncus decreased from 8.23% to 0.12%, etc.. The average vaginal pH values of 16 rhesus macaques of the sucrose gel group decreased from 5.4 to 3.89. There were no significant changes in microbiota and vaginal pH observed in the placebo group. Rhesus macaques can be used as animal models of bacterial vaginosis to develop drugs and test treatment efficacy. Furthermore, the topical application of sucrose gel induced the shifting of vaginal flora of rhesus macaques from a BV kind of flora to a lactobacilli-dominating flora. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by

  10. The vaginal microbiota, host defence and reproductive physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The interaction between the human host and the vaginal microbiota is highly dynamic. Major changes in the vaginal physiology and microbiota over a woman's lifetime are largely shaped by transitional periods such as puberty, menopause and pregnancy, while daily fluctuations in microbial composition observed through culture‐independent studies are more likely to be the results of daily life activities and behaviours. The vaginal microbiota of reproductive‐aged women is largely made up of at least five different community state types. Four of these community state types are dominated by lactic‐acid producing Lactobacillus spp. while the fifth is commonly composed of anaerobes and strict anaerobes and is sometimes associated with vaginal symptoms. The production of lactic acid has been associated with contributing to the overall health of the vagina due to its direct and indirect effects on pathogens and host defence. Some species associated with non‐Lactobacillus vaginal microbiota may trigger immune responses as well as degrade the host mucosa, processes that ultimately increase susceptibility to infections and contribute to negative reproductive outcomes such as infertility and preterm birth. Further studies are needed to better understand the functional underpinnings of how the vaginal microbiota affect host physiology but also how host physiology affects the vaginal microbiota. Understanding this fine‐tuned interaction is key to maintaining women's reproductive health. PMID:27373840

  11. The vaginal microbiota, host defence and reproductive physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steven B; Ravel, Jacques

    2017-01-15

    The interaction between the human host and the vaginal microbiota is highly dynamic. Major changes in the vaginal physiology and microbiota over a woman's lifetime are largely shaped by transitional periods such as puberty, menopause and pregnancy, while daily fluctuations in microbial composition observed through culture-independent studies are more likely to be the results of daily life activities and behaviours. The vaginal microbiota of reproductive-aged women is largely made up of at least five different community state types. Four of these community state types are dominated by lactic-acid producing Lactobacillus spp. while the fifth is commonly composed of anaerobes and strict anaerobes and is sometimes associated with vaginal symptoms. The production of lactic acid has been associated with contributing to the overall health of the vagina due to its direct and indirect effects on pathogens and host defence. Some species associated with non-Lactobacillus vaginal microbiota may trigger immune responses as well as degrade the host mucosa, processes that ultimately increase susceptibility to infections and contribute to negative reproductive outcomes such as infertility and preterm birth. Further studies are needed to better understand the functional underpinnings of how the vaginal microbiota affect host physiology but also how host physiology affects the vaginal microbiota. Understanding this fine-tuned interaction is key to maintaining women's reproductive health. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  12. MRI of vaginal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, C.; Balogun, M.; Ganesan, R.; Olliff, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the assessment of suspected vaginal pathology. This pictorial review demonstrates the MRI features and some of the histopathological findings of a variety of vaginal conditions. These may be congenital (total vaginal agenesis, partial vaginal agenesis, longitudinal vaginal septum, transverse vaginal septum), benign (Bartholin's cyst, diffuse vaginal inflammation, invasive endometriosis, ureterovaginal fistula, post-surgical appearances with the formation of a neovagina and adhesions) or malignant, usually due to extension or recurrence from another pelvic malignancy. In this paper, examples of the above are described and illustrated together with examples of the much rarer primary vaginal malignancies

  13. MRI of vaginal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, C. [Department of Radiology, Birmingham Women' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: carolina.lopez@bwhct.nhs.uk; Balogun, M. [Department of Radiology, Birmingham Women' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Ganesan, R. [Department of Histopathology, Birmingham Women' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Olliff, J.F. [University Hospital Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the assessment of suspected vaginal pathology. This pictorial review demonstrates the MRI features and some of the histopathological findings of a variety of vaginal conditions. These may be congenital (total vaginal agenesis, partial vaginal agenesis, longitudinal vaginal septum, transverse vaginal septum), benign (Bartholin's cyst, diffuse vaginal inflammation, invasive endometriosis, ureterovaginal fistula, post-surgical appearances with the formation of a neovagina and adhesions) or malignant, usually due to extension or recurrence from another pelvic malignancy. In this paper, examples of the above are described and illustrated together with examples of the much rarer primary vaginal malignancies.

  14. Efficacy and safety of a vaginal medicinal product containing three strains of probiotic bacteria: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomusiak, Anna; Strus, Magdalena; Heczko, Piotr B; Adamski, Paweł; Stefański, Grzegorz; Mikołajczyk-Cichońska, Aleksandra; Suda-Szczurek, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate whether vaginal administration of probiotic Lactobacillus results in their colonization and persistence in the vagina and whether Lactobacillus colonization promotes normalization and maintenance of pH and Nugent score. The study was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial. Altogether, 376 women were assessed for eligibility, and signed informed consent. One hundred and sixty eligible women with abnormal, also called intermediate, vaginal microflora, as indicated by a Nugent score of 4-6 and pH >4.5 and zero or low Lactobacillus count, were randomized. Each participant was examined four times during the study. Women were randomly allocated to receive either the probiotic preparation inVag(®), or a placebo (one capsule for seven consecutive days vaginally). The product inVag includes the probiotic strains Lactobacillus fermentum 57A, Lactobacillus plantarum 57B, and Lactobacillus gasseri 57C. We took vaginal swabs during visits I, III, and IV to determine the presence and abundance of bacteria from the Lactobacillus genus, measure the pH, and estimate the Nugent score. Drug safety evaluation was based on analysis of the types and occurrence of adverse events. Administration of inVag contributed to a significant decrease (between visits) in both vaginal pH (Pvaginal microbiota, as demonstrated by predominance of the Lactobacillus bacteria in vaginal microbiota.

  15. Expert Opinion on Three Phage Therapy Related Topics: Bacterial Phage Resistance, Phage Training and Prophages in Bacterial Production Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Rohde

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Phage therapy is increasingly put forward as a “new” potential tool in the fight against antibiotic resistant infections. During the “Centennial Celebration of Bacteriophage Research” conference in Tbilisi, Georgia on 26–29 June 2017, an international group of phage researchers committed to elaborate an expert opinion on three contentious phage therapy related issues that are hampering clinical progress in the field of phage therapy. This paper explores and discusses bacterial phage resistance, phage training and the presence of prophages in bacterial production strains while reviewing relevant research findings and experiences. Our purpose is to inform phage therapy stakeholders such as policy makers, officials of the competent authorities for medicines, phage researchers and phage producers, and members of the pharmaceutical industry. This brief also points out potential avenues for future phage therapy research and development as it specifically addresses those overarching questions that currently call for attention whenever phages go into purification processes for application.

  16. [Vaginal disbacteriosis--social and sexual risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovachev, S

    2013-01-01

    The vaginal microbe equilibrium could be impaired by different agents. Many of the risk factors can change the preventive mechanisms of the vagina and can lead to inflammation and disease. We even do not suppose about the role of most of them in impairing of vaginal microbe equilibrium. The exact understanding of those risk factors and mechanisms by which they disturb the vaginal microbe balance could reduce female morbidity of vaginal disbacteriosis and vaginal inflammations. The aim of this literature synopsis is to review some of the most frequent risk factors for vaginal disbacteriosis and about how they change vaginal micro-flora with dominant lactobacillus within it. The most informative and detailed articles on the theme which were found in the resent literature as well as in Medline for the period between 1990 and 2012 were selected. The risk agents for vaginal disbacteriosis are: endogenetic, social, sexual, infectious and iatrogenic. The social and sexual factors are the most frequent in our daily round. The intensity and the kind of sexual life, smoking, homosexual connections, vaginal douching and contraception methods are included in them. All these factors depend on us. Thus we hope that through their popularization and discussion will help to prevent the females' health.

  17. Vaginal Cancer Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Vaginal Cancer Vaginal Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Vaginal Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Vaginal Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and ...

  18. Group B Streptococcus and the Vaginal Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Geoffrey H; Randis, Tara M; Desai, Purnahamsi V; Sapra, Katherine J; Ma, Bing; Gajer, Pawel; Humphrys, Michael S; Ravel, Jacques; Gelber, Shari E; Ratner, Adam J

    2017-09-15

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus [GBS]) is an important neonatal pathogen and emerging cause of disease in adults. The major risk factor for neonatal disease is maternal vaginal colonization. However, little is known about the relationship between GBS and vaginal microbiota. Vaginal lavage samples from nonpregnant women were tested for GBS, and amplicon-based sequencing targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA V3-V4 region was performed. Four hundred twenty-eight of 432 samples met the high-quality read threshold. There was no relationship between GBS carriage and demographic characteristics, α-diversity, or overall vaginal microbiota community state type (CST). Within the non-Lactobacillus-dominant CST IV, GBS positive status was significantly more prevalent in CST IV-A than CST IV-B. Significant clustering by GBS status was noted on principal coordinates analysis, and 18 individual taxa were found to be significantly associated with GBS carriage by linear discriminant analysis. After adjusting for race/ethnicity, 4 taxa were positively associated with GBS, and 6 were negatively associated. Vaginal microbiota CST and α-diversity are not related to GBS status. However, specific microbial taxa are associated with colonization of this important human pathogen, highlighting a potential role for the microbiota in promotion or inhibition of GBS colonization. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Testing of viscous anti-HIV microbicides using Lactobacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncla, B J; Pryke, K; Rohan, L C; Yang, H

    2012-02-01

    The development of topical microbicides for intravaginal use to prevent HIV infection requires that the drugs and formulated products be nontoxic to the endogenous vaginal Lactobacillus. In 30min exposure tests we found dapivirine, tenofovir and UC781 (reverse transcriptase inhibitor anti-HIV drugs) as pure drugs or formulated as film or gel products were not deleterious to Lactobacillus species; however, PSC-RANTES (a synthetic CCR5 antagonist) killed 2 strains of Lactobacillus jensenii. To demonstrate the toxicity of formulated products a new assay was developed for use with viscous and non-viscous samples that we have termed the Lactobacillus toxicity test. We found that the vortex mixing of vaginal Lactobacillus species can lead to reductions in bacterial viability. Lactobacillus can survive briefly, about 2s, but viability declines with increased vortex mixing. The addition of heat inactivated serum or bovine serum albumin, but not glycerol, prevented the decrease in bacterial viability. Bacillus atrophaeus spores also demonstrated loss of viability upon extended mixing. We observed that many of the excipients used in film formulation and the films themselves also afford protection from the killing during vortex mixing. This method is of relevance for toxicity for cidal activities of viscous products. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The prophage sequences of Lactobacillus plantarum strain WCFS1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, Marco; Canchaya, Carlos; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Vos, Willem M. de; Siezen, Roland J.; Bruessow, Harald

    2003-01-01

    The Lactobacillus plantarum commensal WCFS1 contains four prophage elements in its genome. Lp1 and Lp2 are two about 40-kb-long uninducible prophages that share closely related DNA packaging, head and tail genes defining a second lineage of pac-site Siphoviridae in L. plantarum, distinct from L. plantarum phage phig1e, but related to Bacillus phage SPP1 and Lactococcus phage TP901-1. Northern analysis revealed transcribed prophage genes exclusively near both attachment sites. Comparative genomics identified candidate lysogenic conversion genes (LCG) downstream of the lysis cassette and within the lysogeny module. Notable are genes with sequence similarities to putative LCG from Streptococcus pyogenes prophages and to a Bacillus plasmid. Both prophages harbored tRNA genes. R-Lp3 and R-Lp4 represent short prophage remnants; R-Lp3 abuts Lp2 and displays sequence links to cos-site Siphoviridae

  1. A novel chimeric prophage vB_LdeS-phiJB from commercial Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tingting; Zhang, Chenchen; Xin, Yongping; Xin, Min; Kong, Jian

    2016-05-01

    Prophage vB_LdeS-phiJB (phiJB) was induced by mitomycin C and UV radiation from the Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus SDMCC050201 isolated from a Chinese yoghurt sample. It has an isometric head and a non-contractile tail with 36,969 bp linear double-stranded DNA genome, which is classified into the group a of Lb. delbrueckii phages. The genome of phiJB is highly modular with functionally related genes clustered together. Unexpectedly, there is no similarity of its DNA replication module to any phages that have been reported, while it consists of open-reading frames homologous to the proteins of Lactobacillus strains. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that its late gene clusters, integration/lysogeny modules and DNA replication module derived from different evolutionary ancestors and integrated into a chimera. Our results revealed a novel chimeric phage of commercial Lb. delbrueckii and will broaden the knowledge of phage diversity in the dairy industry.

  2. Targeting mammalian organelles with internalizing phage (iPhage) libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Roberto; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Guzman-Rojas, Liliana; Salmeron, Carolina C.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-01-01

    Techniques largely used for protein interaction studies and discovery of intracellular receptors, such as affinity capture complex purification and yeast two-hybrid, may produce inaccurate datasets due to protein insolubility, transient or weak protein interactions, or irrelevant intracellular context. A versatile tool to overcome these limitations as well as to potentially create vaccines and engineer peptides and antibodies as targeted diagnostic and therapeutic agents, is the phage display technique. We have recently developed a new technology for screening internalizing phage (iPhage) vectors and libraries utilizing a ligand/receptor-independent mechanism to penetrate eukaryotic cells. iPhage particles provide a unique discovery platform for combinatorial intracellular targeting of organelle ligands along with their corresponding receptors and to fingerprint functional protein domains in living cells. Here we explain the design, cloning, construction, and production of iPhage-based vectors and libraries, along with basic ligand-receptor identification and validation methodologies for organelle receptors. An iPhage library screening can be performed in ~8 weeks. PMID:24030441

  3. Effect of lactobacillus in preventing post-antibiotic vulvovaginal candidiasis: a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirotta, Marie; Gunn, Jane; Chondros, Patty; Grover, Sonia; O'Malley, Paula; Hurley, Susan; Garland, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    Objective To test whether oral or vaginal lactobacillus can prevent vulvovaginitis after antibiotic treatment. Design Randomised, placebo controlled, double blind, factorial 2×2 trial. Setting Fifty general practices and 16 pharmacies in Melbourne, Australia. Participants Non-pregnant women aged 18-50 years who required a short course of oral antibiotics for a non-gynaecological infection: 278 were enrolled in the study, and results were available for 235. Interventions Lactobacillus preparations taken orally or vaginally, or both, from enrolment until four days after completion of their antibiotic course. Main outcome measures Participants' reports of symptoms of post-antibiotic vulvovaginitis, with microbiological evidence of candidiasis provided by a self obtained vaginal swab. Results Overall, 55/235 (23% (95% confidence interval 18% to 29%)) women developed post-antibiotic vulvovaginitis. Compared with placebo, the odds ratio for developing post-antibiotic vulvovaginitis with oral lactobacillus was 1.06 (95% confidence interval 0.58 to 1.94) and with vaginal lactobacillus 1.38 (0.75 to 2.54). Compliance with antibiotics and interventions was high. The trial was terminated after the second interim analysis because of lack of effect of the interventions. Given the data at this time, the chances of detecting a significant reduction in vulvovaginitis with oral or vaginal lactobacillus treatment were less than 0.032 and 0.0006 respectively if the trial proceeded to full enrolment. Conclusions The use of oral or vaginal forms of lactobacillus to prevent post-antibiotic vulvovaginitis is not supported by these results. Further research on this subject is unlikely to be fruitful, unless new understandings about the pathogenesis of post-antibiotic vulvovaginitis indicate a possible role for lactobacillus. PMID:15333452

  4. Abnormal vaginal microbiota may be associated with poor reproductive outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, T.

    2016-01-01

    primers were specific for four common Lactobacillus spp., G. vaginalis and A. vaginae. Results: The prevalence of BV defined by Nugent score was 21% (27/130), whereas the prevalence of an abnormal vaginal microbiota was 28% (36/130) defined by qPCR with high concentrations of G. vaginalis and/or A....... vaginae. The qPCR diagnostic approach had a sensitivity and specificity of 93% and 93% for Nugent-defined BV. Eighty-four patients completed IVF treatment. The overall clinical pregnancy rate was 35% (29/84). Interestingly, only 9% (2/22) with qPCR defined abnormal vaginal microbiota obtained a clinical...... pregnancy (P = 0.004). Wider implications: If a negative correlation between abnormal vaginal microbiota and the clinical pregnancy rate is corroborated, patients could be screened and subsequently treated for abnormal vaginal microbiota prior to fertility treatment....

  5. Probiotics in the Prevention and Treatment of Postmenopausal Vaginal Infections: Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Mo; Park, Yoo Jin

    2017-12-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) and complicated vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) are frequently occurring vaginal infections in postmenopausal women, caused by an imbalance in vaginal microflora. Postmenopausal women suffer from decreased ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone. A normal, healthy vaginal microflora mainly comprises Lactobacillus species (spp.), which act beneficially as a bacterial barrier in the vagina, interfering with uropathogens. During premenopausal period, estrogen promotes vaginal colonization by lactobacilli that metabolizing glycogen and producing lactic acid, and maintains intravaginal health by lowering the intravaginal pH level. A lower vaginal pH inhibits uropathogen growth, preventing vaginal infections. Decreased estrogen secretion in postmenopausal women depletes lactobacilli and increases intravaginal pH, resulting in increased vaginal colonization by harmful microorganisms (e.g., Enterobacter , Escherichia coli , Candida , and Gardnerella ). Probiotics positively effects on vaginal microflora composition by promoting the proliferation of beneficial microorganisms, alters the intravaginal microbiota composition, prevents vaginal infections in postmenopausal. Probiotics also reduce the symptoms of vaginal infections (e.g., vaginal discharge, odor, etc.), and are thus helpful for the treatment and prevention of BV and VVC. In this review article, we provide information on the intravaginal mechanism of postmenopausal vaginal infections, and describes the effectiveness of probiotics in the treatment and prevention of BV and VVC.

  6. Probiotics in the Prevention and Treatment of Postmenopausal Vaginal Infections: Review Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoo Jin

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) and complicated vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) are frequently occurring vaginal infections in postmenopausal women, caused by an imbalance in vaginal microflora. Postmenopausal women suffer from decreased ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone. A normal, healthy vaginal microflora mainly comprises Lactobacillus species (spp.), which act beneficially as a bacterial barrier in the vagina, interfering with uropathogens. During premenopausal period, estrogen promotes vaginal colonization by lactobacilli that metabolizing glycogen and producing lactic acid, and maintains intravaginal health by lowering the intravaginal pH level. A lower vaginal pH inhibits uropathogen growth, preventing vaginal infections. Decreased estrogen secretion in postmenopausal women depletes lactobacilli and increases intravaginal pH, resulting in increased vaginal colonization by harmful microorganisms (e.g., Enterobacter, Escherichia coli, Candida, and Gardnerella). Probiotics positively effects on vaginal microflora composition by promoting the proliferation of beneficial microorganisms, alters the intravaginal microbiota composition, prevents vaginal infections in postmenopausal. Probiotics also reduce the symptoms of vaginal infections (e.g., vaginal discharge, odor, etc.), and are thus helpful for the treatment and prevention of BV and VVC. In this review article, we provide information on the intravaginal mechanism of postmenopausal vaginal infections, and describes the effectiveness of probiotics in the treatment and prevention of BV and VVC. PMID:29354612

  7. Diverse vaginal microbiomes in reproductive-age women with vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mu-Biao; Xu, Su-Rong; He, Yan; Deng, Guan-Hua; Sheng, Hua-Fang; Huang, Xue-Mei; Ouyang, Cai-Yan; Zhou, Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is one of the most prevalent vaginal infectious diseases, and there are controversial reports regarding the diversity of the associated vaginal microbiota. We determined the vaginal microbial community in patients with VVC, bacterial vaginosis (BV), and mixed infection of VVC and BV using Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA tags. Our results revealed for the first time the highly variable patterns of the vaginal microbiome from VVC patients. In general, the alpha-diversity results of species richness and evenness showed the following order: normal control vaginal microbiota of VVC is complex. The mixed BV and VVC infection group showed a unique pattern, with a relatively higher abundance of Lactobacillus than the BV group and higher abundance of Prevotella, Gardnerella, and Atopobium than the normal control. In contrast, the VVC-only group could not be described by any single profile, ranging from a community structure similar to the normal control (predominated with Lactobacillus) to BV-like community structures (abundant with Gardnerella and Atopobium). Treatment of VVC resulted in inconsistent changes of the vaginal microbiota, with four BV/VVC samples recovering to a higher Lactobacillus level, whereas many VVC-only patients did not. These results will be useful for future studies on the role of vaginal microbiota in VVC and related infectious diseases.

  8. Vaginal dysbiosis increases risk of preterm fetal membrane rupture, neonatal sepsis and is exacerbated by erythromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard G; Marchesi, Julian R; Lee, Yun S; Smith, Ann; Lehne, Benjamin; Kindinger, Lindsay M; Terzidou, Vasso; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Bennett, Phillip R; MacIntyre, David A

    2018-01-24

    Preterm prelabour rupture of the fetal membranes (PPROM) precedes 30% of preterm births and is a risk factor for early onset neonatal sepsis. As PPROM is strongly associated with ascending vaginal infection, prophylactic antibiotics are widely used. The evolution of vaginal microbiota compositions associated with PPROM and the impact of antibiotics on bacterial compositions are unknown. We prospectively assessed vaginal microbiota prior to and following PPROM using MiSeq-based sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and examined the impact of erythromycin prophylaxis on bacterial load and community structures. In contrast to pregnancies delivering at term, vaginal dysbiosis characterised by Lactobacillus spp. depletion was present prior to the rupture of fetal membranes in approximately a third of cases (0% vs. 27%, P = 0.026) and persisted following membrane rupture (31%, P = 0.005). Vaginal dysbiosis was exacerbated by erythromycin treatment (47%, P = 0.00009) particularly in women initially colonised by Lactobacillus spp. Lactobacillus depletion and increased relative abundance of Sneathia spp. were associated with subsequent funisitis and early onset neonatal sepsis. Our data show that vaginal microbiota composition is a risk factor for subsequent PPROM and is associated with adverse short-term maternal and neonatal outcomes. This highlights vaginal microbiota as a potentially modifiable antenatal risk factor for PPROM and suggests that routine use of erythromycin for PPROM be re-examined.

  9. Diversity of cultivable vaginal microbiota in asymptomatic women of reproductive age in Mumbai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinku Pramanick

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbes in the vaginal microbiota form a mutual relation with its constituent members and its host. In recent years our acquaintance with vaginal microbiota has widened, however, insufficient knowledge is available in Indian scenario. In the present study, the diversity of cultivable vaginal microbiota in asymptomatic women of the reproductive age group from Mumbai was investigated using multiplex PCR and species specific PCR, validated by 16sRNA Sanger sequencing. Vaginal samples taken from 199 women were classified according to Nugent score as normal (n=147, intermediate (n=23 and bacterial vaginosis (n=29 indicating 14.5% asymptomatic BV. Cultivable Lactobacilli were recovered from 97.9% (195 participants. The abundance of vaginal Lactobacilli was reduced in women with BV. Of 147 women, 110 were considered healthy, as 37 women colonized vaginal Candida. The most predominant vaginal Lactobacillus spp. in healthy women were L. iners (70.9%, L. crispatus (26.4%, L. reuteri (20.9%, L. gasseri (18.2%, and L. jensenii (15.5%. Our data demonstrated a profound shift in the prevalent vaginal Lactobacillus spp. when comparing women with healthy and diseased conditions. In women with normal flora colonizing Candida, L. rhamnosus (24.3% was one of the prevalent Lactobacilli. L. crispatus was identified as a specific species present only in the healthy state. L. iners was fund to be the most frequent vaginal Lactobacillus irrespective of the vaginal health. Majority of the women harbored heterogeneous population of Lactobacillus indicating their cumulative effect in maintaining the vaginal niche. Among the single species population, distinct diversity of Lactobacilli were found in women with Normal, Intermediate and BV microflora. Though most frequently identified, L. iners, significantly coexisted with other Lactobacillus spp., suggesting its minimal protective role alone in the vaginal niche. About one third of study population colonized Candida, most

  10. Phages in the Human Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Ferran; Muniesa, Maite

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, have re-emerged as powerful regulators of bacterial populations in natural ecosystems. Phages invade the human body, just as they do other natural environments, to such an extent that they are the most numerous group in the human virome. This was only revealed in recent metagenomic studies, despite the fact that the presence of phages in the human body was reported decades ago. The influence of the presence of phages in humans has yet to be evaluated; but as in marine environments, a clear role in the regulation of bacterial populations could be envisaged, that might have an impact on human health. Moreover, phages are excellent vehicles of genetic transfer, and they contribute to the evolution of bacterial cells in the human body by spreading and acquiring DNA horizontally. The abundance of phages in the human body does not pass unnoticed and the immune system reacts to them, although it is not clear to what extent. Finally, the presence of phages in human samples, which most of the time is not considered, can influence and bias microbiological and molecular results; and, in view of the evidences, some studies suggest that more attention needs to be paid to their interference.

  11. Vaginal bleeding between periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003156.htm Vaginal bleeding between periods To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. This article discusses vaginal bleeding that occurs between a woman's monthly menstrual ...

  12. Vaginal and Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAGINAL & VULVAR CANCER Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer There are five main types of cancer that affect a woman’s reproductive organs: cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal, and vulvar. As a group, they are referred ...

  13. Management of aerobic vaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempera, Gianna; Furneri, Pio Maria

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic vaginitis is a new nonclassifiable pathology that is neither specific vaginitis nor bacterial vaginosis. The diversity of this microbiological peculiarity could also explain several therapeutic failures when patients were treated for infections identified as bacterial vaginosis. The diagnosis 'aerobic vaginitis' is essentially based on microscopic examinations using a phase-contrast microscope (at ×400 magnification). The therapeutic choice for 'aerobic vaginitis' should take into consideration an antibiotic characterized by an intrinsic activity against the majority of bacteria of fecal origin, bactericidal effect and poor/absent interference with the vaginal microbiota. Regarding the therapy for aerobic vaginitis when antimicrobial agents are prescribed, not only the antimicrobial spectrum but also the presumed ecological disturbance on the anaerobic and aerobic vaginal and rectal microbiota should be taken into a consideration. Because of their very low impact on the vaginal microbiota, kanamycin or quinolones are to be considered a good choice for therapy. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Current insights into phage biodiversity and biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Rebecca Vega

    2009-10-01

    Phages exert tremendous ecological and evolutionary forces directly on their bacterial hosts. Phage induced cell lysis also indirectly contributes to organic and inorganic nutrient recycling. Phage abundance, diversity, and distribution are therefore important parameters in ecosystem function. The assumption that phage consortia are ubiquitous and homogenous across habitats (everything is everywhere) is currently being re-evaluated. New studies on phage biogeography have found that some phages are globally distributed while others are unique and perhaps endemic to specific environments. Furthermore, advances in technology have allowed scientists to conduct experiments aimed at analyzing phage consortia over temporal scales, and surprisingly have found reoccurring patterns. This review discusses currents in the field of phage ecology with particular focus on efforts to characterize phage diversity and biogeography across various spatial and temporal scales.

  15. The dynamic changes of vaginal microecosystem in patients with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis: a retrospective study of 800 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xin-Ai; Chen, Ping; Tang, Yuanting; Wu, Xiuli; Hu, Zhengqiang

    2015-12-01

    Vaginal microecological environment is an important factor of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC). This study was undertaken to investigate dynamic changes of vaginal microecosystem in patients with RVVC. Four hundred patients with VVC and 400 healthy women of reproductive age who admitted to the hospital from January 2012 to December 2013 were evaluated retrospectively. Vaginal microecological factors were evaluated before and after treatment until no recurrence, including vaginal cleanliness, white blood cells, Lactobacillus, Lactobacillus classification, bacteria density, flora diversity, Nugent scores, etc. The grouping was done according to the recurrence of the disease. Every time after treatment, the relapsing patients were defined as case group and the cured patients without recurrence were defined as control group. The differences in the results between the case and the control groups were analyzed by t test. With the development of RVVC, the ages of all case groups were lower than the corresponding control groups. In different stages of the disease, the bacteria density of the case groups and their corresponding control groups had no significant difference (P > 0.05). Most of the microecological indicators of the first occurring group were significantly different (P vaginal microecological indicators (except Lactobacillus) of all case groups were higher than that of the control groups. The values of Lactobacillus of all RVVC case groups were lower than that of the RVVC control groups. There were vaginal microecological imbalances in all developing stages of RVVC. As for vaginal flora, diverse sorts changed to normal Lactobacillus dominantly with the development of RVVC. In the first occurrence of RVVC, after antifungal treatment, Lactobacillus is suggested to be timely supplemented to restore vaginal microecological balance.

  16. Lactobacilli Dominance and Vaginal pH: Why is the Human Vaginal Microbiome Unique?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Miller

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The human vaginal microbiome is dominated by bacteria from the genus Lactobacillus, which create an acidic environment thought to protect women against sexually transmitted pathogens and opportunistic infections. Strikingly, lactobacilli dominance appears to be unique to humans; while the relative abundance of lactobacilli in the human vagina is typically >70%, in other mammals lactobacilli rarely comprise more than 1% of vaginal microbiota. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain humans' unique vaginal microbiota, including humans' distinct reproductive physiology, high risk of STDs, and high risk of microbial complications linked to pregnancy and birth. Here, we test these hypotheses using comparative data on vaginal pH and the relative abundance of lactobacilli in 26 mammalian species and 50 studies (N=21 mammals for pH and 14 mammals for lactobacilli abundance. We found that non-human mammals, like humans, exhibit the lowest vaginal pH during the period of highest estrogen. However, the vaginal pH of non-human mammals is never as low as is typical for humans (median vaginal pH in humans = 4.5; range of pH across all 21 non-human mammals = 5.4 to 7.8. Contrary to disease and obstetric risk hypotheses, we found no significant relationship between vaginal pH or lactobacilli abundance and multiple metrics of STD or birth injury risk (P-values ranged from 0.13 to 0.99. Given the lack of evidence for these hypotheses, we discuss two alternative explanations: the common function hypothesis and a novel hypothesis related to the diet of agricultural humans. Specifically, with regard to diet we propose that high levels of starch in human diets have led to increased levels of glycogen in the vaginal tract, which, in turn, promotes the proliferation of lactobacilli. If true, human diet may have paved the way for a novel, protective microbiome in human vaginal tracts. Overall, our results highlight the need for continuing research on non

  17. Establishment of a sensitive system for analysis of human vaginal microbiota on the basis of rRNA-targeted reverse transcription-quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurakawa, Takashi; Ogata, Kiyohito; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Kado, Yukiko; Takahashi, Takuya; Kida, Yumi; Ito, Masahiro; Okada, Nobuhiko; Nomoto, Koji

    2015-04-01

    Ten specific primer sets, for Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus crispatus, Atopobium vaginae, Gardnerella vaginalis, Mobiluncus curtisii, Chlamydia trachomatis/muridarum, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, and Bifidobacterium angulatum, were developed for quantitative analysis of vaginal microbiota. rRNA-targeted reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of the vaginal samples from 12 healthy Japanese volunteers using the new primer sets together with 25 existing primer sets revealed the diversity of their vaginal microbiota: Lactobacilli such as L. crispatus, L. gasseri, Lactobacillus jensenii, Lactobacillus iners, and Lactobacillus vaginalis, as the major populations at 10(7) cells/ml vaginal fluid, were followed by facultative anaerobes such as Streptococcus and strict anaerobes at lower population levels of 10(4) cells/ml or less. Certain bacterial vaginosis (BV)-related bacteria, such as G. vaginalis, A. vaginae, M. curtisii, and Prevotella, were also detected in some subjects. Especially in one subject, both G. vaginalis and A. vaginae were detected at high population levels of 10(8.8) and 10(8.9) cells/ml vaginal fluid, suggesting that she is an asymptomatic BV patient. These results suggest that the RT-qPCR system is effective for accurate analysis of major vaginal commensals and diagnosis of several vaginal infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Formulation, development and characterization of mucoadhesive film for treatment of vaginal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Renuka; Joshi, Priyanka; Mehta, Tejal

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was formulation, optimization and characterization of mucoadhesive film of clotrimazole (CT) which is patient-convenient and provides an effective alternative for the treatment of vaginal candidiasis. CT is an antimycotic drug applied locally for the treatment of vaginal candidiasis. Mucoadhesive vaginal films were prepared by solvent casting technique using hydroxyl propylcellulose and sodium alginate as polymers. Propylene glycol and polyethylene glycol-400 were evaluated as plasticizers. The mucoadhesive vaginal films were evaluated for percentage elongation, tensile strength, folding endurance, drug content, in vitro disintegration time, in vitro dissolution study, swelling index, bioadhesive strength, and diffusion study. Among various permeation enhancers used, isopropyl myristate was found to be suitable. To evaluate the role of the concentration of permeation enhancer and concentration of polymers in the optimization of mucoadhesive vaginal film, 3(2) full factorial design was employed. Optimized batch showed in vitro disintegration time, 18 min; drug content, 99.83%; and tensile strength, 502.1 g/mm(2). In vitro diffusion study showed that 77% drug diffusion occurred in 6 h. This batch was further evaluated by scanning electron microscopy indicating uniformity of the film. In vitro Lactobacillus inhibition and in vitro antifungal activity of optimized batch showed an inhibitory effect against Candida albicans and no effect on Lactobacillus, which is a normal component of vaginal flora. Mucoadhesive vaginal film of CT is an effective dosage form for the treatment of vaginal candidiasis.

  19. The effect of microablative fractional CO2 laser on vaginal flora of postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, S; Pitsouni, E; Antonopoulou, S; Zacharakis, D; Salvatore, S; Falagas, M E; Grigoriadis, T

    2016-10-01

    To assess the effect of microablative fractional CO2 laser (MFCO2-Laser) therapy on the vaginal microenvironment of postmenopausal women. Three laser therapies at monthly intervals were applied in postmenopausal women with moderate to severe symptoms of genitourinary syndrome of menopause, pH of vaginal fluid >4.5 and superficial epithelial cells on vaginal smear Vaginal fluid pH values, fresh wet mount microscopy, Gram stain and aerobic and anaerobic cultures were evaluated at baseline and 1 month after each subsequent therapy. Nugent score and Hay-Ison criteria were used to evaluate vaginal flora. Fifty-three women (mean age 57.2 ± 5.4 years) participated and completed this study. MFCO2-Laser therapy increased Lactobacillus (p vaginal pH from a mean of 5.5 ± 0.8 (initial value) to 4.7 ± 0.5 (p aerobic vaginitis or candidiasis did not appear in any participant. MFCO2-Laser therapy is a promising treatment for improving the vaginal health of postmenopausal women by helping repopulate the vagina with normally existing Lactobacillus species and reconstituting the normal flora to premenopausal status.

  20. Effects of a One Year Reusable Contraceptive Vaginal Ring on Vaginal Microflora and the Risk of Vaginal Infection: An Open-Label Prospective Evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongmei Huang

    Full Text Available A contraceptive vaginal ring (CVR containing Nestorone® (NES and ethinyl estradiol (EE that is reusable for 1- year (13 cycles is under development. This study assessed effects of this investigational CVR on the incidence of vaginal infections and change in vaginal microflora.There were 120 women enrolled into a NES/EE CVR Phase III trial and a microbiology sub-study for up to 1- year of cyclic product use. Gynecological examinations were conducted at baseline, the first week of cycle 6 and last week of cycle 13 (or during early discontinuation visits. Vaginal swabs were obtained for wet mount microscopy, Gram stain and culture. The CVR was removed from the vagina at the last study visit and cultured. Semi-quantitative cultures for Lactobacillus, Gardnerella vaginalis, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, anaerobic gram negative rods (GNRs, Candida albicans and other yeasts were performed on vaginal and CVR samples. Vaginal infections were documented throughout the study.Over 1- year of use, 3.3% of subjects were clinically diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis, 15.0% with vulvovaginal candidiasis, and 0.8% with trichomoniasis. The detection rate of these three infections did not change significantly from baseline to either Cycle 6 or 13. Nugent scores remained stable. H2O2-positive Lactobacillus dominated vaginal flora with a non-significant prevalence increase from 76.7% at baseline to 82.7% at cycle 6 and 90.2% at cycle 13, and a median concentration of 107 colony forming units (cfu per gram. Although anaerobic GNRs prevalence increased significantly, the median concentration decreased slightly (104 to 103cfu per gram. There were no significant changes in frequency or concentrations of other pathogens. High levels of agreement between vaginal and ring surface microbiota were observed.Sustained use of the NES/EE CVR did not increase the risk of vaginal infection and was not disruptive to the vaginal ecosystem

  1. Effects of a One Year Reusable Contraceptive Vaginal Ring on Vaginal Microflora and the Risk of Vaginal Infection: An Open-Label Prospective Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yongmei; Merkatz, Ruth B.; Hillier, Sharon L.; Roberts, Kevin; Blithe, Diana L.; Sitruk-Ware, Régine; Creinin, Mitchell D.

    2015-01-01

    Background A contraceptive vaginal ring (CVR) containing Nestorone® (NES) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) that is reusable for 1- year (13 cycles) is under development. This study assessed effects of this investigational CVR on the incidence of vaginal infections and change in vaginal microflora. Methods There were 120 women enrolled into a NES/EE CVR Phase III trial and a microbiology sub-study for up to 1- year of cyclic product use. Gynecological examinations were conducted at baseline, the first week of cycle 6 and last week of cycle 13 (or during early discontinuation visits). Vaginal swabs were obtained for wet mount microscopy, Gram stain and culture. The CVR was removed from the vagina at the last study visit and cultured. Semi-quantitative cultures for Lactobacillus, Gardnerella vaginalis, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, anaerobic gram negative rods (GNRs), Candida albicans and other yeasts were performed on vaginal and CVR samples. Vaginal infections were documented throughout the study. Results Over 1- year of use, 3.3% of subjects were clinically diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis, 15.0% with vulvovaginal candidiasis, and 0.8% with trichomoniasis. The detection rate of these three infections did not change significantly from baseline to either Cycle 6 or 13. Nugent scores remained stable. H2O2-positive Lactobacillus dominated vaginal flora with a non-significant prevalence increase from 76.7% at baseline to 82.7% at cycle 6 and 90.2% at cycle 13, and a median concentration of 107 colony forming units (cfu) per gram. Although anaerobic GNRs prevalence increased significantly, the median concentration decreased slightly (104 to 103cfu per gram). There were no significant changes in frequency or concentrations of other pathogens. High levels of agreement between vaginal and ring surface microbiota were observed. Conclusion Sustained use of the NES/EE CVR did not increase the risk of vaginal infection and was not disruptive to

  2. Evaluation of profertility effect of probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum 2621 in a murine model

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    Praveen Bhandari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Urogenital infections of bacterial origin have a high incidence among the female population at reproductive age, affecting the fertility. Strains of Escherichia coli can colonize the vagina and replace natural microflora. Lactobacillus the predominant vaginal microorganism in healthy women, maintains the acidic vaginal pH which inhibits pathogenic microorganisms. Studies on Lactobacillus have shown that these can inhibit E. coli growth and vaginal colonization. An alternative therapeutic approach to antimicrobial therapy is to re-establish Lactobacillus in this microbiome through probiotic administration to resurge fertility. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the capability of L. plantarum 2621 strain with probiotic properties, to prevent the vaginal colonization of E. coli causing agglutination of sperms and to evaluate its profertility effect in a murine model. m0 ethods: Screened mice were divided into five groups i.e. control group, E. coli group, Lactobacillus group, prophylactic and therapeutic groups. The control group was infused with 20 µl PBS, E.coli group was administered with 10 [6] cfu/20 µl E. coli, and probiotic group was administered with Lactobacillus (10 [8] cfu/20 µl for 10 consecutive days. In prophylactic group, the vagina was colonized with 10 consecutive doses of Lactobacillus (10 [8] cfu/20 µl. After 24 h, it was followed by 10 day intravaginal infection with E. coli (10 [6] cfu/20 µl whereas for the therapeutic group vagina was colonized with (10 [6] cfu/20 µl E. coli for 10 consecutive days, followed by 10 day intravaginal administration with Lactobacillus after 24 h. Results: Upon mating and completion of gestation period, control, probiotic and the therapeutic groups had litters in contrast to the prophylactic group and the group administered with E. coli. Interpretation & conclusions: Results indicated that Lactobacillus intermitted colonization of pathogenic

  3. Phages of lactic acid bacteria: The role of genetics in understanding phage-host interactions and their co-evolutionary processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahony, Jennifer; Ainsworth, Stuart; Stockdale, Stephen; Sinderen, Douwe van

    2012-01-01

    Dairy fermentations are among the oldest food processing applications, aimed at preservation and shelf-life extension through the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) starter cultures, in particular strains of Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus spp. and Leuconostoc spp. Traditionally this was performed by continuous passaging of undefined cultures from a finished fermentation to initiate the next fermentation. More recently, consumer demands on consistent and desired flavours and textures of dairy products have led to a more defined approach to such processes. Dairy (starter) companies have responded to the need to define the nature and complexity of the starter culture mixes, and dairy fermentations are now frequently based on defined starter cultures of low complexity, where each starter component imparts specific technological properties that are desirable to the product. Both mixed and defined starter culture approaches create the perfect environment for the proliferation of (bacterio)phages capable of infecting these LAB. The repeated use of the same starter cultures in a single plant, coupled to the drive towards higher and consistent production levels, increases the risk and negative impact of phage infection. In this review we will discuss recent advances in tracking the adaptation of phages to the dairy industry, the advances in understanding LAB phage-host interactions, including evolutionary and genomic aspects.

  4. Phages of lactic acid bacteria: The role of genetics in understanding phage-host interactions and their co-evolutionary processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahony, Jennifer, E-mail: j.mahony@ucc.ie [Department of Microbiology, University College Cork, Western Road, Cork (Ireland); Ainsworth, Stuart; Stockdale, Stephen [Department of Microbiology, University College Cork, Western Road, Cork (Ireland); Sinderen, Douwe van, E-mail: d.vansinderen@ucc.ie [Department of Microbiology, University College Cork, Western Road, Cork (Ireland); Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, Biosciences Institute, University College Cork, Western Road, Cork (Ireland)

    2012-12-20

    Dairy fermentations are among the oldest food processing applications, aimed at preservation and shelf-life extension through the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) starter cultures, in particular strains of Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus spp. and Leuconostoc spp. Traditionally this was performed by continuous passaging of undefined cultures from a finished fermentation to initiate the next fermentation. More recently, consumer demands on consistent and desired flavours and textures of dairy products have led to a more defined approach to such processes. Dairy (starter) companies have responded to the need to define the nature and complexity of the starter culture mixes, and dairy fermentations are now frequently based on defined starter cultures of low complexity, where each starter component imparts specific technological properties that are desirable to the product. Both mixed and defined starter culture approaches create the perfect environment for the proliferation of (bacterio)phages capable of infecting these LAB. The repeated use of the same starter cultures in a single plant, coupled to the drive towards higher and consistent production levels, increases the risk and negative impact of phage infection. In this review we will discuss recent advances in tracking the adaptation of phages to the dairy industry, the advances in understanding LAB phage-host interactions, including evolutionary and genomic aspects.

  5. Synthetic Phage for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Yoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling structural organization and signaling motif display is of great importance to design the functional tissue regenerating materials. Synthetic phage, genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage has been recently introduced as novel tissue regeneration materials to display a high density of cell-signaling peptides on their major coat proteins for tissue regeneration purposes. Structural advantages of their long-rod shape and monodispersity can be taken together to construct nanofibrous scaffolds which support cell proliferation and differentiation as well as direct orientation of their growth in two or three dimensions. This review demonstrated how functional synthetic phage is designed and subsequently utilized for tissue regeneration that offers potential cell therapy.

  6. Influence of vaginal bacteria and D- and L-lactic acid isomers on vaginal extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer: implications for protection against upper genital tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkin, Steven S; Mendes-Soares, Helena; Linhares, Iara M; Jayaram, Aswathi; Ledger, William J; Forney, Larry J

    2013-08-06

    We evaluated levels of vaginal extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-8) in vaginal secretions in relation to the composition of vaginal bacterial communities and D- and L-lactic acid levels. The composition of vaginal bacterial communities in 46 women was determined by pyrosequencing the V1 to V3 region of 16S rRNA genes. Lactobacilli were dominant in 71.3% of the women, followed by Gardnerella (17.4%), Streptococcus (8.7%), and Enterococcus (2.2%). Of the lactobacillus-dominated communities, 51.5% were dominated by Lactobacillus crispatus, 36.4% by Lactobacillus iners, and 6.1% each by Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus jensenii. Concentrations of L-lactic acid were slightly higher in lactobacillus-dominated vaginal samples, but most differences were not statistically significant. D-Lactic acid levels were higher in samples containing L. crispatus than in those with L. iners (Pvaginal communities dominated by species of lactobacilli was in concordance with the proportions found in axenic cultures of the various species grown in vitro. Levels of L-lactic acid (Pvaginal concentrations of EMMPRIN and MMP-8 levels were highly correlated (Pinfections. A large proportion of preterm births (>50%) result from infections caused by bacteria originating in the vagina, which requires that they traverse the cervix. Factors that influence susceptibility to these infections are not well understood; however, there is evidence that matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-8) is known to alter the integrity of the cervix. In this work, we show that concentrations of vaginal extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) are influenced by members of the vaginal microbial community and concentrations of D- or L-lactic acid isomers in vaginal secretions. Elevated levels of D-lactic acid and the ratio of D- to L-lactic acid influence EMMPRIN concentrations as well as MMP-8 levels. Thus, isomers of lactic acid may function as

  7. A study of aerobic bacterial pathogens associated with vaginitis in reproductive age group women (15-45 years) and their sensitivity pattern

    OpenAIRE

    Sangeetha K. T.; Saroj Golia; Vasudha C. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aerobic vaginitis (AV) is caused by a displacement of the healthy vaginal Lactobacillus species with aerobic pathogens such as Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus that triggers a localized vaginal inflammatory immune response. AV if it is not diagnosed and treated early, especially during pregnancy can place the health of both the mother and the foetus at risk as it is associated with preterm birth, premature rupture of membranes (PROM) and chorioamni...

  8. Vaginitis: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faro, S

    1996-01-01

    The various conditions that give rise to vaginitis include specific and nonspecific entities, such as candidiasis, trichomoniasis, bacterial vaginosis, group B streptococcal vaginitis, purulent vaginitis, volvodynia, and vestibulitis. The patient with chronic vaginitis usually develops this condition because of a misdiagnosis. It is critical that patients who have chronic vaginitis be thoroughly evaluated to determine if there is a specific etiology and whether their condition is recurrent or persistent, or is a reinfection. This also must include obtaining a detailed history, beginning with the patient's best recollection of when she felt perfectly normal. The physician must have an understanding of a healthy vaginal ecosystem and what mechanisms are in place to maintain the equilibrium. The vaginal ecosystem is a complex system of micro-organisms interacting with host factors to maintain its equilibrium. The endogenous microflora consists of a variety of bacteria, which include aerobic, facultative and obligate anaerobic bacteria. These organisms exist in a commensal, synergistic or antagonistic relationship. Therefore, it is important to understand what factors control the delicate equilibrium of the vaginal ecosystem, and which factors, both endogenous and exogenous, can disrupt this system. It is also important for the physician to understand that when a patient has symptoms of vaginitis it is not always due to an infectious etiology. There are situations in which an inflammatory reaction occurs but the specific etiology may not be determined. Thus, it is important that the physician not rush through the history or the examination.

