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Sample records for vagal afferent neurons

  1. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript mediates the actions of cholecystokinin on rat vagal afferent neurons.

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    De Lartigue, Guillaume; Dimaline, Rod; Varro, Andrea; Raybould, Helen; De la Serre, Claire Barbier; Dockray, Graham J

    2010-04-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) acts on vagal afferent neurons to inhibit food intake and gastric emptying; it also increases expression of the neuropeptide cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), but the significance of this is unknown. We investigated the role of CARTp in vagal afferent neurons. Release of CART peptide (CARTp) from cultured vagal afferent neurons was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Expression of receptors and neuropeptides in rat vagal afferent neurons in response to CARTp was studied using immunohistochemistry and luciferase promoter reporter constructs. Effects of CARTp and CCK were studied on food intake. CCK stimulated CARTp release from cultured nodose neurons. CARTp replicated the effect of CCK in stimulating expression of Y2R and of CART itself in these neurons in vivo and in vitro, but not in inhibiting cannabinoid-1, melanin-concentrating hormone, and melanin-concentrating hormone-1 receptor expression. Effects of CCK on Y2R and CART expression were reduced by CART small interfering RNA or brefeldin A. Exposure of rats to CARTp increased the inhibitory action of CCK on food intake after short-, but not long-duration, fasting. The actions of CCK in stimulating CART and Y2R expression in vagal afferent neurons and in inhibiting food intake are augmented by CARTp; CARTp is released by CCK from these neurons, indicating that it acts as an autocrine excitatory mediator. 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Vagal afferent neurons in high fat diet-induced obesity; intestinal microflora, gut inflammation and cholecystokinin.

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    de Lartigue, Guillaume; de La Serre, Claire Barbier; Raybould, Helen E

    2011-11-30

    The vagal afferent pathway is the major neural pathway by which information about ingested nutrients reaches the CNS and influences both GI function and feeding behavior. Vagal afferent neurons (VAN) express receptors for many of the regulatory peptides and molecules released from the intestinal wall, pancreas, and adipocytes that influence GI function, glucose homeostasis, and regulate food intake and body weight. As such, they play a critical role in both physiology and pathophysiology, such as obesity, where there is evidence that vagal afferent function is altered. This review will summarize recent findings on changes in vagal afferent function in response to ingestion of high fat diets and explore the hypothesis that changes in gut microbiota and integrity of the epithelium may not only be important in inducing these changes but may be the initial events that lead to dysregulation of food intake and body weight in response to high fat, high energy diets. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chronic exposure to low dose bacterial lipopolysaccharide inhibits leptin signaling in vagal afferent neurons.

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    de La Serre, Claire B; de Lartigue, Guillaume; Raybould, Helen E

    2015-02-01

    Bacterially derived factors are implicated in the causation and persistence of obesity. Ingestion of a high fat diet in rodents and obesity in human subjects is associated with chronic elevation of low plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a breakdown product of Gram-negative bacteria. The terminals of vagal afferent neurons are positioned within the gut mucosa to convey information from the gut to the brain to regulate food intake and are responsive to LPS. We hypothesized that chronic elevation of LPS could alter vagal afferent signaling. We surgically implanted osmotic mini-pumps that delivered a constant, low-dose of LPS into the intraperitoneal cavity of rats (12.5 μg/kg/hr for 6 weeks). LPS-treated rats developed hyperphagia and showed marked changes in vagal afferent neuron function. Chronic LPS treatment reduced vagal afferent leptin signaling, characterized by a decrease in leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, LPS treatment decreased cholecystokinin-induced satiety. There was no alteration in leptin signaling in the hypothalamus. These findings offer a mechanism by which a change in gut microflora can promote hyperphagia, possibly leading to obesity. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. TRPM8 function and expression in vagal sensory neurons and afferent nerves innervating guinea pig esophagus.

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    Yu, Xiaoyun; Hu, Youtian; Ru, Fei; Kollarik, Marian; Undem, Bradley J; Yu, Shaoyong

    2015-03-15

    Sensory transduction in esophageal afferents requires specific ion channels and receptors. TRPM8 is a new member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family and participates in cold- and menthol-induced sensory transduction, but its role in visceral sensory transduction is still less clear. This study aims to determine TRPM8 function and expression in esophageal vagal afferent subtypes. TRPM8 agonist WS-12-induced responses were first determined in nodose and jugular neurons by calcium imaging and then investigated by whole cell patch-clamp recordings in Dil-labeled esophageal nodose and jugular neurons. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in nodose and jugular C fiber neurons using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. TRPM8 mRNA expression was determined by single neuron RT-PCR in Dil-labeled esophageal nodose and jugular neurons. The TRPM8 agonist WS-12 elicited calcium influx in a subpopulation of jugular but not nodose neurons. WS-12 activated outwardly rectifying currents in esophageal Dil-labeled jugular but not nodose neurons in a dose-dependent manner, which could be inhibited by the TRPM8 inhibitor AMTB. WS-12 selectively evoked action potential discharges in esophageal jugular but not nodose C fibers. Consistently, TRPM8 transcripts were highly expressed in esophageal Dil-labeled TRPV1-positive jugular neurons. In summary, the present study demonstrated a preferential expression and function of TRPM8 in esophageal vagal jugular but not nodose neurons and C fiber subtypes. This provides a distinctive role of TRPM8 in esophageal sensory transduction and may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of esophageal sensation and nociception. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Deletion of leptin signaling in vagal afferent neurons results in hyperphagia and obesity.

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    de Lartigue, Guillaume; Ronveaux, Charlotte C; Raybould, Helen E

    2014-09-01

    The vagal afferent pathway senses hormones released from the gut in response to nutritional cues and relays these signals to the brain. We tested the hypothesis that leptin resistance in vagal afferent neurons (VAN) is responsible for the onset of hyperphagia by developing a novel conditional knockout mouse to delete leptin receptor selectively in sensory neurons (Nav1.8/LepR (fl/fl) mice). Chow fed Nav1.8/LepR (fl/fl) mice weighed significantly more and had increased adiposity compared with wildtype mice. Cumulative food intake, meal size, and meal duration in the dark phase were increased in Nav1.8/LepR (fl/fl) mice; energy expenditure was unaltered. Reduced satiation in Nav1.8/LepR (fl/fl) mice is in part due to reduced sensitivity of VAN to CCK and the subsequent loss of VAN plasticity. Crucially Nav1.8/LepR (l/fl) mice did not gain further weight in response to a high fat diet. We conclude that disruption of leptin signaling in VAN is sufficient and necessary to promote hyperphagia and obesity.

  6. Allergen challenge sensitizes TRPA1 in vagal sensory neurons and afferent C-fiber subtypes in guinea pig esophagus.

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    Liu, Zhenyu; Hu, Youtian; Yu, Xiaoyun; Xi, Jiefeng; Fan, Xiaoming; Tse, Chung-Ming; Myers, Allen C; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Li, Xingde; Yu, Shaoyong

    2015-03-15

    Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) is a newly defined cationic ion channel, which selectively expresses in primary sensory afferent nerve, and is essential in mediating inflammatory nociception. Our previous study demonstrated that TRPA1 plays an important role in tissue mast cell activation-induced increase in the excitability of esophageal vagal nodose C fibers. The present study aims to determine whether prolonged antigen exposure in vivo sensitizes TRPA1 in a guinea pig model of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Antigen challenge-induced responses in esophageal mucosa were first assessed by histological stains and Ussing chamber studies. TRPA1 function in vagal sensory neurons was then studied by calcium imaging and by whole cell patch-clamp recordings in 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labeled esophageal vagal nodose and jugular neurons. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in vagal nodose and jugular C-fiber neuron subtypes using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. Antigen challenge significantly increased infiltrations of eosinophils and mast cells in the esophagus. TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate (AITC)-induced calcium influx in nodose and jugular neurons was significantly increased, and current densities in esophageal DiI-labeled nodose and jugular neurons were also significantly increased in antigen-challenged animals. Prolonged antigen challenge decreased esophageal epithelial barrier resistance, which allowed intraesophageal-infused AITC-activating nodose and jugular C fibers at their nerve endings. Collectively, these results demonstrated that prolonged antigen challenge sensitized TRPA1 in esophageal sensory neurons and afferent C fibers. This novel finding will help us to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying esophageal sensory and motor dysfunctions in EoE. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Diet-induced obesity leads to the development of leptin resistance in vagal afferent neurons.

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    de Lartigue, Guillaume; Barbier de la Serre, Claire; Espero, Elvis; Lee, Jennifer; Raybould, Helen E

    2011-07-01

    Ingestion of high-fat, high-calorie diets is associated with hyperphagia, increased body fat, and obesity. The mechanisms responsible are currently unclear; however, altered leptin signaling may be an important factor. Vagal afferent neurons (VAN) integrate signals from the gut in response to ingestion of nutrients and express leptin receptors. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that leptin resistance occurs in VAN in response to a high-fat diet. Sprague-Dawley rats, which exhibit a bimodal distribution of body weight gain, were used after ingestion of a high-fat diet for 8 wk. Body weight, food intake, and plasma leptin levels were measured. Leptin signaling was determined by immunohistochemical localization of phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3) in cultured VAN and by quantifaction of pSTAT3 protein levels by Western blot analysis in nodose ganglia and arcuate nucleus in vivo. To determine the mechanism of leptin resistance in nodose ganglia, cultured VAN were stimulated with leptin alone or with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and SOCS-3 expression measured. SOCS-3 protein levels in VAN were measured by Western blot following leptin administration in vivo. Leptin resulted in appearance of pSTAT3 in VAN of low-fat-fed rats and rats resistant to diet-induced obesity but not diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. However, leptin signaling was normal in arcuate neurons. SOCS-3 expression was increased in VAN of DIO rats. In cultured VAN, LPS increased SOCS-3 expression and inhibited leptin-induced pSTAT3 in vivo. We conclude that VAN of diet-induced obese rats become leptin resistant; LPS and SOCS-3 may play a role in the development of leptin resistance.

  8. Leptin resistance in vagal afferent neurons inhibits cholecystokinin signaling and satiation in diet induced obese rats.

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    de Lartigue, Guillaume; Barbier de la Serre, Claire; Espero, Elvis; Lee, Jennifer; Raybould, Helen E

    2012-01-01

    The gastrointestinal hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) plays an important role in regulating meal size and duration by activating CCK1 receptors on vagal afferent neurons (VAN). Leptin enhances CCK signaling in VAN via an early growth response 1 (EGR1) dependent pathway thereby increasing their sensitivity to CCK. In response to a chronic ingestion of a high fat diet, VAN develop leptin resistance and the satiating effects of CCK are reduced. We tested the hypothesis that leptin resistance in VAN is responsible for reducing CCK signaling and satiation. Lean Zucker rats sensitive to leptin signaling, significantly reduced their food intake following administration of CCK8S (0.22 nmol/kg, i.p.), while obese Zucker rats, insensitive to leptin, did not. CCK signaling in VAN of obese Zucker rats was reduced, preventing CCK-induced up-regulation of Y2 receptor and down-regulation of melanin concentrating hormone 1 receptor (MCH1R) and cannabinoid receptor (CB1). In VAN from diet-induced obese (DIO) Sprague Dawley rats, previously shown to become leptin resistant, we demonstrated that the reduction in EGR1 expression resulted in decreased sensitivity of VAN to CCK and reduced CCK-induced inhibition of food intake. The lowered sensitivity of VAN to CCK in DIO rats resulted in a decrease in Y2 expression and increased CB1 and MCH1R expression. These effects coincided with the onset of hyperphagia in DIO rats. Leptin signaling in VAN is required for appropriate CCK signaling and satiation. In response to high fat feeding, the onset of leptin resistance reduces the sensitivity of VAN to CCK thus reducing the satiating effects of CCK.

  9. Leptin resistance in vagal afferent neurons inhibits cholecystokinin signaling and satiation in diet induced obese rats.

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    Guillaume de Lartigue

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal hormone cholecystokinin (CCK plays an important role in regulating meal size and duration by activating CCK1 receptors on vagal afferent neurons (VAN. Leptin enhances CCK signaling in VAN via an early growth response 1 (EGR1 dependent pathway thereby increasing their sensitivity to CCK. In response to a chronic ingestion of a high fat diet, VAN develop leptin resistance and the satiating effects of CCK are reduced. We tested the hypothesis that leptin resistance in VAN is responsible for reducing CCK signaling and satiation.Lean Zucker rats sensitive to leptin signaling, significantly reduced their food intake following administration of CCK8S (0.22 nmol/kg, i.p., while obese Zucker rats, insensitive to leptin, did not. CCK signaling in VAN of obese Zucker rats was reduced, preventing CCK-induced up-regulation of Y2 receptor and down-regulation of melanin concentrating hormone 1 receptor (MCH1R and cannabinoid receptor (CB1. In VAN from diet-induced obese (DIO Sprague Dawley rats, previously shown to become leptin resistant, we demonstrated that the reduction in EGR1 expression resulted in decreased sensitivity of VAN to CCK and reduced CCK-induced inhibition of food intake. The lowered sensitivity of VAN to CCK in DIO rats resulted in a decrease in Y2 expression and increased CB1 and MCH1R expression. These effects coincided with the onset of hyperphagia in DIO rats.Leptin signaling in VAN is required for appropriate CCK signaling and satiation. In response to high fat feeding, the onset of leptin resistance reduces the sensitivity of VAN to CCK thus reducing the satiating effects of CCK.

  10. EGR1 Is a target for cooperative interactions between cholecystokinin and leptin, and inhibition by ghrelin, in vagal afferent neurons.

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    de Lartigue, Guillaume; Lur, Gyorgy; Dimaline, Rod; Varro, Andrea; Raybould, Helen; Dockray, Graham J

    2010-08-01

    Food intake is regulated by signals from peripheral organs, but the way these are integrated remains uncertain. Cholecystokinin (CCK) from the intestine and leptin from adipocytes interact to inhibit food intake. Our aim was to examine the hypothesis that these interactions occur at the level of vagal afferent neurons via control of the immediate early gene EGR1. We now report that CCK stimulates redistribution to the nucleus of early growth response factor-1 (EGR1) in these neurons in vivo and in culture, and these effects are not dependent on EGR1 synthesis. Leptin stimulates EGR1 expression; leptin alone does not stimulate nuclear translocation, but it strongly potentiates the action of CCK. Ghrelin inhibits CCK-stimulated nuclear translocation of EGR1 and leptin-stimulated EGR1 expression. Expression of the gene encoding the satiety peptide cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CARTp) is stimulated by CCK via an EGR1-dependent mechanism, and this is strongly potentiated by leptin. Leptin potentiated inhibition of food intake by endogenous CCK in the rat in conditions reflecting changes in EGR1 activation. The data indicate that by separately regulating EGR1 activation and synthesis, CCK and leptin interact cooperatively to define the capacity for satiety signaling by vagal afferent neurons; manipulation of these interactions may be therapeutically beneficial.

  11. Intragastric gavage with denatonium benzoate acutely induces neuronal activation in the solitary tract nucleus via the vagal afferent pathway.

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    Jung, Hyo Young; Kim, Woosuk; Yoo, Dae Young; Nam, Sung Min; Kim, Jong Whi; Choi, Jung Hoon; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Kim, Hye Young; Hwang, In Koo

    2014-12-01

    Natural toxic substances have a bitter taste and their ingestion sends signals to the brain leading to aversive oral sensations. In the present study, we investigated chronological changes in c-Fos immunoreactivity in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) to study the bitter taste reaction time of neurons in the NTS. Equal volumes (0.5 mL) of denatonium benzoate (DB), a bitter tastant, or its vehicle (distilled water) were administered to rats intragastrically. The rats were sacrificed at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, or 16 h after treatment. In the vehicle-treated group, the number of c-Fos-positive nuclei started to increase 0.5 h after treatment and peaked 2 h after gavage. In contrast, the number of c-Fos-positive nuclei in the DB-treated group significantly increased 1 h after gavage. Thereafter, the number of c-Fos immunoreactive nuclei decreased over time. The number of c-Fos immunoreactive nuclei in the NTS was also increased in a dose-dependent manner 1 h after gavage. Subdiaphragmatic vagotomy significantly decreased DB-induced neuronal activation in the NTS. These results suggest that intragastric DB increases neuronal c-Fos expression in the NTS 1 h after gavage and this effect is mediated by vagal afferent fibers.

  12. Plasticity of vagal afferent signaling in the gut

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    Gintautas Grabauskas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vagal sensory neurons mediate the vago-vagal reflex which, in turn, regulates a wide array of gastrointestinal functions including esophageal motility, gastric accommodation and pancreatic enzyme secretion. These neurons also transmit sensory information from the gut to the central nervous system, which then mediates the sensations of nausea, fullness and satiety. Recent research indicates that vagal afferent neurons process non-uniform properties and a significant degree of plasticity. These properties are important to ensure that vagally regulated gastrointestinal functions respond rapidly and appropriately to various intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Similar plastic changes in the vagus also occur in pathophysiological conditions, such as obesity and diabetes, resulting in abnormal gastrointestinal functions. A clear understanding of the mechanisms which mediate these events may provide novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders due to vago-vagal pathway malfunctions.

  13. Glucagon-like peptide 1 interacts with ghrelin and leptin to regulate glucose metabolism and food intake through vagal afferent neuron signaling.

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    Ronveaux, Charlotte C; Tomé, Daniel; Raybould, Helen E

    2015-04-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested a possible physiologic role for peripheral glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in regulating glucose metabolism and food intake. The likely site of action of GLP-1 is on vagal afferent neurons (VANs). The vagal afferent pathway is the major neural pathway by which information about ingested nutrients reaches the central nervous system and influences feeding behavior. Peripheral GLP-1 acts on VANs to inhibit food intake. The mechanism of the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is unlike other gut-derived receptors; GLP-1Rs change their cellular localization according to feeding status rather than their protein concentrations. It is possible that several gut peptides are involved in mediating GLP-1R translocation. The mechanism of peripheral GLP-1R translocation still needs to be elucidated. We review data supporting the role of peripheral GLP-1 acting on VANs in influencing glucose homeostasis and feeding behavior. We highlight evidence demonstrating that GLP-1 interacts with ghrelin and leptin to induce satiation. Our aim was to understand the mechanism of peripheral GLP-1 in the development of noninvasive antiobesity treatments. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  14. Plasticity of gastrointestinal vagal afferent satiety signals.

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    Page, A J; Kentish, S J

    2017-05-01

    The vagal link between the gastrointestinal tract and the central nervous system (CNS) has numerous vital functions for maintaining homeostasis. The regulation of energy balance is one which is attracting more and more attention due to the potential for exploiting peripheral hormonal targets as treatments for conditions such as obesity. While physiologically, this system is well tuned and demonstrated to be effective in the regulation of both local function and promoting/terminating food intake the neural connection represents a susceptible pathway for disruption in various disease states. Numerous studies have revealed that obesity in particularly is associated with an array of modifications in vagal afferent function from changes in expression of signaling molecules to altered activation mechanics. In general, these changes in vagal afferent function in obesity further promote food intake instead of the more desirable reduction in food intake. It is essential to gain a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms responsible for these detrimental effects before we can establish more effective pharmacotherapies or lifestyle strategies for the treatment of obesity and the maintenance of weight loss. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Plasticity of gastro-intestinal vagal afferent endings.

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    Kentish, Stephen J; Page, Amanda J

    2014-09-01

    Vagal afferents are a vital link between the peripheral tissue and central nervous system (CNS). There is an abundance of vagal afferents present within the proximal gastrointestinal tract which are responsible for monitoring and controlling gastrointestinal function. Whilst essential for maintaining homeostasis there is a vast amount of literature emerging which describes remarkable plasticity of vagal afferents in response to endogenous as well as exogenous stimuli. This plasticity for the most part is vital in maintaining healthy processes; however, there are increased reports of vagal plasticity being disrupted in pathological states, such as obesity. Many of the disruptions, observed in obesity, have the potential to reduce vagal afferent satiety signalling which could ultimately perpetuate the obese state. Understanding how plasticity occurs within vagal afferents will open a whole new understanding of gut function as well as identify new treatment options for obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic tracing of Nav1.8-expressing vagal afferents in the mouse.

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    Gautron, Laurent; Sakata, Ichiro; Udit, Swalpa; Zigman, Jeffrey M; Wood, John N; Elmquist, Joel K

    2011-10-15

    Nav1.8 is a tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel present in large subsets of peripheral sensory neurons, including both spinal and vagal afferents. In spinal afferents, Nav1.8 plays a key role in signaling different types of pain. Little is known, however, about the exact identity and role of Nav1.8-expressing vagal neurons. Here we generated mice with restricted expression of tdTomato fluorescent protein in all Nav1.8-expressing afferent neurons. As a result, intense fluorescence was visible in the cell bodies, central relays, and sensory endings of these neurons, revealing the full extent of their innervation sites in thoracic and abdominal viscera. For instance, vagal and spinal Nav1.8-expressing endings were seen clearly within the gastrointestinal mucosa and myenteric plexus, respectively. In the gastrointestinal muscle wall, labeled endings included a small subset of vagal tension receptors but not any stretch receptors. We also examined the detailed innervation of key metabolic tissues such as liver and pancreas and evaluated the anatomical relationship of Nav1.8-expressing vagal afferents with select enteroendocrine cells (i.e., ghrelin, glucagon, GLP-1). Specifically, our data revealed the presence of Nav1.8-expressing vagal afferents in several metabolic tissues and varying degrees of proximity between Nav1.8-expressing mucosal afferents and enteroendocrine cells, including apparent neuroendocrine apposition. In summary, this study demonstrates the power and versatility of the Cre-LoxP technology to trace identified visceral afferents, and our data suggest a previously unrecognized role for Nav1.8-expressing vagal neurons in gastrointestinal functions. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Vagal afferents are essential for maximal resection-induced intestinal adaptive growth in orally fed rats

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    Nelson, David W; Liu, Xiaowen; Holst, Jens Juul

    2006-01-01

    Small bowel resection stimulates intestinal adaptive growth by a neuroendocrine process thought to involve both sympathetic and parasympathetic innervation and enterotrophic hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2). We investigated whether capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferent neurons are es...

  18. Effects of acid on vagal nociceptive afferent subtypes in guinea pig esophagus.

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    Yu, Xiaoyun; Hu, Youtian; Yu, Shaoyong

    2014-08-15

    Acid reflux-induced heartburn and noncardiac chest pain are processed peripherally by sensory nerve endings in the wall of the esophagus, but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. This study aims to determine the effects of acid on esophageal vagal nociceptive afferent subtypes. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in guinea pig vagal nodose or jugular C fiber neurons by using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. We recorded action potentials (AP) of esophageal nodose or jugular C fibers evoked by acid perfusion and compared esophageal distension-evoked AP before and after acid perfusion. Acid perfusion for 30 min (pH range 7.4 to 5.8) did not evoke AP in nodose C fibers but significantly decreased their responses to esophageal distension, which could be recovered after washing out acid for 90 min. In jugular C fibers, acid perfusion not only evoked AP but also inhibited their responses to esophageal distension, which were not recovered after washing out acid for 120 min. Lower concentration of capsaicin perfusion mimicked acid-induced effects in nodose and jugular C fibers. Pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonist AMG9810, but not acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) inhibitor amiloride, significantly inhibited acid-induced effects in nodose and jugular C fiber. These results demonstrate that esophageal vagal nociceptive afferent nerve subtypes display distinctive responses to acid. Acid activates jugular, but not nodose, C fibers and inhibits both of their responses to esophageal distension. These effects are mediated mainly through TRPV1. This inhibitory effect is a novel finding and may contribute to esophageal sensory/motor dysfunction in acid reflux diseases. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Contribution of vagal afferents to respiratory reflexes evoked by acute inhalation of ozone in dogs

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    Schelegle, E.S.; Carl, M.L.; Coleridge, H.M.; Coleridge, J.C.; Green, J.F. (Univ. of California, Davis (United States))

    1993-05-01

    Acute inhalation of ozone induces vagally mediated rapid shallow breathing and bronchoconstriction. In spontaneously breathing anesthetized dogs, we attempted to determine whether afferent vagal C-fibers in the lower airways contributed to these responses. Dogs inhaled 3 ppm ozone for 40-70 min into the lower trachea while cervical vagal temperature was maintained successively at 37, 7, and 0 degrees C. At 37 degrees C, addition of ozone to the inspired air decreased tidal volume and dynamic lung compliance and increased breathing frequency, total lung resistance, and tracheal smooth muscle tension. Ozone still evoked significant effects when conduction in myelinated vagal axons was blocked selectively by cooling the nerves to 7 degrees C. Ozone-induced effects were largely abolished when nonmyelinated vagal axons were blocked by cooling to 0 degree C, breathing during ozone inhalation at 0 degree C being generally similar to that during air breathing at 0 degree C, except that minute volume and inspiratory flow were higher. We conclude that afferent vagal C-fibers in the lower airways make a major contribution to the acute respiratory effects of ozone and that nonvagal afferents contribute to the effects that survive vagal blockade.

  20. Anatomy and Physiology of Phrenic Afferent Neurons.

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    Nair, Jayakrishnan; Streeter, Kristi A; Turner, Sara M F; Sunshine, Michael D; Bolser, Donald C; Fox, Emily J; Davenport, Paul W; Fuller, David D

    2017-08-23

    Large diameter myelinated phrenic afferents discharge in phase with diaphragm contraction and smaller diameter fibers discharge across the respiratory cycle. In this article, we review the phrenic afferent literature and highlight areas in need of further study. We conclude that 1) activation of both myelinated and non-myelinated phrenic sensory afferents can influence respiratory motor output on a breath-by-breath basis; 2) the relative impact of phrenic afferents substantially increases with diaphragm work and fatigue; 3) activation of phrenic afferents has a powerful impact on sympathetic motor outflow, and 4) phrenic afferents contribute to diaphragm somatosensation and the conscious perception of breathing. Much remains to be learned regarding the spinal and supraspinal distribution and synaptic contacts of myelinated and non-myelinated phrenic afferents. Similarly, very little is known regarding the potential role of phrenic afferent neurons in triggering or modulating expression of respiratory neuroplasticity. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Neurophysiology.

  1. NMDA receptors control vagal afferent excitability in the nucleus of the solitary tract.

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    Vance, Katie M; Rogers, Richard C; Hermann, Gerlinda E

    2015-01-21

    Previous behavioral studies have demonstrated that presynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors expressed on vagal afferent terminals are involved in food intake and satiety. Therefore, using in vitro live cell calcium imaging of prelabeled rat hindbrain slices, we characterized which NMDA receptor GluN2 subunits may regulate vagal afferent activity. The nonselective NMDA receptor antagonist d,l-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (d,l-AP5) significantly inhibited vagal terminal calcium influx, while the excitatory amino acid reuptake inhibitor d,l-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA), significantly increased terminal calcium levels following pharmacological stimulation with ATP. Subunit-specific NMDA receptor antagonists and potentiators were used to identify which GluN2 subunits mediate the NMDA receptor response on the vagal afferent terminals. The GluN2B-selective antagonist, ifenprodil, selectively reduced vagal calcium influx with stimulation compared to the time control. The GluN2A-selective antagonist, 3-chloro-4-fluoro-N-[4-[[2-(phenylcarbonyl)hydrazino]carbonyl] benzyl]benzenesulfonamide (TCN 201) produced smaller but not statistically significant effects. Furthermore, the GluN2A/B-selective potentiator (pregnenolone sulfate) and the GluN2C/D-selective potentiator [(3-chlorophenyl)(6,7-dimethoxy-1-((4-methoxyphenoxy)methyl)-3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2(1H)-yl)methanone; (CIQ)] enhanced vagal afferent calcium influx during stimulation. These data suggest that presynaptic NMDA receptors with GluN2B, GluN2C, and GluN2D subunits may predominantly control vagal afferent excitability in the nucleus of the solitary tract. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of levodropropizine on vagal afferent C-fibres in the cat.

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    Shams, H.; Daffonchio, L.; Scheid, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. Levodropropizine (LVDP) is an effective antitussive drug. Its effects on single-unit discharge of vagal afferent C-fibres were tested in anaesthetized cats to assess whether an inhibition of vagal C-fibres is involved in its antitussive properties. Vagal C-fibres, identified by their response to phenylbiguanide (PBG), were recorded via suction electrodes from the distal part of the cut vagus. Based on their response to lung inflation, C-fibres were classified as pulmonary (19 fibres) or no...

  3. Vagal Sensory Neuron Subtypes that Differentially Control Breathing.

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    Chang, Rui B; Strochlic, David E; Williams, Erika K; Umans, Benjamin D; Liberles, Stephen D

    2015-04-23

    Breathing is essential for survival and under precise neural control. The vagus nerve is a major conduit between lung and brain required for normal respiration. Here, we identify two populations of mouse vagus nerve afferents (P2ry1, Npy2r), each a few hundred neurons, that exert powerful and opposing effects on breathing. Genetically guided anatomical mapping revealed that these neurons densely innervate the lung and send long-range projections to different brainstem targets. Npy2r neurons are largely slow-conducting C fibers, while P2ry1 neurons are largely fast-conducting A fibers that contact pulmonary endocrine cells (neuroepithelial bodies). Optogenetic stimulation of P2ry1 neurons acutely silences respiration, trapping animals in exhalation, while stimulating Npy2r neurons causes rapid, shallow breathing. Activating P2ry1 neurons did not impact heart rate or gastric pressure, other autonomic functions under vagal control. Thus, the vagus nerve contains intermingled sensory neurons constituting genetically definable labeled lines with different anatomical connections and physiological roles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Age-related changes in vagal afferents innervating the gastrointestinal tract.

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    Phillips, Robert J; Walter, Gary C; Powley, Terry L

    2010-02-16

    Recent progress in understanding visceral afferents, some of it reviewed in the present issue, serves to underscore how little is known about the aging of the visceral afferents in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In spite of the clinical importance of the issue-with age, GI function often becomes severely compromised-only a few initial observations on age-related structural changes of visceral afferents are available. Primary afferent cell bodies in both the nodose ganglia and dorsal root ganglia lose Nissl material and accumulate lipofucsin, inclusions, aggregates, and tangles. Additionally, in changes that we focus on in the present review, vagal visceral afferent terminals in both the muscle wall and the mucosa of the GI tract exhibit age-related structural changes. In aged animals, both of the vagal terminal types examined, namely intraganglionic laminar endings and villus afferents, exhibit dystrophic or regressive morphological changes. These neuropathies are associated with age-related changes in the structural integrity of the target organs of the affected afferents, suggesting that local changes in trophic environment may give rise to the aging of GI innervation. Given the clinical relevance of GI tract aging, a more complete understanding both of how aging alters the innervation of the gut and of how such changes might be mitigated should be made research priorities. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chemical afferent vagal axotomy blocks re-intake after partial withdrawal of gastric food contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafra, María A; Molina, Filomena; Puerto, Amadeo

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the biological process by which animals regulate meal size. An experimental procedure for its study is to examine food re-intake after partial withdrawal of gastric food contents. The aim of the present experiments was to investigate the role of vagal afferents in food re-intake after perivagal administration of capsaicin, a neurotoxin that specifically damages weakly myelinated or unmyelinated vagal sensory axons. In experiment 1, capsaicin-treated animals initially consumed higher amounts of food in comparison to controls (in first 24 hours) but their excess intake was compensated for in subsequent daily satiation tests. However, capsaicin treatment impaired the common short-term re-intake behavior observed in control rats after partial removal of gastric food nutrients, and the lesioned animals consumed significantly less food than had been withdrawn after completion of the initial meal; moreover, in this deficit condition, no counteraction was observed in subsequent repeated tests. This behavioral disturbance cannot be attributed to an indirect effect of capsaicin on gastric emptying volume, because the stomach contents were similar in both groups (Experiment 2). These findings are discussed in terms of the critical role played by vagal afferents in rapid visceral adjustments related to short-term food intake, as also observed in other gastrointestinal regulatory behaviors that require immediate processing of visceral sensory information.

  6. Rimonabant induced anorexia in rodents is not mediated by vagal or sympathetic gut afferents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas Nygaard; Jelsing, Jacob; van de Wall, Esther H E M

    2009-01-01

    The selective CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant is a novel weight control agent. Although CB1 receptors and binding sites are present in both the rodent central and peripheral nervous systems, including the afferent vagus nerve, the role of gut afferents in mediating anorexia following CB1R...... blockade is still debated. In the present study we examined rimonabant-induced anorexia in male C57BL/6J mice with subdiaphragmatic vagotomy (VGX) as well as in male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to either subdiaphragmatic vagal deafferentation (SDA) alone or in combination with a complete celiac...... system, are required for rimonabant to inhibit food intake leading to the hypothesis that centrally located CB1 receptors are the prime mediators of rimonabant-induced anorexia....

  7. Glucose sensing by gut endocrine cells and activation of the vagal afferent pathway is impaired in a rodent model of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer; Cummings, Bethany P; Martin, Elizabeth; Sharp, James W; Graham, James L; Stanhope, Kimber L; Havel, Peter J; Raybould, Helen E

    2012-03-15

    Glucose in the gut lumen activates gut endocrine cells to release 5-HT, glucagon-like peptide 1/2 (GLP-1/2), and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), which act to change gastrointestinal function and regulate postprandial plasma glucose. There is evidence that both release and action of incretin hormones is reduced in type 2 diabetes (T2D). We measured cellular activation of enteroendocrine and enterochromaffin cells, enteric neurons, and vagal afferent neurons in response to intestinal glucose in a model of type 2 diabetes mellitus, the UCD-T2DM rat. Prediabetic (PD), recent-diabetic (RD, 2 wk postonset), and 3-mo diabetic (3MD) fasted UCD-T2DM rats were given an orogastric gavage of vehicle (water, 0.5 ml /100 g body wt) or glucose (330 μmol/100 g body wt); after 6 min tissue was removed and cellular activation was determined by immunohistochemistry for phosphorylated calcium calmodulin-dependent kinase II (pCaMKII). In PD rats, pCaMKII immunoreactivity was increased in duodenal 5-HT (P < 0.001), K (P < 0.01) and L (P < 0.01) cells in response to glucose; glucose-induced activation of all three cell types was significantly reduced in RD and 3MD compared with PD rats. Immunoreactivity for GLP-1, but not GIP, was significantly reduced in RD and 3MD compared with PD rats (P < 0.01). Administration of glucose significantly increased pCaMKII in enteric and vagal afferent neurons in PD rats; glucose-induced pCaMKII immunoreactivity was attenuated in enteric and vagal afferent neurons (P < 0.01, P < 0.001, respectively) in RD and 3MD. These data suggest that glucose sensing in enteroendocrine and enterochromaffin cells and activation of neural pathways is markedly impaired in UCD-T2DM rats.

  8. Effects of levodropropizine on vagal afferent C-fibres in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, H; Daffonchio, L; Scheid, P

    1996-03-01

    1. Levodropropizine (LVDP) is an effective antitussive drug. Its effects on single-unit discharge of vagal afferent C-fibres were tested in anaesthetized cats to assess whether an inhibition of vagal C-fibres is involved in its antitussive properties. Vagal C-fibres, identified by their response to phenylbiguanide (PBG), were recorded via suction electrodes from the distal part of the cut vagus. Based on their response to lung inflation, C-fibres were classified as pulmonary (19 fibres) or non-pulmonary (6 fibres). 2. PBG increased the discharge rate of both C-fibre types and activated a respiratory reflex causing apnoea. This reflex was abolished when the second vagus nerve was cut as well, while PBG-mediated stimulation of the C-fibres was not affected by vagotomy. 3. LVDP was administered intravenously and the C-fibre response to PBG was compared with that before administration of the drug. LVDP reduced both the duration of apnoea and the response of the C-fibre to PBG. 4. Comparison of the C-fibre responses to PBG and to a mixture of PBG and LVDP revealed that the period of apnoea was shortened and the discharge rate of the C-fibre reduced when LVDP was present. 5. The LVDP-induced inhibition of the C-fibre response to PBG was on average 50% in pulmonary and 25% in non-pulmonary fibres. 6. These results suggest that LVDP significantly reduces the response of vagal C-fibres to chemical stimuli. It is, thus, likely that the antitussive effect of LVDP is mediated through its inhibitory action on C-fibres.

  9. Immunomodulation of afferent neurons in guinea-pig isolated airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, M M; Myers, A C; Undem, B J

    1996-01-01

    1. The trachea, larynx and main bronchi with the right vagus nerve and nodose ganglion were isolated from guinea-pigs passively immunized 24 h previously with serum containing anti-ovalbumin antibody. 2. The airways were placed in one compartment of a Perspex chamber for recording of isometric tension while the nodose ganglion and attached vagus nerve were pulled into another compartment. Action potentials arriving from single airway afferent nerve endings were monitored extracellularly using a glass microelectrode positioned near neuronal cell bodies in the ganglion. Mechanosensitivity of the nerve endings was quantified using calibrated von Frey filaments immediately before and after exposure to antigen (10 micrograms ml-1 ovalbumin). 3. Ten endings responded to the force exerted by the lowest filament (0.078 mN) and were not further investigated. In airways from thirteen immunized guinea-pigs, the mechanical sensitivity of A delta afferent fibres (conduction velocity = 4.3 +/- 0.6 m s-1) was enhanced 4.1 +/- 0.9-fold following airway exposure to antigen (P afferent fibres (conduction velocity = 4.3 +/- 0.6 m s-1) from non-immunized control guinea-pig airways were unaffected by antigen (n = 13). 4. Antigen did not overtly cause action potential generation except in one instance when the receptive field was located over the smooth muscle. This ending also responded to methacholine suggesting that spatial changes in the receptive field, induced by muscle contraction, were responsible for the activation. 5. The mediators responsible for these effects are unknown, although histamine, prostaglandins, leukotrienes and tachykinins do not appear to be essential. The increase in mechanical responsiveness was not associated with the smooth muscle contraction since leukotriene C4, histamine and tachykinins, which all caused a similar contraction to antigen, did not affect mechanical thresholds. Moreover, the antigen-induced increases in excitability persisted beyond the

  10. Vagal Sensory Neuron Subtypes that Differentially Control Breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Rui B.; Strochlic, David E.; Williams, Erika K.; Umans, Benjamin D.; Liberles, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Breathing is essential for survival and under precise neural control. The vagus nerve is a major conduit between lung and brain required for normal respiration. Here, we identify two populations of mouse vagus nerve afferents (P2ry1, Npy2r), each a few hundred neurons, that exert powerful and opposing effects on breathing. Genetically guided anatomical mapping revealed that these neurons densely innervate the lung and send long-range projections to different brainstem targets. Npy2r neurons a...

  11. Chronic kidney disease impairs renal nerve and haemodynamic reflex responses to vagal afferent input through a central mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Ibrahim M; Hildreth, Cara M; Phillips, Jacqueline K

    2017-05-01

    We investigated age- and sex-related changes in reflex renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and haemodynamic responses to vagal afferent stimulation in a rodent model of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Using anaesthetised juvenile (7-8weeks) and adult (12-13weeks) Lewis Polycystic Kidney (LPK) and Lewis control rats of either sex (n=63 total), reflex changes in RSNA, heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) to vagal afferent stimulation (5-s train, 4.0V, 2.0-ms pulses, 1-16Hz) were measured. In all groups, stimulation of the vagal afferents below 16Hz produced frequency-dependent reductions in RSNA, HR and MAP, while a 16Hz stimulus produced an initial sympathoinhibition followed by sympathoexcitation. In juvenile LPK versus age-matched Lewis, sympathoinhibition was reduced when responses were expressed as % baseline (P<0.05), but not as microvolts, while bradycardic responses were greater. Reflex depressor responses were greater (P=0.015) only in juvenile female LPK. In adult LPK, reflex sympathoinhibition (%) was blunted (P<0.05), and an age-related decline apparent (when expressed as microvolts). Reflex reductions in HR and MAP were only diminished (P<0.05) in adult female LPK versus age-matched Lewis. Peak reflex sympathoexcitation at 16Hz did not differ between groups; however, area under the curve values were greater in the LPK versus Lewis (overall, 9±1 versus 19±3μVs, P<0.05) irrespective of age, suggestive of enhanced sympathoexcitatory drive in the LPK. Our data demonstrates a progressive deficit in the central processing of vagal afferent input and a differential sex influence on reflex regulation of autonomic function and blood pressure homeostasis in CKD. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evidence of activation of vagal afferents by non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation: An electrophysiological study in healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonis, Romain; D’Ostilio, Kevin; Schoenen, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Background Benefits of cervical non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation (nVNS) devices have been shown in episodic cluster headache and preliminarily suggested in migraine, but direct evidence of vagus nerve activation using such devices is lacking. Vagal somatosensory evoked potentials (vSEPs) associated with vagal afferent activation have been reported for invasive vagus nerve stimulation (iVNS) and non-invasive auricular vagal stimulation. Here, we aimed to show and characterise vSEPs for cervical nVNS. Methods vSEPs were recorded for 12 healthy volunteers who received nVNS over the cervical vagus nerve, bipolar electrode/DS7A stimulation over the inner tragus, and nVNS over the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle. We measured peak-to-peak amplitudes (P1-N1), wave latencies, and N1 area under the curve. Results P1-N1 vSEPs were observed for cervical nVNS (11/12) and auricular stimulation (9/12), with latencies similar to those described previously, whereas SCM stimulation revealed only a muscle artefact with a much longer latency. A dose-response analysis showed that cervical nVNS elicited a clear vSEP response in more than 80% of the participants using an intensity of 15 V. Conclusion Cervical nVNS can activate vagal afferent fibres, as evidenced by the recording of far-field vSEPs similar to those seen with iVNS and non-invasive auricular stimulation. PMID:28648089

  13. Voltage-gated sodium channels in nociceptive versus non-nociceptive nodose vagal sensory neurons innervating guinea pig lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Kevin; Carr, Michael J; Gibbard, Anna; Savage, Tony J; Singh, Kuljit; Jing, Junping; Meeker, Sonya; Undem, Bradley J

    2008-01-01

    Lung vagal sensory fibres are broadly categorized as C fibres (nociceptors) and A fibres (non-nociceptive; rapidly and slowly adapting low-threshold stretch receptors). These afferent fibre types differ in degree of myelination, conduction velocity, neuropeptide content, sensitivity to chemical and mechanical stimuli, as well as evoked reflex responses. Recent studies in nociceptive fibres of the somatosensory system indicated that the tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are preferentially expressed in the nociceptive fibres of the somatosensory system (dorsal root ganglia). Whereas TTX-R sodium currents have been documented in lung vagal sensory nerves fibres, a rigorous comparison of their expression in nociceptive versus non-nociceptive vagal sensory neurons has not been carried out. Using multiple approaches including patch clamp electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, and single-cell gene expression analysis in the guinea pig, we obtained data supporting the hypothesis that the TTX-R sodium currents are similarly distributed between nodose ganglion A-fibres and C-fibres innervating the lung. Moreover, mRNA and immunoreactivity for the TTX-R VGSC molecules NaV1.8 and NaV1.9 were present in nearly all neurons. We conclude that contrary to findings in the somatosensory neurons, TTX-R VGSCs are not preferentially expressed in the nociceptive C-fibre population innervating the lungs. PMID:18187475

  14. Relations between metabolic homeostasis, diet, and peripheral afferent neuron biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Tamara N; Adams, Sean H

    2014-07-01

    It is well established that food intake behavior and energy balance are regulated by crosstalk between peripheral organ systems and the central nervous system (CNS), for instance, through the actions of peripherally derived leptin on hindbrain and hypothalamic loci. Diet- or obesity-associated disturbances in metabolic and hormonal signals to the CNS can perturb metabolic homeostasis bodywide. Although interrelations between metabolic status and diet with CNS biology are well characterized, afferent networks (those sending information to the CNS from the periphery) have received far less attention. It is increasingly appreciated that afferent neurons in adipose tissue, the intestines, liver, and other tissues are important controllers of energy balance and feeding behavior. Disruption in their signaling may have consequences for cardiovascular, pancreatic, adipose, and immune function. This review discusses the diverse ways that afferent neurons participate in metabolic homeostasis and highlights how changes in their function associate with dysmetabolic states, such as obesity and insulin resistance. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  15. Neural control of left ventricular contractility in the dog heart: synaptic interactions of negative inotropic vagal preganglionic neurons in the nucleus ambiguus with tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, V J; Dickerson, L W; Gray, A L; Lauenstein, J M; Blinder, K J; Newsome, J T; Rodak, D J; Fleming, T J; Gatti, P J; Gillis, R A

    1998-08-17

    Recent physiological evidence indicates that vagal postganglionic control of left ventricular contractility is mediated by neurons found in a ventricular epicardial fat pad ganglion. In the dog this region has been referred to as the cranial medial ventricular (CMV) ganglion [J.L. Ardell, Structure and function of mammalian intrinsic cardiac neurons, in: J.A. Armour, J.L. Ardell (Eds.). Neurocardiology, Oxford Univ. Press, New York, 1994, pp. 95-114; B.X. Yuan, J.L. Ardell, D.A. Hopkins, A.M. Losier, J.A. Armour, Gross and microscopic anatomy of the canine intrinsic cardiac nervous system, Anat. Rec., 239 (1994) 75-87]. Since activation of the vagal neuronal input to the CMV ganglion reduces left ventricular contractility without influencing cardiac rate or AV conduction, this ganglion contains a functionally selective pool of negative inotropic parasympathetic postganglionic neurons. In the present report we have defined the light microscopic distribution of preganglionic negative inotropic neurons in the CNS which are retrogradely labeled from the CMV ganglion. Some tissues were also processed for the simultaneous immunocytochemical visualization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH: a marker for catecholaminergic neurons) and examined with both light microscopic and electron microscopic methods. Histochemically visualized neurons were observed in a long slender column in the ventrolateral nucleus ambiguus (NA-VL). The greatest number of retrogradely labeled neurons were observed just rostral to the level of the area postrema. TH perikarya and dendrites were commonly observed interspersed with vagal motoneurons in the NA-VL. TH nerve terminals formed axo-dendritic synapses upon negative inotropic vagal motoneurons, however the origin of these terminals remains to be determined. We conclude that synaptic interactions exist which would permit the parasympathetic preganglionic vagal control of left ventricular contractility to be modulated monosynaptically by

  16. Dynamic GABAergic afferent modulation of AgRP neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Alastair S; Shah, Bhavik P; Burgess, Christian R; Li, Monica M; Li, Chia; Steger, Jennifer S; Madara, Joseph C; Campbell, John N; Kroeger, Daniel; Scammell, Thomas E; Tannous, Bakhos A; Myers, Martin G; Andermann, Mark L; Krashes, Michael J; Lowell, Bradford B

    2016-12-01

    Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons of the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) promote homeostatic feeding at times of caloric insufficiency, yet they are rapidly suppressed by food-related sensory cues before ingestion. Here we identify a highly selective inhibitory afferent to AgRP neurons that serves as a neural determinant of this rapid modulation. Specifically, GABAergic projections arising from the ventral compartment of the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (vDMH) contribute to the preconsummatory modulation of ARCAgRP neurons. In a manner reciprocal to ARCAgRP neurons, ARC-projecting leptin receptor-expressing GABAergic vDMH neurons exhibit rapid activation upon availability of food that additionally reflects the relative value of the food. Thus, leptin receptor-expressing GABAergic vDMH neurons form part of the sensory network that relays real-time information about the nature and availability of food to dynamically modulate ARCAgRP neuron activity and feeding behavior.

  17. Cervical vagus nerve stimulation augments spontaneous discharge in second- and higher-order sensory neurons in the rat nucleus of the solitary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Eric; Campbell, Regenia P; Andresen, Michael C; Scofield, Stephanie; Singh, Krishna; Libbus, Imad; KenKnight, Bruce H; Snyder, Logan; Cantrell, Nathan

    2017-08-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) currently treats patients with drug-resistant epilepsy, depression, and heart failure. The mild intensities used in chronic VNS suggest that primary visceral afferents and central nervous system activation are involved. Here, we measured the activity of neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in anesthetized rats using clinically styled VNS. Our chief findings indicate that VNS at threshold bradycardic intensity activated NTS neuron discharge in one-third of NTS neurons. This VNS directly activated only myelinated vagal afferents projecting to second-order NTS neurons. Most VNS-induced activity in NTS, however, was unsynchronized to vagal stimuli. Thus, VNS activated unsynchronized activity in NTS neurons that were second order to vagal afferent C-fibers as well as higher-order NTS neurons only polysynaptically activated by the vagus. Overall, cardiovascular-sensitive and -insensitive NTS neurons were similarly activated by VNS: 3/4 neurons with monosynaptic vagal A-fiber afferents, 6/42 neurons with monosynaptic vagal C-fiber afferents, and 16/21 polysynaptic NTS neurons. Provocatively, vagal A-fibers indirectly activated C-fiber neurons during VNS. Elevated spontaneous spiking was quantitatively much higher than synchronized activity and extended well into the periods of nonstimulation. Surprisingly, many polysynaptic NTS neurons responded to half the bradycardic intensity used in clinical studies, indicating that a subset of myelinated vagal afferents is sufficient to evoke VNS indirect activation. Our study uncovered a myelinated vagal afferent drive that indirectly activates NTS neurons and thus central pathways beyond NTS and support reconsideration of brain contributions of vagal afferents underpinning of therapeutic impacts.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Acute vagus nerve stimulation elevated activity in neurons located in the medial nucleus of the solitary tract. Such stimuli directly activated only myelinated vagal afferents but

  18. Frequency response properties of primary afferent neurons in the posterior lateral line system of larval zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Rafael; Akanyeti, Otar; Ballo, Aleksander; Liao, James C

    2015-01-15

    The ability of fishes to detect water flow with the neuromasts of their lateral line system depends on the physiology of afferent neurons as well as the hydrodynamic environment. Using larval zebrafish (Danio rerio), we measured the basic response properties of primary afferent neurons to mechanical deflections of individual superficial neuromasts. We used two types of stimulation protocols. First, we used sine wave stimulation to characterize the response properties of the afferent neurons. The average frequency-response curve was flat across stimulation frequencies between 0 and 100 Hz, matching the filtering properties of a displacement detector. Spike rate increased asymptotically with frequency, and phase locking was maximal between 10 and 60 Hz. Second, we used pulse train stimulation to analyze the maximum spike rate capabilities. We found that afferent neurons could generate up to 80 spikes/s and could follow a pulse train stimulation rate of up to 40 pulses/s in a reliable and precise manner. Both sine wave and pulse stimulation protocols indicate that an afferent neuron can maintain their evoked activity for longer durations at low stimulation frequencies than at high frequencies. We found one type of afferent neuron based on spontaneous activity patterns and discovered a correlation between the level of spontaneous and evoked activity. Overall, our results establish the baseline response properties of lateral line primary afferent neurons in larval zebrafish, which is a crucial step in understanding how vertebrate mechanoreceptive systems sense and subsequently process information from the environment. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Monosynaptic connections between primary afferents and giant neurons in the turtle spinal dorsal horn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández, A; Radmilovich, M; Russo, R E

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports the occurrence of monosynaptic connections between dorsal root afferents and a distinct cell type-the giant neuron-deep in the dorsal horn of the turtle spinal cord. Light microscope studies combining Nissl stain and transganglionic HRP-labeling of the primary afferents have re...

  20. Tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-dependent sodium channels in identified muscle afferent neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandra, Renuka; McGrew, Stephanie Y.; Baxter, James C.; Kiveric, Esad; Elmslie, Keith S.

    2012-01-01

    Muscle afferents are critical regulators of motor function (Group I and II) and cardiovascular responses to exercise (Group III and IV). However, little is known regarding the expressed voltage-dependent ion channels. We identified muscle afferent neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), using retrograde labeling to examine voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels. In patch-clamp recordings, we found that the dominant NaV current in the majority of identified neurons was insensitive to tetrodoto...

  1. Electrophysiological characteristics of IB4-negative TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent DRG neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yi-Wen; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Muscle afferent neurons that express transient receptor potential vanilloid type I (TRPV1) are responsible for muscle pain associated with tissue acidosis. We have previously found that TRPV1 of isolectin B4 (IB4)-negative muscle nociceptors plays an important role in the acid-induced hyperalgesic priming and the development of chronic hyperalgesia in a mouse model of fibromyalgia. To understand the electrophysiological properties of the TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent neurons, we used whole...

  2. Membrane Mechanics of Primary Afferent Neurons in the Dorsal Root Ganglia of Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Hirosato; Gu, Jianguo G

    2017-04-25

    Membrane mechanics is an important biological factor regulating many cellular functions including cell motility, intercellular and intracellular signaling, gene expression, and membrane ion channel activity. Primary afferent neurons transduce sensory information about temperature, touch, and pain. These sensory functions may be profoundly affected by the states of primary afferent neuron mechanics. However, membrane mechanics of primary afferent neurons is largely unknown. In this study, we established the optical trapping technique for determining membrane mechanics of cultured primary afferent neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We further determined the roles of cytoskeleton and membrane lipids in DRG neuron mechanics. We found that DRG neurons had a plasma membrane tension of ∼54 pN/μm, and the tension was significantly decreased to ∼29 pN/μm by cytochalasin D treatment to disrupt actin cytoskeleton and increased to ∼79 pN/μm by methyl-β-cyclodextrin treatment to sequester membrane cholesterol. DRG neuron membrane stiffness was not significantly affected by the cytoskeleton disruption but was significantly increased after cholesterol sequestration. Our findings elucidate membrane mechanical properties of primary afferent neurons, which provide, to our knowledge, a new perspective on their sensory functions. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Anorexia‐cachexia syndrome in hepatoma tumour‐bearing rats requires the area postrema but not vagal afferents and is paralleled by increased MIC‐1/GDF15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borner, Tito; Arnold, Myrtha; Ruud, Johan; Breit, Samuel N.; Langhans, Wolfgang; Lutz, Thomas A.; Blomqvist, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The cancer‐anorexia‐cachexia syndrome (CACS) negatively affects survival and therapy success in cancer patients. Inflammatory mediators and tumour‐derived factors are thought to play an important role in the aetiology of CACS. However, the central and peripheral mechanisms contributing to CACS are insufficiently understood. The area postrema (AP) and the nucleus tractus solitarii are two important brainstem centres for the control of eating during acute sickness conditions. Recently, the tumour‐derived macrophage inhibitory cytokine‐1 (MIC‐1) emerged as a possible mediator of cancer anorexia because lesions of these brainstem areas attenuated the anorectic effect of exogenous MIC‐1 in mice. Methods Using a rat hepatoma tumour model, we examined the roles of the AP and of vagal afferents in the mediation of CACS. Specifically, we investigated whether a lesion of the AP (APX) or subdiaphragmatic vagal deafferentation (SDA) attenuate anorexia, body weight, muscle, and fat loss. Moreover, we analysed MIC‐1 levels in this tumour model and their correlation with tumour size and the severity of the anorectic response. Results In tumour‐bearing sham‐operated animals mean daily food intake significantly decreased. The anorectic response was paralleled by a significant loss of body weight and muscle mass. APX rats were protected against anorexia, body weight loss, and muscle atrophy after tumour induction. In contrast, subdiaphragmatic vagal deafferentation did not attenuate cancer‐induced anorexia or body weight loss. Tumour‐bearing rats had substantially increased MIC‐1 levels, which positively correlated with tumour size and cancer progression and negatively correlated with food intake. Conclusions These findings demonstrate the importance of the AP in the mediation of cancer‐dependent anorexia and body weight loss and support a pathological role of MIC‐1 as a tumour‐derived factor mediating CACS, possibly via an AP

  4. Tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-dependent sodium channels in identified muscle afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Renuka; McGrew, Stephanie Y; Baxter, James C; Kiveric, Esad; Elmslie, Keith S

    2012-10-01

    Muscle afferents are critical regulators of motor function (Group I and II) and cardiovascular responses to exercise (Group III and IV). However, little is known regarding the expressed voltage-dependent ion channels. We identified muscle afferent neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), using retrograde labeling to examine voltage-dependent sodium (Na(V)) channels. In patch-clamp recordings, we found that the dominant Na(V) current in the majority of identified neurons was insensitive to tetrodotoxin (TTX-R), with Na(V) current in only a few (14%) neurons showing substantial (>50%) TTX sensitivity (TTX-S). The TTX-R current was sensitive to a Na(V)1.8 channel blocker, A803467. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated labeling of muscle afferent neurons by a Na(V)1.8 antibody, which further supported expression of these channels. A portion of the TTX-R Na(V) current appeared to be noninactivating during our 25-ms voltage steps, which suggested activity of Na(V)1.9 channels. The majority of the noninactivating current was insensitive to A803467 but sensitive to extracellular sodium. Immunocytochemistry showed labeling of muscle afferent neurons by a Na(V)1.9 channel antibody, which supports expression of these channels. Further examination of the muscle afferent neurons showed that functional TTX-S channels were expressed, but were largely inactivated at physiological membrane potentials. Immunocytochemistry showed expression of the TTX-S channels Na(V)1.6 and Na(V)1.7 but not Na(V)1.1. Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 appear to be the dominant functional sodium channels in small- to medium-diameter muscle afferent neurons. The expression of these channels is consistent with the identification of these neurons as Group III and IV, which mediate the exercise pressor reflex.

  5. Morphological and electrophysiological features of motor neurons and putative interneurons in the dorsal vagal complex of rats and mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong; Glatzer, Nicholas R.; Williams, Kevin W.; Derbenev, Andrei V.; Liu, Dan; Smith, Bret N.

    2009-01-01

    The dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) contains preganglionic motor neurons that control viscera along the subdiaphragmatic digestive tract, but may also contain neurons that do not project to the viscera. Neurons that expressed EGFP 60-72 h subsequent to PRV-152 inoculation of vagal terminals in the stomach wall were targeted for whole-cell patch-clamp recording and biocytin filling in transverse brainstem slices from rats and their quantitative morphological and electrophysiological characteristics were compared with uninfected cells. Over 90% of PRV-152 labeled neurons were also labeled subsequent to intraperitoneal injection of FluoroGold, indicating most were preganglionic motor neurons. In reconstructed neurons with an identifiable axon trajectory, two cellular subtypes were distinguished. The axon projected ventrolaterally from the DMV in 44 of 49 cells and these were likely to be vagal motor neurons. Axons of other neurons ramified within the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) or DMV. These cells were smaller and otherwise morphologically distinct from putative motor neurons. Transgenic mice with GFP-expressing inhibitory neurons (i.e., GIN mice) were used to identify a GABAergic subset vagal neurons. These neurons had locally-ramifying axons and formed a morphologically distinct subset of DMV cells, which were similar in size and axon trajectory to GABAergic neurons in the NTS. Most neurons in the DMV therefore possess morphological features of motor neurons, but locally projecting cells and inhibitory neurons with distinct morphological features are also found within the DMV. These cells likely contribute to regulation of vagal function. PMID:19619517

  6. Spinal afferent neurons projecting to the rat lung and pleura express acid sensitive channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Michael; Helbig, Tanja; Grau, Veronika; Kummer, Wolfgang; Haberberger, Rainer V

    2006-01-01

    Background The acid sensitive ion channels TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor-1) and ASIC3 (acid sensing ion channel-3) respond to tissue acidification in the range that occurs during painful conditions such as inflammation and ischemia. Here, we investigated to which extent they are expressed by rat dorsal root ganglion neurons projecting to lung and pleura, respectively. Methods The tracer DiI was either injected into the left lung or applied to the costal pleura. Retrogradely labelled dorsal root ganglion neurons were subjected to triple-labelling immunohistochemistry using antisera against TRPV1, ASIC3 and neurofilament 68 (marker for myelinated neurons), and their soma diameter was measured. Results Whereas 22% of pulmonary spinal afferents contained neither channel-immunoreactivity, at least one is expressed by 97% of pleural afferents. TRPV1+/ASIC3- neurons with probably slow conduction velocity (small soma, neurofilament 68-negative) were significantly more frequent among pleural (35%) than pulmonary afferents (20%). TRPV1+/ASIC3+ neurons amounted to 14 and 10% respectively. TRPV1-/ASIC3+ neurons made up between 44% (lung) and 48% (pleura) of neurons, and half of them presumably conducted in the A-fibre range (larger soma, neurofilament 68-positive). Conclusion Rat pleural and pulmonary spinal afferents express at least two different acid-sensitive channels that make them suitable to monitor tissue acidification. Patterns of co-expression and structural markers define neuronal subgroups that can be inferred to subserve different functions and may initiate specific reflex responses. The higher prevalence of TRPV1+/ASIC3- neurons among pleural afferents probably reflects the high sensitivity of the parietal pleura to painful stimuli. PMID:16813657

  7. Synaptic transmission of baro- and chemoreceptors afferents in the NTS second order neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accorsi-Mendonça, Daniela; Machado, Benedito H

    2013-04-01

    Second order neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) process and integrate the afferent information from arterial baroreceptors with high fidelity and precise timing synaptic transmission. Since 2nd-order NTS neurons receiving baroreceptors inputs are relatively well characterized, their electrophysiological profile has been accepted as a general characteristic for all 2nd-order NTS neurons involved with the processing of different sensorial inputs. On the other hand, the synaptic properties of other afferent systems in NTS, such as the peripheral chemoreceptors, are not yet well understood. In this context, in previous studies we demonstrated that in response to repetitive afferents stimulation, the chemoreceptors 2nd-order NTS neurons also presented high fidelity of synaptic transmission, but with a large variability in the latency of evoked responses. This finding is different in relation to the precise timing transmission for baroreceptor 2nd-order NTS neurons, which was accepted as a general characteristic profile for all 2nd order neurons in the NTS. In this brief review we discuss this new concept as an index of complexity of the sensorial inputs to NTS with focus on the synaptic processing of baro- and chemoreceptor afferents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Electrophysiological characteristics of IB4-negative TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent DRG neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Wen; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Muscle afferent neurons that express transient receptor potential vanilloid type I (TRPV1) are responsible for muscle pain associated with tissue acidosis. We have previously found that TRPV1 of isolectin B4 (IB4)-negative muscle nociceptors plays an important role in the acid-induced hyperalgesic priming and the development of chronic hyperalgesia in a mouse model of fibromyalgia. To understand the electrophysiological properties of the TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent neurons, we used whole-cell patch clamp recording to study the acid responsiveness and action potential (AP) configuration of capsaicin-sensitive neurons innervating to gastrocnemius muscle. Here we showed that IB4-negative TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent neurons are heterogeneous in terms of cell size, resting membrane potential, AP configuration, tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistance, and acid-induced current (I acid), as well as capsaicin-induced current (I cap). TRPV1-expressing neurons were all acid-sensitive and could be divided into two acid-sensitive groups depending on an acid-induced sustained current (type I) or an acid-induced biphasic ASIC3-like current (type II). Type I TRPV1-expressing neurons were distinguishable from type II TRPV1-expressing neurons in AP overshoot, after-hyperpolarization duration, and all I acid parameters, but not in AP threshold, TTX-resistance, resting membrane potential, and I cap parameters. These differential biophysical properties of TRPV1-expressing neurons might partially annotate their different roles involved in the development and maintenance of chronic muscle pain.

  9. Chronic intermittent hypoxia-hypercapnia blunts heart rate responses and alters neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyavanapalli, Jhansi; Jameson, Heather; Dergacheva, Olga; Jain, Vivek; Alhusayyen, Mona; Mendelowitz, David

    2014-07-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnoea experience chronic intermittent hypoxia-hypercapnia (CIHH) during sleep that elicit sympathetic overactivity and diminished parasympathetic activity to the heart, leading to hypertension and depressed baroreflex sensitivity. The parasympathetic control of heart rate arises from pre-motor cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) located in nucleus ambiguus (NA) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMNX). The mechanisms underlying diminished vagal control of heart rate were investigated by studying the changes in blood pressure, heart rate, and neurotransmission to CVNs evoked by acute hypoxia-hypercapnia (H-H) and CIHH. In vivo telemetry recordings of blood pressure and heart rate were obtained in adult rats during 4 weeks of CIHH exposure. Retrogradely labelled CVNs were identified in an in vitro brainstem slice preparation obtained from adult rats exposed either to air or CIHH for 4 weeks. Postsynaptic inhibitory or excitatory currents were recorded using whole cell voltage clamp techniques. Rats exposed to CIHH had increases in blood pressure, leading to hypertension, and blunted heart rate responses to acute H-H. CIHH induced an increase in GABAergic and glycinergic neurotransmission to CVNs in NA and DMNX, respectively; and a reduction in glutamatergic neurotransmission to CVNs in both nuclei. CIHH blunted the bradycardia evoked by acute H-H and abolished the acute H-H evoked inhibition of GABAergic transmission while enhancing glycinergic neurotransmission to CVNs in NA. These changes with CIHH inhibit CVNs and vagal outflow to the heart, both in acute and chronic exposures to H-H, resulting in diminished levels of cardioprotective parasympathetic activity to the heart as seen in OSA patients. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  10. Regulation of Piezo2 Mechanotransduction by Static Plasma Membrane Tension in Primary Afferent Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhanfeng; Ikeda, Ryo; Ling, Jennifer; Viatchenko-Karpinski, Viacheslav; Gu, Jianguo G

    2016-04-22

    The Piezo2 channel is a newly identified mammalian mechanical transducer that confers rapidly adapting mechanically activated (RA-MA) currents in primary afferent neurons. The Piezo2 channels sense rapid membrane displacement, but it is not clear whether they are sensitive to osmotic swelling, which slowly increases static plasma membrane tension (SPMT). Here, we show that SPMT exerts a profound impact on the mechanical sensitivity of RA-MA channels in primary afferent neurons. RA-MA currents are greatly enhanced, and the mechanical threshold was reduced in both primary afferent neurons of rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and HEK293 cells heterologously expressing Piezo2 when these cells undergo osmotic swelling to increase SPMT. Osmotic swelling switches the kinetics of RA-MA currents to the slowly adapting type in both cultured DRG neurons and HEK293 cells heterologously expressing Piezo2. The potentiation of RA-MA currents is abolished when cultured DRG neurons are treated with cytochalasin D, an actin filament disruptor that prevents SPMT of cultured DRG neurons from an increase by osmotic swelling. Osmotic swelling significantly increases DRG neuron mechano-excitability such that a subthreshold mechanical stimulus can result in action potential firing. Behaviorally, the mechanical hind paw withdrawal threshold in rats is reduced following the injection of a hypotonic solution, but this osmotic effect is abolished when cytochalasin D or Gd(3+) is co-administered with the hypo-osmotic solution. Taken together, our findings suggest that Piezo2-mediated mechanotransduction is regulated by SPMT in primary afferent neurons. Because SPMT can be changed by multiple biological factors, our findings may have broad implications in mechanical sensitivity under physiological and pathological conditions. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Afferent neuronal control of type-I gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH neurons in the human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik eHrabovszky

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the regulation of the human menstrual cycle represents an important ultimate challenge of reproductive neuroendocrine research. However, direct translation of information from laboratory animal experiments to the human is often complicated by strikingly different and unique reproductive strategies and central regulatory mechanisms that can be present in even closely related animal species. In all mammals studied so far, type-I gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH synthesizing neurons form the final common output way from the hypothalamus in the neuroendocrine control of the adenohypophysis. Under various physiological and pathological conditions, hormonal and metabolic signals either regulate GnRH neurons directly or act on upstream neuronal circuitries to influence the pattern of pulsatile GnRH secretion into the hypophysial portal circulation. Neuronal afferents to GnRH cells convey important metabolic-, stress-, sex steroid-, lactational- and circadian signals to the reproductive axis, among other effects. This article gives an overview of the available neuroanatomical literature that described the afferent regulation of human GnRH neurons by peptidergic, monoaminergic and amino acidergic neuronal systems. Recent studies of human genetics provided evidence that central peptidergic signaling by kisspeptins and neurokinin B play particularly important roles in puberty onset and later, in the sex steroid-dependent feedback regulation of GnRH neurons. This review article places special emphasis on the topographic distribution, sexual dimorphism, aging-dependent neuroanatomical changes and plastic connectivity to GnRH neurons of the critically important human hypothalamic kisspeptin and neurokinin B systems.

  12. Activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors suppresses the ROS-induced hypersensitivity of rat vagal lung C-fiber afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chou-Ming; Ruan, Ting; Lin, Yu-Jung; Hsu, Tien-Huan

    2016-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including H2O2, have been shown to induce hypersensitivity of vagal lung C-fibers (VLCFs) mainly through receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and P2X receptors. Cannabinoids (CBs) exert antinociceptive effects by binding to specific CB receptors, designated CB1 and CB2 (type 2) for type 1 and type 2, respectively. We investigated whether activation of CB receptors can suppress ROS-mediated VLCF hypersensitivity and, if so, what type(s) of CB receptors are involved. Aerosolized H2O2 (0.05%) was inhaled by anesthetized spontaneously breathing rats (n = 304) to sensitize VLCFs. Airway reflex reactivity to intravenous capsaicin, a VLCF stimulant, was measured. Perivagal pretreatments with various types of agonists and antagonists, a technique that can modulate VLCF sensitivity, were made to delineate the roles of the CB receptors. Aerosolized H2O2 induced an augmented apneic response to capsaicin, which was blocked by bilateral vagotomy or by perivagal capsaicin treatment, suggesting that the response is mediated through VLCFs. Perivagal treatment with HU210 (a nonselective CB agonist) or ACPA (a selective CB1 receptor agonist), but not JWH133 (a CB2 receptor agonist), attenuated this H2O2-induced VLCF hypersensitivity. The suppressive effects of HU210 and ACPA were prevented by an additional treatment with AM251 (a selective CB1 antagonist), but not with AM630 (a selective CB2 antagonist). Perivagal treatment with a combination of ACPA, HC030031 (a TRPA1 receptor antagonist), and iso-PPADS (a P2X receptor antagonist) further attenuated the H2O2-induced VLCF hypersensitivity, as compared with treatment with a combination of HC030031 and iso-PPADS. Our results suggest that activation of CB1 receptors may suppress the ROS-mediated VLCF hypersensitivity through a mechanism that is at least partly distinct from the function of TRPA1 and P2X receptors. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Gender Differences in Histamine-Induced Depolarization and Inward Currents in Vagal Ganglion Neurons in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-Nan; Qian, Zhao; Xu, Wen-Xiao; Xu, Bing; Lu, Xiao-Long; Yan, Zhen-Yu; Han, Li-Min; Liu, Yang; Yuan, Mei; Schild, John; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Li, Bai-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Evidence has shown gender differences regarding the critical roles of histamine in the prevalence of asthma, anaphylaxis, and angina pectoris. Histamine depolarizes unmyelinated C-type neurons without any effects on myelinated A-type vagal ganglion neurons (VGNs) in male rats. However, little is known if VGNs from females react to histamine in a similar manner. Membrane depolarization and inward currents were tested in VGNs isolated from adult rats using a whole-cell patch technique. Results from males were consistent with the literature. Surprisingly, histamine-induced depolarization and inward currents were observed in both unmyelinated C-type and myelinated A- and Ah-type VGNs from female rats. In Ah-type neurons, responses to 1.0 μM histamine were stronger in intact females than in males and significantly reduced in ovariectomized (OVX) females. In C-type neurons, histamine-induced events were significantly smaller (pA/pF) in intact females compared with males and this histamine-induced activity was dramatically increased by OVX. Female A-types responded to histamine, which was further increased following ovariectomy. Histamine at 300 nM depolarized Ah-types in females, but not Ah-types in OVX females. In contrast, the sensitivity of A- and C-types to histamine was upregulated by OVX. These data demonstrate gender differences in VGN chemosensitivity to histamine for the first time. Myelinated Ah-types showed the highest sensitivity to histamine across female populations, which was changed by OVX. These novel findings improve the understanding of gender differences in the prevalence of asthma, anaphylaxis, and pain. Changes in sensitivity to histamine by OVX may explain alterations in the prevalence of certain pathophysiological conditions when women reach a postmenopausal age. PMID:24339729

  14. Afferent-specific AMPA receptor subunit composition and regulation of synaptic plasticity in midbrain dopamine neurons by abused drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Good, Cameron H.; Lupica, Carl R.

