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Sample records for vaccine therapy gm-csf

  1. Immune Correlates of GM-CSF and Melanoma Peptide Vaccination in a Randomized Trial for the Adjuvant Therapy of Resected High-Risk Melanoma (E4697).

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    Butterfield, Lisa H; Zhao, Fengmin; Lee, Sandra; Tarhini, Ahmad A; Margolin, Kim A; White, Richard L; Atkins, Michael B; Cohen, Gary I; Whiteside, Theresa L; Kirkwood, John M; Lawson, David H

    2017-09-01

    Purpose: E4697 was a multicenter intergroup randomized placebo-controlled phase III trial of adjuvant GM-CSF and/or a multiepitope melanoma peptide vaccine for patients with completely resected, high-risk stage III/IV melanoma.Experimental Design: A total of 815 patients were enrolled from December 1999 to October 2006 into this six-arm study. GM-CSF was chosen to promote the numbers and functions of dendritic cells (DC). The melanoma antigen peptide vaccine (Tyrosinase368-376 (370D), gp100209-217 (210M), MART-127-35) in montanide was designed to promote melanoma-specific CD8+ T-cell responses.Results: Although the overall RFS and OS were not significantly improved with the vaccine or GM-CSF when compared with placebo, immunomodulatory effects were observed in peripheral blood and served as important correlates to this therapeutic study. Peripheral blood was examined to evaluate the impact of GM-CSF and/or the peptide vaccine on peripheral blood immunity and to investigate potential predictive or prognostic biomarkers. A total of 11.3% of unvaccinated patients and 27.1% of vaccinated patients developed peptide-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. HLA-A2+ patients who had any peptide-specific CD8+ T-cell response at day +43 tended to have poorer OS in univariate analysis. Patients receiving GM-CSF had significant reduction in percentages of circulating myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) and plasmacytoid DC (pDC) at day +43. In a subset of patients who received GM-CSF, circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and anti-GM-CSF-neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) were also modulated. The majority of patients developed anti-GM-CSF Nabs, which correlated with improved RFS and OS.Conclusions: The assessment of cellular and humoral responses identified counterintuitive immune system changes correlating with clinical outcome. Clin Cancer Res; 23(17); 5034-43. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Recent progress in GM-CSF-based cancer immunotherapy.

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    Yan, Wan-Lun; Shen, Kuan-Yin; Tien, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Yu-An; Liu, Shih-Jen

    2017-03-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is a growing field. GM-CSF, a potent cytokine promoting the differentiation of myeloid cells, can also be used as an immunostimulatory adjuvant to elicit antitumor immunity. Additionally, GM-CSF is essential for the differentiation of dendritic cells, which are responsible for processing and presenting tumor antigens for the priming of antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Some strategies have been developed for GM-CSF-based cancer immunotherapy in clinical practice: GM-CSF monotherapy, GM-CSF-secreting cancer cell vaccines, GM-CSF-fused tumor-associated antigen protein-based vaccines, GM-CSF-based DNA vaccines and GM-CSF combination therapy. GM-CSF also contributes to the regulation of immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment. This review provides recommendations regarding GM-CSF-based cancer immunotherapy.

  3. A Review of GM-CSF Therapy in Sepsis

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    Mathias, Brittany; Szpila, Benjamin E.; Moore, Frederick A.; Efron, Philip A.; Moldawer, Lyle L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Determine what clinical role, if any, GM-CSF may have in the clinical treatment of sepsis in the adult patient. Advancements in the management of sepsis have led to significant decreases in early mortality; however, sepsis remains a significant source of long-term mortality and disability which places strain on healthcare resources with a substantial growing economic impact. Historically, early multiple organ failure (MOF) and death in patients with severe sepsis was thought to result from an exaggerated proinflammatory response called the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Numerous prospective randomized controlled trials (PRCTs) tested therapies aimed at decreasing the organ injury associated with an exaggerated inflammatory response. With few exceptions, the results from these PRCTs have been disappointing, and currently no specific therapeutic agent is approved to counteract the early SIRS response in patients with severe sepsis. It has long been recognized that there is a delayed immunosuppressive state that contributes to long-term morbidity. However, recent findings now support a concurrent proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory response present throughout sepsis. Multiple immunomodulating agents have been studied to combat the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis with the goal of decreasing secondary infection, reducing organ dysfunction, decreasing ICU stays, and improving survival. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a myelopoietic growth factor currently used in patients with neutropenia secondary to chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression, has been studied as a potential immune-activating agent. The applicability of GM-CSF as a standard therapy for generalized sepsis is still largely understudied; however, small-scale studies available have demonstrated some improved recovery from infection, decreased hospital length of stay, decreased days requiring mechanical ventilation, and decreased medical costs. PMID

  4. Recombinant rabies virus expressing dog GM-CSF is an efficacious oral rabies vaccine for dogs.

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    Zhou, Ming; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Songqin; Wang, Zhao; Ruan, Juncheng; Tang, Lijun; Jia, Ziming; Cui, Min; Zhao, Ling; Fu, Zhen F

    2015-11-17

    Developing efficacious oral rabies vaccines is an important step to increase immunization coverage for stray dogs, which are not accessible for parenteral vaccination. Our previous studies have demonstrated that recombinant rabies virus (RABV) expressing cytokines/chemokines induces robust protective immune responses after oral immunization in mice by recruiting and activating dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells. To develop an effective oral rabies vaccine for dogs, a recombinant attenuated RABV expressing dog GM-CSF, designated as LBNSE-dGM-CSF was constructed and used for oral vaccination in a dog model. Significantly more DCs or B cells were activated in the peripheral blood of dogs vaccinated orally with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than those vaccinated with the parent virus LBNSE, particularly at 3 days post immunization (dpi). As a result, significantly higher levels of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) were detected in dogs immunized with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than with the parent virus. All the immunized dogs were protected against a lethal challenge with 4500 MICLD50 of wild-type RABV SXTYD01. LBNSE-dGM-CSF was found to replicate mainly in the tonsils after oral vaccination as detected by nested RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Taken together, our results indicate that LBNSE-dGM-CSF could be a promising oral rabies vaccine candidate for dogs.

  5. Human autologous in vitro models of glioma immunogene therapy using B7-2, GM-CSF, and IL12

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    Parney, I.F.; Farr-Jones, M.A. [Univ. of Alberta, Div. of Neurosurgery, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Kane, K.; Chang, L.-J. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. of Surgery and Dept. of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Petruk, K.C. [Univ. of Alberta, Div. of Neurosurgery, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2002-08-01

    Cancer immunogene therapy is based on vaccination with radiated, autologous tumor cells transduced with immunostimulatory genes. To help determine an optimal glioma immunogene therapy strategy, we stimulated lymphocytes with autologous human glioma cells transduced with B7-2 (CD86), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and/or interleukin-12 (IL12). A human glioma-derived cell culture (Ed147.BT) was transduced with B7-2, GM-CSF, and/or IL12 using retroviral vectors. Autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were co-cultured with irradiated gene-transduced tumor alone or a combination of radiated wild type and gene-transduced cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation was determined by serial cell counts. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells phenotype was assessed by flow cytometry for CD4, CD8, and CD16. Anti-tumor cytotoxicity was determined by chromium-51 ({sup 51}Cr) release assay. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells cell numbers all decreased during primary stimulation but tumor cells expressing B7-2 or GM-CSF consistently caused secondary proliferation. Tumors expressing B7-2 and GM-CSF or B7-2,GM-CSF,and IL12 consistently increased PBMC CD8+ (cytotoxic T) and CD16+ (natural killer) percentages. Interestingly, anti-tumor cytotoxicity only exceeded that of PBMC stimulated with wild type tumor alone when peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with both wild type tumor and B7-2/GM-CSF- (but not IL12) transduced cells. PBMC proliferation and phenotype is altered as expected by exposure to immunostimulatory gene-transduced tumor. However, transduced tumor cells alone do not stimulate greater anti-tumor cytotoxicity than wild type tumor. Only B7-2/GM-CSF-transduced cells combined with wild type produced increased cytotoxicity. This may reflect selection of turnor subclones with limited antigenic spectra during retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. (author)

  6. PD-1/PD-L1 blockade enhances the efficacy of SA-GM-CSF surface-modified tumor vaccine in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaojun; Zhang, Xinji; Li, Jinlong; Zhao, Hongfan; Mo, Lijun; Shi, Xianghua; Hu, Zhiming; Gao, Jimin; Tan, Wanlong

    2017-10-10

    Program death receptor-1 (PD-1)/program death ligand 1 (PD-L1) signaling plays an important role in tumor adaptive immune resistance. The streptavidin-granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (SA-GM-CSF) surface-modified tumor cells vaccine developed through our novel protein-anchor technology could significantly promote the activation of dendritic cells. Although GM-CSF vaccine could significantly increase the number of tumor-specific CD8+T-cells, the majority of these CD8+T-cells expressed PD-1. Moreover, GM-CSF vaccine up-regulated the PD-L1 expression of tumor cells, resulting in immune resistance. Adding PD-1/PD-L1 blockade to GM-CSF vaccine therapy could significantly increase the population of CD4+ T, CD8+ T and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T but not CD4+ Foxp3+ T-cells and induced the highest production of IFN-γ. PD-1/PD-L1 blockade could effectively rescue the tumor-specific T lymphocytes generated by the GM-CSF vaccine, resulting in consistent tumor rejection. Taken together, PD-1/PD-L1 blockade combined with SA-GM-CSF-modified vaccine could effectively induce a strong specific antitumor immune response against prostate cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Expression of GM-CSF in T Cells Is Increased in Multiple Sclerosis and Suppressed by IFN-β Therapy.

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    Rasouli, Javad; Ciric, Bogoljub; Imitola, Jaime; Gonnella, Patricia; Hwang, Daniel; Mahajan, Kedar; Mari, Elisabeth R; Safavi, Farinaz; Leist, Thomas P; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2015-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the CNS. Studies in animal models of MS have shown that GM-CSF produced by T cells is necessary for the development of autoimmune CNS inflammation. This suggests that GM-CSF may have a pathogenic role in MS as well, and a clinical trial testing its blockade is ongoing. However, there have been few reports on GM-CSF production by T cells in MS. The objective of this study was to characterize GM-CSF production by T cells of MS patients and to determine the effect of IFN-β therapy on its production. GM-CSF production by peripheral blood (PB) T cells and the effects of IFN-β were characterized in samples of untreated and IFN-β-treated MS patients versus healthy subjects. GM-CSF production by T cells in MS brain lesions was analyzed by immunofluorescence. Untreated MS patients had significantly greater numbers of GM-CSF(+)CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in PB compared with healthy controls and IFN-β-treated MS patients. IFN-β significantly suppressed GM-CSF production by T cells in vitro. A number of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in MS brain lesions expressed GM-CSF. Elevated GM-CSF production by PB T cells in MS is indicative of aberrant hyperactivation of the immune system. Given its essential role in animal models, abundant GM-CSF production at the sites of CNS inflammation suggests that GM-CSF contributes to MS pathogenesis. Our findings also reveal a potential mechanism of IFN-β therapy, namely suppression of GM-CSF production. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. A novel therapeutic vaccine of GM-CSF/TNFalpha surface-modified RM-1 cells against the orthotopic prostatic cancer.

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    Yin, Weihua; He, Qiushan; Hu, Zhiming; Chen, Zhong; Qifeng, Mao; Zhichun, Song; Zhihui, Qu; Xiaoxia, Nie; Li, Jinlong; Gao, Jimin

    2010-07-12

    A novel therapeutic vaccine against prostate cancer was developed by simultaneous immobilization of streptavidin-tagged bioactive GM-CSF and TNFalpha on the biotinylated surface of 30% ethanol-fixed RM-1 prostatic cancer cells. This study showed that the GM-CSF/TNFalpha-doubly surface-modified vaccine significantly extended the survival in the orthotopic model of RM-1 prostate cancer, and was superior to single GM-CSF- or TNFalpha-surface-modified vaccine. Moreover, the splenocytes from the GM-CSF/TNFalpha-vaccine-treated mice showed the most potent cytotoxicity on RM-1 cells and the highest production of RM-1-specific IFNgamma. In addition, more CD4+ and CD8+ T cells infiltrated into the tumor sites in the GM-CSF/TNFalpha-vaccine-treated mice than in the GM-CSF- or TNFalpha-vaccine-treated mice. Therefore, our study demonstrated that the efficacy of RM-1 prostate cancer cell vaccine could be improved by conjugating both GM-CSF and TNFalpha simultaneously on the surface of cancer cells, and that this modification thus has a potential translational significance.

  9. Biological Effects of Anti-Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Antibody Formation in Patients Treated With GM-CSF (Sargramostim) as Adjuvant Therapy of Melanoma.

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    Spitler, Lynn E; Cao, Huynh; Piironen, Timo; Whiteside, Theresa L; Weber, Robert W; Cruickshank, Scott

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the development of binding and neutralizing antibodies to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in patients receiving prolonged therapy with GM-CSF as adjuvant therapy of melanoma and the impact of these antibodies on biological effects. Fifty-three patients with high-risk melanoma that had been surgically excised were treated with GM-CSF, 125 μg/m daily for 14 days every 28 days for 1 year after surgical resection of disease. Serum samples for antibodies to GM-CSF were measured before treatment and on study days 155 and 351. Blood draws for testing biological effects were keyed to GM-CSF administration: days 0 (before), 15 (after 14 d on GM-CSF), 29 (after 14 d off GM-CSF), 155, and 351 (after 14 d on GM-CSF in the sixth and 13th cycle of treatment). Of 53 patients enrolled, 43 were evaluable for the development of anti-GM-CSF antibodies. Of these, 93% developed binding antibodies and 42% developed both binding and neutralizing antibodies. The increase in the white blood cell count, percent eosinophils, or neopterin levels engendered by GM-CSF administration was abrogated or markedly decreased in patients with neutralizing antibodies but not in patients who developed only binding antibodies. Ninety-three percent of patients with melanoma treated with GM-CSF as adjuvant therapy develop antibodies to GM-CSF. In those with neutralizing antibodies, a diminution of the biological effects of GM-CSF was observed. The development of neutralizing antibodies might also abrogate the potential clinical benefit of this treatment and should be considered in the design of future clinical trials.

  10. Oncolytic and immunologic cancer therapy with GM-CSF-armed vaccinia virus of Tian Tan strain Guang9.

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    Deng, Lili; Fan, Jun; Guo, Mingming; Huang, Biao

    2016-03-28

    Targeted oncolytic vaccinia viruses are being developed as a novel strategy in cancer therapy. Arming vaccinia viruses with immunostimulatory cytokines can enhance antitumor efficacy. Such engineered oncolytic viruses, like JX-594, a Wyeth strain vaccinia virus modified with human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), have shown promising results and have proceeded rapidly in clinical trials. However, the oncolytic potential of the Chinese vaccine strain Tian Tan (VTT) has not been explored. In this study, we constructed a targeted oncolytic vaccinia virus of Tian Tan strain Guang9 (VG9) expressing murine GM-CSF (VG9-GMCSF) and evaluated the antitumor effect of this recombinant vaccinia virus in a murine melanoma model. In vitro, viral replication and cytotoxicity of VG9-GMCSF was as potent as VG9; in vivo, VG9-GMCSF significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneously implanted melanoma tumors, prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice, and produced an antitumor cytotoxic response. Such antitumor effect may be due to the lytic nature of virus as well as the stimulation of immune activity by GM-CSF production. Our results indicate that VG9-GMCSF induces strong tumoricidal activity, providing a potential therapeutic strategy for combating cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dual Role of GM-CSF as a Pro-Inflammatory and a Regulatory Cytokine: Implications for Immune Therapy

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    Bhattacharya, Palash; Budnick, Isadore; Singh, Medha; Thiruppathi, Muthusamy; Alharshawi, Khaled; Elshabrawy, Hatem; Holterman, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is generally recognized as an inflammatory cytokine. Its inflammatory activity is primarily due its role as a growth and differentiation factor for granulocyte and macrophage populations. In this capacity, among other clinical applications, it has been used to bolster anti-tumor immune responses. GM-CSF-mediated inflammation has also been implicated in certain types of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Thus, agents that can block GM-CSF or its receptor have been used as anti-inflammatory therapies. However, a review of literature reveals that in many situations GM-CSF can act as an anti-inflammatory/regulatory cytokine. We and others have shown that GM-CSF can modulate dendritic cell differentiation to render them “tolerogenic,” which, in turn, can increase regulatory T-cell numbers and function. Therefore, the pro-inflammatory and regulatory effects of GM-CSF appear to depend on the dose and the presence of other relevant cytokines in the context of an immune response. A thorough understanding of the various immunomodulatory effects of GM-CSF will facilitate more appropriate use and thus further enhance its clinical utility. PMID:25803788

  12. Expression of GM-CSF in T cells is increased in multiple sclerosis and suppressed by IFN-β therapy1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Javad; Ciric, Bogoljub; Imitola, Jaime; Gonnella, Patricia; Hwang, Daniel; Mahajan, Kedar; Mari, Elisabeth R.; Safavi, Farinaz; Leist, Thomas P.; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Studies in animal models of MS have shown that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) produced by T cells is necessary for development of autoimmune CNS inflammation. This suggests that GM-CSF may have a pathogenic role in MS as well, and a clinical trial testing its blockade is ongoing. However, there have been few reports on GM-CSF production by T cells in MS. The objective of this study was to characterize GM-CSF production by T cells of MS patients, and to determine the effect of interferon-beta (IFN-β) therapy on its production. GM-CSF production by peripheral blood (PB) T cells and the effects of IFN-β were characterized in samples of untreated and IFN-β-treated MS patients vs. healthy subjects. GM-CSF production by T cells in MS brain lesions was analyzed by immunofluorescence. Untreated MS patients had significantly greater numbers of GM-CSF+ CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in PB compared to healthy controls and IFN-β-treated MS patients. IFN-β significantly suppressed GM-CSF production by T cells in vitro. A number of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in MS brain lesions expressed GM-CSF. Elevated GM-CSF production by PB T cells in MS is indicative of aberrant hyperactivation of the immune system. Given its essential role in animal models, abundant GM-CSF production at the sites of CNS inflammation suggests that GM-CSF contributes to MS pathogenesis. Our findings also reveal a potential mechanism of IFN-β therapy, namely suppression of GM-CSF production. PMID:25917097

  13. Coexpression of GM-CSF and antigen in DNA prime-adenoviral vector boost immunization enhances polyfunctional CD8+ T cell responses, whereas expression of GM-CSF antigen fusion protein induces autoimmunity

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    Tenbusch, Matthias; Kuate, Seraphin; Tippler, Bettina; Gerlach, Nicole; Schimmer, Simone; Dittmer, Ulf; Überla, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has shown promising results as a cytokine adjuvant for antiviral vaccines and in various models of tumor gene therapy. To explore whether the targeting of antigens to GM-CSF receptors on antigen-presenting cells enhances antigen-specific CD8 T-cell responses, fusion proteins of GM-CSF and ovalbumin (OVA) were expressed by DNA and adenoviral vector vaccines. In addition, bicistronic vectors allowing independent expre...

  14. A novel subunit vaccine co-expressing GM-CSF and PCV2b Cap protein enhances protective immunity against porcine circovirus type 2 in piglets.

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    Zhang, Huawei; Qian, Ping; Peng, Bo; Shi, Lin; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Xiangmin

    2015-05-15

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) causes porcine circovirus-associated disease. Capsid (Cap) protein of PCV2 is the principal immunogenic protein that induces neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity. GM-CSF is an immune adjuvant that enhances responses to vaccines. In this study, recombinant baculoviruses Ac-Cap and Ac-Cap-GM-CSF expressing the Cap protein alone and co-expressing the Cap protein and porcine GM-CSF, respectively, were constructed successfully. The target proteins were analyzed by western blotting and IFA. Further, these proteins were confirmed by electron microscopy, which showed that Cap proteins could self-assemble into virus-like particles having diameters of 17-25nm. Animal experiments showed that pigs immunized with Cap-GM-CSF subunit vaccine showed significantly higher levels of PCV2-specific antibodies and neutralizing antibodies than pigs immunized with the Cap subunit vaccine and a commercial vaccine (Ingelvac CircoFLEX; PGM-CSF subunit vaccine showed significantly higher average daily weight gain after wild-type PCV2 challenge than pigs receiving the other three vaccines (PGM-CSF was a powerful immunoadjuvant for PCV2 subunit vaccines because it enhanced humoral immune response and improved immune protection against PCV2 infection in pigs. Thus, the novel Cap-GM-CSF subunit vaccine has the potential to be used as an effective and safe vaccine candidate against PCV2 infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Suppressive Effects on the Immune Response and Protective Immunity to a JEV DNA Vaccine by Co-administration of a GM-CSF-Expressing Plasmid in Mice

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    Chen, Hui; Gao, Na; Fan, Dongying; Wu, Jiangman; Zhu, Junping; Li, Jieqiong; Wang, Juan; Chen, Yanlei; An, Jing

    2012-01-01

    As a potential cytokine adjuvant of DNA vaccines, granulocyte-macrophage colony–stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has received considerable attention due to its essential role in the recruitment of antigen-presenting cells, differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells. However, in our recent study of a Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) DNA vaccine, co-inoculation of a GM-CSF plasmid dramatically suppressed the specific IgG response and resulted in decreased protection against JEV challenge. It is known that GM-CSF has been used in clinic to treat neutropenia for repopulating myeloid cells, and as an adjuvant in vaccine studies; it has shown various effects on the immune response. Therefore, in this study, we characterized the suppressive effects on the immune response to a JEV DNA vaccine by the co-administration of the GM-CSF-expressing plasmid and clarified the underlying mechanisms of the suppression in mice. Our results demonstrated that co-immunization with GM-CSF caused a substantial dampening of the vaccine-induced antibody responses. The suppressive effect was dose- and timing-dependent and likely related to the immunogenicity of the antigen. The suppression was associated with the induction of immature dendritic cells and the expansion of regulatory T cells but not myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Collectively, our findings not only provide valuable information for the application of GM-CSF in clinic and using as a vaccine adjuvant but also offer further insight into the understanding of the complex roles of GM-CSF. PMID:22493704

  16. Targeting GM-CSF in inflammatory diseases.

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    Wicks, Ian P; Roberts, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a growth factor first identified as an inducer of differentiation and proliferation of granulocytes and macrophages derived from haematopoietic progenitor cells. Later studies have shown that GM-CSF is involved in a wide range of biological processes in both innate and adaptive immunity, with its production being tightly linked to the response to danger signals. Given that the functions of GM-CSF span multiple tissues and biological processes, this cytokine has shown potential as a new and important therapeutic target in several autoimmune and inflammatory disorders - particularly in rheumatoid arthritis. Indeed, GM-CSF was one of the first cytokines detected in human synovial fluid from inflamed joints. Therapies that target GM-CSF or its receptor have been tested in preclinical studies with promising results, further supporting the potential of targeting the GM-CSF pathway. In this Review, we discuss our expanding view of the biology of GM-CSF, outline what has been learnt about GM-CSF from studies of animal models and human diseases, and summarize the results of early phase clinical trials evaluating GM-CSF antagonism in inflammatory disorders.

  17. Comparative Antitumor Effect of Preventive versus Therapeutic Vaccines Employing B16 Melanoma Cells Genetically Modified to Express GM-CSF and B7.2 in a Murine Model

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    Salvador F. Aliño

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer vaccines have always been a subject of gene therapy research. One of the most successful approaches has been working with genetically modified tumor cells. In this study, we describe our approach to achieving an immune response against a murine melanoma model, employing B16 tumor cells expressing GM-CSF and B7.2. Wild B16 cells were injected in C57BL6 mice to cause the tumor. Irradiated B16 cells transfected with GM-CSF, B7.2, or both, were processed as a preventive and therapeutic vaccination. Tumor volumes were measured and survival curves were obtained. Blood samples were taken from mice, and IgGs of each treatment group were also measured. The regulatory T cells (Treg of selected groups were quantified using counts of images taken by confocal microscopy. Results: one hundred percent survival was achieved by preventive vaccination with the group of cells transfected with p2F_GM-CSF. Therapeutic vaccination achieved initial inhibition of tumor growth but did not secure overall survival of the animals. Classical Treg cells did not vary among the different groups in this therapeutic vaccination model.

  18. Enrichment of Ly6C(hi) monocytes by multiple GM-CSF injections with HBV vaccine contributes to viral clearance in a HBV mouse model.

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    Zhao, Weidong; Zhou, Xian; Zhao, Gan; Lin, Qing; Wang, Xianzheng; Yu, Xueping; Wang, Bin

    2017-07-12

    Adjuvants are considered a necessary component for HBV therapeutic vaccines but few are licensed in clinical practice due to concerns about safety or efficiency. In our recent study, we established that a combination protocol of 3-day pretreatments with GM-CSF before a vaccination (3 × GM-CSF+VACCINE) into the same injection site could break immune tolerance and cause over 90% reduction of HBsAg level in the HBsAg transgenic mouse model. Herein, we further investigated the therapeutic potential of the combination in AAV8-1.3HBV-infected mice. After 4 vaccinations, both serum HBeAg and HBsAg were cleared and there was a 95% reduction of HBV-positive hepatocytes, in addition to the presence of large number of infiltrating CD8(+) T cells in the livers. Mechanistically, the HBV-specific T-cell responses were elicited via a 3 × GM-CSF+VACCINE-induced conversion of CCR2-dependent CD11b(+) Ly6C(hi) monocytes into CD11b(+)CD11c(+) DCs. Experimental depletion of Ly6C(hi) monocytes resulted in a defective HBV-specific immune response thereby abrogating HBV eradication. This vaccination strategy could lead to development of an effective therapeutic protocol against chronic HBV in infected patients.

  19. GM-CSF production allows the identification of immunoprevalent antigens recognized by human CD4+ T cells following smallpox vaccination.

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    Valeria Judkowski

    Full Text Available The threat of bioterrorism with smallpox and the broad use of vaccinia vectors for other vaccines have led to the resurgence in the study of vaccinia immunological memory. The importance of the role of CD4+ T cells in the control of vaccinia infection is well known. However, more CD8+ than CD4+ T cell epitopes recognized by human subjects immunized with vaccinia virus have been reported. This could be, in part, due to the fact that most of the studies that have identified human CD4+ specific protein-derived fragments or peptides have used IFN-γ production to evaluate vaccinia specific T cell responses. Based on these findings, we reasoned that analyzing a large panel of cytokines would permit us to generate a more complete analysis of the CD4 T cell responses. The results presented provide clear evidence that TNF-α is an excellent readout of vaccinia specificity and that other cytokines such as GM-CSF can be used to evaluate the reactivity of CD4+ T cells in response to vaccinia antigens. Furthermore, using these cytokines as readout of vaccinia specificity, we present the identification of novel peptides from immunoprevalent vaccinia proteins recognized by CD4+ T cells derived from smallpox vaccinated human subjects. In conclusion, we describe a "T cell-driven" methodology that can be implemented to determine the specificity of the T cell response upon vaccination or infection. Together, the single pathogen in vitro stimulation, the selection of CD4+ T cells specific to the pathogen by limiting dilution, the evaluation of pathogen specificity by detecting multiple cytokines, and the screening of the clones with synthetic combinatorial libraries, constitutes a novel and valuable approach for the elucidation of human CD4+ T cell specificity in response to large pathogens.

  20. A GM-CSF and CD40L bystander vaccine is effective in a murine breast cancer model

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    Soliman H

    2015-12-01

    -γ secreting T-cells on ELISPOT for BCG treated groups, and a trend for higher numbers of tumor infiltrating CD3+ lymphocytes. Some tumors in the 4T1-BCG demonstrated organized lymphoid structures within the tumor microenvironment as well. Conclusion: The use of BCG bystander cell lines demonstrates proof of concept for anti-tumor activity and immunogenicity in an immunocompetent murine model of breast cancer. This vaccine is being evaluated in lung cancer and should be explored further in clinical trials of breast cancer patients at high risk of recurrence or in combination with other immunomodulatory agents. Keywords: breast cancer, immunotherapy, bystander vaccine, CD40L, GM-CSF

  1. Pivotal Roles of GM-CSF in Autoimmunity and Inflammation

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    Shiomi, Aoi; Usui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor, which stimulates the proliferation of granulocytes and macrophages from bone marrow precursor cells. In autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, Th17 cells have been considered as strong inducers of tissue inflammation. However, recent evidence indicates that GM-CSF has prominent proinflammatory functions and that this growth factor (not IL-17) is critical for the pathogenicity of CD4+ T cells. Therefore, the mechanism of GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cell differentiation and the role of GM-CSF in the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases are gaining increasing attention. This review summarizes the latest knowledge of GM-CSF and its relationship with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The potential therapies targeting GM-CSF as well as their possible side effects have also been addressed in this review. PMID:25838639

  2. Vaccination with a plasmid DNA encoding HER-2/neu together with low doses of GM-CSF and IL-2 in patients with metastatic breast carcinoma: a pilot clinical trial

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    Knutson Keith L

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adjuvant trastuzumab (Herceptin treatment of breast cancer patients significantly improves their clinical outcome. Vaccination is an attractive alternative approach to provide HER-2/neu (Her2-specific antibodies and may in addition concomitantly stimulate Her2-reactive T-cells. Here we report the first administration of a Her2-plasmid DNA (pDNA vaccine in humans. Patients and Methods The vaccine, encoding a full-length signaling-deficient version of the oncogene Her2, was administered together with low doses of GM-CSF and IL-2 to patients with metastatic Her2-expressing breast carcinoma who were also treated with trastuzumab. Six of eight enrolled patients completed all three vaccine cycles. In the remaining two patients treatment was discontinued after one vaccine cycle due to rapid tumor progression or disease-related complications. The primary objective was the evaluation of safety and tolerability of the vaccine regimen. As a secondary objective, treatment-induced Her2-specific immunity was monitored by measuring antibody production as well as T-cell proliferation and cytokine production in response to Her2-derived antigens. Results No clinical manifestations of acute toxicity, autoimmunity or cardiotoxicity were observed after administration of Her2-pDNA in combination with GM-CSF, IL-2 and trastuzumab. No specific T-cell proliferation following in vitro stimulation of freshly isolated PBMC with recombinant human Her2 protein was induced by the vaccination. Immediately after all three cycles of vaccination no or even decreased CD4+ T-cell responses towards Her2-derived peptide epitopes were observed, but a significant increase of MHC class II restricted T-cell responses to Her2 was detected at long term follow-up. Since concurrent trastuzumab therapy was permitted, λ-subclass specific ELISAs were performed to specifically measure endogenous antibody production without interference by trastuzumab. Her2-pDNA vaccination

  3. GM-CSF increases mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza DNA vaccine administered into the epidermis of non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, Peter T; Yager, Eric J; Lynch, Debbie T; Narendran, Amithi; Stagnar, Cristy; Franchini, Anthony M; Fuller, James T; White, Phil A; Nyuandi, Julia; Wiley, Clayton A; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Fuller, Deborah H

    2010-06-08

    The recent H5N1 avian and H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus outbreaks reaffirm that the threat of a world-wide influenza pandemic is both real and ever-present. Vaccination is still considered the best strategy for protection against influenza virus infection but a significant challenge is to identify new vaccine approaches that offer accelerated production, broader protection against drifted and shifted strains, and the capacity to elicit anti-viral immune responses in the respiratory tract at the site of viral entry. As a safe alternative to live attenuated vaccines, the mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza (A/New Caledonia/20/99) HA DNA vaccine administered by particle-mediated epidermal delivery (PMED or gene gun) was analyzed in rhesus macaques. Macaques were immunized at weeks 0, 8, and 16 using a disposable single-shot particle-mediated delivery device designed for clinical use that delivers plasmid DNA directly into cells of the epidermis. Significant levels of hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibodies and cytokine-secreting HA-specific T cells were observed in the periphery of macaques following 1-3 doses of the PMED HA DNA vaccine. In addition, HA DNA vaccination induced detectable levels of HA-specific mucosal antibodies and T cells in the lung and gut-associated lymphoid tissues of vaccinated macaques. Importantly, co-delivery of a DNA encoding the rhesus macaque GM-CSF gene was found to significantly enhance both the systemic and mucosal immunogenicity of the HA DNA vaccine. These results provide strong support for the development of a particle-mediated epidermal DNA vaccine for protection against respiratory pathogens such as influenza and demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of skin-delivered GM-CSF to serve as an effective mucosal adjuvant for vaccine induction of immune responses in the gut and respiratory tract.

  4. GM-CSF increases mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza DNA vaccine administered into the epidermis of non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T Loudon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent H5N1 avian and H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus outbreaks reaffirm that the threat of a world-wide influenza pandemic is both real and ever-present. Vaccination is still considered the best strategy for protection against influenza virus infection but a significant challenge is to identify new vaccine approaches that offer accelerated production, broader protection against drifted and shifted strains, and the capacity to elicit anti-viral immune responses in the respiratory tract at the site of viral entry. As a safe alternative to live attenuated vaccines, the mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza (A/New Caledonia/20/99 HA DNA vaccine administered by particle-mediated epidermal delivery (PMED or gene gun was analyzed in rhesus macaques.Macaques were immunized at weeks 0, 8, and 16 using a disposable single-shot particle-mediated delivery device designed for clinical use that delivers plasmid DNA directly into cells of the epidermis. Significant levels of hemagglutination inhibiting (HI antibodies and cytokine-secreting HA-specific T cells were observed in the periphery of macaques following 1-3 doses of the PMED HA DNA vaccine. In addition, HA DNA vaccination induced detectable levels of HA-specific mucosal antibodies and T cells in the lung and gut-associated lymphoid tissues of vaccinated macaques. Importantly, co-delivery of a DNA encoding the rhesus macaque GM-CSF gene was found to significantly enhance both the systemic and mucosal immunogenicity of the HA DNA vaccine.These results provide strong support for the development of a particle-mediated epidermal DNA vaccine for protection against respiratory pathogens such as influenza and demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of skin-delivered GM-CSF to serve as an effective mucosal adjuvant for vaccine induction of immune responses in the gut and respiratory tract.

  5. Recombinant rabies viruses expressing GM-CSF or flagellin are effective vaccines for both intramuscular and oral immunizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Zhang, Guoqing; Ren, Guiping; Gnanadurai, Clement W; Li, Zhenguang; Chai, Qingqing; Yang, Yang; Leyson, Christina M; Wu, Wenxue; Cui, Min; Fu, Zhen F

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies indicated that recombinant rabies viruses (rRABV) expressing chemokines or cytokines (including GM-CSF) could enhance the immunogenicity by recruiting and/or activating dendritic cells (DC). In this study, bacterial flagellin was cloned into the RABV genome and recombinant virus LBNSE-Flagellin was rescued. To compare the immunogenicity of LBNSE-Flagellin with recombinant virus expressing GMCSF (LBNSE-GMCSF), mice were immunized with each of these rRABVs by intramuscular (i.m.) or oral route. The parent virus (LBNSE) without expression of any foreign molecules was included for comparison. The i.m.-immunized mice were bled at three weeks after the immunization for the measurement of virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) and then challenged with 50 LD50 challenge virus standard (CVS-24). Orally immunized mice were boosted after three weeks and then bled and challenged one week after the booster immunization. It was found that both LBNSE-GMCSF and LBNSE-Flagellin recruited/activated more DCs and B cells in the periphery, stimulated higher levels of adaptive immune responses (VNA), and protected more mice against challenge infection than the parent virus LBNSE in both the i.m. and the orally immunized groups. Together, these studies suggest that recombinant RABV expressing GM-CSF or flagellin are more immunogenic than the parent virus in both i.m. and oral immunizations.

  6. Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Phase III Trial of Yeast-Derived Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Versus Peptide Vaccination Versus GM-CSF Plus Peptide Vaccination Versus Placebo in Patients With No Evidence of Disease After Complete Surgical Resection of Locally Advanced and/or Stage IV Melanoma: A Trial of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-American College of Radiology Imaging Network Cancer Research Group (E4697).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, David H; Lee, Sandra; Zhao, Fengmin; Tarhini, Ahmad A; Margolin, Kim A; Ernstoff, Marc S; Atkins, Michael B; Cohen, Gary I; Whiteside, Theresa L; Butterfield, Lisa H; Kirkwood, John M

    2015-12-01

    We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and peptide vaccination (PV) on relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with resected high-risk melanoma. Patients with completely resected stage IV or high-risk stage III melanoma were grouped by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) -A2 status. HLA-A2-positive patients were randomly assigned to receive GM-CSF, PV, both, or placebo; HLA-A2-negative patients, GM-CSF or placebo. Treatment lasted for 1 year or until recurrence. Efficacy analyses were conducted in the intent-to-treat population. A total of 815 patients were enrolled. There were no significant improvements in OS (stratified log-rank P = .528; hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% repeated CI, 0.77 to 1.15) or RFS (P = .131; hazard ratio, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.04) in the patients assigned to GM-CSF (n = 408) versus those assigned to placebo (n = 407). The median OS times with GM-CSF versus placebo treatments were 69.6 months (95% CI, 53.4 to 83.5 months) versus 59.3 months (95% CI, 44.4 to 77.3 months); the 5-year OS probability rates were 52.3% (95% CI, 47.3% to 57.1%) versus 49.4% (95% CI, 44.3% to 54.3%), respectively. The median RFS times with GM-CSF versus placebo were 11.4 months (95% CI, 9.4 to 14.8 months) versus 8.8 months (95% CI, 7.5 to 11.2 months); the 5-year RFS probability rates were 31.2% (95% CI, 26.7% to 35.9%) versus 27.0% (95% CI, 22.7% to 31.5%), respectively. Exploratory analyses showed a trend toward improved OS in GM-CSF-treated patients with resected visceral metastases. When survival in HLA-A2-positive patients who received PV versus placebo was compared, RFS and OS were not significantly different. Treatment-related grade 3 or greater adverse events were similar between GM-CSF and placebo groups. Neither adjuvant GM-CSF nor PV significantly improved RFS or OS in patients with high-risk resected melanoma. Exploratory analyses suggest

  7. Coexpression of GM-CSF and antigen in DNA prime-adenoviral vector boost immunization enhances polyfunctional CD8+ T cell responses, whereas expression of GM-CSF antigen fusion protein induces autoimmunity.

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    Tenbusch, Matthias; Kuate, Seraphin; Tippler, Bettina; Gerlach, Nicole; Schimmer, Simone; Dittmer, Ulf; Uberla, Klaus

    2008-04-11

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has shown promising results as a cytokine adjuvant for antiviral vaccines and in various models of tumor gene therapy. To explore whether the targeting of antigens to GM-CSF receptors on antigen-presenting cells enhances antigen-specific CD8 T-cell responses, fusion proteins of GM-CSF and ovalbumin (OVA) were expressed by DNA and adenoviral vector vaccines. In addition, bicistronic vectors allowing independent expression of the antigen and the cytokine were tested in parallel. In vitro, the GM-CSF ovalbumin fusion protein (GM-OVA) led to the better stimulation of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells by antigen-presenting cells than OVA and GM-CSF given as two separate proteins. However, prime-boost immunizations of mice with DNA and adenoviral vector vaccines encoding GM-OVA suppressed CD8+ T-cell responses to OVA. OVA-specific IgG2a antibody levels were also reduced, while the IgG1 antibody response was enhanced. Suppression of CD8+ T cell responses by GM-OVA vaccines was associated with the induction of neutralizing antibodies to GM-CSF. In contrast, the coexpression of GM-CSF and antigens in DNA prime adenoviral boost immunizations led to a striking expansion of polyfunctional OVA-specific CD8+ T cells without the induction of autoantibodies. The induction of autoantibodies suggests a general note of caution regarding the use of highly immunogenic viral vector vaccines encoding fusion proteins between antigens and host proteins. In contrast, the expansion of polyfunctional OVA-specific CD8+ T cells after immunizations with bicistronic vectors further support a potential application of GM-CSF as an adjuvant for heterologous prime-boost regimens with genetic vaccines. Since DNA prime adenoviral vector boost regimenes are presently considered as one of the most efficient ways to induce CD8+ T cell responses in mice, non-human primates and humans, further enhancement of this response by GM-CSF is a striking observation.

  8. Coexpression of GM-CSF and antigen in DNA prime-adenoviral vector boost immunization enhances polyfunctional CD8+ T cell responses, whereas expression of GM-CSF antigen fusion protein induces autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerlach Nicole

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF has shown promising results as a cytokine adjuvant for antiviral vaccines and in various models of tumor gene therapy. To explore whether the targeting of antigens to GM-CSF receptors on antigen-presenting cells enhances antigen-specific CD8 T-cell responses, fusion proteins of GM-CSF and ovalbumin (OVA were expressed by DNA and adenoviral vector vaccines. In addition, bicistronic vectors allowing independent expression of the antigen and the cytokine were tested in parallel. Results In vitro, the GM-CSF ovalbumin fusion protein (GM-OVA led to the better stimulation of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells by antigen-presenting cells than OVA and GM-CSF given as two separate proteins. However, prime-boost immunizations of mice with DNA and adenoviral vector vaccines encoding GM-OVA suppressed CD8+ T-cell responses to OVA. OVA-specific IgG2a antibody levels were also reduced, while the IgG1 antibody response was enhanced. Suppression of CD8+ T cell responses by GM-OVA vaccines was associated with the induction of neutralizing antibodies to GM-CSF. In contrast, the coexpression of GM-CSF and antigens in DNA prime adenoviral boost immunizations led to a striking expansion of polyfunctional OVA-specific CD8+ T cells without the induction of autoantibodies. Conclusion The induction of autoantibodies suggests a general note of caution regarding the use of highly immunogenic viral vector vaccines encoding fusion proteins between antigens and host proteins. In contrast, the expansion of polyfunctional OVA-specific CD8+ T cells after immunizations with bicistronic vectors further support a potential application of GM-CSF as an adjuvant for heterologous prime-boost regimens with genetic vaccines. Since DNA prime adenoviral vector boost regimenes are presently considered as one of the most efficient ways to induce CD8+ T cell responses in mice, non-human primates and humans, further

  9. Delivery of GM-CSF to Protect against Influenza Pneumonia.

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    Renuka Subramaniam

    Full Text Available Since adaptive immunity is thought to be central to immunity against influenza A virus (IAV pneumonias, preventive strategies have focused primarily on vaccines. However, vaccine efficacy has been variable, in part because of antigenic shift and drift in circulating influenza viruses. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of innate immunity in protecting against influenza.Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF contributes to maturation of mononuclear phagocytes, enhancing their capacity for phagocytosis and cytokine production.Overexpression of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF in the lung of transgenic mice provides remarkable protection against IAV, which depends on alveolar macrophages (AM. In this study, we report that pulmonary delivery of GM-CSF to wild type young and aged mice abrogated mortality from IAV.We also demonstrate that protection is species specific and human GM-CSF do not protect the mice nor stimulates mouse immunity. We also show that IAV-induced lung injury is the culprit for side-effects of GM-CSF in treating mice after IAV infection, and introduce a novel strategy to deliver the GM-CSF to and retain it in the alveolar space even after IAV infection.

  10. A DNA vaccine encoding mutated HPV58 mE6E7-Fc-GPI fusion antigen and GM-CSF and B7.1

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    Wang H

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available He Wang,1 Jiyun Yu,2 Li Li1 1Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi, 2Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV is a predominant cause of cervical cancer, and HPV58 is the third most common virus detected in the patients with cervical cancer in Asia. E6 and E7 are the viral oncogenes which are constitutively expressed in HPV-associated tumor cells and can be used as target antigens for related immunotherapy. In this study, we modified the HPV58 E6 and E7 oncogenes to eliminate their oncogenic potential and constructed a recombinant DNA vaccine that coexpresses the sig-HPV58 mE6E7-Fc-GPI fusion antigen in addition to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and B7.1 as molecular adjuvants (PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB for the treatment of HPV58 (+ cancer. Methods: PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB recombinant DNA vaccine was constructed to express a fusion protein containing a signal peptide, a modified HPV58 mE6E7 gene, and human IgG Fc and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchoring sequences using the modified DNA vaccine vector PVAX1-IRES-GM/B7.1 that coexpresses GM-CSF, and B7.1. C57BL/6 mice were challenged by HPV58 E6E7-expressing B16-HPV58 E6E7 cells, followed by immunization by PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB vaccine on days 7, 14, 21 after tumor challenge. The cellular immune responses in immunized mice were assessed by measuring IFN-γ production in splenocytes upon stimulation by HPV58 E6E7-GST protein and the lysis of B16-HPV58 E6E7 target cells by splenocytes after restimulation with HPV58 E6E7-GST protein. The antitumor efficacy was evaluated by monitoring the growth of the tumor. Results: PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB elicited varying levels of IFN-lsgdB58onn T-cell immune responses and lysis of target cell in mice in response to the

  11. GM-CSF enhances tumor invasion by elevated MMP-2, -9, and -26 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutschalk, Claudia M; Yanamandra, Archana K; Linde, Nina; Meides, Alice; Depner, Sofia; Mueller, Margareta M

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) promotes tumor progression in different tumor models in an autocrine and paracrine manner. However, at the same time GM-CSF is used in cancer therapies to ameliorate neutropenia. We have previously shown in GM-CSF and G-CSF expressing or negative skin or head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that GM-CSF expression is associated with a highly angiogenic and invasive tumor phenotype. To determine the functional contribution of GM-CSF to tumor invasion, we stably transfected a GM-CSF negative colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29 with GM-CSF or treated the same cell line with exogenous GM-CSF. While GM-CSF overexpression and treatment reduced tumor cell proliferation and tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, respectively, it contributed to tumor progression. Together with an enhanced migratory capacity in vitro, we observed a striking increase in tumor cell invasion into the surrounding tissue concomitant with the induction of an activated tumor stroma in GM-CSF overexpressing or GM-CSF treated tumors. In a complex 3D in vitro model, enhanced GM-CSF expression was associated with a discontinued basement membrane deposition that might be mediated by the increased expression and activation of MMP-2, -9, and -26. Treatment with GM-CSF blocking antibodies reversed this effect. The increased presence and activity of these tumor cell derived proteases was confirmed in vivo. Here, expression of MMP-26 protein was predominantly located in pre- and early-invasive areas suggesting MMP-26 expression as an early event in promoting GM-CSF dependent tumor invasion. PMID:23634280

  12. Silencing of Foxp3 enhances the antitumor efficacy of GM-CSF genetically modified tumor cell vaccine against B16 melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antonio Miguel,1 Luis Sendra,1 Verónica Noé,2 Carles J Ciudad,2 Francisco Dasí,3,4 David Hervas,5 María José Herrero,1,6 Salvador F Aliño17 1Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Valencia, 2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona, 3Research University Hospital of Valencia, INCLIVA Health Research Institute, 4Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Valencia Foundation, 5Biostatistics Unit, 6Pharmacogenetics Unit, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria La Fe (IIS La Fe, 7Clinical Pharmacology Unit, ACM Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, Valencia, Spain Abstract: The antitumor response after therapeutic vaccination has a limited effect and seems to be related to the presence of T regulatory cells (Treg, which express the immunoregulatory molecules CTLA4 and Foxp3. The blockage of CTLA4 using antibodies has shown an effective antitumor response conducing to the approval of the human anti-CTLA4 antibody ipilimumab by the US Food and Drug Administration. On the other hand, Foxp3 is crucial for Treg development. For this reason, it is an attractive target for cancer treatment. This study aims to evaluate whether combining therapeutic vaccination with CTLA4 or Foxp3 gene silencing enhances the antitumor response. First, the “in vitro” cell entrance and gene silencing efficacy of two tools, 2'-O-methyl phosphorotioate-modified oligonucleotides (2'-OMe-PS-ASOs and polypurine reverse Hoogsteen hairpins (PPRHs, were evaluated in EL4 cells and cultured primary lymphocytes. Following B16 tumor transplant, C57BL6 mice were vaccinated with irradiated B16 tumor cells engineered to produce granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and were intraperitoneally treated with CTLA4 and Foxp3 2'-OMe-PS-ASO before and after vaccination. Tumor growth, mice survival, and CTLA4 and Foxp3 expression in blood cells were measured. The following

  13. GM-CSF DNA: an adjuvant for higher avidity IgG, rectal IgA, and increased protection against the acute phase of a SHIV-89.6P challenge by a DNA/MVA immunodeficiency virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Lilin; Vödrös, Dalma; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Montefiori, David C; Wilson, Robert L; Akerstrom, Vicki L; Chennareddi, Lakshmi; Yu, Tianwei; Kannanganat, Sunil; Ofielu, Lazarus; Villinger, Francois; Wyatt, Linda S; Moss, Bernard; Amara, Rama Rao; Robinson, Harriet L

    2007-12-05

    Single intradermal or intramuscular inoculations of GM-CSF DNA with the DNA prime for a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-89.6 vaccine, which consists of DNA priming followed by modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) boosting, increased protection of both the blood and intestines against the acute phase of an intrarectal SHIV-89.6P challenge. GM-CSF appeared to contribute to protection by enhancing two antibody responses: the avidity maturation of anti-Env IgG in blood (p=oranti-viral IgA in rectal secretions (p<0.01). The avidity of anti-Env IgG showed strong correlations with protection both pre and post challenge. Animals with the highest avidity anti-Env Ab had 1000-fold reductions in peak viremia over those with the lowest avidity anti-Env Ab. The enhanced IgA response was associated with the best protection, but did not achieve significance.

  14. Replication-defective recombinant Semliki Forest virus encoding GM-CSF as a vector system for rapid and facile generation of autologous human tumor cell vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withoff, S; Glazenburg, KL; van Veen, ML; Kraak, MMJ; Hospers, GAP; Storkel, S; de Vries, EGE; Wischut, J; Daemen, T

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the production of recombinant Semliki Forest virus encoding murine or human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and the capacity of these vectors to transduce murine and human tumor cells ex vivo. High-titer stocks (up to 3 x 10(9) particles/ml) of

  15. Co-vaccination with adeno-associated virus vectors encoding human papillomavirus 16 L1 proteins and adenovirus encoding murine GM-CSF can elicit strong and prolonged neutralizing antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dai-Wei; Chang, Junn-Liang; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Huang, Chien-Wei; Kuo, Shu-Wen; Chen, Show-Li

    2005-01-01

    Non-infectious human papillomavirus-like particles (VLPs), encoded by the major capsid gene L1, have been shown to be effective as vaccines to prevent cervical cancer. We have developed the genetic immunization of the L1 gene to induce a neutralizing antibody. We constructed and generated a recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 L1 protein that could form virus-like particles in transduced cells. Previous reports have demonstrated that the formation of VLP is necessary to induce high titers of neutralizing antibodies to protect an animal from viral challenge. Therefore, we carried out a single intramuscular (i.m.) injection with recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding HPV-16 L1 protein (rAAV-16L1) in BALB/c mice, which ultimately produced stronger and more prolonged neutralizing L1 antibodies, when compared to the DNA vaccine. Immunohistochemistry showed that the accumulation of antigen presenting cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells, in rAAV-16L1 and L1 DNA-injected muscle fibers may be due to the L1 protein expression, but not to AAV infection. When compared to the L1 VLP vaccine, however, the titers of neutralizing L1 antibodies induced by VLP were higher than those induced by rAAV-16L1. Co-vaccinating with rAAV-16L1 and adenovirus encoding murine GM-CSF (rAAV-16L1/rAd-mGM-CSF) induced comparable higher levels of neutralizing L1 antibodies with those of VLP. This implies that a single i.m. co-injection with rAAV-16L1/rAd-mGM-CSF can achieve the same vaccine effect as a VLP vaccine requiring 3 booster injections.

  16. GM-CSF has disparate roles during intranasal and intradermal Francisella tularensis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Sherry L; Bosio, Catharine M; De Pascalis, Roberto; Elkins, Karen L

    2016-12-01

    Our laboratory has employed in vitro and in vivo mouse models based on Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS)-induced protection to elucidate immune correlates for intracellular bacteria. Among the effectors found was GM-CSF, a pleiotropic cytokine that is integral to the development and proliferation of myeloid cells, including alveolar macrophages. GM-CSF has roles in resistance to primary murine infection with several intracellular pathogens, but its role during Francisella infection is unknown. Francisella is an intracellular pathogen that infects lungs after inhalation, primarily invading alveolar macrophages. Here we show that GM-CSF has route-dependent roles during primary infection of mice with LVS. GM-CSF deficient (GM-CSF KO) mice were slightly more susceptible than wild type to intradermal infection, but had increased resistance to intranasal infection. Similarly, these mice had increased resistance to pulmonary infection with virulent F. tularensis (SchuS4). LVS-vaccinated GM-CSF KO mice had normal adaptive immune responses, as measured by T cell activities after LVS intradermal or intranasal vaccination, and survived lethal secondary LVS challenge. GM-CSF KO mice also had robust humoral responses, producing elevated levels of serum antibodies following LVS vaccination compared to wild type mice. Taken together, our data demonstrates that the absence of GM-CSF improves resistance to pulmonary, but not intradermal, infection with Francisella. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gözde Isik

    Full Text Available HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env. An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed Env(GM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized Env(GM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric Env(GM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins.

  18. The infarcted myocardium solicits GM-CSF for the detrimental oversupply of inflammatory leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Atsushi; Choi, Jennifer L; He, Shun; Fenn, Ashley M; Nairz, Manfred; Rattik, Sara; McAlpine, Cameron S; Mindur, John E; Chan, Christopher T; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Tricot, Benoit; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R; Weissleder, Ralph; Libby, Peter; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Stone, James R; Becher, Burkhard; Swirski, Filip K

    2017-11-06

    Myocardial infarction (MI) elicits massive inflammatory leukocyte recruitment to the heart. Here, we hypothesized that excessive leukocyte invasion leads to heart failure and death during acute myocardial ischemia. We found that shortly and transiently after onset of ischemia, human and mouse cardiac fibroblasts produce granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) that acts locally and distally to generate and recruit inflammatory and proteolytic cells. In the heart, fibroblast-derived GM-CSF alerts its neighboring myeloid cells to attract neutrophils and monocytes. The growth factor also reaches the bone marrow, where it stimulates a distinct myeloid-biased progenitor subset. Consequently, hearts of mice deficient in either GM-CSF or its receptor recruit fewer leukocytes and function relatively well, whereas mice producing GM-CSF can succumb from left ventricular rupture, a complication mitigated by anti-GM-CSF therapy. These results identify GM-CSF as both a key contributor to the pathogenesis of MI and a potential therapeutic target, bolstering the idea that GM-CSF is a major orchestrator of the leukocyte supply chain during inflammation. © 2017 Anzai et al.

  19. GM-CSF is not essential for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis but promotes brain-targeted disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Emily R; Goverman, Joan M

    2017-04-06

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) has been used as an animal model of multiple sclerosis to identify pathogenic cytokines that could be therapeutic targets. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is the only cytokine reported to be essential for EAE. We investigated the role of GM-CSF in EAE in C3HeB/FeJ mice that uniquely exhibit extensive brain and spinal cord inflammation. Unexpectedly, GM-CSF-deficient C3HeB/FeJ mice were fully susceptible to EAE because IL-17 activity compensated for the loss of GM-CSF during induction of spinal cord-targeted disease. In contrast, both GM-CSF and IL-17 were needed to fully overcome the inhibitory influence of IFN-γ on the induction of inflammation in the brain. Both GM-CSF and IL-17 independently promoted neutrophil accumulation in the brain, which was essential for brain-targeted disease. These results identify a GM-CSF/IL-17/IFN-γ axis that regulates inflammation in the central nervous system and suggest that a combination of cytokine-neutralizing therapies may be needed to dampen central nervous system autoimmunity.

  20. Pulmonary epithelial cell expression of GM-CSF corrects the alveolar proteinosis in GM-CSF-deficient mice.

    OpenAIRE

    J. A. Huffman; Hull, W M; Dranoff, G; Mulligan, R C; Whitsett, J A

    1996-01-01

    Mutation of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene by homologous recombination caused alveolar proteinosis in mice. To further discern the role of GM-CSF in surfactant homeostasis, the synthesis of GM-CSF was directed to the respiratory epithelium of GM-CSF-hull mutant mice (GM-/-) with a chimeric gene expressing GM-CSF under the control of the promoter from the human surfactant protein-C (SP-C) gene. Transgenic mice bearing the SP-C-GM-CSF construct (SP-C-GM+) wer...

  1. Rab27a regulates GM-CSF-dependent priming of neutrophil exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Johnson, Jennifer Linda; Catz, Sergio D

    2017-03-01

    Neutrophil secretory proteins are mediators of systemic inflammation in infection, trauma, and cancer. In response to specific inflammatory mediators, neutrophil granules are mobilized and cargo proteins released to modulate the microenvironment of inflammatory sites and tumors. In particular, GM-CSF, a cytokine secreted by several immune, nonimmune, and tumor cells, regulates neutrophil priming and exocytosis. Whereas a comprehensive understanding of this process is necessary to design appropriate anti-inflammatory therapies, the molecular effectors regulating GM-CSF-dependent priming of neutrophil exocytosis are currently unknown. With the use of neutrophils deficient in the small GTPase Rab27a or its effector Munc13-4, we show that although both of these secretory factors control matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) exocytosis in response to GM-CSF, their involvement in exocytosis after GM-CSF priming is very different. Whereas GM-CSF priming-induced exocytosis is abolished in the absence of Rab27a for all secondary stimuli tested, including TLR7, TLR9, and formyl peptide receptor 1 (Fpr1) ligands, cells lacking Munc13-4 showed a significant exocytic response to GM-CSF priming. The mobilization of CD11b was independent of both Rab27a and Munc13-4 in GM-CSF-primed cells unless the cells were stimulated with nucleic acid-sensing TLR ligand, thus highlighting a role for both Rab27a and Munc13-4 in endocytic TLR maturation. Finally, the observation that the absence of Rab27a expression impairs the exocytosis of MMP-9 and MPO under both primed and unprimed conditions suggests that Rab27a is a possible target for intervention in inflammatory processes in which GM-CSF-dependent neutrophil priming is involved. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  2. GM-CSF as a therapeutic target in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Aoi; Usui, Takashi; Mimori, Tsuneyo

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been known as a hematopoietic growth factor and immune modulator. Recent studies revealed that GM-CSF also had pro-inflammatory functions and contributed to the pathogenicity of Th17 cells in the development of Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases. GM-CSF inhibition in some animal models of autoimmune diseases showed significant beneficial effects. Therefore, several agents targeting GM-CSF are being developed and are expected to be a useful strategy for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Particularly, in clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, GM-CSF inhibition showed rapid and significant efficacy with no serious side effects. This article summarizes recent findings of GM-CSF and information of clinical trials targeting GM-CSF in autoimmune diseases.

  3. GM-CSF modulates pulmonary resistance to influenza A infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Murthy, Aditi; Davis, Jeremy; Florence, Jon Matthew; Kurdowska, Anna; Krupa, Agnieszka; Tichelaar, Jay W.; White, Mitchell R.; Hartshorn, Kevan L.; Kobzik, Lester; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Chroneos, Zissis C.

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar type II epithelial or other pulmonary cells secrete GM-CSF that regulates surfactant catabolism and mucosal host defense through its capacity to modulate the maturation and activation of alveolar macrophages. GM-CSF enhances expression of scavenger receptors MARCO and SR-A. The alveolar macrophage SP-R210 receptor binds the surfactant collectin SP-A mediating clearance of respiratory pathogens. The current study determined the effects of epithelial-derived GM-CSF in host resistance to influenza A pneumonia. The results demonstrate that GM-CSF enhanced resistance to infection with 1.9 × 104 ffc of the mouse-adapted influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) H1N1 strain, as indicated by significant differences in mortality and mean survival of GM-CSF-deficient (GM−/−) mice compared to GM−/− mice in which GM-CSF is expressed at increased levels. Protective effects of GM-CSF were observed both in mice with constitutive and inducible GM-CSF expression under the control of the pulmonary-specific SFTPC or SCGB1A1 promoters, respectively. Mice that continuously secrete high levels of GM-CSF developed desquamative interstitial pneumonia that impaired long-term recovery from influenza. Conditional expression of optimal GM-CSF levels at the time of infection, however, resulted in alveolar macrophage proliferation and focal lymphocytic inflammation of distal airways. GM-CSF enhanced alveolar macrophage activity as indicated by increased expression of SP-R210 and CD11c. Infection of mice lacking the GM-CSF-regulated SR-A and MARCO receptors revealed that MARCO decreases resistance to influenza in association with increased levels of SP-R210 in MARCO−/− alveolar macrophages. In conclusion, GM-CSF enhances early host resistance to influenza. Targeting of MARCO may reinforce GM-CSF-mediated host defense against pathogenic influenza. PMID:21925209

  4. T Cell Production of GM-CSF Protects the Host during Experimental Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Richard T

    2017-12-12

    Although classically associated with myelopoiesis, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is increasingly recognized as being important for tuberculosis (TB) resistance. GM-CSF is expressed by nonhematopoietic and hematopoietic lineages following infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is necessary to restrict M. tuberculosis growth in experimental models. Until the recent study by Rothchild et al. (mBio 8:e01514-17, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01514-17), it was unknown whether GM-CSF-producing T cells contribute to TB resistance. Rothchild et al. identify which conventional and nonconventional T cell subsets produce GM-CSF during experimental TB, establish their protective nature using a variety of approaches, and provide a mechanistic basis for their ability to restrict M. tuberculosis growth. This commentary discusses the significance of these findings to basic and applied TB research. As translated to human disease, these findings suggest vaccine-mediated expansion of GM-CSF-producing T cells could be an effective prophylactic or therapeutic TB strategy. Copyright © 2017 Robinson.

  5. Characterization of pathogenic human monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanni; Thomson, Christy A; Allan, Lenka L; Jackson, Linda M; Olson, Melanie; Hercus, Timothy R; Nero, Tracy L; Turner, Amanda; Parker, Michael W; Lopez, Angel L; Waddell, Thomas K; Anderson, Gary P; Hamilton, John A; Schrader, John W

    2013-05-07

    The origin of pathogenic autoantibodies remains unknown. Idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is caused by autoantibodies against granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We generated 19 monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF from six patients with idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The autoantibodies used multiple V genes, excluding preferred V-gene use as an etiology, and targeted at least four nonoverlapping epitopes on GM-CSF, suggesting that GM-CSF is driving the autoantibodies and not a B-cell epitope on a pathogen cross-reacting with GM-CSF. The number of somatic mutations in the autoantibodies suggests that the memory B cells have been helped by T cells and re-entered germinal centers. All autoantibodies neutralized GM-CSF bioactivity, with general correlations to affinity and off-rate. The binding of certain autoantibodies was changed by point mutations in GM-CSF that reduced binding to the GM-CSF receptor. Those monoclonal autoantibodies that potently neutralize GM-CSF may be useful in treating inflammatory disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, cancer, and pain.

  6. Immunogenicity of a novel Clade B HIV-1 vaccine combination: Results of phase 1 randomized placebo controlled trial of an HIV-1 GM-CSF-expressing DNA prime with a modified vaccinia Ankara vaccine boost in healthy HIV-1 uninfected adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan P Buchbinder

    Full Text Available A phase 1 trial of a clade B HIV vaccine in HIV-uninfected adults evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of a DNA prime co-expressing GM-CSF (Dg followed by different numbers and intervals of modified vaccinia Ankara Boosts (M. Both vaccines produce virus-like particles presenting membrane-bound Env.Four US sites randomized 48 participants to receiving 1/10th the DNA dose as DgDgMMM given at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 months, or full dose DgDgM_M or DgDgMM_M regimens, given at 0, 2, 4, and 8 months, and 0, 2, 4, 6, and 10 months, respectively. Peak immunogenicity was measured 2 weeks post-last vaccination.All regimens were well tolerated and safe. Full dose DgDgM_M and DgDgMM_M regimens generated Env-specific IgG to HIV-1 Env in >90%, IgG3 in >80%, and IgA in <20% of participants. Responses to gp140 and gp41 targets were more common and of higher magnitude than to gp120 and V1V2. The gp41 antibody included reactivity to the conserved immunodominant region with specificities known to mediate virus capture and phagocytosis and did not cross-react with a panel of intestinal flora antigens. The 3rd dose of MVA increased the avidity of elicited antibody (7.5% to 39%, the ADCC response to Bal gp120 (14% to 64%, and the one-year durability of the IgG3 responses to gp41 by 4-fold (13% vs. 3.5% retention of peak response. The co-expressed GM-CSF did not enhance responses over those in trials testing this vaccine without GM-CSF.This DNA/MVA prime-boost regimen induced durable, functional humoral responses that included ADCC, high antibody avidity, and Env IgG1 and IgG3 binding responses to the immunodominant region of gp41. The third, spaced MVA boost improved the overall quality of the antibody response. These products without co-expressed GM-CSF but combined with protein boosts will be considered for efficacy evaluation.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01571960.

  7. GM-CSF as successful salvage therapy of metamizole (dipyrone)-induced agranulocytosis with Fournier's gangrene and severe septic shock in an adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Annegret; Kietz, Silke; Bahlmann, Hagen; Jafarzade, Gunel; Lode, Holger N; Heckmann, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    This case report describes the successful use of granulocyte and macrophage colony-stimulating factor as salvage therapy and an alternative to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a 14-year-old adolescent with metamizole (dipyrone)-induced agranulocytosis and severe septic shock.

  8. Response to Treatment with TNFα Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis Is Associated with High Levels of GM-CSF and GM-CSF+ T Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrom, Jonas; Clanchy, Felix I; Taher, Taher E; Al-Bogami, Mohammed M; Muhammad, Hawzheen A; Alzabin, Saba; Mangat, Pamela; Jawad, Ali S; Williams, Richard O; Mageed, Rizgar A

    2017-10-01

    Biologic TNFα inhibitors are a mainstay treatment option for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) refractory to other treatment options. However, many patients either do not respond or relapse after initially responding to these agents. This study was carried out to identify biomarkers that can distinguish responder from non-responder patients before the initiation of treatment. The level of cytokines in plasma and those produced by ex vivo T cells, B cells and monocytes in 97 RA patients treated with biologic TNFα inhibitors was measured before treatment and after 1 and 3 months of treatment by multiplex analyses. The frequency of T cell subsets and intracellular cytokines were determined by flow cytometry. The results reveal that pre-treatment, T cells from patients who went on to respond to treatment with biologic anti-TNFα agents produced significantly more GM-CSF than non-responder patients. Furthermore, immune cells from responder patients produced higher levels of IL-1β, TNFα and IL-6. Cytokine profiling in the blood of patients confirmed the association between high levels of GM-CSF and responsiveness to biologic anti-TNFα agents. Thus, high blood levels of GM-CSF pre-treatment had a positive predictive value of 87.5% (61.6 to 98.5% at 95% CI) in treated RA patients. The study also shows that cells from most anti-TNFα responder patients in the current cohort produced higher levels of GM-CSF and TNFα pre-treatment than non-responder patients. Findings from the current study and our previous observations that non-responsiveness to anti-TNFα is associated with high IL-17 levels suggest that the disease in responder and non-responder RA patients is likely to be driven/sustained by different inflammatory pathways. The use of biomarker signatures of distinct pro-inflammatory pathways could lead to evidence-based prescription of the most appropriate biological therapies for different RA patients.