  9. Beneficial effects of a Coriolus versicolor-based vaginal gel on cervical epithelization, vaginal microbiota and vaginal health: a pilot study in asymptomatic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Santiago; Losa, Fernando; Dexeus, Damián; Cortés, Javier

    2017-03-16

    To assess the effect of a 12-day treatment using a vaginal gel based on niosomes containing hyaluronic acid, ß-glucan, alpha-glucan oligosaccharide, Coriolus versicolor, Asian centella, Azadirachta indica and Aloe vera on vaginal microbiota, cervical epithelization and vaginal health. Open-label, prospective pilot study conducted in asymptomatic women in daily practice. Cervical epithelization was evaluated by colposcopy using an ectopy epithelization score (from 5: no ectopy to 1: severe ectopy and bleeding), vaginal microbiota using the VaginaStatus-Diagnostic test (Instiüt für Mikroökologie, Herborn, Germany) and further rated by the investigator using a 5-point Liker scale (from 5: normal to 1: very severe deterioration in which all evaluated species were altered), and vaginal health using the Vaginal Health Index. In 21 women, a positive effect to improve epithelization of the cervical mucosa, with a mean score of 4.42 at the final visit as compared to 3.09 at baseline (P vaginal microbiota status, with a mean score of 4.0 at the final visit vs. 3.3 at baseline (P = NS) (21.2% improvement). In 11 women, the Vaginal Health Index increased from 19.0 at baseline to 22.3 at the final visit (P = 0.007). The concentration of Lactobacillus spp. increased 54.5% of women and pH decreased from 4.32 to 4.09. These encouraging preliminary results provide the basis for designing a randomized controlled study, and for potential use in human papilloma virus infection. ISRCTN77955077 . Registration date: February 15, 2017. Retrospectively registered.

  10. Phage typing of Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Pereira, A.; Melo Cristino, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    This study included 502 staphylococcus strains; Staphylococcus saprophyticus (297 strains) S. cohnii (47), S. xylosus (10), S. epidermidis (67) and S. aureus (81). Mitomycin C induction was performed on 100 isolates of S. saprophyticus and all induced strains were reacted with each other. Twenty-six strains proved to be lysogenic. Phages were propagated and titrated. With 12 of the phages there were three frequent associations, named lytic groups A, B and C, which included 75% of all typable strains. Typability of the system was 45% and reproducibility was between 94.2% and 100%. Phages did not lyse S. aureus and S. epidermidis strains, but they lysed S. saprophyticus and only rare strains of other novobiocin resistant species. Effective S. saprophyticus typing serves ecological purposes and tracing the origin of urinary strains from the skin or mucous membranes. Phage typing in association with plasmid profiling previously described, are anticipated as complementary methods with strong discriminatory power for differentiating among S. saprophyticus strains. PMID:1752305

  11. Phage lytic enzymes: a history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudil, David

    2015-02-01

    There are many recent studies regarding the efficacy of bacteriophage-related lytic enzymes: the enzymes of 'bacteria-eaters' or viruses that infect bacteria. By degrading the cell wall of the targeted bacteria, these lytic enzymes have been shown to efficiently lyse Gram-positive bacteria without affecting normal flora and non-related bacteria. Recent studies have suggested approaches for lysing Gram-negative bacteria as well (Briersa Y, et al., 2014). These enzymes include: phage-lysozyme, endolysin, lysozyme, lysin, phage lysin, phage lytic enzymes, phageassociated enzymes, enzybiotics, muralysin, muramidase, virolysin and designations such as Ply, PAE and others. Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria, do not contribute to antimicrobial resistance, are easy to develop, inexpensive to manufacture and safe for humans, animals and the environment. The current focus on lytic enzymes has been on their use as anti-infectives in humans and more recently in agricultural research models. The initial translational application of lytic enzymes, however, was not associated with treating or preventing a specific disease but rather as an extraction method to be incorporated in a rapid bacterial detection assay (Bernstein D, 1997).The current review traces the translational history of phage lytic enzymes-from their initial discovery in 1986 for the rapid detection of group A streptococcus in clinical specimens to evolving applications in the detection and prevention of disease in humans and in agriculture.

  12. Correlates of the molecular vaginal microbiota composition of African women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Raju; Borgdorff, Hanneke; Jespers, Vicky; Francis, Suzanna C; Verhelst, Rita; Mwaura, Mary; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Ndayisaba, Gilles; Kyongo, Jordan K; Hardy, Liselotte; Menten, Joris; Crucitti, Tania; Tsivtsivadze, Evgeni; Schuren, Frank; van de Wijgert, Janneke H H M

    2015-02-21

    Sociodemographic, behavioral and clinical correlates of the vaginal microbiome (VMB) as characterized by molecular methods have not been adequately studied. VMB dominated by bacteria other than lactobacilli may cause inflammation, which may facilitate HIV acquisition and other adverse reproductive health outcomes. We characterized the VMB of women in Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa and Tanzania (KRST) using a 16S rDNA phylogenetic microarray. Cytokines were quantified in cervicovaginal lavages. Potential sociodemographic, behavioral, and clinical correlates were also evaluated. Three hundred thirteen samples from 230 women were available for analysis. Five VMB clusters were identified: one cluster each dominated by Lactobacillus crispatus (KRST-I) and L. iners (KRST-II), and three clusters not dominated by a single species but containing multiple (facultative) anaerobes (KRST-III/IV/V). Women in clusters KRST-I and II had lower mean concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1α (p vaginal candidiasis (ptrend = 0.09), but these associations did not reach statistical significance. Women who reported unusual vaginal discharge were more likely to belong to clusters KRST-III/IV/V (p = 0.05). Vaginal dysbiosis in African women was significantly associated with vaginal inflammation; the associations with increased prevalence of STIs and UTI, and decreased prevalence of vaginal candidiasis, should be confirmed in larger studies.

  13. The habits of highly effective phages: population dynamics as a framework for identifying therapeutic phages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Bull

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of bacteriophages as antibacterial agents is being actively researched on a global scale. Typically, the phages used are isolated from the wild by plating on the bacteria of interest, and a far larger set of candidate phages is often available than can be used in any application. When an excess of phages is available, how should the best phages be identified? Here we consider phage-bacterial population dynamics as a basis for evaluating and predicting phage success. A central question is whether the innate dynamical properties of phages are the determinants of success, or instead, whether extrinsic, indirect effects can be responsible. We address the dynamical perspective, motivated in part by the absence of dynamics in previously suggested principles of phage therapy. Current mathematical models of bacterial-phage dynamics do not capture the realities of in vivo dynamics, nor is this likely to change, but they do give insight to qualitative properties that may be generalizable. In particular, phage adsorption rate may be critical to treatment success, so understanding the effects of the in vivo environment on host availability may allow prediction of useful phages prior to in vivo experimentation. Principles for predicting efficacy may be derived by developing a greater understanding of the in vivo system, or such principles could be determined empirically by comparing phages with known differences in their dynamic properties. The comparative approach promises to be a powerful method of discovering the key to phage success. We offer five recommendations for future study: (i compare phages differing in treatment efficacy to identify the phage properties associated with success, (ii assay dynamics in vivo, (iii understand mechanisms of bacterial escape from phages, (iv test phages in model infections that are relevant to the intended clinical applications, and (v develop new classes of models for phage growth in spatially heterogeneous

  14. A Prospective Study of Vaginal Bacterial Flora and Other Risk Factors for Vulvovaginal Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, R. Scott; Richardson, Barbra A.; Hassan, Wisal M.; Graham, Susan M.; Kiarie, James; Baeten, Jared M.; Mandaliya, Kishorchandra; Jaoko, Walter; Ndinya-Achola, Jeckoniah O.; Holmes, King K.

    2009-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that vaginal lactobacilli may reduce the risk of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), but supporting data are limited. Our objective was to determine the relationship between vaginal bacterial flora and VVC. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort analysis among 151 Kenyan sex workers. At monthly follow-up, VVC was defined as the presence of yeast buds, pseudohyphae, or both on vaginal wet preparation or KOH preparation. Generalized estimating equations were used to identify correlates of VVC. Results: Participants returned for a median of 12 (interquartile range 11-12) visits. Vulvovaginal candidiasis was present at 162 visits, including 26 with symptomatic VVC. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) was associated with fewer episodes of VVC (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.16-0.50). After excluding women with concurrent BV, another possible cause of vaginal symptoms, the likelihood of symptomatic VVC was higher in those with yeast on vaginal wet preparation in the past 60 days (aOR 4.06, 95% CI 1.12-14.74) and those with concurrent vaginal Lactobacillus colonization (aOR 3.75, 95% CI 1.30-10.83). Conclusions: Contrary to a commonly posed hypothesis of a protective effect, we found that vaginal Lactobacillus colonization was associated with a >4-fold increase in the likelihood of symptomatic VVC. PMID:19456235

  15. Prospective study of vaginal bacterial flora and other risk factors for vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, R Scott; Richardson, Barbra A; Hassan, Wisal M; Graham, Susan M; Kiarie, James; Baeten, Jared M; Mandaliya, Kishorchandra; Jaoko, Walter; Ndinya-Achola, Jeckoniah O; Holmes, King K

    2009-06-15

    It has been suggested that vaginal colonization with lactobacilli may reduce the risk of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), but supporting data are limited. Our objective was to determine the relationship between vaginal bacterial flora and VVC. We conducted a prospective cohort analysis that involved 151 Kenyan sex workers. At monthly follow-up visits, VVC was defined as the presence of yeast buds, pseudohyphae, or both on a wet preparation (including potassium hydroxide preparation) of vaginal secretions. Generalized estimating equations were used to identify correlates of VVC. Participants returned for a median of 12 visits (interquartile range, 11-12 visits). VVC was identified at 162 visits, including 26 involving symptomatic VVC. Bacterial vaginosis was associated with fewer episodes of VVC (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.29 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.16-0.50]). After excluding women with concurrent bacterial vaginosis, another possible cause of vaginal symptoms, the likelihood of symptomatic VVC was higher among those who had had yeast identified on wet preparation of vaginal secretions during the past 60 days (aOR, 4.06 [95% CI, 1.12-14.74]) and those with concurrent vaginal Lactobacillus colonization (aOR, 3.75 [95% CI, 1.30-10.83]). Contrary to the commonly posited hypothesis that vaginal Lactobacillus colonization has a protective effect, we found that such colonization was associated with a nearly 4-fold increase in the likelihood of symptomatic VVC.

  16. Effects of feminine hygiene products on the vaginal mucosal biome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raina N. Fichorova

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over-the-counter (OTC feminine hygiene products come with little warning about possible side effects. This study evaluates in-vitro their effects on Lactobacillus crispatus, which is dominant in the normal vaginal microbiota and helps maintain a healthy mucosal barrier essential for normal reproductive function and prevention of sexually transmitted infections and gynecologic cancer. Methods: A feminine moisturizer (Vagisil, personal lubricant, and douche were purchased OTC. A topical spermicide (nonoxynol-9 known to alter the vaginal immune barrier was used as a control. L. crispatus was incubated with each product for 2 and 24h and then seeded on agar for colony forming units (CFU. Human vaginal epithelial cells were exposed to products in the presence or absence of L. crispatus for 24h, followed by epithelium-associated CFU enumeration. Interleukin-8 was immunoassayed and ANOVA was used for statistical evaluation. Results: Nonoxynol-9 and Vagisil suppressed Lactobacillus growth at 2h and killed all bacteria at 24h. The lubricant decreased bacterial growth insignificantly at 2h but killed all at 24h. The douche did not have a significant effect. At full strength, all products suppressed epithelial viability and all, except the douche, suppressed epithelial-associated CFU. When applied at non-toxic dose in the absence of bacteria, the douche and moisturizer induced an increase of IL-8, suggesting a potential to initiate inflammatory reaction. In the presence of L. crispatus, the proinflammatory effects of the douche and moisturizer were countered, and IL-8 production was inhibited in the presence of the other products. Conclusion: Some OTC vaginal products may be harmful to L. crispatus and alter the vaginal immune environment. Illustrated through these results, L. crispatus is essential in the preservation of the function of vaginal epithelial cells in the presence of some feminine hygiene products. More research should be invested

  17. Vaginal or uterine bleeding - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and other menstrual conditions; Abnormal menstrual periods; Abnormal vaginal bleeding ... There are many causes of abnormal vaginal bleeding. HORMONES ... Doctors call the problem abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) . AUB ...

  18. Efficacy and safety of a vaginal medicinal product containing three strains of probiotic bacteria: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomusiak A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Anna Tomusiak,1 Magdalena Strus,1 Piotr B Heczko,1 Paweł Adamski,2 Grzegorz Stefański,3 Aleksandra Mikołajczyk-Cichońska,3 Magdalena Suda-Szczurek3 1Department of Microbiology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 2Institute of Nature Conservation, Polish Academy of Sciences, 3IBSS BIOMED SA, Kraków, Poland Objective: The main objective of this study was to evaluate whether vaginal administration of probiotic Lactobacillus results in their colonization and persistence in the vagina and whether Lactobacillus colonization promotes normalization and maintenance of pH and Nugent score. Patients and methods: The study was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial. Altogether, 376 women were assessed for eligibility, and signed informed consent. One hundred and sixty eligible women with abnormal, also called intermediate, vaginal microflora, as indicated by a Nugent score of 4–6 and pH >4.5 and zero or low Lactobacillus count, were randomized. Each participant was examined four times during the study. Women were randomly allocated to receive either the probiotic preparation inVag®, or a placebo (one capsule for seven consecutive days vaginally. The product inVag includes the probiotic strains Lactobacillus fermentum 57A, Lactobacillus plantarum 57B, and Lactobacillus gasseri 57C. We took vaginal swabs during visits I, III, and IV to determine the presence and abundance of bacteria from the Lactobacillus genus, measure the pH, and estimate the Nugent score. Drug safety evaluation was based on analysis of the types and occurrence of adverse events. Results: Administration of inVag contributed to a significant decrease (between visits in both vaginal pH (P<0.05 and Nugent score (P<0.05, and a significant increase in the abundance of Lactobacillus between visit I and visits III and IV (P<0.05. Molecular typing revealed the presence of Lactobacillus strains originating from inVag in 82% of women taking the drug at

  19. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnazza, S; Gioffre, G; Felici, F; Guglielmino, S [Department of Microbiological, Genetic and Molecular Sciences, University of Messina, Messina (Italy)

    2007-10-03

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 10{sup 4} cells ml{sup -1}. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  20. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnazza, S.; Gioffrè, G.; Felici, F.; Guglielmino, S.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 104 cells ml-1. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  1. Phage Therapy: Eco-Physiological Pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T. Abedon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial virus use as antibacterial agents, in the guise of what is commonly known as phage therapy, is an inherently physiological, ecological, and also pharmacological process. Physiologically we can consider metabolic properties of phage infections of bacteria and variation in those properties as a function of preexisting bacterial states. In addition, there are patient responses to pathogenesis, patient responses to phage infections of pathogens, and also patient responses to phage virions alone. Ecologically, we can consider phage propagation, densities, distribution (within bodies, impact on body-associated microbiota (as ecological communities, and modification of the functioning of body “ecosystems” more generally. These ecological and physiological components in many ways represent different perspectives on otherwise equivalent phenomena. Comparable to drugs, one also can view phages during phage therapy in pharmacological terms. The relatively unique status of phages within the context of phage therapy as essentially replicating antimicrobials can therefore result in a confluence of perspectives, many of which can be useful towards gaining a better mechanistic appreciation of phage therapy, as I consider here. Pharmacology more generally may be viewed as a discipline that lies at an interface between organism-associated phenomena, as considered by physiology, and environmental interactions as considered by ecology.

  2. Temperate and virulent Lactobacillus delbrueckii bacteriophages: comparison of their thermal and chemical resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrecht, Ana C; Guglielmotti, Daniela M; Tremmel, Gustavo; Reinheimer, Jorge A; Suárez, Viviana B

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this work was to study the efficiency of diverse chemical and thermal treatments usually used in dairy industries to control the number of virulent and temperate Lactobacillus delbrueckii bacteriophages. Two temperate (Cb1/204 and Cb1/342) and three virulent (BYM, YAB and Ib3) phages were studied. The thermal treatments applied were: 63 degrees C for 30 min (low temperature--long time, LTLT), 72 degrees C for 15 s (high temperature--short time, HTST), 82 degrees C for 5 min (milk destined to yogurt elaboration) and 90 degrees C for 15 min (FIL-IDF). The chemical agents studied were: sodium hypochlorite, ethanol, isopropanol, peracetic acid, biocides A (quaternary ammonium chloride), B (hydrogen peroxide, peracetic acid and peroctanoic acid), C (alkaline chloride foam), D (p-toluensulfonchloroamide, sodium salt) and E (ethoxylated nonylphenol and phosphoric acid). The kinetics of inactivation were drew and T(99) (time necessary to eliminate the 99% of phage particles) calculated. Results obtained showed that temperate phages revealed lower resistance than the virulent ones to the treatment temperatures. Biocides A, C, E and peracetic acid showed a notable efficiency to inactivate high concentrations of temperate and virulent L. delbrueckii phages. Biocide B evidenced, in general, a good capacity to eliminate the phage particles. Particularly for this biocide virulent phage Ib3 showed the highest resistance in comparison to the rest of temperate and virulent ones. On the contrary, biocide D and isopropanol presented a very low capacity to inactivate all phages studied. The efficiency of ethanol and hypochlorite was variable depending to the phages considered. These results allow a better knowledge and give useful information to outline more effective treatments to reduce the phage infections in dairy plants. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Robust vaginal colonization of macaques with a novel vaginally disintegrating tablet containing a live biotherapeutic product to prevent HIV infection in women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel A Lagenaur

    Full Text Available MucoCept is a biotherapeutic for prevention of HIV-1 infection in women and contains a human, vaginal Lactobacillus jensenii that has been genetically enhanced to express the HIV-1 entry inhibitor, modified cyanovirin-N (mCV-N. The objective of this study was to develop a solid vaginal dosage form that supports sustained vaginal colonization of the MucoCept Lactobacillus at levels previously shown, with freshly prepared cultures, to protect macaques from SHIV infection and to test this formulation in a macaque vaginal colonization model. Vaginally disintegrating tablets were prepared by lyophilizing the formulated bacteria in tablet-shaped molds, then packaging in foil pouches with desiccant. Disintegration time, potency and stability of the tablets were assessed. For colonization, non-synchronized macaques were dosed vaginally with either one tablet or five tablets delivered over five days. Vaginal samples were obtained at three, 14, and 21 days post-dosing and cultured to determine Lactobacillus colonization levels. To confirm identity of the MucoCept Lactobacillus strain, genomic DNA was extracted from samples on days 14 and 21 and a strain-specific PCR was performed. Supernatants from bacteria were tested for the presence of the mCV-N protein by Western blot. The tablets were easy to handle, disintegrated within two minutes, potent (5.7x1011 CFU/g, and stable at 4°C and 25°C. Vaginal administration of the tablets to macaques resulted in colonization of the MucoCept Lactobacillus in 66% of macaques at 14 days post-dosing and 83% after 21 days. There was no significant difference in colonization levels for the one or five tablet dosing regimens (p=0.88 Day 14, p=0.99 Day 21. Strain-specific PCR confirmed the presence of the bacteria even in culture-negative macaques. Finally, the presence of mCV-N protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis using a specific anti-mCV-N antibody.

  4. Robust vaginal colonization of macaques with a novel vaginally disintegrating tablet containing a live biotherapeutic product to prevent HIV infection in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagenaur, Laurel A; Swedek, Iwona; Lee, Peter P; Parks, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    MucoCept is a biotherapeutic for prevention of HIV-1 infection in women and contains a human, vaginal Lactobacillus jensenii that has been genetically enhanced to express the HIV-1 entry inhibitor, modified cyanovirin-N (mCV-N). The objective of this study was to develop a solid vaginal dosage form that supports sustained vaginal colonization of the MucoCept Lactobacillus at levels previously shown, with freshly prepared cultures, to protect macaques from SHIV infection and to test this formulation in a macaque vaginal colonization model. Vaginally disintegrating tablets were prepared by lyophilizing the formulated bacteria in tablet-shaped molds, then packaging in foil pouches with desiccant. Disintegration time, potency and stability of the tablets were assessed. For colonization, non-synchronized macaques were dosed vaginally with either one tablet or five tablets delivered over five days. Vaginal samples were obtained at three, 14, and 21 days post-dosing and cultured to determine Lactobacillus colonization levels. To confirm identity of the MucoCept Lactobacillus strain, genomic DNA was extracted from samples on days 14 and 21 and a strain-specific PCR was performed. Supernatants from bacteria were tested for the presence of the mCV-N protein by Western blot. The tablets were easy to handle, disintegrated within two minutes, potent (5.7x1011 CFU/g), and stable at 4°C and 25°C. Vaginal administration of the tablets to macaques resulted in colonization of the MucoCept Lactobacillus in 66% of macaques at 14 days post-dosing and 83% after 21 days. There was no significant difference in colonization levels for the one or five tablet dosing regimens (p=0.88 Day 14, p=0.99 Day 21). Strain-specific PCR confirmed the presence of the bacteria even in culture-negative macaques. Finally, the presence of mCV-N protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis using a specific anti-mCV-N antibody.

  5. Dietary supplementation with probiotics during late pregnancy: outcome on vaginal microbiota and cytokine secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Beatrice; Cruciani, Federica; Baldassarre, Maria Elisabetta; Capursi, Teresa; Spisni, Enzo; Valerii, Maria Chiara; Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2012-10-18

    The vaginal microbiota of healthy women consists of a wide variety of anaerobic and aerobic bacterial genera and species dominated by the genus Lactobacillus. The activity of lactobacilli helps to maintain the natural healthy balance of the vaginal microbiota. This role is particularly important during pregnancy because vaginal dismicrobism is one of the most important mechanisms for preterm birth and perinatal complications. In the present study, we characterized the impact of a dietary supplementation with the probiotic VSL#3, a mixture of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Streptococcus strains, on the vaginal microbiota and immunological profiles of healthy women during late pregnancy. An association between the oral intake of the probiotic VSL#3 and changes in the composition of the vaginal microbiota of pregnant women was revealed by PCR-DGGE population profiling. Despite no significant changes were found in the amounts of the principal vaginal bacterial populations in women administered with VSL#3, qPCR results suggested a potential role of the probiotic product in counteracting the decrease of Bifidobacterium and the increase of Atopobium, that occurred in control women during late pregnancy. The modulation of the vaginal microbiota was associated with significant changes in some vaginal cytokines. In particular, the decrease of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 was observed only in control women but not in women supplemented with VSL#3. In addition, the probiotic consumption induced the decrease of the pro-inflammatory chemokine Eotaxin, suggesting a potential anti-inflammatory effect on the vaginal immunity. Dietary supplementation with the probiotic VSL#3 during the last trimester of pregnancy was associated to a modulation of the vaginal microbiota and cytokine secretion, with potential implications in preventing preterm birth. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01367470.

  6. Dietary supplementation with probiotics during late pregnancy: outcome on vaginal microbiota and cytokine secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitali Beatrice

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vaginal microbiota of healthy women consists of a wide variety of anaerobic and aerobic bacterial genera and species dominated by the genus Lactobacillus. The activity of lactobacilli helps to maintain the natural healthy balance of the vaginal microbiota. This role is particularly important during pregnancy because vaginal dismicrobism is one of the most important mechanisms for preterm birth and perinatal complications. In the present study, we characterized the impact of a dietary supplementation with the probiotic VSL#3, a mixture of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Streptococcus strains, on the vaginal microbiota and immunological profiles of healthy women during late pregnancy. Results An association between the oral intake of the probiotic VSL#3 and changes in the composition of the vaginal microbiota of pregnant women was revealed by PCR-DGGE population profiling. Despite no significant changes were found in the amounts of the principal vaginal bacterial populations in women administered with VSL#3, qPCR results suggested a potential role of the probiotic product in counteracting the decrease of Bifidobacterium and the increase of Atopobium, that occurred in control women during late pregnancy. The modulation of the vaginal microbiota was associated with significant changes in some vaginal cytokines. In particular, the decrease of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 was observed only in control women but not in women supplemented with VSL#3. In addition, the probiotic consumption induced the decrease of the pro-inflammatory chemokine Eotaxin, suggesting a potential anti-inflammatory effect on the vaginal immunity. Conclusion Dietary supplementation with the probiotic VSL#3 during the last trimester of pregnancy was associated to a modulation of the vaginal microbiota and cytokine secretion, with potential implications in preventing preterm birth. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01367470

  7. Vaginal toxic shock reaction triggering desquamative inflammatory vaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Nigel; Edlind, Thomas D; Schlievert, Patrick M; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to report 2 cases of desquamative inflammatory vaginitis associated with toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1)-producing Staphylococcus aureus strains. Case report of 2 patients, 1 with an acute and 1 with a chronic presentation, diagnosed with desquamative inflammatory vaginitis on the basis of clinical findings and wet mount microscopy. Pretreatment and posttreatment vaginal bacterial and yeast cultures were obtained. Pretreatment vaginal bacterial cultures from both patients grew TSST-1-producing S. aureus. Subsequent vaginal bacterial culture results after oral antibiotic therapy were negative. Desquamative inflammatory vaginitis may be triggered through TSST-1-mediated vaginal toxic shock reaction.

  8. Basics of Antibody Phage Display Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledsgaard, Line; Kilstrup, Mogens; Karatt-Vellatt, Aneesh; McCafferty, John; Laustsen, Andreas H

    2018-06-09

    Antibody discovery has become increasingly important in almost all areas of modern medicine. Different antibody discovery approaches exist, but one that has gained increasing interest in the field of toxinology and antivenom research is phage display technology. In this review, the lifecycle of the M13 phage and the basics of phage display technology are presented together with important factors influencing the success rates of phage display experiments. Moreover, the pros and cons of different antigen display methods and the use of naïve versus immunized phage display antibody libraries is discussed, and selected examples from the field of antivenom research are highlighted. This review thus provides in-depth knowledge on the principles and use of phage display technology with a special focus on discovery of antibodies that target animal toxins.

  9. Control of Pierce's Disease by Phage.

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    Mayukh Das

    Full Text Available Pierce's Disease (PD of grapevines, caused by Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa (Xf, is a limiting factor in the cultivation of grapevines in the US. There are presently no effective control methods to prevent or treat PD. The therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy of a phage cocktail composed of four virulent (lytic phages was evaluated for control of PD. Xf levels in grapevines were significantly reduced in therapeutically or prophylactically treated grapevines. PD symptoms ceased to progress one week post-therapeutic treatment and symptoms were not observed in prophylactically treated grapevines. Cocktail phage levels increased in grapevines in the presence of the host. No in planta phage-resistant Xf isolates were obtained. Moreover, Xf mutants selected for phage resistance in vitro did not cause PD symptoms. Our results indicate that phages have great potential for biocontrol of PD and other economically important diseases caused by Xylella.

  10. Vaginal drug distribution modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, David F; Yuan, Andrew; Gao, Yajing

    2015-09-15

    This review presents and applies fundamental mass transport theory describing the diffusion and convection driven mass transport of drugs to the vaginal environment. It considers sources of variability in the predictions of the models. It illustrates use of model predictions of microbicide drug concentration distribution (pharmacokinetics) to gain insights about drug effectiveness in preventing HIV infection (pharmacodynamics). The modeling compares vaginal drug distributions after different gel dosage regimens, and it evaluates consequences of changes in gel viscosity due to aging. It compares vaginal mucosal concentration distributions of drugs delivered by gels vs. intravaginal rings. Finally, the modeling approach is used to compare vaginal drug distributions across species with differing vaginal dimensions. Deterministic models of drug mass transport into and throughout the vaginal environment can provide critical insights about the mechanisms and determinants of such transport. This knowledge, and the methodology that obtains it, can be applied and translated to multiple applications, involving the scientific underpinnings of vaginal drug distribution and the performance evaluation and design of products, and their dosage regimens, that achieve it. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of Probiotic SYNBIO(®) Administered by Vaginal Suppositories in Promoting Vaginal Health of Apparently Healthy Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdenelli, Maria Cristina; Cecchini, Cinzia; Coman, Maria Magdalena; Silvi, Stefania; Orpianesi, Carla; Coata, Giuliana; Cresci, Alberto; Di Renzo, Gian Carlo

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether vaginal administration of probiotic Lactobacillus results in their colonization and persistence in the vagina and whether it promotes normalization and maintenance of pH and Nugent score. A single-arm, open-label controlled towards the baseline (pre-post) study including 35 apparently healthy women was conducted. Each woman was examined three times during the study. Women were instructed to receive daily for 7 days, the probiotic suppositories SYNBIO(®) gin (Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501(®) and Lactobacillus paracasei IMC 502(®)). Vaginal swabs were collected during visit 1, 2, and 3 to determine the total lactobacilli count, the presence of the two administered bacteria, the measure of the pH, and the estimation of Nugent score. Evaluation of treatment tolerability was based on analysis of the type and occurrence of adverse events. The probiotic vaginal suppository was well tolerated and no side effects were reported. Intermediate Nugent score was registered in 40 % of women at visit 1 and these intermediate scores reverted to normal at day 7 (end of treatment) in 20 % of subjects. Administration of SYNBIO(®) gin contributed to a significant increase in the lactobacilli level at visit 2. Molecular typing revealed the presence of the two strains originating from SYNBIO(®) gin in 100 % of women at visit 2 and 34 % at visit 3. No significant changes were registered for pH between visits. The SYNBIO(®) gin product is safe for daily use in healthy women and it could be useful to restore and maintain a normal vaginal microbiota.

  12. Analysis of Vaginal Cell Populations during Experimental Vaginal Candidiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Fidel, Paul L.; Luo, Wei; Steele, Chad; Chabain, Joseph; Baker, Marc; Wormley, Floyd

    1999-01-01

    Studies with an estrogen-dependent murine model of vaginal candidiasis suggest that local cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is more important than systemic CMI for protection against vaginitis. The present study, however, showed that, compared to uninfected mice, little to no change in the percentage or types of vaginal T cells occurred during a primary vaginal infection or during a secondary vaginal infection where partial protection was observed. Furthermore, depletion of polymorphonuclear leuko...

  13. Vaginal Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two-thirds of vaginal cancer cases are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Vaccines that protect against infection with HPV may reduce the risk of vaginal cancer. When found early, vaginal cancer can often be cured. Start here to find information on vaginal cancer treatment and research.

  14. Technological and Probiotic Traits of the Lactobacilli Isolated From Vaginal Tract of the Healthy Women for Probiotic Use

    OpenAIRE

    Bouridane, Hamida; Sifour, Mohamed; Idoui, Tayeb; Annick, Lejeune; Thonard, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background For biotechnological application, selected lactic acid bacteria strains belonging to the genera Lactobacillus (Lb) are proposed as an alternative to the antibiotics for the prevention and treatment of urogenital tract infections. Objectives Isolating and selecting vaginal lactobacilli strains for probiotic use based on their technological and probiotic aptitudes. Materials and Methods The vaginal isolates were examined for their essential characteristics as the potential probiotic ...

  15. [Peptide phage display in biotechnology and biomedicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmicheva, G A; Belyavskaya, V A

    2016-07-01

    To date peptide phage display is one of the most common combinatorial methods used for identifying specific peptide ligands. Phage display peptide libraries containing billions different clones successfully used for selection of ligands with high affinity and selectivity toward wide range of targets including individual proteins, bacteria, viruses, spores, different kind of cancer cells and variety of nonorganic targets (metals, alloys, semiconductors etc.) Success of using filamentous phage in phage display technologies relays on the robustness of phage particles and a possibility to genetically modify its DNA to construct new phage variants with novel properties. In this review we are discussing characteristics of the most known non-commercial peptide phage display libraries of different formats (landscape libraries in particular) and their successful applications in several fields of biotechnology and biomedicine: discovery of peptides with diagnostic values against different pathogens, discovery and using of peptides recognizing cancer cells, trends in using of phage display technologies in human interactome studies, application of phage display technologies in construction of novel nano materials.

  16. Vaginal microbiota of women with frequent vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xia; Westman, Rachel; Hickey, Roxana; Hansmann, Melanie A; Kennedy, Colleen; Osborn, Thomas W; Forney, Larry J

    2009-09-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is an insidious infection that afflicts a large proportion of women of all ages, and 5 to 8% of affected women experience recurrent VVC (RVVC). The aim of this study was to explore the possible importance of vaginal bacterial communities in reducing the risk of RVVC. The species composition and diversity of microbial communities were evaluated for 42 women with and without frequent VVC based on profiles of terminal restriction fragment polymorphisms of 16S rRNA genes and phylogenetic analysis of cloned 16S rRNA gene sequences from the numerically dominant microbial populations. The data showed that there were no significant differences between the vaginal microbial communities of women in the two groups (likelihood score, 5.948; bootstrap P value, 0.26). Moreover, no novel bacteria were found in the communities of women with frequent VVC. The vaginal communities of most women in both groups (38/42; 90%) were dominated by species of Lactobacillus. The results of this study failed to provide evidence for the existence of altered or unusual vaginal bacterial communities in women who have frequent VVC compared to women who do not have frequent VVC. The findings suggest that commensal vaginal bacterial species may not be able to prevent VVC.

  17. Vaginal delivery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregnancy - discharge after vaginal delivery ... You may have bleeding from your vagina for up to 6 weeks. Early on, you may pass some small clots when you first get up. Bleeding will slowly become ...

  18. Can Vaginitis Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... examples of safe sex. 1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). Self-study STD module—vaginitis . ... Halvorson New Chief of Gynecologic Health and Disease Branch Division of Epidemiology, Statistics, ...

  19. Diversity and composition of vaginal microbiota of pregnant women at risk for transmitting Group B Streptococcus treated with intrapartum penicillin.

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    Luiz Fernando Wurdig Roesch

    Full Text Available Administering intravenous antibiotics during labor to women at risk for transmitting Group B Streptococcus (GBS can prevent infections in newborns. However, the impact of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis on mothers' microbial community composition is largely unknown. We compared vaginal microbial composition in pregnant women experiencing preterm birth at ≤ 32 weeks gestation that received intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis with that in controls.Microbiota in vaginal swabs collected shortly before delivery from GBS positive women that received penicillin intravenously during labor or after premature rupture of membranes was compared to controls. Microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA sequencing using the PGM Ion Torrent to determine the effects of penicillin use during hospitalization and GBS status on its composition.Penicillin administration was associated with an altered vaginal microbial community composition characterized by increased microbial diversity. Lactobacillus sp. contributed only 13.1% of the total community in the women that received penicillin compared to 88.1% in the controls. Streptococcus sp. were present in higher abundance in GBS positive woman compared to controls, with 60% of the total vaginal microbiota in severe cases identified as Streptococcus sp.Vaginal communities of healthy pregnant women were dominated by Lactobacillus sp. and contained low diversity, while Group B Streptococcus positive women receiving intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis had a modified vaginal microbiota composition with low abundance of Lactobacillus but higher microbial diversity.

  20. Diversity and composition of vaginal microbiota of pregnant women at risk for transmitting Group B Streptococcus treated with intrapartum penicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Luiz Fernando Wurdig; Silveira, Rita C; Corso, Andréa L; Dobbler, Priscila Thiago; Mai, Volker; Rojas, Bruna S; Laureano, Álvaro M; Procianoy, Renato S

    2017-01-01

    Administering intravenous antibiotics during labor to women at risk for transmitting Group B Streptococcus (GBS) can prevent infections in newborns. However, the impact of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis on mothers' microbial community composition is largely unknown. We compared vaginal microbial composition in pregnant women experiencing preterm birth at ≤ 32 weeks gestation that received intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis with that in controls. Microbiota in vaginal swabs collected shortly before delivery from GBS positive women that received penicillin intravenously during labor or after premature rupture of membranes was compared to controls. Microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA sequencing using the PGM Ion Torrent to determine the effects of penicillin use during hospitalization and GBS status on its composition. Penicillin administration was associated with an altered vaginal microbial community composition characterized by increased microbial diversity. Lactobacillus sp. contributed only 13.1% of the total community in the women that received penicillin compared to 88.1% in the controls. Streptococcus sp. were present in higher abundance in GBS positive woman compared to controls, with 60% of the total vaginal microbiota in severe cases identified as Streptococcus sp. Vaginal communities of healthy pregnant women were dominated by Lactobacillus sp. and contained low diversity, while Group B Streptococcus positive women receiving intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis had a modified vaginal microbiota composition with low abundance of Lactobacillus but higher microbial diversity.

  1. Comparison of storage conditions for human vaginal microbiome studies.

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    Guoyun Bai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effect of storage conditions on the microbiome and metabolite composition of human biological samples has not been thoroughly investigated as a potential source of bias. We evaluated the effect of two common storage conditions used in clinical trials on the bacterial and metabolite composition of the vaginal microbiota using pyrosequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA gene sequencing and (1H-NMR analyses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eight women were enrolled and four mid-vaginal swabs were collected by a physician from each woman. The samples were either processed immediately, stored at -80°C for 4 weeks or at -20°C for 1 week followed by transfer to -80°C for another 4 weeks prior to analysis. Statistical methods, including Kolmogorovo-Smirnov and Wilcoxon tests, were performed to evaluate the differences in vaginal bacterial community composition and metabolites between samples stored under different conditions. The results showed that there were no significant differences between samples processed immediately after collection or stored for varying durations. (1H-NMR analysis of the small molecule metabolites in vaginal secretions indicated that high levels of lactic acid were associated with Lactobacillus-dominated communities. Relative abundance of lactic acid did not appear to correlate with relative abundance of individual Lactobacillus sp. in this limited sample, although lower levels of lactic acid were observed when L. gasseri was dominant, indicating differences in metabolic output of seemingly similar communities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings benefit large-scale, field-based microbiome and metabolomic studies of the vaginal microbiota.

  2. Association between cigarette smoking and the vaginal microbiota: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotman, Rebecca M; He, Xin; Gajer, Pawel; Fadrosh, Doug; Sharma, Eva; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Ravel, Jacques; Glover, Elbert D; Rath, Jessica M

    2014-08-28

    Smoking has been identified in observational studies as a risk factor for bacterial vaginosis (BV), a condition defined in part by decimation of Lactobacillus spp. The anti-estrogenic effect of smoking and trace amounts of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE) may predispose women to BV. BPDE increases bacteriophage induction in Lactobacillus spp. and is found in the vaginal secretions of smokers. We compared the vaginal microbiota between smokers and non-smokers and followed microbiota changes in a smoking cessation pilot study. In 2010-2011, 20 smokers and 20 non-smokers were recruited to a cross-sectional study (Phase A) and 9 smokers were enrolled and followed for a 12-week smoking cessation program (Phase B). Phase B included weekly behavioral counseling and nicotine patches to encourage smoking cessation. In both phases, participants self-collected mid-vaginal swabs (daily, Phase B) and completed behavioral surveys. Vaginal bacterial composition was characterized by pyrosequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA genes (V1-V3 regions). Vaginal smears were assigned Nugent Gram stain scores. Smoking status was evaluated (weekly, Phase B) using the semi-quantitative NicAlert® saliva cotinine test and carbon monoxide (CO) exhalation. In phase A, there was a significant trend for increasing saliva cotinine and CO exhalation with elevated Nugent scores (P value Vaginal microbiota clustered into three community state types (CSTs); two dominated by Lactobacillus (L. iners, L. crispatus), and one lacking significant numbers of Lactobacillus spp. and characterized by anaerobes (termed CST-IV). Women who were observed in the low-Lactobacillus CST-IV state were 25-fold more likely to be smokers than those dominated by L. crispatus (aOR: 25.61, 95 % CI: 1.03-636.61). Four women completed Phase B. One of three who entered smoking cessation with high Nugent scores demonstrated a switch from CST-IV to a L.iners-dominated profile with a concomitant drop in Nugent scores which coincided

  3. Electrotransformation of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis with Various Plasmids

    OpenAIRE

    Serror, Pascale; Sasaki, Takashi; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Maguin, Emmanuelle

    2002-01-01

    We describe, for the first time, a detailed electroporation procedure for Lactobacillus delbrueckii. Three L. delbrueckii strains were successfully transformed. Under optimal conditions, the transformation efficiency was 104 transformants per μg of DNA. Using this procedure, we identified several plasmids able to replicate in L. delbrueckii and integrated an integrative vector based on phage integrative elements into the L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus chromosome. These vectors provide a goo...

  4. Primary biliary cirrhosis following lactobacillus vaccination for recurrent vaginitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogdanos, Dimitrios; Pusl, Thomas; Rust, Christian; Vergani, Diego; Beuers, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aims:Antimitochondrial antibodies directed against the E2 subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, PDC-E2, and other mitochondrial 2-oxoacid dehydrogenases (AMA-M2) are the hallmark for diagnosis (of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). AMA-M2 formation as an early step in the

  5. Association of the vaginal microbiota with human papillomavirus infection in a Korean twin cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, Sunghee; Lee, Heetae; Song, Yun-Mi; Lee, Kayoung; Han, Min Ji; Sung, Joohon; Ko, GwangPyo

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most important causative agent of cervical cancers worldwide. However, our understanding of how the vaginal microbiota might be associated with HPV infection is limited. In addition, the influence of human genetic and physiological factors on the vaginal microbiota is unclear. Studies on twins and their families provide the ideal settings to investigate the complicated nature of human microbiota. This study investigated the vaginal microbiota of 68 HPV-infected or uninfected female twins and their families using 454-pyrosequencing analysis targeting the variable region (V2-V3) of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Analysis of the vaginal microbiota from both premenopausal women and HPV-discordant twins indicated that HPV-positive women had significantly higher microbial diversity with a lower proportion of Lactobacillus spp. than HPV-negative women. Fusobacteria, including Sneathia spp., were identified as a possible microbiological marker associated with HPV infection. The vaginal microbiotas of twin pairs were significantly more similar to each other than to those from unrelated individuals. In addition, there were marked significant differences from those of their mother, possibly due to differences in menopausal status. Postmenopausal women had a lower proportion of Lactobacillus spp. and a significantly higher microbiota diversity. This study indicated that HPV infection was associated with the composition of the vaginal microbiota, which is influenced by multiple host factors such as genetics and menopause. The potential biological markers identified in this study could provide insight into HPV pathogenesis and may represent biological targets for diagnostics.

  6. Bacteria in the vaginal microbiome alter the innate immune response and barrier properties of the human vaginal epithelia in a species-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerflinger, Sylvie Y; Throop, Andrea L; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M

    2014-06-15

    Bacterial vaginosis increases the susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections and negatively affects women's reproductive health. To investigate host-vaginal microbiota interactions and the impact on immune barrier function, we colonized 3-dimensional (3-D) human vaginal epithelial cells with 2 predominant species of vaginal microbiota (Lactobacillus iners and Lactobacillus crispatus) or 2 prevalent bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis (Atopobium vaginae and Prevotella bivia). Colonization of 3-D vaginal epithelial cell aggregates with vaginal microbiota was observed with direct attachment to host cell surface with no cytotoxicity. A. vaginae infection yielded increased expression membrane-associated mucins and evoked a robust proinflammatory, immune response in 3-D vaginal epithelial cells (ie, expression of CCL20, hBD-2, interleukin 1β, interleukin 6, interleukin 8, and tumor necrosis factor α) that can negatively affect barrier function. However, P. bivia and L. crispatus did not significantly upregulate pattern-recognition receptor-signaling, mucin expression, antimicrobial peptides/defensins, or proinflammatory cytokines in 3-D vaginal epithelial cell aggregates. Notably, L. iners induced pattern-recognition receptor-signaling activity, but no change was observed in mucin expression or secretion of interleukin 6 and interleukin 8. We identified unique species-specific immune signatures from vaginal epithelial cells elicited by colonization with commensal and bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria. A. vaginae elicited a signature that is consistent with significant disruption of immune barrier properties, potentially resulting in enhanced susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections during bacterial vaginosis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Fast real-time polymerase chain reaction for quantitative detection of Lactobacillus delbrueckii bacteriophages in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Maria Cruz; del Rio, Beatriz; Martínez, Noelia; Magadán, Alfonso H; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2008-12-01

    One of the main microbiological problems of the dairy industry is the susceptibility of starter bacteria to virus infections. Lactobacillus delbrueckii, a component of thermophilic starter cultures used in the manufacture of several fermented dairy products, including yogurt, is also sensitive to bacteriophage attacks. To avoid the problems associated with these viruses, quick and sensitive detection methods are necessary. In the present study, a fast real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for the direct detection and quantification of L. delbrueckii phages in milk was developed. A set of primers and a TaqMan MGB probe was designed, based on the lysin gene sequence of different L. delbrueckii phages. The results show the proposed method to be a rapid (total processing time 30 min), specific and highly sensitive technique for detecting L. delbrueckii phages in milk.

  8. MVP: a microbe-phage interaction database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Na L; Zhang, Chengwei; Zhang, Zhanbing; Hu, Songnian; Lercher, Martin J; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Bork, Peer; Liu, Zhi; Chen, Wei-Hua

    2018-01-04

    Phages invade microbes, accomplish host lysis and are of vital importance in shaping the community structure of environmental microbiota. More importantly, most phages have very specific hosts; they are thus ideal tools to manipulate environmental microbiota at species-resolution. The main purpose of MVP (Microbe Versus Phage) is to provide a comprehensive catalog of phage-microbe interactions and assist users to select phage(s) that can target (and potentially to manipulate) specific microbes of interest. We first collected 50 782 viral sequences from various sources and clustered them into 33 097 unique viral clusters based on sequence similarity. We then identified 26 572 interactions between 18 608 viral clusters and 9245 prokaryotes (i.e. bacteria and archaea); we established these interactions based on 30 321 evidence entries that we collected from published datasets, public databases and re-analysis of genomic and metagenomic sequences. Based on these interactions, we calculated the host range for each of the phage clusters and accordingly grouped them into subgroups such as 'species-', 'genus-' and 'family-' specific phage clusters. MVP is equipped with a modern, responsive and intuitive interface, and is freely available at: http://mvp.medgenius.info. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Characterizing Phage Genomes for Therapeutic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casandra W. Philipson

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Multi-drug resistance is increasing at alarming rates. The efficacy of phage therapy, treating bacterial infections with bacteriophages alone or in combination with traditional antibiotics, has been demonstrated in emergency cases in the United States and in other countries, however remains to be approved for wide-spread use in the US. One limiting factor is a lack of guidelines for assessing the genomic safety of phage candidates. We present the phage characterization workflow used by our team to generate data for submitting phages to the Federal Drug Administration (FDA for authorized use. Essential analysis checkpoints and warnings are detailed for obtaining high-quality genomes, excluding undesirable candidates, rigorously assessing a phage genome for safety and evaluating sequencing contamination. This workflow has been developed in accordance with community standards for high-throughput sequencing of viral genomes as well as principles for ideal phages used for therapy. The feasibility and utility of the pipeline is demonstrated on two new phage genomes that meet all safety criteria. We propose these guidelines as a minimum standard for phages being submitted to the FDA for review as investigational new drug candidates.