    2010-01-01

    Ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons play a pivotal role in processing reward-related information and are involved in drug addiction and mental illness in humans. Information is conveyed to the VTA in large part by glutamatergic afferents that arise in various brain nuclei, including the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN). Using a unique rat brain slice preparation, we found that PPN stimulation activates afferents targeting GluR2-containing AMPA receptors (AMPAR) on VTA DA neurons,...

  15. Upper gastrointestinal dysmotility after spinal cord injury: Is diminished vagal sensory processing one culprit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory M Holmes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the widely recognized prevalence of gastric, colonic and anorectal dysfunction after SCI, significant knowledge gaps persist regarding the mechanisms leading to post-SCI gastrointestinal (GI impairments. Briefly, the regulation of GI function is governed by a mix of parasympathetic, sympathetic and enteric neurocircuitry. Unlike the intestines, the stomach is dominated by parasympathetic (vagal control whereby gastric sensory information is transmitted via the afferent vagus nerve to neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS. The NTS integrates this sensory information with signals from throughout the CNS. Glutamatergic and GABAergic NTS neurons project to other nuclei, including the preganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV. Finally, axons from the DMV project to gastric myenteric neurons, again, through the efferent vagus nerve. SCI interrupts descending input to the lumbosacral spinal cord neurons that modulate colonic motility and evacuation reflexes. In contrast, vagal neurocircuitry remains anatomically intact after injury. This review presents evidence that unlike the post-SCI loss of supraspinal control which leads to colonic and anorectal dysfunction, gastric dysmotility occurs as an indirect or secondary pathology following SCI. Specifically, emerging data points toward diminished sensitivity of vagal afferents to GI neuroactive peptides, neurotransmitters and, possibly, macronutrients. The neurophysiological properties of rat vagal afferent neurons are highly plastic and can be altered by injury or energy balance. A reduction of vagal afferent signaling to NTS neurons may ultimately bias NTS output toward unregulated GABAergic transmission onto gastric-projecting DMV neurons. The resulting gastroinhibitory signal may be one mechanism leading to upper GI dysmotility following SCI.

  16. Prostaglandin potentiates 5-HT responses in stomach and ileum innervating visceral afferent sensory neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sojin; Jin, Zhenhua; Lee, Goeun [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yong Seek; Park, Cheung-Seog [Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Young-Ho, E-mail: jinyh@khu.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Prostaglandin E2 (PGE{sub 2}) effect was tested on visceral afferent neurons. • PGE{sub 2} did not evoke response but potentiated serotonin (5-HT) currents up to 167%. • PGE{sub 2}-induced potentiation was blocked by E-prostanoid type 4 receptors antagonist. • PGE{sub 2} effect on 5-HT response was also blocked by protein kinase A inhibitor KT5720. • Thus, PGE{sub 2} modulate visceral afferent neurons via synergistic signaling with 5-HT. - Abstract: Gastrointestinal disorder is a common symptom induced by diverse pathophysiological conditions that include food tolerance, chemotherapy, and irradiation for therapy. Prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) level increase was often reported during gastrointestinal disorder and prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors has been used for ameliorate the symptoms. Exogenous administration of PGE{sub 2} induces gastrointestinal disorder, however, the mechanism of action is not known. Therefore, we tested PGE{sub 2} effect on visceral afferent sensory neurons of the rat. Interestingly, PGE{sub 2} itself did not evoked any response but enhanced serotonin (5-HT)-evoked currents up to 167% of the control level. The augmented 5-HT responses were completely inhibited by a 5-HT type 3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron. The PGE{sub 2}-induced potentiation were blocked by a selective E-prostanoid type4 (EP{sub 4}) receptors antagonist, L-161,982, but type1 and 2 receptor antagonist AH6809 has no effect. A membrane permeable protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720 also inhibited PGE{sub 2} effects. PGE{sub 2} induced 5-HT current augmentation was observed on 15% and 21% of the stomach and ileum projecting neurons, respectively. Current results suggest a synergistic signaling in visceral afferent neurons underlying gastrointestinal disorder involving PGE{sub 2} potentiation of 5-HT currents. Our findings may open a possibility for screen a new type drugs with lower side effects than currently using steroidal prostaglandin

  17. Gut chemosensing: interactions between gut endocrine cells and visceral afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, Helen E

    2010-02-16

    Chemosensing in the gastrointestinal tract is less well understood than many aspects of gut mechanosensitivity; however, it is important in the overall function of the GI tract and indeed the organism as a whole. Chemosensing in the gut represents a complex interplay between the function of enteroendocrine (EEC) cells and visceral (primarily vagal) afferent neurons. In this brief review, I will concentrate on a new data on endocrine cells in chemosensing in the GI tract, in particular on new findings on glucose-sensing by gut EEC cells and the importance of incretin peptides and vagal afferents in glucose homeostasis, on the role of G protein coupled receptors in gut chemosensing, and on the possibility that gut endocrine cells may be involved in the detection of a luminal constituent other than nutrients, the microbiota. The role of vagal afferent pathways as a downstream target of EEC cell products will be considered and, in particular, exciting new data on the plasticity of the vagal afferent pathway with respect to expression of receptors for GI hormones and how this may play a role in energy homeostasis will also be discussed. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. NaV1.8 channels are expressed in large, as well as small, diameter sensory afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Renuka; McGrew, Stephanie Y; Baxter, James C; Howard, Jason R; Elmslie, Keith S

    2013-01-01

    Sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) express a subset of voltage dependent sodium channels (NaV) including NaV1.1, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8 and 1.9. Previous work supported preferential localization of NaV1.8 channels to small-medium diameter, nociceptive afferent neurons. However, we recently published evidence that NaV1.8 was the dominant NaV channel expressed in the somas of small, medium and large diameter muscle afferent neurons, which is consistent with other reports. Here, we extend those results to show that NaV1.8 expression is not correlated with afferent neuron diameter. Using immunocytochemistry, we found NaV1.8 expression in ~50% of sensory afferent neurons with diameters ranging from 20 to 70 µm. In addition, electrophysiological analysis shows that the kinetic and inactivation properties of NaV1.8 current are invariant with neuron size. These data add further support to the idea that NaV1.8 contributes to the electrical excitability of both nociceptive and non-nociceptive sensory neurons.

  19. Axon reaction in hypoglossal and dorsal motor vagal neurons of adult rat: incorporation of (3H)leucine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldskogius, H.; Barron, K.D.; Regal, R.

    1984-07-01

    Pairs of adult rats received (/sup 3/H)leucine 0.25, 1, and 16 h before killing and zero to 164 days after unilateral cervical vagotomy and hypoglossal neurotomy. Grain counts and morphometric measurements were made on axotomized and uninjured neurons in histoautoradiographs of the medullary nuclei. Axotomized hypoglossal neurons, which largely survive the injury, both enlarged and incorporated increased amounts of tritiated leucine at each labeling interval, 3 through 28 days postoperatively. In the vagal dorsal motor nucleus (DMN), axotomized cells, which frequently die after neurotomy, enlarged slightly through 28 days postoperatively, then atrophied; DMN neurons increased amino acid uptake for a shorter period (days 7 through 14) than hypoglossal neurons. Axotomized DMN neurons did not sustain increased protein synthesis as long as their hypoglossal counterparts and seemed to fail to increase synthesis of structural proteins with long half-lives (16-h labeling interval). The frequently necrobiotic response of axotomized DMN neurons may relate to these phenomena. From these and earlier results, the authors conclude that axon reaction appears to differ fundamentally in peripheral and central neurons. This difference may have significance for research on regeneration in the central nervous system.

  20. Gut Chemosensing: Interactions between Gut Endocrine Cells and Visceral Afferents

    OpenAIRE

    Raybould, Helen E.

    2009-01-01

    Chemosensing in the gastrointestinal tract is less well understood than many aspects of gut mechanosensitivity; however, it is important in the overall function of the GI tract and indeed the organism as a whole. Chemosensing in the gut represents a complex interplay between the function of enteroendocrine (EEC) cells and visceral (primarily vagal) afferent neurons. In this brief review, I will concentrate on new data on endocrine cells in chemosensing in the GI tract, in particular on new fi...

  1. Nesfatin-1 influences the excitability of glucosensing neurons in the dorsal vagal complex and inhibits food intake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Dong

    Full Text Available Nesfatin-1 is a recently discovered metabolic peptide hormone that decreases food intake after lateral, third, or fourth brain ventricle; cisterna magna; or paraventricular nucleus (PVN injection in ad libitum fed rats. Additional micro-injection studies will improve the understanding of how nesfatin-1 acts on the brain and define specific nuclei responsive to nesfatin-1, which will provide insight on its effects on food intake. We evaluated how nesfatin-1 injection into the dorsal vagal complex (DVC modulates food intake response in rats during the dark phase. Consistent with previous observations, nesfatin-1-injected rats significantly reduced cumulative food intake over a 5-h period in rats. Chronic administration of nesfatin-1 into the DVC reduced body weight gain over a 10-day period. Because glucosensing neurons in the DVC are involved in glucoprivic feeding and homeostatic control of blood glucose, we examined the effect of nesfatin-1 on the excitability of DVC glucosensing neurons. Nesfatin-1 inhibited most of the glucose-inhibitory (GI neurons and excited most of the glucose-excitatory (GE neurons in the DVC. Current-clamp electrophysiology recordings from DVC glucosensing neurons in slice preparation showed that bath applied nesfatin-1(10 nM increased the firing frequency of GE neurons and inhibited the firing rate of GI-neurons. Nesfatin-1 inhibited 88.9% (16/18 of gastric distension inhibitory (GD-INH neurons and excited 76.2% (32/42 of gastric distension excitatory (GD-EXC neurons. Thus, nesfatin-1 may control food intake by modulating the excitability of glucosensing neurons in the DVC.

  2. Neurotransmission to parasympathetic cardiac vagal neurons in the brain stem is altered with left ventricular hypertrophy-induced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauley, Edmund; Wang, Xin; Dyavanapalli, Jhansi; Sun, Ke; Garrott, Kara; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Kay, Matthew W; Mendelowitz, David

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF) are widespread and debilitating cardiovascular diseases that affect nearly 23 million people worldwide. A distinctive hallmark of these cardiovascular diseases is autonomic imbalance, with increased sympathetic activity and decreased parasympathetic vagal tone. Recent device-based approaches, such as implantable vagal stimulators that stimulate a multitude of visceral sensory and motor fibers in the vagus nerve, are being evaluated as new therapeutic approaches for these and other diseases. However, little is known about how parasympathetic activity to the heart is altered with these diseases, and this lack of knowledge is an obstacle in the goal of devising selective interventions that can target and selectively restore parasympathetic activity to the heart. To identify the changes that occur within the brain stem to diminish the parasympathetic cardiac activity, left ventricular hypertrophy was elicited in rats by aortic pressure overload using a transaortic constriction approach. Cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the brain stem that generate parasympathetic activity to the heart were identified with a retrograde tracer and studied using patch-clamp electrophysiological recordings in vitro. Animals with left cardiac hypertrophy had diminished excitation of CVNs, which was mediated both by an augmented frequency of spontaneous inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission (with no alteration of inhibitory glycinergic activity) as well as a diminished amplitude and frequency of excitatory neurotransmission to CVNs. Opportunities to alter these network pathways and neurotransmitter receptors provide future targets of intervention in the goal to restore parasympathetic activity and autonomic balance to the heart in cardiac hypertrophy and other cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. The role of trigeminal nasal TRPM8-expressing afferent neurons in the antitussive effects of menthol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plevkova, J.; Kollarik, M.; Poliacek, I.; Brozmanova, M.; Surdenikova, L.; Tatar, M.; Mori, N.

    2013-01-01

    The cold-sensitive cation channel TRPM8 is a target for menthol, which is used routinely as a cough suppressant and as an additive to tobacco and food products. Given that cold temperatures and menthol activate neurons through gating of TRPM8, it is unclear how menthol actively suppresses cough. In this study we describe the antitussive effects of (−)-menthol in conscious and anesthetized guinea pigs. In anesthetized guinea pigs, cough evoked by citric acid applied topically to the tracheal mucosa was suppressed by menthol only when it was selectively administered as vapors to the upper airways. Menthol applied topically to the tracheal mucosa prior to and during citric acid application or administered continuously as vapors or as an aerosol to the lower airways was without effect on cough. These actions of upper airway menthol treatment were mimicked by cold air delivered to the upper airways but not by (+)-menthol, the inactive isomer of menthol, or by the TRPM8/TRPA1 agonist icilin administered directly to the trachea. Subsequent molecular analyses confirmed the expression of TRPM8 in a subset of nasal trigeminal afferent neurons that do not coincidently express TRPA1 or TRPV1. We conclude that menthol suppresses cough evoked in the lower airways primarily through a reflex initiated from the nose. PMID:23640596

  4. Secondary Metabolites in Allergic Plant Pollen Samples Modulate Afferent Neurons and Murine Tracheal Rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Božičević, Alen; De Mieri, Maria; Nassenstein, Christina; Wiegand, Silke; Hamburger, Matthias

    2017-11-22

    Plant pollens are strong airborne elicitors of asthma. Their proteinaceous allergens have been studied intensively, but little is known about a possible contribution of pollen secondary metabolites to the nonallergic exacerbation of asthma. Pollen samples originating from 30 plant species were analyzed by HPLC coupled to PDA, ESIMS, and ELSD detectors and off-line NMR spectroscopy. Polyamine conjugates, flavonoids, and sesquiterpene lactones were identified. Polyamine conjugates were characteristic of all Asteraceae species. The presence of sesquiterpene lactones in Asteraceae pollen varied between species and pollen lots. All plant pollen, including those from non-Asteraceae species, contained to some extent electrophiles as determined by their reaction with N-acetyl-l-cysteine. Selected pollen extracts and pure compounds were tested in murine afferent neurons and in murine tracheal preparations. Tetrahydrofuran extracts of Ambrosia artemisiifolia and Ambrosia psilostachya pollen and a mixture of sesquiterpene lactones coronopilin/parthenin increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in 15%, 32%, and 37% of cinnamaldehyde-responsive neurons, respectively. In organ bath experiments, only the sesquiterpene lactones tested induced a weak dilatation of naïve tracheas and strongly lowered the maximal methacholine-induced tracheal constriction. A tetrahydrofuran extract of A. psilostachya and coronopilin/parthenin led to a time-dependent relaxation of the methacholine-preconstricted trachea. These results provide the first evidence for a potential role of pollen secondary metabolites in the modulation of the tracheal tone.

  5. In Vitro Research of the Alteration of Neurons in Vagal Core in Medulla Oblongata at Asphyxic Deaths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naim Haliti

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to research the morphological changes of neurons in the vagus nerve nuclei in medulla oblongata in asphyxia related death cases. Morphological changes that were investigated were mainly in the dorsal motor respiratory center (DMRC, nucleus tractus solitarius (nTS and nucleus ambigus (nA in the medulla oblongata. In our research, the autopsy material from asphyxia related death cases was used from various etiologies: monoxide carbon (CO, liquid drowning, strangulation, electricity, clinical-pathological death, firing weapon, explosive weapon, sharp and blunt objects and death cases due to accident. The material selected for research was taken from medulla oblongata and lungs from all lobes. The material from the medulla oblongata and lungs was fixed in a 10% solution of buffered formalin. Special histochemical methods for central nervous system (CNS were employed like: Cresyl echt violet, toluidin blue, Sevier-Munger modification and Grimelius. For stereometrical analysis of the quantitative density of the neurons the universal testing system Weibel M42 was used. The acquired results show that in sudden asphyxia related death cases, there are alterations in the nuclei of vagal nerve in form of: central chromatolysis, axonal retraction, axonal fragmentation, intranuclear vacuolization, cytoplasmic vacuolization, edema, condensation and dispersion of substance of Nissl, proliferation of oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and microglia. The altered population of vagus nerve neurons does not show an important statistica! significarne compared to the overall quantity of the neurons in the nuclei of the vagus nerve (p<0,05.

  6. Afferent fibers of the pudendal nerve modulate sympathetic neurons controlling the bladder neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, André; Schmid, Daniel M; Curt, Armin; Knapp, Peter A; Schurch, Brigitte

    2003-01-01

    Pudendal nerve stimulation is known to have a potential modulative effect on bladder function. However, even if its efficiency has been established for various neurogenic and non-neurogenic bladder dysfunctions, the underlying neuronal mechanism, and the involved pathways in humans remain unknown. In this prospective study we focused on the effects of pudendal nerve stimulation in complete spinal cord injured patients to identify neuromodulative processes that occur on spinal level. Twenty complete spinal male presenting with upper motor neuron lesion and neurogenic incontinence underwent pudendal nerve stimulation. Bladder, bladder neck (BN), and external urethral sphincter (EUS) pressures were continuously recorded with a three channel microtip pressure transducer catheter. Fifty six pudendal stimulations using biphasic rectangular impulses (0.2 ms, 10 Hz) with intensities up to 100 mA were applied to the dorsal penile nerve. In six patients, 18 stimulations were repeated after intravenous (i.v.) administration of 7 mg phentolamine. Mean BN and EUS pressure increased during stimulation significantly (P stimulation significantly (P nerve stimulation evoked somatic responses in the EUS and autonomic responses in the smooth muscle sphincter controlling the BN. Longer latencies of the BN responses and the sensitivity to the alpha-blocking agent phentolamine suggest that sympathetic alpha-adrenergic fibers are involved. Somatic afferent fibers of the pudendal nerve are supposed to project on sympathetic thoracolumbar neurons to the BN and modulate their function. This neuromodulative effect works exclusively at the spinal level and appears to be at least partly responsible for BN competence and at least continence. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Thyroid hormone is required for the pruning of afferent type II spiral ganglion neurons in the mouse cochlea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Srividya; Balasubbu, Suganthalakshmi; Mustapha, Mirna

    2015-01-01

    Afferent connections to the sensory inner and outer hair cells in the cochlea refine and functionally mature during the thyroid hormone (TH)- critical period of inner ear development that occurs perinatally in rodents. In this study, we investigated the effects of hypothyroidism on afferent type II innervation to outer hair cells (OHCs) using the Snell dwarf mouse (Pit1dw). Using a transgenic approach to specifically label type II spiral ganglion neurons, we found that a lack of TH causes persistence of excess type II SGN connections to the OHCs, as well as continued expression of the hair cell functional marker, otoferlin, in the OHCs beyond the maturation period. We also observed a concurrent delay in efferent attachment to the OHCs. Supplementing with TH during the early postnatal period from postnatal day (P) 3 to P4 reversed the defect in type II SGN pruning but did not alter otoferlin expression. Our results show that hypothyroidism causes a defect in the large-scale pruning of afferent type II spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea, and a delay in efferent attachment and the maturation of otoferlin expression. Our data suggest that the state of maturation of hair cells, as determined by otoferlin expression, may not regulate the pruning of their afferent innervation. PMID:26592716

  8. Vagal gustatory reflex circuits for intraoral food sorting behavior in the goldfish: cellular organization and neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenaga, Takanori; Ogura, Tatsuya; Finger, Thomas E

    2009-09-20

    The sense of taste is crucial in an animal's determination as to what is edible and what is not. This gustatory function is especially important in goldfish, who utilize a sophisticated oropharyngeal sorting mechanism to separate food from substrate material. The computational aspects of this detection are carried out by the medullary vagal lobe, which is a large, laminated structure combining elements of both the gustatory nucleus of the solitary tract and the nucleus ambiguus. The sensory layers of the vagal lobe are coupled to the motor layers via a simple reflex arc. Details of this reflex circuit were investigated with histology and calcium imaging. Biocytin injections into the motor layer labeled vagal reflex interneurons that have radially directed dendrites ramifying within the layers of primary afferent terminals. Axons of reflex interneurons extend radially inward to terminate onto both vagal motoneurons and small, GABAergic interneurons in the motor layer. Functional imaging shows increases in intracellular Ca++ of vagal motoneurons following electrical stimulation in the sensory layer. These responses were suppressed under Ca(++)-free conditions and by interruption of the axons bridging between the sensory and motor layers. Pharmacological experiments showed that glutamate acting via (+/-)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy- 5-ethylisoxazole-4-propioinc acid (AMPA)/kainate and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors mediate neurotransmission between reflex interneurons and vagal motoneurons. Thus, the vagal gustatory portion of the viscerosensory complex is linked to branchiomotor neurons of the pharynx via a glutamatergic interneuronal system.

  9. Renal and cardiovascular afferent inputs to hypothalamic paraventriculo-spinal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caverson, M M; Ciriello, J

    1988-12-19

    Experiments were done in chloralose-anesthetized cats to identify single units in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) that responded to stimulation of afferent renal nerves (ARN) and the buffer nerves (carotid sinus (CSN) and aortic depressor (ADN) nerves), and whose axons projected directly to thoracic spinal sympathetic areas. Of 426 single units tested in the PVH region, 20 were antidromically activated by stimulation of the spinal cord. Sixteen of these antidromic units (80%) responded orthodromically to stimulation of ARN and/or the buffer nerves; 6 units (30%) were excited by ARN stimulation only, 2 units (10%) were excited by both ARN and buffer nerve stimulation, and 6 units were excited and 2 inhibited by buffer nerve stimulation only. These data demonstrate that sensory information originating in renal and cardiovascular receptors alters the firing rate of PVH-spinal projecting neurons and suggest that this long renal-PVH reflex loop may contribute to the elevation of arterial pressure (AP) during conditions when ARN are activated.

  10. Differential Inhibitory Control of Semicircular Canal Nerve Afferent-Evoked Inputs in Second-Order Vestibular Neurons by Glycinergic and GABAergic Circuits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stefan Biesdorf; David Malinvaud; Ingrid Reichenberger; Sandra Pfanzelt; Hans Straka

    2008-01-01

    ... (2°VN) sum with disynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) that originate from the thickest afferent fibers of the same nerve branch and are mediated by neurons in the ipsilateral vestibular nucleus...

  11. Induction of CB1 cannabinoid receptor by inflammation in primary afferent neurons facilitates antihyperalgesic effect of peripheral CB1 agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Fumimasa; Shimosato, Goshun; Kawasaki, Yasuhiko; Hashimoto, Satoru; Tanaka, Yoshifumi; Ji, Ru-Rong; Tanaka, Masaki

    2006-09-01

    Cannabinoids act on various regions in the nervous system to modulate neuronal activity including nociception. Here, we investigated CB1 receptor expression in primary afferent neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and the efficacy of a local (intraplantar) application of the selective CB1 agonist, 2-arachidonyl-2-chloroethylamide (ACEA), on inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia. In situ hybridization showed normal CB1 mRNA expression in 28% of DRG neurons. Peripheral inflammation by CFA (complete Freund's adjuvant) significantly increased the ratio of CB1 mRNA-positive neurons to 43%, primarily with increase in NF200-negative C-fiber nociceptors. Furthermore, CB1 and TRPV1 (transient potential receptor vanilloid subtype-1) co-localization was increased from 41% before inflammation to 67% two days after inflammation. Inflammation also increased CB1 immunoreactivity in DRG neurons and in nerve fibers of the hindpaw dermis, indicating increased CB1 transport from the cell body to the peripheral nerve. The intraplantar application of ACEA attenuated CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia. The antinociceptive properties of ACEA became more prominent at 2 days after inflammation, compared with those in non-inflamed and inflamed animals at 8 h. These results suggest that CB1 expression in primary afferent neurons is increased by inflammation and that the subsequent increase in CB1 transport to peripheral axons contributes to the increased antihyperalgesic efficacy of locally administered CB1 agonist.

  12. Betahistine produces post-synaptic inhibition of the excitability of the primary afferent neurons in the vestibular endorgans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, E; Chávez, H; Valli, P; Benvenuti, C; Vega, R

    2001-01-01

    Betahistine has been used to treat several vestibular disorders of both central and peripheral origin. The objective of this work was to study the action of betahistine in the vestibular endorgans. Experiments were done in wild larval axolotl (Ambystoma tigrinum). Multiunit extracellular recordings were obtained from the semicircular canal nerve using a suction electrode. Betahistine (10 microM to 10 mM; n = 32) inhibited the basal spike discharge of the vestibular afferent neurons with an IC50 of 600 microM. To define the site of action of betahistine, its interactions with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine (3 microM) and with the cholinergic antagonists atropine (10 microM; n = 3) and d-tubocurarine (10 microM; n = 3) were studied. The action of betahistine when co-administered with these drugs was the same as that in control experiments, indicating that its effects did not include nitric oxide production or the activation of cholinergic receptors. In contrast, 0.01-1 mM betahistine reduced the excitatory action of kainic acid (10 microM; n = 6) and quiscualic acid (1 microM; n = 13). These results indicate that the action of betahistine on the spike discharge of afferent neurons seems to be due to a post-synaptic inhibitory action on the primary afferent neuron response to the hair cell neurotransmitter.

  13. The physiological motor patterns produced by neurons in the nucleus retroambiguus in the rat and their modulation by vagal, peripheral chemosensory, and nociceptive stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Hari H; Huang, Zheng-Gui; Silburn, Peter A; Balnave, Ron J; Holstege, Gert

    2018-02-01

    The nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) is a neuronal cell group in the medullary ventrolateral tegmentum, rostrocaudally between the obex and the first cervical spinal segment. NRA neurons are premotor interneurons with direct projections to the motoneurons of soft palate, pharynx, and larynx in the nucleus ambiguus in the lateral medulla as well as to the motoneurons in the spinal cord innervating diaphragm, abdominal, and pelvic floor muscles and the lumbosacral motoneurons generating sexual posture. These NRA premotor interneurons receive very strong projections from the periaqueductal gray (PAG) in the context of basic survival mechanisms as fight, flight, freezing, sound production, and sexual behavior. In the present study in rat we investigated the physiological motor patterns generated by NRA neurons, as the result of vagal, peripheral chemosensory, and nociceptive stimulation. The results show that the NRA contains phasic respiratory modulated neurons, as well as nonphasic tonically modulated neurons. Stimulation in the various rostrocaudal levels of the NRA generates site-specific laryngeal, respiratory, abdominal, and pelvic floor motor activities. Vagal and peripheral chemosensory stimulation induces both excitatory and inhibitory modulation of phasic NRA-neurons, while peripheral chemosensory and nociceptive stimulation causes excitation and inhibition of nonphasic NRA-neurons. These results are in agreement with the concept that the NRA represents a multifunctional group of neurons involved in the output of the emotional motor system, such as vomiting, vocalization, mating, and changes in respiration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Synaptic transmission of chaotic spike trains between primary afferent fiber and spinal dorsal horn neuron in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Y-H; Jian, Z; Wen, Z-H; Wang, Y-Y; Han, S; Duan, Y-B; Xing, J-L; Zhu, J-L; Hu, S-J

    2004-01-01

    Primary sensory neurons can generate irregular burst firings in which the existence of significant deterministic behaviors of chaotic dynamics has been proved with nonlinear time series analysis. But how well the deterministic characteristics and neural information of presynaptic chaotic spike trains were transmitted into postsynaptic spike trains is still an open question. Here we investigated the synaptic transmission of chaotic spike trains between primary Adelta afferent fiber and spinal dorsal horn neuron. Two kinds of basic stimulus unit, brief burst and single pulse, were employed by us to comprise chaotic stimulus trains. For time series analysis, we defined "events" as the longest sequences of spikes with all interspike intervals less than or equal to a certain threshold and extracted the interevent intervals (IEIs) from spike trains. Return map analysis of the IEI series showed that the main temporal structure of chaotic input trains could be detected in postsynaptic output trains, especially under brief-burst stimulation. Using correlation dimension and nonlinear prediction methods, we found that synaptic transmission could influence the nonlinear characteristics of chaotic trains, such as fractal dimension and short-term predictability, with greater influence made under single-pulse stimulation. By calculating the mutual information between input and output trains, we found the information carried by presynaptic spike trains could not be completely transmitted at primary afferent synapses, and that brief bursts could more reliably transmit the information carried by chaotic input trains across synapses. These results indicate that although unreliability exists during synaptic transmission, the main deterministic characteristics of chaotic burst trains can be transmitted across primary afferent synapses. Moreover, brief bursts that come from the periphery can more reliably transmit neural information between primary afferent fibers and spinal dorsal horn

  15. Comparison of the expression of c-fos, nur77 and egr1 mRNAs in rat hypothalamic magnocellular neurons and their putative afferent projection neurons: cell- and stimulus-specific induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckman, S M

    1997-11-01

    Hypothalamic magnocellular neurons and their afferent inputs provide a model system in which to study the regulation of inducible transcription factors in the brain in vivo. Osmotic stimulation of rats produced by graded infusions of saline at different tonicities was found to lead to the induction of c-fos, nur77 and egr1 mRNAs in magnocellular neurons, as well as in putative afferent neurons, including those in structures of the forebrain (subfornical organ, median preoptic nucleus and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis). The results presented suggest that stronger levels of osmotic stimulation recruit additional afferents from the forebrain and brainstem that can act on magnocellular neurons via alternative receptors. A single systemic injection of the peptide cholecystokinin produced robust induction of c-fos and nur77 mRNAs in afferent neurons of the brainstem nucleus tractus solitarii and in magnocellular neurons. Despite the fact that these two neuronal populations are clearly electrically active, egr1 was not induced by this stimulus, providing examples of cell- and stimulus-specificity of its expression. This study re-emphasizes that the induction of transcription factors is largely dependent on the nature of the afferent input and does not correlate necessarily to the electrical activity of the neuron.

  16. Dynorphin-dependent reduction of excitability and attenuation of inhibitory afferents of NPS neurons in the pericoerulear region of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay eJuengling

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Neuropeptide S system, consisting of the 20-amino acid peptide neuropeptide S (NPS and its G-protein coupled receptor (NPSR, modulates arousal, wakefulness, anxiety, and fear-extinction in mice. In addition, recent evidence indicates that the NPS system attenuates stress-dependent impairment of fear extinction, and that NPS-expressing neurons in close proximity to the locus coeruleus (pericoerulear, periLC region are activated by stress. Furthermore, periLC NPS neurons receive afferents from neurons of the centrolateral nucleus of the amygdala (CeL, of which a substantial population expresses the kappa opioid receptor (KOR ligand precursor prodynorphin. This study aims to identify the effect of the dynorphinergic system on NPS neurons in the periLC via pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. Using electrophysiological recordings in mouse brain slices, we provide evidence that NPS neurons in the periLC region are directly inhibited by dynorphin A via activation of κ-opioid receptor 1 (KOR1 and a subsequent increase of potassium conductances. Thus, the dynorphinergic system is suited to inactivate NPS neurons in the periLC. In addition to this direct, somatic effect, dynorphin A reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses on NPS neurons via KOR1 and KOR2. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence for the interaction of the NPS and the kappa opioid system in the periLC. Therefore, the endogenous opioid dynorphin is suited to inhibit NPS neurons with a subsequent decrease in NPS release in putative target regions leading to a variety of physiological consequences such as increased anxiety or vulnerability to stress exposure.

  17. Distinct target cell-dependent forms of short-term plasticity of the central visceral afferent synapses of the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watabe Ayako M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The visceral afferents from various cervico-abdominal sensory receptors project to the dorsal vagal complex (DVC, which is composed of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS, the area postrema and the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMX, via the vagus and glossopharyngeal nerves and then the solitary tract (TS in the brainstem. While the excitatory transmission at the TS-NTS synapses shows strong frequency-dependent suppression in response to repeated stimulation of the afferents, the frequency dependence and short-term plasticity at the TS-DMX synapses, which also transmit monosynaptic information from the visceral afferents to the DVC neurons, remain largely unknown. Results Recording of the EPSCs activated by paired or repeated TS stimulation in the brainstem slices of rats revealed that, unlike NTS neurons whose paired-pulse ratio (PPR is consistently below 0.6, the distribution of the PPR of DMX neurons shows bimodal peaks that are composed of type I (PPR, 0.6-1.5; 53% of 120 neurons recorded and type II (PPR, Conclusions These two general types of short-term plasticity might contribute to the differential activation of distinct vago-vagal reflex circuits, depending on the firing frequency and type of visceral afferents.

  18. NMDA receptor subunit expression and PAR2 receptor activation in colospinal afferent neurons (CANs) during inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckow, Shelby K; Caudle, Robert M

    2009-09-22

    Visceral hypersensitivity is a clinical observation made when diagnosing patients with functional bowel disorders. The cause of visceral hypersensitivity is unknown but is thought to be attributed to inflammation. Previously we demonstrated that a unique set of enteric neurons, colospinal afferent neurons (CANs), co-localize with the NR1 and NR2D subunits of the NMDA receptor as well as with the PAR2 receptor. The aim of this study was to determine if NMDA and PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs contribute to visceral hypersensitivity following inflammation. Recently, work has suggested that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor mediate inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity. Therefore, in order to study CAN involvement in visceral hypersensitivity, DRG neurons expressing the TRPV1 receptor were lesioned with resiniferatoxin (RTX) prior to inflammation and behavioural testing. CANs do not express the TRPV1 receptor; therefore, they survive following RTX injection. RTX treatment resulted in a significant decrease in TRPV1 expressing neurons in the colon and immunohistochemical analysis revealed no change in peptide or receptor expression in CANs following RTX lesioning as compared to control data. Behavioral studies determined that both inflamed non-RTX and RTX animals showed a decrease in balloon pressure threshold as compared to controls. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the NR1 cassettes, N1 and C1, of the NMDA receptor on CANs were up-regulated following inflammation. Furthermore, inflammation resulted in the activation of the PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs. Our data show that inflammation causes an up-regulation of the NMDA receptor and the activation of the PAR2 receptor expressed on CANs. These changes are associated with a decrease in balloon pressure in response to colorectal distension in non-RTX and RTX lesioned animals. Therefore, these data suggest that CANs

  19. NMDA receptor subunit expression and PAR2 receptor activation in colospinal afferent neurons (CANs during inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caudle Robert M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visceral hypersensitivity is a clinical observation made when diagnosing patients with functional bowel disorders. The cause of visceral hypersensitivity is unknown but is thought to be attributed to inflammation. Previously we demonstrated that a unique set of enteric neurons, colospinal afferent neurons (CANs, co-localize with the NR1 and NR2D subunits of the NMDA receptor as well as with the PAR2 receptor. The aim of this study was to determine if NMDA and PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs contribute to visceral hypersensitivity following inflammation. Recently, work has suggested that dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1 receptor mediate inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity. Therefore, in order to study CAN involvement in visceral hypersensitivity, DRG neurons expressing the TRPV1 receptor were lesioned with resiniferatoxin (RTX prior to inflammation and behavioural testing. Results CANs do not express the TRPV1 receptor; therefore, they survive following RTX injection. RTX treatment resulted in a significant decrease in TRPV1 expressing neurons in the colon and immunohistochemical analysis revealed no change in peptide or receptor expression in CANs following RTX lesioning as compared to control data. Behavioral studies determined that both inflamed non-RTX and RTX animals showed a decrease in balloon pressure threshold as compared to controls. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the NR1 cassettes, N1 and C1, of the NMDA receptor on CANs were up-regulated following inflammation. Furthermore, inflammation resulted in the activation of the PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs. Conclusion Our data show that inflammation causes an up-regulation of the NMDA receptor and the activation of the PAR2 receptor expressed on CANs. These changes are associated with a decrease in balloon pressure in response to colorectal distension in non-RTX and RTX lesioned

  20. Chronic recruitment of primary afferent neurons by microstimulation in the feline dorsal root ganglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Lee E.; Ayers, Christopher A.; Ciollaro, Mattia; Ventura, Valérie; Weber, Douglas J.; Gaunt, Robert A.

    2014-06-01

    Objective. This study describes results of primary afferent neural microstimulation experiments using microelectrode arrays implanted chronically in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of four cats. The goal was to test the stability and selectivity of these microelectrode arrays as a potential interface for restoration of somatosensory feedback after damage to the nervous system such as amputation. Approach. A five-contact nerve-cuff electrode implanted on the sciatic nerve was used to record the antidromic compound action potential response to DRG microstimulation (2-15 µA biphasic pulses, 200 µs cathodal pulse width), and the threshold for eliciting a response was tracked over time. Recorded responses were segregated based on conduction velocity to determine thresholds for recruiting Group I and Group II/Aβ primary afferent fibers. Main results. Thresholds were initially low (5.1 ± 2.3 µA for Group I and 6.3 ± 2.0 µA for Group II/Aβ) and increased over time. Additionally the number of electrodes with thresholds less than or equal to 15 µA decreased over time. Approximately 12% of tested electrodes continued to elicit responses at 15 µA up to 26 weeks after implantation. Higher stimulation intensities (up to 30 µA) were tested in one cat at 23 weeks post-implantation yielding responses on over 20 additional electrodes. Within the first six weeks after implantation, approximately equal numbers of electrodes elicited only Group I or Group II/Aβ responses at threshold, but the relative proportion of Group II/Aβ responses decreased over time. Significance. These results suggest that it is possible to activate Group I or Group II/Aβ primary afferent fibers in isolation with penetrating microelectrode arrays implanted in the DRG, and that those responses can be elicited up to 26 weeks after implantation, although it may be difficult to achieve a consistent response day-to-day with currently available electrode technology. The DRG are compelling targets

  1. Tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels Na(v)1.8/SNS and Na(v)1.9/NaN in afferent neurons innervating urinary bladder in control and spinal cord injured rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Joel A; Cummins, Theodore R; Yoshimura, Naoki; de Groat, William C; Waxman, Stephen G

    2003-02-14

    Tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channels Na(v)1.8/SNS and Na(v)1.9/NaN are preferentially expressed in small diameter dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. The urinary bladder is innervated by small afferent neurons from L6/S1 DRG, of which approximately 75% exhibit high-threshold action potentials that are mediated by TTX-R sodium channels. Following transection of the spinal cord at T8, the bladder becomes areflexic and then gradually hyper-reflexic, and there is an attenuation of the TTX-R sodium currents in bladder afferent neurons. In the present study, we demonstrate that Na(v)1.8 is expressed in both bladder and non-bladder afferent neurons, while Na(v)1.9 is expressed in non-bladder afferent neurons but is rarely observed in bladder afferent neurons. In spinal cord transected rats 28-32 days following transection, there is a decreased expression of Na(v)1.8 sodium channels in bladder afferents, but no change in the expression of Na(v)1.8 in non-bladder afferent neurons. Both bladder and non-bladder afferent neurons exhibit limited increases in Na(v)1.9 expression following spinal cord transection. These results demonstrate that the expression of TTX-R channels in bladder afferent neurons changes after spinal cord transection, and these changes may contribute to the increased excitability of these neurons following spinal cord injury.

  2. Musings on the wanderer: what's new in our understanding of vago-vagal reflexes? III. Activity-dependent plasticity in vago-vagal reflexes controlling the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travagli, R Alberto; Hermann, Gerlinda E; Browning, Kirsteen N; Rogers, Richard C

    2003-02-01

    Vago-vagal reflex circuits modulate digestive functions from the oral cavity to the transverse colon. Previous articles in this series have described events at the level of the sensory receptors encoding the peripheral stimuli, the transmission of information in the afferent vagus, and the conversion of this data within the dorsal vagal complex (DVC) to impulses in the preganglionic efferents. The control by vagal efferents of the postganglionic neurons impinging on the glands and smooth muscles of the target organs has also been illustrated. Here we focus on some of the mechanisms by which these apparently static reflex circuits can be made quite plastic as a consequence of the action of modulatory inputs from other central nervous system sources. A large body of evidence has shown that the neuronal elements that constitute these brain stem circuits have nonuniform properties and function differently according to status of their target organs and the level of activity in critical modulatory inputs. We propose that DVC circuits undergo a certain amount of short-term plasticity that allows the brain stem neuronal elements to act in harmony with neural systems that control behavioral and physiological homeostasis.

  3. Cutaneous TRPM8-expressing sensory afferents are a small population of neurons with unique firing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Michael P; Rau, Kristofer K; Koerber, H Richard

    2017-04-01

    It has been well documented that the transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) receptor is involved in environmental cold detection. The role that this receptor plays in nociception however, has been somewhat controversial since conflicting reports have shown different neurochemical identities and responsiveness of TRPM8 neurons. In order to functionally characterize cutaneous TRMP8 fibers, we used two ex vivo somatosensory recording preparations to functionally characterize TRPM8 neurons that innervate the hairy skin in mice genetically engineered to express GFP from the TRPM8 locus. We found several types of cold-sensitive neurons that innervate the hairy skin of the mouse but the TRPM8-expressing neurons were found to be of two specific populations that responded with rapid firing to cool temperatures. The first group was mechanically insensitive but the other did respond to high threshold mechanical deformation of the skin. None of these fibers were found to contain calcitonin gene-related peptide, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 or bind isolectin B4. These results taken together with other reports suggest that TRPM8 containing sensory neurons are environmental cooling detectors that may be nociceptive or non-nociceptive depending on the sensitivity of individual fibers to different combinations of stimulus modalities. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  4. CRF1 receptor activation increases the response of neurons in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala to afferent stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The basolateral nucleus (BLA of the amygdala contributes to the consolidation of memories for emotional or stressful events. The nucleus contains a high density of CRF1 receptors that are activated by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF. Modulation of the excitability of neurons in the BLA by CRF may regulate the immediate response to stressful events and the formation of associated memories. In the present study, CRF was found to increase the amplitude of field potentials recorded in the BLA following excitatory afferent stimulation, in vitro. The increase was mediated by CRF1 receptors, since it could be blocked by the selective, non-peptide antagonists, NBI30775 and NBI35583, but not by the CRF2-selective antagonist, astressin 2B. Furthermore, the CRF2-selective agonist, urocortin II had no effect on field potential amplitude. The increase induced by CRF was long-lasting, could not be reversed by subsequent administration of NBI35583, and required the activation of protein kinase C. This effect of CRF in the BLA may be important for increasing the salience of aversive stimuli under stressful conditions, and for enhancing the consolidation of associated memories. The results provide further justification for studying the efficacy of selective antagonists of the CRF1 receptor to reduce memory formation linked to emotional or traumatic events, and suggest that these compounds might be useful as prophylactic treatment for stress-related illness such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

  5. Urinary bladder irritation alters efficacy of vagal stimulation on rostral medullary neurons in chronic T8 spinalized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddumi, Ezidin G; Hubscher, Charles H

    2007-07-01

    The presence of pelvic visceral inputs to neurons in the rostral medulla that are responsive to electrical stimulation of the abdominal branches of the vagus nerve (VAG-abd) was investigated in a complete chronic T8 spinal transection rat model. Using extracellular electrophysiological recordings from single medullary reticular formation (MRF) neurons, 371 neurons in 15 rats responsive to pinching the ear (search stimulus) were tested for somato-visceral and viscero-visceral convergent responses to stimulation of the following nerves/territories: VAG-abd, dorsal nerve of the penis, pelvic nerve, distention of urinary bladder and colon, penile stimulation, urethral infusion, and touch/pinch of the entire body surface. In addition to these mechanical and electrical stimuli, a chemical stimulus applied to the bladder was assessed as well. Of the total neurons examined, 205 were tested before and 166 tested beginning 20 min after application of a chemical irritant (2% acetic acid) to the urinary bladder (same rats used pre/post irritation). As with intact controls, many ear-responsive MRF neurons responded to the electrical stimulation of VAG-abd. Although MRF neuron responses failed to be evoked with direct (mechanical and electrical nerve) pelvic visceral stimuli, acute chemical irritation of the urinary bladder produced a significant increase in the number of MRF neurons responsive to stimulation of VAG-abd. The results of this study indicate a central effect that potentially relates to some of the generalized below level pelvic visceral sensations that have been documented in patients with complete spinal cord injury.

  6. Acylcarnitines as markers of exercise-associated fuel partitioning, xenometabolism, and potential signals to muscle afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Light, Alan R; Hoppel, Charles L; Campbell, Caitlin; Chandler, Carol J; Burnett, Dustin J; Souza, Elaine C; Casazza, Gretchen A; Hughen, Ronald W; Keim, Nancy L; Newman, John W; Hunter, Gary R; Fernandez, Jose R; Garvey, W Timothy; Harper, Mary-Ellen; Fiehn, Oliver; Adams, Sean H

    2017-01-01

    that a weight-loss/fitness intervention alters plasma xenometabolites [i.e. cis-3,4-methylene-heptanoylcarnitine and γ-butyrobetaine (a co-metabolite possibly derived in part from gut bacteria)], suggesting that host metabolic health regulated gut microbe metabolism. Finally, we considered whether acylcarnitine metabolites signal to muscle-innervating afferents; palmitoylcarnitine at concentrations as low as 1-10 μm activated a subset (∼2.5-5%) of these neurons ex vivo. This supports the hypothesis that in addition to tracking exercise-associated shifts in fuel metabolism, muscle acylcarnitines act as signals of exertion to short-loop somatosensory-motor circuits or to the brain. © 2016 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  7. Response properties of whisker-associated primary afferent neurons following infraorbital nerve transection with microsurgical repair in adult rats

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Bo; Zanoun, Rami R.; Carvell, George E.; Simons, Daniel J.; Washington, Kia M.

    2016-01-01

    The rodent whisker/trigeminal system, characterized by high spatial and temporal resolution, provides an experimental model for developing new therapies for improving sensory functions of damaged peripheral nerves. Here, we use controlled whisker stimulation and single-unit recordings of trigeminal ganglion cells to examine in detail the nature and time course of functional recovery of mechanoreceptive afferents following nerve transection with microsurgical repair of the infraorbital nerve (...

  8. Temperature differentially facilitates spontaneous but not evoked glutamate release from cranial visceral primary afferents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Fawley

    Full Text Available Temperature is fundamentally important to all biological functions including synaptic glutamate release. Vagal afferents from the solitary tract (ST synapse on second order neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract, and glutamate release at this first central synapse controls autonomic reflex function. Expression of the temperature-sensitive Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type 1 receptor separates ST afferents into C-fibers (TRPV1+ and A-fibers (TRPV1-. Action potential-evoked glutamate release is similar between C- and A-fiber afferents, but TRPV1 expression facilitates a second form of synaptic glutamate release in C-fibers by promoting substantially more spontaneous glutamate release. The influence of temperature on different forms of glutamate release is not well understood. Here we tested how temperature impacts the generation of evoked and spontaneous release of glutamate and its relation to TRPV1 expression. In horizontal brainstem slices of rats, activation of ST primary afferents generated synchronous evoked glutamate release (ST-eEPSCs at constant latency whose amplitude reflects the probability of evoked glutamate release. The frequency of spontaneous EPSCs in these same neurons measured the probability of spontaneous glutamate release. We measured both forms of glutamate from each neuron during ramp changes in bath temperature of 4-5 °C. Spontaneous glutamate release from TRPV1+ closely tracked with these thermal changes indicating changes in the probability of spontaneous glutamate release. In the same neurons, temperature changed axon conduction registered as latency shifts but ST-eEPSC amplitudes were constant and independent of TRPV1 expression. These data indicate that TRPV1-operated glutamate release is independent of action potential-evoked glutamate release in the same neurons. Together, these support the hypothesis that evoked and spontaneous glutamate release originate from two pools of vesicles that are

  9. Renal Afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Alissa A; Carmichael, Casey Y; Wainford, Richard D

    2016-09-01

    The etiology of hypertension, a critical public health issue affecting one in three US adults, involves the integration of the actions of multiple organ systems, including the renal sympathetic nerves. The renal sympathetic nerves, which are comprised of both afferent (sensory input) and efferent (sympathetic outflow) arms, have emerged as a major potential therapeutic target to treat hypertension and disease states exhibiting excess renal sympathetic activity. This review highlights recent advances in both clinical and basic science that have provided new insight into the distribution, function, and reinnervation of the renal sympathetic nerves, with a focus on the renal afferent nerves, in hypertension and hypertension-evoked disease states including salt-sensitive hypertension, obesity-induced hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. Increased understanding of the differential role of the renal afferent versus efferent nerves in the pathophysiology of hypertension has the potential to identify novel targets and refine therapeutic interventions designed to treat hypertension.

  10. Sensory Neurons that Detect Stretch and Nutrients in the Digestive System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Erika K; Chang, Rui B; Strochlic, David E; Umans, Benjamin D; Lowell, Bradford B; Liberles, Stephen D

    2016-06-30

    Neural inputs from internal organs are essential for normal autonomic function. The vagus nerve is a key body-brain connection that monitors the digestive, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems. Within the gastrointestinal tract, vagal sensory neurons detect gut hormones and organ distension. Here, we investigate the molecular diversity of vagal sensory neurons and their roles in sensing gastrointestinal inputs. Genetic approaches allowed targeted investigation of gut-to-brain afferents involved in homeostatic responses to ingested nutrients (GPR65 neurons) and mechanical distension of the stomach and intestine (GLP1R neurons). Optogenetics, in vivo ganglion imaging, and genetically guided anatomical mapping provide direct links between neuron identity, peripheral anatomy, central anatomy, conduction velocity, response properties in vitro and in vivo, and physiological function. These studies clarify the roles of vagal afferents in mediating particular gut hormone responses. Moreover, genetic control over gut-to-brain neurons provides a molecular framework for understanding neural control of gastrointestinal physiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of inner ear afferent connections: forming primary neurons and connecting them to the developing sensory epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, Bernd

    2003-01-01

    The molecular and cellular origin of the primary neurons of the inner ear, the vestibular and spiral neurons, is reviewed including how they connect to the specific sensory epithelia and what the molecular nature of their survival is. Primary neurons of the ear depend on a single basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) protein for their formation, neurogenin 1 (ngn1). An immediate downstream gene is the bHLH gene neuronal differentiation (NeuroD). Targeted null mutations of ngn1 results in absence of primary neuron formation; targeted null mutation of NeuroD results in loss of almost all spiral and many vestibular neurons. NeuroD and a later expressed gene, Brn3a, play a role in pathfinding to and within sensory epithelia. The molecular nature of this pathfinding property is unknown. Reduction of hair cells in ngn1 null mutations suggests a clonal relationship with primary neurons. This relationship may play some role in specifying the identity of hair cells and the primary neurons that connect with them. Primary neuron neurites growth to sensory epithelia is initially independent of trophic factors released from developing sensory epithelia, but becomes rapidly dependent on those factors. Null mutations of specific neurotrophic factors lose distinct primary neuron populations which undergo rapid embryonic cell death.

  12. Mu Opioid Receptors on Primary Afferent Nav1.8 Neurons Contribute to Opiate-Induced Analgesia: Insight from Conditional Knockout Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karchewski, Laurie; Gardon, Olivier; Matifas, Audrey; Filliol, Dominique; Becker, Jérôme A. J.; Wood, John N.; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Gaveriaux-Ruff, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Opiates are powerful drugs to treat severe pain, and act via mu opioid receptors distributed throughout the nervous system. Their clinical use is hampered by centrally-mediated adverse effects, including nausea or respiratory depression. Here we used a genetic approach to investigate the potential of peripheral mu opioid receptors as targets for pain treatment. We generated conditional knockout (cKO) mice in which mu opioid receptors are deleted specifically in primary afferent Nav1.8-positive neurons. Mutant animals were compared to controls for acute nociception, inflammatory pain, opiate-induced analgesia and constipation. There was a 76% decrease of mu receptor-positive neurons and a 60% reduction of mu-receptor mRNA in dorsal root ganglia of cKO mice. Mutant mice showed normal responses to heat, mechanical, visceral and chemical stimuli, as well as unchanged morphine antinociception and tolerance to antinociception in models of acute pain. Inflammatory pain developed similarly in cKO and controls mice after Complete Freund’s Adjuvant. In the inflammation model, however, opiate-induced (morphine, fentanyl and loperamide) analgesia was reduced in mutant mice as compared to controls, and abolished at low doses. Morphine-induced constipation remained intact in cKO mice. We therefore genetically demonstrate for the first time that mu opioid receptors partly mediate opiate analgesia at the level of Nav1.8-positive sensory neurons. In our study, this mechanism operates under conditions of inflammatory pain, but not nociception. Previous pharmacology suggests that peripheral opiates may be clinically useful, and our data further demonstrate that Nav1.8 neuron-associated mu opioid receptors are feasible targets to alleviate some forms of persistent pain. PMID:24069332

  13. Response properties of whisker-associated primary afferent neurons following infraorbital nerve transection with microsurgical repair in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bo; Zanoun, Rami R; Carvell, George E; Simons, Daniel J; Washington, Kia M

    2016-03-01

    The rodent whisker/trigeminal system, characterized by high spatial and temporal resolution, provides an experimental model for developing new therapies for improving sensory functions of damaged peripheral nerves. Here, we use controlled whisker stimulation and single-unit recordings of trigeminal ganglion cells to examine in detail the nature and time course of functional recovery of mechanoreceptive afferents following nerve transection with microsurgical repair of the infraorbital nerve (ION) branch of the trigeminal nerve in adult rats. Response measures include rapid vs. slow adaptation, firing rate, interspike intervals, latency, and angular (directional) tuning. Whisker-evoked responses, readily observable by 3 wk post-transection, recover progressively for at least the next 5 wk. All cells in transected animals, as in control cases, responded to deflections of single whiskers only, but topography within the ganglion was clearly disrupted. The time course and extent of recovery of quantitative response measures were receptor dependent. Cells displaying slowly adapting (SA) properties recovered more quickly than rapidly adapting (RA) populations, and for some response measures-notably evoked firing rates-closely approached or attained control levels by 8 wk post-transection. Angular tuning of RA cells was slightly better than control units, whereas SA tuning did not differ from control values. Nerve conduction times and refractory periods, examined separately using electrical stimulation of the ION, were slower than normal in all transected animals and poorly reflected recovery of whisker-evoked response latencies and interspike intervals. Results underscore the need for multiple therapeutic strategies that target different aspects of functional restitution following peripheral nerve injury. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. K+ Currents in Isolated Vestibular Afferent Calyx Terminals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dhawan, Ritu; Mann, Scott E; Meredith, Frances L; Rennie, Katherine J

    2010-01-01

    Vestibular hair cells transduce mechanical displacements of their hair bundles into an electrical receptor potential which modulates transmitter release and subsequent action potential firing in afferent neurons...

  15. Is intuitive eating related to resting state vagal activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschel, Stephanie K V; Tylka, Tracy L; Williams, DeWayne P; Kaess, Michael; Thayer, Julian F; Koenig, Julian

    2017-11-15

    Efferent and afferent fibers of the vagus nerve are involved in regulating hunger and satiety. Vagally-mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) reflects vagal activity. Previously no study addressed a potential association between resting state vagal activity and intuitive eating. Self-reports on intuitive eating and measures of resting state vmHRV were obtained in 39 students (16 female, mean age: 19.64±1.44years). Hierarchical multiple regression models showed that, after controlling for gender, age, and body mass index, resting vagal activity was inversely related to the Unconditional Permission to Eat subscale of the Intuitive Eating scale. Individuals with higher resting vagal activity tend to be less willing to eat desired foods and are more likely to label certain foods as forbidden. Future studies should include measures of self-regulation and eating disorder symptomatology to identify potential mediators or moderators when attempting to replicate these preliminary findings in larger samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Afferent diversity and the organization of central vestibular pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, J M

    2000-02-01

    This review considers whether the vestibular system includes separate populations of sensory axons innervating individual organs and giving rise to distinct central pathways. There is a variability in the discharge properties of afferents supplying each organ. Discharge regularity provides a marker for this diversity since fibers which differ in this way also differ in many other properties. Postspike recovery of excitability determines the discharge regularity of an afferent and its sensitivity to depolarizing inputs. Sensitivity is small in regularly discharging afferents and large in irregularly discharging afferents. The enhanced sensitivity of irregular fibers explains their larger responses to sensory inputs, to efferent activation, and to externally applied galvanic currents, but not their distinctive response dynamics. Morphophysiological studies show that regular and irregular afferents innervate overlapping regions of the vestibular nuclei. Intracellular recordings of EPSPs reveal that some secondary vestibular neurons receive a restricted input from regular or irregular afferents, but that most such neurons receive a mixed input from both kinds of afferents. Anodal currents delivered to the labyrinth can result in a selective and reversible silencing of irregular afferents. Such a functional ablation can provide estimates of the relative contributions of regular and irregular inputs to a central neuron's discharge. From such estimates it is concluded that secondary neurons need not resemble their afferent inputs in discharge regularity or response dynamics. Several suggestions are made as to the potentially distinctive contributions made by regular and irregular afferents: (1) Reflecting their response dynamics, regular and irregular afferents could compensate for differences in the dynamic loads of various reflexes or of individual reflexes in different parts of their frequency range; (2) The gating of irregular inputs to secondary VOR neurons could

  17. Retrograde and transganglionic transport of horseradish peroxidase-conjugated cholera toxin B subunit, wheatgerm agglutinin and isolectin B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia I in primary afferent neurons innervating the rat urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H F; Shortland, P; Park, M J; Grant, G

    1998-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated and compared the ability of the cholera toxin B subunit, wheat germ agglutinin and isolectin B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia I conjugated to horseradish peroxidase, to retrogradely and transganglionically label visceral primary afferents after unilateral injections into the rat urinary bladder wall. Horseradish peroxidase histochemical or lectin-immunofluorescence histochemical labelling of bladder afferents was seen in the L6-S1 spinal cord segments and in the T13-L2 and L6-S1 dorsal root ganglia. In the lumbosacral spinal cord, the most intense and extensive labelling of bladder afferents was seen when cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase was injected. Cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase-labelled fibres were found in Lissauer's tract, its lateral and medial collateral projections, and laminae I and IV-VI of the spinal gray matter. Labelled fibres were numerous in the lateral collateral projection and extended into the spinal parasympathetic nucleus. Labelling from both the lateral and medial projections extended into the dorsal grey commissural region. Wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase labelling produced a similar pattern but was not as dense and extensive as that of cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase. The isolectin B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia I-horseradish peroxidase-labelled fibres, on the other hand, were fewer and only observed in the lateral collateral projection and occasionally in lamina I. Cell profile counts showed that a larger number of dorsal root ganglion cells were labelled with cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase than with wheat germ agglutinin- or isolectin B4-horseradish peroxidase. In the L6-S1 dorsal root ganglia, the majority (81%) of the cholera toxin B subunit-, and almost all of the wheat germ agglutinin- and isolectin B4-immunoreactive cells were RT97-negative (an anti-neurofilament antibody that labels dorsal root ganglion neurons with

  18. Diet-driven microbiota dysbiosis is associated with vagal remodeling and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Tanusree; Cawthon, Carolina R; Ihde, Benjamin Thomas; Hajnal, Andras; DiLorenzo, Patricia M; de La Serre, Claire B; Czaja, Krzysztof

    2017-05-01

    /HSD and LF/HSD fed rats. HF/HSD and LF/HSD-fed rats also exhibited an increase in cecum and serum levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a pro-inflammatory bacterial product. Immunofluorescence revealed the withdrawal of vagal afferents from the gut and at their site of termination the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in both the HF/HSD and LF/HSD rats. Moreover, there was significant microglia activation in the nodose ganglia, which contain the vagal afferent neuron cell bodies, of HF/HSD and LF/HSD rats. Taken together, these data indicate that, similar to HF/HSD, consumption of an LF/HSD induces dysbiosis of gut microbiota, increases gut inflammation and alters vagal gut-brain communication. These changes are associated with an increase in body fat accumulation. © 2016.

  19. Inhibitory Interneurons That Express GFP in the PrP-GFP Mouse Spinal Cord Are Morphologically Heterogeneous, Innervated by Several Classes of Primary Afferent and Include Lamina I Projection Neurons among Their Postsynaptic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganley, Robert P.; Iwagaki, Noboru; del Rio, Patricia; Baseer, Najma; Dickie, Allen C.; Boyle, Kieran A.; Polgár, Erika; Watanabe, Masahiko; Abraira, Victoria E; Zimmerman, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord contains numerous inhibitory interneurons, which regulate the transmission of information perceived as touch, pain, or itch. Despite the importance of these cells, our understanding of their roles in the neuronal circuitry is limited by the difficulty in identifying functional populations. One group that has been identified and characterized consists of cells in the mouse that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under control of the prion protein (PrP) promoter. Previous reports suggested that PrP-GFP cells belonged to a single morphological class (central cells), received inputs exclusively from unmyelinated primary afferents, and had axons that remained in lamina II. However, we recently reported that the PrP-GFP cells expressed neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and/or galanin, and it has been shown that nNOS-expressing cells are more diverse in their morphology and synaptic connections. We therefore used a combined electrophysiological, pharmacological, and anatomical approach to reexamine the PrP-GFP cells. We provide evidence that they are morphologically diverse (corresponding to “unclassified” cells) and receive synaptic input from a variety of primary afferents, with convergence onto individual cells. We also show that their axons project into adjacent laminae and that they target putative projection neurons in lamina I. This indicates that the neuronal circuitry involving PrP-GFP cells is more complex than previously recognized, and suggests that they are likely to have several distinct roles in regulating the flow of somatosensory information through the dorsal horn. PMID:25972186

  20. Store-operated calcium entry in vagal sensory nerves is independent of Orai channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Justin Shane; Hadley, Stephen H; Mathews, Adithya; Taylor-Clark, Thomas E

    2013-03-29

    Vagal sensory nerves innervate the majority of visceral organs (e.g., heart, lungs, GI tract, etc) and their activation is critical for defensive and regulatory reflexes. Intracellular Ca(2+) is a key regulator of neuronal excitability and is largely controlled by the Ca(2+) stores of the endoplasmic reticulum. In other cell types store-operated channels (SOC) have been shown to contribute to the homeostatic control of intracellular Ca(2+). Here, using Ca(2+) imaging, we have shown that ER depletion in vagal sensory neurons (using thapsigargin or caffeine) in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) evoked Ca(2+) influx upon re-introduction of Ca(2+) into the extracellular buffer. This store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) was observed in approximately 25-40% of vagal neurons, equally distributed among nociceptive and non-nociceptive sensory subtypes. SOCE was blocked by Gd(3+) but not by the Orai channel blocker SKF96365. We found Orai channel mRNA in extracts from whole vagal ganglia, but when using single cell RT-PCR analysis we found only 3 out of 34 neurons expressed Orai channel mRNA, indicating that Orai channel expression in the vagal ganglia was likely derived from non-neuronal cell types. Confocal microscopy of vagal neurons in 3 day cultures demonstrated rich ER tracker fluorescence throughout axonal and neurite structures and ER store depletion (thapsigargin) evoked Ca(2+) transients from these structures. However, no SOCE could be detected in the axonal/neurite structures of vagal neurons. We conclude that SOCE occurs in vagal sensory neuronal cell bodies through non-Orai mechanisms but is absent at nerve terminals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hemicrania Continua-like headache due to nonmetastatic lung cancer--a vagal cephalalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Randolph W

    2007-10-01

    A 72-year-old man presented with a 7-week history of a new onset constant severe right-sided headache associated with redness and tearing of the right eye, which resolved on indomethacin due to nonmetastatic small cell carcinoma producing a large suprahilar mass. This is the first case report of a hemicrania continua-like headache with autonomic features due to lung cancer. I propose the term "vagal cephalalgia" to include headache and/or facial pain due to nonmetastatic lung cancer and cardiac cephalalgia which result from vagal afferent stimulation.

  2. Characterization of persistent TTX-R Na+ currents in physiological concentration of sodium in rat visceral afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Guo-Fen; Li, Bai-Yan; Zhou, Yu-Hong; Lu, Yan-Jie; Schild, John H

    2009-01-01

    Persistent tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) (Na(v)1.9/SCN11A) currents are not normally recorded in vagal afferent neurons (VANs) with 50 mM of extracellular Na(+) although the functional expression of this current was observed in the presence of PGE(2) or forskolin. However, it is uncertain whether this current can be seen under physiological condition (150 mM Na(+)). Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we showed that persistent TTX-R Na(+) currents were expressed in 9 out of 38 VANs bathed in 150 mM Na(+). The current density, but not the whole-cell capacitance, was significantly enhanced in the VANs expressing Nav1.9. Persistent TTX-R Na(+) channels were activated at a more hyperpolarized membrane potential near -60 mV, compared with TTX-sensitive (TTX-S at -40 mV) and TTX-R Na(+) channels (at -20 mV). This indicates that persistent TTX-R Na(+) channels provide a wider activation window than TTX-S and TTX-R Na channels to up-regulate neuronal excitability. These results suggest that the persistent TTX-R Na(+) currents may be involved in the neuronal excitability by setting a lower pressure-discharge threshold and higher discharge frequency of VANs, especially the unique subset and gender-specific distribution of myelinated Ah-type VANs, including Ah-type aortic baroreceptor neurons, identified in our previous study.

  3. Classification of neurons by dendritic branching pattern. A categorisation based on Golgi impregnation of spinal and cranial somatic and visceral afferent and efferent cells in the adult human.

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Maguid, T E; Bowsher, D

    1984-01-01

    Neurons from adult human brainstem and spinal cord, fixed by immersion in formalin, were impregnated by a Golgi method and examined in sections 100 micron thick. Objective numerical criteria were used to classify completely impregnated neurons. Only the parameters mentioned below were found to be valid. Neurons in 100 micron sections were classified on the basis of (i) the primary dendrite number, indicated by a Roman numeral and called group; (ii) the dendritic branching pattern, comprising ...

  4. Failure of action potential propagation in sensory neurons: mechanisms and loss of afferent filtering in C-type units after painful nerve injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemes, Geza; Koopmeiners, Andrew; Rigaud, Marcel; Lirk, Philipp; Sapunar, Damir; Bangaru, Madhavi Latha; Vilceanu, Daniel; Garrison, Sheldon R.; Ljubkovic, Marko; Mueller, Samantha J.; Stucky, Cheryl L.; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2013-01-01

    The T-junction of sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is a potential impediment to action potential (AP) propagation towards the CNS. Using intracellular recordings from rat DRG neuronal somata during stimulation of the dorsal root, we determined that the maximal rate at which all of

  5. Microstimulation of primary afferent neurons in the L7 dorsal root ganglia using multielectrode arrays in anesthetized cats: thresholds and recruitment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, R. A.; Hokanson, J. A.; Weber, D. J.

    2009-10-01

    Current research in motor neural prosthetics has focused primarily on issues related to the extraction of motor command signals from the brain (e.g. brain-machine interfaces) to direct the motion of prosthetic limbs. Patients using these types of systems could benefit from a somatosensory neural interface that conveys natural tactile and kinesthetic sensations for the prosthesis. Electrical microstimulation within the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) has been proposed as one method to accomplish this, yet little is known about the recruitment properties of electrical microstimulation in activating nerve fibers in this structure. Current-controlled microstimulation pulses in the range of 1-15 µA (200 µs, leading cathodic pulse) were delivered to the L7 DRG in four anesthetized cats using penetrating microelectrode arrays. Evoked responses and their corresponding conduction velocities (CVs) were measured in the sciatic nerve with a 5-pole nerve cuff electrode arranged as two adjacent tripoles. It was found that in 76% of the 69 electrodes tested, the stimulus threshold was less than or equal to 3 µA, with the lowest recorded threshold being 1.1 µA. The CVs of afferents recruited at threshold had a bimodal distribution with peaks at 70 m s-1 and 85 m s-1. In 53% of cases, the CV of the response at threshold was slower (i.e. smaller diameter fiber) than the CVs of responses observed at increasing stimulation amplitudes. In summary, we found that microstimulation applied through penetrating microelectrodes in the DRG provides selective recruitment of afferent fibers from a range of sensory modalities (as identified by CVs) at very low stimulation intensities. We conclude that the DRG may serve as an attractive location from which to introduce surrogate somatosensory feedback into the nervous system.

  6. Nociceptive afferents to the premotor neurons that send axons simultaneously to the facial and hypoglossal motoneurons by means of axon collaterals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulin Dong

    Full Text Available It is well known that the brainstem premotor neurons of the facial nucleus and hypoglossal nucleus coordinate orofacial nociceptive reflex (ONR responses. However, whether the brainstem PNs receive the nociceptive projection directly from the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus is still kept unclear. Our present study focuses on the distribution of premotor neurons in the ONR pathways of rats and the collateral projection of the premotor neurons which are involved in the brainstem local pathways of the orofacial nociceptive reflexes of rat. Retrograde tracer Fluoro-gold (FG or FG/tetramethylrhodamine-dextran amine (TMR-DA were injected into the VII or/and XII, and anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA was injected into the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vc. The tracing studies indicated that FG-labeled neurons receiving BDA-labeled fibers from the Vc were mainly distributed bilaterally in the parvicellular reticular formation (PCRt, dorsal and ventral medullary reticular formation (MdD, MdV, supratrigeminal nucleus (Vsup and parabrachial nucleus (PBN with an ipsilateral dominance. Some FG/TMR-DA double-labeled premotor neurons, which were observed bilaterally in the PCRt, MdD, dorsal part of the MdV, peri-motor nucleus regions, contacted with BDA-labeled axonal terminals and expressed c-fos protein-like immunoreactivity which induced by subcutaneous injection of formalin into the lip. After retrograde tracer wheat germ agglutinated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP was injected into VII or XII and BDA into Vc, electron microscopic study revealed that some BDA-labeled axonal terminals made mainly asymmetric synapses on the dendritic and somatic profiles of WGA-HRP-labeled premotor neurons. These data indicate that some premotor neurons could integrate the orofacial nociceptive input from the Vc and transfer these signals simultaneously to different brainstem motonuclei by axonal collaterals.