  9. A novel self-assembled nanoparticle vaccine with HIV-1 Tat₄₉₋₅₇/HPV16 E7₄₉₋₅₇ fusion peptide and GM-CSF DNA elicits potent and prolonged CD8⁺ T cell-dependent anti-tumor immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jun; Yin, Rui; Tian, Yi; Huang, Zeming; Shi, Jinglei; Fu, Xiaolan; Wang, Li; Wu, Yuzhang; Hao, Fei; Ni, Bing

    2012-02-01

    Peptide-based vaccines derived from the E7 protein of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 were developed to induce effective T cell responses against established cervical cancer, but have met with limited clinical success. It is necessary to develop novel peptide-based strategies to substantially improve the immune response against HPV16-related cancer. In this study, we aimed to design a novel peptide-based self-assembled nanoparticle HPV16 vaccine by combining the cell-penetrating peptide HIV-1 Tat(49-57) that was fused with the HPV16 E7(49-57) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope and the granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene, and to investigate how it improves the immune response and the therapeutic outcome ex vivo and in vivo. Nanoparticles were prepared and identified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), gel retardation and DNase I protection assays. This type of vaccine formulation formed the 20-80 nm nanoparticles, and greatly improved epitope-specific immunity both ex vivo and in vivo. Importantly, this vaccine type was associated with decreased tumor growth and enhanced long-term survival in the prophylactic and therapeutic mouse models. The underlying mechanisms were determined to involve priming of enhanced frequency of CD8(+) memory T subtype cells. These results suggest that the nanoparticle Tat-E7/pGM-CSF represents a promising novel approach to enhance the potency of peptide-based cervical cancer vaccines, and this vaccine design strategy may act as a useful reference for research of virus-associated diseases and specific tumor immunotherapies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Superiority of intramuscular route and full length glycoprotein D for DNA vaccination against herpes simplex 2. Enhancement of protection by the co-delivery of the GM-CSF gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fló, J; Beatriz Perez, A; Tisminetzky, S; Baralle, F

    2000-08-01

    Immunization with naked DNA has been analyzed in two critical variables: the site of injection and the cellular compartment to which the coded protein is directed. The gene for the full length of the glycoprotein D (gD) of HSV-2 under the control of the citomegalovirus (CMV) promoter was injected via the intradermal (i.d.) or the intramuscular (i.m.) routes in mice. Immunization in the quadricep muscle was superior to the intradermal immunization in the footpads. A stronger activation of IFN-gamma-secreting cells in the spleen and draining lymph nodes (DLN) was induced, resulting in a more efficient protection against an intravaginal challenge. In order to analyze the effect of the cellular localizations of the coded protein, the DNA for the truncated form of the gD (DeltagD) was injected via the i.m. route. Immunization with a vector encoding for DeltagD resulted in higher antibody levels in serum and vaginal washes than immunization with the gene for the full length gD. However, immunization with the DeltagD DNA elicited a much weaker cell-mediated immune response and was inferior to gD DNA in providing protection against a lethal intravaginal challenge with HSV. Co-injection of an expression cassette for the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) increased both the humoral and cell-mediated immune response with both gD and DeltagD. A strong activation of IL-4-secreting cells was observed in the spleen and DLN together with an increase in the number of IFN-gamma-secreting cells. In addition, a reduction in the vaginal virus titers after an intravaginal challenge was observed in mice co-injected with the GM-CSF gene as compared to those immunized with pCDNAgD only.

  11. Preclinical characterisation of the GM-CSF receptor as a therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greven, D E A; Cohen, E S; Gerlag, D M; Campbell, J; Woods, J; Davis, N; van Nieuwenhuijze, A; Lewis, A; Heasmen, S; McCourt, M; Corkill, D; Dodd, A; Elvin, J; Statache, G; Wicks, I P; Anderson, I K; Nash, A; Sleeman, M A; Tak, P P

    2015-10-01

    Previous work has suggested that the granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-GM-CSF receptor α axis (GM-CSFRα) may provide a new therapeutic target for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, we investigated the cellular expression of GM-CSFRα in RA synovial tissue and investigated the effects of anti-GM-CSFRα antibody treatment in vitro and in vivo in a preclinical model of RA. We compared GM-CSFRα expression on macrophages positive for CD68 or CD163 on synovial biopsy samples from patients with RA or psoriatic arthritis (PsA) to disease controls. In addition, we studied the effects of CAM-3003, an anti-GM-CSFR antibody in a collagen induced arthritis model of RA in DBA/1 mice. The pharmacokinetic profile of CAM-3003 was studied in naïve CD1(ICR) mice (see online supplement) and used to interpret the results of the pharmacodynamic studies in BALB/c mice. GM-CSFRα was expressed by CD68 positive and CD163 positive macrophages in the synovium, and there was a significant increase in GM-CSFRα positive cells in patients in patients with RA as well as patients with PsA compared with patients with osteoarthritis and healthy controls. In the collagen induced arthritis model there was a dose dependent reduction of clinical arthritis scores and the number of F4/80 positive macrophages in the inflamed synovium after CAM-3003 treatment. In BALB/c mice CAM-3003 inhibited recombinant GM-CSF mediated margination of peripheral blood monocytes and neutrophils. The findings support the ongoing development of therapies aimed at interfering with GM-CSF or its receptor in various forms of arthritis, such as RA and PsA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Adenoviral vector-mediated GM-CSF gene transfer improves anti-mycobacterial immunity in mice - role of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singpiel, Alena; Kramer, Julia; Maus, Regina; Stolper, Jennifer; Bittersohl, Lara Friederike; Gauldie, Jack; Kolb, Martin; Welte, Tobias; Sparwasser, Tim; Maus, Ulrich A

    2017-10-26

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor involved in differentiation, survival and activation of myeloid and non-myeloid cells with important implications for lung antibacterial immunity. Here we examined the effect of pulmonary adenoviral vector-mediated delivery of GM-CSF (AdGM-CSF) on anti-mycobacterial immunity in M. bovis BCG infected mice. Exposure of M. bovis BCG infected mice to AdGM-CSF either applied on 6h, or 6h and 7days post-infection substantially increased alveolar recruitment of iNOS and IL-12 expressing macrophages, and significantly increased accumulation of IFNγpos T cells and particularly regulatory T cells (Tregs). This was accompanied by significantly reduced mycobacterial loads in the lungs of mice. Importantly, diphtheria toxin-induced depletion of Tregs did not influence mycobacterial loads, but accentuated immunopathology in AdGM-CSF-exposed mice infected with M. bovis BCG. Together, the data demonstrate that AdGM-CSF therapy improves lung protective immunity against M. bovis BCG infection in mice independent of co-recruited Tregs, which however critically contribute to limit lung immunopathology in BCG-infected mice. These data may be relevant to the development of immunomodulatory strategies to limit immunopathology-based lung injury in tuberculosis in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. GM-CSF: a role in immune and inflammatory reactions in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Laia; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Kagnoff, Martin F

    2010-12-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that promotes myeloid cell development and maturation, and dendritic cell differentiation and survival in vitro. Growing evidence supports the notion that GM-CSF has a major role in some inflammatory and autoimmune reactions and in the host's response to pulmonary infection, but few studies have addressed its functions and importance in the GI tract. Recent studies demonstrated that administration of GM-CSF can result in clinical improvement in patients with Crohn's disease. Mice deficient in GM-CSF (GM-CSF(-/-) ) developed more severe intestinal and systemic infection after an enteric infection, and more severe colitis in response to enteric exposure to dextran sodium sulfate. Both the severity of infection and colitis were largely prevented by GM-CSF administration. Such studies indicate that GM-CSF has an important role in the regulation of intestinal immune and inflammatory responses.

  14. TRAF6 is required for the GM-CSF-induced JNK, p38 and Akt activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiwu; Zhou, Chenchen; Huo, Jiang; Ni, Yanli; Zhang, Pengfei; Lu, Cheng; Jing, Bin; Xiao, Fengjun; Chen, Wenxia; Li, Wei; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Luo

    2015-06-01

    JNK, p38 and Akt signalings have been shown to be activated by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and are pivotal for GM-CSF-mediated survival, proliferation and differentiation of macrophages and their progenitors. However, the detailed mechanism of how these signalings is activated by GM-CSF is not fully elucidated. We report here that E3 ligase TRAF6 is required for the GM-CSF-induced activation of JNK, p38 and Akt. GM-CSF triggers autoubiquitination of TRAF6 and TRAF6 knocked down results in impaired activation of JNK and p38 signaling. TRAF6 is also required for GM-CSF-induced ubiquitination and activation of Akt. These findings reveal novel roles of TRAF6 in GM-CSF signaling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Safety and immunogenicity of vaccination with MART-1 (26-35, 27L), gp100 (209-217, 210M), and tyrosinase (368-376, 370D) in adjuvant with PF-3512676 and GM-CSF in metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhini, Ahmad A; Leng, Siyang; Moschos, Stergios J; Yin, Yan; Sander, Cindy; Lin, Yan; Gooding, William E; Kirkwood, John M

    2012-05-01

    The effectivenes of cancer vaccines in inducing CD8(+) T-cell responses remains a challenge, resulting in a need for testing more potent adjuvants. Our objective was to determine the safety and immunogenicity of vaccination against melanoma-related antigens employing MART-1, gp100, and tysosinase paptides combined with the TLR9 agonist PF-3512676 and local granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor in oil emulsion. Using continuous monitoring of safety and a 2-stage design for immunologic efficacy, 20 immune response evaluable patients were targetted. Vaccinations were given subcutaneously on days 1 and 15 per cycle (1cycle=28 d) for up to 13 cycles. Interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot was used as the primary assay measuring the frequency of peripheral antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells at days 50 and 90 compared with baseline (target ≥ 9/20 immunologic responses). Clinical responses were measured by Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors every 8 weeks. Twenty-two (including 20 immune response evaluable) melanoma patients were enrolled. All had American Joint Committe on Cancer stage IV (5M1a, 6M1b, 11M1c) and most had previously received therapy. Eight had previously treated brain metastases. An average of 3.5 cycles of vaccination per patient was administered. Clinical response data were available for 21 patients. There were 2 partial response and 8 stable disease lasting 2-7 months. One patient with ongoing partial response continued on treatment. At a median follow-up of 7.39 months (range, 3.22-20.47 mo), median progression-free survival was 1.9 months (90% confidence interval, 1.84-3.68) and median overall survival was 13.4 months (90% confidence interval,11.3-∞). No regimen-related grade 3/4/5 toxicities were observed. There were 9/20 patients with positive enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot at day 50 and/or day 90. Our adjuvant regimen combining PF-3512676 and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor was safe and is worthy of

  16. Incorporation of GM-CSF or CD40L Enhances the Immunogenicity of Hantaan Virus-Like Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lin-Feng; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Liang; Yu, Lan; Ye, Wei; Liu, Zi-Yu; Ying, Qi-Kang; Wu, Xing-An; Xu, Zhi-Kai; Zhang, Fang-Lin

    2016-01-01

    A safe and effective Hantaan virus (HTNV) vaccine is highly desirable because HTNV causes an acute and often fatal disease (hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, HFRS). Since the immunity of the inactivated vaccine is weak and the safety is poor, HTNV virus-like particles (VLPs) offer an attractive and safe alternative. These particles lack the viral genome but are perceived by the immune system as virus particles. We hypothesized that adding immunostimulatory signals to VLPs would enhance their efficacy. To accomplish this enhancement, we generated chimeric HTNV VLPs containing glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or CD40 ligand (CD40L) and investigated their biological activity in vitro. The immunization of mice with chimeric HTNV VLPs containing GM-CSF or CD40L induced stronger humoral immune responses and cellular immune responses compared to the HTNV VLPs and Chinese commercial inactivated hantavirus vaccine. Chimeric HTNV VLPs containing GM-CSF or CD40L also protected mice from an HTNV challenge. Altogether, our results suggest that anchoring immunostimulatory molecules into HTNV VLPs can be a potential approach for the control and prevention of HFRS. PMID:28066721

  17. GM-CSF and GM-CSF receptor have regulatory role in transforming rat mesenteric mesothelial cells into macrophage-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Sándor; Zsiros, Viktória; Dóczi, Nikolett; Szabó, Arnold; Biczó, Ádám; Kiss, Anna L

    2016-10-01

    During peritonitis, mesothelial cells assume macrophage characteristics, expressing macrophage markers, indicating that they might differentiate into macrophage-like cells. Twenty-five male rats were used for in vivo experiments. For in vitro experiments, a primary mesentery culture model was developed. The mesothelial cell to macrophage-like cell transition was followed by studying ED1 expression. In vitro primary mesenteric culture was treated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, 1 ng/ml). Blocking internalization of receptor-ligand complex, Dynasore (80 µM) was used. Acute peritonitis was induced by Freund's adjuvant's (1 ml) intraperitoneal injection. Immunohistochemistry: GM-CSF in vitro treatment resulted in a prominent ED1 expression in transformed mesothelial cells. Blocking the internalization, ED1 expression could not be detected. GM-CSF receptor (both α and β) was expressed in mesothelial cells in vitro (even if the GM-CSF was not present) and in vivo. Inflammation resulted in an increasing GM-CSF and GM-CSF-receptor level in the lysate of mesothelial cells. Mesothelial cells can differentiate into macrophage-like cells, and GM-CSF, produced by the mesothelial cells, has probably an autocrine regulatory role in this transition. Our results provide new data about the plasticity of mesothelial cell and support the idea that during inflammation macrophages can derive from non-hematopoietic sources as well.

  18. [Immuno-modulating effects of eukaryotic expressing vectors of IL-12 and GM-CSF associated to DNA-based vaccination against experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis in BALB/c mouse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S Ben Hadj; Dellagi, K; Bahloul, C

    2009-01-01

    Different works of DNA based vaccination against leishmaniasis highlight the complexity of the induced immune responses to fight against the disease. In this work, we exploited the capacity of IL-12 and GMC-SF to activate immune cell mediators and effectors to induce a Th1 response, more capable of clearing the parasite. To generate these immunomodulating activities, we associated eukaryotic expressing vectors of murine IL-12 and GMC-SF to several DNA based vaccine candidates encoding to several L. (L.) major antigens, in the BALB/c mouse. When mice were challenged with a high parasitic load in the hind footpad, no additional protective effect could be generated. However, when the challenge was carried out in the inner face of the ear with a small parasitic load, the association of plasmids encoding to IL-12 and GMC-SF to DNA based vaccination, the protective effects were increased.

  19. Unique transcriptome signatures and GM-CSF expression in lymphocytes from patients with spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mossawi, M H; Chen, L; Fang, H; Ridley, A; de Wit, J; Yager, N; Hammitzsch, A; Pulyakhina, I; Fairfax, B P; Simone, D; Yi, Yao; Bandyopadhyay, S; Doig, K; Gundle, R; Kendrick, B; Powrie, F; Knight, J C; Bowness, P

    2017-11-15

    Spondyloarthritis encompasses a group of common inflammatory diseases thought to be driven by IL-17A-secreting type-17 lymphocytes. Here we show increased numbers of GM-CSF-producing CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes in the blood and joints of patients with spondyloarthritis, and increased numbers of IL-17A+GM-CSF+ double-producing CD4, CD8, γδ and NK cells. GM-CSF production in CD4 T cells occurs both independently and in combination with classical Th1 and Th17 cytokines. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells producing predominantly GM-CSF are expanded in synovial tissues from patients with spondyloarthritis. GM-CSF+CD4+ cells, isolated using a triple cytokine capture approach, have a specific transcriptional signature. Both GM-CSF+ and IL-17A+GM-CSF+ double-producing CD4 T cells express increased levels of GPR65, a proton-sensing receptor associated with spondyloarthritis in genome-wide association studies and pathogenicity in murine inflammatory disease models. Silencing GPR65 in primary CD4 T cells reduces GM-CSF production. GM-CSF and GPR65 may thus serve as targets for therapeutic intervention of spondyloarthritis.

  20. GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor common β chain (CD131 expression as a biomarker of antigen-stimulated CD8+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maric Dragan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upon Ag-activation cytotoxic T cells (CTLs produce IFN-γ GM-CSF and TNF-α, which deliver simultaneously pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory signals to the surrounding microenvironment. Whether this secretion affects in an autocrine loop the CTLs themselves is unknown. Methods Here, we compared the transcriptional profile of Ag-activated, Flu-specific CTL stimulated with the FLU M1:58-66 peptide to that of convivial CTLs expanded in vitro in the same culture. PBMCs from 6 HLA-A*0201 expressing donors were expanded for 7 days in culture following Flu M1:58-66 stimulation in the presence of 300 IU/ml of interleukin-2 and than sorted by high speed sorting to high purity CD8+ expressing T cells gated according to FluM1:58-66 tetrameric human leukocyte antigen complexes expression. Results Ag-activated CTLs displayed higher levels of IFN-γ, GM-CSF (CSF2 and GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor common β- chain (CD131 but lacked completely expression of IFN-γ receptor-II and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs. This observation suggested that Ag-activated CTLs in preparation for the release of IFN-γ and GM-CSF shield themselves from the potentially apoptotic effects of the former entrusting their survival to GM-SCF. In vitro phenotyping confirmed the selective surface expression of CD131 by Ag-activated CTLs and their increased proliferation upon exogenous administration of GM-CSF. Conclusion The selective responsiveness of Ag-activated CTLs to GM-CSF may provide an alternative explanation to the usefulness of this chemokine as an adjuvant for T cell aimed vaccines. Moreover, the selective expression of CD131 by Ag-activated CTLs proposes CD131 as a novel biomarker of Ag-dependent CTL activation.

  1. Paediatric Crohn disease patients with stricturing behaviour exhibit ileal granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) autoantibody production and reduced neutrophil bacterial killing and GM-CSF bioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurickova, I; Collins, M H; Chalk, C; Seese, A; Bezold, R; Lake, K; Allmen, D; Frischer, J S; Falcone, R A; Trapnell, B C; Denson, L A

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) autoantibodies are associated with stricturing behaviour in Crohn disease (CD). We hypothesized that CD ileal lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) would produce GM-CSF autoantibodies and peripheral blood (PB) samples would contain GM-CSF neutralizing capacity (NC). Paediatric CD and control PBMC and ileal biopsies or LPMC were isolated and cultured and GM-CSF, immunoglobulin (Ig)G and GM-CSF autoantibodies production were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Basal and GM-CSF-primed neutrophil bacterial killing and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) tyrosine phosphorylation (pSTAT5) were measured by flow cytometry. GM-CSF autoantibodies were enriched within total IgG for LPMC isolated from CD ileal strictures and proximal margins compared to control ileum. Neutrophil bacterial killing was reduced in CD patients compared to controls. Within CD, neutrophil GM-CSF-dependent STAT5 activation and bacterial killing were reduced as GM-CSF autoantibodies increased. GM-CSF stimulation of pSTAT5 did not vary between controls and CD patients in washed PB granulocytes in which serum was removed. However, GM-CSF stimulation of pSTAT5 was reduced in whole PB samples from CD patients. These data were used to calculate the GM-CSF NC. CD patients with GM-CSF NC greater than 25% exhibited a fourfold higher rate of stricturing behaviour and surgery. The likelihood ratio (95% confidence interval) for stricturing behaviour for patients with elevation in both GM-CSF autoantibodies and GM-CSF NC was equal to 5 (2, 11). GM-CSF autoantibodies are produced by LPMC isolated from CD ileal resection specimens and are associated with reduced neutrophil bacterial killing. CD peripheral blood contains GM-CSF NC, which is associated with increased rates of stricturing behaviour. PMID:23600834

  2. Blockade of GM-CSF pathway induced sustained suppression of myeloid and T cell activities in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiang; Higgs, Brandon W; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Wu, Yuling; Karsdal, Morten A; Kuziora, Michael; Godwood, Alex; Close, David; Ryan, Patricia C; Roskos, Lorin K; White, Wendy I

    2018-01-01

    Targeting the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) pathway holds great potential in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Mavrilimumab, a human monoclonal GM-CSF receptor-α antibody, has demonstrated clinical efficacy in RA. Our current study aimed to elucidate mechanisms of action and identify peripheral biomarkers associated with therapeutic responses of GM-CSF antagonism in RA. A 24-week placebo (PBO)-controlled trial was conducted in 305 RA patients who received mavrilimumab (30, 100 or 150 mg) or PBO once every 2 weeks. Serum biomarkers and whole blood gene expression profiles were measured by protein immunoassay and whole genome microarray. Mavrilimumab treatment induced significant down-regulation of type IV collagen formation marker (P4NP 7S), macrophage-derived chemokine (CCL22), IL-2 receptor α and IL-6 compared with PBO. Both early and sustained reduction of P4NP 7S was associated with clinical response to 150 mg mavrilimumab treatment. Gene expression analyses demonstrated reduced expression of transcripts enriched in macrophage and IL-22/IL-17 signalling pathways after GM-CSF blockade therapy. Myeloid and T cell-associated transcripts were suppressed in mavrilimumab-treated ACR20 responders but not non-responders. While CCL22 and IL-6 down-regulation may reflect a direct effect of GM-CSFR blockade on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators by myeloid cells, the suppression of IL-2 receptor α and IL-17/IL-22 associated transcripts suggests an indirect suppressive effect of mavrilimumab on T cell activation. Our results demonstrated association of peripheral biomarker changes with therapeutic response to mavrilimumab in RA patients. The sustained efficacy of mavrilimumab in RA may result from both direct effects on myeloid cells and indirect effects on T cell activation after GM-CSFR blockade.

  3. Preclinical characterisation of the GM-CSF receptor as a therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greven, D. E. A.; Cohen, E. S.; Gerlag, D. M.; Campbell, J.; Woods, J.; Davis, N.; van Nieuwenhuijze, A.; Lewis, A.; Heasmen, S.; McCourt, M.; Corkill, D.; Dodd, A.; Elvin, J.; Statache, G.; Wicks, I. P.; Anderson, I. K.; Nash, A.; Sleeman, M. A.; Tak, P. P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous work has suggested that the granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-GM-CSF receptor α axis (GM-CSFRα) may provide a new therapeutic target for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, we investigated the cellular expression of GM-CSFRα in RA synovial tissue

  4. GM-CSF promotes migration of human monocytes across the blood brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Daphne Y S; Kooij, Gijs; Heijnen, Priscilla D A M; Breur, Marjolein; Peferoen, Laura A N; van der Valk, Paul; de Vries, Helga E; Amor, Sandra; Dijkstra, Christine D

    2015-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Infiltration of monocytes into the CNS is crucial for disease onset and progression. Animal studies indicate that granulocyte-macrophages colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) may play an essential role in this process, possibly by acting on the migratory capacities of myeloid cells across the blood-brain barrier. This study describes the effect of GM-CSF on human monocytes, macrophages, and microglia. Furthermore, the expression of GM-CSF and its receptor was investigated in the CNS under healthy and pathological conditions. We show that GM-CSF enhances monocyte migration across human blood-brain barrier endothelial cells in vitro. Next, immunohistochemical analysis on human brain tissues revealed that GM-CSF is highly expressed by microglia and macrophages in MS lesions. The GM-CSF receptor is expressed by neurons in the rim of combined gray/white matter lesions and astrocytes. Finally, the effect of GM-CSF on human macrophages was determined, revealing an intermediate activation status, with a phenotype similar to that observed in active MS lesions. Together our data indicate that GM-CSF is a powerful stimulator of monocyte migration, and is abundantly present in the inflamed CNS where it may act as an activator of macrophages and microglia. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. GM-CSF Enhances Macrophage Glycolytic Activity In Vitro and Improves Detection of Inflammation In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Parmanand; González-Ramos, Silvia; Mojena, Marina; Rosales-Mendoza, César Eduardo; Emami, Hamed; Swanson, Jeffrey; Morss, Alex; Fayad, Zahi A; Rudd, James H F; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Paz-García, Marta; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Boscá, Lisardo; Tawakol, Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    (18)F-FDG accumulates in glycolytically active tissues and is known to concentrate in tissues that are rich in activated macrophages. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a clinically used cytokine, increases macrophage glycolysis and deoxyglucose uptake in vitro and acutely enhances (18)F-FDG uptake within inflamed tissues such as atherosclerotic plaques in vivo. In vitro experiments were conducted on human macrophages whereby inflammatory activation and uptake of radiolabeled 2-deoxyglucose was assessed before and after GM-CSF exposure. In vivo studies were performed on mice and New Zealand White rabbits to assess the effect of GM-CSF on (18)F-FDG uptake in normal versus inflamed arteries, using PET. Incubation of human macrophages with GM-CSF resulted in increased glycolysis and increased 2-deoxyglucose uptake (P GM-CSF administration resulted in a 70% and 73% increase (P GM-CSF substantially augments glycolytic flux in vitro (via a mechanism dependent on ubiquitous type 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase and tumor necrosis factor-α) and increases (18)F-FDG uptake within inflamed atheroma in vivo. These findings demonstrate that GM-CSF can be used to enhance detection of inflammation. Further studies should explore the role of GM-CSF stimulation to enhance the detection of inflammatory foci in other disease states. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  6. GM-CSF Induces Inflammatory Macrophages by Regulating Glycolysis and Lipid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Yi Rang; Gu, Gyo Jung; Jung, Daun; Kim, Young Won; Na, Juri; Woo, Jin Sun; Cho, Joo Youn; Youn, Hyewon; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-11-15

    GM-CSF induces proinflammatory macrophages, but the underlying mechanisms have not been studied thus far. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of how GM-CSF induces inflammatory macrophages. First, we observed that GM-CSF increased the extent of LPS-induced acute glycolysis in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages. This directly correlates with an inflammatory phenotype because glycolysis inhibition by 2-deoxyglucose abolished GM-CSF-mediated increase of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12p70 synthesis upon LPS stimulation. Increased glycolytic capacity is due to de novo synthesis of glucose transporter (GLUT)-1, -3, and -4, as well as c-myc. Meanwhile, GM-CSF increased 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase, which is the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway. Inhibition of acute glycolysis or 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase abrogated the inflammatory effects of GM-CSF priming in macrophages. Finally, mice with inflamed colons exposed to dextran sodium sulfate containing GLUT-1high macrophages led to massive uptake of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose, but GM-CSF neutralization reduced the positron-emission tomography signal in the intestine and also decreased GLUT-1 expression in colonic macrophages. Collectively, our results reveal glycolysis and lipid metabolism created by GM-CSF as the underlying metabolic constructs for the function of inflammatory macrophages. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Neutralization and clearance of GM-CSF by autoantibodies in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Luca; Campo, Ilaria; Fregni, Chiara Silacci; Rodriguez, Blanca Maria Fernandez; Minola, Andrea; Sallusto, Federica; Luisetti, Maurizio; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2015-06-16

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a severe autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies that neutralize GM-CSF resulting in impaired function of alveolar macrophages. In this study, we characterize 21 GM-CSF autoantibodies from PAP patients and find that somatic mutations critically determine their specificity for the self-antigen. Individual antibodies only partially neutralize GM-CSF activity using an in vitro bioassay, depending on the experimental conditions, while, when injected in mice together with human GM-CSF, they lead to the accumulation of a large pool of circulating GM-CSF that remains partially bioavailable. In contrast, a combination of three non-cross-competing antibodies completely neutralizes GM-CSF activity in vitro by sequestering the cytokine in high-molecular-weight complexes, and in vivo promotes the rapid degradation of GM-CSF-containing immune complexes in an Fc-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings provide a plausible explanation for the severe phenotype of PAP patients and for the safety of treatments based on single anti-GM-CSF monoclonal antibodies.

  8. MDSCs are involved in the protumorigenic potentials of GM-CSF in colitis-associated cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Liu, Qilin; Hou, Lin; Wang, Yalin; Liu, Ziling

    2017-06-01

    Chronic inflammation is thought to be a major driving force for the development of colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC). As one member of proinflammatory cytokine family, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been identified to play a key role in CAC pathogenesis recently. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain largely unknown. In this study, we found that myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulated increasingly in the lesions during the progression from colitis to cancer, which was critical for CAC formation. Importantly, this MDSC accumulation was controlled by GM-CSF. MDSC number decreased significantly in GM-CSF-deficient mice suffering from CAC induction, and transfusion of MDSCs from wild-type CAC-bearing mice into GM-CSF-deficient counterparts led to recurrence of CAC. Furthermore, the supernatants of CAC lesions or GM-CSF alone was sufficient to differentiate hematopoietic precursors into MDSCs. Addition of neutralizing anti-GM-CSF antibody impaired the MDSC-differentiating effects of the supernatants of CAC lesions. Overall, these findings shed new insights into the mechanisms of GM-CSF underlying CAC development, by inducing/recruiting CAC-promoting MDSCs. Blocking GM-CSF activity or MDSC function may represent new therapeutic strategies for CAC in clinic.

  9. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor does not increase the potency or efficacy of a foot-and-mouth disease virus subunit vaccine Fator estimulante de colônias de granu-lócitos e macrófagos (GM-CSF não aumenta a eficácia ou potência da vacina de subunidades da febre aftosa em suínos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luizinho Caron

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD is one of the most feared diseases of livestock worldwide. Vaccination has been a very effective weapon in controlling the disease, however a number of concerns with the current vaccine including the inability of approved diagnostic tests to reliably distinguish vaccinated from infected animals and the need for high containment facilities for vaccine production, have limited its use during outbreaks in countries previously free of the disease. A number of FMD vaccine candidates have been tested and a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 vector containing the FMDV capsid (P1-2A and 3C protease coding regions has been shown to completely protect pigs against challenge with the homologous virus (FMDV A12 and A24. An Ad5-P1-2A+3C vaccine for FMDV O1 Campos (Ad5-O1C, however, only induced a low FMDV-specific neutralizing antibody response in swine potency tests. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF has been successfully used to stimulate the immune response in vaccine formulations against a number of diseases, including HIV, hepatitis C and B. To attempt to improve the FMDV-specific immune response induced by Ad5-O1C, we inoculated swine with Ad5-O1C and an Ad5 vector containing the gene for porcine GM-CSF (pGM-CSF. However, in the conditions used in this trial, pGM-CSF did not improve the immune response to Ad5-O1C and adversely affected the level of protection of swine challenged with homologous FMDV.A febre aftosa é uma das doenças mais temidas nos rebanhos em todo o mundo. A vacinação tem sido uma arma eficiente no controle da doença, no entanto há preocupações com as vacinas atualmente utilizadas incluindo a necessidade de instalações de alta segurança para a produção dessas vacinas e a falta de um teste de diagnóstico aprovado que faça distinção precisa entre animais vacinados dos infectados. Várias vacinas têm sido testadas contra a febre aftosa e uma dessas

  10. Chimeric rabies virus-like particles containing membrane-anchored GM-CSF enhances the immune response against rabies virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hongtao; Qi, Yinglin; Wang, Hualei; Zheng, Xuexing; Gao, Yuwei; Li, Nan; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2015-03-11

    Rabies remains an important public health threat in most developing countries. To develop a more effective and safe vaccine against rabies, we have constructed a chimeric rabies virus-like particle (VLP), which containing glycoprotein (G) and matrix protein (M) of rabies virus (RABV) Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA) strain, and membrane-anchored granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and it was named of EVLP-G. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of EVLP-G against RABV were evaluated by intramuscular administration in a mouse model. The EVLP-G was successfully produced in insect cells by coinfection with three recombinant baculoviruses expressing G, M, and GM-CSF, respectively. The membrane-anchored GM-CSF possesses a strong adjuvant activity. More B cells and dendritic cells (DCs) were recruited and/or activated in inguinal lymph nodes in mice immunized with EVLP-G. EVLP-G was found to induce a significantly increased RABV-specific virus-neutralizing antibody and elicit a larger and broader antibody subclass responses compared with the standard rabies VLP (sRVLP, consisting of G and M). The EVLP-G also elicited significantly more IFN-γ- or IL-4-secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells than the sRVLP. Moreover, the immune responses induced by EVLP-G protect all vaccinated mice from lethal challenge with RABV. These results suggest that EVLP-G has the potential to be developed as a novel vaccine candidate for the prevention and control of animal rabies.

  11. Chimeric Rabies Virus-Like Particles Containing Membrane-Anchored GM-CSF Enhances the Immune Response against Rabies Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Kang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rabies remains an important public health threat in most developing countries. To develop a more effective and safe vaccine against rabies, we have constructed a chimeric rabies virus-like particle (VLP, which containing glycoprotein (G and matrix protein (M of rabies virus (RABV Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA strain, and membrane-anchored granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and it was named of EVLP-G. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of EVLP-G against RABV were evaluated by intramuscular administration in a mouse model. The EVLP-G was successfully produced in insect cells by coinfection with three recombinant baculoviruses expressing G, M, and GM-CSF, respectively. The membrane-anchored GM-CSF possesses a strong adjuvant activity. More B cells and dendritic cells (DCs were recruited and/or activated in inguinal lymph nodes in mice immunized with EVLP-G. EVLP-G was found to induce a significantly increased RABV-specific virus-neutralizing antibody and elicit a larger and broader antibody subclass responses compared with the standard rabies VLP (sRVLP, consisting of G and M. The EVLP-G also elicited significantly more IFN-γ- or IL-4-secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells than the sRVLP. Moreover, the immune responses induced by EVLP-G protect all vaccinated mice from lethal challenge with RABV. These results suggest that EVLP-G has the potential to be developed as a novel vaccine candidate for the prevention and control of animal rabies.

  12. In Lysinuric Protein Intolerance system y+L activity is defective in monocytes and in GM-CSF-differentiated macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariani Francesca

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the recessive aminoaciduria Lysinuric Protein Intolerance (LPI, mutations of SLC7A7/y+LAT1 impair system y+L transport activity for cationic amino acids. A severe complication of LPI is a form of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP, in which alveolar spaces are filled with lipoproteinaceous material because of the impaired surfactant clearance by resident macrophages. The pathogenesis of LPI-associated PAP remains still obscure. The present study investigates for the first time the expression and function of y+LAT1 in monocytes and macrophages isolated from a patient affected by LPI-associated PAP. A comparison with mesenchymal cells from the same subject has been also performed. Methods Monocytes from peripheral blood were isolated from a 21-year-old patient with LPI. Alveolar macrophages and fibroblastic-like mesenchymal cells were obtained from a whole lung lavage (WLL performed on the same patient. System y+L activity was determined measuring the 1-min uptake of [3H]-arginine under discriminating conditions. Gene expression was evaluated through qRT-PCR. Results We have found that: 1 system y+L activity is markedly lowered in monocytes and alveolar macrophages from the LPI patient, because of the prevailing expression of SLC7A7/y+LAT1 in these cells; 2 on the contrary, fibroblasts isolated from the same patient do not display the transport defect due to compensation by the SLC7A6/y+LAT2 isoform; 3 in both normal and LPI monocytes, GM-CSF induces the expression of SLC7A7, suggesting that the gene is a target of the cytokine; 4 GM-CSF-induced differentiation of LPI monocytes is comparable to that of normal cells, demonstrating that GM-CSF signalling is unaltered; 5 general and respiratory conditions of the patient, along with PAP-associated parameters, markedly improved after GM-CSF therapy through aerosolization. Conclusions Monocytes and macrophages, but not fibroblasts, derived from a LPI patient clearly display the

  13. Targeting the GM-CSF receptor for the treatment of CNS autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifergan, Igal; Davidson, Todd S; Kebir, Hania; Xu, Dan; Palacios-Macapagal, Daphne; Cann, Jennifer; Rodgers, Jane M; Hunter, Zoe N; Pittet, Camille L; Beddow, Sara; Jones, Clare A; Prat, Alexandre; Sleeman, Matthew A; Miller, Stephen D

    2017-11-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), there is a growing interest in inhibiting the pro-inflammatory effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We sought to evaluate the therapeutic potential and underlying mechanisms of GM-CSF receptor alpha (Rα) blockade in animal models of MS. We show that GM-CSF signaling inhibition at peak of chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) results in amelioration of disease progression. Similarly, GM-CSF Rα blockade in relapsing-remitting (RR)-EAE model prevented disease relapses and inhibited T cell responses specific for both the inducing and spread myelin peptides, while reducing activation of mDCs and inflammatory monocytes. In situ immunostaining of lesions from human secondary progressive MS (SPMS), but not primary progressive MS patients shows extensive recruitment of GM-CSF Rα+ myeloid cells. Collectively, this study reveals a pivotal role of GM-CSF in disease relapses and the benefit of GM-CSF Rα blockade as a potential novel therapeutic approach for treatment of RRMS and SPMS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. GM-CSF: From Growth Factor to Central Mediator of Tissue Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Burkhard; Tugues, Sonia; Greter, Melanie

    2016-11-15

    The granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was initially classified as a hematopoietic growth factor. However, unlike its close relatives macrophage CSF (M-CSF) and granulocyte CSF (G-CSF), the majority of myeloid cells do not require GM-CSF for steady-state myelopoiesis. Instead, in inflammation, GM-CSF serves as a communication conduit between tissue-invading lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Even though lymphocytes are in all likelihood the instigators of chronic inflammatory disease, GM-CSF-activated phagocytes are well equipped to cause tissue damage. The pivotal role of GM-CSF at the T cell:myeloid cell interface might shift our attention toward studying the function of the myeloid compartment in immunopathology. Targeting specifically the crosstalk between T cells and myeloid cells through GM-CSF holds promise for the development of therapeutics to combat chronic tissue inflammation. Here, we will review some of the major discoveries of the recent past, which indicate that GM-CSF is so much more than its name suggests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. GM-CSF in murine psoriasiform dermatitis: Redundant and pathogenic roles uncovered by antibody-induced neutralization and genetic deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Tatjana; Weigert, Andreas; Brüne, Bernhard; Sadik, Christian D; Böhm, Beate; Burkhardt, Harald

    2017-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic, Th17-derived cytokine thought to critically contribute to the pathogenesis of diverse autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis. Treatment with monoclonal antibodies that block GM-CSF activity is associated with favorable therapeutic effects in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We evaluated the role of GM-CSF as a potential target for therapeutic interference in psoriasis using a combined pharmacologic and genetic approach and the mouse model of imiquimod-induced psoriasiform dermatitis (IMQPD). Neutralization of murine GM-CSF by an anti-GM-CSF antibody ameliorated IMQPD. In contrast, genetic deficiency in GM-CSF did not alter the course of IMQPD, suggesting the existence of mechanisms compensating for chronic, but not acute, absence of GM-CSF. Further investigation uncovered an alternative pathogenic pathway for IMQPD in the absence of GM-CSF characterized by an expanded plasmacytoid dendritic cell population and release of IFNα and IL-22. This pathway was not activated in wild-type mice during short-term anti-GM-CSF treatment. Our investigations support the potential value of GM-CSF as a therapeutic target in psoriatic disease. The discovery of an alternative pathogenic pathway for psoriasiform dermatitis in the permanent absence of GM-CSF, however, suggests the need for monitoring during therapeutic use of long-term GM-CSF blockade.

  16. Mechanisms of GM-CSF increase by diesel exhaust particles in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, S; Bonvallot, V; Fournier, T; Baeza-Squiban, A; Aubier, M; Marano, F

    2000-01-01

    We have previously shown that exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) stimulates human airway epithelial cells to secrete the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-8, interleukin-1beta, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) involved in allergic diseases. In the present paper, we studied the mechanisms underlying the increase in GM-CSF release elicited by DEPs using the human bronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE14o-. RT-PCR analysis has shown an increase in GM-CSF mRNA levels after DEP treatments. Comparison of the effects of DEPs, extracted DEPs, or extracts of DEPs has shown that the increase in GM-CSF release is mainly due to the adsorbed organic compounds and not to the metals present on the DEP surface because the metal chelator desferrioxamine had no inhibitory effect. Furthermore, radical scavengers inhibited the DEP-induced GM-CSF release, showing involvement of reactive oxygen species in this response. Moreover genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, abrogated the effects of DEPs on GM-CSF release, whereas protein kinase (PK) C, PKA, cyclooxygenase, or lipoxygenase inhibitors had no effect. PD-98059, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase, diminished the effects of DEPs, whereas SB-203580, an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, had a lower effect, and DEPs did actually increase the active, phosphorylated form of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase as shown by Western blotting. In addition, cytochalasin D, which inhibits the phagocytosis of DEPs, reduced the increase in GM-CSF release after DEP treatment. Together, these data suggest that the increase in GM-CSF release is mainly due to the adsorbed organic compounds and that the effect of native DEPs requires endocytosis of the particles. Reactive oxygen species and tyrosine kinase(s) may be involved in the DEP-triggered signaling of the GM-CSF response.

  17. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshida, Ryusuke, E-mail: rkoshida-myz@umin.ac.jp; Oishi, Hisashi, E-mail: hoishi@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-07-17

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia. - Highlights: • GM-CSF alters the phenotype of microglia in vitro more potently than M-CSF. • Transcription factor MafB antagonizes the effect of GM-CSF on microglia in vitro. • MafB deficiency leads to RhoA activation in microglia in response to GM-CSF. • We show for the first time the function of MafB in microglia.

  18. Differential binding of IL-3 and GM-CSF to human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, M J; Moss, J; Dottore, M; Park, L S; Vadas, M A; Lopez, A F

    1992-01-01

    Human monocytes respond to IL-3 and GM-CSF with a similar range of functional activities, and at similar cytokine concentrations. We have recently shown, however, that the rate of monocyte activation is greater in response to GM-CSF than to IL-3. In order to understand the basis of this phenomenon we investigated the interaction of IL-3 and GM-CSF with their surface receptors by means of kinetic binding experiments. 125I-GM-CSF showed very rapid association to monocytes at 37 degrees C, with a half-time of only 40 sec. The pattern of binding with this ligand was complex, with a decline in overall cell-associated radioactivity after 2 min of incubation. In contrast, 125I-IL-3 showed slower association, with a half-time at 37 degrees C of 2.5 min. The different rates of association correlated well with the different rates of cell activation induced by the two cytokines. On the other hand, rates of internalisation were similar for the two cytokines, with half-times of 14-15 min. Competition binding experiments performed under high affinity conditions showed that IL-3 and GM-CSF cross-competed for binding on the surface of monocytes. In contrast, under low affinity conditions IL-3 did not compete for 125I-GM-CSF binding while GM-CSF was a strong competitor of 125I-IL-3 binding. In quantitative inhibition experiments GM-CSF showed inhibitory effects on low affinity 125I-IL-3 binding at lower concentrations than those needed with unlabelled IL-3. It is suggested that current models of IL-3/GM-CSF receptor interactions need to be revised in order to accommodate the unique pattern of competition on human monocytes presented here.

  19. Granulocyte macrophage - colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) significantly enhances articular cartilage repair potential by microfracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, M-D; Choi, B H; Kim, Y J; Kim, M S; Min, B-H

    2017-08-01

    To investigate whether granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can be used to increase the number of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in blood clots formed by microfracture arthroplasty (MFX) and whether it can improve the therapeutic outcome for cartilage repair. Thirty-six New Zealand white rabbits were divided into four groups: (1) control, (2) GM-CSF, (3) MFX, and (4) GM-CSF + MFX. GM-CSF was administrated intravenously (IV) at 10 μg/kg body weight 20 min before the MFX surgery. The repaired tissues were retrieved and examined by histological observation, quantitative assessment, and biochemical assays at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after treatment. The number of MSCs was measured in the blood clots by the colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) assay. The kinetic profile and distribution of GM-CSF in vivo was also evaluated by near-Infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. In the histological observations and chemical assays examined at 4, 8, and 12 weeks, the MFX after GM-CSF administration showed better cartilage repair than the one without GM-CSF. The CFU-F assay showed a significantly larger amount of MSCs present in the blood clots of the GM-CSF + MFX group than in the blood clots of the other groups. The blood concentration of GM-CSF peaked at 10 min and decreased back to almost the initial level after a couple of hours. GM-CSF was distributed in many organs including the bone marrow but was not observed clearly in the joint cavity. Intravenous administration of GM-CSF together with MFX could be a promising therapeutic protocol to enhance the repair of cartilage defects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. A neuroprotective function for the hematopoietic protein granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Krüger, Carola; Pitzer, Claudia; Weber, Daniela; Laage, Rico; Gassler, Nikolaus; Aronowski, Jaroslaw; Mier, Walter; Kirsch, Friederike; Dittgen, Tanjew; Bach, Alfred; Sommer, Clemens; Schneider, Armin

    2008-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic cytokine responsible for the proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of cells of the myeloid lineage, which was cloned more than 20 years ago...

  1. GM-CSF-Producing Th Cells in Rats Sensitive and Resistant to Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojić-Vukanić, Zorica; Pilipović, Ivan; Vujnović, Ivana; Nacka-Aleksić, Mirjana; Petrović, Raisa; Arsenović-Ranin, Nevena; Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Leposavić, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Given that granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is identified as the key factor to endow auto-reactive Th cells with the potential to induce neuroinflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models, the frequency and phenotype of GM-CSF-producing (GM-CSF+) Th cells in draining lymph nodes (dLNs) and spinal cord (SC) of Albino Oxford (AO) and Dark Agouti (DA) rats immunized for EAE were examined. The generation of neuroantigen-specific GM-CSF+ Th lymphocytes was impaired in dLNs of AO rats (relatively resistant to EAE induction) compared with their DA counterparts (susceptible to EAE) reflecting impaired CD4+ lymphocyte proliferation and less supportive of GM-CSF+ Th cell differentiation dLN cytokine microenvironment. Immunophenotyping of GM-CSF+ Th cells showed their phenotypic heterogeneity in both strains and revealed lower frequency of IL-17+IFN-γ+, IL-17+IFN-γ-, and IL-17-IFN-γ+ cells accompanied by higher frequency of IL-17-IFN-γ- cells among them in AO than in DA rats. Compared with DA, in AO rats was also found (i) slightly lower surface density of CCR2 (drives accumulation of highly pathogenic GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 cells in SC) on GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 lymphocytes from dLNs, and (ii) diminished CCL2 mRNA expression in SC tissue, suggesting their impaired migration into the SC. Moreover, dLN and SC cytokine environments in AO rats were shown to be less supportive of GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 cell differentiation (judging by lower expression of mRNAs for IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-23/p19). In accordance with the (i) lower frequency of GM-CSF+ Th cells in dLNs and SC of AO rats and their lower GM-CSF production, and (ii) impaired CCL2 expression in the SC tissue, the proportion of proinflammatory monocytes among peripheral blood cells and their progeny (CD45hi cells) among the SC CD11b+ cells were reduced in AO compared with DA rats. Collectively, the results indicate that the strain specificities in efficacy of several mechanisms

  2. Activation of peritoneal cells upon in vivo transfection with a recombinant alphavirus expressing GM-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimp, A H; van der Vaart, E; Lansink, P O; Withoff, S; de Vries, E G; Scherphof, G L; Wilschut, J; Daemen, T

    2001-02-01

    In this study we determined the in vivo localization of recombinant proteins expressed by intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) particles. Subsequently, we investigated the influence of i.p. administered SFV particles encoding recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rmGM-CSF) on intraperitoneal recruitment and activation of cells. Finally, the therapeutic effect of SFV-GM-CSF treatment on an i.p. growing ovarian tumor was determined. Intraperitoneal injections of recombinant SFV particles encoding the reporter protein luciferase resulted in a high level of luciferase activity in cells of the peritoneal lining and tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity. Low levels of luciferase activity were found in liver, spleen and lungs. Injection of SFV-GM-CSF particles resulted in a slight increase in the number of peritoneal macrophages and in a significant increase in the number of neutrophils. In contrast to multiple i.p. injections with commercially available recombinant GM-CSF, i.p. injected SFV-GM-CSF particles activated the macrophages to tumor cytotoxicity. Although treatment of tumor-bearing mice with SFV-GM-CSF particles did not result in prolonged survival, tumor growth was inhibited for 2 weeks. Our findings indicate that macrophage-activating cytokines expressed by the efficient and safe recombinant SFV system when administered i.p. may provide an immunotherapeutic treatment modality additional to current chemotherapeutic treatment of intraperitoneally growing cancers.

  3. Incorporating the use of GM-CSF in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2009-03-01

    We evaluated the clinical activity of GM-CSF in combination with standard dose rituximab in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The rationale for exploring this combination is provided by the ability of GM-CSF to increase surface expression of CD20 in CLL cells and potentially render them a better target for rituximab. GM-CSF also enhances antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against CLL cells. The combination of GM-CSF and rituximab was evaluated as initial treatment in elderly patients with indication for treatment and in patients at high risk for progression identified by elevated beta(2) microglobulin. This combination was also evaluated in patients with recurrent CLL. On the basis of the results of 118 patients, we observed an overall response rate of 65 and 9% complete remission and these results compare favourably with the results obtained with rituximab single agent. This combination was well tolerated with the most common toxicity consisting in mild GM-CSF injection site erythema. On the basis of this experience, we are currently evaluating the use of GM-CSF in combination with the chemoimmunotherapy regimen fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and rituximab.

  4. GM-CSF primes cardiac inflammation in a mouse model of Kawasaki disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Brent S.

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the leading cause of pediatric heart disease in developed countries. KD patients develop cardiac inflammation, characterized by an early infiltrate of neutrophils and monocytes that precipitates coronary arteritis. Although the early inflammatory processes are linked to cardiac pathology, the factors that regulate cardiac inflammation and immune cell recruitment to the heart remain obscure. In this study, using a mouse model of KD (induced by a cell wall Candida albicans water-soluble fraction [CAWS]), we identify an essential role for granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in orchestrating these events. GM-CSF is rapidly produced by cardiac fibroblasts after CAWS challenge, precipitating cardiac inflammation. Mechanistically, GM-CSF acts upon the local macrophage compartment, driving the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, whereas therapeutically, GM-CSF blockade markedly reduces cardiac disease. Our findings describe a novel role for GM-CSF as an essential initiating cytokine in cardiac inflammation and implicate GM-CSF as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in KD. PMID:27595596

  5. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF biological actions on human dermal fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Montagnani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are involved in all pathologies characterized by increased ExtraCellularMatrix synthesis, from wound healing to fibrosis. Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF is a cytokine isolated as an hemopoietic growth factor but recently indicated as a differentiative agent on endothelial cells. In this work we demonstrated the expression of the receptor for GM-CSF (GMCSFR on human normal skin fibroblasts from healthy subjects (NFPC and on a human normal fibroblast cell line (NHDF and we try to investigate the biological effects of this cytokine. Human normal fibroblasts were cultured with different doses of GM-CSF to study the effects of this factor on GMCSFR expression, on cell proliferation and adhesion structures. In addition we studied the production of some Extra-Cellular Matrix (ECM components such as Fibronectin, Tenascin and Collagen I. The growth rate of fibroblasts from healthy donors (NFPC is not augmented by GM-CSF stimulation in spite of increased expression of the GM-CSFR. On the contrary, the proliferation of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF cell line seems more influenced by high concentration of GM-CSF in the culture medium. The adhesion structures and the ECM components appear variously influenced by GM-CSF treatment as compared to fibroblasts cultured in basal condition, but newly only NHDF cells are really induced to increase their synthesis activity. We suggest that the in vitro treatment with GM-CSF can shift human normal fibroblasts towards a more differentiated state, due or accompanied by an increased expression of GM-CSFR and that such “differentiation” is an important event induced by such cytokine.

  6. GM-CSF as a target in inflammatory/autoimmune disease: current evidence and future therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, John A

    2015-04-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can be viewed as a pro-inflammatory cytokine rather than as a key regulator of steady state and systemic myelopoiesis. Key aspects of GM-CSF biology need to be clarified such as pro-survival vs activation/differentiation function, its cellular sources, its responsive cell populations, its downstream mediators/pathways, and when GM-CSF is relevant. Striking effects of GM-CSF depletion/deletion in some pre-clinical autoimmune/inflammation models have been reported. Systemic effects of administered GM-CSF are not necessarily informative about its local blockade in disease. Recent clinical RA trials, particularly Phase II trials with mavrilimumab (anti-GM-CSFRα Ab), show rapid and impressive efficacy with no significant adverse effects. Larger and longer trials targeting GM-CSF are needed and with careful monitoring of unwanted side effects. This review summarizes the most recent information on these topics.

  7. GM-CSF: An Immune Modulatory Cytokine that can Suppress Autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Palash; Thiruppathi, Muthusamy; Elshabrawy, Hatem A.; Alharshawi, Khaled; Kumar, Prabhakaran; Prabhakar, Bellur S.

    2015-01-01

    GM-CSF was originally identified as a colony stimulating factor (CSF) because of its ability to induce granulocyte and macrophage populations from precursor cells. Multiple studies have demonstrated that GM-CSF is also an immune-modulatory cytokine, capable of affecting not only the phenotype of myeloid lineage cells, but also T-cell activation through various myeloid intermediaries. This property has been implicated in the sustenance of several autoimmune diseases like arthritis and multiple sclerosis. In contrast, several studies using animal models have shown that GM-CSF is also capable of suppressing many autoimmune diseases like Crohn's disease, Type-1 diabetes, Myasthenia gravis and experimental autoimmune thyroiditis. Knockout mouse studies have suggested that the role of GM-CSF in maintaining granulocyte and macrophage populations in the physiological steady state is largely redundant. Instead, its immune-modulatory role plays a significant role in the development or resolution of autoimmune diseases. This is mediated either through the differentiation of precursor cells into specialized non-steady state granulocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, or through the modulation of the phenotype of mature myeloid cells. Thus, outside of myelopoiesis, GM-CSF has a profound role in regulating the immune response and maintaining immunological tolerance. PMID:26113402

  8. A novel subset of helper T cells promotes immune responses by secreting GM-CSF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Roberts, A I; Liu, C; Ren, G; Xu, G; Zhang, L; Devadas, S; Shi, Yufang

    2013-01-01

    Helper T cells are crucial for maintaining proper immune responses. Yet, they have an undefined relationship with one of the most potent immune stimulatory cytokines, granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). By depleting major cytokines during the differentiation of CD4+ T cells in vitro, we derived cells that were found to produce large amounts of GM-CSF, but little of the cytokines produced by other helper T subsets. By their secretion of GM-CSF, this novel subset of helper T cells (which we have termed ThGM cells) promoted the production of cytokines by other T-cell subtypes, including type 1 helper T cell (Th1), type 2 helper T cell (Th2), type 1 cytotoxic T cell (Tc1), type 2 cytotoxic T cell (Tc2), and naive T cells, as evidenced by the fact that antibody neutralization of GM-CSF abolished this effect. ThGM cells were found to be highly prone to activation-induced cell death (AICD). Inhibitors of TRAIL or granzymes could not block AICD in ThGM cells, whereas inhibition of FasL/Fas interaction partially rescued ThGM cells from AICD. Thus, ThGM cells are a novel subpopulation of T helper cells that produce abundant GM-CSF, exhibit exquisite susceptibility to apoptosis, and therefore play a pivotal role in the regulation of the early stages of immune responses. PMID:24076588

  9. GM-CSF produced by nonhematopoietic cells is required for early epithelial cell proliferation and repair of injured colonic mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Laia; McAllister, Christopher S; Lakhdari, Omar; Minev, Ivelina; Shenouda, Steve; Kagnoff, Martin F

    2013-02-15

    GM-CSF is a growth factor that promotes the survival and activation of macrophages and granulocytes, as well as dendritic cell differentiation and survival in vitro. The mechanism by which exogenous GM-CSF ameliorates the severity of Crohn's disease in humans and colitis in murine models has mainly been considered to reflect its activity on myeloid cells. We used GM-CSF-deficient (GM-CSF(-/-)) mice to probe the functional role of endogenous host-produced GM-CSF in a colitis model induced after injury to the colon epithelium. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), at doses that resulted in little epithelial damage and mucosal ulceration in wild type mice, caused marked colon ulceration and delayed ulcer healing in GM-CSF(-/-) mice. Colon crypt epithelial cell proliferation in vivo was significantly decreased in GM-CSF(-/-) mice at early times after DSS injury. This was paralleled by decreased expression of crypt epithelial cell genes involved in cell cycle, proliferation, and wound healing. Decreased crypt cell proliferation and delayed ulcer healing in GM-CSF(-/-) mice were rescued by exogenous GM-CSF, indicating the lack of a developmental abnormality in the epithelial cell proliferative response in those mice. Nonhematopoietic cells, and not myeloid cells, produced the GM-CSF important for colon epithelial proliferation after DSS-induced injury, as revealed by bone marrow chimera and dendritic cell-depletion experiments, with colon epithelial cells being the cellular source of GM-CSF. Endogenous epithelial cell-produced GM-CSF has a novel nonredundant role in facilitating epithelial cell proliferation and ulcer healing in response to injury of the colon crypt epithelium.

  10. GM-CSF production by CD4+ T cells in MS patients: regulation by regulatory T cells and vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peelen, E; Muris, A-H; Damoiseaux, J; Knippenberg, S; Broens, K; Smolders, J; Cohen Tervaert, J W; Hupperts, R; Thewissen, M

    2015-03-15

    Data from animal models of MS suggest that GM-CSF(+)CD4(+)T cells are pathogenic cells. Therefore, GM-CSF production by CD4(+)T cells of MS patients and their susceptibility to regulatory mechanisms were investigated. Intracellular flowcytometry was performed to determine the GM-CSF(+)CD4(+)T cell fraction in PBMC and CSF of MS patients and controls. The effect of regulatory T cells (Tregs) on GM-CSF production by CD4(+)T cells was studied in MS patients using a proliferation-suppression assay. Finally, GM-CSF(+)CD4(+)T cell fraction and GM-CSF protein levels in supernatant were assessed in anti-CD3-stimulated CD4(+)T cell cultures derived from healthy controls and MS patients, in the presence or absence of the active vitamin D metabolite calcitriol. The GM-CSF(+)CD4(+)T cell fraction in the peripheral blood did not differ between controls and MS patients. This T cell population could also be detected in the CSF of both subjects with MS as well as subjects with another diagnosis. In the CSF, it comprised a significant fraction of the T cell population. Upon in vitro stimulation of PBMC with anti-CD3 antibody, no differences were observed in GM-CSF(+)CD4(+)T cell frequencies. GM-CSF secretion was susceptible to regulation by Treg and vitamin D. Suppression of GM-CSF secretion by vitamin D was reduced in MS patients. Our study showed no elevation in GM-CSF(+)CD4(+)T cell fractions in MS patients compared to controls. Furthermore, GM-CSF secretion was prone to regulation by Treg and vitamin D, the latter being less effective in MS patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Contrasting effects of hyperoxia on GM-CSF gene transcription in alveolar epithelial cells and T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, Anne; Baker, Jessica A; Mir-Kasimov, Mustafa; Paine, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is critically important for normal pulmonary innate immunity and for functional maturation of alveolar macrophages. Alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) are a major source of GM-CSF in the lung and express this growth factor constitutively, whereas most other cells, including T cells, express GM-CSF following inflammatory stimulation. AEC expression of GM-CSF is suppressed by oxidative stress, at least in part through induction of microRNA leading to increased mRNA turnover. In this report, we compare and contrast the effect of hyperoxia on transcriptional aspects of gene regulation of GM-CSF in lung epithelia and T cells of human and mouse origin. Similar to primary murine AEC, human H820 cells that express multiple characteristics of normal alveolar epithelial cells express GM-CSF constitutively, with decreased expression and increased mRNA turnover following exposure to hyperoxia. In contrast, hyperoxia induces augmented GM-CSF expression in human and murine activated T cells, in association with enhanced GM-CSF mRNA stability. Alveolar epithelial cells demonstrate constitutive transcription, with the proximal promoter in an open configuration in normoxia, without change in hyperoxia. Conversely, in both human and murine T cells, hyperoxia increased GM-CSF gene transcription. The proximal promoter was in a closed configuration in unstimulated T cells but became accessible upon activation and still more accessible in activated T cells exposed to hyperoxia. These fundamental differences in molecular regulation of GM-CSF expression highlight the distinctive niche of alveolar epithelial cell expression of GM-CSF and offer insights into the biology of GM-CSF in the setting of acute lung injury. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  12. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshida, Ryusuke; Oishi, Hisashi; Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Anti-tumour research of recombinant BCG using BZLF1 and hGM-CSF fusion genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qing-Jie; Li, Yun-Qing; Yang, Chun-Qing; Chen, Ting; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Cheng, Baohua; Wang, Chun-Mei

    2017-03-14

    The random primer Oligo(dT) 15 was used in RT-PCR to obtain cDNA from the human granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) gene and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) gene BZLF1. Then, the sequence splicing overlap extension method was used to obtain a GCBF fusion gene containing a linker sequence that encoded the polypeptide (Gly 4 Ser) 3 . The GCBF fusion gene was inserted into pMV261, which was then transformed into competent E. coli DH5 alpha cells, and positive cells were selected based on kanamycin resistance on LB plates. The recombinant plasmid pMVBZLF1 was extracted from E. coli, and BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) was transformed into competent cells. According to the RT-PCR results, the target genes hGM-CSF and BZLF1 were 461bp and 788bp in size, which was in agreement with the expected values. Construction of the recombinant plasmid by double enzyme digestion, amplification, sequencing and Western blotting confirmed that the GCBF fusion gene (1204bp) was correctly inserted into pMV261, successfully transformed into BCG competent cells, and properly expressed. After mice were injected with rBCG (recombinant BCG), antibody levels were detected using ELISA, and spleen cells were obtained and the killing rates of specific CTLs by rBCG were detected using a CTL assay kit. Then, the influence of rBCG on tumour cells was analysed in C57BL/6 mice. We found that rBCG-secreting cytokines hybridized with hGM-CSF and BZLF1 antibodies and that the rBCG vaccine stimulated antibody production in C57BL/6 mice. The specific cytotoxic effects of the spleen cells from the rBCG group on EB virus-positive tumour cells was significantly different from the cytotoxic effects of the control group cells (P<0.01). CD8 + T and CD4 + T lymphocytes were detected in the tumour tissues of the rBCG group mice by flow cytometry, indicating that CD8 + T and CD4 + T lymphocytes infiltrated into the tumour tissue in the mice. Morphological observations of the tumour sections from

  14. GM-CSF neutralisation suppresses inflammation and protects cartilage in acute streptococcal cell wall arthritis of mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plater-Zyberk, C.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Helsen, M.M.A.; Hepp, J.; Baeuerle, P.A.; Berg, W.B. van den

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The pathogenic involvement of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in arthritis has been put forward. We have investigated the therapeutic effect of GM-CSF neutralisation in the streptococcal cell wall (SCW) arthritis model in mice. In this model, the pathogenic

  15. Inhibitory mechanism of Korean Red Ginseng on GM-CSF expression in UVB-irradiated keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Chung

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Taken together, we found that treatment with SKRG decreased the phosphorylation of EGFR and ERK in UVB-irradiated SP-1 keratinocytes and subsequently inhibited the expression of GM-CSF. Furthermore, we identified ginsenoside-Rh3 as the active saponin in Korean Red Ginseng.

  16. Clinical role of GM-CSF in neutrophil recovery in relation to health care parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, LS; DeVries, EGE; UylDeGroot, CA; Vellenga, E

    Recombinant human growth factors, particularly granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), have been only available for a few years. Since their introduction they have affected the management of drug-induced neutropenia, the use of dose intensive chemotherapy regimens and in the

  17. TNFalpha and GM-CSF-induced activation of the CAEV promoter is independent of AP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brian G; Hötzel, Isidro; Jasmer, Douglas P; Davis, William C; Knowles, Donald

    2006-08-15

    Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus transcription is under the control of the viral promoter within the long terminal repeat. Previous studies with the closely related maedi visna lentivirus have indicated that viral transcription is dependent upon the AP-1 transcription factor. Other studies have indicated a potential role for the cytokines TNFalpha and GM-CSF in CAEV pathogenesis by increasing viral loads in infected tissues. The hypotheses that AP-1 transcription factors are necessary for transcriptional activation of the CAEV promoter and that CAEV transcriptional activation results from treatment with the cytokines GM-CSF and TNFalpha were tested with a stably transduced U937 cell line. Here, we found that TNFalpha and GM-CSF activated CAEV transcription in U937 cells. However, this activation effect was not blocked by SP600125, an inhibitor of Jun N-terminal kinase. SP600125 effectively prevented Jun phosphorylation in cells subsequently treated with cytokines. The cytokines TNFalpha and GM-CSF therefore activate CAEV transcription, and this effect occurs independently of AP-1. A set of progressive deletion mutants was utilized to show that TNFalpha-induced expression depends on an element or elements within the U3 70-bp repeat.

  18. GM-CSF producing autoreactive CD4+ T cells in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, Jan; Gavrisan, Anita; Kuehn, Denise; Reinhardt, Julia; Heinrich, Melanie; Hippich, Markus; Eugster, Anne; Ockert, Christian; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2017-12-08

    The phenotype of autoreactive T cells in type 1 diabetes is described as Th1, Th17 and/or Th21, but is largely uncharacterized. We combined multi-parameter cytokine profiling and proliferation, and identified GM-CSF producing cells as a component of the response to beta cell autoantigens proinsulin and GAD65. Overall cytokine profiles of CD4+ T cell were not altered in type 1 diabetes. In contrast, patients with recent onset type 1 diabetes had increased frequencies of proinsulin-responsive CD4+CD45RA- T cells producing GM-CSF (p=0.002), IFNγ (p=0.004), IL-17A (p=0.008), IL-21 (p=0.011), and IL-22 (p=0.007), and GAD65-responsive CD4+CD45RA- T cells producing IL-21 (p=0.039). CD4+ T cells with a GM-CSF+IFNγ-IL-17A-IL-21-IL-22- phenotype were increased in patients for responses to both proinsulin (p=0.006) and GAD65 (p=0.037). GM-CSF producing T cells are a novel phenotype in the repertoire of T helper cells in type 1 diabetes and consolidate a Th1/Th17 pro-inflammatory pathogenesis in the disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. GM-CSF promotes migration of human monocytes across the blood brain barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, D.Y.S.; Kooij, G.; Heijnen, P.D.A.M.; Breur, M.; Peferoen, L.A.N.; van der Valk, P.; de Vries, H.E.; Amor, S.; Dijkstra, C.D.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Infiltration of monocytes into the CNS is crucial for disease onset and progression. Animal studies indicate that granulocyte-macrophages colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) may play an

  20. Anticipated administration of GM-CSF in the treatment of non small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkisi, M. [Cukurova University Medical School, Dept. of Medical Oncology, Adana (Turkey); Erkurt, E.; Tunali, C. [Cukurova University Medical School, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Adana (Turkey); Zeren, H. [Cukurova University Medical School, Dept. of Pathology, Adana (Turkey); Kocabas, A. [Cukurova University Medical School, Dept. of Chest Diseases, Adana (Turkey); Burgut, R. [Cukurova University Medical School, Dept. of Biostatistics, Adana (Turkey)

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the kinetic response of the human marrow myeloid progenitor cells to the short term use of GM-CSF and its impact on the therapeutic activity of this three-drug cisplatinum containing regimen in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Sixty patients with stage 3-B and 4 NSCLC were randomised to receive GM-CSF for 3 days, five days prior to the onset of chemotherapy. The chemotherapy regimen consisted of Mitomycin-C: 6 mg/m{sup 2} on day one, Ifosfamide: 2000 mg/m{sup 2} days 1 to 3, Mesna: 2000 mg/m{sup 2} days 1 to 3, Cisplatinum: 30 mg/m{sup 2} days 1 to 3, and was repeated every 4 weeks. All the patients received 30-50 Gy of radiotherapy to the primary and/or metastatic sites. Chemotherapy cycles and overall survival (p=0.000). Administration of GM-CSF was an independent prognostic parameter in locally advanced and metastatic disease (p=0.041). In the GM-CSF receiving arm more courses could be given (117 versus 99, p=0.0415), and less courses were postponed (6 versus 22). In this arm, the mean of granulocyte nadir was higher (p=0.033) and mean time to granulocyte recovery became shorter (p=0.001) as the number of chemotherapy cycles increased. It was concluded that, dose intensification with GM-CSF prophylaxis is benefical in increasing the treatment tolerability by decreasing the intensity of granulocytopenia as well as providing rapid recovery.

  1. NADPH oxidase NOX2 mediates TLR2/6-dependent release of GM-CSF from endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuett, Jutta; Schuett, Harald; Oberoi, Raghav; Koch, Ann-Kathrin; Pretzer, Silke; Luchtefeld, Maren; Schieffer, Bernhard; Grote, Karsten

    2017-06-01

    NADPH oxidase-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) from immune cells are well known to be important for pathogen killing in response to TLR ligands. Here, we investigated a new aspect of NADPH oxidase in the TLR2/6-induced release of the immunologically relevant GM-CSF by endothelial cells. Stimulation of human endothelial cells with TLR2/6 agonist, MALP-2 (macrophage-activating lipopeptide of 2 kDa), induced NADPH oxidase activation and ROS formation. Inhibition by ROS scavengers and NADPH oxidase inhibitors blocked MALP-2-induced GM-CSF release. NADPH oxidase activators or ROS donors alone did not result in GM-CSF secretion; however, additional superoxide supply augmented MALP-2-induced GM-CSF secretion and restored GM-CSF levels after NADPH oxidase inhibition. MALP-2-dependent NF-ĸB activation was suppressed by NADPH oxidase inhibition, and inhibition of NF-κB completely blunted MALP-2-induced GM-CSF release. Vascular explants from mice that were deficient for the NADPH oxidase subunit p47 phox showed diminished intimal superoxide production and GM-CSF release after ex vivo stimulation with MALP-2. Moreover, an increase in circulating progenitor cells after MALP-2 injection was completely abolished in p47phox-knockout mice. Finally, MALP-2 stimulation increased mRNA expression of the major subunit NADPH oxidase, (Nox)2, in endothelial cells, and Nox2 inhibition prevented MALP-2-induced GM-CSF release. Our findings identify a Nox2-containing NADPH oxidase as a crucial regulator of the immunologic important growth factor GM-CSF after TLR2/6 stimulation in endothelial cells.-Schuett, J., Schuett, H., Oberoi, R., Koch, A.-K., Pretzer, S., Luchtefeld, M., Schieffer, B., Grote, K. NADPH oxidase NOX2 mediates TLR2/6-dependent release of GM-CSF from endothelial cells. © FASEB.