  10. Characterizing Phage Genomes for Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipson, Casandra W; Voegtly, Logan J; Lueder, Matthew R; Long, Kyle A; Rice, Gregory K; Frey, Kenneth G; Biswas, Biswajit; Cer, Regina Z; Hamilton, Theron; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A

    2018-04-10

    Multi-drug resistance is increasing at alarming rates. The efficacy of phage therapy, treating bacterial infections with bacteriophages alone or in combination with traditional antibiotics, has been demonstrated in emergency cases in the United States and in other countries, however remains to be approved for wide-spread use in the US. One limiting factor is a lack of guidelines for assessing the genomic safety of phage candidates. We present the phage characterization workflow used by our team to generate data for submitting phages to the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) for authorized use. Essential analysis checkpoints and warnings are detailed for obtaining high-quality genomes, excluding undesirable candidates, rigorously assessing a phage genome for safety and evaluating sequencing contamination. This workflow has been developed in accordance with community standards for high-throughput sequencing of viral genomes as well as principles for ideal phages used for therapy. The feasibility and utility of the pipeline is demonstrated on two new phage genomes that meet all safety criteria. We propose these guidelines as a minimum standard for phages being submitted to the FDA for review as investigational new drug candidates.

  11. Vaginal microbial communities from synchronized heifers and cows with reproductive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Moreno, C; Fontana, C; Cocconcelli, P S; Callegari, M L; Otero, M C

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate changes in the resident microbial population in the cranial vaginal mucosa induced by a progesterone-releasing intravaginal device (PRID) compared to the vaginal microbiota of cows with reproductive disorders. Vaginal discharge was evaluated by clinical examination and a Vaginitis Diagnosis Score was performed by exfoliative cytology. All samples classified as positive and some classified as negative by clinical evaluation were later diagnosed as positive for vaginitis by cytological analysis. Bacterial diversity profiles were performed by PCR-DGGE and clustered according to the reproductive health status of the specimens, revealing a correspondence between the structures of the communities in the vagina and the clinical profile. Representative bands from each group were sequenced and identified as Ruminococcus sp., Dialister sp., Escherichia sp./Shigella sp., Virgibacillus sp., Campylobacter sp., Helcoccoccus sp., Staphylococcus sp., Bacillus sp., Actinopolymorpha sp., Exiguobacterium sp., Haemophilus sp./Histophilus sp., Aeribacillus sp., Porphyromonas sp., Lactobacillus sp. and Clostridium sp. Our results contribute to the knowledge of the vaginal microbiome in synchronized heifers showing positive or negative clinical vaginitis. This study contributes to the understanding of a dynamic vaginal colonization by bacterial consortiums during the synchronization with a widely used PRID protocol. Also, the results reveal the presence of well-known metritis-related pathogens as well as emerging uterine opportunistic pathogens. The provided information will allow to carry out further studies to elucidate functional roles of these native micro-organisms in the bovine reproductive tract. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. After vaginal delivery - in the hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    After vaginal birth; Pregnancy - after vaginal delivery; Postpartum care - after vaginal delivery ... blood pressure, heart rate, and the amount of vaginal bleeding Check to make sure your uterus is ...

  13. Vaginal Cancer—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaginal cancer is often squamous cell carcinoma. Other types of vaginal cancer are adenocarcinoma, melanoma, and sarcoma. Infection with certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) causes most vaginal cancer. Find evidence-based information on vaginal cancer treatment and research.

  14. The vaginal mycobiome: A contemporary perspective on fungi in women's health and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, L Latéy; Ravel, Jacques

    2017-04-03

    Most of what is known about fungi in the human vagina has come from culture-based studies and phenotypic characterization of single organisms. Though valuable, these approaches have masked the complexity of fungal communities within the vagina. The vaginal mycobiome has become an emerging field of study as genomics tools are increasingly employed and we begin to appreciate the role these fungal communities play in human health and disease. Though vastly outnumbered by its bacterial counterparts, fungi are important constituents of the vaginal ecosystem in many healthy women. Candida albicans, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, colonizes 20% of women without causing any overt symptoms, yet it is one of the leading causes of infectious vaginitis. Understanding its mechanisms of commensalism and patho-genesis are both essential to developing more effective therapies. Describing the interactions between Candida, bacteria (such as Lactobacillus spp.) and other fungi in the vagina is funda-mental to our characterization of the vaginal mycobiome.

  15. Antibody production in response to staphylococcal MS-1 phage cocktail in patients undergoing phage therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Żaczek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the humoral immune response (through the release of IgG, IgA, and IgM antiphage antibodies to a staphylococcal phage cocktail in patients undergoing experimental phage therapy at the Phage Therapy Unit, Medical Center of the Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy in Wrocław, Poland. We also evaluated whether occurring antiphage antibodies had neutralizing properties towards applied phages (K rate. Among 20 examined patients receiving the MS-1 phage cocktail orally and/or locally, the majority did not show a noticeably higher level of antiphage antibodies in their sera during phage administration. Even in those individual cases with an increased immune response, mostly by induction of IgG and IgM, the presence of antiphage antibodies did not translate into unsatisfactory clinical results of phage therapy. On the other hand, a negative outcome of the treatment occurred in some patients who showed relatively weak production of antiphage antibodies before and during treatment. This may imply that possible induction of antiphage antibodies is not an obstacle to the implementation of phage therapy and support our assumption that the outcome of the phage treatment does not primarily depend on the appearance of antiphage antibodies in sera of patients during therapy. These conclusions are in line with our previous findings. The confirmation of this thesis is of great interest as regards the efficacy of phage therapy in humans.

  16. Antibody Production in Response to Staphylococcal MS-1 Phage Cocktail in Patients Undergoing Phage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żaczek, Maciej; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Owczarek, Barbara; Kopciuch, Agnieszka; Fortuna, Wojciech; Rogóż, Paweł; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the humoral immune response (through the release of IgG, IgA, and IgM antiphage antibodies) to a staphylococcal phage cocktail in patients undergoing experimental phage therapy at the Phage Therapy Unit, Medical Center of the Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy in Wrocław, Poland. We also evaluated whether occurring antiphage antibodies had neutralizing properties toward applied phages (K rate). Among 20 examined patients receiving the MS-1 phage cocktail orally and/or locally, the majority did not show a noticeably higher level of antiphage antibodies in their sera during phage administration. Even in those individual cases with an increased immune response, mostly by induction of IgG and IgM, the presence of antiphage antibodies did not translate into unsatisfactory clinical results of phage therapy. On the other hand, a negative outcome of the treatment occurred in some patients who showed relatively weak production of antiphage antibodies before and during treatment. This may imply that possible induction of antiphage antibodies is not an obstacle to the implementation of phage therapy and support our assumption that the outcome of the phage treatment does not primarily depend on the appearance of antiphage antibodies in sera of patients during therapy. These conclusions are in line with our previous findings. The confirmation of this thesis is of great interest as regards the efficacy of phage therapy in humans.

  17. The PAV trial: Does lactobacillus prevent post-antibiotic vulvovaginal candidiasis? Protocol of a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN24141277

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurley Susan

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicines are used by many consumers, and increasingly are being incorporated into the general practitioner's armamentarium. Despite widespread usage, the evidence base for most complementary therapies is weak or non-existent. Post-antibiotic vulvovaginitis is a common problem in general practice, for which complementary therapies are often used. A recent study in Melbourne, Australia, found that 40% of women with a past history of vulvovaginitis had used probiotic Lactobacillus species to prevent or treat post-antibiotic vulvovaginitis. There is no evidence that this therapy is effective. This study aims to test whether oral or vaginal lactobacillus is effective in the prevention of post-antibiotic vulvovaginitis. Methods/design A randomised placebo-controlled blinded 2 × 2 factorial design is being used. General practitioners or pharmacists approach non-pregnant women, aged 18–50 years, who present with a non-genital infection requiring a short course of oral antibiotics, to participate in the study. Participants are randomised in a four group factorial design either to oral lactobacillus powder or placebo and either vaginal lactobacillus pessaries or placebo. These interventions are taken while on antibiotics and for four days afterwards or until symptoms of vaginitis develop. Women self collect a vaginal swab for culture of Candida species and complete a survey at baseline and again four days after completing their study medications. The sample size (a total of 496 – 124 in each factorial group is calculated to identify a reduction of half in post-antibiotic vulvovaginitis from 23%, while allowing for a 25% drop-out. An independent Data Monitoring Committee is supervising the trial. Analysis will be intention-to-treat, with two pre-specified main comparisons: (i oral lactobacillus versus placebo and (ii vaginal lactobacillus versus placebo.

  18. Vaginal Microbiomes Associated With Aerobic Vaginitis and Bacterial Vaginosis

    OpenAIRE

    Evelyn Kaambo; Evelyn Kaambo; Evelyn Kaambo; Charlene Africa; Ramadhani Chambuso; Ramadhani Chambuso; Jo-Ann Shelley Passmore; Jo-Ann Shelley Passmore; Jo-Ann Shelley Passmore

    2018-01-01

    A healthy vaginal microbiota is considered to be significant for maintaining vaginal health and preventing infections. However, certain vaginal bacterial commensal species serve an important first line of defense of the body. Any disruption of this microbial barrier might result in a number of urogenital conditions including aerobic vaginitis (AV) and bacterial vaginosis (BV). The health of the vagina is closely associated with inhabitant microbiota. Furthermore, these microbes maintain a low...

  19. [Treatment of aerobic vaginitis and clinically uncertain causes of vulvovaginal discomfort].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepický, P; Malina, J; Kuzelová, M

    2003-11-01

    The treatment of clinically uncertain conditions of vaginal discomforts with a mixed preparation of nifuratel + nystatin (Macmiror complex) and the relation of uncertain conditions to aerobic vaginitis. A prospective study. Gynecology-Obstetrics Outpatient Department LEVRET Ltd., AescuLab Ltd., Laboratory of Microbiology, Prague. 50 women with vaginal discomfort, causes of which had not been clarified by gynecological examination, determination of pH and the amine test, were examined by vaginal smears using microscopy. The results were evaluated in relation to aerobic vaginitis in a pure form or in combination with other nosological units. The authors also evaluated results of therapy by oral nifuratel (Macmiror tbl) 3 x 200 mg daily and a vaginal combined preparation containing nifuratel 500 mg + nystatin 200 kIU (Macmiror complex 500 glo vag) for the period of 7 days. In 50 women candida was demonstrated 24 times, presence of key cells 11 times, lactobacillus nine times with more than 50 in the field, six women were affected by aerobic vaginitis. In all these cases the pH was 4.8 or higher, leukocytes were significantly represented in all cases (> 15 in the field), as well as gram-negative bacteria and/or cocci (> 30 in the field), indicating a combined picture of mycosis, anaerobic vaginosis or lactobacillosis with aerobic vaginitis. The therapy was successful in all cases, the relapse of complaints during one month occurred in three cases. Aerobic vaginitis in a pure form or with anaerobic vaginosis, mycosis or lactobacillosis is frequently concealed under clinically uncertain pictures of vulvo-vaginal discomfort. The therapy by a combination of nifurated 3 x 200 mg orally together with the combined vaginal preparation nifuratel 500 mg + nystatin 200 kIU for the period of 7 days exerts high effect and a low number of relapses.

  20. Therapeutic use of chimeric bacteriophage (phage) lysins in staphylococcal endophthalmitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Phage endolysins are peptidoglycan hydrolases that are produced at the end of the phage lytic cycle to digest the host bacterial cell wall, facilitating the release of mature phage progeny. The aim of this study is to determine the antimicrobial activity of chimeric phage lysins against cli...

  1. Alterations in the Vaginal Microbiome by Maternal Stress Are Associated With Metabolic Reprogramming of the Offspring Gut and Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jašarević, Eldin; Howerton, Christopher L; Howard, Christopher D; Bale, Tracy L

    2015-09-01

    The neonate is exposed to the maternal vaginal microbiota during parturition, providing the primary source for normal gut colonization, host immune maturation, and metabolism. These early interactions between the host and microbiota occur during a critical window of neurodevelopment, suggesting early life as an important period of cross talk between the developing gut and brain. Because perturbations in the prenatal environment such as maternal stress increase neurodevelopmental disease risk, disruptions to the vaginal ecosystem could be a contributing factor in significant and long-term consequences for the offspring. Therefore, to examine the hypothesis that changes in the vaginal microbiome are associated with effects on the offspring gut microbiota and on the developing brain, we used genomic, proteomic and metabolomic technologies to examine outcomes in our mouse model of early prenatal stress. Multivariate modeling identified broad proteomic changes to the maternal vaginal environment that influence offspring microbiota composition and metabolic processes essential for normal neurodevelopment. Maternal stress altered proteins related to vaginal immunity and abundance of Lactobacillus, the prominent taxa in the maternal vagina. Loss of maternal vaginal Lactobacillus resulted in decreased transmission of this bacterium to offspring. Further, altered microbiota composition in the neonate gut corresponded with changes in metabolite profiles involved in energy balance, and with region- and sex-specific disruptions of amino acid profiles in the developing brain. Taken together, these results identify the vaginal microbiota as a novel factor by which maternal stress may contribute to reprogramming of the developing brain that may predispose individuals to neurodevelopmental disorders.

  2. Aerobic vaginitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donders, Ggg; Bellen, G; Rezeberga, D

    2011-09-01

    Aerobic vaginitis (AV) is an alteration in vaginal bacterial flora that differs from bacterial vaginosis (BV). AV is characterised by an abnormal vaginal microflora accompanied by an increased localised inflammatory reaction and immune response, as opposed to the suppressed immune response that is characteristic of BV. Given the increased local production of interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 and IL-8 associated with AV during pregnancy, not surprisingly AV is associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery, chorioamnionitis and funisitis of the fetus. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment for AV in pregnant or non-pregnant women, but a broader spectrum drug such as clindamycin is preferred above metronidazole to prevent infection-related preterm birth. The exact role of AV in pregnancy, the potential benefit of screening, and the use of newer local antibiotics, disinfectants, probiotics and immune modulators need further study. © 2011 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2011 RCOG.

  3. Vaginal itching and discharge - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruritus vulvae; Itching - vaginal area; Vulvar itching; Yeast infection - child ... Common causes of vaginal itching and discharge in young girls include: Chemicals such as perfumes and dyes in detergents, fabric softeners, creams, ointments, ...

  4. Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000627.htm Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy To use the sharing ... JavaScript. One out of 10 women will have vaginal bleeding during their 3rd trimester. At times, it ...

  5. Changes in vaginal microbiota following antimicrobial and probiotic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean M. Macklaim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The composition of the vaginal microbiota is known to be important for health. When infections occur, antimicrobial therapy is often poorly efficacious. Objective and design: We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to characterize changes in the bacterial microbiota following oral antimicrobial and probiotic interventions. Results: While the bacterial vaginal profiles of women with vulvovaginal candidiasis were dominated by lactobacilli as in healthy women, and unchanged by therapy, Gardnerella vaginalis, Prevotella, Atopobium, Sneathia, and Megasphaera dominated the vagina of women with bacterial vaginosis (BV, and treatment with tinidazole plus Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14+L. rhamnosus GR-1 resulted in an increased relative abundance of indigenous L. iners or L. crispatus. Conclusions: The ability to restore homeostasis provides a rationale for conjoint use of probiotics with antibiotic treatment of BV.

  6. Vaginal pH and microbicidal lactic acid when lactobacilli dominate the microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hanlon, Deirdre E; Moench, Thomas R; Cone, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    Lactic acid at sufficiently acidic pH is a potent microbicide, and lactic acid produced by vaginal lactobacilli may help protect against reproductive tract infections. However, previous observations likely underestimated healthy vaginal acidity and total lactate concentration since they failed to exclude women without a lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota, and also did not account for the high carbon dioxide, low oxygen environment of the vagina. Fifty-six women with low (0-3) Nugent scores (indicating a lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota) and no symptoms of reproductive tract disease or infection, provided a total of 64 cervicovaginal fluid samples using a collection method that avoided the need for sample dilution and rigorously minimized aerobic exposure. The pH of samples was measured by microelectrode immediately after collection and under a physiological vaginal concentration of CO2. Commercial enzymatic assays of total lactate and total acetate concentrations were validated for use in CVF, and compared to the more usual HPLC method. The average pH of the CVF samples was 3.5 ± 0.3 (mean ± SD), range 2.8-4.2, and the average total lactate was 1.0% ± 0.2% w/v; this is a five-fold higher average hydrogen ion concentration (lower pH) and a fivefold higher total lactate concentration than in the prior literature. The microbicidal form of lactic acid (protonated lactic acid) was therefore eleven-fold more concentrated, and a markedly more potent microbicide, than indicated by prior research. This suggests that when lactobacilli dominate the vaginal microbiota, women have significantly more lactic acid-mediated protection against infections than currently believed. Our results invite further evaluations of the prophylactic and therapeutic actions of vaginal lactic acid, whether provided in situ by endogenous lactobacilli, by probiotic lactobacilli, or by products that reinforce vaginal lactic acid.

  7. Phages of life - the path to pharma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Amanda; Hill, Colin

    2018-02-01

    Bacteriophage (phage) therapy has encountered both enthusiasm and scepticism in the past century. New antimicrobial strategies against lethal pathogens are now a top priority for the World Health Organization, and although compassionate use of phages recently met with significant success, regulated clinical interventions seem unlikely in the near future. The hundredth anniversary of their discovery seems an appropriate time for a revival of phage therapy, particularly as the dilemma of antibiotic resistance grows. Phages are ubiquitous in the environment, on our food and in and on our bodies. Their influence on human health is currently being evaluated, and in this mini-review, we examine data from recent metagenomic studies that propose a role for phages in the structure of the microbiome and in health and disease. We assess evidence for phages as vehicles for gene transfer in the context of antibiotic resistance and discuss challenges and opportunities along the critical path from phage discovery to a patient-focused pharmaceutical intervention. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Phage Therapy -- Everything Old Is New again

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Kropinski

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of bacterial viruses (bacteriophages or phages proved pivotal in the nascence of the disciplines of molecular biology and microbial genetics, providing important information on the central processes of the bacterial cell (DNA replication, transcription and translation and on how DNA can be transferred from one cell to another. As a result of the pioneering genetics studies and modern genomics, it is now known that phages have contributed to the evolution of the microbial cell and to its pathogenic potential. Because of their ability to transmit genes, phages have been exploited to develop cloning vector systems. They also provide a plethora of enzymes for the modern molecular biologist. Until the introduction of antibiotics, phages were used to treat bacterial infections (with variable success. Western science is now having to re-evaluate the application of phage therapy -- a therapeutic modality that never went out of vogue in Eastern Europe -- because of the emergence of an alarming number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The present article introduces the reader to phage biology, and the benefits and pitfalls of phage therapy in humans and animals.

  9. Development of a phage typing system for Staphylococcus hyicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1993-01-01

    Bacteriophages were released by 98% of 100 Staphylococcus hyicus strains studied after treatment with mitomycin C. Twenty-three phages with different lytic spectra were included in a phage typing system and used f or typing S. hyicus. On a test-set of 100 epidemiologically unrelated S. hyicus...... strains isolated from Danish pig herds, the phages were able to type 92% of the strains, producing 16 different phage types. Reproducibility of the phage typing system after subculture of the strains and using fresh phage stock was 96%. Typability ranged from 52 to 80% when typing porcine strains...... originating from other countries. Although phages were isolated from porcine skin strains exclusively, the system produced phage types in S. hyicus strains of bovine origin. Ten strains of S. aureus and S. chromogenes were not typable by these phages. Strains belonging to one phage type (A/B/C/W) were...

  10. Complete genome sequence of Vibrio anguillarum phage CHOED successfully used for phage therapy in aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romero, Jaime; Higuera, Gastón; Gajardo, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum phage CHOED was isolated from Chilean mussels. It is a virulent phage showing effective inhibition of V. anguillarum. CHOED has potential in phage therapy, because it can protect fish from vibriosis in fish farms. Here, we announce the completely sequenced genome of V....... anguillarum phage CHOED....

  11. Heat tolerance of dairy lactococcal c2 phages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Cecilie Lykke Marvig; Basheer, Aideh; Neve, H.

    2011-01-01

    -order kinetics with correlation coefficients of 0.96–0.99. D70-values of 12 s and 16.6 min were calculated for the most sensitive and resistant phage, respectively. Release of phage DNA from capsids, and disintegration of phage heads and tails were among the first morphological changes observed for moderately...... thermal inactivated lysates (15% phage inactivation) of the heat tolerant phage P635....

  12. [Isolation and characterization of siphovirus phages infecting bovine Streptococcus agalactiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Qinqin; Yang, Yongchun; Lu, Chengping

    2016-02-04

    To isolate and identify Streptococcus agalactiae phages and screen candidate phages to control infection caused by bovine S. agalactiae. We used two methods for isolation of S. agalactiae phages, namely (1) isolation of phages from milk and environmental samples, and (2) isolation of phages via induction of lysogens with Mitomycin C. Double-layer agar culture method was used to purify phages. Then the newly obtained phages, with S. agalactiae phage JX01 isolated from mastitis milk, were comparatively analyzed in the following aspects: morphology of phages by transmission electron microscopy, host range of phages to 55 S. agalactiae strains and other Streptococcus strains, phages DNA using EcoR I, Xba I, Pst I and Sal I, the optical multiplicity of infection, absorption curve and one step growth curve, and the stability of phages at different storage conditions. The comparative analysis of the 3 novel phages LYGO9, HZ04 and pA11 (induced from S. agalctiae bovine clinical isolate HAJL2011070601) with JX01 showed that the 4 phages were classified as the member of Siphovirdae family. EcoR I, Sal I, Xba I and Pst I separately digested the 4 phages DNA provided 4, 3, 3 and 2 profiles, respectively. This suggested that they were different strains. All the 4 phages specifically infected bovine S. agalactiae isolates. LYGO9, pA11, JX01 and HZ04 could lyse 12, 13, 20 and 23 of 42 tested bovine S. agalctiae isolates, respectively. This clearly indicated that these 4 phages are closely related. The 3 new phages which specifically lyse bovine S. agalactiae isolates are siphovirus phages. Phage LYGO9 was shown having a short latent period and a larger burst size.

  13. The Baseplate of Lactobacillus delbrueckii Bacteriophage Ld17 Harbors a Glycerophosphodiesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Anneleen; Sadovskaya, Irina; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Blangy, Stéphanie; Spinelli, Silvia; Casey, Eoghan; Mahony, Jennifer; Noben, Jean-Paul; Dal Bello, Fabio; Cambillau, Christian; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2016-08-05

    Glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterases (GDPDs; EC 3.1.4.46) typically hydrolyze glycerophosphodiesters to sn-glycerol 3-phosphate (Gro3P) and their corresponding alcohol during patho/physiological processes in bacteria and eukaryotes. GDPD(-like) domains were identified in the structural particle of bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) specifically infecting Gram-positive bacteria. The GDPD of phage 17 (Ld17; GDPDLd17), representative of the group b Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (Ldb)-infecting bacteriophages, was shown to hydrolyze, besides the simple glycerophosphodiester, two complex surface-associated carbohydrates of the Ldb17 cell envelope: the Gro3P decoration of the major surface polysaccharide d-galactan and the oligo(glycerol phosphate) backbone of the partially glycosylated cell wall teichoic acid, a minor Ldb17 cell envelope component. Degradation of cell wall teichoic acid occurs according to an exolytic mechanism, and Gro3P substitution is presumed to be inhibitory for GDPDLd17 activity. The presence of the GDPDLd17 homotrimer in the viral baseplate structure involved in phage-host interaction together with the dependence of native GDPD activity, adsorption, and efficiency of plating of Ca(2+) ions supports a role for GDPDLd17 activity during phage adsorption and/or phage genome injection. In contrast to GDPDLd17, we could not identify any enzymatic activity for the GDPD-like domain in the neck passage structure of phage 340, a 936-type Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bacteriophage. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. The prophages of Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533: comparative genomics and transcription analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, Marco; Canchaya, Carlos; Pridmore, R. David; Bruessow, Harald

    2004-01-01

    Two non-inducible, but apparently complete prophages were identified in the genome of the sequenced Lactobacillus johnsonii strain NCC 533. The 38- and 40-kb-long prophages Lj928 and Lj965 represent distinct lineages of Sfi11-like pac-site Siphoviridae unrelated at the DNA sequence level. The deduced structural proteins from Lj928 demonstrated aa sequence identity with Lactococcus lactis phage TP901-1, while Lj965 shared sequence links with Streptococcus thermophilus phage O1205. With the exception of tRNA genes, inserted between DNA replication and DNA packaging genes, the transcription of the prophage was restricted to the genome segments near both attachment sites. Transcribed genes unrelated to phage functions were inserted between the phage repressor and integrase genes; one group of genes shared sequence relatedness with a mobile DNA element in Staphylococcus aureus. A short, but highly transcribed region was located between the phage lysin and right attachment site; it lacked a protein-encoding function in one prophage

  15. Analysis of Vaginal Cell Populations during Experimental Vaginal Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidel, Paul L.; Luo, Wei; Steele, Chad; Chabain, Joseph; Baker, Marc; Wormley, Floyd

    1999-01-01

    Studies with an estrogen-dependent murine model of vaginal candidiasis suggest that local cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is more important than systemic CMI for protection against vaginitis. The present study, however, showed that, compared to uninfected mice, little to no change in the percentage or types of vaginal T cells occurred during a primary vaginal infection or during a secondary vaginal infection where partial protection was observed. Furthermore, depletion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) had no effect on infection in the presence or absence of pseudoestrus. These results indicate a lack of demonstrable effects by systemic CMI or PMN against vaginitis and suggest that if local T cells are important, they are functioning without showing significant increases in numbers within the vaginal mucosa during infection. PMID:10338532

  16. Three New Escherichia coli Phages from the Human Gut Show Promising Potential for Phage Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Dalmasso

    Full Text Available With the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria the use of bacteriophages (phages is gaining renewed interest as promising anti-microbial agents. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize phages from human fecal samples. Three new coliphages, ɸAPCEc01, ɸAPCEc02 and ɸAPCEc03, were isolated. Their phenotypic and genomic characteristics, and lytic activity against biofilm, and in combination with ciprofloxacin, were investigated. All three phages reduced the growth of E. coli strain DPC6051 at multiplicity of infection (MOI between 10-3 and 105. A cocktail of all three phages completely inhibited the growth of E. coli. The phage cocktail also reduced biofilm formation and prevented the emergence of phage-resistant mutants which occurred with single phage. When combined with ciprofloxacin, phage alone or in cocktail inhibited the growth of E. coli and prevented the emergence of resistant mutants. These three new phages are promising biocontrol agents for E. coli infections.

  17. Lactobacillus Decelerates Cervical Epithelial Cell Cycle Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielfort, Katarina; Weyler, Linda; Söderholm, Niklas; Engelbrecht, Mattias; Löfmark, Sonja; Aro, Helena

    2013-01-01

    We investigated cell cycle progression in epithelial cervical ME-180 cells during colonization of three different Lactobacillus species utilizing live cell microscopy, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays, and flow cytometry. The colonization of these ME-180 cells by L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri, originating from human gastric epithelia and saliva, respectively, was shown to reduce cell cycle progression and to cause host cells to accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The G1 phase accumulation in L. rhamnosus-colonized cells was accompanied by the up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of p21. By contrast, the vaginal isolate L. crispatus did not affect cell cycle progression. Furthermore, both the supernatants from the lactic acid-producing L. rhamnosus colonies and lactic acid added to cell culture media were able to reduce the proliferation of ME-180 cells. In this study, we reveal the diversity of the Lactobacillus species to affect host cell cycle progression and demonstrate that L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri exert anti-proliferative effects on human cervical carcinoma cells. PMID:23675492

  18. Lactobacillus decelerates cervical epithelial cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Vielfort

    Full Text Available We investigated cell cycle progression in epithelial cervical ME-180 cells during colonization of three different Lactobacillus species utilizing live cell microscopy, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays, and flow cytometry. The colonization of these ME-180 cells by L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri, originating from human gastric epithelia and saliva, respectively, was shown to reduce cell cycle progression and to cause host cells to accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The G1 phase accumulation in L. rhamnosus-colonized cells was accompanied by the up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of p21. By contrast, the vaginal isolate L. crispatus did not affect cell cycle progression. Furthermore, both the supernatants from the lactic acid-producing L. rhamnosus colonies and lactic acid added to cell culture media were able to reduce the proliferation of ME-180 cells. In this study, we reveal the diversity of the Lactobacillus species to affect host cell cycle progression and demonstrate that L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri exert anti-proliferative effects on human cervical carcinoma cells.

  19. Is vaginal hyaluronic acid as effective as vaginal estriol for vaginal dryness relief?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stute, Petra

    2013-12-01

    In a multicenter, randomized, controlled, open-label, parallel- group trial hyaluronic acid vaginal gel (Hyalofemme) was compared to estriol vaginal cream (Ovestin) in women with vaginal dryness due to various causes. A total of 144 supposedly postmenopausal women below age 70 years were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either receive hyaluronic acid vaginal gel (5 g per application) or estriol vaginal cream (0.5 g cream per application = 0.5 mg estriol) every 3 days for a total of ten applications, respectively. Exclusion criteria included vaginal infections, conventional contraindications to estrogens, use of vaginal products other than the investigational compounds, being unmarried, pregnant, or breastfeeding. The aim of the study was to test for non-inferiority of hyaluronic acid vaginal gel compared to estriol vaginal cream. The primary efficacy end point was the percentage (%) improvement in vaginal dryness, with the secondary end points being the percentage (%) improvements in vaginal itching, burning, and dyspareunia. Efficacy was assessed by using a visual analog scale (VAS) (0-10; 0 = absent, 10 = intolerable) at baseline (V0), during telephone contact after the third administration (V1), and at the final visit after the tenth administration (V2). Safety parameters included vaginal pH, endometrial thickness, and a vaginal smear for vaginal microecosystem assessment. Adverse events were recorded according to international guidelines. 133 women completed the study. At baseline, participants' characteristics did not differ significantly. Mean age was 54 years, time since menopause was 5 years on average, and cause of menopause was mostly natural. However, mean menstrual cycle days were also reported, although according to inclusion criteria only postmenopausal women were eligible for the study. At V1, an improvement in vaginal dryness was reported by about 49 % of women using hyaluronic acid vaginal gel, and by 53 % of women using estriol vaginal cream (p = 0

  20. The composition and stability of the vaginal microbiota of normal pregnant women is different from that of non-pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romero, Roberto; Hassan, Sonia S; Gajer, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    was higher than that of non-pregnant women; however, during normal pregnancy, bacterial communities shift almost exclusively from one CST dominated by Lactobacillus spp. to another CST dominated by Lactobacillus spp. CONCLUSION: We report the first longitudinal study of the vaginal microbiota in normal......BACKGROUND: This study was undertaken to characterize the vaginal microbiota throughout normal human pregnancy using sequence-based techniques. We compared the vaginal microbial composition of non-pregnant patients with a group of pregnant women who delivered at term. RESULTS: A retrospective case......-control longitudinal study was designed and included non-pregnant women (n = 32) and pregnant women who delivered at term (38 to 42 weeks) without complications (n = 22). Serial samples of vaginal fluid were collected from both non-pregnant and pregnant patients. A 16S rRNA gene sequence-based survey was conducted...

  1. Supersize me: Cronobacter sakazakii phage GAP32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasifar, Reza; Griffiths, Mansel W. [Canadian Research Institute for Food Safety, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Sabour, Parviz M. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Guelph Food Research Centre, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 5C9 (Canada); Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang [Department of Microbiology-Infectiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Vandersteegen, Katrien; Lavigne, Rob [Laboratory of Gene Technology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Noben, Jean-Paul [Biomedical Research Institute and Transnational University Limburg, School of Life Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Alanis Villa, Argentina; Abbasifar, Arash [Canadian Research Institute for Food Safety, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Nash, John H.E. [Public Health Agency of Canada, Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 3W4 (Canada); Kropinski, Andrew M., E-mail: akropins@uoguelph.ca [Public Health Agency of Canada, Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 3W4 (Canada); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Cronobacter sakazakii is a Gram-negative pathogen found in milk-based formulae that causes infant meningitis. Bacteriophages have been proposed to control bacterial pathogens; however, comprehensive knowledge about a phage is required to ensure its safety before clinical application. We have characterized C. sakazakii phage vB{sub C}saM{sub G}AP32 (GAP32), which possesses the second largest sequenced phage genome (358,663 bp). A total of 571 genes including 545 protein coding sequences and 26 tRNAs were identified, thus more genes than in the smallest bacterium, Mycoplasma genitalium G37. BLASTP and HHpred searches, together with proteomic analyses reveal that only 23.9% of the putative proteins have defined functions. Some of the unique features of this phage include: a chromosome condensation protein, two copies of the large subunit terminase, a predicted signal-arrest-release lysin; and an RpoD-like protein, which is possibly involved in the switch from immediate early to delayed early transcription. Its closest relatives are all extremely large myoviruses, namely coliphage PBECO4 and Klebsiella phage vB{sub K}leM-RaK2, with whom it shares approximately 44% homologous proteins. Since the homologs are not evenly distributed, we propose that these three phages belong to a new subfamily. - Highlights: • Cronobacter sakazakii phage vB{sub C}saM{sub G}AP32 has a genome of 358,663 bp. • It encodes 545 proteins which is more than Mycoplasma genitalium G37. • It is a member of the Myoviridae. • It is peripherally related to coliphage PBECO4 and Klebsiella phage vB{sub K}leM-RaK2. • GAP32 encodes a chromosome condensation protein.

  2. Complete Genome Sequences of 44 Arthrobacter Phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyczek, Karen K; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Adair, Tamarah L; Adams, Sandra D; Ball, Sarah L; Benjamin, Robert C; Bonilla, J Alfred; Breitenberger, Caroline A; Daniels, Charles J; Gaffney, Bobby L; Harrison, Melinda; Hughes, Lee E; King, Rodney A; Krukonis, Gregory P; Lopez, A Javier; Monsen-Collar, Kirsten; Pizzorno, Marie C; Rinehart, Claire A; Staples, Amanda K; Stowe, Emily L; Garlena, Rebecca A; Russell, Daniel A; Cresawn, Steven G; Pope, Welkin H; Hatfull, Graham F

    2018-02-01

    We report here the complete genome sequences of 44 phages infecting Arthrobacter sp. strain ATCC 21022. These phages have double-stranded DNA genomes with sizes ranging from 15,680 to 70,707 bp and G+C contents from 45.1% to 68.5%. All three tail types (belonging to the families Siphoviridae , Myoviridae , and Podoviridae ) are represented. Copyright © 2018 Klyczek et al.

  3. The composition of the vaginal microbiome in first trimester pregnant women influences the level of autophagy and stress in vaginal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasioudis, Dimitrios; Forney, Larry J; Schneider, G Maria; Gliniewicz, Karol; France, Michael T; Boester, Allison; Sawai, Mio; Scholl, Jessica; Witkin, Steven S

    2017-09-01

    Epithelial cells lining the vagina are major components of genital tract immunity. The influence of the vaginal microbiome on properties of host epithelial cells is largely unexplored. We evaluated whether differences in the most abundant lactobacilli species or bacterial genera in the vagina of first trimester pregnant women were associated with variations in the extent of stress and autophagy in vaginal epithelial cells. Vaginal swabs from 154 first trimester pregnant women were analyzed for bacterial composition by amplification and sequencing of the V1-V3 region of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. Vaginal epithelial cells were lysed and autophagy quantitated by measurement of p62. Intracellular levels of the inducible 70kDa heat shock protein (hsp70), an indicator of cell stress and an autophagy inhibitor, were determined. When Lactobacillus crispatus was the most abundant member of the vaginal microbiota, epithelial p62 and hsp70 levels were lowest as compared to when other bacterial taxa were most abundant. The highest concentrations of p62 and hsp70 were associated with Streptococcus and Bifidobacterium abundance. The p62 level associated with Gardnerella abundance was lower than that observed when lactobacilli other than L. crispatus were most abundant. In conclusion, in the first trimester of pregnancy the abundance of different bacterial taxa is associated with variations in autophagy and magnitude of the stress response in vaginal epithelial cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Staphylococci Phages Family: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Van Melderen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to their crucial role in pathogenesis and virulence, phages of Staphylococcus aureus have been extensively studied. Most of them encode and disseminate potent staphylococcal virulence factors. In addition, their movements contribute to the extraordinary versatility and adaptability of this prominent pathogen by improving genome plasticity. In addition to S. aureus, phages from coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS are gaining increasing interest. Some of these species, such as S. epidermidis, cause nosocomial infections and are therefore problematic for public health. This review provides an overview of the staphylococcal phages family extended to CoNS phages. At the morphological level, all these phages characterized so far belong to the Caudovirales order and are mainly temperate Siphoviridae. At the molecular level, comparative genomics revealed an extensive mosaicism, with genes organized into functional modules that are frequently exchanged between phages. Evolutionary relationships within this family, as well as with other families, have been highlighted. All these aspects are of crucial importance for our understanding of evolution and emergence of pathogens among bacterial species such as Staphylococci.

  5. Association between the vaginal microbiota, menopause status, and signs of vulvovaginal atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotman, Rebecca M; Shardell, Michelle D; Gajer, Pawel; Fadrosh, Doug; Chang, Kathryn; Silver, Michelle I; Viscidi, Raphael P; Burke, Anne E; Ravel, Jacques; Gravitt, Patti E

    2014-05-01

    The vaginal microbiota helps protect the female genital tract from disease. We sought to describe the composition of the vaginal microbiota in premenopausal, perimenopausal, and postmenopausal women and to explore the association between the microbiota and vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA). Eighty-seven women (aged 35-60 y) were classified as premenopausal (n = 30), perimenopausal (n = 29), or postmenopausal (n = 28) according to Stages of Reproductive Aging Workshop guidelines. Midvaginal bacterial community composition was characterized by 16S ribosomal RNA gene analysis. Bacterial communities clustered into six community state types (CSTs), of which four were dominated by Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus iners, or Lactobacillus jensenii, and two (CST IV-A and CST IV-B) had low relative abundance of Lactobacillus. CST IV-A was characterized by Streptococcus and Prevotella, whereas CST IV-B was characterized by Atopobium. There were significant associations between menopause stage and CST (P = 0.004) and between VVA and CST (P = 0.002). Perimenopausal women were more likely to be classified as CST IV-A or L. gasseri CST, whereas postmenopausal women were often classified as CST IV-A. CSTs dominated by L. crispatus and L. iners were more prevalent in premenopausal women. Nineteen participants had signs of mild or moderate VVA. Compared with women with no VVA, the vaginal microbiota of women with mild or moderate atrophy had 25-fold greater odds of being classified as CST IV-A versus L. crispatus CST (adjusted odds ratio, 25.89; 95% credible interval, 2.98-406.79). A distinct bacterial community state (CST IV-A) with a low relative abundance of Lactobacillus is associated with VVA. Future studies recruiting a larger number of women are needed to replicate the findings. This study provides an impetus for future longitudinal studies designed to manage, modulate, and restore vaginal microbiota homeostasis, which would provide stronger evidence for

  6. Vaginal health in contraceptive vaginal ring users - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lete, Iñaki; Cuesta, María C; Marín, Juan M; Guerra, Sandra

    2013-08-01

    To provide an overview of the available data from clinical studies of vaginal conditions in women who use a vaginal ring as a contraceptive. A systematic review of the literature. Millions of women have already used the ethylene vinyl acetate vaginal ring that releases ethinylestradiol and etonogestrel for contraception. Because of its small size, more than four out of five women using the ring report that they do not feel it, even during sexual intercourse. No colposcopic or cytological changes have been observed in users, although approximately 10% have increased vaginal discharge. While in vitro studies have shown adhesion of Candida yeasts to the vaginal ring surface, clinical studies have not demonstrated a greater incidence of Candida infections compared to users of equivalent oral contraceptives. Some clinical studies suggest a lower incidence of bacterial vaginosis. No interaction exists between concomitant use of the vaginal ring and other drugs or products for vaginal use. The use of a contraceptive vaginal ring does not alter the vaginal ecosystem and therefore does not substantially affect vaginal health.

  7. Longitudinal analysis reveals characteristically high proportions of bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria and temporal variability of vaginal microbiota in northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Lei, Ai-Hua; Zheng, Hong-Yi; Lyu, Long-Bao; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2015-09-18

    The complex and dynamic vaginal microbial ecosystem is critical to both health and disease of the host. Studies focusing on how vaginal microbiota influences HIV-1 infection may face limitations in selecting proper animal models. Given that northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina) are susceptible to HIV-1 infection, they may be an optimal animal model for elucidating the mechanisms by which vaginal microbiota contributes to resistance and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. However, little is known about the composition and temporal variability of vaginal microbiota of the northern pig-tailed macaque. Here, we present a comprehensive catalog of the composition and temporal dynamics of vaginal microbiota of two healthy northern pig-tailed macaques over 19 weeks using 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. We found remarkably high proportions of a diverse array of anaerobic bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis. Atopobium and Sneathia were dominant genera, and interestingly, we demonstrated the presence of Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota. Moreover, longitudinal analysis demonstrated that the temporal dynamics of the vaginal microbiota were considerably individualized. Finally, network analysis revealed that vaginal pH may influence the temporal dynamics of the vaginal microbiota, suggesting that inter-subject variability of vaginal bacterial communities could be mirrored in inter-subject variation in correlation profiles of species with each other and with vaginal pH over time. Our results suggest that the northern pig-tailed macaque could be an ideal animal model for prospective investigation of the mechanisms by which vaginal microbiota influence susceptibility and resistance to HIV-1 infection in the context of highly polymicrobial and Lactobacillus-dominated states.

  8. Taxonomic and Strain-Specific Identification of the Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus 35 within the Lactobacillus casei Group▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudeyras, Sophie; Marchandin, Hélène; Fajon, Céline; Forestier, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    Lactobacilli are lactic acid bacteria that are widespread in the environment, including the human diet and gastrointestinal tract. Some Lactobacillus strains are regarded as probiotics because they exhibit beneficial health effects on their host. In this study, the long-used probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus 35 was characterized at a molecular level and compared with seven reference strains from the Lactobacillus casei group. Analysis of rrn operon sequences confirmed that L. rhamnosus 35 indeed belongs to the L. rhamnosus species, and both temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis and ribotyping showed that it is closer to the probiotic strain L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103 (also known as L. rhamnosus GG) than to the species type strain. In addition, L. casei ATCC 334 gathered in a coherent cluster with L. paracasei type strains, unlike L. casei ATCC 393, which was closer to L. zeae; this is evidence of the lack of relatedness between the two L. casei strains. Further characterization of the eight strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis repetitive DNA element-based PCR identified distinct patterns for each strain, whereas two isolates of L. rhamnosus 35 sampled 40 years apart could not be distinguished. By subtractive hybridization using the L. rhamnosus GG genome as a driver, we were able to isolate five L. rhamnosus 35-specific sequences, including two phage-related ones. The primer pairs designed to amplify these five regions allowed us to develop rapid and highly specific PCR-based identification methods for the probiotic strain L. rhamnosus 35. PMID:18326671

  9. Determination of Antibacterial and Technological Properties of Vaginal Lactobacilli for Their Potential Application in Dairy Products

    OpenAIRE

    Siroli, Lorenzo; Patrignani, Francesca; Serrazanetti, Diana I.; Parolin, Carola; ?ahui Palomino, Rogers A.; Vitali, Beatrice; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2017-01-01

    Functional foods could differently affect human health in relation to the gender. Recent studies have highlighted the anti-Candida and anti-Chlamydia activities of some Lactobacillus strains isolated from the vagina of healthy women. Considering these important beneficial activities on women's health, the preparation of functional food containing active vaginal lactobacilli can represent a great scientific challenge for the female gender. In this context, the aim of this work was to study som...

  10. Changes in the predominant human Lactobacillus flora during in vitro fertilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forsum Urban

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signature matching of nucleotide sequences in the V1 and V3 regions 16S rRNA genes using pyrosequencing technology is a powerful tool for typing vaginal Lactobacilli to the species level and has been used for investigating the vaginal microbial niche. Methods This study has characterized the normal cultivable vaginal Lactobacillus flora at varying estradiol levels in plasma; the study comprised 17 patients undergoing ovarian stimulation for In Vitro Fertilization (IVF treatment. The vaginal status of each participant was initially assessed as normal according to Amsel and Nugent criteria. Results L. crispatus, L. gasseri and/or L. jensenii were present in 10 of the patients throughout the study period, and little variation among these three species was encountered in individual patients. The flora of three women was dominated by L. delbrüeckii, L. rhamnosus or L. vaginalis. One woman exhibited a dominance of L. iners. The flora of the remaining three women were initially dominated by L. rhamnosus or L. reuteri, but as their estrogen levels rose, their flora composition altered, to become dominated by one of the three species most common in a normal, healthy vagina. Conclusion Signature matching of nucleotide sequences in the V1 and V3 regions of 16S rRNA genes is a discriminative tool for the study of vaginal Lactobacilli and can be used to track the Lactobacillus flora under a variety of physiological conditions.

  11. The restoration of the vaginal microbiota after treatment for bacterial vaginosis with metronidazole or probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Chen, Weiguang; Luo, Yueqiu; Yuan, Li; Xia, Yaxian; Nelson, Karen E; Huang, Shaolei; Zhang, Shaoen; Wang, Yuezhu; Yuan, Jieli; Li, Lanjuan; Xiang, Charlie

    2013-04-01

    Whether or not treatment with antibiotics or probiotics for bacterial vaginosis (BV) is associated with a change in the diversity of vaginal microbiota in women was investigated. One hundred fifteen women, consisting of 30 healthy subjects, 30 BV-positive control subjects, 30 subjects with BV treated with a 7-day metronidazole regimen, and 25 subjects with BV treated with a 10-day probiotics regimen, were analyzed to determine the efficacy and disparity of diversity and richness of vaginal microbiota using 454 pyrosequencing. Follow-up visits at days 5 and 30 showed a greater BV cure rate in the probiotics-treated subjects (88.0 and 96 %, respectively) compared to the metronidazole-treated subjects (83.3 and 70 %, respectively [p = 0.625 at day 5 and p = 0.013 at day 30]). Treatment with metronidazole reduced the taxa diversity and eradicated most of the BV-associated phylotypes, while probiotics only suppressed the overgrowth and re-established vaginal homeostasis gradually and steadily. Despite significant interindividual variation, the microbiota of the actively treated groups or participants constituted a unique profile. Along with the decrease in pathogenic bacteria, such as Gardnerella, Atopobium, Prevotella, Megasphaera, Coriobacteriaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Mycoplasma, and Sneathia, a Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota was recovered. Acting as vaginal sentinels and biomarkers, the relative abundance of Lactobacillus and pathogenic bacteria determined the consistency of the BV clinical and microbiologic cure rates, as well as recurrent BV. Both 7-day intravaginal metronidazole and 10-day intravaginal probiotics have good efficacy against BV, while probiotics maintained normal vaginal microbiota longer due to effective and steady vaginal microbiota restoration, which provide new insights into BV treatment.