  7. Classification of neurons by dendritic branching pattern. A categorisation based on Golgi impregnation of spinal and cranial somatic and visceral afferent and efferent cells in the adult human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Maguid, T E; Bowsher, D

    1984-06-01

    Neurons from adult human brainstem and spinal cord, fixed by immersion in formalin, were impregnated by a Golgi method and examined in sections 100 micron thick. Objective numerical criteria were used to classify completely impregnated neurons. Only the parameters mentioned below were found to be valid. Neurons in 100 micron sections were classified on the basis of (i) the primary dendrite number, indicated by a Roman numeral and called group; (ii) the dendritic branching pattern, comprising the highest branching order seen, indicated by an Arabic numeral and called category; the lowest dendritic branching order observed in complete neurons, indicated by an upper case letter and called class; and the number of branching orders seen between the two preceding, indicated by a lower case letter and called subclass. On the basis of the above characteristics, all neurons seen in the grey matter of the spinal cord and cranial nerve nuclei could be classified into thirteen 'families'. The results of other investigations (Abdel-Maguid & Bowsher, 1979, 1984) showed that this classification has functional value.

  8. Development of fusimotor innervation correlates with group Ia afferents but is independent of neurotrophin-3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringstedt, T; Copray, S; Walro, J; Kucera, J

    1998-01-01

    Fusimotor neurons, group Ia afferents and muscle spindles are absent in mutant mice lacking the gene for neurotrophin-3 (NT3). To partition the effect of Ia afferent or spindle absence from that of NT3 deprivation on fusimotor neuron development, we examined the fusimotor system in a mutant mouse

  9. Vagal Blocking for Obesity Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Helene; Revesz, David; Kodama, Yosuke

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, the US FDA has approved "vagal blocking therapy or vBLoc® therapy" as a new treatment for obesity. The aim of the present study was to study the mechanism-of-action of "VBLOC" in rat models. METHODS: Rats were implanted with VBLOC, an intra-abdominal electrical device...

  10. High glucose increases action potential firing of catecholamine neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract by increasing spontaneous glutamate inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brandon L; Zhu, Mingyan; Zhao, Huan; Dillon, Crystal; Appleyard, Suzanne M

    2017-09-01

    Glucose is a crucial substrate essential for cell survival and function. Changes in glucose levels impact neuronal activity and glucose deprivation increases feeding. Several brain regions have been shown to respond to glucoprivation, including the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in the brain stem. The NTS is the primary site in the brain that receives visceral afferent information from the gastrointestinal tract. The catecholaminergic (CA) subpopulation within the NTS modulates many homeostatic functions including cardiovascular reflexes, respiration, food intake, arousal, and stress. However, it is not known if they respond to changes in glucose. Here we determined whether NTS-CA neurons respond to changes in glucose concentration and the mechanism involved. We found that decreasing glucose concentrations from 5 mM to 2 mM to 1 mM, significantly decreased action potential firing in a cell-attached preparation, whereas increasing it back to 5 mM increased the firing rate. This effect was dependent on glutamate release from afferent terminals and required presynaptic 5-HT 3 Rs. Decreasing the glucose concentration also decreased both basal and 5-HT 3 R agonist-induced increase in the frequency of spontaneous glutamate inputs onto NTS-CA neurons. Low glucose also blunted 5-HT-induced inward currents in nodose ganglia neurons, which are the cell bodies of vagal afferents. The effect of low glucose in both nodose ganglia cells and in NTS slices was mimicked by the glucokinase inhibitor glucosamine. This study suggests that NTS-CA neurons are glucosensing through a presynaptic mechanism that is dependent on vagal glutamate release, 5-HT 3 R activity, and glucokinase. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. The presence and role of the tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel Na(v)1.9 (NaN) in nociceptive primary afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xin; Djouhri, Laiche; Black, Joel A; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G; Lawson, Sally N

    2002-09-01

    This is the first examination of sensory receptive properties and associated electrophysiological properties in vivo of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons that express the TTX-resistant sodium channel Na(v)1.9 (NaN). Intracellular recordings in lumbar DRGs in Wistar rats enabled units with dorsal root C-, Adelta-, or Aalpha/beta-fibers to be classified as nociceptive, low-threshold mechanoreceptive (LTM), or unresponsive. Intracellular dye injection enabled subsequent immunocytochemistry for Na(v)1.9-like immunoreactivity (Na(v)1.9-LI). Na(v)1.9-LI was expressed selectively in nociceptive-type (C- and A-fiber nociceptive and C-unresponsive) units. Of the nociceptive units, 64, 54, and 31% of C-, Adelta-, and Aalpha/beta-fiber units, respectively, were positive for Na(v)1.9-LI. C-unresponsive units were included in the nociceptive-type group on the basis of their nociceptor-like membrane properties; 91% were positive. Na(v)1.9-LI was undetectable in Adelta- or Aalpha/beta-fiber LTM units and in one C-LTM unit. Na(v)1.9-LI intensity was correlated negatively with soma size and conduction velocity in nociceptive units and with conduction velocity in C-fiber units. There was a positive correlation with action potential rise time in nociceptive-type units with membrane potentials equal to or more negative than -50 mV. The data provide direct evidence that Na(v)1.9 is expressed selectively in (but not in all) C- and A-fiber nociceptive-type units and suggest that Na(v)1.9 contributes to membrane properties that are typical of nociceptive neurons.

  12. Differential central projections of vestibular afferents in pigeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, J. D.; Fang, Q.

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether a differential distribution of vestibular afferent information to central nuclear neurons is present in pigeons was studied using neural tracer compounds. Discrete tracing of afferent fibers innervating the individual semicircular canal and otolith organs was produced by sectioning individual branches of the vestibular nerve that innervate the different receptor organs and applying crystals of horseradish peroxidase, or a horseradish peroxidase/cholera toxin mixture, or a biocytin compound for neuronal uptake and transport. Afferent fibers and their terminal distributions within the brainstem and cerebellum were visualized subsequently. Discrete areas in the pigeon central nervous system that receive primary vestibular input include the superior, dorsal lateral, ventral lateral, medial, descending, and tangential vestibular nuclei; the A and B groups; the intermediate, medial, and lateral cerebellar nuclei; and the nodulus, the uvula, and the paraflocculus. Generally, the vertical canal afferents projected heavily to medial regions in the superior and descending vestibular nuclei as well as the A group. Vertical canal projections to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei were observed but were less prominent. Horizontal canal projections to the superior and descending vestibular nuclei were much more centrally located than those of the vertical canals. A more substantial projection to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei was seen with horizontal canal afferents compared to vertical canal fibers. Afferents innervating the utricle and saccule terminated generally in the lateral regions of all vestibular nuclei in areas that were separate from the projections of the semicircular canals. In addition, utricular fibers projected to regions in the vestibular nuclei that overlapped with the horizontal semicircular canal terminal fields, whereas saccular afferents projected to regions that received vertical canal fiber terminations. Lagenar

  13. Ventral tegmental area afferents and drug-dependent behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idaira eOliva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug-related behaviors in both humans and rodents are commonly thought to arise from aberrant learning processes. Preclinical studies demonstrate that the acquisition and expression of many drug-dependent behaviors involves the ventral tegmental area (VTA, a midbrain structure comprised of dopamine, GABA and glutamate neurons. Drug experience alters the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic input onto VTA dopamine neurons, suggesting a critical role for VTA afferents in mediating the effects of drugs. In this review we present evidence implicating the VTA in drug-related behaviors, highlight the diversity of neuronal populations in the VTA, and discuss the behavioral effects of selectively manipulating VTA afferents. Future experiments are needed to determine which VTA afferents and what neuronal populations in the VTA mediate specific drug-dependent behaviors. Further studies are also necessary for identifying the afferent-specific synaptic alterations onto dopamine and non-dopamine neurons in the VTA following drug administration. The identification of neural circuits and adaptations involved with drug-dependent behaviors can highlight potential neural targets for pharmacological and deep brain stimulation interventions to treat substance abuse disorders.

  14. Heterogeneity and dynamics of lateral line afferent innervation during development in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haehnel, Melanie; Taguchi, Masashige; Liao, James C

    2012-05-01

    The lateral line system of larval zebrafish is emerging as a model to study a range of topics in neurobiology, from hair cell regeneration to sensory processing. However, despite numerous studies detailing the patterning and development of lateral line neuromasts, little is known about the organization of their connections to afferent neurons and targets in the hindbrain. We found that as fish grow and neuromasts proliferate over the body surface, the number of afferent neurons increases linearly. The number of afferents innervating certain neuromasts increases over time, while it decreases for other neuromasts. The ratio of afferent neurons to neuromasts differs between the anterior and posterior lateral line system, suggesting potential differences in sensitivity threshold or spatial resolution. A single afferent neuron routinely contacts a group of neuromasts, suggesting that different afferent neurons can convey information about receptive fields along the body. When afferent projections are traced into the hindbrain, where a distinct somatotopy has been previously described, we find that this general organization is absent at the Mauthner cell. We speculate that directional input from the lateral line is less important at an early age, whereas the speed of the escape response is paramount, and that directional responses arise later in development. By quantifying morphological connections in the lateral line system, this study provides a detailed foundation to understand how hydrodynamic information is processed and ultimately translated into appropriate motor behaviors. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Ventral Tegmental Area Afferents and Drug-Dependent Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Idaira eOliva; Matthew eWanat

    2016-01-01

    Drug-related behaviors in both humans and rodents are commonly thought to arise from aberrant learning processes. Preclinical studies demonstrate that the acquisition and expression of many drug-dependent behaviors involves the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a midbrain structure comprised of dopamine, GABA, and glutamate neurons. Drug experience alters the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic input onto VTA dopamine neurons, suggesting a critical role for VTA afferents in mediating the effects o...

  16. Opioid Actions in Primary-Afferent Fibers—Involvement in Analgesia and Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsugumi Fujita

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Opioids inhibit glutamatergic excitatory transmission from the periphery by activating G-protein coupled opioid receptors in the central terminals of primary-afferent neurons in the spinal substantia gelatinosa, resulting in antinociception. Opioid receptor activation in the peripheral terminals of primary-afferent neurons inhibits the production of action potentials in response to nociceptive stimuli given to the periphery, leading to antinociception. Opioids also exhibit a local anesthetic effect without opioid receptor activation in peripheral nerve fibers. This review article will focus on analgesia and anesthesia produced by the actions of opioids on primary-afferent fibers.

  17. Vagal withdrawal during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M; Rasmussen, Verner; Schulze, S

    2000-01-01

    tone during the ERCP was found, but we observed no difference between the metoprolol and the placebo group. For both groups the lowest vagal tone occurred at maximum heart rate during endoscopy. The SDRR/meanRR ratio returned towards base line for the subsequent 60 min after endoscopy. CONCLUSIONS....... During ERCP the patients were monitored with a Holter tape recorder. Holter tapes from 31 patients (16 receiving metoprolol) were available to analyse the ratio of the standard deviations of the RR intervals (SDRR) to the mean RR intervals (measure of vagal tone) during ERCP. RESULTS: A decreased vagal...

  18. Afferent activity to necklace glomeruli is dependent on external stimuli

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    Munger Steven D

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main olfactory epithelium (MOE is a complex organ containing several functionally distinct subpopulations of sensory neurons. One such subpopulation is distinguished by its expression of the guanylyl cyclase GC-D. The axons of GC-D-expressing (GC-D+ neurons innervate 9–15 "necklace" glomeruli encircling the caudal main olfactory bulb (MOB. Chemosensory stimuli for GC-D+ neurons include two natriuretic peptides, uroguanylin and guanylin, and CO2. However, the biologically-relevant source of these chemostimuli is unclear: uroguanylin is both excreted in urine, a rich source of olfactory stimuli for rodents, and expressed in human nasal epithelium; CO2 is present in both inspired and expired air. Findings To determine whether the principal source of chemostimuli for GC-D+ neurons is external or internal to the nose, we assessed the consequences of removing external chemostimuli for afferent activity to the necklace glomeruli. To do so, we performed unilateral naris occlusions in Gucy2d-Mapt-lacZ +/- mice [which express a β-galactosidase (β-gal reporter specifically in GC-D+ neurons] followed by immunohistochemistry for β-gal and a glomerular marker of afferent activity, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH. We observed a dramatic decrease in TH immunostaining, consistent with reduced or absent afferent activity, in both necklace and non-necklace glomeruli ipsilateral to the occluded naris. Conclusion Like other MOB glomeruli, necklace glomeruli exhibit a large decrease in afferent activity upon removal of external stimuli. Thus, we conclude that activity in GC-D+ neurons, which specifically innervate necklace glomeruli, is not dependent on internal stimuli. Instead, GC-D+ neurons, like other OSNs in the MOE, primarily sense the external world.

  19. Vagal modulation of pre-inspiratory activity in hypoglossal discharge in the decerebrate rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Michael George Zaki

    2015-08-15

    Respiration consists of three phases--inspiration (I), post-inspiration (post-I), and late expiration (E2). Pre-I is a subphase occurring at the end of E2. Hypoglossal (XII) discharge contains I and occasionally pre-I activity. Functionally, XII pre-I underlies tongue muscle contraction and expansion of the upper airway, causing a decrease in airway resistance in anticipation of the succeeding inspiratory effort. It has been shown that vagotomy causes an increase in pre-I activity in XII in anesthetized animals. Also, in anesthetized artificially-ventilated animals, XII onset is synchronized with that of inspiratory phrenic nerve (PhN) activity. Therefore, we sought to systematically test the hypothesis that XII pre-I is present in vagus-intact unanesthetized decerebrate animals and vagal afferents negatively modulate XII pre-I discharge in decerebrate rats, in the absence of confounding anesthesia. Experiments were performed on seven Sprague-Dawley unanesthetized decerebrate adult male rats and bilateral PhN and XII recordings performed. In three animals, vagotomy was performed during PhN recordings and one animal was vagotomized during initial surgical preparation prior to recordings. In vagus-intact animals, XII pre-I duration averaged 12.4 ms. Vagotomy was associated with greater XII pre-I duration, expressed in absolute time (89.5 vs. 12.4 ms; pdecerebrate animals and is negatively modulated by vagal afferents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of brainstem TRH/TRH-R1 receptors in the vagal gastric cholinergic response to various stimuli including sham-feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taché, Y; Yang, H; Miampamba, M; Martinez, V; Yuan, P Q

    2006-04-30

    Pavlov's pioneering work established that sham-feeding induced by sight or smell of food or feeding in dogs with permanent esophagostomy stimulates gastric acid secretion through vagal pathways. Brain circuitries and transmitters involved in the central vagal regulation of gastric function have recently been unraveled. Neurons in the dorsal vagal complex including the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMN) express thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor and are innervated by TRH fibers originating from TRH synthesizing neurons in the raphe pallidus, raphe obscurus and the parapyramidal regions. TRH injected into the DMN or cisterna magna increases the firing of DMN neurons and gastric vagal efferent discharge, activates cholinergic neurons in gastric submucosal and myenteric plexuses, and induces a vagal-dependent, atropine-sensitive stimulation of gastric secretory (acid, pepsin) and motor functions. TRH antibody or TRH-R1 receptor oligodeoxynucleotide antisense pretreatment in the cisterna magna or DMN abolished vagal-dependent gastric secretory and motor responses to sham-feeding, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, cold exposure and chemical activation of cell bodies in medullary raphe nuclei. TRH excitatory action in the DMN is potentiated by co-released prepro-TRH-(160-169) flanking peptide, Ps4 and 5-HT, and inhibited by a number of peptides involved in the stress/immune response and inhibition of food-intake. These neuroanatomical, electrophysiological and neuropharmacological data are consistent with a physiological role of brainstem TRH in the central vagal stimulation of gastric myenteric cholinergic neurons in response to several vagal dependent stimuli including sham-feeding.

  1. Chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, H; Chen, X; Hartsfield, J F; Hara, J; Martin, D; Fermin, C D

    1998-01-01

    Neurons from the vestibular (VG) and the statoacoustic (SAG) ganglion of the chick (Gallus domesticus) were evaluated histologically and morphometrically. Embryos at stages 34 (E8 days), 39 (E13 days) and 44 (E18 days) were sacrificed and temporal bones microdissected. Specimens were embedded in JB-4 methacrylate plastic, and stained with a mixture of 0.2% toluidine blue (TB) and 0.1% basic Fuschin in 25% ethanol or with a mixture of 2% TB and 1% paraphenylenediamine (PDA) for axon and myelin measurement study. Images of the VIIIth nerve were produced by a V150 (R) color imaging system and the contour of 200-300 neuronal bodies (perikarya) was traced directly on a video screen with a mouse in real time. The cross-sectional area of VG perikarya was 67.29 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 128.46 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 275.85 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). The cross-sectional area of SAG perikarya was 62.44 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 102.05 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 165.02 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). A significant cross-sectional area increase of the VG perikarya between stage 39 (E13) and stage 44 (E18) was determined. We randomly measured the cross-sectional area of myelin and axoplasm of hatchling afferent nerves, and found a correspondence between axoplasmic and myelin cross-sectional area in the utricular, saccular and semicircular canal nerve branches of the nerve. The results suggest that the period between stage 34 (E8) and 39 (E13) is a critical period for afferent neuronal development. Physiological and behavioral vestibular properties of developing and maturing hatchlings may change accordingly. The results compliment previous work by other investigators and provide valuable anatomical measures useful to correlate physiological data obtained from stimulation of the whole nerve or its parts.

  2. Role of calcium ions in the positive interaction between TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels in bronchopulmonary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chun-Chun; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2015-06-15

    Both transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors are abundantly expressed in bronchopulmonary C-fiber sensory nerves and can be activated by a number of endogenous inflammatory mediators. A recent study has reported a synergistic effect of simultaneous TRPA1 and TRPV1 activations in vagal pulmonary C-fiber afferents in anesthetized rats, but its underlying mechanism was not known. This study aimed to characterize a possible interaction between these two TRP channels and to investigate the potential role of Ca(2+) as a mediator of this interaction in isolated rat vagal pulmonary sensory neurons. Using the perforated patch-clamp recording technique, our study demonstrated a distinct positive interaction occurring abruptly between TRPA1 and TRPV1 when they were activated simultaneously by their respective agonists, capsaicin (Cap) and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), at near-threshold concentrations in these neurons. AITC at this low concentration evoked only minimal or undetectable responses, but it markedly amplified the Cap-evoked current in the same neurons. This potentiating effect was eliminated when either AITC or Cap was replaced by non-TRPA1 and non-TRPV1 chemical activators of these neurons, demonstrating the selectivity of the interaction between these two TRP channels. Furthermore, when Ca(2+) was removed from the extracellular solution, the synergistic effect of Cap and AITC on pulmonary sensory neurons was completely abrogated, clearly indicating a critical role of Ca(2+) in mediating the action. These results suggest that this TRPA1-TRPV1 interaction may play a part in regulating the sensitivity of pulmonary sensory neurons during airway inflammatory reaction. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Imaging stretch-activated firing of spinal afferent nerve endings in mouse colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee etravis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Spinal afferent neurons play a major role in detecting noxious and innocuous stimuli from visceral organs, such as the gastrointestinal tract. However, all our understanding about spinal afferents has been obtained from recordings of spinal afferent axons, or cell bodies that lie outside the gut wall, or peripheral organ they innervate. No recordings have been made directly from spinal afferent nerve endings, which is where sensory transduction occurs. We developed a preparation whereby recordings could be made from rectal afferent nerve endings in the colon, to characterize mechanisms underlying sensory transduction. Dorsal root ganglia (L6-S2 were removed from mice, whilst retaining neural continuity with the colon. Fluo-4-AM was used to record from rectal afferent nerve endings in myenteric ganglia and circular muscle at 36oC. In slack (unstretched preparations of colon, no calcium transients were recorded from spinal afferent endings. However, in response to a maintained increase in circumferential diameter, a maintained discharge of calcium transients occurred simultaneously in multiple discrete varicosities along single axons of rectal afferents in myenteric ganglia and circular muscle. Stretch-activated calcium transients were resistant to hexamethonium and nifedipine, but were abolished by tetrodotoxin, CPA, BAPTA-AM, cobalt, gadolinium, or replacement of extracellular Na+ with NMDG. In summary, we present a novel preparation in which stretch-activated firing of spinal afferent nerve endings can be recorded, using calcium imaging. We show that circumferential stretch of the colon activates a maintained discharge of calcium transients simultaneously in varicosities along single rectal afferent endings in myenteric ganglia and circular muscle. Non-selective cation channels, TTX-sensitive Na+ channels and both extracellular calcium influx and intracellular Ca2+ stores are required for stretch-activated calcium transients in rectal afferent

  4. Duodenal lipid sensing activates vagal afferents to regulate non-shivering brown fat thermogenesis in rats.

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    Clémence Blouet

    Full Text Available Previous evidence indicates that duodenal lipid sensing engages gut-brain neurocircuits to determine food intake and hepatic glucose production, but a potential role for gut-brain communication in the control of energy expenditure remains to be determined. Here, we tested the hypothesis that duodenal lipid sensing activates a gut-brain-brown adipose tissue neuraxis to regulate thermogenesis. We demonstrate that direct administration of lipids into the duodenum increases brown fat temperature. Co-infusion of the local anesthetic tetracaine with duodenal lipids abolished the lipid-induced increase in brown fat temperature. Systemic administration of the CCKA receptor antagonist devazepide blocked the ability of duodenal lipids to increase brown fat thermogenesis. Parenchymal administration of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor blocker MK-801 directly into the caudomedial nucleus of the solitary tract also abolished duodenal lipid-induced activation of brown fat thermogenesis. These findings establish that duodenal lipid sensing activates a gut-brain-brown fat axis to determine brown fat temperature, and thereby reveal a previously unappreciated pathway that regulates thermogenesis.

  5. The anxiolytic effect of Bifidobacterium longum NCC3001 involves vagal pathways for gut-brain communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercik, P; Park, A J; Sinclair, D; Khoshdel, A; Lu, J; Huang, X; Deng, Y; Blennerhassett, P A; Fahnestock, M; Moine, D; Berger, B; Huizinga, J D; Kunze, W; McLean, P G; Bergonzelli, G E; Collins, S M; Verdu, E F

    2011-12-01

    The probiotic Bifidobacterium longum NCC3001 normalizes anxiety-like behavior and hippocampal brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in mice with infectious colitis. Using a model of chemical colitis we test whether the anxiolytic effect of B. longum involves vagal integrity, and changes in neural cell function. Methods  Mice received dextran sodium sulfate (DSS, 3%) in drinking water during three 1-week cycles. Bifidobacterium longum or placebo were gavaged daily during the last cycle. Some mice underwent subdiaphragmatic vagotomy. Behavior was assessed by step-down test, inflammation by myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and histology. BDNF mRNA was measured in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells after incubation with sera from B. longum- or placebo-treated mice. The effect of B. longum on myenteric neuron excitability was measured using intracellular microelectrodes. Chronic colitis was associated with anxiety-like behavior, which was absent in previously vagotomized mice. B. longum normalized behavior but had no effect on MPO activity or histological scores. Its anxiolytic effect was absent in mice with established anxiety that were vagotomized before the third DSS cycle. B. longum metabolites did not affect BDNF mRNA expression in SH-SY5Y cells but decreased excitability of enteric neurons. In this colitis model, anxiety-like behavior is vagally mediated. The anxiolytic effect of B. longum requires vagal integrity but does not involve gut immuno-modulation or production of BDNF by neuronal cells. As B. longum decreases excitability of enteric neurons, it may signal to the central nervous system by activating vagal pathways at the level of the enteric nervous system. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Effects of subthalamic nucleus lesions and stimulation upon corticostriatal afferents in the 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walker, Ruth H; Moore, Cindy; Davies, Georgia; Dirling, Lisa B; Koch, Rick J; Meshul, Charles K

    2012-01-01

    ... or lesioning of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). The major glutamatergic afferent pathways to the striatum are from the cortex and thalamus, and are thus likely to be sources of striatal neuronally-released glutamate...

  7. Asystole Following Profound Vagal Stimulation During Hepatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeta John

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Asystole in a non laparoscopic upper abdominal surgery following intense vagal stimulation is a rare event. This case report highlights the need for awareness of such a complication when a thoracic epidural anaesthetic has been given in addition to a general anaesthetic for an upper abdominal procedure. A combined thoracic epidural and general anaesthetic was given. The anterior abdominal wall was retracted forty minutes after administration of the epidural bolus. This maneuver resulted in a profound vagal response with bradycardia and asystole. The patient was resuscitated successfully with a cardiac massage, atropine and adrenaline and the surgery was resumed. Surgery lasted eleven hours and was uneventful.

  8. Vagal Reactions during Cryoballoon-Based Pulmonary Vein Isolation: A Clue for Autonomic Nervous System Modulation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Peyrol

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF is known to be initiated by rapid firing of pulmonary veins (PV and non-PV triggers, the crucial role of cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS in the initiation and maintenance of AF has long been appreciated in both experimental and clinical studies. The cardiac intrinsic ANS is composed of ganglionated plexi (GPs, located close to the left atrium-pulmonary vein junctions and a vast network of interconnecting neurons. Ablation strategies aiming for complete PV isolation (PVI remain the cornerstone of AF ablation procedures. However, several observational studies and few randomized studies have suggested that GP ablation, as an adjunctive strategy, might achieve better clinical outcomes in patients undergoing radiofrequency-based PVI for both paroxysmal and nonparoxysmal AF. In these patients, vagal reactions (VR such as vagally mediated bradycardia or asystole are thought to reflect intrinsic cardiac ANS modulation and/or denervation. Vagal reactions occurring during cryoballoon- (CB- based PVI have been previously reported; however, little is known on resulting ANS modulation and/or prevalence and significance of vagal reactions during PVI with the CB technique. We conducted a review of prevalence, putative mechanisms, and significance of VR during CB-based PVI.

  9. Direct and indirect regulation of spinal cord Ia afferent terminal formation by the γ-Protocadherins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuhina ePrasad

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Pcdh-γ gene cluster encodes 22 protocadherin adhesion molecules that interact as homophilic multimers and critically regulate synaptogenesis and apoptosis of interneurons in the developing spinal cord. Unlike interneurons, the two primary components of the monosynaptic stretch reflex circuit, dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons and ventral motor neurons, do not undergo excessive apoptosis in Pcdh-γdel/del null mutants, which die shortly after birth. However, as we show here, mutants exhibit severely disorganized Ia proprioceptive afferent terminals in the ventral horn. In contrast to the fine net-like pattern observed in wild-type mice, central Ia terminals in Pcdh-γ mutants are expanded, clumped, and fill the space between individual motor neurons; quantitative analysis shows a ~2.5 fold increase in the area of terminals. Concomitant with this, there is a 70% loss of the collaterals that Ia afferents extend to ventral interneurons, many of which undergo apoptosis in the mutants. The Ia afferent phenotype is ameliorated, though not entirely rescued, when apoptosis is blocked in Pcdh-γ null mice by introduction of a Bax null allele. This indicates that loss of ventral interneurons, which act as intermediate Ia afferent targets, contributes to the disorganization of terminals on motor pools. Restricted mutation of the Pcdh-γ cluster using conditional mutants and multiple Cre transgenic lines (Wnt1-Cre for sensory neurons; Pax2-Cre for ventral interneurons; Hb9-Cre for motor neurons also revealed a direct requirement for the γ-Pcdhs in Ia neurons and ventral interneurons, but not in motor neurons themselves. Together, these genetic manipulations indicate that the γ-Pcdhs are required for the formation of the Ia afferent circuit in two ways: First, they control the survival of ventral interneurons that act as intermediate Ia targets; and second, they provide a homophilic molecular cue between Ia afferents and target ventral interneurons.

  10. Peptide and lipid modulation of glutamatergic afferent synaptic transmission in the solitary tract nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Andresen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The brainstem nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS holds the first central neurons in major homeostatic reflex pathways. These homeostatic reflexes regulate and coordinate multiple organ systems from gastrointestinal to cardiopulmonary functions. The core of many of these pathways arise from cranial visceral afferent neurons that enter the brain as the solitary tract (ST with more than two-thirds arising from the gastrointestinal system. About one quarter of ST afferents have myelinated axons but the majority are classed as unmyelinated C-fibers. All ST afferents release the fast neurotransmitter glutamate with remarkably similar, high-probability release characteristics. Second order NTS neurons receive surprisingly limited primary afferent information with one or two individual inputs converging on single second order NTS neurons. A- and C-fiber afferents never mix at NTS second order neurons. Many transmitters modify the basic glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC often by reducing glutamate release or interrupting terminal depolarization. Thus, a distinguishing feature of ST transmission is presynaptic expression of G-protein coupled receptors for peptides common to peripheral or forebrain (e.g. hypothalamus neuron sources. Presynaptic receptors for angiotensin (AT1, vasopressin (V1a, oxytocin (OT, opioid (MOR, ghrelin (GHSR1 and cholecystokinin (CCK differentially control glutamate release on particular subsets of neurons with most other ST afferents unaffected. Lastly, lipid-like signals are transduced by two key ST presynaptic receptors, the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1 and the cannabinoid receptor (CB1 that oppositely control glutamate release. Increasing evidence suggests that peripheral nervous signaling mechanisms are repurposed at central terminals to control excitation and are major sites of signal integration of peripheral and central inputs particularly from the hypothalamus.

  11. Neuronal influence behind the central nervous system regulation of the immune cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANAHI eCHAVARRIA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system has a highly specialized microenvironment, and despite being initially considered an immune privileged site, this immune status is far from absolute because it varies with age and brain topography. The brain monitors immune responses by several means that act in parallel; one pathway involves afferent nerves (vagal nerve and the other resident cells (neurons and glia. These cell populations exert a strong role in the regulation of the immune system, favoring an immune-modulatory environment in the CNS. Neurons control glial cell and infiltrated T-cells by contact-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Contact-dependent mechanisms are provided by several membrane immune modulating molecules such as Sema-7A, CD95L, CD22, CD200, CD47, NCAM, ICAM-5 and cadherins; which can inhibit the expression of microglial inflammatory cytokines, induce apoptosis or inactivate infiltrated T-cells. On the other hand, soluble neuronal factors like Sema-3A, cytokines, neurotrophins, neuropeptides, and neurotransmitters attenuate microglial and/or T-cell activation. In this review, we focused on all known mechanism driven only by neurons in order to control the local immune cells.

  12. Coding of stimuli by ampullary afferents in Gnathonemus petersii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, J; Gertz, S; Goulet, J; Schuh, A; von der Emde, G

    2010-10-01

    Weakly electric fish use electroreception for both active and passive electrolocation and for electrocommunication. While both active and passive electrolocation systems are prominent in weakly electric Mormyriform fishes, knowledge of their passive electrolocation ability is still scarce. To better estimate the contribution of passive electric sensing to the orientation toward electric stimuli in weakly electric fishes, we investigated frequency tuning applying classical input-output characterization and stimulus reconstruction methods to reveal the encoding capabilities of ampullary receptor afferents. Ampullary receptor afferents were most sensitive (threshold: 40 μV/cm) at low frequencies (thresholds were one order of magnitude higher. The integration of simultaneously recorded afferents of similar frequency-tuning resulted in strongly enhanced signal-to-noise ratios and increased mutual information rates but did not increase the range of frequencies detectable by the system. Theoretically the neuronal integration of input from receptors experiencing opposite polarities of a stimulus (left and right side of the fish) was shown to enhance encoding of such stimuli, including an increase of bandwidth. Covariance and coherence analysis showed that spiking of ampullary afferents is sufficiently explained by the spike-triggered average, i.e., receptors respond to a single linear feature of the stimulus. Our data support the notion of a division of labor of the active and passive electrosensory systems in weakly electric fishes based on frequency tuning. Future experiments will address the role of central convergence of ampullary input that we expect to lead to higher sensitivity and encoding power of the system.

  13. Urothelial Tight Junction Barrier Dysfunction Sensitizes Bladder Afferents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rued, Anna C.; Taiclet, Stefanie N.; Birder, Lori A.; Kullmann, F. Aura

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a chronic voiding disorder that presents with pain in the urinary bladder and surrounding pelvic region. A growing body of evidence suggests that an increase in the permeability of the urothelium, the epithelial barrier that lines the interior of the bladder, contributes to the symptoms of IC/BPS. To examine the consequence of increased urothelial permeability on pelvic pain and afferent excitability, we overexpressed in the urothelium claudin 2 (Cldn2), a tight junction (TJ)-associated protein whose message is significantly upregulated in biopsies of IC/BPS patients. Consistent with the presence of bladder-derived pain, rats overexpressing Cldn2 showed hypersensitivity to von Frey filaments applied to the pelvic region. Overexpression of Cldn2 increased the expression of c-Fos and promoted the activation of ERK1/2 in spinal cord segments receiving bladder input, which we conceive is the result of noxious stimulation of afferent pathways. To determine whether the mechanical allodynia observed in rats with reduced urothelial barrier function results from altered afferent activity, we examined the firing of acutely isolated bladder sensory neurons. In patch-clamp recordings, about 30% of the bladder sensory neurons from rats transduced with Cldn2, but not controls transduced with GFP, displayed spontaneous activity. Furthermore, bladder sensory neurons with tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) action potentials from rats transduced with Cldn2 showed hyperexcitability in response to suprathreshold electrical stimulation. These findings suggest that as a result of a leaky urothelium, the diffusion of urinary solutes through the urothelial barrier sensitizes bladders afferents, promoting voiding at low filling volumes and pain. PMID:28560313

  14. Effects of auricular electrical stimulation on vagal activity in healthy men: evidence from a three-armed randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Marca, Roberto; Nedeljkovic, Marko; Yuan, Lizhuang; Maercker, Andreas; Elhert, Ulrike

    2010-04-01

    The activity of the VN (vagus nerve) is negatively associated with risk factors such as stress and smoking, morbidity and mortality. In contrast, it is also a target of therapeutic intervention. VN stimulation is used in depression and epilepsy. Because of its high invasivity and exclusive application to therapy-resistant patients, there is interest in less invasive methods affecting the VN. Several studies examining acupuncture report beneficial effects on vagal activity. However, findings are inconsistent, and applied methods are heterogeneous resulting in difficulties in interpretation. The purpose of the present study was evaluation of the effects of acupuncture on vagal activity in a three-armed randomized trial while controlling several disturbing factors. Fourteen healthy men participated in random order in four examinations: a control condition without intervention, a condition with placebo, manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture. Acupuncture was conducted on the concha of the ear, as there is neuroanatomical evidence for vagal afferents. Each examination took place once, with a week's time between examinations. RSA(TR) (respiratory sinus arrhythmia adjusted for tidal volume) indicating vagal activity was measured continuously. The study was conducted partially blind in accordance with recommendations. After controlling for respiration,condition-specific pain sensation, individual differences in belief of acupuncture effectiveness and time effects not attributable to the interventions, electroacupuncture but not manual acupuncture was found to have a positive effect on RSA(TR). The results underline the potential role of auricular electrical stimulation to induce an increase in vagal activity, and it therefore might be used as preventive or adjuvant therapeutic intervention promoting health.

  15. Structure of the afferent terminals in terminal ganglion of a cricket and persistent homology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Brown

    Full Text Available We use topological data analysis to investigate the three dimensional spatial structure of the locus of afferent neuron terminals in crickets Acheta domesticus. Each afferent neuron innervates a filiform hair positioned on a cercus: a protruding appendage at the rear of the animal. The hairs transduce air motion to the neuron signal that is used by a cricket to respond to the environment. We stratify the hairs (and the corresponding afferent terminals into classes depending on hair length, along with position. Our analysis uncovers significant structure in the relative position of these terminal classes and suggests the functional relevance of this structure. Our method is very robust to the presence of significant experimental and developmental noise. It can be used to analyze a wide range of other point cloud data sets.

  16. Structure of the Afferent Terminals in Terminal Ganglion of a Cricket and Persistent Homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacob; Gedeon, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    We use topological data analysis to investigate the three dimensional spatial structure of the locus of afferent neuron terminals in crickets Acheta domesticus. Each afferent neuron innervates a filiform hair positioned on a cercus: a protruding appendage at the rear of the animal. The hairs transduce air motion to the neuron signal that is used by a cricket to respond to the environment. We stratify the hairs (and the corresponding afferent terminals) into classes depending on hair length, along with position. Our analysis uncovers significant structure in the relative position of these terminal classes and suggests the functional relevance of this structure. Our method is very robust to the presence of significant experimental and developmental noise. It can be used to analyze a wide range of other point cloud data sets. PMID:22649516

  17. Nitric oxide has tonic inhibitory effect, but is not involved in the vagal control or VIP effects on motility of the porcine antrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, P T; Orskov, C; Rasmussen, T N

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in vagal control and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)-induced effects on antral motility was studied using isolated perfused preparations of porcine gastric antrum with intact vagal innervation. METHODS: The presence of NO and VIP-producing ......BACKGROUND: The involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in vagal control and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)-induced effects on antral motility was studied using isolated perfused preparations of porcine gastric antrum with intact vagal innervation. METHODS: The presence of NO and VIP......-producing neurons was studied using immunohistochemistry and histochemical techniques. Widespread, but not total, co-localization of NO and VIP immunoreactivity was found in the submucosa and in the muscle layers. RESULTS: Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerves for 5 min (8 Hz, 10 mA, 4 msec) increased...

  18. Mutant α-Synuclein Overexpression Induces Stressless Pacemaking in Vagal Motoneurons at Risk in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasser-Katz, Efrat; Simchovitz, Alon; Chiu, Wei-Hua; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Sharon, Ronit; Soreq, Hermona; Roeper, Jochen; Goldberg, Joshua A

    2017-01-04

    -synuclein pathology (e.g., Lewy bodies) is not directly related to the degree of neurodegeneration across various vulnerable neuronal populations. Here, we show that, in contrast to dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, vagal motoneurons do not enhance their excitability and oxidative load in response to chronic mutant α-synuclein overexpression. Rather, by downregulating their voltage-activated calcium channels, vagal motoneurons acquire a stressless form of pacemaking that diminishes mitochondrial and cytosolic oxidative stress. Emulating this endogenous adaptive response to α-synuclein overexpression could lead to novel strategies to protect dopamine neurons and perhaps delay the onset of Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/370048-11$15.00/0.

  19. TRH/TRH-R1 receptor signaling in the brain medulla as a pathway of vagally mediated gut responses during the cephalic phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taché, Yvette; Adelson, David; Yang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Pavlov's seminal findings in the early twentieth century showed that the sight, smell or taste of food in dogs with chronic esophagostomy induces a vagal-dependent gastric acid secretion. These observations established the concept of the cephalic phase of digestion. Compelling experimental evidence in rats indicates that the three amino acid peptide thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) expressed in the brainstem plays a key role in the vagal stimulation of gastric function. Neurons in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMN) expressed TRH receptor subtype (TRH-R1) and received efferent input from TRH containing fibers arising from TRH synthesizing neurons in the raphe pallidus, raphe obscurus, and the parapyramidal regions. TRH microinjected into the DMN or intracisternally excites the firing of DMN neurons and stimulates efferent activity in the gastric branch of the vagus nerve and gastric myenteric cholinergic neurons. At the functional level, this results in a vagally-mediated and atropine-sensitive stimulation of gastric epithelial and endocrine cells secreting acid, pepsin, serotonin, histamine and ghrelin, and enteric neurons leading to increased gastric motility and emptying. Importantly, the blockade of TRH or TRH-R1 in the brainstem by pretreatment into the cisterna magna or the DMN with TRH antibody or TRH-R1 oligodeoxynucleotide antisense respectively abolishes the stimulation of gastric acid induced by sham-feeding. The gastric response to TRH injected into the DMN is potentiated by serotonin and the proTRH flanking peptide, Ps4 and suppressed by a number of brainstem peptides and cytokines activated during stress or immune response and inhibiting food intake and gastric acid secretion. These convergent data strongly support a physiological involvement of TRH signaling pathway in the brainstem to stimulate vagal activity and identified TRH-TRH-R1 system as a major effector in the dorsal vagal complex to drive the vagally mediated gut response

  20. Immunocytochemical localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and substance P in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis: Effects of vagal stimulation on GAD immunoreactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damelio, F.; Gibbs, M. A.; Mehler, W. R.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by means of its biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the neuropeptide substance P in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), and gelatinous nucleus (GEL). In addition, electrical stimulation was applied to the night vagus nerve at the cervical level to assess the effects on GAD-immunoreactivity (GAR-IR). GAD-IR terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. They showed pronounced density at the level of the ASP and gradual decrease towards the solitary complex. Nerve cells were not labelled in our preparations. Ultrastructural studies showed symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contracts between labelled terminals and non-immunoreactive dendrites, axons, or neurons. Some of the labelled terminals contained both clear- and dense-core vesicles. Our preliminary findings, after electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, revealed a bilateral decrease of GAD-IR that was particularly evident at the level of the ASP. SP-immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed varying densities in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. In our preparations, the lateral sub-division of the NTS showed the greatest accumulation. The ASP showed medium density of immunoreactive varicosities and terminals and the AP and GEL displayed scattered varicose axon terminals. The electron microscopy revealed that all immunoreactive terminals contained clear-core vesicles which make symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contact with unlabelled dendrites. It is suggested that the GABAergic terminals might correspond to vagal afferent projections and that GAD/GABA and substance P might be co-localized in the same terminal allowing the possibility of a regulated release of the transmitters in relation to demands.

  1. Central projections of the wing afferents in the hawkmoth, Agrius convolvuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Noriyasu; Wang, Hao; Shirai, Koji; Kiguchi, Kenji; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2011-11-01

    Flight behaviors in various insect species are closely correlated with their mechanical and neuronal properties. Compared to locusts and flies which have been intensively studied, moths have "intermediate" properties in terms of the neurogenic muscle activations, power generation by indirect muscles, and two-winged-insect-like flapping behavior. Despite these unique characteristics, little is known about the neuronal mechanisms of flight control in moths. We investigated projections of the wing mechanosensory afferents in the central nervous system (CNS) of the hawkmoth, Agrius convolvuli, because the mechanosensory proprioceptive feedback has an essential role for flight control and would be presumably optimized for insect species. We conducted anterograde staining of nine afferent nerves from the fore- and hindwings. All of these afferents projected into the prothoracic, mesothoracic and metathoracic ganglia (TG1, 2 and 3) and had ascending fibers to the head ganglia. Prominent projection areas in the TG1-3 and suboesophageal ganglion (SOG) were common between the forewing, hindwing and contralateral forewing afferents, suggesting that information from different wings are converged at multiple levels presumably for coordinating wing flapping. On the other hand, differences of projections between the fore- and hindwing afferents were observed especially in projection areas of the tegulae in the TG1 and contralateral projections of the anterior forewing nerve in the TGs and SOG, which would reflect functional differences between corresponding mechanoreceptors on each wing. Afferents comprising groups of the campaniform sensilla at the wing bases had prominent ascending pathways to the SOG, resembling the head-neck motor system for gaze control in flies. Double staining of the wing afferents and flight or neck motoneurons also indicated potential connectivity between them. Our results suggest multiple roles of the wing proprioceptive feedback for flight and provide

  2. Resting Vagal Tone and Vagal Response to Stress: Associations with Anxiety, Aggression and Perceived Anxiety Control among Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Brandon G.; Weems, Carl F.

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the associations of both resting vagal tone and vagal response to stress with anxiety control beliefs, anxiety, and aggression among 80 youth (aged 11-17 years). Measures included physiological assessments of emotion regulation along with youth self-report of anxiety control beliefs, anxiety, and aggression and caregiver reports of their child's anxiety and aggression. Resting vagal tone was positively related to anxiety control beliefs, but negatively associated with anxiet...

  3. Transcutaneous cervical vagal nerve stimulation modulates cardiac vagal tone and tumor necrosis factor-alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, C; Brock, B; Aziz, Q

    2016-01-01

    -VNS, there was an increase in cardiac vagal tone and a reduction in tumor necrosis factor-α in comparison to baseline. No change was seen in blood pressure, cardiac sympathetic index or other cytokines. These preliminary data suggest that t-VNS exerts an autonomic and a subtle antitumor necrosis factor-α effect, which...

  4. Combined genetic and pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 and P2X3 attenuates colorectal hypersensitivity and afferent sensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Kiyatkin, Michael E.; Feng, Bin; Schwartz, Erica S.; Gebhart, G.F.

    2013-01-01

    The ligand-gated channels transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and P2X3 have been reported to facilitate colorectal afferent neuron sensitization, thus contributing to organ hypersensitivity and pain. In the present study, we hypothesized that TRPV1 and P2X3 cooperate to modulate colorectal nociception and afferent sensitivity. To test this hypothesis, we employed TRPV1-P2X3 double knockout (TPDKO) mice and channel-selective pharmacological antagonists and evaluated combined chann...

  5. Social Stress Engages Neurochemically-Distinct Afferents to the Rat Locus Coeruleus Depending on Coping Strategy123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Beverly A. S.; Zitnik, Gerard; Foster, Celia; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Stress increases vulnerability to psychiatric disorders, partly by affecting brain monoamine systems, such as the locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine system. During stress, LC activity is coregulated by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and endogenous opioids. This study identified neural circuitry that regulates LC activity of intruder rats during the resident–intruder model of social stress. LC afferents were retrogradely labeled with Fluorogold (FG) and rats were subjected to one or five daily exposures to an aggressive resident. Sections through the nucleus paragigantocellularis (PGi) and central amygdalar nucleus (CNA), major sources of enkephalin (ENK) and CRF LC afferents, respectively, were immunocytochemically processed to detect c-fos, FG, and CRF or ENK. In response to a single exposure, intruder rats assumed defeat with a relatively short latency (SL). LC neurons, PGI-ENK LC afferents, and CNA-CRF LC afferents were activated in these rats as indicated by increased c-fos expression. With repeated stress, rats exhibited either a SL or long latency (LL) to defeat and these strategies were associated with distinct patterns of neuronal activation. In SL rats, LC neurons were activated, as were CNA-CRF LC afferents but not PGI-ENK LC afferents. LL rats had an opposite pattern, maintaining activation of PGi-ENK LC afferents but not CNA-CRF LC afferents or LC neurons. Together, these results indicate that the establishment of different coping strategies to social stress is associated with changes in the circuitry that regulates activity of the brain norepinephrine system. This may underlie differential vulnerability to the consequences of social stress that characterize these different coping strategies. PMID:26634226

  6. Modulation of visceral hypersensitivity by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α-3 in colorectal afferents

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, T.; Shinoda, M.; Feng, B.; Albers, K. M.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2010-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by colorectal hypersensitivity and contributed to by sensitized mechanosensitive primary afferents and recruitment of mechanoinsensitive (silent) afferents. Neurotrophic factors are well known to orchestrate dynamic changes in the properties of sensory neurons. Although pain modulation by proteins in the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family has been documented in various pathophysiological states, their role in colorectal hypersen...

  7. Vagally mediated effects of brain stem dopamine on gastric tone and phasic contractions of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmi, L; Toti, L; Bove, C; Travagli, R A

    2017-11-01

    Dopamine (DA)-containing fibers and neurons are embedded within the brain stem dorsal vagal complex (DVC); we have shown previously that DA modulates the membrane properties of neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) via DA1 and DA2 receptors. The vagally dependent modulation of gastric tone and phasic contractions, i.e., motility, by DA, however, has not been characterized. With the use of microinjections of DA in the DVC while recording gastric tone and motility, the aims of the present study were 1) assess the gastric effects of brain stem DA application, 2) identify the DA receptor subtype, and, 3) identify the postganglionic pathway(s) activated. Dopamine microinjection in the DVC decreased gastric tone and motility in both corpus and antrum in 29 of 34 rats, and the effects were abolished by ipsilateral vagotomy and fourth ventricular treatment with the selective DA2 receptor antagonist L741,626 but not by application of the selective DA1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Systemic administration of the cholinergic antagonist atropine attenuated the inhibition of corpus and antrum tone in response to DA microinjection in the DVC. Conversely, systemic administration of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor nitro-l-arginine methyl ester did not alter the DA-induced decrease in gastric tone and motility. Our data provide evidence of a dopaminergic modulation of a brain stem vagal neurocircuit that controls gastric tone and motility.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Dopamine administration in the brain stem decreases gastric tone and phasic contractions. The gastric effects of dopamine are mediated via dopamine 2 receptors on neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. The inhibitory effects of dopamine are mediated via inhibition of the postganglionic cholinergic pathway. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Vagal function in health and disease: Studies in Pittsburgh.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gianaros, P.J.; Graham, R.; Somsen, R.J.M.; van der Molen, M.W.; Jennings, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    The integration of behavioral processes with changes in vagally-controlled heart rate has been the focus of our investigations. A series of studies is reviewed showing that central and peripheral response inhibition is a primary source of transient, vagally-induced cardiac slowing during information

  9. Moderate Baseline Vagal Tone Predicts Greater Prosociality in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonas G.; Kahle, Sarah; Hastings, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    Vagal tone is widely believed to be an important physiological aspect of emotion regulation and associated positive behaviors. However, there is inconsistent evidence for relations between children's baseline vagal tone and their helpful or prosocial responses to others (Hastings & Miller, 2014). Recent work in adults suggests a quadratic…

  10. Tachykinins mediate vagal inhibition of gastrin secretion in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, P; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Hilsted, L

    1996-01-01

    Electrical vagal stimulation activates both stimulatory and inhibitory nerve fibers regulating gastrin release in the porcine antrum. The aim of this study was to examine the role of tachykinins in the inhibitory vagal control of gastrin release in the porcine antrum....

  11. Innervation of enteric mast cells by primary spinal afferents in guinea pig and human small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Qu, Meihua; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2014-10-01

    Mast cells express the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor and the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor in guinea pig and human small intestine. Enzyme-linked immunoassay showed that activation of intramural afferents by antidromic electrical stimulation or by capsaicin released SP and CGRP from human and guinea pig intestinal segments. Electrical stimulation of the afferents evoked slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in the enteric nervous system. The slow EPSPs were mediated by tachykinin neurokinin 1 and CGRP receptors. Capsaicin evoked slow EPSP-like responses that were suppressed by antagonists for protease-activated receptor 2. Afferent stimulation evoked slow EPSP-like excitation that was suppressed by mast cell-stabilizing drugs. Histamine and mast cell protease II were released by 1) exposure to SP or CGRP, 2) capsaicin, 3) compound 48/80, 4) elevation of mast cell Ca²⁺ by ionophore A23187, and 5) antidromic electrical stimulation of afferents. The mast cell stabilizers cromolyn and doxantrazole suppressed release of protease II and histamine when evoked by SP, CGRP, capsaicin, A23187, electrical stimulation of afferents, or compound 48/80. Neural blockade by tetrodotoxin prevented mast cell protease II release in response to antidromic electrical stimulation of mesenteric afferents. The results support a hypothesis that afferent innervation of enteric mast cells releases histamine and mast cell protease II, both of which are known to act in a diffuse paracrine manner to influence the behavior of enteric nervous system neurons and to elevate the sensitivity of spinal afferent terminals. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Decoding of the spike timing of primary afferents during voluntary arm movements in monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya eUmeda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms of encoding forelimb kinematics in the activity of peripheral afferents is essential for determining the optimal parameters of afferent stimulation to transmit proprioceptive signals in neuroprosthetics. To investigate whether the spike timing of dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons could be estimated from the forelimb kinematics of behaving monkeys, we implanted two multi-electrode arrays chronically in the DRGs at the level of the cervical segments in two monkeys. Neuronal activity during voluntary reach-to-grasp movements were recorded simultaneously with the trajectories of hand/arm movements, which were tracked in three-dimensional space using a motion capture system. Sixteen and 13 neurons, including muscle spindles, skin receptors, and tendon organ afferents, were recorded in the two monkeys, respectively. We were able to reconstruct forelimb joint kinematics from the temporal firing pattern of a subset of DRG neurons using sparse linear regression (SLiR analysis, suggesting that DRG neuronal ensembles encoded information about joint kinematics. Furthermore, we estimated the spike timing of the DRG neuronal ensembles from joint kinematics using an integrate-and-fire model (IF incorporating the SLiR algorithm. The temporal change of firing frequency of a subpopulation of neurons was reconstructed precisely from forelimb kinematics using the SLiR. The spike timing of the DRG neurons was calculated using an IF model, in which a spike occurs if the cumulative sum of the firing frequency value exceeded a constant threshold. The estimated firing pattern of the DRG neuronal ensembles encoded forelimb joint angles and velocities as precisely as the originally recorded neuronal activity. These results suggest that the simple model can be used to generate an accurate estimate of the spike timing of DRG neuronal ensembles from forelimb joint kinematics, and is useful for designing a proprioceptive decoder in a brain machine

  13. Afferent Endocrine Control of Eating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhans, Wolfgang; Holst, Jens Juul

    2016-01-01

    The afferent endocrine factors that control eating can be separated into different categories. One obvious categorization is by the time course of their effects, with long-term factors that signal adiposity and short-term factors that operate within the time frame of single meals. The second...... obvious categorization is by the origin of the endocrine signalling molecules. The level of knowledge concerning the physiological mechanisms and relevance of the hormones that are implicated in the control of eating is clearly different. With the accumulating knowledge about the hormones' actions......, various criteria have been developed for when the effect of a hormone can be considered 'physiologic'. This chapter treats the hormones separately and categorizes them by origin. It discusses ALL hormones that are implicated in eating control such as Gastrointestinal (GI) hormone and glucagon-like peptide...

  14. Anatomy and physiology of the afferent visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sashank; Galetta, Steven L

    2011-01-01

    The efficient organization of the human afferent visual system meets enormous computational challenges. Once visual information is received by the eye, the signal is relayed by the retina, optic nerve, chiasm, tracts, lateral geniculate nucleus, and optic radiations to the striate cortex and extrastriate association cortices for final visual processing. At each stage, the functional organization of these circuits is derived from their anatomical and structural relationships. In the retina, photoreceptors convert photons of light to an electrochemical signal that is relayed to retinal ganglion cells. Ganglion cell axons course through the optic nerve, and their partial decussation in the chiasm brings together corresponding inputs from each eye. Some inputs follow pathways to mediate pupil light reflexes and circadian rhythms. However, the majority of inputs arrive at the lateral geniculate nucleus, which relays visual information via second-order neurons that course through the optic radiations to arrive in striate cortex. Feedback mechanisms from higher cortical areas shape the neuronal responses in early visual areas, supporting coherent visual perception. Detailed knowledge of the anatomy of the afferent visual system, in combination with skilled examination, allows precise localization of neuropathological processes and guides effective diagnosis and management of neuro-ophthalmic disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Tactile stimulation with kinesiology tape alleviates muscle weakness attributable to attenuation of Ia afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged vibration stimulation to normal individuals could lead to muscle weakness attributable to attenuation of afferent feedback. This weakness is neurophysiologically similar to that seen in patients with knee injury. Theoretically, increasing input to gamma motor neurons could reverse this weakness. Sensory input to these neurons from skin could indirectly increase Ia afferent feedback. The present study examined the effect of this tactile stimulation in the form of Kinesiology tape on muscle weakness attributable to attenuation of afferent feedback. Randomized, crossover design. All participants were measured their eccentric maximal voluntary contractions under the 2 conditions (taping and non-taping). First, maximal voluntary contraction during eccentric contraction was measured as baseline. For the taping condition, Kinesiology tape was applied around each subject's knee joint during maximal voluntary contraction measurement after vibration. For the non-taping condition, tape was not applied during maximal voluntary contraction measurement after vibration. Mean percentage changes between pre- and post-vibration stimulation were compared between two conditions. Maximal voluntary contraction and average electromyography of taping condition was significantly larger than that of non-taping condition. Our results suggest that tactile stimulation in the form of Kinesiology tape inhibits the decline of both strength and electromyography. Alpha motor neuron activity attenuated by prolonged vibration would thus be partially rescued by tactile stimulation. These results indirectly suggest that stimulation of skin around the knee could counter quadriceps femoris weakness due to attenuated Ia afferent activity. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Optogenetics reveal delayed afferent synaptogenesis on grafted human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avaliani, Natalia; Sørensen, Andreas Toft; Ledri, Marco

    2014-01-01

    properties such as tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium currents and action potentials (APs), as well as both spontaneous and evoked postsynaptic currents, indicating functional afferent synaptic inputs. The grafted cells had a distinct electrophysiological profile compared to host cells in the OHSCs with higher...... input resistance, lower resting membrane potential, and APs with lower amplitude and longer duration. To investigate the origin of synaptic afferents to the grafted lt-NES cell-derived neurons, the host neurons were transduced with Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and optogenetically activated by blue light...

  17. pH-evoked dural afferent signaling is mediated by ASIC3 and is sensitized by mast cell mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jin; Wei, Xiaomei; Bischoff, Christina; Edelmayer, Rebecca M; Dussor, Gregory

    2013-09-01

    Prior studies have shown that decreased meningeal pH activates dural afferents via opening of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), suggesting one pathophysiological mechanism for the generation of headaches. The studies described here further examined the ASIC subtype mediating pH-induced dural-afferent activation and examined whether sensitization influences pH responses. Given the potential importance of meningeal mast cells to headache, the goal of this study was to evaluate dural afferent responses to pH following sensitization with mast cell mediators. Cutaneous allodynia was measured in rats following stimulation of the dura with decreased pH alone or in combination with mast cell mediators. Trigeminal ganglion neurons retrogradely labeled from the dura were stained with an ASIC3 antibody using immunohistochemistry. Current and action potentials evoked by changes in pH alone or in combination with mast cell mediators were measured in retrogradely labeled dural afferents using patch-clamp electrophysiology. pH-sensitive dural afferents generated currents in response to the ASIC3 activator 2-guanidine-4-methylquinazoline (GMQ), approximately 80% of these neurons express ASIC3 protein, and pH-evoked behavioral responses were inhibited by the ASIC3 blocker APETx2. Following exposure to mast cell mediators, dural afferents exhibited increased pH-evoked excitability, and cutaneous allodynia was observed at higher pH than with pH stimuli alone. These data indicate that the predominant ASIC subtype responding to decreased meningeal pH is ASIC3. Additionally, they demonstrate that in the presence of inflammation, dural afferents respond to even smaller decreases in pH providing further support for the ability of small pH changes within the meninges to initiate afferent input leading to headache. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  18. Daith Piercing in a Case of Chronic Migraine: A Possible Vagal Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Cascio Rizzo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Daith piercing is an ear piercing located at the crus of the helix, bilaterally. It is getting great consent on social media as alternative treatment in chronic migraine. No data about its efficacy and action are available in scientific literature so far. We present the case of a 54-year-old male patient suffering from refractory chronic migraine with medication-overuse, who substantially improved after bilateral ear daith piercing. His migraine was refractory to symptomatic as well as prophylactic therapies. He used to treat headaches with up to five symptomatic drugs per attack and had attempted several pharmacological preventive therapies, including Onabotulinumtoxin A. He also underwent detoxification treatments with intravenous steroids and diazepam, without durable benefit. At the time of daith piercing, the headache-related disability measures showed a HIT-6 score of 64, a MIDAS-score of 70, and a 11-point Box scale of 5. On his own free will, he decided to get a “daith piercing.” After that, he experienced a reduction of migraine attacks, which became very rare, and infrequent, less disabling episodes of tension-type headache (HIT-6 score of 56; MIDAS score of 27, 11-point Box scale of 3. Painkiller assumption has much decreased: he takes only one tablet of indomethacin 50 mg to treat tensive headaches, about four times per month. Beyond a placebo effect, we can speculate a vagal modulation as the action mechanism of daith piercing: a nociceptive sensory stimulus applied to trigeminal and vagal areas of the ear can activate ear vagal afferents, which can modulate pain pathways by means of projections to the caudal trigeminal nucleus, to the locus coeruleus and to the nucleus raphe magnus. Currently, daith piercing cannot be recommended as migraine treatment because of the lack of scientific evidence, the unquantified rate of failure and the associated risks with insertion. However, given the increasing but anecdotal evidence, we

  19. Afferent Inputs to Neurotransmitter-Defined Cell Types in the Ventral Tegmental Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Faget

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ventral tegmental area (VTA plays a central role in the neural circuit control of behavioral reinforcement. Though considered a dopaminergic nucleus, the VTA contains substantial heterogeneity in neurotransmitter type, containing also GABA and glutamate neurons. Here, we used a combinatorial viral approach to transsynaptically label afferents to defined VTA dopamine, GABA, or glutamate neurons. Surprisingly, we find that these populations received qualitatively similar inputs, with dominant and comparable projections from the lateral hypothalamus, raphe, and ventral pallidum. However, notable differences were observed, with striatal regions and globus pallidus providing a greater share of input to VTA dopamine neurons, cortical input preferentially on to glutamate neurons, and GABA neurons receiving proportionally more input from the lateral habenula and laterodorsal tegmental nucleus. By comparing inputs to each of the transmitter-defined VTA cell types, this study sheds important light on the systems-level organization of diverse inputs to VTA.

  20. Relationships among metabolic homeostasis, diet, and peripheral afferent neuron biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is well-established that food intake behavior and energy balance are regulated by cross-talk between peripheral organ systems and the central nervous system (CNS), for instance through the actions of peripherally-derived leptin on hindbrain and hypothalamic loci. Diet- or obesity-associated dist...

  1. Runx1-deficient afferents impair visceral nociception, exacerbating dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Shih-Ping; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Ma, Ming Chieh; Hu, Jui-Ting; Sun, Ya-Yun; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Chung, Yuan-Chiang; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Chen, Chih-Li

    2014-01-01

    Colitis is a group of inflammatory and auto-immune disorders that affect the tissue lining of the gastrointestinal (GI) system. Studies of chemically-induced animal models of colitis have indicated that nociceptive afferents or neuropeptides have differing effects on GI inflammation. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in visceral pain and the role of visceral sensory afferents involved in the modulation of colitis remains unclear. A previous study demonstrated that Runx1, a Runt domain transcription factor, is restricted to nociceptors. In these neurons, Runx1 regulates the expression of numerous ion channels and receptors, controlling the lamina-specific innervation patterns of nociceptive afferents in the spinal cord. Moreover, mice that lack Runx1 exhibit specific defects in thermal and neuropathic pain. To examine the function of Runx1 in visceral nociception, we employed double-transgenic mice (WntCre: Runx1(F/F)), in which the expression of Runx1 was specifically disrupted in the sensory neurons. To determine the role of Runx1 in visceral pain sensation, the WntCre: Runx1(F/F) mice and their control littermates (Runx1(F/F)) were treated using dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) to induce colitis. The results indicated that disrupted Runx1 in the sensory afferents resulted in: (1) impairment of the visceral pain sensation in murine DSS-induced colitis; (2) exacerbating the phenotypes in murine DSS-induced colitis; (3) a differential effect on the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the colon tissues isolated from mice treated using DSS and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis; and (4) alteration of the distribution of lymphocytes and mast cells in mucosa. These results show that the function of Runx1 in sensory afferents is vital for modulating visceral pain and the neuro-immune axis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Combined genetic and pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 and P2X3 attenuates colorectal hypersensitivity and afferent sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Michael E.; Feng, Bin; Schwartz, Erica S.

    2013-01-01

    The ligand-gated channels transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and P2X3 have been reported to facilitate colorectal afferent neuron sensitization, thus contributing to organ hypersensitivity and pain. In the present study, we hypothesized that TRPV1 and P2X3 cooperate to modulate colorectal nociception and afferent sensitivity. To test this hypothesis, we employed TRPV1-P2X3 double knockout (TPDKO) mice and channel-selective pharmacological antagonists and evaluated combined channel contributions to behavioral responses to colorectal distension (CRD) and afferent fiber responses to colorectal stretch. Baseline responses to CRD were unexpectedly greater in TPDKO compared with control mice, but zymosan-produced CRD hypersensitivity was absent in TPDKO mice. Relative to control mice, proportions of mechanosensitive and -insensitive pelvic nerve afferent classes were not different in TPDKO mice. Responses of mucosal and serosal class afferents to mechanical probing were unaffected, whereas responses of muscular (but not muscular/mucosal) afferents to stretch were significantly attenuated in TPDKO mice; sensitization of both muscular and muscular/mucosal afferents by inflammatory soup was also significantly attenuated. In pharmacological studies, the TRPV1 antagonist A889425 and P2X3 antagonist TNP-ATP, alone and in combination, applied onto stretch-sensitive afferent endings attenuated responses to stretch; combined antagonism produced greater attenuation. In the aggregate, these observations suggest that 1) genetic manipulation of TRPV1 and P2X3 leads to reduction in colorectal mechanosensation peripherally and compensatory changes and/or disinhibition of other channels centrally, 2) combined pharmacological antagonism produces more robust attenuation of mechanosensation peripherally than does antagonism of either channel alone, and 3) the relative importance of these channels appears to be enhanced in colorectal hypersensitivity. PMID:23989007

  3. Tuning afferent synapses of hippocampal interneurons by neuropeptide Y

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledri, Marco; Sørensen, Andreas Toft; Erdelyi, Ferenc

    2011-01-01

    extrahippocampal afferents. Various excitatory and inhibitory afferent and efferent synapses of the hippocampal CCK basket cells express serotoninergic, cholinergic, cannabinoid, and benzodiazepine sensitive receptors, all contributing to their functional plasticity. We explored whether CCK basket cells...

  4. Vagal Recovery From Cognitive Challenge Moderates Age-Related Deficits in Executive Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Olga V.; Kimhy, David; McKinley, Paula S.; Burg, Matthew M.; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Lachman, Margie E.; Tun, Patricia A.; Ryff, Carol D.; Seeman, Teresa E.; Sloan, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    Decline in executive functioning (EF) is a hallmark of cognitive aging. We have previously reported that faster vagal recovery from cognitive challenge is associated with better EF. This study examined the association between vagal recovery from cognitive challenge and age-related differences in EF among 817 participants in the Midlife in the U.S. study (aged 35–86). Cardiac vagal control was measured as high-frequency heart rate variability. Vagal recovery moderated the association between age and EF (β = .811, p = .004). Secondary analyses revealed that older participants (aged 65–86) with faster vagal recovery had superior EF compared to their peers who had slower vagal recovery. In contrast, among younger (aged 35–54) and middle-aged (aged 55–64) participants, vagal recovery was not associated with EF. We conclude that faster vagal recovery from cognitive challenge is associated with reduced deficits in EF among older, but not younger individuals. PMID:26303063

  5. Group Ia afferents contribute to short-latency interlimb reflexes in the human biceps femoris muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Kamavuako, Ernest Nlandu; Geertsen, Svend Sparre

    2017-01-01

    to contralateral motor neurons in humans (Stubbs & Mrachacz-Kersting, JNeurophysiol., 2009; Jankowska, Brain Res. Rev., 2008). Significance Statement: This study provides further indirect evidence for the presence of spinal commissural interneurons relaying ipsilateral sensory information to contralateral motor......, and facilitatory following flexion perturbations. Due to the onset latency (45 ms), spinal pathways likely mediate the reflexes. Furthermore, the same population of cBF motor units (MUs) inhibited following iKnee extension perturbations were facilitated following iKnee flexion perturbations, indicating...... neurons in humans, with primary contributions from group Ia muscle spindle afferents....

  6. Integration of sensory quanta in cuneate nucleus neurons in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Bengtsson

    Full Text Available Discriminative touch relies on afferent information carried to the central nervous system by action potentials (spikes in ensembles of primary afferents bundled in peripheral nerves. These sensory quanta are first processed by the cuneate nucleus before the afferent information is transmitted to brain networks serving specific perceptual and sensorimotor functions. Here we report data on the integration of primary afferent synaptic inputs obtained with in vivo whole cell patch clamp recordings from the neurons of this nucleus. We find that the synaptic integration in individual cuneate neurons is dominated by 4-8 primary afferent inputs with large synaptic weights. In a simulation we show that the arrangement with a low number of primary afferent inputs can maximize transfer over the cuneate nucleus of information encoded in the spatiotemporal patterns of spikes generated when a human fingertip contact objects. Hence, the observed distributions of synaptic weights support high fidelity transfer of signals from ensembles of tactile afferents. Various anatomical estimates suggest that a cuneate neuron may receive hundreds of primary afferents rather than 4-8. Therefore, we discuss the possibility that adaptation of synaptic weight distribution, possibly involving silent synapses, may function to maximize information transfer in somatosensory pathways.

  7. Nitric oxide in the afferent synaptic transmission of the axolotl vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, A; Soto, E; Vega, R

    2001-01-01

    This study was performed using intracellular and multiunit extracellular recording techniques in order to characterize the role of nitric oxide in the afferent synaptic transmission of the vestibular system of the axolotl (Ambystoma tigrinum). Bath application of nitric oxide synthase inhibitors N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (0.01microM to 10microM) and N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (0.1microM to 1000microM) elicited a dose-dependent decrease in the basal discharge of the semicircular canal afferent fibers. N(G)-Nitro-L-arginine also diminished the response to mechanical stimuli. Moreover, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (1microM) produced a hyperpolarization associated with a decrease in the spike discharge and diminished the frequency of the excitatory postsynaptic potentials on afferent fibers recorded intracellularly. Nitric oxide donors were also tested: (i) S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine (0.1microM to 100microM) increased the basal discharge and the response to mechanical stimuli. At the maximum effective concentration (100microM) this drug affected neither the amplitude nor the frequency of the excitatory postsynaptic potentials. However, it slightly depolarized the afferent neurons and decreased their input resistance. (ii) 3-Morpholino-sydnonimine hydrochloride did not significantly affect the basal discharge or the mechanically evoked peak response of afferent neurons at any of the concentrations used (1microM to 1000microM). However, after 10min of perfusion in the bath, 1microM and 10microM 3-morpholino-sydnonimine hydrochloride significantly modified the baseline of the mechanically evoked response, producing an increase in the mean spike discharge of the afferent fibers. These results indicate that nitric oxide may have a facilitatory role on the basal discharge and on the response to mechanical stimuli of the vestibular afferent fibers. Thus, nitric oxide probably participates in the sensory coding and adaptative changes of vestibular input in

  8. Pathology Influences Blood Pressure Change following Vagal Stimulation in an Animal Intubation Model.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, P; Guillaud, L; Desbois, C; Benoist, J.F.; Combrisson, H; Dauger, S.; Peters, M J

    2013-01-01

    The haemodynamic response to critical care intubation is influenced by the use of sedation and relaxant drugs and the activation of the vagal reflex. It has been hypothesized that different disease states may have a contrasting effect on the cardiovascular response to vagal stimulation. Our objective was to determine whether the blood pressure response to vagal stimulation was modified by endotoxaemia or hypovolaemia.