  2. Age predicts cytokine kinetics and innate immune cell activation following intranasal delivery of IFNγ and GM-CSF in a mouse model of RSV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichinger, Katherine M; Resetar, Erin; Orend, Jacob; Anderson, Kacey; Empey, Kerry M

    2017-09-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in young children and is further associated with increased healthcare utilization and cost of care in the first years of life. Severe RSV disease during infancy has also been linked to the later development of allergic asthma, yet there remains no licensed RSV vaccine or effective treatment. Pre-clinical and clinical studies have shown that disease severity and development of allergic asthma are associated with differences in cytokine production. As a result, stimulation of the innate host immune response with immune potentiators is gaining attention for their prospective application in populations with limited immune responses to antigenic stimuli or against pathogens for which vaccines do not exist. Specifically, macrophage-activating cytokines such as interferon gamma (IFNγ) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are commercially available immune potentiators used to prevent infections in patients with chronic granulomatous disease and febrile neutropenia, respectively. Moreover, an increasing number of reports describe the protective function of IFNγ and GM-CSF as vaccine adjuvants. Although a positive correlation between cytokine production and age has previously been reported, little is known about age-dependent cytokine metabolism or immune activating responses in infant compared to adult lungs. Here we use a non-compartmental pharmacokinetic model in naïve and RSV-infected infant and adult BALB/c mice to determine the effect of age on IFNγ and GM-CSF elimination and innate cell activation following intranasal delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Recombinant GM-CSF/IL-3 fusion protein: its effect on in vitro human megakaryocytopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, E; Briddell, R A; Cooper, R J; Brandt, J E; Hoffman, R

    1992-05-01

    An evaluation of the effectiveness of a genetically engineered recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)/interleukin 3 (IL-3) fusion protein (FP) as a means of delivering cytokine combinations to megakaryocyte (MK) progenitor cells was performed, utilizing a serum-depleted clonal assay system and a long-term bone marrow culture system. The effects of the FP, alone and in combination with a variety of other cytokines, on the primitive MK progenitor cell, the megakaryocyte burst-forming unit (BFU-MK), and the more differentiated megakaryocyte colony-forming unit (CFU-MK) were assessed. Subpopulations of bone marrow cells (CD34+ DR- for BFU-MK and CD34+ DR+ for CFU-MK) served as sources of these two classes of MK progenitor cells. The FP was equivalent to a combination of optimal concentrations of GM-CSF and IL-3 in promoting both the number and size of BFU-MK-derived colonies. The GM-CSF/IL-3 combination, however, promoted the formation of far greater CFU-MK-derived colonies than did the FP alone. The size of MK colonies formed in the presence of the FP or GM-CSF/IL-3 was similar. The ability of the FP to stimulate BFU-MK- but not CFU-MK-derived colony formation was also further augmented by the addition of interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha). The addition of c-kit ligand (KL) increased both FP-stimulated CFU-MK- and BFU-MK-derived colony numbers but only BFU-MK-derived colony size. In addition, the FP alone sustained long-term megakaryocytopoiesis in vitro to a level equivalent to that of the GM-CSF/IL-3 combination and was superior in this regard to either GM-CSF or IL-3 alone. These data indicate that FP is capable of supporting various stages of human megakaryocytopoiesis. We conclude that such genetically engineered molecules as the FP may prove to be effective means of pharmacologically delivering the biological effects of specific cytokine combinations.

  4. Serum levels of GM-CSF 20 years after sulfur mustard exposure: Sardasht-Iran Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Sara; Ghazanfari, Tooba; Yaraee, Roya; Salimi, Hassan; Ebtekar, Massoumeh; Shams, Jalaleddin; Ghasemi, Hassan; Pourfarzam, Shahryar; Moin, Athar; Sharifnia, Zarin; Soroush, Mohammad R; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat; Hassan, Zuhair M

    2009-12-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is highly toxic for various organs. The eyes, skin, respiratory tract, as well hematopoietic and immune systems are the main organs affected by SM. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a potent cytokine that plays an important role in the hematopoietic and immune system. The aim of this study was to determine the serum levels of GM-CSF and its relation to blood cell count and other inflammatory cytokines 20 years after SM exposure. The association of GM-CSF with the clinical severity of pulmonary, ophthalmic and dermatologic complications has also been studied. In this historical cohort study named as Sardasht-Iran Cohort Study (SICS), 369 SM exposed male participants and 125 unexposed volunteers were studied. The serum concentrations of cytokines were measured by ELISA technique. The severity of clinical complications was graded according to the criteria verified by the Medical Committee of the Foundation of Martyr and Veterans Affairs. The serum levels of GM-CSF in the SM exposed group did not display any significant differences with the control group. Median of GM-CSF was 7.33 and 9.39 pg/ml in the SM exposed group and the controls respectively. There was a positive correlation between the serum levels of GM-CSF and the percent of eosinophils only in the exposed group. Moreover, positive correlations were found between circulating levels of GM-CSF with IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, TNF-alpha and IL-6. This correlation was not observed between GM-CSF and IL-8 in both study groups. The serum levels of GM-CSF did not show any significant association with clinical complications.

  5. GM-CSF upregulated in rheumatoid arthritis reverses cognitive impairment and amyloidosis in Alzheimer mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Tim D; Bennett, Steven P; Mori, Takashi; Governatori, Nicholas; Runfeldt, Melissa; Norden, Michelle; Padmanabhan, Jaya; Neame, Peter; Wefes, Inge; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Arendash, Gary W; Potter, Huntington

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a negative risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). While it has been commonly assumed that RA patients' usage of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) helped prevent onset and progression of AD, NSAID clinical trials have proven unsuccessful in AD patients. To determine whether intrinsic factors within RA pathogenesis itself may underlie RA's protective effect, we investigated the activity of colony-stimulating factors, upregulated in RA, on the pathology and behavior of transgenic AD mice. 5 microg bolus injections of macrophage, granulocyte, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factors (M-CSF, G-CSF, or GM-CSF) were administered unilaterally into the hippocampus of aged cognitively-impaired AD mice and the resulting amyloid load reductions determined one week later, using the artificial cerebrospinal fluid-injected contralateral sides as controls. G-CSF and more significantly, GM-CSF reduced amyloidosis throughout the treated brain hemisphere one week following bolus administration to AD mice. 20 daily subcutaneous injections of 5 microg of GM-CSF (the most amyloid-reducing CSF in the bolus experiment) were administered to balanced cohorts of AD mice after assessment in a battery of cognitive tests. Reductions in amyloid load and improvements in cognitive function were assessed. Subcutaneous GM-CSF administration significantly reduced brain amyloidosis and completely reversed the cognitive impairment, while increasing hippocampal synaptic area and microglial density. These findings, along with two decades of accrued safety data using Leukine, recombinant human GMCSF, in elderly leukopenic patients, suggest that Leukine should be tested as a treatment to reverse cerebral amyloid pathology and cognitive impairment in AD.

  6. The reconstitution of immunocompetence by GM-CSF or IFN[gamma] after pharmacological suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Kühnle, Simone

    2000-01-01

    While immunosuppression is required to prevent graft rejection in transplantation, it increases the risk of infection. We investigated in mice immunosuppressed by different immunosuppressives (cyclosporin A, dexamethasone, tacrolimus and sirolimus), whether the innate immune system can be reactivated by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interferon-gamma (IFNg). Both study drugs reconstituted the suppressed macrophage response ex vivo and in vivo, while the IL-2 and ...

  7. PI3-kinase activation by GM-CSF in endothelium is upstream of Jak/Stat pathway: role of alphaGMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar-Mascareno, Manya; Pedraza, Alicia; Golde, David W

    2005-11-18

    GM-CSF has been identified as a growth factor for endothelial cells. In this study, we investigated the role of PI3-kinase pathway in mediating GM-CSF induced angiogenesis. GM-CSF induced tube formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, as examined using Matrigel assay, was inhibited by specific inhibitors of PI3-kinase, wortmannin, and LY294002. The regulatory subunit of PI3-kinase (p85) interacted with alphaGMR via its C-SH2 domain in a GM-CSF-dependent fashion with concomitant phosphorylation of p85 and activation of PI3-kinase pathway. p85 binding site on the alphaGMR was essential to induce GM-CSF receptor-dependent Stat activation. Furthermore, inhibition of PI3-kinase activity also abrogated GM-CSF induced Stat activation. These studies underscore the significance of the GM-CSF mediated PI3-kinase activation and its role in angiogenesis.

  8. Reduced BMPR2 expression induces GM-CSF translation and macrophage recruitment in humans and mice to exacerbate pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Hirofumi; Saito, Toshie; Nickel, Nils P.; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Glotzbach, Jason P.; Chan, Roshelle; Haghighat, Leila; Fuchs, Gabriele; Januszyk, Michael; Cao, Aiqin; Lai, Ying-Ju; Perez, Vinicio de Jesus; Kim, Yu-Mee; Wang, Lingli; Chen, Pin-I; Spiekerkoetter, Edda; Mitani, Yoshihide; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.; Sarnow, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH [IPAH]) is an insidious and potentially fatal disease linked to a mutation or reduced expression of bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 (BMPR2). Because intravascular inflammatory cells are recruited in IPAH pathogenesis, we hypothesized that reduced BMPR2 enhances production of the potent chemokine granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in response to an inflammatory perturbation. When human pulmonary artery (PA) endothelial cells deficient in BMPR2 were stimulated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a twofold increase in GM-CSF was observed and related to enhanced messenger RNA (mRNA) translation. The mechanism was associated with disruption of stress granule formation. Specifically, loss of BMPR2 induced prolonged phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in response to TNF, and this increased GADD34–PP1 phosphatase activity, dephosphorylating eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF2α), and derepressing GM-CSF mRNA translation. Lungs from IPAH patients versus unused donor controls revealed heightened PA expression of GM-CSF co-distributing with increased TNF and expanded populations of hematopoietic and endothelial GM-CSF receptor α (GM-CSFRα)–positive cells. Moreover, a 3-wk infusion of GM-CSF in mice increased hypoxia-induced PAH, in association with increased perivascular macrophages and muscularized distal arteries, whereas blockade of GM-CSF repressed these features. Thus, reduced BMPR2 can subvert a stress granule response, heighten GM-CSF mRNA translation, increase inflammatory cell recruitment, and exacerbate PAH. PMID:24446489

  9. A GM-CSF/IL-33 pathway facilitates allergic airway responses to sub-threshold house dust mite exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Llop-Guevara

    Full Text Available Allergic asthma is a chronic immune-inflammatory disease of the airways. Despite aeroallergen exposure being universal, allergic asthma affects only a fraction of individuals. This is likely related, at least in part, to the extent of allergen exposure. Regarding house dust mite (HDM, we previously identified the threshold required to elicit allergic responses in BALB/c mice. Here, we investigated the impact of an initial immune perturbation on the response to sub-threshold HDM exposure. We show that transient GM-CSF expression in the lung facilitated robust eosinophilic inflammation, long-lasting antigen-specific Th2 responses, mucus production and airway hyperresponsiveness. This was associated with increased IL-33 levels and activated CD11b(+ DCs expressing OX40L. GM-CSF-driven allergic responses were significantly blunted in IL-33-deficient mice. IL-33 was localized on alveolar type II cells and in vitro stimulation of human epithelial cells with GM-CSF enhanced intracellular IL-33 independently of IL-1α. Likewise, GM-CSF administration in vivo resulted in increased levels of IL-33 but not IL-1α. These findings suggest that exposures to environmental agents associated with GM-CSF production, including airway infections and pollutants, may decrease the threshold of allergen responsiveness and, hence, increase the susceptibility to develop allergic asthma through a GM-CSF/IL-33/OX40L pathway.

  10. Interaction of RNA-binding protein HuR and miR-466i regulates GM-CSF expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Adamiak, William; Huang, Ganlei; Atasoy, Ulus; Rostami, Abdolmohamad; Yu, Shiguang

    2017-12-08

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) produced by T helper 17 (Th17) cells plays an essential role in autoimmune diseases. Transcriptional regulation of Th17 cell differentiation has been extensively studied, but post-transcriptional regulation of Th17 cell differentiation has remained less well characterized. The RNA-binding protein HuR functions to promote the stability of target mRNAs via binding the AU-rich elements of the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of numerous pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-4, IL-13, IL-17 and TNF-α. However, whether HuR regulates GM-CSF expression in Th17 cells has not been fully investigated. Here we showed that HuR conditional knockout (KO) Th17 cells have decreased GM-CSF mRNA in comparison with wild-type (WT) Th17 cells, and that HuR binds directly to GM-CSF mRNA 3'UTR. Interestingly, HuR deficiency increased the levels of certain microRNA expression in Th17 cells; for example, miR-466i functioned to mediate GM-CSF and IL-17 mRNA decay, which was confirmed by in vitro luciferase assay. Furthermore, we found that HuR promoted Mxi1 expression to inhibit certain miRNA expression. Taken together, these findings indicate that interaction of HuR and miR-466i orchestrates GM-CSF expression in Th17 cells.

  11. Effects of low dose GM-CSF on microglial inflammatory profiles to diverse pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kielian Tammy

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well appreciated that obtaining sufficient numbers of primary microglia for in vitro experiments has always been a challenge for scientists studying the biological properties of these cells. Supplementing culture medium with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF partially alleviates this problem by increasing microglial yield. However, GM-CSF has also been reported to transition microglia into a dendritic cell (DC-like phenotype and consequently, affect their immune properties. Methods Although the concentration of GM-CSF used in our protocol for mouse microglial expansion (0.5 ng/ml is at least 10-fold less compared to doses reported to affect microglial maturation and function (≥ 5 ng/ml, in this study we compared the responses of microglia derived from mixed glial cultures propagated in the presence/absence of low dose GM-CSF to establish whether this growth factor significantly altered the immune properties of microglia to diverse bacterial stimuli. These stimuli included the gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus and its cell wall product peptidoglycan (PGN, a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 agonist; the TLR3 ligand polyinosine-polycytidylic acid (polyI:C, a synthetic mimic of viral double-stranded RNA; lipopolysaccharide (LPS a TLR4 agonist; and the TLR9 ligand CpG oligonucleotide (CpG-ODN, a synthetic form of bacteria/viral DNA. Results Interestingly, the relative numbers of microglia recovered from mixed glial cultures following the initial harvest were not influenced by GM-CSF. However, following the second and third collections of the same mixed cultures, the yield of microglia from GM-CSF-supplemented flasks was increased two-fold. Despite the ability of GM-CSF to expand microglial numbers, cells propagated in the presence/absence of GM-CSF demonstrated roughly equivalent responses following S. aureus and PGN stimulation. Specifically, the induction of tumor necrosis factor

  12. The relative balance of GM-CSF and TGF-β1 regulates lung epithelial barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overgaard, Christian E; Schlingmann, Barbara; Dorsainvil White, StevenClaude; Ward, Christina; Fan, Xian; Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Brown, Lou Ann S; Guidot, David M; Koval, Michael

    2015-06-15

    Lung barrier dysfunction is a cardinal feature of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Alcohol abuse, which increases the risk of ARDS two- to fourfold, induces transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, which increases epithelial permeability and impairs granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent barrier integrity in experimental models. We hypothesized that the relative balance of GM-CSF and TGF-β1 signaling regulates lung epithelial barrier function. GM-CSF and TGF-β1 were tested separately and simultaneously for their effects on lung epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. TGF-β1 alone caused an ∼ 25% decrease in transepithelial resistance (TER), increased paracellular flux, and was associated with projections perpendicular to tight junctions ("spikes") containing claudin-18 that colocalized with F-actin. In contrast, GM-CSF treatment induced an ∼ 20% increase in TER, decreased paracellular flux, and showed decreased colocalization of spike-associated claudin-18 with F-actin. When simultaneously administered to lung epithelial cells, GM-CSF antagonized the effects of TGF-β1 on epithelial barrier function in cultured cells. Given this, GM-CSF and TGF-β1 levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia and correlated with markers for pulmonary edema and patient outcome. In patient BAL fluid, protein markers of lung barrier dysfunction, serum α2-macroglobulin, and IgM levels were increased at lower ratios of GM-CSF/TGF-β1. Critically, patients who survived had significantly higher GM-CSF/TGF-β1 ratios than nonsurviving patients. This study provides experimental and clinical evidence that the relative balance between GM-CSF and TGF-β1 signaling is a key regulator of lung epithelial barrier function. The GM-CSF/TGF-β1 ratio in BAL fluid may provide a concentration-independent biomarker that can predict patient outcomes in ARDS. Copyright © 2015 the American

  13. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) targets myeloid leukocytes in the uterus during the post-mating inflammatory response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, S A; O'Connell, A C; Hudson, S N; Seamark, R F

    2000-03-01

    Factors in seminal plasma elicit a surge of GM-CSF expression in uterine epithelial cells after mating in mice. This study investigates the nature of the endometrial cell populations targeted by epithelial GM-CSF. In quantitative RT-PCR studies, expression of the alpha-subunit of the GM-CSF receptor (GM-CSF-R) parallelled GM-CSF expression, being maximal during the 48 h period after mating and declining thereafter. Expression of mRNA encoding beta-common chain (AIC2B) also increased after mating and remained high until the time of embryo implantation on day 4 of pregnancy. Cells expressing GM-CSF receptors were identified in sections of uterus on the day after mating using 125I-GM-CSF, and were located predominantly in the endometrial stroma subjacent to the luminal epithelium, co-localising with abundant populations of myeloid leukocytes. Cells expressing GM-CSF receptor were identified as macrophages, granulocytes and putative dendritic cells by flow cytometric analysis using lineage and receptor subunit specific antibodies. Recombinant GM-CSF injected into the uterine lumen of ovariectomised mice was found to elicit a dose-dependant accumulation of macrophages and granulocytes in the endometrium, in a pattern of distribution comparable to that seen in uteri after natural mating. Together, these data indicate a role for epithelial cell-derived GM-CSF in mediating the recruitment and potentially in modifying the behaviour of uterine leukocytes during the post-mating inflammatory response in mice.

  14. Molecular basis of in vitro affinity maturation and functional evolution of a neutralizing anti-human GM-CSF antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eylenstein, Roy; Weinfurtner, Daniel; Härtle, Stefan; Strohner, Ralf; Böttcher, Jark; Augustin, Martin; Ostendorp, Ralf; Steidl, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    X-ray structure analysis of 4 antibody Fab fragments, each in complex with human granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), was performed to investigate the changes at the protein-protein binding interface during the course of in vitro affinity maturation by phage display selection. The parental antibody MOR03929 was compared to its derivatives MOR04252 (CDR-H2 optimized), MOR04302 (CDR-L3 optimized) and MOR04357 (CDR-H2 and CDR-L3 optimized). All antibodies bind to a conformational epitope that can be divided into 3 sub-epitopes. Specifically, MOR04357 binds to a region close to the GM-CSF N-terminus (residues 11-24), a short second sub-epitope (residues 83-89) and a third at the C-terminus (residues 112-123). Modifications introduced during affinity maturation in CDR-H2 and CDR-L3 led to the establishment of additional hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts, respectively, providing a rationale for the observed improvement in binding affinity and neutralization potency. Once GM-CSF is complexed to the antibodies, modeling predicts a sterical clash with GM-CSF binding to GM-CSF receptor α and β chain. This predicted mutually exclusive binding was confirmed by a GM-CSF receptor α chain ligand binding inhibition assay. Finally, high throughput sequencing of clones obtained after affinity maturation phage display pannings revealed highly selected consensus sequences for CDR-H2 as well for CDR-L3, which are in accordance with the sequence of the highest affinity antibody MOR04357. The resolved crystal structures highlight the criticality of these strongly selected residues for high affinity interaction with GM-CSF.

  15. GM-CSF Grown Bone Marrow Derived Cells Are Composed of Phenotypically Different Dendritic Cells and Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Yi Rang; Jung, Daun; Gu, Gyo Jeong; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-10-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has a role in inducing emergency hematopoiesis upon exposure to inflammatory stimuli. Although GM-CSF generated murine bone marrow derived cells have been widely used as macrophages or dendritic cells in research, the exact characteristics of each cell population have not yet been defined. Here we discriminated GM-CSF grown bone marrow derived macrophages (GM-BMMs) from dendritic cells (GM-BMDCs) in several criteria. After C57BL/6J mice bone marrow cell culture for 7 days with GM-CSF supplementation, two main populations were observed in the attached cells based on MHCII and F4/80 marker expressions. GM-BMMs had MHCIIlowF4/80high as well as CD11c+CD11bhighCD80-CD64+MerTK+ phenotypes. In contrast, GM-BMDCs had MHCIIhighF4/80low and CD11chighCD8α- CD11b+CD80+CD64-MerTKlow phenotypes. Interestingly, the GM-BMM population increased but GM-BMDCs decreased in a GM-CSF dose-dependent manner. Functionally, GM-BMMs showed extremely high phagocytic abilities and produced higher IL-10 upon LPS stimulation. GM-BMDCs, however, could not phagocytose as well, but were efficient at producing TNFα, IL-1β, IL-12p70 and IL-6 as well as inducing T cell proliferation. Finally, whole transcriptome analysis revealed that GM-BMMs and GM-BMDCs are overlap with in vivo resident macrophages and dendritic cells, respectively. Taken together, our study shows the heterogeneicity of GM-CSF derived cell populations, and specifically characterizes GM-CSF derived macrophages compared to dendritic cells.

  16. GM-CSF Ameliorates Micro-vascular Barrier Integrity via Pericytes Derived Ang-1 in Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Min; Hu, Yange; Yao, Min; Bao, Shisan; Fang, Yong

    2018-01-12

    Skin wound healing involves complex coordinated interactions of cells, tissues and mediators. Maintaining microvascular barrier integrity is one of the key events for endothelial homeostasis during wound healing. Vasodilation is observed after vasoconstriction, which causes blood vessels to become porous, facilitates leukocyte infiltration and aids angiogenesis at the wound-area, post-injury. Eventually, vessel integrity has to be re-established for vascular maturation. Numerous studies have found that granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) accelerates wound healing by inducing recruitment of repair cells into the injury area and releases of cytokines. However, whether GM-CSF is involving in the maintaining of micro-vascular barrier integrity and the underlying mechanism remain still unclear. Aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GM-CSF on modulation of micro-vascular permeability in wound healing and underlying mechanisms. Wound closure and micro-vascular leakage was investigated using a full-thickness skin wound mouse model after GM-CSF intervention. The endothelial permeability was measured by Evans-blue assay in vivo and in vitro endothelium/pericyte co-culture system using a FITC-Dextran permeability assay. To identify the source of angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), double staining is used in vivo and ELISA and qPCR are used in vitro. To determine the specific effect of Ang-1 on GM-CSF maintaining micro-vascular stabilization, Ang-1 siRNA was applied to inhibit Ang-1 production in vivo and in vitro. Wound closure was significantly accelerated and micro-vascular leakage was ameliorated after GM-CSF treatment in mouse wound sites. GM-CSF decreased endothelial permeability through tightening endothelial junctions and increased Ang-1 protein level that was derived by perictye. Furthermore, applications of siRNAAng-1 inhibited GM-CSF mediated protection of micro-vascular barrier integrity both in vivo and in vitro. Our data indicate that GM-CSF

  17. Molecular cloning, sequencing and structural studies of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    KAUST Repository

    Sugumar, Thennarasu

    2013-06-25

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that is essential for growth and development of progenitors of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages. In this study, we report molecular cloning, sequencing and characterization of GM-CSF from Indian water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis. In addition, we performed sequence and structural analysis for buffalo GM-CSF. Buffalo GM-CSF has been compared with 17 mammalian GM-CSFs using multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree. Three-dimensional model for buffalo GM-CSF and human receptor complex was built using homology modelling to study cross-reactivity between two species. Detailed analysis was performed to study GM-CSF interface and various interactions at the interface. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Dysregulation of the Cytokine GM-CSF Induces Spontaneous Phagocyte Invasion and Immunopathology in the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spath, Sabine; Komuczki, Juliana; Hermann, Mario; Pelczar, Pawel; Mair, Florian; Schreiner, Bettina; Becher, Burkhard

    2017-02-21

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are influenced by dysregulation of cytokines. Among them, granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is crucial for the pathogenic function of T cells in preclinical models of autoimmunity. To study the impact of dysregulated GM-CSF expression in vivo, we generated a transgenic mouse line allowing the induction of GM-CSF expression in mature, peripheral helper T (Th) cells. Antigen-independent GM-CSF release led to the invasion of inflammatory myeloid cells into the central nervous system (CNS), which was accompanied by the spontaneous development of severe neurological deficits. CNS-invading phagocytes produced reactive oxygen species and exhibited a distinct genetic signature compared to myeloid cells invading other organs. We propose that the CNS is particularly vulnerable to the attack of monocyte-derived phagocytes and that the effector functions of GM-CSF-expanded myeloid cells are in turn guided by the tissue microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Rae Rho

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs. We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF. An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration.

  20. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF) Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Chang Rae; Park, Mi-young; Kang, Seungbum

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF). An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml). MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration.

  1. TGF-β Affects the Differentiation of Human GM-CSF+ CD4+ T Cells in an Activation- and Sodium-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Éliás, Szabolcs; Schmidt, Angelika; Kannan, Venkateshan; Andersson, John; Tegnér, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    The cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis. However, the environmental cues promoting differentiation of GM-CSF producing T cells are unclear. Herein, we performed a broad experimental screening of cytokines and data-driven analysis assessing their ability to induce human GM-CSF+ CD4+ T cells and their subpopulations. TGF-β was discovered to induce GM-CSF production independently of proliferation and IL-2 signaling including STAT5. In contrast, IL-6 and IL-23 decreased GM-CSF production. On the population level, GM-CSF induction was highly correlated with expression of FOXP3 across cytokine stimulations but not with that of IL-17. However, on single-cell level GM-CSF and IFN-γ expression were most correlated, independently of the cytokine environment. Importantly, under low sodium conditions in the medium or upon stimulation with plate-bound instead of bead-bound anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies, the effects of TGF-β on GM-CSF, but not on FOXP3, were reversed. Our analysis indicates a novel role for TGF-β in generating GM-CSF+ subsets of human CD4+ T cells. These results are important for understanding of autoimmune disease and therapeutic considerations.

  2. Pleural innate response activator B cells protect against pneumonia via a GM-CSF-IgM axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Georg F; Chousterman, Benjamin G; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Robbins, Clinton S; Theurl, Igor; Gerhardt, Louisa M S; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Quach, Tam D; Ali, Muhammad; Chen, John W; Rothstein, Thomas L; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K

    2014-06-02

    Pneumonia is a major cause of mortality worldwide and a serious problem in critical care medicine, but the immunophysiological processes that confer either protection or morbidity are not completely understood. We show that in response to lung infection, B1a B cells migrate from the pleural space to the lung parenchyma to secrete polyreactive emergency immunoglobulin M (IgM). The process requires innate response activator (IRA) B cells, a transitional B1a-derived inflammatory subset which controls IgM production via autocrine granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) signaling. The strategic location of these cells, coupled with the capacity to produce GM-CSF-dependent IgM, ensures effective early frontline defense against bacteria invading the lungs. The study describes a previously unrecognized GM-CSF-IgM axis and positions IRA B cells as orchestrators of protective IgM immunity. © 2014 Weber et al.

  3. Lentivirus-ABCG1 instillation reduces lipid accumulation and improves lung compliance in GM-CSF knock-out mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malur, Anagha; Huizar, Isham [Program in Lung Cell Biology and Translational Research, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Wells, Greg [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Barna, Barbara P. [Program in Lung Cell Biology and Translational Research, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Malur, Achut G. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Thomassen, Mary Jane, E-mail: thomassenm@ecu.edu [Program in Lung Cell Biology and Translational Research, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lentivirus-ABCG1 reduces lipid accumulation in lungs of GM-CSF knock-out mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Up-regulation of ABCG1 improves lung function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of ABCG1 improves surfactant metabolism. -- Abstract: We have shown decreased expression of the nuclear transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) and the PPAR{gamma}-regulated ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) in alveolar macrophages from patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). PAP patients also exhibit neutralizing antibodies to granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), an upregulator of PPAR{gamma}. In association with functional GM-CSF deficiency, PAP lung is characterized by surfactant-filled alveolar spaces and lipid-filled alveolar macrophages. Similar pathology characterizes GM-CSF knock-out (KO) mice. We reported previously that intratracheal instillation of a lentivirus (lenti)-PPAR{gamma} plasmid into GM-CSF KO animals elevated ABCG1 and reduced alveolar macrophage lipid accumulation. Here, we hypothesized that instillation of lenti-ABCG1 might be sufficient to decrease lipid accumulation and improve pulmonary function in GM-CSF KO mice. Animals received intratracheal instillation of lenti-ABCG1 or control lenti-enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (eGFP) plasmids and alveolar macrophages were harvested 10 days later. Alveolar macrophage transduction efficiency was 79% as shown by lenti-eGFP fluorescence. Quantitative PCR analyses indicated a threefold (p = 0.0005) increase in ABCG1 expression with no change of PPAR{gamma} or ABCA1 in alveolar macrophages of lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. ABCG1 was unchanged in control lenti-eGFP and PBS-instilled groups. Oil Red O staining detected reduced intracellular neutral lipid in alveolar macrophages from lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. Extracellular cholesterol and phospholipids were also decreased as shown by

  4. A randomized clinical trial to evaluate the effect of granulocyte- macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium for in vitro fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziebe, Søren; Loft, Anne; Povlsen, Betina B.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium on ongoing implantation rate (OIR).......To evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium on ongoing implantation rate (OIR)....

  5. GM-CSF, IL-3 and G-CSF receptors on acute myeloid leukemia cells : function, regulation of expression, and ligand binding characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Budel (Leo)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIL-3, GM-CSF and G-CSF stimulate proliferation of human acute myeloid leukemia in vitro, but patterns of response among clinical cases are diverse. As described in Chapters 2 and 3, numbers and affinity of IL-3, GM-CSF and G-CSF receptors on cells of patients with AML were assessed and

  6. CCR2 defines in vivo development and homing of IL-23-driven GM-CSF-producing Th17 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Ervin E; McKenzie, Duncan R; Bastow, Cameron R; Gregor, Carly E; Fenix, Kevin A; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D; Paton, James C; Mack, Matthias; Pombal, Diana R; Seillet, Cyrill; Dubois, Bénédicte; Liston, Adrian; MacDonald, Kelli P A; Belz, Gabrielle T; Smyth, Mark J; Hill, Geoffrey R; Comerford, Iain; McColl, Shaun R

    2015-10-29

    IL-17-producing helper T (Th17) cells are critical for host defense against extracellular pathogens but also drive numerous autoimmune diseases. Th17 cells that differ in their inflammatory potential have been described including IL-10-producing Th17 cells that are weak inducers of inflammation and highly inflammatory, IL-23-driven, GM-CSF/IFNγ-producing Th17 cells. However, their distinct developmental requirements, functions and trafficking mechanisms in vivo remain poorly understood. Here we identify a temporally regulated IL-23-dependent switch from CCR6 to CCR2 usage by developing Th17 cells that is critical for pathogenic Th17 cell-driven inflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). This switch defines a unique in vivo cell surface signature (CCR6(-)CCR2(+)) of GM-CSF/IFNγ-producing Th17 cells in EAE and experimental persistent extracellular bacterial infection, and in humans. Using this signature, we identify an IL-23/IL-1/IFNγ/TNFα/T-bet/Eomesodermin-driven circuit driving GM-CSF/IFNγ-producing Th17 cell formation in vivo. Thus, our data identify a unique cell surface signature, trafficking mechanism and T-cell intrinsic regulators of GM-CSF/IFNγ-producing Th17 cells.

  7. Distinct changes in pulmonary surfactant homeostasis in common beta-chain-and GM-CSF-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reed, JA; Ikegami, M; Robb, L; Begley, CG; Ross, G; Whitsett, JA

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is caused by inactivation of either granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) or GM receptor common beta-chain (beta(c)) genes in mice [GM(-/-), beta(c)(-/-)], demonstrating a critical role of GM-CSF signaling in surfactant homeostasis. To

  8. An alternative flow cytometry strategy for peripheral blood dendritic cell enumeration in the setting of repetitive GM-CSF dosing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Rita S

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enumeration of circulating peripheral blood dendritic cells (DCs is complicated by the absence of a unique cell surface marker expressed on all DC subsets and by the use of various biological adjuvants to modulate the DC compartment, including granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF. Common methods employ a cocktail of antibodies, typically including anti-CD14, to define a lineage negative, MHC class II positive, putative DC population. Reported flow cytometry protocols include highly variable gating strategies and DC identification criteria. Increasing appreciation of DC pleiomorphism, GM-CSF biology, and recognition of CD14 expression in some DC subsets led us to consider an alternative lineage cocktail to improve identification of the circulating DC pool. Methods Standard whole blood staining with appropriate fluorochrome conjugated antibodies to MHC class II and either standard CD14 containing, or an alternate CD66acde containing, lineage cocktail was performed on samples obtained from normal donors and breast cancer patients before and after administration of dose-dense, cytotoxic chemotherapy with daily GM-CSF hematopoetic growth factor support. Putative DCs were enumerated by standard flow cytometry. Data set differences were evaluated using two tailed Mann-Whitney or Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Cellular morphology was examined in cell-sorted populations from post GM-CSF samples. Results Use of either antibody cocktail defined comparably sized lineage negative, MHC class II positive populations in normal donors and at baseline in cancer patients. However, selection of lineage negative subsets with increasing MHC class II expression levels yielded larger putative DC populations identified with the alternate cocktail. Both cocktails yielded highly reproducible data. Use of the alternate cocktail: 1 yielded a putative DC population, post GM-CSF that was more homogenous and consistent with DCs, 2 resulted

  9. GM-CSF increases LPS-induced production of proinflammatory mediators via upregulation of TLR4 and CD14 in murine microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parajuli Bijay

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microglia are resident macrophage-like cells in the central nervous system (CNS and cause innate immune responses via the LPS receptors, Toll-like receptor (TLR 4 and CD14, in a variety of neuroinflammatory disorders including bacterial infection, Alzheimer’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF activates microglia and induces inflammatory responses via binding to GM-CSF receptor complex composed of two different subunit GM-CSF receptor α (GM-CSFRα and common β chain (βc. GM-CSF has been shown to be associated with neuroinflammatory responses in multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease. However, the mechanisms how GM-CSF promotes neuroinflammation still remain unclear. Methods Microglia were stimulated with 20 ng/ml GM-CSF and the levels of TLR4 and CD14 expression were evaluated by RT-PCR and flowcytometry. LPS binding was analyzed by flowcytometry. GM-CSF receptor complex was analyzed by immunocytechemistry. The levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in culture supernatant of GM-CSF-stimulated microglia and NF-κB nuclear translocation were determined by ELISA. Production of nitric oxide (NO was measured by the Griess method. The levels of p-ERK1/2, ERK1/2, p-p38 and p38 were assessed by Western blotting. Statistically significant differences between experimental groups were determined by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test for multiple comparisons. Results GM-CSF receptor complex was expressed in microglia. GM-CSF enhanced TLR4 and CD14 expressions in microglia and subsequent LPS-binding to the cell surface. In addition, GM-CSF priming increased LPS-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation and production of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and NO by microglia. GM-CSF upregulated the levels of p-ERK1/2 and p-p38, suggesting that induction of TLR4 and CD14 expression by GM-CSF was mediated through ERK1/2 and p38, respectively. Conclusions These results suggest that GM-CSF

  10. IFN regulatory factor 8 represses GM-CSF expression in T cells to affect myeloid cell lineage differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschall, Amy V; Zhang, Ruihua; Qi, Chen-Feng; Bardhan, Kankana; Peng, Liang; Lu, Geming; Yang, Jianjun; Merad, Miriam; McGaha, Tracy; Zhou, Gang; Mellor, Andrew; Abrams, Scott I; Morse, Herbert C; Ozato, Keiko; Xiong, Huabao; Liu, Kebin

    2015-03-01

    During hematopoiesis, hematopoietic stem cells constantly differentiate into granulocytes and macrophages via a distinct differentiation program that is tightly controlled by myeloid lineage-specific transcription factors. Mice with a null mutation of IFN regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) accumulate CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid cells that phenotypically and functionally resemble tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), indicating an essential role of IRF8 in myeloid cell lineage differentiation. However, IRF8 is expressed in various types of immune cells, and whether IRF8 functions intrinsically or extrinsically in regulation of myeloid cell lineage differentiation is not fully understood. In this study, we report an intriguing finding that, although IRF8-deficient mice exhibit deregulated myeloid cell differentiation and resultant accumulation of CD11b(+)Gr1(+) MDSCs, surprisingly, mice with IRF8 deficiency only in myeloid cells exhibit no abnormal myeloid cell lineage differentiation. Instead, mice with IRF8 deficiency only in T cells exhibited deregulated myeloid cell differentiation and MDSC accumulation. We further demonstrated that IRF8-deficient T cells exhibit elevated GM-CSF expression and secretion. Treatment of mice with GM-CSF increased MDSC accumulation, and adoptive transfer of IRF8-deficient T cells, but not GM-CSF-deficient T cells, increased MDSC accumulation in the recipient chimeric mice. Moreover, overexpression of IRF8 decreased GM-CSF expression in T cells. Our data determine that, in addition to its intrinsic function as an apoptosis regulator in myeloid cells, IRF8 also acts extrinsically to repress GM-CSF expression in T cells to control myeloid cell lineage differentiation, revealing a novel mechanism that the adaptive immune component of the immune system regulates the innate immune cell myelopoiesis in vivo. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Spleen tyrosine kinase mediates the actions of EPO and GM-CSF and coordinates with TGF-β in erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hua-Ching; Huang, Duen-Yi; Wu, Mai-Szu; Chu, Ching-Liang; Tzeng, Shiang-Jong; Lin, Wan-Wan

    2017-04-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and GM-CSF are involved in erythropoiesis, while TGF-β inhibits proliferation but potentiates differentiation of erythroblasts. Since Syk inhibitor may induce anemia side effect in clinic, here we investigated the role of Syk in the biological actions of EPO and GM-CSF in erythropoiesis. In human erythroleukemia cell line TF-1, Syk inhibitor R406 exerts an enhancement effect with TGF-β to decrease cell viability, either in the absence or presence of EPO or GM-CSF. Such effect of R406 results from the reduced cell cycle progression and increased cell apoptosis. Notably, unlike Syk, Src family kinases are not involved in the viability control of TF-1 cells. Signaling studies showed that Syk is required for STAT5 and ERK activation induced by EPO, and Akt and ERK activation induced by GM-CSF. Nevertheless, R406 does not change the Smad2/3 signal caused by TGF-β, and TGF-β neither affects above signal pathways of EPO and GM-CSF. Of note, Syk is constitutively associated with EPOR in plasma membrane and can bind to STAT5 at active status upon EPO stimulation. Furthermore, EPO-induced hemoglobin γ expression was reduced by R406. In BFU-E and CFU-E colony formation assays in Syk-deficient erythroid progenitor cells, we confirmed the essential role of Syk in erythropoiesis mediated by EPO. Taken together, Syk is a novel upstream signaling molecule of EPOR, and contributes to erythroblast proliferation, survival and differentiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Adipose Progenitor Cell Secretion of GM-CSF and MMP9 Promotes a Stromal and Immunological Microenvironment That Supports Breast Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggiani, Francesca; Labanca, Valentina; Mancuso, Patrizia; Rabascio, Cristina; Talarico, Giovanna; Orecchioni, Stefania; Manconi, Andrea; Bertolini, Francesco

    2017-09-15

    A cell population with progenitor-like phenotype (CD45-CD34+) resident in human white adipose tissue (WAT) is known to promote the progression of local and metastatic breast cancer and angiogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms of the interaction have not been elucidated. In this study, we identified two proteins that were significantly upregulated in WAT-derived progenitors after coculture with breast cancer: granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9). These proteins were released by WAT progenitors in xenograft and transgenic breast cancer models. GM-CSF was identified as an upstream modulator. Breast cancer-derived GM-CSF induced GM-CSF and MMP9 release from WAT progenitors, and GM-CSF knockdown in breast cancer cells neutralized the protumorigenic activity of WAT progenitors in preclinical models. GM-CSF neutralization in diet-induced obese mice significantly reduced immunosuppression, intratumor vascularization, and local and metastatic breast cancer progression. Similarly, MMP9 inhibition reduced neoplastic angiogenesis and significantly decreased local and metastatic tumor growth. Combined GM-CSF neutralization and MMP9 inhibition synergistically reduced angiogenesis and tumor progression. High-dose metformin inhibited GM-CSF and MMP9 release from WAT progenitors in in vitro and xenograft models. In obese syngeneic mice, metformin treatment mimicked the effects observed with GM-CSF neutralization and MMP9 inhibition, suggesting these proteins as new targets for metformin. These findings support the hypothesis that GM-CSF and MMP9 promote the protumorigenic effect of WAT progenitors on local and metastatic breast cancer. Cancer Res; 77(18); 5169-82. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Action of granulopoiesis-stimulating cytokines rhG-CSF, rhGM-CSF, and rmGM-CSF on murine haematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, M; Vacek, A; Weiterová, L

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide new data to the knowledge of mechanisms by which recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF), recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) and recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rmGM-CSF) enhance the numbers of colonies growing from hematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC) in the murine bone marrow. The in vitro technique for cultivating GM-CFC from normal bone marrow cells was used. For evaluation of stimulatory actions of the drugs studied, the factors themselves or sera of mice given these factors were added to the cultures. The factors or the sera were present in the cultures either as the only potentially stimulatory agents or acted jointly with a suboptimum concentration of recombinant murine interleukin-3 (rmIL-3). It was found that both rhG-CSF and rmGM-CSF stimulate the proliferation of GM-CFC by a combination of direct mechanisms (direct actions on the target cells) and indirect effects (effects mediated through the induction of other cytokines and/or growth factors in the murine organism). The rhGM-CSF exhibited somewhat weaker in vitro effects in comparison with the other two factors and only indirect effects were noted. Additional in vivo experiments documented that, in spite of differences in mechanisms of action of the individual drugs studied on murine bone marrow cells in vitro, equal in vivo doses of the factors induce quantitatively similar effects on the production of GM-CFC in vivo.

  14. Randomized phase 1b trial of MOR103, a human antibody to GM-CSF, in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinescu, Cris S.; Asher, Aliya; Fryze, Waldemar; Kozubski, Wojciech; Wagner, Frank; Aram, Jehan; Tanasescu, Radu; Korolkiewicz, Roman P.; Dirnberger-Hertweck, Maren; Steidl, Stefan; Libretto, Susan E.; Sprenger, Till; Radue, Ernst W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and immunogenicity of the recombinant human monoclonal antibody MOR103 to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) with clinical or MRI activity. Methods: In this 20-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 1b dose-escalation trial (registration number NCT01517282), adults with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) or secondary progressive MS (SPMS) received an IV infu...

  15. GM-CSF Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory Activity on Endothelial Cells Derived from Chronic Venous Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Tisato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty patients affected by chronic venous disease (CVD in tertiary venous network and/or saphenous vein were analyzed before surgical ablation by echo-color-doppler for the hemodynamic parameters reflux time (RT and resistance index (RI, a negative and a positive prognostic factor, respectively. RT and RI were next correlated with relevant in vitro parameters of venous endothelial cells (VEC obtained from surgical specimens, such as cell migration in response to serum gradient, proliferation index, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1 expression, as well as cytokines release. Of interest, ICAM-1 expression in patient-derived VEC cultures correlated positively with RT and negatively with RI. Moreover, RT showed a positive correlation with the baseline osteoprotegerin (OPG expression by VEC and an inverse correlation with VEC proliferation index. On the other hand, RI correlated positively with TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL expression. Among the cytokines released by VEC, GM-CSF showed a positive correlation with VEC proliferation and TRAIL expression and a negative correlation with OPG, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. Since in vitro recombinant GM-CSF induced VEC proliferation and counteracted the induction of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and OPG upon exposure to TNF-α, our data suggest an anti-inflammatory activity of GM-CSF on venous endothelial cells.

  16. Functional paralysis of GM-CSF-derived bone marrow cells productively infected with ectromelia virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Szulc-Dąbrowska

    Full Text Available Ectromelia virus (ECTV is an orthopoxvirus responsible for mousepox, a lethal disease of certain strains of mice that is similar to smallpox in humans, caused by variola virus (VARV. ECTV, similar to VARV, exhibits a narrow host range and has co-evolved with its natural host. Consequently, ECTV employs sophisticated and host-specific strategies to control the immune cells that are important for induction of antiviral immune response. In the present study we investigated the influence of ECTV infection on immune functions of murine GM-CSF-derived bone marrow cells (GM-BM, comprised of conventional dendritic cells (cDCs and macrophages. Our results showed for the first time that ECTV is able to replicate productively in GM-BM and severely impaired their innate and adaptive immune functions. Infected GM-BM exhibited dramatic changes in morphology and increased apoptosis during the late stages of infection. Moreover, GM-BM cells were unable to uptake and process antigen, reach full maturity and mount a proinflammatory response. Inhibition of cytokine/chemokine response may result from the alteration of nuclear translocation of NF-κB, IRF3 and IRF7 transcription factors and down-regulation of many genes involved in TLR, RLR, NLR and type I IFN signaling pathways. Consequently, GM-BM show inability to stimulate proliferation of purified allogeneic CD4+ T cells in a primary mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR. Taken together, our data clearly indicate that ECTV induces immunosuppressive mechanisms in GM-BM leading to their functional paralysis, thus compromising their ability to initiate downstream T-cell activation events.

  17. GM-CSF produced by non-hematopoietic cells is required for early epithelial cell proliferation and repair of injured colonic mucosa1,2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Laia; McAllister, Christopher S.; Lakhdari, Omar; Minev, Ivelina; Shenouda, Steve; Kagnoff, Martin F.

    2012-01-01

    GM-CSF is a growth factor that promotes the survival and activation of macrophages and granulocytes, and dendritic cell (DC) differentiation and survival in vitro. The mechanism by which exogenous GM-CSF ameliorates the severity of Crohn’s disease in humans and colitis in murine models has been considered mainly to reflect its activity on myeloid cells. We used GM-CSF deficient (GM-CSF−/−) mice to probe the functional role of endogenous host-produced GM-CSF in a colitis model induced after injury to the colon epithelium. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) at doses that resulted in little epithelial damage and mucosal ulceration in wild type (WT) mice resulted in marked colon ulceration and delayed ulcer healing in GM-CSF−/− mice. Colon crypt epithelial cell proliferation in vivo was significantly decreased in GM-CSF−/− mice at early times after DSS injury. This was paralleled by decreased expression of crypt epithelial cell genes involved in cell cycle, proliferation, and wound healing. Decreased crypt cell proliferation and delayed ulcer healing in GM-CSF−/− mice were rescued by exogenous GM-CSF, indicating the lack of a developmental abnormality in the epithelial cell proliferative response in those mice. Non-hematopoietic cells and not myeloid cells produced the GM-CSF important for colon epithelial proliferation after DSS-induced injury as revealed by bone marrow chimera and DC depletion experiments, with colon epithelial cells being the cellular source of GM-CSF. Endogenous epithelial cell produced GM-CSF has a novel non-redundant role in facilitating epithelial cell proliferation and ulcer healing in response to injury of the colon crypt epithelium. PMID:23325885

  18. LOCAL GM-CSF DEPENDENT DIFFERENTIATION AND ACTIVATION OF PULMONARY DENDRITIC CELLS AND MACROPHAGES PROTECTS AGAINST PROGRESSIVE CRYPTOCOCCAL LUNG INFECTION IN MICE1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gwo-Hsiao; Teitz-Tennenbaum, Seagal; Neal, Lori M.; Murdock, Benjamin J.; Malachowski, Antoni N.; Dils, Anthony J.; Olszewski, Michal A.; Osterholzer, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acquired deficiency in granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are susceptible to infections with Cryptococcus (C.) neoformans and other opportunistic fungi. We previously showed that GM-CSF protects against progressive fungal disease using a murine model of cryptococcal lung infection. To better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms through which GM-CSF enhances anti-fungal host defenses, we investigated temporal and spatial relationships between myeloid and lymphoid immune responses in GM+/+ and GM−/− mice infected with a moderately-virulent encapsulated strain of C. neoformans (strain 52D). Our data demonstrate that GM-CSF deficiency led to a reduction in: 1) total lung leukocyte recruitment; 2) Th2 and Th17 responses; 3) total numbers of CD11b+ dendritic cells (DC), and CD11b− and CD11b+ macrophages (Mϕ); 4) DC and Mϕ activation; and 5) localization of DC and Mϕ to the microanatomic sites of alveolar infection. In contrast, GM-CSF deficiency resulted in increased accumulation of DC and Mϕ precursors, namely Ly-6Chigh monocytes, in the blood and lungs of infected mice. Collectively, these results show that GM-CSF promotes the local differentiation, accumulation, activation, and alveolar localization of lung DC and macrophages in mice with cryptococcal lung infection. These findings identify GM-CSF as central to the protective immune response that prevents progressive fungal disease and thus shed new light on the increased susceptibility to these infections observed in patients with acquired GM-CSF deficiency. PMID:26755822

  19. GM-CSF Promotes Chronic Disability in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by Altering the Composition of Central Nervous System-Infiltrating Cells, but Is Dispensable for Disease Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, Patrick C; Stoolman, Joshua S; Huber, Amanda K; Segal, Benjamin M

    2017-12-29

    GM-CSF has been portrayed as a critical cytokine in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and, ostensibly, in multiple sclerosis. C57BL/6 mice deficient in GM-CSF are resistant to EAE induced by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 The mechanism of action of GM-CSF in EAE is poorly understood. In this study, we show that GM-CSF augments the accumulation of MOG35-55-specific T cells in the skin draining lymph nodes of primed mice, but it is not required for the development of encephalitogenic T cells. Abrogation of GM-CSF receptor signaling in adoptive transfer recipients of MOG35-55-specific T cells did not alter the incidence of EAE or the trajectory of its initial clinical course, but it limited the extent of chronic CNS tissue damage and neurologic disability. The attenuated clinical course was associated with a relative dearth of MOG35-55-specific T cells, myeloid dendritic cells, and neutrophils, as well as an abundance of B cells, within CNS infiltrates. Our data indicate that GM-CSF drives chronic tissue damage and disability in EAE via pleiotropic pathways, but it is dispensable during early lesion formation and the onset of neurologic deficits. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Intranasal exposure of mice to house dust mite elicits allergic airway inflammation via a GM-CSF-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Elizabeth C; Fattouh, Ramzi; Wattie, Jennifer; Inman, Mark D; Goncharova, Susanna; Coyle, Anthony J; Gutierrez-Ramos, José-Carlos; Jordana, Manel

    2004-11-15

    It is now well established that passive exposure to inhaled OVA leads to a state of immunological tolerance. Therefore, to elicit allergic sensitization, researchers have been compelled to devise alternative strategies, such as the systemic delivery of OVA in the context of powerful adjuvants, which are alien to the way humans are exposed and sensitized to allergens. The objectives of these studies were to investigate immune-inflammatory responses to intranasal delivery of a purified house dust mite (HDM) extract and to evaluate the role of GM-CSF in this process. HDM was delivered to BALB/c mice daily for 10 days. After the last exposure, mice were killed, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed, and samples were obtained. Expression/production of Th2-associated molecules in the lymph nodes, lung, and spleen were evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR and ELISA, respectively. Using this exposure protocol, exposure to HDM alone generated Th2 sensitization based on the expression/production of Th2 effector molecules and airway eosinophilic inflammation. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated expansion and activation of APCs in the lung and an influx of activated Th2 effector cells. Moreover, this inflammation was accompanied by airways hyper-responsiveness and a robust memory-driven immune response. Finally, administration of anti-GM-CSF-neutralizing Abs markedly reduced immune-inflammatory responses in both lung and spleen. Thus, intranasal delivery of HDM results in Th2 sensitization and airway eosinophilic inflammation that appear to be mediated, at least in part, by endogenous GM-CSF production.

  1. Establishment of Self-Renewable GM-CSF-Dependent Immature Macrophages In Vitro from Murine Bone Marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Sachiko; Tanaka, Yuriko; Nishio, Naomi; Thanasegaran, Suganya; Isobe, Ken-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play a key role in the innate immune system. Macrophages are thought to originate from hematopoietic precursors or the yolk sac. Here, we describe the in vitro establishment of self-renewable GM-CSF-dependent immature macrophages (GM-IMs) from murine bone marrow (BM). GM-IMs grow continuously in vitro in conditioned medium containing GM-CSF. The immunophenotype of GM-IMs is F4/80high CD11bhigh CD11clow Ly6Clow. By comparing gene expression in GM-IMs and BM dendritic cells, we found that GM-IMs expressed lower levels of chemokines, cytokines and their receptors. GM-IMs are round in shape, attach loosely to non-coated culture dishes and have a marked phagocytic capacity. These results indicate that GM-IMs are macrophage precursor cells. Following stimulation with LPS, monocyte-like GM-IMs converted to flat macrophage-like cells that tightly adhered to non-coated culture dishes and produced pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-6 and IL-1β. These results indicated that GM-IMs differentiated to M1 pro-inflammatory macrophages. This was confirmed by stimulation of GM-IMs with IFNγ, an inducer of M1 markers. GM-IMs showed enhanced expression of M2 macrophage markers such as Arg1 and Retnla following stimulation by Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13. When GM-IMs were injected into mice at sites of wounding, wound repair was enhanced. These results indicate that GM-IMs can differentiate to M2 macrophages. When GM-IMs were injected into clodronate-treated mice, they induced resident macrophage proliferation by producing M-CSF. In conclusion we have established self-renewable GM-CSF-dependent immature macrophages in vitro from murine BM, which differentiate to M1 or M2 macrophages. PMID:24124601

  2. GM-CSF Inhibits c-Kit and SCF Expression by Bone Marrow-Derived Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroeta Seijas, Amairelys Belen; Simonetti, Sonia; Vitale, Sara; Runci, Daniele; Quinci, Angela Caterina; Soriani, Alessandra; Criscuoli, Mattia; Filippi, Irene; Naldini, Antonella; Sacchetti, Federico Maria; Tarantino, Umberto; Oliva, Francesco; Piccirilli, Eleonora; Santoni, Angela; Di Rosa, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF), the ligand of c-kit, is a key cytokine for hematopoiesis. Hematopoietic precursors express c-kit, whereas differentiated cells of hematopoietic lineage are negative for this receptor, with the exception of NK cells, mast cells, and a few others. While it has long been recognized that dendritic cells (DCs) can express c-kit, several questions remain concerning the SCF/c-kit axis in DCs. This is particularly relevant for DCs found in those organs wherein SCF is highly expressed, including the bone marrow (BM). We characterized c-kit expression by conventional DCs (cDCs) from BM and demonstrated a higher proportion of c-kit+ cells among type 1 cDC subsets (cDC1s) than type 2 cDC subsets (cDC2s) in both humans and mice, whereas similar levels of c-kit expression were observed in cDC1s and cDC2s from mouse spleen. To further study c-kit regulation, DCs were generated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from mouse BM, a widely used protocol. CD11c+ cells were purified from pooled non-adherent and slightly adherent cells collected after 7 days of culture, thus obtaining highly purified BM-derived DCs (BMdDCs). BMdDCs contained a small fraction of c-kit+ cells, and by replating them for 2 days with GM-CSF, we obtained a homogeneous population of c-kit+ CD40hi MHCIIhi cells. Not only did BMdDCs express c-kit but they also produced SCF, and both were striking upregulated if GM-CSF was omitted after replating. Furthermore, a small but significant reduction in BMdDC survival was observed upon SCF silencing. Incubation of BMdDCs with SCF did not modulate antigen presentation ability of these cells, nor it did regulate their membrane expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4. We conclude that the SCF/c-kit-mediated prosurvival circuit may have been overlooked because of the prominent use of GM-CSF in DC cultures in vitro, including those human DC cultures destined for the clinics. We speculate that DCs more prominently rely

  3. GM-CSF and IL-3 Modulate Human Monocyte TNF-α Production and Renewal in In Vitro Models of Trained Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, Francesco; Iannone, Raffaella; Di Somma, Sarah; Loffredo, Stefania; Scamardella, Eloise; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Varricchi, Gilda; Granata, Francescopaolo; Portella, Giuseppe; Marone, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    GM-CSF and IL-3 are hematopoietic cytokines that also modulate the effector functions of several immune cell subsets. In particular, GM-CSF and IL-3 exert a significant control on monocyte and macrophage effector functions, as assessed in experimental models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and also in human studies. Here, we sought to investigate the mechanisms and the extent to which GM-CSF and IL-3 modulate the pro-inflammatory, LPS-mediated, activation of human CD14+ monocytes taking into account the new concept of trained immunity (i.e., the priming stimulus modulates the response to subsequent stimuli mainly by inducing chromatin remodeling and increased transcription at relevant genetic loci). We demonstrate that GM-CSF and IL-3 priming enhances TNF-α production upon subsequent LPS stimulation (short-term model of trained immunity) in a p38- and SIRT2-dependent manner without increasing TNF primary transcript levels (a more direct measure of transcription), thus supporting a posttranscriptional regulation of TNF-α in primed monocytes. GM-CSF and IL-3 priming followed by 6 days of resting also results in increased TNF-α production upon LPS stimulation (long-term model of trained immunity). In this case, however, GM-CSF and IL-3 priming induces a c-Myc-dependent monocyte renewal and increase in cell number that is in turn responsible for heightened TNF-α production. Overall, our results provide insights to understand the biology of monocytes in health and disease conditions in which the hematopoietic cytokines GM-CSF and IL-3 play a role and also extend our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of trained immunity. PMID:28138327

  4. GM-CSF Induces Cyclin D1 Expression and Proliferation of Endothelial Progenitor Cells via PI3K and MAPK Signaling

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    Chaolin Qiu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, which can be isolated from the bone marrow or the peripheral blood, have generated interest because of their capacity to migrate to sites of vascularization and endothelialization and differentiate into endothelial cells in a process termed neovasculogenesis. EPCs are therefore possible regenerative tools for the treatment of vascular diseases and potential targets for the inhibition of angiogenesis during tumor development. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF on the acceleration of EPC proliferation and colony formation. Methods: EPCs were isolated, identified and cultured in the presence of GM-CSF. The effect of GM-CSF on endothelial cell colony formation and proliferation was examine by colony formation assay and MTT assay, separately. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. The expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E were detected by western bloting. JAK/Stat, PI3K/Akt and MAPK signaling were analyzed. Results: GM-CSF accelerated the G1/S phase transition in EPCs by upregulating the expression of cyclins D1 and E. The GM-CSF induced increase in the levels of cyclin D1 and the subsequent phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (Rb protein activated E2F-1, resulting in the upregulation of the transcription of cyclin E. Furthermore, the induction of cyclin D1 expression and cell cycle progression by GM-CSF was mediated by the PI3K/Akt, JNK and ERK signaling pathways through the phosphorylation of GSK3β or the activation of AP-1 transcription factors. Conclusion: Our findings shed light on the mechanisms underlying the effect of GM-CSF on the modulation of cell cycle progression in EPCs, which is important considering their role in vascular repair and their therapeutic potential in several diseases.

  5. GM-CSF and IL-3 Modulate Human Monocyte TNF-α Production and Renewal in In Vitro Models of Trained Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, Francesco; Iannone, Raffaella; Di Somma, Sarah; Loffredo, Stefania; Scamardella, Eloise; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Varricchi, Gilda; Granata, Francescopaolo; Portella, Giuseppe; Marone, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    GM-CSF and IL-3 are hematopoietic cytokines that also modulate the effector functions of several immune cell subsets. In particular, GM-CSF and IL-3 exert a significant control on monocyte and macrophage effector functions, as assessed in experimental models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and also in human studies. Here, we sought to investigate the mechanisms and the extent to which GM-CSF and IL-3 modulate the pro-inflammatory, LPS-mediated, activation of human CD14+ monocytes taking into account the new concept of trained immunity (i.e., the priming stimulus modulates the response to subsequent stimuli mainly by inducing chromatin remodeling and increased transcription at relevant genetic loci). We demonstrate that GM-CSF and IL-3 priming enhances TNF-α production upon subsequent LPS stimulation (short-term model of trained immunity) in a p38- and SIRT2-dependent manner without increasing TNF primary transcript levels (a more direct measure of transcription), thus supporting a posttranscriptional regulation of TNF-α in primed monocytes. GM-CSF and IL-3 priming followed by 6 days of resting also results in increased TNF-α production upon LPS stimulation (long-term model of trained immunity). In this case, however, GM-CSF and IL-3 priming induces a c-Myc-dependent monocyte renewal and increase in cell number that is in turn responsible for heightened TNF-α production. Overall, our results provide insights to understand the biology of monocytes in health and disease conditions in which the hematopoietic cytokines GM-CSF and IL-3 play a role and also extend our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of trained immunity.

  6. GM-CSF overexpression after influenza a virus infection prevents mortality and moderates M1-like airway monocyte/macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, E Scott; Umstead, Todd M; Davies, Michael L; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Silveyra, Patricia; Howyrlak, Judie; Yang, Linlin; Guo, Weichao; Hu, Sanmei; Hewage, Eranda Kurundu; Chroneos, Zissis C

    2018-01-05

    Influenza A viruses cause life-threatening pneumonia and lung injury in the lower respiratory tract. Application of high GM-CSF levels prior to infection has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality from pathogenic influenza infection in mice, but the mechanisms of protection and treatment efficacy have not been established. Mice were infected intranasally with influenza A virus (PR8 strain). Supra-physiologic levels of GM-CSF were induced in the airways using the double transgenic GM-CSF (DTGM) or littermate control mice starting on 3 days post-infection (dpi). Assessment of respiratory mechanical parameters was performed using the flexiVent rodent ventilator. RNA sequence analysis was performed on FACS-sorted airway macrophage subsets at 8 dpi. Supra-physiologic levels of GM-CSF conferred a survival benefit, arrested the deterioration of lung mechanics, and reduced the abundance of protein exudates in bronchoalveolar (BAL) fluid to near baseline levels. Transcriptome analysis, and subsequent validation ELISA assays, revealed that excess GM-CSF re-directs macrophages from an "M1-like" to a more "M2-like" activation state as revealed by alterations in the ratios of CXCL9 and CCL17 in BAL fluid, respectively. Ingenuity pathway analysis predicted that GM-CSF surplus during IAV infection elicits expression of anti-inflammatory mediators and moderates M1 macrophage pro-inflammatory signaling by Type II interferon (IFN-γ). Our data indicate that application of high levels of GM-CSF in the lung after influenza A virus infection alters pathogenic "M1-like" macrophage inflammation. These results indicate a possible therapeutic strategy for respiratory virus-associated pneumonia and acute lung injury.

  7. Synovial CD4+ T-cell-derived GM-CSF supports the differentiation of an inflammatory dendritic cell population in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, G; Gibbon, J R; Pratt, A G; Wood, M J; Coady, D; Raftery, G; Lorenzi, A R; Gray, A; Filer, A; Buckley, C D; Haniffa, M A; Isaacs, J D; Hilkens, C M U

    2016-01-01

    Objective A population of synovial inflammatory dendritic cells (infDCs) has recently been identified in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is thought to be monocyte-derived. Here, we investigated the role and source of granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the differentiation of synovial infDC in RA. Methods Production of GM-CSF by peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) CD4+ T cells was assessed by ELISA and flow cytometry. In vitro CD4+ T-cell polarisation experiments were performed with T-cell activating CD2/CD3/CD28-coated beads in the absence or presence of pro-Th1 or pro-Th17 cytokines. CD1c+ DC and CD16+ macrophage subsets were flow-sorted and analysed morphologically and functionally (T-cell stimulatory/polarising capacity). Results RA-SF CD4+ T cells produced abundant GM-CSF upon stimulation and significantly more than RA-SF mononuclear cells depleted of CD4+ T cells. GM-CSF-producing T cells were significantly increased in RA-SF compared with non-RA inflammatory arthritis SF, active RA PB and healthy donor PB. GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells were expanded by Th1-promoting but not Th17-promoting conditions. Following coculture with RA-SF CD4+ T cells, but not healthy donor PB CD4+ T cells, a subpopulation of monocytes differentiated into CD1c+ infDC; a process dependent on GM-CSF. These infDC displayed potent alloproliferative capacity and enhanced GM-CSF, interleukin-17 and interferon-γ production by CD4+ T cells. InfDC with an identical phenotype to in vitro generated cells were significantly enriched in RA-SF compared with non-RA-SF/tissue/PB. Conclusions We demonstrate a therapeutically tractable feedback loop of GM-CSF secreted by RA synovial CD4+ T cells promoting the differentiation of infDC with potent capacity to induce GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells. PMID:25923217

  8. In vivo kinetics of sup 111 Indium-labelled autologous granulocytes following i. v. administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)

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    Hovgaard, D.; Mortensen, B.T.; Nissen, N.I. (Department of Hematology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Schifter, S.; Raboel, A. (Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    1992-01-01

    Administration of both glycosylated and non-glycosylated recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) induces an immediate transient granulocytopenia of 1-3 hours' duration. In order to explore this phenomenon, granulocytes were labelled with {sup 111}Indium and the effect on the kinetics of granulocytes after administration of rhGM-CSF was studied in 10 previously untreated patients with malignant lymphoma. For both types and doses of rhGM-CSF, a significant and dramatic accumulation of the {sup 111}Indium-labelled granulocytes was observed in the lung within a few minutes after i.v. injection of rhGM-CSF. The accumulation of radioactivity coincided with the pronounced and transient granulocytopenia in peripheral blood. The {sup 111}Indium-labelled granulocytes later reappeared in the peripheral blood, indicating reversible pulmonary vascular margination of the granulocytes. Half-life of labelled granulocytes after reappearance was comparable to half-life values under normal conditions. The transient accumulation of granulocytes in the pulmonary vessels seems not to be of clinical importance in the management of patients, but it may to some degree explain previously described side-effects, such as transient hypoxemia (''first-dose'' reaction) following administration of rhGM-CSF. (au).

  9. Immune-enhancing effect of nano-DNA vaccine encoding a gene of the prME protein of Japanese encephalitis virus and BALB/c mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yongzhen; Zhou, Yan; Li, Ximei; Feng, Guohe

    2015-07-01

    Plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM‑CSF) is an adjuvant for genetic vaccines; however, how GM-CSF enhances immunogenicity remains to be elucidated. In the present study, it was demonstrated that injection of a plasmid encoding the premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) protein of Japanese encephalitis virus and mouse GM-CSF (pJME/GM-CSF) into mouse muscle recruited large and multifocal conglomerates of macrophages and granulocytes, predominantly neutrophils. During the peak of the infiltration, an appreciable number of immature dendritic cells (DCs) appeared, although no T and B-cells was detected. pJME/GM-CSF increased the number of splenic DCs and the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) on splenic DC, and enhanced the antigenic capture, processing and presentation functions of splenic DCs, and the cell-mediated immunity induced by the vaccine. These findings suggested that the immune-enhancing effect by pJME/GM-CSF was associated with infiltrate size and the appearance of integrin αx (CD11c)+cells. Chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles, prepared by coacervation via intramuscular injection, outperformed standard pJME/GM-CSF administrations in DC recruitment, antigen processing and presentation, and vaccine enhancement. This revealed that muscular injection of chitosan‑pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles may enhance the immunoadjuvant properties of GM-CSF.

  10. Fed-batch fermentation of GM-CSF-producing glycoengineered Pichia pastoris under controlled specific growth rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haustraete Jurgen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yeast expression systems with altered N-glycosylation are now available to produce glycoproteins with homogenous, defined N-glycans. However, data on the behaviour of these strains in high cell density cultivation are scarce. Results Here, we report on cultivations under controlled specific growth rate of a GlycoSwitch-Man5 Pichia pastoris strain producing Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF at high levels (hundreds of milligrams per liter. We demonstrate that homogenous Man5GlcNAc2 N-glycosylation of the secreted proteins is achieved at all specific growth rates tested. Conclusions Together, these data illustrate that the GlycoSwitch-Man5 P. pastoris is a robust production strain for homogenously N-glycosylated proteins.