  12. Investigation of vaginal microbiota in sexually active women using hormonal contraceptives in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi Yasmeen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies report association of contraceptives with moderate increase in urinary tract infection among sexually active premenopausal women. The aim of our study was to find out whether the use of hormonal contraceptives has any effect on microbiota of the vagina in the contraceptives users in Khairpur Sindh Pakistan. Methods A prospective study in woman population of Khairpur Sindh Pakistan aged 20–30 years and 31–40 years, using Hormonal contraceptives was carried out. High vaginal swab samples (n = 100 were collected from the test populations as well as control group (n = 100 and investigated for vaginal microbial flora using standard microbiological and biochemical techniques. Results Vaginal swabs culturing from hormonal contraceptives users in the age group 20–30 years showed statistically insignificant Candida sp (10% samples, and statistically significant (p Staphylococcus saprophyticus. (18% samples, Streptococcus agalactiae (23% samples, Escherichia coli (28% samples and Lactobacillus fermentum (32% samples. In the age group 31–40 years, statistically significant percentage of samples (p Lactobacillus fermentum (28%, Candida sp (24%, and E. coli, (24% where statistically insignificant samples showed Staphylococcus saprophyticus (13% and Streptococcus agalactiae (11%. Conclusions The use of hormonal contraceptives alters the normal microbiota of vagina in women according to the age. Lactobacillus fermentum appeared as the predominant species followed by E. coli among the age group of 20–30 years and, Lactobacillus fermentum, Candida sp and E. coli as predominant among women of age group 31–40 years when compared to corresponding control groups. An inverse relationship between E. coli and Lactobacillus fermentum was observed in the women aged 20–30 years.

  13. Colonisation of a phage susceptible Campylobacter jejuni population in two phage positive broiler flocks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Kittler

    Full Text Available The pathogens Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are commensals in the poultry intestine and campylobacteriosis is one of the most frequent foodborne diseases in developed and developing countries. Phages were identified to be effective in reducing intestinal Campylobacter load and this was evaluated, in the first field trials which were recently carried out. The aim of this study was to further investigate Campylobacter population dynamics during phage application on a commercial broiler farm. This study determines the superiority in colonisation of a Campylobacter type found in a field trial that was susceptible to phages in in vitro tests. The colonisation factors, i.e. motility and gamma glutamyl transferase activity, were increased in this type. The clustering in phylogenetic comparisons of MALDI-TOF spectra did not match the ST, biochemical phenotype and phage susceptibility. Occurrence of Campylobacter jejuni strains and phage susceptibility types with different colonisation potential seem to play a very important role in the success of phage therapy in commercial broiler houses. Thus, mechanisms of both, phage susceptibility and Campylobacter colonisation should be further investigated and considered when composing phage cocktails.

  14. Toward Understanding Phage:Host Interactions in the Rumen; Complete Genome Sequences of Lytic Phages Infecting Rumen Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalind A. Gilbert

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The rumen is known to harbor dense populations of bacteriophages (phages predicted to be capable of infecting a diverse range of rumen bacteria. While bacterial genome sequencing projects are revealing the presence of phages which can integrate their DNA into the genome of their host to form stable, lysogenic associations, little is known of the genetics of phages which utilize lytic replication. These phages infect and replicate within the host, culminating in host lysis, and the release of progeny phage particles. While lytic phages for rumen bacteria have been previously isolated, their genomes have remained largely uncharacterized. Here we report the first complete genome sequences of lytic phage isolates specifically infecting three genera of rumen bacteria: Bacteroides, Ruminococcus, and Streptococcus. All phages were classified within the viral order Caudovirales and include two phage morphotypes, representative of the Siphoviridae and Podoviridae families. The phage genomes displayed modular organization and conserved viral genes were identified which enabled further classification and determination of closest phage relatives. Co-examination of bacterial host genomes led to the identification of several genes responsible for modulating phage:host interactions, including CRISPR/Cas elements and restriction-modification phage defense systems. These findings provide new genetic information and insights into how lytic phages may interact with bacteria of the rumen microbiome.

  15. Vaginal Microbiomes Associated With Aerobic Vaginitis and Bacterial Vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaambo, Evelyn; Africa, Charlene; Chambuso, Ramadhani; Passmore, Jo-Ann Shelley

    2018-01-01

    A healthy vaginal microbiota is considered to be significant for maintaining vaginal health and preventing infections. However, certain vaginal bacterial commensal species serve an important first line of defense of the body. Any disruption of this microbial barrier might result in a number of urogenital conditions including aerobic vaginitis (AV) and bacterial vaginosis (BV). The health of the vagina is closely associated with inhabitant microbiota. Furthermore, these microbes maintain a low vaginal pH, prevent the acquisition of pathogens, stimulate or moderate the local innate immune system, and further protect against complications during pregnancies. Therefore, this review will focus on vaginal microbial "health" in the lower reproductive tract of women and on the physiological characteristics that determine the well-being of reproductive health. In addition, we explore the distinct versus shared characteristics of BV and AV, which are commonly associated with increased risk for preterm delivery.

  16. Vaginal Microbiomes Associated With Aerobic Vaginitis and Bacterial Vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Kaambo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A healthy vaginal microbiota is considered to be significant for maintaining vaginal health and preventing infections. However, certain vaginal bacterial commensal species serve an important first line of defense of the body. Any disruption of this microbial barrier might result in a number of urogenital conditions including aerobic vaginitis (AV and bacterial vaginosis (BV. The health of the vagina is closely associated with inhabitant microbiota. Furthermore, these microbes maintain a low vaginal pH, prevent the acquisition of pathogens, stimulate or moderate the local innate immune system, and further protect against complications during pregnancies. Therefore, this review will focus on vaginal microbial “health” in the lower reproductive tract of women and on the physiological characteristics that determine the well-being of reproductive health. In addition, we explore the distinct versus shared characteristics of BV and AV, which are commonly associated with increased risk for preterm delivery.

  17. Pyomyositis after vaginal delivery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gaughan, Eve

    2011-01-01

    Pyomyositis is a purulent infection of skeletal muscle that arises from haematogenous spread, usually with abscess formation. It can develop after a transient bacteraemia of any cause. This type of infection has never been reported before in the literature after vaginal delivery. A 34-year-old woman had progressive severe pain in the left buttock and thigh and weakness in the left lower limb day 1 post spontaneous vaginal delivery. MRI showed severe oedema of the left gluteus, iliacus, piriformis and adductor muscles of the left thigh and a small fluid collection at the left hip joint. She was diagnosed with pyomyositis. She had fever of 37.9°C immediately postpartum and her risk factors for bacteraemia were a mild IV cannula-associated cellulitis and labour itself. She required prolonged treatment with antibiotics before significant clinical improvement was noted.

  18. Vaginal microbicides and teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Richard E; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2003-10-01

    Sexually active teens are at significant risk from sexually transmitted infections and girls and women bear the greatest burden of these infections. New methods, such as vaginal microbicides, would provide female controlled options. Microbicides are currently in development and thus it is timely to discuss the progress made and factors that may influence acceptability for teens. Microbicide development presents many challenges, and several different potential mechanisms of action are being explored. There is interest in these products from women and men, and specific preferences are being investigated. Adolescents, due to reproductive system immaturity, developing cognitive abilities and the psychosocial context of their relationships, present a special set of challenges in efforts to foster microbicide use. Vaginal microbicides are on the horizon. Further study into teen issues is required to develop successful strategies for marketing and encouraging adolescent use of microbicides.

  19. Effects of vaginal prolapse surgery and ageing on vaginal vascularization

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Ageing affects pelvic floor anatomy and function, resulting in several disorders like pelvic organ prolapse (POP), lower urinary tract symptoms and vaginal atrophy (VA). In this thesis we searched for methods to link the function of pelvic organs to physiological changes. The effects of POP and vaginal prolapse surgery on vaginal vascularization and the influence of ageing and topical oestrogens on pelvic floor disorders were examined. The lack of knowledge regarding the effects of ageing on ...

  20. Diversity and Geographical Distribution of Flavobacterium psychrophilum Isolates and Their Phages: Patterns of Susceptibility to Phage Infection and Phage Host Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Espejo, Romilio

    2014-01-01

    in disease control requires detailed knowledge about the diversity and dynamics of host susceptibility to phage infection. For this reason, we examined the genetic diversity of 49 F. psychrophilum strains isolated in three different areas (Chile, Denmark, and USA) through direct genome restriction enzyme...... analysis (DGREA) and their susceptibility to 33 bacteriophages isolated in Chile and Denmark, thus covering large geographical (>12,000 km) and temporal (>60 years) scales of isolation. An additional 40 phage-resistant isolates obtained from culture experiments after exposure to specific phages were...... examined for changes in phage susceptibility against the 33 phages. The F. psychrophilum and phage populations isolated from Chile and Denmark clustered into geographically distinct groups with respect to DGREA profile and host range, respectively. However, cross infection between Chilean phage isolates...

  1. Morphological evidence for phages in Xylella fastidiosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Civerolo Edwin L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presumptive phage particles associated with Xylella fastidiosa strain Temecula-1 grown in PW broth were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM in ultrathin sections of bacterial cell-containing low speed centrifugation pellets and in partially purified preparations from CsCl equilibrium centrifugation density gradients. Ultrathin-sectioned cell pellets contained icosahedral particles of about 45 nm in diameter. Samples collected from CsCl density gradients revealed mostly non-tailed icosahedral but also tailed particles. The icosahedral particles could be divided into two types: a large type (about 45 nm and a small type (about 30 nm. Filamentous phage-like particles (17 × 120 to 6,300 nm were also observed. The presence of different types of phage-like particles resembling to those in several bacteriophage families provides new physical evidence, in addition to X. fastidiosa genomic information, that X. fastidiosa possesses active phages. This is the first report of phage particles released in X. fastidiosa cultures.

  2. In Vivo Imaging of Molecularly Targeted Phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Kelly

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid identification of in vivo affinity ligands would have far-reaching applications for imaging specific molecular targets, in vivo systems imaging, and medical use. We have developed a high-throughput method for identifying and optimizing ligands to map and image biologic targets of interest in vivo. We directly labeled viable phage clones with far-red fluorochromes and comparatively imaged them in vivo by multichannel fluorescence ratio imaging. Using Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (osteonectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 as model targets, we show that: 1 fluorescently labeled phage retains target specificity on labeling; 2 in vivo distribution can be quantitated (detection thresholds of ~ 300 phage/mm3 tissue throughout the entire depth of the tumor using fluorescent tomographic imaging; and 3 fluorescently labeled phage itself can serve as a replenishable molecular imaging agent. The described method should find widespread application in the rapid in vivo discovery and validation of affinity ligands and, importantly, in the use of fluorochrome-labeled phage clones as in vivo imaging agents.

  3. Phages of Listeria offer novel tools for diagnostics and biocontrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J Loessner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Historically, bacteriophages infecting their hosts have perhaps been best known and even notorious for being a nuisance in dairy-fermentation processes. However, with the rapid progress in molecular microbiology and microbial ecology, a new dawn has risen for phages. This review will provide an overview on possible uses and applications of Listeria phages, including phage-typing, reporter phage for bacterial diagnostics, and use of phage as biocontrol agents for food safety. The use of phage-encoded enzymes such as endolysins for the detection and as antimicrobial will also be addressed. Desirable properties of candidate phages for biocontrol will be discussed. While emphasizing the enormous future potential for applications, we will also consider some of the intrinsic limitations dictated by both phage and bacterial ecology.

  4. Prevalent high-risk HPV infection and vaginal microbiota in Nigerian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dareng, E O; Ma, B; Famooto, A O; Adebamowo, S N; Offiong, R A; Olaniyan, O; Dakum, P S; Wheeler, C M; Fadrosh, D; Yang, H; Gajer, P; Brotman, R M; Ravel, J; Adebamowo, C A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the association between high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) and the vaginal microbiome. Participants were recruited in Nigeria between April and August 2012. Vaginal bacterial composition was characterized by deep sequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA gene fragments (V4) on Illumina MiSeq and HPV was identified using the Roche Linear Array® HPV genotyping test. We used exact logistic regression models to evaluate the association between community state types (CSTs) of vaginal microbiota and hrHPV infection, weighted UniFrac distances to compare the vaginal microbiota of individuals with prevalent hrHPV to those without prevalent hrHPV infection, and the Linear Discriminant Analysis effect size (LEfSe) algorithm to characterize bacteria associated with prevalent hrHPV infection. We observed four CSTs: CST IV-B with a low relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. in 50% of participants; CST III (dominated by L. iners) in 39·2%; CST I (dominated by L. crispatus) in 7·9%; and CST VI (dominated by proteobacteria) in 2·9% of participants. LEfSe analysis suggested an association between prevalent hrHPV infection and a decreased abundance of Lactobacillus sp. with increased abundance of anaerobes particularly of the genera Prevotella and Leptotrichia in HIV-negative women (P < 0·05). These results are hypothesis generating and further studies are required.

  5. Hormone therapy alters the composition of the vaginal microflora in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezirtzoglou, E; Voidarou, Ch; Papadaki, A; Tsiotsias, A; Kotsovolou, O; Konstandi, M

    2008-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the alterations that may take place in the bacterial genital tract flora in the absence of ovarian hormones. The role of hormone replacement therapy was also assessed. For this purpose, various bacteria were identified from the vaginal flora of ovariectomized and sham operated female rats, following the Bergey's manual criteria. The data of this study showed that substantial differences exist in the vaginal bacterial microflora between ovariectomized and normal cyclic rats. Ovariectomy was associated with a lower total bacterial load that may be due mainly to the absence of Lactobacillus. Anaerobic bacteria were also absent. Streptococcus and Enterococcus were also not favored in an environment lacking the ovarian hormones. In contrast, C. perfringens, Bacteroides, S. epidermidis, and S. aureus were detected in high numbers in ovariectomized rats. In terms of the impact of hormone replacement therapy on vaginal flora, only estradiol (EE2) restored Lactobacillus levels in ovariectomized rats, whereas all hormonal schemes used brought Streptococcus, Clostridium lec (-), and C. perfringens, the spore and vegetative forms, close to those detected in normal cyclic female rats. In conclusion, ovarian hormones appeared to be regulatory factors that favor the presence of a broad variety of bacteria, which are members of the normal genital tract flora. On the other hand, ovariectomy modifies the vaginal microbial profile, and hormone replacement therapy based mainly on schemes containing EE2 could alleviate this disturbance.

  6. Effect of probiotics on vaginal health in pregnancy. EFFPRO, a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gille, Christian; Böer, Bettina; Marschal, Matthias; Urschitz, Michael S; Heinecke, Volker; Hund, Verena; Speidel, Sarah; Tarnow, Inge; Mylonas, Ioannis; Franz, Axel; Engel, Corinna; Poets, Christian F

    2016-11-01

    Preterm delivery is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and death. It often results from chorioamnionitis, which is a complication of bacterial vaginosis. Probiotics are effective in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis in women who were not pregnant; studies in pregnant woman are missing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether an oral probiotic food supplement supports the maintenance or restoration of a normal vaginal microbiota during pregnancy. We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, triple-blind, parallel group trial. Oral Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1and L reuteri RC-14 (10 9 colony-forming units) or placebo were administered for 8 weeks to women with Vaginal swabs were taken before and after intervention and analyzed according to the Nugent scoring system. Telephone interviews were performed before and after intervention and after delivery. Primary outcome was the proportion of swabs with normal Nugent score (Vaginal swabs were analyzed from 290 women before and 271 women after intervention. The proportion of normal vaginal microbiota decreased from 82.6 to 77.8% in the treatment group and from 79.1 to 74.3% in the placebo group, with no significant difference across groups after intervention (P=.297). Oral probiotics may be suitable for implementation in antenatal care but, as administered here, had no effect on vaginal health during mid gestation. Other application routes or probiotic preparations may be more effective in supporting vaginal microbiota during pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnosis and microecological characteristics of aerobic vaginitis in outpatients based on preformed enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Liang; Fu, Lan-Yong; Xiong, Zheng-Ai; Qin, Qin; Yu, Teng-Hua; Wu, Yu-Tong; Hua, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Yong-Hong

    2016-02-01

    Aerobic vaginitis (AV) is a recently proposed term for genital tract infection in women. The diagnosis of AV is mainly based on descriptive diagnostic criteria proposed by Donders and co-workers. The objective of this study is to report AV prevalence in southwest China using an objective assay kit based on preformed enzymes and also to determine its characteristics. A total of 1948 outpatients were enrolled and tested by a commercial diagnostic kit to investigate the AV prevalence and characteristics in southwestern China. The study mainly examined the vaginal ecosystem, age distribution, Lactobacillus amount, and changes in pH. Differences within groups were analyzed by Wilcoxon two-sample test. The AV detection rate is 15.40%. The AV patients were usually seen in the sexually active age group of 20-30 years, followed by those in the age group of 30-40 years. The vaginal ecosystems of all the patients studied were absolutely abnormal, and diagnosed to have a combined infection [aerobic vaginitis (AV) + bacterial vaginitis (BV) 61.33%; 184/300]. Aerobic bacteria, especially Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, were predominantly found in the vaginal samples of these women. AV is a common type of genital infection in southwestern China and is characterized by sexually active age and combined infection predominated by the AV and BV type. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Vaginal Discharge: What's Normal, What's Not

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Vaginal Discharge: What's Normal, What's Not KidsHealth / For Teens / ... Discharge: What's Normal, What's Not Print What Is Vaginal Discharge? Vaginal discharge is fluid that comes from ...

  9. Vaginitis: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spanish Vulvovaginitis - overview (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Vaginitis updates by ... Vaginitis test - wet mount Vulvovaginitis - overview Related Health Topics Trichomoniasis Vaginal Diseases Yeast Infections Other Languages Find ...

  10. Vaginal epithelial cells regulate membrane adhesiveness to co-ordinate bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Jessica A; Klappe, Karin; Kok, Jan Willem; Busscher, Henk J; Reid, Gregor; van der Mei, Henny C

    2016-04-01

    Vaginal epithelium is colonized by different bacterial strains and species. The bacterial composition of vaginal biofilms controls the balance between health and disease. Little is known about the relative contribution of the epithelial and bacterial cell surfaces to bacterial adhesion and whether and how adhesion is regulated over cell membrane regions. Here, we show that bacterial adhesion forces with cell membrane regions not located above the nucleus are stronger than with regions above the nucleus both for vaginal pathogens and different commensal and probiotic lactobacillus strains involved in health. Importantly, adhesion force ratios over membrane regions away from and above the nucleus coincided with the ratios between numbers of adhering bacteria over both regions. Bacterial adhesion forces were dramatically decreased by depleting the epithelial cell membrane of cholesterol or sub-membrane cortical actin. Thus, epithelial cells can regulate membrane regions to which bacterial adhesion is discouraged, possibly to protect the nucleus. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Recovery of phage lambda from ultraviolet damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devoret, R.; Blanco, M.; George, J.; Radman, M.

    1975-01-01

    Recovery of phage lambda from ultraviolet damage can occur, in the dark, through three types of repair processes as defined by microbiological tests: host-cell reactivation, prophage reactivation, and uv reactivation. This paper reviews the properties of the three repair processes, analyzes their dependence on the functioning of bacterial and phage genes, and discusses their relationship. Progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the three repair processes has been relatively slow, particularly for uv reactivation. It has been shown that host-cell reactivation is due to pyrimidine dimer excision and that prophage reactivation is due to genetic recombination (prereplicative). We provide evidence showing that neither of these mechanisms accounts for uv reactivation of phage lambda. Furthermore, uv reactivation differs from the other repair processes in that it is inducible and error-prone. Whether uv-damaged bacterial DNA is subject to a similar repair process is still an open question

  12. Phage therapy in the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endersen, Lorraine; O'Mahony, Jim; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul; McAuliffe, Olivia; Coffey, Aidan

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in modern technologies, the food industry is continuously challenged with the threat of microbial contamination. The overuse of antibiotics has further escalated this problem, resulting in the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant foodborne pathogens. Efforts to develop new methods for controlling microbial contamination in food and the food processing environment are extremely important. Accordingly, bacteriophages (phages) and their derivatives have emerged as novel, viable, and safe options for the prevention, treatment, and/or eradication of these contaminants in a range of foods and food processing environments. Whole phages, modified phages, and their derivatives are discussed in terms of current uses and future potential as antimicrobials in the traditional farm-to-fork context, encompassing areas such as primary production, postharvest processing, biosanitation, and biodetection. The review also presents some safety concerns to ensure safe and effective exploitation of bacteriophages in the future.

  13. Genomics of phages with therapeutic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zschach, Henrike

    Bacteriophages, viruses that prey on bacteria, have been applied since the 1920’s to treat and prevent bacterial infection. After the discovery of antibiotics, this route was however largely abandoned. Now, with antimicrobial resistance in human-pathogenic bacteria on the rise and a dire need...... for alternatives, phage therapy once again takes center stage. Phage therapy holds the promise of substantial benefits both from the economic as well as the public health perspective but also holds distinct challenges. The aim of this PhD was to address how bioinformatics tools, specifically genomics...... and mathematical modelling, can be applied to move the field towards a future of actual phage therapy in humans. It is composed of three related research projects. The first part of this thesis is an introduction to various topics and methods relevant to the research projects that jointedly make up this Ph...

  14. Effects of vaginal lactobacilli in Chlamydia trachomatis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastromarino, Paola; Di Pietro, Marisa; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Nardis, Chiara; Gentile, Massimo; Sessa, Rosa

    2014-07-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that abnormal vaginal flora lacking lactobacilli facilitates the acquisition of several sexually transmitted diseases including Chlamydia trachomatis. C. trachomatis, the most common bacterial agent of genital infections worldwide, can progress from the lower to upper reproductive tract and induce severe sequelae. The ability of C. trachomatis to develop into a persistent form has been suggested as key pathogenetic mechanism underlying chronic infections and sequelae. The aim of our study was to investigate the C. trachomatis interaction with vaginal microbiota analyzing the effects of Lactobacillus strains (L. brevis and L. salivarius) on the different phases of C. trachomatis developmental cycle. In addition, the effect of lactobacilli on persistent chlamydial forms induced by HSV-2 coinfection has also been evaluated. Our results demonstrated significant inhibition of C. trachomatis multiplication by vaginal lactobacilli. L. brevis was significantly more effective than L. salivarius (pinfection cycle suggesting that the ability of lactobacilli to protect from infection is strain-dependent. Lactobacilli had an adverse effect on elementary chlamydial bodies (pvaginal microbiota can reduce the risk of acquiring C. trachomatis infection and counteract the development of persistent chlamydial forms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Vaginal microbiota and its role in HIV transmission and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Mariya I; van den Broek, Marianne; Balzarini, Jan; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2013-09-01

    The urogenital tract appears to be the only niche of the human body that shows clear differences in microbiota between men and women. The female reproductive tract has special features in terms of immunological organization, an epithelial barrier, microbiota, and influence by sex hormones such as estrogen. While the upper genital tract is regarded as free of microorganisms, the vagina is colonized by bacteria dominated by Lactobacillus species, although their numbers vary considerably during life. Bacterial vaginosis is a common pathology characterized by dysbiosis, which increases the susceptibility for HIV infection and transmission. On the other hand, HIV infections are often characterized by a disturbed vaginal microbiota. The endogenous vaginal microbiota may protect against HIV by direct production of antiviral compounds, through blocking of adhesion and transmission by ligands such as lectins, and/or by stimulation of immune responses. The potential role of probiotics in the prevention of HIV infections and associated symptoms, by introducing them to the vaginal and gastrointestinal tract (GIT), is also discussed. Of note, the GIT is a site of considerable HIV replication and CD4(+) T-cell destruction, resulting in both local and systemic inflammation. Finally, genetically engineered lactobacilli show promise as new microbicidal agents against HIV. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Phage-Host Interactions in Flavobacterium psychrophilum and the Potential for Phage Therapy in Aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb

    , the increasing problem with antibiotic resistance has led to increased attention to the use of phages for controlling F. psychrophilum infections in aquaculture. In a synopsis and four scientific papers, this PhD project studies the potential and optimizes the use of phage therapy for treatment and prevention......, studies of the genetic diversity and susceptibility patterns of F. psychrophilum strains and phages isolated in three geographically distinct areas (Chile, Denmark, and USA) showed that the strains and phages clustered into geographically distinct groups. However, cross-infectivity between Chilean phage......-phage. In the third paper, a detailed analysis of the resistance mechanisms in F. psychrophilum and six phage resistant mutants was done. The results revealed unique changes in the genomes in all the phage resistant strains and that some of these changes were related to cell surface properties which were suggested...

  17. An improved plating assay for determination of phage titer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RACHEL

    antibiotics to control bacterial infections in swine (Thacker,. 2014). Phage therapy is re-valued by researchers to combat the growing menace of antibiotic-resistant infections (Torres-Barceló and Hochberg, 2016). Determination of phage titer in a sample is a key step in the study of the phage involved. It is very important to.

  18. HostPhinder: A Phage Host Prediction Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Villarroel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The current dramatic increase of antibiotic resistant bacteria has revitalised the interest in bacteriophages as alternative antibacterial treatment. Meanwhile, the development of bioinformatics methods for analysing genomic data places high-throughput approaches for phage characterization within reach. Here, we present HostPhinder, a tool aimed at predicting the bacterial host of phages by examining the phage genome sequence. Using a reference database of 2196 phages with known hosts, HostPhinder predicts the host species of a query phage as the host of the most genomically similar reference phages. As a measure of genomic similarity the number of co-occurring k-mers (DNA sequences of length k is used. Using an independent evaluation set, HostPhinder was able to correctly predict host genus and species for 81% and 74% of the phages respectively, giving predictions for more phages than BLAST and significantly outperforming BLAST on phages for which both had predictions. HostPhinder predictions on phage draft genomes from the INTESTI phage cocktail corresponded well with the advertised targets of the cocktail. Our study indicates that for most phages genomic similarity correlates well with related bacterial hosts. HostPhinder is available as an interactive web service [1] and as a stand alone download from the Docker registry [2].

  19. Phage therapy reduces Campylobacter jejuni colonization in broilers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, J.A.; Bergen, van M.A.P.; Mueller, M.A.; Wassenaar, T.M.; Carlton, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of phage therapy in the control of Campylobacter jejuni colonization in young broilers, either as a preventive or a therapeutic measure, was tested. A prevention group was infected with C. jejuni at day 4 of a 10-day phage treatment. A therapeutic group was phage treated for 6 days,

  20. The Caulobacter crescentus phage phiCbK: genomics of a canonical phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill Jason J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is a popular model for the study of cell cycle regulation and senescence. The large prolate siphophage phiCbK has been an important tool in C. crescentus biology, and has been studied in its own right as a model for viral morphogenesis. Although a system of some interest, to date little genomic information is available on phiCbK or its relatives. Results Five novel phiCbK-like C. crescentus bacteriophages, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma, CcrRogue and CcrColossus, were isolated from the environment. The genomes of phage phiCbK and these five environmental phage isolates were obtained by 454 pyrosequencing. The phiCbK-like phage genomes range in size from 205 kb encoding 318 proteins (phiCbK to 280 kb encoding 448 proteins (CcrColossus, and were found to contain nonpermuted terminal redundancies of 10 to 17 kb. A novel method of terminal ligation was developed to map genomic termini, which confirmed termini predicted by coverage analysis. This suggests that sequence coverage discontinuities may be useable as predictors of genomic termini in phage genomes. Genomic modules encoding virion morphogenesis, lysis and DNA replication proteins were identified. The phiCbK-like phages were also found to encode a number of intriguing proteins; all contain a clearly T7-like DNA polymerase, and five of the six encode a possible homolog of the C. crescentus cell cycle regulator GcrA, which may allow the phage to alter the host cell’s replicative state. The structural proteome of phage phiCbK was determined, identifying the portal, major and minor capsid proteins, the tail tape measure and possible tail fiber proteins. All six phage genomes are clearly related; phiCbK, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma and CcrRogue form a group related at the DNA level, while CcrColossus is more diverged but retains significant similarity at the protein level. Conclusions Due to their lack of any apparent relationship to

  1. Vaginal pressure during daily activities before and after vaginal repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, L; Hulbaek, M; Brostrøm, S

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the study was to measure vaginal pressure during various daily activities in patients before and after vaginal surgery for pelvic organ prolapse, searching data for evidence-based activity guidelines. Vaginal pressure (VP) was studied in 23 patients during activities such as rest......, pelvic floor contraction (PFC), coughing, Valsalva, rising from sitting to standing and lifting 2 and 5 kg with four different lifting techniques. VP was measured before, 1-5 days and 4-6 weeks after vaginal repair. Mean VP was four to five times higher during coughing and Valsalva compared to PFC...... was not related to the type of vaginal repair. The results imply that post-operative counselling should concentrate more on treating chronic cough and constipation than restrictions of moderate physical activities....

  2. Red herring vaginal discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Hee; Pringle, Kirsty; Rajimwale, Ashok

    2013-09-18

    Labial hair tourniquet syndrome is a rare condition that can be easily misdiagnosed and ultimately lead to irreversible damage. An 11-year-old premenarche girl presented with a 5-day history of pain and swelling in the labia with associated vaginal discharge. The general practitioner treated her with clotrimazole without improvement. On examination, there was an oedematous swelling of the right labia with a proximal hair tourniquet. Local anaesthetic was applied and the hair removed with forceps. There was instant relief of pain and the discharge stopped within 24 h. The patient was sent home with a course of antibiotics.

  3. Improvement of abnormal vaginal flora in Ugandan women by self-testing and short use of intravaginal antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donders, G; Bellen, G; Donders, F; Pinget, J; Vandevelde, I; Michiels, T; Byamughisa, J

    2017-04-01

    The vaginal composition of African women is more often lactobacillus-deficient compared to that of women from other areas around the world. Lactobacillus-deficient microflora is a known risk factor for serious health problems, such as preterm birth, cervix cancer, and entrapment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of local vaginal antibiotic or antiseptic treatment on abnormal vaginal flora (AVF), aerobic vaginitis (AV), and bacterial vaginosis (BV) among women in rural, semi-urban, and urban areas in Uganda, as compared to placebo. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial, 300 women presenting for outpatient routine, follow-up, or medical care at Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda, were enrolled to receive 6 days of treatment with vaginal rifaximin (RFX), dequalinium chloride (DQC), or placebo if they had an increased vaginal pH of >4.5 as determined by self-testing. At initial visit and at control visit after 4 weeks, a smear was taken for blinded wet mount microscopy to determine AVF, BV, AV, and Candida severity scores. As compared to placebo, both RFX or DQC treatments dramatically diminished BV prevalence and severity from the initial to follow-up visit: the BV score declined from 2.5 to 1.6 (p vaginal microbiome composition of women with disturbed vaginal microflora. As African women have high prevalences of BV, AV, and AVF, this approach could improve their odds to prevent health-compromising complications. Further studies assessing direct health outcomes are needed to substantiate this.

  4. Inhibitory Effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on Some Pathogenic Bacteria Isolated From Women With Bacterial Vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslami

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Considering the high prevalence of bacterial vaginosis and its association with urinary tract infection in women and treatment of gynecologic problems occur when a high recurrence of bacterial vaginosis is often treated with antibiotics. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on pathogenic bacteria isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis. Materials and Methods Ninety-six samples were obtained from vaginal discharge of women with bacterial vaginosis by a gynecologist with a Dacron swab and put in sterile tubes containing TSB broth and Thioglycollate broth. Then were immediately sent to the laboratory in cold chain for further assessment. Afterward, culture was transferred on blood agar, EMB, Palcam and differential diagnosis environments. Then cultures were incubated for 24 hours at 37 °C. Lactobacillus reuteri strains were cultured in MRS environment and transferred to laboratory. After purification of pathogenic bacteria, Lactobacillus reuteri inhibitory effect on pathogenic bacteria was evaluated by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and antibiogram. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software v.16. Results The results of this study demonstrated the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on some pathogenic bacteria that cause bacterial, including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Enterococcus, Listeria monocytogenes and E. coli. Microscopic examination of stained smears of most Lactobacillus and pathogenic bacteria showed reduced. The prevalence of abnormal vaginal discharge, history of drug use, contraceptive methods and douching were 61%, 55%, 42% and 13%, respectively. Significant difference was observed between the use and non-use of IUD in women with bacterial. Conclusions Our findings indicated the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on pathogenic bacteria that

  5. Vaginal haemangioendothelioma: an unusual tumour.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohan, H

    2012-02-01

    Vaginal tumours are uncommon and this is a particularly rare case of a vaginal haemangioendothelioma in a 38-year-old woman. Initial presentation consisted of symptoms similar to uterovaginal prolapse with "something coming down". Examination under anaesthesia demonstrated a necrotic anterior vaginal wall tumour. Histology of the lesion revealed a haemangioendothelioma which had some features of haemangiopericytoma. While the natural history of vaginal haemangioendothelioma is uncertain, as a group, they have a propensity for local recurrence. To our knowledge this is the third reported case of a vaginal haemangioendothelioma. Management of this tumour is challenging given the paucity of literature on this tumour. There is a need to add rare tumours to our "knowledge bank" to guide management of these unusual tumours.

  6. [Longitudinal analysis of vaginal microbiota in women with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao; Cai, Hui-Hua; He, Yan; Zheng, Hui-Min; Kang, Ling; Zhou, Hong-Wei; Liu, Mu-Biao

    2016-02-20

    To investigate the vaginal flora in patients with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC). Vaginal swabs were collected at different time points from 6 RVVC patients and 5 healthy women of child-bearing age. The dynamic changes, microbiota composition, alpha diversity and beta diversity in the two groups were assessed by analyzing the 16S rRNA V4 hypervariable region amplified from the total genomic DNA from the swabs. Lactobacillus was the predominant species in healthy women with similar proportions of L.iners and L.crispatus; small proportions of Gardnerella, Prevotella and other genus were also detected. In some healthy women, the vaginal flora showed a high relative abundance of anaerobic bacteria such as Gardnerella, Prevotella, Atopobium, Sneathia. Compared with the healthy women, patients with RVVC showed a significantly reduced diversity of vaginal flora, where L.iners was the predominant species and the content of L.crispatus decreased significantly. In healthy women, the vaginal flora fluctuated with the menstrual cycle, and the fluctuation was the most prominent during menstruation; the dominant species either alternated regularly or maintain an absolute superiority in the menstrual cycle. The vaginal flora showed attenuated fluctuation in women with RVVC, were highly conserved within the menstrual cycle, and maintained a similar composition in the episodes and intermittent periods. The vaginal flora of RVVC patients do not undergo regular variations with the menstrual cycle and shows a similar composition between the episodes and intermittent periods. Promoting the production of L.iners or inhibiting the colonization of L.crispatus to restore the composition of the vaginal flora may help in the treatment of RVVC.

  7. Influence of age, reproductive cycling status, and menstruation on the vaginal microbiome in baboons (Papio anubis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchihashi, M; Bergin, I L; Bassis, C M; Hashway, S A; Chai, D; Bell, J D

    2015-05-01

    The vaginal microbiome is believed to influence host health by providing protection from pathogens and influencing reproductive outcomes such as fertility and gestational length. In humans, age-associated declines in diversity of the vaginal microbiome occur in puberty and persist into adulthood. Additionally, menstruation has been associated with decreased microbial community stability. Adult female baboons, like other non-human primates (NHPs), have a different and highly diverse vaginal microbiome compared to that of humans, which is most commonly dominated by Lactobacillus spp. We evaluated the influence of age, reproductive cycling status (cycling vs. non-cycling) and menstruation on the vaginal microbiome of 38 wild-caught, captive female olive baboons (Papio anubis) by culture-independent sequencing of the V3-V5 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. All baboons had highly diverse vaginal microbial communities. Adult baboons had significantly lower microbial diversity in comparison to subadult baboons, which was attributable to decreased relative abundance of minor taxa. No significant differences were detected based on cycling state or menstruation. Predictive metagenomic analysis showed uniformity in relative abundance of metabolic pathways regardless of age, cycle stage, or menstruation, indicating conservation of microbial community functions. This study suggests that selection of an optimal vaginal microbial community occurs at puberty. Since decreased diversity occurs in both baboons and humans at puberty, this may reflect a general strategy for selection of adult vaginal microbial communities. Comparative evaluation of vaginal microbial community development and composition may elucidate mechanisms of community formation and function that are conserved across host species or across microbial community types. These findings have implications for host health, evolutionary biology, and microbe-host ecosystems. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. How to Name and Classify Your Phage: An Informal Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien Adriaenssens

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available With this informal guide, we try to assist both new and experienced phage researchers through two important stages that follow phage discovery; that is, naming and classification. Providing an appropriate name for a bacteriophage is not as trivial as it sounds, and the effects might be long-lasting in databases and in official taxon names. Phage classification is the responsibility of the Bacterial and Archaeal Viruses Subcommittee (BAVS of the International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV. While the BAVS aims at providing a holistic approach to phage taxonomy, for individual researchers who have isolated and sequenced a new phage, this can be a little overwhelming. We are now providing these researchers with an informal guide to phage naming and classification, taking a “bottom-up” approach from the phage isolate level.

  9. Isolation of Vaginal Lactobacilli and Characterization of Anti-Candida Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Parolin

    Full Text Available Healthy vaginal microbiota is dominated by Lactobacillus spp., which form a critical line of defence against pathogens, including Candida spp. The present study aims to identify vaginal lactobacilli exerting in vitro activity against Candida spp. and to characterize their antifungal mechanisms of action. Lactobacillus strains were isolated from vaginal swabs of healthy premenopausal women. The isolates were taxonomically identified to species level (L. crispatus B1-BC8, L. gasseri BC9-BC14 and L. vaginalis BC15-BC17 by sequencing the 16S rRNA genes. All strains produced hydrogen peroxide and lactate. Fungistatic and fungicidal activities against C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. lusitaniae were evaluated by broth micro-dilution method. The broadest spectrum of activity was observed for L. crispatus BC1, BC4, BC5 and L. vaginalis BC15, demonstrating fungicidal activity against all isolates of C. albicans and C. lusitaniae. Metabolic profiles of lactobacilli supernatants were studied by 1H-NMR analysis. Metabolome was found to be correlated with both taxonomy and activity score. Exclusion, competition and displacement experiments were carried out to investigate the interference exerted by lactobacilli toward the yeast adhesion to HeLa cells. Most Lactobacillus strains significantly reduced C. albicans adhesion through all mechanisms. In particular, L. crispatus BC2, L. gasseri BC10 and L. gasseri BC11 appeared to be the most active strains in reducing pathogen adhesion, as their effects were mediated by both cells and supernatants. Inhibition of histone deacetylases was hypothesised to support the antifungal activity of vaginal lactobacilli. Our results are prerequisites for the development of new therapeutic agents based on probiotics for prophylaxis and adjuvant therapy of Candida infection.

  10. The effect of vaginal cream containing ginger in users of clotrimazole vaginal cream on vaginal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabanian, Sheida; Khalili, Sima; Lorigooini, Zahra; Malekpour, Afsaneh; Heidari-Soureshjani, Saeid

    2017-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is one of the most common infections of the genital tract in women that causes many complications. Therefore, we examined the clinical effect of ginger cream along with clotrimazole compared to vaginal clotrimazole alone in this study. This double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 67 women admitted to the Gynecology Clinic of Hajar Hospital with vaginal candidiasis. The patients were divided randomly into two groups of 33 and 34 people. The diagnosis was made according to clinical symptoms, wet smear, and culture. Ginger-clotrimazole vaginal cream 1% and clotrimazole vaginal cream 1% were administered to groups 1 and 2, respectively, once a day for 7 days and therapeutic effects and symptoms were evaluated in readmission. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version 22, t -test and Chi-square. The mean value of variables itching ( P > 0.05), burning ( P > 0.05), and cheesy secretion ( P vaginal candidiasis.

  11. Electrotransformation of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis with Various Plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serror, Pascale; Sasaki, Takashi; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Maguin, Emmanuelle

    2002-01-01

    We describe, for the first time, a detailed electroporation procedure for Lactobacillus delbrueckii. Three L. delbrueckii strains were successfully transformed. Under optimal conditions, the transformation efficiency was 104 transformants per μg of DNA. Using this procedure, we identified several plasmids able to replicate in L. delbrueckii and integrated an integrative vector based on phage integrative elements into the L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus chromosome. These vectors provide a good basis for developing molecular tools for L. delbrueckii and open the field of genetic studies in L. delbrueckii. PMID:11772607

  12. Episiotomy for vaginal birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroli, Guillermo; Mignini, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Background Episiotomy is done to prevent severe perineal tears, but its routine use has been questioned. The relative effects of midline compared with midlateral episiotomy are unclear. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effects of restrictive use of episiotomy compared with routine episiotomy during vaginal birth. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (March 2008). Selection criteria Randomized trials comparing restrictive use of episiotomy with routine use of episiotomy; restrictive use of mediolateral episiotomy versus routine mediolateral episiotomy; restrictive use of midline episiotomy versus routine midline episiotomy; and use of midline episiotomy versus mediolateral episiotomy. Data collection and analysis The two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted the data. Main results We included eight studies (5541 women). In the routine episiotomy group, 75.15% (2035/2708) of women had episiotomies, while the rate in the restrictive episiotomy group was 28.40% (776/2733). Compared with routine use, restrictive episiotomy resulted in less severe perineal trauma (relative risk (RR) 0.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.49 to 0.91), less suturing (RR 0.71, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.81) and fewer healing complications (RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.85). Restrictive episiotomy was associated with more anterior perineal trauma (RR 1.84, 95% CI 1.61 to 2.10). There was no difference in severe vaginal/perineal trauma (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.72 to 1.18); dyspareunia (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.90 to 1.16); urinary incontinence (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.20) or several pain measures. Results for restrictive versus routine mediolateral versus midline episiotomy were similar to the overall comparison. Authors’ conclusions Restrictive episiotomy policies appear to have a number of benefits compared to policies based on routine episiotomy. There is less posterior perineal trauma, less suturing and

  13. Twelve previously unknown phage genera are ubiquitous in global oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmfeldt, Karin; Solonenko, Natalie; Shah, Manesh; Corrier, Kristen; Riemann, Lasse; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2013-07-30

    Viruses are fundamental to ecosystems ranging from oceans to humans, yet our ability to study them is bottlenecked by the lack of ecologically relevant isolates, resulting in "unknowns" dominating culture-independent surveys. Here we present genomes from 31 phages infecting multiple strains of the aquatic bacterium Cellulophaga baltica (Bacteroidetes) to provide data for an underrepresented and environmentally abundant bacterial lineage. Comparative genomics delineated 12 phage groups that (i) each represent a new genus, and (ii) represent one novel and four well-known viral families. This diversity contrasts the few well-studied marine phage systems, but parallels the diversity of phages infecting human-associated bacteria. Although all 12 Cellulophaga phages represent new genera, the podoviruses and icosahedral, nontailed ssDNA phages were exceptional, with genomes up to twice as large as those previously observed for each phage type. Structural novelty was also substantial, requiring experimental phage proteomics to identify 83% of the structural proteins. The presence of uncommon nucleotide metabolism genes in four genera likely underscores the importance of scavenging nutrient-rich molecules as previously seen for phages in marine environments. Metagenomic recruitment analyses suggest that these particular Cellulophaga phages are rare and may represent a first glimpse into the phage side of the rare biosphere. However, these analyses also revealed that these phage genera are widespread, occurring in 94% of 137 investigated metagenomes. Together, this diverse and novel collection of phages identifies a small but ubiquitous fraction of unknown marine viral diversity and provides numerous environmentally relevant phage-host systems for experimental hypothesis testing.

  14. Vaginal oxytetracycline concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thin, R N; Al Rawi, Z H; Simmons, P D; Treharne, J; Tabaqchali, S

    1979-01-01

    Although tetracycline preparations are widely used in departments of genitourinary medicine, or sexually transmitted diseases clinics, little is known of the concentrations of these preparations in genital secretions. For this reason a microbiological method was used for estimating oxytetracycline concentrations in vaginal secretions. These concentrations varied from 0.6 to 6.5 microgram/ml in 19 women who had had sexual contact with a man with non-specific urethritis and who were taking oxytetracycline dihydrate 250 mg four times daily. They were well in excess of the minimum inhibitory concentration of oxytetracycline (0.2 microgram/ml) for the strains of Chlamydia trachomatis isolated from the patients with positive culture results. Thus, oxytetracycline 250 mg four times daily appears to be a satisfactory regimen for the treatment of chlamydial genital infection in women. PMID:509190

  15. Formulation, stabilisation and encapsulation of bacteriophage for phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Danish J; Sokolov, Ilya J; Vinner, Gurinder K; Mancuso, Francesco; Cinquerrui, Salvatore; Vladisavljevic, Goran T; Clokie, Martha R J; Garton, Natalie J; Stapley, Andrew G F; Kirpichnikova, Anna

    2017-11-01

    Against a backdrop of global antibiotic resistance and increasing awareness of the importance of the human microbiota, there has been resurgent interest in the potential use of bacteriophages for therapeutic purposes, known as phage therapy. A number of phage therapy phase I and II clinical trials have concluded, and shown phages don't present significant adverse safety concerns. These clinical trials used simple phage suspensions without any formulation and phage stability was of secondary concern. Phages have a limited stability in solution, and undergo a significant drop in phage titre during processing and storage which is unacceptable if phages are to become regulated pharmaceuticals, where stable dosage and well defined pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are de rigueur. Animal studies have shown that the efficacy of phage therapy outcomes depend on the phage concentration (i.e. the dose) delivered at the site of infection, and their ability to target and kill bacteria, arresting bacterial growth and clearing the infection. In addition, in vitro and animal studies have shown the importance of using phage cocktails rather than single phage preparations to achieve better therapy outcomes. The in vivo reduction of phage concentration due to interactions with host antibodies or other clearance mechanisms may necessitate repeated dosing of phages, or sustained release approaches. Modelling of phage-bacterium population dynamics reinforces these points. Surprisingly little attention has been devoted to the effect of formulation on phage therapy outcomes, given the need for phage cocktails, where each phage within a cocktail may require significantly different formulation to retain a high enough infective dose. This review firstly looks at the clinical needs and challenges (informed through a review of key animal studies evaluating phage therapy) associated with treatment of acute and chronic infections and the drivers for phage encapsulation. An important driver

  16. Sensitive quantitative analysis of the meconium bacterial microbiota in healthy term infants born vaginally or by cesarean section.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Nagpal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For decades, babies were thought to be born germ-free, but recent evidences suggest that they are already exposed to various bacteria in-utero. However, the data on population levels of such pioneer gut bacteria, particularly in context to birth mode, is sparse. We herein aimed to quantify such bacteria from the meconium of 151 healthy term Japanese infants born vaginally or by C-section. Neonatal first meconium was obtained within 24-48 hours of delivery; RNA was extracted and subjected to reverse-transcription-quantitative PCR using specific primers for Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, Bacteroides fragilis group, Atopobium cluster, Prevotella, Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Enterococcus, Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus, Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Clostridium perfringens, and C. difficile. We detected several bacterial groups in both vaginally- and cesarean-born infants. B. fragilis group, Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcus, Streptococcus and Staphylococcus were detected in more than 50% of infants, with counts ranging from 105-108 cells/g sample. About 30-35% samples harbored Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus (104-105 cells/g; whereas C. coccoides group, C. leptum subgroup and C. perfringens were detected in 10-20% infants (103-105 cells/g. Compared to vaginally-born babies, cesarean-born babies were significantly less often colonized with Lactobacillus genus (6% vs. 37%; P=0.01 and L. gasseri subgroup (6% vs. 31%; P=0.04. Overall, seven Lactobacillus subgroups/ species i.e. L. gasseri subgroup, L. ruminis subgroup, L. casei subgroup, L. reuteri subgroup, L. sakei subgroup, L. plantarum subgroup and L. brevis were detected in the samples from vaginally-born group, whereas only two members i.e. L. gasseri subgroup and L. brevis were detected in the cesarean group. These data corroborate that several bacterial clades may already be present before birth in term infants’ gut. Further, Remarkably lower detection rate

  17. Oral Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 to reduce Group B Streptococcus colonization in pregnant women: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming; Chang, Yin-Yi; Chang, Wei-Chun; Lin, Hung-Chih; Wang, Mei-Hung; Lin, Wu-Chou; Chiu, Tsan-Hung

    2016-08-01

    This study is to examine the effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 taken orally before bedtime on Group B Streptococcus (GBS)-positive pregnant women with respect to becoming GBS negative. In total, 110 pregnant women at 35-37 weeks of gestation who were diagnosed by GBS culture as being GBS positive for both vaginal and rectal GBS colonization were randomly assigned to be orally treated with two placebo capsules or two probiotic capsules (containing L. rhamnosus GR-1 and L. reuteri RC-14) before bedtime until delivery. All women were tested for vaginal and rectal GBS colonization again by GBS culture on admission for delivery. Of the 110 participants, 99 completed the study (49 in the probiotic group and 50 in the placebo group). The GBS colonization results changed from positive to negative in 21 women in the probiotic group (42.9%) and in nine women in the placebo group (18.0%) during this period (Chi-square p=0.007). Oral probiotic containing L. rhamnosus GR-1 and L. reuteri RC-14 could reduce the vaginal and rectal GBS colonization rate in pregnant women. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Actinomyces associated with persistent vaginal granulation tissue.