  9. Nonnociceptive afferent activity depresses nocifensive behavior and nociceptive synapses via an endocannabinoid-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Sharleen; Burrell, Brian D

    2013-12-01

    Previously, low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of a nonnociceptive touch-sensitive neuron has been found to elicit endocannabinoid-dependent long-term depression (eCB-LTD) in nociceptive synapses in the leech central nervous system (CNS) that requires activation of a presynaptic transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV)-like receptor by postsynaptically synthesized 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG). This capacity of nonnociceptive afferent activity to reduce nociceptive signaling resembles gate control of pain, albeit longer lasting in these synaptic experiments. Since eCB-LTD has been observed at a single sensory-motor synapse, this study examines the functional relevance of this mechanism, specifically whether this form of synaptic plasticity has similar effects at the behavioral level in which additional, intersegmental neural circuits are engaged. Experiments were carried out using a semi-intact preparation that permitted both synaptic recordings and monitoring of the leech whole body shortening, a defensive withdrawal reflex that was elicited via intracellular stimulation of a single nociceptive neuron (the N cell). The same LFS of a nonnociceptive afferent that induced eCB-LTD in single synapses also produced an attenuation of the shortening reflex. Similar attenuation of behavior was also observed when 2-AG was applied. LFS-induced behavioral and synaptic depression was blocked by tetrahydrolipstatin (THL), a diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor, and by SB366791, a TRPV1 antagonist. The effects of both THL and SB366791 were observed following either bath application of the drug or intracellular injection into the presynaptic (SB366791) or postsynaptic (THL) neuron. These findings demonstrate a novel, endocannabinoid-based mechanism by which nonnociceptive afferent activity may modulate nocifensive behaviors via action on primary afferent synapses.

  10. Revisiting the role of neurons in neurovascular coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Cauli

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we will review molecular, anatomical, physiological and pharmacological data in an attempt to better understand how excitatory and inhibitory neurons recruited by distinct afferent inputs to the cerebral cortex contribute to the coupled hemodynamic response, and how astrocytes can act as intermediaries to these neuronal populations. We aim at providing the pros and cons to the following statements that, depending on the nature of the afferent input to the neocortex, (i different neuronal or astroglial messengers, likely acting in sequence, mediate the hemodynamic changes, (ii some recruited neurons release messengers that directly alter blood vessel tone, (iii others act by modulating neuronal and astroglial activity, and (iv astrocytes act as intermediaries for both excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. We will stress that a given afferent signal activates a precise neuronal circuitry that determines the mediators of the hemodynamic response as well as the level of interaction with surrounding astrocytes.

  11. Malignant Transformation of Vagal Nerve Schwannoma in to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vagal schwannomas are benign, rare peripheral nerve sheath tumors in the head and neck region. Some physicians opt to closely observe cases of schwannoma of the neck on an outpatient basis rather than to perform radical surgery. However, there is a possibility, albeit rare, of malignant transformation of a.

  12. Effects of Electrical Vagal Stimulation and Bilateral Vagotomy on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of electrical vagal stimulation and bilateral vagotomy on the flow and electrolyte composition of bile was studied in fasted and anaesthetized male albino Wistar Rats. Entero-hepatic circulation was maintained artificially by continuous infusion of 1% sodium teurocholate. In each experiment, bile was collected at 15 ...

  13. Thrombolytic therapy preserves vagal activity early after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, P; Hintze, U; Møller, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of thrombolytic therapy on vagal tone after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). DESIGN: Holter monitoring for 24 h was performed at hospital discharge and 6 weeks after AMI in 74 consecutive male survivors of a first AMI, who fulfilled...

  14. Malignant Transformation of Vagal Nerve Schwannoma in to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here, we are reporting the first case from the Indian subcontinent which was transformed into the angiosarcoma from benign vagal schwannoma over a long period. A 47‑year‑old male patient complaining of left sided neck swelling since last 12 years, swelling was insidious in onset, gradually progressive very slowly. In last ...

  15. Pain processing by spinal microcircuits: afferent combinatorics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Steven A; Ratté, Stéphanie

    2012-08-01

    Pain, itch, heat, cold, and touch represent different percepts arising from somatosensory input. How stimuli give rise to these percepts has been debated for over a century. Recent work supports the view that primary afferents are highly specialized to transduce and encode specific stimulus modalities. However, cross-modal interactions (e.g. inhibition or exacerbation of pain by touch) support convergence rather than specificity in central circuits. We outline how peripheral specialization together with central convergence could enable spinal microcircuits to combine inputs from distinctly specialized, co-activated afferents and to modulate the output signals thus formed through computations like normalization. These issues will be discussed alongside recent advances in our understanding of microcircuitry in the superficial dorsal horn. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Population coding of forelimb joint kinematics by peripheral afferents in monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Umeda

    Full Text Available Various peripheral receptors provide information concerning position and movement to the central nervous system to achieve complex and dexterous movements of forelimbs in primates. The response properties of single afferent receptors to movements at a single joint have been examined in detail, but the population coding of peripheral afferents remains poorly defined. In this study, we obtained multichannel recordings from dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons in cervical segments of monkeys. We applied the sparse linear regression (SLiR algorithm to the recordings, which selects useful input signals to reconstruct movement kinematics. Multichannel recordings of peripheral afferents were performed by inserting multi-electrode arrays into the DRGs of lower cervical segments in two anesthetized monkeys. A total of 112 and 92 units were responsive to the passive joint movements or the skin stimulation with a painting brush in Monkey 1 and Monkey 2, respectively. Using the SLiR algorithm, we reconstructed the temporal changes of joint angle, angular velocity, and acceleration at the elbow, wrist, and finger joints from temporal firing patterns of the DRG neurons. By automatically selecting a subset of recorded units, the SLiR achieved superior generalization performance compared with a regularized linear regression algorithm. The SLiR selected not only putative muscle units that were responsive to only the passive movements, but also a number of putative cutaneous units responsive to the skin stimulation. These results suggested that an ensemble of peripheral primary afferents that contains both putative muscle and cutaneous units encode forelimb joint kinematics of non-human primates.

  17. Constitutive overexpression of muscarinic receptors leads to vagal hyperreactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Livolsi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alterations in muscarinic receptor expression and acetylcholinesterase (AchE activity have been observed in tissues from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS. Vagal overactivity has been proposed as a possible cause of SIDS as well as of vasovagal syncopes. The aim of the present study was to seek whether muscarinic receptor overexpression may be the underlying mechanism of vagal hyperreactivity. Rabbits with marked vagal pauses following injection of phenylephrine were selected and crossed to obtain a vagal hyperreactive strain. The density of cardiac muscarinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase (AchE gene expression were assessed. Blood markers of the observed cardiac abnormalities were also sought. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cardiac muscarinic M(2 and M(3 receptors were overexpressed in hyperreactive rabbits compared to control animals (2.3-fold and 2.5-fold, respectively and the severity of the phenylephrine-induced bradycardia was correlated with their densities. A similar overexpression of M(2 receptors was observed in peripheral mononuclear white blood cells, suggesting that cardiac M(2 receptor expression can be inferred with high confidence from measurements in blood cells. Sequencing of the coding fragment of the M(2 receptor gene revealed a single nucleotide mutation in 83% of hyperreactive animals, possibly contributing for the transcript overexpression. Significant increases in AchE expression and activity were also assessed (AchE mRNA amplification ratio of 3.6 versus normal rabbits. This phenomenon might represent a compensatory consequence of muscarinic receptors overexpression. Alterations in M(2 receptor and AchE expression occurred between the 5th and the 7th week of age, a critical period also characterized by a higher mortality rate of hyperreactive rabbits (52% in H rabbits versus 13% in normal rabbits and preceeded the appearance of functional disorders. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that

  18. Comparison of assessment methods of cardiac vagal modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Vagner Clayton de; Santana, Kelen Rabelo; Silva, Bruno Moreira; Ramos, Plínio Santos; Lovisi, Júlio César Moraes; Araújo, Claudio Gil Soares de; Ricardo, Djalma Rabelo

    2011-12-01

    Several methods have been used to assess cardiac vagal modulation, but there are gaps regarding the association and accuracy of these methods. To investigate the association between three valid, reproducible and commonly methods used to assess cardiac vagal modulation and compare their accuracies. Thirty healthy men (23 ± 4 years) and 15 men with coronary artery disease (61 ± 10 years) were evaluated in counterbalanced design by Heart Rate Variability (HRV; variables: the time domain = pNN50, SDNN and RMSSD, the frequency domain HF = ms² and HF n.u.), Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA) and 4-second Exercise Test (T4s). Thirty healthy men (23 ± 4 years) and 15 men with coronary artery disease (61 ± 10 years) were evaluated in counterbalanced order by Heart Rate Variability (HRV; variables: the time domain = pNN50, SDNN and RMSSD, the frequency domain HF = ms² and HF n.u.), Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA) and 4-second Exercise Test (T4s). Healthy subjects had higher vagal modulation by the three methods (p RSA, but there was no correlation between the T4s and the other two methods. In the group with coronary artery disease, there was a correlation between the results of HRV (pNN50, SDNN, RMSSD, HF ms² and HF n.u.) and RSA. In addition, there was a correlation between the RSA and T4s. Finally, the T4s and RSA methods presented more accurate effect size and better accuracy (p RSA generated partially redundant results in healthy subjects and in patients with coronary artery disease, while the T4s generated results that were complementary to HRV and RSA in healthy subjects. In addition, RSA and T4s methods were more accurate when discriminating cardiac vagal modulation between healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease, when compared to HRV.

  19. Deglutition Syncope: Two Case Reports Attributed to Vagal Hyperactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhogal, Sukhdeep; Sethi, Pooja; Taha, Yasir; Papireddy, Muralidhar; Mahajan, Akhilesh; Zaidi, Syed Imran M; Ramu, Vijay; Paul, Timir

    2017-01-01

    Deglutition syncope is a relatively rare cause of syncope that belongs to the category of neurally mediated reflex syncopal syndromes. The phenomenon is related to vagal reflex in context to deglutition causing atrioventricular block and acute reduction in cardiac output leading to dizziness or syncope. We present case series of two cases of deglutition syncope, of which first was managed medically and second with pacemaker implantation.

  20. Deglutition Syncope: Two Case Reports Attributed to Vagal Hyperactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Bhogal, Sukhdeep; Sethi, Pooja; Taha, Yasir; Papireddy, Muralidhar; Mahajan, Akhilesh; Zaidi, Syed Imran M.; Ramu, Vijay; Paul, Timir

    2017-01-01

    Deglutition syncope is a relatively rare cause of syncope that belongs to the category of neurally mediated reflex syncopal syndromes. The phenomenon is related to vagal reflex in context to deglutition causing atrioventricular block and acute reduction in cardiac output leading to dizziness or syncope. We present case series of two cases of deglutition syncope, of which first was managed medically and second with pacemaker implantation.

  1. Human sinus arrhythmia as an index of vagal cardiac outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckberg, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    The human central vagal mechanisms were investigated by measuring the intervals between heartbeats during controlled breathing (at breathing intervals of 2.5-10 s and nominal tidal volumes of 1000 and 1500 ml) in six young men and women. It was found that as the breathing interval increased, the longest heart periods became longer, the shortest heart periods became shorter, and the peak-valley P-P intervals increased asymptotically. Peak-valley intervals also increased in proportion to tidal volume, although this influence was small. The phase angles between heart period changes and respiration were found to vary as linear functions of breathing interval. Heart period shortening began in inspiration at short breathing intervals and in expiration at long breathing intervals, while heart period lengthening began in early expiration at all breathing intervals studied. It is concluded that a close relationship exists between variations of respiratory depth and interval and the quantity, periodicity, and timing of vagal cardiac outflow in conscious humans. The results indicate that at usual breathing rates, phasic respiration-related changes of vagal motoneuron activity begin in expiration, progress slowly, and are incompletely expressed at fast breathing ratges.

  2. Afference copy as a quantitative neurophysiological model for consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Hugo; Coop, Allan D

    2014-06-01

    Consciousness is a topic of considerable human curiosity with a long history of philosophical analysis and debate. We consider there is nothing particularly complicated about consciousness when viewed as a necessary process of the vertebrate nervous system. Here, we propose a physiological "explanatory gap" is created during each present moment by the temporal requirements of neuronal activity. The gap extends from the time exteroceptive and proprioceptive stimuli activate the nervous system until they emerge into consciousness. During this "moment", it is impossible for an organism to have any conscious knowledge of the ongoing evolution of its environment. In our schematic model, a mechanism of "afference copy" is employed to bridge the explanatory gap with consciously experienced percepts. These percepts are fabricated from the conjunction of the cumulative memory of previous relevant experience and the given stimuli. They are structured to provide the best possible prediction of the expected content of subjective conscious experience likely to occur during the period of the gap. The model is based on the proposition that the neural circuitry necessary to support consciousness is a product of sub/preconscious reflexive learning and recall processes. Based on a review of various psychological and neurophysiological findings, we develop a framework which contextualizes the model and briefly discuss further implications.

  3. Experimental studies of gastric dysfunction in motion sickness: The effect of gastric and vestibular stimulation on the vagal and splanchnic gastric efferents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niijima, A.; Jiang, Z. Y.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    The experiments were conducted in anaesthetized rats. In the first part of the experiments, the effect of CuSO4 on the afferent activity in the gastric branch of the vagus nerve was investigated. Gastric perfusion of CuSO4 solution (0.04 percent and 0.08 percent) provoked an increase in afferent activity. In the second part of the experiments, the reflex effects of gastric perfusion of CuSO4 solution, repetitive stimulation of the gastric vagus nerve, and caloric stimulation of the right vestibular apparatus (5-18 C water) on gastric autonomic outflow were investigated. The results of these experiments showed that these three different types of stimulation caused an inhibition in efferent activity of the gastric vagus nerve and a slight activation of the splanchnic gastric efferents. The summation of the effect of each stimulation was also observed. These results, therefore, provide evidence for a possible integrative inhibitory function of the vagal gastric center as well as an excitatory function of gastric sympathetic motoneurons in relation to motion sickness.

  4. Contribution of vagal pathways to the renal responses to head-out immersion in the nonhuman primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, J P; Zucker, I H

    1978-02-01

    Studies were carried out to determine the contribution of cardiopulmonary receptors to the renal responses to head-out water immersion in the nonhuman primate. Immersion to the suprasternal notch was associated with significant increases in central venous pressure, urine flow, and sodium excretion. The increased sodium excretion was due primarily to a significant increase in the percent of the filtered sodium excreted. Deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) and antiduretic hormone (ADH) had no substantial effects on these responses. The finding of a vasopressin-resistant hyposthenuria is consistent with the natriuresis of immersion being due, at least in part, to a decrease in sodium reabsorption proximal to the diluting segment, possibly the proximal tubule. Bilateral cervical vagotomy had no substantial influence on the renal responses to immersion, demonstrating that cardiopulmonary receptors whose axons traverse the vagus nerves are not necessary for the homeostatic adjustments to central hypervolemia in the primate. Since the renal and cardiovascular responses of the primate to immersion are essentially the same as those seen in man, it is probable that vagal pathways also are not necessary in man. However, it is possible that sympathetic afferents are involved in the natriuresis observed in the primate during immersion.

  5. Partial Aminoglycoside Lesions in Vestibular Epithelia Reveal Broad Sensory Dysfunction Associated with Modest Hair Cell Loss and Afferent Calyx Retraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultemeier, David R; Hoffman, Larry F

    2017-01-01

    Although the effects of aminoglycoside antibiotics on hair cells have been investigated for decades, their influences on the dendrites of primary afferent neurons have not been widely studied. This is undoubtedly due to the difficulty in disassociating pathology to dendritic processes from that resulting from loss of the presynaptic hair cell. This was overcome in the present investigation through development of a preparation using Chinchilla laniger that enabled direct perilymphatic infusion. Through this strategy we unmasked gentamicin's potential effects on afferent calyces. The pathophysiology of the vestibular neuroepithelia after post-administration durations of 0.5 through 6 months was assessed using single-neuron electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, and confocal microscopy. Hair cell densities within cristae central zones (0.5-, 1-, 2-, and 6-months) and utricle peri- and extrastriola (6-months) regions were determined, and damage to calretinin-immunoreactive calyces was quantified. Gentamicin-induced hair cell loss exhibited a profile that reflected elimination of a most-sensitive group by 0.5-months post-administration (18.2%), followed by loss of a second group (20.6%) over the subsequent 5.5 months. The total hair cell loss with this gentamicin dose (approximately 38.8%) was less than the estimated fraction of type I hair cells in the chinchilla's crista central zone (approximately 60%), indicating that viable type I hair cells remained. Extensive lesions to afferent calyces were observed at 0.5-months, though stimulus-evoked modulation was intact at this post-administration time. Widespread compromise to calyx morphology and severe attenuation of stimulus-evoked afferent discharge modulation was found at 1 month post-administration, a condition that persisted in preparations examined through the 6-month post-administration interval. Spontaneous discharge was robust at all post-administration intervals. All calretinin-positive calyces had retracted

  6. Partial Aminoglycoside Lesions in Vestibular Epithelia Reveal Broad Sensory Dysfunction Associated with Modest Hair Cell Loss and Afferent Calyx Retraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultemeier, David R.; Hoffman, Larry F.

    2017-01-01

    Although the effects of aminoglycoside antibiotics on hair cells have been investigated for decades, their influences on the dendrites of primary afferent neurons have not been widely studied. This is undoubtedly due to the difficulty in disassociating pathology to dendritic processes from that resulting from loss of the presynaptic hair cell. This was overcome in the present investigation through development of a preparation using Chinchilla laniger that enabled direct perilymphatic infusion. Through this strategy we unmasked gentamicin’s potential effects on afferent calyces. The pathophysiology of the vestibular neuroepithelia after post-administration durations of 0.5 through 6 months was assessed using single-neuron electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, and confocal microscopy. Hair cell densities within cristae central zones (0.5-, 1-, 2-, and 6-months) and utricle peri- and extrastriola (6-months) regions were determined, and damage to calretinin-immunoreactive calyces was quantified. Gentamicin-induced hair cell loss exhibited a profile that reflected elimination of a most-sensitive group by 0.5-months post-administration (18.2%), followed by loss of a second group (20.6%) over the subsequent 5.5 months. The total hair cell loss with this gentamicin dose (approximately 38.8%) was less than the estimated fraction of type I hair cells in the chinchilla’s crista central zone (approximately 60%), indicating that viable type I hair cells remained. Extensive lesions to afferent calyces were observed at 0.5-months, though stimulus-evoked modulation was intact at this post-administration time. Widespread compromise to calyx morphology and severe attenuation of stimulus-evoked afferent discharge modulation was found at 1 month post-administration, a condition that persisted in preparations examined through the 6-month post-administration interval. Spontaneous discharge was robust at all post-administration intervals. All calretinin-positive calyces had

  7. Effect of Microgravity on Afferent Innervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Presentations and publications are: (1) an audiovisual summary web presentation on results from SLM-MIR avian experiments. A color presentation summarizing results from the SLM-MIR and STS-29 avian experiments; (2) color threshold and ratio of S 100B MAP5, NF68/200, GABA and GAD; (3) chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents; (4) microgravity in the STS-29 Space Shuttle Discovery affected the vestibular system of chick embryos; (5) expression of S 100B in sensory and secretory cells of the vertebrate inner ear; (6) otoconia biogenesis, phylogeny, composition and functional attributes;(7) the glycan keratin sulfate in inner ear crystals; (8) elliptical-P cells in the avian perilymphatic interface of the tegmentum vasculosum; and (9) LAMP2c and S100B upregulation in brain stem after VIIIth nerve deafferentation.

  8. Serotonin controls initiation of locomotion and afferent modulation of coordination via 5-HT7 receptors in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabaj, Anna M; Majczyński, Henryk; Couto, Erika; Gardiner, Phillip F; Stecina, Katinka; Sławińska, Urszula; Jordan, Larry M

    2017-01-01

    Experiments on neonatal rodent spinal cord showed that serotonin (5-HT), acting via 5-HT7 receptors, is required for initiation of locomotion and for controlling the action of interneurons responsible for inter- and intralimb coordination, but the importance of the 5-HT system in adult locomotion is not clear. Blockade of spinal 5-HT7 receptors interfered with voluntary locomotion in adult rats and fictive locomotion in paralysed decerebrate rats with no afferent feedback, consistent with a requirement for activation of descending 5-HT neurons for production of locomotion. The direct control of coordinating interneurons by 5-HT7 receptors observed in neonatal animals was not found during fictive locomotion, revealing a developmental shift from direct control of locomotor interneurons in neonates to control of afferent input from the moving limb in adults. An understanding of the afferents controlled by 5-HT during locomotion is required for optimal use of rehabilitation therapies involving the use of serotonergic drugs. Serotonergic pathways to the spinal cord are implicated in the control of locomotion based on studies using serotonin type 7 (5-HT7 ) receptor agonists and antagonists and 5-HT7 receptor knockout mice. Blockade of these receptors is thought to interfere with the activity of coordinating interneurons, a conclusion derived primarily from in vitro studies on isolated spinal cord of neonatal rats and mice. Developmental changes in the effects of serotonin (5-HT) on spinal neurons have recently been described, and there is increasing data on control of sensory input by 5-HT7 receptors on dorsal root ganglion cells and/or dorsal horn neurons, leading us to determine the effects of 5-HT7 receptor blockade on voluntary overground locomotion and on locomotion without afferent input from the moving limb (fictive locomotion) in adult animals. Intrathecal injections of the selective 5-HT7 antagonist SB269970 in adult intact rats suppressed locomotion by partial

  9. Critical Airway Compromise due to a Massive Vagal Schwannoma

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDermott, AM

    2016-05-01

    We describe the case of a 37-year-old man with a slowly enlarging neck lump and compressive symptoms. He presented to a separate institution 10 years prior where an observational approach was advocated. Following preoperative investigations and embolization, an 11cm vagal schwannoma was excised and vagus nerve was sacrificed. Although conservative management is appropriate for a select patient population, surgical excision is treatment of choice for cervical neurogenic tumours and paraganglionomas and must be considered in young patients or rapidly expanding tumours to avoid compressive symptoms, as in this case.

  10. Acute Vagal Nerve Stimulation Lowers α2 Adrenoceptor Availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landau, Anne M.; Dyve, Suzan; Jakobsen, Steen

    2015-01-01

    Background Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) emerged as an anti-epileptic therapy, and more recently as a potential antidepressant intervention. Objective/hypothesis We hypothesized that salutary effects of VNS are mediated, at least in part, by augmentation of the inhibitory effects of cortical...... binding potentials for selected brain regions of each animal. Results VNS treatment markedly reduced the binding potential of yohimbine in limbic, thalamic and cortical brain regions, in inverse correlation with the baseline binding potential. Conclusion The result is consistent with release...... of noradrenaline by antidepressant therapy, implying a possible explanation for the antidepressant effect of VNS....

  11. Vagal activity: effect of age, sex and physical activity pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, C G; Nobrega, A C; Castro, C L

    1989-01-01

    Heart rate response to a short (4 s) bicycle exercise test during maximal inspiratory apnea was used to assess vagal activity (VA). This study aims to evaluate the role of age, sex and physical activity pattern on VA. A total of 148 subjects, divided into athletes (N = 90) and non-athletes (N = 58) were tested. No correlation was found between age (range from 15 to 42 years) and VA in the male and female athletes (P greater than 0.05). No gender effect could be identified. In spite of a slight tendency toward higher VA in athletes, no significant differences could be found between the two groups.

  12. Emulated Muscle Spindle and Spiking Afferents Validates VLSI Neuromorphic Hardware as a Testbed for Sensorimotor Function and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanxin M. Niu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The lack of multi-scale empirical measurements (e.g. recording simultaneously from neurons, muscles, whole body, etc. complicates understanding of sensorimotor function in humans. This is particularly true for the understanding of development during childhood, which requires evaluation of measurements over many years. We have developed a synthetic platform for emulating multi-scale activity of the vertebrate sensorimotor system. Our design benefits from Very Large Scale Integrated-circuit (VLSI technology to provide considerable scalability and high-speed, as much as 365x faster than real-time. An essential component of our design is the proprioceptive sensor, or muscle spindle. Here we demonstrate an accurate and extremely fast emulation of a muscle spindle and its spiking afferents, which are computationally expensive but fundamental for reflex functions. We implemented a well-known rate-based model of the spindle (Mileusnic et al., 2006 and a simplified spiking sensory neuron model using the Izhikevich approximation to the Hodgkin-Huxley model. The resulting behavior of our afferent sensory system is qualitatively compatible with classic cat soleus recording (Matthews, 1964; 1972; Crowe and Matthews, 1964b. Our results suggest that this simplified structure of the spindle and afferent neuron is sufficient to produce physiologically-realistic behavior. The VLSI technology allows us to accelerate this behavior beyond 365x real-time. Our goal is to use this testbed for predicting years of disease progression with only a few days of emulation. This is the first hardware emulation of the spindle afferent system, and it may have application not only for emulation of human health and disease, but also for the construction of compliant neuromorphic robotic systems.

  13. Emulated muscle spindle and spiking afferents validates VLSI neuromorphic hardware as a testbed for sensorimotor function and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chuanxin M; Nandyala, Sirish K; Sanger, Terence D

    2014-01-01

    The lack of multi-scale empirical measurements (e.g., recording simultaneously from neurons, muscles, whole body, etc.) complicates understanding of sensorimotor function in humans. This is particularly true for the understanding of development during childhood, which requires evaluation of measurements over many years. We have developed a synthetic platform for emulating multi-scale activity of the vertebrate sensorimotor system. Our design benefits from Very Large Scale Integrated-circuit (VLSI) technology to provide considerable scalability and high-speed, as much as 365× faster than real-time. An essential component of our design is the proprioceptive sensor, or muscle spindle. Here we demonstrate an accurate and extremely fast emulation of a muscle spindle and its spiking afferents, which are computationally expensive but fundamental for reflex functions. We implemented a well-known rate-based model of the spindle (Mileusnic et al., 2006) and a simplified spiking sensory neuron model using the Izhikevich approximation to the Hodgkin-Huxley model. The resulting behavior of our afferent sensory system is qualitatively compatible with classic cat soleus recording (Crowe and Matthews, 1964b; Matthews, 1964, 1972). Our results suggest that this simplified structure of the spindle and afferent neuron is sufficient to produce physiologically-realistic behavior. The VLSI technology allows us to accelerate this behavior beyond 365× real-time. Our goal is to use this testbed for predicting years of disease progression with only a few days of emulation. This is the first hardware emulation of the spindle afferent system, and it may have application not only for emulation of human health and disease, but also for the construction of compliant neuromorphic robotic systems.

  14. Lower Cardiac Vagal Tone in Non-Obese Healthy Men with Unfavorable Anthropometric Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Plínio S.; Araújo, Claudio Gil S.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to determine if there are differences in cardiac vagal tone values in non-obese healthy, adult men with and without unfavorable anthropometric characteristics. INTRODUCTION: It is well established that obesity reduces cardiac vagal tone. However, it remains unknown if decreases in cardiac vagal tone can be observed early in non-obese healthy, adult men presenting unfavorable anthropometric characteristics. METHODS: Among 1688 individuals assessed between 2004 and 2008, we selected 118 non-obese (BMI somatotype), a 4-second exercise test to estimate cardiac vagal tone and a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test to exclude individuals with myocardial ischemia. The same physician performed all procedures. RESULTS: A lower cardiac vagal tone was found for the individuals in the higher quintiles – unfavorable anthropometric characteristics - of BMI (p=0.005), sum of six skinfolds (p=0.037) and waist circumference (p<0.001). In addition, the more endomorphic individuals also presented a lower cardiac vagal tone (p=0.023), while an ectomorphic build was related to higher cardiac vagal tone values as estimated by the 4-second exercise test (r=0.23; p=0.017). CONCLUSIONS: Non-obese and healthy adult men with unfavorable anthropometric characteristics tend to present lower cardiac vagal tone levels. Early identification of this trend by simple protocols that are non-invasive and risk-free, using select anthropometric characteristics, may be clinically useful in a global strategy to prevent cardiovascular disease. PMID:20126345

  15. Selectivity for Specific Cardiovascular Effects of Vagal Nerve Stimulation With a Multi-Contact Electrode Cuff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordelman, Simone Cornelia Maria Anna; Kornet, L.; Cornelussen, R.; Buschman, H.P.J.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    2012-01-01

    The cardiovascular system can be influenced by electrically stimulating the vagal nerve. Selectivity for specific cardiac fibers may be limited when stimulating at the cervical level. Our objective was to increase effectiveness and selectivity for cardiovascular effects of vagal nerve stimulation by

  16. Glomus vagale presenting as a supraclavicular mass: Magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puvaneswary, M.; Gani, J. [John Hunter Hospital, New Lambton Heights, Newcastle, NSW (Australia). Departments of Medical Imaging and Surgery; Kalnins, I.K. [Westmead Hospital, Westmead, Sydney NSW (Australia)

    1998-11-01

    Glomus vagale are rare vascular tumours of the paraganglion cells of the vagus nerve, and they usually occur in the carotid space. Tumours can be familial, multicentric, malignant but rarely hormonally active. A rare case is reported of glomus vagale presenting as a supraclavicular mass. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 12 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Mothers' responses to children's negative emotions and child emotion regulation: the moderating role of vagal suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Nicole B; Calkins, Susan D; Nelson, Jackie A; Leerkes, Esther M; Marcovitch, Stuart

    2012-07-01

    The current study examined the moderating effect of children's cardiac vagal suppression on the association between maternal socialization of negative emotions (supportive and nonsupportive responses) and children's emotion regulation behaviors. One hundred and ninety-seven 4-year-olds and their mothers participated. Mothers reported on their reactions to children's negative emotions and children's regulatory behaviors. Observed distraction, an adaptive self-regulatory strategy, and vagal suppression were assessed during a laboratory task designed to elicit frustration. Results indicated that children's vagal suppression moderated the association between mothers' nonsupportive emotion socialization and children's emotion regulation behaviors such that nonsupportive reactions to negative emotions predicted lower observed distraction and lower reported emotion regulation behaviors when children displayed lower levels of vagal suppression. No interaction was found between supportive maternal emotion socialization and vagal suppression for children's emotion regulation behaviors. Results suggest physiological regulation may serve as a buffer against nonsupportive emotion socialization. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Determining cardiac vagal threshold from short term heart rate complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdan Rami Abou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating individual aerobic exercise capacity is fundamental in sports and exercise medicine but associated with organizational and instrumental effort. Here, we extract an index related to common performance markers, the aerobic and anaerobic thresholds enabling the estimation of exercise capacity from a conventional sports watch supporting beatwise heart rate tracking. Therefore, cardiac vagal threshold (CVT was determined in 19 male subjects performing an incremental maximum exercise test. CVT varied around the anaerobic threshold AnT with mean deviation of 7.9 ± 17.7 W. A high correspondence of the two thresholds was indicated by Bland-Altman plots with limits of agreement −27.5 W and 43.4 W. Additionally, CVT was strongly correlated AnT (rp = 0.86, p < 0.001 and reproduced this marker well (rc = 0.81. We conclude, that cardiac vagal threshold derived from compression entropy time course can be useful to assess physical fitness in an uncomplicated way.

  19. Muscle afferent excitability testing in spinal root-intact rats: dissociating peripheral afferent and efferent volleys generated by intraspinal microstimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomatsu, Saeka; Kim, Geehee; Confais, Joachim; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2017-02-01

    Presynaptic inhibition of the sensory input from the periphery to the spinal cord can be evaluated directly by intra-axonal recording of primary afferent depolarization (PAD) or indirectly by intraspinal microstimulation (excitability testing). Excitability testing is superior for use in normal behaving animals, because this methodology bypasses the technically challenging intra-axonal recording. However, use of excitability testing on the muscle or joint afferent in intact animals presents its own technical challenges. Because these afferents, in many cases, are mixed with motor axons in the peripheral nervous system, it is crucial to dissociate antidromic volleys in the primary afferents from orthodromic volleys in the motor axon, both of which are evoked by intraspinal microstimulation. We have demonstrated in rats that application of a paired stimulation protocol with a short interstimulus interval (ISI) successfully dissociated the antidromic volley in the nerve innervating the medial gastrocnemius muscle. By using a 2-ms ISI, the amplitude of the volleys evoked by the second stimulation was decreased in dorsal root-sectioned rats, but the amplitude did not change or was slightly increased in ventral root-sectioned rats. Excitability testing in rats with intact spinal roots indicated that the putative antidromic volleys exhibited dominant primary afferent depolarization, which was reasonably induced from the more dorsal side of the spinal cord. We concluded that excitability testing with a paired-pulse protocol can be used for studying presynaptic inhibition of somatosensory afferents in animals with intact spinal roots.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Excitability testing of primary afferents has been used to evaluate presynaptic modulation of synaptic transmission in experiments conducted in vivo. However, to apply this method to muscle afferents of animals with intact spinal roots, it is crucial to dissociate antidromic and orthodromic volleys induced by spinal

  20. Voltage-Dependent Currents in Isolated Vestibular Afferent Calyx Terminals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rennie, Katherine J; Streeter, Michele A

    ...; accepted in final form 6 September 2005 Na + currents were studied by whole cell patch clamp of chalice-shaped afferent terminals attached to type I hair cells isolated from the gerbil semicircular canal and utricle. Outward K...

  1. How to test for a relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Broadway

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article explains how careful examination of the pupil light reflex can reveal valuable information about the afferent (optic nerve and efferent (oculomotor nerve light reflex pathway, and hence the functioning of these two cranial nerves.

  2. Identifying local and descending inputs for primary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Shengli; Rodriguez, Erica; Takatoh, Jun; Han, Bao-Xia; Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Fan

    2015-10-01

    Primary pain and touch sensory neurons not only detect internal and external sensory stimuli, but also receive inputs from other neurons. However, the neuronal derived inputs for primary neurons have not been systematically identified. Using a monosynaptic rabies viruses-based transneuronal tracing method combined with sensory-specific Cre-drivers, we found that sensory neurons receive intraganglion, intraspinal, and supraspinal inputs, the latter of which are mainly derived from the rostroventral medulla (RVM). The viral-traced central neurons were largely inhibitory but also consisted of some glutamatergic neurons in the spinal cord and serotonergic neurons in the RVM. The majority of RVM-derived descending inputs were dual GABAergic and enkephalinergic (opioidergic). These inputs projected through the dorsolateral funiculus and primarily innervated layers I, II, and V of the dorsal horn, where pain-sensory afferents terminate. Silencing or activation of the dual GABA/enkephalinergic RVM neurons in adult animals substantially increased or decreased behavioral sensitivity, respectively, to heat and mechanical stimuli. These results are consistent with the fact that both GABA and enkephalin can exert presynaptic inhibition of the sensory afferents. Taken together, this work provides a systematic view of and a set of tools for examining peri- and extrasynaptic regulations of pain-afferent transmission.

  3. Afferent diversity and the organization of central vestibular pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, Jay M.

    2000-01-01

    This review considers whether the vestibular system includes separate populations of sensory axons innervating individual organs and giving rise to distinct central pathways. There is a variability in the discharge properties of afferents supplying each organ. Discharge regularity provides a marker for this diversity since fibers which differ in this way also differ in many other properties. Postspike recovery of excitability determines the discharge regularity of an afferent and its sensitiv...

  4. [Acute pancreatitis and afferent loop syndrome. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas-Fregoso, Elpidio Manuel; Romero-Hernández, Teodoro; Macías-Amezcua, Michel Dassaejv

    2013-01-01

    The afferent syndrome loop is a mechanic obstruction of the afferent limb before a Billroth II or Roux-Y reconstruction, secondary in most of case to distal or subtotal gastrectomy. Clinical case: Male 76 years old, with antecedent of cholecystectomy, gastric adenocarcinoma six years ago, with subtotal gastrectomy and Roux-Y reconstruction. Beginning a several abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, abdominal distension, without peritoneal irritation sings. Amylase 1246 U/L, lipase 3381 U/L. Computed Tomography with thickness wall and dilatation of afferent loop, pancreas with diffuse enlargement diagnostic of acute pancreatitis secondary an afferent loop syndrome. The afferent loop syndrome is presented in 0.3%-1% in all cases with Billroth II reconstruction, with a mortality of up to 57%, the obstruction lead accumulation of bile, pancreatic and intestinal secretions, increasing the pressure and resulting in afferent limb, bile conduct and Wirsung conduct dilatation, triggering an inflammatory response that culminates in pancreatic inflammation. The severity of the presentation is related to the degree and duration of the blockage.

  5. Afferent and motoneuron activity in response to single neuromast stimulation in the posterior lateral line of larval zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haehnel-Taguchi, Melanie; Akanyeti, Otar; Liao, James C

    2014-09-15

    The lateral line system of fishes contains mechanosensory receptors along the body surface called neuromasts, which can detect water motion relative to the body. The ability to sense flow informs many behaviors, such as schooling, predator avoidance, and rheotaxis. Here, we developed a new approach to stimulate individual neuromasts while either recording primary sensory afferent neuron activity or swimming motoneuron activity in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio). Our results allowed us to characterize the transfer functions between a controlled lateral line stimulus, its representation by primary sensory neurons, and its subsequent behavioral output. When we deflected the cupula of a neuromast with a ramp command, we found that the connected afferent neuron exhibited an adapting response which was proportional in strength to deflection velocity. The maximum spike rate of afferent neurons increased sigmoidally with deflection velocity, with a linear range between 0.1 and 1.0 μm/ms. However, spike rate did not change when the cupula was deflected below 8 μm, regardless of deflection velocity. Our findings also reveal an unexpected sensitivity in the larval lateral line system: stimulation of a single neuromast could elicit a swimming response which increased in reliability with increasing deflection velocities. At high deflection velocities, we observed that lateral line evoked swimming has intermediate values of burst frequency and duty cycle that fall between electrically evoked and spontaneous swimming. An understanding of the sensory capabilities of a single neuromast will help to build a better picture of how stimuli are encoded at the systems level and ultimately translated into behavior. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Trafficking of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger to the site of persistent inflammation in nociceptive afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheff, Nicole N; Gold, Michael S

    2015-06-03

    Persistent inflammation results in an increase in the amplitude and duration of depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transients in putative nociceptive afferents. Previous data indicated that these changes were the result of neither increased neuronal excitability nor an increase in the amplitude of depolarization. Subsequent data also ruled out an increase in voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents and recruitment of Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Parametric studies indicated that the inflammation-induced increase in the duration of the evoked Ca(2+) transient required a relatively large and long-lasting increase in the concentration of intracellular Ca(2+) implicating the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), a major Ca(2+) extrusion mechanism activated with high intracellular Ca(2+) loads. The contribution of NCX to the inflammation-induced increase in the evoked Ca(2+) transient in rat sensory neurons was tested using fura-2 AM imaging and electrophysiological recordings. Changes in NCX expression and protein were assessed with real-time PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. An inflammation-induced decrease in NCX activity was observed in a subpopulation of putative nociceptive neurons innervating the site of inflammation. The time course of the decrease in NCX activity paralleled that of the inflammation-induced changes in nociceptive behavior. The change in NCX3 in the cell body was associated with a decrease in NCX3 protein in the ganglia, an increase in the peripheral nerve (sciatic) yet no change in the central root. This single response to inflammation is associated with changes in at least three different segments of the primary afferent, all of which are likely to contribute to the dynamic response to persistent inflammation. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/358423-10$15.00/0.

  7. Modeling the nonlinear dynamic interactions of afferent pathways in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimoka, Angelika; Courellis, Spiros H; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z; Berger, Theodore W

    2008-05-01

    The dentate gyrus is the first region of the hippocampus that receives and integrates sensory information (e.g., visual, auditory, and olfactory) via the perforant path, which is composed of two distinct neuronal pathways: the Lateral Perforant Path (LPP) and the Medial Perforant Path (MPP). This paper examines the nonlinear dynamic interactions among arbitrary stimulation patterns at these two afferent pathways and their combined effect on the resulting response of the granule cells at the dentate gyrus. We employ non-parametric Poisson-Volterra models that serve as canonical quantitative descriptors of the nonlinear dynamic transformations of the neuronal signals propagating through these two neuronal pathways. These Poisson-Volterra models are estimated in the so-called "reduced form" with experimental data from in vitro hippocampal slices and provide excellent predictions of the electrophysiological activity of the granule cells in response to arbitrary stimulation patterns. The data are acquired through a custom-made multi-electrode-array system, which stimulated simultaneously the two pathways with random impulse trains and recorded the neuronal postsynaptic activity at the granule cell layer. The results of this study show that significant nonlinear interactions exist between the LPP and the MPP that may be critical for the integration of sensory information performed by the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus.

  8. Afferent innervation of the utricular macula in pigeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Xiaohong; Zakir, Mridha Md; Dickman, J. David

    2003-01-01

    Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was used to retrogradely label afferents innervating the utricular macula in adult pigeons. The pigeon utriclar macula consists of a large rectangular-shaped neuroepithelium with a dorsally curved anterior edge and an extended medioposterior tail. The macula could be demarcated into several regions based on cytoarchitectural differences. The striola occupied 30% of the macula and contained a large density of type I hair cells with fewer type II hair cells. Medial and lateral extrastriola zones were located outside the striola and contained only type II hair cells. A six- to eight-cell-wide band of type II hair cells existed near the center of the striola. The reversal line marked by the morphological polarization of hair cells coursed throughout the epithelium, near the peripheral margin, and through the center of the type II band. Calyx afferents innervated type I hair cells with calyceal terminals that contained between 2 and 15 receptor cells. Calyx afferents were located only in the striola region, exclusive of the type II band, had small total fiber innervation areas and low innervation densities. Dimorph afferents innervated both type I and type II hair cells with calyceal and bouton terminals and were primarily located in the striola region. Dimorph afferents had smaller calyceal terminals with few type I hair cells, extended fiber branches with bouton terminals and larger innervation areas. Bouton afferents innervated only type II hair cells in the extrastriola and type II band regions. Bouton afferents innervating the type II band had smaller terminal fields with fewer bouton terminals and smaller innervation areas than fibers located in the extrastriolar zones. Bouton afferents had the most bouton terminals on the longest fibers, the largest innervation areas with the highest innervation densities of all afferents. Among all afferents, smaller terminal innervation fields were observed in the striola and large fields were

  9. EXPRESS: Voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels in group IV sensory afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Renuka; Elmslie, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with intermittent claudication suffer from both muscle pain and an exacerbated exercise pressor reflex. Excitability of the group III and group IV afferent fibers mediating these functions is controlled in part by voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels. We previously found tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV1.8 channels to be the primary type in muscle afferent somata. However, action potentials in group III and IV afferent axons are blocked by TTX, supporting a minimal role of NaV1.8 channels. To address these apparent differences in NaV channel expression between axon and soma, we used immunohistochemistry to identify the NaV channels expressed in group IV axons within the gastrocnemius muscle and the dorsal root ganglia sections. Positive labeling by an antibody against the neurofilament protein peripherin was used to identify group IV neurons and axons. We show that >67% of group IV fibers express NaV1.8, NaV1.6, or NaV1.7. Interestingly, expression of NaV1.8 channels in group IV somata was significantly higher than in the fibers, whereas there were no significant differences for either NaV1.6 or NaV1.7. When combined with previous work, our results suggest that NaV1.8 channels are expressed in most group IV axons, but that, under normal conditions, NaV1.6 and/or NaV1.7 play a more important role in action potential generation to signal muscle pain and the exercise pressor reflex.

  10. Central projections of vestibular afferents from the horizontal semicircular canal in the carpet shark Cephaloscyllium isabella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housley, G D; Montgomery, J C

    1983-12-01

    This study utilizes anterograde axonal transport of cobaltous-lysine and conventional silver-staining techniques to study the central projections of the horizontal semicircular canal branch of the VIII nerve within the vestibular nuclei of the carpet shark Cephaloscyllium isabella. Two major terminating axon fields were observed, one caudal and one rostral to the entrance of the VIII nerve, corresponding to the ventral vestibular nucleus and superior vestibular nucleus, respectively. Both fields appear to be located within the ventral portion of the nuclei indicating an apparent subdivision of the VIII nerve projections within the brainstem. The resolution of the sensitive cobalt tracer indicates the presence of both dendritic and pericellular termination of these primary afferent fibres. In the area immediately caudal to the entrance of the VIII nerve a number of labelled primary afferent fibres project to the ventral region of the intermediate nucleus. Other fibres follow the visceral sensory root VII and terminate proximal to the sulcus limitans of His within the dendritic field of the neurons of the nucleus magnocellularis. Some fibres turn ventromedially from the main group of the ascending fibres and terminate in the area of the inferior reticular formation.

  11. Gentamicin induced nitric oxide-related oxidative damages on vestibular afferents in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Hwa; Park, Sook Kyung; Cho, Yang-Sun; Lee, Hyun-Seok; Kim, Ki Ryung; Kim, Myung Gu; Chung, Won-Ho

    2006-01-01

    Gentamicin is a well-known ototoxic aminoglycoside. However, the mechanism underlying this ototoxicity remains unclear. One of the mechanisms which may be responsible for this ototoxicity is excitotoxic damage to hair cells. The overstimulation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors increases the production of nitric oxide (NO), which induces oxidative stress on hair cells. In order to determine the mechanism underlying this excitotoxicity, we treated guinea pigs with gentamicin by placing gentamicin (0.5 mg) pellets into a round window niche. After the sacrifice of the animals, which occurred at 3, 7 and 14 days after the treatment, the numbers of hair cells in the animals were counted with a scanning electron microscope. We then performed immunostaining using neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), inducible NOS (iNOS) and nitrotyrosine antibodies. The number of hair cells in the animals was found to decrease significantly after 7 days. nNOS and iNOS expression levels were observed to have increased 3 days after treatment. Nitrotyrosine was expressed primarily at the calyceal afferents of the type I hair cells 3 days after treatment. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining revealed positive hair cells 3 days after treatment. Our results suggest that inner ear treatment with gentamicin may upregulate nNOS and iNOS to induce oxidative stress in the calyceal afferents of type I hair cells, via nitric oxide overproduction.

  12. Acetazolamide potentiates the afferent drive to prefrontal cortex in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno-Junior, Lezio S; Ruggiero, Rafael N; Rossignoli, Matheus T; Del Bel, Elaine A; Leite, Joao P; Uchitel, Osvaldo D

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge on real-time neurophysiological effects of acetazolamide is still far behind the wide clinical use of this drug. Acetazolamide - a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor - has been shown to affect the neuromuscular transmission, implying a pH-mediated influence on the central synaptic transmission. To start filling such a gap, we chose a central substrate: hippocampal-prefrontal cortical projections; and a synaptic phenomenon: paired-pulse facilitation (a form of synaptic plasticity) to probe this drug's effects on interareal brain communication in chronically implanted rats. We observed that systemic acetazolamide potentiates the hippocampal-prefrontal paired-pulse facilitation. In addition to this field electrophysiology data, we found that acetazolamide exerts a net inhibitory effect on prefrontal cortical single-unit firing. We propose that systemic acetazolamide reduces the basal neuronal activity of the prefrontal cortex, whereas increasing the afferent drive it receives from the hippocampus. In addition to being relevant to the clinical and side effects of acetazolamide, these results suggest that exogenous pH regulation can have diverse impacts on afferent signaling across the neocortex. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  13. Vagally mediated inhibition of acoustic stress-induced cortisol release by orally administered kappa-opioid substances in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, L; Gue, M; Fargeas, M J; Alvinerie, M; Junien, J L; Fioramonti, J

    1989-04-01

    The effects of oral vs. iv administration of kappa- and mu-opioid agonists on plasma cortisol release induced by acoustic stress (AS) were evaluated in fasted dogs with an implanted jugular catheter. AS was induced by 1 h of music (less than or equal to 86 decibels) played through earphones and was accompanied by a 382% maximal rise in plasma cortisol after 15-30 min. Administered orally 30 min before the AS session, both U-50488 (0.1 mg/kg) and PD 117-302 (0.05 mg/kg) significantly (P less than or equal to 0.01) decreased (by 71.2% and 80.9%, respectively) the maximal increase in plasma cortisol induced by AS, while bremazocine, morphine, as well as iv administration of U-50488 at similar doses were ineffective. The effects of U-50488 and PD 117-302 orally administered (0.1 mg/kg) on the hypercortisolemia induced by AS were abolished by pretreatment with iv naloxone (0.1 mg/kg) or MR 2266 (0.1 mg/kg). Naloxone given alone significantly (P less than 0.01) increased basal plasma cortisol, without affecting cortisol increase induced by AS. Vagotomy abolished the effects of orally administered U-50488 on the AS-induced increase in plasma cortisol. Neither U-50488 nor PD 117302 (0.1 mg/kg, orally) reduced the increase in plasma cortisol induced by intracerebroventricular administration of ovine CRF (100 ng/kg). It is concluded that kappa- but not mu-opioid agonists are able to inhibit the stimulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis induced by AS by acting selectively on peripheral kappa-receptors located in the wall of the proximal gut. This action is neurally mediated through afferent vagal fibers affecting central nervous system release of CRF induced by a centrally acting stressor.

  14. A giant vagal schwannoma with unusual extension from skull base to the mediastinum

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    Shenoy S Vijendra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical vagal schwannoma is an extremely rare neoplasm. Middle aged people are usually affected. These tumors usually present as asymptomatic masses. These tumors are almost always benign. Preoperative diagnosis of these lesions is important due to the morbidity associated with its excision. Preoperative tissue diagnosis is not accurate. The imaging modality can be done to assess the extent and for planning the treatment. Surgical excision with preservation of neural origin is the treatment option. Giant vagal schwannomas are extremely rare. Only one case has been reported in the literature till date. There has no reported case of extensive vagal schwannoma from skull base to the mediastinum. Here, we describe the asymptomatic presentation of an unusual appearing giant cervical vagal schwannoma with an extension from skull base to the mediastinum.

  15. Dual Modulation of Nociception and Cardiovascular Reflexes during Peripheral Ischemia through P2Y1 Receptor-Dependent Sensitization of Muscle Afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queme, Luis F; Ross, Jessica L; Lu, Peilin; Hudgins, Renita C; Jankowski, Michael P

    2016-01-06

    the development of pain-related behaviors during ischemia. At the same time, under these pathological conditions, the changes in muscle sensory neurons appear to modulate an increase in mean systemic blood pressure after exercise. This is the first report of the potential peripheral mechanisms by which group III/IV muscle afferents can dually regulate muscle nociception and the exercise pressor reflex. These data provide evidence related to the potential underlying reasons for the comorbidity of muscle pain and altered sympathetic reflexes in disease states that are based in problems with peripheral perfusion and may indicate a potential target for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/360019-12$15.00/0.

  16. Lower cardiac vagal tone in non-obese healthy men with unfavorable anthropometric characteristics

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    Plínio S. Ramos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to determine if there are differences in cardiac vagal tone values in non-obese healthy, adult men with and without unfavorable anthropometric characteristics. INTRODUCTION: It is well established that obesity reduces cardiac vagal tone. However, it remains unknown if decreases in cardiac vagal tone can be observed early in non-obese healthy, adult men presenting unfavorable anthropometric characteristics. METHODS: Among 1688 individuals assessed between 2004 and 2008, we selected 118 non-obese (BMI <30 kg/m², healthy men (no known disease conditions or regular use of relevant medications, aged between 20 and 77 years old (42 ± 12-years-old. Their evaluation included clinical examination, anthropometric assessment (body height and weight, sum of six skinfolds, waist circumference and somatotype, a 4-second exercise test to estimate cardiac vagal tone and a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test to exclude individuals with myocardial ischemia. The same physician performed all procedures. RESULTS: A lower cardiac vagal tone was found for the individuals in the higher quintiles - unfavorable anthropometric characteristics - of BMI (p=0.005, sum of six skinfolds (p=0.037 and waist circumference (p<0.001. In addition, the more endomorphic individuals also presented a lower cardiac vagal tone (p=0.023, while an ectomorphic build was related to higher cardiac vagal tone values as estimated by the 4-second exercise test (r=0.23; p=0.017. CONCLUSIONS: Non-obese and healthy adult men with unfavorable anthropometric characteristics tend to present lower cardiac vagal tone levels. Early identification of this trend by simple protocols that are non-invasive and risk-free, using select anthropometric characteristics, may be clinically useful in a global strategy to prevent cardiovascular disease.

  17. Vagal nerve stimulation for medically refractory epilepsy in Angelman syndrome: a series of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomei, Krystal L; Mau, Christine Y; Ghali, Michael; Pak, Jayoung; Goldstein, Ira M

    2018-03-01

    We describe three children with Angelman syndrome and medically refractory epilepsy. Case series of three pediatric patients with Angelman syndrome and medically refractory epilepsy. All three patients failed medical treatment and were recommended for vagal nerve stimulator (VNS) implantation. Following VNS implantation, all three patients experienced reduction in seizure frequency greater than that afforded by medication alone. We present vagal nerve stimulator implantation as a viable treatment option for medically refractory epilepsy associated with Angelman syndrome.

  18. Pulmonary vein region ablation in experimental vagal atrial fibrillation: role of pulmonary veins versus autonomic ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemola, Kristina; Chartier, Denis; Yeh, Yung-Hsin; Dubuc, Marc; Cartier, Raymond; Armour, Andrew; Ting, Michael; Sakabe, Masao; Shiroshita-Takeshita, Akiko; Comtois, Philippe; Nattel, Stanley

    2008-01-29

    Pulmonary vein (PV) -encircling radiofrequency ablation frequently is effective in vagal atrial fibrillation (AF), and there is evidence that PVs may be particularly prone to cholinergically induced arrhythmia mechanisms. However, PV ablation procedures also can affect intracardiac autonomic ganglia. The present study examined the relative role of PVs versus peri-PV autonomic ganglia in an experimental vagal AF model. Cholinergic AF was studied under carbachol infusion in coronary perfused canine left atrial PV preparations in vitro and with cervical vagal stimulation in vivo. Carbachol caused dose-dependent AF promotion in vitro, which was not affected by excision of all PVs. Sustained AF could be induced easily in all dogs during vagal nerve stimulation in vivo both before and after isolation of all PVs with encircling lesions created by a bipolar radiofrequency ablation clamp device. PV elimination had no effect on atrial effective refractory period or its responses to cholinergic stimulation. Autonomic ganglia were identified by bradycardic and/or tachycardic responses to high-frequency subthreshold local stimulation. Ablation of the autonomic ganglia overlying all PV ostia suppressed the effective refractory period-abbreviating and AF-promoting effects of cervical vagal stimulation, whereas ablation of only left- or right-sided PV ostial ganglia failed to suppress AF. Dominant-frequency analysis suggested that the success of ablation in suppressing vagal AF depended on the elimination of high-frequency driver regions. Intact PVs are not needed for maintenance of experimental cholinergic AF. Ablation of the autonomic ganglia at the base of the PVs suppresses vagal responses and may contribute to the effectiveness of PV-directed ablation procedures in vagal AF.

  19. Favorable Swallowing Outcomes following Vagus Nerve Sacrifice for Vagal Schwannoma Resection.

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    Patel, Mira A; Eytan, Danielle F; Bishop, Justin; Califano, Joseph A

    2017-02-01

    Objective To determine the impact of unilateral vagal sacrifice for vagal schwannoma on postoperative swallowing function. Study Design Case series, chart review. Setting Academic medical institution. Subjects and Methods Ten patients underwent vagus nerve sacrifice for vagal schwannoma resection. Archived pathology records dating from 1985 through 2012 at our institution were retrospectively queried for cases of vagal schwannoma with vagus nerve sacrifice. Medical records were abstracted for demographic and disease information as well as cranial nerve and swallowing function. Preoperative and postoperative cranial nerve function, subjective and objective measures of swallowing function, Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS) level, and need for vocal fold medialization were variables collected. Data were analyzed with summary statistics. Results The patients who underwent vagal sacrifice for vagal schwannoma at our institution had a mean age of 42.3 years (median, 44 years; range, 15-63 years) and follow-up of 35.6 months (median, 9 months; range, 1-115 months). Most presented with no preoperative cranial nerve deficit or difficulty swallowing. Immediately postoperatively, 90% had a vagus nerve deficit, but 50% had no subjective difficulty swallowing, and 70% had a FOIS level of 7 at postoperative hospital discharge. Within 1 month after surgery, 70% had normal swallowing function according to a modified barium swallow study. A full diet was tolerated by mouth within an average of 2.7 days (median, 2 days; range, 1-6 days) after surgery in this cohort. Seventy percent required vocal fold medialization postoperatively for incomplete glottic closure. Conclusion Vagal nerve sacrifice during resection of vagal schwannoma can be performed with normal postoperative swallowing function.

  20. Mechanical sensibility of nociceptive and non-nociceptive fast-conducting afferents is modulated by skin temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boada, M Danilo; Eisenach, James C; Ririe, Douglas G

    2016-01-01

    The ability to distinguish mechanical from thermal input is a critical component of peripheral somatosensory function. Polymodal C fibers respond to both stimuli. However, mechanosensitive, modality-specific fast-conducting tactile and nociceptor afferents theoretically carry information only about mechanical forces independent of the thermal environment. We hypothesize that the thermal environment can nonetheless modulate mechanical force sensibility in fibers that do not respond directly to change in temperature. To study this, fast-conducting mechanosensitive peripheral sensory fibers in male Sprague-Dawley rats were accessed at the soma in the dorsal root ganglia from T11 or L4/L5. Neuronal identification was performed using receptive field characteristics and passive and active electrical properties. Neurons responded to mechanical stimuli but failed to generate action potentials in response to changes in temperature alone, except for the tactile mechanical and cold sensitive neurons. Heat and cold ramps were utilized to determine temperature-induced modulation of response to mechanical stimuli. Mechanically evoked electrical activity in non-nociceptive, low-threshold mechanoreceptors (tactile afferents) decreased in response to changes in temperature while mechanically induced activity was increased in nociceptive, fast-conducting, high-threshold mechanoreceptors in response to the same changes in temperature. These data suggest that mechanical activation does not occur in isolation but rather that temperature changes appear to alter mechanical afferent activity and input to the central nervous system in a dynamic fashion. Further studies to understand the psychophysiological implications of thermal modulation of fast-conducting mechanical input to the spinal cord will provide greater insight into the implications of these findings. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Gastric electrical stimulation decreases gastric distension-induced central nociception response through direct action on primary afferents.

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    Wassila Ouelaa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: Gastric electrical stimulation (GES is an effective therapy to treat patients with chronic dyspepsia refractory to medical management. However, its mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. METHODS: Gastric pain was induced by performing gastric distension (GD in anesthetized rats. Pain response was monitored by measuring the pseudo-affective reflex (e.g., blood pressure variation, while neuronal activation was determined using c-fos immunochemistry in the central nervous system. Involvement of primary afferents was assessed by measuring phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in dorsal root ganglia. RESULTS: GES decreased blood pressure variation induced by GD, and prevented GD-induced neuronal activation in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (T9-T10, the nucleus of the solitary tract and in CRF neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. This effect remained unaltered within the spinal cord when sectioning the medulla at the T5 level. Furthermore, GES prevented GD-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in dorsal root ganglia. CONCLUSIONS: GES decreases GD-induced pain and/or discomfort likely through a direct modulation of gastric spinal afferents reducing central processing of visceral nociception.

  2. Effect of ozone on breathing in dogs: vagal and nonvagal mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, K.; Nadel, J.A.; Hahn, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    We exposed two awake dogs with a chronic tracheostomy and the cervical vagus nerves exteriorized in skin loops to 1.0 ppm of ozone (O/sub 3/) for 2 h at intervals of 4 wk. We measured ventilatory variables before and after O/sub 3/ exposure during rest and exercise before and after vagal block. We compared the effects of vagal blockade, exercise, and O/sub 3/ on the primary determinants of breathing pattern (VT/TI, VT/TE, TI, and TE) in each of three conditions: base line (steady state), during hypercapnia, and after inhalation of 1% histamine. Under base-line conditions, O/sub 3/ increased respiratory rate and decreased tidal volume (VT) by shortening time of expiration (TE) and time of inspiration (TI) without affecting VT/TI, an indicator of the neural drive to breathing. During progressive hypercapnia, O/sub 3/ shortened TE and TI by effects both on tonic (nonvolume-related) and on phasic (volume-related) vagal inputs, and only the latter were prevented completely by cooling of the vagus nerves. Histamine-induced tachypnea was increased by O/sub 3/ and was totally blocked by cooling the vagus nerves. It was concluded that O/sub 3/ shortens the timing of respiration without increasing ventilatory drive, shortens TI and TE through vagal and nonvagal pathways, increases tonic nonvagal and phasic vagal inputs, and stimulates more than one vagal fiber type.

  3. The eloquence of silent cortex: analysis of afferent input to deafferented cortex in arm amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackert, Bruno-Marcel; Sappok, Tanja; Grüsser, Sabine; Flor, Herta; Curio, Gabriel

    2003-03-03

    Cortical reorganisation after limb amputation includes topographic displacements of body representation areas and changes of areal extent. Remarkably, truncated nerves, which had innervated amputated limb parts and remained in the residual limbs, can retain access to the deafferented somatosensory cortex. Using somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) we characterized afferences from electrically stimulated truncated nerves to the brachial plexus and cortex in 12 arm amputees. While peripheral responses were highly variable, thalamocortical input to S-1, as reflected by the primary cortical SEP component, was present in 11 of 12 patients. Despite long-term deafferentation, macroscopic phenomena of inhibition/refractoriness, as assessed by stimulus rate variations, appeared to be changed only marginally. Thus, deafferented cortex remains responsive when given artificial phantom input and could provide a neuronal substrate for spontaneous phantom limb sensations, including phantom pain.

  4. Short-term plasticity in turtle dorsal horn neurons mediated by L-type Ca2+ channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, R E; Hounsgaard, J

    1994-01-01

    Windup--the gradual increase of the response--of dorsal horn neurons to repeated activation of primary afferents is an elementary form of short-term plasticity that may mediate central sensitization to pain. In deep dorsal horn neurons of the turtle spinal cord in vitro we report windup of the re......Windup--the gradual increase of the response--of dorsal horn neurons to repeated activation of primary afferents is an elementary form of short-term plasticity that may mediate central sensitization to pain. In deep dorsal horn neurons of the turtle spinal cord in vitro we report windup...

  5. Spleen vagal denervation inhibits the production of antibodies to circulating antigens.

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    Ruud M Buijs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently the vagal output of the central nervous system has been shown to suppress the innate immune defense to pathogens. Here we investigated by anatomical and physiological techniques the communication of the brain with the spleen and provided evidence that the brain has the capacity to stimulate the production of antigen specific antibodies by its parasympathetic autonomic output. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This conclusion was reached by successively demonstrating that: 1. The spleen receives not only sympathetic input but also parasympathetic input. 2. Intravenous trinitrophenyl-ovalbumin (TNP-OVA does not activate the brain and does not induce an immune response. 3. Intravenous TNP-OVA with an inducer of inflammation; lipopolysaccharide (LPS, activates the brain and induces TNP-specific IgM. 4. LPS activated neurons are in the same areas of the brain as those that provide parasympathetic autonomic information to the spleen, suggesting a feed back circuit between brain and immune system. Consequently we investigated the interaction of the brain with the spleen and observed that specific parasympathetic denervation but not sympathetic denervation of the spleen eliminates the LPS-induced antibody response to TNP-OVA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings not only show that the brain can stimulate antibody production by its autonomic output, it also suggests that the power of LPS as adjuvant to stimulate antibody production may also depend on its capacity to activate the brain. The role of the autonomic nervous system in the stimulation of the adaptive immune response may explain why mood and sleep have an influence on antibody production.

  6. Chloride regulates afferent arteriolar contraction in response to depolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P B; Jensen, B L; Skott, O

    1998-01-01

    -Renal vascular reactivity is influenced by the level of dietary salt intake. Recent in vitro data suggest that afferent arteriolar contractility is modulated by extracellular chloride. In the present study, we assessed the influence of chloride on K+-induced contraction in isolated perfused rabbit...... afferent arterioles. In 70% of vessels examined, K+-induced contraction was abolished by acute substitution of bath chloride. Consecutive addition of Cl- (30, 60, 80, 100, 110, and 117 mmol/L) restored the sensitivity to K+, and half-maximal response was observed at 82 mmol/L chloride. The calcium channel....... The results show that K+-induced contraction of smooth muscle cells in the afferent arteriole is highly sensitive to chloride, whereas neurotransmitter release and ensuing contraction is not dependent on chloride. Thus, there are different activation pathways for depolarizing vasoconstrictors...

  7. Force sensor in simulated skin and neural model mimic tactile SAI afferent spiking response to ramp and hold stimuli

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    Kim Elmer K

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The next generation of prosthetic limbs will restore sensory feedback to the nervous system by mimicking how skin mechanoreceptors, innervated by afferents, produce trains of action potentials in response to compressive stimuli. Prior work has addressed building sensors within skin substitutes for robotics, modeling skin mechanics and neural dynamics of mechanotransduction, and predicting response timing of action potentials for vibration. The effort here is unique because it accounts for skin elasticity by measuring force within simulated skin, utilizes few free model parameters for parsimony, and separates parameter fitting and model validation. Additionally, the ramp-and-hold, sustained stimuli used in this work capture the essential features of the everyday task of contacting and holding an object. Methods This systems integration effort computationally replicates the neural firing behavior for a slowly adapting type I (SAI afferent in its temporally varying response to both intensity and rate of indentation force by combining a physical force sensor, housed in a skin-like substrate, with a mathematical model of neuronal spiking, the leaky integrate-and-fire. Comparison experiments were then conducted using ramp-and-hold stimuli on both the spiking-sensor model and mouse SAI afferents. The model parameters were iteratively fit against recorded SAI interspike intervals (ISI before validating the model to assess its performance. Results Model-predicted spike firing compares favorably with that observed for single SAI afferents. As indentation magnitude increases (1.2, 1.3, to 1.4 mm, mean ISI decreases from 98.81 ± 24.73, 54.52 ± 6.94, to 41.11 ± 6.11 ms. Moreover, as rate of ramp-up increases, ISI during ramp-up decreases from 21.85 ± 5.33, 19.98 ± 3.10, to 15.42 ± 2.41 ms. Considering first spikes, the predicted latencies exhibited a decreasing trend as stimulus rate increased, as is

  8. Development and organization of polarity-specific segregation of primary vestibular afferent fibers in mice.

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    Maklad, Adel; Kamel, Suzan; Wong, Elaine; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    A striking feature of vestibular hair cells is the polarized arrangement of their stereocilia as the basis for their directional sensitivity. In mammals, each of the vestibular end organs is characterized by a distinct distribution of these polarized cells. We utilized the technique of post-fixation transganglionic neuronal tracing with fluorescent lipid soluble dyes in embryonic and postnatal mice to investigate whether these polarity characteristics correlate with the pattern of connections between the endorgans and their central targets; the vestibular nuclei and cerebellum. We found that the cerebellar and brainstem projections develop independently from each other and have a non-overlapping distribution of neurons and afferents from E11.5 on. In addition, we show that the vestibular fibers projecting to the cerebellum originate preferentially from the lateral half of the utricular macula and the medial half of the saccular macula. In contrast, the brainstem vestibular afferents originate primarily from the medial half of the utricular macula and the lateral half of the saccular macula. This indicates that the line of hair cell polarity reversal within the striola region segregates almost mutually exclusive central projections. A possible interpretation of this feature is that this macular organization provides an inhibitory side-loop through the cerebellum to produce synergistic tuning effects in the vestibular nuclei. The canal cristae project to the brainstem vestibular nuclei and cerebellum, but the projection to the vestibulocerebellum originates preferentially from the superior half of each of the cristae. The reason for this pattern is not clear, but it may compensate for unequal activation of crista hair cells or may be an evolutionary atavism reflecting a different polarity organization in ancestral vertebrate ears.

  9. Determinants of spatial and temporal coding by semicircular canal afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highstein, Stephen M; Rabbitt, Richard D; Holstein, Gay R; Boyle, Richard D

    2005-05-01

    The vestibular semicircular canals are internal sensors that signal the magnitude, direction, and temporal properties of angular head motion. Fluid mechanics within the 3-canal labyrinth code the direction of movement and integrate angular acceleration stimuli over time. Directional coding is accomplished by decomposition of complex angular accelerations into 3 biomechanical components-one component exciting each of the 3 ampullary organs and associated afferent nerve bundles separately. For low-frequency angular motion stimuli, fluid displacement within each canal is proportional to angular acceleration. At higher frequencies, above the lower corner frequency, real-time integration is accomplished by viscous forces arising from the movement of fluid within the slender lumen of each canal. This results in angular velocity sensitive fluid displacements. Reflecting this, a subset of afferent fibers indeed report angular acceleration to the brain for low frequencies of head movement and report angular velocity for higher frequencies. However, a substantial number of afferent fibers also report angular acceleration, or a signal between acceleration and velocity, even at frequencies where the endolymph displacement is known to follow angular head velocity. These non-velocity-sensitive afferent signals cannot be attributed to canal biomechanics alone. The responses of non-velocity-sensitive cells include a mathematical differentiation (first-order or fractional) imparted by hair-cell and/or afferent complexes. This mathematical differentiation from velocity to acceleration cannot be attributed to hair cell ionic currents, but occurs as a result of the dynamics of synaptic transmission between hair cells and their primary afferent fibers. The evidence for this conclusion is reviewed below.