  11. Immunotherapy with concurrent subcutaneous GM-CSF, low-dose IL-2 and IFN-alpha in patients with progressive metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verra, N.; Jansen, R.; Groenewegen, G.; Mallo, H.; Kersten, M. J.; Bex, A.; Vyth-Dreese, F. A.; Sein, J.; van de Kasteele, W.; Nooijen, W. J.; de Waal, M.; Horenblas, S.; de Gast, G. C.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine toxicity, efficacy and immunologic effects of concurrent subcutaneous injections of low-dose interleukin-2 (LD-IL-2), granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interferon-alpha 2b (IFNalpha) in progressive metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

  12. Temozolomide followed by combined immunotherapy with GM-CSF, low-dose IL2 and IFN alpha in patients with metastatic melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gast, G. C.; Batchelor, D.; Kersten, M. J.; Vyth-Dreese, F. A.; Sein, J.; van de Kasteele, W. F.; Nooijen, W. J.; Nieweg, O. E.; de Waal, M. A.; Boogerd, W.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the toxicity and efficacy of temozolomide (TMZ) p.o. followed by subcutaneous (s.c.) low-dose interleukin-2 (IL2), granulocyte-monocyte colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interferon-alpha 2b (IFN alpha) in patients with metastatic melanoma. A total of 74

  13. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is released by female mouse bladder urothelial cells and expressed by the urothelium as an early response to lipopolysaccharides (LPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Lu, Ming; Alvarez-Lugo, Lery; Chen, Gang; Chai, Toby C

    2017-04-01

    We studied in vitro and in vivo response of primary mouse bladder urothelial cells (mBUC) and bladder urothelium to lipopolysaccharides (LPS), focusing on granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) signaling. Female C57BL/6 mBUC were exposed for 12 hr to differing concentrations of LPS (100 ng/ml to 10 µg/ml). mBUC were also exposed to a single dose of LPS (1 µg/ml) for 3, 6, 12 hr. Neutralizing GM-CSF antibody (0.1 μg/ml) was used block GM-CSF activity in vitro. In vivo experiments were performed, whereby, LPS (1 mg/ml) was instilled intravesically and left to dwell for 30 min followed by harvest of bladder urothelium 3 to 18 hr later. ELISA measured GM-CSF. qPCR quantitated mRNA for GM-CSF, vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). RT-PCR was used to detect mRNA for GM-CSF, GM-CSFRα, and β in bladder tissues. Immunohistofluorescence and Western blots for GM-CSFRα were performed on bladder tissues. LPS induced a dose-dependent release of GM-CSF by mBUC. Mouse bladder urothelium did not express GM-CSF mRNA at baseline, but expressed GM-CSF mRNA 3 hr after in vivo LPS exposure, with GM-CSF mRNA expression disappearing 18 hr later. GM-CSFRα expression was confirmed in bladder urothelium. GM-CSF neutralizing antibody significantly diminished LPS-induced increases of VEGF and COX-2 mRNA expression. Urothelium and mBUC secreted GM-CSF as an early response to LPS. GM-CSF mediated downstream expression of VEGF and COX-2. Urothelial GM-CSF may function as a signaling mediator for both inflammation and pain transduction. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:1020-1025, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Local Delivery of OncoVEX(mGM-CSF) Generates Systemic Antitumor Immune Responses Enhanced by Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte-Associated Protein Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moesta, Achim K; Cooke, Keegan; Piasecki, Julia; Mitchell, Petia; Rottman, James B; Fitzgerald, Karen; Zhan, Jinghui; Yang, Becky; Le, Tiep; Belmontes, Brian; Ikotun, Oluwatayo F; Merriam, Kim; Glaus, Charles; Ganley, Kenneth; Cordover, David H; Boden, Andrea M; Ponce, Rafael; Beers, Courtney; Beltran, Pedro J

    2017-10-15

    Purpose: Talimogene laherparepvec, a new oncolytic immunotherapy, has been recently approved for the treatment of melanoma. Using a murine version of the virus, we characterized local and systemic antitumor immune responses driving efficacy in murine syngeneic models.Experimental Design: The activity of talimogene laherparepvec was characterized against melanoma cell lines using an in vitro viability assay. Efficacy of OncoVEX(mGM-CSF) (talimogene laherparepvec with the mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor transgene) alone or in combination with checkpoint blockade was characterized in A20 and CT-26 contralateral murine tumor models. CD8(+) depletion, adoptive T-cell transfers, and Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot assays were used to study the mechanism of action (MOA) of systemic immune responses.Results: Treatment with OncoVEX(mGM-CSF) cured all injected A20 tumors and half of contralateral tumors. Viral presence was limited to injected tumors and was not responsible for systemic efficacy. A significant increase in T cells (CD3(+)/CD8(+)) was observed in injected and contralateral tumors at 168 hours. Ex vivo analyses showed these cytotoxic T lymphocytes were tumor-specific. Increased neutrophils, monocytes, and chemokines were observed in injected tumors only. Importantly, depletion of CD8(+) T cells abolished all systemic efficacy and significantly decreased local efficacy. In addition, immune cell transfer from OncoVEX(mGM-CSF)-cured mice significantly protected from tumor challenge. Finally, combination of OncoVEX(mGM-CSF) and checkpoint blockade resulted in increased tumor-specific CD8(+) anti-AH1 T cells and systemic efficacy.Conclusions: The data support a dual MOA for OncoVEX(mGM-CSF) that involves direct oncolysis of injected tumors and activation of a CD8(+)-dependent systemic response that clears injected and contralateral tumors when combined with checkpoint inhibition. Clin Cancer Res; 23(20); 6190-202. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American

  15. GM-CSF and MEF-conditioned media support feeder-free reprogramming of mouse granulocytes to iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firas, Jaber; Liu, Xiaodong; Nefzger, Christian M; Polo, Jose M

    2014-06-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are characterised by their ability to differentiate into any cell type of the body. Accordingly, iPSCs possess immense potential for disease modelling, pharmaceutical screening and autologous cell therapies. The most common source of iPSCs derivation is skin fibroblasts. However, from a clinical point of view, skin fibroblasts may not be ideal, as invasive procedures such as skin biopsies are required for their extraction. Moreover, fibroblasts are highly heterogeneous with a poorly defined developmental pathway, which makes studying reprogramming mechanistics difficult. Granulocytes, on the other hand, are easily obtainable, their developmental pathway has been extensively studied and fluorescence activated cell sorting allows for the isolation of these cells at high purity; thus iPSCs derivation from granulocytes could provide an alternative to fibroblast-derived iPSCs. Previous studies succeeded in producing iPSC colonies from mouse granulocytes but with the use of a mitotically inactivated feeder layer, restricting their use for studying reprogramming mechanistics. As granulocytes display poor survival under culture conditions, we investigated the influence of haematopoietic cytokines to stabilise this cell type in vitro and allow for reprogramming in the absence of a feeder layer. Our results show that treatment with MEF-conditioned media and/or initial exposure to GM-CSF allows for reprogramming of granulocytes under feeder-free conditions. This work can serve as a basis for future work aimed at dissecting the reprogramming mechanism as well as obtaining large numbers of iPSCs from a clinically relevant cell source. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. IL-2 and GM-CSF are regulated by DNA demethylation during activation of T cells, B cells and macrophages

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    Li, Yan [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Department of Genome Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia); Ohms, Stephen J. [ACRF Biomolecular Resource Facility, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia); Shannon, Frances M. [Department of Genome Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia); The University of Canberra, ACT 2602 (Australia); Sun, Chao, E-mail: sunchao2775@163.com [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Fan, Jun Y., E-mail: jun.fan@anu.edu.au [Department of Genome Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA methylation is dynamic and flexible and changes rapidly upon cell activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA methylation controls the inducible gene expression in a given cell type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some enzymes are involved in maintaining the methylation profile of immune cells. -- Abstract: DNA demethylation has been found to occur at the promoters of a number of actively expressed cytokines and is believed to play a critical role in transcriptional regulation. While many DNA demethylation studies have focused on T cell activation, proliferation and differentiation, changes in DNA methylation in other types of immune cells are less well studied. We found that the expression of two cytokines (IL-2 and GM-CSF) responded differently to activation in three types of immune cells: EL4, A20 and RAW264.7 cells. Using the McrBC and MeDIP approaches, we observed decreases in DNA methylation at a genome-wide level and at the promoters of the genes of these cytokines. The expression of several potential enzymes/co-enzymes involved in the DNA demethylation pathways seemed to be associated with immune cell activation.

  17. GM-CSF Monocyte-Derived Cells and Langerhans Cells As Part of the Dendritic Cell Family

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    Manfred B. Lutz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs and macrophages (Mph share many characteristics as components of the innate immune system. The criteria to classify the multitude of subsets within the mononuclear phagocyte system are currently phenotype, ontogeny, transcription patterns, epigenetic adaptations, and function. More recently, ontogenetic, transcriptional, and proteomic research approaches uncovered major developmental differences between Flt3L-dependent conventional DCs as compared with Mphs and monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs, the latter mainly generated in vitro from murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BM-DCs or human CD14+ peripheral blood monocytes. Conversely, in vitro GM-CSF-dependent monocyte-derived Mphs largely resemble MoDCs whereas tissue-resident Mphs show a common embryonic origin from yolk sac and fetal liver with Langerhans cells (LCs. The novel ontogenetic findings opened discussions on the terminology of DCs versus Mphs. Here, we bring forward arguments to facilitate definitions of BM-DCs, MoDCs, and LCs. We propose a group model of terminology for all DC subsets that attempts to encompass both ontogeny and function.

  18. Single Institution Experience of Ipilimumab 3 mg/kg with Sargramostim (GM-CSF) in Metastatic Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Jason J; Donahue, Hilary; Nishino, Mizuki; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Davis, Meredith; Bailey, Nancy; Ott, Patrick A; Hodi, F Stephen

    2015-09-01

    Ipilimumab, 10 mg/kg with sargramostim (GM-CSF; GM), improved overall survival (OS) and safety of patients with advanced melanoma over ipilimumab in a randomized phase II trial. The FDA-approved dose of ipilimumab of 3 mg/kg has not been assessed with GM (IPI-GM). Consecutive patients treated with IPI-GM at a single institution were reviewed. Treatment included ipilimumab every 3 weeks × 4 and GM, 250-μg s.c. injection days 1 to 14 of each ipilimumab cycle. Efficacy, clinical characteristics, toxicities, and blinded radiology review of tumor burden were evaluated. Thirty-two patients were identified with 25 (78%) having immune-related response criteria (irRC) measurable disease and 41% with central nervous system metastases. A total of 88.6% of GM doses were administered. Response rate by irRC and disease control rate at 12 weeks were 20% and 44%, respectively (median follow-up 37 weeks). Immune-related adverse events (irAE) were observed in 10 (31.3%) patients, with 3 (9.4%) grade 3 events. Patients with grade 3 irAEs had prior autoimmunity, advanced age, and poor performance status. The median OS from first dose of ipilimumab was 41 weeks. Ipi-GM treatment is feasible and in this poor-risk advanced melanoma population, efficacy appeared similar but safety appeared improved relative to historical ipilimumab alone. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Up-regulation of cluster of differentiation (CD) 11b expression on the surface of canine granulocytes with human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagaki, Kazuhide; Nunomura, Yuka; Uchida, Kanji; Nakata, Koh; Tazawa, Ryushi

    2014-08-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine, sharing a common beta subunit (CDw131) with interleukins 3 and 5. GM-CSF is important for its direct and indirect involvement in host defense. In veterinary medicine, human (h) GM-CSF has been used as a substitute for canine GM-CSF to stimulate canine granulocytes and macrophages. In this study, we compared the effects of three distinct hGM-CSFs produced by bacteria, yeasts and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with those of Escherichia (E) coli-produced canine GM-CSF on the cluster of differentiation 11b (CD11b) expression in canine granulocytes. The median effective dose (ED50) of hGM-CSFs from bacteria, yeasts and CHO cells was 3.09, 4.09 and 4.27 ng/ml, respectively, with no significant difference among three. In contrast, a significant difference was observed between ED50 of canine GM-CSF (0.56 ng/ml) and three hGM-CSFs according to the paired t-test (Pgranulocytes, but the average activity of the three rhGM-CSFs was approximately 15% of that of canine GM-CSF.

  20. Biological role of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) on cells of the myeloid lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushach, Irina; Zlotnik, Albert

    2016-09-01

    M-CSF and GM-CSF are 2 important cytokines that regulate macrophage numbers and function. Here, we review their known effects on cells of the macrophage-monocyte lineage. Important clues to their function come from their expression patterns. M-CSF exhibits a mostly homeostatic expression pattern, whereas GM-CSF is a product of cells activated during inflammatory or pathologic conditions. Accordingly, M-CSF regulates the numbers of various tissue macrophage and monocyte populations without altering their "activation" status. Conversely, GM-CSF induces activation of monocytes/macrophages and also mediates differentiation to other states that participate in immune responses [i.e., dendritic cells (DCs)]. Further insights into their function have come from analyses of mice deficient in either cytokine. M-CSF signals through its receptor (CSF-1R). Interestingly, mice deficient in CSF-1R expression exhibit a more significant phenotype than mice deficient in M-CSF. This observation was explained by the discovery of a novel cytokine (IL-34) that represents a second ligand of CSF-1R. Information about the function of these ligands/receptor system is still developing, but its complexity is intriguing and strongly suggests that more interesting biology remains to be elucidated. Based on our current knowledge, several therapeutic molecules targeting either the M-CSF or the GM-CSF pathways have been developed and are currently being tested in clinical trials targeting either autoimmune diseases or cancer. It is intriguing to consider how evolution has directed these pathways to develop; their complexity likely mirrors the multiple functions in which cells of the monocyte/macrophage system are involved. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  1. Molecular Analysis of a Short-term Model of β-Glucans-Trained Immunity Highlights the Accessory Contribution of GM-CSF in Priming Mouse Macrophages Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walachowski, Sarah; Tabouret, Guillaume; Fabre, Marion; Foucras, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    β-Glucans (BGs) are glucose polymers present in the fungal cell wall (CW) and, as such, are recognized by innate immune cells as microbial-associated pattern through Dectin-1 receptor. Recent studies have highlighted the ability of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans or its CW-derived β(1,3) (1,6)-glucans to increase human monocytes cytokine secretion upon secondary stimulation, a phenomenon now referred as immune training. This ability of monocytes programming confers BGs an undeniable immunotherapeutic potential. Our objective was to determine whether BGs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a non-pathogenic yeast, are endowed with such a property. For this purpose, we have developed a short-term training model based on lipopolysaccharide re-stimulation of mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages primed with S. cerevisiae BGs. Through a transcriptome analysis, we demonstrated that BGs induced a specific gene expression signature involving the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway as in human monocytes. Moreover, we showed that over-expression of Csf2 (that encodes for GM-CSF) was a Dectin-1-dependent feature of BG-induced priming of macrophages. Further experiments confirmed that GM-CSF up-regulated Dectin-1 cell surface expression and amplified macrophages response along BG-mediated training. However, the blockade of GM-CSFR demonstrated that GM-CSF was not primarily required for BG-induced training of macrophages although it can substantially improve it. In addition, we found that mouse macrophages trained with BGs upregulated their expression of the four and a half LIM-only protein 2 (Fhl2) in a Dectin-1-dependent manner. Consistently, we observed that intracellular levels of FHL2 increased after stimulation of macrophages with BGs. In conclusion, our experiments provide new insights on GM-CSF contribution to the training of cells from the monocytic lineage and highlights FHL2 as a possible regulator of BG-associated signaling.

  2. Molecular Analysis of a Short-term Model of β-Glucans-Trained Immunity Highlights the Accessory Contribution of GM-CSF in Priming Mouse Macrophages Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Walachowski

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available β-Glucans (BGs are glucose polymers present in the fungal cell wall (CW and, as such, are recognized by innate immune cells as microbial-associated pattern through Dectin-1 receptor. Recent studies have highlighted the ability of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans or its CW-derived β(1,3 (1,6-glucans to increase human monocytes cytokine secretion upon secondary stimulation, a phenomenon now referred as immune training. This ability of monocytes programming confers BGs an undeniable immunotherapeutic potential. Our objective was to determine whether BGs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a non-pathogenic yeast, are endowed with such a property. For this purpose, we have developed a short-term training model based on lipopolysaccharide re-stimulation of mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages primed with S. cerevisiae BGs. Through a transcriptome analysis, we demonstrated that BGs induced a specific gene expression signature involving the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway as in human monocytes. Moreover, we showed that over-expression of Csf2 (that encodes for GM-CSF was a Dectin-1-dependent feature of BG-induced priming of macrophages. Further experiments confirmed that GM-CSF up-regulated Dectin-1 cell surface expression and amplified macrophages response along BG-mediated training. However, the blockade of GM-CSFR demonstrated that GM-CSF was not primarily required for BG-induced training of macrophages although it can substantially improve it. In addition, we found that mouse macrophages trained with BGs upregulated their expression of the four and a half LIM-only protein 2 (Fhl2 in a Dectin-1-dependent manner. Consistently, we observed that intracellular levels of FHL2 increased after stimulation of macrophages with BGs. In conclusion, our experiments provide new insights on GM-CSF contribution to the training of cells from the monocytic lineage and highlights FHL2 as a possible regulator of BG-associated signaling.

  3. Research on influence of interferon on immune stress and HMGB1, MIF, GM-CSF in patients with condyloma acuminatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Chun Yan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the influence of interferon on immune stress and HMGB1, MIF, GMCSF in patients with condyloma acuminatum. Methods: A total of 240 cases of patients with condyloma acuminatum were randomly divided into two groups, control group and observation group, each group of 120 cases. The CO2 laser was used for the removal of warts in all patients, while patients in the observation group were combined with interferon. Then the differences of curative effect and the recurrence of patients between the two groups were compared, and the change of T-lymphocyte subsets and serum inflammatory cytokines, HMGB1, MIF, GMCSF in the two groups were compared before and after treatment. Results: The cure rate of observation group was 88.33%, significantly higher than that of control group by 65%. The recurrence rate of the observation group was 10.83% which was significantly lower than that of the control group by 30.83%. Three, six months after treatment, the CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ of patients in observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group, and CD8+ was significantly lower than that in the control group; the serum levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ were notably higher than those of control group, while the IL-4, IL-10 levels of patients were lower than those in control group; the serum levels of HMGB1, MIF, GM-CSF were lower than control group too. The difference between groups was statistically significant. Conclusion: Interferon can regulate T-lymphocyte subsets, inhibit inflammatory reaction and change the immune stress state, thereby profitably improving the cure rate and reduce the recurrence rate of CA patients.

  4. Randomized phase 1b trial of MOR103, a human antibody to GM-CSF, in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Cris S; Asher, Aliya; Fryze, Waldemar; Kozubski, Wojciech; Wagner, Frank; Aram, Jehan; Tanasescu, Radu; Korolkiewicz, Roman P; Dirnberger-Hertweck, Maren; Steidl, Stefan; Libretto, Susan E; Sprenger, Till; Radue, Ernst W

    2015-08-01

    To determine the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and immunogenicity of the recombinant human monoclonal antibody MOR103 to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) with clinical or MRI activity. In this 20-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 1b dose-escalation trial (registration number NCT01517282), adults with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) or secondary progressive MS (SPMS) received an IV infusion of placebo (n = 6) or MOR103 0.5 (n = 8), 1.0 (n = 8), or 2.0 (n = 9) mg/kg every 2 weeks for 10 weeks. Patients had to have ≤10 gadolinium (Gd)-enhancing brain lesions on T1-weighted MRI at baseline. The primary objective was safety. Most treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were mild to moderate in severity. The most frequent was nasopharyngitis. Between-group differences in TEAE numbers were small. There were no TEAE-related trial discontinuations, infusion-related reactions, or deaths. Nine patients experienced MS exacerbations: 3, 5, 1, and 0 patient(s) in the placebo, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/kg groups, respectively. A few T1 Gd-enhancing lesions and/or new or enlarging T2 lesions indicative of inflammation were observed in all treatment groups. No clinically significant changes were observed in other clinical assessments or laboratory safety assessments. No anti-MOR103 antibodies were detected. PK evaluations indicated dose linearity with low/no drug accumulation over time. MOR103 was generally well-tolerated in patients with RRMS or SPMS. No evidence of immunogenicity was found. This phase 1b study provides Class I evidence that MOR103 has acceptable tolerability in patients with MS.

  5. Persistent STAT5 phosphorylation and epigenetic dysregulation of GM-CSF and PGS2/COX2 expression in Type 1 diabetic human monocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Garrigan

    Full Text Available STAT5 proteins are adaptor proteins for histone acetylation enzymes. Histone acetylation at promoter and enhancer chromosomal regions opens the chromatin and allows access of transcription enzymes to specific genes in rapid response cell signals, such as in inflammation. Histone acetylation-mediated gene regulation is involved in expression of 2 key inflammatory response genes: CSF2, encoding granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and PTGS2, encoding prostaglandin synthase 2/cyclooxygenase 2 (PGS2/COX2. Prolonged CSF2 expression, high GM-CSF production, and GM-CSF activation of PTGS2 gene expression all are seen in type 1 diabetes (T1D monocytes. Persistent phosphorylation activation of monocyte STAT5 (STAT5Ptyr is also found in individuals with or at-risk for T1D. To examine whether elevated T1D monocyte STAT5Ptyr may be associated with aberrant inflammatory gene expression in T1D, blood monocytes from non-autoimmune controls and T1D patients were analyzed by flow cytometry for STAT5Ptyr activation, and by chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP analyses for STAT5Ptyr's ability to bind at CSF2 and PTGS2 regulatory sites in association with histone acetylation. In unstimulated monocytes, STAT5Ptyr was elevated in 59.65% of T1D, but only 2.44% of control subjects (p<0.0001. Increased STAT5Ptyr correlated with T1D disease duration (p = 0.0030, r(2 = 0.0784. Unstimulated (p = 0.140 and GM-CSF-stimulated (p = 0.0485 T1D monocytes, had greater STAT5Ptyr binding to epigenetic regulatory sites upstream of CSF2 than control monocytes. Increased STAT5Ptyr binding in T1D monocytes was concurrent with binding at these sites of STAT6Ptyr (p = 0.0283, CBP/P300 histone acetylase, acetylated histones H3, SMRT/NCoR histone deacetylase (p = 0.0040, and RNA Polymerase II (p = 0.0040. Our study indicates that in T1D monocytes, STAT5Ptyr activation is significantly higher and that STAT5Ptyr is found bound to CSF2 promoter and PTGS2 enhancer regions

  6. Electronegative L5-LDL induces the production of G-CSF and GM-CSF in human macrophages through LOX-1 involving NF-κB and ERK2 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tzu-Ching; Chang, Po-Yuan; Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Lu, Shao-Chun

    2017-12-01

    Circulating levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are associated with the severity of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, what causes increases in G-CSF and GM-CSF is unclear. In this study, we investigated whether L5-low-density lipoprotein (LDL), a mildly oxidized LDL from AMI, can induce G-CSF and GM-CSF production in human macrophages. L1-LDL and L5-LDL were isolated through anion-exchange chromatography from AMI plasma. Human macrophages derived from THP-1 and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with L1-LDL, L5-LDL, or copper-oxidized LDL (Cu-oxLDL) and G-CSF and GM-CSF protein levels in the medium were determined. In addition, the effects of L5-LDL on G-CSF and GM-CSF production were tested in lectin-type oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), CD36, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1, and ERK2 knockdown THP-1 macrophages. L5-LDL but not L1-LDL or Cu-oxLDL significantly induced production of G-CSF and GM-CSF in macrophages. In vitro oxidation of L1-LDL and L5-LDL altered their ability to induce G-CSF and GM-CSF, suggesting that the degree of oxidation is critical for the effects. Knockdown and antibody neutralization experiments suggested that the effects were caused by LOX-1. In addition, nuclear factor (NF)-κB and ERK1/2 inhibition resulted in marked reductions of L5-LDL-induced G-CSF and GM-CSF production. Moreover, knockdown of ERK2, but not ERK1, hindered L5-LDL-induced G-CSF and GM-CSF production. The results indicate that L5-LDL, a naturally occurring mild oxidized LDL, induced G-CSF and GM-CSF production in human macrophages through LOX-1, ERK2, and NF-κB dependent pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Autocrine GM-CSF transcription in the leukemic progenitor cell line KG1a is mediated by the transcription factor ETS1 and is negatively regulated through SECTM1 mediated ligation of CD7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bade-Döding, Christina; Göttmann, Wiebke; Baigger, Anja; Farren, Matthew; Lee, Kelvin P; Blasczyk, Rainer; Huyton, Trevor

    2014-03-01

    CD7 expression is found on ~30% of acute myeloblastic leukemias (AML). The leukemic progenitor cell line KG1a (CD7+) constitutively expresses GM-CSF while the parental KG1 (CD7-) cell line does not. This study focuses on the molecular basis of CD7 mediated GM-CSF regulation. KG1a cells were treated with recombinant SECTM1-Fc protein, the PI3K kinase inhibitors wortmannin, LY292004, or PI4K activator spermine. Stable KG1-CD7+, KG1a-shCD7, KG1a-shETS1 as well as KG1a-GFP, KG1a-PKCβII-GFP cell lines were generated and the levels of CD7, GM-CSF and ETS-1 mRNA and protein were compared by real-time-PCR, western blotting, flow cytometry and ELISA. SECTM1 is expressed in Human Bone Marrow Endothelial Cells (HBMEC) and its expression can be upregulated by both IFN-γ. KG1a cells demonstrated high expression levels of CD7 and ETS-1 allowing a constitutative signaling through the PI3K/Atk pathway to promote GM-CSF expression, while KG1 cells with low expression of CD7 and ETS-1 showed low GM-CSF expression. On KG1a cells GM-CSF expression could be negatively regulated by PI3K inhibitors or by recombinant SECTM1-Fc. Overexpression of CD7 in KG1 cells was insufficient to promote GM-CSF expression, while silencing of CD7 or ETS-1 resulted in reduced GM-CSF expression levels. Differentiation capable KG1a cells overexpressing PKCβII illustrated complete loss of CD7, but maintained normal levels of both ETS-1 and GM-CSF expression. These findings add an additional layer to the previously described autocrine/paracrine signaling between leukemic progenitor cells and the bone marrow microenvironment and highlight a role for SECTM1 in both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. This work shows that SECTM1 secreted from bone marrow stromal cells may interact with CD7 to influence GM-CSF expression in leukemic cells. © 2013.

  8. Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenopathy syndrome is associated with activation of GM-CSF and burst-like expression of IL-8 in peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Eduard; Israeli, Moshe; Klein, Tirza; Amir, Jacob; Harel, Liora

    2014-11-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenopathy (PFAPA) is an autoinflammatory syndrome characterized by periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, cervical lymphadenopathy, myalgia, and abdominal pain. Peripheral blood concentrations of selected cytokines of PFAPA patients during and between febrile episodes were analyzed in a search for PFAPA-specific molecular signature. 23 children with PFAPA (age 6.07 ± 2.94 years, range 5-9 years) and three control children with severe oropharyngeal infections (age 6.2 ± 7.95 years, range 1-17 years) participated in the study. Peripheral blood concentrations of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFN-γ, GM-CSF, TNF-α were measured using Luminex technology. PFAPA febrile episodes were characterized by detection of GM-CSF - 134.07 ± 315.5 pg/mL; significant (P < 0.001), compared to baseline and controls, elevation of concentrations of IL-8 (3193.7 ± 2508 pg/mL vs. 100.36 ± 119. pg/mL vs. 2.04 ± 4.08 pg/mL, respectively), IL-6 (1355.38 ± 2026.53 pg/mL vs. 28.8 ± 44.2 pg/mL and 27.13 ± 26.42 pg/mL, respectively). IL-1β was detected only in febrile and afebrile PFAPA patients (922.8 ± 1639 pg/mL vs. 10.98 ± 19.4 pg/ml, P < 0.002, respectively), but not in controls. Peripheral blood concentration of TNFα did not differ significantly between study groups. IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10 were negligible in all study subjects. PFAPA febrile episodes are characterized by activation of GM-CSF and IL-8 with Th1 skewing. We propose a molecular mechanism governing this phenomenon.

  9. Keratinocyte growth factor administration attenuates murine pulmonary mycobacterium tuberculosis infection through granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent macrophage activation and phagolysosome fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasula, Rajamouli; Azad, Abul K; Gardner, Jason C; Schlesinger, Larry S; McCormack, Francis X

    2015-03-13

    Augmentation of innate immune defenses is an appealing adjunctive strategy for treatment of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections, especially those caused by drug-resistant strains. The effect of intranasal administration of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), an epithelial mitogen and differentiation factor, on M. tuberculosis infection in mice was tested in prophylaxis, treatment, and rescue scenarios. Infection of C57BL6 mice with M. tuberculosis resulted in inoculum size-dependent weight loss and mortality. A single dose of KGF given 1 day prior to infection with 10(5) M. tuberculosis bacilli prevented weight loss and enhanced pulmonary mycobacterial clearance (compared with saline-pretreated mice) for up to 28 days. Similar effects were seen when KGF was delivered intranasally every third day for 15 days, but weight loss and bacillary growth resumed when KGF was withdrawn. For mice with a well established M. tuberculosis infection, KGF given every 3 days beginning on day 15 postinoculation was associated with reversal of weight loss and an increase in M. tuberculosis clearance. In in vitro co-culture experiments, M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages exposed to conditioned medium from KGF-treated alveolar type II cell (MLE-15) monolayers exhibited enhanced GM-CSF-dependent killing through mechanisms that included promotion of phagolysosome fusion and induction of nitric oxide. Alveolar macrophages from KGF-treated mice also exhibited enhanced GM-CSF-dependent phagolysosomal fusion. These results provide evidence that administration of KGF promotes M. tuberculosis clearance through GM-CSF-dependent mechanisms and enhances host defense against M. tuberculosis infection. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Keratinocyte Growth Factor Administration Attenuates Murine Pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection through Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor (GM-CSF)-dependent Macrophage Activation and Phagolysosome Fusion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasula, Rajamouli; Azad, Abul K.; Gardner, Jason C.; Schlesinger, Larry S.; McCormack, Francis X.

    2015-01-01

    Augmentation of innate immune defenses is an appealing adjunctive strategy for treatment of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections, especially those caused by drug-resistant strains. The effect of intranasal administration of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), an epithelial mitogen and differentiation factor, on M. tuberculosis infection in mice was tested in prophylaxis, treatment, and rescue scenarios. Infection of C57BL6 mice with M. tuberculosis resulted in inoculum size-dependent weight loss and mortality. A single dose of KGF given 1 day prior to infection with 105 M. tuberculosis bacilli prevented weight loss and enhanced pulmonary mycobacterial clearance (compared with saline-pretreated mice) for up to 28 days. Similar effects were seen when KGF was delivered intranasally every third day for 15 days, but weight loss and bacillary growth resumed when KGF was withdrawn. For mice with a well established M. tuberculosis infection, KGF given every 3 days beginning on day 15 postinoculation was associated with reversal of weight loss and an increase in M. tuberculosis clearance. In in vitro co-culture experiments, M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages exposed to conditioned medium from KGF-treated alveolar type II cell (MLE-15) monolayers exhibited enhanced GM-CSF-dependent killing through mechanisms that included promotion of phagolysosome fusion and induction of nitric oxide. Alveolar macrophages from KGF-treated mice also exhibited enhanced GM-CSF-dependent phagolysosomal fusion. These results provide evidence that administration of KGF promotes M. tuberculosis clearance through GM-CSF-dependent mechanisms and enhances host defense against M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:25605711

  11. Dragon's blood extracts reduce radiation-induced peripheral blood injury and protects human megakaryocyte cells from GM-CSF withdraw-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Yuanyuan; Xu, Bing; Wang, Ran; Gao, Qian; Jia, Qiutian; Hasan, Murtaza; Shan, Shuangquan; Ma, Hong; Dai, Rongji; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Dragon's blood (DB), a Chinese traditional herb, was shown to have certain protective effects on radiation-induced bone marrow injury due to the presence of several phenolic compounds. The 50% ethanol extracts (DBE) were separated from DB by the methods of alcohol extracting-water precipitating. The protective effects of DBE on hematopoiesis were studied, particularly on megakaryocytes. In this study, we investigated the in vivo radioprotective effects of DBE on hematopoiesis and pathological changes using an irradiated-mouse model. Moreover, the protective effects and potential molecular mechanisms of DBE on megakaryocytopoiesis in vitro were explored in GM-CSF depletion-induced Mo7e cell model. DBE significantly promoted the recovery of peripheral blood cells in irradiated mice. Histology bone marrow confirmed the protective effect of DBE, as shown by an increased number of hematopoietic cells and a reduction of apoptosis. In a megakaryocytic apoptotic model, DBE (50 µg/mL) markedly alleviated GM-CSF withdrawal-induced apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest of Mo7e cells. DBE (50 µg/mL) also significantly decreased the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2 expression, inhibited the active caspase-3 expression. In addition, DBE could induce ERK1/2 phosphorylation in GM-CSF-depleted Mo7e cell, but not Akt. Our data demonstrated that DBE could effectively accelerate the recovery of peripheral blood cells, especially platelet. DBE attenuated cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest through the decrease of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and the reduction of active caspase-3 expression. The effect of DBE on Mo7e cells survival and proliferation is likely associated with the activation of ERK, but not Akt. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    10-1-0699 TITLE: Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after...apoptosis. WT1 protein is highly expressed in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), and is a rational target for immunotherapy. We have developed a...this project is to conduct a multicenter, double-blinded, randomized trial comparing treatment with the WT-1 peptide vaccine + Montanide/GM-CSF to

  13. A murine model of acute myeloid leukemia with Evi1 overexpression and autocrine stimulation by an intracellular form of GM-CSF in DA-3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Maria E; Simonson, Oscar E; Oprea, Iulian I; Moreno, Pedro M D; Silva-Lara, Maria F; Mohamed, Abdalla J; Christensson, Birger; Gahrton, Gösta; Dilber, M Sirac; Smith, C I Edvard; Arteaga, H Jose

    2016-01-01

    The poor treatment response of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) overexpressing high-risk oncogenes such as EVI1, demands specific animal models for new treatment evaluations. Evi1 is a common site of activating integrations in murine leukemia virus (MLV)-induced AML and in retroviral and lentiviral gene-modified HCS. Still, a model of overt AML induced by Evi1 has not been generated. Cell lines from MLV-induced AML are growth factor-dependent and non-transplantable. Hence, for the leukemia maintenance in the infected animals, a growth factor source such as chronic immune response has been suggested. We have investigated whether these leukemias are transplantable if provided with growth factors. We show that the Evi1(+)DA-3 cells modified to express an intracellular form of GM-CSF, acquired growth factor independence and transplantability and caused an overt leukemia in syngeneic hosts, without increasing serum GM-CSF levels. We propose this as a general approach for modeling different forms of high-risk human AML using similar cell lines.

  14. CCR6+ Th cells in the cerebrospinal fluid of persons with multiple sclerosis are dominated by pathogenic non-classic Th1 cells and GM-CSF-only-secreting Th cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restorick, S M; Durant, L; Kalra, S; Hassan-Smith, G; Rathbone, E; Douglas, M R; Curnow, S J

    2017-08-01

    Considerable attention has been given to CCR6+ IL-17-secreting CD4+ T cells (Th17) in the pathology of a number of autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS). However, other Th subsets also play important pathogenic roles, including those that secrete IFNγ and GM-CSF. CCR6 expression by Th17 cells allows their migration across the choroid plexus into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), where they are involved in the early phase of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and in MS these cells are elevated in the CSF during relapses and contain high frequencies of autoreactive cells. However, the relatively low frequency of Th17 cells suggests they cannot by themselves account for the high percentage of CCR6+ cells in MS CSF. Here we identify the dominant CCR6+ T cell subsets in both the blood and CSF as non-classic Th1 cells, including many that secrete GM-CSF, a key encephalitogenic cytokine. In addition, we show that Th cells secreting GM-CSF but not IFNγ or IL-17, a subset termed GM-CSF-only-secreting Th cells, also accumulate in the CSF. Importantly, in MS the proportion of IFNγ- and GM-CSF-secreting T cells expressing CCR6 was significantly enriched in the CSF, and was elevated in MS, suggesting these cells play a pathogenic role in this disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulation of dendritic cell development by GM-CSF: Molecular control and implications for immune homeostasis and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. van de Laar (Lianne); P.J. Coffer (Paul); A.M. Woltman (Andrea)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractDendritic cells (DCs) represent a small and heterogeneous fraction of the hematopoietic system, specialized in antigen capture, processing, and presentation. The different DC subsets act as sentinels throughout the body and perform a key role in the induction of immunogenic as well as

  16. Effect of intramammary infusion of recombinant bovine GM-CSF and IL-8 on CMT score, somatic cell count, and milk mononuclear cell populations in Holstein cows with Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiku, Yoshio; Ozawa, Tomomi; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Kushibiki, Shiro; Inumaru, Shigeki; Shingu, Hiroyuki; Nagasawa, Yuya; Watanabe, Atsushi; Hata, Eiji; Hayashi, Tomohito

    2017-09-01

    The effect of intramammary infusion of recombinant bovine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rbGM-CSF) and interleukin-8 (rbIL-8) on mononuclear cell populations in quarters, somatic cell count (SCC) and the California Mastitis Test (CMT) score were investigated. From the selected cows with naturally occurring Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis, one quarter of each cow were selected for the infusions of rbGM-CSF (400 μg/5 mL/quarter, n = 9), rbIL-8 (1 mg/5 mL/quarter, n = 9), and phosphate-buffered saline (5 mL/quarter, n = 7). The CMT score of both cytokines post infusion temporarily increased between days 0 and 1 and significantly decreased between days 7 and 14 compared to the preinfusion level. The SCC on day 14 after infusions of rbGM-CSF tended to be lower than that of the control group. The percentage of CD14+ cells increased on days 1 and 2 post infusion of rbGM-CSF. The percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ cells also increased on days 2 and 3, suggesting that the infusion of rbGM-CSF enhanced cellular immunity in the mammary gland. In contrast, the percentage of CD14+ cells decreased on days 0.25 and 1 post infusion of rbIL-8. No significant changes in the percentages of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in milk after infusion of rbIL-8 were evident during the experimental period, which suggested that rbIL-8 had little effect on the function of T cells in the mammary gland. These results indicated that rbGM-CSF and rbIL-8 decreased the CMT score by a different mechanism and may have a potential as therapeutic agents for subclinical mastitis.

  17. Alternaria Fungus Induces the Production of GM-CSF, Interleukin-6 and Interleukin-8 and Calcium Signaling in Human Airway Epithelium through Protease-Activated Receptor 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuwaki, Yoshinori; Wada, Kota; White, Thomas; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Kita, Hirohito

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Recent studies suggest that host immune responses to environmental fungi may play an important role in the development of allergic diseases, such as human asthma. Epithelium is considered an active participant in allergic inflammation. We previously reported that aspartate protease from Alternaria induces the activation and degranulation of human eosinophils that are mediated through protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2). However, our current knowledge on the innate immune responses of epithelium to environmental fungi is very limited. We investigated the responses of epithelium to fungi and the mechanisms of these responses. Methods Human airway epithelial cell line BEAS-2B and Calu-3 (both from American Type Culture Collection) were incubated with PAR-2 peptides and extracts of various fungi. The cellular responses, including GM-CSF, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, eotaxin, eotaxin-2 and RANTES production as well as increases in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), were examined. To characterize the proteases involved in these responses, protease inhibitors such as pepstatin A and alkalo-thermophilic Bacillus inhibitor (ATBI), HIV protease inhibitors and 4-amidinophenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride were used. To investigate the role of PAR-2, PAR-2-agonistic and PAR-2-antagonistic peptides were used. Results PAR-2-activating peptide, but not the control peptide, induced GM-CSF, IL-6 and IL-8 production; these cellular responses were accompanied by a quick and marked increase in [Ca2+]i. Among 7 common environmental fungi, only Alternaria induced GM-CSF, IL-6 and IL-8 production and increased [Ca2+]i response. Both cytokine production and increased [Ca2+]i were significantly inhibited by PAR-2 antagonist peptide and by aspartate protease inhibitors (pepstatin A, ritonavir, nelfinavir and ATBI), but not by the PAR-2 control peptide or by other protease inhibitors. Conclusions Aspartate proteases from Alternaria induce cytokine production and

  18. CD1d(hi)CD5+ B cells expanded by GM-CSF in vivo suppress experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jian Rong; Quan, Songhua; Soliven, Betty

    2014-09-15

    IL-10-competent subset within CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells, also known as B10 cells, has been shown to regulate autoimmune diseases. Whether B10 cells can prevent or suppress the development of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) has not been studied. In this study, we investigated whether low-dose GM-CSF, which suppresses EAMG, can expand B10 cells in vivo, and whether adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells would prevent or suppress EAMG. We found that treatment of EAMG mice with low-dose GM-CSF increased the proportion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells and B10 cells. In vitro coculture studies revealed that CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells altered T cell cytokine profile but did not directly inhibit T cell proliferation. In contrast, CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells inhibited B cell proliferation and its autoantibody production in an IL-10-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells to mice could prevent disease, as well as suppress EAMG after disease onset. This was associated with downregulation of mature dendritic cell markers and expansion of regulatory T cells resulting in the suppression of acetylcholine receptor-specific T cell and B cell responses. Thus, our data have provided significant insight into the mechanisms underlying the tolerogenic effects of B10 cells in EAMG. These observations suggest that in vivo or in vitro expansion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells or B10 cells may represent an effective strategy in the treatment of human myasthenia gravis. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Vaccine Therapy for Unresectable Chordoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this phase II clinical trial, adult patients with inoperable chordoma who are scheduled to undergo radiation therapy will be randomly assigned to receive a yeast-based vaccine that targets a protein called brachyury or a placebo injection.

  20. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isik, Gözde; van Montfort, Thijs; Boot, Maikel; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs) that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env

  1. Modulación de la expresión de la L-selectina por agentes quimiotácticos y GM-CSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J. Montoya

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available La L-selectina es una molécula de adhesión que se expresa constitutivamente en la membrana de los granulocitos, monocitos y linfocitos, células en las cuales interviene en los procesos iniciales de migración hacia los sitios de inflamación y órganos linfoides. Una vez que dichas células son activadas, la L-selectina experimenta un proceso de regulación negativa con la liberación de un fragmento soluble. Con el objetivo de analizar el efecto de algunos agentes quimiotácticos fisiológicos y un estimulante artificial sobre la expresión de la L-selectina en la superficie de los granulocitos de sangre periférica, se evaluó ésta por citometría de flujo en leucocitos no estimulados y luego de su incubación con un éster de forbol (PMA, dos agentes quimiotácticos (fMLP y LTB4 y una citocina (GM-CSF. En condiciones basales, la expresión de la L-selectina se encontró en un porcentaje alto (95,03 ± 0,67; la estimulación con PMA indujo una disminución notable en la expresión de esta molécula (3,16 ± 0,63. Los factores quimiotácticos llevaron también a una reducción significativa (69,89 ± 4,96 para LTB4 y 53,70 ± 4,30 para fMLP, mientras que la incubación con GM-CSF no produjo cambios significativos con respecto a la expresión basal (89,08 ± 4,81. Al comparar las diferentes condiciones de estimulación entre ellas, se observó que el efecto del PMA fue significativamente mayor que los demás estímulos; además, cuando se comparó la reducción de la expresión generada por el fMLP y el LTB4 también se encontró que entre ellas existía una diferencia estadísticamente significativa. Estos resultados sugieren que el grado de activación alcanzado por los granulocitos se relaciona directamente con la capacidad para liberar la L-selectina desde su superficie, siendo ésta menos intensa después de la acción de estímulos fisiológicos como los agentes quimiotácticos; si bien el GM-CSF activa funciones importantes en la

  2. Heat shock protein 27-derived atheroprotection involves reverse cholesterol transport that is dependent on GM-CSF to maintain ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression in ApoE-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulakazhi Venu, Vivek Krishna; Adijiang, Ayinuer; Seibert, Tara; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Shi, Chunhua; Batulan, Zarah; O'Brien, Edward R

    2017-06-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that heat shock protein (HSP)-27 is protective against the development of experimental atherosclerosis, reducing plaque cholesterol content by more than 30%. Moreover, elevated HSP-27 levels are predictive of relative freedom from clinical cardiovascular events. HSP-27 signaling occurs via the activation of NF-κB, which induces a marked up-regulation in expression of granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a cytokine that is known to alter ABC transporters involved in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Therefore, we hypothesized that HSP-27-derived GM-CSF has a potent role in impeding plaque formation by promoting macrophage RCT and sought to better characterize this pathway. Treatment of THP-1 cells, RAW-Blue cells, and primary macrophages with recombinant HSP-27 resulted in NF-κB activation via TLR-4 and was inhibited by various pharmacologic blockers of this pathway. Moreover, HSP-27-induced upregulation of GM-CSF expression was dependent on TLR-4 signaling. Recombinant (r)HSP-27 treatment of ApoE-/- female (but not male) mice for 4 wk yielded reductions in plaque area and cholesterol clefts of 33 and 47%, respectively, with no effect on GM-CSF-/-ApoE-/- mice. With 12 wk of rHSP-27 treatment, both female and male mice showed reductions in plaque burden (55 and 42%, respectively) and a 60% reduction in necrotic core area but no treatment effect in GM-CSF-/-ApoE-/- mice. In vitro functional studies revealed that HSP-27 enhanced the expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1, as well as facilitated cholesterol efflux in vitro by ∼10%. These novel findings establish a paradigm for HSP-27-mediated RCT and set the stage for the development of HSP-27 atheroprotective therapeutics.-Pulakazhi Venu, V. K., Adijiang, A., Seibert, T., Chen, Y.-X., Shi, C., Batulan, Z., O'Brien, E. R. Heat shock protein 27-derived atheroprotection involves reverse cholesterol transport that is dependent on GM-CSF to maintain ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression in

  3. Glioblastoma-synthesized G-CSF and GM-CSF contribute to growth and immunosuppression: Potential therapeutic benefit from dapsone, fenofibrate, and ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Richard E; Hill, Quentin A; Wion, Didier; Mellstedt, Håkan; Focosi, Daniele; Karpel-Massler, Georg; Heiland, Tim; Halatsch, Marc-Eric

    2017-05-01

    Increased ratio of circulating neutrophils to lymphocytes is a common finding in glioblastoma and other cancers. Data reviewed establish that any damage to brain tissue tends to cause an increase in G-CSF and/or GM-CSF (G(M)-CSF) synthesized by the brain. Glioblastoma cells themselves also synthesize G(M)-CSF. G(M)-CSF synthesized by brain due to damage by a growing tumor and by the tumor itself stimulates bone marrow to shift hematopoiesis toward granulocytic lineages away from lymphocytic lineages. This shift is immunosuppressive and generates the relative lymphopenia characteristic of glioblastoma. Any trauma to brain-be it blunt, sharp, ischemic, infectious, cytotoxic, tumor encroachment, or radiation-increases brain synthesis of G(M)-CSF. G(M)-CSF are growth and motility enhancing factors for glioblastomas. High levels of G(M)-CSF contribute to the characteristic neutrophilia and lymphopenia of glioblastoma. Hematopoietic bone marrow becomes entrained with, directed by, and contributes to glioblastoma pathology. The antibiotic dapsone, the lipid-lowering agent fenofibrate, and the antiviral drug ribavirin are Food and Drug Administration- and European Medicines Agency-approved medicines that have potential to lower synthesis or effects of G(M)-CSF and thus deprive a glioblastoma of some of the growth promoting contributions of bone marrow and G(M)-CSF.

  4. Different dynamics of NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated IL‑1β production in GM-CSF- and M-CSF-differentiated human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budai, Marietta Margit; Tőzsér, József; Benkő, Szilvia

    2017-06-01

    IL-1β is a "master" cytokine regulating a wide variety of physiologic and immunologic processes. The most frequently studied models for NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated IL-1β production are the macrophages; however, depending on their microenvironment, they can develop into functionally different cells. Several protocols have been developed to model the diversity of these cells in vitro. Here, we report for the first time, to our knowledge, a comparative study about the dynamics and molecular mechanisms of NLRP3 inflammasome priming and activation in LPS-stimulated, human, monocyte-derived GM- or M-macrophages, differentiated in the presence of GM-CSF or M-CSF, respectively. Our results show that IL-1β production by LPS-stimulated M-macrophages is a rapid and short event that requires ATP supplementation and is attenuated, in part, by the presence of IL-10, which reduces Akt signaling. However, IL-1β production by GM-macrophages develops gradually, and these cells produce IL-1β, even in the absence of ATP supplementation, because of the constitutively active caspase-1 enzyme. We show that the membrane-bound ectonucleotidases have an important regulatory role on the IL-1β secretion in GM-macrophages. Furthermore, we provide evidence that adenosine treatment enhances LPS-primed IL-1β secretion by GM-macrophages, but not by M-macrophages. These results show that, because of the different activation status and expression levels of the NLRP3 inflammasome components, as well as the signaling activity of the pathways, the two subtypes of macrophages respond very differently to the same stimuli. For this reason, the molecular composition of the microenvironment that shapes macrophage development should be considered when research or therapeutic methods are planned to control IL-1β production. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  5. Phase I/IIa clinical trial of a novel hTERT peptide vaccine in men with metastatic hormone-naive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilleby, Wolfgang; Gaudernack, Gustav; Brunsvig, Paal F; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana; Schulz, Melanie; Mills, Kate; Hole, Knut Håkon; Inderberg, Else Marit

    2017-07-01

    In newly diagnosed metastatic hormone-naive prostate cancer (mPC), telomerase-based immunotherapy with the novel hTERT peptide vaccine UV1 can induce immune responses with potential clinical benefit. This phase I dose escalation study of UV1 evaluated safety, immune response, effects on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, and preliminary clinical outcome. Twenty-two patients with newly diagnosed metastatic hormone-naïve PC (mPC) were enrolled; all had started androgen deprivation therapy and had no visceral metastases. Bone metastases were present in 17 (77%) patients and 16 (73%) patients had affected lymph nodes. Three dose levels of UV1 were given as intradermal injections combined with GM-CSF (Leukine®). Twenty-one patients in the intention-to-treat population (95%) received conformal radiotherapy. Adverse events reported were predominantly grade 1, most frequently injection site pruritus (86.4%). Serious adverse events considered possibly related to UV1 and/or GM-CSF included anaphylactic reaction in two patients and thrombocytopenia in one patient. Immune responses against UV1 peptides were confirmed in 18/21 evaluable patients (85.7%), PSA declined to prostatic gland. At the end of the nine-month reporting period for the study, 17 patients had clinically stable disease. Treatment with UV1 and GM-CSF gave few adverse events and induced specific immune responses in a large proportion of patients unselected for HLA type. The intermediate dose of 0.3 mg UV1 resulted in the highest proportion of, and most rapid UV1-specific immune responses with an acceptable safety profile. These results warrant further clinical studies in mPC.

  6. Interleukin 17 regulates SHP-2 and IL-17RA/STAT-3 dependent Cyr61, IL-23 and GM-CSF expression and RANKL mediated osteoclastogenesis by fibroblast-like synoviocytes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2017-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17 predominately produced by the Th17 cells, plays a crucial role in the fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) mediated disease process of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). IL-17 exerts its pathogenic effects in RA-FLS by IL-17/IL-17RA/STAT-3 signaling. Recent studies have shown that RA-FLS produces SHP-2, Cyr61, IL-23, GM-CSF and RANKL which results in worsening of the disease. However, whether IL-17/IL-17RA/STAT-3 signaling regulates SHP-2, Cyr61, IL-23, GM-CSF and RANKL expressions in RA-FLS remains unknown. In this study, IL-17 treatment dramatically induced the production of Cyr61, IL-23 and GM-CSF in FLS isolated from adjuvant induced arthritis (AA) rats. Conversely, IL-17 mediated production of Cyr61, IL-23 and GM-CSF was abrogated by knockdown of IL-17RA using a small interfering RNA or blockade of STAT-3 activation with S3I-201 in AA-FLS. Interestingly, IL-17 treatment noticeably increased the expression of IL-17RA and SHP-2 in AA-FLS. However, silencing of IL-17RA reversed the effect of IL-17 on the expression of IL-17RA and SHP-2 in AA-FLS. In addition, an increased number of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells were observed in a coculture system consisting of IL-17 treated AA-FLS and rat bone marrow derived monocytes/macrophages. Further, mechanistically we found that IL-17 upregulated RANKL expression in AA-FLS that was dependent on the IL-17/IL-17RA/STAT-3 signaling cascade. Knockdown of IL-17RA or inhibition of STAT-3 activation decreased the IL- 17 induced RANKL expression by AA-FLS and their osteoclastogenic potential. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that IL-17 regulates SHP-2 expression and IL-17RA/STAT-3 dependent production of Cyr61, IL-23, GM-CSF and RANKL in AA-FLS and may reveal a new insight into the pathogenesis of RA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevention and synergistic control of Ph(+) ALL by a DNA vaccine and 6-mercaptopurine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köchling, Joachim; Rott, Yvonne; Arndt, Stefanie; Marschke, Christina; Schmidt, Manuel; Wittig, Burghardt; Kalies, Katrin; Westermann, Jürgen; Henze, Günter

    2012-09-07

    Although the outcome of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been improved continuously by chemotherapy and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, prognosis of patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph(+)) ALL still remains poor. Since further intensification of chemotherapy is limited by toxic side effects and patients with high risk of transplant-related mortality are not eligible for allogeneic stem cell transplantation new treatment strategies are urgently needed for the prevention of Ph(+) ALL relapse. There is increasing evidence that the immune system plays an essential role for the eradication or immunologic control of remaining leukemia cells. We developed several DNA-based vaccines encoding a BCR-ABL(p185) specific peptide and GM-CSF, and CD40-L, IL-27 or IL-12 and evaluated the preventive and therapeutic efficacy against a lethal challenge of syngeneic Ph(+) ALL in Balb/c mice. In vivo cell depletion assays and cytokine expression studies were performed and the efficacy of the DNA vaccine was compared with 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) alone and the combination of the DNA vaccine and 6-MP. Preventive immunization with the vaccine BCR-ABL/GM-CSF/IL-12 and the TLR-9 agonist dSLIM induced an innate and adaptive immune response mediated by NK-cells, CD4(+) T-cells and CD8(+) T-cells leading to a survival rate of 80%. Therapeutic vaccination resulted in a significantly longer leukemia-free survival (40.7 days vs. 20.4 days) and a higher survival rate (56% vs. 10%) compared to chemotherapy with 6-MP. Remarkably, in combination with the vaccine 6-MP acted synergistically and led to 100% survival. These results demonstrate that minimal residual disease of Ph(+) ALL can be significantly better controlled by a combined treatment approach of immunotherapy and chemotherapy. This provides a rationale for improving maintenance therapy in order to reduce the relapse rate in patients with Ph(+) ALL. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. PU.1 is essential for CD11c expression in CD8(+/CD8(- lymphoid and monocyte-derived dendritic cells during GM-CSF or FLT3L-induced differentiation.

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    Xue-Jun Zhu

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs regulate innate and acquired immunity through their roles as antigen-presenting cells. Specific subsets of mature DCs, including monocyte-derived and lymphoid-derived DCs, can be distinguished based on distinct immunophenotypes and functional properties. The leukocyte integrin, CD11c, is considered a specific marker for DCs and it is expressed by all DC subsets. We created a strain of mice in which DCs and their progenitors could be lineage traced based on activity of the CD11c proximal promoter. Surprisingly, we observed levels of CD11c promoter activity that were similar in DCs and in other mature leukocytes, including monocytes, granulocytes, and lymphocytes. We sought to identify DNA elements and transcription factors that regulate DC-associated expression of CD11c. The ets transcription factor, PU.1, is a key regulator of DC development, and expression of PU.1 varies in different DC subsets. GM-CSF increased monocyte-derived DCs in mice and from mouse bone marrow cultured in vitro, but it did not increase CD8(+ lymphoid-derived DCs or B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. FLT3L increased both monocyte-derived DCs and lymphoid-derived DCs from mouse bone marrow cultured in vitro. GM-CSF increased the 5.3 Kb CD11c proximal promoter activity in monocyte-derived DCs and CD8(+ lymphoid-derived DCs, but not in B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. In contrast, FLT3L increased the CD11c proximal promoter activity in both monocyte-derived DCs and B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. We used shRNA gene knockdown and chromatin immunoprecipitation to demonstrate that PU.1 is required for the effects of GM-CSF or FLT3L on monocyte-derived DCs. We conclude that both GM-CSF and FLT3L act through PU.1 to activate the 5.3 Kb CD11c proximal promoter in DCs and to induce differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs. We also confirm that the CD11c proximal promoter is not sufficient to direct lineage specificity of CD11c expression, and that additional DNA elements are required

  9. Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy, Vaccination and Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, William S. M.; Toth, Karoly

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are the most commonly employed vector for cancer gene therapy. They are also used for gene therapy and as vaccines to express foreign antigens. Adenovirus vectors can be replication-defective; certain essential viral genes are deleted and replaced by a cassette that expresses a foreign therapeutic gene. Such vectors are used for gene therapy, as vaccines, and for cancer therapy. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are employed for cancer gene therapy. Oncolytic vector...

  10. The necrotic venom of the brown recluse spider induces dysregulated endothelial cell-dependent neutrophil activation. Differential induction of GM-CSF, IL-8, and E-selectin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, K D; Modur, V; Zimmerman, G A; Prescott, S M; McIntyre, T M

    1994-01-01

    Brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) venom induces severe dermonecrotic lesions. The mechanism for this is unknown but presents an interesting paradox: necrosis is completely dependent on the victim's neutrophils, yet neutrophils are not activated by the venom. We show Loxosceles venom is a potent, but disjointed, endothelial cell agonist. It weakly induced E-selectin expression, but not intercellular adhesion molecule-1 or IL-6 expression, yet significantly stimulated release of IL-8 and large amounts of GM-CSF by 4 h. In contrast, TNF strongly induced all of these, except for GM-CSF. PMN bound to E-selectin on venom-activated endothelial cells, apparently via counterreceptors different from those that bind E-selectin on TNF alpha-activated monolayers. Notably, PMN bound venom-activated monolayers only at intercellular junctions, did not polarize, and completely failed to migrate beneath the monolayer. Despite this, bound PMN demonstrated increased intracellular Ca2+ levels and secreted primary and secondary granule markers. The latter event was suppressed by sulfones used to treat envenomation. We have defined a new endothelial cell agonist, Loxosceles venom, that differentially stimulates the inflammatory response of endothelial cells. This, in turn, leads to a dysregulated PMN response where adhesion and degranulation are completely dissociated from shape change and transmigration. Images PMID:7518841

  11. Differential expression of IL-17, 22 and 23 in the progression of colorectal cancer in patients with K-ras mutation: Ras signal inhibition and crosstalk with GM-CSF and IFN-γ.

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    Savvas Petanidis

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that aberrant K-ras signaling is responsible for triggering immunological responses and inflammation-driven tumorigenesis. Interleukins IL-17, IL-22, and IL-23 have been reported in various types of malignancies, but the exact mechanistic role of these molecules remains to be elucidated. Given the role of K-ras and the involvement of interleukins in colorectal tumorigenesis, research efforts are reported for the first time, showing that differentially expressed interleukin IL-17, IL-22, and IL-23 levels are associated with K-ras in a stage-specific fashion along colorectal cancer progression. Specifically, a the effect of K-ras signaling was investigated in the overall expression of interleukins in patients with colorectal cancer and healthy controls, and b an association was established between mutant K-ras and cytokines GM-CSF and IFN-γ. The results indicate that specific interleukins are differentially expressed in K-ras positive patients and the use of K-ras inhibitor Manumycin A decreases both interleukin levels and apoptosis in Caco-2 cells by inhibiting cell viability. Finally, inflammation-driven GM-CSF and IFN-γ levels are modulated through interleukin expression in tumor patients, with interleukin expression in the intestinal lumen and cancerous tissue mediated by aberrant K-ras signaling. Collectively, the findings a indicate that interleukin expression is influenced by ras signaling and specific interleukins play an oncogenic promoter role in colorectal cancer, highlighting the molecular link between inflammation and tumorigenesis, and b accentuate the interwoven molecular correlations as leads to new therapeutic approaches in the future.

  12. Co-administration of plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor increases human immunodeficiency virus-1 DNA vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses

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    Vinicius Canato Santana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available T-cell based vaccines against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV generate specific responses that may limit both transmission and disease progression by controlling viral load. Broad, polyfunctional, and cytotoxic CD4+ T-cell responses have been associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus/HIV-1 replication, supporting the inclusion of CD4+ T-cell epitopes in vaccine formulations. Plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (pGM-CSF co-administration has been shown to induce potent CD4+ T-cell responses and to promote accelerated priming and increased migration of antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells. However, no study has shown whether co-immunisation with pGM-CSF enhances the number of vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cells. Our group has previously developed a DNA vaccine encoding conserved, multiple human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR binding HIV-1 subtype B peptides, which elicited broad, polyfunctional and long-lived CD4+ T-cell responses. Here, we show that pGM-CSF co-immunisation improved both magnitude and quality of vaccine-induced T-cell responses, particularly by increasing proliferating CD4+ T-cells that produce simultaneously interferon-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-2. Thus, we believe that the use of pGM-CSF may be helpful for vaccine strategies focused on the activation of anti-HIV CD4+ T-cell immunity.

  13. Co-administration of plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor increases human immunodeficiency virus-1 DNA vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Vinicius Canato; Almeida, Rafael Ribeiro; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Ferreira, Luís Carlos de Souza; Kalil, Jorge; Rosa, Daniela Santoro; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2015-12-01

    T-cell based vaccines against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) generate specific responses that may limit both transmission and disease progression by controlling viral load. Broad, polyfunctional, and cytotoxic CD4+T-cell responses have been associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus/HIV-1 replication, supporting the inclusion of CD4+ T-cell epitopes in vaccine formulations. Plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (pGM-CSF) co-administration has been shown to induce potent CD4+ T-cell responses and to promote accelerated priming and increased migration of antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells. However, no study has shown whether co-immunisation with pGM-CSF enhances the number of vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cells. Our group has previously developed a DNA vaccine encoding conserved, multiple human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR binding HIV-1 subtype B peptides, which elicited broad, polyfunctional and long-lived CD4+ T-cell responses. Here, we show that pGM-CSF co-immunisation improved both magnitude and quality of vaccine-induced T-cell responses, particularly by increasing proliferating CD4+ T-cells that produce simultaneously interferon-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-2. Thus, we believe that the use of pGM-CSF may be helpful for vaccine strategies focused on the activation of anti-HIV CD4+ T-cell immunity.

  14. Clinical Safety and Immunogenicity of Tumor-Targeted, Plant-Made Id-KLH Conjugate Vaccines for Follicular Lymphoma

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    Daniel Tusé

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the first evaluation of plant-made conjugate vaccines for targeted treatment of B-cell follicular lymphoma (FL in a Phase I safety and immunogenicity clinical study. Each recombinant personalized immunogen consisted of a tumor-derived, plant-produced idiotypic antibody (Ab hybrid comprising the hypervariable regions of the tumor-associated light and heavy Ab chains, genetically grafted onto a common human IgG1 scaffold. Each immunogen was produced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants using twin magnICON vectors expressing the light and heavy chains of the idiotypic Ab. Each purified Ab was chemically linked to the carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH to form a conjugate vaccine. The vaccines were administered to FL patients over a series of ≥6 subcutaneous injections in conjunction with the adjuvant Leukine (GM-CSF. The 27 patients enrolled in the study had previously received non-anti-CD20 cytoreductive therapy followed by ≥4 months of immune recovery prior to first vaccination. Of 11 patients who became evaluable at study conclusion, 82% (9/11 displayed a vaccine-induced, idiotype-specific cellular and/or humoral immune response. No patients showed serious adverse events (SAE related to vaccination. The fully scalable plant-based manufacturing process yields safe and immunogenic personalized FL vaccines that can be produced within weeks of obtaining patient biopsies.