    OpenAIRE

    Wai, Clifford Y; Nihira, Mikio A; Drewes, Peter G; Chang, Joe S; Siddiqui, Momin T; Hemsell, David L

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We report a case of symptomatic actinomycosis associated with vaginal suture erosion and granulation tissue refractory to conservative management, in an outpatient setting. CASE: Three months after total vaginal hysterectomy and uterosacral ligament vaginal vault suspension, a woman complained of painless, intermittent vaginal discharge and spotting. Despite cauterization of granulation tissue, vaginal spotting persisted for another month. On re-examination, braided polyester sutu...

  19. Assembling filamentous phage occlude pIV channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciano, D K; Russel, M; Simon, S M

    2001-07-31

    Filamentous phage f1 is exported from its Escherichia coli host without killing the bacterial cell. Phage-encoded protein pIV, which is required for phage assembly and secretion, forms large highly conductive channels in the outer membrane of E. coli. It has been proposed that the phage are extruded across the bacterial outer membrane through pIV channels. To test this prediction, we developed an in vivo assay by using a mutant pIV that functions in phage export but whose channel opens in the absence of phage extrusion. In E. coli lacking its native maltooligosacharride transporter LamB, this pIV variant allowed oligosaccharide transport across the outer membrane. This entry of oligosaccharide was decreased by phage production and still further decreased by production of phage that cannot be released from the cell surface. Thus, exiting phage block the pIV-dependent entry of oligosaccharide, suggesting that phage occupy the lumen of pIV channels. This study provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, for viral exit through a large aqueous channel.

  20. Screening of biofilm formation by beneficial vaginal lactobacilli and influence of culture media components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terraf, M C Leccese; Juárez Tomás, M S; Nader-Macías, M E F; Silva, C

    2012-12-01

    To assess the ability of vaginal lactobacilli to form biofilm under different culture conditions and to determine the relationship between their growth and the capability of biofilm formation by selected strains. Fifteen Lactobacillus strains from human vagina were tested for biofilm formation by crystal violet staining. Only Lactobacillus rhamnosus Centro de Referencia para Lactobacilos Culture Collection (CRL) 1332, Lact. reuteri CRL 1324 and Lact. delbrueckii CRL 1510 were able to grow and form biofilm in culture media without Tween 80. However, Lact. gasseri CRL 1263 (a non-biofilm-forming strain) did not grow in these media. Scanning electron microscopy showed that Lact. rhamnosus CRL 1332 and Lact. reuteri CRL 1324 formed a highly structured biofilm, but only Lact. reuteri CRL 1324 showed a high amount of extracellular material in medium without Tween. Biofilm formation was significantly influenced by the strain, culture medium, inoculum concentration, microbial growth and chemical nature of the support used for the assay. The results allow the selection of biofilm-forming vaginal Lactobacillus strains and the conditions and factors that affect this phenomenon. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Drugs Approved for Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent vaginal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  2. Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007376.htm Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures To use the sharing features ... are types of surgeries that help control stress urinary incontinence . This is urine leakage that happens when you ...

  3. Vaginal lactobacilli inhibiting growth of Gardnerella vaginalis, Mobiluncus and other bacterial species cultured from vaginal content of women with bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarin, A; Sylwan, J

    1986-12-01

    On a solid agar medium the growth-inhibitory effect of 9 Lactobacillus strains cultured from vaginal content was tested on bacteria cultured from vaginal content of women with bacterial vaginosis: Mobiluncus, Gardnerella vaginalis, Bacteroides and anaerobic cocci. Inhibition zones were observed in the growth of all of the strains isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis around all lactobacilli. The inhibitory effect of the lactobacilli was further tested on various anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic species, both type strains and fresh extragenitally cultured strains. Four Bacteroides fragilis strains as well as 2 out of 4 Staphylococcus aureus strains were clearly inhibited by the lactobacilli. The inhibition zones were generally wider at pH 5.5 than at 6.0. For all inhibited strains, (the S. aureus excepted) a low pH on the agar around the lactobacilli correlated to wider growth-inhibition zones.

  4. Vaginal rhinosporidiosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahan, S; Haque, M A; Nessa, F; Begum, A; Hasan, A H; Sen, S; Huq, M H

    2014-07-01

    The female genital tract is an extremely rare site for Rhinosporidiosis. Here we described a 13 year old girl who presented with a slow growing polypoid fleshy mass in the posterior vaginal wall near the orifice for 6 months with scanty bleeding from the mass. The girl was admitted to hospital with profuse watery vaginal discharge. Excision of the mass was followed by histopathological examination which confirmed the diagnosis Rhinosporidiosis.

  5. Laparoscopically assisted vaginal radical trachelectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielik, T.; Karovic, M.; Trska, R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Radical trachelectomy is a fertility-sparing procedure with the aim to provide adequate oncological safety to patients with cervical cancer while preserving their fertility. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate, in a series of 3 patients, the feasibility, morbidity, and safety of laparoscopically assisted vaginal radical trachelectomy for early cervical cancer. Patients and Methods: Three non consecutive patients with FIGO stage IA1 and IB1 cervical cancer was evaluated in a period of years 2008 - 2011. The patients underwent a laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy and radical parametrectomy class II procedure according to the Piver classification. The section of vaginal cuff, trachelectomy, permanent cerclage and isthmo-vaginal anastomosis ware realised by vaginal approach. Results: The median operative time, the median blood loss and the mean number of resected pelvic nodes was comparable with published data. Major intraoperative complications did not occur and no patient required a blood transfusion. The median follow-up time was 33 (38-59) months. One vaginal recurrence occurred in 7 months after primary surgery. The patient was underwent a radicalisation procedure and adjuvant oncologic therapy and now is free of disease. Conclusions: Laparoscopically assisted vaginal radical trachelectomy (LAVRT)may be an alternative in fertility-preserving surgery for early cervical cancer. The procedure offers patients potential benefits of minimally invasive surgery with adequate oncological safety, but it should be reserved for oncologic surgeons trained in advanced laparoscopic procedures. (author)

  6. Recurrent vaginal discharge in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreal, Sharon; Wood, Paul

    2013-08-01

    Childhood vaginal discharge remains a frequent reason for referral from primary to secondary care. The Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology (PAG) service at Kettering General Hospital was established in 1993 and provides a specialized service that meets the needs of children with gynaecological conditions. To investigate recurrent vaginal discharge noting symptomatology, defining pathogens, common and rarer causes, exploring management regimes, and any changes in practice over time. Retrospective review spanning 15 years identifying prepubertal children attending the outpatient PAG clinic with recurrent vaginal discharge. We reviewed the medical notes individually. 110 patients were identified; 85% were referred from primary care. The age distribution was bimodal at four and eight years. Thirty-five percent of our patients were discharged after the initial consultation. The commonest cause of discharge was vulvovaginitis (82%). Other important causes included suspected sexual abuse (5%), foreign body (3%), labial adhesions (3%), vaginal agenesis (2%). 35% of patients were admitted for vaginoscopy. Vaginal discharge is the most common gynecological symptom in prepubertal girls and can cause repeated clinical episodes. Vulvovaginitis is the most common cause and often responds to simple hygiene measures. Awareness of the less common causes of vaginal discharge is essential. Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Drug resistance plasmids in Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus reuteri.

    OpenAIRE

    Vescovo, M; Morelli, L; Bottazzi, V

    1982-01-01

    Sixteen strains of Lactobacillus reuteri and 20 strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus were tested for resistance to 22 antibiotics by using commercially available sensitivity disks. Evidence suggesting linkage of these resistances to plasmids was obtained by "curing" experiments with acridine dyes and high growth temperatures. Examination of plasmid patterns of agarose gel electrophoresis provided further evidence of loss in plasmid DNA under curing conditions in some of the strains examined.

  8. Twice-daily application of HIV microbicides alter the vaginal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel, Jacques; Gajer, Pawel; Fu, Li; Mauck, Christine K; Koenig, Sara S K; Sakamoto, Joyce; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A; Doncel, Gustavo F; Zeichner, Steven L

    2012-12-18

    Vaginal HIV microbicides offer great promise in preventing HIV transmission, but failures of phase 3 clinical trials, in which microbicide-treated subjects had an increased risk of HIV transmission, raised concerns about endpoints used to evaluate microbicide safety. A possible explanation for the increased transmission risk is that the agents shifted the vaginal bacterial community, resulting in loss of natural protection and enhanced HIV transmission susceptibility. We characterized vaginal microbiota, using pyrosequencing of bar-coded 16S rRNA gene fragments, in samples from 35 healthy, sexually abstinent female volunteer subjects (ages 18 to 50 years) with regular menses in a repeat phase 1 study of twice-daily application over 13.5 days of 1 of 3 gel products: a hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC)-based "universal" placebo (10 subjects), 6% cellulose sulfate (CS; 13 subjects), and 4% nonoxynol-9 (N-9; 12 subjects). We used mixed effects models inferred using Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, which showed that treatment with active agents shifted the microbiota toward a community type lacking significant numbers of Lactobacillus spp. and dominated by strict anaerobes. This state of the vaginal microbiota was associated with a low or intermediate Nugent score and was not identical to bacterial vaginosis, an HIV transmission risk factor. The placebo arm contained a higher proportion of communities dominated by Lactobacillus spp., particularly L. crispatus, throughout treatment. The data suggest that molecular evaluation of microbicide effects on vaginal microbiota may be a critical endpoint that should be incorporated in early clinical assessment of microbicide candidates. Despite large prevention efforts, HIV transmission and acquisition rates remain unacceptably high. In developing countries, transmission mainly occurs through heterosexual intercourse, where women are significantly more vulnerable to infection than men. Vaginal microbicides are considered to

  9. Genome sequencing and analysis of the first complete genome of Lactobacillus kunkeei strain MP2, an Apis mellifera gut isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddy Asenjo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. The honey bee (Apis mellifera is the most important pollinator in agriculture worldwide. However, the number of honey bees has fallen significantly since 2006, becoming a huge ecological problem nowadays. The principal cause is CCD, or Colony Collapse Disorder, characterized by the seemingly spontaneous abandonment of hives by their workers. One of the characteristics of CCD in honey bees is the alteration of the bacterial communities in their gastrointestinal tract, mainly due to the decrease of Firmicutes populations, such as the Lactobacilli. At this time, the causes of these alterations remain unknown. We recently isolated a strain of Lactobacillus kunkeei (L. kunkeei strain MP2 from the gut of Chilean honey bees. L. kunkeei, is one of the most commonly isolated bacterium from the honey bee gut and is highly versatile in different ecological niches. In this study, we aimed to elucidate in detail, the L. kunkeei genetic background and perform a comparative genome analysis with other Lactobacillus species. Methods. L. kunkeei MP2 was originally isolated from the guts of Chilean A. mellifera individuals. Genome sequencing was done using Pacific Biosciences single-molecule real-time sequencing technology. De novo assembly was performed using Celera assembler. The genome was annotated using Prokka, and functional information was added using the EggNOG 3.1 database. In addition, genomic islands were predicted using IslandViewer, and pro-phage sequences using PHAST. Comparisons between L. kunkeei MP2 with other L. kunkeei, and Lactobacillus strains were done using Roary. Results. The complete genome of L. kunkeei MP2 comprises one circular chromosome of 1,614,522 nt. with a GC content of 36,9%. Pangenome analysis with 16 L. kunkeei strains, identified 113 unique genes, most of them related to phage insertions. A large and unique region of L. kunkeei MP2 genome contains several genes that encode for phage structural protein and

  10. Changes in Vaginal Microbiota and Immune Mediators in HIV-1-Seronegative Kenyan Women Initiating Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxby, Alison C; Fredricks, David N; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Ásbjörnsdóttir, Kristjana; Masese, Linnet; Fiedler, Tina L; De Rosa, Stephen; Jaoko, Walter; Kiarie, James N; Overbaugh, Julie; McClelland, R Scott

    2016-04-01

    Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is associated with HIV acquisition. We studied changes in vaginal microbiota and inflammatory milieu after DMPA initiation. In a cohort of HIV-negative Kenyan women, we collected monthly vaginal swabs over 1 year before and after DMPA. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we compared quantities of Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii, Lactobacillus iners, Gardnerella vaginalis, and total bacterial load (16S ribosomal RNA gene levels). Six vaginal immune mediators were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Trends in the detection and quantity of bacteria were estimated by logistic and linear mixed-effects regression. From 2010 to 2012, 15 HIV-seronegative women initiated DMPA, contributing 85 visits (median, 6 visits/woman; range, 3-8 visits/woman). The median time of DMPA-exposed follow-up was 8.4 months (range, 1.5-11.6 months). Seven women (46%) had bacterial vaginosis within 70 days before DMPA start. L. iners was detected in 13 women (87%) before DMPA start, but other lactobacilli were rarely detected. Gardnerella vaginalis decreased by 0.21 log10 copies per swab per month after DMPA exposure (P = 0.01). Total bacterial load decreased by 0.08 log10 copies per swab per month of DMPA (P = 0.02). Sustained decreases in interleukin (IL)-6 (P = 0.03), IL-8 (P = 0.04), and IL-1 receptor antagonist (P vaginal bacterial concentrations and levels of inflammatory mediators. Further studies are warranted to outline components of the vaginal microbiota influenced by DMPA use and impact on HIV susceptibility.

  11. Association between Trichomonas vaginalis and vaginal bacterial community composition among reproductive-age women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotman, Rebecca M.; Bradford, L. Latey; Conrad, Melissa; Gajer, Pawel; Ault, Kevin; Peralta, Ligia; Forney, Larry J.; Carlton, Jane M.; Abdo, Zaid; Ravel, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Some vaginal bacterial communities are thought to prevent infection by sexually transmitted organisms. Prior work demonstrated that the vaginal microbiota of reproductive-age women cluster into five types of bacterial communities; 4 dominated by Lactobacillus species (L. iners, L. crispatus, L. gasseri, L. jensenii), and one (termed community state type (CST) IV) lacking significant numbers of lactobacilli and characterized by higher proportions of Atopobium, Prevotella, Parvimonas, Sneathia, Gardnerella, Mobiluncus, and other taxa. We sought to evaluate the relationship between vaginal bacterial composition and Trichomonas vaginalis. Methods Self-collected vaginal swabs were obtained cross-sectionally from 394 women equally representing four ethnic/racial groups. T. vaginalis screening was performed using PCR targeting the 18S rRNA and β-tubulin genes. Vaginal bacterial composition was characterized by pyrosequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA genes. A panel of eleven microsatellite markers was used to genotype T. vaginalis. The association between vaginal microbiota and T. vaginalis was evaluated by exact logistic regression. Results T. vaginalis was detected in 2.8% of participants (11/394). Of the eleven T. vaginalis-positive cases, eight (72%) were categorized as CST-IV, two (18%) as communities dominated by L. iners and one (9%) as L. crispatus-dominated (p-value:0.05). CST-IV microbiota were associated with an 8-fold increased odds of detecting T. vaginalis compared to women in the L. crispatus-dominated state (OR:8.26, 95% CI:1.07–372.65). Seven of the 11 T. vaginalis isolates were assigned to two genotypes. Conclusion T. vaginalis was associated with vaginal microbiota consisting of low proportions of lactobacilli and high proportions of Mycoplasma, Parvimonas, Sneathia, and other anaerobes. PMID:23007708

  12. A century of the phage: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmond, George P C; Fineran, Peter C

    2015-12-01

    Viruses that infect bacteria (bacteriophages; also known as phages) were discovered 100 years ago. Since then, phage research has transformed fundamental and translational biosciences. For example, phages were crucial in establishing the central dogma of molecular biology - information is sequentially passed from DNA to RNA to proteins - and they have been shown to have major roles in ecosystems, and help drive bacterial evolution and virulence. Furthermore, phage research has provided many techniques and reagents that underpin modern biology - from sequencing and genome engineering to the recent discovery and exploitation of CRISPR-Cas phage resistance systems. In this Timeline, we discuss a century of phage research and its impact on basic and applied biology.

  13. Pseudomonas predators: understanding and exploiting phage-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Jeroen; Hendrix, Hanne; Blasdel, Bob G; Danis-Wlodarczyk, Katarzyna; Lavigne, Rob

    2017-09-01

    Species in the genus Pseudomonas thrive in a diverse set of ecological niches and include crucial pathogens, such as the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. The bacteriophages that infect Pseudomonas spp. mirror the widespread and diverse nature of their hosts. Therefore, Pseudomonas spp. and their phages are an ideal system to study the molecular mechanisms that govern virus-host interactions. Furthermore, phages are principal catalysts of host evolution and diversity, which directly affects the ecological roles of environmental and pathogenic Pseudomonas spp. Understanding these interactions not only provides novel insights into phage biology but also advances the development of phage therapy, phage-derived antimicrobial strategies and innovative biotechnological tools that may be derived from phage-bacteria interactions.

  14. [Operative vaginal deliveries training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, O

    2008-12-01

    The appropriate use of forceps, vacuums or spatulas facilitates the rapid delivery of foetuses faced with life-threatening situations. It also makes possible the relief of certain cases of prolonged second-stage labor. In France, operative vaginal delivery (OVD) accounts for approximately 10% of all births. OVD training aims to optimize maternal, as well as neonatal safety. It should enable trainees to indicate or contraindicate an OVD safely, as well as to choose the appropriate instrument, use it correctly, and master quality control principles. Traditional OVD training is confronted with both spatial and time-related limitations. Spatial constraints involve both the teacher and trainee who only have limited visual access to the pelvic canal, and the head of the foetus; the time constraint occurs whenever the OVD occurs in an emergency setting. These limitations have been further aggravated by new constraints: decreasing time dedicated to training (European safety rules prohibit work the day after night duty), increasing litigation, and constraints imposed by society. Training by means of simulation removes such limitations making it possible to both avoid exposing pregnant women to the hazards of traditional training, and adapt the training to the skills of each trainee. OVD training should include forceps, vacuums and the use of spatulas. The OVD skills of obstetricians should be audited regularly on both a personal and a confidential level. Such audits could be based on a method using a simulator. Prospective studies comparing traditional and simulation-based training should be encouraged.

  15. Effect of lyophilized lactobacilli and 0.03 mg estriol (Gynoflor®) on vaginitis and vaginosis with disrupted vaginal microflora: a multicenter, randomized, single-blind, active-controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donders, G G G; Van Bulck, B; Van de Walle, P; Kaiser, R R; Pohlig, G; Gonser, S; Graf, F

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of lyophilized lactobacilli in combination with 0.03 mg estriol when compared to metronidazole in the treatment of bacterial vaginal infections. Multicenter, randomized, single-blind, active-controlled pilot study in 3 independent gynecological practices in Belgium. Forty-six, 18- to 50-year-old premenopausal women with a disrupted vaginal flora due to a bacterial vaginal infection (bacterial vaginosis, aerobic vaginitis) were included, provided that fresh phase-contrast microscopy of the vaginal fluid showed lactobacillary flora grade 2B or 3. Patients were given a blinded box with either 12 vaginal tablets of Gynoflor® (study medication) or 6 vaginal suppositories containing 500 mg metronidazole (control medication). Eight efficacy variables were studied to assess the status of the vaginal flora at entry, 3-7 days (control 1), 4-6 (control 2) weeks and 4 months after the end of therapy. At control 1, the combined variables equally improved in the lactobacilli group as in the metronidazole group. At control 2, the lactobacillus preparation showed slightly inferior results when compared to metronidazole. At 4 months, this analysis could not be performed due to low numbers, but analysis of recurrence rate and extra medication needed was not different between both groups. Lyophilized lactobacilli in combination with low-dose estriol are equivalent to metronidazole in the short-term treatment of bacterial vaginal infections, but have less effect after 1 month. Further studies are required to evaluate the long-term efficacy of lactobacilli when applied repeatedly. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Definition of a type of abnormal vaginal flora that is distinct from bacterial vaginosis: aerobic vaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donders, Gilbert G G; Vereecken, Annie; Bosmans, Eugene; Dekeersmaecker, Alfons; Salembier, Geert; Spitz, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    To define an entity of abnormal vaginal flora: aerobic vaginitis. Observational study. University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven, Belgium. 631 women attending for routine prenatal care or attending vaginitis clinic. Samples were taken for fresh wet mount microscopy of vaginal fluid, vaginal cultures and measurement of lactate, succinate and cytokine levels in vaginal fluid. Smears deficient in lactobacilli and positive for clue cells were considered to indicate a diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. Aerobic vaginitis was diagnosed if smears were deficient in lactobacilli, positive for cocci or coarse bacilli, positive for parabasal epithelial cells, and/or positive for vaginal leucocytes (plus their granular aspect). Genital complaints include red inflammation, yellow discharge, vaginal dyspareunia. Group B streptococci, escherichia coli, staphylococcus aureus and trichomonas vaginalis are frequently cultured. Vaginal lactate concentration is severely depressed in women with aerobic vaginitis, as in bacterial vaginosis, but vaginal succinate is not produced. Also in contrast to bacterial vaginosis, aerobic vaginitis produces a host immune response that leads to high production of interleukin-6, interleukin-1-beta and leukaemia inhibitory factor in the vaginal fluid. Aerobic vaginitis is associated with aerobic micro-organisms, mainly group B streptococci and E. coli. Its characteristics are different from those of bacterial vaginosis and elicit an important host response. The most severe form of aerobic vaginitis equals desquamative inflammatory vaginitis. In theory, aerobic vaginitis may be a better candidate than bacterial vaginosis as the cause of pregnancy complications, such as ascending chorioamnionitis, preterm rupture of the membranes and preterm delivery.

  17. Clinical Characteristics of Aerobic Vaginitis and Its Association to Vaginal Candidiasis, Trichomonas Vaginitis and Bacterial Vaginosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jahic, Mahira; Mulavdic, Mirsada; Nurkic, Jasmina; Jahic, Elmir; Nurkic, Midhat

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim of the work: Examine clinical characteristics of aerobic vaginitis and mixed infection for the purpose of better diagnostic accuracy and treatment efficiency. Materials and methods: Prospective research has been conducted at Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department for Microbiology and Pathology at Polyclinic for laboratory diagnostic and Gynecology and Obstetrics Department at Health Center Sapna. Examination included 100 examinees with the signs of vaginitis. Examinatio...

  18. In vitro evaluation of antimicrobial activity of Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501(®) , Lactobacillus paracasei IMC 502(®) and SYNBIO(®) against pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, M M; Verdenelli, M C; Cecchini, C; Silvi, S; Orpianesi, C; Boyko, N; Cresci, A

    2014-08-01

    Probiotic lactobacilli have a great potential to produce antimicrobial compounds that inhibit and control the microbial pathogen growth. The antimicrobial and antifungal activities of two probiotic strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501(®) and Lactobacillus paracasei IMC 502(®) , and their 1 : 1 combination, named SYNBIO(®) , were studied using four different methods. Using two modified streak methods and a well diffusion method, the inhibitory activity of the probiotics and their metabolites towards six Gram-positive, nine Gram-negative pathogenic bacterial strains and eight Candida strains was tested. Antagonistic effect of probiotic Lactobacillus strains was also investigated by coculturing assay highlighting a significant inhibition of most of the pathogens tested in this study. The combination SYNBIO(®) showed a microbicidal activity against most of the strains tested in the study. Compared with the control, most of the pathogenic bacteria and yeast were inhibited by all probiotic strains tested to various degrees. Screening Lactobacillus strains according to their activity in various environmental conditions could precede the clinical efficacy studies for adjunct treatment with probiotics in cure of different gastrointestinal and vaginal tract infections. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage AAT-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Domínguez, Andrés; Kolter, Roberto

    2016-08-25

    Aspects of the interaction between phages and animals are of interest and importance for medical applications. Here, we report the genome sequence of the lytic Pseudomonas phage AAT-1, isolated from mammalian serum. AAT-1 is a double-stranded DNA phage, with a genome of 57,599 bp, containing 76 predicted open reading frames. Copyright © 2016 Andrade-Domínguez and Kolter.

  20. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H. (Nestle Research Centre, Lausanne (Switzerland))

    1990-06-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an {alpha}-{sup 32}P-labeled probe.

  1. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H.

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α- 32 P-labeled probe

  2. DNA Probe for Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    OpenAIRE

    Delley, Michèle; Mollet, Beat; Hottinger, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognizes L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α-32P-l...

  3. Plasmid integration in a wide range of bacteria mediated by the integrase of Lactobacillus delbrueckii bacteriophage mv4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvray, F; Coddeville, M; Ritzenthaler, P; Dupont, L

    1997-01-01

    Bacteriophage mv4 is a temperate phage infecting Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. During lysogenization, the phage integrates its genome into the host chromosome at the 3' end of a tRNA(Ser) gene through a site-specific recombination process (L. Dupont et al., J. Bacteriol., 177:586-595, 1995). A nonreplicative vector (pMC1) based on the mv4 integrative elements (attP site and integrase-coding int gene) is able to integrate into the chromosome of a wide range of bacterial hosts, including Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus casei (two strains), Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Integrative recombination of pMC1 into the chromosomes of all of these species is dependent on the int gene product and occurs specifically at the pMC1 attP site. The isolation and sequencing of pMC1 integration sites from these bacteria showed that in lactobacilli, pMC1 integrated into the conserved tRNA(Ser) gene. In the other bacterial species where this tRNA gene is less or not conserved; secondary integration sites either in potential protein-coding regions or in intergenic DNA were used. A consensus sequence was deduced from the analysis of the different integration sites. The comparison of these sequences demonstrated the flexibility of the integrase for the bacterial integration site and suggested the importance of the trinucleotide CCT at the 5' end of the core in the strand exchange reaction. PMID:9068626

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Phages Infecting Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Krasowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages have been suggested as an alternative approach to reduce the amount of pathogens in various applications. Bacteriophages of various specificity and virulence were isolated as a means of controlling food-borne pathogens. We studied the interaction of bacteriophages with Bacillus species, which are very often persistent in industrial applications such as food production due to their antibiotic resistance and spore formation. A comparative study using electron microscopy, PFGE, and SDS-PAGE as well as determination of host range, pH and temperature resistance, adsorption rate, latent time, and phage burst size was performed on three phages of the Myoviridae family and one phage of the Siphoviridae family which infected Bacillus subtilis strains. The phages are morphologically different and characterized by icosahedral heads and contractile (SIOΦ, SUBω, and SPOσ phages or noncontractile (ARπ phage tails. The genomes of SIOΦ and SUBω are composed of 154 kb. The capsid of SIOΦ is composed of four proteins. Bacteriophages SPOσ and ARπ have genome sizes of 25 kbp and 40 kbp, respectively. Both phages as well as SUBω phage have 14 proteins in their capsids. Phages SIOΦ and SPOσ are resistant to high temperatures and to the acid (4.0 and alkaline (9.0 and 10.0 pH.

  5. Evolution of phage display technology: from discovery to application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbarnia, Leila; Farajnia, Safar; Babaei, Hossein; Majidi, Jafar; Veisi, Kamal; Ahmadzadeh, Vahideh; Akbari, Bahman

    2017-03-01

    Phage display technology as a selection-based system is an attractive method for evolution of new biological drugs. Unique ability of phage libraries for displaying proteins on bacteriophage surfaces enable them to make a major contribution in diverse fields of researches related to the diagnosis and therapy of diseases. One of the great challenges facing researchers is the modification of phage display technology and the development of new applications. This article reviews the molecular basis of phage display library, and summarizes the novel and specific applications of this technique in the field of biological drugs development including therapeutic antibodies, peptides, vaccines, and catalytic antibodies.

  6. Ligand-directed profiling of organelles with internalizing phage libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobroff, Andrey S.; Rangel, Roberto; Guzman-Roja, Liliana; Salmeron, Carolina C.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Bologa, Cristian G.; Oprea, Tudor I.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a resourceful tool to, in an unbiased manner, discover and characterize functional protein-protein interactions, to create vaccines, and to engineer peptides, antibodies, and other proteins as targeted diagnostic and/or therapeutic agents. Recently, our group has developed a new class of internalizing phage (iPhage) for ligand-directed targeting of organelles and/or to identify molecular pathways within live cells. This unique technology is suitable for applications ranging from fundamental cell biology to drug development. Here we describe the method for generating and screening the iPhage display system, and explain how to select and validate candidate internalizing homing peptide. PMID:25640897

  7. Dynamics of Vaginal Bacterial Communities in Women Developing Bacterial Vaginosis, Candidiasis, or No Infection, Analyzed by PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Real-Time PCR▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Beatrice; Pugliese, Ciro; Biagi, Elena; Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Bellen, Gert; Donders, Gilbert G. G.; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2007-01-01

    The microbial flora of the vagina plays a major role in preventing genital infections, including bacterial vaginosis (BV) and candidiasis (CA). An integrated approach based on PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and real-time PCR was used to study the structure and dynamics of bacterial communities in vaginal fluids of healthy women and patients developing BV and CA. Universal eubacterial primers and Lactobacillus genus-specific primers, both targeted at 16S rRNA genes, were used in DGGE and real-time PCR analysis, respectively. The DGGE profiles revealed that the vaginal flora was dominated by Lactobacillus species under healthy conditions, whereas several potentially pathogenic bacteria were present in the flora of women with BV. Lactobacilli were the predominant bacterial population in the vagina for patients affected by CA, but changes in the composition of Lactobacillus species were observed. Real-time PCR analysis allowed the quantitative estimation of variations in lactobacilli associated with BV and CA diseases. A statistically significant decrease in the relative abundance of lactobacilli was found in vaginal fluids of patients with BV compared to the relative abundance of lactobacilli in the vaginal fluids of healthy women and patients with CA. PMID:17644631

  8. Dynamics of vaginal bacterial communities in women developing bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis, or no infection, analyzed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Beatrice; Pugliese, Ciro; Biagi, Elena; Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Bellen, Gert; Donders, Gilbert G G; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2007-09-01

    The microbial flora of the vagina plays a major role in preventing genital infections, including bacterial vaginosis (BV) and candidiasis (CA). An integrated approach based on PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and real-time PCR was used to study the structure and dynamics of bacterial communities in vaginal fluids of healthy women and patients developing BV and CA. Universal eubacterial primers and Lactobacillus genus-specific primers, both targeted at 16S rRNA genes, were used in DGGE and real-time PCR analysis, respectively. The DGGE profiles revealed that the vaginal flora was dominated by Lactobacillus species under healthy conditions, whereas several potentially pathogenic bacteria were present in the flora of women with BV. Lactobacilli were the predominant bacterial population in the vagina for patients affected by CA, but changes in the composition of Lactobacillus species were observed. Real-time PCR analysis allowed the quantitative estimation of variations in lactobacilli associated with BV and CA diseases. A statistically significant decrease in the relative abundance of lactobacilli was found in vaginal fluids of patients with BV compared to the relative abundance of lactobacilli in the vaginal fluids of healthy women and patients with CA.

  9. Clinical characteristics of aerobic vaginitis and its association to vaginal candidiasis, trichomonas vaginitis and bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahic, Mahira; Mulavdic, Mirsada; Nurkic, Jasmina; Jahic, Elmir; Nurkic, Midhat

    2013-12-01

    Examine clinical characteristics of aerobic vaginitis and mixed infection for the purpose of better diagnostic accuracy and treatment efficiency. Prospective research has been conducted at Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department for Microbiology and Pathology at Polyclinic for laboratory diagnostic and Gynecology and Obstetrics Department at Health Center Sapna. Examination included 100 examinees with the signs of vaginitis. anamnesis, clinical, gynecological and microbiological examination of vaginal smear. The average age of the examinees was 32,62±2,6. Examining vaginal smears of the examinees with signs of vaginitis in 96% (N-96) different microorganisms have been isolated, while in 4% (N-4) findings were normal. AV has been found in 51% (N-51) of the examinees, Candida albicans in 17% (N-17), BV in 15% (N-15), Trichomonas vaginalis in 13% (N-13). In 21% (N-21) AV was diagnosed alone while associated with other agents in 30% (N-30). Most common causes of AV are E. coli (N-55) and E. faecalis (N-52). AV and Candida albicanis have been found in (13/30, 43%), Trichomonas vaginalis in (9/30, 30%) and BV (8/30, 26%). Vaginal secretion is in 70,05% (N-36) yellow coloured, red vagina wall is recorded in 31,13% (N-16) and pruritus in 72,54% (N-37). Increased pH value of vagina found in 94,10% (N-48). The average pH value of vaginal environment was 5,15±0,54 and in associated presence of AV and VVC, TV and BV was 5,29±0,56 which is higher value considering presence of AV alone but that is not statistically significant difference (p>0,05). Amino-odor test was positive in 29,94% (N-15) of associated infections. Lactobacilli are absent, while leukocytes are increased in 100% (N-51) of the examinees with AV. AV is vaginal infection similar to other vaginal infections. It is important to be careful while diagnosing because the treatment of AV differentiates from treatment of other vaginitis.

  10. Diagnosis of aerobic vaginitis by quantitative real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantseva, T A; Bellen, G; Savochkina, Y A; Guschin, A E; Donders, G G G

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate a real-time PCR-based technique to quantify bacteria associated with aerobic vaginitis (AV) as a potential test. Vaginal samples from 100 women were tested by wet-mount microscopy, gram stain and quantitative real-time PCR targeting Enterobacteriacea, Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Enterococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, S. aureus; Lactobacillus spp. AV diagnosis obtained by wet-mount microscopy was used as reference. Some level of AV was diagnosed in 23 (23.7 %) cases. Various concentrations of Enterobacteriacea, Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp. were detected an all patients. Enterococcus spp. were detected in 76 (78.3 %) cases. Summarized concentrations of aerobes were tenfold higher in AV-positive compared to AV-negative cases [7.30lg vs 6.06lg (p = 0.02)]. Concentrations of aerobes in severe, moderate and light AV cases did not vary significantly (p = 0.14). Concentration of lactobacilli was 1000-fold lower in AV-positive cases compared to normal cases (5.3lg vs 8.3lg, p AV-positive cases [19/22 (86.4 %) samples]. The relation of high loads of aerobes to the low numbers of Lactobacilli are a reliable marker for the presence of AV and could substitute microscopy as a test. PCR may be a good standardized substitution for AV diagnosis in settings where well-trained microscopists are lacking.

  11. The influence of maternal vaginal flora on the intestinal colonization in newborns and 3-month-old infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Iwona; Olejek, Anita; Stencel-Gabriel, Krystyna; Wielgoś, Miroslaw

    2018-06-01

    The role of maternal vaginal bacteria on the colonization of neonatal gut is still a matter of discussion. Our aim was to estimate the role of maternal vaginal flora on the development of intestinal flora in neonates and 3-month-old infants. Seventy-nine maternal-neonatal pairs were included in the study. Vaginal swabs were taken before the rupture of membranes after admission to the delivery ward. First neonatal stool (meconium) and stool at 3-month-old infants were collected and cultured. All samples were subjected to microbiological analysis for Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Bifidobacterium, Clostridium (including C. difficile), Lactobacillus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Candida. Maternal vagina was colonized mainly by streptococci (67%) followed by lactobacilli (58%) and Candida spp. (39%). Vaginal streptococci influenced the intestinal colonization in infants with staphylococci, C. difficile, and candida. Vaginal lactobacilli influenced colonization with C. difficile, and Candida. Vaginal flora is a potent factor influencing the development of bacterial flora in the neonatal and infantile gut. The extension of the observation period until 3 months of life allow to discover the potential changes in the intestinal flora of children.

  12. Enhanced Trapping of HIV-1 by Human Cervicovaginal Mucus Is Associated with Lactobacillus crispatus-Dominant Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Kenetta L.; Wang, Ying-Ying; Harit, Dimple; Humphrys, Michael S.; Ma, Bing; Cone, Richard; Ravel, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) can provide a barrier that precludes HIV and other sexually transmitted virions from reaching target cells in the vaginal epithelium, thereby preventing or reducing infections. However, the barrier properties of CVM differ from woman to woman, and the causes of these variations are not yet well understood. Using high-resolution particle tracking of fluorescent HIV-1 pseudoviruses, we found that neither pH nor Nugent scores nor total lactic acid levels correlated significantly with virus trapping in unmodified CVM from diverse donors. Surprisingly, HIV-1 was generally trapped in CVM with relatively high concentrations of d-lactic acid and a Lactobacillus crispatus-dominant microbiota. In contrast, a substantial fraction of HIV-1 virions diffused rapidly through CVM with low concentrations of d-lactic acid that had a Lactobacillus iners-dominant microbiota or significant amounts of Gardnerella vaginalis, a bacterium associated with bacterial vaginosis. Our results demonstrate that the vaginal microbiota, including specific species of Lactobacillus, can alter the diffusional barrier properties of CVM against HIV and likely other sexually transmitted viruses and that these microbiota-associated changes may account in part for the elevated risks of HIV acquisition linked to bacterial vaginosis or intermediate vaginal microbiota. PMID:26443453

  13. Streptococcus agalactiae: a vaginal pathogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniatis, A N; Palermos, J; Kantzanou, M; Maniatis, N A; Christodoulou, C; Legakis, N J

    1996-03-01

    The significance of Streptococcus agalactiae as an aetiological agent in vaginitis was evaluated. A total of 6226 samples from women who presented with vaginal symptoms was examined. The presence of >10 leucocytes/high-power field (h.p.f.) was taken to be the criterion of active infection. S. agalactiae was isolated from 10.1% of these samples. The isolation rates of other common pathogens such as Candida spp., Gardnerella vaginalis and Trichomonas spp. were 54.1%, 27.2% and 4.2%, respectively, in the same group of patients. In contrast, the isolation rates of these micro-organisms in the group of patients who had no infection (S. agalactiae was isolated, it was the sole pathogen isolated (83%) and its presence was associated with an inflammatory response in 80% of patients. Furthermore, the relative risk of vaginal infection with S. agalactiae (2.38) in patients with purulent vaginal discharge was greater than that of Candida spp. infection (1.41) and lower than that of Trichomonas spp. infection (8.32). These data suggest that S. agalactiae in symptomatic women with microscopic evidence of inflammation should be considered a causative agent of vaginitis.

  14. Molecular definition of vaginal microbiota in East African commercial sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, John J; Links, Matthew G; Hill, Janet E; Dumonceaux, Tim J; Kimani, Joshua; Jaoko, Walter; Wachihi, Charles; Mungai, Jane Njeri; Peters, Geoffrey A; Tyler, Shaun; Graham, Morag; Severini, Alberto; Fowke, Keith R; Ball, T Blake; Plummer, Francis A

    2011-06-01

    Resistance to HIV infection in a cohort of commercial sex workers living in Nairobi, Kenya, is linked to mucosal and antiinflammatory factors that may be influenced by the vaginal microbiota. Since bacterial vaginosis (BV), a polymicrobial dysbiosis characterized by low levels of protective Lactobacillus organisms, is an established risk factor for HIV infection, we investigated whether vaginal microbiology was associated with HIV-exposed seronegative (HESN) or HIV-seropositive (HIV(+)) status in this cohort. A subset of 44 individuals was selected for deep-sequencing analysis based on the chaperonin 60 (cpn60) universal target (UT), including HESN individuals (n = 16), other HIV-seronegative controls (HIV-N, n = 16), and HIV(+) individuals (n = 12). Our findings indicate exceptionally high phylogenetic resolution of the cpn60 UT using reads as short as 200 bp, with 54 species in 29 genera detected in this group. Contrary to our initial hypothesis, few differences between HESN and HIV-N women were observed. Several HIV(+) women had distinct profiles dominated by Escherichia coli. The deep-sequencing phylogenetic profile of the vaginal microbiota corresponds closely to BV(+) and BV(-) diagnoses by microscopy, elucidating BV at the molecular level. A cluster of samples with intermediate abundance of Lactobacillus and dominant Gardnerella was identified, defining a distinct BV phenotype that may represent a transitional stage between BV(+) and BV(-). Several alpha- and betaproteobacteria, including the recently described species Variovorax paradoxus, were found to correlate positively with increased Lactobacillus levels that define the BV(-) ("normal") phenotype. We conclude that cpn60 UT is ideally suited to next-generation sequencing technologies for further investigation of microbial community dynamics and mucosal immunity underlying HIV resistance in this cohort.

  15. Vaginal microbiota and sexually transmitted infections that may influence transmission of cell-associated HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Richard A

    2014-12-15

    Vaginal microbiota and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are likely to influence the transmission of cell-associated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Lactic acid produced by Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota (Nugent score 0-3) will likely inhibit transmission, especially female-to-male transmission. In contrast, polymicrobial microbiota (Nugent score 4-10), community state types IV-A and IV-B, and STIs will likely increase transmission of cell-associated HIV. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Vaginal birth after C-section

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000589.htm Vaginal birth after C-section To use the sharing ... the same way again. Many women can have vaginal deliveries after having a C-section in the ...

  17. VBAC (Vaginal Birth After C-Section)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaginal birth after C-section (VBAC) Overview If you've delivered a baby by C-section and ... between scheduling a repeat C-section or attempting vaginal birth after C-section (VBAC). For many women, ...

  18. Urinary incontinence - tension-free vaginal tape

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/007377.htm Urinary incontinence - tension-free vaginal tape To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Placement of tension-free vaginal tape is surgery to help control stress urinary ...

  19. What is vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pinterest Email Print What is vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC)? VBAC refers to vaginal delivery of a baby after a previous pregnancy was delivered by cesarean delivery. In the past, pregnant women who had ...

  20. Spontaneous rupture of vaginal enterocele

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, J H; Galatius, H; Hansen, P K

    1985-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of an enterocele is a rare complication. Only 24 cases including the present case have been reported in the literature. The patients were elderly and had had at least one vaginal operation. The patients were remarkably unaffected symptomatically on admission.......Spontaneous rupture of an enterocele is a rare complication. Only 24 cases including the present case have been reported in the literature. The patients were elderly and had had at least one vaginal operation. The patients were remarkably unaffected symptomatically on admission....

  1. Premenarchal, recurrent vaginal discharge associated with an incomplete obstructing longitudinal vaginal septum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Keith A; DeWitt, Jason

    2005-12-01

    To describe an unusual, premenarchal presentation of an obstructive vaginal anomaly. Case Report. University Medical Center. Premenarchal subject Vaginogram, vaginal septum resection. Vaginal septum resection with resolution of vaginal discharge. This case demonstrates some of the typical features of uterus didelphys bicollis with incomplete obstructing hemivagina, but had a unique presentation with premenarchal, recurrent vaginal discharge. Typically, patients with an obstructing mullerian anomaly present after menarche with pelvic pain and a mass. The vaginogram assists in the preoperative definition of abnormal anatomy which allows the surgeon to develop the most appropriate surgical approach. Resection of this incompletely obstructing vaginal septum resulted in resolution of the recurrent vaginal discharge.

  2. Evaluation of vaginal flora and antibiogram analysis in reproductive-age women with or without vaginitis in primary care settings

    OpenAIRE

    Alim, Ahmet; Çetin, Ali; Yıldız, Çağlar

    2009-01-01

    Aims: The treatment modalities of patients with vaginal discharge are generally related to their symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate vaginal flora and antibiogram analysis in reproductive-age women with or without vaginitis in primary care settings. Methods: Vaginal swabs were taken from 311 women who have vaginitis, and tested for the causative agents of vaginal discharge. The control group was 89 healthy women without vaginal discharge. Vaginal swaps were used in a commercial te...

  3. Analysis of functional properties of Lactobacillus acidophilus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, R.X.; Sun, J.L.; Mo, H.Z.; Yang Zhu, Yang

    2007-01-01

    Metabolites from Lactobacillus acidophilus were analysed. The results showed that Lactobacillus acidophilus Ind-1 and Lactobacillus acidophilus Lakcid produced respectively 12.73 g and 13.33 g lactic acid l¿1 after incubating in skim milk at 37 °C for 36 h; and 2.229 unit and 1.808 unit

  4. Production of a phage-displayed single chain variable fragment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop specific single chain variable fragments (scFv) against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) via phage display technology. Methods: Purified viruses were initially applied for iterative panning rounds of scFv phage display libraries. The binding ability of the selected scFv antibody fragments against the ...

  5. An improved plating assay for determination of phage titer | Yang ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, an improved plating assay was developed for detection of the number of recombinant phage Cap-T7 present in a test solution at a certain dilution point by counting the plaque forming units. The data demonstrated that the improved plating assay is fast, useful, and convenient for the determination of the phage ...

  6. Popping the cork: mechanisms of phage genome ejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molineux, I.J.; Panja, D.