  10. NMDA Receptors in Dopaminergic Neurons are Crucial for Habit Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei Phillip; Li, Fei; Wang, Dong; Xie, Kun; Wang, Deheng; Shen, Xiaoming; Tsien, Joe Z.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Dopamine is crucial for habit learning. Activities of midbrain dopaminergic neurons are regulated by the cortical and subcortical signals among which glutamatergic afferents provide excitatory inputs. Cognitive implications of glutamatergic afferents in regulating and engaging dopamine signals during habit learning however remain unclear. Here we show that mice with dopaminergic neuron-specific NMDAR1 deletion are impaired in a variety of habit learning tasks while normal in some other dopamine-modulated functions such as locomotor activities, goal directed learning, and spatial reference memories. In vivo neural recording revealed that DA neurons in these mutant mice could still develop the cue-reward association responses, but their conditioned response robustness was drastically blunted. Our results suggest that integration of glutamatergic inputs to DA neurons by NMDA receptors, likely by regulating associative activity patterns, is a crucial part of the cellular mechanism underpinning habit learning. PMID:22196339

  11. Pathology influences blood pressure change following vagal stimulation in an animal intubation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter; Guillaud, Laurent; Desbois, Christophe; Benoist, Jean-Francois; Combrisson, Helene; Dauger, Stephane; Peters, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    The haemodynamic response to critical care intubation is influenced by the use of sedation and relaxant drugs and the activation of the vagal reflex. It has been hypothesized that different disease states may have a contrasting effect on the cardiovascular response to vagal stimulation. Our objective was to determine whether the blood pressure response to vagal stimulation was modified by endotoxaemia or hypovolaemia. New Zealand White rabbits were anaesthetised with urethane before tracheotomy. The exposed left Vagus nerve of randomised groups of control (n = 11), endotoxin (n = 11, 1 mg/kg), hypovolaemia 40% (n = 8) and hypovolaemia 20% (n = 8) rabbits were subjected to 10 Hz pulsed electrical stimulations of 25 s duration every 15 min. Haemodynamic parameters were recorded from a catheter in the right carotid artery connected to an iWorx monitor. Serum catecholamines were measured every 30 min using reverse-phase ion-pairing liquid chromatography. The change in blood pressure after vagal stimulation was compared to controls for one hour after the first death in the experimental groups. 29% of the rabbits died in the hypovolaemia 40% group and 27% in the endotoxin group. One rabbit died in the hypovolaemia 40% group before vagal stimulation and was excluded. Following electrical stimulation of the Vagus nerve there was a fall in blood pressure in control rabbits. Blood pressure was conserved in the hypovolaemic rabbits compared to controls (pblood pressure to decrease more than the controls. Serum catecholamines were significantly raised in both the hypovolaemic and endotoxaemic rabbits. Pathology may contribute to modifications in blood pressure when vagal activation occurs. Patients who are either already vasoconstricted, or not vasoplegic, may be less at risk from intubation-related vagally mediated reductions in blood pressure than those with vasodilatory pathologies.

  12. Pathology influences blood pressure change following vagal stimulation in an animal intubation model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jones

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The haemodynamic response to critical care intubation is influenced by the use of sedation and relaxant drugs and the activation of the vagal reflex. It has been hypothesized that different disease states may have a contrasting effect on the cardiovascular response to vagal stimulation. Our objective was to determine whether the blood pressure response to vagal stimulation was modified by endotoxaemia or hypovolaemia. METHODS: New Zealand White rabbits were anaesthetised with urethane before tracheotomy. The exposed left Vagus nerve of randomised groups of control (n = 11, endotoxin (n = 11, 1 mg/kg, hypovolaemia 40% (n = 8 and hypovolaemia 20% (n = 8 rabbits were subjected to 10 Hz pulsed electrical stimulations of 25 s duration every 15 min. Haemodynamic parameters were recorded from a catheter in the right carotid artery connected to an iWorx monitor. Serum catecholamines were measured every 30 min using reverse-phase ion-pairing liquid chromatography. The change in blood pressure after vagal stimulation was compared to controls for one hour after the first death in the experimental groups. RESULTS: 29% of the rabbits died in the hypovolaemia 40% group and 27% in the endotoxin group. One rabbit died in the hypovolaemia 40% group before vagal stimulation and was excluded. Following electrical stimulation of the Vagus nerve there was a fall in blood pressure in control rabbits. Blood pressure was conserved in the hypovolaemic rabbits compared to controls (p<0.01. For the endotoxaemic rabbits, there was a non-significant trend for the mean blood pressure to decrease more than the controls. Serum catecholamines were significantly raised in both the hypovolaemic and endotoxaemic rabbits. CONCLUSIONS: Pathology may contribute to modifications in blood pressure when vagal activation occurs. Patients who are either already vasoconstricted, or not vasoplegic, may be less at risk from intubation-related vagally mediated

  13. The increase in the cardiodepressant activity and vasopressin concentration in the sella turcica venous blood during vagal afferents stimulation or after angiotensin II infusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goraca, A.; Orlowska-Majdak, M.; Traczyk, W.Z. [Akademia Medyczna, Lodz (Poland). Katedra Fizjologii

    1996-12-31

    It has previously been demonstrated that the cardiodepressant activity is present in the bovine hypothalamic extract and in the fluid incubating the posterior pituitary lobe {sup i}n situ{sup .} The present study was an attempt to reveal if the cardiodepressant factor and vasopressin were simultaneously released from the pituitary into blood. The samples of venous blood flowing from the sella turcica and, for comparison, from the posterior paw were collected in anesthetized rats. Blood from the sella turcica was collected with a fine cannula inserted into the internal maxillary vein. The concentration of vasopressin in blood plasma was determined by radioimmunoassay and cardiodepressant activity-using a biological test on a spontaneously discharged pacemaker tissue of the right auricle of the right heart atrium. Stimulation of the central ends of the cut vagus nerves or intra-arterial infusion of angiotensin II simultaneously caused an increase in the cardiodepressant activity and vasopressin concentration in the sella turcica venous blood. The cardiodepressant activity and vasopressin concentration was also enhanced to some degree in blood outflowing from the posterior paw. Present results indicate that both vasopressin and the cardiodepressant factor are released into blood from the posterior pituitary lobe. (author). 37 refs, 4 figs.

  14. Muscle weakness, afferent sensory dysfunction and exercise in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Herzog, Walter; Block, Joel A

    2011-01-01

    Lower-extremity muscle strength and afferent sensory dysfunction, such as reduced proprioceptive acuity, are potentially modifiable putative risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Findings from current studies suggest that muscle weakness is a predictor of knee OA onset, while there is confli...

  15. Cellular mechanisms for presynaptic inhibition of sensory afferents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, Jean-Francois Marie; delgado-lezama, rodolfo; Christensen, Rasmus Kordt

    of blockers for the GABA transporters 1 & 3 (GAT), the DRP was strongly reduced. Since GAT3 is mainly expressed in astrocytes, our results suggest that these glial cells are part of the microcircuit that controls the activity of primary afferents. Addition of the potent chloride channel blocker NPPB also...

  16. Expression of myosin VIIA in the developing chick inner ear neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kristi; Hall, Amanda L; Jones, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    The auditory-vestibular ganglion (AVG) is formed by the division of otic placode-derived neuroblasts, which then differentiate into auditory and vestibular afferent neurons. The developmental mechanisms that regulate neuronal cell fate determination, axonal pathfinding and innervation of otic neurons are poorly understood. The present study characterized the expression of myosin VIIA, along with the neuronal markers, Islet1, NeuroD1 and TuJ1, in the developing avian ear, during Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) stages 16-40. At early stages, when neuroblasts are delaminating from the otic epithelium, myosin VIIA expression was not observed. Myosin VIIA was initially detected in a subset of neurons during the early phase of neuronal differentiation (HH stage 20). As the AVG segregates into the auditory and vestibular portions, myosin VIIA was restricted to a subset of vestibular neurons, but was not present in auditory neurons. Myosin VIIA expression in the vestibular ganglion was maintained through HH stage 33 and was downregulated by stage 36. Myosin VIIA was also observed in the migrating processes of vestibular afferents as they begin to innervate the otic epithelium HH stage 22/23. Notably, afferents targeting hair cells of the cristae were positive for myosin VIIA while afferents targeting the utricular and saccular maculae were negative (HH stage 26-28). Although previous studies have reported that myosin VIIA is restricted to sensory hair cells, our data shows that myosin VIIA is also expressed in neurons of the developing chick ear. Our study suggests a possible role for myosin VIIA in axonal migration/pathfinding and/or innervation of vestibular afferents. In addition, myosin VIIA could be used as an early marker for vestibular neurons during the development of the avian AVG. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. DMPD: Afferent pathways of pyrogen signaling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9917870 Afferent pathways of pyrogen signaling. Blatteis CM, Sehic E, Li S. Ann N Y... Acad Sci. 1998 Sep 29;856:95-107. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Afferent pathways of pyrogen signaling.... PubmedID 9917870 Title Afferent pathways of pyrogen signaling. Authors Blatteis CM, Sehic E, Li S. Publica

  18. Low vagal tone magnifies the association between psychosocial stress exposure and internalizing psychopathology in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Katie A; Rith-Najarian, Leslie; Dirks, Melanie A; Sheridan, Margaret A

    2015-01-01

    Vagal tone is a measure of cardiovascular function that facilitates adaptive responses to environmental challenge. Low vagal tone is associated with poor emotional and attentional regulation in children and has been conceptualized as a marker of sensitivity to stress. We investigated whether the associations of a wide range of psychosocial stressors with internalizing and externalizing psychopathology were magnified in adolescents with low vagal tone. Resting heart period data were collected from a diverse community sample of adolescents (ages 13-17; N = 168). Adolescents completed measures assessing internalizing and externalizing psychopathology and exposure to stressors occurring in family, peer, and community contexts. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) was calculated from the interbeat interval time series. We estimated interactions between RSA and stress exposure in predicting internalizing and externalizing symptoms and evaluated whether interactions differed by gender. Exposure to psychosocial stressors was associated strongly with psychopathology. RSA was unrelated to internalizing or externalizing problems. Significant interactions were observed between RSA and child abuse, community violence, peer victimization, and traumatic events in predicting internalizing but not externalizing symptoms. Stressors were positively associated with internalizing symptoms in adolescents with low RSA but not in those with high RSA. Similar patterns were observed for anxiety and depression. These interactions were more consistently observed for male than female individuals. Low vagal tone is associated with internalizing psychopathology in adolescents exposed to high levels of stressors. Measurement of vagal tone in clinical settings might provide useful information about sensitivity to stress in child and adolescent clients.

  19. Slit/Robo-mediated chemorepulsion of vagal sensory axons in the fetal gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, David; Borojevic, Rajka; Anderson, Monique; Chen, Jason J; Gershon, Michael D; Ratcliffe, Elyanne M

    2013-01-01

    The vagus nerve descends from the brain to the gut during fetal life to reach specific targets in the bowel wall. Vagal sensory axons have been shown to respond to the axon guidance molecule netrin and to its receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC). As there are regions of the gut wall into which vagal axons do and do not extend, it is likely that a combination of attractive and repellent cues are involved in how vagal axons reach specific targets. We tested the hypothesis that Slit/Robo chemorepulsion can contribute to the restriction of vagal sensory axons to specific targets in the gut wall. Transcripts encoding Robo1 and Robo2 were expressed in the nodose ganglia throughout development and mRNA encoding the Robo ligands Slit1, Slit2, and Slit3 were all found in the fetal and adult bowel. Slit2 protein was located in the outer gut mesenchyme in regions that partially overlap with the secretion of netrin-1. Neurites extending from explanted nodose ganglia were repelled by Slit2. These observations suggest that vagal sensory axons are responsive to Slit proteins and are thus repelled by Slits secreted in the gut wall and prevented from reaching inappropriate targets. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Low Vagal Tone Magnifies the Association Between Psychosocial Stress Exposure and Internalizing Psychopathology in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Katie A.; Rith-Najarian, Leslie; Dirks, Melanie A.; Sheridan, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Vagal tone is a measure of cardiovascular function that facilitates adaptive responses to environmental challenge. Low vagal tone is associated with poor emotional and attentional regulation in children and has been conceptualized as a marker of sensitivity to stress. We investigated whether the associations of a wide range of psychosocial stressors with internalizing and externalizing psychopathology were magnified in adolescents with low vagal tone. Resting heart period data were collected from a diverse community sample of adolescents (ages 13–17; N =168). Adolescents completed measures assessing internalizing and externalizing psychopathology and exposure to stressors occurring in family, peer, and community contexts. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) was calculated from the interbeat interval time series. We estimated interactions between RSA and stress exposure in predicting internalizing and externalizing symptoms and evaluated whether interactions differed by gender. Exposure to psychosocial stressors was associated strongly with psychopathology. RSA was unrelated to internalizing or externalizing problems. Significant interactions were observed between RSA and child abuse, community violence, peer victimization, and traumatic events in predicting internalizing but not externalizing symptoms. Stressors were positively associated with internalizing symptoms in adolescents with low RSA but not in those with high RSA. Similar patterns were observed for anxiety and depression. These interactions were more consistently observed for male than female individuals. Low vagal tone is associated with internalizing psychopathology in adolescents exposed to high levels of stressors. Measurement of vagal tone in clinical settings might provide useful information about sensitivity to stress in child and adolescent clients. PMID:24156380

  1. Electrical Grounding Improves Vagal Tone in Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passi, Rohit; Doheny, Kim K; Gordin, Yuri; Hinssen, Hans; Palmer, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Low vagal tone (VT) is a marker of vulnerability to stress and the risk of developing necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants. Electric fields produced by equipment in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) induce an electric potential measurable on the skin in reference to ground. An electrical connection to ground reduces the skin potential and improves VT in adults. We aimed to measure the electric field strengths in the NICU environment and to determine if connecting an infant to electrical ground would reduce the skin potential and improve VT. We also wished to determine if the skin potential correlated with VT. Environmental magnetic flux density (MFD) was measured in and around incubators. Electrical grounding (EG) was achieved with a patch electrode and wire that extended to a ground outlet. We measured the skin potential in 26 infants and heart rate variability in 20 infants before, during, and after grounding. VT was represented by the high-frequency power of heart rate variability. The background MFD in the NICU was below 0.5 mG, but it ranged between 1.5 and 12.7 mG in the closed incubator. A 60-Hz oscillating potential was recorded on the skin of all infants. With EG, the skin voltage dropped by about 95%. Pre-grounding VT was inversely correlated with the skin potential. VT increased by 67% with EG. After grounding, the VT fell to the pre-grounding level. The electrical environment affects autonomic balance. EG improves VT and may improve resilience to stress and lower the risk of neonatal morbidity in preterm infants. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Evidence for the tonic inhibition of spinal pain by nicotinic cholinergic transmission through primary afferents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoue Makoto

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have proposed that nerve injury-specific loss of spinal tonic cholinergic inhibition may play a role in the analgesic effects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR agonists on neuropathic pain. However, the tonic cholinergic inhibition of pain remains to be well characterized. Results Here, we show that choline acetyltransferase (ChAT signals were localized not only in outer dorsal horn fibers (lamina I–III and motor neurons in the spinal cord, but also in the vast majority of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG. When mice were treated with an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS-ODN against ChAT, which decreased ChAT signals in the dorsal horn and DRG, but not in motor neurons, they showed a significant decrease in nociceptive thresholds in paw pressure and thermal paw withdrawal tests. Furthermore, in a novel electrical stimulation-induced paw withdrawal (EPW test, the thresholds for stimulation through C-, Aδ- and Aβ-fibers were all decreased by AS-ODN-pretreatments. The administration of nicotine (10 nmol i.t. induced a recovery of the nociceptive thresholds, decreased by the AS-ODN, in the mechanical, thermal and EPW tests. However, nicotine had no effects in control mice or treated with a mismatch scramble (MS-ODN in all of these nociception tests. Conclusion These findings suggest that primary afferent cholinergic neurons produce tonic inhibition of spinal pain through nAChR activation, and that intrathecal administration of nicotine rescues the loss of tonic cholinergic inhibition.

  3. Modulation of vagal tone enhances gastroduodenal motility and reduces somatic pain sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøkjaer, J B; Bergmann, S; Brock, C

    2016-01-01

    , using transcutaneous electrical vagal nerve stimulation (t-VNS) and deep slow breathing (DSB) respectively, could increase musculoskeletal pain thresholds and enhance gastroduodenal motility in healthy subjects. METHODS: Eighteen healthy subjects were randomized to a subject-blinded, sham......-controlled, cross-over study with an active protocol including stimulation of auricular branch of the vagus nerve, and breathing at full inspiratory capacity and forced full expiration. Recording of cardiac derived parameters including cardiac vagal tone, moderate pain thresholds to muscle, and bone pressure......BACKGROUND: The parasympathetic nervous system, whose main neural substrate is the vagus nerve, exerts a fundamental antinociceptive role and influences gastrointestinal sensori-motor function. Our research question was to whether combined electrical and physiological modulation of vagal tone...

  4. Parenting Stressors and Young Adolescents’ Depressive Symptoms: Does High Vagal Suppression Offer Protection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Anne C.; Buehler, Cheryl; Buchanan, Christy M.; Weymouth, Bridget B.

    2017-01-01

    Grounded in a dual-risk, biosocial perspective of developmental psychopathology, this study examined the role of higher vagal suppression in providing young adolescents protection from four parenting stressors. It was expected that lower vagal suppression would increase youth vulnerability to the deleterious effects of these parenting stressors. Depressive symptoms were examined as a central marker of socioemotional difficulties during early adolescence. The four parenting stressors examined were interparental hostility, maternal use of harsh discipline, maternal inconsistent discipline, and maternal psychological control. Participants were 68 young adolescents (Grade 6) and their mothers. Greater vagal suppression provided protection (i.e., lower depressive symptoms) from interparental hostility, harsh discipline, and maternal psychological control for boys but not for girls. PMID:27979628

  5. Effects of antidromic and orthodromic activation of STN afferent axons during DBS in Parkinson's disease: a simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiyeom eKang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that subthalamic nucleus (STN-Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS may exert at least part of its therapeutic effect through the antidromic suppression of pathological oscillations in the cortex in 6-OHDA treated rats and in PD patients. STN-DBS may also activate STN neurons by initiating action potential propagation in the orthodromic direction, similarly resulting in suppression of pathological oscillations in the STN. While experimental studies have provided strong evidence in support of antidromic stimulation of cortical neurons, it is difficult to separate relative contributions of antidromic and orthodromic effects of STN-DBS. The aim of this computational study was to examine the effects of antidromic and orthodromic activation on neural firing patterns and beta band (13-30 Hz oscillations in the STN and cortex during DBS of STN afferent axons projecting from the cortex. High frequency antidromic stimulation alone effectively suppressed simulated beta activity in both the cortex and STN-globus pallidus externa (GPe network. High frequency orthodromic stimulation, when simulated in isolation, similarly suppressed beta activity within the STN and GPe through the direct stimulation of STN neurons driven by DBS at the same frequency as the stimulus. Combined effect of antidromic and orthodromic stimulation modulated cortical activity antidromically while simultaneously orthodromically driving STN neurons. While high frequency STN-DBS reduced STN beta-band power, low frequency stimulation resulted in resonant effects, increasing beta-band activity, consistent with previous experimental observations. The simulation results indicate effective suppression of simulated oscillatory activity through both antidromic stimulation of cortical neurons and direct orthodromic stimulation of STN neurons. Results of the study agree with experimental recordings of STN and cortical neurons and support therapeutic potential for stimulation of

  6. Peakonsul Jaanus Kirikmäe andis teenetemärgi praost Thomas Vagale / Airi Vaga ; foto: Harold Karu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vaga, Airi, 1940-

    2008-01-01

    President Toomas Hendrik Ilves annetas iseseisvuspäeva puhul USA I praostkonna praostile Thomas Vagale Valgetähe IV klassi teenetemärgi. Teenetemärgi andis Thomas Vagale üle Eesti Vabariigi peakonsul Jaanus Kirikmäe

  7. The interactive effect of change in perceived stress and trait anxiety on vagal recovery from cognitive challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Olga V.; McKinley, Paula S.; Burg, Matthew M.; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Ryff, Carol D.; Weinstein, Maxine; Seeman, Teresa E.; Sloan, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that the change in state negative affect (measured as perceived stress) after cognitive challenge moderates the relationship of trait anxiety and anger to vagal recovery from that challenge. Cardiac vagal control (assessed using heart rate variability) and respiratory rate were measured in a sample of 905 participants from the Midlife in the United States Study. Cognitive challenges consisted of computerized mental arithmetic and Stroop color-word matching tasks. Multiple regression analyses controlling for the effects of the demographic, lifestyle, and medical factors influencing cardiac vagal control showed a significant moderating effect of change in perceived stress on the relationship of trait anxiety to vagal recovery from cognitive challenges (Beta = .253, p= .013). After adjustment for respiratory rate, this effect became marginally significant (Beta = .177, p= .037). In contrast, for the relationship of trait anger to vagal recovery, this effect was not significant either before (Beta = .141, p=.257) or after (Beta = .186, p=.072) adjusting for respiratory rate. Secondary analyses revealed that among the individuals with higher levels of trait anxiety, greater reductions in perceived stress were associated with greater increases in cardiac vagal control after the challenge. In contrast, among the individuals with lower levels of trait anxiety, changes in perceived stress had no impact on vagal recovery. Therefore, change in perceived stress moderates the relationship of trait anxiety, but not trait anger, to vagal recovery from cognitive challenge. PMID:21945037

  8. Relationship between vagal withdrawaland reactivation indices and aerobic capacity in taekwondo athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Augusto Perandini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between vagal withdrawal and reactivation indices and maximal running velocity (Vmax in taekwondo athletes. Eleven elite taekwondo athletes (seven men: 23.7±2.2 years, 72.4±7.0 kg, 178.8±7.5 cm, 51.9±2.9 ml.kg-1.min-1, and four women: 18.8±1.5 years, 61.8±1.8 kg, 168.0±4.4 cm, 41.6±2.4 ml.kg-1.min-1 performed a graded exercise test until exhaustion, with the last complete stage performed corresponding to Vmax. Heart rate variability (HRV parameters were calculated at 1-minute intervals until 85% of maximum HR and plotted against time for the estimation of vagal withdrawal indices (τ, amplitude (A and area under the curve (AUC. Vagal reactivation indices were determined based on HR recovery during the first 60 s (HRR60s and negative reciprocal of the slope of the regression line obtained during the first 30 s of HRR (T30. The vagal withdrawal parameters A and AUC were moderately and significantly correlated with Vmax (r = 0.61-0.71, P 0.05. T30 and HRR60s were also significantly correlated with Vmax (r = -0.77 and 0.64, P < 0.05, respectively. The present results showed that vagal withdrawal (A and AUC and vagal reactivation (T30 and HRR60s indices were significantly correlated with Vmax, suggesting that these indices can be used for the evaluation and monitoring of aerobic fitness in taekwondo athletes.

  9. Enhanced adipose afferent reflex contributes to sympathetic activation in diet-induced obesity hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Wei-Wei; Han, Ying; Zhou, Ye-Bo; Zhang, Feng; Gao, Xing-Ya; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2012-11-01

    We recently found that adipose afferent reflex (AAR) induced by chemical stimulation of white adipose tissue (WAT) increased sympathetic outflow and blood pressure in normal rats. The study was designed to test the hypothesis that AAR contributes to sympathetic activation in obesity hypertension. Male rats were fed with a control diet (12% kcal as fat) or high-fat diet (42% kcal as fat) for 12 weeks to induce obesity hypertension. Stimulation of WAT with capsaicin increased renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure. Both AAR and WAT afferent activity were enhanced in obesity hypertension (OH) compared with obesity nonhypertension (ON) and in ON compared with obesity-resistant or control diet rats. WAT sensory denervation induced by resiniferatoxin caused greater decreases in renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure in OH than ON and in ON than obesity-resistant or control. The depressor effect of resiniferatoxin lasted ≥ 3 weeks in OH. Leptin antagonist in WAT reduced renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure in OH. WAT injection of capsaicin increased plasma renin, angiotensin II, and norepinephrine levels in OH and caused more c-fos expression in paraventricular nucleus in OH than ON and in ON than obesity-resistant or control rats. Inhibiting paraventricular nucleus neurons with lidocaine attenuated renal sympathetic nerve activity in OH and ON, decreased mean arterial pressure in OH, and abolished the capsaicin-induced AAR in all groups. The results indicate that enhanced AAR contributes to sympathetic activation in OH, and paraventricular nucleus plays an important role in the enhanced AAR and sympathetic activation in OH.

  10. Muscle afferent receptors engaged in augmented sympathetic responsiveness in peripheral artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua eLi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The exercise pressor reflex (EPR is a neural control mechanism responsible for the cardiovascular responses to exercise. As exercise is initiated, thin fiber muscle afferent nerves are activated by mechanical and metabolic stimuli arising in the contracting muscles. This leads to reflex increases in arterial blood pressure and heart rate primarily through activation of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA. Studies of humans and animals have indicated that the EPR is exaggerated in a number of cardiovascular diseases. For the last several years, studies have specifically employed a rodent model to examine the mechanisms at receptor and cellular levels by which responses of SNA and blood pressure to static exercise are heightened in peripheral artery disease (PAD, one of the most common cardiovascular disorders. A rat model of this disease has well been established. Specifically, femoral artery occlusion is used to study intermittent claudication that is observed in human PAD. The receptors on thin fiber muscle afferents that are engaged in this disease include transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1, purinergic P2X and acid sensing ion channel (ASIC. The role played by nerve growth factor (NGF in regulating those sensory receptors in the processing of amplified EPR was also investigated. The purpose of this review is to focus on a theme namely that PAD accentuates autonomic reflex responses to exercise and further address regulatory mechanisms leading to abnormal sympathetic responsiveness. This review will present some of recent results in regard with several receptors in muscle sensory neurons in contribution to augmented autonomic reflex responses in PAD. Review of the findings from recent studies would lead to a better understanding in integrated processing of sympathetic nervous system in PAD.

  11. Vagal nerve endings in visceral pleura and triangular ligaments of the rat lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-Bin; Liao, Yi-Han; Wang, Yao-Chen

    2017-02-01

    The inner thoracic cavity is lined by the parietal pleura, and the lung lobes are covered by the visceral pleura. The parietal and visceral plurae form the pleural cavity that has negative pressure within to enable normal respiration. The lung tissues are bilaterally innervated by vagal and spinal nerves, including sensory and motor components. This complicated innervation pattern has made it difficult to discern the vagal vs. spinal processes in the pulmonary visceral pleura. With and without vagotomy, we identified vagal nerve fibres and endings distributed extensively in the visceral pleura ('P'-type nerve endings) and triangular ligaments ('L'-type nerve endings) by injecting wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase as a tracer into the nucleus of solitary tract or nodose ganglion of male Sprague-Dawley rats. We found the hilar and non-hilar vagal pulmonary pleural innervation pathways. In the hilar pathway, vagal sub-branches enter the hilum and follow the pleural sheet to give off the terminal arborizations. In the non-hilar pathway, vagal sub-branches run caudally along the oesophagus and either directly enter the ventral-middle-mediastinal left lobe or follow the triangular ligaments to enter the left and inferior lobe. Both vagi innervate: (i) the superior, middle and accessory lobes on the ventral surfaces that face the heart; (ii) the dorsal-rostral superior lobe; (iii) the dorsal-caudal left lobe; and (iv) the left triangular ligament. Innervated only by the left vagus is: (i) the ventral-rostral and dorsal-rostral left lobe via the hilar pathway; (ii) the ventral-middle-mediastinal left lobe and the dorsal accessory lobe that face the left lobe via the non-hilar pathway; and (iii) the ventral-rostral inferior lobe that faces the heart. Innervated only by the right vagus, via the non-hilar pathway, is: (i) the inferior (ventral and dorsal) and left (ventral only) lobe in the area near the triangular ligament; (ii) the dorsal-middle-mediastinal left

  12. Differential distribution of voltage-gated channels in myelinated and unmyelinated baroreceptor afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, John H; Kunze, Diana L

    2012-12-24

    hallmark of myelinated baroreceptors. Interestingly, HCN2 and HCN4 expression levels are comparable in both fiber types. Collectively, such apportion of VGC constrains the neural coding of myelinated A-type baroreceptors to low threshold, high frequency, high fidelity discharge but with a limited capacity for neuromodulation of afferent bandwidth. Unmyelinated C-type baroreceptors require greater depolarizing forces for spike initiation and have a low frequency discharge profile that is often poorly correlated with the physiological stimulus. But the complement of VGC in C-type neurons provides far greater capacity for neuromodulation of cell excitability than can be obtained from A-type baroreceptors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Calcium-dependent plateau potentials in rostral ambiguus neurons in the newborn mouse brain stem in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Feldman, J L

    1997-01-01

    Calcium-dependent plateau potentials in rostral ambiguus neurons in the newborn mouse brain stem in vitro. J. Neurophysiol. 78: 2483-2492, 1997. The nucleus ambiguus contains vagal and glossopharyngeal motoneurons and preganglionic neurons involved in respiration, swallowing, vocalization......, and control of heart beat. Here we show that the rostral compact formation's ambiguus neurons, which control the esophageal phase of swallowing, display calcium-dependent plateau potentials in response to tetanic orthodromic stimulation or current injection. Whole cell recordings were made from visualized...... neurons in the rostral nucleus ambiguus using a slice preparation from the newborn mouse. Biocytin-labeling revealed dendritic trees with pronounced rostrocaudal orientations confined to the nucleus ambiguus, a morphological profile matching that of vagal motoneurons projecting to the esophagus. Single...

  14. Burst-generating neurones in the dorsal horn in an in vitro preparation of the turtle spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, R E; Hounsgaard, J

    1996-01-01

    1. In transverse slices of the spinal cord of the turtle, intracellular recordings were used to characterize and analyse the responses to injected current and activation of primary afferents in dorsal horn neurones. 2. A subpopulation of neurones, with cell bodies located centrally in the dorsal...

  15. The role of peripheral afferents in persistent inguinal postherniorrhaphy pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijayasinghe, N; Ringsted, T K; Bischoff, J M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe, persistent inguinal postherniorrhaphy pain (PIPP) is a debilitating condition that develops in 2-5% of patients. PIPP may be neuropathic in nature, yet the lesion in the peripheral nervous system has not been located. Most PIPP-patients demonstrate a tender point (TP......, was demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: This trial demonstrates that peripheral afferent input from the TP-area is important for maintenance of spontaneous and evoked pain in PIPP. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT02065219....

  16. How to test for a relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD)

    OpenAIRE

    David C Broadway

    2016-01-01

    The 'swinging light test' is used to detect a relative afferent pupil defect (RAPD): a means of detecting differences between the two eyes in how they respond to a light shone in one eye at a time. The test can be very useful for detecting unilateral or asymmetrical disease of the retina or optic nerve (but only optic nerve disease that occurs in front of the optic chiasm).

  17. How to test for a relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Broadway

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The 'swinging light test' is used to detect a relative afferent pupil defect (RAPD: a means of detecting differences between the two eyes in how they respond to a light shone in one eye at a time. The test can be very useful for detecting unilateral or asymmetrical disease of the retina or optic nerve (but only optic nerve disease that occurs in front of the optic chiasm.

  18. The visceromotor and somatic afferent nerves of the penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Djibril; Zaitouna, Mazen; Alsaid, Bayan; Quillard, Jeanine; Ba, Nathalie; Allodji, Rodrigue Sètchéou; Benoit, Gérard; Bedretdinova, Dina; Bessede, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Innervation of the penis supports erectile and sensory functions. This article aims to study the efferent autonomic (visceromotor) and afferent somatic (sensory) nervous systems of the penis and to investigate how these systems relate to vascular pathways. Penises obtained from five adult cadavers were studied via computer-assisted anatomic dissection (CAAD). The number of autonomic and somatic nerve fibers was compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Proximally, penile innervation was mainly somatic in the extra-albugineal sector and mainly autonomic in the intracavernosal sector. Distally, both sectors were almost exclusively supplied by somatic nerve fibers, except the intrapenile vascular anastomoses that accompanied both somatic and autonomic (nitrergic) fibers. From this point, the neural immunolabeling within perivascular nerve fibers was mixed (somatic labeling and autonomic labeling). Accessory afferent, extra-albugineal pathways supplied the outer layers of the penis. There is a major change in the functional type of innervation between the proximal and distal parts of the intracavernosal sector of the penis. In addition to the pelvis and the hilum of the penis, the intrapenile neurovascular routes are the third level where the efferent autonomic (visceromotor) and the afferent somatic (sensory) penile nerve fibers are close. Intrapenile neurovascular pathways define a proximal penile segment, which guarantees erectile rigidity, and a sensory distal segment. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  19. Adipose afferent reflex: sympathetic activation and obesity hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, X-Q; Chen, W-W; Zhu, G-Q

    2014-03-01

    Excessive sympathetic activity contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension and the progression of the related organ damage. Adipose afferent reflex (AAR) is a sympatho-excitatory reflex that the afferent activity from white adipose tissue (WAT) increases sympathetic outflow and blood pressure. Hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN or PVH) is one of the central sites in the control of the AAR, and ionotropic glutamate receptors in the nucleus mediate the AAR. The AAR is enhanced in obesity and obesity hypertension. Enhanced WAT afferent activity and AAR contribute to the excessive sympathetic activation and hypertension in obesity. Blockage of the AAR attenuates the excessive sympathetic activity and hypertension. Leptin may be one of sensors in the WAT for the AAR, and is involved in the enhanced AAR in obesity and hypertension. This review focuses on the neuroanatomical basis and physiological functions of the AAR, and the important role of the enhanced AAR in the pathogenesis of obesity hypertension. © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Vagal-immune interactions involved in cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zila, I; Mokra, D; Kopincova, J; Kolomaznik, M; Javorka, M; Calkovska, A

    2017-09-22

    Inflammation and other immune responses are involved in the variety of diseases and disorders. The acute response to endotoxemia includes activation of innate immune mechanisms as well as changes in autonomic nervous activity. The autonomic nervous system and the inflammatory response are intimately linked and sympathetic and vagal nerves are thought to have anti-inflammation functions. The basic functional circuit between vagus nerve and inflammatory response was identified and the neuroimmunomodulation loop was called cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Unique function of vagus nerve in the anti-inflammatory reflex arc was found in many experimental and pre-clinical studies. They brought evidence on the cholinergic signaling interacting with systemic and local inflammation, particularly suppressing immune cells function. Pharmacological/electrical modulation of vagal activity suppressed TNF-alpha and other proinflammatory cytokines production and had beneficial therapeutic effects. Many questions related to mapping, linking and targeting of vagal-immune interactions have been elucidated and brought understanding of its basic physiology and provided the initial support for development of Tracey´s inflammatory reflex. This review summarizes and critically assesses the current knowledge defining cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway with main focus on studies employing an experimental approach and emphasizes the potential of modulation of vagally-mediated anti-inflammatory pathway in the treatment strategies.

  1. The vagal cardiac accelerator system in the reflex control of heart rate in conscious dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roossien, A; Brunsting, [No Value; Zaagsma, J; Zijlstra, WG; Muntinga, JHJ

    2000-01-01

    The reactions of the vagal cardioaccelerator (VCA) system to changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) were studied in five beta -adrenoceptor blocked conscious dogs. An increase in MAP was obtained by administration of vasopressin or methoxamine, a decrease by doxazosin or nitroprusside. In the first

  2. Physiology and Functioning: Parents' Vagal Tone, Emotion Socialization, and Children's Emotion Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Susan B.; Camras, Linda A.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined relationships among parents' physiological regulation, their emotion socialization behaviors, and their children's emotion knowledge. Parents' resting cardiac vagal tone was measured, and parents provided information regarding their socialization behaviors and family emotional expressiveness. Their 4- or 5-year-old children (N…

  3. Impact of gonadectomy on sympatho-vagal balance in male and female normotensive rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijacka, Wioletta; Clifford, Bethan; Walas, Dawid; Tilburgs, Chantal; Joles, Jaap A; McMullen, Sarah; Langley-Evans, Simon C

    OBJECTIVE: It is well established that autonomic nervous system and sympatho-vagal balance plays an important role in maintaining arterial blood pressure (ABP) (Salman IM., 2016) and that autonomic regulation of ABP differs between males and females (Hart EC et al., 2014). We hypothesised that sex

  4. Resting Afferent Renal Nerve Discharge and Renal Inflammation: Elucidating the Role of Afferent and Efferent Renal Nerves in Deoxycorticosterone Acetate Salt Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banek, Christopher T; Knuepfer, Mark M; Foss, Jason D; Fiege, Jessica K; Asirvatham-Jeyaraj, Ninitha; Van Helden, Dusty; Shimizu, Yoji; Osborn, John W

    2016-12-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RDNx) has emerged as a novel therapy for hypertension; however, the therapeutic mechanisms remain unclear. Efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity has recently been implicated in trafficking renal inflammatory immune cells and inflammatory chemokine and cytokine release. Several of these inflammatory mediators are known to activate or sensitize afferent nerves. This study aimed to elucidate the roles of efferent and afferent renal nerves in renal inflammation and hypertension in the deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) salt rat model. Uninephrectomized male Sprague-Dawley rats (275-300 g) underwent afferent-selective RDNx (n=10), total RDNx (n=10), or Sham (n=10) and were instrumented for the measurement of mean arterial pressure and heart rate by radiotelemetry. Rats received 100-mg DOCA (SC) and 0.9% saline for 21 days. Resting afferent renal nerve activity in DOCA and vehicle animals was measured after the treatment protocol. Renal tissue inflammation was assessed by renal cytokine content and T-cell infiltration and activation. Resting afferent renal nerve activity, expressed as a percent of peak afferent nerve activity, was substantially increased in DOCA than in vehicle (35.8±4.4 versus 15.3±2.8 %Amax). The DOCA-Sham hypertension (132±12 mm Hg) was attenuated by ≈50% in both total RDNx (111±8 mm Hg) and afferent-selective RDNx (117±5 mm Hg) groups. Renal inflammation induced by DOCA salt was attenuated by total RDNx and unaffected by afferent-selective RDNx. These data suggest that afferent renal nerve activity may mediate the hypertensive response to DOCA salt, but inflammation may be mediated primarily by efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity. Also, resting afferent renal nerve activity is elevated in DOCA salt rats, which may highlight a crucial neural mechanism in the development and maintenance of hypertension. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Hippocampal - brainstem connectivity associated with vagal modulation after an intense exercise intervention in healthy men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Juergen Bär

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractRegular physical exercise leads increased vagal modulation of the cardiovascular system. A combination of peripheral and central processes has been proposed to underlie this adaptation. However, specific changes in the central autonomic network have not been described in human in more detail. We hypothesized that the anterior hippocampus known to be influenced by regular physical activity might be involved in the development of increased vagal modulation after a 6 weeks high intensity intervention in young healthy men (exercise group: n=17, control group: n=17. In addition to the determination of physical capacity before and after the intervention, we used resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and synchronic heart rate variability assessment.We detected a significant increase of the power output at the anaerobic threshold of 11.4% (p<0.001, the maximum power output Pmax of 11.2% (p<0.001, and VO2max adjusted for body weight of 4.7% (p<0.001 in the exercise group (EG. Comparing baseline (T0 and post-exercise (T1 values of parasympathetic modulation of the exercise group, we observed a trend for a decrease in heart rate (p<0.06 and a significant increase of vagal modulation as indicated by RMSSD (p<0.026 during resting state. In the whole brain analysis, we found that the connectivity pattern of the right anterior hippocampus (aHC was specifically altered to the ventromedial anterior cortex, the dorsal striatum and to the dorsal vagal complex (DVC in the brainstem. Moreover, we only observed a highly significant negative correlation between increased RMSSD after exercise and decreased functional connectivity from the right aHC to DVC (r=-0.69, p=0.003. This indicates that increased vagal modulation was associated with functional connectivity between aHC and the dorsal vagal complex.In conclusion, our findings suggest that exercise associated changes in anterior hippocampal function might be involved in increased vagal

  6. A dual physiological character for cerebral mechanisms of sexuality and cognition: common somatic peripheral afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motofei, Ion G

    2011-11-01

    The dual theory of sexuality is a work in progress that tries to put together all the significant physiological aspects described on this subject, the most recent published article discussing about the hormonal and pheromonal neuromodulation of somatic peripheral afferents. But sexuality and cognition shares common somatic peripheral afferents, so that a good understanding of sexual mechanisms supposes also a good knowledge of the essential psychological mechanisms/neuromodulators. Current psychological approaches could be limited to two general tendencies. Some authors consider that cerebral neuronal connexions generate a unitary network substrate that - increasing in its complexity - becomes compatible with our complex mental function. Others suggest that such a complex cerebral function correspond actually to a system based on subsystems, represented by distinct neuronal units (not necessarily complexes) that interact each other. Starting from basic somatic/sexual neurophysiological elements and general accepted psychological aspects, the discussion gave sense to the last point of view, namely that genesis of a new function is the result of cooperation between distinct structural and functional units. Contrary to the classical concepts, this paper sows the fact that mental perception corresponds actually (in term of touch/tangibility) to the internal representation of an external object while sensations realize an internal representation of the external characteristics of environmental object. As a conclusion, sexuality and cognition are two distinct autonomic/dual functions, interrelated at both cerebral and peripheral level. Peripheral interference implies intervention of some specific (mental and sexual) neuromodulators, making external information act as internal mental or internal sexual stimuli. Central cerebral interferences are also clinically and pharmacologically documented, specific neuromodulators being taken into account. Supplementary studies would

  7. Hippocampal-Brainstem Connectivity Associated with Vagal Modulation after an Intense Exercise Intervention in Healthy Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, Karl-Jürgen; Herbsleb, Marco; Schumann, Andy; de la Cruz, Feliberto; Gabriel, Holger W.; Wagner, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Regular physical exercise leads to increased vagal modulation of the cardiovascular system. A combination of peripheral and central processes has been proposed to underlie this adaptation. However, specific changes in the central autonomic network have not been described in human in more detail. We hypothesized that the anterior hippocampus known to be influenced by regular physical activity might be involved in the development of increased vagal modulation after a 6 weeks high intensity intervention in young healthy men (exercise group: n = 17, control group: n = 17). In addition to the determination of physical capacity before and after the intervention, we used resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and simultaneous heart rate variability assessment. We detected a significant increase of the power output at the anaerobic threshold of 11.4% (p exercise group (EG). Comparing baseline (T0) and post-exercise (T1) values of parasympathetic modulation of the exercise group, we observed a trend for a decrease in heart rate (p brain analysis, we found that the connectivity pattern of the right anterior hippocampus (aHC) was specifically altered to the ventromedial anterior cortex, the dorsal striatum and to the dorsal vagal complex (DVC) in the brainstem. Moreover, we observed a highly significant negative correlation between increased RMSSD after exercise and decreased functional connectivity from the right aHC to DVC (r = −0.69, p = 0.003). This indicates that increased vagal modulation was associated with functional connectivity between aHC and the DVC. In conclusion, our findings suggest that exercise associated changes in anterior hippocampal function might be involved in increased vagal modulation. PMID:27092046

  8. Pancreatic polypeptide responses to isoglycemic oral and intravenous glucose in humans with and without intact vagal innervation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veedfald, Simon; Plamboeck, Astrid; Hartmann, Bolette

    2015-01-01

    hyperglycemia inhibits secretion. The glucose sensing mechanism has yet to be determined but may involve a vagal pathway. To investigate the role of enteral stimuli with or without intact vagal innervation, while controlling for the glucose excursion caused by the OGTT, we measured PP plasma levels by an in...... from the DPP-4i day to determine the potential effect of DPP-4-cleaved peptides on PP secretion. In both vagotomized and controls, oral glucose elicited PP secretion. In controls, but not in the vagotomized participants, intravenous glucose significantly inhibited PP secretion suggesting a vagal...

  9. Long-term sensitization of mechanosensitive and -insensitive afferents in mice with persistent colorectal hypersensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Bin; La, Jun-Ho; Schwartz, Erica S.; Tanaka, Takahiro; McMurray, Timothy P.; Gebhart, G.F.

    2012-01-01

    Afferent input contributes significantly to the pain and colorectal hypersensitivity that characterize irritable bowel syndrome. In the present study, we investigated the contributions of mechanically sensitive and mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs; or silent afferents) to colorectal hypersensitivity. The visceromotor response to colorectal distension (CRD; 15–60 mmHg) was recorded in mice before and for weeks after intracolonic treatment with zymosan or saline. After CRD tests, the di...

  10. Chloride is essential for contraction of afferent arterioles after agonists and potassium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Ellekvist, Peter; Skøtt, O

    1997-01-01

    A depolarizing chloride efflux has been suggested to activate voltage-dependent calcium channels in renal afferent arteriolar smooth muscle cells in response to vasoconstrictors. To test this proposal, rabbit afferent arterioles were microperfused, and the contractile dose responses...... chloride. We conclude that norepinephrine and ANG II use different mechanisms for contraction and that extracellular chloride is essential for contraction in afferent arterioles after activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels. We suggest that a chloride influx pathway is activated concomitantly...

  11. Otolith-Canal Convergence in Vestibular Nuclei Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, J. David

    1996-01-01

    During manned spaceflight, acute vestibular disturbances often occur, leading to physical duress and a loss of performance. Vestibular adaptation to the weightless environment follows within two to three days yet the mechanisms responsible for the disturbance and subsequent adaptation are still unknown In order to understand vestibular system function in space and normal earth conditions the basic physiological mechanisms of vestibular information co coding must be determined. Information processing regarding head movement and head position with respect to gravity takes place in the vestibular nuclei neurons that receive signals From the semicircular canals and otolith organs in the vestibular labyrinth. These neurons must synthesize the information into a coded output signal that provides for the head and eye movement reflexes as well as the conscious perception of the body in three-dimensional space The current investigation will for the first time. determine how the vestibular nuclei neurons quantitatively synthesize afferent information from the different linear and angular acceleration receptors in the vestibular labyrinths into an integrated output signal. During the second year of funding, progress on the current project has been focused on the anatomical orientation of semicircular canals and the spatial orientation of the innervating afferent responses. This information is necessary in order to understand how vestibular nuclei neurons process the incoming afferent spatial signals particularly with the convergent otolith afferent signals that are also spatially distributed Since information from the vestibular nuclei is presented to different brain regions associated with differing reflexive and sensory functions it is important to understand the computational mechanisms used by vestibular neurons to produce the appropriate output signal.

  12. Excitability changes in sacral afferents innervating the urethra, perineum and hindlimb skin of the cat during micturition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, R R; Shefchyk, S J

    1999-01-01

    Excitability changes in afferents innervating the urethra, perineum and hindlimb were measured in decerebrated cats during micturition and in response to stimulation of lumbosacral afferents. Increases in excitability were interpreted as primary afferent depolarization (PAD) and decreases as primary afferent hyperpolarization.Excitability increases were observed in 11 of 19 urethral pudendal afferents during micturition. Four of these 11 afferents showed an excitability increase during voiding. Seven of these showed a biphasic change with a decrease in excitability when sphincter activity resumed at the end of the void. Three of 19 afferents showed an excitability decrease during micturition and no change was detected in five afferents.During micturition, the peak amplitude of urethral afferent-evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials in seven of eight sphincter motoneurones was diminished to a mean of 36% of control values.Eighty per cent of hindlimb cutaneous afferents and 50% of dorsal penile/clitoral and superficial perineal nerve afferents in the sacral cord showed increased excitability during voiding. No excitability increases were measured in 13 hindlimb cutaneous fibres examined in the lumbar segments.PAD was observed in sacral urethral, perineal and hindlimb cutaneous afferents in response to electrical stimulation of other perineal, urethral, hindlimb cutaneous and group II muscle afferents.It is concluded that control of transmission from urethral afferents by the micturition circuitry is different to that by sensory transmission from hindlimb and perineal regions during micturition. We hypothesize that more than one population of sacral PAD-mediating interneurones is involved. PMID:9852338

  13. Artificial spatiotemporal touch inputs reveal complementary decoding in neocortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Calogero M; Mazzoni, Alberto; Spanne, Anton; Enander, Jonas M D; Mogensen, Hannes; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Camboni, Domenico; Micera, Silvestro; Jörntell, Henrik

    2017-04-04

    Investigations of the mechanisms of touch perception and decoding has been hampered by difficulties in achieving invariant patterns of skin sensor activation. To obtain reproducible spatiotemporal patterns of activation of sensory afferents, we used an artificial fingertip equipped with an array of neuromorphic sensors. The artificial fingertip was used to transduce real-world haptic stimuli into spatiotemporal patterns of spikes. These spike patterns were delivered to the skin afferents of the second digit of rats via an array of stimulation electrodes. Combined with low-noise intra- and extracellular recordings from neocortical neurons in vivo, this approach provided a previously inaccessible high resolution analysis of the representation of tactile information in the neocortical neuronal circuitry. The results indicate high information content in individual neurons and reveal multiple novel neuronal tactile coding features such as heterogeneous and complementary spatiotemporal input selectivity also between neighboring neurons. Such neuronal heterogeneity and complementariness can potentially support a very high decoding capacity in a limited population of neurons. Our results also indicate a potential neuroprosthetic approach to communicate with the brain at a very high resolution and provide a potential novel solution for evaluating the degree or state of neurological disease in animal models.

  14. Artificial spatiotemporal touch inputs reveal complementary decoding in neocortical neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Calogero M.; Mazzoni, Alberto; Spanne, Anton; Enander, Jonas M. D.; Mogensen, Hannes; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Camboni, Domenico; Micera, Silvestro; Jörntell, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Investigations of the mechanisms of touch perception and decoding has been hampered by difficulties in achieving invariant patterns of skin sensor activation. To obtain reproducible spatiotemporal patterns of activation of sensory afferents, we used an artificial fingertip equipped with an array of neuromorphic sensors. The artificial fingertip was used to transduce real-world haptic stimuli into spatiotemporal patterns of spikes. These spike patterns were delivered to the skin afferents of the second digit of rats via an array of stimulation electrodes. Combined with low-noise intra- and extracellular recordings from neocortical neurons in vivo, this approach provided a previously inaccessible high resolution analysis of the representation of tactile information in the neocortical neuronal circuitry. The results indicate high information content in individual neurons and reveal multiple novel neuronal tactile coding features such as heterogeneous and complementary spatiotemporal input selectivity also between neighboring neurons. Such neuronal heterogeneity and complementariness can potentially support a very high decoding capacity in a limited population of neurons. Our results also indicate a potential neuroprosthetic approach to communicate with the brain at a very high resolution and provide a potential novel solution for evaluating the degree or state of neurological disease in animal models. PMID:28374841

  15. Validating a population model of tactile mechanotransduction of slowly adapting type I afferents at levels of skin mechanics, single-unit response and psychophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerling, Gregory J; Rivest, Isabelle I; Lesniak, Daine R; Scanlon, Jacob R; Wan, Lingtian

    2014-01-01

    Previous models of touch have linked skin mechanics to neural firing rate, neural dynamics to action potential elicitation, and mechanoreceptor populations to psychophysical discrimination. However, no one model spans all levels. The objective of work herein is to build a multi-level, computational model of tactile neurons embedded in cutaneous skin, and then validate its predictions of skin surface deflection, single-afferent firing to indenter shift, and population response for sphere discrimination. The model includes a 3D finite element representation of the distal phalange with hyper- and visco-elastic mechanics. Distributed over its surface, a population of receptor models is comprised of bi-phasic functions to represent Merkel cells' transformation of stress/strain to membrane current and a leaky integrate-and-fire neuronal models to generate the timing of action potentials. After including neuronal noise, the predictions of two population encoding strategies (gradient sum and euclidean distance) are compared to psychophysical discrimination of spheres. Results indicate that predicted skin surface deflection matches Srinivasan's observations for 50 micron and 3.17 mm diameter cylinders and single-afferent responses achieve R(2) = 0.81 when compared to Johnson's recordings. Discrimination results correlate with Goodwin's experiments, whereby 287 and 365 m(-1) spheres are more discriminable than 287 and 296 m(-1).

  16. Reliable activation of immature neurons in the adult hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas A Mongiat

    Full Text Available Neurons born in the adult dentate gyrus develop, mature, and connect over a long interval that can last from six to eight weeks. It has been proposed that, during this period, developing neurons play a relevant role in hippocampal signal processing owing to their distinctive electrical properties. However, it has remained unknown whether immature neurons can be recruited into a network before synaptic and functional maturity have been achieved. To address this question, we used retroviral expression of green fluorescent protein to identify developing granule cells of the adult mouse hippocampus and investigate the balance of afferent excitation, intrinsic excitability, and firing behavior by patch clamp recordings in acute slices. We found that glutamatergic inputs onto young neurons are significantly weaker than those of mature cells, yet stimulation of cortical excitatory axons elicits a similar spiking probability in neurons at either developmental stage. Young neurons are highly efficient in transducing ionic currents into membrane depolarization due to their high input resistance, which decreases substantially in mature neurons as the inward rectifier potassium (Kir conductance increases. Pharmacological blockade of Kir channels in mature neurons mimics the high excitability characteristic of young neurons. Conversely, Kir overexpression induces mature-like firing properties in young neurons. Therefore, the differences in excitatory drive of young and mature neurons are compensated by changes in membrane excitability that render an equalized firing activity. These observations demonstrate that the adult hippocampus continuously generates a population of highly excitable young neurons capable of information processing.

  17. Topographical features of the vagal nerve at the cervical level in an aging population evaluated by ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Inamura, MD

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Our study encourages utilizing longitudinal and cross-individual ultrasound studies within and amongst individuals of different ages to allow understanding the variations of the vagal nerve in its neck portion. This has implications to many neurosurgical procedures.

  18. Identification of specific sensory neuron populations for study of expressed ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Renuka; McGrew, Stephanie; Elmslie, Keith

    2013-12-24

    Sensory neurons transmit signals from various parts of the body to the central nervous system. The soma for these neurons are located in the dorsal root ganglia that line the spinal column. Understanding the receptors and channels expressed by these sensory afferent neurons could lead to novel therapies for disease. The initial step is to identify the specific subset of sensory neurons of interest. Here we describe a method to identify afferent neurons innervating the muscles by retrograde labeling using a fluorescent dye DiI (1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate). Understanding the contribution of ion channels to excitation of muscle afferents could help to better control excessive excitability induced by certain disease states such as peripheral vascular disease or heart failure. We used two approaches to identify the voltage dependent ion channels expressed by these neurons, patch clamp electrophysiology and immunocytochemistry. While electrophysiology plus pharmacological blockers can identify functional ion channel types, we used immunocytochemistry to identify channels for which specific blockers were unavailable and to better understand the ion channel distribution pattern in the cell population. These techniques can be applied to other areas of the nervous system to study specific neuronal groups.

  19. Sensory sciatic nerve afferent inputs to the dorsal lateral medulla in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alioto, Olavo Egídio; Lindsey, Charles Julian; Koepp, Janice; Caous, Cristofer André

    2008-06-01

    Investigations show the paratrigeminal nucleus (Pa5) as an input site for sensory information from the sciatic nerve field. Functional or physical disruption of the Pa5 alters behavioral and somatosensory responses to nociceptive hindpaw stimulation or sciatic nerve electrostimulation (SNS), both contralateral to the affected structure. The nucleus, an input site for cranial and spinal nerves, known for orofacial nociceptive sensory processing, has efferent connections to structures associated with nociception and cardiorespiratory functions. This study aimed at determining the afferent sciatic pathway to dorsal lateral medulla by means of a neuronal tract-tracer (biocytin) injected in the iliac segment of the sciatic nerve. Spinal cord samples revealed bilateral labeling in the gracile and pyramidal or cuneate tracts from survival day 2 (lumbar L1/L2) to day 8 (cervical C2/C3 segments) following biocytin application. From day 10 to day 20 medulla samples showed labeling of the contralateral Pa5 to the injection site. The ipsilateral paratrigeminal nucleus showed labeling on day 10 only. The lateral reticular nucleus (LRt) showed fluorescent labeled terminal fibers on day 12 and 14, after tracer injection to contralateral sciatic nerve. Neurotracer injection into the LRt of sciatic nerve-biocytin-treated rats produced retrograde labeled neurons soma in the Pa5 in the vicinity of biocytin labeled nerve terminals. Therefore, Pa5 may be considered one of the first sites in the brain for sensory/nociceptive inputs from the sciatic nerve. Also, the findings include Pa5 and LRt in the neural pathway of the somatosympathetic pressor response to SNS and nocifensive responses to hindpaw stimulation.

  20. Interactions between visceral afferent signaling and stimulus processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo D Critchley

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Visceral afferent signals to the brain influence thoughts, feelings and behaviour. Here we highlight the findings of a set of empirical investigations in humans concerning body-mind interaction that focus on how feedback from states of autonomic arousal shapes cognition and emotion. There is a longstanding debate regarding the contribution of the body, to mental processes. Recent theoretical models broadly acknowledge the role of (autonomically-mediated physiological arousal to emotional, social and motivational behaviours, yet the underlying mechanisms are only partially characterized. Neuroimaging is overcoming this shortfall; first, by demonstrating correlations between autonomic change and discrete patterns of evoked, and task-independent, neural activity; second, by mapping the central consequences of clinical perturbations in autonomic response and; third, by probing how dynamic fluctuations in peripheral autonomic state are integrated with perceptual, cognitive and emotional processes. Building on the notion that an important source of the brain’s representation of physiological arousal is derived from afferent information from arterial baroreceptors, we have exploited the phasic nature of these signals to show their differential contribution to the processing of emotionally-salient stimuli. This recent work highlights the facilitation at neural and behavioral levels of fear and threat processing that contrasts with the more established observations of the inhibition of central pain processing during baroreceptors activation. The implications of this body-brain-mind axis are discussed.

  1. The mouse olfactory peduncle. 3. Development of neurons, glia and centrifugal afferents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eBrunjes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present series of studies was designed to provide a general overview of the development of the region connecting the olfactory bulb to the forebrain. The olfactory peduncle contains several structures involved in processing odor information with the anterior olfactory nucleus (cortex being the largest and most studied. Results indicate that considerable growth occurs in the peduncle from postnatal day (P10-P20, with reduced expansion from P20-P30. No evidence was found for the addition of new projection or interneurons during the postnatal period. GABAergic cells decreased in both number and density after P10. Glial populations exhibited different patterns of development, with astrocytes declining in density from P10-P30, and both oligodendrocytes and microglia increasing through the interval. Myelination in the anterior commissure emerged between P11-14. Dense cholinergic innervation was observed at P10 and remained relatively stable through P30, while considerable maturation of serotonergic innervation occurred through the period. Unilateral naris occlusion from P1-P30 resulted in about a 30% reduction in the size of the ipsilateral peduncle but few changes were observed on the contralateral side. The ipsilateral peduncle also exhibited higher densities of GAD67- containing interneurons and cholinergic fibers suggesting a delay in normal developmental pruning. Lower densities of interneurons expressing CCK, somatostatin and NPY and in myelin basic protein staining were also observed. Understanding variations in developmental trajectories within the olfactory peduncle may be an important tool for unravelling the functions of the region.

  2. Vagal Tone and Children���s Delay of Gratification: Differential Sensitivity Across Resource Poor and Resource Rich Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Sturge-Apple, Melissa L.; Suor, Jennifer H.; Davies, Patrick T.; Cicchetti, Dante; Skibo, Michael A.; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2016-01-01

    Socioeconomic disparities in children���s delay of gratification exist, with impoverished children displaying greater difficulties in this developmental domain. The present paper examined the role of vagal tone in predicting the ability to delay gratification across resource rich and resource poor environments. Embedding hypotheses within evolutionary models of children���s conditional adaptation to proximal rearing contexts, Study 1 tested whether elevated vagal tone was associated with lowe...

  3. Mercaptoacetate and fatty acids exert direct and antagonistic effects on nodose neurons via GPR40 fatty acid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Rebecca A; Zhao, Huan; Kinch, Dallas; Li, Ai-Jun; Simasko, Steven M; Ritter, Sue

    2014-07-01

    β-mercaptoacetate (MA) is a drug known to block mitochondrial oxidation of medium- and long-chain fatty acids (FAs) and to stimulate feeding. Because MA-induced feeding is vagally dependent, it has been assumed that the feeding response is mediated by MA's antimetabolic action at a peripheral, vagally innervated site. However, MA's site of action has not yet been identified. Therefore, we used fluorescent calcium measurements in isolated neurons from rat nodose ganglia to determine whether MA has direct effects on vagal sensory neurons. We found that MA alone did not alter cytosolic calcium concentrations in nodose neurons. However, MA (60 μM to 6 mM) significantly decreased calcium responses to both linoleic acid (LA; 10 μM) and caprylic acid (C8; 10 μM) in all neurons responsive to LA and C8. GW9508 (40 μM), an agonist of the FA receptor, G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40), also increased calcium levels almost exclusively in FA-responsive neurons. MA significantly inhibited this response to GW9508. MA did not inhibit calcium responses to serotonin, high K(+), or capsaicin, which do not utilize GPRs, or to CCK, which acts on a different GPR. GPR40 was detected in nodose ganglia by RT-PCR. Results suggest that FAs directly activate vagal sensory neurons via GPR40 and that MA antagonizes this effect. Thus, we propose that MA's nonmetabolic actions on GPR40 membrane receptors, expressed by multiple peripheral tissues in addition to the vagus nerve, may contribute to or mediate MA-induced stimulation of feeding. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Temporal dynamics of L5 dendrites in medial prefrontal cortex regulate integration versus coincidence detection of afferent inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembrow, Nikolai C; Zemelman, Boris V; Johnston, Daniel

    2015-03-18

    Distinct brain regions are highly interconnected via long-range projections. How this inter-regional communication occurs depends not only upon which subsets of postsynaptic neurons receive input, but also, and equally importantly, upon what cellular subcompartments the projections target. Neocortical pyramidal neurons receive input onto their apical dendrites. However, physiological characterization of these inputs thus far has been exclusively somatocentric, leaving how the dendrites respond to spatial and temporal patterns of input unexplored. Here we used a combination of optogenetics with multisite electrode recordings to simultaneously measure dendritic and somatic responses to afferent fiber activation in two different populations of layer 5 (L5) pyramidal neurons in the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). We found that commissural inputs evoked monosynaptic responses in both intratelencephalic (IT) and pyramidal tract (PT) dendrites, whereas monosynaptic hippocampal input primarily targeted IT, but not PT, dendrites. To understand the role of dendritic integration in the processing of long-range inputs, we used dynamic clamp to simulate synaptic currents in the dendrites. IT dendrites functioned as temporal integrators that were particularly responsive to dendritic inputs within the gamma frequency range (40-140 Hz). In contrast, PT dendrites acted as coincidence detectors by responding to spatially distributed signals within a narrow time window. Thus, the PFC extracts information from different brain regions through the combination of selective dendritic targeting and the distinct dendritic physiological properties of L5 pyramidal dendrites. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354501-14$15.00/0.

  5. Vagal changes following cancer chemotherapy: implications for the development of nausea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, G R; Andrews, P L; Hickok, J T; Stern, R

    2000-05-01

    Many physiological changes that occur contemporaneously with nausea are mediated by the autonomic nervous system, but the specific autonomic changes associated with nausea have not been characterized. Cardiac parasympathetic (vagal) activity as indicated by heart rate variability, measured as the standard deviation of successive differences (SDSD) in beat-to-beat intervals, was assessed in 24 women with ovarian cancer immediately prior to and accompanying nausea that occurred following anticancer chemotherapy. A progressive increase in SDSD followed infusion of the chemotherapy agent, indicating a rise in cardiac parasympathetic (vagal) activity, with onset of nausea consistently occurring after the peak activity had been reached, at a time when SDSD was decreasing. An increase in parasympathetic activity seems to set the stage for the expression of nausea but an additional stimulus is apparently needed to finally trigger the event.

  6. High-intensity interval exercise improves vagal tone and decreases arrhythmias in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraud, Thibaut; Labrunee, Marc; Gaucher-Cazalis, Kevin; Despas, Fabien; Meyer, Philippe; Bosquet, Laurent; Gales, Celine; Vaccaro, Angelica; Bousquet, Marc; Galinier, Michel; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Pathak, Atul

    2013-10-01

    Autonomic dysfunction including sympathetic activation and vagal withdrawal has been reported in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We tested the hypotheses that high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) in CHF patients would enhance vagal modulation and thus decrease arrhythmic events. Eighteen CHF patients underwent a baseline assessment (CON) and were then randomized to a single session of HIIE and to an isocaloric moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MICE). We evaluated the HR, HR variability parameters, and arrhythmic events by 24-h Holter ECG recordings after HIIE, MICE, and CON sessions. We found that HR was significantly decreased after HIIE (68 ± 3 bpm, P CHF patients, leading to significant reductions of HR and arrhythmic events in a 24-h posttraining period. Cardioprotective effects of HIIE in CHF patients need to be confirmed in a larger study population and on a long-term basis.

  7. Perturbed sympatho-vagal balance in Turner syndrome - relation to aortic dilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian Havmand; Andersen, Niels Holmark

    examined once. Aortic dimensions were measured at nine positions using 3D, non-contrast and free-breathing cardiovascular-MRI. HRV measured by short-term spectral analysis (supine-standing), transthoracic echocardiography, 24-hour ambulatory BP were done. Results: The changes in High frequency (HF) power......-average=-0.312 and -0.341; pmeasures of HRV. Prospectively there were no changes in HRV. Conclusions: A perturbed sympatho-vagal balance is present in TS explained by a decreased vagal activity......Objective: The risk of aortic dissection is 100 fold increased in Turner syndrome (TS). Increased blood pressure (BP) and heart rate is present as well as an increased risk of ischemic heart disease and diabetes. This study aimed to prospectively assess heart rate variability (HRV) in TS and its...

  8. Stressing the feedback: attention and cardiac vagal tone during a cognitive stress task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Muhammad Abid; Ritvo, Paul; Fashler, Samantha R; Katz, Joel

    2017-07-07

    The present study examined relationships among gaze behaviour and cardiac vagal tone using a novel stress-inducing task. Participants' (N = 40) eye movements and heart rate variability (HRV) were measured during an unsolvable computer-based task randomly presenting feedback of "Right" and "Wrong" answers distinctly onscreen after each trial. Subgroups were created on the basis of more frequent eye movements to the right ("Correct"-Attenders; n = 23) or wrong ("Incorrect"-Attenders; n = 17) areas onscreen. Correct-Attenders maintained HRV from baseline to the stress task. In contrast, Incorrect-Attenders spent significantly more time viewing "Wrong" feedback, exhibited a reduction in HRV during the stress condition (p attention to negative feedback ("Wrong") elicits perseverative stress and negative self-evaluations among university students. This study highlights the potential for studying attentional biases and emotional distress through combined measures of gaze behaviour and cardiac vagal tone.

  9. Parenting behaviors and vagal tone at six months predict attachment disorganization at twelve months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holochwost, Steven J; Gariépy, Jean-Louis; Propper, Cathi B; Mills-Koonce, W Roger; Moore, Ginger A

    2014-09-01

    The authors investigated the relationships among parenting behaviors, infant vagal tone, and subsequent attachment classification. Vagal tone was assessed among 6-month olds (n = 95) during the still-face paradigm (SFP) via respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), while attachment security and disorganization were measured at 12 months during the strange situation procedure (SSP). Infants demonstrating higher levels of RSA during the normal interaction and reunion episodes of the SFP whose mothers were also rated as negative-intrusive exhibited higher levels of attachment disorganization at 12 months, while infants with lower RSA and mothers who were negative-intrusive did not exhibit higher levels of disorganization. These results suggest that high levels of RSA may not be adaptive within the context of negative-intrusive parenting. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cardiac vagal reactivity during relived sadness is predicted by affect intensity and emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rash, Joshua A; Prkachin, Kenneth M

    2013-02-01

    The induction of one particular emotion - sadness - has shown two different profiles of autonomic nervous system (ANS) response that are characterized by activation, or withdrawal in cardiac parasympathetic activation. We tested whether individual differences in emotion expression predict cardiac vagal reactivity from baseline to autobiographical sadness induction. Respiration sinus arrhythmia (RSA(c)) was measured in 56 adults (28 men) asked to relive an episode of sadness. Participants completed an emotional intelligence (EI) test, and a measure of trait affect intensity. Sadness resulted in cardiac vagal activation with concomitant increase in HR suggestive of parasympathetic and sympathetic co-activation. Individual differences were observed in autonomic reactivity during sadness. Higher scores on the affect intensity measure and the emotional intelligence test predicted greater change in RSA(c) during sadness and recovery. The tendency to experience affect intensely and the ability to perceive emotions predict adaptive physiological regulation during sadness. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. An indirect component in the evoked compound action potential of the vagal nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordelman, Simone C. M. A.; Kornet, Lilian; Cornelussen, Richard; Buschman, Hendrik P. J.; Veltink, Peter H.

    2010-12-01

    The vagal nerve plays a vital role in the regulation of the cardiovascular system. It not only regulates the heart but also sends sensory information from the heart back to the brain. We hypothesize that the evoked vagal nerve compound action potential contains components that are indirect via the brain stem or coming via the neural network on the heart. In an experimental study of 15 pigs, we identified four components in the evoked compound action potentials. The fourth component was found to be an indirect component, which came from the periphery. The latency of the indirect component increased when heart rate and contractility were decreased by burst stimulation (P = 0.01; n = 7). When heart rate and contractility were increased by dobutamine administration, the latency of the indirect component decreased (P = 0.01; n = 9). This showed that the latency of the indirect component of the evoked compound action potentials may relate to the state of the cardiovascular system.

  12. Rhythmic activity of feline dorsal and ventral spinocerebellar tract neurons during fictive motor actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedirchuk, Brent; Stecina, Katinka; Kristensen, Kasper Kyhl

    2013-01-01

    (without phasic afferent feedback). In this study, we compared the activity of DSCT and VSCT neurons during fictive rhythmic motor behaviors. We used decerebrate cat preparations in which fictive motor tasks can be evoked while the animal is paralyzed and there is no rhythmic sensory input from hindlimb......Neurons of the dorsal spinocerebellar tracts (DSCT) have been described to be rhythmically active during walking on a treadmill in decerebrate cats, but this activity ceased following deafferentation of the hindlimb. This observation supported the hypothesis that DSCT neurons primarily relay...... the activity of hindlimb afferents during locomotion, but lack input from the spinal central pattern generator. The ventral spinocerebellar tract (VSCT) neurons, on the other hand, were found to be active during actual locomotion (on a treadmill) even after deafferentation, as well as during fictive locomotion...