  15. Poxvirus-based vaccine therapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

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    Seo Kang

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose An open-label Phase 1 study of recombinant prime-boost poxviruses targeting CEA and MUC-1 in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer was conducted to determine safety, tolerability and obtain preliminary data on immune response and survival. Patients and methods Ten patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were treated on a Phase I clinical trial. The vaccination regimen consisted of vaccinia virus expressing tumor antigens carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA and mucin-1 (MUC-1 with three costimulatory molecules B7.1, ICAM-1 and LFA-3 (TRICOM (PANVAC-V and fowlpox virus expressing the same antigens and costimulatory molecules (PANVAC-F. Patients were primed with PANVAC-V followed by three booster vaccinations using PANVAC-F. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF was used as a local adjuvant after each vaccination and for 3 consecutive days thereafter. Monthly booster vaccinations for up to 12 months were provided for patients without progressive disease. Peripheral blood was collected before, during and after vaccinations for immune analysis. Results The most common treatment-related adverse events were mild injection-site reactions. Antibody responses against vaccinia virus was observed in all 10 patients and antigen-specific T cell responses were observed in 5 out of 8 evaluable patients (62.5%. Median overall survival was 6.3 months and a significant increase in overall survival was noted in patients who generated anti CEA- and/or MUC-1-specific immune responses compared with those who did not (15.1 vs 3.9 months, respectively; P = .002. Conclusion Poxvirus vaccination is safe, well tolerated, and capable of generating antigen-specific immune responses in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

  16. Lymph node-derived donor encephalitogenic CD4+ T cells in C57BL/6 mice adoptive transfer experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis highly express GM-CSF and T-bet

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    Lambracht-Washington Doris

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is a relevant animal model for the human demyelinating inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS, multiple sclerosis (MS. Induction of EAE by adoptive transfer allows studying the role of the donor T lymphocyte in disease pathogenesis. It has been challenging to reliably induce adoptive transfer EAE in C57BL/6 (H-2b mice. The goal of this study was to develop a reproducible and high yield protocol for adoptive transfer EAE in C57BL/6 mice. A step-wise experimental approach permitted us to develop a protocol that resulted in a consistent relatively high disease incidence of ~70% in recipient mice. Donor mice were immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOGp35-55 in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA followed by pertussis toxin (PT. Only lymph node cells (LNC isolated at day 12 post immunization, and restimulated in vitro for 72 hours with 10 μg/mL of MOGp35-55 and 0.5 ng/mL of interleukin-12 (IL-12 were able to transfer disease. The ability of LNC to transfer disease was associated with the presence of inflammatory infiltrates in the CNS at day 12. Interferon gamma (IFNγ was produced at comparable levels in cell cultures prepared from mice at both day 6 and day 12 post immunization. By contrast, there was a trend towards a negative association between IL-17 and disease susceptibility in our EAE model. The amount of GM-CSF secreted was significantly increased in the culture supernatants from cells collected at day 12 post immunization versus those collected at day 6 post-immunization. Activated CD4+ T cells present in the day 12 LNC cultures maintained expression of the transcription factor T-bet, which has been shown to regulate the expression of the IL-23 receptor. Also, there was an increased prevalence of MOGp35-55-specific CD4+ T cells in day 12 LNC after in vitro re-stimulation. In summary, encephalitogenic LNC that adoptively transfer EAE in C57BL/6 mice were

  17. Lymph node-derived donor encephalitogenic CD4+ T cells in C57BL/6 mice adoptive transfer experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis highly express GM-CSF and T-bet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravens, Petra D; Hussain, Rehana Z; Zacharias, Tresa E; Ben, Li-Hong; Herndon, Emily; Vinnakota, Ramya; Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Nessler, Stefan; Zamvil, Scott S; Eagar, Todd N; Stüve, Olaf

    2011-06-24

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a relevant animal model for the human demyelinating inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS), multiple sclerosis (MS). Induction of EAE by adoptive transfer allows studying the role of the donor T lymphocyte in disease pathogenesis. It has been challenging to reliably induce adoptive transfer EAE in C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice. The goal of this study was to develop a reproducible and high yield protocol for adoptive transfer EAE in C57BL/6 mice. A step-wise experimental approach permitted us to develop a protocol that resulted in a consistent relatively high disease incidence of ~70% in recipient mice. Donor mice were immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)p35-55 in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) followed by pertussis toxin (PT). Only lymph node cells (LNC) isolated at day 12 post immunization, and restimulated in vitro for 72 hours with 10 μg/mL of MOGp35-55 and 0.5 ng/mL of interleukin-12 (IL-12) were able to transfer disease. The ability of LNC to transfer disease was associated with the presence of inflammatory infiltrates in the CNS at day 12. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) was produced at comparable levels in cell cultures prepared from mice at both day 6 and day 12 post immunization. By contrast, there was a trend towards a negative association between IL-17 and disease susceptibility in our EAE model. The amount of GM-CSF secreted was significantly increased in the culture supernatants from cells collected at day 12 post immunization versus those collected at day 6 post-immunization. Activated CD4+ T cells present in the day 12 LNC cultures maintained expression of the transcription factor T-bet, which has been shown to regulate the expression of the IL-23 receptor. Also, there was an increased prevalence of MOGp35-55-specific CD4+ T cells in day 12 LNC after in vitro re-stimulation. In summary, encephalitogenic LNC that adoptively transfer EAE in C57BL/6 mice were not characterized

  18. Leishmaniasis in humans: drug or vaccine therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Masoud; Farhoudi, Ramin

    2018-01-01

    Leishmania is an obligate intracellular pathogen that invades phagocytic host cells. Approximately 30 different species of Phlebotomine sand flies can transmit this parasite either anthroponotically or zoonotically through their bites. Leishmaniasis affects poor people living around the Mediterranean Basin, East Africa, the Americas, and Southeast Asia. Affected regions are often remote and unstable, with limited resources for treating this disease. Leishmaniasis has been reported as one of the most dangerous neglected tropical diseases, second only to malaria in parasitic causes of death. People can carry some species of Leishmania for long periods without becoming ill, and symptoms depend on the form of the disease. There are many drugs and candidate vaccines available to treat leishmaniasis. For instance, antiparasitic drugs, such as amphotericin B (AmBisome), are a treatment of choice for leishmaniasis depending on the type of the disease. Despite the availability of different treatment approaches to treat leishmaniasis, therapeutic tools are not adequate to eradicate this infection. In the meantime, drug therapy has been limited because of adverse side effects and unsuccessful vaccine preparation. However, it can immediately make infections inactive. According to other studies, vaccination cannot eradicate leishmaniasis. There is no perfect vaccine or suitable drug to eradicate leishmaniasis completely. So far, no vaccine or drug has been provided to induce long-term protection and ensure effective immunity against leishmaniasis. Therefore, it is necessary that intensive research should be performed in drug and vaccine fields to achieve certain results. PMID:29317800

  19. Leishmaniasis in humans: drug or vaccine therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorbani M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Masoud Ghorbani, Ramin Farhoudi Department of Viral Vaccine Production, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Research and Production Complex, Karaj, Iran Abstract: Leishmania is an obligate intracellular pathogen that invades phagocytic host cells. Approximately 30 different species of Phlebotomine sand flies can transmit this parasite either anthroponotically or zoonotically through their bites. Leishmaniasis affects poor people living around the Mediterranean Basin, East Africa, the Americas, and Southeast Asia. Affected regions are often remote and unstable, with limited resources for treating this disease. Leishmaniasis has been reported as one of the most dangerous neglected tropical diseases, second only to malaria in parasitic causes of death. People can carry some species of Leishmania for long periods without becoming ill, and symptoms depend on the form of the disease. There are many drugs and candidate vaccines available to treat leishmaniasis. For instance, antiparasitic drugs, such as amphotericin B (AmBisome, are a treatment of choice for leishmaniasis depending on the type of the disease. Despite the availability of different treatment approaches to treat leishmaniasis, therapeutic tools are not adequate to eradicate this infection. In the meantime, drug therapy has been limited because of adverse side effects and unsuccessful vaccine preparation. However, it can immediately make infections inactive. According to other studies, vaccination cannot eradicate leishmaniasis. There is no perfect vaccine or suitable drug to eradicate leishmaniasis completely. So far, no vaccine or drug has been provided to induce long-term protection and ensure effective immunity against leishmaniasis. Therefore, it is necessary that intensive research should be performed in drug and vaccine fields to achieve certain results. Keywords: leishmania, leishmania treatment, vaccine, recombinant antigens

  20. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Distinct Metabolic Differences Between Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) and Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (M-CSF) Grown Macrophages Derived from Murine Bone Marrow Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Yi Rang; Hong, Ji Hye; Lee, Min Yong; Jung, Jae Hun; Jung, Daun; Kim, Young Won; Son, Dain; Choi, Murim; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are crucial in controlling infectious agents and tissue homeostasis. Macrophages require a wide range of functional capabilities in order to fulfill distinct roles in our body, one being rapid and robust immune responses. To gain insight into macrophage plasticity and the key regulatory protein networks governing their specific functions, we performed quantitative analyses of the proteome and phosphoproteome of murine primary GM-CSF and M-CSF grown bone marrow derived macrophages (GM-BMMs and M-BMMs, respectively) using the latest isobaric tag based tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Strikingly, metabolic processes emerged as a major difference between these macrophages. Specifically, GM-BMMs show significant enrichment of proteins involving glycolysis, the mevalonate pathway, and nitrogen compound biosynthesis. This evidence of enhanced glycolytic capability in GM-BMMs is particularly significant regarding their pro-inflammatory responses, because increased production of cytokines upon LPS stimulation in GM-BMMs depends on their acute glycolytic capacity. In contrast, M-BMMs up-regulate proteins involved in endocytosis, which correlates with a tendency toward homeostatic functions such as scavenging cellular debris. Together, our data describes a proteomic network that underlies the pro-inflammatory actions of GM-BMMs as well as the homeostatic functions of M-BMMs. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. TL1A increases expression of CD25, LFA-1, CD134 and CD154, and induces IL-22 and GM-CSF production from effector CD4 T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Reichwald

    Full Text Available Elevated levels of the cytokine TL1A is associated with several autoimmune diseases e.g. rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. However, the exact role of TL1A remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the function of TL1A in a pro-inflammatory setting. We show that TL1A together with IL-12, IL-15 and IL-18 increases expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD154 (CD40 ligand and CD134 (OX40 on previously activated CD4+ T cells. This indicates that TL1A functions as a co-stimulatory molecule, decreasing the activation threshold of T-cells. We have previously shown that TL1A co-stimulation strongly induces IL-6 in human healthy leukocytes. Interestingly, the cytokine-activated effector T-cells did not produce IL-6 in response to TL1A, indicating distinct effects of TL1A on different cell populations. We further show that this co-stimulation increases the expression of CD25 (IL-2Rα and CD11a (α-chain of LFA-1 on CD4 T-cells, likely governing increased IL-2/IL-15 sensitivity and cell-cell contact. Along with this, TL1A co-stimulation caused a specific induction of IL-22 and GM-CSF from the activated T-cells. These results substantially contribute to the explanation of TL1A's role in inflammation. Our results suggest that TL1A should be considered as a target for immunotherapeutic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease.

  2. Pancreatic cancer vaccine: a unique potential therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappello P

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Paola Cappello, Moitza Principe, Francesco Novelli Department of Molecular Biotechnologies and Health Sciences, Center for Experimental Research and Medical Studies, AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, University of Turin, Turin, Italy Abstract: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA is a lethal disease and is one of the cancers that is most resistant to traditional therapies. Historically, neither chemotherapy nor radiotherapy has provided any significant increase in the survival of patients with PDA. Despite intensive efforts, any attempts to improve the survival in the past 15 years have failed. This holds true even after the introduction of molecularly targeted agents, chosen on the basis of their involvement in pathways that are considered to be important in PDA development and progression. Recently, however, FOLFIRINOX (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin treatment has provided a limited survival advantage in patients with advanced PDA. Therefore, effective therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to improve the survival rate of patients with PDA. Results from the last 10 years of research in the field of PDA have helped to identify new immunological targets and develop new vaccines that are capable of stimulating an immune response. In addition, the information obtained about the role of the tumor microenvironment in suppressing the immune response and the possibility of targeting PDA microenvironment to limit immune suppression and enhance the response of effector T-cells has opened new avenues for treating this incurable disease. The time is ripe for developing new therapeutic approaches that are able to effectively counteract the progression and spreading of PDA. This review discusses the potential prospects in the care of patients with pancreatic cancer through vaccination and its combination therapy with surgery, chemotherapy, targeting of the tumor microenvironment, and inhibition of immunological

  3. A safety and feasibility study of an allogeneic colon cancer cell vaccine administered with a granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor-producing bystander cell line in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Edil, Barish H; Soares, Kevin C; El-Shami, Khaled; Uram, Jennifer N; Judkins, Carol; Zhang, Zhe; Onners, Beth; Laheru, Daniel; Pardoll, Drew; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Schulick, Richard D

    2014-11-01

    Despite recent advances in earlier detection and improvements in chemotherapy, the 5-year survival rate of patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma remains poor. Immunotherapy is a potentially effective therapeutic approach to the treatment of colorectal carcinoma. Preclinical studies have supported the antitumor activity of immunization with a granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) producing murine colon tumor cell vaccine. A novel colorectal cancer vaccine composed of irradiated, allogeneic human colon cancer cells and GM-CSF-producing bystander cells was developed and tested in combination with a single intravenous low dose of cyclophosphamide in a phase 1 study of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. A total of nine patients were enrolled onto and treated in this study. Six patients had a history of colorectal adenocarcinoma hepatic metastases and underwent curative metastasectomy, while three other patients had unresectable stage IV disease. This study demonstrates the safety and feasibility of this vaccine administered in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. At last follow-up, the six patients who underwent curative metastasectomy survived longer than 36 months, and four of these six patients were without disease recurrence. Immunologic correlate results suggest that the GM-CSF-producing colon cancer vaccine enhances the production of anti-MUC1 antibodies. This vaccine is feasible and safe. Future investigation of the efficacy and antitumor immunity of this vaccine is warranted.

  4. Improvement of different vaccine delivery systems for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaiyan Shima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer vaccines are the promising tools in the hands of the clinical oncologist. Many tumor-associated antigens are excellent targets for immune therapy and vaccine design. Optimally designed cancer vaccines should combine the best tumor antigens with the most effective immunotherapy agents and/or delivery strategies to achieve positive clinical results. Various vaccine delivery systems such as different routes of immunization and physical/chemical delivery methods have been used in cancer therapy with the goal to induce immunity against tumor-associated antigens. Two basic delivery approaches including physical delivery to achieve higher levels of antigen production and formulation with microparticles to target antigen-presenting cells (APCs have demonstrated to be effective in animal models. New developments in vaccine delivery systems will improve the efficiency of clinical trials in the near future. Among them, nanoparticles (NPs such as dendrimers, polymeric NPs, metallic NPs, magnetic NPs and quantum dots have emerged as effective vaccine adjuvants for infectious diseases and cancer therapy. Furthermore, cell-penetrating peptides (CPP have been known as attractive carrier having applications in drug delivery, gene transfer and DNA vaccination. This review will focus on the utilization of different vaccine delivery systems for prevention or treatment of cancer. We will discuss their clinical applications and the future prospects for cancer vaccine development.

  5. Therapeutic cancer vaccines in combination with conventional therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald; Junker, Niels; Ellebaek, Eva

    2010-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of most therapeutic vaccines against cancer has not yet met its promise. Data are emerging that strongly support the notion that combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies, for example, radiation and chemotherapy may improve efficacy. In particular combination...

  6. Vaccination of melanoma patients with peptide- or tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, F O; Alijagic, S; Gilliet, M; Sun, Y; Grabbe, S; Dummer, R; Burg, G; Schadendorf, D

    1998-03-01

    Melanoma is the main cause of death in patients with skin cancer. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) attack melanoma cells in an HLA-restricted and tumor antigen-specific manner. Several melanoma-associated tumor antigens have been identified. These antigens are suitable candidates for a vaccination therapy of melanoma. Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells (APCs) specialized for the induction of a primary T-cell response. Mouse studies have demonstrated the potent capacity of DCs to induce antitumor immunity. In the present clinical pilot study, DCs were generated in the presence of granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin 4 (IL-4) and were pulsed with tumor lysate or a cocktail of peptides known to be recognized by CTLs, depending on the patient's HLA haplotype. Keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) was added as a CD4 helper antigen and immunological tracer molecule. Sixteen patients with advanced melanoma were immunized on an outpatient basis. Vaccination was well tolerated. No physical sign of autoimmunity was detected in any of the patients. DC vaccination induced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactivity toward KLH in all patients, as well as a positive DTH reaction to peptide-pulsed DCs in 11 patients. Recruitment of peptide-specific CTLs to the DTH challenge site was also demonstrated. Therefore, antigen-specific immunity was induced during DC vaccination. Objective responses were evident in 5 out of 16 evaluated patients (two complete responses, three partial responses) with regression of metastases in various organs (skin, soft tissue, lung, pancreas) and one additional minor response. These data indicate that vaccination with autologous DCs generated from peripheral blood is a safe and promising approach in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Further studies are necessary to demonstrate clinical effectiveness and impact on the survival of melanoma patients.

  7. Yellow Fever Vaccination of a Primary Vaccinee During Adalimumab Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Esther R; Brand, Myron; Chalkias, Spyridon

    2015-01-01

    In this case report, we describe a 63-year-old female with Crohn's disease since age 16 years, and on adalimumab therapy, who inadvertently received a yellow fever vaccine (YFV) 4 days before her next dose of adalimumab. She had never received YFV. Her next dose of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonist was held. She did not report any adverse effects referable to the vaccine. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for yellow fever (YF) viral RNA on days 12 and 18 postvaccination was negative. Neutralizing antibody to YF virus vaccine was immunoprotective on day 18 following vaccination, which further increased by day 26. A neutralizing antibody obtained 2 years following vaccination also remained immunoprotective. © 2015 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  8. Challenges and future in vaccines, drug development, and immunomodulatory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Heather M; Nau, Gerard J; Ross, Ted M; Evans, Thomas G; Chakraborty, Krishnendu; Empey, Kerry M; Flynn, JoAnne L

    2014-08-01

    Pulmonary diseases and infections are among the top contributors to human morbidity and mortality worldwide, and despite the successful history of vaccines and antimicrobial therapeutics, infectious disease still presents a significant threat to human health. Effective vaccines are frequently unavailable in developing countries, and successful vaccines have yet to be developed for major global maladies, such as tuberculosis. Furthermore, antibiotic resistance poses a growing threat to human health. The "Challenges and Future in Vaccines, Drug Development, and Immunomodulatory Therapy" session of the 2013 Pittsburgh International Lung Conference highlighted several recent and current studies related to treatment and prevention of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, highly pathogenic influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. Research presented here focused on novel antimicrobial therapies, new vaccines that are either in development or currently in clinical trials, and the potential for immunomodulatory therapies. These studies are making important contributions to the areas of microbiology, virology, and immunology related to pulmonary diseases and infections and are paving the way for improvements in the efficacy of vaccines and antimicrobials.

  9. Role of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Production by T Cells duringMycobacterium tuberculosisInfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothchild, Alissa C; Stowell, Britni; Goyal, Girija; Nunes-Alves, Cláudio; Yang, Qianting; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba; Sassetti, Christopher M; Dranoff, Glenn; Chen, Xinchun; Lee, Jinhee; Behar, Samuel M

    2017-10-24

    response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis While gamma interferon (IFN-γ) is a key effector function of T cells during infection, a failed phase IIb clinical trial and other studies have revealed that IFN-γ production alone is not sufficient to control M. tuberculosis In this study, we demonstrate that CD4 + , CD8 + , and nonconventional T cells produce GM-CSF during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice and in the peripheral blood of infected humans. Under conditions where other sources of GM-CSF are absent, T cell production of GM-CSF is protective and is required for control of infection. GM-CSF activation of macrophages to limit bacterial growth requires host expression of the transcription factor PPARγ. The identification of GM-CSF production as a T cell effector function may inform future host-directed therapy or vaccine designs. Copyright © 2017 Rothchild et al.

  10. Rituximab therapy in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis improves alveolar macrophage lipid homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malur Anagha

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rationale Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP patients exhibit an acquired deficiency of biologically active granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF attributable to GM-CSF specific autoantibodies. PAP alveolar macrophages are foamy, lipid-filled cells with impaired surfactant clearance and markedly reduced expression of the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ and the PPARγ-regulated ATP binding cassette (ABC lipid transporter, ABCG1. An open label proof of concept Phase II clinical trial was conducted in PAP patients using rituximab, a chimeric murine-human monoclonal antibody directed against B lymphocyte specific antigen CD20. Rituximab treatment decreased anti-GM-CSF antibody levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid, and 7/9 patients completing the trial demonstrated clinical improvement as measured by arterial blood oxygenation. Objectives This study sought to determine whether rituximab therapy would restore lipid metabolism in PAP alveolar macrophages. Methods BAL samples were collected from patients pre- and 6-months post-rituximab infusion for evaluation of mRNA and lipid changes. Results Mean PPARγ and ABCG1 mRNA expression increased 2.8 and 5.3-fold respectively (p ≤ 0.05 after treatment. Lysosomal phospholipase A2 (LPLA2 (a key enzyme in surfactant degradation mRNA expression was severely deficient in PAP patients pre-treatment but increased 2.8-fold post-treatment. In supplemental animal studies, LPLA2 deficiency was verified in GM-CSF KO mice but was not present in macrophage-specific PPARγ KO mice compared to wild-type controls. Oil Red O intensity of PAP alveolar macrophages decreased after treatment, indicating reduced intracellular lipid while extracellular free cholesterol increased in BAL fluid. Furthermore, total protein and Surfactant protein A were significantly decreased in the BAL fluid post therapy. Conclusions Reduction in GM-CSF

  11. Vaccines and photodynamic therapies for oral microbial-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Zhu, Wen-Hong; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2009-01-01

    The mouth is a favorable habitat for a great variety of bacteria. Microbial composition of dental plaque is the usual cause of various oral diseases in humans, including dental caries, periodontal disease and halitosis. In general, oral antibacterial agents such as antibiotics are commonly used to treat oral bacterial infection. Traditional periodontal surgery is painful and time-consuming. In addition, bacterial resistance and toxicity of antibiotics have become a global pandemic and unavoidable. Recently, vaccines for dental caries and periodontal disease have been developed and applied. Moreover, the use of photodynamic therapy has become an alternative to antibiotic drugs. The purpose of this article is to highlight the advantages of vaccine therapy and photodynamic therapy for oral microbial-related diseases compared to treatments with antimicrobial agents and traditional periodontal surgery.

  12. Vaccines and Photodynamic Therapies for Oral Microbial-Related Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Zhu, Wen-Hong; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2009-01-01

    The mouth is a favorable habitat for a great variety of bacteria. Microbial composition of dental plaque is the usual cause of various oral diseases in humans, including dental caries, periodontal disease and halitosis. In general, oral antibacterial agents such as antibiotics are commonly used to treat oral bacterial infection. Traditional periodontal surgery is painful and time-consuming. In addition, bacterial resistance and toxicity of antibiotics have become a global pandemic and unavoidable. Recently, vaccines for dental caries and periodontal disease have been developed and applied. Moreover, the use of photodynamic therapy has become an alternative to antibiotic drugs. The purpose of this article is to highlight the advantages of vaccine therapy and photodynamic therapy for oral microbial-related diseases compared to treatments with antimicrobial agents and traditional periodontal surgery. PMID:19149517

  13. Intrinsic MyD88-Akt1-mTOR Signaling Coordinates Disparate Tc17 and Tc1 Responses during Vaccine Immunity against Fungal Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Som Gowda Nanjappa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections have skyrocketed in immune-compromised patients lacking CD4+ T cells, underscoring the need for vaccine prevention. An understanding of the elements that promote vaccine immunity in this setting is essential. We previously demonstrated that vaccine-induced IL-17A+ CD8+ T cells (Tc17 are required for resistance against lethal fungal pneumonia in CD4+ T cell-deficient hosts, whereas the individual type I cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α and GM-CSF, are dispensable. Here, we report that T cell-intrinsic MyD88 signals are crucial for these Tc17 cell responses and vaccine immunity against lethal fungal pneumonia in mice. In contrast, IFN-γ+ CD8+ cell (Tc1 responses are largely normal in the absence of intrinsic MyD88 signaling in CD8+ T cells. The poor accumulation of MyD88-deficient Tc17 cells was not linked to an early onset of contraction, nor to accelerated cell death or diminished expression of anti-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL. Instead, intrinsic MyD88 was required to sustain the proliferation of Tc17 cells through the activation of mTOR via Akt1. Moreover, intrinsic IL-1R and TLR2, but not IL-18R, were required for MyD88 dependent Tc17 responses. Our data identify unappreciated targets for augmenting adaptive immunity against fungi. Our findings have implications for designing fungal vaccines and immune-based therapies in immune-compromised patients.

  14. Cancer treatment: the combination of vaccination with other therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M.H.; Sorensen, R.B.; Schrama, D.

    2008-01-01

    approach to fight cancer, the combination with additional therapy could create a number of synergistic effects. Herein we discuss the possibilities and prospects of vaccination when combined with other treatments. In this regard, cell death upon drug exposure may be immunogenic or non-immunogenic depending...... and endothelial cells. The efficacy of therapeutic vaccination against cancer will over the next few years be studied in settings taking advantage of strategies in which vaccination is combined with other treatment modalities. These combinations should be based on current knowledge not only regarding the biology...... of the cancer cell per se, but also considering how treatment may influence the malignant cell population as well as the immune system Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11...

  15. Varicella Vaccination of Children With Leukemia Without Interruption of Maintenance Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedegaard, Lotte Møller; Poulsen, Anja; Kristensen, Ines Ackerl

    2016-01-01

    of vaccination and (5) receiving maintenance therapy. Results: Forty-five children were vaccinated. No child died or experienced serious adverse events due to VZV vaccination. Nine children developed late chickenpox despite vaccination. Long-term protection was found in 86% of children not receiving acyclovir......, a vaccine-induced rash reduced the risk of late chickenpox [hazard ratio = 0.08 (0.01, 0.66), P = 0.02]. No child had interruption of maintenance therapy at the time of vaccination, but 33% experienced discontinuation of therapy due to vaccine-induced rash. Dexamethasone was associated with an increased......Background: Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) can be fatal or cause severe complications in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This analysis set out to investigate the morbidity and mortality of VZV vaccination without interruption of maintenance therapy in children with ALL. Methods...

  16. Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines in Combination with Conventional Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mads Hald Andersen; Niels Junker; Eva Ellebaek; Inge Marie Svane; Per thor Straten

    2010-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of most therapeutic vaccines against cancer has not yet met its promise. Data are emerging that strongly support the notion that combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies, for example, radiation and chemotherapy may improve efficacy. In particular combination with chemotherapy may lead to improved clinical efficacy by clearing suppressor cells, reboot of the immune system, by rendering tumor cells more susceptible to immune mediated killing, or by activation o...

  17. Gene therapy of cancer by vaccines carrying inserted immunostimulatory genes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2007), s. 71-73 ISSN 0015-5500 Grant - others:EU-FP6 NoE Clinigene(XE) 018933; Liga proti rakovině, Praha(CZ) XX Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : gene therapy * immunostimulatory genes * vaccine Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.596, year: 2007

  18. Phase I trial of anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody hu3F8 plus GM-CSF: Impact of body weight, immunogenicity and anti-GD2 response on pharmacokinetics and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Irene Y; Kushner, Brian H; Modak, Shakeel; Basu, Ellen M; Roberts, Stephen S; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2017-01-01

    Fifty-seven stage 4 patients with refractory/relapsed neuroblastoma were enrolled in a phase I trial (Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01757626) using humanized anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody hu3F8 in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The influence of body weight and human anti-human antibody (HAHA) on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of hu3F8, and the effect of de novo anti-GD2 response on patient outcome were explored. Serum samples before hu3F8 infusion, and serially up to day 12 during treatment cycle #1, and at 5 min after each hu3F8 infusion for all subsequent cycles were collected. PK was analyzed using non-compartmental modeling. Immunogenicity was assayed by HAHA response, and vaccination effect by induced host anti-GD2 response measured periodically until disease progression or last followup. Progression-free and overall survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Despite dosing being based on body weight, smaller patients had consistently lower area-under-the-curve and faster clearance over the 15 dose levels (0.9 to 9.6 mg/kg per treatment cycle) in this trial. Positive HAHA, defined by the upper limit of normal, when measured within 10 days from the last hu3F8 dose received, was associated with significantly lower serum hu3F8. Despite prior sensitization to other anti-GD2 antibody, e.g. mouse 3F8 or ch14.18, 75% of the patients never developed HAHA response even after getting more treatment cycles. Hu3F8 induced a de novo anti-GD2 response in patients, which was prognostic of progression-free survival. We conclude that hu3F8 had low immunogenicity. During treatment, positive HAHA and low body weight affected PK adversely, whereas induced anti-GD2 response was an outcome predictor.

  19. Varicella Vaccination of Children With Leukemia Without Interruption of Maintenance Therapy: A Danish Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedegaard, Lotte Møller; Poulsen, Anja; Kristensen, Ines Ackerl; Rosthøj, Susanne; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Nygaard, Ulrikka

    2016-11-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) can be fatal or cause severe complications in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This analysis set out to investigate the morbidity and mortality of VZV vaccination without interruption of maintenance therapy in children with ALL. Files of 73 seronegative children with ALL were examined for data regarding VZV vaccination and infection, and long-term seroconversion was measured. Criteria before VZV vaccination were (1) seronegative, (2) in complete remission, (3) age ≥ 1.0 year, (4) lymphocyte count ≥ 0.6 × 10/L at time of vaccination and (5) receiving maintenance therapy. Forty-five children were vaccinated. No child died or experienced serious adverse events due to VZV vaccination. Nine children developed late chickenpox despite vaccination. Long-term protection was found in 86% of children not receiving acyclovir and 78% of the entire population. Long-term seroconversion was found in 52% of the children. There were no severe cases of varicella infection. Acyclovir prophylaxis postvaccination was associated with an increased risk of late chickenpox [hazard ratio = 5.40 (1.43, 20.41), P = 0.01]. In contrast, a vaccine-induced rash reduced the risk of late chickenpox [hazard ratio = 0.08 (0.01, 0.66), P = 0.02]. No child had interruption of maintenance therapy at the time of vaccination, but 33% experienced discontinuation of therapy due to vaccine-induced rash. Dexamethasone was associated with an increased risk of vaccine-induced rash [hazard ratio = 2.9 (1.21, 6.90), P = 0.02]. This analysis indicates that VZV vaccination is feasible and justified in seronegative children with ALL, in countries where VZV vaccination is not part of the national vaccination program.

  20. GM-CSF negatively regulates early IL-10 mediated responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilbers, R.H.P.; Westerhof, L.B.; Raaij, van D.R.; Smant, G.; Bakker, J.; Schots, A.

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory disorders are becoming more prevalent in the Western world. Treatment of these diseases relies on the intervention in inflammatory responses thereby restoring immune homeostasis. One cytokine that has the potential to restore immune homeostasis is the anti-inflammatory cytokine

  1. Combination immunotherapy and active-specific tumor cell vaccination augments anti-cancer immunity in a mouse model of gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Engel Natasja K

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Active-specific immunotherapy used as an adjuvant therapeutic strategy is rather unexplored for cancers with poorly characterized tumor antigens like gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to augment a therapeutic immune response to a low immunogenic tumor cell line derived from a spontaneous gastric tumor of a CEA424-SV40 large T antigen (CEA424-SV40 TAg transgenic mouse. Methods Mice were treated with a lymphodepleting dose of cyclophosphamide prior to reconstitution with syngeneic spleen cells and vaccination with a whole tumor cell vaccine combined with GM-CSF (a treatment strategy abbreviated as LRAST. Anti-tumor activity to subcutaneous tumor challenge was examined in a prophylactic as well as a therapeutic setting and compared to corresponding controls. Results LRAST enhances tumor-specific T cell responses and efficiently inhibits growth of subsequent transplanted tumor cells. In addition, LRAST tended to slow down growth of established tumors. The improved anti-tumor immune response was accompanied by a transient decrease in the frequency and absolute number of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells (Tregs. Conclusions Our data support the concept that whole tumor cell vaccination in a lymphodepleted and reconstituted host in combination with GM-CSF induces therapeutic tumor-specific T cells. However, the long-term efficacy of the treatment may be dampened by the recurrence of Tregs. Strategies to counteract suppressive immune mechanisms are required to further evaluate this therapeutic vaccination protocol.

  2. Co-expression of HIV-1 virus-like particles and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor by GEO-D03 DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellerstein, Michael; Xu, Yongxian; Marino, Tracie; Lu, Shan; Yi, Hong; Wright, Elizabeth R; Robinson, Harriet L

    2012-11-01

    Here, we report on GEO-D03, a DNA vaccine that co-expresses non-infectious HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs) and the human cytokine, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The virus-like particles display the native gp160 form of the HIV-1 Envelope glycoprotein (Env) and are designed to elicit antibody against the natural form of Env on virus and virus-infected cells. The DNA-expressed HIV Gag, Pol and Env proteins also have the potential to elicit virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. The purpose of the co-expressed GM-CSF is to target a cytokine that recruits, expands and differentiates macrophages and dendritic cells to the site of VLP expression. The GEO-D03 DNA vaccine is currently entered into human trials as a prime for a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) boost. In preclinical studies in macaques using an SIV prototype vaccine, this vaccination regimen elicited both anti-viral T cells and antibody, and provided 70% protection against acquisition during 12 weekly rectal exposures with a heterologous SIV. Higher avidity of the Env-specific Ab for the native form of the Env in the challenge virus correlated with lower likelihood of SIV infection.

  3. Phase II Study of Adjuvant Immunotherapy with the CSF-470 Vaccine Plus Bacillus Calmette–Guerin Plus Recombinant Human Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor vs Medium-Dose Interferon Alpha 2B in Stages IIB, IIC, and III Cutaneous Melanoma Patients: A Single Institution, Randomized Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Mordoh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The irradiated, allogeneic, cellular CSF-470 vaccine plus Bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG and recombinant human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF is being tested against medium-dose IFN-α2b in stages IIB–III cutaneous melanoma (CM patients (pts after surgery in an open, randomized, Phase II/III study. We present the results of the Phase II part of the ongoing CASVAC-0401 study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01729663. Thirty-one pts were randomized to the CSF-470 vaccine (n = 20 or to the IFN-α2b arm (n = 11. During the 2-year treatment, immunized pts should receive 13 vaccinations. On day 1 of each visit, 1.6 × 107 irradiated CSF-470 cells plus 106 colony-forming units BCG plus 100 µg rhGM-CSF were administered intradermally, followed on days 2–4 by 100 µg rhGM-CSF. IFN-α2b pts should receive 10 million units (MU/day/5 days a week for 4 weeks; then 5 MU thrice weekly for 23 months. Toxicity and quality of life (QOL were evaluated at each visit. With a mean and a maximum follow-up of 39.4 and 83 months, respectively, a significant benefit in the distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS for CSF-470 was observed (p = 0.022. Immune monitoring showed an increase in antitumoral cellular and humoral response in vaccinated pts. CSF-470 was well tolerated; 20/20 pts presented grades 1–2 dermic reactions at the vaccination site; 3/20 pts presented grade 3 allergic reactions. Other adverse events (AEs were grade 1. Pts in the IFN-α2b arm presented grades 2–3 hematological (7/11, hepatic (2/11, and cardiac (1/11 toxicity; AEs in 9/11 pts forced treatment interruptions. QOL was significantly superior in the vaccine arm (p < 0.0001. Our results suggest that CSF-470 vaccine plus BCG plus GM-CSF can significantly prolong, with lower toxicity, the DMFS of high-risk CM pts with respect to medium-dose IFN-α2b. The continuation of a Phase III part of the CASVAC-0401 study is encouraged.

  4. Vaccination with Irradiated Tumor Cells Engineered to Secrete Murine Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Stimulates Potent, Specific, and Long-Lasting Anti-Tumor Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranoff, Glenn; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Lazenby, Audrey; Golumbek, Paul; Levitsky, Hyam; Brose, Katja; Jackson, Valerie; Hamada, Hirofumi; Pardoll, Drew; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1993-04-01

    To compare the ability of different cytokines and other molecules to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cells, we generated 10 retroviruses encoding potential immunomodulators and studied the vaccination properties of murine tumor cells transduced by the viruses. Using a B16 melanoma model, in which irradiated tumor cells alone do not stimulate significant anti-tumor immunity, we found that irradiated tumor cells expressing murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulated potent, long-lasting, and specific anti-tumor immunity, requiring both CD4^+ and CD8^+ cells. Irradiated cells expressing interleukins 4 and 6 also stimulated detectable, but weaker, activity. In contrast to the B16 system, we found that in a number of other tumor models, the levels of anti-tumor immunity reported previously in cytokine gene transfer studies involving live, transduced cells could be achieved through the use of irradiated cells alone. Nevertheless, manipulation of the vaccine or challenge doses made it possible to demonstrate the activity of murine GM-CSF in those systems as well. Overall, our results have important implications for the clinical use of genetically modified tumor cells as therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  5. Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines in Combination with Conventional Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mads Hald Andersen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical efficacy of most therapeutic vaccines against cancer has not yet met its promise. Data are emerging that strongly support the notion that combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies, for example, radiation and chemotherapy may improve efficacy. In particular combination with chemotherapy may lead to improved clinical efficacy by clearing suppressor cells, reboot of the immune system, by rendering tumor cells more susceptible to immune mediated killing, or by activation of cells of the immune system. In addition, a range of tumor antigens have been characterized to allow targeting of proteins coupled to intrinsic properties of cancer cells. For example, proteins associated with drug resistance can be targeted, and form ideal target structures for use in combination with chemotherapy for killing of surviving drug resistant cancer cells. Proteins associated with the malignant phenotype can be targeted to specifically target cancer cells, but proteins targeted by immunotherapy may also simultaneously target cancer cells as well as suppressive cells in the tumor stroma.

  6. Early Events of the Reaction Elicited by CSF-470 Melanoma Vaccine Plus Adjuvants: An In Vitro Analysis of Immune Recruitment and Cytokine Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampena, María B.; Barrio, María M.; Juliá, Estefanía P.; Blanco, Paula A.; von Euw, Erika M.; Mordoh, José; Levy, Estrella Mariel

    2017-01-01

    In a previous work, we showed that CSF-470 vaccine plus bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as adjuvants resulted in a significant benefit in the distant metastasis-free survival when comparing vaccinated vs. IFN-α2b-treated high-risk cutaneous melanoma patients in a Phase II study. Immune monitoring demonstrated an increase in anti-tumor innate and adaptive immunities of vaccinated patients, with a striking increase in IFN-γ secreting lymphocytes specific for melanoma antigens (Ags). In an effort to dissect the first steps of the immune response elicited by CSF-470 vaccine plus adjuvants, we evaluated, in an in vitro model, leukocyte migration, cytokine production, and monocyte phagocytosis of vaccine cells. Our results demonstrate that leukocytes recruitment, mostly from the innate immune system, is an early event after CSF-470 vaccine plus BCG plus GM-CSF interaction with immune cells, possibly explained by the high expression of CCL2/MCP-1 and other chemokines by vaccine cells. Early release of TNF-α and IL-1β pro-inflammatory cytokines and efficient tumor Ags phagocytosis by monocytes take place and would probably create a favorable context for Ag processing and presentation. Although the presence of the vaccine cells hampered cytokines production stimulated by BCG in a mechanism partially mediated by TGF-β and IL-10, still significant levels of TNF-α and IL-1β could be detected. Thus, BCG was required to induce local inflammation in the presence of CSF-470 vaccine cells. PMID:29109725

  7. Early Events of the Reaction Elicited by CSF-470 Melanoma Vaccine Plus Adjuvants: An In Vitro Analysis of Immune Recruitment and Cytokine Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María B. Pampena

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In a previous work, we showed that CSF-470 vaccine plus bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF as adjuvants resulted in a significant benefit in the distant metastasis-free survival when comparing vaccinated vs. IFN-α2b-treated high-risk cutaneous melanoma patients in a Phase II study. Immune monitoring demonstrated an increase in anti-tumor innate and adaptive immunities of vaccinated patients, with a striking increase in IFN-γ secreting lymphocytes specific for melanoma antigens (Ags. In an effort to dissect the first steps of the immune response elicited by CSF-470 vaccine plus adjuvants, we evaluated, in an in vitro model, leukocyte migration, cytokine production, and monocyte phagocytosis of vaccine cells. Our results demonstrate that leukocytes recruitment, mostly from the innate immune system, is an early event after CSF-470 vaccine plus BCG plus GM-CSF interaction with immune cells, possibly explained by the high expression of CCL2/MCP-1 and other chemokines by vaccine cells. Early release of TNF-α and IL-1β pro-inflammatory cytokines and efficient tumor Ags phagocytosis by monocytes take place and would probably create a favorable context for Ag processing and presentation. Although the presence of the vaccine cells hampered cytokines production stimulated by BCG in a mechanism partially mediated by TGF-β and IL-10, still significant levels of TNF-α and IL-1β could be detected. Thus, BCG was required to induce local inflammation in the presence of CSF-470 vaccine cells.

  8. Clinical application of dendritic cells in cancer vaccination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Inge Marie; Soot, Mette Line; Buus, Søren

    2003-01-01

    for large-scale generation of dendritic cells for clinical applications has made possible phase I/II studies designed to analyze the toxicity, feasibility and efficacy of this approach. In clinical trials, DC-based vaccination of patients with advanced cancer has in many cases led to immunity...... endpoints, including toxicity and response evaluation. This paper aims to review the technical aspects and clinical impact of vaccination trials, focusing on the generation of DC-based vaccines, evaluation of immunologic parameters and design of clinical trials necessary to meet the need for good laboratory...

  9. The therapeutic HIV Env C5/gp41 vaccine candidate Vacc-C5 induces specific T cell regulation in a phase I/II clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekke, Kristin; Sommerfelt, Maja; Ökvist, Mats; Dyrhol-Riise, Anne Margarita; Kvale, Dag

    2017-03-24

    Levels of non-neutralising antibodies (AB) to the C5 domain of HIV Env gp120 are inversely related to progression of HIV infection. In this phase I/II clinical study we investigated safety of Vacc-C5, a peptide-based therapeutic vaccine candidate corresponding to C5/gp41732-744 as well as the effects on pre-existing AB levels to C5/gp41732-744, immune activation and T cell responses including exploratory assessments of Vacc-C5-induced T cell regulation. Our hypothesis was that exposure of the C5 peptide motif may have detrimental effects due to several of its HLA-like features and that enhancement of non-neutralising anti-C5 AB by vaccination could reduce C5 exposure and thereby chronic immune activation. Thirty-six HIV patients on effective antiretroviral therapy were randomised to one of three dose levels of Vacc-C5 administered intramuscularly with Alhydrogel or intradermally with GM-CSF as adjuvant through initial immunisation and two booster periods over 26 weeks. Vacc-C5-specific AB were measured by ELISA and T cell responses by both IFN-γ ELISPOT and proliferative assays analysed by flow cytometry. Immune regulation was assessed by functional blockade of the two inhibitory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-β in parallel cultures. Non-parametric statistical tests were applied. Vacc-C5 was found safe and well tolerated in all patients. Only marginal changes in humoral and cellular responses were induced, without any effect on immune activation. Overall, anti-Vacc-C5 AB levels seemed to decrease compared to pre-existing levels. Whereas Vacc-C5-specific CD8+ T cell proliferative responses increased after the first booster period (p = 0.020; CD4+, p = 0.057), they were reduced after the second. In contrast, Vacc-C5-induced T cell regulation increased after completed vaccination (p ≤ 0.027) and was lower at baseline in the few AB responders identified (p = 0.027). The therapeutic HIV vaccine candidate Vacc-C5 safely induced only marginal immune responses

  10. Mucosal Vaccination and Therapy with Genetically Modified Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, J.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have proved to be effective mucosal delivery vehicles that overcome the problem of delivering functional proteins to the mucosal tissues. By the intranasal route, both live and killed LAB vaccine strains have been shown to elicit mucosal and systemic immune responses that

  11. Design and characterization of the tumor vaccine MGN1601, allogeneic fourfold gene-modified vaccine cells combined with a TLR-9 agonist

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    Barbara Volz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tumor vaccine MGN1601 was designed and developed for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC. MGN1601 consists of a combination of fourfold gene-modified cells with the toll-like receptor 9 agonist dSLIM, a powerful connector of innate and adaptive immunity. Vaccine cells originate from a renal cell carcinoma cell line (grown from renal cell carcinoma tissue, express a variety of known tumor-associated antigens (TAA, and are gene modified to transiently express two co-stimulatory molecules, CD80 and CD154, and two cytokines, GM-CSF and IL-7, aimed to support immune response. Proof of concept of the designed vaccine was shown in mice: The murine homologue of the vaccine efficiently (100% prevented tumor growth when used as prophylactic vaccine in a syngeneic setting. Use of the vaccine in a therapeutic setting showed complete response in 92% of mice as well as synergistic action and necessity of the components. In addition, specific cellular and humoral immune responses in mice were found when used in an allogeneic setting. Immune response to the vaccine was also shown in mRCC patients treated with MGN1601: Peptide array analysis revealed humoral CD4-based immune response to TAA expressed on vaccine cells, including survivin, cyclin D1, and stromelysin.

  12. Disabilities in multibacillary leprosy following multidrug therapy with and without immunotherapy with Mycobacterium w antileprosy vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P; Kar, H K; Misra, R S; Mukherjee, A; Kaur, H; Mukherjee, R; Rani, R

    1999-09-01

    A vaccine based on autoclaved Mycobacterium w was administered, in addition to standard multidrug therapy (MDT), to 157 bacteriologically positive, lepromin-negative, multibacillary leprosy patients supported by a well-matched control group of 147 patients with similar type of disease who received a placebo injection in addition to MDT. The MDT was given for a minimum period of 2 years and continued until skin-smear negativity, while the vaccine/placebo was given at 3-month intervals up to a maximum of 8 doses in the initial 2 years. The overall incidence of type 1 and type 2 reactions and neuritis during treatment and follow up was nearly equal in the patients in the vaccine and placebo groups; the differences were not statistically significant. The occurrence of disabilities, such as anesthesia, trophic ulcers, claw hand and grade 3 deformities, were not different statistically in the vaccine and placebo groups, an observation valid both for deformities present at induction and for those which developed during the course of therapy and surveillance. A statistically significant difference was observed in the recovery of newly developed trophic ulcers; recovery was quicker in the vaccine group. The recovery rate for motor deformities was marginally higher in the vaccine group, although not significant (p = 0.068) statistically. There was a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of grade 3 deformities following MDT with and without immunotherapy. To conclude, the addition of vaccine to MDT did not precipitate neuritis or deformities over and above that encountered with MDT alone, although it did accelerate bacteriological clearance, histopathological upgrading, conversion to lepromin positivity, and clinical improvement.

  13. A Novel Rabies Vaccine Expressing CXCL13 Enhances Humoral Immunity by Recruiting both T Follicular Helper and Germinal Center B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhao; Li, Mingming; Zhou, Ming; Zhang, Yajing; Yang, Jie; Cao, Yandi; Wang, Kunlun; Cui, Min; Chen, Huanchun; Fu, Zhen F; Zhao, Ling

    2017-02-01

    Rabies remains a public health threat in most parts of the world, and approximately 99% of the cases are transmitted by dogs. There is an urgent need to develop an efficacious and affordable vaccine to control canine-transmitted rabies in developing countries. Our previous studies demonstrate that overexpression of chemokines/cytokines such as CCL-3 (MIP-1α) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can enhance the immunogenicity of rabies vaccines. In the present study, the chemokine CXCL13 was inserted into the genome of the recombinant rabies virus (rRABV) strain LBNSE, and the effect of the chemokine CXCL13 on the immunogenicity of RABV was investigated. It was found that LBNSE-CXCL13 recruited follicular helper T (Tfh) and germinal center (GC) B cells, promoted the formation of GCs, and increased the population of plasma cells in immunized mice. Further studies showed that mice immunized with LBNSE-CXCL13 produced more rabies virus-neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) and developed better protection than those immunized with the parent virus LBNSE or the GM-CSF-expressing RABV (LBNSE-GM-CSF). Collectively, these findings provide a better understanding of the role of CXCL13 expression in the immunogenicity of the RABV, which may help in designing more-efficacious rabies vaccines. Rabies is endemic in most parts of the world, and more effort is needed to develop affordable and effective vaccines to control or eliminate this disease. The chemokine CXCL13 recruits both Tfh and B cells, which is essential for the homing of Tfh cells and the development of B cell follicles. In this study, the effect of the overexpression of CXCL13 on the immunogenicity of the RABV was evaluated in a mouse model. We found that CXCL13 expression promoted humoral immunity by recruiting Tfh and GC B cells, facilitating the formation of GCs, and increasing the number of plasma cells. As expected, the overexpression of CXCL13 resulted in enhanced virus-neutralizing antibody

  14. Mucosal vaccination and therapy with genetically modified lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have proved to be effective mucosal delivery vehicles that overcome the problem of delivering functional proteins to the mucosal tissues. By the intranasal route, both live and killed LAB vaccine strains have been shown to elicit mucosal and systemic immune responses that afford protection against infectious challenges. To be effective via oral administration, frequent dosing over several weeks is required but new targeting and adjuvant strategies have clearly demonstrated the potential to increase the immunogenicity and protective immunity of LAB vaccines. Oral administration of Lactococcus lactis has been shown to induce antigen-specific oral tolerance (OT) to secreted recombinant antigens. LAB delivery is more efficient at inducing OT than the purified antigen, thus avoiding the need for purification of large quantities of antigen. This approach holds promise for new therapeutic interventions in allergies and antigen-induced autoimmune diseases. Several clinical and research reports demonstrate considerable progress in the application of genetically modified L. lactis for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). New medical targets are on the horizon, and the approval by several health authorities and biosafety committees of a containment system for a genetically modified L. lactis that secretes Il-10 should pave the way for new LAB delivery applications in the future.

  15. DNA-based vaccines: the future of multiple sclerosis therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stüve, Olaf; Cravens, Petra D; Eagar, Todd N

    2008-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common human inflammatory, demyelinating and degenerative disorder of the CNS. Based mostly on work in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, CD4(+) T cells were long thought to play the crucial role in MS pathogenesis. Only more recently has it been recognized that other effector cell types, including CD8(+) T cells, gammadelta-T cells and B lymphocytes may also have an important role in disease initiation and perpetuation. The expression of soluble inflammatory mediators, including cytokines and free radicals, may be one of the late pathways mediating CNS tissue damage. In addition, in virtually all patients with MS, an oligoclonal banding pattern of antibodies can be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). However, the cause of MS still remains unknown. Specifically, no single foreign or self antigen has been identified to account for clinical disease activity or the presence of surrogate disease markers. All approved pharmacotherapies have anti-inflammatory or immunoregulatory properties and work in early stages of the disease. In a recent clinical trial, BHT-3009, a DNA vaccine encoding full-length human myelin basic protein, was tested in patient with MS. BHT-3009 was safe and well tolerated. In addition, immunization with BHT-3009 induced anti-inflammatory antigen-specific immune changes consisting of a marked decrease in T-cell proliferation of IFN gamma production and a reduction in titers of myelin-specific autoantibodies in the CSF. This review will discuss these intriguing observations and the overall potential of DNA vaccination in MS.

  16. Primary cultured fibroblasts derived from patients with chronic wounds: a methodology to produce human cell lines and test putative growth factor therapy such as GMCSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coppock Donald L

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple physiologic impairments are responsible for chronic wounds. A cell line grown which retains its phenotype from patient wounds would provide means of testing new therapies. Clinical information on patients from whom cells were grown can provide insights into mechanisms of specific disease such as diabetes or biological processes such as aging. The objective of this study was 1 To culture human cells derived from patients with chronic wounds and to test the effects of putative therapies, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF on these cells. 2 To describe a methodology to create fibroblast cell lines from patients with chronic wounds. Methods Patient biopsies were obtained from 3 distinct locations on venous ulcers. Fibroblasts derived from different wound locations were tested for their migration capacities without stimulators and in response to GM-CSF. Another portion of the patient biopsy was used to develop primary fibroblast cultures after rigorous passage and antimicrobial testing. Results Fibroblasts from the non-healing edge had almost no migration capacity, wound base fibroblasts were intermediate, and fibroblasts derived from the healing edge had a capacity to migrate similar to healthy, normal, primary dermal fibroblasts. Non-healing edge fibroblasts did not respond to GM-CSF. Six fibroblast cell lines are currently available at the National Institute on Aging (NIA Cell Repository. Conclusion We conclude that primary cells from chronic ulcers can be established in culture and that they maintain their in vivo phenotype. These cells can be utilized for evaluating the effects of wound healing stimulators in vitro.

  17. Concurrent dendritic cell vaccine and strontium-89 radiation therapy in the management of multiple bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Li, J; Fan, Y; Chang, K; Yang, X; Zhu, W; Wu, X; Pang, Yan

    2015-06-01

    In addition to its direct cytotoxic effects, radiation therapy renders tumor cells more susceptible to T cell-mediated cytotoxicity by modulating cell surface molecules involved in antigen presentation. The purpose of the present study was to determine the benefit of combined 89Sr radiation and dendritic cell (DC) vaccine therapy in bone metastasis patients. Patients were treated with intravenous 89Sr at a dose of 40 μCi/kg of body weight on the first day after the peripheral blood mononuclear cell collection. Seven days later, patients received DCs once a week for 6 weeks. The first three vaccines were administered by intravenous infusion, and the last three vaccines were administered by 24-point intradermal injection. Clinical response was evaluated by the number of bone metastatic foci demonstrated on bone scintigraphy; cell-mediated cytotoxicity response was evaluated by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction. All treatment-related toxicities including vaccine-induced fever and 89Sr-associated hematological toxicity were carefully monitored. Twenty-six patients with histologically diagnosed with primary cancers and multiple bone metastases demonstrated on bone scintigraphy were studied. The overall survival rate was 58.3%. The total positive DTH rate was 50%. The efficiency rate for pain relief was 60% (6/10), for quantity of life was 80%, and for clinic responses was 90%. Out of 10 cases, the Grade 1 or 2 of hematological depression in 4, erythema in 1, and fever in 7 were observed. The study has important implications for that combined 89Sr radiation, and DC vaccine therapy can benefit cancer patients with bone metastasis.

  18. Side-by-side comparison of gene-based smallpox vaccine with MVA in nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph W Golden

    Full Text Available Orthopoxviruses remain a threat as biological weapons and zoonoses. The licensed live-virus vaccine is associated with serious health risks, making its general usage unacceptable. Attenuated vaccines are being developed as alternatives, the most advanced of which is modified-vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA. We previously developed a gene-based vaccine, termed 4pox, which targets four orthopoxvirus antigens, A33, B5, A27 and L1. This vaccine protects mice and non-human primates from lethal orthopoxvirus disease. Here, we investigated the capacity of the molecular adjuvants GM-CSF and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT to enhance the efficacy of the 4pox gene-based vaccine. Both adjuvants significantly increased protective antibody responses in mice. We directly compared the 4pox plus LT vaccine against MVA in a monkeypox virus (MPXV nonhuman primate (NHP challenge model. NHPs were vaccinated twice with MVA by intramuscular injection or the 4pox/LT vaccine delivered using a disposable gene gun device. As a positive control, one NHP was vaccinated with ACAM2000. NHPs vaccinated with each vaccine developed anti-orthopoxvirus antibody responses, including those against the 4pox antigens. After MPXV intravenous challenge, all control NHPs developed severe disease, while the ACAM2000 vaccinated animal was well protected. All NHPs vaccinated with MVA were protected from lethality, but three of five developed severe disease and all animals shed virus. All five NHPs vaccinated with 4pox/LT survived and only one developed severe disease. None of the 4pox/LT-vaccinated animals shed virus. Our findings show, for the first time, that a subunit orthopoxvirus vaccine delivered by the same schedule can provide a degree of protection at least as high as that of MVA.

  19. Engineering HSV-1 vectors for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goins, William F; Huang, Shaohua; Cohen, Justus B; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2014-01-01

    Virus vectors have been employed as gene transfer vehicles for various preclinical and clinical gene therapy applications, and with the approval of Glybera (alipogene tiparvovec) as the first gene therapy product as a standard medical treatment (Yla-Herttuala, Mol Ther 20: 1831-1832, 2013), gene therapy has reached the status of being a part of standard patient care. Replication-competent herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors that replicate specifically in actively dividing tumor cells have been used in Phase I-III human trials in patients with glioblastoma multiforme, a fatal form of brain cancer, and in malignant melanoma. In fact, T-VEC (talimogene laherparepvec, formerly known as OncoVex GM-CSF) displayed efficacy in a recent Phase III trial when compared to standard GM-CSF treatment alone (Andtbacka et al. J Clin Oncol 31: sLBA9008, 2013) and may soon become the second FDA-approved gene therapy product used in standard patient care. In addition to the replication-competent oncolytic HSV vectors like T-VEC, replication-defective HSV vectors have been employed in Phase I-II human trials and have been explored as delivery vehicles for disorders such as pain, neuropathy, and other neurodegenerative conditions. Research during the last decade on the development of HSV vectors has resulted in the engineering of recombinant vectors that are totally replication defective, nontoxic, and capable of long-term transgene expression in neurons. This chapter describes methods for the construction of recombinant genomic HSV vectors based on the HSV-1 replication-defective vector backbones, steps in their purification, and their small-scale production for use in cell culture experiments as well as preclinical animal studies.

  20. Preclinical Development of TVAX: An Advanced Multiantigen Vaccine for Therapy and Prevention of Malignant Mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We proposed to evaluate the efficacy of a multi-antigen vaccine for the treatment of malignant mesothelioma (MM...Malignant Mesothelioma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Pietro Bertino CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Hawaii Systems Honolulu, HI 96822 REPORT DATE...Therapy and Prevention of Malignant Mesothelioma 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0357 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Pietro Bertino 5d

  1. Antitumor Cell-Complex Vaccines Employing Genetically Modified Tumor Cells and Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Miguel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the immune response mediated by vaccination with cell complexes composed of irradiated B16 tumor cells and mouse fibroblasts genetically modified to produce GM-CSF. The animals were vaccinated with free B16 cells or cell complexes. We employed two gene plasmid constructions: one high producer (pMok and a low producer (p2F. Tumor transplant was performed by injection of B16 tumor cells. Plasma levels of total IgG and its subtypes were measured by ELISA. Tumor volumes were measured and survival curves were obtained. The study resulted in a cell complex vaccine able to stimulate the immune system to produce specific anti-tumor membrane proteins (TMP IgG. In the groups vaccinated with cells transfected with the low producer plasmid, IgG production was higher when we used free B16 cell rather than cell complexes. Nonspecific autoimmune response caused by cell complex was not greater than that induced by the tumor cells alone. Groups vaccinated with B16 transfected with low producer plasmid reached a tumor growth delay of 92% (p ≤ 0.01. When vaccinated with cell complex, the best group was that transfected with high producer plasmid, reaching a tumor growth inhibition of 56% (p ≤ 0.05. Significant survival (40% was only observed in the groups vaccinated with free transfected B16 cells.

  2. Salmonella as live trojan horse for vaccine development and cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, María; Kramer, M Gabriela; Yim, Lucía; Chabalgoity, José A

    2010-02-01

    The design of efficient vectors for vaccine development and cancer gene therapy is an area of intensive research. Bacteria-based vectors are being investigated as optimal vehicles for antigen and therapeutic gene delivery to immune and tumour cells. Attenuated Salmonella strains have shown great potential as live vectors with broad applications in human and veterinary medicine. An impressively high, and still growing, number of reports published over the last two decades have demonstrated the effectiveness in animal models of Salmonella-based therapies for the prevention and treatment of infectious and non-infectious diseases, as well as cancer. Further, the recent dramatic expansion in knowledge of genetics, biology and pathogenesis of the bacteria allows more rational design of Salmonella constructs tailored for specific applications. However, only few clinical trials have been conducted so far, and although they have conclusively demonstrated the safety of this system, the results on immunogenicity are less than optimal. Thus, more research particularly in target species is required to bring this system closer to human and veterinary use. In this review we first describe some particularities of the bacteria and its relationship with the host that could be on the basis of its success as vector, and then summarize the different strategies used so far to develop Salmonella-based vaccines for infectious diseases as well as for non-traditional indications such as prion and Alzheimer disease vaccination. Finally, we review the many different approaches that employ Salmonella for the design of new therapies for cancer.

  3. A phase II open label trial evaluating safety and efficacy of a telomerase peptide vaccination in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayuso Carmen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sole effective option for patients with advanced HCC is sorafenib and there is an urgent need to develop new therapeutic approaches. Immunotherapy is a promising option that deserves major investigation. In this open label, single arm clinical trial, we analyzed the effect of a low dose cyclophosphamide treatment in combination with a telomerase peptide (GV1001 vaccination in patients with advanced HCC. Methods 40 patients with advanced HCC were treated with 300 mg/m2 cyclophosphamide on day -3 followed by GM-CSF + GV1001 vaccinations on days 1, 3, 5, 8, 15, 22, 36 followed by 4-weekly injections. Primary endpoint of this phase II trial was tumor response; secondary endpoints evaluated were TTP, TTSP, PFS, OS, safety and immune responses. Results None of the patients had a complete or partial response to treatment, 17 patients (45.9% demonstrated a stable disease six months after initiation of treatment. The median TTP was 57.0 days; the median TTSP was estimated to be 358.0 days. Cyclophosphamide, GV1001 and GM-CSF treatment were well tolerated and most adverse events, which were of grade 1 or 2, were generally related to the injection procedure and injection site reactions. GV1001 treatment resulted in a decrease in CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells; however, no GV1001 specific immune responses were detected after vaccination. Conclusions Low dose cyclophosphamide treatment followed by GV1001 vaccinations did not show antitumor efficacy as per tumor response and time to progression. Further studies are needed to analyze the effect of a combined chemo-immunotherapy to treat patients with HCC. Trial registration NCT00444782

  4. Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease — reinforcing the importance of vaccines in your pet's preventive health care program. Are there risks? Any treatment carries some risk, but these risks should be weighed against the benefits of protecting your pet from potentially fatal diseases. ...

  5. Epigenetic potentiation of NY-ESO-1 vaccine therapy in human ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odunsi, Kunle; Matsuzaki, Junko; James, Smitha R; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Tsuji, Takemasa; Miller, Austin; Zhang, Wa; Akers, Stacey N; Griffiths, Elizabeth A; Miliotto, Anthony; Beck, Amy; Batt, Carl A; Ritter, Gerd; Lele, Shashikant; Gnjatic, Sacha; Karpf, Adam R

    2014-01-01

    The cancer-testis/cancer-germline antigen NY-ESO-1 is a vaccine target in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but its limited expression is a barrier to vaccine efficacy. As NY-ESO-1 is regulated by DNA methylation, we hypothesized that DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors may augment NY-ESO-1 vaccine therapy. In agreement, global DNA hypomethylation in EOC was associated with the presence of circulating antibodies to NY-ESO-1. Pre-clinical studies using EOC cell lines showed that decitabine treatment enhanced both NY-ESO-1 expression and NY-ESO-1-specific CTL-mediated responses. Based on these observations, we performed a phase I dose-escalation trial of decitabine, as an addition to NY-ESO-1 vaccine and doxorubicin liposome (doxorubicin) chemotherapy, in 12 patients with relapsed EOC. The regimen was safe, with limited and clinically manageable toxicities. Both global and promoter-specific DNA hypomethylation occurred in blood and circulating DNAs, the latter of which may reflect tumor cell responses. Increased NY-ESO-1 serum antibodies and T cell responses were observed in the majority of patients, and antibody spreading to additional tumor antigens was also observed. Finally, disease stabilization or partial clinical response occurred in 6/10 evaluable patients. Based on these encouraging results, evaluation of similar combinatorial chemo-immunotherapy regimens in EOC and other tumor types is warranted.

  6. Development of an ultrasound-responsive and mannose-modified gene carrier for DNA vaccine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Un, Keita; Kawakami, Shigeru; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2010-10-01

    Development of a gene delivery system to transfer the gene of interest selectively and efficiently into targeted cells is essential for achievement of sufficient therapeutic effects by gene therapy. Here, we succeeded in developing the gene transfection method using ultrasound (US)-responsive and mannose-modified gene carriers, named Man-PEG(2000) bubble lipoplexes. Compared with the conventional lipofection method using mannose-modified carriers, this transfection method using Man-PEG(2000) bubble lipoplexes and US exposure enabled approximately 500-800-fold higher gene expressions in the antigen presenting cells (APCs) selectively in vivo. This enhanced gene expression was contributed by the improvement of delivering efficiency of nucleic acids to the targeted organs, and by the increase of introducing efficiency of nucleic acids into the cytoplasm followed by US exposure. Moreover, high anti-tumor effects were demonstrated by applying this method to DNA vaccine therapy using ovalbumin (OVA)-expressing plasmid DNA (pDNA). This US-responsive and cell-specific gene delivery system can be widely applied to medical treatments such as vaccine therapy and anti-inflammation therapy, which its targeted cells are APCs, and our findings may help in establishing innovative methods for in-vivo gene delivery to overcome the poor introducing efficiency of carriers into cytoplasm which the major obstacle associated with gene delivery by non-viral carriers. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Viruses, anti-viral therapy, and viral vaccines in children with immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elalfy, Mohsen S; Nugent, Diane

    2016-04-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) might be preceded by silent or overt viral infections. Similarly, anti-viral drugs and viral vaccines could also trigger ITP and might play a central role in its pathogenesis. The seasonal nature of childhood ITP suggests that viral infections might initiate immune responses that increase the predisposition and occurrence of ITP. Active cytomegalovirus or Epstein-Barr virus should be considered in differential diagnosis when thrombocytopenia is associated with lymphadenopathy, especially with splenomegaly. This review will focus on the specific association of ITP in association with viral disease and vaccinations, and will discuss the effectiveness of current therapies in light of our current understanding of viral-associated ITP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Alterations in p53-specific T cells and other lymphocyte subsets in breast cancer patients during vaccination with p53-peptide loaded dendritic cells and low-dose interleukin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Inge Marie; Pedersen, Anders E; Nikolajsen, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    We have previously established a cancer vaccine using autologous DCs, generated by in vitro stimulation with IL-4 and GM-CSF, and pulsed with six HLA-A*0201 binding wild-type p53 derived peptides. This vaccine was used in combination with low-dose interleukin-2 in a recently published clinical...... Phase II trial where 26 HLA-A2+ patients with progressive late-stage metastatic breast cancer (BC) were included. Almost 1/3rd of the patients obtained stable disease or minor regression during treatment with a positive correlation to tumour over-expression of p53. In the present study, we performed...... a comprehensive analysis of the effector stage of the p53-specific CD8+ T cells by the use of Dextramer Technology and multicolour FACS. Pre- and post-treatment blood samples from eight BC patients were analysed. Independent of clinical outcome p53-specific T cells were phenotypic distinctly antigen experienced...

  9. Detecting T-cell reactivity to whole cell vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusic, Ana; Hainz, Ursula; Wadleigh, Martha; Neuberg, Donna; Su, Mei; Canning, Christine M.; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Stone, Richard M.; Lee, Jeng-Shin; Mulligan, Richard C.; Ritz, Jerome; Dranoff, Glenn; Sasada, Tetsuro; Wu, Catherine J.

    2012-01-01

    BCR-ABL+ K562 cells hold clinical promise as a component of cancer vaccines, either as bystander cells genetically modified to express immunostimulatory molecules, or as a source of leukemia antigens. To develop a method for detecting T-cell reactivity against K562 cell-derived antigens in patients, we exploited the dendritic cell (DC)-mediated cross-presentation of proteins generated from apoptotic cells. We used UVB irradiation to consistently induce apoptosis of K562 cells, which were then fed to autologous DCs. These DCs were used to both stimulate and detect antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell reactivity. As proof-of-concept, we used cross-presented apoptotic influenza matrix protein-expressing K562 cells to elicit reactivity from matrix protein-reactive T cells. Likewise, we used this assay to detect increased anti-CML antigen T-cell reactivity in CML patients that attained long-lasting clinical remissions following immunotherapy (donor lymphocyte infusion), as well as in 2 of 3 CML patients vaccinated with lethally irradiated K562 cells that were modified to secrete high levels of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). This methodology can be readily adapted to examine the effects of other whole tumor cell-based vaccines, a scenario in which the precise tumor antigens that stimulate immune responses are unknown. PMID:23170257

  10. Alteration of the tumor stroma using a consensus DNA vaccine targeting Fibroblast Activation Protein (FAP) synergizes with anti-tumor vaccine therapy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duperret, Elizabeth K; Trautz, Aspen; Ammons, Dylan; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Wise, Megan C; Yan, Jian; Reed, Charles; Weiner, David B

    2017-12-21

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is over-expressed in cancer-associated fibroblasts and is an interesting target for cancer immune therapy, with prior studies indicating a potential to impact the tumor stroma. Our aim was to extend this earlier work through development of a novel FAP immunogen with improved capacity to break tolerance for use in combination with tumor antigen vaccines. We used a synthetic consensus (SynCon) sequence approach to provide MHC class II help to support breaking of tolerance. We evaluated immune responses and anti-tumor activity of this novel FAP vaccine in pre-clinical studies, and correlated these findings to patient data. This SynCon FAP DNA vaccine was capable of breaking tolerance and inducing both CD8+ and CD4+ immune responses. In genetically diverse, outbred mice, the SynCon FAP DNA vaccine was superior at breaking tolerance compared to a native mouse FAP immunogen. In several tumor models, the SynCon FAP DNA vaccine synergized with other tumor-antigen specific DNA vaccines to enhance anti-tumor immunity. Evaluation of the tumor microenvironment showed increased CD8+ T cell infiltration and a decreased macrophage infiltration driven by FAP immunization. We extended this to patient data from the Cancer Genome Atlas, where we find high FAP expression correlates with high macrophage and low CD8+ T cell infiltration. These results suggest that immune therapy targeting tumor antigens in combination with a micro-consensus FAP vaccine provides a two fisted punch inducing responses that target both the tumor microenvironment and tumor cells directly. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. AAV2-mediated in vivo immune gene therapy of solid tumours

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Sara A

    2010-12-20

    Abstract Background Many strategies have been adopted to unleash the potential of gene therapy for cancer, involving a wide range of therapeutic genes delivered by various methods. Immune therapy has become one of the major strategies adopted for cancer gene therapy and seeks to stimulate the immune system to target tumour antigens. In this study, the feasibility of AAV2 mediated immunotherapy of growing tumours was examined, in isolation and combined with anti-angiogenic therapy. Methods Immune-competent Balb\\/C or C57 mice bearing subcutaneous JBS fibrosarcoma or Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumour xenografts respectively were treated by intra-tumoural administration of AAV2 vector encoding the immune up-regulating cytokine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and the co-stimulatory molecule B7-1 to subcutaneous tumours, either alone or in combination with intra-muscular (IM) delivery of AAV2 vector encoding Nk4 14 days prior to tumour induction. Tumour growth and survival was monitored for all animals. Cured animals were re-challenged with tumourigenic doses of the original tumour type. In vivo cytotoxicity assays were used to investigate establishment of cell-mediated responses in treated animals. Results AAV2-mediated GM-CSF, B7-1 treatment resulted in a significant reduction in tumour growth and an increase in survival in both tumour models. Cured animals were resistant to re-challenge, and induction of T cell mediated anti-tumour responses were demonstrated. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes to naïve animals prevented tumour establishment. Systemic production of Nk4 induced by intra-muscular (IM) delivery of Nk4 significantly reduced subcutaneous tumour growth. However, combination of Nk4 treatment with GM-CSF, B7-1 therapy reduced the efficacy of the immune therapy. Conclusions Overall, this study demonstrates the potential for in vivo AAV2 mediated immune gene therapy, and provides data on the inter-relationship between tumour

  12. HBIg discontinuation with maintenance oral anti-viral therapy and HBV vaccination in liver transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Nicholas K; Forman, Lisa M; Trotter, James F

    2010-02-01

    Hepatitis B (HBV) is an uncommon indication for liver transplantation in the US accounting for approximately 5% of cases. Recurrence prophylaxis is typically long-term hepatitis B immune-globulin (HBIg) and an oral anti-HBV agent. Because of high HBIg costs and improving efficacy of new oral agents, there is increasing interest in HBIg discontinuation. To describe results of a protocol at our center including HBV vaccination and HBIg discontinuation. All patients received HBIg therapy and an oral anti-viral agent from the time of transplant. Patients transplanted for HBV with a stable post-operative clinical course underwent HBV vaccination and HBIg discontinuation. After HBIg discontinuation, patients were monitored for HBV recurrence for at least one year. Recurrence was defined as either viral (HBV-DNA 10(4) copies/ml on two consecutive occasions) or hepatitis (viral recurrence with elevated liver transaminases). Of 1182 recipients, 36 (3%) had HBV. Twenty-four were excluded from the protocol, and the remaining 12 patients underwent HBIg withdrawal. Median age at HBIg discontinuation was 56 (range, 36-70) years, median time from transplant to HBIg discontinuation was 62.8 (range, 27.5-128) months, and median time of follow-up after discontinuation was 27.4 (range, 13-69) months. Of the 12 patients vaccinated, no patients maintained HBSAb >or= 10 IU/l at last follow-up. There was no viral or hepatitis recurrence and no deaths or graft loss. HBIg discontinuation with maintenance oral anti-viral monotherapy is safe and effective for HBV liver transplant recipients. Vaccination is not effective in this population.