    2013-01-01

    Sixty years after Hershey and Chase showed that nucleic acid is the major component of phage particles that is ejected into cells, we still do not fully understand how the process occurs. Advances in electron microscopy have revealed the structure of the condensed DNA confined in a phage capsid, and

  7. Effects of vaginal prolapse surgery and ageing on vaginal vascularization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Ageing affects pelvic floor anatomy and function, resulting in several disorders like pelvic organ prolapse (POP), lower urinary tract symptoms and vaginal atrophy (VA). In this thesis we searched for methods to link the function of pelvic organs to physiological changes. The effects of POP and

  8. Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Lactobacillus acidophilus La-14 Attenuate Gardnerella vaginalis-Infected Bacterial Vaginosis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Se-Eun; Jeong, Jin-Ju; Choi, Su-Young; Kim, Hyunji; Han, Myung Joo; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2017-05-23

    Oral administration of a probiotic mixture (PM; Respecta ® ) consisting of Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (L1), Lactobacillus acidophilus La-14 (L2), and lactoferrin RCXTM results in colonization of these probiotics in the vagina of healthy women. Therefore, we examined whether vaginal colonization of the PM ingredients L1 and L2 could attenuate bacterial vaginosis (BV). BV was induced in mice via β-estradiol-3-benzoate-induced immunosuppression and intravaginal inoculation with Gardnerella vaginalis (GV). Inflammatory markers were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry. Oral or intravaginal administration of PM resulted in colonization of L1 and L2 in the vagina. Oral or intravaginal administration of L1, L2, or PM significantly inhibited GV-induced epithelial cell disruption, myeloperoxidase activity, NF-κB activation, and IL-1β and TNF-α expression ( p < 0.05). Administration of these probiotics also inhibited IL-17 and RORγt expression but increased IL-10 and Foxp3 expression. Of these probiotics, L2 most effectively attenuated GV-induced BV, followed by L1 and PM. Oral administration was more effective against GV-induced BV than intravaginal administration. L1 and L2 also significantly inhibited the adherence of GV to HeLa cells (a human cervical cancer cell line) and GV growth in vitro. In addition, L1 and L2 inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced NF-κB activation in macrophages and the differentiation of splenocytes into Th17 cells in vitro, but increased their differentiation into Treg cells. Our study suggests that L1, L2, and PM attenuated GV-induced vaginosis by regulating both vaginal and systemic innate and adaptive immune responses rather than direct competition or killing of GV in the vagina.

  9. A New Method to Measure Vaginal Sensibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakeman, M. M. E.; Laan, E.; Vaart, C. H.; Roovers, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Vaginal surgery may affect sexual function both positively and negatively. Possibly, negative consequences of surgical interventions on sexuality may be caused by reduced sensibility of the vaginal wall. Aims: To develop a new method to measure vaginal sensibility. Methods: We

  10. A new method to measure vaginal sensibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakeman, M. M. E.; Laan, E.; Vaart, C. H.; Roovers, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Vaginal surgery may affect sexual function both positively and negatively. Possibly, negative consequences of surgical interventions on sexuality may be caused by reduced sensibility of the vaginal wall. To develop a new method to measure vaginal sensibility. We developed a technique to measure the

  11. Characterisation of the vaginal microflora of human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lactobacilli predominate normal vaginal microflora and are important in maintenance of vaginal health. The current study set out to identify and compare culture isolates of vaginal microflora of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive (HIV+) and HIV negative (HIV-) women at different phases during menstrual cycle ...

  12. Ethinyl Estradiol and Etonogestrel Vaginal Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or infection of the vagina white or yellow vaginal discharge vaginal bleeding or spotting when it is not time ... Follow your doctor's directions for examining your breasts; report any lumps ... and ethinyl estradiol vaginal ring.Do not let anyone else use your ...

  13. Characterisation of the vaginal microflora of human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teresa kiama

    2014-02-26

    Feb 26, 2014 ... Lactobacilli predominate normal vaginal microflora and are important in maintenance of vaginal health. The current study set out to identify and compare culture isolates of vaginal microflora of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive (HIV+) and HIV negative (HIV-) women at different phases during.

  14. Probiotics for vaginal health in South Africa: what is on retailers' shelves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happel, Anna-Ursula; Jaumdally, Shameem Z; Pidwell, Tanya; Cornelius, Tracy; Jaspan, Heather B; Froissart, Remy; Barnabas, Shaun L; Passmore, Jo-Ann S

    2017-01-19

    Probiotics are widely used to improve gastrointestinal (GI) health, but they may also be useful to prevent or treat gynaecological disorders, including bacterial vaginosis (BV) and candidiasis. BV prevalence is high in South Africa and is associated with increased HIV risk and pregnancy complications. We aimed to assess the availability of probiotics for vaginal health in retail stores (pharmacies, supermarkets and health stores) in two major cities in South Africa. A two-stage cluster sampling strategy was used in the Durban and Cape Town metropoles. Instructions for use, microbial composition, dose, storage and manufacturers' details were recorded. A total of 104 unique probiotics were identified in Cape Town and Durban (66.4% manufactured locally). Cape Town had more products than Durban (94 versus 59 probiotics), although 47% were common between cities (49/104). Only four products were explicitly for vaginal health. The remainder were for GI health in adults (51.0%) or infants (17.3%). The predominant species seen overall included Lactobacillus acidophilus (53.5%), L. rhamnosus (37.6%), Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum (35.6%) and B. animalis ssp. lactis (33.7%). Products for vaginal health contained only common GI probiotic species, with a combination of L. acidophilus/B. longum ssp. longum/B. bifidum, L. rhamnosus/L. reuteri or L. rhamnosus alone, despite L. crispatus, L. gasseri, and L. jensenii being the most common commensals found in the lower female reproductive tract. This survey highlights the paucity of vaginal probiotics available in South Africa, where vaginal dysbiosis is common. Most vaginal products contained organisms other than female genital tract commensals.

  15. Chemical Strategies for the Covalent Modification of Filamentous Phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Francis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Historically filamentous bacteriophage have been known to be the workhorse of phage display due to their ability to link genotype to phenotype. More recently, the filamentous phage scaffold has proved to be powerful outside the realms of phage display technology in fields such as molecular imaging, cancer research and materials and vaccine development. The ability of the virion to serve as a platform for a variety of applications heavily relies on the functionalization of the phage coat proteins with a wide variety of functionalities. Genetic modification of the coat proteins has been the most widely used strategy for functionalizing the virion; however complementary chemical modification strategies can help to diversify the range of materials that can be developed. This review emphasizes the recent advances that have been made in the chemical modification of filamentous phage as well as some of the challenges that are involved functionalizing the virion.

  16. Influence of the vaginal microbiota on toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 production by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhee, Roderick A; Miller, Wayne L; Gloor, Gregory B; McCormick, John K; Hammond, Jo-Anne; Burton, Jeremy P; Reid, Gregor

    2013-03-01

    Menstrual toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a serious illness that afflicts women of premenopausal age worldwide and arises from vaginal infection by Staphylococcus aureus and concurrent production of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1). Studies have illustrated the capacity of lactobacilli to reduce S. aureus virulence, including the capacity to suppress TSST-1. We hypothesized that an aberrant microbiota characteristic of pathogenic bacteria would induce the increased production of TSST-1 and that this might represent a risk factor for the development of TSS. A S. aureus TSST-1 reporter strain was grown in the presence of vaginal swab contents collected from women with a clinically healthy vaginal status, women with an intermediate status, and those diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis (BV). Bacterial supernatant challenge assays were also performed to test the effects of aerobic vaginitis (AV)-associated pathogens toward TSST-1 production. While clinical samples from healthy and BV women suppressed toxin production, in vitro studies demonstrated that Streptococcus agalactiae and Enterococcus spp. significantly induced TSST-1 production, while some Lactobacillus spp. suppressed it. The findings suggest that women colonized by S. aureus and with AV, but not BV, may be more susceptible to menstrual TSS and would most benefit from prophylactic treatment.

  17. The influence of sexual activity on the vaginal microbiota and Gardnerella vaginalis clade diversity in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodstrcil, Lenka A; Twin, Jimmy; Garland, Suzanne M; Fairley, Christopher K; Hocking, Jane S; Law, Matthew G; Plummer, Erica L; Fethers, Katherine A; Chow, Eric P F; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Bradshaw, Catriona S

    2017-01-01

    To examine the influence of sexual activity on the composition and consistency of the vaginal microbiota over time, and distribution of Gardnerella vaginalis clades in young women. Fifty-two participants from a university cohort were selected. Vaginal swabs were self-collected every 3-months for up to 12 months with 184 specimens analysed. The vaginal microbiota was characterised using Roche 454 V3/4 region 16S rRNA sequencing, and G.vaginalis clade typing by qPCR. A Lactobacillus crispatus dominated vaginal microbiota was associated with Caucasian ethnicity (adjusted relative risk ratio[ARRR] = 7.28, 95%CI:1.37,38.57,p = 0.020). An L.iners (ARRR = 17.51, 95%CI:2.18,140.33,p = 0.007) or G.vaginalis (ARRR = 14.03, 95%CI:1.22,160.69, p = 0.034) dominated microbiota was associated with engaging in penile-vaginal sex. Microbiota dominated by L.crispatus, L.iners or other lactobacilli exhibited greater longitudinal consistency of the bacterial communities present compared to ones dominated by heterogeneous non-lactobacilli (pvaginal sex (RRR = 9.55, 95%CI:1.33,68.38,p = 0.025) or were diagnosed with BV (RRR = 31.5, 95%CI:1.69,586.87,p = 0.021). Sexual activity and ethnicity influenced the composition of the vaginal microbiota of these young, relatively sexually inexperienced women. Women had consistent vaginal microbiota over time if lactobacilli were the dominant spp. present. Penile-vaginal sex did not alter the consistency of microbial communities but increased G.vaginalis clade diversity in young women with and without BV, suggesting sexual transmission of commensal and potentially pathogenic clades.

  18. The Vaginal Microbiome and its Potential to Impact Efficacy of HIV Pre-exposure Prophylaxis for Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velloza, Jennifer; Heffron, Renee

    2017-10-01

    This review describes existing evidence addressing the potential modulation of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) products, specifically 1% tenofovir (TFV) gel and oral tenofovir-based PrEP, by vaginal dysbiosis and discusses future considerations for delivering novel, long-acting PrEP products to women at high risk for vaginal dysbiosis and HIV. We describe results from analyses investigating the modification of PrEP efficacy by vaginal dysbiosis and studies of biological mechanisms that could render PrEP ineffective in the presence of specific microbiota. A secondary analysis from the CAPRISA-004 cohort demonstrated that there is no effect of the 1% TFV gel in the presence of non-Lactobacillus dominant microbiota. Another recent analysis comparing oral tenofovir-based PrEP efficacy among women with and without bacterial vaginosis in the Partners PrEP Study found that oral PrEP efficacy is not modified by bacterial vaginosis. Gardnerella vaginalis, commonly present in women with vaginal dysbiosis, can rapidly metabolize TFV particularly when it is locally applied and thereby prevent TFV integration into cells. Given that vaginal dysbiosis appears to modulate efficacy for 1% TFV gel but not for oral tenofovir-based PrEP, vaginal dysbiosis is potentially less consequential to HIV protection from TFV in the context of systemic drug delivery and high product adherence. Vaginal dysbiosis may undermine the efficacy of 1% TFV gel to protect women from HIV but not the efficacy of oral PrEP. Ongoing development of novel ring, injectable, and film-based PrEP products should investigate whether vaginal dysbiosis can reduce efficacy of these products, even in the presence of high adherence.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus phage types and their correlation to antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehndiratta P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Context: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most devastating human pathogen. The organism has a differential ability to spread and cause outbreak of infections. Characterization of these strains is important to control the spread of infection in the hospitals as well as in the community. Aim: To identify the currently existing phage groups of Staphylococcus aureus, their prevalence and resistance to antibiotics. Materials and Methods: Study was undertaken on 252 Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from clinical samples. Strains were phage typed and their resistance to antibiotics was determined following standard microbiological procedures. Statistical Analysis: Chi square test was used to compare the antibiotic susceptibility between methicillin resistant Staph. aureus (MRSA and methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA strains. Results: Prevalence of MRSA and MSSA strains was found to be 29.36% and 70.65% respectively. Of these 17.56% of MRSA and 40.44% of MSSA strains were community acquired. All the MSSA strains belonging to phage type 81 from the community were sensitive to all the antibiotics tested including clindamycin and were resistant to penicillin. Forty five percent strains of phage group III and 39% of non-typable MRSA strains from the hospital were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Conclusion: The study revealed that predominant phage group amongst MRSA strains was phage group III and amongst MSSA from the community was phage group NA (phage type 81. MSSA strains isolated from the community differed significantly from hospital strains in their phage type and antibiotic susceptibility. A good correlation was observed between community acquired strains of phage type 81 and sensitivity to gentamycin and clindamycin.

  20. Protein Expression Modifications in Phage-Resistant Mutants of Aeromonas salmonicida after AS-A Phage Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Moreirinha

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of infections by pathogenic bacteria is one of the main sources of financial loss for the aquaculture industry. This problem often cannot be solved with antibiotic treatment or vaccination. Phage therapy seems to be an alternative environmentally-friendly strategy to control infections. Recognizing the cellular modifications that bacteriophage therapy may cause to the host is essential in order to confirm microbial inactivation, while understanding the mechanisms that drive the development of phage-resistant strains. The aim of this work was to detect cellular modifications that occur after phage AS-A treatment in A. salmonicida, an important fish pathogen. Phage-resistant and susceptible cells were subjected to five successive streak-plating steps and analysed with infrared spectroscopy, a fast and powerful tool for cell study. The spectral differences of both populations were investigated and compared with a phage sensitivity profile, obtained through the spot test and efficiency of plating. Changes in protein associated peaks were found, and these results were corroborated by 1-D electrophoresis of intracellular proteins analysis and by phage sensitivity profiles. Phage AS-A treatment before the first streaking-plate step clearly affected the intracellular proteins expression levels of phage-resistant clones, altering the expression of distinct proteins during the subsequent five successive streak-plating steps, making these clones recover and be phenotypically more similar to the sensitive cells.

  1. Unique Insights in the Cervicovaginal Lactobacillus iners and L. crispatus Proteomes and Their Associations with Microbiota Dysbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanneke Borgdorff

    Full Text Available A Lactobacillus-dominated cervicovaginal microbiota (VMB protects women from adverse reproductive health outcomes, but the role of L. iners in the VMB is poorly understood. Our aim was to explore the association between the cervicovaginal L. iners and L. crispatus proteomes and VMB composition.The vaginal proteomes of 50 Rwandan women at high HIV risk, grouped into four VMB groups (based on 16S rDNA microarray results, were investigated by mass spectrometry using cervicovaginal lavage (CVL samples. Only samples with positive 16S results for L. iners and/or L. crispatus within each group were included in subsequent comparative protein analyses: Lactobacillus crispatus-dominated VMB cluster (with 16S-proven L. iners (ni = 0, and with 16S-proven L. crispatus (nc = 5, L. iners-dominated VMB cluster (ni = 11, nc = 4, moderate dysbiosis (ni = 12, nc = 2; and severe dysbiosis (ni = 8, nc = 2. The relative abundances of proteins that were considered specific for L. iners and L. crispatus were compared among VMB groups.Forty Lactobacillus proteins were identified of which 7 were specific for L. iners and 11 for L. crispatus. The relative abundances of L. iners DNA starvation/stationary phase protection protein (DPS, and the glycolysis enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI, were significantly decreased in women with L. iners-containing dysbiosis compared to women with a L. iners-dominated VMB, independent of vaginal pH and L. iners abundance. Furthermore, L. iners DPS, GAPDH, GPI, and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (ALDO were significantly negatively associated with vaginal pH. Glycolysis enzymes of L. crispatus showed a similar negative, but nonsignificant, trend related to dysbiosis.Most identified Lactobacillus proteins had conserved intracellular functions, but their high abundance in CVL supernatant might imply an additional extracellular (moonlighting role. Our findings suggest that these

  2. Unique Insights in the Cervicovaginal Lactobacillus iners and L. crispatus Proteomes and Their Associations with Microbiota Dysbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgdorff, Hanneke; Armstrong, Stuart D.; Tytgat, Hanne L. P.; Xia, Dong; Ndayisaba, Gilles F.; Wastling, Jonathan M.; van de Wijgert, Janneke H. H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background A Lactobacillus-dominated cervicovaginal microbiota (VMB) protects women from adverse reproductive health outcomes, but the role of L. iners in the VMB is poorly understood. Our aim was to explore the association between the cervicovaginal L. iners and L. crispatus proteomes and VMB composition. Methods The vaginal proteomes of 50 Rwandan women at high HIV risk, grouped into four VMB groups (based on 16S rDNA microarray results), were investigated by mass spectrometry using cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) samples. Only samples with positive 16S results for L. iners and/or L. crispatus within each group were included in subsequent comparative protein analyses: Lactobacillus crispatus-dominated VMB cluster (with 16S-proven L. iners (ni) = 0, and with 16S-proven L. crispatus (nc) = 5), L. iners-dominated VMB cluster (ni = 11, nc = 4), moderate dysbiosis (ni = 12, nc = 2); and severe dysbiosis (ni = 8, nc = 2). The relative abundances of proteins that were considered specific for L. iners and L. crispatus were compared among VMB groups. Results Forty Lactobacillus proteins were identified of which 7 were specific for L. iners and 11 for L. crispatus. The relative abundances of L. iners DNA starvation/stationary phase protection protein (DPS), and the glycolysis enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI), were significantly decreased in women with L. iners-containing dysbiosis compared to women with a L. iners-dominated VMB, independent of vaginal pH and L. iners abundance. Furthermore, L. iners DPS, GAPDH, GPI, and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (ALDO) were significantly negatively associated with vaginal pH. Glycolysis enzymes of L. crispatus showed a similar negative, but nonsignificant, trend related to dysbiosis. Conclusions Most identified Lactobacillus proteins had conserved intracellular functions, but their high abundance in CVL supernatant might imply an additional extracellular (moonlighting) role

  3. Phase variable expression of a single phage receptor in Campylobacter jejuni NCTC12662 influences sensitivity toward several diverse CPS-dependent phages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Sørensen, Martine C.H.; Wenzel, Cory Q.

    2018-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni NCTC12662 is sensitive to infection by many Campylobacter bacteriophages. Here we used this strain to investigate the molecular mechanism behind phage resistance development when exposed to a single phage and demonstrate how phase variable expression of one surface component...... influences phage sensitivity against many diverse C. jejuni phages. When C. jejuni NCTC12662 was exposed to phage F207 overnight, 25% of the bacterial cells were able to grow on a lawn of phage F207, suggesting that resistance develops at a high frequency. One resistant variant, 12662R, was further...... characterized and shown to be an adsorption mutant. Plaque assays using our large phage collection showed that seven out of 36 diverse capsular polysaccharide (CPS)-dependent phages could not infect 12662R, whereas the remaining phages formed plaques on 12662R with reduced efficiencies. Analysis of the CPS...

  4. Nonstarter Lactobacillus strains as adjunct cultures for cheese making: in vitro characterization and performance in two model cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggiler-Marcó, M; Capra, M L; Quiberoni, A; Vinderola, G; Reinheimer, J A; Hynes, E

    2007-10-01

    Nonstarter lactic acid bacteria are the main uncontrolled factor in today's industrial cheese making and may be the cause of quality inconsistencies and defects in cheeses. In this context, adjunct cultures of selected lactobacilli from nonstarter lactic acid bacteria origin appear as the best alternative to indirectly control cheese biota. The objective of the present work was to study the technological properties of Lactobacillus strains isolated from cheese by in vitro and in situ assays. Milk acidification kinetics and proteolytic and acidifying activities were assessed, and peptide mapping of trichloroacetic acid 8% soluble fraction of milk cultures was performed by liquid chromatography. In addition, the tolerance to salts (NaCl and KCl) and the phage-resistance were investigated. Four strains were selected for testing as adjunct cultures in cheese making experiments at pilot plant scale. In in vitro assays, most strains acidified milk slowly and showed weak to moderate proteolytic activity. Fast strains decreased milk pH to 4.5 in 8 h, and continued acidification to 3.5 in 12 h or more. This group consisted mostly of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains. Approximately one-third of the slow strains, which comprised mainly Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Lactobacillus curvatus, were capable to grow when milk was supplemented with glucose and casein hydrolysate. Peptide maps were similar to those of lactic acid bacteria considered to have a moderate proteolytic activity. Most strains showed salt tolerance and resistance to specific phages. The Lactobacillus strains selected as adjunct cultures for cheese making experiments reached 10(8) cfu/g in soft cheeses at 7 d of ripening, whereas they reached 10(9) cfu/g in semihard cheeses after 15 d of ripening. In both cheese varieties, the adjunct culture population remained at high counts during all ripening, in some cases overcoming or equaling primary starter. Overall

  5. Physiological measures of vaginal vasocongestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, E.; Everaerd, W.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews reliability, specificity, and practical applicability of the two most promising and widely used methods for measuring blood flow within the vagina: the oxygenation-temperature method and vaginal photoplethysmography. It was concluded that the oxygenation-temperature method and

  6. MRI in distal vaginal atresia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugosson, C.; Jorulf, H.; Bakri, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetric resonance imaging in two young females with abdominal pain revealed vaginal atresia with massive hematocolpos but a normal cervix and uterine body. Information obtained with MRI was superior to ultrasound and CT and is suggested as the examination of choice prior to surgical correction. (orig.)

  7. Safety and anti-HIV assessments of natural vaginal cleansing products in an established topical microbicides in vitro testing algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Maureen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present, there is no effective vaccine or other approved product for the prevention of sexually transmitted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection. It has been reported that women in resource-poor communities use vaginally applied citrus juices as topical microbicides. These easily accessible food products have historically been applied to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and cytotoxicity of these substances using an established topical microbicide testing algorithm. Freshly squeezed lemon and lime juice and household vinegar were tested in their original state or in pH neutralized form for efficacy and cytotoxicity in the CCR5-tropic cell-free entry and cell-associated transmission assays, CXCR4-tropic entry and fusion assays, and in a human PBMC-based anti-HIV-1 assay. These products were also tested for their effect on viability of cervico-vaginal cell lines, human cervical explant tissues, and beneficial Lactobacillus species. Results Natural lime and lemon juice and household vinegar demonstrated anti-HIV-1 activity and cytotoxicity in transformed cell lines. Neutralization of the products reduced both anti-HIV-1 activity and cytotoxicity, resulting in a low therapeutic window for both acidic and neutralized formulations. For the natural juices and vinegar, the IC50 was ≤ 3.5 (0.8-3.5% and the TC50 ≤ 6.3 (1.0-6.3%. All three liquid products inhibited viability of beneficial Lactobacillus species associated with vaginal health. Comparison of three different toxicity endpoints in the cervical HeLa cell line revealed that all three products affected membrane integrity, cytosolic enzyme release, and dehydrogenase enzyme activity in living cells. The juices and vinegar also exerted strong cytotoxicity in cervico-vaginal cell lines, mainly due to their acidic pH. In human cervical explant tissues, treatment with 5% lemon or lime juice

  8. The XXIIIrd Phage/Virus Assembly Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serwer, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The XXIIIrd Phage/Virus Assembly (PVA) meeting returned to its birthplace in Lake Arrowhead, CA on September 8-13, 2013 (Fig. 1). The original meeting occurred in 1968, organized by Bob Edgar (Caltech, Pasadena, CA USA), Fred Eiserling (University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA USA) and Bill Wood (Caltech, Pasadena, CA USA). The organizers of the 2013 meeting were Bill Gelbart (University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA USA) and Jack Johnson (Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA USA). This meeting specializes in an egalitarian format. Students are distinguished from senior faculty primarily by the signs of age. With the exception of historically based introductory talks, all talks were allotted the same time and freedom. This tradition began when the meeting was phage-only and has been continued now that all viruses are included. Many were the animated conversations about basic questions. New and international participants were present, a sign that the field has significant attraction, as it should, based on details below. The meeting was also characterized by a sense of humor and generally good times, a chance to both enjoy the science and forget the funding malaise to which many participants are exposed. I will present some of the meeting content, without attempting to be comprehensive.

  9. Exploration of Phage-Host Interactions in Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum and Anti-Phage Defense Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Demeng

    The disease vibriosis is caused by the bacterial pathogen Vibrio anguillarum and results in large losses in aquaculture both in Denmark and around the world. Antibiotics have been widely used in antimicrobial prophylaxis and treatment of vibriosis. Recently, numerous multidrug-resistant strains...... of V. anguillarum have been isolated, indicating that antibiotic use has to be restricted and alternatives have to be developed. Lytic phages have been demonstrated to play an essential role in preventing bacterial infection. However, phages are also known to play a critical role in the evolution...... of bacterial pathogenicity development. Therefore, successful application of phage therapy in the treatment of vibriosis requires a detailed understanding of phage-host interactions, especially with regards to anti-phage defense mechanisms in the host. Part I. As a first approach, 24 V. anguillarum and 13...

  10. Vaginal leiomyoma: MRI features with pathologic correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avantika Gupta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare case of vaginal leiomyoma presenting as prolapsed vaginal mass in a 45 years old woman. The leiomyoma was found to arise from the right lateral vaginal fornix with a vascular stalk. MRI showed homogenous hypointense signals on T1W1 and iso to hyperintense signals on T2W1 images with moderate heterogenous enhancement on post contrast images. It was enucleated via vaginal route and the histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of vaginal leiomyoma.

  11. Lactobacillus buchneri genotyping on the basis of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) locus diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briner, Alexandra E; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2014-02-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in combination with associated sequences (cas) constitute the CRISPR-Cas immune system, which uptakes DNA from invasive genetic elements as novel "spacers" that provide a genetic record of immunization events. We investigated the potential of CRISPR-based genotyping of Lactobacillus buchneri, a species relevant for commercial silage, bioethanol, and vegetable fermentations. Upon investigating the occurrence and diversity of CRISPR-Cas systems in Lactobacillus buchneri genomes, we observed a ubiquitous occurrence of CRISPR arrays containing a 36-nucleotide (nt) type II-A CRISPR locus adjacent to four cas genes, including the universal cas1 and cas2 genes and the type II signature gene cas9. Comparative analysis of CRISPR spacer content in 26 L. buchneri pickle fermentation isolates associated with spoilage revealed 10 unique locus genotypes that contained between 9 and 29 variable spacers. We observed a set of conserved spacers at the ancestral end, reflecting a common origin, as well as leader-end polymorphisms, reflecting recent divergence. Some of these spacers showed perfect identity with phage sequences, and many spacers showed homology to Lactobacillus plasmid sequences. Following a comparative analysis of sequences immediately flanking protospacers that matched CRISPR spacers, we identified a novel putative protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM), 5'-AAAA-3'. Overall, these findings suggest that type II-A CRISPR-Cas systems are valuable for genotyping of L. buchneri.

  12. DNA Probe for Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delley, Michèle; Mollet, Beat; Hottinger, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognizes L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α-32P-labeled DNA probe. Images PMID:16348233

  13. Abnormal vaginal microbiota may be associated with poor reproductive outcomes: a prospective study in IVF patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haahr, T; Jensen, J S; Thomsen, L; Duus, L; Rygaard, K; Humaidan, P

    2016-04-01

    What is the diagnostic performance of qPCR assays compared with Nugent scoring for abnormal vaginal microbiota and for predicting the success rate of IVF treatment? The vaginal microbiota of IVF patients can be characterized with qPCR tests which may be promising tools for diagnosing abnormal vaginal microbiota and for prediction of clinical pregnancy in IVF treatment. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common genital disorder with a prevalence of approximately 19% in the infertile population. BV is often sub-clinical with a change of the vaginal microbiota from being Lactobacillus spp. dominated to a more heterogeneous environment with anaerobic bacteria, such as Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae. Few studies have been conducted in infertile women, and some have suggested a negative impact on fecundity in the presence of BV. A cohort of 130 infertile patients, 90% Caucasians, attending two Danish fertility clinics for in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment from April 2014-December 2014 were prospectively enrolled in the trial. Vaginal swabs from IVF patients were obtained from the posterior fornix. Gram stained slides were assessed according to Nugent's criteria. PCR primers were specific for four common Lactobacillus spp., G. vaginalis and A. vaginae. Threshold levels were established using ROC curve analysis. The prevalence of BV defined by Nugent score was 21% (27/130), whereas the prevalence of an abnormal vaginal microbiota was 28% (36/130) defined by qPCR with high concentrations of Gardnerella vaginalis and/or Atopobium vaginae. The qPCR diagnostic approach had a sensitivity and specificity of respectively 93% and 93% for Nugent-defined BV. Furthermore, qPCR enabled the stratification of Nugent intermediate flora. Eighty-four patients completed IVF treatment. The overall clinical pregnancy rate was 35% (29/84). Interestingly, only 9% (2/22) with qPCR defined abnormal vaginal microbiota obtained a clinical pregnancy (P = 0.004). Although a total of 130

  14. Vibrio vulnificus phage PV94 is closely related to temperate phages of V. cholerae and other Vibrio species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Pryshliak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vibrio vulnificus is an important pathogen which can cause serious infections in humans. Yet, there is limited knowledge on its virulence factors and the question whether temperate phages might be involved in pathogenicity, as is the case with V. cholerae. Thus far, only two phages (SSP002 and VvAW1 infecting V. vulnificus have been genetically characterized. These phages were isolated from the environment and are not related to Vibrio cholerae phages. The lack of information on temperate V. vulnificus phages prompted us to isolate those phages from lysogenic strains and to compare them with phages of other Vibrio species. RESULTS: In this study the temperate phage PV94 was isolated from a V. vulnificus biotype 1 strain by mitomycin C induction. PV94 is a myovirus whose genome is a linear double-stranded DNA of 33,828 bp with 5'-protruding ends. Sequence analysis of PV94 revealed a modular organization of the genome. The left half of the genome comprising the immunity region and genes for the integrase, terminase and replication proteins shows similarites to V. cholerae kappa phages whereas the right half containing genes for structural proteins is closely related to a prophage residing in V. furnissii NCTC 11218. CONCLUSION: We present the first genomic sequence of a temperate phage isolated from a human V. vulnificus isolate. The sequence analysis of the PV94 genome demonstrates the wide distribution of closely related prophages in various Vibrio species. Moreover, the mosaicism of the PV94 genome indicates a high degree of horizontal genetic exchange within the genus Vibrio, by which V. vulnificus might acquire virulence-associated genes from other species.

  15. True vaginal prolapse in a bitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan, M; Cetin, Y; Sendag, S; Eski, F

    2007-08-01

    Frequently, vaginal fold prolapse is the protrusion of edematous vaginal tissue into and through the opening of the vulva occurring during proestrus and estrus stages of the sexual cycle. True vaginal prolapse may occur near parturition, as the concentration of serum progesterone declines and the concentration of serum oestrogen increases. In the bitch, this type of true vaginal prolapse is a very rare condition. This short communication describes a 5-year-old female, cross-breed dog in moderate condition, weighing 33 kg, with distocia and true vaginal prolapse. Abdominal palpation and transabdominal ultrasonography revealed live and dead foetuses in the uterine horns. One dead and four live fetuses were removed from uterus by cesarean section. The ovariohysterectomy was performed after repositioning the vaginal wall with a combination of traction from within the abdomen and external manipulation through the vulva. Re-occurrence of a vaginal prolapse was not observed and the bitch recovered completely after the surgical therapy. Compared to other vaginal disorders, vaginal prolapse is an uncommon condition in the bitch. In the present case, extreme tenesmus arising from distocia may have predisposed to the vaginal prolapse. The cause of dystocia was probably the disposition of the first foetus. We concluded that the vaginal prolapse was the result of dystocia in the present case.

  16. Detection of hydrogen peroxide-producing Lactobacillus species in the vagina: a comparison of culture and quantitative PCR among HIV-1 seropositive women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balkus Jennifer E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 producing Lactobacillus in the vagina may play a role in controlling genital HIV-1 shedding. Sensitive molecular methods improve our ability to characterize the vaginal microbiota; however, they cannot characterize phenotype. We assessed the concordance of H2O2-producing Lactobacillus detected by culture with quantitative PCR (qPCR detection of Lactobacillus species commonly assumed to be H2O2-producers. Methods Samples were collected as part of a prospective cohort study of HIV-1 seropositive US women. Cervicovaginal lavage specimens were tested for L. crispatus and L. jensenii using 16S rRNA gene qPCR assays. Vaginal swabs were cultured for Lactobacillus and tested for H2O2-production. We calculated a kappa statistic to assess concordance between culture and qPCR. Results Culture and qPCR results were available for 376 visits from 57 women. Lactobacilli were detected by culture at 308 (82% visits, of which 233 of 308 (76% produced H2O2. L. crispatus and/or L. jensenii were detected at 215 (57% visits. Concordance between detection of L. crispatus and/or L. jensenii by qPCR and H2O2-producing Lactobacillus by culture was 75% (kappa = 0.45. Conclusions Among HIV-1 seropositive women, there was a moderate level of concordance between H2O2-producing Lactobacillus detected by culture and the presence of L. crispatus and/or L. jensenii by qPCR. However, one-quarter of samples with growth of H2O2-producing lactobacilli did not have L. crispatus or L. jensenii detected by qPCR. This discordance may be due to the presence of other H2O2-producing Lactobacillus species.

  17. The effects of hyaluronic acid vaginal gel on the vaginal epithelium of ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuai-Bin; Liu, Shao-Li; Gan, Xiao-Ling; Zhou, Qin; Hu, Li-Na

    2015-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid is one of the best materials of water retention which can be used in vaginal atrophy. This study is to evaluate the role and mechanism of the hyaluronic acid vaginal gel (Hyalofemme) in the vaginal epithelium of ovariectomized rats. Sixty SD rats were randomly divided into control group (Sham ovariectomy, Sham-OVX), tendency group (ovariectomy, OVX), and experiment group (ovariectomy+Hyalofemme, OVX+Hyalofemme). The hyaluronic acid vaginal gel was administered local vaginal therapy to the experiment group with cytologicaly confirmed vaginal atrophy. The doses were adjusted by animal weight according to human dosage. After daily treatment for 14 days, VEGF and P-AKT activations were detected by Western blot in the experiment group. The hyaluronic acid vaginal gel proved to be very effective in the cytological reversal of vaginal atrophy but did not increase uterine weight. Vaginal microecosystem indicators were negative in the control group and the experiment group. By contrast, the indicators were positive in the tendency group. Hyaluronic acid vaginal gel is effective in the reversal of vaginal atrophy and is beneficial for improving vaginal microecosystem in the postmenopausal rat model. The hyaluronic acid vaginal gel can also improve the repair capacity of the vaginal epithelium.

  18. Coevolution of CRISPR bacteria and phage in 2 dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pu; Deem, Michael

    2014-03-01

    CRISPR (cluster regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) is a newly discovered adaptive, heritable immune system of prokaryotes. It can prevent infection of prokaryotes by phage. Most bacteria and almost all archae have CRISPR. The CRISPR system incorporates short nucleotide sequences from viruses. These incorporated sequences provide a historical record of the host and predator coevolution. We simulate the coevolution of bacteria and phage in 2 dimensions. Each phage has multiple proto-spacers that the bacteria can incorporate. Each bacterium can store multiple spacers in its CRISPR. Phages can escape recognition by the CRISPR system via point mutation or recombination. We will discuss the different evolutionary consequences of point mutation or recombination on the coevolution of bacteria and phage. We will also discuss an intriguing ``dynamic phase transition'' in the number of phage as a function of time and mutation rate. We will show that due to the arm race between phages and bacteria, the frequency of spacers and proto-spacers in a population can oscillate quite rapidly.

  19. Vaginal Microbiota of Adolescent Girls Prior to the Onset of Menarche Resemble Those of Reproductive-Age Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Roxana J.; Zhou, Xia; Settles, Matthew L.; Erb, Julie; Malone, Kristin; Hansmann, Melanie A.; Shew, Marcia L.; Van Der Pol, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Puberty is an important developmental stage wherein hormonal shifts mediate the physical and physiological changes that lead to menarche, but until now, the bacterial composition of vaginal microbiota during this period has been poorly characterized. We performed a prospective longitudinal study of perimenarcheal girls to gain insight into the timing and sequence of changes that occur in the vaginal and vulvar microbiota during puberty. The study enrolled 31 healthy, premenarcheal girls between the ages of 10 and 12 years and collected vaginal and vulvar swabs quarterly for up to 3 years. Bacterial composition was characterized by Roche 454 pyrosequencing and classification of regions V1 to V3 of 16S rRNA genes. Contrary to expectations, lactic acid bacteria, primarily Lactobacillus spp., were dominant in the microbiota of most girls well before the onset of menarche in the early to middle stages of puberty. Gardnerella vaginalis was detected at appreciable levels in approximately one-third of subjects, a notable finding considering that this organism is commonly associated with bacterial vaginosis in adults. Vulvar microbiota closely resembled vaginal microbiota but often exhibited additional taxa typically associated with skin microbiota. Our findings suggest that the vaginal microbiota of girls begin to resemble those of adults well before the onset of menarche. PMID:25805726

  20. Symptomatic candidiasis: Using self sampled vaginal smears to establish the presence of Candida, lactobacilli, and Gardnerella vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engberts, M K; Boon, M E; van Haaften, M; Heintz, A P M

    2007-10-01

    In a prospective cohort study, 10 symptomatic women with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis were taught how to prepare vaginal smears of their own vaginal fluids on days 7, 14, 21, and 28. The 40 smears were stained with the PAS-method and examined by three different cytopathologists for presence of Candida. Thereafter, the smears were restained with Giemsa-stain to determine presence of lactobacilli, Gardnerella vaginalis ("clue cells") and neutrophils. All three cytopathologists unequivocally established Candida blastospores and (pseudo)hyphae in 27 out of the 40 PAS-stained vaginal smears, whereas in the remaining 13 smears Candida was not found. All 10 patients had Candida in their smears during the second half of their menstrual cycle.Self sampled smears prove to be reliable for establishing the presence of Candida in symptomatic patients with candidiasis. Candida is associated with a lactobacillus-predominated vaginal flora, but with the absence of Gardnerella vaginalis. Further studies may be directed towards the interaction between the various members of the vaginal flora. This study should open molecular methodology for determining the possible interactions of lactobacilli and Candida. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. The vaginal microbiota, human papillomavirus infection and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: what do we know and where are we going next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Anita; MacIntyre, David A; Marchesi, Julian R; Lee, Yun S; Bennett, Phillip R; Kyrgiou, Maria

    2016-11-01

    The vaginal microbiota plays a significant role in health and disease of the female reproductive tract. Next-generation sequencing techniques based upon the analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes permit in-depth study of vaginal microbial community structure to a level of detail not possible with standard culture-based microbiological techniques. The human papillomavirus (HPV) causes both cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer. Although the virus is highly prevalent, only a small number of women have a persistent HPV infection and subsequently develop clinically significant disease. There is emerging evidence which leads us to conclude that increased diversity of vaginal microbiota combined with reduced relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. is involved in HPV acquisition and persistence and the development of cervical precancer and cancer. In this review, we summarise the current literature and discuss potential mechanisms for the involvement of vaginal microbiota in the evolution of CIN and cervical cancer. The concept of manipulation of vaginal bacterial communities using pre- and probiotics is also discussed as an exciting prospect for the field of cervical pathology.

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Lactobacillus rhamnosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korhonen, J.M.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Saarela, M.; Huys, G.; Tosi, L.; Mayrhofer, S.; Wright, A.

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of Lactobacillus rhamnosus (n=75) strains, to study their antibiotic resistance genes with microarray, and to assess the microbiological cut-off values of tested antimicrobial agents. L. rhamnosus strains were tested with agar

  3. Identifying Bacterial Immune Evasion Proteins Using Phage Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fevre, Cindy; Scheepmaker, Lisette; Haas, Pieter-Jan

    2017-01-01

    Methods aimed at identification of immune evasion proteins are mainly rely on in silico prediction of sequence, structural homology to known evasion proteins or use a proteomics driven approach. Although proven successful these methods are limited by a low efficiency and or lack of functional identification. Here we describe a high-throughput genomic strategy to functionally identify bacterial immune evasion proteins using phage display technology. Genomic bacterial DNA is randomly fragmented and ligated into a phage display vector that is used to create a phage display library expressing bacterial secreted and membrane bound proteins. This library is used to select displayed bacterial secretome proteins that interact with host immune components.

  4. Lethal effects of 32P decay on transfecting activity of Bacillus subtillis phage phie DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveday, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    Disintegration of 32 P present in the DNA of Bacillus subtilis phage phie (a phage containing double-strand DNA) results in the loss of viability of intact phage as well as transfecting activity of isolated DNA. Only 1/12 of the 32 P disintegrations per phage DNA equivalent inactivities the intact phage while nearly every disintegration inactivates the transfecting DNA. This result provides evidence for a single-strand intermediate in the transfection of B. subtilis by phie DNA

  5. Phage-Bacterial Dynamics with Spatial Structure: Self Organization around Phage Sinks Can Promote Increased Cell Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, James J; Christensen, Kelly A; Scott, Carly; Jack, Benjamin R; Crandall, Cameron J; Krone, Stephen M

    2018-01-29

    Bacteria growing on surfaces appear to be profoundly more resistant to control by lytic bacteriophages than do the same cells grown in liquid. Here, we use simulation models to investigate whether spatial structure per se can account for this increased cell density in the presence of phages. A measure is derived for comparing cell densities between growth in spatially structured environments versus well mixed environments (known as mass action). Maintenance of sensitive cells requires some form of phage death; we invoke death mechanisms that are spatially fixed, as if produced by cells. Spatially structured phage death provides cells with a means of protection that can boost cell densities an order of magnitude above that attained under mass action, although the effect is sometimes in the opposite direction. Phage and bacteria self organize into separate refuges, and spatial structure operates so that the phage progeny from a single burst do not have independent fates (as they do with mass action). Phage incur a high loss when invading protected areas that have high cell densities, resulting in greater protection for the cells. By the same metric, mass action dynamics either show no sustained bacterial elevation or oscillate between states of low and high cell densities and an elevated average. The elevated cell densities observed in models with spatial structure do not approach the empirically observed increased density of cells in structured environments with phages (which can be many orders of magnitude), so the empirical phenomenon likely requires additional mechanisms than those analyzed here.

  6. Composition of the vaginal microbiota in women of reproductive age--sensitive and specific molecular diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis is possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Shipitsyna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Bacterial vaginosis (BV is the most common vaginal disorder, characterized by depletion of the normal lactobacillus-dominant microbiota and overgrowth of commensal anaerobic bacteria. This study aimed to investigate the composition of the vaginal microbiota in women of reproductive age (healthy women and women with BV, with the view of developing molecular criteria for BV diagnosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Vaginal samples from 163 women (79 control, 73 BV and 11 intermediate (Lactobacillary grade II flora cases were analyzed using 454 pyrosequencing of the hypervariable regions V3-V4 of the 16S rRNA gene and 16 quantitative bacterial species/genus-specific real-time PCR assays. Sensitivities and specificities of potential BV markers were computed using the Amsel criteria as reference standard for BV. The use of quantitative thresholds for prediction of BV, determined for both relative abundance measured with 454 pyrosequencing and bacterial load measured with qPCR, was evaluated. RESULTS: Relative to the healthy women, the BV patients had in their vaginal microbiota significantly higher prevalence, loads and relative abundances of the majority of BV associated bacteria. However, only Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Eggerthella, Prevotella, BVAB2 and Megasphaera type 1 detected at or above optimal thresholds were highly predictable for BV, with the best diagnostic accuracy shown for A. vaginae. The depletion of Lactobacillus species combined with the presence of either G. vaginalis or A. vaginae at diagnostic levels was a highly accurate BV predictor. CONCLUSIONS: Quantitative determination of the presence of G. vaginalis, A. vaginae, Eggerthella, Prevotella, BVAB2 and Megasphaera type 1 as well as the depletion of Lactobacillus was highly accurate for BV diagnosis. Measurements of abundance of normal and BV microbiota relative to total bacteria in vaginal fluid may provide more accurate BV diagnosis, and be

  7. Composition of the Vaginal Microbiota in Women of Reproductive Age – Sensitive and Specific Molecular Diagnosis of Bacterial Vaginosis Is Possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipitsyna, Elena; Roos, Annika; Datcu, Raluca; Hallén, Anders; Fredlund, Hans; Jensen, Jørgen S.; Engstrand, Lars; Unemo, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal disorder, characterized by depletion of the normal lactobacillus-dominant microbiota and overgrowth of commensal anaerobic bacteria. This study aimed to investigate the composition of the vaginal microbiota in women of reproductive age (healthy women and women with BV), with the view of developing molecular criteria for BV diagnosis. Materials and Methods Vaginal samples from 163 women (79 control, 73 BV and 11 intermediate (Lactobacillary grade II flora) cases) were analyzed using 454 pyrosequencing of the hypervariable regions V3–V4 of the 16S rRNA gene and 16 quantitative bacterial species/genus-specific real-time PCR assays. Sensitivities and specificities of potential BV markers were computed using the Amsel criteria as reference standard for BV. The use of quantitative thresholds for prediction of BV, determined for both relative abundance measured with 454 pyrosequencing and bacterial load measured with qPCR, was evaluated. Results Relative to the healthy women, the BV patients had in their vaginal microbiota significantly higher prevalence, loads and relative abundances of the majority of BV associated bacteria. However, only Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Eggerthella, Prevotella, BVAB2 and Megasphaera type 1 detected at or above optimal thresholds were highly predictable for BV, with the best diagnostic accuracy shown for A. vaginae. The depletion of Lactobacillus species combined with the presence of either G. vaginalis or A. vaginae at diagnostic levels was a highly accurate BV predictor. Conclusions Quantitative determination of the presence of G. vaginalis, A. vaginae, Eggerthella, Prevotella, BVAB2 and Megasphaera type 1 as well as the depletion of Lactobacillus was highly accurate for BV diagnosis. Measurements of abundance of normal and BV microbiota relative to total bacteria in vaginal fluid may provide more accurate BV diagnosis, and be used for test

  8. Plasmids and packaging cell lines for use in phage display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2012-07-24

    The invention relates to a novel phagemid display system for packaging phagemid DNA into phagemid particles which completely avoids the use of helper phage. The system of the invention incorporates the use of bacterial packaging cell lines which have been transformed with helper plasmids containing all required phage proteins but not the packaging signals. The absence of packaging signals in these helper plasmids prevents their DNA from being packaged in the bacterial cell, which provides a number of significant advantages over the use of both standard and modified helper phage. Packaged phagemids expressing a protein or peptide of interest, in fusion with a phage coat protein such as g3p, are generated simply by transfecting phagemid into the packaging cell line.

  9. Metagenomic recovery of phage genomes of uncultured freshwater actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghai, Rohit; Mehrshad, Maliheh; Mizuno, Carolina Megumi; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Low-GC Actinobacteria are among the most abundant and widespread microbes in freshwaters and have largely resisted all cultivation efforts. Consequently, their phages have remained totally unknown. In this work, we have used deep metagenomic sequencing to assemble eight complete genomes of the first tailed phages that infect freshwater Actinobacteria. Their genomes encode the actinobacterial-specific transcription factor whiB, frequently found in mycobacteriophages and also in phages infecting marine pelagic Actinobacteria. Its presence suggests a common and widespread strategy of modulation of host transcriptional machinery upon infection via this transcriptional switch. We present evidence that some whiB-carrying phages infect the acI lineage of Actinobacteria. At least one of them encodes the ADP-ribosylating component of the widespread bacterial AB toxins family (for example, clostridial toxin). We posit that the presence of this toxin reflects a 'trojan horse' strategy, providing protection at the population level to the abundant host microbes against eukaryotic predators.