  13. Multiple roles for NaV1.9 in the activation of visceral afferents by noxious inflammatory, mechanical, and human disease–derived stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockley, James R.F.; Boundouki, George; Cibert-Goton, Vincent; McGuire, Cian; Yip, Ping K.; Chan, Christopher; Tranter, Michael; Wood, John N.; Nassar, Mohammed A.; Blackshaw, L. Ashley; Aziz, Qasim; Michael, Gregory J.; Baker, Mark D.; Winchester, Wendy J.; Knowles, Charles H.; Bulmer, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic visceral pain affects millions of individuals worldwide and remains poorly understood, with current therapeutic options constrained by gastrointestinal adverse effects. Visceral pain is strongly associated with inflammation and distension of the gut. Here we report that the voltage-gated sodium channel subtype NaV1.9 is expressed in half of gut-projecting rodent dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons. We show that NaV1.9 is required for normal mechanosensation, for direct excitation and for sensitization of mouse colonic afferents by mediators from inflammatory bowel disease tissues, and by noxious inflammatory mediators individually. Excitatory responses to ATP or PGE2 were substantially reduced in NaV1.9−/− mice. Deletion of NaV1.9 substantially attenuates excitation and subsequent mechanical hypersensitivity after application of inflammatory soup (IS) (bradykinin, ATP, histamine, PGE2, and 5HT) to visceral nociceptors located in the serosa and mesentery. Responses to mechanical stimulation of mesenteric afferents were also reduced by loss of NaV1.9, and there was a rightward shift in stimulus–response function to ramp colonic distension. By contrast, responses to rapid, high-intensity phasic distension of the colon are initially unaffected; however, run-down of responses to repeat phasic distension were exacerbated in NaV1.9−/− afferents. Finally colonic afferent activation by supernatants derived from inflamed human tissue was greatly reduced in NaV1.9−/− mice. These results demonstrate that NaV1.9 is required for persistence of responses to intense mechanical stimulation, contributes to inflammatory mechanical hypersensitivity, and is essential for activation by noxious inflammatory mediators, including those from diseased human bowel. These observations indicate that NaV1.9 represents a high-value target for development of visceral analgesics. PMID:24972070

  14. Multiple roles for NaV1.9 in the activation of visceral afferents by noxious inflammatory, mechanical, and human disease-derived stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockley, James R F; Boundouki, George; Cibert-Goton, Vincent; McGuire, Cian; Yip, Ping K; Chan, Christopher; Tranter, Michael; Wood, John N; Nassar, Mohammed A; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Aziz, Qasim; Michael, Gregory J; Baker, Mark D; Winchester, Wendy J; Knowles, Charles H; Bulmer, David C

    2014-10-01

    Chronic visceral pain affects millions of individuals worldwide and remains poorly understood, with current therapeutic options constrained by gastrointestinal adverse effects. Visceral pain is strongly associated with inflammation and distension of the gut. Here we report that the voltage-gated sodium channel subtype NaV1.9 is expressed in half of gut-projecting rodent dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons. We show that NaV1.9 is required for normal mechanosensation, for direct excitation and for sensitization of mouse colonic afferents by mediators from inflammatory bowel disease tissues, and by noxious inflammatory mediators individually. Excitatory responses to ATP or PGE2 were substantially reduced in NaV1.9(-/-) mice. Deletion of NaV1.9 substantially attenuates excitation and subsequent mechanical hypersensitivity after application of inflammatory soup (IS) (bradykinin, ATP, histamine, PGE2, and 5HT) to visceral nociceptors located in the serosa and mesentery. Responses to mechanical stimulation of mesenteric afferents were also reduced by loss of NaV1.9, and there was a rightward shift in stimulus-response function to ramp colonic distension. By contrast, responses to rapid, high-intensity phasic distension of the colon are initially unaffected; however, run-down of responses to repeat phasic distension were exacerbated in NaV1.9(-/-) afferents. Finally colonic afferent activation by supernatants derived from inflamed human tissue was greatly reduced in NaV1.9(-/-) mice. These results demonstrate that NaV1.9 is required for persistence of responses to intense mechanical stimulation, contributes to inflammatory mechanical hypersensitivity, and is essential for activation by noxious inflammatory mediators, including those from diseased human bowel. These observations indicate that NaV1.9 represents a high-value target for development of visceral analgesics. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of a calcitonin gene-related peptide-binding L-RNA aptamer on neuronal activity in the rat spinal trigeminal nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Michael J. M.; Schmidt, Jakob; Koulchitsky, Stanislav; Klussmann, Sven; Vater, Axel; Messlinger, Karl

    2018-01-01

    Background Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays a major role in the pathogenesis of migraine and other primary headaches. Spinal trigeminal neurons integrate nociceptive afferent input from trigeminal tissues including intracranial afferents, and their activity is thought to reflect facial pain and headache in man. CGRP receptor inhibitors and anti-CGRP antibodies have been demonstrated to be therapeutically effective in migraine. In parallel, CGRP receptor inhibition has been shown t...

  16. Differential Activation of Medullary Vagal Nuclei Caused by Stimulation of Different Esophageal Mechanoreceptors

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Ivan M.; Medda, Bidyut K.; Shaker, Reza

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal mechanorecptors, i.e. muscular slowly adapting tension receptors and mucosal rapidly adapting touch receptors, mediate different sets of reflexes. The aim of this study was to determine the medullary vagal nuclei involved in the reflex responses to activation of these receptors. Thirty-three cats were anesthetized with alpha-chloralose and the esophagus was stimulated by slow balloon or rapid air distension. The physiological effects of the stimuli (N=4) were identified by recordin...

  17. Vagal denervation inhibits the increase in pulmonary blood flow during partial lung aeration at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Justin A R; Pearson, James T; Binder-Heschl, Corinna; Wallace, Megan J; Siew, Melissa L; Kitchen, Marcus J; Te Pas, Arjan B; Lewis, Robert A; Polglase, Graeme R; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Hooper, Stuart B

    2017-03-01

    Lung aeration at birth significantly increases pulmonary blood flow, which is unrelated to increased oxygenation or other spatial relationships that match ventilation to perfusion. Using simultaneous X-ray imaging and angiography in near-term rabbits, we investigated the relative contributions of the vagus nerve and oxygenation to the increase in pulmonary blood flow at birth. Vagal denervation inhibited the global increase in pulmonary blood flow induced by partial lung aeration, although high inspired oxygen concentrations can partially mitigate this effect. The results of the present study indicate that a vagal reflex may mediate a rapid global increase in pulmonary blood flow in response to partial lung aeration. Air entry into the lungs at birth triggers major cardiovascular changes, including a large increase in pulmonary blood flow (PBF) that is not spatially related to regional lung aeration. To investigate the possible underlying role of a vagally-mediated stimulus, we used simultaneous phase-contrast X-ray imaging and angiography in near-term (30 days of gestation) vagotomized (n = 15) or sham-operated (n = 15) rabbit kittens. Rabbits were imaged before ventilation, when one lung was ventilated (unilateral) with 100% nitrogen (N2 ), air or 100% oxygen (O2 ), and after all kittens were switched to unilateral ventilation in air and then ventilation of both lungs using air. Compared to control kittens, vagotomized kittens had little or no increase in PBF in both lungs following unilateral ventilation when ventilation occurred with 100% N2 or with air. However, relative PBF did increase in vagotomized animals ventilated with 100% O2 , indicating the independent stimulatory effects of local oxygen concentration and autonomic innervation on the changes in PBF at birth. These findings demonstrate that vagal denervation inhibits the previously observed increase in PBF with partial lung aeration, although high inspired oxygen concentrations can partially

  18. Working Memory Load Under Anxiety: Quadratic Relations to Cardiac Vagal Control and Inhibition of Distractor Interference

    OpenAIRE

    Spangler, Derek P

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety is marked by impaired inhibition of distraction (Eysenck et al., 2007). It is unclear whether these impairments are reduced or exacerbated when loading working memory (WM) with non-affective information. Cardiac vagal control has been related to emotion regulation and may serve as a proxy for load-related inhibition under anxiety (Thayer and Lane, 2009). The present study examined whether: (1) the enhancing and impairing effects of load on inhibition exist together in a nonlinear func...

  19. Effect of nicotine on the pelvic afferent nerve activity and bladder pressure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontani, Hitoshi; Okamura, Takashi; Kimura, Satoko; Ishida, Kazuumi; Takeno, Satoshi

    2009-08-01

    To record afferent nerve activity and bladder pressure in anesthetized male rats and to investigate whether increased afferent nerve activity induced by nicotine is able to evoke reflex bladder contractions. Using continuous infusion cystometrography, bladder pressure was measured via a bladder cannula. Afferent activity was recorded in the uncut L6 dorsal root. Nicotine was injected intra-arterially through a cannula placed near the bifurcation of the internal iliac artery a few minutes after micturition. Nicotine (0.15-1.5 micromol) evoked a marked elevation of afferent discharge without a simultaneous increase in bladder pressure. Bladder contractions appeared about 43 and 19 s after bolus injection of nicotine at 0.45 and 1.5 micromol, respectively. Firing rates of afferent nerves were reduced when the contraction appeared. Continuous infusion of nicotine at 0.75 micromol/min for 20 min evoked marked elevation of afferent discharge, which was maintained during infusion of nicotine and after it had been withdrawn. Repetitive contractions were observed thereafter and disappeared when the L6 dorsal roots were bilaterally resected. A transient increase in afferent discharges induced by bolus injection of nicotine was unable to evoke reflex bladder contraction. Repetitive bladder contractions after withdrawal of continuous nicotine infusion were induced in a reflex manner by the increased afferent activity.

  20. Total Reconstruction of the Afferent Loop for Treatment of Radiation-Induced Afferent Loop Obstruction with Segmental Involvement after Pancreaticoduodenectomy with Roux-en-Y Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Blouhos

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available As the literature on afferent loop obstruction (ALO after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD is very limited, standardized rules for its management do not exist. Herein, we report the case of a 65-year-old male patient with chronic ALO who had undergone PD with single Roux-en-Y limb reconstruction and adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for pancreatic head adenocarcinoma 2 years earlier. The patient was brought to the operating room with the diagnosis of radiation enteritis of the afferent loop with segmental involvement and concurrent hepaticojejunostomy (HJ and pancreaticojejunostomy (PJ stricture. Complete mobilization of the afferent loop, removal of the affected segment and reconstruction were performed. Reconstruction of the afferent loop was a one-way option for the surgeons because the Roux-en-Y reconstruction limited endoscopic access to the afferent loop, and the segmental radiation injury of the afferent loop ruled out bypass surgery. However, mobilization of the affected segment through a field of dense adhesions and revision of the HJ and PJ were technically demanding.

  1. Vagal sensory evoked potentials disappear under the neuromuscular block - an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutzow, Bianca; Lange, Jörn; Gibb, Andreas; Schroeder, Henry; Nowak, Andreas; Wendt, Michael; Usichenko, Taras I

    2013-09-01

    Transcutaneous vagal nerve stimulation is a promising treatment modality in patients suffering mood disorders and chronic pain, however, the mechanisms are still to be elucidated. A recently developed technique of EEG responses to electrical stimulation of the inner side of the tragus suggests that these responses are far field potentials, generated in the vagal system - Vagal Sensory Evoked Potentials (VSEP). To reproduce the VSEP technique free from myogenic artifacts. Fourteen ASA I-II patients scheduled for elective surgery in standardized Total Intravenous Anesthesia (TIVA) were enrolled. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation was applied to the inner side of the right tragus. Averaged EEG responses were recorded from the electrode positions C4-F4 and T4-O2 before and after induction of TIVA, during the maximal effect of the non-depolarizing muscle relaxing agent, cis-atracurium (C-AR) and after recovery from C-AR under TIVA. Typical response curves with P1, N1 and P2 peaks could be reproduced in all patients before and after anesthesia induction. The response curves disappeared during the C-AR action and re-appeared after recovery from C-AR under TIVA. The disappearance of the scalp responses to electrical tragus stimulation under the neuromuscular block suggests a muscular origin of these potentials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Heart rate variability predicts levels of inflammatory markers: Evidence for the vagal anti-inflammatory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Timothy M; McKinley, Paula S; Seeman, Teresa E; Choo, Tse-Hwei; Lee, Seonjoo; Sloan, Richard P

    2015-10-01

    Evidence from numerous animal models shows that vagal activity regulates inflammatory responses by decreasing cytokine release. Heart rate variability (HRV) is a reliable index of cardiac vagal regulation and should be inversely related to levels of inflammatory markers. Inflammation is also regulated by sympathetic inputs, but only one previous paper controlled for this. In a larger and more representative sample, we sought to replicate those results and examine potential sex differences in the relationship between HRV and inflammatory markers. Using data from the MIDUS II study, we analyzed the relationship between 6 inflammatory markers and both HF-HRV and LF-HRV. After controlling for sympathetic effects measured by urinary norepinephrine as well as a host of other factors, LF-HRV was found to be inversely associated with fibrinogen, CRP and IL-6, while HF-HRV was inversely associated with fibrinogen and CRP. We did not observe consistent sex differences. These results support the existence of the vagal anti-inflammatory pathway and suggest that it has similar effects in men and women. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Vagal Paraganglioma Presenting as a Neck Mass Associated with Cough on Palpation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Heyes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old female presented with a neck mass and sporadic dry cough, often leading to fits of coughing severe enough to cause vomiting. The patient reported that touching the mass triggered the cough. On examination, a 2.5 cm right-sided level two neck mass deep to the sternocleidomastoid was present. Palpation of the mass immediately triggered coughing. Cross-sectional imaging proposed vagal paraganglioma as the chief differential, which was confirmed following surgical excision. The patient reported complete resolution of her severe dry cough after surgery. Vagal paragangliomas are rare neuroendocrine tumors arising from the neural crest-derived paraganglionic tissue surrounding the vagus nerve, typically presenting as a neck mass associated with hoarseness or pulsatile tinnitus. To the best of our knowledge this is a unique description in the English literature. This case is presented to aid physicians should they encounter a neck mass associated with cough. Vagal paraganglioma, although rare, should be part of the differential in such a presentation.

  4. Successful removal and reimplant of vagal nerve stimulator device after 10 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Giulioni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of implanted vagal nerve stimulators is growing and the need for removal or revision of the devices will become even more frequent. A significant concern about Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS therapy is the presence of the spiral stimulating electrodes, wrapped around the nerve, once treatment is considered ineffective or is no longer desired. Our purpose is to demonstrate the feasibility of complete removal and replacement of the vagal nerve stimulator electrodes using microsurgical technique even after a long period, without damaging the nerve. We attempted removal and replacement of spiral stimulating electrodes from a patient who received a 10-year long VNS therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy. Our results indicate that the spiral electrodes may be safely removed from the vagus nerve, even after several years. The reversibility of lead implantation may enhance the attractiveness of VNS therapy. Furthermore, with a correct microsurgical technique, it is possible to respect the normal anatomy and functionality of vagal nerve and to reimplant a new VNS system with all its components, maintaining the same therapeutic efficacy after many years.

  5. Responses to Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid of Rat Visual Cortical Neurons in Tissue Slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    abdominal stretch receptor neuron in crayfish. Factor I was later identified as GABA (Bazemore et al., 1957). The next breakthrough came in 1958, when...Kuffler and Edwards found that GABA mimicked the effects of afferent stimulation of the crayfish stretch receptor neuron, and suggested that GABA...GABAergic efferents arising from the corpus striatum. GABA has also been linked to Parkinson’s disease, olivo-vestibular disorders, and spasticity

  6. Cardiac vagal tone, a non-invasive measure of parasympathetic tone, is a clinically relevant tool in Type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, C; Jessen, N. C.; Brock, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    in people with Type 1 diabetes than in a matched healthy cohort and lower still in people with established neuropathy. METHODS: Cardiac vagal tone is a validated cardiometrically derived index of parasympathetic tone. It is measured using a standard three-lead electrocardiogram which connects, via Bluetooth......, to a smartphone application. A 5-min resting recording of cardiac vagal tone was undertaken and observational comparisons were made between 42 people with Type 1 diabetes and peripheral neuropathy and 23 without peripheral neuropathy and 65 healthy people. In those with neuropathy, 24-h heart rate variability...... values were compared with cardiac vagal tone. Correlations between cardiac vagal tone and clinical variables were also made. RESULTS: Cardiac vagal tone was lower in people with established neuropathy and Type 1 diabetes in comparison with healthy participants [median (interquartile range) linear vagal...

  7. Functional recovery of anterior semicircular canal afferents following hair cell regeneration in birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Richard; Highstein, Stephen M.; Carey, John P.; Xu, Jinping

    2002-01-01

    Streptomycin sulfate (1.2 g/kg i.m.) was administered for 5 consecutive days to 5-7-day-old white Leghorn chicks; this causes damage to semicircular canal hair cells that ultimately regenerate to reform the sensory epithelium. During the recovery period, electrophysiological recordings were taken sequentially from anterior semicircular canal primary afferents using an indentation stimulus of the canal that has been shown to mimic rotational stimulation. Chicks were assigned to an early (14-18 days; n = 8), intermediate (28-34 days; n = 5), and late (38-58 days; n = 4) period based on days after treatment. Seven untreated chicks, 15-67 days old, provided control data. An absence of background and indent-induced discharge was the prominent feature of afferents in the early period: only "silent" afferents were encountered in 5/8 experiments. In several of these chicks, fascicles of afferent fibers were seen extending up to the epithelium that was void of hair cells, and intra- and extracellular biocytin labeling revealed afferent processes penetrating into the supporting cell layer of the crista. In 3/8 chicks 74 afferents could be characterized, and they significantly differed from controls (n = 130) by having a lower discharge rate and a negligible response to canal stimulation. In the intermediate period there was considerable variability in discharge properties of 121 afferents, but as a whole the number of "silent" fibers in the canal nerve diminished, the background rate increased, and a response to canal stimulation detected. Individually biocytin-labeled afferents had normal-appearing terminal specializations in the sensory epithelium by 28 days poststreptomycin. In the late period, afferents (n = 58) remained significantly different from controls in background discharge properties and response gain. The evidence suggests that a considerable amount of variability exists between chicks in the return of vestibular afferent function following ototoxic injury and

  8. Plateau-generating neurones in the dorsal horn in an in vitro preparation of the turtle spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, R E; Hounsgaard, J

    1996-01-01

    1. In transverse slices of the spinal cord of the turtle, intracellular recordings were used to characterize and analyse the responses to injected current and activation of primary afferents in dorsal horn neurones. 2. A subpopulation of neurones, with cell bodies located laterally in the deep do....... The sAHP was mediated by both apamin and tetraethylammonium (TEA)-sensitive K+ channels. 7. Our findings suggest that basic properties of sensory integration may reside with the specialized intrinsic response properties of particular subtypes of neurones in the dorsal horn.......1. In transverse slices of the spinal cord of the turtle, intracellular recordings were used to characterize and analyse the responses to injected current and activation of primary afferents in dorsal horn neurones. 2. A subpopulation of neurones, with cell bodies located laterally in the deep...

  9. Heart failure induces changes in acid-sensing ion channels in sensory neurons innervating skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, David D; Kutschke, William J; Weiss, Robert M; Benson, Christopher J

    2015-10-15

    Heart failure is associated with diminished exercise capacity, which is driven, in part, by alterations in exercise-induced autonomic reflexes triggered by skeletal muscle sensory neurons (afferents). These overactive reflexes may also contribute to the chronic state of sympathetic excitation, which is a major contributor to the morbidity and mortality of heart failure. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are highly expressed in muscle afferents where they sense metabolic changes associated with ischaemia and exercise, and contribute to the metabolic component of these reflexes. Therefore, we tested if ASICs within muscle afferents are altered in heart failure. We used whole-cell patch clamp to study the electrophysiological properties of acid-evoked currents in isolated, labelled muscle afferent neurons from control and heart failure (induced by myocardial infarction) mice. We found that the percentage of muscle afferents that displayed ASIC-like currents, the current amplitudes, and the pH dose-response relationships were not altered in mice with heart failure. On the other hand, the biophysical properties of ASIC-like currents were significantly different in a subpopulation of cells (40%) from heart failure mice. This population displayed diminished pH sensitivity, altered desensitization kinetics, and very fast recovery from desensitization. These unique properties define these channels within this subpopulation of muscle afferents as being heteromeric channels composed of ASIC2a and -3 subunits. Heart failure induced a shift in the subunit composition of ASICs within muscle afferents, which significantly altered their pH sensing characteristics. These results might, in part, contribute to the changes in exercise-mediated reflexes that are associated with heart failure. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  10. CELIOMESENTERIC AFFERENCE OF THE DORSOLUMBAR NEUROMERS IN HORSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARMEN BERGHES

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The frequent variability of the splanchnic branches in all species creates difficulties both in carrying out physiological experiments and, particularly, in some specifications concerning the neuroglandular relations in the mesenteric area in horses. A total of 32 dissections were conducted on fresh, non-mummified corpses and were accompanied by comparative evaluations. The nervous formations were tracked up to the limit of visibility with the magnifying glass of 15 dioptres. To make possible the differentiation of the nervous fibres, the arteries were injected with a red dye. The ganglion formations were investigated with histological methods of differentiation. The dissection also revealed that the efferent fibres which approach the celiomesenteric plexus do not belong, as thought, only to the large and small splanchnic, but also to the lumbar splanchnic nerves which were regarded as being small accessory splanchnic nerves. According to these wrong data, the renosuprarenal plexus would only include abdominal splanchnic afferences and not also lumbar splanchnic afferences, as it actually happens. Speaking of horses, the data reveal the existence of peculiarities regarding the dorsolumbar efferences of the celiomesenteric plexus which detach in most cases from the interganglionar connectives and not directly from the paravertebral ganglia. Another observation is related to the existence of the renal nerves (one or two small fibres, nerves which detach from the abdominal splanchnic nerves which, crossing over the lateral side of the suprarenal gland seem to link it to the kidneys. The existence of postrenal nervous loops might provide evidence, if not on the ontogeny, at least on the way of postembryonic migration of this organ.

  11. Distribution of voltage-gated potassium and hyperpolarization-activated channels in sensory afferent fibers in the rat carotid body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buniel, Maria; Glazebrook, Patricia A; Ramirez-Navarro, Angelina; Kunze, Diana L

    2008-10-01

    The chemosensory glomus cells of the carotid body (CB) detect changes in O2 tension. Carotid sinus nerve fibers, which originate from peripheral sensory neurons located within the petrosal ganglion, innervate the CB. Release of transmitter from glomus cells activates the sensory afferent fibers to transmit information to the nucleus of the solitary tract in the brainstem. The ion channels expressed within the sensory nerve terminals play an essential role in the ability of the terminal to initiate action potentials in response to transmitter-evoked depolarization. However, with a few exceptions, the identity of ion channels expressed in these peripheral nerve fibers is unknown. This study addresses the expression of voltage-gated channels in the sensory fibers with a focus on channels that set the resting membrane potential and regulate discharge patterns. By using immunohistochemistry and fluorescence confocal microscopy, potassium channel subunits and HCN (hyperpolarization-activated) family members were localized both in petrosal neurons that expressed tyrosine hydroxylase and in the CSN axons within the carotid body. Channels contributing to resting membrane potential, including HCN2 responsible in part for I(h) current and the KCNQ2 and KCNQ5 subunits thought to underlie the neuronal "M current," were identified in the sensory neurons and their axons innervating the carotid body. In addition, the results presented here demonstrate expression of several potassium channels that shape the action potential and the frequency of discharge, including Kv1.4, Kv1.5, Kv4.3, and K(Ca) (BK). The role of these channels should be considered in interpretation of the fiber discharge in response to perturbation of the carotid body environment.

  12. Spontaneous Contractions Evoke Afferent Nerve Firing in Mouse Bladders With Detrusor Overactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Carly J.; Zabbarova, Irina V.; Brumovsky, Pablo R.; Roppolo, James R.; Gebhart, Gerald F.; Kanai, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Afferent nerve firing has been linked to spontaneous bladder contractions in a number of lower urinary tract pathologies and it may lead to urgency and incontinence. Using optical mapping, single unit recording and tension measurements we investigated the correlation between afferent nerve firing and spontaneous bladder contractions in spinal cord transected mice. Materials and Methods Bladder-nerve preparations (bladder sheets and the associated L6-S2 pelvic nerves) were dissected from normal and spinal cord transected mice showing overactivity on cystometry and opened along the ventral aspect from base to dome. Bladder sheets were mounted horizontally in a temperature regulated chamber to simultaneously record Ca2+ transients across the mucosal surface, single unit afferent nerve firing and whole bladder tension. Results Single unit afferent fibers were identified by probing their receptive fields. Fibers showed a graded response to von Frey stimulation and a frequency of afferent firing that increased as a function of the degree of stretch. Optical maps of Ca2+ transients in control bladders demonstrated multiple initiation sites that resulted in high frequency, low amplitude spontaneous contractions. Alternatively in maps of the bladders of spinal cord transected mice Ca2+ transients arose from 1 or 2 focal sites, resulting in low frequency, high amplitude contractions and concomitant afferent firing. Conclusions Large amplitude, spontaneous bladder contractions evoke afferent nerve activity, which may contribute to incontinence. PMID:19157431

  13. Noisy Neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Nerves are fibres that conduct electrical signals and hence pass on information from and to the brain. Nerves are made of nerve cells called neurons (Figure 1). Instructions in our body are sent via electrical signals that present themselves as variations in the potential across neuronal membranes. These potential differences ...

  14. Motor Neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2017-01-01

    Motor neurons translate synaptic input from widely distributed premotor networks into patterns of action potentials that orchestrate motor unit force and motor behavior. Intercalated between the CNS and muscles, motor neurons add to and adjust the final motor command. The identity and functional...

  15. Tau pathology spread in PS19 tau transgenic mice following locus coeruleus (LC) injections of synthetic tau fibrils is determined by the LC's afferent and efferent connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iba, Michiyo; McBride, Jennifer D; Guo, Jing L; Zhang, Bin; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2015-09-01

    Filamentous tau inclusions are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative tauopathies. An increasing number of studies implicate the cell-to-cell propagation of tau pathology in the progression of tauopathies. We recently showed (Iba et al., J Neurosci 33:1024-1037, 2013) that inoculation of preformed synthetic tau fibrils (tau PFFs) into the hippocampus of young transgenic (Tg) mice (PS19) overexpressing human P301S mutant tau induced robust tau pathology in anatomically connected brain regions including the locus coeruleus (LC). Since Braak and colleagues hypothesized that the LC is the first brain structure to develop tau lesions and since LC has widespread connections throughout the CNS, LC neurons could be the critical initiators of the stereotypical spreading of tau pathology through connectome-dependent transmission of pathological tau in AD. Here, we report that injections of tau PFFs into the LC of PS19 mice induced propagation of tau pathology to major afferents and efferents of the LC. Notably, tau pathology propagated along LC efferent projections was localized not only to axon terminals but also to neuronal perikarya, suggesting transneuronal transfer of templated tau pathology to neurons receiving LC projections. Further, brainstem neurons giving rise to major LC afferents also developed perikaryal tau pathology. Surprisingly, while tangle-bearing neurons degenerated in the LC ipsilateral to the injection site starting 6 months post-injection, no neuron loss was seen in the contralateral LC wherein tangle-bearing neurons gradually cleared tau pathology by 6-12 months post-injection. However, the spreading pattern of tau pathology observed in our LC-injected mice is different from that in AD brains since hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, which are affected in early stages of AD, were largely spared of tau inclusions in our model. Thus, while our study tested critical aspects of the Braak hypothesis of tau pathology spread

  16. Relationship between vagal tone, cortisol, TNF-alpha, epinephrine and negative affects in Crohn's disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

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    Sonia Pellissier

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease (CD and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS involve brain-gut dysfunctions where vagus nerve is an important component. The aim of this work was to study the association between vagal tone and markers of stress and inflammation in patients with CD or IBS compared to healthy subjects (controls. The study was performed in 73 subjects (26 controls, 21 CD in remission and 26 IBS patients. The day prior to the experiment, salivary cortisol was measured at 8:00 AM and 10:00 PM. The day of the experiment, subjects completed questionnaires for anxiety (STAI and depressive symptoms (CES-D. After 30 min of rest, ECG was recorded for heart rate variability (HRV analysis. Plasma cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, TNF-alpha and IL-6 were measured in blood samples taken at the end of ECG recording. Compared with controls, CD and IBS patients had higher scores of state-anxiety and depressive symptomatology. A subgroup classification based on HRV-normalized high frequency band (HFnu as a marker of vagal tone, showed that control subjects with high vagal tone had significantly lower evening salivary cortisol levels than subjects with low vagal tone. Such an effect was not observed in CD and IBS patients. Moreover, an inverse association (r =  -0.48; p<0.05 was observed between the vagal tone and TNF-alpha level in CD patients exclusively. In contrast, in IBS patients, vagal tone was inversely correlated with plasma epinephrine (r =  -0.39; p<0.05. No relationship was observed between vagal tone and IL-6, norepinephrine or negative affects (anxiety and depressive symptomatology in any group. In conclusion, these data argue for an imbalance between the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and the vagal tone in CD and IBS patients. Furthermore, they highlight the specific homeostatic link between vagal tone and TNF-alpha in CD and epinephrine in IBS and argue for the relevance of vagus nerve reinforcement interventions in those diseases.

  17. Memory formation orchestrates the wiring of adult-born hippocampal neurons into brain circuits.

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    Petsophonsakul, Petnoi; Richetin, Kevin; Andraini, Trinovita; Roybon, Laurent; Rampon, Claire

    2017-08-01

    During memory formation, structural rearrangements of dendritic spines provide a mean to durably modulate synaptic connectivity within neuronal networks. New neurons generated throughout the adult life in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus contribute to learning and memory. As these neurons become incorporated into the network, they generate huge numbers of new connections that modify hippocampal circuitry and functioning. However, it is yet unclear as to how the dynamic process of memory formation influences their synaptic integration into neuronal circuits. New memories are established according to a multistep process during which new information is first acquired and then consolidated to form a stable memory trace. Upon recall, memory is transiently destabilized and vulnerable to modification. Using contextual fear conditioning, we found that learning was associated with an acceleration of dendritic spines formation of adult-born neurons, and that spine connectivity becomes strengthened after memory consolidation. Moreover, we observed that afferent connectivity onto adult-born neurons is enhanced after memory retrieval, while extinction training induces a change of spine shapes. Together, these findings reveal that the neuronal activity supporting memory processes strongly influences the structural dendritic integration of adult-born neurons into pre-existing neuronal circuits. Such change of afferent connectivity is likely to impact the overall wiring of hippocampal network, and consequently, to regulate hippocampal function.

  18. Percutaneous jejunostomy through the liver parenchyma for palliation of afferent loop syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jae Hyun; Han, Yoon Hee

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of afferent loop syndrome, jejunostomy or Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy have tended to represent the preferred procedures. In patients who are not good candidates for surgery, palliative treatment-i.e., percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or percutaneous direct transperitoneal jejunostomy techniques-have been applied. Transhepatic biliary drainage confers a risk of ascending cholangitis. Direct percutaneous transperitoneal drainage may be impractical when overlying bowel loops prevent access to deeply located afferent loops. In the present case, percutaneous jejunostomy through the liver parenchyma was performed successfully for palliation of afferent loop syndrome.

  19. Vagal Tone and Children's Delay of Gratification: Differential Sensitivity in Resource-Poor and Resource-Rich Environments.

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    Sturge-Apple, Melissa L; Suor, Jennifer H; Davies, Patrick T; Cicchetti, Dante; Skibo, Michael A; Rogosch, Fred A

    2016-06-01

    Children from different socioeconomic backgrounds have differing abilities to delay gratification, and impoverished children have the greatest difficulties in doing so. In the present study, we examined the role of vagal tone in predicting the ability to delay gratification in both resource-rich and resource-poor environments. We derived hypotheses from evolutionary models of children's conditional adaptation to proximal rearing contexts. In Study 1, we tested whether elevated vagal tone was associated with shorter delay of gratification in impoverished children. In Study 2, we compared the relative role of vagal tone across two groups of children, one that had experienced greater impoverishment and one that was relatively middle-class. Results indicated that in resource-rich environments, higher vagal tone was associated with longer delay of gratification. In contrast, high vagal tone in children living in resource-poor environments was associated with reduced delay of gratification. We interpret the results with an eye to evolutionary-developmental models of the function of children's stress-response system and adaptive behavior across varying contexts of economic risk. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Vagal Tone and Children’s Delay of Gratification: Differential Sensitivity Across Resource Poor and Resource Rich Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturge-Apple, Melissa L.; Suor, Jennifer H.; Davies, Patrick T.; Cicchetti, Dante; Skibo, Michael A.; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2016-01-01

    Socioeconomic disparities in children’s delay of gratification exist, with impoverished children displaying greater difficulties in this developmental domain. The present paper examined the role of vagal tone in predicting the ability to delay gratification across resource rich and resource poor environments. Embedding hypotheses within evolutionary models of children’s conditional adaptation to proximal rearing contexts, Study 1 tested whether elevated vagal tone was associated with lower delay of gratification within impoverished children. Study 2 compared the relative role of vagal tone across two groups of children, one which experienced greater impoverishment and one which was relatively middle-class. Results indicated that within resource rich environments, high vagal tone was associated with greater delay of gratification. In contrast, high vagal tone in children living within resource poor environments was associated with reduced delay of gratification. The results are interpreted within evolutionary-developmental models of children’s stress response system functioning and adaptive behavior across varying contexts of economic risk. PMID:27117276

  1. Mothers’ Responses to Children’s Negative Emotions and Child Emotion Regulation: The Moderating Role of Vagal Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Nicole B.; Calkins, Susan D.; Nelson, Jackie A.; Leerkes, Esther M.; Marcovitch, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the moderating effect of children’s cardiac vagal suppression on the association between maternal socialization of negative emotions (supportive and non-supportive responses) and children’s emotion regulation behaviors. One hundred and ninety-seven 4-year-olds and their mothers participated. Mothers reported on their reactions to children’s negative emotions and children’s regulatory behaviors. Observed distraction, an adaptive self-regulatory strategy, and vagal suppression were assessed during a laboratory task designed to elicit frustration. Results indicated that children’s vagal suppression moderated the association between mothers’ non-supportive emotion socialization and children’s emotion regulation behaviors such that non-supportive reactions to negative emotions predicted lower observed distraction and lower reported emotion regulation behaviors when children displayed lower levels of vagal suppression. No interaction was found between supportive maternal emotion socialization and vagal suppression for children’s emotion regulation behaviors. Results suggest physiological regulation may serve as a buffer against non-supportive emotion socialization. PMID:22072217

  2. Assessment of the potential role of muscle spindle mechanoreceptor afferents in chronic muscle pain in the rat masseter muscle.

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    James P Lund

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The phenotype of large diameter sensory afferent neurons changes in several models of neuropathic pain. We asked if similar changes also occur in "functional" pain syndromes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Acidic saline (AS, pH 4.0 injections into the masseter muscle were used to induce persistent myalgia. Controls received saline at pH 7.2. Nocifensive responses of Experimental rats to applications of Von Frey Filaments to the masseters were above control levels 1-38 days post-injection. This effect was bilateral. Expression of c-Fos in the Trigeminal Mesencephalic Nucleus (NVmes, which contains the somata of masseter muscle spindle afferents (MSA, was above baseline levels 1 and 4 days after AS. The resting membrane potentials of neurons exposed to AS (n = 167 were hyperpolarized when compared to their control counterparts (n = 141, as were their thresholds for firing, high frequency membrane oscillations (HFMO, bursting, inward and outward rectification. The amplitude of HFMO was increased and spontaneous ectopic firing occurred in 10% of acid-exposed neurons, but never in Controls. These changes appeared within the same time frame as the observed nocifensive behaviour. Ectopic action potentials can travel centrally, but also antidromically to the peripheral terminals of MSA where they could cause neurotransmitter release and activation of adjacent fibre terminals. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that annulospiral endings of masseter MSA express the glutamate vesicular transporter VGLUT1, indicating that they can release glutamate. Many capsules also contained fine fibers that were labelled by markers associated with nociceptors (calcitonin gene-related peptide, Substance P, P2X3 receptors and TRPV1 receptors and that expressed the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR5. Antagonists of glutamatergic receptors given together with the 2(nd injection of AS prevented the hypersensitivity observed bilaterally but were

  3. Relation Between the Frequency of Short-Pulse Electrical Stimulation of Afferent Nerve Fibers and Evoked Muscle Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dideriksen, Jakob; Leerskov, Kasper; Czyzewska, Magdalena; Rasmussen, Rune

    Objective: Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is conventionally performed by the stimulation of motor axons causing the muscle fibers innervated by these axons to contract. An alternative strategy that may evoke contractions with more natural motor unit behavior is to stimulate afferent fibers (primarily type Ia) to excite the motor neurons at the spinal level. The aim of the study was to investigate the range of forces that can be evoked in this way and the degree to which the torque can be controlled. Methods: We stimulated the tibial nerve of ten healthy participants at amplitudes at which the highest H-reflex with minimal M-wave was present. The evoked plantar flexion torque was recorded following short stimulation pulses (0.4 ms) with frequencies ranging from 20 to 200 Hz. Results: Across all subjects, the median highest evocable torque was 38.3% (quartiles: 16.9-51.0) of the maximum voluntary contraction torque (MVC). The average torque variability (standard deviation) was 1.7 +/- 0.7% MVC. For most subjects, the relation between stimulation frequency and evoked torque was well characterized by sigmoidal curves (median root mean square error: 6.4% MVC). The plateau of this sigmoid curve (indicating the range of frequencies over which torque amplitude could be modulated) was reached at 56.0 (quartiles: 29.4-81.9) Hz. Conclusion: Using the proposed method for FES, substantial evoked torques that could be controlled by stimulation frequency were achieved. Significance: Stimulation of afferent fibers could be a useful and fatigue-resistant strategy for several applications of FES.Objective: Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is conventionally performed by the stimulation of motor axons causing the muscle fibers innervated by these axons to contract. An alternative strategy that may evoke contractions with more natural motor unit behavior is to stimulate afferent fibers (primarily type Ia) to excite the motor neurons at the spinal level. The aim of the

  4. Sustained morphine-induced sensitization and loss of diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNIC) in dura-sensitive medullary dorsal horn neurons

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    Okada-Ogawa, Akiko; Porreca, Frank; Meng, Ian D.

    2009-01-01

    Overuse of medications used to treat migraine headache can produce a chronic daily headache, termed medication overuse headache (MOH). Although “overuse” of opioids, triptans, and over-the-counter analgesics can all produce MOH, the neuronal mechanisms remain unknown. Headache pain is likely to be produced by stimulation of primary afferent neurons that innervate the intracranial vasculature and the resulting activation of medullary dorsal horn (MDH) neurons. The present study compared the re...

  5. Neuronal gagging activity patterns may be generated by neurons in the reticular area dorsomedial to the retrofacial nucleus in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, H; Koga, T

    1997-03-01

    Expulsion is induced when hypercapnea and hypoxia develop during retching, or when the oropharyngeal mucosa is irritated (the gag reflex). The central pattern generator (CPG) for expulsion has been suggested to coexist with the CPG for retching in the reticular area dorsomedial to the retrofacial nucleus, which may correspond to the Botzinger complex (BOT). However, its participation in gagging induced by oropharyngeal irritation is unclear. To elucidate such participation, the firing patterns of BOT neurons were observed during gagging induced by stimulation of superior laryngeal afferents in decerebrate, paralyzed dogs. Only 23% of inspiratory and 34% of expiratory BOT neurons increased their firing in response to stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve. In contrast, 75% of nonrespiratory BOT neurons showed enhanced firing with this stimulation. During gagging, each nonrespiratory, inspiratory, and expiratory BOT neuron fired with the same pattern that they exhibited during expulsion caused by changes in blood gases. These firing patterns could be classified into five types and are thought to be appropriate for generating neuronal gagging activity. These results suggest that the CPG for expulsion in the BOT produces gagging when it is activated by oropharyngolaryngeal afferents.

  6. Afferent projections to the mammillary complex of the rat, with special reference to those from surrounding hypothalamic regions

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    Gonzalo-Ruiz, A.; Alonso, A.; Sanz, J. M.; Llinas, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    To better understand the functional organization of the mammillary nuclei, we investigated the afferents to this nuclear complex in the rat with iontophoretically injected wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase. Particular attention was paid to tracing local hypothalamic afferents to these nuclei. Injections into the medial mammillary nucleus (MMN) revealed strong projections from the subicular region, and weaker projections from the prefrontal cortex, medial septum, and the nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca. Other descending subcortical projections to the MMN arise from the anterior and the lateral hypothalamic area, the medial preoptic area, and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Ascending afferents to the MMN were found to originate in the raphe and various tegmental nuclei. Following all injections into the MMN, labelled neurons were found in nuclei surrounding the mammillary body. The lateral and posterior subdivisions of the tuberomammillary nucleus projected mainly to the pars medianus and pars medialis of the MMN. The dorsal and ventral premammillary nuclei projected to the pars lateralis of the MMN. The supramammillary nucleus at rostral level had a small projection to the pars medialis and lateralis of the MMN. However, the most obvious projection from this nucleus was to the pars posterior of the MMN, chiefly from the lateral part of the caudal supramammillary nucleus. Injections into the lateral mammillary nucleus revealed inputs from the presubiculum, parasubiculum, septal region, dorsal tegmental nucleus, dorsal raphe nucleus, and periaqueductal gray. In addition, the lateral mammillary nucleus was found to receive a moderate projection from the medial part of the supramammillary nucleus and stronger projections from the lateral part of the caudal supramammillary nucleus. A very light projection was also seen from the lateral and posterior subdivisions of the tuberomammillary nucleus. These findings add to our knowledge

  7. Sensitization of dural afferents underlies migraine-related behavior following meningeal application of interleukin-6 (IL-6

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    Yan Jin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migraine headache is one of the most common neurological disorders, but the pathophysiology contributing to migraine is poorly understood. Intracranial interleukin-6 (IL-6 levels have been shown to be elevated during migraine attacks, suggesting that this cytokine may facilitate pain signaling from the meninges and contribute to the development of headache. Methods Cutaneous allodynia was measured in rats following stimulation of the dura with IL-6 alone or in combination with the MEK inhibitor, U0126. The number of action potentials and latency to the first action potential peak in response to a ramp current stimulus as well as current threshold were measured in retrogradely-labeled dural afferents using patch-clamp electrophysiology. These recordings were performed in the presence of IL-6 alone or in combination with U0126. Association between ERK1 and Nav1.7 following IL-6 treatment was also measured by co-immunoprecipitation. Results Here we report that in awake animals, direct application of IL-6 to the dura produced dose-dependent facial and hindpaw allodynia. The MEK inhibitor U0126 blocked IL-6-induced allodynia indicating that IL-6 produced this behavioral effect through the MAP kinase pathway. In trigeminal neurons retrogradely labeled from the dura, IL-6 application decreased the current threshold for action potential firing. In response to a ramp current stimulus, cells treated with IL-6 showed an increase in the numbers of action potentials and a decrease in latency to the first spike, an effect consistent with phosphorylation of the sodium channel Nav1.7. Pretreatment with U0126 reversed hyperexcitability following IL-6 treatment. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated an increased association between ERK1 and Nav1.7 following IL-6 treatment. Conclusions Our results indicate that IL-6 enhances the excitability of dural afferents likely via ERK-mediated modulation of Nav1.7 and these responses

  8. Miniature EPSPs and sensory encoding in the primary afferents of the vestibular lagena of the toadfish, Opsanus tau.

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    Locke, R; Vautrin, J; Highstein, S

    1999-05-28

    The synaptic activity transmitted from vestibular hair cells of the lagena to primary afferent neurons was recorded in vitro using sharp, intracellular microelectrodes. At rest, the activity was composed of miniature excitatory postsynaptic potentials (mEPSPs) at frequencies from 5 to 20/s and action potentials (APs) at frequencies betwen 0 and 10/s. mEPSPs recorded from a single fiber displayed a large variability. For mEPSPs not triggering APs, amplitudes exhibited an average coefficient of variance (CV) of 0.323 and rise times an average CV of 0.516. APs were only triggered by mEPSPs with larger amplitudes (estimated 4-6 mV) and/or steeper maximum rate of rise (10.9 mV/ms, +/- 3.7 SD, n=4 experiments) compared to (3.50 mV/ms, +/-0.07 SD, n=6 experiments) for nontriggering mEPSPs. The smallest mEPSPs showed a fast rise time (0.99 ms between 10% and 90% of peak amplitude) and limited variability across fibers (CV:0.18) confirming that they were not attenuated signals, but rather represented single-transmitter discharges (TDs). The mEPSP amplitude and rise-time relationship suggests that many mEPSPs represented several, rather than a single pulse of secretion of TDs. According to the estimated overall TD frequency, the coincidence of TDs contributing to the same mEPSP were not statistically independent, indicating a positive interaction between TDs that is reminiscent of the way subminiature signals group to form miniature signals at the neuromuscular junction. Depending on the duration and intensity of efferent stimulation, a complete block of AP initiation occurred either immediately or after a delay of a few seconds. Efferent stimulation did not significantly change AP threshold level, but abruptly decreased mEPSP frequency to a near-complete block that followed the block of APs. Maximum mEPSP rate of rise decreased during, and recovered progressively after, efferent stimulation. After termination of efferent stimulation, mEPSP amplitude did not recover

  9. Central projections of antennular chemosensory and mechanosensory afferents in the brain of the terrestrial hermit crab (Coenobita clypeatus; Coenobitidae, Anomura)

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    Tuchina, Oksana; Koczan, Stefan; Harzsch, Steffen; Rybak, Jürgen; Wolff, Gabriella; Strausfeld, Nicholas J.; Hansson, Bill S.

    2015-01-01

    The Coenobitidae (Decapoda, Anomura, Paguroidea) is a taxon of hermit crabs that includes two genera with a fully terrestrial life style as adults. Previous studies have shown that Coenobitidae have evolved a sense of spatial odor localization that is behaviorally highly relevant. Here, we examined the central olfactory pathway of these animals by analyzing central projections of the antennular nerve of Coenobita clypeatus, combining backfilling of the nerve with dextran-coupled dye, Golgi impregnations and three-dimensional reconstruction of the primary olfactory center, the antennular lobe. The principal pattern of putative olfactory sensory afferents in C. clypeatus is in many aspects similar to what have been established for aquatic decapod crustaceans, such as the spiny lobster Panulirus argus. However, there are also obvious differences that may, or may not represent adaptations related to a terrestrial lifestyle. In C. clypeatus, the antennular lobe dominates the deutocerebrum, having more than one thousand allantoid-shaped subunits. We observed two distinct patterns of sensory neuron innervation: putative olfactory afferents from the aesthetascs either supply the cap/subcap region of the subunits or they extend through its full depth. Our data also demonstrate that any one sensory axon can supply input to several subunits. Putative chemosensory (non-aesthetasc) and mechanosensory axons represent a different pathway and innervate the lateral and median antennular neuropils. Hence, we suggest that the chemosensory input in C. clypeatus might be represented via a dual pathway: aesthetascs target the antennular lobe, and bimodal sensilla target the lateral antennular neuropil and median antennular neuropil. The present data is compared to related findings in other decapod crustaceans. PMID:26236202

  10. Central projections of antennular chemosensory and mechanosensory afferents in the brain of the terrestrial hermit crab (Coenobita clypeatus; Coenobitidae, Anomura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana eTuchina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Coenobitidae (Decapoda, Anomura, Paguroidea is a taxon of hermit crabs that includes two genera with a fully terrestrial life style as adults. Previous studies have shown that Coenobitidae have evolved a sense of spatial odor localization that is behaviorally highly relevant. Here, we examined the central olfactory pathway of these animals by analyzing central projections of the antennular nerve of Coenobita clypeatus, combining backfilling of the nerve with dextran-coupled dye, Golgi impregnations and three-dimensional reconstruction of the primary olfactory center, the antennular lobe. The principal pattern of putative olfactory sensory afferents in C. clypeatus is in many aspects similar to what have been established for aquatic decapod crustaceans, such as the spiny lobster Panulirus argus. However, there are also obvious differences that may, or may not represent adaptations related to a terrestrial lifestyle. In C. clypeatus, the antennular lobe dominates the deutocerebrum, having more than one thousand allantoid-shaped subunits. We observed two distinct patterns of sensory neuron innervation: putative olfactory afferents from the aesthetascs either supply the cap/subcap region of the subunits or they extend through its full depth. Our data also demonstrate that any one sensory axon can supply input to several subunits. Putative chemosensory (non-aesthetasc and mechanosensory axons represent a different pathway and innervate the lateral and median antennular neuropils. Hence, we suggest that the chemosensory input in C. clypeatus might be represented via a dual pathway: aesthetascs target the antennular lobe, and bimodal sensilla target the lateral antennular neuropil and median antennular neuropil. The present data is compared to related findings in other decapod crustaceans.

  11. Artemisia santolinifolia enhances glutamatergic neurotransmission in the nucleus of the solitary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Katie M; Ribnicky, David M; Rogers, Richard C; Hermann, Gerlinda E

    2014-10-17

    Artemisia extracts have been used as remedies for a variety of maladies related to metabolic and gastrointestinal control. Because the vagal afferent-nucleus of the solitary tract (NST) synapse regulates the same homeostatic functions affected by Artemisia, it is possible that these extracts may have activity at the synaptic level in the NST. Therefore, we evaluated how extracts of three common medicinal Artemisia species, Artemisia santolinifolia (SANT), Artemisia scoparia (SCO), and Artemisia dracunculus L (PMI-5011), modulate the excitability of the glutamatergic vagal afferent-NST synapse. Our in vitro live cell calcium imaging data from prelabeled vagal afferent terminals show that SANT extract is a positive modulator of vagal afferent calcium levels, as the extract significantly increased the calcium signal relative to the time control. Neither SCO nor PMI-5011 extract altered the vagal calcium signals compared to the time control. Furthermore, whole cell voltage-clamp recordings from NST neurons corroborated the vagal terminal calcium data in that SANT extract also significantly increased miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) frequency in NST neurons. These data suggest that SANT extract could be a pharmacologically significant mediator of glutamatergic neurotransmission within the CNS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Paclitaxel-induced increase in NCX activity in subpopulations of nociceptive afferents: A protective mechanism against chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Eser; Gold, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    We recently demonstrated, in a rat model of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), that there is a significant decrease in the duration of the depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transient in isolated somata of putative nociceptive afferents innervating the glabrous skin of the hindpaw, but no change in transient magnitude or the resting concentration of intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i). Because the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) only contributes to the regulation of the duration of the evoked Ca(2+) transient, in putative nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, we hypothesized that an increase in NCX activity underlies the CIPN-induced change in this subpopulation of neurons. Acutely dissociated retrogradely labeled sensory neurons from naïve, vehicle-, and paclitaxel-treated rats were studied with fura-2 based Ca(2+) imaging. There was no difference in the relative level of NCX activity between glabrous neurons from paclitaxel-treated or control rats. However, in contrast to the relatively large and long lasting Ca(2+) transients needed to evoke NCX activity in neurons from naïve rats, there was evidence of resting NCX activity in glabrous neurons from both vehicle- and paclitaxel-treated rats. More interestingly, there was a paclitaxel-induced increase in NCX activity in putative nociceptive neurons innervating the thigh, neurons in which there is no evidence of a change in the depolarization-induced Ca(2+) transient, or a body site in which there was a change in nociceptive threshold. Furthermore, while the majority of NCX activity in glabrous neurons is sensitive to the NCX3-preferring blocker KB-R7943, the increase in NCX activity in thigh neurons was resistant to KB-R7943 but sensitive to the NCX1-preferring blocker SEA0400. These results suggest that a mechanism(s) other than NCX underlies the paclitaxel-induced decrease in the duration of the evoked Ca(2+) transient in putative nociceptive glabrous skin neurons. However, the compensatory

  13. Differential Activation of Medullary Vagal Nuclei Caused by Stimulation of Different Esophageal Mechanoreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Ivan M.; Medda, Bidyut K.; Shaker, Reza

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal mechanorecptors, i.e. muscular slowly adapting tension receptors and mucosal rapidly adapting touch receptors, mediate different sets of reflexes. The aim of this study was to determine the medullary vagal nuclei involved in the reflex responses to activation of these receptors. Thirty-three cats were anesthetized with alpha-chloralose and the esophagus was stimulated by slow balloon or rapid air distension. The physiological effects of the stimuli (N=4) were identified by recording responses from the pharyngeal, laryngeal, and hyoid muscles, esophagus, and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). The effects on the medullary vagal nuclei of the stimuli: slow distension (N=10), rapid distension (N=9), and in control animals (N=10) were identified using the immunohistochemical analysis of c-fos. The experimental groups were stimulated 3 times per minute for 3 hours. After the experiment, the brains were removed and processed for c-fos immunoreactivity or thioinin. We found that slow balloon distension activated the esophago-UES contractile reflex and esophago LES relaxation response, and rapid air injection activated the belch and its component reflexes. Slow balloon distension activated the NTSce, NTSdl, NTSvl, DMNc, DMNr and NAr; and rapid air injection primarily activated AP, NTScd, NTSim, NTSis, NTSdm, NTSvl, NAc and NAr. We concluded that different sets of medullary vagal nuclei mediate different reflexes of the esophagus activated from different sets of mechanoreceptors. The NTScd is the primary NTS subnucleus mediating reflexes from the mucosal rapidly adapting touch receptors, and the NTSce is the primary NTS subnucleus mediating reflexes from the muscular slowly adapting tension receptors. The AP may be involved in mediation of belching. PMID:20971087

  14. Non-intubated thoracoscopic surgery using internal intercostal nerve block, vagal block and targeted sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ming-Hui; Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Chan, Kuang-Cheng; Chen, Ke-Cheng; Yie, Jr-Chi; Cheng, Ya-Jung; Chen, Jin-Shing

    2014-10-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery using internal intercostal nerve block, vagal block and targeted sedation without endotracheal intubation is a promising technique for selected patients, but little is known about its feasibility and safety. We evaluated 109 patients with lung (105), mediastinal (3) or pleural (1) tumours treated using non-intubated thoracoscopic surgery. Internal, intercostal nerve block was performed at the T3-T8 intercostal level and vagal block was performed adjacent to the vagus nerve at the level of the lower trachea for right-sided operations and at the level of the aortopulmonary window for left-sided operations. Sedation was performed with propofol infusion to achieve a bispectral index value between 40 and 60. Thoracoscopic lobectomy was performed in 43 patients, wedge resection in 50, segmentectomy in 12 and mediastinal or pleural tumour excision in 4. Three patients (2.8%) required conversion to intubated one-lung ventilation because of vigorous mediastinal movement and dense diaphragmatic adhesions. Anaesthetic induction and operation had a median duration of 10.0 and 127.0 min, respectively. Operative complications developed in 13 patients with air leaks for more than 3 days and 1 patient required transfusion of blood products. The median postoperative chest drainage and hospital stay were 2.0 and 4.0 days, respectively. Non-intubated thoracoscopic surgery using internal intercostal nerve block, vagal block and targeted sedation is technically feasible and safe in surgical treatment of lung, mediastinal and pleural tumours in selected patients. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  15. Swimming training increases cardiac vagal activity and induces cardiac hypertrophy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Medeiros

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of swimming training (ST on vagal and sympathetic cardiac effects was investigated in sedentary (S, N = 12 and trained (T, N = 12 male Wistar rats (200-220 g. ST consisted of 60-min swimming sessions 5 days/week for 8 weeks, with a 5% body weight load attached to the tail. The effect of the autonomic nervous system in generating training-induced resting bradycardia (RB was examined indirectly after cardiac muscarinic and adrenergic receptor blockade. Cardiac hypertrophy was evaluated by cardiac weight and myocyte morphometry. Plasma catecholamine concentrations and citrate synthase activity in soleus muscle were also determined in both groups. Resting heart rate was significantly reduced in T rats (355 ± 16 vs 330 ± 20 bpm. RB was associated with a significantly increased cardiac vagal effect in T rats (103 ± 25 vs 158 ± 40 bpm, since the sympathetic cardiac effect and intrinsic heart rate were similar for the two groups. Likewise, no significant difference was observed for plasma catecholamine concentrations between S and T rats. In T rats, left ventricle weight (13% and myocyte dimension (21% were significantly increased, suggesting cardiac hypertrophy. Skeletal muscle citrate synthase activity was significantly increased by 52% in T rats, indicating endurance conditioning. These data suggest that RB induced by ST is mainly mediated parasympathetically and differs from other training modes, like running, that seems to mainly decrease intrinsic heart rate in rats. The increased cardiac vagal activity associated with ST is of clinical relevance, since both are related to increased life expectancy and prevention of cardiac events.

  16. [Protection and functional repair of vagus nerve during the operation of cervical vagal paraganglioma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Chen, Zhe; Wu, Ruiqing; Zhang, Wenyan; Lu, Changli

    2012-08-01

    To explore the clinical anatomy and the methods to protect or reconstruct the continuity and function of vagus nerve during the operation of cervical vagal paraganglioma. Six cases of vagal paraganglioma were reviewed. All tumors were identified to wrap the cervical vagus nerve stem and excised during surgery. The operative modality was to trace the vagus nerve stem inside the tumor as far as possible, to reconstruct the continuity by way of vagus nerve anastomosis (3/6) or alternatively, other motor nerve transplantation (3/6). Postoperative treatment included steroid, neurotrophic medication and voice and swallowing rehabilitation. Two cases of the recurrent paraganglioma experienced aspiration during swallowing preoperatively and no aspiration after surgery. Choking was gradually reduced in four recurrent cases half to one year postoperatively. Hoarseness was improved in five cases (5/6) half to one year postoperatively, while one case remained prolonged obvious hoarseness. Three months postoperatively, the vocal cord fibrillation at the tumor-related side was observed during pronunciation in the end-to-end anastomosis cases (3/6), sublingual nerve-transplanted case (1/6) and deep cervical nerve-transplanted cases (1/6) under fiberoptic laryngoscope, and the mobility was even more obvious at the time of half an year postoperatively. While in another deep cervical nerve-transplanted case (1/6), the vocal cord demonstrated no obvious fibrillation. To carefully identify and preserve the vagus nerve fibers as much as possible during the operation of cervical vagal paraganglioma could significantly eliminate postoperative hoarseness and aspiration. End-to-end anastomosis, deep cervical nerve or sublingual nerve transplantation to resume the continuity of vagus nerve may improve the mobility of vocal cord thus the quality of voice and swallowing.

  17. Vagal reactivation after exercise and cardiac autonomic nervous activity in adult Fontan patients without pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eser, Prisca; Herzig, David; Vogt, Marcel; Stämpfli, Roger; Trovato, Moreno; Olstad, Daniela Schäfer; Trachsel, Lukas; Deluigi, Christina; Wustmann, Kerstin; Greutmann, Matthias; Tobler, Daniel; Stambach, Dominik; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Schwerzmann, Markus; Wilhelm, Matthias

    2016-10-01

    Patients with Fontan circulation have reduced heart rate variability (HRV) in supine position. However, neither cardiac autonomic nervous activity (CANA) in response to orthostatic challenge nor vagal reactivation by means of heart rate (HR) recovery after cessation of exercise have previously been investigated in Fontan patients. The aim of this study was to compare HRV in supine and standing position, as well as HR recovery between Fontan patients and healthy controls. Eight Fontan patients (4 male/4 female) without pacemakers and 12 healthy volunteers (5m/7f) with minimum age of 18years were recruited. HR was measured by Holter-electrocardiogram. HRV was measured in supine position and after orthostatic challenge. The power of the high frequency (HF: 0.15Hz-0.4Hz) and low frequency (LF: 0.04Hz-0.15Hz) bands was analysed by fast-Fourier transformation. HR recovery was determined at 30s and 60s after termination of a maximal exercise test. In both supine and standing position, total power, HF and LF power were reduced in Fontan patients compared to controls (by approximately a factor of 10) while there was no differences in LF/HF power ratio. Response to orthostatic challenge was blunted in absolute power but normal in relative power. HR recovery was not different between groups. Fontan patients have greatly reduced HRV, a blood-pressure dependent marker of CANA, but normal HR recovery, a blood pressure independent marker of vagal reactivation, suggesting that vagal activity may be normal, and only vascular capacitance reduced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Is the afferent auditory message modulated by the cortex?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lavernhe-Lemaire, M C; Robier, A

    1997-12-01

    An eventual modulation of the afferent auditory message by the cortex is the subject of this study. To test this hypothesis, clicks (10 Hz, 100 microseconds) of white noise of 40 and 70 dB Hl were sent alternatively into the ears of normally hearing volunteers, while the brainstem evoked potentials were recorded. The subjects were asked to focus or relax their attention on one or other ear. Thirty subjects aged less than 25 years (15 men and 15 women) with normal hearing level, were split into two groups. The first group was asked to focus first on the more strongly stimulated ear (70 dB), the second group on the more weakly stimulated one (40 dB). Each subject received (1) without any instruction about attention: 40 dB on the left ear (L), 70 dB on the right ear (R); 40 dB then 70 dB bilateral; (2) 2 runs with 40 dB on the L and 70 dB on the R focussing on the most or less strongly stimulated ear; (3) a run without instruction with 70 dB on the L and 40 dB on the R, and (4) two runs with 70 dB on the L and 40 dB on the R focussing enough on the more or less strongly stimulated ear. On the evoked potentials simultaneously recorded, amplitudes and latencies of the pikes were measured and compared. From these experiments, the following elements were obtained. (1) The measured potentials were always caused by ipsilateral stimuli. (2) Focussing on left or right ear was not equivalent. (3) A gender difference appeared in the brainstem auditory responses. (4) Preferential attention paid to the left ear was more efficient than to the right one. (5) Attention can alter the whole nervous pathway with considerable lengthening of O-I, O-III, O-V, III-V, I-V but not I-III latencies. The III wave amplitude generally decreased on the side where attention was focussed while V waves seemed not to vary. These first results indicate that a cortico-efferent pathway stimulated by the attention plays a role in the auditory responses modifying the afferent message. These effects were

  19. Soluble Tau has devastating effects on the structural plasticity of hippocampal granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolós, M; Pallas-Bazarra, N; Terreros-Roncal, J; Perea, J R; Jurado-Arjona, J; Ávila, J; Llorens-Martín, M

    2017-12-08

    Tau is a neuronal microtubule-associated protein with countless physiological functions. Although the detrimental effects of insoluble aggregated Tau have been widely studied, recent evidence supports the notion that soluble Tau (composed mostly of monomers and dimers) is also toxic for neurons. Here we evaluated the long-term impact of a single stereotaxic injection of human soluble Tau on hippocampal granule neurons in mice. At the ultrastructural level, soluble Tau reduced the number of afferent synapses and caused a dramatic depletion of synaptic vesicles both in afferent and efferent synapses. Furthermore, the use of an RFP-expressing retrovirus revealed that soluble Tau altered the morphology of newborn granule neurons and reduced their afferent (dendritic spines) and efferent (mossy fiber terminals) connectivity. Finally, soluble Tau caused specific impairment of behavioral pattern separation capacity. Our results thus demonstrate for the first time that soluble Tau causes long-term detrimental effects on the morphology and connectivity of newborn granule neurons and that these effects correlate with impaired behavioral pattern separation skills. These data might be relevant for the field of neurodegenerative disorders, since they contribute to reinforcing the pathological roles played by distinct Tau species in vivo.

  20. Vagal enhancement linking abnormal blood pressure response and subendocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Tatsuya; Sugihara, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    An abnormal blood pressure response to exercise has been reported to be associated with left ventricular subendocardial ischemia in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We report a case of HCM with an abnormal blood pressure response and subendocardial ischemia, in which the analysis of heart rate variability revealed exercise-induced vagal enhancement. The present case highlights the possible mechanism linking abnormal blood pressure response and left ventricular subendocardial ischemia in patients with HCM. ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, Infection, Prone Sleep Position, and Vagal Neuroimmunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Nathan Goldwater

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings suggest that infection (and sepsis stand alone as the only plausible mechanism of causation of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS and accordingly achieves congruence with all clinicopathological and epidemiological findings. This review examines the role of infection in the pathogenesis of SIDS in the context of the major risk factor of prone sleep position. The study explores how sleep position could interact with the immune system and inflammatory response via vagal neural connections, which could play key roles in gut and immune homeostasis. A plausible and congruent clinicopathological and epidemiological paradigm is suggested.

  2. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, Infection, Prone Sleep Position, and Vagal Neuroimmunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwater, Paul Nathan

    2017-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that infection (and sepsis) stand alone as the only plausible mechanism of causation of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and accordingly achieves congruence with all clinicopathological and epidemiological findings. This review examines the role of infection in the pathogenesis of SIDS in the context of the major risk factor of prone sleep position. The study explores how sleep position could interact with the immune system and inflammatory response via vagal neural connections, which could play key roles in gut and immune homeostasis. A plausible and congruent clinicopathological and epidemiological paradigm is suggested.

  3. The effect of vagal nerve blockade using electrical impulses on glucose metabolism in nondiabetic subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathananthan M

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Matheni Sathananthan,1 Sayeed Ikramuddin,2 James M Swain,3,6 Meera Shah,1 Francesca Piccinini,4 Chiara Dalla Man,4 Claudio Cobelli,4 Robert A Rizza,1 Michael Camilleri,5 Adrian Vella1 1Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Division of General Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 3Division of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA; 4Department of Information Engineering, University of Padua, Padua, Italy; 5Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA; 6Scottsdale Healthcare Bariatric Center, Scottsdale, AZ, USA Purpose: Vagal interruption causes weight loss in humans and decreases endogenous glucose production in animals. However, it is unknown if this is due to a direct effect on glucose metabolism. We sought to determine if vagal blockade using electrical impulses alters glucose metabolism in humans. Patients and methods: We utilized a randomized, cross-over study design where participants were studied after 2 weeks of activation or inactivation of vagal nerve blockade (VNB. Seven obese subjects with impaired fasting glucose previously enrolled in a long-term study to examine the effect of VNB on weight took part. We used a standardized triple-tracer mixed meal to enable measurement of the rate of meal appearance, endogenous glucose production, and glucose disappearance. The 550 kcal meal was also labeled with 111In-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA to measure gastrointestinal transit. Insulin action and ß-cell responsivity indices were estimated using the minimal model. Results: Integrated glucose, insulin, and glucagon concentrations did not differ between study days. This was also reflected in a lack of effect on β-cell responsivity and insulin action. Furthermore, fasting and postprandial endogenous glucose production, integrated meal appearance, and glucose

  4. Three-dimensional distribution of sensory stimulation-evoked neuronal activity of spinal dorsal horn neurons analyzed by in vivo calcium imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Nishida

    Full Text Available The spinal dorsal horn comprises heterogeneous populations of interneurons and projection neurons, which form neuronal circuits crucial for processing of primary sensory information. Although electrophysiological analyses have uncovered sensory stimulation-evoked neuronal activity of various spinal dorsal horn neurons, monitoring these activities from large ensembles of neurons is needed to obtain a comprehensive view of the spinal dorsal horn circuitry. In the present study, we established in vivo calcium imaging of multiple spinal dorsal horn neurons by using a two-photon microscope and extracted three-dimensional neuronal activity maps of these neurons in response to cutaneous sensory stimulation. For calcium imaging, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET-based calcium indicator protein, Yellow Cameleon, which is insensitive to motion artifacts of living animals was introduced into spinal dorsal horn neurons by in utero electroporation. In vivo calcium imaging following pinch, brush, and heat stimulation suggests that laminar distribution of sensory stimulation-evoked neuronal activity in the spinal dorsal horn largely corresponds to that of primary afferent inputs. In addition, cutaneous pinch stimulation elicited activities of neurons in the spinal cord at least until 2 spinal segments away from the central projection field of primary sensory neurons responsible for the stimulated skin point. These results provide a clue to understand neuronal processing of sensory information in the spinal dorsal horn.

  5. Three-dimensional distribution of sensory stimulation-evoked neuronal activity of spinal dorsal horn neurons analyzed by in vivo calcium imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Kazuhiko; Matsumura, Shinji; Taniguchi, Wataru; Uta, Daisuke; Furue, Hidemasa; Ito, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    The spinal dorsal horn comprises heterogeneous populations of interneurons and projection neurons, which form neuronal circuits crucial for processing of primary sensory information. Although electrophysiological analyses have uncovered sensory stimulation-evoked neuronal activity of various spinal dorsal horn neurons, monitoring these activities from large ensembles of neurons is needed to obtain a comprehensive view of the spinal dorsal horn circuitry. In the present study, we established in vivo calcium imaging of multiple spinal dorsal horn neurons by using a two-photon microscope and extracted three-dimensional neuronal activity maps of these neurons in response to cutaneous sensory stimulation. For calcium imaging, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based calcium indicator protein, Yellow Cameleon, which is insensitive to motion artifacts of living animals was introduced into spinal dorsal horn neurons by in utero electroporation. In vivo calcium imaging following pinch, brush, and heat stimulation suggests that laminar distribution of sensory stimulation-evoked neuronal activity in the spinal dorsal horn largely corresponds to that of primary afferent inputs. In addition, cutaneous pinch stimulation elicited activities of neurons in the spinal cord at least until 2 spinal segments away from the central projection field of primary sensory neurons responsible for the stimulated skin point. These results provide a clue to understand neuronal processing of sensory information in the spinal dorsal horn.