  13. Biotechnology and genetic engineering in the new drug development. Part II. Monoclonal antibodies, modern vaccines and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjewska, Agnieszka; Kiepura, Katarzyna; Librowski, Tadeusz; Lochyński, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies, modern vaccines and gene therapy have become a major field in modern biotechnology, especially in the area of human health and fascinating developments achieved in the past decades are impressive examples of an interdisciplinary interplay between medicine, biology and engineering. Among the classical products from cells one can find viral vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and interferons, as well as recombinant therapeutic proteins. Gene therapy opens up challenging new areas. In this review, a definitions of these processes are given and fields of application and products, as well as the future prospects, are discussed.

  14. CLINICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF T C ELL-BASED VACCINE THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH PROGREDIENT MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Seledtsova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Thirty-nine patients with a progredient clinical form of chronic multiple sclerosis (MS were subject to multiple immunization with autologous polyclonal T-cell vaccines. Two years after initiating the vaccine therapy, no evidence for disease progression was noted in 16 patients (41% of total. Neurological improvement was observed in five cases (13% from the vaccine-treated group. Of 22 control MS patients who did not receive the immunotherapy, only 6 persons (27% exhibited stabilization of their clinical state. Clinical improvement was not detectable among this group of MS patients. A group of twenty-six MS patients was treated with Rebif, without evidence of disease progression in eleven cases (42%, and distinct neurological improvement noted in one patient (4% from this group. One year after starting the vaccine therapy, a rise in serum IL-10 was detected in vaccine-treated patients, whereas IL-17 and IL-18 serum levels remained within the initial ranges. A correlation between the serum levels of anti-myelin antibodies and appropriate anti-idiotypic antibodies was revealed in these patients. In general, the results obtained suggest polyclonal T-cell vaccination as a potentially effective treatment approach, both at early and more advanced stages of the disorder.

  15. A full scale comparative study of methods for generation of functional Dendritic cells for use as cancer vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvalheim Gunnar

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells with the ability to induce primary T-cell responses and are commonly produced by culturing monocytes in the presence of IL-4 and GM-CSF for 5–7 days (Standard DC. Recently, Dauer and co-workers presented a modified protocol for differentiation of human monocytes into mature DCs within 48 hours (Fast DC. Here we report a functional comparison of the two strategies for generation of DCs from human monocytes with adaptions for large-scale clinical use. Methods The Elutra Cell Selection System was used to isolate monocytes after collection of leukapheresis product. The enriched monocytes were cultured in gas permeable Teflon bags with IL-4 and GM-CSF for 24 hours (Fast DC or 5 days (Standard DC to obtain immature DCs. The cells were then transfected with mRNA from the leukemia cell line Jurkat E6 by electroporation and incubated for additional 24 h or 2 days in the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6 and PGE2 to obtain mature DCs. Results Mature Fast DC and Standard DC displayed comparable levels of many markers expressed on DC, including HLA-DR, CD83, CD86, CD208 and CCR7. However, compared to Standard DC, mature Fast DC was CD14high CD209low. Fast DC and Standard DC transfected with Jurkat E6-cell mRNA were equally able to elicit T cell specifically recognizing transfected DCs in vitro. IFNγ-secreting T cells were observed in both the CD4+ and CD8+ subsets. Conclusion Our results indicate that mature Fast DC are functional antigen presenting cells (APCs capable of inducing primary T-cell responses, and suggest that these cells may be valuable for generation of anti-tumor vaccines.

  16. Safety of live vaccines on immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory therapy-a retrospective study in three Swiss Travel Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Fabienne; Ehrensperger, Benoît; Hatz, Christoph; Chappuis, François; Bühler, Silja; Eperon, Gilles

    2018-01-01

    Patients increasingly benefit from immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory medications for a range of conditions allowing them a lifestyle similar to healthy individuals, including travel. However, the administration of live vaccines to immunodeficient patients bears the risk of replication of the attenuated vaccine microorganism. Therefore, live vaccines are generally contraindicated on immunosuppression. Data on live vaccinations on immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory medication are scarce. We identified all travellers seeking pre-travel advice in three Swiss travel clinics with a live vaccine during immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory therapy to ascertain experienced side effects. A retrospective and multi-centre study design was chosen to increase the sample size. This study was conducted in the travel clinics of the University of Zurich; the Swiss TPH, Basel; and Geneva University Hospitals. Travellers on immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory therapy who received live vaccines [yellow fever vaccination (YFV), measles/mumps/rubella (MMR), varicella and/ or oral typhoid vaccination (OTV)] between 2008 and 2015 were identified and interviewed. A total of 60 age- and sex-matched controls (matched to Basel/Zurich travel clinics travellers) were included. Overall, 197 patients were identified. And 116 patients (59%) and 60 controls were interviewed. YFV was administered 92 times, MMR 21 times, varicella 4 times and OTV 6 times to patients on immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory therapy. Most common medications were corticosteroids (n = 45), mesalazine (n = 28) and methotrexate (n = 19). Live vaccines were also administered on biological treatment, e.g. TNF-alpha inhibitors (n = 8). Systemic reactions were observed in 12.2% of the immunosuppressed vs 13.3% of controls; local reactions in 7.8% of the immunosuppressed vs 11.7% of controls. In controls, all reactions were mild/moderate. In the immunosuppressed, 2/21 severe reactions occurred: severe local pain on interferon

  17. Tumor Radiation Therapy Creates Therapeutic Vaccine Responses to the Colorectal Cancer Antigen GUCY2C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witek, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Blomain, Erik S.; Magee, Michael S.; Xiang, Bo; Waldman, Scott A. [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Snook, Adam E., E-mail: adam.snook@jefferson.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is thought to produce clinical responses in cancer patients, not only through direct toxicity to cancer cells and supporting tumor stroma cells, but also through activation of immunologic effectors. More recently, RT has potentiated the local and systemic effects of cancer immunotherapy (IT). However, combination regimens that maximize immunologic and clinical efficacy remain undefined. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the impact of local RT on adenoviral-mediated vaccination against the colorectal cancer antigen GUCY2C (Ad5-GUCY2C) in a murine subcutaneous tumor model using mouse CT26 colon cancer cells (CT26-GUCY2C). Immune responses were assessed by ELISpot, and clinical responses were assessed by tumor size and incidence. Results: The specific sequence of tumor-directed RT preceding Ad5-GUCY2C IT transformed inactive therapeutic Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination into a curative vaccine. GUCY2C-specific T cell responses were amplified (P<.05), tumor eradication was maximized (P<.01), and tumor volumes were minimized (P<.001) in mice whose tumors were irradiated before, compared with after, Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination. The immunologic and antitumor efficacy of Ad5-GUCY2C was amplified comparably by unfractionated (8 Gy × 1), or biologically equivalent doses of fractionated (3.5 Gy × 3), RT. The antitumor effects of sequential RT and IT (RT-IT) depended on expression of GUCY2C by tumor cells and the adenoviral vaccine vector, and tumor volumes were inversely related to the magnitude of GUCY2C-specific T cell responses. Moreover, mice cured of CT26-GUCY2C tumors by RT-IT showed long-lasting antigen-dependent protection, resisting tumors formed by GUCY2C-expressing 4T1 breast cancer cells inoculated 50 days after CT26 cells. Conclusions: Optimal sequencing of RT and IT amplifies antigen-specific local and systemic immune responses, revealing novel acute and long-term therapeutic antitumor protection. These observations underscore the importance

  18. Influenza vaccination and antiviral therapy: is there a role for concurrent administration in the institutionalised elderly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinka, Paul J

    2003-01-01

    Influenza vaccination is estimated to be 50-68% efficacious in preventing pneumonia, hospitalisation or death in nursing home residents. Large culture-proven outbreaks may occur despite high resident vaccination rates. There is, therefore, a significant role for concurrent administration of influenza vaccination and antiviral therapy. The use of antiviral treatment and chemoprophylaxis requires community reporting of viral isolates, and contingency plans for rapid case identification and application of antiviral therapy. Clinicians must react quickly to control a highly infectious seasonal pathogen that may strike as an explosive outbreak. This situation is unique in geriatric practice. Current antiviral treatment should be administered within 48 hours of symptom onset, and is more efficacious if administered within 12 hours. In the case of an explosive institutional outbreak, a 1-day delay in prophylaxis may allow infection of many residents with a potentially fatal illness. Influenza must be differentiated from other respiratory viruses or syndromes. Grouped rapid diagnostic tests can aid laboratory confirmation. Antiviral agents include the M(2) inhibitors, amantadine and rimantadine, active against influenza A, and the neuraminidase inhibitors, zanamivir and oseltamivir, active against influenza A and B. In our experience, influenza B illness is as severe as influenza A. All agents have similar efficacy as treatment and prophylaxis against sensitive strains. When M(2) inhibitors are used simultaneously within an enclosed space (i.e. household or nursing home) as both treatment and prophylaxis, resistant strains may emerge that limit prophylactic efficacy. When M(2) inhibitors are administered to suspected cases (residents or staff) in institutions, precautions against secretion are especially important to diminish the risk of transmission of resistant virus. Rimantadine has been shown to have significantly fewer CNS adverse events compared with amantadine

  19. A vaccine combining two Leishmania braziliensis proteins offers heterologous protection against Leishmania infantum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Mariana C; Lage, Daniela P; Martins, Vívian T; Costa, Lourena E; Lage, Letícia M R; Carvalho, Ana Maria R S; Ludolf, Fernanda; Santos, Thaís T O; Roatt, Bruno M; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Tavares, Carlos A P; Coelho, Eduardo A F

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, two Leishmania braziliensis proteins, one hypothetical and the eukaryotic initiation factor 5a (EiF5a), were cloned and used as a polyproteins vaccine for the heterologous protection of BALB/c mice against infantum infection. Animals were immunized with the antigens separately or in association, and in both cases saponin was used as an adjuvant. In the results, spleen cells from mice inoculated with the individual or polyproteins vaccine and lately challenged produced significantly higher levels of protein- and parasite-specific IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF, when both a capture ELISA and flow cytometry assays were performed. Evaluating the parasite load by a limiting dilution as well as by RT-PCR, these animals presented significant reductions in the parasite number in all evaluated organs, when compared to the control (saline and saponin) groups. The best protection was reached when the polyproteins vaccine was employed. Protection was associated with the IFN-γ production against parasite extracts, which was mediated by both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and correlated with the antileishmanial nitrite production. In this context, this vaccine combining two L. braziliensis proteins was able to induce a heterologous protection against VL, and could be considered in future studies to be tested against other Leishmania species or in other mammalian hosts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of host genetic variation on rubella-specific T cell cytokine responses following rubella vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Ryan, Jenna E; Vierkant, Robert A; O'Byrne, Megan M; Pankratz, V Shane; Jacobson, Robert M; Poland, Gregory A

    2009-05-26

    The variability of immune response modulated by immune response gene polymorphisms is a significant factor in the protective effect of vaccines. We studied the association between cellular (cytokine) immunity and HLA genes among 738 schoolchildren (396 males and 342 females) between the ages of 11 and 19 years, who received two doses of rubella vaccine (Merck). Cytokine secretion levels in response to rubella virus stimulation were determined in PBMC cultures by ELISA. Cell supernatants were assayed for Th1 (IFN-gamma, IL-2, and IL-12p40), Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10), and innate/proinflammatory (TNF-alpha, GM-CSF, and IL-6) cytokines. We found a strong association between multiple alleles of the HLA-DQA1 (global p-value 0.022) and HLA-DQB1 (global p-value 0.007) loci and variations in rubella-specific IL-2 cytokine secretion. Additionally, the relationships between alleles of the HLA-A (global p-value 0.058), HLA-B (global p-value 0.035), and HLA-C (global p-value 0.023) loci and TNF-alpha secretion suggest the importance of HLA class I molecules in innate/inflammatory immune response. Better characterization of these genetic profiles could help to predict immune responses at the individual and population level, provide data on mechanisms of immune response development, and further inform vaccine development and vaccination policies.

  1. Pre-existing adenovirus immunity modifies a complex mixed Th1 and Th2 cytokine response to an Ad5/HIV-1 vaccine candidate in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel O Pine

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of the recent Step Study highlight a need to clarify the effects of pre-existing natural immunity to a vaccine vector on vaccine-induced T-cell responses. To investigate this interaction, we examined the relationship between pre-existing Ad5 immunity and T-cell cytokine response profiles in healthy, HIV-uninfected recipients of MRKAd5 HIV-1 gag vaccine (HVTN 050, ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00849732. Participants were grouped by baseline Ad5 neutralizing antibody titer as either Ad5-seronegative (titer ≤18; n = 36 or Ad5-seropositive (titer >200; n = 34. Samples from vaccine recipients were analyzed for immune responses to either HIV-1 Gag peptide pools or Ad5 empty vector using an ex vivo assay that measures thirty cytokines in the absence of long-term culture. The overall profiles of cytokine responses to Gag and Ad5 had similar combinations of induced Th1- and Th2-type cytokines, including IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, IP-10, IL-13, and IL-10, although the Ad5-specific responses were uniformly higher than the Gag-specific responses (p<0.0001 for 9 out of 11 significantly expressed analytes. At the peak response time point, PBMC from Ad5-seronegative vaccinees secreted significantly more IP-10 in response to Gag (p = 0.008, and significantly more IP-10 (p = 0.0009, IL-2 (p = 0.006 and IL-10 (p = 0.05 in response to Ad5 empty vector than PBMC from Ad5-seropositive vaccinees. Additionally, similar responses to the Ad5 vector prior to vaccination were observed in almost all subjects, regardless of Ad5 neutralizing antibody status, and the levels of secreted IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-1Ra and GM-CSF were blunted following vaccination. The cytokine response profile of Gag-specific T cells mirrored the Ad5-specific response present in all subjects before vaccination, and included a number of Th1- and Th2-associated cytokines not routinely assessed in current vaccine trials, such as IP-10, IL-10, IL-13, and GM-CSF. Together, these

  2. Live attenuated measles virus vaccine therapy for locally established malignant glioblastoma tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Shammari AM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed M Al-Shammari,1 Farah E Ismaeel,2 Shahlaa M Salih,2 Nahi Y Yaseen11Experimental Therapy Department, Iraqi Center for Cancer and Medical Genetic Researches, Mustansiriya University, 2Departments of Biotechnology, College of Science, Al-Nahrain University, Baghdad, IraqAbstract: Glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in humans, with poor prognosis. A new glioblastoma cell line (ANGM5 was established from a cerebral glioblastoma multiforme in a 72-year-old Iraqi man who underwent surgery for an intracranial tumor. This study was carried out to evaluate the antitumor effect of live attenuated measles virus (MV Schwarz vaccine strain on glioblastoma multiforme tumor cell lines in vitro. Live attenuated MV Schwarz strain was propagated on Vero, human rhabdomyosarcoma, and human glioblastoma-multiform (ANGM5 cell lines. The infected confluent monolayer appeared to be covered with syncytia with granulation and vacuolation, as well as cell rounding, shrinkage, and large empty space with cell debris as a result of cell lysis and death. Cell lines infected with virus have the ability for hemadsorption to human red blood cells after 72 hours of infection, whereas no hemadsorption of uninfected cells is seen. Detection of MV hemagglutinin protein by monoclonal antibodies in infected cells of all cell lines by immunocytochemistry assay gave positive results (brown color in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Cell viability was measured after 72 hours of infection by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Results showed a significant cytotoxic effect for MV (P≤0.05 on growth of ANGM5 and rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines after 72 hours of infection. Induction of apoptosis by MV was assessed by measuring mitochondrial membrane potentials in tumor cells after 48, 72, and 120 hours of infection. Apoptotic cells were counted, and the mean percentage of dead cells was significantly higher after 48, 72

  3. Xenogeneic cell-based vaccine therapy for colorectal cancer: Safety, association of clinical effects with vaccine-induced immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seledtsova, G V; Shishkov, A A; Kaschenko, E A; Seledtsov, V I

    2016-10-01

    An accumulating body of evidence suggests that xenogeneic vaccines can be very effective in breaking the immune tolerance to human tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). We assessed adverse effects, as well as clinical and immune responses induced by a lyophilized xenogeneic polyantigenic vaccine (XPV) prepared from murine melanoma B16 and carcinoma LLC cells in 60 stage IV colorectal cancer patients. Neither grade III/IV toxicities, nor laboratory and clinical signs of systemic severe autoimmune disorders were documented in any XPV-treated patient. Clinical effects of various grades (complete response, partial response and disease stabilization) with duration of no shorter than 6 months was observed in 25 (41.67%) vaccinated patients. The average survival time of the XPV-treated patients was markedly longer than that of the clinically matched control patients (20 vs. 7 months). The overall 3-year survival rate in the XPV-treated and control group was 16.7% (10 patients) and 0%, respectively. Following a course of ten XPV vaccinations, peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation assays revealed increased T-cell immune responses to human Caco-2 colon adenocarcinoma-associated antigens. In addition, relative contents of CD25+ FoxP3+regulatory T-cells in patients with proven immunotherapy-mediated clinical effects (responders) were significantly decreased in the blood, which was paralleled by marked increases in serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interferon-alpha (IFN-α), IFN-ɣ, and interleukin-8 (IL-8). Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), IL-1, IL-4, and IL-6 were not affected in both responder and non-responder patients. In conclusion, this study provides evidence for the safety, clinical feasibility and immunogenicity of xenogeneic composite cell vaccine administration in colorectal cancer patients. This is the first demonstration that clinical effects of such a vaccine are associated with vaccine-induced, proinflammatory

  4. Vaccination with the Leishmania infantum ribosomal proteins induces protection in BALB/c mice against Leishmania chagasi and Leishmania amazonensis challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel A; Costa, Mariana A F; Oliveira, Dulcilene M; Ramírez, Laura; Costa, Lourena E; Duarte, Mariana C; Martins, Vivian T; Oliveira, Jamil S; Olortegi, Carlos C; Bonay, Pedro; Alonso, Carlos; Tavares, Carlos A P; Soto, Manuel; Coelho, Eduardo A F

    2010-11-01

    Leishmania chagasi and Leishmania amazonensis are the etiologic agents of different clinical forms of human leishmaniasis in South America. In an attempt to select candidate antigens for a vaccine protecting against different Leishmania species, the efficacy of vaccination using Leishmania ribosomal proteins and saponin as adjuvant was examined in BALB/c mice against challenge infection with both parasite species. Mice vaccinated with parasite ribosomal proteins purified from Leishmania infantum plus saponin showed a specific production of IFN-γ, IL-12 and GM-CSF after in vitro stimulation with L. infantum ribosomal proteins. Vaccinated mice showed a reduction in the liver and spleen parasite burdens after L. chagasi infection. After L. amazonensis challenge, vaccinated mice showed a decrease of the dermal pathology and a reduction in the parasite loads in the footpad and spleen. In both models, protection was correlated to an IL-12-dependent production of IFN-γ by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that activate macrophages for the synthesis of NO. In the protected mice a decrease in the parasite-mediated IL-4 and IL-10 responses was also observed. In mice challenged with L. amazonensis, lower levels of anti-parasite-specific antibodies were detected. Thus, Leishmania ribosomal proteins plus saponin fits the requirements to compose a pan-Leishmania vaccine. Copyright © 2010 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Increasing the efficacy of antitumor glioma vaccines by photodynamic therapy and local injection of allogeneic glioma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Peng, Qian; Madsen, Steen J.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2016-03-01

    Immunotherapy of brain tumors involves the stimulation of an antitumor immune response. This type of therapy can be targeted specifically to tumor cells thus sparing surrounding normal brain. Due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier, the brain is relatively isolated from the systemic circulation and, as such, the initiation of significant immune responses is more limited than other types of cancers. The purpose of this study was to show that the efficacy of tumor primed antigen presenting macrophage vaccines could be increased by: (1) PDT of the priming tumor cells, and (2) injection of allogeneic glioma cells directly into brain tumors. Experiments were conducted in an in vivo brain tumor model using Fisher rats and BT4C (allogeneic) and F98 (syngeneic) glioma cells. Preliminary results showed that vaccination alone had significantly less inhibitory effect on F98 tumor growth compared to the combination of vaccination and allogeneic cell (BT4C) injection.

  6. Oncolytic virus therapy: A new era of cancer treatment at dawn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Ino, Yasushi; Todo, Tomoki

    2016-10-01

    Oncolytic virus therapy is perhaps the next major breakthrough in cancer treatment following the success in immunotherapy using immune checkpoint inhibitors. Oncolytic viruses are defined as genetically engineered or naturally occurring viruses that selectively replicate in and kill cancer cells without harming the normal tissues. T-Vec (talimogene laherparepvec), a second-generation oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) armed with GM-CSF, was recently approved as the first oncolytic virus drug in the USA and Europe. The phase III trial proved that local intralesional injections with T-Vec in advanced malignant melanoma patients can not only suppress the growth of injected tumors but also act systemically and prolong overall survival. Other oncolytic viruses that are closing in on drug approval in North America and Europe include vaccinia virus JX-594 (pexastimogene devacirepvec) for hepatocellular carcinoma, GM-CSF-expressing adenovirus CG0070 for bladder cancer, and Reolysin (pelareorep), a wild-type variant of reovirus, for head and neck cancer. In Japan, a phase II clinical trial of G47∆, a third-generation oncolytic HSV-1, is ongoing in glioblastoma patients. G47∆ was recently designated as a "Sakigake" breakthrough therapy drug in Japan. This new system by the Japanese government should provide G47∆ with priority reviews and a fast-track drug approval by the regulatory authorities. Whereas numerous oncolytic viruses have been subjected to clinical trials, the common feature that is expected to play a major role in prolonging the survival of cancer patients is an induction of specific antitumor immunity in the course of tumor-specific viral replication. It appears that it will not be long before oncolytic virus therapy becomes a standard therapeutic option for all cancer patients. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  7. Identification of immune factors regulating antitumor immunity using polymeric vaccines with multiple adjuvants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ali, Omar A; Verbeke, Catia; Johnson, Chris; Sands, R Warren; Lewin, Sarah A; White, Des; Doherty, Edward; Dranoff, Glenn; Mooney, David J

    2014-01-01

    ...) subsets and cytokines critical to this efficacy. Three-dimensional, porous polymer matrices loaded with tumor lysates and presenting distinct combinations of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF...

  8. Boosting of DNA Vaccine-Elicited Gamma Interferon Responses in Humans by Exposure to Malaria Parasites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Ruobing; Richie, Thomas L; Baraceros, Maria F; Rahardjo, Nancy; Gay, Tanya; Banania, Jo-Glenna; Charoenvit, Yupin; Epstein, Judith E; Luke, Thomas; Freilich, Daniel A; Norman, Jon; Hoffman, Stephen L

    2004-01-01

    A mixture of DNA plasmids expressing five Plasmodium falciparum pre-erythrocyte-stage antigens was administered with or without a DNA plasmid encoding human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF...

  9. PD-1/PD-L1 blockade together with vaccine therapy facilitates effector T-cell infiltration into pancreatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Kevin C; Rucki, Agnieszka A; Wu, Annie A; Olino, Kelly; Xiao, Qian; Chai, Yi; Wamwea, Anthony; Bigelow, Elaine; Lutz, Eric; Liu, Linda; Yao, Sheng; Anders, Robert A; Laheru, Daniel; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Edil, Barish H; Schulick, Richard D; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Zheng, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has a poor prognosis due to late detection and resistance to conventional therapies. Published studies show that the PDA tumor microenvironment is predominantly infiltrated with immune suppressive cells and signals that if altered, would allow effective immunotherapy. However, single-agent checkpoint inhibitors including agents that alter immune suppressive signals in other human cancers such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4), programmed death 1 (PD-1), and its ligand PD-L1, have failed to demonstrate objective responses when given as single agents to PDA patients. We recently reported that inhibition of the CTLA-4 pathway when given together with a T cell inducing vaccine gives objective responses in metastatic PDA patients. In this study, we evaluated blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway. We found that PD-L1 is weakly expressed at a low frequency in untreated human and murine PDAs but treatment with a granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor secreting PDA vaccine (GVAX) significantly upregulates PD-L1 membranous expression after treatment of tumor-bearing mice. In addition, combination therapy with vaccine and PD-1 antibody blockade improved murine survival compared with PD-1 antibody monotherapy or GVAX therapy alone. Furthermore, PD-1 blockade increased effector CD8 T lymphocytes and tumor-specific interferon-γ production of CD8 T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Immunosuppressive pathways, including regulatory T cells and CTLA-4 expression on T cells were overcome by the addition of vaccine and low-dose cyclophosphamide to PD-1 blockade. Collectively, our study supports combining PD-1 or PD-L1 antibody therapy with a T cell inducing agent for PDA treatment.

  10. Inoculation site from a cutaneous melanoma patient treated with an allogeneic therapeutic vaccine: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana eAris

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a therapeutic vaccine consisting of a mixture of lethally-irradiated allogeneic cutaneous melanoma cell lines with BCG and GM-CSF as adjuvants. The CSF-470 vaccine is currently being assayed in a Phase II-III trial against medium-dose IFN-a2b. All vaccinated patients immunized intradermally developed large edematous erythema reactions, which then transformed into subcutaneous nodules active for several months. However, vaccine injection sites were not routinely biopsied. We describe the case of a female patient, previously classified as stage III, but who, due to the simultaneous discovery of bone metastases, only received one vaccination, was withdrawn from the study and continued her treatment elsewhere. Patient #1 developed a post-vaccination nodule which was surgically removed 7 weeks later, and allowed to analyze the reactivity and immune profiling of the inoculation site. An inflammatory reaction with zones of fibrosis, high irrigation and brisk lymphoid infiltration, primarily composed of CD8+ and CD20+ lymphocytes, was observed. There were no remaining BCG bacilli, and scarce CD4+ and Foxp3+ T cells were observed. MART-1 Ag was found throughout the vaccination site. CD11c+ Ag presenting cells were either dispersed or forming dense nests. Some CD11c+ cells proliferated; most of them contained intracellular MART-1 Ag, and some interacted with CD8+ lymphocytes. These observations suggest a potent, long-lasting local inflammatory response with recruitment of Ag-presenting cells that incorporate melanoma Ags, probably leading to Ag presentation to naïve T cells.

  11. Systematic Information to Health-Care Professionals about Vaccination Guidelines Improves Adherence in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Anti-TNFα Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Katrine R; Steenholdt, Casper; Buhl, Sine S

    2015-01-01

    vaccination guidelines at baseline and at 2-month intervals for 6 months, followed by reassessment of vaccination status (intervention group; n=99); (3) cross-sectional evaluation of representative gastroenterologists' knowledge of guidelines (n=53). Outcomes were assessed by validated questionnaires. RESULTS...... (32%) and insufficient consultation time (26%). Patient-perceived barriers were costs of vaccinations (35%) and forgetfulness (25%). CONCLUSIONS: Gastroenterologists' limited knowledge of vaccination guidelines during anti-TNFα therapy can be overcome by systematic education of health......' adherence. METHODS: The study comprised three parts: (1) cross-sectional evaluation of baseline vaccination status in all IBD patients in anti-TNFα therapy (reference group; n=130); (2) prospective interventional study, where health-care professionals received systematic oral and written information about...

  12. Structural basis of GM-CSF and IL-2 sequestration by the viral decoy receptor GIF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felix, Jan; Kandiah, Eaazhisai; De Munck, Steven; Bloch, Yehudi; Van Zundert, Gydo C P; Pauwels, Kris; Dansercoer, Ann; Novanska, Katka; Read, Randy J.; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Vergauwen, Bjorn; Verstraete, Kenneth; Gutsche, Irina; Savvides, Savvas N.

    2016-01-01

    Subversion of the host immune system by viruses is often mediated by molecular decoys that sequester host proteins pivotal to mounting effective immune responses. The widespread mammalian pathogen parapox Orf virus deploys GIF, a member of the poxvirus immune evasion superfamily, to antagonize

  13. Hemopoietic stem cells in rhesus monkeys : surface antigens, radiosensitivity, and responses to GM-CSF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Wielenga (Jenne)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractRhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were bred at the Primate Center TNO, Rijswijk, The Netherlands!. Both male and female animals were used for the experiments. The monkeys weighed 2.5-4 kg and were 2-4 years old at the time of the experiment. They were all typed for RhLA-A, -B and -DR

  14. GM-CSF Upregulated in Rheumatoid Arthritis Reverses Cognitive Impairment and Amyloidosis in Alzheimer Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, Tim D.; Bennett, Steven P.; Mori, Takashi; Governatori, Nicholas; Runfeldt, Melissa; Norden, Michelle; Padmanabhan, Jaya; Neame, Peter; Wefes, Inge; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Arendash, Gary W.; Potter, Huntington

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a negative risk factor for the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). While it has been commonly assumed that RA patients’ usage of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) helped prevent onset and progression of AD, NSAID clinical trials have proven unsuccessful in AD patients. To determine whether intrinsic factors within RA pathogenesis itself may underlie RA’s protective effect, we investigated the activity of colony-stimulating factors, upregulated in...

  15. Activation of peritoneal cells upon in vivo transfection with a recombinant alphavirus expressing GM-CSF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klimp, AH; Lansink, PO; Withoff, S; de Vries, EGE; Scherphof, GL; Wilschut, J; Daemen, T

    In this study we determined the in vivo localization of recombinant proteins expressed by intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) particles. Subsequently, we investigated the influence of i.p. administered SFV particles encoding recombinant murine

  16. Induction of MAGE-A3 and HPV-16 immunity by Trojan vaccines in patients with head and neck carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskens, Caroline J; Sewell, Duane; Hertzano, Ronna; DeSanto, Jennifer; Rollins, Sandra; Lee, Myounghee; Taylor, Rodney; Wolf, Jeffrey; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Gastman, Brian; Papadimitriou, John C; Lu, Changwan; Tan, Ming; Morales, Robert; Cullen, Kevin; Celis, Esteban; Mann, Dean; Strome, Scott E

    2012-12-01

    We performed a pilot study using Trojan vaccines in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). These vaccines are composed of HLA-I and HLA-II restricted melanoma antigen E (MAGE)-A3 or human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 derived peptides, joined by furin-cleavable linkers, and linked to a "penetrin" peptide sequence derived from HIV-TAT. Thirty-one patients with SCCHN were screened for the trial and 5 were enrolled. Enrolled patients were treated with 300 μg of Trojan peptide supplemented with Montanide and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) at 4-week intervals for up to 4 injections. Following vaccination, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 4 of 5 patients recognized both the full Trojan constructs and constituent HLA-II peptides, whereas responses to HLA-I restricted peptides were less pronounced. This treatment regimen seems to have acceptable toxicity and elicits measurable systemic immune responses against HLA-II restricted epitopes in a subset of patients with advanced SCCHN. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. THE CYTOKINES SYNTHESIS IN VITRO IN THE TICK-BORNE ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS INFECTED CELLS AND IN THE PRESENCE OF INACTIVATED VACCINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Mesentseva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE is severe neuroinfectious disease with involvement of immune mechanisms in pathogenesis. Comparative analysis of synthesis of key cytokines had been performed for the TBE virus (TBEV infected cells and in the presence of inactivated vaccine against TBE in vitro. Persistent TBEV infection of immortal tissue culture of human larynx cancer cells caused transcription activation of interferons IFNα, IFNγ, IFNλ1, interleukins IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, tumour necrosis factor TNFα as well as one of apoptosis factors Fas. Comparison of transcription and production of cytokines revealed that the TBEV infection resulted in posttranscription Th1 shift of cytokine response. In the presence of inactivated vaccine against TBE based on the same strain Sofjin of the TBEV activation of transcription of cytokines IFNα, IFNλ1, IL-4, IL-10 was also observed as after the TBEV infection that together with an additional stimulation of GM-CSF production might serve as an evidence of Th2 response. Involvement of IFNIII type (IFNλ1 both during persistent infection and after addition of inactivated vaccines was found in the first time. Differences in dynamics of cytokines IL-2, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, TNFα response during the TBEV infection and in the presence of inactivated vaccine are described.

  18. Oncolytic Adenovirus and Tumor-Targeting Immune Modulatory Therapy Improve Autologous Cancer Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Rivera-Molina, Yisel; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Bover, Laura; Vence, Luis M; Yuan, Ying; Lang, Frederick F; Toniatti, Carlo; Hossain, Mohammad B; Fueyo, Juan

    2017-07-15

    Oncolytic viruses selectively lyse tumor cells, disrupt immunosuppression within the tumor, and reactivate antitumor immunity, but they have yet to live up to their therapeutic potential. Immune checkpoint modulation has been efficacious in a variety of cancer with an immunogenic microenvironment, but is associated with toxicity due to nonspecific T-cell activation. Therefore, combining these two strategies would likely result in both effective and specific cancer therapy. To test the hypothesis, we first constructed oncolytic adenovirus Delta-24-RGDOX expressing the immune costimulator OX40 ligand (OX40L). Like its predecessor Delta-24-RGD, Delta-24-RGDOX induced immunogenic cell death and recruit lymphocytes to the tumor site. Compared with Delta-24-RGD, Delta-24-RGDOX exhibited superior tumor-specific activation of lymphocytes and proliferation of CD8+ T cells specific to tumor-associated antigens, resulting in cancer-specific immunity. Delta-24-RGDOX mediated more potent antiglioma activity in immunocompetent C57BL/6 but not immunodeficient athymic mice, leading to specific immune memory against the tumor. To further overcome the immune suppression mediated by programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression on cancer cells accompanied with virotherapy, intratumoral injection of Delta-24-RGDOX and an anti-PD-L1 antibody showed synergistic inhibition of gliomas and significantly increased survival in mice. Our data demonstrate that combining an oncolytic virus with tumor-targeting immune checkpoint modulators elicits potent in situ autologous cancer vaccination, resulting in an efficacious, tumor-specific, and long-lasting therapeutic effect. Cancer Res; 77(14); 3894-907. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Probing the efficacy of a heterologous Leishmania/L. Viannia braziliensis recombinant enolase as a candidate vaccine to restrict the development of L. infantum in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Thaís T O; Martins, Vívian T; Lage, Daniela P; Costa, Lourena E; Salles, Beatriz C S; Carvalho, Ana M R S; Dias, Daniel S; Ribeiro, Patrícia A F; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel A; Machado-de-Ávila, Ricardo A; Roatt, Bruno M; de Magalhães-Soares, Danielle F; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Coelho, Eduardo A F; Duarte, Mariana C

    2017-07-01

    In the present study, the Leishmania braziliensis enolase protein was evaluated as a vaccine candidate against visceral leishmaniasis (VL). The DNA sequence was cloned and the recombinant protein (rEnolase) was evaluated as a vaccine, associated with saponin, as an immune adjuvant. The protective efficacy of the rEnolase plus saponin combination was investigated in BALB/c mice against Leishmania infantum infection. The results revealed that the vaccine induced higher levels of IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF when a capture ELISA and flow cytometry were performed, as well as an antileishmanial nitrite production after using in vitro stimulation with rEnolase and an antigenic Leishmania preparation. The vaccinated animals, when compared to the control groups, showed a lower parasite burden in the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and paws' draining lymph nodes when both a limiting dilution technique and RT-PCR assay were performed. In addition, these mice showed low levels of antileishmanial IL-4, IL-10, and anti-Leishmania IgG1 isotype antibodies. Partial protection was associated with IFN-γ production, which was mainly mediated by CD4 + T cells. In conclusion, the present study's data showed that the L. braziliensis enolase protein could be considered a vaccine candidate that offers heterologous protection against VL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Detecting T-cell reactivity to whole cell vaccines: Proof of concept analysis of T-cell response to K562 cell antigens in CML patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusic, Ana; Hainz, Ursula; Wadleigh, Martha; Neuberg, Donna; Su, Mei; Canning, Christine M; Deangelo, Daniel J; Stone, Richard M; Lee, Jeng-Shin; Mulligan, Richard C; Ritz, Jerome; Dranoff, Glenn; Sasada, Tetsuro; Wu, Catherine J

    2012-10-01

    BCR-ABL(+) K562 cells hold clinical promise as a component of cancer vaccines, either as bystander cells genetically modified to express immunostimulatory molecules, or as a source of leukemia antigens. To develop a method for detecting T-cell reactivity against K562 cell-derived antigens in patients, we exploited the dendritic cell (DC)-mediated cross-presentation of proteins generated from apoptotic cells. We used UVB irradiation to consistently induce apoptosis of K562 cells, which were then fed to autologous DCs. These DCs were used to both stimulate and detect antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell reactivity. As proof-of-concept, we used cross-presented apoptotic influenza matrix protein-expressing K562 cells to elicit reactivity from matrix protein-reactive T cells. Likewise, we used this assay to detect increased anti-CML antigen T-cell reactivity in CML patients that attained long-lasting clinical remissions following immunotherapy (donor lymphocyte infusion), as well as in 2 of 3 CML patients vaccinated with lethally irradiated K562 cells that were modified to secrete high levels of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). This methodology can be readily adapted to examine the effects of other whole tumor cell-based vaccines, a scenario in which the precise tumor antigens that stimulate immune responses are unknown.

  1. Nonintegrating Lentiviral Vector-Based Vaccine Efficiently Induces Functional and Persistent CD8+ T Cell Responses in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella R. M. Negri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cells are an essential component of an effective host immune response to tumors and viral infections. Genetic immunization is particularly suitable for inducing CTL responses, because the encoded proteins enter the MHC class I processing pathway through either transgene expression or cross-presentation. In order to compare the efficiency and persistence of immune response induced by genetic vaccines, BALB/c mice were immunized either twice intramuscularly with DNA plasmid expressing a codon-optimized HIV-1 gp120 Envelope sequence together with murine GM-CSF sequence or with a single immunization using an integrase defective lentiviral vector (IDLV expressing the same proteins. Results strongly indicated that the schedule based on IDLV vaccine was more efficient in inducing specific immune response, as evaluated three months after the last immunization by IFN ELISPOT in both splenocytes and bone marrow- (BM- derived cells, chromium release assay in splenocytes, and antibody detection in sera. In addition, IDLV immunization induced high frequency of polyfunctional CD8+ T cells able to simultaneously produce IFN, TNF, and IL2.

  2. Anti-tumor immune response correlates with neurological symptoms in a dog with spontaneous astrocytoma treated by gene and vaccine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluhar, G Elizabeth; Grogan, Patrick T; Seiler, Charlie; Goulart, Michelle; Santacruz, Karen S; Carlson, Cathy; Chen, Wei; Olin, Mike R; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G; Haines, Stephen J; Ohlfest, John R

    2010-04-26

    Gene therapy and vaccination have been tested in malignant glioma patients with modest, albeit encouraging results. The combination of these therapies has demonstrated synergistic efficacy in murine models but has not been reported in large animals. Gemistocytic astrocytoma (GemA) is a low-grade glioma that typically progresses to lethal malignancy despite conventional therapies. Until now there has been no useful animal model of GemA. Here we report the treatment of a dog with spontaneous GemA using the combination of surgery, intracavitary adenoviral interferon gamma (IFNgamma) gene transfer, and vaccination with glioma cell lysates mixed with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides. Surgical tumor debulking and delivery of Ad-IFNgamma into the resection cavity were performed. Autologous tumor cells grew slowly in culture, necessitating vaccination with allogeneic tumor lysate in four of the five vaccinations. Transient left-sided blindness and hemiparesis occurred following the fourth and fifth vaccinations. These neurological symptoms correlated with a peak in the levels of tumor-reactive IgG and CD8(+) T cells measured in the blood. All symptoms resolved and this dog remains tumor-free over 450 days following surgery. This case report preliminarily demonstrates the feasibility of treating dogs with spontaneous glioma using immune-based therapy and warrants further study using this therapeutic approach. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Adjuvant therapeutic vaccination in patients with non-small cell lung cancer made lymphopenic and reconstituted with autologous PBMC: first clinical experience and evidence of an immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schendel Dolores J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the considerable toxicity and modest benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, there is clearly a need for new treatment modalities in the adjuvant setting. Active specific immunotherapy may represent such an option. However, clinical responses have been rare so far. Manipulating the host by inducing lymphopenia before vaccination resulted in a magnification of the immune response in the preclinical setting. To evaluate feasibility and safety of an irradiated, autologous tumor cell vaccine given following induction of lymphopenia by chemotherapy and reinfusion of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, we are currently conducting a pilot-phase I clinical trial in patients with NSCLC following surgical resection. This paper reports on the first clinical experience and evidence of an immune response in patients suffering from NSCLC. Methods NSCLC patients stages I-IIIA are recruited. Vaccines are generated from their resected lung specimens. Patients undergo leukapheresis to harvest their PBMC prior to or following the surgical procedure. Furthermore, patients receive preparative chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide 350 mg/m2 and fludarabine 20 mg/m2 on 3 consecutive days for induction of lymphopenia followed by reconstitution with their autologous PBMC. Vaccines are administered intradermally on day 1 following reconstitution and every two weeks for a total of up to five vaccinations. Granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating-factor (GM-CSF is given continuously (at a rate of 50 μg/24 h at the site of vaccination via minipump for six consecutive days after each vaccination. Results To date, vaccines were successfully manufactured for 4 of 4 patients. The most common toxicities were local injection-site reactions and mild constitutional symptoms. Immune responses to chemotherapy, reconstitution and vaccination are measured by vaccine site and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH skin

  4. Impact of Estrogen Therapy on Lymphocyte Homeostasis and the Response to Seasonal Influenza Vaccine in Post-Menopausal Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Engelmann

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized that changes in levels of ovarian steroids modulate severity of autoimmune disease and immune function in young adult women. These observations suggest that the loss of ovarian steroids associated with menopause could affect the age-related decline in immune function, known as immune senescence. Therefore, in this study, we determined the impact of menopause and estrogen therapy (ET on lymphocyte subset frequency as well as the immune response to seasonal influenza vaccine in three different groups: 1 young adult women (regular menstrual cycles, not on hormonal contraception; 2 post-menopausal (at least 2 years women who are not receiving any form of hormone therapy (HT and 3 post-menopausal hysterectomized women receiving ET. Although the numbers of circulating CD4 and CD20 B cells were reduced in the post-menopausal group receiving ET, we also detected a better preservation of naïve B cells, decreased CD4 T cell inflammatory cytokine production, and slightly lower circulating levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. Following vaccination, young adult women generated more robust antibody and T cell responses than both post-menopausal groups. Despite similar vaccine responses between the two post-menopausal groups, we observed a direct correlation between plasma 17β estradiol (E2 levels and fold increase in IgG titers within the ET group. These findings suggest that ET affects immune homeostasis and that higher plasma E2 levels may enhance humoral responses in post-menopausal women.

  5. Adjuvant dendritic cells vaccine combined with cytokine-induced-killer cell therapy after renal cell carcinoma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kai; Tan, Jian-Ming; Wu, Wei-Zhen; Qiu, Yu-Miao; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Ting-Zhao; Sun, Xing-Hui; Zhuo, Wen-Li; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    To observe the efficacy and side effects of adjuvant dendritic cells' (DCs) vaccine combined with cytokine-induced killer cell (CIK) therapy after renal cell carcinoma (RCC) surgery (RCCS). DCs vaccine and CIK that loaded the autologous tumor cell lysate were prepared in vitro. Four hundred and ten RCC patients were recruited, and the study group was given DCs-CIK immunotherapy, while the control group was given IFN-α therapy. Disease progression (recurrence, metastasis or death) showed significant differences between the two groups in clinical stage I and II patients, as well as in highly and moderately differentiated disease (pdisease (p>0.05). The 3- and 5-year overall survival rates of the DCs-CIK group (96% and 96%, respectively) exhibited significant difference compared to the IFN-α group (83% and 74%, respectively (p<0.01). Progression-free survival (PFS) between the two groups was significantly different (p<0.01). Tumor stage and DCs-CIK treatment were independent factors concerning prognosis of RCC (p<0.05). There was no severe toxicity observed in the DCs-CIK treatment group. Adjuvant post-RCCS DCs-CIK treatment prolonged PFS and reduced mortality, showing better overall activity compared to interferon treatment.

  6. Beyond cancer vaccines: a reason for future optimism with immunomodulatory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postow, Michael; Callahan, Margaret K; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2011-01-01

    Despite significant scientific knowledge in the field of cancer immunology, therapeutic strategies using cancer vaccines to generate anti-tumor immunity have historically resulted in only modest clinical benefit. Disappointing results from prior cancer vaccine trials are likely due to multifactorial causes. Perhaps the most important is the role of inherent tumor-induced immune suppression and enhanced immunologic tolerance. Current research directed toward understanding the mechanisms of immunologic tolerance has led to the development of promising therapeutic immune regulatory antibodies that inhibit immunologic checkpoints and subsequently enhance immunologic anti-tumor activity. This review discusses the prior challenges associated with cancer vaccines and describes how, by breaking immune inhibition and facilitating immune stimulation, immune regulatory antibodies show great promise in the treatment of a variety of tumors.

  7. A review of novel therapies for melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimkhani, Chante; Gonzalez, Rene; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-08-01

    This review summarizes results from major recent trials regarding novel therapeutic agents in melanoma. The topics discussed include targeted therapy with BRAF (V-RAF murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B) inhibitors (vemurafenib and dabrafenib), MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase) inhibitors (trametinib), bcr-abl/c-kit/PDGF-R inhibitors (imatinib), and angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab and aflibercept), as well as immunotherapy with anti-CTLA-4 (anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4) antibodies (ipilimumab), anti-PD (anti-programmed death receptor) antibodies (nivolumab and lambrolizumab), and anti-PD-L (anti-programmed death ligand) antibodies. Various combinations of these agents, as well as adjunctive GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor), T-VEC (talimogene laherparepvec) oncolytic viruses, and novel chemotherapeutic agents, are also described. Despite the tremendous advances that these novel treatments have created, optimal therapeutic agent selection remains a highly individualized decision. Melanoma therapy has vastly progressed since the days when dacarbazine was the sole option for advanced melanoma patients. The molecular understanding of melanoma pathogenesis has yielded a brighter future for advanced melanoma patients.

  8. Combination of interleukin-12 gene therapy, metronomic cyclophosphamide and DNA cancer vaccination directs all arms of the immune system towards tumor eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denies, Sofie; Cicchelero, Laetitia; Van Audenhove, Isabel; Sanders, Niek N

    2014-08-10

    In this work a combination therapy that acts upon the immune suppressive, the innate and specific arms of the immune system is proposed. This combination therapy, which consists of intratumoral interleukin-12 (IL-12) gene therapy, human tyrosinase (hTyr) DNA vaccination and metronomic cyclophosphamide (CPX), was evaluated in a B16-F10 mouse model. The following groups were compared: (1) no treatment, (2) control vector, (3) intratumoral IL-12 gene therapy, (4) intratumoral IL-12 gene therapy+metronomic CPX, (5) intratumoral IL-12 gene therapy+metronomic CPX+hTyr DNA vaccination. Next to clinical efficacy and safety, we characterized acute effects of IL-12 and anti-tumor immune response after a second tumor challenge. All treatment groups showed increased survival and higher cure rates than control groups. Survival of non-cured mice was increased when metronomic CPX was combined with IL-12 gene therapy. Furthermore, mice that received metronomic CPX had significantly lower percentages of regulatory T cells. Addition of the hTyr DNA vaccine increased cure rate and resulted in increased survival compared to other treatment groups. We also demonstrated that the manifest necrosis within days after IL-12 gene therapy is at least partly due to IL-12 mediated activation of NK cells. All cured mice were resistant to a second challenge. A humoral memory response against the tumor cells was observed in all groups that received IL-12 gene therapy, while a cellular memory response was observed only in the vaccinated mice. In conclusion, every component of this combination treatment contributed a unique immunologic trait with associated clinical benefits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanistic studies on long peptide-based vaccines for the use in cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijker, Martijn Sander

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic peptide vaccines aiming at the induction of a protective CD8+ T-cell response against infectious or malignant diseases are widely used in the clinic but, despite their success in animal models, they do not yet live up to their promise in humans. This thesis assesses the development of

  10. Systematic review of the use of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with advanced melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeller, Christoph; Michielin, Olivier; Ascierto, Paolo A; Szabo, Zsolt; Blank, Christian U

    2016-09-01

    Several immunomodulatory checkpoint inhibitors have been approved for the treatment of patients with advanced melanoma, including ipilimumab, nivolumab and pembrolizumab. Talimogene laherparepvec is the first oncolytic virus to gain regulatory approval in the USA; it is also approved in Europe. Talimogene laherparepvec expresses granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and with other GM-CSF-expressing oncolytic viruses in development, understanding the clinical relevance of this cytokine in treating advanced melanoma is important. Results of trials of GM-CSF in melanoma have been mixed, and while GM-CSF has the potential to promote anti-tumor responses, some preclinical data suggest that GM-CSF may sometimes promote tumor growth. GM-CSF has not been approved as a melanoma treatment. We undertook a systematic literature review of studies of GM-CSF in patients with advanced melanoma (stage IIIB-IV). Of the 503 articles identified, 26 studies met the eligibility criteria. Most studies investigated the use of GM-CSF in combination with another treatment, such as peptide vaccines or chemotherapy, or as an adjuvant to surgery. Some clinical benefit was reported in patients who received GM-CSF as an adjuvant to surgery, or in combination with other treatments. In general, outcomes for patients receiving peptide vaccines were not improved with the addition of GM-CSF. GM-CSF may be a valuable therapeutic adjuvant; however, further studies are needed, particularly head-to-head comparisons, to confirm the optimal dosing regimen and clinical effectiveness in patients with advanced melanoma.

  11. Incorporation of membrane-bound, mammalian-derived immunomodulatory proteins into influenza whole virus vaccines boosts immunogenicity and protection against lethal challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Paul C

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza epidemics continue to cause morbidity and mortality within the human population despite widespread vaccination efforts. This, along with the ominous threat of an avian influenza pandemic (H5N1, demonstrates the need for a much improved, more sophisticated influenza vaccine. We have developed an in vitro model system for producing a membrane-bound Cytokine-bearing Influenza Vaccine (CYT-IVAC. Numerous cytokines are involved in directing both innate and adaptive immunity and it is our goal to utilize the properties of individual cytokines and other immunomodulatory proteins to create a more immunogenic vaccine. Results We have evaluated the immunogenicity of inactivated cytokine-bearing influenza vaccines using a mouse model of lethal influenza virus challenge. CYT-IVACs were produced by stably transfecting MDCK cell lines with mouse-derived cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-2 and IL-4 fused to the membrane-anchoring domain of the viral hemagglutinin. Influenza virus replication in these cell lines resulted in the uptake of the bioactive membrane-bound cytokines during virus budding and release. In vivo efficacy studies revealed that a single low dose of IL-2 or IL-4-bearing CYT-IVAC is superior at providing protection against lethal influenza challenge in a mouse model and provides a more balanced Th1/Th2 humoral immune response, similar to live virus infections. Conclusion We have validated the protective efficacy of CYT-IVACs in a mammalian model of influenza virus infection. This technology has broad applications in current influenza virus vaccine development and may prove particularly useful in boosting immune responses in the elderly, where current vaccines are minimally effective.

  12. Enhancing whole-tumor cell vaccination by engaging innate immune system through NY-ESO-1/dendritic cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Le; Zheng, Junying; Nguyen, David H; Luong, Quang T; Zeng, Gang

    2013-10-01

    NY-ESO-1 is a cancer/germline antigen (Ag) with distinctively strong immunogenicity. We have previously demonstrated that NY-ESO-1 serves as an endogenous adjuvant by engaging dendritic cell (DC)-surface receptors of calreticulin (CRT) and toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. In the present study, NY-ESO-1 was investigated for its immunomodulatory roles as a molecular adjuvant in whole-tumor cell vaccines using the Renca kidney cancer model. Renca cells were genetically engineered to express NY-ESO-1 on the cell surface to enhance direct interactions with DC. The effect of ectopic cell-surface expression of NY-ESO-1 was investigated on tumor immunogenicity, DC activation, cytotoxic T lymphocytes against model tumor-associated Ags, and the effectiveness of the modified tumor cells as a therapeutic whole-cell vaccine. Cell-surface expression of NY-ESO-1 was able to reduce the tumor growth of Renca cells in BALB/c mice, although the modification did not alter cell proliferation rate in vitro. Directly engaging the innate immune system through NY-ESO-1 facilitated the interaction of tumor cells with DC, leading to enhanced DC activation and subsequent tumor-specific T-cell priming. When used as a therapeutic whole-cell vaccine, Renca cells with NY-ESO-1 on the surface mediated stronger inhibitory effects on tumor growth and metastasis compared with parental Renca or Renca cells expressing a control protein GFP on the surface. Augmented antitumor efficacy correlated with increased CD8 T-cell infiltration into tumors and decreased myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells in the spleen. As a cancer/germline Ag and as an immunomodulatory adjuvant through engaging innate immune receptors, NY-ESO-1 offers a unique opportunity for improved whole-tumor cell vaccinations upon the classic GM-CSF-engineered cell vaccines.

  13. Responses of primary human nasal epithelial cells to EDIII-DENV stimulation: the first step to intranasal dengue vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantachit, Nattika; Sunintaboon, Panya; Ubol, Sukathida

    2016-08-18

    About half of the world's population are living in the endemic area of dengue viruses implying that a rapid-mass vaccination may be required. In addition, a major target of dengue vaccine are children, thus, a needle-free administration is more attractive. These problems may be overcome by the alternative route of vaccination such as topical, oral and intranasal vaccination. Here, we investigated the possibility to deliver a dengue immunogen intranasally, a painless route of vaccination. The tested immunogen was the domain III of dengue serotype-3 E protein (EDIII-D3) loaded into trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles (EDIII-D3 TMC NPs). The primary human nasal epithelial cells, HNEpCs, were used as an in vitro model for nasal responses. At tested concentrations, EDIII-D3 TMC NPs not only exerted no detectable toxicity toward HNEpC cultures but also efficiently delivered EDIII-D3 immunogens into HNEpCs. Moreover, HNEpCs quickly and strongly produced proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α), type-I IFN, the growth factors (GM-CSF, IL-7), the chemokines (MCP-1, MIP-1β, IL-8), Th1-related cytokines (IL-2, IL-12p70, IL-17, IFN-γ) and Th2-related cytokine (IL-4) in response to EDIII-D3 TMC NPs treatment. A potential mucosal delivery system for dengue immunogens was revealed and found to stimulate a strong local innate antiviral response which possibly leading to a systemic adaptive immunity.

  14. Have we found an optimal insertion site in a Newcastle disease virus vector to express a foreign gene for vaccine and gene therapy purposes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using reverse genetics technology, many strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) have been developed as vectors to express foreign genes for vaccine and gene therapy purposes. The foreign gene is usually inserted into a non-coding region of the NDV genome as an independent transcription unit. Eval...

  15. Sequential Vacc-4x and romidepsin during combination antiretroviral therapy (cART)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tapia, G; Højen, J F; Ökvist, M

    2017-01-01

    -cell responses following Vacc-4x/rhuGM-CSF immunotherapy in relation to virological outcomes on the HIV reservoir. METHODS: This study, conducted in Aarhus, Denmark, enrolled participants (n = 20) with CD4>500 cells/mm(3) on cART. Six Vacc-4x (1.2 mg) intradermal immunizations using rhuGM-CSF (60 μg) as adjuvant...

  16. Vaccines in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Eric M L; Chahin, Salim; Berger, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    Vaccinations help prevent communicable disease. To be valuable, a vaccine's ability to prevent disease must exceed the risk of adverse effects from administration. Many vaccines present no risk of infection as they are comprised of killed or non-infectious components while other vaccines consist of live attenuated microorganisms which carry a potential risk of infection-particularly, in patients with compromised immunity. There are several unique considerations with respect to vaccination in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population. First, there has been concern that vaccination may trigger or aggravate the disease. Second, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) employed in the treatment of MS may increase the risk of infectious complications from vaccines or alter their efficacy. Lastly, in some cases, vaccination strategies may be part of the treatment paradigm in attempts to avoid complications of therapy.

  17. Abnormal humoral immune response to influenza vaccination in pediatric type-1 human immunodeficiency virus infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J Montoya

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Given that highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has been demonstrated useful to restore immune competence in type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1-infected subjects, we evaluated the specific antibody response to influenza vaccine in a cohort of HIV-1-infected children on HAART so as to analyze the quality of this immune response in patients under antiretroviral therapy. Sixteen HIV-1-infected children and 10 HIV-1 seronegative controls were immunized with a commercially available trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine containing the strains A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B. Serum hemagglutinin inhibition (HI antibody titers were determined for the three viral strains at the time of vaccination and 1 month later. Immunization induced a significantly increased humoral response against the three influenza virus strains in controls, and only against A/H3N2 in HIV-1-infected children. The comparison of post-vaccination HI titers between HIV-1+ patients and HIV-1 negative controls showed significantly higher HI titers against the three strains in controls. In addition, post vaccination protective HI titers (defined as equal to or higher than 1:40 against the strains A/H3N2 and B were observed in a lower proportion of HIV-1+ children than in controls, while a similar proportion of individuals from each group achieved protective HI titers against the A/H1N1 strain. The CD4+ T cell count, CD4/CD8 T cells ratio, and serum viral load were not affected by influenza virus vaccination when pre- vs post-vaccination values were compared. These findings suggest that despite the fact that HAART is efficient in controlling HIV-1 replication and in increasing CD4+ T cell count in HIV-1-infected children, restoration of immune competence and response to cognate antigens remain incomplete, indicating that additional therapeutic strategies are required to achieve a full reconstitution of immune functions.

  18. Antiradiation UV Vaccine: UV Radiation, Biological effects, lesions and medical management - immune-therapy and immune-protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    Key Words: Ultraviolet radiation,Standard Erythema Dose(SED), Minimal Erythema Dose(MED), Sun Burns, Solar Dermatitis, Sun Burned Disease, DNA Damage,Cell Damage, Antiradiation UV Vaccine, Immune-Prophylaxis of Sun Burned Diseases, Immune-Prophylaxis of Sun Burns, Immune-Therapy of Sun-Burned Disease and Sun Burns,Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC), Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC), Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis(TEN). Introduction: High doses of UV generated by solar source and artificial sources create an exposure of mammals and other species which can lead to ultraviolet(UV)radiation- associated disease (including erythema, epilation, keratitis, etc.). UV radiation belongs to the non-ionizing part of the electromagnetic spectrum and ranges between 100 nm and 400 nm with 100 nm having been chosen arbitrarily as the boundary between non-ionizing and ionizing radiation, however EMR is a spectrum and UV can produce molecular ionization. UV radiation is conventionally categorized into 3 areas: UV-A (>315-400 nm),UV-B (>280-315 nm)and UV-C (>100-280 nm) [IARC,Working Group Reports,2005] An important consequence of stratospheric ozone depletion is the increased transmission of solar ultraviolet (UV)radiation to the Earth's lower atmosphere and surface. Stratospheric ozone levels have been falling, in certain areas, for the past several decades, so current surface ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation levels are thought to be close to their modern day maximum. [S.Madronich et al.1998] Overexposure of ultraviolet radiation a major cause of skin cancer including basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) { collectively referred to as “non-melanoma" skin cancer (NMSC) and melanoma as well, with skin cancers being the most common cancer in North America. [Armstrong et al. 1993, Gallagher et al. 2005] Methods and Experimental Design: Our experiments and testing of a novel UV “Antiradiation Vaccine” have employed a wide variety of laboratory animals which include : Chinchilla

  19. Dendritic cell-based vaccines for the therapy of experimental tumors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Piasecka, E.P.; Indrová, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2010), s. 257-268 ISSN 1750-743X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500520807; GA ČR GA301/09/1024; GA MZd NS10660 Grant - others:Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education(PL) NN401235334 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : dendritic cells * preparation of vaccine s * experimental tumors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.542, year: 2010

  20. HPV vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer; Genital warts - HPV vaccine; Cervical dysplasia - HPV vaccine; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine; Cancer of the cervix - HPV vaccine; Abnormal ...

  1. Limitations of Murine Models for Assessment of Antibody-Mediated Therapies or Vaccine Candidates against Staphylococcus epidermidis Bloodstream Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinrong; Kesselly, Augustus; Lam, Hubert; Kleanthous, Harry; Yethon, Jeremy A.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is normally a commensal colonizer of human skin and mucus membranes, but, due to its ability to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices, it has emerged as a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Bacteremia or bloodstream infection is a frequent and costly complication resulting from biofilm fouling of medical devices. Our goal was to develop a murine model of S. epidermidis infection to identify potential vaccine targets for the prevention of S. epidermidis bacteremia. However, assessing the contribution of adaptive immunity to protection against S. epidermidis challenge was complicated by a highly efficacious innate immune response in mice. Naive mice rapidly cleared S. epidermidis infections from blood and solid organs, even when the animals were immunocompromised. Cyclophosphamide-mediated leukopenia reduced the size of the bacterial challenge dose required to cause lethality but did not impair clearance after a nonlethal challenge. Nonspecific innate immune stimulation, such as treatment with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist, enhanced bacterial clearance. TLR2 signaling was confirmed to accelerate the clearance of S. epidermidis bacteremia, but TLR2−/− mice could still resolve a bloodstream infection. Furthermore, TLR2 signaling played no role in the clearance of bacteria from the spleen. In conclusion, these data suggest that S. epidermidis bloodstream infection is cleared in a highly efficient manner that is mediated by both TLR2-dependent and -independent innate immune mechanisms. The inability to establish a persistent infection in mice, even in immunocompromised animals, rendered these murine models unsuitable for meaningful assessment of antibody-mediated therapies or vaccine candidates. PMID:26857577

  2. Therapy of Venezuelan patients with severe mucocutaneous or early lesions of diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis with a vaccine containing pasteurized Leishmania promastigotes and bacillus Calmette-Guerin: preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinto Convit

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Severe mucocutaneous (MCL and diffuse (DCL forms of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL are infrequent in Venezuela. Chemotherapy produces only transitory remission in DCL, and occasional treatment failures are observed in MCL. We have evaluated therapy with an experimental vaccine in patients with severe leishmaniasis. Four patients with MCL and 3 with early DCL were treated with monthly intradermal injections of a vaccine containing promastigotes of Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis killed by pasteurization and viable Bacillus Calmette- Guerin. Clinical and immunological responses were evaluated. Integrity of protein constituents in extracts of pasteurized promastigotes was evaluated by gel electrophoresis. Complete remission of lesions occurred after 5-9 injections in patients with MCL or 7-10 injections in patients with early DCL. DCL patients developed positive skin reactions, average size 18.7 mm. All have been free of active lesions for at least 10 months. Adverse effects of the vaccine were limited to local reactivity to BCG at the injection sites and fever in 2 patients. Extracts of pasteurized and fresh promastigotes did not reveal differences in the integrity of protein components detectable by gel electrophoresis. Immunotherapy with this modified vaccine offers an effective, safe option for the treatment of patients who do not respond to immunotherapy with vaccine containing autoclaved parasites or to chemotherapy .

  3. Therapy of Venezuelan patients with severe mucocutaneous or early lesions of diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis with a vaccine containing pasteurized Leishmania promastigotes and bacillus Calmette-Guerin: preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convit, Jacinto; Ulrich, Marian; Polegre, María Argelia; Avila, Angela; Rodríguez, Noris; Mazzedo, Maria Ilina; Blanco, Belkis

    2004-02-01

    Severe mucocutaneous (MCL) and diffuse (DCL) forms of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) are infrequent in Venezuela. Chemotherapy produces only transitory remission in DCL, and occasional treatment failures are observed in MCL. We have evaluated therapy with an experimental vaccine in patients with severe leishmaniasis. Four patients with MCL and 3 with early DCL were treated with monthly intradermal injections of a vaccine containing promastigotes of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis killed by pasteurization and viable Bacillus Calmette- Guerin. Clinical and immunological responses were evaluated. Integrity of protein constituents in extracts of pasteurized promastigotes was evaluated by gel electrophoresis. Complete remission of lesions occurred after 5-9 injections in patients with MCL or 7-10 injections in patients with early DCL. DCL patients developed positive skin reactions, average size 18.7 mm. All have been free of active lesions for at least 10 months. Adverse effects of the vaccine were limited to local reactivity to BCG at the injection sites and fever in 2 patients. Extracts of pasteurized and fresh promastigotes did not reveal differences in the integrity of protein components detectable by gel electrophoresis. Immunotherapy with this modified vaccine offers an effective, safe option for the treatment of patients who do not respond to immunotherapy with vaccine containing autoclaved parasites or to chemotherapy.

  4. Induction of retinoic acid receptor-alpha by granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in human myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, T; Takeda, K

    2000-08-15

    We reported previously that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induces differentiation of human myeloblastic leukemia ML-1 cells to granulocytes, whereas treatment with ATRA alone induces practically no differentiation of these cells. To investigate the mechanism of the synergistic effect of these factors, we examined the effect of GM-CSF on retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs) in ML-1 cells. We reveal that GM-CSF induces the expression of RAR alpha mRNA and protein and stimulates the binding of nuclear proteins to direct repeat 5, a consensus sequence with high affinity for RAR-RXR heterodimers. Furthermore, expression of CD38 mRNA mediated through RAR alpha is induced synergistically by treatment with ATRA + GM-CSF. These results suggest that GM-CSF stimulates transcriptional activity mediated via RAR alpha in ML-1 cells. The induction of RAR alpha by GM-CSF may therefore be a mechanism for stimulation by GM-CSF. The induction of RAR alpha by GM-CSF was also detected in other myeloid leukemia cell lines (THP-1 and KG-1) that showed a synergistic effect similar to that seen in ML-1 cells in response to ATRA + GM-CSF. We also found that GM-CSF induced the expression of RAR alpha in blood cells obtained from patients with acute myeloid leukemia. This activity of GM-CSF may serve as a useful adjunct to differentiation therapy for retinoic acid-nonresponsive leukemias.