  10. Primary isolation strain determines both phage type and receptors recognised by Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine C Holst Sørensen

    Full Text Available In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated using NCTC12662 as the indicator strain, which may have biased the selection of phages. A large group of C. jejuni phages rely on the highly diverse capsular polysaccharide (CPS for infection and recent work identified the O-methyl phosphoramidate modification (MeOPN of CPS as a phage receptor. We therefore chose seven C. jejuni strains each expressing different CPS structures as indicator strains in a large screening for phages in samples collected from free-range poultry farms. Forty-three phages were isolated using C. jejuni NCTC12658, NCTC12662 and RM1221 as host strains and 20 distinct phages were identified based on host range analysis and genome restriction profiles. Most phages were isolated using C. jejuni strains NCTC12662 and RM1221 and interestingly phage genome size (140 kb vs. 190 kb, host range and morphological appearance correlated with the isolation strain. Thus, according to C. jejuni phage grouping, NCTC12662 and NCTC12658 selected for CP81-type phages, while RM1221 selected for CP220-type phages. Furthermore, using acapsular ∆kpsM mutants we demonstrated that phages isolated on NCTC12658 and NCTC12662 were dependent on the capsule for infection. In contrast, CP220-type phages isolated on RM1221 were unable to infect non-motile ∆motA mutants, hence requiring motility for successful infection. Hence, the primary phage isolation strain determines both phage type (CP81 or CP220 as well as receptors (CPS or flagella recognised by the isolated phages.

  11. Concurrent chemoradiation for vaginal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T Miyamoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is not known whether the addition of chemotherapy to radiation therapy improves outcomes in primary vaginal cancer. Here, we review clinical outcomes in patients with primary vaginal cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT or concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT. METHODS: Seventy-one patients with primary vaginal cancer treated with definitive RT with or without concurrent chemotherapy at a single institution were identified and their records reviewed. A total of 51 patients were treated with RT alone; 20 patients were treated with CRT. Recurrences were analyzed. Overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression analysis was performed. RESULTS: The median age at diagnosis was 61 years (range, 18-92 years and the median follow-up time among survivors was 3.0 years. Kaplan-Meier estimates for OS and DFS differed significantly between the RT and CRT groups (3-yr OS = 56% vs. 79%, log-rank p = 0.037; 3-yr DFS = 43% vs. 73%, log-rank p = 0.011. Twenty-three patients (45% in the RT group had a relapse at any site compared to 3 (15% in the CRT group (p = 0.027. With regard to the sites of first relapse, 10 patients (14% had local only, 4 (6% had local and regional, 9 (13% had regional only, 1 (1% had regional and distant, and 2 (3% had distant only relapse. On univariate analysis, the use of concurrent chemotherapy, FIGO stage, tumor size, and date of diagnosis were significant predictors of DFS. On multivariate analysis, the use of concurrent chemotherapy remained a significant predictor of DFS (hazard ratio 0.31 (95% CI, 0.10-0.97; p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: Vaginal cancer results in poor outcomes. Adequate radiation dose is essential to ensure curative management. Concurrent chemotherapy should be considered for vaginal cancer patients.

  12. Use of vaginal estrogen in Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meaidi, Amani; Goukasian, Irina; Lidegaard, Oejvind

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We know little about the use of vaginal estrogen in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. We aimed to assess the prevalence of vaginal estrogen use in Denmark. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was designed as a nationwide cross-sectional study of all Danish women aged 40-79 years......, living in Denmark during the period 2007-2013. The Danish Prescription Register delivered data permitting us to assess the prevalence, age and regional geographical belonging of women purchasing prescribed vaginal estradiol. The number of women using over-the-counter vaginal estriol products...... was estimated from sale statistics from the same register. RESULTS: In 2013, 10.2% of all Danish women between 40 and 79 years of age used vaginal estradiol. The prevalence of women using this type of vaginal estrogen increased from 8.5% in year 2007 to 10.2% in 2013. The use peaked at 16.5% in women aged 60...

  13. Radiation tolerance of the vaginal mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintz, b.L.; Kagan, A.R.; Chan, P.; Gilbert, H.A.; Nussbaum, H.; Rao, A.R.; Wollin, M.

    1980-01-01

    Sixteen patients with cancer of the vagina that were controlled locally for a minimum of eighteen months after teletherpay (T) or brachytherapy (B) or both (T and B), were analyzed for radiation tolerance of the vaginal mucosa. The site of vaginal necrosis did not always coincide with the site of the tumor. The posterior wall appeared more vulnerable than the anterior or lateral walls. For the distal vaginal mucosa, necrosis requiring surgical intervention occurred following combined T and B, if summated rad exceeded9800. The upper vagina tolerated higher dosages. No patient surgery for upper vaginal necrosis even though summated (T and B) dosage up to 14,000 rad was applied. Placing radioactive needles on the surface of the vaginal cylinder with or without interstitial perincal needles should be avoided. Further accumulation of data is needed to define these vaginal mucosa tolerance limits more closely

  14. Bacterial vaginosis and vaginal yeast, but not vaginal cleansing, increase HIV-1 acquisition in African women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wijgert, Janneke H. H. M.; Morrison, Charles S.; Cornelisse, Peter G. A.; Munjoma, Marshall; Moncada, Jeanne; Awio, Peter; Wang, Jing; van der Pol, Barbara; Chipato, Tsungai; Salata, Robert A.; Padian, Nancy S.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate interrelationships between bacterial vaginosis (BV), vaginal yeast, vaginal practices (cleansing and drying/tightening), mucosal inflammation, and HIV acquisition. METHODS: A multicenter, prospective, observational cohort study was conducted, enrolling 4531 HIV-negative women

  15. Phage display as a promising approach for vaccine development

    OpenAIRE

    Aghebati-Maleki, Leili; Bakhshinejad, Babak; Baradaran, Behzad; Motallebnezhad, Morteza; Aghebati-Maleki, Ali; Nickho, Hamid; Yousefi, Mehdi; Majidi, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are specific antagonists to bacterial hosts. These viral entities have attracted growing interest as optimal vaccine delivery vehicles. Phages are well-matched for vaccine design due to being highly stable under harsh environmental conditions, simple and inexpensive large scale production, and potent adjuvant capacities. Phage vaccines have efficient immunostimulatory effects and present a high safety profile because these viruses have made a constant relationship with the mamm...

  16. Killing cancer cells by targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoby Iftach

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents, in addition to its anti-tumor benefits, results in indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. This shortcoming may be overcome by targeted drug-carrying platforms that ferry the drug to the tumor site while limiting exposure to non-target tissues and organs. Results We present a new form of targeted anti-cancer therapy in the form of targeted drug-carrying phage nanoparticles. Our approach is based on genetically-modified and chemically manipulated filamentous bacteriophages. The genetic manipulation endows the phages with the ability to display a host-specificity-conferring ligand. The phages are loaded with a large payload of a cytotoxic drug by chemical conjugation. In the presented examples we used anti ErbB2 and anti ERGR antibodies as targeting moieties, the drug hygromycin conjugated to the phages by a covalent amide bond, or the drug doxorubicin conjugated to genetically-engineered cathepsin-B sites on the phage coat. We show that targeting of phage nanomedicines via specific antibodies to receptors on cancer cell membranes results in endocytosis, intracellular degradation, and drug release, resulting in growth inhibition of the target cells in vitro with a potentiation factor of >1000 over the corresponding free drugs. Conclusion The results of the proof-of concept study presented here reveal important features regarding the potential of filamentous phages to serve as drug-delivery platform, on the affect of drug solubility or hydrophobicity on the target specificity of the platform and on the effect of drug release mechanism on the potency of the platform. These results define targeted drug-carrying filamentous phage nanoparticles as a unique type of antibody-drug conjugates.

  17. Killing cancer cells by targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Hagit; Yacoby, Iftach; Benhar, Itai

    2008-01-01

    Background Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents, in addition to its anti-tumor benefits, results in indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. This shortcoming may be overcome by targeted drug-carrying platforms that ferry the drug to the tumor site while limiting exposure to non-target tissues and organs. Results We present a new form of targeted anti-cancer therapy in the form of targeted drug-carrying phage nanoparticles. Our approach is based on genetically-modified and chemically manipulated filamentous bacteriophages. The genetic manipulation endows the phages with the ability to display a host-specificity-conferring ligand. The phages are loaded with a large payload of a cytotoxic drug by chemical conjugation. In the presented examples we used anti ErbB2 and anti ERGR antibodies as targeting moieties, the drug hygromycin conjugated to the phages by a covalent amide bond, or the drug doxorubicin conjugated to genetically-engineered cathepsin-B sites on the phage coat. We show that targeting of phage nanomedicines via specific antibodies to receptors on cancer cell membranes results in endocytosis, intracellular degradation, and drug release, resulting in growth inhibition of the target cells in vitro with a potentiation factor of >1000 over the corresponding free drugs. Conclusion The results of the proof-of concept study presented here reveal important features regarding the potential of filamentous phages to serve as drug-delivery platform, on the affect of drug solubility or hydrophobicity on the target specificity of the platform and on the effect of drug release mechanism on the potency of the platform. These results define targeted drug-carrying filamentous phage nanoparticles as a unique type of antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:18387177

  18. “French Phage Network”—Second Meeting Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Barceló, Clara; Kaltz, Oliver; Froissart, Rémy; Gandon, Sylvain; Ginet, Nicolas; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2017-01-01

    The study of bacteriophages (viruses of bacteria) includes a variety of approaches, such as structural biology, genetics, ecology, and evolution, with increasingly important implications for therapeutic and industrial uses. Researchers working with phages in France have recently established a network to facilitate the exchange on complementary approaches, but also to engage new collaborations. Here, we provide a summary of the topics presented during the second meeting of the French Phage Network that took place in Marseille in November 2016. PMID:28430166

  19. Vulvovaginitis and vaginal discharge in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, W.

    1975-01-01

    Ninety-four patients with vulvovaginitis and vaginal discharge were assessed clinically and had vaginal swabs taken in an effort to establish a definite diagnosis. A high incidence of fungous infection was found while there was a surprisingly low incidence of Trichomonal vaginitis. These findings vary markedly from recent surveys in other countries (Delaha et al. (1964); Gray and Barnes, 1965; Desai et al., 1966). PMID:1223281

  20. [Isolation and characterization of vaginal lactobacilli producing hydrogen peroxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashaian, M M; Oganesian, G G

    2011-01-01

    Isolation and characteristics of vaginal lactobacilli that actively generate H2O2 and have high antagonistic activity. Staphylococcus aureus 8956, Escherichia coli 8852, Klebsiella pneumoniae 8795 and Candida albicans 5646 were used as target-strains. Skim milk and MRS medium were used for lactobacilli isolation and cultivation. Antagonism was studied in complete agar and Saburo medium. Merckoquant peroxide test (Merck) stripes were used for the determination of H2O2. Antibacterial activity was determined by diffusion into agar. Specific culture growth rate was determined by conventional method, acidification of the culture medium--by pH-meter. 12 strains were isolated from vaginal smears of healthy women. These strains have an ability to ferment milk among which a highly active H2O2 producer was isolated and attributed to Lactobacillus delbrueckii by the results of 16S rRNA and alpha-subunit RNA polymerase gene sequence analysis (16S rDNA and rpoA genes are registered in GenBank, numbers HQ379171 and HQ379180 respectively). L. delbrueckii MH-10 bacterial cells were characterized by specific growth speed 1.26 per hour, reaching a maximum titer of 2 x 10(9) PFU/ml with lowering medium pH to 4.0. Under aerated conditions H2O2 concentration reached 100 microg/ml or more. L. delbrueckii MH-10 has high antibacterial activity against S. aureus, E. coli, K. pneumoniae. L. delbrueckii MH-10 isolate is an active H2O2 producer, has high growth speed and broad antibacterial activity spectrum, is a perspective candidate for the development of probiotic preparation for the prophylaxis and therapy of vaginoses.

  1. Vaginal Mucosal Flap as a Sling Preservation for the Treatment of Vaginal Exposure of Mesh

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sea Young; Park, Jong Yeon; Kim, Han Kwon; Park, Chang Hoo; Kim, Sung Jin; Sung, Gi Teck; Park, Chang Myon

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) procedures are used for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women. The procedures with synthetic materials can have a risk of vaginal erosion. We experienced transobturator suburethral sling (TOT) tape-induced vaginal erosion and report the efficacy of a vaginal mucosal covering technique. Materials and Methods A total of 560 female patients diagnosed with stress urinary incontinence underwent TOT procedures at our hospital between January 2...

  2. Hybrid Nanomaterial Complexes for Advanced Phage-guided Gene Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerapong Yata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing nanomaterials that are effective, safe, and selective for gene transfer applications is challenging. Bacteriophages (phage, viruses that infect bacteria only, have shown promise for targeted gene transfer applications. Unfortunately, limited progress has been achieved in improving their potential to overcome mammalian cellular barriers. We hypothesized that chemical modification of the bacteriophage capsid could be applied to improve targeted gene delivery by phage vectors into mammalian cells. Here, we introduce a novel hybrid system consisting of two classes of nanomaterial systems, cationic polymers and M13 bacteriophage virus particles genetically engineered to display a tumor-targeting ligand and carry a transgene cassette. We demonstrate that the phage complex with cationic polymers generates positively charged phage and large aggregates that show enhanced cell surface attachment, buffering capacity, and improved transgene expression while retaining cell type specificity. Moreover, phage/polymer complexes carrying a therapeutic gene achieve greater cancer cell killing than phage alone. This new class of hybrid nanomaterial platform can advance targeted gene delivery applications by bacteriophage.

  3. Phage therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in dental root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leron Khalifa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem faced by all major sectors of health care, including dentistry. Recurrent infections related to multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE in hospitals are untreatable and question the effectiveness of notable drugs. Two major reasons for these recurrent infections are acquired antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm formation. None of the traditionally known effective techniques have been able to efficiently resolve these issues. Hence, development of a highly effective antibacterial practice has become inevitable. One example of a hard-to-eradicate pathogen in dentistry is Enterococcus faecalis, which is one of the most common threats observed in recurrent root canal treatment failures, of which the most problematic to treat are its biofilm-forming VRE strains. An effective response against such infections could be the use of bacteriophages (phages. Phage therapy was found to be highly effective against biofilm and multidrug-resistant bacteria and has other advantages like ease of isolation and possibilities for genetic manipulations. The potential of phage therapy in dentistry, in particular against E. faecalis biofilms in root canals, is almost unexplored. Here we review the efforts to develop phage therapy against biofilms. We also focus on the phages isolated against E. faecalis and discuss the possibility of using phages against E. faecalis biofilm in root canals.

  4. Ultraviolet inactivation and photoreactivation of the cholera phage 'Kappa'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samad, S.A.; Bhattacharyya, S.C.; Chatterjee, S.N.

    1987-01-01

    The lysogenic cholera phage, 'Kappa' is some ten to twenty folds more resistant to UV (254 nm) than are most of the T. phages of E. coli, or the cholera phage PL 163/10, or the host V. cholerae strain H218 Sm r , the 37% (D 37 ) and 10% (D 10 ) survival doses being 255.8 J/m 2 and 633.6 J/m 2 respectively. The UV-irradiated 'Kappa' phages could be photoreactivated in the host V. cholerae strain H218 Sm r to a maximum extent of 40%. The removal of the number of lethal hits per phage by the survival-enhancement treatment (photoreactivation) with time followed an exponential relation, the constant probability of removal of lethal hit per unit time being 2.8x10 -2 min -1 . The UV-irradiated phages could also be Weigle reactivated in the host strain of H218 Sm r by a small degree, the maximum reactivation factor (ratio of survivals in UV-irradiated and non-irradiated hosts) being 1.50. (orig.)

  5. Vaginal rejuvenation using energy-based devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Karcher, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Physiologic changes in a woman’s life, such as childbirth, weight fluctuations, and hormonal changes due to aging and menopause, may alter the laxity of the vaginal canal, damage the pelvic floor, and devitalize the mucosal tone of the vaginal wall. These events often lead to the development of genitourinary conditions such as stress urinary incontinence; vaginal atrophy; dryness; and physiologic distress affecting a woman’s quality of life, self-confidence, and sexuality. Various treatment modalities are currently available to manage these indications, varying from invasive vaginal surgery to more benign treatments like topical vaginal hormonal gels or hormone-replacement therapy. A new trend gaining momentum is the advent of energy-based devices for vaginal rejuvenation that apply thermal or nonthermal energy to the various layers of the vaginal tissue, stimulating collagen regeneration contracture of elastin fibers, neovascularization, and improved vaginal lubrication. This review aims to present the available technologies offering vaginal rejuvenation and the scientific evidence that underlines their safety and efficacy for this indication.

  6. Evaluation of common organisms causing vaginal discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shazia A; Amir, Fauzia; Altaf, Shagufta; Tanveer, Raazia

    2009-01-01

    Vaginal discharge is very common problem among females. Alteration in balance of normal vaginal organisms can cause the overgrowth of the bacteria that creates vaginal discharge. It is common among sexually active women yet there still remain gaps in our knowledge of this infectious disorder. To evaluate the frequency of bacterial vaginosis (BV), vaginal candidiasis (VC), vaginal trichomoniasis and Group B streptococcus in women complaining of vaginal discharge in our setup. A total of 100 women of reproductive age group with the complaint of vaginal discharge were included in the study. After filling proforma patients were examined by speculum examination and two high vaginal swabs (HVS) were collected aseptically from each patient. One swab was used for making wet mount for clue cells, pus cells and for motility of Trichomonas vaginalis. The other swab was used to check pH and Amine test. The growth was confirmed by Gram staining in each case. Gardnerrella vaginalis were isolated in 28%, Group B streptococcus in 5% and T. vaginolis in 4% of women. Gardnerella vaginalis causing BV is the most common cause of vaginal discharge in otherwise healthy women of reproductive age group in our setup.

  7. Characterisation of a novel enterobacteria phage, CAjan, isolated from rat faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Alexander B; Kot, Witold; Lametsch, Rene; Neve, Horst; Hansen, Lars H

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we describe the isolation and characterisation of the novel enterobacteria phage CAjan. This phage belongs to the order Caudovirales and the family Siphoviridae. The phage possesses a linear, double-stranded DNA genome consisting of 59,670 bp with a G+C content of 44.7 % and 91 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Putative functions were assigned to 39 of the ORFs (37.4 %). The phage structural genes were furthermore functionally characterised by LC MS/MS. CAjan, together with Escherichia phage Seurat and Escherichia phage slur01, represent a novel and genetically distinct clade of Siphoviridae phages that could be considered to constitute a new phage genus. Despite limited sequence similarity, the phages in this group share a number of other common features, including genome structure and the presence of queuosine biosynthesis genes.

  8. Dynamic Clinical Measurements of Voluntary Vaginal Contractions and Autonomic Vaginal Reflexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broens, Paul M. A.; Spoelstra, Symen K.; Weijmar Schultz, Willibrord C. M.

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionThe vaginal canal is an active and responsive canal. It has pressure variations along its length and shows reflex activity. At present, the prevailing idea is that the vaginal canal does not have a sphincter mechanism. It is hypothesized that an active vaginal muscular mechanism exists

  9. Phage Therapy Approaches to Reducing Pathogen Persistence and Transmission in Animal Production Environments: Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colavecchio, Anna; Goodridge, Lawrence D

    2017-06-01

    The era of genomics has allowed for characterization of phages for use as antimicrobials to treat animal infections with a level of precision never before realized. As more research in phage therapy has been conducted, several advantages of phage therapy have been realized, including the ubiquitous nature, specificity, prevalence in the biosphere, and low inherent toxicity of phages, which makes them a safe and sustainable technology for control of animal diseases. These unique qualities of phages have led to several opportunities with respect to emerging trends in infectious disease treatment. However, the opportunities are tempered by several challenges to the successful implementation of phage therapy, such as the fact that an individual phage can only infect one or a few bacterial strains, meaning that large numbers of different phages will likely be needed to treat infections caused by multiple species of bacteria. In addition, phages are only effective if enough of them can reach the site of bacterial colonization, but clearance by the immune system upon introduction to the animal is a reality that must be overcome. Finally, bacterial resistance to the phages may develop, resulting in treatment failure. Even a successful phage infection and lysis of its host has consequences, because large amounts of endotoxin are released upon lysis of Gram-negative bacteria, which can lead to local and systemic complications. Overcoming these challenges will require careful design and development of phage cocktails, including comprehensive characterization of phage host range and assessment of immunological risks associated with phage treatment.

  10. Surface glycosaminoglycans mediate adherence between HeLa cells and Lactobacillus salivarius Lv72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Rebeca; Martín, Carla; Escobedo, Susana; Suárez, Juan E; Quirós, Luis M

    2013-09-17

    The adhesion of lactobacilli to the vaginal surface is of paramount importance to develop their probiotic functions. For this reason, the role of HeLa cell surface proteoglycans in the attachment of Lactobacillus salivarius Lv72, a mutualistic strain of vaginal origin, was investigated. Incubation of cultures with a variety of glycosaminoglycans (chondroitin sulfate A and C, heparin and heparan sulfate) resulted in marked binding interference. However, no single glycosaminoglycan was able to completely abolish cell binding, the sum of all having an additive effect that suggests cooperation between them and recognition of specific adhesins on the bacterial surface. In contrast, chondroitin sulfate B enhanced cell to cell attachment, showing the relevance of the stereochemistry of the uronic acid and the sulfation pattern on binding. Elimination of the HeLa surface glycosaminoglycans with lyases also resulted in severe adherence impairment. Advantage was taken of the Lactobacillus-glycosaminoglycans interaction to identify an adhesin from the bacterial surface. This protein, identify as a soluble binding protein of an ABC transporter system (OppA) by MALDI-TOF/(MS), was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and shown to interfere with L. salivarius Lv72 adhesion to HeLa cells. These data suggest that glycosaminoglycans play a fundamental role in attachment of mutualistic bacteria to the epithelium that lines the cavities where the normal microbiota thrives, OppA being a bacterial adhesin involved in the process.

  11. Highly efficient treatment of aerobic vaginitis with simple acidic buffered gels: The importance of pH and buffers on the microenvironment of vaginas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaodong; Qiu, Haiying; Jin, Yiguang

    2017-06-15

    Aerobic vaginitis (AV) leads to uterus deep infection or preterm birth. Antibacterial agents are not optimal therapeutics of AV. Here, we report a series of temperature-sensitive in situ forming acidic buffered gels for topical treatment of AV, involving lactate, acetate, and citrate gels at pH 3.5, 5.0, and 6.5. AV rat models were prepared following vaginal infection with Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. In vitro/in vivo studies of the buffered gels were performed compared with ofloxacin gels and blank gels. All the buffered gels showed the lower in vitro antibacterial activities than ofloxacin gels but the better in vivo anti-S. aureus effects and similar anti-E. coli effects. The buffered gels improved Lactobacillus growth in the vaginas. Both the healthy rat vaginal pH and the pH of rat vaginas treated with the buffered gels were about 6.5 though the AV rat models or ones treated with ofloxacin gels still remained at the high pH more than 7.0. After treatments with the buffered gels, the vaginal smears changed to a clean state nearly without aerobic bacteria, the vaginal tissues were refreshed, and the immunoreactions were downregulated. The acidic buffered gels bring rapid decrease of local vaginal pH, high antibacterial activities, improvement of probiotics, and alleviation of inflammation. They are simple, highly efficient, and safe anti-AV formulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Genomic diversity of Lactobacillus salivarius

    OpenAIRE

    Raftis, Emma J.

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus salivarius is unusual among the lactobacilli due to its multireplicon genome architecture. The circular megaplasmids harboured by L. salivarius strains encode strain-specific traits for intestinal survival and probiotic activity. L. salivarius strains are increasingly being exploited for their probiotic properties in humans and animals. In terms of probiotic strain selection, it is important to have an understanding of the level of genomic diversity present in this species. Comp...

  13. Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus thermotolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Gouesbet , Gwenola; Jan , Gwenaël; Boyaval , Patrick

    2001-01-01

    International audience; Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus is a lactic acid bacterium widely used in the dairy food industry. Since the industrial processes are a succession of constraints, it is essential to understand the behaviour of L. bulgaricus when facing usual stresses. The influence of heat stress was investigated on the viability of L. bulgaricus cells grown in a chemically defined medium. The susceptibility of cells to heat-shock was obvious only above 55 $^{\\circ}$C. We inv...

  14. Longitudinal analysis of vaginal microbiome dynamics in women with recurrent bacterial vaginosis: recognition of the conversion process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet A Lambert

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV affects ∼ 30% of women of reproductive age, has a high rate of recurrence, and is associated with miscarriage, preterm birth, and increased risk of acquiring other sexually transmitted infections, including HIV-1. Little is known of the daily changes in the vaginal bacterial composition as it progresses from treatment to recurrence, or whether any of these might be useful in its prediction or an understanding of its causes. We used phylogenetic branch-inclusive quantitative PCR (PB-qPCR and Lactobacillus blocked/unblocked qPCR (Lb-qPCR to characterize longitudinal changes in the vaginal microbiota in sequential vaginal self-swabs from five women with recurrent BV, from diagnosis through remission to recurrence. Both patients with acute BV samples dominated by G. vaginalis recurred during the study with similar profiles, whereas the three patients with acute BV samples dominated by other anaerobes did not recur or recurred to an intermediate Nugent score. L. iners dominated remission phases, with intermittent days of abnormal microbial profiles typically associated with menses. The exception was a newly discovered phenomenon, a sustained period of abnormal profiles, termed conversion, which preceded symptomatic acute BV. Species known to have antagonistic activity towards Lactobacillus were detected in pre-conversion samples, possibly contributing to the decline in Lactobacillus. Lb-qPCR scores define two categories of response in the initial post-treatment visit samples; scores 8 may predict delayed or no recurrence. Amsel criteria or Nugent scores did not have this potential predictive capability. Larger studies are warranted to evaluate the prognostic potential of detecting conversion and poor Lb-qPCR scores at the post-treatment visit of recurrent BV patients.

  15. Vaginal contraception--an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, D A; Thompson, S

    1982-04-01

    A number of new and innovative methods of vaginal contraceptive have been developed in recent years and are currently being evaluated. Some of these methods are described briefly and the available data on their safety and efficacy are presented. 3 types of contraceptive sponges have been developed--collagen sponge, intravaginal insert, and Secure sponge--and are now being evaluated. The collagen sponge, a cylindrical-shaped disk, exerts its contraceptive effect by acting as a physical barrier to the sperm and through its ability to absorb semen much in excess of its own weight. Preliminary data confirm the effectiveness of the sponge obtained from post-coital tests. The intravaginal insert (IVI) is made of a polyester material incorporating the spermicide nonoxynol-9. In a small clinical evaluation of the IVI, 49 women were followed up for 1 month. No pregnancies or unexpected adverse reactions were reported. The Secure sponge is made of polyurethane and incorporates 1 g of the spermicide nonoxynol-9. Its primary mode of action in preventing pregnancy is through the release of nonoxynol-9. In a multiclinic phase 2 evaluation of the Secure, which included 382 women, the 6-month gross life-table pregnancy rate was 3.8 +or- 1.3/100 women; the 6-month gross discontinuation rate for all reasons was 26.2 +or- 3.4/100 women. Sufficient data from the comparative trials of the Secure and Neo Sampoon foaming suppository studies conducted in Yugoslavia, Taiwan, and Bangladesh have been reported to the International Fertility Research Program (IFRP). The 12-month life-table rates for reasons leading to discontinuation of the contraceptive methods were not significantly different except for the category of "other personal reasons." The advantages Secure provides over other vaginal contraceptives are identified. Foaming vaginal suppositories similar to Neo Sampoon but containing 100 mg nonoxynol-9 are being developed and evaluated in the U.S. Clinical data on these products are

  16. More frequent vaginal orgasm is associated with experiencing greater excitement from deep vaginal stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Stuart; Klapilova, Katerina; Krejčová, Lucie

    2013-07-01

    Research indicated that: (i) vaginal orgasm (induced by penile-vaginal intercourse [PVI] without concurrent clitoral masturbation) consistency (vaginal orgasm consistency [VOC]; percentage of PVI occasions resulting in vaginal orgasm) is associated with mental attention to vaginal sensations during PVI, preference for a longer penis, and indices of psychological and physiological functioning, and (ii) clitoral, distal vaginal, and deep vaginal/cervical stimulation project via different peripheral nerves to different brain regions. The aim of this study is to examine the association of VOC with: (i) sexual arousability perceived from deep vaginal stimulation (compared with middle and shallow vaginal stimulation and clitoral stimulation), and (ii) whether vaginal stimulation was present during the woman's first masturbation. A sample of 75 Czech women (aged 18-36), provided details of recent VOC, site of genital stimulation during first masturbation, and their recent sexual arousability from the four genital sites. The association of VOC with: (i) sexual arousability perceived from the four genital sites and (ii) involvement of vaginal stimulation in first-ever masturbation. VOC was associated with greater sexual arousability from deep vaginal stimulation but not with sexual arousability from other genital sites. VOC was also associated with women's first masturbation incorporating (or being exclusively) vaginal stimulation. The findings suggest (i) stimulating the vagina during early life masturbation might indicate individual readiness for developing greater vaginal responsiveness, leading to adult greater VOC, and (ii) current sensitivity of deep vaginal and cervical regions is associated with VOC, which might be due to some combination of different neurophysiological projections of the deep regions and their greater responsiveness to penile stimulation. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  17. Comparative Omics and Trait Analyses of Marine Pseudoalteromonas Phages Advance the Phage OTU Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa B. Duhaime

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Viruses influence the ecology and evolutionary trajectory of microbial communities. Yet our understanding of their roles in ecosystems is limited by the paucity of model systems available for hypothesis generation and testing. Further, virology is limited by the lack of a broadly accepted conceptual framework to classify viral diversity into evolutionary and ecologically cohesive units. Here, we introduce genomes, structural proteomes, and quantitative host range data for eight Pseudoalteromonas phages isolated from Helgoland (North Sea, Germany and use these data to advance a genome-based viral operational taxonomic unit (OTU definition. These viruses represent five new genera and inform 498 unaffiliated or unannotated protein clusters (PCs from global virus metagenomes. In a comparison of previously sequenced Pseudoalteromonas phage isolates (n = 7 and predicted prophages (n = 31, the eight phages are unique. They share a genus with only one other isolate, Pseudoalteromonas podophage RIO-1 (East Sea, South Korea and two Pseudoalteromonas prophages. Mass-spectrometry of purified viral particles identified 12–20 structural proteins per phage. When combined with 3-D structural predictions, these data led to the functional characterization of five previously unidentified major capsid proteins. Protein functional predictions revealed mechanisms for hijacking host metabolism and resources. Further, they uncovered a hybrid sipho-myovirus that encodes genes for Mu-like infection rarely described in ocean systems. Finally, we used these data to evaluate a recently introduced definition for virus populations that requires members of the same population to have >95% average nucleotide identity across at least 80% of their genes. Using physiological traits and genomics, we proposed a conceptual model for a viral OTU definition that captures evolutionarily cohesive and ecologically distinct units. In this trait-based framework, sensitive hosts are

  18. Vaginal hysterectomy, an outpatient procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engh, Marie Ellström; Hauso, Wenche

    2012-11-01

    To report our experience of treating women undergoing vaginal hysterectomy in an outpatient setting and to identify risk factors for hospital admission and women dissatisfied with care. Prospective observational report. department of obstetrics and gynecology, university hospital in Norway. 150 women who underwent vaginal hysterectomy at the outpatient clinic from February 2009 to April 2010. Perioperative data were collected prospectively and case notes were searched for complications. On the first postoperative day all women were contacted by telephone by a nurse. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to monitor pain and nausea during the stay at the outpatient clinic and the day after surgery. VAS was also used to specify the women's degree of satisfaction with care the day after surgery. The number of women who could be discharged from the outpatient unit and had a satisfaction score of ≥7 the day after surgery. Of the 150 women, 84% could be discharged after a mean observation period of 276 min (SD ± 80 min). The mean satisfaction score was 9.0, SD ± 1.4, and 92.6% of the women reported ≥7 points in the satisfaction score. No women with serious complications were sent home. Using a multivariable logistic regression model only pain at discharge was found as significant (p= 0.009) for admittance to hospital. Vaginal hysterectomy is a feasible outpatient procedure and the majority of women were satisfied with the care they received. © 2012 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2012 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  19. The effects of vaginal prolapse surgery using synthetic mesh on vaginal wall sensibility, vaginal vasocongestion, and sexual function: a prospective single-center study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, Maaike A.; Lakeman, Marielle M. E.; Laan, Ellen; Roovers, Jan-Paul W. R.

    2014-01-01

    Vaginal mesh surgery in patients with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) has been associated with sexual dysfunction. Implantation of synthetic mesh might damage vaginal innervation and vascularization, which could cause sexual dysfunction. We aim to evaluate the effects of vaginal mesh surgery on vaginal

  20. The vaginal microbiota and its association with Human Papillomavirus, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhea and Mycoplasma genitalium infections: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarelle, Jeanne; Thiébaut, Anne C M; de Barbeyrac, Bertille; Bébéar, Cécile; Ravel, Jacques; Delarocque-Astagneau, Elisabeth

    2018-05-02

    The vaginal microbiota may modulate susceptibility to Human papillomavirus, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhea and Mycoplasma genitalium infections. The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the association between these infections and the vaginal microbiota. The search (2000-2016) yielded 1054 articles, of which 39 articles meeting the inclusion criteria were analyzed. The vaginal microbiota was dichotomized into high-Lactobacillus vaginal microbiota (HL-VMB) and low-Lactobacillus vaginal microbiota (LL-VMB), using either Nugent score, Amsel's criteria, presence of clue cells or gene sequencing. Measures of association with LL-VMB ranged from 0.6 (95% Confidence Interval 0.3, 1.2) to 2.8 (0.3, 28.0), 0.7 (0.4, 1.2) to 5.2 (1.9, 14.8), 0.8 (0.5, 1.4) to 3.8 (0.4, 36.2), and 0.4 (0.1, 1.5) to 6.1 (2.0, 18.5) for HPV, C. trachomatis, N. gonorrhea and M. genitalium infections respectively. While no clear trend for N. gonorrhea and M. genitalium infections could be detected, our results support a protective role of HL-VMB for HPV and C. trachomatis. Overall, these findings advocate for the use of high-resolution characterization methods for the vaginal microbiota to lay the foundation for its integration in prevention and treatment strategies. Copyright © 2018 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Radiation inactivation of T7 phage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.; Redpath, J.L.; Grossweiner, L.I.

    1978-01-01

    The radiation inactivation of T7 phage by 25-MeV electron pulses has been measured in various media containing a wide concentration range of radical scavenging solutes and in the presence of protective and sensitizing agents. The dependence of sensitivity on pulse dose, from 1 mrad to 3.6 krad, is attributed to radical depletion via bimolecular processes. The survival data are analyzed by extending target theory to include diffusive reactions of primary and secondary radicals generated in the medium. It is concluded that OH radicals are the principal primary inactivating species and that secondary radicals from Br - , CNS - , uracil, glucose, ribose, sucrose, tyrosine, and histidine are lethal to some extent. In nutrient broth or 100 mM histidine, psoralen derivatives, Actinomycin D, and Mitomycin C are anoxic sensitizers. It is proposed that the psoralens promote the formation of non-strand break lesions as the sensitization mechanism. The target theory based on diffusional kinetics is applicable to other systems including single cells

  2. Vaginal mucosal flap as a sling preservation for the treatment of vaginal exposure of mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sea Young; Park, Jong Yeon; Kim, Han Kwon; Park, Chang Hoo; Kim, Sung Jin; Sung, Gi Teck; Park, Chang Myon

    2010-06-01

    Tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) procedures are used for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women. The procedures with synthetic materials can have a risk of vaginal erosion. We experienced transobturator suburethral sling (TOT) tape-induced vaginal erosion and report the efficacy of a vaginal mucosal covering technique. A total of 560 female patients diagnosed with stress urinary incontinence underwent TOT procedures at our hospital between January 2005 and August 2009. All patients succeeded in follow-ups, among which 8 patients (mean age: 50.5 years) presented with vaginal exposure of the mesh. A vaginal mucosal covering technique was performed under local anesthesia after administration of antibiotics and vaginal wound dressings for 3-4 days. Seven of the 8 patients complained of persistent vaginal discharge postoperatively. Two of the 8 patients complained of dyspareunia of their male partners. The one remaining patient was otherwise asymptomatic, but mesh erosion was discovered at the routine follow-up visit. Six of the 8 patients showed complete mucosal covering of the mesh after the operation (mean follow-up period: 16 moths). Vaginal mucosal erosion recurred in 2 patients, and the mesh was then partially removed. One patient had recurrent stress urinary incontinence. Vaginal mucosal covering as a sling preservation with continued patient continence may be a feasible and effective option for the treatment of vaginal exposure of mesh after TOT tape procedures.

  3. Rejection of reclassification of Lactobacillus kimchii and Lactobacillus bobalius as later subjective synonyms of Lactobacillus paralimentarius using comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seung-Jo; Kim, Byung-Yong; Chun, Jongsik

    2017-11-01

    Lactobacillus bobalius, Lactobacillus kimchii and Lactobacillus paralimentarius belong to the genus Lactobacillus and show close phylogenetic relationships. In a previous study, L. bobalius and L. kimchii were proposed to be reclassified as later heterotypic synonyms of L. paralimentarius using high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities (≥99.5 %) and DNA-DNA hybridization values (≥82 %). We determined high quality whole genome assemblies of the type strains of L. bobalius and L. kimchii, which were then compared with that of L. paralimentarius. Average nucleotide identity values among three genomes ranged from 91.4 to 92.3 % which are clearly below 95~96 %, the generally recognized cutoff value for bacterial species boundaries. On the basis of comparative genomic evidence, L. bobalius, L. kimchii, and L. paralimentarius should stand as separate species in the genus Lactobacillus. We therefore suggest rejecting the previous proposal to combine these three species into a single species.

  4. Lactobacillus proteins are associated with the bactericidal activity against E. coli of female genital tract secretions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabah Kalyoussef

    Full Text Available Female genital tract secretions are bactericidal for Escherichia (E. coli ex vivo. However, the intersubject variability and molecules that contribute to this activity have not been defined.The bactericidal activity and concentration of immune mediators in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL collected from 99 healthy women were determined.CVL reduced the number of E. coli colonies by 68% [-26, 100] (median [range]. CVL were active against laboratory and clinical isolates of E. coli, but were inactive against Lactobacillus species. Bactericidal activity correlated with the concentration of protein recovered (p90% inhibitory activity (active and two with<30% activity were subjected to MS/MS proteomic analysis. 215 proteins were identified and six were found exclusively in active samples. Four of these corresponded to Lactobacillus crispatus or jensenii proteins. Moreover, culture supernatants from Lactobacillus jensenii were bactericidal for E. coli.Both host and commensal microbiota proteins contribute to mucosal defense. Identification of these proteins will facilitate the development of strategies to maintain a healthy vaginal microbiome and prevent colonization with pathogenic bacteria such as E. coli that increase the risk for urinary tract infections, preterm labor and perinatal infection.

  5. Descriptiveness of vaginal secretions pH in the vaginal microbiota assessment in pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Nagornaya

    2016-07-01

    2 KU maternity hospital №7, Odessa           Summary 143 pregnant and 20 non-pregnant women have been examined. The objective: to determine the information content of  the vaginal fluid pH.  Methods used: Cytological, standard microbiological,  real time PCR, the measurement of vaginal fluid pH. Results: five types  of vaginal microbiota have been revealed, as well as a clear link of pH and the quantitative characteristic of microflora, high inverse correlation with  estradiol content was shown,  and correspondence to the number of gestation complications and the number of inflammatory diseases of the somatic plan was proved. The authors recommend to use pH of the vaginal fluid as an indicator of the state of vaginal biotope in the course of pregnancy.       Keywords: pH of the vaginal secretion, vaginal biotope pregnancy.

  6. Culture Supernatants of Lactobacillus gasseri and L. crispatus Inhibit Candida albicans Biofilm Formation and Adhesion to HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yuko; Cho, Otomi; Sugita, Takashi; Ogishima, Daiki; Takeda, Satoru

    2018-03-30

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a common superficial infection of the vaginal mucous membranes caused by the fungus Candida albicans. The aim of this study was to assess the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of the culture supernatants of Lactobacillus gasseri and L. crispatus, the predominant microbiota in Asian healthy women, on C. albicans biofilm formation. The inhibition of C. albicans adhesion to HeLa cells by Lactobacillus culture supernatant was also investigated. Candida albicans biofilm was formed on polystyrene flat-bottomed 96-well plates, and the inhibitory effects on the initial colonization and maturation phases were determined using the XTT reduction assay. The expression levels of biofilm formation-associated genes (HWP1, ECE1, ALS3, BCR1, EFG1, TEC1, and CPH1) were determined by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The inhibition of C. albicans adhesion to HeLa cells by Lactobacillus culture supernatant was evaluated by enumerating viable C. albicans cells. The culture supernatants of both Lactobacillus species inhibited the initial colonization and maturation of C. albicans biofilm. The expression levels of all biofilm formation-related genes were downregulated in the presence of Lactobacillus culture supernatant. The culture supernatant also inhibited C. albicans adhesion to HeLa cells. The culture supernatants of L. gasseri and L. crispatus inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation by downregulating biofilm formation-related genes and C. albicans adhesion to HeLa cells. These findings support the notion that Lactobacillus metabolites may be useful alternatives to antifungal drugs for the management of VVC.

  7. Reoccurrence of retained placenta at vaginal delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolajsen, Sys; Løkkegaard, Ellen Christine Leth; Bergholt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence and validate the diagnosis of retained placenta in nulliparous women and the risk of reoccurrence at subsequent vaginal delivery.......To estimate the prevalence and validate the diagnosis of retained placenta in nulliparous women and the risk of reoccurrence at subsequent vaginal delivery....

  8. Use of vaginal hysterectomy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sidsel Lykke; Daugbjerg, Signe B; Gimbel, Helga

    2011-01-01

    To describe the use of vaginal, abdominal and laparoscopic hysterectomy in Denmark from 1999 to 2008, the influence of national guidelines and the patient and procedure-related characteristics associated with the choice of vaginal hysterectomy. Design. Nationwide register-based cohort study....

  9. VULVO-VAGINAL CANDIDIASIS ASSOCIATED WITH ACITRETIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STURKENBOOM, MCJM; MIDDELBEEK, A; VANDENBERG, LTWD; VANDENBERG, PB; STRICKER, BHC; WESSELING, H

    The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of vulvo-vaginal candidiasis among the users of acitretin. The incidence rate ratio of vulvo-vaginal candidiasis was estimated in a cohort of acitretin users by using prescription sequence analysis. Study subjects were 196 women between 15 and 45 years

  10. Short convalescence after vaginal prolapse surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Marianne; Sørensen, Mette; Kehlet, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Retrospectively to describe the recommended convalescence according to patients who had undergone vaginal prolapse surgery in 1996-98, and prospectively to describe the need for and limiting factors for convalescence after vaginal prolapse surgery in 1999-2000 at a Danish University Ho...

  11. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or to...

  12. Value of bacterial culture of vaginal swabs in diagnosis of vaginal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenadić Dane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Vaginal and cervical swab culture is still very common procedure in our country’s everyday practice whereas simple and rapid diagnostic methods have been very rarely used. The aim of this study was to show that the employment of simple and rapid diagnostic tools [vaginal fluid wet mount microscopy (VFWMM, vaginal pH and potassium hydroxide (KOH test] offers better assessment of vaginal environment than standard microbiologic culture commonly used in Serbia. Methods. This prospective study included 505 asymptomatic pregnant women undergoing VFWMM, test with 10% KOH, determination of vaginal pH and standard culture of cervicovaginal swabs. Combining findings from the procedures was used to make diagnoses of bacterial vaginosis (BV and vaginitis. In addition, the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN was determined in each sample and analyzed along with other findings. Infections with Candida albicans and Trichomonas vaginalis were confirmed or excluded by microscopic examination. Results. In 36 (6% patients cervicovaginal swab cultures retrieved several aerobes and facultative anaerobes, whereas in 52 (11% women Candida albicans was isolated. Based on VFWMM findings and clinical criteria 96 (19% women had BV, 19 (4% vaginitis, and 72 (14% candidiasis. Of 115 women with BV and vaginitis, pH 4.5 was found in 5, and of 390 with normal findings 83 (21% had vaginal pH 4.5. Elevated numbers of PMN were found in 154 (30% women - in 83 (54% of them VFWMM was normal. Specificity and sensitivity of KOH test and vaginal pH determination in defining pathological vaginal flora were 95% and 81%, and 79% and 91%, respectively. Conclusion. Cervicovaginal swab culture is expensive but almost non-informative test in clinical practice. The use of simpler and rapid methods as vaginal fluid wet mount microscopy, KOH test and vaginal pH offers better results in diagnosis, and probably in the treatment and prevention of sequels of vaginal

  13. Value of bacterial culture of vaginal swabs in diagnosis of vaginal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadić, Dane; Pavlović, Miloš D

    2015-06-01

    Vaginal and cervical swab culture is still very common procedure in our country's everyday practice whereas simple and rapid diagnostic methods have been very rarely used. The aim of this study was to show that the employment of simple and rapid diagnostic tools [vaginal fluid wet mount microscopy (VFWMM), vaginal pH and potassium hydroxide (KOH) test] offers better assessment of vaginal environment than standard microbiologic culture commonly used in Serbia. This prospective study included 505 asymptomatic pregnant women undergoing VFWMM, test with 10% KOH, determination of vaginal pH and standard culture of cervicovaginal swabs. Combining findings from the procedures was used to make diagnoses of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and vaginitis. In addition, the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) was determined in each sample and analyzed along with other findings. Infections with Candida albicans and Trichomonas vaginalis were confirmed or excluded by microscopic examination. In 36 (6%) patients cervicovaginal swab cultures retrieved several aerobes and facultative anaerobes, whereas in 52 (11%) women Candida albicans was isolated. Based on VFWMM findings and clinical criteria 96 (19%) women had BV, 19 (4%) vaginitis, and 72 (14%) candidiasis. Of 115 women with BV and vaginitis, pH 4.5 was found in 5, and of 390 with normal findings 83 (21%) had vaginal pH 4.5. Elevated numbers of PMN were found in 154 (30%) women--in 83 (54%) of them VFWMM was normal. Specificity and sensitivity of KOH test and vaginal pH determination in defining pathological vaginal flora were 95% and 81%, and 79% and 91%, respectively. Cervicovaginal swab culture is expensive but almost non-informative test in clinical practice. The use of simpler and rapid methods as vaginal fluid wet mount microscopy, KOH test and vaginal pH offers better results in diagnosis, and probably in the treatment and prevention of sequels of vaginal infections.