  6. Pancreaticojejuno-jejunostomy during reconstruction of the afferent loop in surgery of radiation-induced afferent loop obstruction following pancreaticoduodenectomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouhos, Konstantinos; Boulas, Konstantinos A; Tsiomita, Evridiki; Papageorgiou, Irene; Ioannidis, Konstantinos; Hatzigeorgiadis, Anestis

    2014-03-01

    Radiation-induced afferent loop obstruction is a rare complication following pancreaticoduodenectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. As in the setting of Roux-en-Y reconstruction endoscopic approaches are limited, surgery of this complication becomes inevitable. This study provides a new classification/management system of the radiation-induced obstruction of the afferent loop based on the extent and location of radiation injury, and describes the Pancreaticojejuno-jejunostomy, a novel technique to avoid revision of the pancreatic anastomosis during reconstruction of the afferent loop. Data were analyzed from nine patients who developed radiation-induced afferent loop obstruction after pancreaticoduodenectomy with single Roux limb reconstruction. One patient had type I obstruction and treated with by-pass surgery, seven patients had type II obstruction and treated with reconstruction including revision of the hepaticojejunostomy and Pancreaticojejuno-jejunostomy, and one patient had type III obstruction and treated with reconstruction including revision of the hepaticojejunostomy and the pancreatic anastomosis. Reconstruction along with Pancreaticojejuno-jejunostomy performed in six patients with type II radiation-induced afferent loop obstruction; reconstruction was not feasible for one patient. The median operative time was 149 min. No intraoperative complication was observed. By performing Pancreaticojejuno-jejunostomy we managed efficiently to convert a pancreatic anastomosis to an enteric anastomosis as one case of Grade B pancreatic fistula and no case of Pancreaticojejuno-jejunostomy stricture were observed, regarding short- and long-term results, respectively. The above technique may have a useful application in the surgical management of the radiation-induced afferent loop obstruction when endoscopy fails and by-pass surgery is inappropriate.

  7. Afferent-mediated modulation of the soleus muscle activity during the stance phase of human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazarena, Mazzaro; Grey, Michael James; do Nascimento, Omar Feix

    2006-01-01

    -mediated contribution from muscle group II afferents, cutaneous and proprioceptive afferents from the foot, and load-sensitive afferents to the soleus EMG. Slow-velocity, small-amplitude ankle trajectory modifications were combined with the pharmaceutical depression of group II polysynaptic pathways with tizanidine......The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of proprioceptive feedback to the amplitude modulation of the soleus muscle activity during human walking. We have previously shown that slow-velocity, small-amplitude ankle dorsiflexion enhancements and reductions applied during the stance...... hydrochloride, anaesthetic blocking of sensory information from the foot with injections of lidocaine hydrochloride, and modulation of load feedback by increasing and decreasing the body load. The depression of the group II afferents significantly reduced the soleus response to the ankle trajectory...

  8. Influence of Connexin40 on the renal myogenic response in murine afferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings; Sørensen, Charlotte Mehlin

    2015-01-01

    Renal autoregulation consists of two main mechanisms; the myogenic response and the tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism (TGF). Increases in renal perfusion pressure activate both mechanisms causing a reduction in diameter of the afferent arteriole (AA) resulting in stabilization of the glomerular...

  9. Paraventricular nucleus is involved in the central pathway of cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ming-Kui Zhong; Yang-Can Duan; Ai-Dong Chen; Bo Xu; Xing-Ya Gao; Wei De; Guo-Qing Zhu

    2008-01-01

    ...) modulate the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex (CSAR). The present study was designed to demonstrate more conclusively that the PVN is an important component of the central neurocircuitry of the CSAR...

  10. Input–Output Functions of Vestibular Afferent Responses to Air-Conducted Clicks in Rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhu, Hong; Tang, Xuehui; Wei, Wei; Maklad, Adel; Mustain, William; Rabbitt, Richard; Highstein, Steve; Allison, Jerome; Zhou, Wu

    2014-01-01

    ...) have proven useful in clinical assessment of vestibular function. VEMPs are commonly interpreted as a test of saccular function, based on neurophysiological evidence showing activation of saccular afferents by intense acoustic click stimuli...

  11. Organization of diencephalic and brainstem afferent projections to the lateral septum in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, Paul G.M.; Kuipers, Folkert; Schuitmaker, Hans

    1982-01-01

    Ascending diencephalic and brainstem afferents to the lateral septal column were studied by retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase following microiontophoretic injections in the various subdivisions of the lateral septal area. Predominantly ispilateral cells, of which several coincide with

  12. Liver afferents contribute to water drinking-induced sympathetic activation in human subjects: a clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    May, M.; Gueler, F.; Barg-Hock, H.; Heiringhoff, K.H.; Engeli, S.; Heusser, K.; Diedrich, A.; Brandt, A.; Strassburg, C.P.; Tank, J.; Sweep, F.C.; Jordan, J.

    2011-01-01

    Water drinking acutely increases sympathetic activity in human subjects. In animals, the response appears to be mediated through transient receptor potential channel TRPV4 activation on osmosensitive hepatic spinal afferents, described as osmopressor response. We hypothesized that hepatic

  13. Activation and inhibition of the micturition reflex by penile afferents in the cat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    John P. Woock; Paul B. Yoo; Warren M. Grill

    2008-01-01

    .... We quantified the effects on the micturition reflex of sensory inputs from genital afferents traveling in the penile component of the somatic pudendal nerve by electrical stimulation of the dorsal nerve of the penis (DNP) in α...

  14. Differential roles of galanin on mechanical and cooling responses at the primary afferent nociceptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulse Richard P

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Galanin is expressed in a small percentage of intact small diameter sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia and in the afferent terminals of the superficial lamina of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. The neuropeptide modulates nociception demonstrating dose-dependent pro- and anti-nociceptive actions in the naïve animal. Galanin also plays an important role in chronic pain, with the anti-nociceptive actions enhanced in rodent neuropathic pain models. In this study we compared the role played by galanin and its receptors in mechanical and cold allodynia by identifying individual rat C-fibre nociceptors and characterising their responses to mechanical or acetone stimulation. Results Mechanically evoked responses in C-fibre nociceptors from naive rats were sensitised after close intra-arterial infusion of galanin or Gal2-11 (a galanin receptor-2/3 agonist confirming previous data that galanin modulates nociception via activation of GalR2. In contrast, the same dose and route of administration of galanin, but not Gal2-11, inhibited acetone and menthol cooling evoked responses, demonstrating that this inhibitory mechanism is not mediated by activation of GalR2. We then used the partial saphenous nerve ligation injury model of neuropathic pain (PSNI and the complete Freund’s adjuvant model of inflammation in the rat and demonstrated that close intra-arterial infusion of galanin, but not Gal2-11, reduced cooling evoked nociceptor activity and cooling allodynia in both paradigms, whilst galanin and Gal2-11 both decreased mechanical activation thresholds. A previously described transgenic mouse line which inducibly over-expresses galanin (Gal-OE after nerve injury was then used to investigate whether manipulating the levels of endogenous galanin also modulates cooling evoked nociceptive behaviours after PSNI. Acetone withdrawal behaviours in naive mice showed no differences between Gal-OE and wildtype (WT mice. 7-days after

  15. Binding of the isolectin I-B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia to the general visceral afferents in the vagus nerve: a light- and electron-microscope study in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Nomura, S; Mizuno, N

    1997-01-24

    Prominent binding to the isolectin I-B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia (I-B4) was observed not only in the terminal area of general somatic afferents (lamina II of the medullary and the spinal dorsal horns), but also in the terminal area of the general visceral afferents (nucleus of the solitary tract, NST). The vast majority of neuronal cell bodies in the nodose ganglion (NG), including those with substance P-like immunoreactivity, also showed the I-B4-binding. After ganglionectomy of the NG, the I-B4-binding in the solitary tract and NST was highly reduced throughout the solitary tract and the NST on the side ipsilateral to the operation. The I-B4-binding was electron microscopically observed in many axon terminals within the NST.

  16. Less Empathic and More Reactive: The Different Impact of Childhood Maltreatment on Facial Mimicry and Vagal Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Ardizzi

    Full Text Available Facial mimicry and vagal regulation represent two crucial physiological responses to others' facial expressions of emotions. Facial mimicry, defined as the automatic, rapid and congruent electromyographic activation to others' facial expressions, is implicated in empathy, emotional reciprocity and emotions recognition. Vagal regulation, quantified by the computation of Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA, exemplifies the autonomic adaptation to contingent social cues. Although it has been demonstrated that childhood maltreatment induces alterations in the processing of the facial expression of emotions, both at an explicit and implicit level, the effects of maltreatment on children's facial mimicry and vagal regulation in response to facial expressions of emotions remain unknown. The purpose of the present study was to fill this gap, involving 24 street-children (maltreated group and 20 age-matched controls (control group. We recorded their spontaneous facial electromyographic activations of corrugator and zygomaticus muscles and RSA responses during the visualization of the facial expressions of anger, fear, joy and sadness. Results demonstrated a different impact of childhood maltreatment on facial mimicry and vagal regulation. Maltreated children did not show the typical positive-negative modulation of corrugator mimicry. Furthermore, when only negative facial expressions were considered, maltreated children demonstrated lower corrugator mimicry than controls. With respect to vagal regulation, whereas maltreated children manifested the expected and functional inverse correlation between RSA value at rest and RSA response to angry facial expressions, controls did not. These results describe an early and divergent functional adaptation to hostile environment of the two investigated physiological mechanisms. On the one side, maltreatment leads to the suppression of the spontaneous facial mimicry normally concurring to empathic understanding of

  17. Computed tomographic features of afferent loop syndrome: pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zissin, R. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Hertz, M. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Tel Aviv (Israel); Paran, H. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Surgery ' A' , Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Osadchy, A. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Gayer, G. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Assaf Harofe Medical Center, Zrifin, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2005-04-15

    This pictorial essay reviews the computed tomography (CT) findings of afferent loop syndrome (ALS) in various pathological conditions to demonstrate the contribution of a common imaging modality-that is, abdominal CT, used nowadays for various abdominal complaints-to the diagnosis of ALS. ALS is caused by obstruction of the duodenum and jejunum proximal to a gastrojejunostomy anastomosis. It is a rare complication after Billroth II subtotal gastrectomy and even more rare after total or subtotal gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction. Although currently advanced medical treatment and endoscopic interventions have dramatically decreased the necessity of surgery for peptic ulcer disease, ALS may appear years after previously common operations. Alternatively, the use of surgical resection for early gastric cancer nowadays leads to an increasing rate of malignancy-related ALS. Clinically, ALS may be difficult to diagnose as its presentation may be vague and nonspecific, but it has a characteristic appearance on CT. Clinicians and radiologists should therefore be familiar with this rare complication. Prompt recognition and correct diagnosis of this syndrome and its probable etiology are important as a guide for treatment. This review illustrates the CT features of ALS in various conditions. (author)

  18. Differential roles of stretch-sensitive pelvic nerve afferents innervating mouse distal colon and rectum

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Bin; Brumovsky, Pablo R.; Gebhart, Gerald F.

    2010-01-01

    Information about colorectal distension (i.e., colorectal dilation by increased intraluminal pressure) is primarily encoded by stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents in the pelvic nerve (PN). Despite anatomic differences between rectum and distal colon, little is known about the functional roles of colonic vs. rectal afferents in the PN pathway or the quantitative nature of mechanosensory encoding. We utilized an in vitro mouse colorectum-PN preparation to investigate pressure-encoding charac...

  19. Activation and inhibition of the micturition reflex by penile afferents in the cat

    OpenAIRE

    Woock, John P; Yoo, Paul B.; Grill, Warren M.

    2008-01-01

    Coordination of the urinary bladder and the external urethral sphincter (EUS) is controlled by descending projections from the pons, and is also subject to modulation by segmental afferents. We quantified the effects on the micturition reflex of sensory inputs from genital afferents, traveling in the penile component of the somatic pudendal nerve, by electrical stimulation of the dorsal nerve of the penis (DNP) in α-chloralose anesthetized male cats. Depending on the frequency of stimulation ...

  20. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Lindsea C.; May, Clive N.; Yao, Song T.

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF. PMID:26483699

  1. An excitatory paraventricular nucleus to AgRP neuron circuit that drives hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krashes, Michael J; Shah, Bhavik P; Madara, Joseph C; Olson, David P; Strochlic, David E; Garfield, Alastair S; Vong, Linh; Pei, Hongjuan; Watabe-Uchida, Mitsuko; Uchida, Naoshige; Liberles, Stephen D; Lowell, Bradford B

    2014-03-13

    Hunger is a hard-wired motivational state essential for survival. Agouti-related peptide (AgRP)-expressing neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) at the base of the hypothalamus are crucial to the control of hunger. They are activated by caloric deficiency and, when naturally or artificially stimulated, they potently induce intense hunger and subsequent food intake. Consistent with their obligatory role in regulating appetite, genetic ablation or chemogenetic inhibition of AgRP neurons decreases feeding. Excitatory input to AgRP neurons is important in caloric-deficiency-induced activation, and is notable for its remarkable degree of caloric-state-dependent synaptic plasticity. Despite the important role of excitatory input, its source(s) has been unknown. Here, through the use of Cre-recombinase-enabled, cell-specific neuron mapping techniques in mice, we have discovered strong excitatory drive that, unexpectedly, emanates from the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, specifically from subsets of neurons expressing thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP, also known as ADCYAP1). Chemogenetic stimulation of these afferent neurons in sated mice markedly activates AgRP neurons and induces intense feeding. Conversely, acute inhibition in mice with caloric-deficiency-induced hunger decreases feeding. Discovery of these afferent neurons capable of triggering hunger advances understanding of how this intense motivational state is regulated.

  2. Evidence of the Primary Afferent Tracts Undergoing Neurodegeneration in Horses With Equine Degenerative Myeloencephalopathy Based on Calretinin Immunohistochemical Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finno, C J; Valberg, S J; Shivers, J; D'Almeida, E; Armién, A G

    2016-01-01

    Equine degenerative myeloencephalopathy (EDM) is characterized by a symmetric general proprioceptive ataxia in young horses, and is likely underdiagnosed for 2 reasons: first, clinical signs overlap those of cervical vertebral compressive myelopathy; second, histologic lesions--including axonal spheroids in specific tracts of the somatosensory and motor systems--may be subtle. The purpose of this study was (1) to utilize immunohistochemical (IHC) markers to trace axons in the spinocuneocerebellar, dorsal column-medial lemniscal, and dorsospinocerebellar tracts in healthy horses and (2) to determine the IHC staining characteristics of the neurons and degenerated axons along the somatosensory tracts in EDM-affected horses. Examination of brain, spinal cord, and nerves was performed on 2 age-matched control horses, 3 EDM-affected horses, and 2 age-matched disease-control horses via IHC for calbindin, vesicular glutamate transporter 2, parvalbumin, calretinin, glutamic acid decarboxylase, and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Primary afferent axons of the spinocuneocerebellar, dorsal column-medial lemniscal, and dorsospinocerebellar tracts were successfully traced with calretinin. Calretinin-positive cell bodies were identified in a subset of neurons in the dorsal root ganglia, suggesting that calretinin IHC could be used to trace axonal projections from these cell bodies. Calretinin-immunoreactive spheroids were present in EDM-affected horses within the nuclei cuneatus medialis, cuneatus lateralis, and thoracicus. Neurons within those nuclei were calretinin negative. Cell bodies of degenerated axons in EDM-affected horses are likely located in the dorsal root ganglia. These findings support the role of sensory axonal degeneration in the pathogenesis of EDM and provide a method to highlight tracts with axonal spheroids to aid in the diagnosis of this neurodegenerative disease. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Synchronous malignant vagal paraganglioma with contralateral carotid body paraganglioma treated by radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devlina Chakarvarty

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Paragangliomas are rare tumors and very few cases of malignant vagal paraganglioma with synchronous carotid body paraganglioma have been reported. We report a case of a 20-year old male who presented with slow growing bilateral neck masses of eight years duration. He had symptoms of dysphagia to solids, occasional mouth breathing and hoarseness of voice. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC performed where he lived showed a sinus histiocytosis and he was administered anti-tubercular treatment for six months without any improvement in his symptoms. His physical examination revealed pulsatile, soft to firm, non-tender swellings over the anterolateral neck confined to the upper-mid jugulo-diagastric region on both sides. Direct laryngoscopy examination revealed a bulge on the posterior pharyngeal wall and another over the right lateral pharyngeal wall. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, 99mTc-labeled octreotide scan and angiography diagnosed the swellings as carotid body paraganglioma, stage III on the right side with left-sided vagal malignant paraganglioma. Surgery was ruled out as a high morbidity with additional risk to life was expected due to the highly vascular nature of the tumor. The patient was treated with radiation therapy by image guided radiation to a dose of 5040cGy in 28 fractions. At a follow-up at 16 months, the tumors have regressed bilaterally and the patient can take solids with ease.

  4. Consequences of capsaicin treatment on pulmonary vagal reflexes and chemoreceptor activity in lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, V; Arsenault, J; Praud, J P

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that capsaicin treatment in lambs selectively inhibits bronchopulmonary C-fiber function but does not alter other vagal pulmonary receptor functions or peripheral and central chemoreceptor functions. Eleven lambs were randomized to receive a subcutaneous injection of either 25 mg/kg capsaicin (6 lambs) or solvent (5 lambs) under general anesthesia. Capsaicin-treated lambs did not demonstrate the classical ventilatory response consistently observed in response to capsaicin bolus intravenous injection in control lambs. Moreover, the ventilatory responses to stimulation of the rapidly adapting pulmonary stretch receptors (intratracheal water instillation) and slowly adapting pulmonary stretch receptors (Hering-Breuer inflation reflex) were similar in both groups of lambs. Finally, the ventilatory responses to various stimuli and depressants of carotid body activity and to central chemoreceptor stimulation (CO(2) rebreathing) were identical in control and capsaicin-treated lambs. We conclude that 25 mg/kg capsaicin treatment in lambs selectively inhibits bronchopulmonary C-fiber function without significantly affecting the other vagal pulmonary receptor functions or that of peripheral and central chemoreceptors.

  5. Alpha-synuclein transgenic mice display age-related slowing of gastrointestinal motility associated with transgene expression in the vagal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorian, Ali Reza; Rha, Jennifer; Annerino, Dana M; Bernhard, Douglas; Taylor, Georgia M; Greene, James G

    2012-10-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction is the one of the most common non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and occurs in nearly every patient afflicted with this common neurodegenerative disorder. While parkinsonian motor symptoms are caused by degeneration of dopamine neurons in the midbrain substantia nigra, the neurological localization of non-motor symptoms in PD is not known. In this study, we examined a transgenic mouse model of PD in which mutant (A53T) human α-synuclein was expressed under control of the prion promoter (AS mice). We found that gastrointestinal expression of human α-synuclein in this transgenic line was limited to efferent fibers projecting from the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMV) to the enteric nervous system (ENS). Older transgenic mice had a lower density of human α-synuclein expression in the GI tract, suggesting an age-related disruption of efferent vagal fibers in this model. At the same time, mice developed age-related declines in stool frequency and gastric emptying consistent with those seen in human PD. These behavioral and neuropathological patterns parallel those seen in PD patients and suggest the DMV as a target for further investigation into causes for GI neuropathology and symptomatology in parkinsonism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The binding of botulinum neurotoxins to different peripheral neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, O

    2017-10-16

    Botulinum neurotoxins are the most potent toxins known. The double receptor binding modality represents one of the most significant properties of botulinum neurotoxins and largely accounts for their incredible potency and lethality. Despite the high affinity and the very specific binding, botulinum neurotoxins are versatile and multi-tasking toxins. Indeed they are able to act both at the somatic and at the autonomic nervous system. In spite of the preference for cholinergic nerve terminals botulinum neurotoxins have been shown to inhibit to some extent also the noradrenergic postganglionic sympathetic nerve terminals and the afferent nerve terminals of the sensory neurons inhibiting the release of neuropeptides and glutamate, which are responsible of nociception. Therefore, there is increasing evidence that the therapeutic effect in both motor and autonomic disorders is based on a complex mode of botulinum neurotoxin action modulating the activity of efferent as well as afferent nerve fibres. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Peripheral nerve injury and TRPV1-expressing primary afferent C-fibers cause opening of the blood-brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salter Michael W

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The blood-brain barrier (BBB plays the crucial role of limiting exposure of the central nervous system (CNS to damaging molecules and cells. Dysfunction of the BBB is critical in a broad range of CNS disorders including neurodegeneration, inflammatory or traumatic injury to the CNS, and stroke. In peripheral tissues, the vascular-tissue permeability is normally greater than BBB permeability, but vascular leakage can be induced by efferent discharge activity in primary sensory neurons leading to plasma extravasation into the extravascular space. Whether discharge activity of sensory afferents entering the CNS may open the BBB or blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB remains an open question. Results Here we show that peripheral nerve injury (PNI produced by either sciatic nerve constriction or transecting two of its main branches causes an increase in BSCB permeability, as assessed by using Evans Blue dye or horseradish peroxidase. The increase in BSCB permeability was not observed 6 hours after the PNI but was apparent 24 hours after the injury. The increase in BSCB permeability was transient, peaking about 24-48 hrs after PNI with BSCB integrity returning to normal levels by 7 days. The increase in BSCB permeability was prevented by administering the local anaesthetic lidocaine at the site of the nerve injury. BSCB permeability was also increased 24 hours after electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at intensity sufficient to activate C-fibers, but not when A-fibers only were activated. Likewise, BSCB permeability increased following application of capsaicin to the nerve. The increase in permeability caused by C-fiber stimulation or by PNI was not anatomically limited to the site of central termination of primary afferents from the sciatic nerve in the lumbar cord, but rather extended throughout the spinal cord and into the brain. Conclusions We have discovered that injury to a peripheral nerve and electrical stimulation of C

  8. Transmission of olfactory information between three populations of neurons in the antennal lobe of the fly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Minna; Roorda, Robert D; Lima, Susana Q; Zemelman, Boris V; Morcillo, Patrick; Miesenböck, Gero

    2002-10-24

    Three classes of neurons form synapses in the antennal lobe of Drosophila, the insect counterpart of the vertebrate olfactory bulb: olfactory receptor neurons, projection neurons, and inhibitory local interneurons. We have targeted a genetically encoded optical reporter of synaptic transmission to each of these classes of neurons and visualized population responses to natural odors. The activation of an odor-specific ensemble of olfactory receptor neurons leads to the activation of a symmetric ensemble of projection neurons across the glomerular synaptic relay. Virtually all excited glomeruli receive inhibitory input from local interneurons. The extent, odor specificity, and partly interglomerular origin of this input suggest that inhibitory circuits assemble combinatorially during odor presentations. These circuits may serve as dynamic templates that extract higher order features from afferent activity patterns.

  9. Role of ionotropic GABA, glutamate and glycine receptors in the tonic and reflex control of cardiac vagal outflow in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodchild Ann K

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac vagal preganglionic neurons (CVPN are responsible for the tonic, reflex and respiratory modulation of heart rate (HR. Although CVPN receive GABAergic and glutamatergic inputs, likely involved in respiratory and reflex modulation of HR respectively, little else is known regarding the functions controlled by ionotropic inputs. Activation of g-protein coupled receptors (GPCR alters these inputs, but the functional consequence is largely unknown. The present study aimed to delineate how ionotropic GABAergic, glycinergic and glutamatergic inputs contribute to the tonic and reflex control of HR and in particular determine which receptor subtypes were involved. Furthermore, we wished to establish how activation of the 5-HT1A GPCR affects tonic and reflex control of HR and what ionotropic interactions this might involve. Results Microinjection of the GABAA antagonist picrotoxin into CVPN decreased HR but did not affect baroreflex bradycardia. The glycine antagonist strychnine did not alter HR or baroreflex bradycardia. Combined microinjection of the NMDA antagonist, MK801, and AMPA antagonist, CNQX, into CVPN evoked a small bradycardia and abolished baroreflex bradycardia. MK801 attenuated whereas CNQX abolished baroreceptor bradycardia. Control intravenous injections of the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT evoked a small bradycardia and potentiated baroreflex bradycardia. These effects were still observed following microinjection of picrotoxin but not strychnine into CVPN. Conclusions We conclude that activation of GABAA receptors set the level of HR whereas AMPA to a greater extent than NMDA receptors elicit baroreflex changes in HR. Furthermore, activation of 5-HT1A receptors evokes bradycardia and enhances baroreflex changes in HR due to interactions with glycinergic neurons involving strychnine receptors. This study provides reference for future studies investigating how diseases alter neurochemical inputs to CVPN.

  10. Functional up-regulation of Nav1.8 sodium channel in Aβ afferent fibers subjected to chronic peripheral inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional alterations in the properties of Aβ afferent fibers may account for the increased pain sensitivity observed under peripheral chronic inflammation. Among the voltage-gated sodium channels involved in the pathophysiology of pain, Nav1.8 has been shown to participate in the peripheral sensitization of nociceptors. However, to date, there is no evidence for a role of Nav1.8 in controlling Aβ-fiber excitability following persistent inflammation. Methods Distribution and expression of Nav1.8 in dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerves were qualitatively or quantitatively assessed by immunohistochemical staining and by real time-polymerase chain reaction at different time points following complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) administration. Using a whole-cell patch-clamp configuration, we further determined both total INa and TTX-R Nav1.8 currents in large-soma dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons isolated from sham or CFA-treated rats. Finally, we analyzed the effects of ambroxol, a Nav1.8-preferring blocker on the electrophysiological properties of Nav1.8 currents and on the mechanical sensitivity and inflammation of the hind paw in CFA-treated rats. Results Our findings revealed that Nav1.8 is up-regulated in NF200-positive large sensory neurons and is subsequently anterogradely transported from the DRG cell bodies along the axons toward the periphery after CFA-induced inflammation. We also demonstrated that both total INa and Nav1.8 peak current densities are enhanced in inflamed large myelinated Aβ-fiber neurons. Persistent inflammation leading to nociception also induced time-dependent changes in Aβ-fiber neuron excitability by shifting the voltage-dependent activation of Nav1.8 in the hyperpolarizing direction, thus decreasing the current threshold for triggering action potentials. Finally, we found that ambroxol significantly reduces the potentiation of Nav1.8 currents in Aβ-fiber neurons observed following intraplantar CFA injection and

  11. Directional tuning of human forearm muscle afferents during voluntary wrist movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kelvin E; Wessberg, Johan; Vallbo, Åke B

    2001-01-01

    Single unit activity was recorded with the microneurography technique from sixteen spindle afferents and one Golgi tendon organ afferent originating from the forearm extensor muscles. Impulse rates were studied while subjects performed unobstructed aiming movements at the wrist in eight different directions 45 deg apart. In addition, similar imposed movements were performed while the subject was instructed to remain relaxed. Movement amplitudes were about 5 deg and the speed 10–30 deg s−1. Joint movements were translated to movements of a cursor on a monitor to provide visual feedback. Individual spindle afferents modulated their activity over a number of targets, i.e. were broadly tuned, during these aiming movements. The preferred direction for a spindle afferent was the same during both passive and active movements, indicating that the fusimotor effects associated with active contractions had little or no effect on the direction of tuning. The direction of tuning of individual spindle afferents could be predicted from the biomechanically inferred length changes of the parent muscle. Thus spindle afferents responded as stretch receptors, i.e. impulse rates increased with lengthening and decreased with shortening, in active as well as passive movements. Spindles from muscles, which continuously counteracted gravity exhibited a stretch response and directional tuning during the phase of movement alone whereas their position sensitivity was poor. In contrast, spindle afferents from the muscles that had no or minimal antigravity role were directionally tuned during both the dynamic and the static phase of the aiming task and their position sensitivity was substantially higher. In spite of the limited data base from three extensor muscles it could be demonstrated that wrist joint position was remarkably well encoded in the ensemble muscle spindle data. In some cases the ensemble muscle spindle data encoded the instantaneous trajectory of movement as well. PMID

  12. Sensitization of group III and IV muscle afferents in mouse after ischemia and reperfusion injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jessica L.; Queme, Luis F.; Shank, Aaron T.; Hudgins, Renita C.; Jankowski, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic myalgia is a unique type of muscle pain in the patient population. The role that discrete muscle afferent subpopulations play in the generation of pain during ischemic events, however, has yet to be determined. Using two brachial artery occlusion models to compare prolonged ischemia or transient ischemia with reperfusion of the muscles, we found that both injuries caused behavioral decrements in grip strength, as well as increased spontaneous pain behaviors. Using our ex vivo forepaw muscles, median and ulnar nerves, dorsal root ganglion (DRG), and spinal cord recording preparation, we found after both prolonged and transient ischemia, that there was a significant increase in the number of afferents that responded to both noxious and non-noxious36 chemical (lactate, ATP, varying pH) stimulation of the muscles compared to uninjured controls. However, we found an increase in firing to heat stimuli specifically in muscle afferents during prolonged ischemia, but a distinct increase in afferent firing to non-noxious chemicals and decreased mechanical thresholds after transient ischemia. The unique changes in afferent function observed also corresponded with distinct patterns of gene expression in the DRGs. Thus the development of ischemic myalgia may be generated by unique afferent based mechanisms during prolonged and transient ischemia. Perspective This study analyzes the response properties of thinly myelinated group III and unmyelinated group IV muscle afferents during prolonged and transient ischemia in addition to pain behaviors and alterations in DRG gene expression in mouse. Results suggest that mechanisms of pain generation during prolonged ischemia may be different from ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:25245401

  13. Is pancreatic polypeptide response to food ingestion a reliable index of vagal function in type 1 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damholt, M B; Arlien-Soeborg, P; Hilsted, L

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy in diabetic patients is based on cardiovascular reflex tests. Since cardiac function may be affected by arteriosclerosis and cardiomyopathy in type 1 diabetes mellitus, alternative tests reflecting vagal nerve function, in other organ systems, are needed...

  14. Dysfunctional muscarinic M(2) autoreceptors in vagally induced bronchoconstriction of conscious guinea pigs after the early allergic reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TenBerge, REJ; Krikke, M; Teisman, ACH; Roffel, AF; Zaagsma, J

    1996-01-01

    We studied the function of autoinhibitory muscarinic M(2) receptors on vagal nerve endings in the airways of conscious, unrestrained, ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs after the early and late allergic reaction. For this purpose, the effects of the selective muscarinic M(2) receptor antagonist

  15. Electrosensory Midbrain Neurons Display Feature Invariant Responses to Natural Communication Stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan Aumentado-Armstrong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Neurons that respond selectively but in an invariant manner to a given feature of natural stimuli have been observed across species and systems. Such responses emerge in higher brain areas, thereby suggesting that they occur by integrating afferent input. However, the mechanisms by which such integration occurs are poorly understood. Here we show that midbrain electrosensory neurons can respond selectively and in an invariant manner to heterogeneity in behaviorally relevant stimulus waveforms. Such invariant responses were not seen in hindbrain electrosensory neurons providing afferent input to these midbrain neurons, suggesting that response invariance results from nonlinear integration of such input. To test this hypothesis, we built a model based on the Hodgkin-Huxley formalism that received realistic afferent input. We found that multiple combinations of parameter values could give rise to invariant responses matching those seen experimentally. Our model thus shows that there are multiple solutions towards achieving invariant responses and reveals how subthreshold membrane conductances help promote robust and invariant firing in response to heterogeneous stimulus waveforms associated with behaviorally relevant stimuli. We discuss the implications of our findings for the electrosensory and other systems.

  16. The Languages of Neurons: An Analysis of Coding Mechanisms by Which Neurons Communicate, Learn and Store Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris H. Baslow

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper evidence is provided that individual neurons possess language, and that the basic unit for communication consists of two neurons and their entire field of interacting dendritic and synaptic connections. While information processing in the brain is highly complex, each neuron uses a simple mechanism for transmitting information. This is in the form of temporal electrophysiological action potentials or spikes (S operating on a millisecond timescale that, along with pauses (P between spikes constitute a two letter “alphabet” that generates meaningful frequency-encoded signals or neuronal S/P “words” in a primary language. However, when a word from an afferent neuron enters the dendritic-synaptic-dendritic field between two neurons, it is translated into a new frequency-encoded word with the same meaning, but in a different spike-pause language, that is delivered to and understood by the efferent neuron. It is suggested that this unidirectional inter-neuronal language-based word translation step is of utmost importance to brain function in that it allows for variations in meaning to occur. Thus, structural or biochemical changes in dendrites or synapses can produce novel words in the second language that have changed meanings, allowing for a specific signaling experience, either external or internal, to modify the meaning of an original word (learning, and store the learned information of that experience (memory in the form of an altered dendritic-synaptic-dendritic field.

  17. T-type calcium channels, but not Cav3.2, in the peripheral sensory afferents are involved in acute itch in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Si-Fang; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Feng-Ming; Fei, Yuan-Hui; Gu, Jia-Hui; Li, Jie; Bi, Ling-Bo; Liu, Xing-Jun

    2017-06-10

    T-type calcium channels are prominently expressed in primary nociceptive fibers and well characterized in pain processes. Although itch and pain share many similarities including primary sensory fibers, the function of T-type calcium channels on acute itch has not been explored. We investigated whether T-type calcium channels expressed within primary sensory fibers of mouse skin, especially Cav3.2 subtype, involve in chloroquine-, endothelin-1- and histamine-evoked acute itch using pharmacological, neuronal imaging and behavioral analyses. We found that pre-locally blocking three subtypes of T-type calcium channels in the peripheral afferents of skins, yielded an inhibition in acute itch or pain behaviors, while selectively blocking the Cav3.2 channel in the skin peripheral afferents only inhibited acute pain but not acute itch. These results suggest that T-type Cav3.1 or Cav3.3, but not Cav3.2 channel, have an important role in acute itch processing, and their distinctive roles in modulating acute itch are worthy of further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A afferent fibers are involved in the pathology of central changes in the spinal dorsal horn associated with myofascial trigger spots in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fei; Ge, Hong-You; Wang, Yong-Hui; Yue, Shou-Wei

    2015-11-01

    A afferent fibers have been reported to participate in the development of the central sensitization induced by inflammation and injuries. Current evidence suggests that myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) induce central sensitization in the related spinal dorsal horn, and clinical studies indicate that A fibers are associated with pain behavior. Because most of these clinical studies applied behavioral indexes, objective evidence is needed. Additionally, MTrP-related neurons in dorsal root ganglia and the spinal ventral horn have been reported to be smaller than normal, and these neurons were considered to be related to A fibers. To confirm the role of A fibers in MTrP-related central changes in the spinal dorsal horn, we studied central sensitization as well as the size of neurons associated with myofascial trigger spots (MTrSs, equivalent to MTrPs in humans) in the biceps femoris muscle of rats and provided some objective morphological evidence. Cholera toxin B subunit-conjugated horseradish peroxidase was applied to label the MTrS-related neurons, and tetrodotoxin was used to block A fibers specifically. The results showed that in the spinal dorsal horn associated with MTrS, the expression of glutamate receptor (mGluR1α/mGluR5/NMDAR1) increased, while the mean size of MTrS-related neurons was smaller than normal. After blocking A fibers, these changes reversed to some extent. Therefore, we concluded that A fibers participated in the development and maintenance of the central sensitization induced by MTrPs and were related to the mean size of neurons associated with MTrPs in the spinal dorsal horn.

  19. Noisy Neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 1. Noisy Neurons: Hodgkin-Huxley Model and Stochastic Variants. Shurti Paranjape. General Article Volume 20 Issue 1 January 2015 pp 34-43. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. Relative afferent pupillary defects in primary open-angle glaucoma--five years' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, C J; Merritt, J C; Evans, B

    1985-12-01

    Afferent pupillary defects may accompany asymmetric primary open-angle glaucoma, though the exact incidence has not been reported. Charts were reviewed on 89 patients attending the Glaucoma/Uveitis Clinic at the North Carolina Memorial Hospital in Chapel Hill, North Carolina over a five-year period. All patients had primary open-angle glaucoma diagnosed by: (1) increased ocular tensions (22 mmHg) in the presence of open-anterior-chamber angles and (2) optic-nerve cupping and atrophy compatible with (3) pressure-dependent, visual-field loss. No subjects with secondary glaucomas, primary-angle-closure glaucoma, or ocular hypertension are included.The presence of the relative afferent pupillary defect was noted in 21 of 89 patients (23 percent). Sixteen of 70 black patients had relative afferent pupillary defect in the more severely affected eye, while five of 19 white patients demonstrated afferent pupils. Other demographic characteristics of this population are described. Two typical primary-open-angle glaucoma patients are discussed to demonstrate comparable changes within the optic nerves and Goldmann visual fields. The presence of the relative afferent pupillary defect best correlates with asymmetric, visual-field loss in the more severely affected eye.

  1. Targeted deletion of Sox10 by Wnt1-cre defects neuronal migration and projection in the mouse inner ear.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YanYan Mao

    Full Text Available Sensory nerves of the brainstem are mostly composed of placode-derived neurons, neural crest-derived neurons and neural crest-derived Schwann cells. This mixed origin of cells has made it difficult to dissect interdependence for fiber guidance. Inner ear-derived neurons are known to connect to the brain after delayed loss of Schwann cells in ErbB2 mutants. However, the ErbB2 mutant related alterations in the ear and the brain compound interpretation of the data. We present here a new model to evaluate exclusively the effect of Schwann cell loss on inner ear innervation. Conditional deletion of the neural crest specific transcription factor, Sox10, using the rhombic lip/neural crest specific Wnt1-cre driver spares Sox10 expression in the ear. We confirm that neural crest-derived cells provide a stop signal for migrating spiral ganglion neurons. In the absence of Schwann cells, spiral ganglion neurons migrate into the center of the cochlea and even out of the ear toward the brain. Spiral ganglion neuron afferent processes reach the organ of Corti, but many afferent fibers bypass the organ of Corti to enter the lateral wall of the cochlea. In contrast to this peripheral disorganization, the central projection to cochlear nuclei is normal. Compared to ErbB2 mutants, conditional Sox10 mutants have limited cell death in spiral ganglion neurons, indicating that the absence of Schwann cells alone contributes little to the embryonic survival of neurons. These data suggest that neural crest-derived cells are dispensable for all central and some peripheral targeting of inner ear neurons. However, Schwann cells provide a stop signal for migratory spiral ganglion neurons and facilitate proper targeting of the organ of Corti by spiral ganglion afferents.

  2. Vagally-Mediated Heart Rate Variability and Indices of Wellbeing: Results of a Nationally Representative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Richard P; Schwarz, Emilie; McKinley, Paula S; Weinstein, Maxine; Love, Gayle; Ryff, Carol; Mroczek, Daniel; Choo, Tse; Lee, Seonjoo; Seeman, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Objective High frequency (HF) heart rate variability (HRV) has long been accepted as an index of cardiac vagal control. Recent studies report relationships between HF-HRV and indices of positive and negative affect, personality traits and wellbeing but these studies generally are based on small and selective samples. Method These relationships were examined using data from 967 participants in the second Midlife in the US (MIDUS II) study. Participants completed survey questionnaires on wellbeing and affect. HF-HRV was measured at rest. A hierarchical series of regression analyses examined relationships between these various indices and HF-HRV before and after adjustment for relevant demographic and biomedical factors. Results Significant inverse relationships were found only between indices of negative affect and HF-HRV. Relationships between indices of psychological and hedonic wellbeing and positive affect failed to reach significance. Conclusions These findings raise questions about relationships between cardiac parasympathetic modulation, emotion regulation, and indices of wellbeing. PMID:27570892

  3. Cardiac Vagal Control and Depressive Symptoms: The Moderating Role of Sleep Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Gabriela G.; Ford, Brett Q.; Mauss, Iris B.; Schabus, Manuel; Blechert, Jens; Wilhelm, Frank H.

    2017-01-01

    Lower cardiac vagal control (CVC) has been linked to greater depression. However, this link has not been consistently demonstrated, suggesting the presence of key moderators. Sleep plausibly is one such factor. Therefore, we investigated whether sleep quality moderates the link between CVC (quantified by high-frequency heart rate variability, HF-HRV) and depressive symptoms (assessed using established questionnaires) in 29 healthy women. Results revealed a significant interaction between HF-HRV and sleep quality in predicting depressive symptoms: participants with lower HF-HRV reported elevated depressive symptoms only when sleep quality was also low. In contrast, HF-HRV was not associated with depressive symptoms when sleep quality was high, suggesting a protective function of high sleep quality in the context of lower CVC. PMID:27149648

  4. Do the psychological effects of vagus nerve stimulation partially mediate vagal pain modulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangos, Eleni; Richards, Emily A; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2017-01-01

    There is preclinical and clinical evidence that vagus nerve stimulation modulates both pain and mood state. Mechanistic studies show brainstem circuitry involved in pain modulation by vagus nerve stimulation, but little is known about possible indirect descending effects of altered mood state on pain perception. This possibility is important, since previous studies have shown that mood state affects pain, particularly the affective dimension (pain unpleasantness). To date, human studies investigating the effects of vagus nerve stimulation on pain perception have not reliably measured psychological factors to determine their role in altered pain perception elicited by vagus nerve stimulation. Thus, it remains unclear how much of a role psychological factors play in vagal pain modulation. Here, we present a rationale for including psychological measures in future vagus nerve stimulation studies on pain.

  5. Vestibular nucleus neurons respond to hindlimb movement in the decerebrate cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshian, Milad S; Hobson, Candace E; Catanzaro, Michael F; Miller, Daniel J; Puterbaugh, Sonya R; Cotter, Lucy A; Yates, Bill J; McCall, Andrew A

    2014-06-15

    The vestibular nuclei integrate information from vestibular and proprioceptive afferents, which presumably facilitates the maintenance of stable balance and posture. However, little is currently known about the processing of sensory signals from the limbs by vestibular nucleus neurons. This study tested the hypothesis that limb movement is encoded by vestibular nucleus neurons and described the changes in activity of these neurons elicited by limb extension and flexion. In decerebrate cats, we recorded the activity of 70 vestibular nucleus neurons whose activity was modulated by limb movements. Most of these neurons (57/70, 81.4%) encoded information about the direction of hindlimb movement, while the remaining neurons (13/70, 18.6%) encoded the presence of hindlimb movement without signaling the direction of movement. The activity of many vestibular nucleus neurons that responded to limb movement was also modulated by rotating the animal's body in vertical planes, suggesting that the neurons integrated hindlimb and labyrinthine inputs. Neurons whose firing rate increased during ipsilateral ear-down roll rotations tended to be excited by hindlimb flexion, whereas neurons whose firing rate increased during contralateral ear-down tilts were excited by hindlimb extension. These observations suggest that there is a purposeful mapping of hindlimb inputs onto vestibular nucleus neurons, such that integration of hindlimb and labyrinthine inputs to the neurons is functionally relevant. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Subtypes of muscarinic receptors in vagal inhibitory pathway to the lower esophageal sphincter of the opossum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, R J; Dodds, W J

    1987-10-01

    We assessed the characteristics of muscarinic neural transmission in the vagal inhibitory pathway to the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) of anesthetized opossums. LES relaxation was induced by electrical stimulation of the cervical vagus. Measurements were made of LES relaxation before and after intravenous administration of nicotinic (hexamethonium), serotonergic (5-Meo-DMT), nonselective muscarinic (atropine), and selective muscarinic (pirenzepine-M1 and 4-DAMP-M2) antagonists. The latency of LES relaxation was increased substantially by pirenzepine and atropine, increased slightly by hexamethonium, but was not affected by 4-DAMP or 5-Meo-DMT. Given as concurrent intravenous infusions, hexamethonium, 5-Meo-DMT and 4-DAMP added to pirenzepine or atropine did not significantly increase LES relaxation latency above that caused by pirenzepine or atropine alone. None of the antagonists alone had a significant effect on percent LES relaxation. The combination of pirenzepine or 4-DAMP with hexamethonium and 5-Meo-DMT did not affect percent LES relaxation. The combination of atropine with hexamethonium and 5-Meo-DMT reduced LES relaxation to 18%. The combination of pirenzepine and 4-DAMP with hexamethonium and 5-Meo-DMT, however, had no effect on percent LES relaxation. We conclude that muscarinic participation in vagally induced LES relaxation exhibits two functional receptor subtypes: (1) M1 receptors that determine LES relaxation latency and are antagonized by pirenzepine or atropine, and (2) non-M1, non-M2 receptors (Mx receptors) that contribute to the magnitude of LES relaxation and are antagonized by atropine, but not by pirenzepine or 4-DAMP.

  7. Haemodynamic Responses to Selective Vagal Nerve Stimulation under Enalapril Medication in Rats.

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    Mortimer Gierthmuehlen

    Full Text Available Selective vagal nerve stimulation (sVNS has been demonstrated to lower blood pressure (BP in rats without causing major side effects. This method might be adapted for the treatment of therapy-resistant hypertension in patients. Converting enzyme inhibitors (CEIs are among the first drugs that are administered for arterial hypertension and prominently reduce BP primarily by interacting with the renin-angiotensin system of the kidneys. Beyond the reduction of BP, CEI have a positive effect on the survival rate after myocardial infarction; they reduce the rates of stroke and improve the neurohormonal status in heart-failure patients. If sVNS might be introduced as a therapy against resistant hypertension, patients will at least partially stay on their CEI medication. It is therefore the aim of this study to investigate the influence of the CEI enalapril on the haemodynamic and respiratory effects of sVNS. In 10 male Wistar rats, a polyimide-based multichannel-cuff-electrode was placed around the vagal nerve bundle to selectively stimulate the aortic depressor nerve fibres. Stimulation parameters were adapted to the thresholds of the individual animals and included repetition frequencies between 30 and 50 Hz, amplitudes of 0.5 to 1.5 mA and pulse widths between 0.4 ms and 1.0 ms. BP responses were detected with a microtip transducer in the left carotid artery, and electrocardiography was recorded with subcutaneous electrodes. After intravenous administration of enalapril (2 mg/kg bodyweight, the animals' mean arterial blood pressures (MAPs decreased significantly, while the heart rates (HRs were not significantly influenced. The effects of sVNS on BP and HR were attenuated by enalapril but were still present. We conclude that sVNS can lower the MAP during enalapril treatment without relevant side effects.

  8. Parasympathetic neurons in the cranial medial ventricular fat pad on the dog heart selectively decrease ventricular contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, L W; Rodak, D J; Fleming, T J; Gatti, P J; Massari, V J; McKenzie, J C; Gillis, R A

    1998-05-28

    We hypothesized that selective control of ventricular contractility might be mediated by postganglionic parasympathetic neurons in the cranial medial ventricular (CMV) ganglion plexus located in a fat pad at the base of the aorta. Sinus rate, atrioventricular (AV) conduction (ventricular rate during atrial pacing), and left ventricular contractile force (LV dP/dt during right ventricular pacing) were measured in eight chloralose-anesthetized dogs both before and during bilateral cervical vagus stimulation (20-30 V, 0.5 ms pulses, 15-20 Hz). Seven of these dogs were tested under beta-adrenergic blockade (propranolol, 0.8 mg kg(-1) i.v.). Control responses included sinus node bradycardia or arrest during spontaneous rhythm, high grade AV block or complete heart block, and a 30% decrease in contractility from 2118 +/- 186 to 1526 +/- 187 mm Hg s(-1) (P 0.05) decrease in contractility but still elicited the same degree of sinus bradycardia and AV block (N = 8, P < 0.05). Five dogs were re-tested 3 h after trimethaphan fat pad injection, at which time blockade of vagally-induced negative inotropy was partially reversed, as vagal stimulation decreased LV dP/dt by 19%. The same dose of trimethaphan given either locally into other fat pads (PVFP or IVC-ILA) or systemically (i.v.) had no effect on vagally-induced negative inotropy. Thus, parasympathetic ganglia located in the CMV fat pad mediated a decrease in ventricular contractility during vagal stimulation. Blockade of the CMV fat pad had no effect on vagally-mediated slowing of sinus rate or AV conduction.

  9. Nociceptive afferents selectively modulate the cardiac component of the peripheral chemoreceptor reflex via actions within the solitary tract nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscan, P; Paton, J F R

    2002-01-01

    Our previous findings showed that the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) mediated part of the tachycardia evoked during somatic noxious stimulation. Here, we investigated the interaction between somatic nociceptor- and peripheral chemoreceptor-evoked cardiac changes. We sought to determine whether this interaction occurred within the NTS, the primary site of termination of chemoreceptor afferents. In a working heart-brainstem preparation of rat, mechanical noxious activation of a forelimb evoked a tachycardia of 17.5+/-3 (mean+/-S.E.M.) b.p.m., whereas sodium cyanide (7-30 microg) stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors produced a sub-maximal bradycardia of -140+/-15 b.p.m. During nociceptor stimulation the sodium cyanide-evoked bradycardia was attenuated to -42.6+/-12 b.p.m. but could be prevented by a multiple bilateral NTS microinjection of bicuculline (i.e. -173+/-18 b.p.m.). Furthermore, the activity of NTS neurones responding to peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation increased from 2.8+/-1.3 to 9.4+/-1.9 Hz during sodium cyanide injection (n=7; Pchemoreceptor-evoked excitatory synaptic response. We conclude that somatic noxious stimulation attenuates the chemoreceptor reflex-evoked bradycardia via a GABA(A)ergic mechanism in the NTS.

  10. Thy1.2 YFP-16 transgenic mouse labels a subset of large-diameter sensory neurons that lack TRPV1 expression.

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    Thomas E Taylor-Clark

    Full Text Available The Thy1.2 YFP-16 mouse expresses yellow fluorescent protein (YFP in specific subsets of peripheral and central neurons. The original characterization of this model suggested that YFP was expressed in all sensory neurons, and this model has been subsequently used to study sensory nerve structure and function. Here, we have characterized the expression of YFP in the sensory ganglia (DRG, trigeminal and vagal of the Thy1.2 YFP-16 mouse, using biochemical, functional and anatomical analyses. Despite previous reports, we found that YFP was only expressed in approximately half of DRG and trigeminal neurons and less than 10% of vagal neurons. YFP-expression was only found in medium and large-diameter neurons that expressed neurofilament but not TRPV1. YFP-expressing neurons failed to respond to selective agonists for TRPV1, P2X(2/3 and TRPM8 channels in Ca2+ imaging assays. Confocal analysis of glabrous skin, hairy skin of the back and ear and skeletal muscle indicated that YFP was expressed in some peripheral terminals with structures consistent with their presumed non-nociceptive nature. In summary, the Thy1.2 YFP-16 mouse expresses robust YFP expression in only a subset of sensory neurons. But this mouse model is not suitable for the study of nociceptive nerves or the function of such nerves in pain and neuropathies.

  11. Correlation of Ventricular Arrhythmogenesis with Neuronal Remodeling of Cardiac Postganglionic Parasympathetic Neurons in the Late Stage of Heart Failure after Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongze; Tu, Huiyin; Wang, Chaojun; Cao, Liang; Muelleman, Robert L.; Wadman, Michael C.; Li, Yu-Long

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Ventricular arrhythmia is a major cause of sudden cardiac death in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Our recent study demonstrates that N-type Ca2+ currents in intracardiac ganglionic neurons are reduced in the late stage of CHF rats. Rat intracardiac ganglia are divided into the atrioventricular ganglion (AVG) and sinoatrial ganglion. Only AVG nerve terminals innervate the ventricular myocardium. In this study, we tested the correlation of electrical remodeling in AVG neurons with ventricular arrhythmogenesis in CHF rats. Methods and Results: CHF was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by surgical ligation of the left coronary artery. The data from 24-h continuous radiotelemetry ECG recording in conscious rats showed that ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (VT/VF) occurred in 3 and 14-week CHF rats but not 8-week CHF rats. Additionally, as an index for vagal control of ventricular function, changes of left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and the maximum rate of left ventricular pressure rise (LV dP/dtmax) in response to vagal efferent nerve stimulation were blunted in 14-week CHF rats but not 3 or 8-week CHF rats. Results from whole-cell patch clamp recording demonstrated that N-type Ca2+ currents in AVG neurons began to decrease in 8-week CHF rats, and that there was also a significant decrease in 14-week CHF rats. Correlation analysis revealed that N-type Ca2+ currents in AVG neurons negatively correlated with the cumulative duration of VT/VF in 14-week CHF rats, whereas there was no correlation between N-type Ca2+ currents in AVG neurons and the cumulative duration of VT/VF in 3-week CHF. Conclusion: Malignant ventricular arrhythmias mainly occur in the early and late stages of CHF. Electrical remodeling of AVG neurons highly correlates with the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias in the late stage of CHF. PMID:28533740

  12. Correlation of Ventricular Arrhythmogenesis with Neuronal Remodeling of Cardiac Postganglionic Parasympathetic Neurons in the Late Stage of Heart Failure after Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongze Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ventricular arrhythmia is a major cause of sudden cardiac death in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF. Our recent study demonstrates that N-type Ca2+ currents in intracardiac ganglionic neurons are reduced in the late stage of CHF rats. Rat intracardiac ganglia are divided into the atrioventricular ganglion (AVG and sinoatrial ganglion. Only AVG nerve terminals innervate the ventricular myocardium. In this study, we tested the correlation of electrical remodeling in AVG neurons with ventricular arrhythmogenesis in CHF rats.Methods and Results: CHF was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by surgical ligation of the left coronary artery. The data from 24-h continuous radiotelemetry ECG recording in conscious rats showed that ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (VT/VF occurred in 3 and 14-week CHF rats but not 8-week CHF rats. Additionally, as an index for vagal control of ventricular function, changes of left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP and the maximum rate of left ventricular pressure rise (LV dP/dtmax in response to vagal efferent nerve stimulation were blunted in 14-week CHF rats but not 3 or 8-week CHF rats. Results from whole-cell patch clamp recording demonstrated that N-type Ca2+ currents in AVG neurons began to decrease in 8-week CHF rats, and that there was also a significant decrease in 14-week CHF rats. Correlation analysis revealed that N-type Ca2+ currents in AVG neurons negatively correlated with the cumulative duration of VT/VF in 14-week CHF rats, whereas there was no correlation between N-type Ca2+ currents in AVG neurons and the cumulative duration of VT/VF in 3-week CHF.Conclusion: Malignant ventricular arrhythmias mainly occur in the early and late stages of CHF. Electrical remodeling of AVG neurons highly correlates with the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias in the late stage of CHF.

  13. Correlation of Ventricular Arrhythmogenesis with Neuronal Remodeling of Cardiac Postganglionic Parasympathetic Neurons in the Late Stage of Heart Failure after Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongze; Tu, Huiyin; Wang, Chaojun; Cao, Liang; Muelleman, Robert L; Wadman, Michael C; Li, Yu-Long

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Ventricular arrhythmia is a major cause of sudden cardiac death in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Our recent study demonstrates that N-type Ca(2+) currents in intracardiac ganglionic neurons are reduced in the late stage of CHF rats. Rat intracardiac ganglia are divided into the atrioventricular ganglion (AVG) and sinoatrial ganglion. Only AVG nerve terminals innervate the ventricular myocardium. In this study, we tested the correlation of electrical remodeling in AVG neurons with ventricular arrhythmogenesis in CHF rats. Methods and Results: CHF was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by surgical ligation of the left coronary artery. The data from 24-h continuous radiotelemetry ECG recording in conscious rats showed that ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (VT/VF) occurred in 3 and 14-week CHF rats but not 8-week CHF rats. Additionally, as an index for vagal control of ventricular function, changes of left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and the maximum rate of left ventricular pressure rise (LV dP/dtmax) in response to vagal efferent nerve stimulation were blunted in 14-week CHF rats but not 3 or 8-week CHF rats. Results from whole-cell patch clamp recording demonstrated that N-type Ca(2+) currents in AVG neurons began to decrease in 8-week CHF rats, and that there was also a significant decrease in 14-week CHF rats. Correlation analysis revealed that N-type Ca(2+) currents in AVG neurons negatively correlated with the cumulative duration of VT/VF in 14-week CHF rats, whereas there was no correlation between N-type Ca(2+) currents in AVG neurons and the cumulative duration of VT/VF in 3-week CHF. Conclusion: Malignant ventricular arrhythmias mainly occur in the early and late stages of CHF. Electrical remodeling of AVG neurons highly correlates with the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias in the late stage of CHF.

  14. Modulation of local field potentials by high-frequency stimulation of afferent axons in the hippocampal CA1 region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Feng, Zhouyan; Cao, Jiayue; Guo, Zheshan; Wang, Zhaoxiang; Hu, Na; Wei, Xuefeng

    2016-03-01

    Modulation of the rhythmic activity of local field potentials (LFP) in neuronal networks could be a mechanism of deep brain stimulation (DBS). However, exact changes of LFP during the periods of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of DBS are unclear because of the interference of dense stimulation artifacts with high amplitudes. In the present study, we investigated LFP changes induced by HFS of afferent axons in the hippocampal CA1 region of urethane-anesthetized rats by using a proper algorithm of artifact removal. Afterward, the LFP changes in the frequency bands of [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] rhythms were studied by power spectrum analysis and coherence analysis for the recorded signals collected in the pyramidal layer and in the stratum radiatum of CA1 region before, during and after 1-min long 100 and 200[Formula: see text]Hz HFS. Results showed that the power of LFP rhythms in higher-frequency band ([Formula: see text] rhythm) increased in the pyramidal layer and the power of LFP rhythms in lower-frequency bands ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] rhythms) decreased in the stratum radiatum during HFS. The synchronization of [Formula: see text] rhythm decreased and the synchronization of [Formula: see text] rhythm increased during HFS in the stratum radiatum. These results suggest that axonal HFS could modulate LFP rhythms in the downstream brain areas with a plausible underlying mechanism of partial axonal blockage induced by HFS. The study provides new evidence to support the mechanism of DBS modulating rhythmic activity of neuronal populations.

  15. Role of Connexin40 in the autoregulatory response of the afferent arteriole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Charlotte Mehlin; Giese, Isaiah; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig

    2012-01-01

    in the regulation of renin secretion. We investigated the effect of deleting the Cx40 gene on autoregulation of afferent arteriolar diameter in response to acute changes in renal perfusion pressure. The experiments were performed using the isolated blood perfused juxtamedullary nephron preparation in kidneys...... obtained from wild type or Cx40 knockout mice. Renal perfusion pressure was increased in steps from 75 mm Hg to 155 mm Hg and the response in afferent arteriolar diameter was measured. Hereafter a papillectomy was performed to inhibit TGF and the pressure steps were repeated. Conduction of intercellular Ca......(2+) changes in response to local electrical stimulation was examined in isolated interlobular arteries and afferent arterioles from wild type or Cx40 knockout mice. Cx40 knockout mice had an impaired autoregulatory response to acute changes in renal perfusion pressure compared to wild type mice...

  16. Immobilization induces changes in presynaptic control of group Ia afferents in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2008-01-01

    Neural plasticity occurs throughout adult life in response to maturation, use and disuse. Recent studies have documented that H-reflex amplitudes increase following a period of immobilization. To elucidate the mechanisms contributing to the increase in H-reflex size following immobilization we...... inhibition of SOL Ia afferents and taken together suggest that GABAergic presynaptic inhibition of the SOL Ia afferents is decreased following 2 weeks of immobilization. The depression of the SOL H-reflex when evoked at intervals shorter than 10 s (homosynaptic post-activation depression) also decreased...... following immobilization, suggesting that the activity-dependent regulation of transmitter release from the afferents was also affected by immobilization. We observed no significant changes in disynaptic reciprocal Ia inhibition. Two weeks after cast removal measurements returned to pre immobilization...

  17. Contribution of afferent feedback to the soleus muscle activity during human locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzaro, Nazarena; Grey, Michael James; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    During the stance phase of the human step cycle, the ankle undergoes a natural dorsiflexion that stretches the soleus muscle. The afferent feedback resulting from this stretch enhances the locomotor drive. In this study a robotic actuator was used to slightly enhance or reduce the natural ankle...... enhancements was reduced when the group Ia afferents were blocked with peripheral ischemia at the thigh, and during high-frequency Achilles tendon vibration. However, neither ischemia nor tendon vibration affected the decrements in the SOL EMG during the dorsiflexion reductions. These findings give evidence...... of the contribution of afferent feedback to the SOL activity in an ongoing basis during the stance phase. The results suggest that mainly feedback from the group Ia pathways is responsible for the increments in the SOL EMG during the dorsiflexion enhancements. However, the decrements in the SOL activity might...

  18. Plasticity of Select Primary Afferent Projections to the Dorsal Horn after a Lumbosacral Ventral Root Avulsion Injury and Root Replantation in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigbee, Allison J; Akhavan, Mahnaz; Havton, Leif A

    2017-01-01

    Injuries to the conus medullaris and cauda equina portions of the spinal cord result in neurological impairments, including paralysis, autonomic dysfunction, and pain. In experimental studies, earlier investigations have shown that a lumbosacral ventral root avulsion (VRA) injury results in allodynia, which may be ameliorated by surgical replantation of the avulsed ventral roots. Here, we investigated the long-term effects of an L6 + S1 VRA injury on the plasticity of three populations of afferent projections to the dorsal horn in rats. At 8 weeks after a unilateral L6 + S1 VRA injury, quantitative morphological studies of the adjacent L5 dorsal horn showed reduced immunoreactivity (IR) for the vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT1 and isolectin B4 (IB4) binding, whereas IR for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was unchanged. The IR for VGLUT1 and CGRP as well as IB4 binding was at control levels in the L5 dorsal horn at 8 weeks following an acute surgical replantation of the avulsed L6 + S1 ventral roots. Quantitative morphological studies of the L5 dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) showed unchanged neuronal numbers for both the VRA and replanted series compared to shams. The portions of L5 DRG neurons expressing IR for VGLUT1 and CGRP, and IB4 binding were also the same between the VRA, replanted, and sham-operated groups. We conclude that the L5 dorsal horn shows selective plasticity for VGLUT1 and IB4 primary afferent projections after an L6 + S1 VRA injury and surgical repair.

  19. Plasticity of Select Primary Afferent Projections to the Dorsal Horn after a Lumbosacral Ventral Root Avulsion Injury and Root Replantation in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison J. Bigbee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Injuries to the conus medullaris and cauda equina portions of the spinal cord result in neurological impairments, including paralysis, autonomic dysfunction, and pain. In experimental studies, earlier investigations have shown that a lumbosacral ventral root avulsion (VRA injury results in allodynia, which may be ameliorated by surgical replantation of the avulsed ventral roots. Here, we investigated the long-term effects of an L6 + S1 VRA injury on the plasticity of three populations of afferent projections to the dorsal horn in rats. At 8 weeks after a unilateral L6 + S1 VRA injury, quantitative morphological studies of the adjacent L5 dorsal horn showed reduced immunoreactivity (IR for the vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT1 and isolectin B4 (IB4 binding, whereas IR for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP was unchanged. The IR for VGLUT1 and CGRP as well as IB4 binding was at control levels in the L5 dorsal horn at 8 weeks following an acute surgical replantation of the avulsed L6 + S1 ventral roots. Quantitative morphological studies of the L5 dorsal root ganglia (DRGs showed unchanged neuronal numbers for both the VRA and replanted series compared to shams. The portions of L5 DRG neurons expressing IR for VGLUT1 and CGRP, and IB4 binding were also the same between the VRA, replanted, and sham-operated groups. We conclude that the L5 dorsal horn shows selective plasticity for VGLUT1 and IB4 primary afferent projections after an L6 + S1 VRA injury and surgical repair.

  20. Firing of antagonist small-diameter muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation and torque of elbow flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David S; McNeil, Chris J; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2013-07-15

    During muscle fatigue, firing of small-diameter muscle afferents can decrease voluntary activation of the fatigued muscle. However, these afferents may have a more widespread effect on other muscles in the exercising limb. We examined if the firing of fatigue-sensitive afferents from elbow extensor muscles in the same arm reduces torque production and voluntary activation of elbow flexors. In nine subjects we examined voluntary activation of elbow flexors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex during brief (2-3 s) maximal voluntary contractions (MVC). Inflation of a blood pressure cuff following a 2-min sustained MVC blocked blood flow to the fatigued muscle and maintained firing of small-diameter afferents. After a fatiguing elbow flexion contraction, maximal flexion torque was lower (26.0 ± 4.4% versus 67.9 ± 5.2% of initial maximal torque; means ± s.d.; P torque was also reduced (82.2 ± 4.9% versus 91.4 ± 2.3% of initial maximal torque; P = 0.007), superimposed twitches were larger (2.7 ± 0.7% versus 1.3 ± 0.2% ongoing MVC; P = 0.02) and voluntary activation lower (81.6 ± 8.2% versus 95.5 ± 6.9%; P = 0.04) with than without ischaemia. After a fatiguing contraction, voluntary drive to the fatigued muscles is reduced with continued input from small-diameter muscle afferents. Furthermore, fatigue of the elbow extensor muscles decreases voluntary drive to unfatigued elbow flexors of the same arm. Therefore, firing of small-diameter muscle afferents from one muscle can affect voluntary activation and hence torque generation of another muscle in the same limb.

  1. Information analysis of posterior canal afferents in the turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Michael H; Neiman, Alexander B

    2012-01-24

    We have used sinusoidal and band-limited Gaussian noise stimuli along with information measures to characterize the linear and non-linear responses of morpho-physiologically identified posterior canal (PC) afferents and to examine the relationship between mutual information rate and other physiological parameters. Our major findings are: 1) spike generation in most PC afferents is effectively a stochastic renewal process, and spontaneous discharges are fully characterized by their first order statistics; 2) a regular discharge, as measured by normalized coefficient of variation (cv*), reduces intrinsic noise in afferent discharges at frequencies below the mean firing rate; 3) coherence and mutual information rates, calculated from responses to band-limited Gaussian noise, are jointly determined by gain and intrinsic noise (discharge regularity), the two major determinants of signal to noise ratio in the afferent response; 4) measures of optimal non-linear encoding were only moderately greater than optimal linear encoding, indicating that linear stimulus encoding is limited primarily by internal noise rather than by non-linearities; and 5) a leaky integrate and fire model reproduces these results and supports the suggestion that the combination of high discharge regularity and high discharge rates serves to extend the linear encoding range of afferents to higher frequencies. These results provide a framework for future assessments of afferent encoding of signals generated during natural head movements and for comparison with coding strategies used by other sensory systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neural Coding. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Systemic administration of monosodium glutamate elevates intramuscular glutamate levels and sensitizes rat masseter muscle afferent fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Brian E; Dong, Xudong; Mann, Mandeep K; Svensson, Peter; Sessle, Barry J; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; McErlane, Keith M

    2007-11-01

    There is evidence that elevated tissue concentrations of glutamate may contribute to pain and sensitivity in certain musculoskeletal pain conditions. In the present study, the food additive monosodium glutamate (MSG) was injected intravenously into rats to determine whether it could significantly elevate interstitial concentrations of glutamate in the masseter muscle and whether MSG administration could excite and/or sensitize slowly conducting masseter afferent fibers through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation. The interstitial concentration of glutamate after systemic injection of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline (control) or MSG (10 and 50mg/kg) was measured with a glutamate-selective biosensor. The pre-injection baseline interstitial concentration of glutamate in the rat masseter muscle was 24+/-11 microM. Peak interstitial concentration after injection of 50mg/kg MSG was 63+/-18 microM and remained elevated above baseline for approximately 18 min. In vivo single unit recording experiments were undertaken to assess the effect of MSG (50mg/kg) on masseter afferent fibers. Injection of MSG evoked a brief discharge in one afferent fiber, and significantly decreased ( approximately 25%) the average afferent mechanical threshold (n=10) during the first 5 min after injection of MSG. Intravenous injection of ketamine (1mg/kg), 5 min prior to MSG, prevented the MSG-induced decreases in the mechanical threshold of masseter afferent fibers. The present results indicate that a 2- to 3-fold elevation in interstitial glutamate levels in the masseter muscle is sufficient to excite and induce afferent mechanical sensitization through NMDA receptor activation. These findings suggest that modest elevations of interstitial glutamate concentration could alter musculoskeletal pain sensitivity in humans.

  3. Finite post synaptic potentials cause a fast neuronal response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz eHelias

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A generic property of the communication between neurons is the exchange of pulsesat discrete time points, the action potentials. However, the prevalenttheory of spiking neuronal networks of integrate-and-fire model neuronsrelies on two assumptions: the superposition of many afferent synapticimpulses is approximated by Gaussian white noise, equivalent to avanishing magnitude of the synaptic impulses, and the transfer oftime varying signals by neurons is assessable by linearization. Goingbeyond both approximations, we find that in the presence of synapticimpulses the response to transient inputs differs qualitatively fromprevious predictions. It is instantaneous rather than exhibiting low-passcharacteristics, depends non-linearly on the amplitude of the impulse,is asymmetric for excitation and inhibition and is promoted by a characteristiclevel of synaptic background noise. These findings resolve contradictionsbetween the earlier theory and experimental observations. Here wereview the recent theoretical progress that enabled these insights.We explain why the membrane potential near threshold is sensitiveto properties of the afferent noise and show how this shapes the neuralresponse. A further extension of the theory to time evolution in discretesteps quantifies simulation artifacts and yields improved methodsto cross check results.

  4. Long-term depression of nociceptive synapses by non-nociceptive afferent activity: role of endocannabinoids, Ca²+, and calcineurin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Sharleen; Burrell, Brian D

    2012-06-15

    Activity in non-nociceptive afferents is known to produce long-lasting decreases in nociceptive signaling, often referred to as gate control, but the cellular mechanisms mediating this form of neuroplasticity are poorly understood. In the leech, activation of non-nociceptive touch (T) mechanosensory neurons induces a heterosynaptic depression of nociceptive (N) synapses that is endocannabinoid-dependent. This heterosynaptic, endocannabinoid-dependent long-term depression (ecLTD) is observed where the T- and N-cells converge on a common postsynaptic target, in this case the motor neuron that innervates the longitudinal muscles (L-cells) that contributes to a defensive withdrawal reflex. Depression in the nociceptive synapse required both presynaptic and postsynaptic increases in intracellular Ca²⁺. Activation of the Ca²⁺-sensitive protein phosphatase calcineurin was also required, but only in the presynaptic neuron. Heterosynaptic ecLTD was unaffected by antagonists for NMDA or metabotropic glutamate receptors, but was blocked by the 5-HT₂ receptor antagonist ritanserin. Depression was also blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant, but this is thought to represent an effect on a TRPV-like receptor. This heterosynaptic, endocannabinoid-dependent modulation of nociceptive synapses represents a novel mechanism for regulating how injury-inducing or painful stimuli are transmitted to the rest of the central nervous system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. How Vestibular Neurons Solve the Tilt/Translation Ambiguity: Comparison of Brainstem, Cerebellum, and Thalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Dora E. Angelaki; Yakusheva, Tatyana A.