  5. Current and potential immune therapies and vaccines in the management of psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaffenberger, Benjamin H; Lee, Grace L; Tyler, Kelly; Chan, Derek V; Jarjour, Wael; Ariza, Maria E; Williams, Marshall V; Wong, Henry K

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, immune skin disease associated with significant morbidity. Development of psoriasis is influenced by numerous genes, one allele is HLA-CW*0602. Other genes and single nucleotide polymorphisms affect immunologic pathways and antimicrobial peptide synthesis. Dendritic cells initiate psoriasis by activating T-cells toward a Th1 and Th17 response, with increased cytokines including TNF-α, IL-6, -12, -17, -22, and -23. IL-22 appears to promote keratinocyte dedifferentiation and increased antimicrobial peptide synthesis while TNF-α and IL-17 induce leukocyte localization within the psoriatic plaque. These recent insights identifying key cytokine pathways have led to the development of inhibitors with significant efficacy in the treatment of psoriasis. While a strategy for vaccine modulation of the immune response in psoriasis is in progress, with new technology they may provide a cost-effective long-term treatment that may induce tolerance or targeted self-inhibition for patients with autoimmune disorders, such as psoriasis. PMID:24492530

  6. Developing a HER3 Vaccine to Prevent Resistance to Endocrine Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    forward 5’-CCA TCT TCG TCA TGT TGA ACT ATA ACA C-3’, reverse: 5’-TAC ACA AAC TCC TCC ATA CTG ATA CTT-3’. Thirty cycles of PCR were performed...tumors: revised RECIST guideline (version 1.1). Eur J Cancer 45:228–247 23. CTEP Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program. CTCAE and CTC Website (2010) http

  7. A national multicenter phase 2 study of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) pox virus vaccine with sequential androgen ablation therapy in patients with PSA progression: ECOG 9802.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Robert S; Chen, Yu-Hui; Bubley, Glenn J; Stein, Mark N; Hahn, Noah M; Carducci, Michael A; Lattime, Edmund C; Gulley, James L; Arlen, Philip M; Butterfield, Lisa H; Wilding, George

    2015-09-01

    E9802 was a phase 2 multi-institution study conducted to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of vaccinia and fowlpox prostate-specific antigen (PSA) vaccine (step 1) followed by combination with androgen ablation therapy (step 2) in patients with PSA progression without visible metastasis. To test the hypothesis that vaccine therapy in this early disease setting will be safe and have a biochemical effect that would support future studies of immunotherapy in patients with minimal disease burden. Patients who had PSA progression following local therapy were treated with PROSTVAC-V (vaccinia)/TRICOM on cycle 1 followed by PROSTVAC-F (fowlpox)/TRICOM for subsequent cycles in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (step 1). Androgen ablation was added on progression (step 2). Step 1 primary end points included progression at 6 mo and characterization of change in PSA velocity pretreatment to post-treatment. Step 2 end points included PSA response with combined vaccine and androgen ablation. In step 1, 25 of 40 eligible patients (63%) were progression free at 6 mo after registration (90% confidence interval [CI], 48-75). The median pretreatment PSA velocity was 0.13 log(PSA)/mo, in contrast to median postregistration velocity of 0.09 log(PSA)/mo (p=0.02), which is an increase in median PSA doubling time from 5.3 mo to 7.7 mo. No grade ≥4 treatment-related toxicity was observed. In the 27 patients eligible and treated for step 2, 20 patients achieved a complete response (CR) at 7 mo (CR rate: 74%; 90% CI, 57-87). Although supportive of larger studies in the cooperative group setting, this study is limited by the small number of patients and the absence of a control group as in a phase 3 study. A viral PSA vaccine can be administered safely in the multi-institutional cooperative group setting to patients with minimal disease volume alone and combined with androgen ablation, supporting the feasibility of future phase 3 studies in this

  8. Preparation by alkaline treatment and detailed characterisation of empty hepatitis B virus core particles for vaccine and gene therapy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strods, Arnis; Ose, Velta; Bogans, Janis; Cielens, Indulis; Kalnins, Gints; Radovica, Ilze; Kazaks, Andris; Pumpens, Paul; Renhofa, Regina

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core (HBc) virus-like particles (VLPs) are one of the most powerful protein engineering tools utilised to expose immunological epitopes and/or cell-targeting signals and for the packaging of genetic material and immune stimulatory sequences. Although HBc VLPs and their numerous derivatives are produced in highly efficient bacterial and yeast expression systems, the existing purification and packaging protocols are not sufficiently optimised and standardised. Here, a simple alkaline treatment method was employed for the complete removal of internal RNA from bacteria- and yeast-produced HBc VLPs and for the conversion of these VLPs into empty particles, without any damage to the VLP structure. The empty HBc VLPs were able to effectively package the added DNA and RNA sequences. Furthermore, the alkaline hydrolysis technology appeared efficient for the purification and packaging of four different HBc variants carrying lysine residues on the HBc VLP spikes. Utilising the introduced lysine residues and the intrinsic aspartic and glutamic acid residues exposed on the tips of the HBc spikes for chemical coupling of the chosen peptide and/or nucleic acid sequences ensured a standard and easy protocol for the further development of versatile HBc VLP-based vaccine and gene therapy applications.

  9. Local delivery of Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor protects mice from lethal pneumococcal pneumonia1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinwede, Kathrin; Tempelhof, Ole; Bolte, Kristine; Maus, Regina; Bohling, Jennifer; Ueberberg, Bianca; Länger, Florian; Christman, John W.; Paton, James C.; Ask, Kjetil; Maharaj, Shyam; Kolb, Martin; Gauldie, Jack; Welte, Tobias; Maus, Ulrich A.

    2013-01-01

    The growth factor granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has an important role in pulmonary surfactant metabolism and the regulation of antibacterial activities of lung sentinel cells. However, the potential of intra-alveolar GM-CSF to augment lung protective immunity against inhaled bacterial pathogens has not been defined in preclinical infection models. We hypothesized that transient overexpression of GM-CSF in the lungs of mice by adenoviral gene transfer (Ad-GM-CSF) would protect mice from subsequent lethal pneumococcal pneumonia. Our data show that intra-alveolar delivery of Ad-GM-CSF led to sustained increased pSTAT5 expression and PU.1 protein expression in alveolar macrophages during a 28 day observation period. Pulmonary Ad-GM-CSF delivery two or four weeks prior to infection of mice with S. pneumoniae significantly reduced mortality rates relative to control vector treated mice. This increased survival was accompanied by increased iNOS expression, antibacterial activity and a significant reduction in caspase 3 dependent apoptosis and secondary necrosis of lung sentinel cells. Importantly, therapeutic treatment of mice with recombinant GM-CSF improved lung protective immunity and accelerated bacterial clearance after pneumococcal challenge. We conclude that prophylactic delivery of GM-CSF triggers long-lasting immunostimulatory effects in the lung in vivo and rescues mice from lethal pneumococcal pneumonia by improving antibacterial immunity. These data support use of novel antibiotic-independent immunostimulatory therapies to protect patients against bacterial pneumonias. PMID:22003204

  10. The prevalence of neutralizing antibodies against AAV serotype 1 in healthy subjects in China: implications for gene therapy and vaccines using AAV1 vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Huang, Weijin; Zhao, Chenyan; Zhang, Li; Meng, Shufang; Gao, Dongying; Wang, Youchun

    2013-09-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) has attracted tremendous interest as a promising vector for gene therapy and vaccine applications. However, the presence of AAV1 neutralizing antibodies as a consequence of exposure to wild type AAV1 can limit significantly effective gene transfer for biologics based AAV1 vector. Prior studies have reported that a prevalence of AAV1 neutralizing antibodies ranged from 10% to 50% in different countries around the world, and up to 79% in Dutch subjects. However, few studies have reported on the AAV1 neutralizing antibody prevalence in Chinese subjects. In this study, a high-throughput luciferase-based virus neutralization assay was established and standardized for critical parameters, including the appropriate cell line, and the optimal viral infection dose, and the infection time with homologous AAV1 vaccinated mice and guinea pig sera. Then, a total of 500 healthy individual serum samples from two separate regions of China were screened for the AAV1 neutralizing antibodies by conducting a non-randomized, cross-sectional analysis. Interestingly, a high prevalence of AAV1 neutralizing antibody (69.8%) was found in all individuals. There was significant difference observed for prevalence by gender (P = 0.042), age range (P = 0.011) and geographic origin (P AAV1 neutralizing antibodies (NT50  > 10) in teenagers (year AAV1-based vaccination and gene therapy strategies in Beijing and Anhui provinces of China. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Current status of clinical trials assessing oncolytic virus therapy for urological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Satoru; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Homma, Yukio; Todo, Tomoki

    2017-05-01

    Oncolytic virus therapy has recently been recognized as a promising new option for cancer treatment. Oncolytic viruses replicate selectively in cancer cells, thus killing them without harming normal cells. Notably, T-VEC (talimogene laherparepvec, formerly called OncoVEX(GM)(-)(CSF) ), an oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of inoperable melanoma in October 2015, and was subsequently approved in Europe and Australia in 2016. The efficacies of many types of oncolytic viruses against urological cancers have been investigated in preclinical studies during the past decade, and some have already been tested in clinical trials. For example, a phase I trial of the third-generation oncolytic Herpes simplex virus type 1, G47Δ, in patients with prostate cancer was completed in 2016. We summarize the current status of clinical trials of oncolytic virus therapy in patients with the three major urological cancers: prostate, bladder and renal cell cancers. In addition to Herpes simplex virus type 1, adenoviruses, reoviruses, vaccinia virus, Sendai virus and Newcastle disease virus have also been used as parental viruses in these trials. We believe that oncolytic virus therapy is likely to become an important and major treatment option for urological cancers in the near future. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  12. Adjuvant Effect of Bacille Calmette–Guérin on Hepatitis B Vaccine Immunogenicity in the Preterm and Term Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheid, Annette; Borriello, Francesco; Pietrasanta, Carlo; Christou, Helen; Diray-Arce, Joann; Pettengill, Matthew A.; Joshi, Sweta; Li, Ning; Bergelson, Ilana; Kollmann, Tobias; Dowling, David J.; Levy, Ofer

    2018-01-01

    Immunization is key to protecting term and preterm infants from a heightened risk of infection. However, preterm immunity is distinct from that of the term, limiting its ability to effectively respond to vaccines routinely given at birth, such as hepatitis B vaccine (HBV). As part of the Expanded Program on Immunization, HBV is often given together with the live-attenuated vaccine Bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG), known to activate multiple pattern-recognition receptors. Of note, some clinical studies suggest BCG can enhance efficacy of other vaccines in term newborns. However, little is known about whether BCG can shape Th-polarizing cytokine responses to HBV nor the age-dependency of such effects, including whether they may extend to the preterm. To characterize the effects of BCG on HBV immunogenicity, we studied individual and combined administration of these vaccines to cord newborn and adult human whole blood and mononuclear cells in vitro and to neonatal and adult mice in vivo. Compared to either BCG or HBV alone, (BCG + HBV) synergistically enhanced in vitro whole blood production of IL-1β, while (BCG + HBV) also promoted production of several cytokines/chemokines in all age groups, age-specific enhancement included IL-12p70 in the preterm and GM-CSF in the preterm and term. In human mononuclear cells, (BCG + HBV) enhanced mRNA expression of several genes including CSF2, which contributed to clustering of genes by vaccine treatment via principle component analysis. To assess the impact of BCG on HBV immunization, mice of three different age groups were immunized subcutaneously with, BCG, HBV, (BCG + HBV) into the same site; or BCG and HBV injected into separate sites. Whether injected into a separate site or at the same site, co-administration of BCG with HBV significantly enhanced anti-HBV IgG titers in mice immunized on day of life-0 or -7, respectively, but not in adult mice. In summary, our data demonstrate that innate and adaptive

  13. An Optimized Method for Manufacturing a Clinical Scale Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine for the Treatment of Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogliani, Simona; Pellegatta, Serena; Antozzi, Carlo; Baggi, Fulvio; Gellera, Cinzia; Pollo, Bianca; Parati, Eugenio A.; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Frigerio, Simona

    2012-01-01

    Immune-based treatments represent a promising new class of therapy designed to boost the immune system to specifically eradicate malignant cells. Immunotherapy may generate specific anti-tumor immune responses, and dendritic cells (DC), professional antigen-presenting cells, are widely used in experimental cancer immunotherapy. Several reports describe methods for the generation of mature, antigen-pulsed DC for clinical use. Improved quality and standardization are desirable to obtain GMP-compliant protocols. In this study we describe the generation of DC from 31 Glioblastoma (GB) patients starting from their monocytes isolated by immunomagnetic CD14 selection using the CliniMACS® device. Upon differentiation of CD14+ with IL-4 and GM-CSF, DC were induced to maturation with TNF-α, PGE2, IL-1β, and IL-6. Whole tumor lysate was obtained, for the first time, in a closed system using the semi-automated dissociator GentleMACS®. The yield of proteins improved by 130% compared to the manual dissociation method. Interestingly the Mean Fluorescence Intensity for CD83 increased significantly in DC pulsed with “new method” lysate compared to DC pulsed with “classical method” lysate. Our results indicate that immunomagnetic isolation of CD14+ monocytes using the CliniMACS® device and their pulsing with whole tumor lysate proteins is a suitable method for clinical-scale generation of high quality, functional DC under GMP-grade conditions. PMID:23284979

  14. Cuscuta chinensis Ameliorates Immunosuppression and Urotoxic Effect of Cyclophosphamide by Regulating Cytokines - GM-CSF and TNF-Alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Nidhi; Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan; Kannan, Narayanan; Vinod Prabhu, Venugopal; Guruvayoorappan, Chandrasekaran

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide. Cyclophosphamide (CTX) is commonly used as anticancer drug which causes toxicity by its reactive metabolites such as acroline and phosphoramide mustard. In this study, Cuscuta chinensis (C. chinensis) (family: Convolvulaceae) was assessed for ability to restore mice against CTX-induced toxicity. Coadministration of C. chinensis extract (10 mg/kg BW, IP, daily) for ten consecutive days reduced CTX-induced (25 mg/kg BW, IP, daily) toxicity. Treatment with C. chinensis extract significantly (p < 0.01) increased the relative organ weight and body weight. Moreover, administration of C. chinensis extract significantly increased bone marrow cellulatity and α-esterase activity in CTX-treated mice which suggested its protective role on the hematopoietic system. The GSH content was drastically reduced by CTX administration in urinary bladder which was enhanced by treatment with C. chinensis extract, indicating that preventing acroline-mediated tissue damage or cell toxicity and also the extract decreased the urinary bladder nitric oxide (NO) level which proves recovery over urinary tract injury associated with CTX treatment. The administration of C. chinensis extract decreased serum urea, creatinine, and bilirubin levels when compared to CTX-alone-treated group. Histopathological analysis of the urinary bladder of CTX-alone-treated group showed necrotic damage whereas the C. chinensis-treated group showed normal bladder architecture. The above data clearly demonstrates chemoprotective role of C. chinensis against CTX-induced toxicities by regulating antioxidant and inflammatory mediators.

  15. Standardized serum GM-CSF autoantibody testing for the routine clinical diagnosis of autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Kanji; Nakata, Koh; Carey, Brenna; Chalk, Claudia; Suzuki, Takuji; Sakagami, Takuro; Koch, Diana E; Stevens, Carrie; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Yamada, Yoshitsugu; Trapnell, Bruce C

    2014-01-15

    Autoantibodies against granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMAbs) cause autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) and measurement of the GMAb level in serum is now commonly used to identify this disease, albeit, in a clinical research setting. The present study was undertaken to optimize and standardize serum GMAb concentration testing using a GMAb enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (GMAb ELISA) to prepare for its introduction into routine clinical use. The GMAb ELISA was evaluated using serum specimens from autoimmune PAP patients, healthy people, and GMAb-spiked serum from healthy people. After optimizing assay components and procedures, its accuracy, precision, reliability, sensitivity, specificity, and ruggedness were evaluated. The coefficient of variation in repeated measurements was acceptable (standards, or by storage of serum samples at -80°C. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of the PAP patient-derived polyclonal GMAb reference standard (PCRS) was 0.78ng/ml. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified a serum GMAb level of 5μg/ml (based on PCRS) as the optimal cut off value for distinguishing autoimmune PAP serum from normal serum. A pharmaceutical-grade, monoclonal GMAb reference standard (MCRS) was developed as the basis of a new unit of measure for GMAb concentration: one International Unit (IU) of GMAb is equivalent to 1μg/ml of MCRS. The median [interquartile range] serum GMAb level was markedly higher in autoimmune PAP patients than in healthy people (21.54 [12.83-36.38] versus 0.08 [0.05-0.14] IU; n=56, 38; respectively; Pstandardized units. These findings support the use of this GMAb ELISA for the routine clinical diagnosis of autoimmune PAP and introduce a new unit of measure to enable standardized reporting of serum GMAb data from different laboratories. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Immunization With AFP + GM CSF Plasmid Prime and AFP Adenoviral Vector Boost in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Hepatoma; Liver Cancer, Adult; Liver Cell Carcinoma; Liver Cell Carcinoma, Adult; Cancer of Liver; Cancer of the Liver; Cancer, Hepatocellular; Hepatic Cancer; Hepatic Neoplasms; Hepatocellular Cancer; Liver Cancer; Neoplasms, Hepatic; Neoplasms, Liver

  17. Cytokine-Enhanced Vaccine and Interferon-β plus Suicide Gene Therapy as Surgery Adjuvant Treatments for Spontaneous Canine Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finocchiaro, Liliana M E; Fondello, Chiara; Gil-Cardeza, María L; Rossi, Úrsula A; Villaverde, Marcela S; Riveros, María D; Glikin, Gerardo C

    2015-06-01

    We present here a nonviral immunogene therapy trial for canine malignant melanoma, an aggressive disease displaying significant clinical and histopathological overlapping with human melanoma. As a surgery adjuvant approach, it comprised the co-injection of lipoplexes bearing herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase and canine interferon-β genes at the time of surgery, combined with the periodic administration of a subcutaneous genetic vaccine composed of tumor extracts and lipoplexes carrying the genes of human interleukin-2 and human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Following complete surgery (CS), the combined treatment (CT) significantly raised the portion of local disease-free canine patients from 11% to 83% and distant metastases-free (M0) from 44% to 89%, as compared with surgery-only-treated controls (ST). Even after partial surgery (PS), CT better controlled the systemic disease (M0: 82%) than ST (M0: 48%). Moreover, compared with ST, CT caused a significant 7-fold (CS) and 4-fold (PS) rise of overall survival, and >17-fold (CS) and >13-fold (PS) rise of metastasis-free survival. The dramatic increase of PS metastasis-free survival (>1321 days) and CS recurrence- and metastasis-free survival (both >2251 days) demonstrated that CT was shifting a rapidly lethal disease into a chronic one. In conclusion, this surgery adjuvant CT was able of significantly delaying or preventing postsurgical recurrence and distant metastasis, increasing disease-free and overall survival, and maintaining the quality of life. The high number of canine patients involved in CT (301) and the extensive follow-up (>6 years) with minimal or absent toxicity warrant the long-term safety and efficacy of this treatment. This successful clinical outcome justifies attempting a similar scheme for human melanoma.

  18. Activities of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor revealed by gene transfer and gene knockout studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranoff, G; Mulligan, R C

    1994-01-01

    We used retroviral mediated gene transfer and gene knockout technologies to explore the in vivo functions of murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) [1, 2]. In tumor vaccination experiments, GM-CSF was the most potent molecule of a large number of cytokines, adhesion molecules and other immunomodulators for the induction of specific and long-lasting anti-tumor immunity. Vaccination required activities of both CD4 and CD8 positive lymphocytes, and likely involved the augmentation by GM-CSF of host professional antigen-presenting cell function. Mice engineered by homologous recombination techniques in embryonic stem cells to lack GM-CSF demonstrated no significant perturbations in steady-state hematopoiesis. All mutant animals, however, developed the accumulation of surfactant proteins and lipids in the alveolar space, the defining feature of the idiopathic human disorder pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Surfactant lipid and protein content were increased in the absence of alterations in surfactant protein mRNA, supporting the concept that surfactant clearance or catabolism was perturbed. Extensive lymphoid hyperplasia associated with lung airways and blood vessels was also found, yet no infectious agents could be isolated. These results demonstrate that GM-CSF is not an essential growth factor for basal hematopoiesis and reveal an unexpected, critical role for GM-CSF in pulmonary homeostasis. It is tempting to speculate that the ability of GM-CSF to modulate the uptake and processing of particulate material underlies the mechanisms of immunostimulation and surfactant accumulation.

  19. A simple in vitro method for evaluating dendritic cell-based vaccinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham PV

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Phuc Van Pham, Nhung Thi Nguyen, Hoang Minh Nguyen, Lam Tan Khuat, Phong Minh Le, Viet Quoc Pham, Sinh Truong Nguyen, Ngoc Kim Phan Laboratory of Stem Cell Research and Application, University of Science, Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Background: Dendritic cell (DC therapy is a promising therapy for cancer-targeting treatments. Recently, DCs have been used for treatment of some cancers. We aimed to develop an in vitro assay to evaluate DC therapy in cancer treatment using a breast cancer model. Methods: DCs were induced from murine bone marrow mononuclear cells in Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with GM-CSF (20 ng/mL and IL-4 (20 ng/mL. Immature DCs were primed with breast cancer stem cell (BCSC-derived antigens. BCSCs were sorted from 4T1 cell lines based on aldehyde dehydrogenase expression. A mixture of DCs and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs were used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of antigen-primed DCs on BCSCs. BCSC proliferation and doubling time were recorded based on impedance-based cell analysis using the xCELLigence system. The specification of inhibitory effects of DCs and CTLs was also evaluated using the same system. Results: The results showed that impedance-based analysis of BCSCs reflected cytotoxicity and inhibitory effects of DCs and CTLs at 72 hours. Differences in ratios of DC:CTL changed the cytotoxicity of DCs and CTLs. Conclusion: This study successfully used impedance-based cell analysis as a new in vitro assay to evaluate DC efficacy in cancer immunotherapy. We hope this technique will contribute to the development and improvement of immunotherapies in the near future. Keywords: CTLs, cytotoxicity assay, dendritic cells, immunotherapy, targeting therapy

  20. Effective immunotherapy of weakly immunogenic solid tumours using a combined immunogene therapy and regulatory T-cell inactivation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whelan, M C

    2012-01-31

    Obstacles to effective immunotherapeutic anti-cancer approaches include poor immunogenicity of the tumour cells and the presence of tolerogenic mechanisms in the tumour microenvironment. We report an effective immune-based treatment of weakly immunogenic, growing solid tumours using a locally delivered immunogene therapy to promote development of immune effector responses in the tumour microenvironment and a systemic based T regulatory cell (Treg) inactivation strategy to potentiate these responses by elimination of tolerogenic or immune suppressor influences. As the JBS fibrosarcoma is weakly immunogenic and accumulates Treg in its microenvironment with progressive growth, we used this tumour model to test our combined immunotherapies. Plasmids encoding GM-CSF and B7-1 were electrically delivered into 100 mm(3) tumours; Treg inactivation was accomplished by systemic administration of anti-CD25 antibody (Ab). Using this approach, we found that complete elimination of tumours was achieved at a level of 60% by immunogene therapy, 25% for Treg inactivation and 90% for combined therapies. Moreover, we found that these responses were immune transferable, systemic, tumour specific and durable. Combined gene-based immune effector therapy and Treg inactivation represents an effective treatment for weakly antigenic solid growing tumours and that could be considered for clinical development.

  1. Advances in universal influenza virus vaccine design and antibody mediated therapies based on conserved regions of the hemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, Florian; Palese, Peter; Steel, John

    2015-01-01

    The threat of novel influenza viruses emerging into the human population from animal reservoirs, as well as the short duration of protection conferred by licensed vaccines against human seasonal strains has spurred research efforts to improve upon current vaccines and develop novel therapeutics against influenza viruses. In recent years these efforts have resulted in the identification of novel, highly conserved epitopes for neutralizing antibodies on the influenza virus hemagglutinin protein, which are present in both the stalk and globular head domains of the molecule. The existence of such epitopes may allow for generation of novel therapeutic antibodies, in addition to serving as attractive targets of novel vaccine design. The aims of developing improved vaccines include eliciting broader protection from drifted strains, inducing long-lived immunity against seasonal strains, and allowing for the rational design of vaccines that can be stockpiled for use as pre-pandemic vaccines. In addition, an increased focus on influenza virus vaccine research has prompted an improved understanding of how the immune system responds to influenza virus infection.

  2. Mimotope-based vaccines of Leishmania infantum antigens and their protective efficacy against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Lourena Emanuele; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Pereira, Nathália Cristina de Jesus; Lima, Mayara Ingrid Sousa; Duarte, Mariana Costa; Martins, Vivian Tamietti; Lage, Paula Sousa; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Ribeiro, Tatiana Gomes; Melo, Maria Norma; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Soto, Manuel; Tavares, Carlos Alberto Pereira; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel Angel; Coelho, Eduardo Antonio Ferraz

    2014-01-01

    The development of cost-effective prophylactic strategies to prevent leishmaniasis has become a high-priority. The present study has used the phage display technology to identify new immunogens, which were evaluated as vaccines in the murine model of visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Epitope-based immunogens, represented by phage-fused peptides that mimic Leishmania infantum antigens, were selected according to their affinity to antibodies from asymptomatic and symptomatic VL dogs' sera. Twenty phage clones were selected after three selection cycles, and were evaluated by means of in vitro assays of the immune stimulation of spleen cells derived from naive and chronically infected with L. infantum BALB/c mice. Clones that were able to induce specific Th1 immune response, represented by high levels of IFN-γ and low levels of IL-4 were selected, and based on their selectivity and specificity, two clones, namely B10 and C01, were further employed in the vaccination protocols. BALB/c mice vaccinated with clones plus saponin showed both a high and specific production of IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF after in vitro stimulation with individual clones or L. infantum extracts. Additionally, these animals, when compared to control groups (saline, saponin, wild-type phage plus saponin, or non-relevant phage clone plus saponin), showed significant reductions in the parasite burden in the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and paws' draining lymph nodes. Protection was associated with an IL-12-dependent production of IFN-γ, mainly by CD8+ T cells, against parasite proteins. These animals also presented decreased parasite-mediated IL-4 and IL-10 responses, and increased levels of parasite-specific IgG2a antibodies. This study describes two phage clones that mimic L. infantum antigens, which were directly used as immunogens in vaccines and presented Th1-type immune responses, and that significantly reduced the parasite burden. This is the first study that describes phage-displayed peptides as

  3. Mimotope-based vaccines of Leishmania infantum antigens and their protective efficacy against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourena Emanuele Costa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of cost-effective prophylactic strategies to prevent leishmaniasis has become a high-priority. The present study has used the phage display technology to identify new immunogens, which were evaluated as vaccines in the murine model of visceral leishmaniasis (VL. Epitope-based immunogens, represented by phage-fused peptides that mimic Leishmania infantum antigens, were selected according to their affinity to antibodies from asymptomatic and symptomatic VL dogs' sera. METHODOLOGY/MAIN FINDINGS: Twenty phage clones were selected after three selection cycles, and were evaluated by means of in vitro assays of the immune stimulation of spleen cells derived from naive and chronically infected with L. infantum BALB/c mice. Clones that were able to induce specific Th1 immune response, represented by high levels of IFN-γ and low levels of IL-4 were selected, and based on their selectivity and specificity, two clones, namely B10 and C01, were further employed in the vaccination protocols. BALB/c mice vaccinated with clones plus saponin showed both a high and specific production of IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF after in vitro stimulation with individual clones or L. infantum extracts. Additionally, these animals, when compared to control groups (saline, saponin, wild-type phage plus saponin, or non-relevant phage clone plus saponin, showed significant reductions in the parasite burden in the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and paws' draining lymph nodes. Protection was associated with an IL-12-dependent production of IFN-γ, mainly by CD8+ T cells, against parasite proteins. These animals also presented decreased parasite-mediated IL-4 and IL-10 responses, and increased levels of parasite-specific IgG2a antibodies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study describes two phage clones that mimic L. infantum antigens, which were directly used as immunogens in vaccines and presented Th1-type immune responses, and that significantly reduced the

  4. Photodynamic therapy-mediated cancer vaccination enhances stem-like phenotype and immune escape, which can be blocked by thrombospondin-1 signaling through CD47 receptor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanhong; Zou, Fangyuan; Wang, Jingjing; Yin, Guifang; Le, Vanminh; Fei, Zhewei; Liu, Jianwen

    2015-04-03

    Like most of the strategies for cancer immunotherapy, photodynamic therapy-mediated vaccination has shown poor clinical outcomes in application. The aim of this study is to offer a glimpse at the mechanisms that are responsible for the failure based on cancer immuno-editing theory and to search for a positive solution. In this study we found that tumor cells were able to adapt themselves to the immune pressure exerted by vaccination. The survived tumor cells exhibited enhanced tumorigenic and stem-like phenotypes as well as undermined immunogenicity. Viewed as a whole, immune-selected tumor cells showed more malignant characteristics and the ability of immune escape, which might contribute to the eventual relapse. Thrombospondin-1 signaling via CD47 helped prevent tumor cells from becoming stem-like and rendered them vulnerable to immune attack. These findings prove that the TSP-1/CD47/SIRP-α signal axis is important to the evolution of tumor cells in the microenvironment of immunotherapy and identify thrombospondin-1 as a key signal with therapeutic benefits in overcoming long term relapse, providing new evidence for the clinical promise of cancer vaccination. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Vaccines and Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Bianchini, Sonia; Dellepiane, Rosa Maria; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The distinctive immune system characteristics of children with Kawasaki disease (KD) could suggest that they respond in a particular way to all antigenic stimulations, including those due to vaccines. Moreover, treatment of KD is mainly based on immunomodulatory therapy. These factors suggest that vaccines and KD may interact in several ways. These interactions could be of clinical relevance because KD is a disease of younger children who receive most of the vaccines recommended for infectious disease prevention. This paper shows that available evidence does not support an association between KD development and vaccine administration. Moreover, it highlights that administration of routine vaccines is mandatory even in children with KD and all efforts must be made to ensure the highest degree of protection against vaccine-preventable diseases for these patients. However, studies are needed to clarify currently unsolved issues, especially issues related to immunologic interference induced by intravenous immunoglobulin and biological drugs.

  6. Effect of the hepatitis B virus S‑ecdCD40L vaccine therapy in HBV transgenic mice: A vaccine‑induced activation of antigen presenting dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Huaqin; Lan, Songsong; Wu, Jinming; Tang, Binbin; Xu, Yin

    2017-11-01

    The classical hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA vaccination plasmid only encodes for a single viral antigen, either the S or the PreS2/S antigen. Many strategies have been employed to improve the effect of these DNA vaccines. Our previous study identified that the fusion gene, HBV S‑ecd cluster of differentiation 40 ligand (CD40L), may promote the activation of dendritic cells (DCs) and enhance their function in vitro. In the current study, the effect of HBV S‑ecdCD40L vaccine therapy on liver DCs was investigated, and its therapeutic potential in HBV transgenic (HBV‑Tg) mice was evaluated. The eukaryotic expression plasmid, pcDNA3.1‑S‑ecdCD40L, was constructed by inserting the HBV S gene and mouse CD40L gene into the vector, pcDNA3.1 (+). HBV‑Tg mice were immunized with pcDNA3.1‑S‑ecdCD40L, pcDNA3.1‑S, pcDNA3.1 or PBS. Following this, immunophenotyping, cytokine production and T‑cell activation were analyzed in the CD11c‑enriched DC population obtained from the liver. Vaccine efficacy was further assessed by the detection of serological and biochemical parameters. When comparing with other control groups, DCs from HBV‑Tg mice immunized with pcDNA3.1‑S‑ecdCD40L exhibited increased expression of immunologically important cell molecules (CD86 and major histocompatibility complex class II), pro‑inflammatory cytokines (interleukin‑12), and enhanced capacity to promote allogeneic T‑cell proliferation. Furthermore, the HBV S‑ecdCD40L vaccine resulted in a significant inhibition of HBV DNA replication and downregulation of the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) in HBV‑Tg mice, without obvious liver injury. In conclusion, the HBV S‑ecdCD40L vaccine may be a feasible strategy for chronic HBV immunotherapy via promoting DC activation and function.

  7. Two doses of candidate TB vaccine MVA85A in antiretroviral therapy (ART naïve subjects gives comparable immunogenicity to one dose in ART+ subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandakha N Dieye

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is a global public health problem exacerbated by the HIV epidemic. Here we evaluate a candidate TB vaccine, MVA85A, in a Phase I study in HIV-infected adults in Senegal. 24 patients were enrolled: Group 1∶12, antiretroviral therapy (ART naïve, adults, with CD4 counts >300 and HIV RNA load 300, and an undetectable HIV RNA load. Safety was evaluated by occurrence of local and systemic adverse events (AEs and by monitoring of CD4 count, HIV RNA load, haematology and biochemistry. Immunogenicity was evaluated by ex-vivo interferon-gamma ELISpot assay. 87.7% of AEs were mild; 11.6% were moderate; and 0.7% were severe. 29.2% of AEs were systemic; 70.8% were expected local AEs. There were no vaccine-related Serious Adverse Events (SAEs or clinically significant effects on HIV RNA load or CD4 count. In ART naive subjects, the first MVA85A immunisation induced a significant immune response at 1 and 4 weeks post-immunisation, which contracted to baseline by 12 weeks. Durability of immunogenicity in subjects on ART persisted out to 24 weeks post-vaccination. A second dose of MVA85A at 12 months enhanced immunogenicity in ART naïve subjects. Subjects on ART had higher responses after the first vaccination compared with ART naïve subjects; responses were comparable after 2 immunisations. In conclusion, MVA85A is well-tolerated and immunogenic in HIV-infected subjects in Senegal. A two dose regimen in ART naïve subjects is comparable in immunogenicity to a single dose in subjects on ART. Clinicaltrials.gov trial identifier NCT00731471.

  8. Inflammatory cytokine levels in chronic venous insufficiency ulcer tissue before and after compression therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidler, Stephanie K.; Douillet, Christelle D.; Berndt, Daniel F.; Keagy, Blair A.; Rich, Preston B.; Marston, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Elevated inflammatory cytokine levels have been implicated in the pathogenesis of non3 healing chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) ulcers. The goal of this study was to determine the protein levels of a wide range of inflammatory cytokines in untreated CVI ulcer tissue before and after 4 weeks of high strength compression therapy. These levels were compared to cytokines present in healthy tissue. Methods Thirty limbs with untreated CVI and leg ulceration received therapy for 4 weeks with sustained high compression bandaging at an ambulatory wound center. Biopsies were obtained from healthy and ulcerated tissue before and after therapy. A multiplexed protein assay was used to measure multiple cytokines in a single sample. Patients were designated as rapid or delayed healers based on ulcer surface area change. Results The majority of pro-inflammatory cytokine protein levels were elevated in ulcer tissue compared to healthy tissue, and compression therapy significantly reduced these cytokines. TGF-β1 was up-regulated in ulcer tissue following compression therapy. Rapid healing ulcers had significantly higher levels of IL-1α, IL-1β, IFN-γ, IL-12p40 and GM-CSF before compression therapy, and IL-1 Ra after therapy. IFN-γ levels significantly decreased following therapy in the rapidly healing patients. Conclusion CVI ulcer healing is associated with a pro-inflammatory environment prior to treatment that reflects metabolically active peri-wound tissue that has the potential to heal. Treatment with compression therapy results in healing that is coupled with reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and higher levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-1 Ra. Clinical Relevance This data suggests that cytokines may provide targets in which topical therapeutic inhibition or promotion at appropriate time points in the healing process may provide novel therapeutic approaches to the healing of CVI ulcers. PMID:19341889

  9. Vaccines (immunizations) - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccinations; Immunizations; Immunize; Vaccine shots; Prevention - vaccine ... of the vaccine. VACCINE SCHEDULE The recommended vaccination (immunization) schedule is updated every 12 months by the ...

  10. Vaccine hesitancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Eve; Laberge, Caroline; Guay, Maryse; Bramadat, Paul; Roy, Réal; Bettinger, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite being recognized as one of the most successful public health measures, vaccination is perceived as unsafe and unnecessary by a growing number of individuals. Lack of confidence in vaccines is now considered a threat to the success of vaccination programs. Vaccine hesitancy is believed to be responsible for decreasing vaccine coverage and an increasing risk of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and epidemics. This review provides an overview of the phenomenon of vaccine hesitancy. First, we will characterize vaccine hesitancy and suggest the possible causes of the apparent increase in vaccine hesitancy in the developed world. Then we will look at determinants of individual decision-making about vaccination. PMID:23584253

  11. Chronic granulomatous dermatitis induced by talimogene laherparepvec therapy of melanoma metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Ashlyn S; Pavlidakey, Peter G; Contreras, Carlo M; De Los Santos, Jennifer F; Kim, Ju Y; McKee, Svetlana B; Kaufman, Howard L; Conry, Robert M

    2017-09-22

    Talimogene laherparepvec (TVEC) is the first oncolytic viral immunotherapy approved by the FDA, for advanced melanoma consisting of genetically modified herpes simplex type 1 virus which selectively replicates causing tumor lysis, expressing granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and activating dendritic cells. Intratumoral injection of TVEC produces objective response in 41% of stage IIB-IV M1a melanoma. However, clinical response assessment can be problematic due to immune-related inflammation at established tumor sites. Herein, we report 5 cases of granulomatous dermatitis developing at sites of TVEC injection associated with pathologic complete response in 4 of 5 patients. Over 5 months, TVEC injections were administrated in a median of 20 tumors per patient for 9 median doses prior to biopsy of persistent, indurated nodules. Granulomatous dermatitis with melanophages and melanin pigment incontinence was observed in all samples without evidence of melanoma cells in 4 patients. The fifth patient was rendered melanoma-free by resection of the 1 nodule out of 4 with persistent tumor. Repetitive administration of TVEC or other oncolytic viral immunotherapies mimicking unresolved infection can produce granulomatous inflammation confounding assessment of the degree of tumor response and need for additional TVEC therapy. Tumor biopsies are encouraged after 4 to 6 months of TVEC administration to differentiate melanoma from granulomatous inflammation. Patients with confirmed granulomatous dermatitis replace continued with remained in remission after treatment discontinuation. Inflammatory nodules typically regress spontaneously. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A phase I clinical study of vaccination of melanoma patients with dendritic cells loaded with allogeneic apoptotic/necrotic melanoma cells. Analysis of toxicity and immune response to the vaccine and of IL-10 -1082 promoter genotype as predictor of disease progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Euw Erika M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sixteen melanoma patients (1 stage IIC, 8 stage III, and 7 stage IV were treated in a Phase I study with a vaccine (DC/Apo-Nec composed of autologous dendritic cells (DCs loaded with a mixture of apoptotic/necrotic allogeneic melanoma cell lines (Apo-Nec, to evaluate toxicity and immune responses. Also, IL-10 1082 genotype was analyzed in an effort to predict disease progression. Methods PBMC were obtained after leukapheresis and DCs were generated from monocytes cultured in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 in serum-free medium. Immature DCs were loaded with gamma-irradiated Apo-Nec cells and injected id without adjuvant. Cohorts of four patients were given four vaccines each with 5, 10, 15, or 20 × 106 DC/Apo-Nec cell per vaccine, two weeks apart. Immune responses were measured by ELISpot and tetramer analysis. Il-10 genotype was measured by PCR and corroborated by IL-10 production by stimulated PBMC. Results Immature DCs efficiently phagocytosed melanoma Apo-Nec cells and matured after phagocytosis as evidenced by increased expression of CD83, CD80, CD86, HLA class I and II, and 75.2 ± 16% reduction in Dextran-FITC endocytosis. CCR7 was also up-regulated upon Apo-Nec uptake in DCs from all patients, and accordingly DC/Apo-Nec cells were able to migrate in vitro toward MIP-3 beta. The vaccine was well tolerated in all patients. The DTH score increased significantly in all patients after the first vaccination (Mann-Whitney Test, p +T lymphocytes specific to gp100 and Melan A/MART-1 Ags was determined by ELISpot and tetramer analysis in five HLA-A*0201 patients before and after vaccination; one patient had stable elevated levels before and after vaccination; two increased their CD8 + levels, one had stable moderate and one had negligible levels. The analysis of IL-10 promoter -1082 polymorphism in the sixteen patients showed a positive correlation between AA genotype, accompanied by lower in vitro IL-10 production by

  13. [Travelers' vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2011-09-01

    The number of Japanese oversea travelers has gradually increased year by year, however they usually pay less attention to the poor physical condition at the voyage place. Many oversea travelers caught vaccine preventable diseases in developing countries. The Vaccine Guideline for Oversea Travelers 2010 published by Japanese Society of Travel Health will be helpful for spreading the knowledge of travelers' vaccine and vaccine preventable diseases in developing countries. Many travelers' vaccines have not licensed in Japan. I hope these travelers' vaccines, such as typhoid vaccine, meningococcal vaccine, cholera vaccine and so on will be licensed in the near future.

  14. Recombinant prohibitin protein of Leishmania infantum acts as a vaccine candidate and diagnostic marker against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Daniel S; Ribeiro, Patrícia A F; Martins, Vívian T; Lage, Daniela P; Ramos, Fernanda F; Dias, Anna L T; Rodrigues, Marcella R; Portela, Áquila S B; Costa, Lourena E; Caligiorne, Rachel B; Steiner, Bethina T; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel A; Salles, Beatriz C S; Santos, Thaís T O; Silveira, Julia A G; Magalhães-Soares, Danielle F; Roatt, Bruno M; Machado-de-Ávila, Ricardo A; Duarte, Mariana C; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Silva, Eduardo S; Galdino, Alexsandro S; Coelho, Eduardo A F

    2017-11-09

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) represents a serious public health problem, as Leishmania infantum is one of main disease causative agents in the Americas. In a previous immunoproteomic study, the prohibitin (PHB) protein was identified in L. infantum promastigote and amastigote extracts by antibodies in asymptomatic and symptomatic VL dog sera. This protein was found to be highly conserved between different Leishmania spp., but it presented a low identity with amino acid sequences of other organisms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cellular response induced by the recombinant PHB (rPHB) protein in BALB/c mice, as well as in PBMCs purified from untreated and treated VL patients, as well as to evaluate its protective efficacy against an infection by L. infantum promastigotes. Our data showed that there was a Th1 cellular response to rPHB, based on high levels of IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF in the immunized animals, as well as a proliferative response specific to the protein and higher IFN-γ levels induced in PBMCs from individuals who had recovered from the disease. The protection was represented by significant reductions in the parasite load in the animals' spleen, liver, bone marrow, and draining lymph nodes, as compared to results found in the control groups. In addition, an anti-rPHB serology, using a canine and human serological panel, showed a high performance of this protein when diagnosing VL based on high sensitivity and specificity values, as compared to results found for the rA2 antigen and the soluble Leishmania antigenic extract. Our data suggest that PHB has a potential application for the diagnosis of canine and human VL through antibody detection, as well as an application as a vaccine candidate to protect against disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Parametric Response Mapping of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient as an Imaging Biomarker to Distinguish Pseudoprogression from True Tumor Progression in Peptide-Based Vaccine Therapy for Pediatric Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceschin, R; Kurland, B F; Abberbock, S R; Ellingson, B M; Okada, H; Jakacki, R I; Pollack, I F; Panigrahy, A

    2015-11-01

    Immune response to cancer therapy may result in pseudoprogression, which can only be identified retrospectively and may disrupt an effective therapy. This study assesses whether serial parametric response mapping (a voxel-by-voxel method of image analysis also known as functional diffusion mapping) analysis of ADC measurements following peptide-based vaccination may help prospectively distinguish progression from pseudoprogression in pediatric patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas. From 2009 to 2012, 21 children, 4-18 years of age, with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas were enrolled in a serial peptide-based vaccination protocol following radiation therapy. DWI was acquired before immunotherapy and at 6-week intervals during vaccine treatment. Pseudoprogression was identified retrospectively on the basis of clinical and radiographic findings, excluding DWI. Parametric response mapping was used to analyze 96 scans, comparing ADC measures at multiple time points (from the first vaccine to up to 12 weeks after the vaccine was halted) with prevaccine baseline values. Log-transformed fractional increased ADC, fractional decreased ADC, and parametric response mapping ratio (fractional increased ADC/fractional decreased ADC) were compared between patients with and without pseudoprogression, by using generalized estimating equations with inverse weighting by cluster size. Median survival was 13.1 months from diagnosis (range, 6.4-24.9 months). Four of 21 children (19%) were assessed as experiencing pseudoprogression. Patients with pseudoprogression had higher fitted average log-transformed parametric response mapping ratios (P = .01) and fractional decreased ADCs (P = .0004), compared with patients without pseudoprogression. Serial parametric response mapping of ADC, performed at multiple time points of therapy, may distinguish pseudoprogression from true progression in patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas treated with peptide-based vaccination.

  16. Occupational Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Late for the Flu Vaccine? Eating Disorders Arrhythmias Occupational Therapy KidsHealth > For Parents > Occupational Therapy Print A A ... for some kids. continue Kids Who Might Need Occupational Therapy According to the AOTA, kids with these medical ...

  17. HER-3 peptide vaccines/mimics: Combined therapy with IGF-1R, HER-2, and HER-1 peptides induces synergistic antitumor effects against breast and pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Megan Jo; Foy, Kevin C; Overholser, Jay P; Nahta, Rita; Kaumaya, Pravin Tp

    2014-11-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER-3/ErbB3) is a unique member of the human epidermal growth factor family of receptors, because it lacks intrinsic kinase activity and ability to heterodimerize with other members. HER-3 is frequently upregulated in cancers with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER-1/ErbB1) or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2/ErBB2) overexpression, and targeting HER-3 may provide a route for overcoming resistance to agents that target EGFR or HER-2. We have previously developed vaccines and peptide mimics for HER-1, HER-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In this study, we extend our studies by identifying and evaluating novel HER-3 peptide epitopes encompassing residues 99-122, 140-162, 237-269 and 461-479 of the HER-3 extracellular domain as putative B-cell epitopes for active immunotherapy against HER-3 positive cancers. We show that the HER-3 vaccine antibodies and HER-3 peptide mimics induced antitumor responses: inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, inhibition of receptor phosphorylation, induction of apoptosis and antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Two of the HER-3 epitopes 237-269 (domain II) and 461-479 (domain III) significantly inhibited growth of xenografts originating from both pancreatic (BxPC3) and breast (JIMT-1) cancers. Combined therapy of HER-3 (461-471) epitope with HER-2 (266-296), HER-2 (597-626), HER-1 (418-435) and insulin-like growth factor receptor type I (IGF-1R) (56-81) vaccine antibodies and peptide mimics show enhanced antitumor effects in breast and pancreatic cancer cells. This study establishes the hypothesis that combination immunotherapy targeting different signal transduction pathways can provide effective antitumor immunity and long-term control of HER-1 and HER-2 overexpressing cancers.

  18. Exosomes derived from tumor cells genetically modified to express Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen: a novel vaccine for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Aya; Eriguchi, Masazumi; Inaba, Toshio; Ushigusa, Takahiro; Sugiura, Kikuya

    2016-11-01

    To examine the potential of exosomes derived from the tumor cells, which had been genetically modified to express a Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen, as a cancer vaccine aimed at overcoming the weak immunogenicity of tumor antigens. We transfected B16 melanoma cells with a plasmid encoding the M. tuberculosis antigen, early secretory antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6). The secreted exosomes bearing both tumor-associated antigens and the pathogenic antigen (or their epitopes) were collected. When the exosomes were injected into foot pads of mice, they significantly (p exosomes significantly suppressed (p exosomes derived from the non-transfected B16 cells showed no effect on tumor growth, although both exosomes should have similar tumor antigens. Exosomes bearing both tumor antigens and the M. tuberculosis antigen (or their epitopes) have a high potential as a candidate for cancer vaccine to overcome the immune escape by tumor cells.

  19. Drug: D09966 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D09966 Drug Talimogene laherparepvec (USAN); Talminogene laherparepvec; Oncovex (TN) Antineoplastic gene the...rapy drug (oncolytic HSV1, GM-CSF [HSA:1437] [KO:K05427]) CAS: 1187560-31-1 PubChem: 124490634 ...

  20. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  1. Cellular based cancer vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Met, O; Svane, I M

    2012-01-01

    Cancer vaccines designed to re-calibrate the existing host-tumour interaction, tipping the balance from tumor acceptance towards tumor control holds huge potential to complement traditional cancer therapies. In general, limited success has been achieved with vaccines composed of tumor...... in vitro migration via autocrine receptor-mediated endocytosis of CCR7. In the current review, we discuss optimal design of DC maturation focused on pre-clinical as well as clinical results from standard and polarized dendritic cell based cancer vaccines....

  2. Cellular based cancer vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M; Met, Ö; Svane, I M

    2012-01-01

    Cancer vaccines designed to re-calibrate the existing host-tumour interaction, tipping the balance from tumor acceptance towards tumor control holds huge potential to complement traditional cancer therapies. In general, limited success has been achieved with vaccines composed of tumor...... to transiently affect in vitro migration via autocrine receptor-mediated endocytosis of CCR7. In the current review, we discuss optimal design of DC maturation focused on pre-clinical as well as clinical results from standard and polarized dendritic cell based cancer vaccines....

  3. Safety of live vaccinations on immunosuppressive therapy in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, solid organ transplantation or after bone-marrow transplantation - A systematic review of randomized trials, observational studies and case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce, Evelina; Hatz, Christoph; Jonker, Emile F; Visser, L G; Jaeger, Veronika K; Bühler, Silja

    2017-03-01

    Live vaccines are generally contraindicated on immunosuppressive therapy due to safety concerns. However, data are limited to corroborate this practice. To estimate the safety of live vaccinations in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID) or solid organ transplantation (SOT) on immunosuppressive treatment and in patients after bone-marrow transplantation (BMT). A search was conducted in electronic databases (Cochrane, Pubmed, Embase) and additional literature was identified by targeted searches. Randomized trials, observational studies and case reports. Patients with IMID or SOT on immunosuppressive treatment and BMT patients Live vaccinations: mumps, measles, rubella (MMR), yellow fever (YF), varicella vaccine (VV), herpes zoster (HZ), oral typhoid, oral polio, rotavirus, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), smallpox. One author performed the data extraction using predefined data fields. It was cross-checked by two other authors. 7305 articles were identified and 64 articles were included: 40 on IMID, 16 on SOT and 8 on BMT patients. In most studies, the administration of live vaccines was safe. However, some serious vaccine-related adverse events occurred. 32 participants developed an infection with the vaccine strain; in most cases the infection was mild. However, in two patients fatal infections were reported: a patient with RA/SLE overlap who started MTX/dexamethasone treatment four days after the YFV developed a yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD) and died. The particular vaccine lot was found to be associated with a more than 20 times risk of YEL-AVD. One infant whose mother was under infliximab treatment during pregnancy received the BCG vaccine at the age of three months and developed disseminated BCG infection and died. An immunogenicity assessment was performed in 43 studies. In most cases the patients developed satisfactory seroprotection rates. In the IMID group, YFV and VV demonstrated high seroconversion

  4. New approaches in oral rotavirus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuate Defo, Zenas; Lee, Byong

    2016-05-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe dehydrating diarrhea worldwide, and affects primarily developing nations, in large part because of the inaccessibility of vaccines and high rates of mortality present therein. At present, there exist two oral rotaviral vaccines, Rotarix™ and RotaTeq™. These vaccines are generally effective in their actions: however, associated costs often stymie their effectiveness, and they continue to be associated with a slight risk of intussusception. While different programs are being implemented worldwide to enhance vaccine distribution and monitor vaccine administration for possible intussusception in light of recent WHO recommendation, another major problem persists: that of the reduced efficacy of the existing rotaviral vaccines in developing countries over time. The development of new oral rotavirus vaccine classes - live-attenuated vaccines, virus-like particles, lactic acid bacteria-containing vaccines, combination therapy with immunoglobulins, and biodegradable polymer-encapsulated vaccines - could potentially circumvent these problems.

  5. Salicylic acid derivatives as potential anti asthmatic agents using disease responsive drug delivery system for prophylactic therapy of allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Kalidhindi Rama Satyanarayana; Ambhore, Nilesh S; Mulukutla, Shashank; Gupta, Saurabh; Murthy, Vishakantha; Kumar, M N Kiran; Madhunapantula, Subba Rao V; Kuppuswamy, Gowthamarajan; Elango, Kannan

    2016-02-01

    Asthma is a multi-factorial and complicated lung disorder of the immune system which has expanded to a wider ambit unveiling its etiology to be omnipresent at both ends of the spectrum involving basic pharmacology and in-depth immunology. As asthma occurs through triggered activation of various immune cells due to different stimuli, it poses a great challenge to uncover specific targets for therapeutic interventions. Recent pharmacotherapeutic approaches for asthma have been focused on molecular targeting of transcription factors and their signaling pathways; mainly nucleus factor kappa B (NFκB) and its associated pathways which orchestrate the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, GM-CSF), chemokines (RANTES, MIP-1a, eotaxin), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1) and inflammatory enzymes (cyclooxygenase-2 and iNOS). 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) and sodium salicylate are known to suppress NFκB activation by inhibiting inhibitor of kappa B kinase (IKκB). In order to target the transcription factor, a suitable carrier system for delivering the drug to the intracellular space is essential. 5-ASA and sodium salicylate loaded liposomes incorporated into PEG-4-acrylate and CCRGGC microgels (a polymer formed by crosslinking of trypsin sensitive peptide and PEG-4-acrylate) could probably suit the needs for developing a disease responsive drug delivery system which will serve as a prophylactic therapy for asthmatic patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Persisting thrombin activity in elderly patients with atrial fibrillation on oral anticoagulation is decreased by anti-inflammatory therapy with intensive cholesterol-lowering treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kuilenburg, Janet; Lappegård, Knut Tore; Sexton, Joe; Plesiewicz, Izabela; Lap, Paul; Bouwels, Leon; Sprong, Tom; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Verheugt, Freek; van Heerde, Waander L; Pop, Gheorghe A

    2011-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the occurrence of ischemic stroke is more prevalent in AF patients, when increased levels of inflammatory markers are present. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of intensive cholesterol lowering therapy on inflammatory markers and evidence of thrombotic in elderly AF patients treated with OAC. 34 elderly patients (69-85 yrs) were randomized to double blind treatment with atorvastatin 40 mg plus ezetimibe 10 mg (n = 17) or double placebo (n = 17) for one year. All were anticoagulated with warfarin (target INR 2.5-3.5). Every 3 months inflammatory markers and parameters for evaluation of haemostatic and fibrinolytic activity were measured. Anti-inflammatory effects in the treatment arm were reflected by a significant decrease from baseline in hs-CRP, FGF, G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1ra, IL-9, IL-13, IL-17 and interferon-γ (P Intensive cholesterol lowering significantly reduced inflammation and was accompanied by reduced thrombin generation. Larger clinical studies should determine which inflammatory markers are most specific and sensitive for estimating the inflammatory burden in these patients and at which corresponding thrombin activity level it is beneficial and safe to add intensive cholesterol lowering therapy even if normal cholesterol levels are present. Copyright © 2011 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Leishmania-specific hypothetical protein expressed in both promastigote and amastigote stages of Leishmania infantum employed for the serodiagnosis of, and as a vaccine candidate against, visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Vivian T; Duarte, Mariana C; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel A; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Coelho, Cecília S P; de Magalhães-Soares, Danielle F; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Soto, Manuel; Tavares, Carlos A P; Coelho, Eduardo A F

    2015-07-11

    LiHyV is an antigenic hypothetical protein present in both promastigote and amastigote stages of Leishmania infantum, which was recently identified by an immunoproteomic approach. A recombinant version of this protein (rLiHyV) was evaluated as a diagnostic marker for canine VL (CVL). In addition, the prophylactic efficacy of the rLiHyV protein, and two of its CD8(+) T cell epitopes, has been analyzed in a murine model of visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Initially, the rLiHyV protein was evaluated by an ELISA technique for the serodiagnosis of CVL. Secondly, vaccines composed of the recombinant protein and both chemically synthesized peptides, combined with saponin as an adjuvant; were administered subcutaneously into BALB/c mice. The cellular and humoral responses generated by vaccination were evaluated. In addition, the parasite burden and immune response were studied 10 weeks after L. infantum infection. The rLiHyV protein was recognized by antibodies of VL dogs. No cross-reactivity was obtained with sera from dogs vaccinated with a Brazilian commercial vaccine, with sera from animals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, Babesia canis and Ehrlichia canis, or those from non-infected animals living in an endemic area for leishmaniasis. After challenge with L. infantum, spleen cells of BALB/c mice vaccinated with rLiHyV/saponin stimulated with parasite antigens showed a higher production of IFN-γ, IL-12 and GM-CSF, than the same cells obtained from mice vaccinated with the individual peptides, or mice from control (inoculated with saline or saponin) groups. This Th1-type cellular response observed in rLiHyV/saponin vaccinated mice was accompanied by the induction of parasite-specific IgG2a isotype antibodies. Animals immunized with rLiHyV/saponin showed significant reductions in the parasite burden in the liver, spleen, bone marrow and in the lymph nodes draining the paws relative to control mice. The present study showed for the first time that the L. infantum Li

  8. A role for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the regulation of CD8{sup +} T cell responses to rabies virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanjalla, Celestine N.; Goldstein, Elizabeth F.; Wirblich, Christoph [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Schnell, Matthias J., E-mail: matthias.schnell@jefferson.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Jefferson Vaccine Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    2012-05-10

    Inflammatory cytokines have a significant role in altering the innate and adaptive arms of immune responses. Here, we analyzed the effect of GM-CSF on a RABV-vaccine vector co-expressing HIV-1 Gag. To this end, we immunized mice with RABV expressing HIV-1 Gag and GM-CSF and analyzed the primary and recall CD8{sup +} T cell responses. We observed a statistically significant increase in antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the spleen and draining lymph nodes in response to GM-CSF. Despite the increase in APCs, the primary and memory anti HIV-1 CD8{sup +} T cell response was significantly lower. This was partly likely due to lower levels of proliferation in the spleen. Animals treated with GM-CSF neutralizing antibodies restored the CD8{sup +} T cell response. These data define a role of GM-CSF expression, in the regulation of the CD8{sup +} T cell immune responses against RABV and has implications in the use of GM-CSF as a molecular adjuvant in vaccine development.

  9. Current status of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the immunotherapy of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Howard L; Ruby, Carl E; Hughes, Tasha; Slingluff, Craig L

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, it was estimated that 9180 people in the United States would die from melanoma and that more than 76,000 new cases would be diagnosed. Surgical resection is effective for early-stage melanoma, but outcomes are poor for patients with advanced disease. Expression of tumor-associated antigens by melanoma cells makes the disease a promising candidate for immunotherapy. The hematopoietic cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has a variety of effects on the immune system including activation of T cells and maturation of dendritic cells, as well as an ability to promote humoral and cell-mediated responses. Given its immunobiology, there has been interest in strategies incorporating GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma. Preclinical studies with GM-CSF have suggested that it has antitumor activity against melanoma and can enhance the activity of anti-melanoma vaccines. Numerous clinical studies have evaluated recombinant GM-CSF as a monotherapy, as adjuvant with or without cancer vaccines, or in combination with chemotherapy. Although there have been suggestions of clinical benefit in some studies, results have been inconsistent. More recently, novel approaches incorporating GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma have been evaluated. These have included oncolytic immunotherapy with the GM-CSF-expressing engineered herpes simplex virus talimogene laherparepvec and administration of GM-CSF in combination with ipilimumab, both of which have improved patient outcomes in phase 3 studies. This review describes the diverse body of preclinical and clinical evidence regarding use of GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma.

  10. Biosafety aspects of modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-based vectors used for gene therapy or vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheust, Céline; Goossens, Martine; Pauwels, Katia; Breyer, Didier

    2012-03-30

    The modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) strain is a highly attenuated strain of vaccinia virus that has been demonstrated to be safe for humans. MVA is widely considered as the vaccinia virus strain of choice for clinical investigation because of its high safety profile. It also represents an excellent candidate for use as vector system in recombinant vaccine development for gene delivery or vaccination against infectious diseases or tumours, even in immunocompromised individuals. The use of MVA and recombinant MVA vectors must comply with various regulatory requirements, particularly relating to the assessment of potential risks for human health and the environment. The purpose of the present paper is to highlight some biological characteristics of MVA and MVA-based recombinant vectors and to discuss these from a biosafety point of view in the context of the European regulatory framework for genetically modified organisms with emphasis on the assessment of potential risks associated with environmental release. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Polio Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctorMost kids have no problems with the polio vaccine. However, call your doctor if your child has any reaction after getting the vaccine. Call ... Tell the doctor when (day and time) your child received the vaccine. You also should file a Vaccine Adverse Event ...

  12. A pilot study on using rapamycin-carrying synthetic vaccine particles (SVP in conjunction with enzyme replacement therapy to induce immune tolerance in Pompe disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Hyuk Lim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A major obstacle to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT with recombinant human acid-α-glucosidase (rhGAA for Pompe disease is the development of high titers of anti-rhGAA antibodies in a subset of patients, which often leads to a loss of treatment efficacy. In an effort to induce sustained immune tolerance to rhGAA, we supplemented the rhGAA therapy with a weekly intravenous injection of synthetic vaccine particles carrying rapamycin (SVP-Rapa during the first 3 weeks of a 12-week course of ERT in GAA-KO mice, and compared this with three intraperitoneal injections of methotrexate (MTX per week for the first 3 weeks. Empty nanoparticles (NP were used as negative control for SVP-Rapa. Co-administration of SVP-Rapa with rhGAA resulted in more durable inhibition of anti-rhGAA antibody responses, higher efficacy in glycogen clearance in skeletal muscles, and greater improvement of motor function than mice treated with empty NP or MTX. Body weight loss was observed during the MTX-treatment but not SVP-Rapa-treatment. Our data suggest that co-administration of SVP-Rapa may be an innovative and safe strategy to induce durable immune tolerance to rhGAA during the ERT in patients with Pompe disease, leading to improved clinical outcomes.

  13. Prevention and therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma by vaccination with TM4SF5 epitope-CpG-DNA-liposome complex without carriers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kwon, Sanghoon; Kim, Dongbum; Park, Byoung Kwon; Cho, Sunhee; Kim, Kwang Dong; Kim, Young-Eun; Park, Cheung-Seog; Ahn, Hyun-Jong; Seo, Jae-Nam; Choi, Kyung-Chan; Kim, Doo-Sik; Lee, Younghee; Kwon, Hyung-Joo

    2012-01-01

    .... To improve the efficacy of peptide vaccines, we previously formulated an efficacious peptide vaccine without carriers using the natural phosphodiester bond CpG-DNA and a special liposome complex (Lipoplex(O...

  14. Prevention and Therapy of Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Vaccination with TM4SF5 Epitope-CpG-DNA-Liposome Complex without Carriers: e33121

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sanghoon Kwon; Dongbum Kim; Byoung Kwon Park; Sunhee Cho; Kwang Dong Kim; Young-Eun Kim; Cheung-Seog Park; Hyun-Jong Ahn; Jae-Nam Seo; Kyung-Chan Choi; Doo-Sik Kim; Younghee Lee; Hyung-Joo Kwon

    2012-01-01

    .... To improve the efficacy of peptide vaccines, we previously formulated an efficacious peptide vaccine without carriers using the natural phosphodiester bond CpG-DNA and a special liposome complex (Lipoplex(O...

  15. HLA-restricted NY-ESO-1 peptide immunotherapy for metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonpavde, Guru; Wang, Mingjun; Peterson, Leif E; Wang, Helen Y; Joe, Teresa; Mims, Martha P; Kadmon, Dov; Ittmann, Michael M; Wheeler, Thomas M; Gee, Adrian P; Wang, Rong-Fu; Hayes, Teresa G

    2014-04-01

    Given the immunogenicity of NY-ESO-1 peptides in prostate cancer, a phase I clinical trial was designed to evaluate HLA class-I and class-II restricted NY-ESO-1 peptides in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Patients with progressive mCRPC, Zubrod Performance Status ≤2, PSA ≥10 ng/ml who had appropriate HLA class I (A2) and class II haplotypes (DR4, DP4) were eligible. Three groups with 3 patients each received the vaccine subcutaneously every 2 weeks for 6 doses. Group 1 received a peptide presented by an HLA class I haplotype (HLA-A2), Group 2 with a peptide presented by HLA class II haplotype (DR4, DP4), and Group 3 with peptides presented by both Class I and II haplotypes. Androgen-deprivation was continued. Owing to a myocardial infarction, the protocol was amended to omit the use of GM-CSF. Fourteen patients were evaluable for toxicities and 9 received all 6 doses and were evaluable for efficacy. One death from myocardial infarction following GM-CSF occurred in a patient with generalized myalgias. After omitting GM-CSF, no grade >2 toxicities were observed. Among 9 patients evaluable for efficacy, the median PSA doubling time pre-therapy and during therapy were 3.1 and 4.92 months, respectively. NY-ESO-1 specific T-cell response observed by ELISPOT appeared more frequent in docetaxel-naïve patients (4 of 4) than docetaxel-pretreated patients (2 of 5). In men with mCRPC, individualized HLA class-I and/or class-II restricted NY-ESO-1 peptides were tolerable, appeared to slow PSA doubling time and yielded antigen-specific T-cell responses more often in chemonaïve patients.

  16. Antiviral Functions of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)-Specific IgG Antibodies: Effects of Antiretroviral Therapy and Implications for Therapeutic HIV-1 Vaccine Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Martyn A; Tjiam, M Christian; Abudulai, Laila N; Fernandez, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Contemporary antiretroviral therapy (ART) is effective and tolerable for long periods of time but cannot eradicate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection by either elimination of viral reservoirs or enhancement of HIV-1-specific immune responses. Boosting "protective" HIV-1-specific immune responses by active or passive immunization will therefore be necessary to control or eradicate HIV-1 infection and is currently the topic of intense investigation. Recently reported studies conducted in HIV patients and non-human primate (NHP) models of HIV-1 infection suggest that HIV-1-specific IgG antibody responses may contribute to the control of HIV-1 infection. However, production of IgG antibodies with virus neutralizing activity by vaccination remains problematic and while vaccine-induced natural killer cell-activating IgG antibodies have been shown to prevent the acquisition of HIV-1 infection, they may not be sufficient to control or eradicate established HIV-1 infection. It is, therefore, important to consider other functional characteristics of IgG antibody responses. IgG antibodies to viruses also mediate opsonophagocytic antibody responses against virions and capsids that enhance the function of phagocytic cells playing critical roles in antiviral immune responses, particularly conventional dendritic cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Emerging evidence suggests that these antibody functions might contribute to the control of HIV-1 infection. In addition, IgG antibodies contribute to the intracellular degradation of viruses via binding to the cytosolic fragment crystallizable (Fc) receptor tripartite motif containing-21 (TRIM21). The functional activity of an IgG antibody response is influenced by the IgG subclass content, which affects binding to antigens and to Fcγ receptors on phagocytic cells and to TRIM21. The IgG subclass content and avidity of IgG antibodies is determined by germinal center (GC) reactions in follicles of lymphoid tissue

  17. Recombinant small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein of Leishmania infantum: Potential vaccine and diagnostic application against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Daniel S; Ribeiro, Patrícia A F; Martins, Vívian T; Lage, Daniela P; Portela, Áquila S B; Costa, Lourena E; Salles, Beatriz C S; Lima, Mariana P; Ramos, Fernanda F; Santos, Thaís T O; Caligiorne, Rachel B; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel A; Silveira, Julia A G; Magalhães-Soares, Danielle F; Gonçalves, Denise U; Oliveira, Jamil S; Roatt, Bruno M; Duarte, Mariana C; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Silva, Eduardo S; Galdino, Alexsandro S; Machado-de-Ávila, Ricardo A; Teixeira, Antonio L; Coelho, Eduardo A F

    2017-11-01

    Different Leishmania proteins have been evaluated in order to find a potential vaccine candidate or diagnostic marker capable of providing long lasting protection against infection or helping to identify infected mammalian hosts, respectively. However, just few molecules have fulfilled all the requirements to be evaluated. In the current study, we evaluated the prophylactic and diagnostic value against visceral leishmaniasis (VL) of a small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing (SGT) protein from Leishmania infantum species. In a first step, the immune response elicited by the immunization using the recombinant protein (rSGT) plus saponin was evaluated in BALB/c mice. Immunized animals had a low parasitism in all evaluated organs. They developed a specific Th1 immune response, which was based on protein-specific production of IFN-γ, IL-12 and GM-CSF, and a humoral response dominated by antibodies of the IgG2a isotype. Both CD4 + and CD8 + T cells contributed to the IFN-γ production, showing that both T cell subtypes contribute to the resistance against infection. Regarding its value as a diagnostic marker, rSGT showed maximum sensitivity and specificity to serologically identify L. infantum-infected dog and human sera. No cross-reactivity with sera from humans or dogs that had other diseases was found. Although further studies are necessary to validate these findings, data showed here suggest immunogenicity of rSGT and its protective effect against murine VL, as well as its potential for the serodiagnosis of human and canine VL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prior human papillomavirus-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccination prevents recurrent high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia after definitive surgical therapy: Post-hoc analysis from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Suzanne M; Paavonen, Jorma; Jaisamrarn, Unnop; Naud, Paulo; Salmerón, Jorge; Chow, Song-Nan; Apter, Dan; Castellsagué, Xavier; Teixeira, Júlio C; Skinner, S Rachel; Hedrick, James; Limson, Genara; Schwarz, Tino F; Poppe, Willy A J; Bosch, F Xavier; de Carvalho, Newton S; Germar, Maria Julieta V; Peters, Klaus; Del Rosario-Raymundo, M Rowena; Catteau, Grégory; Descamps, Dominique; Struyf, Frank; Lehtinen, Matti; Dubin, Gary

    2016-12-15

    We evaluated the efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine in preventing HPV-related disease after surgery for cervical lesions in a post-hoc analysis of the PApilloma TRIal against Cancer In young Adults (PATRICIA; NCT00122681). Healthy women aged 15-25 years were randomized (1:1) to receive vaccine or control at months 0, 1 and 6 and followed for 4 years. Women were enrolled regardless of their baseline HPV DNA status, HPV-16/18 serostatus, or cytology, but excluded if they had previous or planned colposcopy. The primary and secondary endpoints of PATRICIA have been reported previously; the present post-hoc analysis evaluated efficacy in a subset of women who underwent an excisional procedure for cervical lesions after vaccination. The main outcome was the incidence of subsequent HPV-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or greater (CIN2+) 60 days or more post-surgery. Other outcomes included the incidence of HPV-related CIN1+, and vulvar or vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN/VaIN) 60 days or more post-surgery. Of the total vaccinated cohort of 18,644 women (vaccine = 9,319; control = 9,325), 454 (vaccine = 190, control = 264) underwent an excisional procedure during the trial. Efficacy 60 days or more post-surgery for a first lesion, irrespective of HPV DNA results, was 88.2% (95% CI: 14.8, 99.7) against CIN2+ and 42.6% (-21.1, 74.1) against CIN1+. No VIN was reported and one woman in each group had VaIN2+ 60 days or more post-surgery. Women who undergo surgical therapy for cervical lesions after vaccination with the HPV-16/18 vaccine may continue to benefit from vaccination, with a reduced risk of developing subsequent CIN2+. © 2016 UICC.