  14. [Severe vaginal discharge following rectal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, L C; Bremers, A J A; Heesakkers, J P F A; Kluivers, K B

    2018-01-01

    Almost 50% of women who have had rectal surgery subsequently develop vaginal discharge. Due to the recurrent and unexpected nature of this heavy discharge, they often experience it as very distressing. Many of these women undergo extensive diagnostic tests that are mainly focused on identifying fistula formation. If no fistula is found, in most cases no other cause for severe vaginal discharge can be demonstrated. In our practice, we saw three patients (49-, 54- and 74-years-old, respectively) with similar severe vaginal discharge after rectal surgery and in whom no explanation for the vaginal discharge could be found. For this reason we conducted a literature search into this condition. Anatomical changes appear to be responsible for heavy vaginal discharge following rectal surgery. Changes in pelvic floor muscles and compression of the distal part of the vagina may lead to pooling of fluid in the proximal part of the vagina, resulting in severe discharge. Symptomatic treatment may reduce the symptoms.

  15. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of Lactobacillus curvatus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    17 Lactobacillus curvatus and one Lactobacillus brevis isolate were obtained from salami. The isolates were previously selected according to the desirable characteristics regarding technological criteria. Identification was based primarily on the biochemical carbohydrate assimilation profile, and later by amplified 16S rDNA ...

  16. Evaluation of Lactobacillus sanfransicencis (ATCC 14917)and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of sourdoughs, produced with Lactobacillus sanfransicencis (ATCC 14917) and Lactobacillus plantarum (ATCC 43332) at different fermentation time, fermentation temperature and type of starter culture on the staling and microbiological shelf life of Iranian Barbari wheat bread was studied. For statistical analysis a ...

  17. Multiple Genome Sequences of Lactobacillus plantarum Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Kafka, Thomas A.; Geissler, Andreas J.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the genome sequences of four Lactobacillus plantarum strains which vary in surface hydrophobicity. Bioinformatic analysis, using additional genomes of Lactobacillus plantarum strains, revealed a possible correlation between the cell wall teichoic acid-type and cell surface hydrophobicity and provide the basis for consecutive analyses.

  18. Specific aminopeptidases of indigenous Lactobacillus brevis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lactic acid bacteria play an important role in milk coagulation and cheese ripening. To select strains showing interesting industrial features, two indigenous lactobacilli (Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus plantarum) were studied for aminopeptidase activity. Cell and cells free extract were tested for leucyl aminopeptidase ...

  19. Advanced Analysis to Distinguish between Physical Decrease and Inactivation of Viable Phages in Aerosol by Quantitating Phage-Specific Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimasaki, Noriko; Nojima, Yasuhiro; Sakakibara, Masaya; Kikuno, Ritsuko; Iizuka, Chiori; Okaue, Akira; Okuda, Shunji; Shinohara, Katsuaki

    2018-01-01

     Recent studies have investigated the efficacy of air-cleaning products against pathogens in the air. A standard method to evaluate the reduction in airborne viruses caused by an air cleaner has been established using a safe bacteriophage instead of pathogenic viruses; the reduction in airborne viruses is determined by counting the number of viable airborne phages by culture, after operating the air cleaner. The reduction in the number of viable airborne phages could be because of "physical decrease" or "inactivation". Therefore, to understand the mechanism of reduction correctly, an analysis is required to distinguish between physical decrease and inactivation. The purpose of this study was to design an analysis to distinguish between the physical decrease and inactivation of viable phi-X174 phages in aerosols. We established a suitable polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system by selecting an appropriate primer-probe set for PCR and validating the sensitivity, linearity, and specificity of the primer-probe set to robustly quantify phi-X174-specific airborne particles. Using this quantitative PCR system and culture assay, we performed a behavior analysis of the phage aerosol in a small chamber (1 m 3 ) at different levels of humidity, as humidity is known to affect the number of viable airborne phages. The results revealed that the reduction in the number of viable airborne phages was caused not only by physical decrease but also by inactivation under particular levels of humidity. Our study could provide an advanced analysis to differentiate between the physical decrease and inactivation of viable airborne phages.

  20. Safety and protective effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The protective effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus casei, isolated from fresh cow milk, was studied in vivo. Toxicological data of rat serum revealed that the Lactobacillus isolates had liver improvement functions. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities of the rats dosed with Lactobacillus isolates ...

  1. Nongenetic individuality in the host-phage interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivan Pearl

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Isogenic bacteria can exhibit a range of phenotypes, even in homogeneous environmental conditions. Such nongenetic individuality has been observed in a wide range of biological processes, including differentiation and stress response. A striking example is the heterogeneous response of bacteria to antibiotics, whereby a small fraction of drug-sensitive bacteria can persist under extensive antibiotic treatments. We have previously shown that persistent bacteria enter a phenotypic state, identified by slow growth or dormancy, which protects them from the lethal action of antibiotics. Here, we studied the effect of persistence on the interaction between Escherichia coli and phage lambda. We used long-term time-lapse microscopy to follow the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP under the phage lytic promoter, as well as cellular fate, in single infected bacteria. Intriguingly, we found that, whereas persistent bacteria are protected from prophage induction, they are not protected from lytic infection. Quantitative analysis of gene expression reveals that the expression of lytic genes is suppressed in persistent bacteria. However, when persistent bacteria switch to normal growth, the infecting phage resumes the process of gene expression, ultimately causing cell lysis. Using mathematical models for these two host-phage interactions, we found that the bacteria's nongenetic individuality can significantly affect the population dynamics, and might be relevant for understanding the coevolution of bacterial hosts and phages.

  2. Phage Therapy in the Era of Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbu, E Magda; Cady, Kyle C; Hubby, Bolyn

    2016-10-03

    For more than a century, bacteriophage (or phage) research has enabled some of the most important discoveries in biological sciences and has equipped scientists with many of the molecular biology tools that have advanced our understanding of replication, maintenance, and expression of genetic material. Phages have also been recognized and exploited as natural antimicrobial agents and nanovectors for gene therapy, but their potential as therapeutics has not been fully exploited in Western medicine because of challenges such as narrow host range, bacterial resistance, and unique pharmacokinetics. However, increasing concern related to the emergence of bacteria resistant to multiple antibiotics has heightened interest in phage therapy and the development of strategies to overcome hurdles associated with bacteriophage therapeutics. Recent progress in sequencing technologies, DNA manipulation, and synthetic biology allowed scientists to refactor the entire bacterial genome of Mycoplasma mycoides, thereby creating the first synthetic cell. These new strategies for engineering genomes may have the potential to accelerate the construction of designer phage genomes with superior therapeutic potential. Here, we discuss the use of phage as therapeutics, as well as how synthetic biology can create bacteriophage with desirable attributes. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  3. Exploring the mycobacteriophage metaproteome: phage genomics as an educational platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham F Hatfull

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are the most abundant forms of life in the biosphere and carry genomes characterized by high genetic diversity and mosaic architectures. The complete sequences of 30 mycobacteriophage genomes show them collectively to encode 101 tRNAs, three tmRNAs, and 3,357 proteins belonging to 1,536 "phamilies" of related sequences, and a statistical analysis predicts that these represent approximately 50% of the total number of phamilies in the mycobacteriophage population. These phamilies contain 2.19 proteins on average; more than half (774 of them contain just a single protein sequence. Only six phamilies have representatives in more than half of the 30 genomes, and only three-encoding tape-measure proteins, lysins, and minor tail proteins-are present in all 30 phages, although these phamilies are themselves highly modular, such that no single amino acid sequence element is present in all 30 mycobacteriophage genomes. Of the 1,536 phamilies, only 230 (15% have amino acid sequence similarity to previously reported proteins, reflecting the enormous genetic diversity of the entire phage population. The abundance and diversity of phages, the simplicity of phage isolation, and the relatively small size of phage genomes support bacteriophage isolation and comparative genomic analysis as a highly suitable platform for discovery-based education.

  4. Characterization of the Vaginal Microbiota of Ewes and Cows Reveals a Unique Microbiota with Low Levels of Lactobacilli and Near-Neutral pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Jeffrey D.; Lachman, Medora; Westveer, Kelsey; O’Neill, Thomas; Geary, Thomas; Kott, Rodney W.; Berardinelli, James G.; Hatfield, Patrick G.; Thomson, Jennifer M.; Roberts, Andy; Yeoman, Carl J.

    2014-01-01

    Although a number of common reproductive disorders in livestock involve bacterial infection, very little is known about their normal vaginal microbiota. Therefore, we sought to determine the species composition of sheep and cattle vaginal microbiota. Twenty Rambouillet ewes and twenty crossbred cows varying in age and reproductive status were sampled by ectocervicovaginal lavage. We amplified and sequenced the V3–V4 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) contents yielding a total of 907,667 high-quality reads. Good’s Coverage estimates indicated that we obtained data on 98 ± 0.01% of the total microbial genera present in each sample. Cow and ewe vaginal microbiota displayed few differences. Cow microbiota exhibited greater (P ≤ 0.05) α-diversity compared to the ewe microbiota. Both livestock species differed (P ≤ 0.05) from all previously reported vaginal communities. While bacteria were numerically dominant, Archaea were detected in 95% of cow and ewe samples, mainly of the order Desulfurococcales. Both ewes and cows were predominately colonized by the bacterial phyla Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, and Proteobacteria. The most abundant genera were Aggregatibacter spp., and Streptobacillus spp. Lactobacillus spp. were detected in 80% of ewe and 90% of cow samples, but only at very low abundances. Bacteria previously described from culture-based studies as common to the cow and ewe vaginal tract, except for Escherichia, were variably present, and only in low abundance. Ewe and cow pH differed (P ≤ 0.05), with means (±SD) of 6.7 ± 0.38 and 7.3 ± 0.63, respectively. In conclusion, 16S rRNA sequencing of cow and ewe vaginal ectocervicovaginal lavages showed that cow and ewe vaginal microbiota differ from culture-led results, revealing a microbiota distinct from previously described vaginal ecosystems. PMID:26664918

  5. Identification of the host determinant of two prolate-headed phages infecting lactococcus lactis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Janzen, Thomas; Schnabl, Jannie; Johansen, Eric

    2003-01-01

    A gene responsible for host determination was identified in two prolate-headed bacteriophages of the c2 species infecting strains of Lactococcus lactis. The identification of the host determinant gene was based on low DNA sequence homology in a specific open reading frame (ORF) between prolate-headed phages with different host ranges. When a host carrying this ORF from one phage on a plasmid was infected with another phage, we obtained phages with an altered host range at a frequency of 10 -6 to 10 -7 . Sequencing of phage DNA originating from 10 independent single plaques confirmed that a genetic recombination had taken place at different positions between the ORF on the plasmid and the infecting phage. The adsorption of the recombinant phages to their bacterial hosts had also changed to match the phage origin of the ORF. Consequently, it is concluded that this ORF codes for the host range determinant

  6. Understanding the enormous diversity of bacteriophages: the tailed phages that infect the bacterial family Enterobacteriaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grose, Julianne H.; Casjens, Sherwood R.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the predominant biological entity on the planet. The recent explosion of sequence information has made estimates of their diversity possible. We describe the genomic comparison of 337 fully sequenced tailed phages isolated on 18 genera and 31 species of bacteria in the Enterobacteriaceae. These phages were largely unambiguously grouped into 56 diverse clusters (32 lytic and 24 temperate) that have syntenic similarity over >50% of the genomes within each cluster, but substantially less sequence similarity between clusters. Most clusters naturally break into sets of more closely related subclusters, 78% of which are correlated with their host genera. The largest groups of related phages are superclusters united by genome synteny to lambda (81 phages) and T7 (51 phages). This study forms a robust framework for understanding diversity and evolutionary relationships of existing tailed phages, for relating newly discovered phages and for determining host/phage relationships. PMID:25240328

  7. Primary Isolation Strain Determines Both Phage Type and Receptors Recognised by Campylobacter jejuni Bacteriophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Martine C. Holst; Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Birk, Tina

    2015-01-01

    were identified based on host range analysis and genome restriction profiles. Most phages were isolated using C. jejuni strains NCTC12662 and RM1221 and interestingly phage genome size (140 kb vs. 190 kb), host range and morphological appearance correlated with the isolation strain. Thus, according......In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated...... therefore chose seven C. jejuni strains each expressing different CPS structures as indicator strains in a large screening for phages in samples collected from free-range poultry farms. Forty-three phages were isolated using C. jejuni NCTC12658, NCTC12662 and RM1221 as host strains and 20 distinct phages...

  8. Comparative Study on the Vaginal Flora and Incidence of Asymptomatic Vaginosis among Healthy Women and in Women with Infertility Problems of Reproductive Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Geethavani; Singaravelu, Balamuru Ganvelu; Srikumar, R; Reddy, Sreenivasalu V; Kokan, Afraa

    2017-08-01

    The normal vaginal flora is highly complex, dominated by lactobacilli of doderlein that plays a vital role in maintaining the women's health and inhibits other pathogenic microorganisms. Fluctuation in local environment or exposure to any exogenous and endogenous sources changes the vaginal flora over a period of time. Disruption of the vaginal ecosystem changes the microflora of the healthy vagina, altering the pH and predisposing to lower reproductive tract infections. The change in the microflora of the female genital tract by pathogenic organisms may ascend from vagina to upper genital tract and may cause infertility. Although several studies demonstrate a higher prevalence of bacterial vaginosis in infertile population. The role of vaginal microbiome in infertility is not clear and need to be explored further. To compare the vaginal flora and analyse the incidence of asymptomatic vaginosis among healthy women and in women with infertility problems. A cross-sectional study was conducted over a period of six months at Sri Lakshmi Narayana Medical College and Hospital Puducherry, India. A total of 200 high vaginal swabs were collected from Group 1 which included 84 healthy women with regular menstrual cycles without any gynaecological disorder and from Group 2, 116 women with infertility problems attending fertility clinic within the age group of 18 to 45 years. All swabs were subjected to routine aerobic, anaerobic and fungal culture. Saline wet mount was performed for the detection of clue cells and Trichomonas vaginalis , 10% KOH was performed for demonstration of budding yeast cells and pseudo hyphae, Gram's staining to determine the presence of yeast cells, leucocytes and bacterial morphotypes. The smear was also graded using Nugent scoring system. The vaginal flora of Group 1 was dominated by Lactobacillus (40, 27.8 %) followed by Micrococcus (22, 15.3 %), Enterococcus (16, 11.1%), Coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (12, 8.3%). Whereas in Group 2, the

  9. Protection against rat vaginal candidiasis by adoptive transfer of vaginal B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bernardis, Flavia; Santoni, Giorgio; Boccanera, Maria; Lucciarini, Roberta; Arancia, Silvia; Sandini, Silvia; Amantini, Consuelo; Cassone, Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is a mucosal infection affecting many women, but the immune mechanisms operating against Candida albicans at the mucosal level remain unknown. A rat model was employed to further characterize the contribution of B and T cells to anti-Candida vaginal protection. Particularly, the protective role of vaginal B cells was studied by means of adoptive transfer of vaginal CD3(-) CD5(+) IgM(+) cells from Candida-immunized rats to naïve animals. This passive transfer of B cells resulted into a number of vaginal C. albicans CFU approximately 50% lower than their controls. Sorted CD3(-) CD5(+) IgM(+) vaginal B lymphocytes from Candida-infected rats proliferated in response to stimulation with an immunodominant mannoprotein (MP) antigen of the fungus. Importantly, anti-MP antibodies and antibody-secreting B cells were detected in the supernatant and cell cultures, respectively, of vaginal B lymphocytes from infected rats incubated in vitro with vaginal T cells and stimulated with MP. No such specific antibodies were found when using vaginal B cells from uninfected rats. Furthermore, inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-6 and IL-10, were found in the supernatant of vaginal B cells from infected rats. These data are evidence of a partial anti-Candida protective role of CD3(-) CD5(+) IgM(+) vaginal B lymphocytes in our experimental model.

  10. Lysis-deficient phages as novel therapeutic agents for controlling bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kempashanaiah Nanjundappa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interest in phage therapy has grown over the past decade due to the rapid emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens. However, the use of bacteriophages for therapeutic purposes has raised concerns over the potential for immune response, rapid toxin release by the lytic action of phages, and difficulty in dose determination in clinical situations. A phage that kills the target cell but is incapable of host cell lysis would alleviate these concerns without compromising efficacy. Results We developed a recombinant lysis-deficient Staphylococcus aureus phage P954, in which the endolysin gene was rendered nonfunctional by insertional inactivation. P954, a temperate phage, was lysogenized in S. aureus strain RN4220. The native endolysin gene on the prophage was replaced with an endolysin gene disrupted by the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (cat gene through homologous recombination using a plasmid construct. Lysogens carrying the recombinant phage were detected by growth in presence of chloramphenicol. Induction of the recombinant prophage did not result in host cell lysis, and the phage progeny were released by cell lysis with glass beads. The recombinant phage retained the endolysin-deficient genotype and formed plaques only when endolysin was supplemented. The host range of the recombinant phage was the same as that of the parent phage. To test the in vivo efficacy of the recombinant endolysin-deficient phage, immunocompromised mice were challenged with pathogenic S. aureus at a dose that results in 80% mortality (LD80. Treatment with the endolysin-deficient phage rescued mice from the fatal S. aureus infection. Conclusions A recombinant endolysin-deficient staphylococcal phage has been developed that is lethal to methicillin-resistant S. aureus without causing bacterial cell lysis. The phage was able to multiply in lytic mode utilizing a heterologous endolysin expressed from a plasmid in the propagation host

  11. Significance of phage-host interactions for biocontrol of Campylobacter jejuni in food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Athina, Zampara; Sørensen, Martine Camilla Holst; Elsser-Gravesen, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Poultry meat is the main source of Campylobacter jejuni foodborne disease. Currently, no effective control measures prevent C. jejuni from contaminating poultry meat. However, post-harvest phage treatment is a promising biocontrol strategy that has not yet been explored. Here we identified phages....... A thorough understanding of phage-host interactions is prerequisite to further advance phage application as a post-harvest biocontrol strategy against C. jejuni....

  12. The vaginal microbiota: what have we learned after a decade of molecular characterization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wijgert, Janneke H H M; Borgdorff, Hanneke; Verhelst, Rita; Crucitti, Tania; Francis, Suzanna; Verstraelen, Hans; Jespers, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review of the Medline database (U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, U.S.A) to determine if consistent molecular vaginal microbiota (VMB) composition patterns can be discerned after a decade of molecular testing, and to evaluate demographic, behavioral and clinical determinants of VMB compositions. Studies were eligible when published between 1 January 2008 and 15 November 2013, and if at least one molecular technique (sequencing, PCR, DNA fingerprinting, or DNA hybridization) was used to characterize the VMB. Sixty three eligible studies were identified. These studies have now conclusively shown that lactobacilli-dominated VMB are associated with a healthy vaginal micro-environment and that bacterial vaginosis (BV) is best described as a polybacterial dysbiosis. The extent of dysbiosis correlates well with Nugent score and vaginal pH but not with the other Amsel criteria. Lactobacillus crispatus is more beneficial than L. iners. Longitudinal studies have shown that a L. crispatus-dominated VMB is more likely to shift to a L. iners-dominated or mixed lactobacilli VMB than to full dysbiosis. Data on VMB determinants are scarce and inconsistent, but dysbiosis is consistently associated with HIV, human papillomavirus (HPV), and Trichomonas vaginalis infection. In contrast, vaginal colonization with Candida spp. is more common in women with a lactobacilli-dominated VMB than in women with dysbiosis. Cervicovaginal mucosal immune responses to molecular VMB compositions have not yet been properly characterized. Molecular techniques have now become more affordable, and we make a case for incorporating them into larger epidemiological studies to address knowledge gaps in etiology and pathogenesis of dysbiosis, associations of different dysbiotic states with clinical outcomes, and to evaluate interventions aimed at restoring and maintaining a lactobacilli-dominated VMB.

  13. Associations of the vaginal microbiota with HIV infection, bacterial vaginosis, and demographic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehoud, Christel; Stieh, Daniel J; Bailey, Aubrey G; Laughlin, Alice L; Allen, Shannon A; McCotter, Kerrie L; Sherrill-Mix, Scott A; Hope, Thomas J; Bushman, Frederic D

    2017-04-24

    We sought to investigate the effects of HIV infection on the vaginal microbiota and associations with treatment and demographic factors. We thus compared vaginal microbiome samples from HIV-infected (HIV+) and HIV-uninfected (HIV-) women collected at two Chicago area hospitals. We studied vaginal microbiome samples from 178 women analyzed longitudinally (n = 324 samples) and collected extensive data on clinical status and demographic factors. We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to characterize the bacterial lineages present, then UniFrac, Shannon diversity, and other measures to compare community structure with sample metadata. Differences in microbiota measures were modest in the comparison of HIV+ and HIV- samples, in contrast to several previous studies, consistent with effective antiretroviral therapy. Proportions of healthy Lactobacillus species were not higher in HIV- patients overall, but were significantly higher when analyzed within each hospital in isolation. Rates of bacterial vaginosis were higher among African-American women and HIV+ women. Bacterial vaginosis was associated with higher frequency of HIV+. Unexpectedly, African-American women were more likely to switch bacterial vaginosis status between sampling times; switching was not associated with HIV+ status. The influence of HIV infection on the vaginal microbiome was modest for this cohort of well suppressed urban American women, consistent with effective antiretroviral therapy. HIV+ was found to be associated with bacterial vaginosis. Although bacterial vaginosis has previously been associated with HIV transmission, most of the women studied here became HIV+ many years before our test for bacterial vaginosis, thus implicating additional mechanisms linking HIV infection and bacterial vaginosis.

  14. The vaginal microbiota: what have we learned after a decade of molecular characterization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janneke H H M van de Wijgert

    Full Text Available We conducted a systematic review of the Medline database (U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, U.S.A to determine if consistent molecular vaginal microbiota (VMB composition patterns can be discerned after a decade of molecular testing, and to evaluate demographic, behavioral and clinical determinants of VMB compositions. Studies were eligible when published between 1 January 2008 and 15 November 2013, and if at least one molecular technique (sequencing, PCR, DNA fingerprinting, or DNA hybridization was used to characterize the VMB. Sixty three eligible studies were identified. These studies have now conclusively shown that lactobacilli-dominated VMB are associated with a healthy vaginal micro-environment and that bacterial vaginosis (BV is best described as a polybacterial dysbiosis. The extent of dysbiosis correlates well with Nugent score and vaginal pH but not with the other Amsel criteria. Lactobacillus crispatus is more beneficial than L. iners. Longitudinal studies have shown that a L. crispatus-dominated VMB is more likely to shift to a L. iners-dominated or mixed lactobacilli VMB than to full dysbiosis. Data on VMB determinants are scarce and inconsistent, but dysbiosis is consistently associated with HIV, human papillomavirus (HPV, and Trichomonas vaginalis infection. In contrast, vaginal colonization with Candida spp. is more common in women with a lactobacilli-dominated VMB than in women with dysbiosis. Cervicovaginal mucosal immune responses to molecular VMB compositions have not yet been properly characterized. Molecular techniques have now become more affordable, and we make a case for incorporating them into larger epidemiological studies to address knowledge gaps in etiology and pathogenesis of dysbiosis, associations of different dysbiotic states with clinical outcomes, and to evaluate interventions aimed at restoring and maintaining a lactobacilli-dominated VMB.

  15. Novel Variants of Streptococcus thermophilus Bacteriophages Are Indicative of Genetic Recombination among Phages from Different Bacterial Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymczak, Paula; Janzen, Thomas; Neves, Ana Rute

    2017-01-01

    lactis P335 phages. Phage CHPC1151 was closely related to the atypical S. thermophilus phage 5093, homologous with a nondairy streptococcal prophage. By testing adsorption of the related streptococcal and lactococcal phages to the surface of S. thermophilus and L. lactis strains, we revealed....... thermophilus phages from the Chr. Hansen A/S collection, using PCR specific for the cos- or pac-type phages, as well as for the V2 antireceptor region. Three phages did not produce positive results with the assays. Analysis of phage morphologies indicated that two of these phages, CHPC577 and CHPC926, had...... the possibility of cross-interactions. Our data indicated that the use of S. thermophilus together with L. lactis, extensively applied for dairy fermentations, triggered the recombination between phages infecting different bacterial species. A notable diversity among S. thermophilus phage populations requires...

  16. Influence of environmental factors on phage-bacteria interaction and on the efficacy and infectivity of phage P100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Fister

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available When using bacteriophages to control food-borne bacteria in food production plants and processed food, it is crucial to consider that environmental conditions influence their stability. These conditions can also affect the physiological state of bacteria and consequently host-virus interaction and the effectiveness of the phage ability to reduce bacteria numbers. In this study we investigated the stability, binding and replication capability of phage P100 and its efficacy to control L. monocytogenes under conditions typically encountered in dairy plants. The influences of SDS, Lutensol AO 7, salt, smear water and different temperatures were investigated. Results indicate that phage P100 is stable and able to bind to the host under most conditions tested. Replication was dependent upon the growth of L. monocytogenes and efficacy was higher when bacterial growth was reduced by certain environmental conditions. In long-term experiments at different temperatures phages were initially able to reduce bacteria up to seven log10 units after two weeks at 4 °C. However, thereafter re-growth and development of phage-resistant L. monocytogenes isolates were encountered.

  17. The Making of Probiotic Drink (Yoghurt from Cow’s Milk and Soybean Proportion using Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus plantarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firman Jaya

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of current study was to find out the effect of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus plantarum onto cow’s milk and soybean’s milk proportion to yoghurt quality. The results showed that the highest of total lactic acid was combination between Lactobacillus plantarum and soybean milk (45 ml. While the highest pH was combination between Lactobacillus casei and cow’s milk (6.48 and the highest viscosity was combination between Lactobacillus casei and cow’s milk (2.9 cp. Keywords: cow’s milk, soybean’s milk, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus plantarum, yoghurt

  18. Changes of the Specific Infectivity of Tracer Phages during Transport in Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Nawras; Trost, Manuel; Sánchez Fontanet, Laura; Harms, Hauke; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Wick, Lukas Y

    2018-03-20

    Phages (i.e., viruses infecting bacteria) are considered to be good indicators and tracers for fecal pollution, hydraulic flow, or colloidal transport in the subsurface. They are typically quantified as total virus particles (VLP) or plaque forming units (PFU) of infectious phages. As transport may lead to phage deactivation, VLP quantification can overestimate the number of infectious phages. In contrast, PFU counts may underestimate the transport of total virus particles. Using PFU and tunable resistive pulse sensing-based counting for active and total phages, respectively, we quantified the effect of transport through laboratory percolation columns on the specific infectivity (SI). The SI is defined by the ratio of total VLP to PFU and is a measure for the minimum particle numbers needed to create a single infection. Transport of three marine tracer phages and the coli-phage (T4) was described by colloidal filtration theory. We found that apparent collision efficiencies of active and total phages differed. Depending on the phage properties (e.g., morphology or hydrophobicity), passage through a porous medium led to either an increasing or decreasing SI of effluent phages. Our data suggest that both phage mass recovery and the SI should be considered in quantitative phage tracer experiments.

  19. A fast method for large-scale isolation of phages from hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This plaque-forming method could be adopted to isolate E. coli phage easily, rapidly and in large quantities. Among the 18 isolated E. coli phages, 10 of them had a broad host range in E. coli and warrant further study. Key words: Escherichia coli phages, large-scale isolation, drug resistance, biological properties.

  20. Genome Sequences of Gordonia Phages BaxterFox, Kita, Nymphadora, and Yeezy

    OpenAIRE

    Pope, Welkin H.; Bandla, Sharanya; Colbert, Alexandra K.; Eichinger, Fiona G.; Gamburg, Michelle B.; Horiates, Stavroula G.; Jamison, Jerrica M.; Julian, Dana R.; Moore, Whitney A.; Murthy, Pranav; Powell, Meghan C.; Smith, Sydney V.; Mezghani, Nadia; Milliken, Katherine A.; Thompson, Paige K.

    2016-01-01

    Gordonia phages BaxterFox, Kita, Nymphadora, and Yeezy are newly characterized phages of Gordonia terrae, isolated from soil samples in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. These phages have genome lengths between 50,346 and 53,717?bp, and encode on average 84 predicted proteins. All have G+C content of 66.6%.

  1. Genome Sequences of Gordonia Phages BaxterFox, Kita, Nymphadora, and Yeezy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Welkin H; Bandla, Sharanya; Colbert, Alexandra K; Eichinger, Fiona G; Gamburg, Michelle B; Horiates, Stavroula G; Jamison, Jerrica M; Julian, Dana R; Moore, Whitney A; Murthy, Pranav; Powell, Meghan C; Smith, Sydney V; Mezghani, Nadia; Milliken, Katherine A; Thompson, Paige K; Toner, Chelsea L; Ulbrich, Megan C; Furbee, Emily C; Grubb, Sarah R; Warner, Marcie H; Montgomery, Matthew T; Garlena, Rebecca A; Russell, Daniel A; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Hatfull, Graham F

    2016-08-11

    Gordonia phages BaxterFox, Kita, Nymphadora, and Yeezy are newly characterized phages of Gordonia terrae, isolated from soil samples in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. These phages have genome lengths between 50,346 and 53,717 bp, and encode on average 84 predicted proteins. All have G+C content of 66.6%. Copyright © 2016 Pope et al.

  2. Effect of Bacteriophages on the Growth of Flavobacterium psychrophilum and Development of Phage-Resistant Strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Madsen, Lone; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2016-01-01

    The controlling effect of single and multiple phages on the density of Flavobacterium psychrophilum at different initial multiplicity of infection (MOI) was assessed in batch cultures to explore the potential for phage-based treatment of this important fish pathogen. A high initial phage concentr......The controlling effect of single and multiple phages on the density of Flavobacterium psychrophilum at different initial multiplicity of infection (MOI) was assessed in batch cultures to explore the potential for phage-based treatment of this important fish pathogen. A high initial phage...... concentration (MOI = 0.3–4) was crucial for efficient viral lysis, resulting in a 104–105-fold reduction of phage-sensitive cells (both single phages and phage cocktails), which was maintained throughout the incubation (>10 days). Following cell lysis, regrowth of phage-resistant strains was examined...... and resistant strains were isolated for further characterization. The application of a mathematical model allowed simulation of phage-host interactions and resistance development, confirming indications from strain isolations that phage-sensitive strains dominated the regrowing population (>99.8 %) at low MOI...

  3. Restoring logic and data to phage-cures for infectious disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Serwer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic therapy for infectious disease is being compromised by emergence of multi-drug-resistant bacterial strains, often called superbugs. A response is to use a cocktail of several bacteria-infecting viruses (bacteriophages or phages to supplement antibiotic therapy. Use of such cocktails is called phage therapy, which has the advantage of response to bacterial resistance that is rapid and not exhaustible. A procedure of well-established success is to make cocktails from stockpiles of stored environmental phages. New phages are added to stockpiles when phage therapy becomes thwarted. The scientific subtext includes optimizing the following aspects: (1 procedure for rapidly detecting, purifying, storing and characterizing phages for optimization of phage cocktails, (2 use of directed evolution in the presence of bacteriostatic compounds to obtain phages that can be most efficiently used for therapy in the presence of these compounds, (3 phage genome sequencing technology and informatics to improve the characterization of phages, and (4 database technology to make optimal use of all relevant information and to rapidly retrieve phages for cocktails that will vary with the infection(s involved. The use of phage stockpiles has an established record, including a recent major human-therapy success by the US Navy. However, I conclude that most research is not along this track and, therefore, is not likely to lead to real world success. I find that a strong case exists for action to rectify this situation.

  4. Complete genome sequences of three Campylobacter jejuni phage-propagating strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophage therapy has the potential to reduce Campylobacter jejuni numbers in livestock, but requires a detailed understanding of phage-host interactions. Some C. jejuni strains are readily infected by certain phages, and are thus designated as phage-propagating strains. Here we report the compl...

  5. Endometrial safety of ultra-low-dose estradiol vaginal tablets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simon, James; Nachtigall, Lila; Ulrich, Lian G

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma rate after 52-week treatment with ultra-low-dose 10-microgram 17ß-estradiol vaginal tablets in postmenopausal women with vaginal atrophy.......To evaluate the endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma rate after 52-week treatment with ultra-low-dose 10-microgram 17ß-estradiol vaginal tablets in postmenopausal women with vaginal atrophy....

  6. Endometrial safety of ultra-low-dose estradiol vaginal tablets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simon, James; Nachtigall, Lila; Ulrich, Lian G

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma rate after 52-week treatment with ultra-low-dose 10-microgram 17β-estradiol vaginal tablets in postmenopausal women with vaginal atrophy.......To evaluate the endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma rate after 52-week treatment with ultra-low-dose 10-microgram 17β-estradiol vaginal tablets in postmenopausal women with vaginal atrophy....

  7. Construction and Selection of Affilin® Phage Display Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settele, Florian; Zwarg, Madlen; Fiedler, Sebastian; Koscheinz, Daniel; Bosse-Doenecke, Eva

    2018-01-01

    Affilin ® molecules represent a new class of so-called scaffold proteins. The concept of scaffold proteins is to use stable and versatile protein structures which can be endowed with de novo binding properties and specificities by introducing mutations in surface exposed amino acid residues. Complex variations and combinations are generated by genetic methods of randomization resulting in large cDNA libraries. The selection for candidates binding to a desired target can be executed by display methods, especially the very robust and flexible phage display. Here, we describe the construction of ubiquitin based Affilin ® phage display libraries and their use in biopanning experiments for the identification of novel protein ligands.

  8. Is phage therapy acceptable in the immunocompromised host?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysowski, Jan; Górski, Andrzej

    2008-09-01

    Over the last decade, bacteriophages (bacterial viruses) have emerged as the major alternative to antibiotics in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections. While a considerable body of evidence has accumulated for the efficacy and safety of phage therapy in immunocompetent patients, data remain relatively scarce regarding its use in the immunocompromised host. To our knowledge, the present article is the first to summarize all findings, of both experimental and clinical studies, that may be relevant to the employment of phage therapy in immunocompromised patients. The available data suggest that bacteriophages could also be an efficacious and safe therapeutic modality in such patients.

  9. Vaginal rings for delivery of HIV microbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, R Karl; Fetherston, Susan M; McCoy, Clare F; Boyd, Peter; Major, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Following the successful development of long-acting steroid-releasing vaginal ring devices for the treatment of menopausal symptoms and contraception, there is now considerable interest in applying similar devices to the controlled release of microbicides against HIV. In this review article, the vaginal ring concept is first considered within the wider context of the early advances in controlled-release technology, before describing the various types of ring device available today. The remainder of the article highlights the key developments in HIV microbicide-releasing vaginal rings, with a particular focus on the dapivirine ring that is presently in late-stage clinical testing.

  10. Surgical removal of a large vaginal calculus formed after a tension-free vaginal tape procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberlicht, Ariel; Feiner, Benjamin; Haya, Nir; Auslender, Ron; Abramov, Yoram

    2016-11-01

    Vaginal calculus is a rare disorder which has been reported in association with urethral diverticulum, urogenital sinus anomaly, bladder exstrophy and the tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) procedure. We report a 42-year-old woman who presented with persistent, intractable urinary tract infection (UTI) following a TVT procedure. Cystoscopy demonstrated an eroded tape with the formation of a bladder calculus, and the patient underwent laser cystolithotripsy and cystoscopic resection of the tape. Following this procedure, her UTI completely resolved and she remained asymptomatic for several years. Seven years later she presented with a solid vaginal mass. Pelvic examination followed by transvaginal ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a large vaginal calculus located at the lower third of the anterior vaginal wall adjacent to the bladder neck. This video presents the transvaginal excision and removal of the vaginal calculus.

  11. Phase I randomized safety study of twice daily dosing of acidform vaginal gel: candidate antimicrobial contraceptive.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marla J Keller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acidform gel, an acid-buffering product that inactivates spermatozoa, may be an effective topical non-hormonal contraceptive. This study was designed to evaluate the safety of vaginal dosing and effects of Acidform on mucosal immune mediators, antimicrobial properties of genital secretions, and vaginal microbiota. METHODS: Thirty-six sexually abstinent U.S. women were randomized to apply Acidform or hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC placebo gel twice daily for 14 consecutive days. Safety was assessed by symptoms and pelvic examination. The impact of gel on mucosal immunity was assessed by quantifying cytokines, chemokines, antimicrobial proteins and antimicrobial activity of genital secretions collected by cervicovaginal lavage (CVL at screening, 2 hours after gel application, and on days 7, 14 and 21. Vaginal microbiota was characterized at enrollment and day 14 using species-specific quantitative PCR assays. RESULTS: The median vaginal and cervical pH was significantly lower 2 hours after application of Acidform and was associated with an increase in the bactericidal activity of CVL against E. coli. However, 65% of women who received Acidform had at least one local adverse event compared with 11% who received placebo (p = 0.002. While there was no increase in inflammatory cytokines or chemokines, CVL concentrations of lactoferrin and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra, an anti-inflammatory protein, were significantly lower following Acidform compared to HEC placebo gel application. There were no significant changes in Lactobacillus crispatus or Lactobacillus jensenii in either group but there was a decrease in Gardnerella vaginalis in the Acidform group (p = 0.08. CONCLUSIONS: Acidform gel may augment mucosal defense as evidenced by an increase in bactericidal activity of genital secretions against E. coli and a decrease in Gardnerella vaginalis colonization. However, Acidform was associated with more irritation than

  12. Phase I Randomized Safety Study of Twice Daily Dosing of Acidform Vaginal Gel: Candidate Antimicrobial Contraceptive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Marla J.; Carpenter, Colleen A.; Lo, Yungtai; Einstein, Mark H.; Liu, Congzhou; Fredricks, David N.; Herold, Betsy C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Acidform gel, an acid-buffering product that inactivates spermatozoa, may be an effective topical non-hormonal contraceptive. This study was designed to evaluate the safety of vaginal dosing and effects of Acidform on mucosal immune mediators, antimicrobial properties of genital secretions, and vaginal microbiota. Methods Thirty-six sexually abstinent U.S. women were randomized to apply Acidform or hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) placebo gel twice daily for 14 consecutive days. Safety was assessed by symptoms and pelvic examination. The impact of gel on mucosal immunity was assessed by quantifying cytokines, chemokines, antimicrobial proteins and antimicrobial activity of genital secretions collected by cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) at screening, 2 hours after gel application, and on days 7, 14 and 21. Vaginal microbiota was characterized at enrollment and day 14 using species-specific quantitative PCR assays. Results The median vaginal and cervical pH was significantly lower 2 hours after application of Acidform and was associated with an increase in the bactericidal activity of CVL against E. coli. However, 65% of women who received Acidform had at least one local adverse event compared with 11% who received placebo (p = 0.002). While there was no increase in inflammatory cytokines or chemokines, CVL concentrations of lactoferrin and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), an anti-inflammatory protein, were significantly lower following Acidform compared to HEC placebo gel application. There were no significant changes in Lactobacillus crispatus or Lactobacillus jensenii in either group but there was a decrease in Gardnerella vaginalis in the Acidform group (p = 0.08). Conclusions Acidform gel may augment mucosal defense as evidenced by an increase in bactericidal activity of genital secretions against E. coli and a decrease in Gardnerella vaginalis colonization. However, Acidform was associated with more irritation than placebo and lower levels

  13. Inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on pathogenic bacteria isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita Eslami

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the high prevalence of bacterial vaginosis and its association with urinary tract infection in women and treatment of gynecologic problems occur when a high recurrence of bacterial vaginosis is often treated with antibiotics. The purpose of this study is to investigate the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on pathogenic bacteria isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis, respectively.Materials and Methods: 96 samples from women with bacterial vaginosis discharge referred to health centers dependent Shahid Beheshti University in 91-92 were taken by a gynecologist with a dacron swab and put in sterile tubes containing TSB broth and Thioglycollate broth and were immediately sent to the lab location in cold chain for the next stages of investigation. From Thioglycollate and TSB medium was cultured on blood agar and EMB and Palkam and Differential diagnosis environments, and then incubated for 24 h at 37°C. Strains of Lactobacillus rhamnosus were cultured in MRSA environment and were transfered to the lab. After purification of pathogenic bacteria, MIC methods and antibiogram, Lactobacillus rhamnosus inhibitory effect on pathogenic bacteria is checked. Statistical analysis was done by SPSS software v.16.Results: The results of this study show the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on some pathogenic bacteria that cause bacterial vaginosis, including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Entrococcus, Listeria monocytogenes and E.Coli. Microscopic examination of stained smears of the large number of Lactobacillus and pathogenic bacteria showed reduced. The prevalence of abnormal vaginal discharge, history of drug use means of preventing pregnancy and douching, respectively, 61%, 55%, 42% and 13% respectively. Significant difference was observed between the use and non-use of IUD in women with bacterial vaginosis infection

  14. Directed shift of vaginal microbiota induced by vaginal application of sucrose gel in rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Kai-tao; Zheng, Jin-xin; Yu, Zhi-jian; Chen, Zhong; Cheng, Hang; Pan, Wei-guang; Yang, Wei-zhi; Wang, Hong-yan; Deng, Qi-wen; Zeng, Zhong-ming

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Sucrose gel was used to treat bacterial vaginosis in a phase III clinical trial. However, the changes of vaginal flora after treatment were only examined by Nugent score in that clinical trial, While the vaginal microbiota of rhesus macaques is characterized by anaerobic, Gram-negative bacteria, few lactobacilli, and pH levels above 4.6, similar to the microbiota of patients with bacterial vaginosis. This study is aimed to investigate the change of the vaginal microbiota of rehsus...

  15. Vaginal Calculus in a Woman With Mixed Urinary Incontinence and Vaginal Mesh Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelman, William D; Rabban, Joseph T; Korn, Abner P

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal calculi are extremely rare and are most commonly encountered in the setting of an urethrovaginal or vesicovaginal fistula. We present a case of a 72-year-old woman with mixed urinary incontinence and vaginal mesh exposure incidentally found to have a large vaginal calculus. We removed the calculus surgically and analyzed the components. Results demonstrated the presence of ammonium-magnesium phosphate hexahydrate and carbonate apatite.

  16. Probiotic attributes of autochthonous Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains of human origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pithva, Sheetal; Shekh, Satyamitra; Dave, Jayantilal; Vyas, Bharatkumar Rajiv Manuel

    2014-05-01

    The study was aimed at evaluating the probiotic potential of indigenous autochthonous Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains isolated from infant feces and vaginal mucosa of healthy female. The survival of the selected strains and the two reference strains (L. rhamnosus GG and L. casei Actimel) was 67-81 % at pH 2 and 70-80 % after passage through the simulated gastrointestinal fluid. These strains are able to grow in the presence of 4 % bile salt, 10 % NaCl, and 0.6 % phenol. The cell surface of L. rhamnosus strains is hydrophilic in nature as revealed by bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbons (BATH) assay. Despite this, L. rhamnosus strains showed mucin adherence, autoaggregation and coaggregation properties that are strain-specific. In addition, they produce bile salt hydrolase (BSH) and β-galactosidase activities. L. rhamnosus strains exhibit antimicrobial activity against food spoilage organisms and gastrointestinal pathogens, as well as Candida and Aspergillus spp. L. rhamnosus strains have similar antibiotic susceptibility pattern, and resistance to certain antibiotics is intrinsic or innate. The strains are neither haemolytic nor producer of biogenic amines such as histamine, putrescine, cadaverine and tyramine. Lyophilized cells of L. rhamnosus Fb exhibited probiotic properties demonstrating potential of the strain for technological suitability and in the preparation of diverse probiotic food formulations.

  17. Marine phages as excellent tracers for reactive colloidal transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Nawras; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Harms, Hauke; Wick, Lukas Y.

    2016-04-01

    Question: Here we evaluate marine phages as specific markers of hydrological flow and reactive transport of colloidal particles in the Earth's critical zone (CZ). Marine phages and their bacterial hosts are naturally absent in the CZ, and can be detected with extremely high sensitivity. In the framework of the DFG Collaborative Research Center AquaDiva, we asked the following questions: (1) Are marine phages useful specific markers of hydrological flow and reactive transport in porous media? and (2) Which phage properties are relevant drivers for the transport of marine phages in porous media? Methods: Seven marine phages from different families (as well two commonly used terrestrial phages) were selected based on their morphology, size and physico-chemical surface properties (surface charge and hydrophobicity). Phage properties were assessed by electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and water contact angle analysis (CA). Sand-filled laboratory percolation columns were used to study transport. The breakthrough curves of the phages were analyzed using the clean bed filtration theory and the XDLVO theory of colloid stability, respectively. Phages were quantified by a modified high- throughput plaque assay and a culture-independent particle counting method approach. Results: Our data show that most marine tested phages exhibited highly variable transport rates and deposition efficiency, yet generally high colloidal stability and viability. We find that size, morphology and hydrophobicity are key factors shaping the transport efficiency of phages. Differing deposition efficiencies of the phages were also supported by calculated XDLVO interaction energy profile. Conclusion: Marine phages have a high potential for the use as sensitive tracers in terrestrial habitats with their surface properties playing a crucial role for their transport. Marine phages however, exhibit differences in their deposition efficiency depending on their morphology, hydrophobicity and

  18. Adhesion Forces and Coaggregation between Vaginal Staphylococci and Lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Younes, Jessica A.; van der Mei, Henny C.; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Busscher, Henk J.; Reid, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    Urogenital infections are the most common ailments afflicting women. They are treated with dated antimicrobials whose efficacy is diminishing. The process of infection involves pathogen adhesion and displacement of indigenous Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus jensenii. An alternative

  19. Relationship between lactobacilli and opportunistic bacterial pathogens associated with vaginitis

    OpenAIRE

    Razzak, Mohammad Sabri A.; Al-Charrakh, Alaa H.; AL-Greitty, Bara Hamid

    2011-01-01

    Background: Vaginitis, is an infectious inflammation of the vaginal mucosa, which sometimes involves the vulva. The balance of the vaginal flora is maintained by the Lactobacilli and its protective and probiotic role in treating and preventing vaginal infection by producing antagonizing compounds which are regarded as safe for humans. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of Lactobacilli against common bacterial opportunistic pathogens in vaginitis and study the effec...

  20. Prevalence of vaginal candidiasis among pregnant women with abnormal vaginal discharge in Maiduguri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, S M; Bukar, M; Mohammed, Y; Mohammed, B; Yahaya, M; Audu, B M; Ibrahim, H M; Ibrahim, H A

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy represents a risk factor in the occurrence of vaginal candidiasis. To determine the prevalence and clinical features associated with abnormal vaginal discharge and C. albicans infection in pregnant women. High vaginal swab samples and data on epidemiological characteristics were collected from 400 pregnant women with complaints of abnormal vaginal discharge at booking clinic of University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital. The data was analysed using SPSS 16.0 statistical software. The prevalence of abnormal vaginal discharge in pregnancy was 31.5%. The frequency of abnormal vaginal discharge was 183 (45.8%) among those aged 20-24 years, 291 (72.8%) in multipara, 223 (55.8%) in those with Pri