    2009-01-01

    The peripheral vestibular system is faced by a sensory ambiguity, where primary otolith afferents respond identically to translational (inertial) accelerations and changes in head orientation relative to gravity. Under certain conditions, this sensory ambiguity can be resolved using extra-otolith cues, including semicircular canal signals. Here we review and summarize how neurons in the vestibular nuclei, rostral fastigial nuclei, cerebellar nodulus/uvula, and thalamus respond during combinat...

  6. Impaired heart rate variability in patients with non-diabetic chronic kidney disease — Prominent disruption of vagal control and daily fluctuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisaki Makimoto

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: The circadian autonomic, particularly vagal, fluctuations were impaired in non-diabetic CKD patients independently from aging and comorbidities. Further research is required to assess the association between this impairment and prognosis of CKD patients.

  7. Cardiac vagal control and theoretical models of co-occurring depression and anxiety: a cross-sectional psychophysiological study of community elderly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Hsi-Chung; Yang, Cheryl C H; Kuo, Terry B J; Su, Tung-Ping; Chou, Pesus

    2012-01-01

    In order to elucidate the complex relationship between co-occurring depression and anxiety with cardiac autonomic function in the elderly, this study examined the correlation between cardiac vagal control (CVC...

  8. Cold-Sensitive Corneal Afferents Respond to a Variety of Ocular Stimuli Central to Tear Production: Implications for Dry Eye Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hirata, Harumitsu; Meng, Ian D.

    2010-01-01

    Innocuous “cold” cornea afferents were excited by the ocular stimuli (drying, cooling, evaporation, and hyperosmolar stress of the cornea) that normally produce tears. Dysfunction of these corneal afferents may be responsible for some forms of dry eye.

  9. Emergent synchronous bursting of oxytocin neuronal network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Rossoni

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available When young suckle, they are rewarded intermittently with a let-down of milk that results from reflex secretion of the hormone oxytocin; without oxytocin, newly born young will die unless they are fostered. Oxytocin is made by magnocellular hypothalamic neurons, and is secreted from their nerve endings in the pituitary in response to action potentials (spikes that are generated in the cell bodies and which are propagated down their axons to the nerve endings. Normally, oxytocin cells discharge asynchronously at 1-3 spikes/s, but during suckling, every 5 min or so, each discharges a brief, intense burst of spikes that release a pulse of oxytocin into the circulation. This reflex was the first, and is perhaps the best, example of a physiological role for peptide-mediated communication within the brain: it is coordinated by the release of oxytocin from the dendrites of oxytocin cells; it can be facilitated by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin into the hypothalamus, and it can be blocked by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin antagonist. Here we show how synchronized bursting can arise in a neuronal network model that incorporates basic observations of the physiology of oxytocin cells. In our model, bursting is an emergent behaviour of a complex system, involving both positive and negative feedbacks, between many sparsely connected cells. The oxytocin cells are regulated by independent afferent inputs, but they interact by local release of oxytocin and endocannabinoids. Oxytocin released from the dendrites of these cells has a positive-feedback effect, while endocannabinoids have an inhibitory effect by suppressing the afferent input to the cells.

  10. Na+-independent, nifedipine-resistant rat afferent arteriolar Ca2+ responses to noradrenaline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsson, Max; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aim: In rat afferent arterioles we investigated the role of Na(+) entry in noradrenaline (NA)-induced depolarization and voltage-dependent Ca(2+) entry together with the importance of the transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) subfamily for non-voltage-dependent Ca(2+) entry. Methods...

  11. Afferent and efferent activity control in the design of brain computer interfaces for motor rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Woosang; Vidaurre, Carmen; Hoffmann, Ulrich; Birbaumer, Niels; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a cardiovascular accident within the brain resulting in motor and sensory impairment in most of the survivors. A stroke can produce complete paralysis of the limb although sensory abilities are normally preserved. Functional electrical stimulation (FES), robotics and brain computer interfaces (BCIs) have been used to induce motor rehabilitation. In this work we measured the brain activity of healthy volunteers using electroencephalography (EEG) during FES, passive movements, active movements, motor imagery of the hand and resting to compare afferent and efferent brain signals produced during these motor related activities and to define possible features for an online FES-BCI. In the conditions in which the hand was moved we limited the movement range in order to control the afferent flow. Although we observed that there is a subject dependent frequency and spatial distribution of efferent and afferent signals, common patterns between conditions and subjects were present mainly in the low beta frequency range. When averaging all the subjects together the most significant frequency bin comparing each condition versus rest was exactly the same for all conditions but motor imagery. These results suggest that to implement an on-line FES-BCI, afferent brain signals resulting from FES have to be filtered and time-frequency-spatial features need to be used.

  12. Inhibitory mechanisms following electrical stimulation of tendon and cutaneous afferents in the lower limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Serajul I; Burne, John A

    2010-01-13

    Electrical stimulation of the Achilles tendon (TES) produced strong reflex depression (duration>250 ms) of a small background contraction in both heads of gastrocnemius (GA) via large diameter electrodes localized to the tendon. The inhibitory responses were produced without electrical (M wave) or mechanical (muscle twitch) signs of direct muscle stimulation. In this study, the contribution of presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms to the depression was investigated by studying conditioning effects of tendon afferent stimulation on the mechanical tendon reflex (TR) and magnetic motor evoked potential (MEP). TES completely inhibited the TR over an ISI of 300 ms that commenced before and continued during and after the period of voluntary EMG depression. Tendon afferent conditioning stimuli also partially inhibited the MEP, but over a short time course confined to the period of voluntary EMG depression. The strength and extended time course of tendon afferent conditioning of the TR and its failure to produce a similar depression of the MEP are consistent with a mechanism involving presynaptic inhibition of Ia terminals. Cutaneous (sural nerve) afferent conditioning partially inhibited the TR and MEP over a short time course (ISI origin of cutaneous inhibition of the motoneurons.

  13. AFFERENT RESPONSE OF A HEAD CANAL NEUROMAST OF THE RUFF (ACERINA-CERNUA) LATERAL LINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WUBBELS, RJ

    1. The fourth neuromast of the supra-orbital canal of the ruff lateral line is innervated by 300-400 fibres. 2. Afferent activity of 46 fibres was investigated as a function of stimulus amplitude and of stimulus frequency. 3. The dynamic range of the fibres exceeded 30 dB. 4. The gain with respect

  14. Activation and inhibition of the micturition reflex by penile afferents in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woock, John P; Yoo, Paul B; Grill, Warren M

    2008-06-01

    Coordination of the urinary bladder and the external urethral sphincter is controlled by descending projections from the pons and is also subject to modulation by segmental afferents. We quantified the effects on the micturition reflex of sensory inputs from genital afferents traveling in the penile component of the somatic pudendal nerve by electrical stimulation of the dorsal nerve of the penis (DNP) in alpha-chloralose anesthetized male cats. Depending on the frequency of stimulation (range, 1-40 Hz), activation of penile afferents either inhibited contractions of the bladder and promoted urine storage or activated the bladder and produced micturition. Stimulation of the DNP at 5-10 Hz inhibited distension-evoked contractions and increased the maximum bladder capacity before incontinence. Conversely, stimulation at 33 and 40 Hz augmented distension-evoked contractions. When the bladder was filled above a threshold volume (70% of the volume necessary for distension-evoked contractions), stimulation at 20-40 Hz activated de novo the micturition reflex and elicited detrusor contractions that increased voiding efficiency compared with distension-evoked voiding. Electrical stimulation of the DNP with a cuff electrode or percutaneous wire electrode produced similar results. The ability to evoke detrusor contractions by activation of the DNP was preserved following acute spinal cord transection. These results demonstrate a clear role of genital afferents in modulating the micturition reflex and suggest the DNP as a potential target for functional restoration of bladder control using electrical stimulation.

  15. Three-dimensional analysis of vestibular efferent neurons innervating semicircular canals of the gerbil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, I. M.; Perachio, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    Anterograde labeling techniques were used to examine peripheral innervation patterns of vestibular efferent neurons in the crista ampullares of the gerbil. Vestibular efferent neurons were labeled by extracellular injections of biocytin or biotinylated dextran amine into the contralateral or ipsilateral dorsal subgroup of efferent cell bodies (group e) located dorsolateral to the facial nerve genu. Anterogradely labeled efferent terminal field varicosities consist mainly of boutons en passant with fewer of the terminal type. The bouton swellings are located predominately in apposition to the basolateral borders of the afferent calyces and type II hair cells, but several boutons were identified close to the hair cell apical border on both types. Three-dimensional reconstruction and morphological analysis of the terminal fields from these cells located in the sensory neuroepithelium of the anterior, horizontal, and posterior cristae were performed. We show that efferent neurons densely innervate each end organ in widespread terminal fields. Subepithelial bifurcations of parent axons were minimal, with extensive collateralization occurring after the axons penetrated the basement membrane of the neuroepithelium. Axonal branching ranged between the 6th and 27th orders and terminal field collecting area far exceeds that of the peripheral terminals of primary afferent neurons. The terminal fields of the efferent neurons display three morphologically heterogeneous types: central, peripheral, and planum. All cell types possess terminal fields displaying a high degree of anisotropy with orientations typically parallel to or within +/-45 degrees of the longitudinal axis if the crista. Terminal fields of the central and planum zones predominately project medially toward the transverse axis from the more laterally located penetration of the basement membrane by the parent axon. Peripheral zone terminal fields extend predominately toward the planum semilunatum. The innervation

  16. Gastric distension causes changes in heart rate and arterial blood pressure by affecting the crosstalk between vagal and splanchnic systems in anesthetised rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatini, Maurizio; Grossini, Elena; Molinari, Claudio; Mary, David A S G; Vacca, Giovanni; Cannas, Mario

    2017-04-01

    Various hindbrain nuclei have been demonstrated to be involved in the control of the cardiovascular reflexes elicited by both non-noxious and noxious gastric distension, through parasympathetic and sympathetic activation. The different role played by the branches of autonomic nervous system in exerting these effects and their crosstalk in relation to low-/high-pressure distension rate has not been examined yet. Therefore, in the present work, monolateral and bilateral vagotomy and splanchnicotomy were performed in anesthetised rats to analyse the involvement of hindbrain nuclei in haemodynamic changes caused by gastric distension at high (80 mmHg) and low (15 mmHg) pressure. The analysis of c-Fos expression in neuronal areas involved in cardiovascular control allowed us to examine their recruitment in response to various patterns of gastric distension and the crosstalk between vagal and splanchnic systems. The results obtained show that the low-pressure (non-noxious) gastric distension increases both heart rate and arterial blood pressure. In addition, the vagus nerve and hindbrain nuclei, such as nucleus ambiguous, ventrolateral medulla and lateral reticular nucleus, appear to be primarily involved in observed responses. In particular, we have found that although vagus nerve plays a central role in exerting those cardiovascular reflex changes at low gastric distension, for its functional expression an intact splanchnic system is mandatory. Hence, the absence of splanchnic input attenuates pressor responses or turns them into depressor responses. Instead at high-pressure (noxious) gastric distension, the splanchnic nerve represents the primary component in regulating the reflex cardiovascular effects.

  17. The Molecular Fingerprint of Dorsal Root and Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M. Lopes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The dorsal root ganglia (DRG and trigeminal ganglia (TG are clusters of cell bodies of highly specialized sensory neurons which are responsible for relaying information about our environment to the central nervous system. Despite previous efforts to characterize sensory neurons at the molecular level, it is still unknown whether those present in DRG and TG have distinct expression profiles and therefore a unique molecular fingerprint. To address this question, we isolated lumbar DRG and TG neurons using fluorescence-activated cell sorting from Advillin-GFP transgenic mice and performed RNA sequencing. Our transcriptome analyses showed that, despite being overwhelmingly similar, a number of genes are differentially expressed in DRG and TG neurons. Importantly, we identified 24 genes which were uniquely expressed in either ganglia, including an arginine vasopressin receptor and several homeobox genes, giving each population a distinct molecular fingerprint. We compared our findings with published studies to reveal that many genes previously reported to be present in neurons are in fact likely to originate from other cell types in the ganglia. Additionally, our neuron-specific results aligned well with a dataset examining whole human TG and DRG. We propose that the data can both improve our understanding of primary afferent biology and help contribute to the development of drug treatments and gene therapies which seek targets with unique or restricted expression patterns.

  18. Control of refractory status epilepticus precipitated by anticonvulsant withdrawal using left vagal nerve stimulation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Ravish V; Dellabadia, John; Rashidi, Mahmoud; Grier, Laurie; Nanda, Anil

    2005-08-01

    To describe a case of left vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) resulting in immediate cessation of status epilepticus (SE) with good neurological outcome. A 30-year-old man with medically intractable seizures including episodes of SE was successfully treated using left VNS. After requiring discontinuation of phenytoin, valproic acid, carbamazepine, and topiramate because of severe allergic reactions resembling Stevens-Johnson syndrome, the patient required pentobarbital coma along with phenobarbital, tiagabine, and levetiracetam for seizure frequency reduction. He underwent left vagal nerve stimulator placement after nearly 9 days of barbiturate-induced coma, with stimulation initiated in the operating room. On the following day, electroencephalography revealed resolution of previously observed periodic lateral epileptiform discharges and the patient was free of seizures. Prestimulation seizure frequency was recorded at 59 times a day, with some seizures enduring 45 minutes despite barbiturate coma. Poststimulation, the patient has been free of seizures for 19 days and is presently taking only levetiracetam and phenobarbital, from which he continues to be successfully weaned without seizures. He is awake, alert, and can recall events leading up to his seizures, with good long-term memory and residual left upper extremity and lower extremity weakness. This case illustrates the role of left vagal stimulation in the treatment of SE and otherwise medically intractable seizures caused by allergic reactions. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the world literature for adults reporting cessation of SE after VNS. Another case with a similar improvement has been reported in the pediatric population.

  19. Detection of weak synaptic interactions between single Ia afferent and motor-unit spike trains in the decerebrate cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, B A; Halliday, D M; Rosenberg, J R

    1993-11-01

    1. Spike trains from identified single Ia afferents from soleus and lateral gastrocnemius muscles were recorded (while 'in continuity' with the spinal cord) simultaneously with single-motor-unit EMG spike trains from the same muscles in decerebrate cats. 2. A total of 143 Ia afferent-motor-unit pairs were examined for the presence of correlated activity between the Ia afferent and motor-unit and between the motor-unit and Ia afferent. Four types of correlation were identified on the basis of the cross-intensity function estimated for individual Ia afferent-motor-unit pairs. These correlations were attributed to the absence or presence of a central Ia afferent-motoneurone interaction or a peripheral motor-unit-muscle spindle interaction. 3. In addition to the cross-correlation-based second-order cross-intensity function, third-order cumulants were defined and used further to investigate Ia afferent-motor-unit interactions. A third-order cumulant density-based approach to signal processing offers improved signal-to-noise ratios, compared with the traditional product density approach, for parameters characterizing certain kinds of linear processes as well as a description of non-linear interactions. Two classes of third-order relations were described. One class was associated with a strong central connection and the other with a weak central connection. 4. Third-order cumulants estimated for Ia afferent-motor-unit pairs with significant second-order central correlations were able to detect a period of decreased motoneuronal excitability. In addition, temporal summation prior to spike initiation could be identified in cases where the afferent discharge was suitably high. 5. Third-order cumulants estimated for Ia afferent-motor-unit pairs in which no significant second-order central correlation existed identified the presence of weak synaptic interactions. It is argued that these interactions result from the summation from the recorded Ia afferent discharge and other

  20. Comparação entre métodos de avaliação da modulação vagal cardíaca Comparison of assessment methods of cardiac vagal modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagner Clayton de Paiva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: Diversos métodos têm sido utilizados para avaliar a modulação vagal cardíaca; entretanto, há lacunas quanto a associação e acurácia desses métodos. OBJETIVO: Investigar a associação entre três métodos válidos, reprodutíveis e comumente utilizados para avaliação da modulação vagal cardíaca, e comparar as suas acurácias. MÉTODOS: Trinta homens saudáveis (23 ± 4 anos e 15 homens com coronariopatia (61 ± 10 anos foram avaliados em ordem contrabalanceada pela Variabilidade da Frequência Cardíaca (VFC; variáveis: domínio do tempo = pNN50, DPNN e RMSSD, domínio da frequência = AF ms² e AF u.n., Arritmia Sinusal Respiratória (ASR e Teste de Exercício de 4 segundos (T4s. RESULTADOS: Indivíduos saudáveis apresentaram maior modulação vagal nos três métodos (p BACKGROUND: Several methods have been used to assess cardiac vagal modulation, but there are gaps regarding the association and accuracy of these methods. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between three valid, reproducible and commonly methods used to assess cardiac vagal modulation and compare their accuracies. METHODS: Thirty healthy men (23 ± 4 years and 15 men with coronary artery disease (61 ± 10 years were evaluated in counterbalanced design by Heart Rate Variability (HRV; variables: the time domain = pNN50, SDNN and RMSSD, the frequency domain HF = ms² and HF n.u., Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA and 4-second Exercise Test (T4s. Thirty healthy men (23 ± 4 years and 15 men with coronary artery disease (61 ± 10 years were evaluated in counterbalanced order by Heart Rate Variability (HRV; variables: the time domain = pNN50, SDNN and RMSSD, the frequency domain HF = ms² and HF n.u., Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA and 4-second Exercise Test (T4s. RESULTS: Healthy subjects had higher vagal modulation by the three methods (p <0.05. There was a correlation in the healthy group (p <0.05 between the results of HRV (SDNN and pNN50 and

  1. BET 2: Ice water immersion, other vagal manoeuvres or adenosine for SVT in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Marion; Buitrago, Silvia Ruiz

    2017-01-01

    A short cut review was carried out to establish whether a vagal manoeuvre was better than or as good as adenosine at safely terminating supraventricular tachycardia in children. Forty unique papers were found in Medline and Embase using the reported searches, of which five were relevant. A hand search of the forty unique citations identified a further nine relevant papers. Thus, 14 papers presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these best papers are tabulated. It is concluded that the evidence on the management of SVT in children is made up of poor-quality retrospective cohort studies or case series. This best evidence shows that ice water to the face appears to be a safe, quick, effective and non-invasive treatment for paediatric SVT. Adenosine also appears safe and effective, but is more invasive. Valsalva and carotid sinus massage are less effective. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Early determinants of vagal activity at preschool age - With potential dependence on sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühne, Britta; Genser, Bernd; De Bock, Freia

    2016-12-01

    In children, autonomic nervous function is related to various highly prevalent health problems and might therefore represent an early indicator of ill health. We aimed to investigate the role of early-life exposures and physical activity (PA) as potential determinants of autonomic function at preschool age. We used an existing longitudinal data set of repeated vagal tone measurements (assessed via heart rate recovery (HRR)) and retrospectively assessed early-life exposures in 1052 children (mean age: 59.4months, 47.5% girls) from 52 preschools in Germany recruited from 2008 to 2010. HRR 1min after submaximal exercise served as primary outcome. Through multilevel linear regression analysis adjusted for demographic and socioeconomic factors, we assessed the association between repeatedly measured HRR and pregnancy smoking status, breastfeeding and objectively measured PA. Besides significant regression coefficients for previously described correlates of HRR (sex, age), we could show positive associations of HRR with breastfeeding (six versus zero months: +4.2 beats per minute (BPM), p=0.004) and PA (+1.0BPM for 10min increase of moderate-to-vigorous PA/day, pearly pre- and postnatal exposures seem to have long-lasting effects on children's autonomic function, still recordable at preschool age. Our data suggest that these effects might be sex-dependent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Urban air pollution targets the dorsal vagal complex and dark chocolate offers neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal-Calderon, Rafael; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Palacios-Moreno, Juan; Osnaya, Norma; Pérez-Guillé, Beatriz; Maronpot, Robert R; Reed, William; Zhu, Hongtu; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian

    2010-12-01

    Mexico City (MC) residents exposed to fine particulate matter and endotoxin exhibit inflammation of the olfactory bulb, substantia nigra, and vagus nerve. The goal of this study was to model these endpoints in mice and examine the neuroprotective effects of chocolate. Mice exposed to MC air received no treatment or oral dark chocolate and were compared to clean-air mice either untreated or treated intraperitoneally with endotoxin. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), and CD14 messenger RNA (mRNA) were quantified after 4, 8, and 16 months of exposure in target brain regions. After 16 months of exposure, the dorsal vagal complex (DVC) exhibited significant inflammation in endotoxin-treated and MC mice (COX-2 and IL-1β PMexico City mice had olfactory bulb upregulation of CD14 (P=.002) and significant DVC imbalance in genes for antioxidant defenses, apoptosis, and neurodegeneration. These findings demonstrate sustained DVC inflammation in mice exposed to MC air, which is mitigated by chocolate administration. © The Author(s) 2010

  4. Mothers' Vagal Regulation During the Still-Face Paradigm: Normative Reactivity and Impact of Depression Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, Julia E.; Measelle, Jeffrey R.; Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Ablow, Jennifer C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined mothers' physiological reactivity in response to infant distress during the Still-Face Paradigm. We aimed to explore normative regulatory profiles and associated physiological and behavioral processes in order to further our understanding of what constitutes regulation in this dyadic context. We examined physiological patterns—vagal tone, indexed by respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA)-- while mothers maintained a neutral expression over the course of the still face episode, as well as differential reactivity patterns in mothers with depression symptoms compared to non-depressed mothers. Behavioral and physiological data were collected from mothers of 5-month-old infants during the emotion suppression phase of the Still-Face Paradigm. We used Hierarchical Linear Modeling to examine changes in mothers' RSA during infant distress and explored maternal depression as a predictor of physiological profiles. Mothers were generally able to maintain a neutral expression and simultaneously demonstrated a mean-level increase in RSA during the still face episode compared to baseline, indicating an active regulatory response overall. A more detailed time-course examination of RSA trajectories revealed that an initial RSA increase was typically followed by a decrease in response to peak infant distress, suggesting a physiological mobilization response. However, this was not true of mothers with elevated depressive symptoms, who showed no change in RSA during infant distress. These distinct patterns of infant distress-related physiological activation may help to explain differences in maternal sensitivity and adaptive parenting. PMID:23454427

  5. Attenuation of human carotid-cardiac vagal baroreflex responses after physical detraining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Fritsch, Janice M.

    1992-01-01

    Astronauts who are occupied with prelaunch schedules may have to limit their regular physical exercise routines. To assess a potential effect on blood pressure control, carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses of 16 men were evaluated before and after two weeks of exercise detraining that followed ten weeks of regular scheduled exercise (30 min/d, 4 d/week at 75 percent V(O2) max). After detraining, the baroreflex stimulus-response relationship had a reduced slope 0.4 msec/mmHg and range of response. In addition, there was a resetting of the relationship on the R-R interval axis. Both the minimum and maximum R-R interval responses to the stimulus were significantly reduced after detraining. Baseline systolic pressure did not change with detraining, and the carotid baroreceptor-cardiac response relationship did not shift on the pressure axis. These results suggest that detraining from regular exercise can compromise vagally-mediated mechanisms of blood pressure regulation.

  6. Insulin signals through the dorsal vagal complex to regulate energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Beatrice M; Bassiri, Aria; Abraham, Mona A; Duca, Frank A; Yue, Jessica T Y; Lam, Tony K T

    2014-03-01

    Insulin signaling in the hypothalamus regulates food intake and hepatic glucose production in rodents. Although it is known that insulin also activates insulin receptor in the dorsal vagal complex (DVC) to lower glucose production through an extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2)-dependent and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-independent pathway, it is unknown whether DVC insulin action regulates food intake. We report here that a single acute infusion of insulin into the DVC decreased food intake in healthy male rats. Chemical and molecular inhibition of Erk1/2 signaling in the DVC negated the acute anorectic effect of insulin in healthy rats, while DVC insulin acute infusion failed to lower food intake in high fat-fed rats. Finally, molecular disruption of Erk1/2 signaling in the DVC of healthy rats per se increased food intake and induced obesity over a period of 2 weeks, whereas a daily repeated acute DVC insulin infusion for 12 days conversely decreased food intake and body weight in healthy rats. In summary, insulin activates Erk1/2 signaling in the DVC to regulate energy balance.

  7. High cardiac vagal control is related to better subjective and objective sleep quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Gabriela G.; Ford, Brett Q.; Mauss, Iris B.; Schabus, Manuel; Blechert, Jens; Wilhelm, Frank H.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac vagal control (CVC) has been linked to both physical and mental health. One critical aspect of health, that has not received much attention, is sleep. We hypothesized that adults with higher CVC – operationalized by high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) – will exhibit better sleep quality assessed both subjectively (i.e., with Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and objectively (i.e., with polysomnography). HF-HRV was measured in 29 healthy young women during an extended neutral film clip. Participants then underwent full polysomnography to obtain objective measures of sleep quality and HF-HRV during a night of sleep. As expected, higher resting HF-HRV was associated with higher subjective and objective sleep quality (i.e., shorter sleep latency and fewer arousals). HF-HRV during sleep (overall or separated by sleep phases) showed less consistent relationships with sleep quality. These findings indicate that high waking CVC may be a key predictor of healthy sleep. PMID:25709072

  8. Different frequencies of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on sympatho-vagal balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Trevisan de Nardi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the effects of TENS at different frequencies on autonomic balance in healthy volunteers. It is a case-control study, and was composed of fourteen healthy volunteers (5 women with 28 (3.9 years old who underwent low (10 Hz 200ms-1 and high (100 Hz 200ms-1 frequency TENS. The interventions were randomized and applied for 30 minutes in the trajectory brachial nerve plexus from non-dominant member. Intensities were adjusted every 5 minutes and maintained below motor threshold. The autonomic balance was assessed before and after interventions by heart rate variability (HRV. TENS 10 Hz increased 10% sympathetic activity and decreased 10% parasympathetic activity; however, TENS 100 Hz showed opposite effects (p < 0.05. The sympatho-vagal balance increased with low frequency TENS and decreased with high frequency (p < 0.05. It can be concluded that different frequencies of TENS applied in the trajectory brachial nerve plexus modify cardiovascular autonomic responses. High frequency TENS reduces sympathetic activity and increases the parasympathetic, which favors beneficial effects on autonomic balance in healthy volunteers.

  9. Cardiac vagal tone is associated with social engagement and self-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Fay C M; Kubiak, Thomas; Siewert, Kerstin; Weber, Hannelore

    2013-05-01

    The polyvagal theory (Porges, 2007) represents a biobehavioral model that relates autonomic functioning to self-regulation and social engagement. The aim of the two presented studies was to test the proposed association of cardiac vagal tone (CVT), assessed via resting high-frequency heart rate variability (respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA), with coping, emotion-regulation, and social engagement in young adults. In Study 1 (retrospective self-report), RSA was positively associated with engagement coping (situation control, response control, positive self-instructions, social-support seeking) and aspects of social well-being. In Study 2 (ecological momentary assessment), for 28 days following the initial assessment, RSA predicted less use of disengagement strategies (acceptance and avoidance) for regulating negative emotions and more use of socially adaptive emotion-regulation strategies (i.e., social-support seeking as a reaction to sadness and making a concession as a reaction to anger caused by others). Furthermore, RSA was higher in participants who reported no anger episodes compared to those who reported at least one anger episode and was positively associated with reported episodes of negative emotions. Results support the association proposed by the PVT between CVT and self-regulatory behavior, which promotes social bonds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanical stress activates neurites and somata of myenteric neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Kugler

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The particular location of myenteric neurons, sandwiched between the 2 muscle layers of the gut, implies that their somata and neurites undergo mechanical stress during gastrointestinal motility. Existence of mechanosensitive enteric neurons (MEN is undoubted but many of their basic features remain to be studied. In this study, we used ultra-fast neuroimaging to record activity of primary cultured myenteric neurons of guinea pig and human intestine after von Frey hair evoked deformation of neurites and somata. Independent component analysis was applied to reconstruct neuronal morphology and follow neuronal signals. Of the cultured neurons 45% (114 out of 256, 30 guinea pigs responded to neurite probing with a burst spike frequency of 13.4 Hz. Action potentials generated at the stimulation site invaded the soma and other neurites. Mechanosensitive sites were expressed across large areas of neurites. Many mechanosensitive neurites appeared to have afferent and efferent functions as those that responded to deformation also conducted spikes coming from the soma. Mechanosensitive neurites were also activated by nicotine application. This supported the concept of multifunctional MEN. 14% of the neurons (13 out of 96, 18 guinea pigs responded to soma deformation with burst spike discharge of 17.9 Hz. Firing of MEN adapted rapidly (RAMEN, slowly (SAMEN or ultra-slowly (USAMEN. The majority of MEN showed SAMEN behavior although significantly more RAMEN occurred after neurite probing. Cultured myenteric neurons from human intestine had similar properties. Compared to MEN, dorsal root ganglion neurons were activated by neurite but not by soma deformation with slow adaptation of firing. We demonstrated that MEN exhibit specific features very likely reflecting adaptation to their specialized functions in the gut.

  11. Human Cerebral Cortex Cajal-Retzius Neuron: Development, Structure and Function. A Golgi Study

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    Miguel eMarín-Padilla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The development, morphology and possible functional activity of the Cajal-Retzius cell of the developing human cerebral cortex have been explored herein. The C-RC, of extracortical origin, is the essential neuron of the neocortex first lamina. It receives inputs from subcortical afferent fibers that reach the first lamina early in development. Although the origin and function of these original afferent fibers remain unknown, they target the first lamina sole neuron: the C-RC. The neuron’ orchestrates the arrival, size and stratification of all pyramidal neurons (from ependymal origin of the neocortex gray matter. Its axonic terminals spread radially and horizontally throughout the entire first lamina establishing contacts with the dendritic terminals of all gray matter pyramidal cells regardless of size, location and/or eventual functional roles. While the neuron axonic terminals spread radially and horizontally throughout the first lamina, the neuron’ bodies undergoes progressive developmental dilution and locating any of them in the adult brain become quite difficult. The neuron bodies are probably retained in the older regions of the developing neocortex while their axonic collaterals will spread throughout its more recent ones that, eventually, will represent the great majority of the brain surface. This will explain their bodies progressive dilution in the developing neocortex and, later, in the adult brain. Although quite difficult to locate the body of any of them, they have been described in the adult brain.

  12. Sensory modulation of the medial preoptic area neuronal activity by dorsal penile nerve stimulation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, H N; Manchanda, S K; Kumar, V M

    1994-03-01

    The study was aimed at finding out the influence exerted by the genital afferents on the medial preoptic area (mPOA), which plays a pivotal role in the regulation of male sex behavior. To fulfil this objective, the effects of stimulation of the dorsal penile nerve (DPN) on the activity of 82 mPOA neurons were studied. The base line firing rates of the mPOA neurons, studied by extracellular recording, ranged between 0.5 and 38.5 Hz (mean 7.18 +/- 7.91). The stimulation of the DPN (20 Hz, 0.4 msec. 70 microA) influenced 79.69% of the neurons studied. Though increased firing was the predominant influence produced (50%), decreased firing was also seen in a few (29.69%). The excited and inhibited neurons were randomly distributed within the mPOA. Neurons located in the lateral and posterior hypothalamus were not affected by the DPN stimulation. The stimulation parameters used in this study did not produce any change in the systemic arterial pressure and heart rate. The results provide electrophysiological evidence of afferent inputs from the male sex organ to the mPOA, which is an important area controlling male sex behavior.

  13. Serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline adjust actions of myelinated afferents via modulation of presynaptic inhibition in the mouse spinal cord.

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    David L García-Ramírez

    Full Text Available Gain control of primary afferent neurotransmission at their intraspinal terminals occurs by several mechanisms including primary afferent depolarization (PAD. PAD produces presynaptic inhibition via a reduction in transmitter release. While it is known that descending monoaminergic pathways complexly regulate sensory processing, the extent these actions include modulation of afferent-evoked PAD remains uncertain. We investigated the effects of serotonin (5HT, dopamine (DA and noradrenaline (NA on afferent transmission and PAD. Responses were evoked by stimulation of myelinated hindlimb cutaneous and muscle afferents in the isolated neonatal mouse spinal cord. Monosynaptic responses were examined in the deep dorsal horn either as population excitatory synaptic responses (recorded as extracellular field potentials; EFPs or intracellular excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs. The magnitude of PAD generated intraspinally was estimated from electrotonically back-propagating dorsal root potentials (DRPs recorded on lumbar dorsal roots. 5HT depressed the DRP by 76%. Monosynaptic actions were similarly depressed by 5HT (EFPs 54%; EPSCs 75% but with a slower time course. This suggests that depression of monosynaptic EFPs and DRPs occurs by independent mechanisms. DA and NA had similar depressant actions on DRPs but weaker effects on EFPs. IC50 values for DRP depression were 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 µM for 5HT, DA and NA, respectively. Depression of DRPs by monoamines was nearly-identical in both muscle and cutaneous afferent-evoked responses, supporting a global modulation of the multimodal afferents stimulated. 5HT, DA and NA produced no change in the compound antidromic potentials evoked by intraspinal microstimulation indicating that depression of the DRP is unrelated to direct changes in the excitability of intraspinal afferent fibers, but due to metabotropic receptor activation. In summary, both myelinated afferent-evoked DRPs and monosynaptic

  14. Tau Pathology Spread in PS19 Tau Transgenic Mice Following Locus Coeruleus (LC) Injections of Synthetic Tau Fibrils is Determined by the LC’s Afferent and Efferent Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iba, Michiyo; McBride, Jennifer D.; Guo, Jing L.; Zhang, Bin; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous tau inclusions are hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative tauopathies. An increasing number of studies implicate the cell-to-cell propagation of tau pathology in the progression of tauopathies. We recently showed [25] that inoculation of preformed synthetic tau fibrils (tau PFFs) into the hippocampus of young transgenic (Tg) mice (PS19) overexpressing human P301S mutant tau induced robust tau pathology in anatomically connected brain regions including the locus coeruleus (LC). Since Braak and colleagues hypothesized that the LC is the first brain structure to develop tau lesions and since LC has widespread connections throughout the CNS, LC neurons could be the critical initiators of the stereotypical spreading of tau pathology through connectome-dependent transmission of pathological tau in AD. Here, we report that injections of tau PFFs into the LC of PS19 mice induced propagation of tau pathology to major afferents and efferents of the LC. Notably, tau pathology propagated along LC efferent projections was localized not only to axon terminals but also to neuronal perikarya, suggesting transneuronal transfer of templated tau pathology to neurons receiving LC projections. Further, brainstem neurons giving rise to major LC afferents also developed perikaryal tau pathology. Surprisingly, while tangle bearing neurons degenerated in the LC ipsilateral to the injection site starting 6 months post-injection, no neuron loss was seen in the contralateral LC wherein tangle bearing neurons gradually cleared tau pathology by 6–12 months post-injection. However, the spreading pattern of tau pathology observed in our LC-injected mice is different from that in AD brains since hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, which are affected in early stages of AD, were largely spared of tau inclusions in our model. Thus, while our study tested critical aspects of the Braak hypothesis of tau pathology spread, this novel mouse model provides unique

  15. Development of an ex Vivo Method for Multi-unit Recording of Microbiota-Colonic-Neural Signaling in Real Time

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    Maria M. Buckley

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Bidirectional signaling between the gastrointestinal tract and the brain is vital for maintaining whole-body homeostasis. Moreover, emerging evidence implicates vagal afferent signaling in the modulation of host physiology by microbes, which are most abundant in the colon. This study aims to optimize and advance dissection and recording techniques to facilitate real-time recordings of afferent neural signals originating in the distal colon.New Protocol: This paper describes a dissection technique, which facilitates extracellular electrophysiological recordings from visceral pelvic, spinal and vagal afferent neurons in response to stimulation of the distal colon.Examples of Application: Focal application of 75 mM KCl to a section of distal colon with exposed submucosal or myenteric nerve cell bodies and sensory nerve endings evoked activity in the superior mesenteric plexus and the vagal nerve. Noradrenaline stimulated nerve activity in the superior mesenteric plexus, whereas application of carbachol stimulated vagal nerve activity. Exposure of an ex vivo section of distal colon with an intact colonic mucosa to peptidoglycan, but not lipopolysaccharide, evoked vagal nerve firing.Discussion: Previous studies have recorded vagal signaling evoked by bacteria in the small intestine. The technical advances of this dissection and recording technique facilitates recording of afferent nerve signals evoked in extrinsic sensory pathways by neuromodulatory reagents applied to the distal colon. Moreover, we have demonstrated vagal afferent activation evoked by bacterial products applied to the distal colonic mucosa. This protocol may contribute to our understanding of functional bowel disorders where gut-brain communication is dysfunctional, and facilitate real-time interrogation of microbiota-gut-brain signaling.

  16. Hypertrophy of neurons within cardiac ganglia in human, canine, and rat heart failure: the potential role of nerve growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjay; Sayers, Scott; Walter, James S; Thomas, Donald; Dieter, Robert S; Nee, Lisa M; Wurster, Robert D

    2013-08-19

    Autonomic imbalances including parasympathetic withdrawal and sympathetic overactivity are cardinal features of heart failure regardless of etiology; however, mechanisms underlying these imbalances remain unknown. Animal model studies of heart and visceral organ hypertrophy predict that nerve growth factor levels should be elevated in heart failure; whether this is so in human heart failure, though, remains unclear. We tested the hypotheses that neurons in cardiac ganglia are hypertrophied in human, canine, and rat heart failure and that nerve growth factor, which we hypothesize is elevated in the failing heart, contributes to this neuronal hypertrophy. Somal morphology of neurons from human (579.54±14.34 versus 327.45±9.17 μm(2); Phypertrophy of neurons in cardiac ganglia compared with controls. Western blot analysis shows that nerve growth factor levels in the explanted, failing human heart are 250% greater than levels in healthy donor hearts. Neurons from cardiac ganglia cultured with nerve growth factor are significantly larger and have greater dendritic arborization than neurons in control cultures. Hypertrophied neurons are significantly less excitable than smaller ones; thus, hypertrophy of vagal postganglionic neurons in cardiac ganglia would help to explain the parasympathetic withdrawal that accompanies heart failure. Furthermore, our observations suggest that nerve growth factor, which is elevated in the failing human heart, causes hypertrophy of neurons in cardiac ganglia.

  17. Selective reinnervation of hippocampal area CA1 and the fascia dentata after destruction of CA3-CA4 afferents with kainic acid.

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    Nadler, J V; Perry, B W; Cotman, C W

    1980-01-20

    Intraventricular injections of kainic acid were used to destroy the hippocampal CA3-CA4 cells, thus denervating the inner third of the molecular layer of the fascia dentata and stratum radiatum and stratum oriens of area CA1. The responses of intact afferents to such lesions were then examined histologically. The hippocampal mossy fibers densely reinnervated the inner portion of the dentate molecular layer after bilateral destruction of CA4 neurons and to a lesser extent after unilateral destruction. Septohippocampal fibers replaced CA4-derived fibers in the dentate molecular layer only after particularly extensive bilateral CA4 lesions. Medial perforant path fibers showed no anatomical response to any of these lesions. Neither septohippocampal, temporoammonic nor mossy fibers proliferated in or grew into the denervated laminae of area CA1. These results show a preferential ordering in the reinnervation of dentate granule cells which is not readily explained by proximity to the degenerating fibers and also that removal of CA3-CA4-derived innervation more readily elicits translaminar growth in the fascia dentata than in area CA1. These results may be relevant to clinical situations in which neurons of the hippocampal end-blade are lost.

  18. Capsaicin-sensitive intestinal mucosal afferent mechanism and body fat distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Felix W

    2008-07-04

    This report summarizes clinical and experimental data in support of the hypothesis that capsaicin-sensitive intestinal mucosal afferent mechanism plays a role in regulating body fat distribution. Epidemiological data have revealed that the consumption of foods containing capsaicin is associated with a lower prevalence of obesity. Rural Thai people consume diets containing 0.014% capsaicin. Rodents fed a diet containing 0.014% capsaicin showed no change in caloric intake but a significant 24% and 29% reduction in the visceral (peri-renal) fat weight. Increase in intestinal blood flow facilitates nutrient energy absorption and decrease in adipose tissue blood flow facilitates storage of nutrient energy in adipose tissue. Stimulation of intestinal mucosal afferent nerves increases intestinal blood flow, but decreases visceral (mesenteric) adipost tissue blood flow. In in vitro cell studies capsaicin has a direct effect on adipocytes. Intravenous capsaicin produces measurable plasma level and subcutaneous capsaicin retards accumulation of adipose tissue. The data on a direct effect of oral capsaicin on adipose tissue at remote sites, however, are conflicting. Capsaicin absorbed from the gut lumen is almost completely metabolized before reaching the general circulation. Oral capsaicin significantly increases transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel expression as well as TRPV1 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in visceral adipose tissue. In TRPV1 knockout mice on a high fat diet the body weight was not significantly different in the absence or presence of oral capsaicin. In rodent experiments, daily intragastric administration of capsaicin for two weeks led to defunctionalization of intestinal mucosal afferent nerves, manifested by loss of acute mucosal capsaicin-induced effects; but not the corneal afferent nerves, with preservation of the paw wiping reflex of the eye exposed briefly to dilute capsaicin. The latter indicated the absence of an oral

  19. Bidirectional communication between sensory neurons and osteoblasts in an in vitro coculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Daisuke; Hirai, Takao; Kondo, Hisataka; Hamamura, Kazunori; Togari, Akifumi

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the sensory nervous system is involved in bone metabolism. However, the mechanism of communication between neurons and osteoblasts is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathways between sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and the osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells using an in vitro coculture system. Our findings indicate that signal transduction from DRG-derived neurons to MC3T3-E1 cells is suppressed by antagonists of the AMPA receptor and the NK 1 receptor. Conversely, signal transduction from MC3T3-E1 cells to DRG-derived neurons is suppressed by a P2X 7 receptor antagonist. Our results suggest that these cells communicate with each other by exocytosis of glutamate, substance P in the efferent signal, and ATP in the afferent signal. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  20. Viscerosensory input drives angiotensin II type 1A receptor-expressing neurons in the solitary tract nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, D A; Guo, H; Connelly, A A; Bassi, J K; Fong, A Y; Allen, A M; McDougall, S J

    2018-02-01

    Homeostatic regulation of visceral organ function requires integrated processing of neural and neurohormonal sensory signals. The nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) is the primary sensory nucleus for cranial visceral sensory afferents. Angiotensin II (ANG II) is known to modulate peripheral visceral reflexes, in part, by activating ANG II type 1A receptors (AT 1A R) in the NTS. AT 1A R-expressing NTS neurons occur throughout the NTS with a defined subnuclear distribution, and most of these neurons are depolarized by ANG II. In this study we determined whether AT 1A R-expressing NTS neurons receive direct visceral sensory input, and whether this input is modulated by ANG II. Using AT 1A R-GFP mice to make targeted whole cell recordings from AT 1A R-expressing NTS neurons, we demonstrate that two-thirds (37 of 56) of AT 1A R-expressing neurons receive direct excitatory, visceral sensory input. In half of the neurons tested (4 of 8) the excitatory visceral sensory input was significantly reduced by application of the transient receptor potential vallinoid type 1 receptor agonist, capsaicin, indicating AT 1A R-expressing neurons can receive either C- or A-fiber-mediated input. Application of ANG II to a subset of second-order AT 1A R-expressing neurons did not affect spontaneous, evoked, or asynchronous glutamate release from visceral sensory afferents. Thus it is unlikely that AT 1A R-expressing viscerosensory neurons terminate on AT 1A R-expressing NTS neurons. Our data suggest that ANG II is likely to modulate multiple visceral sensory modalities by altering the excitability of second-order AT 1A R-expressing NTS neurons.

  1. Activity-dependent long-term plasticity of afferent synapses on grafted stem/progenitor cell-derived neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Andreas Toft; Rogelius, Nina; Lundberg, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell-based cell replacement therapies aiming at restoring injured or diseased brain function ultimately rely on the capability of transplanted cells to promote functional recovery. The mechanisms by which stem cell-based therapies for neurological conditions can lead to functional recovery...

  2. Acylcarnitines as markers of exercise-associated fuel partitioning, xenometabolism, and potential signals to muscle afferent neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    With insulin-resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus, mismatches between mitochondrial fatty acid fuel delivery and oxidative phosphorylation/tricarboxylic acid cycle activity may contribute to inordinate accumulation of short- or medium-chain acylcarnitine fatty acid derivatives (markers of incomple...

  3. Dendro-dendritic bundling and shared synapses between gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Rebecca E.; Gaidamaka, Galina; Han, Seong-Kyu; Herbison, Allan E.

    2009-01-01

    The pulsatile release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is critical for mammalian fertility, but the mechanisms underlying the synchronization of GnRH neurons are unknown. In the present study, the full extent of the GnRH neuron dendritic tree was visualized by patching and filling individual GnRH neurons with biocytin in acute brain slices from adult GnRH-green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice. Confocal analysis of 42 filled GnRH neurons from male and female adult mice revealed that the dendrites of the great majority of GnRH neurons (86%) formed multiple close appositions with dendrites of other GnRH neurons. Two types of interactions were encountered; the predominant interaction was one of vertical dendritic bundling where dendrites were found to wrap around each other in the same axis. The other interaction was one in which a GnRH neuron dendrite intercepted other GnRH neuron dendrites in a perpendicular fashion. Electron microscopy using pre-embedded, silver-enhanced immunogold labeling for both GnRH and GFP peptides in GnRH-GFP transgenic mice, confirmed that GnRH neuron dendrites were often immediately juxtaposed. Membrane specializations, including punctae and zonula adherens, were found connecting adjacent dendritic elements of GnRH neurons. Remarkably, individual afferent axon terminals were found to synapse with multiple GnRH neuron dendrites at sites of bundling. Together, these data demonstrate that GnRH neurons are not isolated from one another but, rather, interconnected via their long dendritic extensions. The observation of shared synaptic input to bundled GnRH neuron dendrites suggests a mechanism of GnRH neuron synchronization. PMID:19541658

  4. Functional Characterization of Lamina X Neurons in ex-Vivo Spinal Cord Preparation

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    Volodymyr Krotov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Functional properties of lamina X neurons in the spinal cord remain unknown despite the established role of this area for somatosensory integration, visceral nociception, autonomic regulation and motoneuron output modulation. Investigations of neuronal functioning in the lamina X have been hampered by technical challenges. Here we introduce an ex-vivo spinal cord preparation with both dorsal and ventral roots still attached for functional studies of the lamina X neurons and their connectivity using an oblique LED illumination for resolved visualization of lamina X neurons in a thick tissue. With the elaborated approach, we demonstrate electrophysiological characteristics of lamina X neurons by their membrane properties, firing pattern discharge and fiber innervation (either afferent or efferent. The tissue preparation has been also probed using Ca2+ imaging with fluorescent Ca2+ dyes (membrane-impermeable or -permeable to demonstrate the depolarization-induced changes in intracellular calcium concentration in lamina X neurons. Finally, we performed visualization of subpopulations of lamina X neurons stained by retrograde labeling with aminostilbamidine dye to identify sympathetic preganglionic and projection neurons in the lamina X. Thus, the elaborated approach provides a reliable tool for investigation of functional properties and connectivity in specific neuronal subpopulations, boosting research of lamina X of the spinal cord.

  5. Enhanced behavioral responses to cold stimuli following CGRPα sensory neuron ablation are dependent on TRPM8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Eric S; Zylka, Mark J

    2014-11-19

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide-α (CGRPα) is a classic marker of peptidergic nociceptive neurons and is expressed in myelinated and unmyelinated dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Recently, we found that ablation of Cgrpα-expressing sensory neurons reduced noxious heat sensitivity and enhanced sensitivity to cold stimuli in mice. These studies suggested that the enhanced cold responses were due to disinhibition of spinal neurons that receive inputs from cold-sensing/TRPM8 primary afferents; although a direct role for TRPM8 was not examined at the time. Here, we ablated Cgrpα-expressing sensory neurons in mice lacking functional TRPM8 and evaluated sensory responses to noxious heat, cold temperatures, and cold mimetics (acetone evaporative cooling and icilin). We also evaluated thermoregulation in these mice following an evaporative cold challenge. We found that ablation of Cgrpα-expressing sensory neurons in a Trpm8-/- background reduced sensitivity to noxious heat but did not enhance sensitivity to cold stimuli. Thermoregulation following the evaporative cold challenge was not affected by deletion of Trpm8 in control or Cgrpα-expressing sensory neuron-ablated mice. Our data indicate that the enhanced behavioral responses to cold stimuli in CGRPα sensory neuron-ablated mice are dependent on functional TRPM8, whereas the other sensory and thermoregulatory phenotypes caused by CGRPα sensory neuron ablation are independent of TRPM8.

  6. A Little Goes a Long Way: Low Working Memory Load Is Associated with Optimal Distractor Inhibition and Increased Vagal Control under Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Derek P; Friedman, Bruce H

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety impairs both inhibition of distraction and attentional focus. It is unclear whether these impairments are reduced or exacerbated when loading working memory with non-affective information. Cardiac vagal control has been related to top-down regulation of anxiety; therefore, vagal control may reflect load-related inhibition of distraction under anxiety. The present study examined whether: (1) the enhancing and impairing effects of load on inhibition exist together in a non-linear function, (2) there is a similar association between inhibition and concurrent vagal control under anxiety. During anxiogenic threat-of-noise, 116 subjects maintained a digit series of varying lengths (0, 2, 4, and 6 digits) while completing a visual flanker task. The task was broken into four blocks, with a baseline period preceding each. Electrocardiography was acquired throughout to quantify vagal control as high-frequency heart rate variability (HRV). There were significant quadratic relations of working memory load to flanker performance and to HRV, but no associations between HRV and performance. Results indicate that low load was associated with relatively better inhibition and increased HRV. These findings suggest that attentional performance under anxiety depends on the availability of working memory resources, which might be reflected by vagal control. These results have implications for treating anxiety disorders, in which regulation of anxiety can be optimized for attentional focus.

  7. Decreased contribution from afferent feedback to the soleus muscle during walking in patients with spastic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzaro, Nazarena; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbæk; Grey, Michael James

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the contribution of afferent feedback to the soleus (SOL) muscle activity during the stance phase of walking in patients with spastic stroke. A total of 24 patients with hemiparetic spastic stroke and age-matched healthy volunteers participated in the study. A robotic actuator...... attached to the foot and leg was used to apply 3 types of ankle perturbations during treadmill walking. First, fast dorsiflexion perturbations were applied to elicit stretch reflexes in the SOL muscle. The SOL short-latency stretch reflex was facilitated in the patients (1.4 +/- 0.3) compared...... with the healthy volunteers (1.0 +/- 0.3, P = .05). Second, fast plantar flexion perturbations were applied during the stance phase to unload the plantar flexor muscles, thus, removing the afferent input from these muscles to the SOL motoneurons. These perturbations produced a distinct decrease in SOL activity...

  8. [Sensory afferences and motor control of equilibrium using static and dynamic posture tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, P; Perrin, C

    1996-01-01

    One thousand two hundred posturographic tests have been performed since 1988 at the Laboratoire d'Exploration Fonctionnelle ORL, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Nancy-Brabois, using three complementary protocols (Toennis GmBh, G). Static tests [1] measure over 20 seconds periods the displacement of the center of foot pressure (CFP) on individual standing upright on the platform. Dynamic tests assess the mechanisms of balance control following measured platform movements, using surface EMG after a single sharp and unexpected tilt [2], or CFP displacements during longer regular oscillations of the platform [3]. The latter test enables an analysis of balance strategy adopted to maintain equilibrium. These three programs were applied to series of children, adults, elderly people, sportsmen, and patients suffering from ENT, neurological or traumatic disorders. They were confirmed to be complementary tests allowing a thorough investigation of all balance control mechanisms: visual afferences [1], somesthesy [2] and the combination of visual, somesthetic and vestibular afferences in the third test.

  9. Blockade of chloride channels by DIDS stimulates renin release and inhibits contraction of afferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Skøtt, O

    1996-01-01

    arterioles with the chloride channel blocker 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS). Renin secretion was equally enhanced by omission of extracellular calcium and by addition of 0.5 mM DIDS. The inhibitory effect of calcium was blocked by DIDS. The stimulatory effects of low calcium [with......Calcium-activated chloride channels have been proposed to control renin release from juxtaglomerular cells and to be involved in the excitation-contraction coupling of the renal afferent arteriole. The hypothesis was tested on renin release from rat glomeruli and in microperfused rabbit afferent...... or without ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid] and DIDS were not additive. In the absence of chloride, basal renin release was suppressed and the stimulatory effect of DIDS was abolished. The DIDS-induced enhancement of renin release was not dependent on bicarbonate...

  10. Vasodilatation of afferent arterioles and paradoxical increase of renal vascular resistance by furosemide in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oppermann, Mona; Hansen, Pernille B; Castrop, Hayo

    2007-01-01

    Loop diuretics like furosemide have been shown to cause renal vasodilatation in dogs and humans, an effect thought to result from both a direct vascular dilator effect and from inhibition of tubuloglomerular feedback. In isolated perfused afferent arterioles preconstricted with angiotensin II or N......(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, furosemide caused a dose-dependent increase of vascular diameter, but it was without effect in vessels from NKCC1-/- mice suggesting that inhibition of NKCC1 mediates dilatation in afferent arterioles. In the intact kidney, however, furosemide (2 mg/kg iv) caused a 50.5 +/- 3% reduction...... of total renal blood flow (RBF) and a 27% reduction of superficial blood flow (SBF) accompanied by a marked and immediate increase of tubular pressure and volume. At 10 mg/kg, furosemide reduced RBF by 60.4 +/- 2%. Similarly, NKCC1-/- mice responded to furosemide with a 45.4% decrease of RBF and a 29...

  11. Chronic central leptin infusion restores cardiac sympathetic-vagal balance and baroreflex sensitivity in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Carmo, Jussara M; Hall, John E; da Silva, Alexandre A

    2008-11-01

    This study tested whether leptin restores sympathetic-vagal balance, heart rate (HR) variability, and cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. Sprague-Dawley rats were instrumented with arterial and venous catheters, and a cannula was placed in the lateral ventricle for intracerebroventricular (ICV) leptin infusion. Blood pressure (BP) and HR were monitored by telemetry. BRS and HR variability were estimated by linear regression between HR and BP responses to phenylephrine or sodium nitroprusside and autoregressive spectral analysis. Measurements were made during control period, 7 days after induction of diabetes, and 7 days after ICV leptin infusion. STZ diabetes was associated with hyperglycemia (422 +/- 17 mg/dl) and bradycardia (-79 +/- 4 beats/min). Leptin decreased glucose levels (165 +/- 16 mg/dl) and raised HR to control values (303 +/- 10 to 389 +/- 10 beats/min). Intrinsic HR (IHR) and chronotropic responses to a full-blocking dose of propranolol and atropine were reduced during diabetes (260 +/- 7 vs. 316 +/- 6, -19 +/- 2 vs. -43 +/- 6, and 39 +/- 3 vs. 68 +/- 8 beats/min), and leptin treatment restored these variables to normal (300 +/- 7, -68 +/- 10, and 71 +/- 8 beats/min). Leptin normalized BRS (bradycardia, -2.6 +/- 0.3, -1.7 +/- 0.2, and -3.0 +/- 0.5; and tachycardia, -3.2 +/- 0.4, -1.9 +/- 0.3, and -3.4 +/- 0.3 beats.min(-1).mmHg(-1) for control, diabetes, and leptin) and HR variability (23 +/- 4 to 11 +/- 1.5 ms2). Chronic glucose infusion to maintain hyperglycemia during leptin infusion did not alter the effect of leptin on IHR but abolished the improved BRS. These results show rapid impairment of autonomic nervous system control of HR after the induction of diabetes and that central nervous system actions of leptin can abolish the hyperglycemia as well as the altered IHR and BRS in STZ-induced diabetes.

  12. Vagal nerve stimulation started just prior to reperfusion limits infarct size and no-reflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uitterdijk, André; Yetgin, Tuncay; te Lintel Hekkert, Maaike; Sneep, Stefan; Krabbendam-Peters, Ilona; van Beusekom, Heleen M M; Fischer, Trent M; Cornelussen, Richard N; Manintveld, Olivier C; Merkus, Daphne; Duncker, Dirk J

    2015-09-01

    Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) started prior to, or during, ischemia has been shown to reduce infarct size. Here, we investigated the effect of VNS when started just prior to, and continued during early, reperfusion on infarct size and no-reflow and studied the underlying mechanisms. For this purpose, swine (13 VNS, 10 sham) underwent 45 min mid-LAD occlusion followed by 120 min of reperfusion. VNS was started 5 min prior to reperfusion and continued until 15 min of reperfusion. Area at risk, area of no-reflow (% of infarct area) and infarct size (% of area at risk), circulating cytokines, and regional myocardial leukocyte influx were assessed after 120 min of reperfusion. VNS significantly reduced infarct size from 67 ± 2 % in sham to 54 ± 5 % and area of no-reflow from 54 ± 6 % in sham to 32 ± 6 %. These effects were accompanied by reductions in neutrophil (~40 %) and macrophage (~60 %) infiltration in the infarct area (all p < 0.05), whereas systemic circulating plasma levels of TNFα and IL6 were not affected. The degree of cardioprotection could not be explained by the VNS-induced bradycardia or the VNS-induced decrease in the double product of heart rate and left ventricular systolic pressure. In the presence of NO-synthase inhibitor LNNA, VNS no longer attenuated infarct size and area of no-reflow, which was paralleled by similarly unaffected regional leukocyte infiltration. In conclusion, VNS is a promising novel adjunctive therapy that limits reperfusion injury in a large animal model of acute myocardial infarction.

  13. Combined Vagal Stimulation and Limb Remote Ischemic Perconditioning Enhances Cardioprotection via an Anti-inflammatory Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Liu, Gao-Pu; Xue, Fu-Shan; Wang, Shi-Yu; Cui, Xin-Long; Li, Rui-Ping; Yang, Gui-Zhen; Sun, Chao; Liao, Xu

    2015-10-01

    Various combined interventions to acquire enhanced cardioprotection are prevalent focuses of current research. This randomized experiment assessed whether combined vagal stimulation perconditioning (VSPerC) and limb remote ischemic perconditioning (LRIPerC) improved cardioprotection compared to the use of either treatment alone in an in vivo rat model of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. A total of 100 male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly allocated into five groups: sham group, ischemia/reperfusion (IR) group, VSPerC group, LRIPerC group, and combined VSPerC and LRIPerC (COMPerC) group. Serum enzymatic markers, inflammatory cytokines, myocardial inflammatory cytokines, and infarct size were assessed. Infarct size decreased significantly in the COMPerC group compared to the VSPerC and LRIPerC groups. Serum intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) level at 120 min of reperfusion, myocardial interleukin-1 (IL-1), ICAM-1, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) levels in the ischemic region decreased significantly in the COMPerC group compared to the VSPerC group, but myocardial IL-10 levels in the nonischemic region increased markedly in the COMPerC group. Serum TNF-α levels at 30, 60, and 120 min of reperfusion; serum IL-1, IL-6, ICAM-1, and high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB-1) levels at 120 min of reperfusion; and myocardial IL-1, IL-6, ICAM-1, and TNF-α levels in the ischemic region decreased significantly in the COMPerC group compared to the LRIPerC group. However, myocardial IL-10 levels in both ischemic and nonischemic regions were evidently higher in the COMPerC group. This study concludes that combined VSPerC and LRIPerC enhances cardioprotection compared to either treatment alone. This result is likely attributable to a more potent regulation of inflammation.

  14. Vasopressin immunoreactive fibers and neurons in the dorsal pontine tegmentum of the rat, monkey and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffé, A R; Holstege, J C; van Leeuwen, F W

    1991-01-01

    It is now well established that extensive extrahypothalamic vasopressin (VP) systems exist in the rat, monkey and human brain. There are marked differences between species, but in each case VP nuclei provide dense afferents to the dorsal pontine tegmentum. Here VP may play a role in the mechanisms exerted by the locus coeruleus (LC) neurons, possibly both as a neurotransmitter and as a neuromodulator. Although we are aware of some properties of VP systems, e.g., gonadal steroid dependency in the rat, major gaps characterize our knowledge of its anatomy. With regard to the interaction of VP with the LC in the brainstem of mammals some of the questions which stand out are: (1) Is VP really being biosynthesized and transported by LC cells and, if not, what is its function within these cells? (2) Is there a structural difference between male and female LC neurons in the rat as a consequence of the sex-dimorphic VP innervation? (3) What is the origin of VP afferents in the dorsal pontine tegmentum of the (non)human primate and are these afferents also controlled by gonadal steroids? Research strategies to answer these questions will provide us with information to resolve some of the current inconsistencies about the anatomy and the function of the VP and LC systems in the brain.

  15. Trigeminal neurons detect cellphone radiation: Thermal or nonthermal is not the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Andrew A; Kim, Paul Y; Frilot Ii, Clifton

    2017-01-01

    Cellphone electromagnetic radiation produces temperature alterations in facial skin. We hypothesized that the radiation-induced heat was transduced by warmth-sensing trigeminal neurons, as evidenced by changes in cognitive processing of the afferent signals. Ten human volunteers were exposed on the right side of the face to 1 GHz radiation in the absence of acoustic, tactile, and low-frequency electromagnetic stimuli produced by cellphones. Cognitive processing manifested in the electroencephalogram (EEG) was quantitated by analysis of brain recurrence (a nonlinear technique). The theoretical temperature sensitivity of warmth-sensing neurons was estimated by comparing changes in membrane voltage expected as a result of heat transduction with membrane-voltage variance caused by thermal noise. Each participant underwent sixty 12-s trials. The recurrence variable r ("percent recurrence") was computed second by second for the ∆ band of EEGs from two bilaterally symmetric derivations (decussated and nondecussated). Percent recurrence during radiation exposure (first 4 s of each trial) was reduced in the decussated afferent signal compared with the control (last four seconds of each trial); mean difference, r = 1.1 ± 0.5%, p cellphone radiation. Simulated cellphone radiation affected brain electrical activity associated with nonlinear cognitive processing of radiation-induced thermal afferent signals. Radiation standards for cellphones based on a thermal/nonthermal binary distinction do not prevent neurophysiological consequences of cellphone radiation.

  16. Fine motor control of the jaw following alteration of orofacial afferent inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Castrillon, Eduardo; Trulsson, Mats; Svensson, Krister G; Svensson, Peter

    2017-03-01

    The study was designed to investigate if alteration of different orofacial afferent inputs would have different effects on oral fine motor control and to test the hypothesis that reduced afferent inputs will increase the variability of bite force values and jaw muscle activity, and repeated training with splitting of food morsel in conditions with reduced afferent inputs would decrease the variability and lead to optimization of bite force values and jaw muscle activity. Forty-five healthy volunteers participated in a single experimental session and were equally divided into incisal, mucosal, and block anesthesia groups. The participants performed six series (with ten trials) of a standardized hold and split task after the intervention with local anesthesia was made in the respective groups. The hold and split forces along with the corresponding jaw muscle activity were recorded and compared to a reference group. The hold force and the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the masseter muscles during the hold phase were significantly higher in the incisal and block anesthesia group, as compared to the reference group (P motor control. Further, inhibition of afferent inputs from the orofacial or periodontal mechanoreceptors did not increase the variability of bite force values and jaw muscle activity; indicating that the relative precision of the oral fine motor task was not compromised inspite of the anesthesia. The results also suggest the propensity of optimization of bite force values and jaw muscle activity due to repeated splitting of the food morsels, inspite of alteration of sensory inputs. Skill acquisition following a change in oral sensory environment is crucial for understanding how humans learn and re-learn oral motor behaviors and the kind of adaptation that takes place after successful oral rehabilitation procedures.

  17. Role of the vagus nerve in the development and treatment of diet‐induced obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This review highlights evidence for a role of the vagus nerve in the development of obesity and how targeting the vagus nerve with neuromodulation or pharmacology can be used as a therapeutic treatment of obesity. The vagus nerve innervating the gut plays an important role in controlling metabolism. It communicates peripheral information about the volume and type of nutrients between the gut and the brain. Depending on the nutritional status, vagal afferent neurons express two different neurochemical phenotypes that can inhibit or stimulate food intake. Chronic ingestion of calorie‐rich diets reduces sensitivity of vagal afferent neurons to peripheral signals and their constitutive expression of orexigenic receptors and neuropeptides. This disruption of vagal afferent signalling is sufficient to drive hyperphagia and obesity. Furthermore neuromodulation of the vagus nerve can be used in the treatment of obesity. Although the mechanisms are poorly understood, vagal nerve stimulation prevents weight gain in response to a high‐fat diet. In small clinical studies, in patients with depression or epilepsy, vagal nerve stimulation has been demonstrated to promote weight loss. Vagal blockade, which inhibits the vagus nerve, results in significant weight loss. Vagal blockade is proposed to inhibit aberrant orexigenic signals arising in obesity as a putative mechanism of vagal blockade‐induced weight loss. Approaches and molecular targets to develop future pharmacotherapy targeted to the vagus nerve for the treatment of obesity are proposed. In conclusion there is strong evidence that the vagus nerve is involved in the development of obesity and it is proving to be an attractive target for the treatment of obesity. PMID:26959077

  18. Role of the vagus nerve in the development and treatment of diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lartigue, Guillaume

    2016-10-15

    This review highlights evidence for a role of the vagus nerve in the development of obesity and how targeting the vagus nerve with neuromodulation or pharmacology can be used as a therapeutic treatment of obesity. The vagus nerve innervating the gut plays an important role in controlling metabolism. It communicates peripheral information about the volume and type of nutrients between the gut and the brain. Depending on the nutritional status, vagal afferent neurons express two different neurochemical phenotypes that can inhibit or stimulate food intake. Chronic ingestion of calorie-rich diets reduces sensitivity of vagal afferent neurons to peripheral signals and their constitutive expression of orexigenic receptors and neuropeptides. This disruption of vagal afferent signalling is sufficient to drive hyperphagia and obesity. Furthermore neuromodulation of the vagus nerve can be used in the treatment of obesity. Although the mechanisms are poorly understood, vagal nerve stimulation prevents weight gain in response to a high-fat diet. In small clinical studies, in patients with depression or epilepsy, vagal nerve stimulation has been demonstrated to promote weight loss. Vagal blockade, which inhibits the vagus nerve, results in significant weight loss. Vagal blockade is proposed to inhibit aberrant orexigenic signals arising in obesity as a putative mechanism of vagal blockade-induced weight loss. Approaches and molecular targets to develop future pharmacotherapy targeted to the vagus nerve for the treatment of obesity are proposed. In conclusion there is strong evidence that the vagus nerve is involved in the development of obesity and it is proving to be an attractive target for the treatment of obesity. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  19. Plasticité de l'excitabilité des neurones de la région CA1 de rat

    OpenAIRE

    Campanac, Emilie

    2008-01-01

    It has been previously shown in pyramidal neurons of CA1 that in addition to long term synaptic plasticity, tetanus protocols (HFS/LFS) of afferent input induced a synergic plasticity of integration of synaptic potentials. In this context, we have addressed the following questions: 1) are changes on dendritic integration associated to STDP? 2) what are the mechanisms of facilitation of integration expression observed after LTP? and 3) does synaptic activity also induce persistent changes in e...

  20. Group II muscle afferents probably contribute to the medium latency soleus stretch reflex during walking in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Ladouceur, Michel; Andersen, Jacob B.

    2001-01-01

    component (P = 0.004), whereas the medium latency component was unchanged (P = 0.437). 6. Two hours after the ingestion of tizanidine, an alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor agonist known to selectively depress the transmission in the group II afferent pathway, the medium latency reflex was strongly depressed (P...... the hypothesis that, during walking the medium latency component of the stretch reflex resulting from an unexpected perturbation is contributed to by group II muscle afferents....

  1. The effect of type of afferent feedback timed with motor imagery on the induction of cortical plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Voigt, Michael; Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas

    2017-01-01

    A peripherally generated afferent volley that arrives at the peak negative (PN) phase during the movement related cortical potential (MRCP) induces significant plasticity at the cortical level in healthy individuals and chronic stroke patients. Transferring this type of associative brain-computer......A peripherally generated afferent volley that arrives at the peak negative (PN) phase during the movement related cortical potential (MRCP) induces significant plasticity at the cortical level in healthy individuals and chronic stroke patients. Transferring this type of associative brain...

  2. Local activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the urinary bladder reduces the inflammation-induced sensitization of bladder afferents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cervero Fernando

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of cannabinoid agonists is known to reduce pain induced by bladder inflammation and to modulate cystometric parameters in vivo. We have previously reported that intravesical administration of a cannabinoid agonist reduces the electrical activity of bladder afferents under normal conditions. However, the effects of local activation of bladder cannabinoid receptors on afferent activity during inflammation are unknown. This study was aimed to assess the effects of intravesical administration of a cannabinoid agonist on the discharges of afferent fibers in inflamed bladders ex vivo. We also characterized the expression of CB1 receptors in the bladder and their localization and co-expression with TRPV1, a marker of nociceptive afferents. Results Compared to untreated animals, afferent fiber activity in inflamed bladders was increased for intravesical pressures between 10 and 40 mmHg. Local treatment with a non selective cannabinoid agonist (AZ12646915 significantly reduced the afferent activity at intravesical pressures above 20 mmHg. This effect was blocked by AM251 but not by AM630 (selective for CB1 and CB2 respectively. Finally, CB1 was co-expressed with TRPV1 in control and inflamed bladders. Conclusion These results demonstrate that sensitization of bladder afferents induced by inflammation is partly suppressed by intravesical activation of cannabinoid receptors, an effect that appears to be mediated by CB1 receptors. Also, TRPV1 positive fibers were found to co-express CB1, supporting the hypothesis of a direct action of the cannabinoid agonist on nociceptive afferents. Taken together, these results indicate a peripheral modulation by the cannabinoid system of bladder hypersensitivity during inflammation.

  3. Finite element modeling and in vivo analysis of electrode configurations for selective stimulation of pudendal afferent fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Grill Warren M; Yoo Paul B; Woock John P

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Intraurethral electrical stimulation (IES) of pudendal afferent nerve fibers can evoke both excitatory and inhibitory bladder reflexes in cats. These pudendovesical reflexes are a potential substrate for restoring bladder function in persons with spinal cord injury or other neurological disorders. However, the complex distribution of pudendal afferent fibers along the lower urinary tract presents a challenge when trying to determine the optimal geometry and position of IES...