  19. The optimal use of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor in radiation induced mucositis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patni Nidhi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluation of response of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF on acute radiation toxicity profile in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Thirty three patients with proven stage I or II head & neck carcinoma received conventional external beam radiation therapy. Out of these, six patients received postoperative adjuvant therapy while remaining 27 received definitive RT. Patients were given 100 mcg GM-CSF subcutaneously per day along with radiation after they developed grade 2 mucositis and /or grade 2 dysphagia and / or complained of moderate pain. GM-CSF was administered till there was a subjective relief or objective response. Patients were evaluated for oral ulceration, swallowing status, pain and weight loss. Response to the treatment and patient outcome was assessed. Results: There was a decreased severity of mucositis and dysphagia in the evaluated patients. None of the patients suffered severe pain or required opioids. The mean weight loss was only 1.94%. Minimal side effects were experienced with GM-CSF. Conclusions: GM-CSF reduces the severity of acute side effects of radiation therapy thereby allowing completion of the treatment without interruption. Its remarkable response needs to be evaluated further in large randomized trials. The time of initiation and cessation of GM-CSF during radiation therapy and the required dose needs to be established.

  20. DNA/MVA Vaccination of HIV-1 Infected Participants with Viral Suppression on Antiretroviral Therapy, followed by Treatment Interruption: Elicitation of Immune Responses without Control of Re-Emergent Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Thompson

    Full Text Available GV-TH-01, a Phase 1 open-label trial of a DNA prime—Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA boost vaccine (GOVX-B11, was undertaken in HIV infected participants on antiretroviral treatment (ART to evaluate safety and vaccine-elicited T cell responses, and explore the ability of elicited CD8+ T cells to control viral rebound during analytical treatment interruption (TI. Nine men who began antiretroviral therapy (ART within 18 months of seroconversion and had sustained plasma HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL for at least 6 months were enrolled. Median age was 38 years, median pre-ART HIV-1 RNA was 140,000 copies/ml and mean baseline CD4 count was 755/μl. Two DNA, followed by 2 MVA, inoculations were given 8 weeks apart. Eight subjects completed all vaccinations and TI. Clinical and laboratory adverse events were generally mild, with no serious or grade 4 events. Only reactogenicity events were considered related to study drug. No treatment emergent viral resistance was seen. The vaccinations did not reduce viral reservoirs and virus re-emerged in all participants during TI, with a median time to re-emergence of 4 weeks. Eight of 9 participants had CD8+ T cells that could be stimulated by vaccine-matched Gag peptides prior to vaccination. Vaccinations boosted these responses as well as eliciting previously undetected CD8+ responses. Elicited T cells did not display signs of exhaustion. During TI, temporal patterns of viral re-emergence and Gag-specific CD8+ T cell expansion suggested that vaccine-specific CD8+ T cells had been stimulated by re-emergent virus in only 2 of 8 participants. In these 2, transient decreases in viremia were associated with Gag selection in known CD8+ T cell epitopes. We hypothesize that escape mutations, already archived in the viral reservoir, plus a poor ability of CD8+ T cells to traffic to and control virus at sites of re-emergence, limited the therapeutic efficacy of the DNA/MVA vaccine.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01378156.

  1. Vaccine Finder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... list . Showing availability for 25,354 locations. Influenza Vaccine Recommended for everyone greater than or equal to ... which one may be right for you! Flu Vaccines Protects again influenza, commonly called flu, a respiratory ...

  2. Vaccine Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vaccine Safety Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... CDC.gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) New website and ...

  3. Rotavirus Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are also common in babies with rotavirus.Before rotavirus vaccine, rotavirus disease was a common and serious health ... to 60 died. Since the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine, hospitalizations and emergency visits for rotavirus have dropped ...

  4. Contraceptive Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Supotnitsky

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Researches to develop vaccines with contraceptive effect are being carried out since the 1920s. Since 1972, the contraceptive vaccines are one of the priority programs of the World Health Organization (WHO Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. Rockefeller Foundation participates in implementing the program. Openly declared objective of creating such vaccines — the regulation of the population in the Third World countries. There are currently three main directions of contraceptive vaccine design: 1 vaccines targeted at blocking the production of gametes; 2 impairing their function; 3 violating the fertilization process. Contraceptive vaccines for more than 10 years are widely used to reduce fertility and castration of wild and domestic animals. In the commercial realization there are veterinary vaccines Equity®, Improvac®, GonaCon®, Repro-BLOC (based on gonadotropin-releasing hormone; SpayVac™ and IVT-PZP® (based on zona pellucida antigens. Clinical studies have shown effective contraceptive action (in women of vaccines, in which human chorionic gonadotropin is used as an antigen. At the same time, there are found the side effects of such vaccines: for vaccines containing gonadotropin-releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone as antigenic components — castration, impotence; for vaccines containing follicle stimulating hormone — oligospermia; zona pellucida antigens — irreversible oophoritis. This paper discusses approaches to detection of sterilizing components in vaccines intended for mass prevention of infectious diseases, not reported by manufacturers, and the consequences of their use. Hidden use of contraceptive vaccines, which already took place, can be detected: 1 by the presence of antibodies to their antigenic components (in unvaccinated by contraceptive vaccines people such antibodies do not exist, except infertility cases; 2 by change in the hormonal levels of the

  5. FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Infirmary (ground-floor, bldg. 57), with their vaccine, without a prior appointment. The vaccine can be reimbursed directly by Uniqa providing you attach the receipt and the prescription that you will receive from the Medical Service the day of your injection at the infirmary. Ideally, the vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2007 (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00). CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor. Medical Service

  6. Rotavirus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Maureen; Bresee, Joseph S.; Gentsch, Jon R.; Glass, Roger I.

    2000-10-01

    The past few years have seen important developments in understanding the epidemiological and virological characteristics of rotaviruses, and rapid progress has been made in rotavirus vaccine development, but further challenges remain before a vaccine is introduced into widespread use. The licensure of the first rotavirus vaccine, a tetravalent rhesus-based rotavirus vaccine, in the United States in 1998, marked a significant advance in preventing the morbidity associated with rotavirus diarrhea. The association between the tetravalent rhesus-based rotavirus vaccine and intussusception has created significant hurdles as well as new opportunities to study the pathogenesis of rotavirus and rotavirus vaccine infection. Several other rotavirus vaccine candidates are in late stages of development, and results from trials have been encouraging.

  7. Prime-boost using separate oncolytic viruses in combination with checkpoint blockade improves anti-tumour therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilett, E; Kottke, T; Thompson, J; Rajani, K; Zaidi, S; Evgin, L; Coffey, M; Ralph, C; Diaz, R; Pandha, H; Harrington, K; Selby, P; Bram, R; Melcher, A; Vile, R

    2017-01-01

    The anti-tumour effects associated with oncolytic virus therapy are mediated significantly through immune-mediated mechanisms, which depend both on the type of virus and the route of delivery. Here, we show that intra-tumoral oncolysis by Reovirus induced the priming of a CD8+, Th1-type anti-tumour response. By contrast, systemically delivered Vesicular Stomatitis Virus expressing a cDNA library of melanoma antigens (VSV-ASMEL) promoted a potent anti-tumour CD4+ Th17 response. Therefore, we hypothesised that combining the Reovirus-induced CD8+ T cell response, with the VSV-ASMEL CD4+ Th17 helper response, would produce enhanced anti-tumour activity. Consistent with this, priming with intra-tumoral Reovirus, followed by an intra-venous VSV-ASMEL Th17 boost, significantly improved survival of mice bearing established subcutaneous B16 melanoma tumours. We also show that combination of either therapy alone with anti-PD-1 immune checkpoint blockade augmented both the Th1 response induced by systemically delivered Reovirus in combination with GM-CSF, and also the Th17 response induced by VSV-ASMEL. Significantly, anti-PD-1 also uncovered an anti-tumour Th1 response following VSV-ASMEL treatment that was not seen in the absence of checkpoint blockade. Finally, the combination of all three treatments (priming with systemically delivered Reovirus, followed by double boosting with systemic VSV-ASMEL and anti-PD-1) significantly enhanced survival, with long-term cures, compared to any individual, or double, combination therapies, associated with strong Th1 and Th17 responses to tumour antigens. Our data show that it is possible to generate fully systemic, highly effective anti-tumour immunovirotherapy by combining oncolytic viruses, along with immune checkpoint blockade, to induce complementary mechanisms of anti-tumour immune responses.

  8. Growth factor therapy in patients with partial-thickness burns: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Tao; He, Jinguang; Dong, Jiasheng

    2016-06-01

    Growth factor (GF) therapy has shown promise in treating a variety of refractory wounds. However, evidence supporting its routine use in burn injury remains uncertain. We performed this systematic review and meta-analysis assessing randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to investigate efficacy and safety of GFs in the management of partial-thickness burns. Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed and the Cochrane databases. Endpoint results analysed included wound healing and scar formation. Thirteen studies comprising a total of 1924 participants with 2130 wounds (1131 GF receiving patients versus 999 controls) were identified and included, evaluating the effect of fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on partial-thickness burns. Topical application of these agents significantly reduced healing time by 5·02 (95% confidence interval, 2·62 to 7·42), 3·12 (95% CI, 1·11 to 5·13) and 5·1 (95% CI, 4·02 to 6·18) days, respectively, compared with standard wound care alone. In addition, scar improvement following therapy with FGF and EGF was evident in terms of pigmentation, pliability, height and vascularity. No significant increase in adverse events was observed in patients receiving GFs. These results suggested that GF therapy could be an effective and safe add-on to standard wound care for partial-thickness burns. High-quality, adequately powered trials are needed to further confirm the conclusion. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Vaccine allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun Hee

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the increasing numbers of vaccine administrations are associated with increased reports of adverse vaccine reactions. Whilst the general adverse reactions including allergic reactions caused by the vaccine itself or the vaccine components, are rare, they can in some circumstances be serious and even fatal. In accordance with many IgE-mediated reactions and immediate-type allergic reactions, the primary allergens are proteins. The proteins most often implicated in vaccine allergies are egg and gelatin, with perhaps rare reactions to yeast or latex. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the injectable influenza vaccine can be safely administered, although with appropriate precautions, to patients with severe egg allergy, as the current influenza vaccines contain small trace amounts of egg protein. If an allergy is suspected, an accurate examination followed by algorithms is vital for correct diagnosis, treatment and decision regarding re-vaccination in patients with immediate-type reactions to vaccines. Facilities and health care professionals should be available to treat immediate hypersensitivity reactions (anaphylaxis) in all settings where vaccines are administered.

  10. Dual Induction of TREM2 and Tolerance-Related Transcript, Tmem176b, in Amyloid Transgenic Mice: Implications for Vaccine-Based Therapies for Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Melchior

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine-based autoimmune (anti-amyloid treatments are currently being examined for their therapeutic potential in Alzheimer's disease. In the present study we examined, in a transgenic model of amyloid pathology, the expression of two molecules previously implicated in decreasing the severity of autoimmune responses: TREM2 (triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 and the intracellular tolerance-associated transcript, Tmem176b (transmembrane domain protein 176b. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that both molecules were highly expressed in plaque-associated microglia, but their expression defined two different zones of plaque-associated activation. Tmem176b expression was highest in the inner zone of amyloid plaques, whereas TREM2 expression was highest in the outer zone. Induced expression of TREM2 occurred coincident with detection of thioflavine-S-positive amyloid deposits. Transfection studies revealed that expression of TREM2 correlated negatively with motility, but correlated positively with the ability of microglia to stimulate CD4+ T-cell proliferation, TNF (tumour necrosis factor and CCL2 (chemokine ligand 2 production, but not IFNγ (interferon γ production. TREM2 expression also showed a positive correlation with amyloid phagocytosis in unactivated cells. However, activating cells with LPS (lipopolysaccharide, but not IFNγ, reduced the correlation between TREM2 expression and phagocytosis. Transfection of Tmem176b into both microglial and macrophage cell lines increased apoptosis. Taken together, these data suggest that, in vivo, Tmem176b+ cells in closest apposition to amyloid may be the least able to clear amyloid. Conversely, the phagocytic TREM2+ microglia on the plaque outer zones are positioned to capture and present self-antigens to CNS (central nervous system-infiltrating lymphocytes without promoting pro-inflammatory lymphocyte responses. Instead, plaque-associated TREM2+ microglia have the potential to evoke

  11. Immune response to influenza A/H1N1 vaccine in inflammatory bowel disease patients treated with anti TNF-α agents: effects of combined therapy with immunosuppressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrisani, G; Frasca, D; Romero, M; Armuzzi, A; Felice, C; Marzo, M; Pugliese, D; Papa, A; Mocci, G; De Vitis, I; Rapaccini, G L; Blomberg, B B; Guidi, L

    2013-05-01

    Our first objective was to evaluate the immune response to the adjuvanted 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic (pH1N1) vaccine in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients treated with anti-TNF-α alone or combined with immunosuppressants (IS). Second and third aims were the safety of pH1N1 vaccine and the effects on IBD clinical activity. 36 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and 26 with ulcerative colitis (UC) and thirty-one healthy control (HC) subjects were enrolled. 47 patients were on anti TNF-α maintenance monotherapy and 15 on anti TNF-α combined with IS. Sera were collected at baseline (T0) and 4 weeks after the vaccination (T1) for antibody determination by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI). Disease activity was monitored at T0 and T1. Seroprotective titers (≥1:40) in patients were comparable to HC. Seroconvertion rate (≥4 fold increase in HAI titer) was lower than HC in IBD patients (p=0.009), either on anti TNF-α monotherapy (p=0.034) or combined with IS (p=0.011). Geometric mean titer (GMT) of antibodies at T1 was significantly lower in patients on combined therapy versus those on monotherapy (p=0.0017) and versus HC (p=0.011). The factor increase of GMT at T1 versus T0 was significantly lower in IBD patients versus HC (p=0.042), and in those on combined immunosuppression, both versus monotherapy (p=0.0048) and HC (p=0.0015). None of the patients experienced a disease flare. Our study has shown a suboptimal response to pH1N1 vaccine in IBD patients on therapy with anti TNF-α and IS compared to those on anti-TNF-α monotherapy and HC. Copyright © 2012 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Therapeutic Vaccines for Chronic Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autran, Brigitte; Carcelain, Guislaine; Combadiere, Béhazine; Debre, Patrice

    2004-07-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to prevent severe complications of a chronic infection by reinforcing host defenses when some immune control, albeit insufficient, can already be demonstrated and when a conventional antimicrobial therapy either is not available or has limited efficacy. We focus on the rationale and challenges behind this still controversial strategy and provide examples from three major chronic infectious diseases-human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and human papillomavirus-for which the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines is currently being evaluated.

  13. Current status of granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the immunotherapy of melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, it was estimated that 9180 people in the United States would die from melanoma and that more than 76,000 new cases would be diagnosed. Surgical resection is effective for early-stage melanoma, but outcomes are poor for patients with advanced disease. Expression of tumor-associated antigens by melanoma cells makes the disease a promising candidate for immunotherapy. The hematopoietic cytokine granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has a variety of effects on the immune system including activation of T cells and maturation of dendritic cells, as well as an ability to promote humoral and cell-mediated responses. Given its immunobiology, there has been interest in strategies incorporating GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma. Preclinical studies with GM-CSF have suggested that it has antitumor activity against melanoma and can enhance the activity of anti-melanoma vaccines. Numerous clinical studies have evaluated recombinant GM-CSF as a monotherapy, as adjuvant with or without cancer vaccines, or in combination with chemotherapy. Although there have been suggestions of clinical benefit in some studies, results have been inconsistent. More recently, novel approaches incorporating GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma have been evaluated. These have included oncolytic immunotherapy with the GM-CSF–expressing engineered herpes simplex virus talimogene laherparepvec and administration of GM-CSF in combination with ipilimumab, both of which have improved patient outcomes in phase 3 studies. This review describes the diverse body of preclinical and clinical evidence regarding use of GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma. PMID:24971166

  14. FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical Service

  15. Flu vaccination

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Medical Service

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor.CERN Medical Service

  16. Flu Vaccination

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical service

  17. Flu Vaccination

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical Service

  18. Influenza Vaccine, Live Intranasal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should NOT be ... What is live, attenuated influenza vaccine-LAIV (nasal spray)?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children younger ...

  19. Treatment with the smallpox antiviral tecovirimat (ST-246) alone or in combination with ACAM2000 vaccination is effective as a postsymptomatic therapy for monkeypox virus infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berhanu, Aklile; Prigge, Jonathan T; Silvera, Peter M; Honeychurch, Kady M; Hruby, Dennis E; Grosenbach, Douglas W

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacies of smallpox vaccine ACAM2000 and antiviral tecovirimat given alone or in combination starting on day 3 postinfection were compared in a cynomolgus macaque model of lethal...

  20. Ebola vaccine and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Ayato

    2015-01-01

    Filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg viruses) cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. No effective prophylaxis or treatment for filovirus diseases is yet commercially available. The recent outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa has accelerated efforts to develop anti-Ebola virus prophylaxis and treatment, and unapproved drugs were indeed used for the treatment of patients during the outbreak. This article reviews previous researches and the latest topics on vaccine and therapy for Ebola virus disease.

  1. Cancer Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... foreign. Most preventive vaccines, including those aimed at cancer-causing viruses ( hepatitis B virus and human papillomavirus ), stimulate the ... 9 through 25 for the prevention of cervical cancer caused by HPV. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccines. Chronic HBV infection can lead to ...

  2. BCG Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Vanessa; Liu, Jun; Behr, Marcel A

    2014-02-01

    BCG is the collective name for a family of live attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis that are currently used as the only vaccine against tuberculosis (TB). There are two major reasons for studying the genome of these organisms: (i) Because they are attenuated, BCG vaccines provide a window into Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence, and (ii) because they have provided protection in several clinical trials and case-control studies, BCG vaccines may shed light on properties required of a TB vaccine. Since the determination of the M. tuberculosis genome in 1998, the study of BCG vaccines has accelerated dramatically, offering data on the genomic differences between virulent M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, and the vaccine strains. While these findings have been rewarding for the study of virulence, there is unfortunately less accrued knowledge about protection. In this chapter, we review briefly the history of BCG vaccines and then touch upon studies over the past two decades that help explain how BCG underwent attenuation, concluding with some more speculative comments as to how these vaccines might offer protection against TB.

  3. CCL11 and GM-CSF differentially use the Rho GTPase pathway to regulate motility of human eosinophils in a three-dimensional microenvironment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muessel, M.J.; Scott, K.S.; Friedl, P.H.A.; Bradding, P.; Wardlaw, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is a common disease that causes considerable morbidity. Increased numbers of airway eosinophils are a hallmark of asthma. Mechanisms controlling the entry of eosinophils into asthmatic lung have been intensively investigated, but factors regulating migration within the tissue microenvironment

  4. Interleukin-1α controls allergic sensitization to inhaled house dust mite via the epithelial release of GM-CSF and IL-33

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Willart (Monique); K. Deswarte (Kim); P. Pouliot (Philippe); H. Braun (Harald); R. Beyaert (Rudi); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart); H. Hammad (Hamida)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractHouse dust mite (HDM) is one of the most common allergens worldwide. In this study, we have addressed the involvement of IL-1 in the interaction between HDM and the innate immune response driven by lung epithelial cells (ECs) and dendritic cells (DCs) that leads to asthma. Mice lacking

  5. Combination vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David AG Skibinski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccines into a single product has been central to the protection of the pediatric population over the past 50 years. The addition of inactivated polio, Haemophilus influenzae, and hepatitis B vaccines into the combination has facilitated the introduction of these vaccines into recommended immunization schedules by reducing the number of injections required and has therefore increased immunization compliance. However, the development of these combinations encountered numerous challenges, including the reduced response to Haemophilus influenzae vaccine when given in combination; the need to consolidate the differences in the immunization schedule (hepatitis B; and the need to improve the safety profile of the diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis combination. Here, we review these challenges and also discuss future prospects for combination vaccines.

  6. Haemophilus influenzae type-b and non-b-type invasive diseases in urban children (<5years) of Bangladesh: implications for therapy and vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Hossain, Shahadat; Baqui, Abdullah Hel; Shoma, Shereen; Rashid, Harunur; Nahar, Nazmun; Zaman, Mohammed Khalequ; Khatun, Farida

    2008-03-01

    To prospectively study the epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of Haemophilus infuenzae isolates from invasive infections in children. Children (stain, culture and biochemical tests). Hib antigen was detected by latex agglutination (LA) in culture-negative pyogenic CSF and PCR was done for bexA gene in culture- and LA-negative pyogenic CSF. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by E-Tests and beta-lactamase by nitrocefin stick. Seventy-three cases of H. influenzae infections (46 of 293 meningitis cases, 25 of 1493 pneumonia cases, 2 of 48 septicemia cases) were detected; 63%, 34% and 3% of them had meningitis, pneumonia and septicemia respectively. H. influenzae type b (Hib) caused infections in 80.8% of cases (60.3% meningitis, 20.5% pneumonia). Most (86%) infections clustered in 4-12month infants. The case-fatality in pneumonia was 8% compared to 19% in meningitis. H. influenzae isolates from pneumonia and meningitis children were equally resistant to antibiotics (46% vs 43%). Of 10 drugs tested, isolates were resistant to ampicillin (31%), chloramphenicol (42%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (44%) and azithromycin (1.4%). Multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains were equally prevalent in Hib (31%) and non-b-type (29%) isolates, and in pneumonia (31%) and meningitis (34%) cases. None was resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanate, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and gatifloxacin. Of all H. influenzae infections, 40%, 4.4% and 100% of pneumonia, meningitis and septicemia cases were caused by other serotypes or non-typeable strains. All ampicillin-resistant-strains produced beta-lactamase without detection of beta-lactamase-negative-ampicillin-resistant (BLNAR) strains. Hib is a leading cause of invasive bacterial infections in infants. Multidrug-resistant H. influenzae is common and requires amoxicillin-clavulanate, ceftriaxone or azithromycin as empirical therapy with specific recommendation for use of ceftriaxone for treatment of meningitis

  7. Long-term Durability of Responses to 2 or 3 Doses of Hepatitis A Vaccination in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Adults on Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Aristine; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Tsai, Mao-Song; Liu, Wen-Chun; Su, Yi-Ching; Wu, Pei-Ying; Hung, Chien-Ching; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2017-02-15

    Previous studies have shown that the durability of serological response is impaired in successfully vaccinated human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) positive subjects after receiving 2 doses of inactivated hepatitis A virus (HAV) vaccine. We evaluated whether 3 doses compared with 2 doses of HAV vaccine could improve the long-term seroprotection for this susceptible group. Antibody persistence among HIV-positive men who have sex with men aged 18-40 years who had received 2 or 3 doses of HAV vaccine according to a 0-6- or a 0-1-6-month schedule was evaluated biannually for 5 consecutive years in this prospective, nonrandomized cohort study. At the end of 5 years, seroprotection persisted in 79% (146/185) versus 76% (85/110) and 94% (146/155) versus 88% (84/95) of the 3- versus 2-dose primary responders by intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses, respectively (P > .05). Throughout the 5 years, the geometric mean concentrations of anti-HAV immunoglobulin G (IgG) were significantly higher for the 3-dose than the 2-dose group. In the multivariable analysis, a 3-dose regimen compared with a 2-dose regimen (odds ratio = 3.36; 95% confidence interval = 1.14-9.93) was independently associated with sustained seroprotection. Three doses versus 2 doses of HAV vaccine improve the durability of immune responses in terms of higher concentrations of specific IgG, which take longer to decay to subthreshold levels.

  8. Meningococcal Vaccine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español Your Child's Immunizations: Meningococcal Vaccines KidsHealth / For Parents / Your Child's Immunizations: Meningococcal Vaccines Print The meningococcal vaccines protect ...

  9. Synergistic tumoricidal effect of combined hPD-L1 vaccine and HER2 gene vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wangqian; Wang, Shuning; Gu, Jintao; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Zhaowei; Zhang, Kuo; Mu, Nan; Huang, Tonglie; Li, Weina; Hao, Qiang; Xue, Xiaochang; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yingqi; Zhang, Cun

    2018-02-10

    Immunotherapy is gathering momentum as a kind of important therapy for cancer patients. However, monotherapies have limited efficacy in improving outcomes and benefit only in a small subset of patients. Combination therapies targeting multiple pathways often can augment an immune response to improve survival further. Here, the tumoricidal effects of the dual hPD-L1(human programmed cell death ligand 1) vaccination/HER2(human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) gene vaccination immunotherapy against the established HER2-expressed cancers were observed. Animals treated with combination therapy using hPD-L1 vaccine and HER2 gene vaccine had significantly improved survival in a mammary carcinoma model. We observed an increase in tumor growth inhibition following treatment. The percentage of the tumor-free mice (%) was much higher in the combined PD-L1/HER2 group. Furthermore, under the tumor-burden condition, hPD-L1 vaccine enhanced humoral immunity of HER2 gene vaccine. And the combination treatment increased the IFN-γ-producing effector T cells. Additionally, splenocytes from the combined PD-L1/HER2 group immunized mice possessed higher CTL activity. Notably, vaccination with combination therapy induced a significant decrease in the percentage of CD4 + CD25 + Treg cells. Collectively, these data demonstrate that PD-L1/HER2 gene vaccine combination therapy synergistically generates marked tumoricidal effects against established HER2-expressing cancers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. VACCINATION OF CHILDREN WITH MALIGNANCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Yu. Kachanov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Children suffering from oncological diseases fall into the group of immunocompromised patients. They are more at risk of severe children’s banal infections. Development of safe and efficient methods for immunological prevention of preventable infections diseases in this group of children is one of priorities for modern medicine. It is also important to properly organise the process of vaccinating the persons surrounding the patient to eliminate the risk of postvaccinal complications in the sick (non-vaccinated child. The article provides a detailed overview of the global experience in vaccinating children with malignant neoplasms. It describes modern principles of immunological prevention in children both being administered the standard anticancer therapy and those have undergone transplantation of hemopoietic stem cells. Key words: children, malignancy, vaccination.(Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:28-34

  11. Phase I clinical study of anti-apoptosis protein, survivin-derived peptide vaccine therapy for patients with advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minamida Hidetoshi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP family containing a single baculovirus IAP repeat domain. It is expressed during fetal development but becomes undetectable in terminally differentiated normal adult tissues. We previously reported that survivin and its splicing variant survivin-2B was expressed abundantly in various types of tumor tissues as well as tumor cell lines and was suitable as a target antigen for active-specific anti-cancer immunization. Subsequently, we identified an HLA-A24-restricted antigenic peptide, survivin-2B80-88 (AYACNTSTL recognized by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs. We, therefore, started a phase I clinical study assessing the efficacy of survivin-2B peptide vaccination in patients with advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer expressing survivin. Vaccinations with survivin-2B peptide were given subcutaneously six times at 14-day intervals. Of 15 patients who finished receiving the vaccination schedule, three suffered slight toxicities, including anemia (grade 2, general malaise (grade 1, and fever (grade 1. No severe adverse events were observed in any patient. In 6 patients, tumor marker levels (CEA and CA19-9 decreased transiently during the period of vaccination. Slight reduction of the tumor volume was observed in one patient, which was considered a minor responder. No changes were noted in three patients while the remaining eleven patients experienced tumor progression. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes of one patient using HLA-A24/peptide tetramers revealed an increase in peptide-specific CTL frequency from 0.09% to 0.35% of CD8+ T cells after 4 vaccinations. This phase I clinical study indicates that survivin-2B peptide-based vaccination is safe and should be further considered for potential immune and clinical efficacy in HLA-A24-expression patients with colorectal cancer.

  12. Influenza vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerhus, Sven Frederick

    2015-01-01

    The Cochrane Library was systematically searched for meta-analyses regarding influenza vaccination of various populations, both healthy and sick. An effect in reducing the number of cases of influenza, influenza-like illness or complications to influenza was found in some studies, but, generally......, the quality of the studies was low, and several studies lacked hard clinical endpoints. Data on adverse effects were scarce. More randomised controlled trials investigating the effects of influenza vaccination are warranted....

  13. Flu Vaccine Safety Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Flu Vaccine Safety Information Questions & Answers Language: English (US) Español ... of flu vaccines monitored? Egg Allergy Are flu vaccines safe? Flu vaccines have good safety record. Hundreds ...

  14. Thimerosal in Flu Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Thimerosal in Flu Vaccine Questions & Answers Language: English (US) Español Recommend on ... or fungi from contaminating the vaccine. Do flu vaccines contain thimerosal? Flu vaccines in multi-dose vials ...

  15. Vaccine Basics (Smallpox)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Side Effects of Vaccination Who Should Get a Smallpox Vaccination? Bioterrorism The Threat Preparedness Detection and Response Bioterrorism ... Revaccinees Examples of Major or “Take” Reactions to Smallpox Vaccination Vaccine Adverse Reaction Images Laboratory Personnel Specimen Collection ...

  16. Your child's first vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... multi.html . CDC review information for Multi Pediatric Vaccines: Your Child's First Vaccines: What you need to know (VIS): ... of that vaccine. Tell the person giving the vaccines if your child has ever had a severe reaction after any ...

  17. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News ... or may need reinsertion over time. What about vaccines? A vaccine is a preparation administered to stimulate ...

  18. Gene therapeutics and DNA vaccines; quality and regulatory aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk JAC; Hegger I; Jongen PMJM; LGM

    2001-01-01

    Transfer of genes to cells and the subsequent expression of these genes can alleviate the symptoms of a disease (gene therapy), or prevent infectious diseases (DNA vaccination). Gene therapy and DNA vaccination are based on relatively new technologies. The first gene therapeutics are expected to

  19. Factors associated with the immune response to hepatitis A vaccination in HIV-infected patients in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Guillermo; García-Basteiro, Alberto L; Llupià, Anna; Díez, Consolación; Costa, Josep; Gatell, Josep-María; García, Felipe; Bayas, José-María

    2013-08-12

    HIV seropositivity is considered a risk factor for complications in hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection. HAV vaccination schedules are widely implemented in HIV-infected patients, but the immune response remains impaired. We analysed the response to vaccination (antiHAV titres ≥20IU/l) in 282 HIV-infected patients included in a standard (1440 Elisa Units (EU) at 0, 6 months) or rapidly accelerated schedule (720 EU at 0, 7, 21 days and 6 months) between 1997 and 2009. Factors associated with the response to vaccination were analysed using logistic regression. The overall response rate was 73.4%. Male sex (OR: 0.16, 95% CI 0.05-0.51) and hepatitis C virus co-infection (OR: 0.30, 95% CI 0.14-0.74) were associated with a lower probability of response. Protective antibody response was associated with a higher CD4/CD8 ratio (OR: 3.69, 95% CI 1.3-10.5) and having received two doses of standard schedule (compared with patients receiving only one dose of the same schedule) (OR: 2.51, 95% CI 1.22-5.15). Three doses of the rapidly accelerated schedule were not more effective than a single dose of 1440 EU (OR: 1.32, 95% CI 0.48-3.63). The low responses observed in patients receiving a single dose suggest the need to emphasize adhesion to vaccination protocols to avoid failure. The CD4/CD8 ratio may be considered as an immune status marker which could help to better choose the moment of vaccination. Our findings underscore the importance of identifying strategies that optimize the timing and effectiveness of hepatitis A vaccination in HIV-infected patients and of the need for further studies on individual factors such as sex and hepatitis C co-infection that may affect the response to vaccination. Likewise, the sub-optimal effectiveness of three doses of 720 EU in the rapidly accelerated schedule, if confirmed in future studies, might lead to a revision of the current schedule recommended for HIV-infected travellers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics: News

    OpenAIRE

    Riedmann, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term effectiveness shown for Merck’s chickenpox vaccine Again—no link between vaccines and autism Experimental ovarian cancer vaccine successful in phase 1 Sinovac’s HFMD vaccine meets phase 3 study goal A vaccine for long-suffering cat allergy patients Vaccines are key to breaking infectious disease-malnutrition cycle Cancer vaccine failures due to the adjuvant IFA? Novartis’ typhoid vaccine make good progress

  1. Vaccines for visceral leishmaniasis: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Keerti; Jain, N K

    2015-07-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis, which is also known as Kala-Azar, is one of the most severely neglected tropical diseases recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO). The threat of this debilitating disease continues due to unavailability of promising drug therapy or human vaccine. An extensive research is undergoing to develop a promising vaccine to prevent this devastating disease. In this review we compiled the findings of recent research with a view to facilitate knowledge on experimental vaccinology for visceral leishmaniasis. Various killed or attenuated parasite based first generation vaccines, second generation vaccines based on antigenic protein or recombinant protein, and third generation vaccines derived from antigen-encoding DNA plasmids including heterologous prime-boost Leishmania vaccine have been examined for control and prevention of visceral leishmaniasis. Vaccines based on recombinant protein and antigen-encoding DNA plasmids have given promising results and few vaccines including Leishmune®, Leishtec, and CaniLeish® have been licensed for canine visceral leishmaniasis. A systematic investigation of these vaccine candidates can lead to development of promising vaccine for human visceral leishmaniasis, most probably in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines: The Basics Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals ... Influenza vaccine each year to protect against seasonal flu Tdap vaccine to protect against whooping cough and ...

  3. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines: The Basics Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals ... Influenza vaccine each year to protect against seasonal flu Tdap vaccine to protect against whooping cough and ...

  4. HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines: The Basics Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals ... Influenza vaccine each year to protect against seasonal flu Tdap vaccine to protect against whooping cough and ...

  5. Dual induction of TREM2 and tolerance-related transcript, Tmem176b, in amyloid transgenic mice: implications for vaccine-based therapies for Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Benoit Melchior; Garcia, Angie E.; Bor-Kai Hsiung; Katherine M Lo; Doose, Jonathan M; J. Cameron Thrash; Stalder, Anna K.; Matthias Staufenbiel; Harald Neumann; Carson, Monica J.

    2010-01-01

    Vaccine-based autoimmune (anti-amyloid) treatments are currently being examined for their therapeutic potential in Alzheimer's disease. In the present study we examined, in a transgenic model of amyloid pathology, the expression of two molecules previously implicated in decreasing the severity of autoimmune responses: TREM2 (triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2) and the intracellular tolerance-associated transcript, Tmem176b (transmembrane domain protein 176b). In situ hybridizati...

  6. Learning from epidemiological, clinical, and immunological studies on Mycobacterium africanum for improving current understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and for the development and evaluation of diagnostics, host-directed therapies, and vaccines for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Otchere, Isaac Darko; Mensah, Gloria Ivy; Asante-Poku, Adwoa; Gehre, Florian; Maeurer, Markus; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Ntoumi, Francine; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy

    2017-03-01

    Mycobacterium africanum comprises two phylogenetic lineages within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). M. africanum was first described and isolated in 1968 from the sputum of a Senegalese patient with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and it has been identified increasingly as an important cause of human TB, particularly prevalent in West Africa. The restricted geographical distribution of M. africanum, in contrast to the widespread global distribution of other species of MTBC, requires explanation. Available data indicate that M. africanum may also have important differences in transmission, pathogenesis, and host-pathogen interactions, which could affect the evaluation of new TB intervention tools (diagnostics and vaccines)-those currently in use and those under development. The unequal geographical distribution and spread of MTBC species means that individual research findings from one country or region cannot be generalized across the continent. Thus, generalizing data from previous and ongoing research studies on MTBC may be inaccurate and inappropriate. A major rethink is required regarding the design and structure of future clinical trials of new interventions. The West, Central, East, and Southern African EDCTP Networks of Excellence provide opportunities to take forward these pan-Africa studies. More investments into molecular, epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, and immunological studies across the African continent are required to enable further understanding of host-M. africanum interactions, leading to the development of more specific diagnostics, biomarkers, host-directed therapies, and vaccines for TB. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Hookworm vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemert, David J; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Hotez, Peter J

    2008-01-15

    Hookworm infection caused by the soil-transmitted nematodes Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale is one of the most common parasitic infections worldwide. Although not directly responsible for substantial mortality, it causes significant morbidity in the form of chronic anemia and protein malnutrition. Current global control efforts based on periodic mass anthelmintic administration are unsustainable, and new control strategies must be developed. This review describes progress in the development of vaccines against hookworm infection, including the preclinical and initial clinical testing of the N. americanus Ancylostoma Secreted Protein-2 Hookworm Vaccine. Plans call for eventual development of a vaccine that will combine at least 2 hookworm antigens--one targeting the larval stage of the life cycle and another targeting the adult worm living in the gastrointestinal tract.

  8. Mucosal vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis CS; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites. PMID:25424921

  9. Progress and controversies in developing cancer vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speiser Daniel E

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Immunotherapy has become a standard approach for cancer management, through the use of cytokines (eg: interleukin-2 and monoclonal antibodies. Cancer vaccines hold promise as another form of immunotherapy, and there has been substantial progress in identifying shared antigens recognized by T cells, in developing vaccine approaches that induce antigen-specific T cell responses in cancer patients, and in developing new technology for monitoring immune responses in various human tissue compartments. Dramatic clinical regressions of human solid tumors have occurred with some cancer vaccines, but the rate of those responses remains low. This article is part of a 2-part point:counterpoint series on peptide vaccines and adoptive therapy approaches for cancer. The current status of cancer vaccination, and associated challenges, are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the need to increase our knowledge of cancer immunobiology, as well as to improve monitoring of cellular immune function after vaccination. Progress in both areas will facilitate development of effective cancer vaccines, as well as of adoptive therapy. Effective cancer vaccines promise to be useful for treatment and prevention of cancer at low cost and with low morbidity.

  10. EFFECT OF POST VACCINATION MEDICATION ON LAYER CHICKS VACCINATED WITH GUMBORO VACCINE NOBILIS D-78

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Khan, S.M. Subtain, A. Aslam, K. Muhammad1 and K.A. Khan

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and sixty one-day-old layer chicks were divided into four experimental groups A, B, C and D, with 40 birds in each group. Group A was kept as control (non-vaccinated, group B was given vaccine but not medicated, group C was administered vaccine as well as multivitamins for 3 days post-vaccination, while group D was also medicated with aspirin for 3 days post-vaccination. The parameters studied were: heterophil/lymphocyte ratio, serum biochemical analysis (serum protein, glucose and cholesterol, antibody response against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV. At the end of experiment (42nd day adrenal glands from 10 randomly selected birds from each group were subjected to gross and histopathological examination and adrenal/body weight ratio was also determined. The results showed non significant difference among different groups. However, the group that was given multivitamins showed maximum immune response against IBDV, while the aspirin therapy did not show any significant difference. It can be concluded that vaccine produced undetectable stress in layer chicks and the vitamin supplementation evidently showed as an immuno-potentiating effect

  11. Green revolution vaccines, edible vaccines | Tripurani | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... cholera, hepatitis-B, and many more are in the process of development. Food vaccines may also help to suppress autoimmunity disorders such as Type-1 Diabetes. Key words: Edible vaccines, oral vaccines, antigen expression, food vaccines. African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 2 (12), pp. 679-683, December 2003 ...

  12. Green revolution vaccines, edible vaccines | Tripurani | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Edible vaccines are sub-unit vaccines where the selected genes are introduced into the plants and the transgenic plant is then induced to manufacture the encoded protein. Edible vaccines are mucosal-targeted vaccines where stimulation of both systematic and mucosal immune network takes place. Foods under study ...

  13. First case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome after rabies vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Du, Xusheng; Dong, Yu; Peng, Lirong; Han, Xiaonian; Lyu, Jianhua; Bai, Hehe

    2018-01-15

    We describe the first case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) occurring 8 days after the first dose of a three-dose rabies vaccination series. She had no history of vaccine-related rash or other adverse drug reactions, nor had she received any other drug therapy. The temporal relationship between the development of SJS and the vaccination suggests that the rabies vaccination probably was the causal agent. This case serves as a warning of a distinct cutaneous reaction of rabies vaccination. © 2018 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. Immune Therapies for Neuroblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Navid, Fariba; Armstrong, Michael; Barfield, Raymond C

    2009-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a solid tumor arising from developing cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is the most common extracranial tumor in children. The prognosis for high-risk neuroblastoma remains poor with conventional treatment, and new approaches are therefore being explored to treat this disease. One such alternative therapy that holds promise is immune therapy. We review here the recent advances in 4 types of immune therapy – cytokine, vaccine, antibody, and cellular therapy – to treat neu...

  15. Generation in vivo of peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells and presence of regulatory T cells during vaccination with hTERT (class I and II peptide-pulsed DCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satthaporn Sukchai

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimal techniques for DC generation for immunotherapy in cancer are yet to be established. Study aims were to evaluate: (i DC activation/maturation milieu (TNF-α +/- IFN-α and its effects on CD8+ hTERT-specific T cell responses to class I epitopes (p540 or p865, (ii CD8+ hTERT-specific T cell responses elicited by vaccination with class I alone or both class I and II epitope (p766 and p672-pulsed DCs, prepared without IFN-α, (iii association between circulating T regulatory cells (Tregs and clinical responses. Methods Autologous DCs were generated from 10 patients (HLA-0201 with advanced cancer by culturing CD14+ blood monocytes in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 supplemented with TNF-α [DCT] or TNF-α and IFN-α [DCTI]. The capacity of the DCs to induce functional CD8+ T cell responses to hTERT HLA-0201 restricted nonapeptides was assessed by MHC tetramer binding and peptide-specific cytotoxicity. Each DC preparation (DCT or DCTI was pulsed with only one type of hTERT peptide (p540 or p865 and both preparations were injected into separate lymph node draining regions every 2–3 weeks. This vaccination design enabled comparison of efficacy between DCT and DCTI in generating hTERT peptide specific CD8+ T cells and comparison of class I hTERT peptide (p540 or p865-loaded DCT with or without class II cognate help (p766 and p672 in 6 patients. T regulatory cells were evaluated in 8 patients. Results (i DCTIs and DCTs, pulsed with hTERT peptides, were comparable (p = 0.45, t-test in inducing peptide-specific CD8+ T cell responses. (ii Class II cognate help, significantly enhanced (p (iii Clinical responders had significantly lower (p Conclusion Addition of IFN-α to ex vivo monocyte-derived DCs, did not significantly enhance peptide-specific T cell responses in vivo, compared with TNF-α alone. Class II cognate help significantly augments peptide-specific T cell responses. Clinically favourable responses were seen in patients

  16. Vexing Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    Schools play a key role in ensuring that children are being immunized against diseases, but conflicting research is making enforcement difficult. This article discusses a growing trend of vaccine avoidance and the endless supply of conflicting information and research about immunization safety. Despite the controversy, many people appear to accept…

  17. Valuing vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bärnighausen, Till; Bloom, David E.; Cafiero-Fonseca, Elizabeth T.; O’Brien, Jennifer Carroll

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination has led to remarkable health gains over the last century. However, large coverage gaps remain, which will require significant financial resources and political will to address. In recent years, a compelling line of inquiry has established the economic benefits of health, at both the individual and aggregate levels. Most existing economic evaluations of particular health interventions fail to account for this new research, leading to potentially sizable undervaluation of those interventions. In line with this new research, we set forth a framework for conceptualizing the full benefits of vaccination, including avoided medical care costs, outcome-related productivity gains, behavior-related productivity gains, community health externalities, community economic externalities, and the value of risk reduction and pure health gains. We also review literature highlighting the magnitude of these sources of benefit for different vaccinations. Finally, we outline the steps that need to be taken to implement a broad-approach economic evaluation and discuss the implications of this work for research, policy, and resource allocation for vaccine development and delivery. PMID:25136129

  18. DNA Vaccines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    research interests include: eukaryotic gene expres- sion and infectious diseases. Keywords. DNA vaccine, immune response, antibodies, infectious diseases. GENERAL I ... T -cells: Lymphocytes that differentiate primarily in the thymus and are central to the control and ... enhance DNA delivery into skeletal muscle.

  19. Persistent humoral immune defect in highly active antiretroviral therapy-treated children with HIV-1 infection: loss of specific antibodies against attenuated vaccine strains and natural viral infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, Vincent; Scherpbier, Henriëtte; Pajkrt, Dasja; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Zaaijer, Hans; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In the pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy era, a loss of specific antibodies was seen. Our objective with this study was to describe the loss of specific antibodies during treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy. METHODS: In a prospective, single-center, cohort study of

  20. Treatment with the smallpox antiviral tecovirimat (ST-246) alone or in combination with ACAM2000 vaccination is effective as a postsymptomatic therapy for monkeypox virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhanu, Aklile; Prigge, Jonathan T; Silvera, Peter M; Honeychurch, Kady M; Hruby, Dennis E; Grosenbach, Douglas W

    2015-07-01

    The therapeutic efficacies of smallpox vaccine ACAM2000 and antiviral tecovirimat given alone or in combination starting on day 3 postinfection were compared in a cynomolgus macaque model of lethal monkeypox virus infection. Postexposure administration of ACAM2000 alone did not provide any protection against severe monkeypox disease or mortality. In contrast, postexposure treatment with tecovirimat alone or in combination with ACAM2000 provided full protection. Additionally, tecovirimat treatment delayed until day 4, 5, or 6 postinfection was 83% (days 4 and 5) or 50% (day 6) effective. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Vaccine Adverse Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... the primary immunization series in infants Report Adverse Event Report a Vaccine Adverse Event Contact FDA (800) ...

  2. Childhood Vaccine Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Childhood Vaccine Schedule Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents ... please turn Javascript on. When to Vaccinate What Vaccine Why Birth (or any age if not previously ...

  3. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Why get vaccinated?HPV vaccine prevents infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are associated with cause ... at http://www.cdc.gov/hpv. HPV Vaccine (Human Papillomavirus) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and ...

  4. Vaccine-Preventable Disease Photos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home | About | A-Z | Contact | Follow Vaccine Information You Need VACCINE BASICS Evaluating Online Health Information FAQs How Vaccines Work Importance of Vaccines Paying for Vaccines State Immunization Programs ...

  5. Current Vaccine Shortages and Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... value="Submit" /> Related Links Vaccines & Immunizations Current Vaccine Shortages & Delays Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... vaccination are included in this update. Chart of Vaccines* in Delay or Shortage National Vaccine Supply Shortages ...

  6. [Universal vaccination for Rotavirus infection control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Valentin; Capanna, Alessandra; Gervasi, Giuseppe; Zaratti, Laura; Franco, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the most common etiological cause for pediatric acute gastroenteritis, particularly in children under 5 years of age or immunocompromised. Since 2008, vaccination program has determined a decrease in Rotavirus-related hospitalization, outpatient's visits, emergency department visits and mortality. These indicators of illness for Rotaviruses diseases remain high in those countries where there is no access to rehydrating therapies. In Italy vaccine coverage is very low, even if the burden of RV disease is well known, and at present vaccination is offered free of charge in a single region.

  7. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a combination product containing Haemophilus influenzae type b, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... combination product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids, Acellular Pertussis, Hepatitis B, Polio Vaccine)

  8. Immunology Update: New Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, S Paul

    2016-11-01

    A new 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is effective against more cancer-causing HPV types than previous vaccines. HPV vaccine series started with previous vaccines can be completed with the 9-valent vaccine. Two new influenza vaccines are available for adults 65 years and older: a high-dose vaccine and an enhanced adjuvant vaccine. These elicit stronger antibody responses than standard-dose vaccines. Current guidelines specify no preference for the new versus standard-dose vaccines. Two new group B meningococcal vaccines are intended for use during outbreaks and for patients with asplenia, complement deficiencies, frequent occupational meningococcus exposure, or for patients who desire protection from type B meningococcus. These are not substitutes for the quadrivalent vaccine already in use. For pneumococcus, new recommendations state that 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) should be administered to patients 65 years and older, followed at least 1 year later by the polyvalent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23). For patients ages 19 to 64 years with immunocompromise and not previously vaccinated against pneumococcus, administration of these two vaccines should be separated by at least 8 weeks. Rotavirus vaccine is standard for infants at age 2 months. Also, there is a new cholera vaccine approved for use in the United States. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  9. Important advances in malaria vaccine research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Jadhav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is one of the most widespread parasitic infection in Asian countries affecting the poor of the poor. In an effort to develop an effective vaccine for the treatment of malaria, various attempts are being made worldwide. If successful, such a vaccine can be effective for treatment of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. This would also be able to avoid complications such as drug resistance, resistance to insecticides, nonadherence to the treatment schedule, and eventually high cost of treatment in the resource-limited settings. In the current compilation, the details from the literature were collected by using PubMed and Medline as search engines and searched for terms such as malaria, vaccine, and malaria treatment. This review collates and provides glimpses of the information on the recent malaria vaccine development. The reader will be taken through the historical perspective followed by the approaches to the malaria vaccine development from pre-erythrocytic stage vaccines, asexual stage vaccines, transmission blocking vaccines, etc. Looking at the current scenario of the malaria and treatment strategies, it is an absolute need of an hour that an effective malaria vaccine should be developed. This would bring a revolutionary breakthrough in the treatment modalities especially when there is increasing emergence of resistance to existing drug therapy. It would be of great purpose to serve those living in malaria endemic region and also for travelers which are nonimmune and coming to malaria endemic region. As infection by P. vivax is more prevalent in India and other Asian subcontinent and is often prominent in areas where elimination is being attempted, special consideration is required of the role of vaccines in blocking transmission, regardless of the stages being targeted. Development of vaccines is feasible but with the support of private sector and government organization in terms of regulatory and most importantly

  10. Complementary action of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-17A induces interleukin-23, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand, and matrix metalloproteinases and drives bone and cartilage pathology in experimental arthritis: rationale for combination therapy in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijze, A.E. van; Loo, F.A.J. van de; Walgreen, B.; Bennink, M.; Helsen, M.; Bersselaar, L. van den; Wicks, I.P.; Berg, W.B. van den; Koenders, M.I.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Type 17 T helper cells and interleukin (IL)-17 play important roles in the pathogenesis of human and murine arthritis. Although there is a clear link between IL-17 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the inflammatory cascade, details about their interaction

  11. Therapy with radio-attenuated vaccine in experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis showed enhanced T cell and inducible nitric oxide synthase levels, suppressed tumor growth factor-beta production with higher expression of some signaling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sanchita; Roy, Syamal; Manna, Madhumita

    2015-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) or Kala-Azar (KA) is one of the most deadly forms of disease among all neglected tropical diseases. There are no satisfactory drugs or vaccine candidates available for this dreaded disease. Our previous studies showed promising therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy of the live, radio-attenuated parasites through intramuscular (I.M.) and intraperitoneal (I.P.) route in BALB/c mice model. The T-cell proliferation level, the mRNA expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and tumor growth factor-beta (TGF-β) genes and finally the phosphorylation levels of phosphoinositide dependent kinase 1 (PDK1), phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) molecules were checked in BALB/c mice model immunized with radio-attenuated Leishmania donovani parasites through I.M. route. Higher T-cell proliferation, increased iNOS level, and suppressed TGF-β level were found in treated infected animal groups (100 and 150Gy) in relation to untreated infected animals. Likewise, phosphorylation levels of PDK1, PI3K and p38MAPK of these two groups were increased when compared to untreated infected controls. The clearance of the parasites from treated infected groups of animals may be mediated by the restoration of T-cell due to therapy with radio-attenuated L. donovani parasites. The killing of parasites was mediated by increase in nitric oxide release through PDK1, PI3K and p38MAPK signaling pathways. A lower TGF-β expression has augmented the restored Th1 ambience in the 100 and 150Gy treated animal groups proving further the efficacy of the candidate vaccine. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  12. Activity of glycated chitosan and other adjuvants to PDT vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Banáth, Judit; Čiplys, Evaldas; Szulc, Zdzislaw; Bielawska, Alicja; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-03-01

    Glycated chitosan (GC), a water soluble galactose-conjugated natural polysaccharide, has proven to be an effective immunoadjuvant for treatment of tumors based on laser thermal therapy. It was also shown to act as adjuvant for tumor therapy with high-intensity ultrasound and in situ photodynamic therapy (PDT). In the present study, GC was examined as potential adjuvant to PDT-generated cancer vaccine. Two other agents, pure calreticulin protein and acid ceramidase inhibitor LCL521, were also tested as prospective adjuvants for use in conjunction with PDT vaccines. Single treatment with GC, included with PDT vaccine cells suspension, improved the therapeutic efficacy when compared to vaccine alone. This attractive prospect of GC application remains to be carefully optimized and mechanistically elucidated. Both calreticulin and LCL521 proved also effective adjuvants when combined with PDT vaccine tumor treatment.

  13. When to Start Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets When to Start Antiretroviral Therapy Search ... Vaccine? What is a Preventive HIV Vaccine? HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials ... HIV Treatment HIV Treatment: The Basics Just Diagnosed: Next Steps ...

  14. Dried influenza vaccines : Over the counter vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saluja, Vinay; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.

    2010-01-01

    Since last year influenza pandemic has struck again after 40 years, this is the right moment to discuss the different available formulation options for influenza vaccine. Looking back to the last 4 decades, most vaccines are still formulated as liquid solution. These vaccines have shown a poor

  15. Vaccination in food allergic patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    allergy: • Vaccines produced in embryonated eggs, such as yellow fever vaccine, influenza vaccine and rabies vaccine. Yellow fever vaccine is most likely to contain significant amounts of egg protein. • Vaccines produced in chick fibroblast cell cultures, such as measles and measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccines, do not.

  16. History of vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Plotkin, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines have a history that started late in the 18th century. From the late 19th century, vaccines could be developed in the laboratory. However, in the 20th century, it became possible to develop vaccines based on immunologic markers. In the 21st century, molecular biology permits vaccine development that was not possible before.

  17. History of vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Stanley

    2014-08-26

    Vaccines have a history that started late in the 18th century. From the late 19th century, vaccines could be developed in the laboratory. However, in the 20th century, it became possible to develop vaccines based on immunologic markers. In the 21st century, molecular biology permits vaccine development that was not possible before.

  18. Your Baby's First Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Barcodes Related Link Vaccines & Immunizations Immunization Schedules Your Child's First Vaccines Format: Select One PDF [336K] RTF [260K] Recommend ... of that vaccine. Tell the person giving the vaccines if your child has ever had a severe reaction after any ...

  19. [Autism and vaccinations: the end?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigas-Pallarés, J

    2010-03-03

    Of the different theories explaining the aetiology of autism, one that has achieved widespread popularity among the general public is the involvement of the MMR vaccine as the causation of autism. The connection between vaccines and autism rests upon two theories. On the one hand, the anti-measles fraction of the vaccine is attributed with the development of an enteropathy due to malabsorption, which would facilitate the absorption of toxic neuropeptides and the effects of this process on the brain would favour the appearance of autism. The other theory involves thimerosal (a combination of ethylmercury and thiosalicylate), which is used as a preservative in some vaccines, including the MMR. The data in favour of these hypotheses have led to a great amount of social alarm, especially in certain areas that are more inclined to accept 'alternative' therapies and hypotheses. This article analyses the data on which the involvement of the MMR vaccine in autism is based. It also underlines the weakness of the anti-vaccine arguments, as well as the forceful, convincing response, based on experimental and epidemiological work, that has been generated following the notable social unrest. Running parallel to the scientific debate, there has also been a legal discussion, which has arisen as a consequence of the more than 5,000 lawsuits filed in the United States, and in which the claims for financial compensation together amount to two thousand million dollars. On 12th February 2009, following a court hearing in which the specific case of a girl called Michelle Cedillo was taken as an example, the court ruled that the overall weight of the evidence was overwhelmingly opposed to the theories put forward by the plaintiffs.

  20. VACCINATION SAFETY: MODERN DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.К. Tatochenko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination aided disease control over infection pathology among the children led to elimination of smallpox and poliomyelitis, drastic decrease of the tuberculous meningitis recurrences, tetanus, measles and other infection diseases and their complications. At the same time, Russia is still afraid to apply certain vaccines. The reasons for that are mainly subjective. This is the unjustified caution related to the fear that it may cause severe vaccine associated complications. The data in view of the lecture indicates the safety of the vaccinal prevention procedures and measures for the prevention of their complications.Key words: vaccinal prevention, vaccination complications, vaccination safety, children.

  1. Vaccination in Fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chettri, Jiwan Kumar

    significant losses in aquacultural enterprises but vaccination methods implemented since the 1990s have demonstrated their role as one of the most efficient disease control strategies. These have been particularly successful with regard to bacterial diseases in Norwegian salmon farming where multivalent...... vaccines have reduced the need for usage of antibiotics with more than 99 % since the 1980s. Fish can be vaccinated by three different administration routes: injection, immersion and oral vaccination. Injection vaccination (intraperitoneal injection of vaccine) is the most time consuming and labor...... intensive method, which however, provides the best protection of the fish. Immersion vaccination is used for immunization of a high number of small fish is cost-efficient and fast (30 sec immersion into vaccine). Oral vaccination (vaccine in feed) is the least efficient. As in higher vertebrates fish...

  2. Oncolytic vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsedawy, Noura B; Russell, Stephen J

    2013-10-01

    Oncolytic viruses are ideal platforms for tumor vaccination because they can mediate the direct in situ killing of tumor cells that release a broad array of tumor antigens and alarmins or danger signals thereby cross-priming antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), which mediate the indirect killing of uninfected cells. The balance between the direct and indirect killing phases of oncolytic virotherapy is the key to its success and can be manipulated by incorporating various immunomodulatory genes into the oncolytic virus genome. Recently, the interim analysis of a large multicenter Phase III clinical trial for Talimogene laherparepvec, a granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor-armed oncolytic herpes simplex virus, revealed significant improvement in objective response and durable response rates over control arm and a trend toward improved overall survival. Meanwhile, newer oncolytics are being developed expressing additional immunomodulatory transgenes to further enhance cross-priming and the generation of antitumor CTLs and to block the immunosuppressive actions of the tumor microenvironment. Since oncolytic vaccines can be engineered to kill tumor cells directly, modulate the kinetics of the antitumor immune response and reverse the immunosuppressive actions of the tumor, they are predicted to emerge as the preferred immunotherapeutic anticancer weapons of the future.

  3. Learning from epidemiological, clinical, and immunological studies on Mycobacterium africanum for improving current understanding of host–pathogen interactions, and for the development and evaluation of diagnostics, host-directed therapies, and vaccines for tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimuddin Zumla

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium africanum comprises two phylogenetic lineages within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC. M. africanum was first described and isolated in 1968 from the sputum of a Senegalese patient with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB and it has been identified increasingly as an important cause of human TB, particularly prevalent in West Africa. The restricted geographical distribution of M. africanum, in contrast to the widespread global distribution of other species of MTBC, requires explanation. Available data indicate that M. africanum may also have important differences in transmission, pathogenesis, and host–pathogen interactions, which could affect the evaluation of new TB intervention tools (diagnostics and vaccines–those currently in use and those under development. The unequal geographical distribution and spread of MTBC species means that individual research findings from one country or region cannot be generalized across the continent. Thus, generalizing data from previous and ongoing research studies on MTBC may be inaccurate and inappropriate. A major rethink is required regarding the design and structure of future clinical trials of new interventions. The West, Central, East, and Southern African EDCTP Networks of Excellence provide opportunities to take forward these pan-Africa studies. More investments into molecular, epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, and immunological studies across the African continent are required to enable further understanding of host–M. africanum interactions, leading to the development of more specific diagnostics, biomarkers, host-directed therapies, and vaccines for TB.

  4. Therapeutic Vaccine Strategies against Human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadeel Khallouf

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available High-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV cause over 500,000 cervical, anogenital and oropharyngeal cancer cases per year. The transforming potential of HPVs is mediated by viral oncoproteins. These are essential for the induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Thus, HPV-mediated malignancies pose the unique opportunity in cancer vaccination to target immunologically foreign epitopes. Therapeutic HPV vaccination is therefore an ideal scenario for proof-of-concept studies of cancer immunotherapy. This is reflected by the fact that a multitude of approaches has been utilized in therapeutic HPV vaccination design: protein and peptide vaccination, DNA vaccination, nanoparticle- and cell-based vaccines, and live viral and bacterial vectors. This review provides a comprehensive overview of completed and ongoing clinical trials in therapeutic HPV vaccination (summarized in tables, and also highlights selected promising preclinical studies. Special emphasis is given to adjuvant science and the potential impact of novel developments in vaccinology research, such as combination therapies to overcome tumor immune suppression, the use of novel materials and mouse models, as well as systems vaccinology and immunogenetics approaches.

  5. Therapeutic Vaccine Strategies against Human Papillomavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khallouf, Hadeel; Grabowska, Agnieszka K.; Riemer, Angelika B.

    2014-01-01

    High-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) cause over 500,000 cervical, anogenital and oropharyngeal cancer cases per year. The transforming potential of HPVs is mediated by viral oncoproteins. These are essential for the induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Thus, HPV-mediated malignancies pose the unique opportunity in cancer vaccination to target immunologically foreign epitopes. Therapeutic HPV vaccination is therefore an ideal scenario for proof-of-concept studies of cancer immunotherapy. This is reflected by the fact that a multitude of approaches has been utilized in therapeutic HPV vaccination design: protein and peptide vaccination, DNA vaccination, nanoparticle- and cell-based vaccines, and live viral and bacterial vectors. This review provides a comprehensive overview of completed and ongoing clinical trials in therapeutic HPV vaccination (summarized in tables), and also highlights selected promising preclinical studies. Special emphasis is given to adjuvant science and the potential impact of novel developments in vaccinology research, such as combination therapies to overcome tumor immune suppression, the use of novel materials and mouse models, as well as systems vaccinology and immunogenetics approaches. PMID:26344626

  6. Vaccination against bubonic and pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titball, R W; Williamson, E D

    2001-07-20

    Yersinia pestis is the etiological agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague, diseases which have caused over 200 milllion human deaths in the past. Plague still occurs throughout the world today, though for reasons that are not fully understood pandemics of disease do not develop from these outbreaks. Antibiotic treatment of bubonic plague is usually effective, but pneumonic plague is difficult to treat and even with antibiotic therapy death often results. A killed whole cell plague vaccine has been used in the past, but recent studies in animals have shown that this vaccine offers poor protection against pneumonic disease. A live attenuated vaccine is also available. Whilst this vaccine is effective, it retains some virulence and in most countries it is not considered to be suitable for use in humans. We review here work to develop improved sub-unit and live attenuated vaccines against plague. A sub-unit vaccine based on the F1- and V-antigens is highly effective against both bubonic and pneumonic plague, when tested in animal models of disease. This vaccine has been used to explore the utility of different intranasal and oral delivery systems, based on the microencapsulation or Salmonella delivery of sub-units.

  7. Immune Therapies for Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navid, Fariba; Armstrong, Michael; Barfield, Raymond C.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a solid tumor arising from developing cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is the most common extracranial tumor in children. The prognosis for high-risk neuroblastoma remains poor with conventional treatment, and new approaches are therefore being explored to treat this disease. One such alternative therapy that holds promise is immune therapy. We review here the recent advances in 4 types of immune therapy – cytokine, vaccine, antibody, and cellular therapy – to treat neuroblastoma. We present preclinical research and clinical trials on several promising candidates such as IL-12, dendritic cell vaccines, anti-GD2 antibodies, and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. An optimal treatment plan for neuroblastoma will most likely involve multimodal approaches and combinations of immune therapies. PMID:19342881

  8. Obesity vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Mariana P

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is one of the largest and fastest growing public health problems in the world. Last century social changes have set an obesogenic milieu that calls for micro and macro environment interventions for disease prevention, while treatment is mandatory for individuals already obese. The cornerstone of overweight and obesity treatment is diet and physical exercise. However, many patients find lifestyle modifications difficult to comply and prone to failure in the long-term; therefore many patients consider anti-obesity drugs an important adjuvant if not a better alternative to behavioral approach or obesity surgery. Since the pharmacological options for obesity treatment remain quite limited, this is an exciting research area, with new treatment targets and strategies on the horizon. This review discusses the development of innovative therapeutic agents, focusing in energy homeostasis regulation and the use of molecular vaccines, targeting hormones such as somatostatin, GIP and ghrelin, to reduce body weight.

  9. [Developments in HPV vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melker, Hester; Kenter, Gemma; van Rossum, Tekla; Conyn-van Spaendonck, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination against the human papilloma virus (HPV) has been included in the national Vaccination Programme of the Netherlands for 12-year-old girls since 2010. Vaccination coverage for the birth cohort of 1997 was 56.; there is a gradual increase in uptake. Continuous safety monitoring brought no new unknown serious side effects to light; many girls suffered from transient symptoms such as painful arm, fatigue and headache. After the current vaccines that protect against HPV types 2 and 4 types, respectively and induce some cross protection, vaccines are being developed that can induce broader protection. HPV vaccination of 12-year-old girls is cost-effective, even for relatively low vaccination coverage. The potential protection of HPV vaccination extends beyond prevention of cervical cancer by preventing other oncological manifestations of HPV infection in women as well as men and genital warts. The preventive HPV vaccines do not appear to be effective in treating existing abnormalities.

  10. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes The table below shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  12. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a doctor...

  13. Vaccines against poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Calman A.; Saul, Allan

    2014-01-01

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vaccines for neglected infectious diseases. However, the majority of this went to three diseases: HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and not neglected diseases. Much of it went to basic research rather than development, with an ongoing decline in funding for product development partnerships. Further investment in vaccines against diarrheal diseases, hepatitis C, and group A Streptococcus could lead to a major health impact in LMICs, along with vaccines to prevent sepsis, particularly among mothers and neonates. The Advanced Market Commitment strategy of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI) Alliance is helping to implement vaccines against rotavirus and pneumococcus in LMICs, and the roll out of the MenAfriVac meningococcal A vaccine in the African Meningitis Belt represents a paradigm shift in vaccines against poverty: the development of a vaccine primarily targeted at LMICs. Global health vaccine institutes and increasing capacity of vaccine manufacturers in emerging economies are helping drive forward new vaccines for LMICs. Above all, partnership is needed between those developing and manufacturing LMIC vaccines and the scientists, health care professionals, and policy makers in LMICs where such vaccines will be implemented. PMID:25136089

  14. Vaccines against poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Calman A; Saul, Allan

    2014-08-26

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vaccines for neglected infectious diseases. However, the majority of this went to three diseases: HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and not neglected diseases. Much of it went to basic research rather than development, with an ongoing decline in funding for product development partnerships. Further investment in vaccines against diarrheal diseases, hepatitis C, and group A Streptococcus could lead to a major health impact in LMICs, along with vaccines to prevent sepsis, particularly among mothers and neonates. The Advanced Market Commitment strategy of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI) Alliance is helping to implement vaccines against rotavirus and pneumococcus in LMICs, and the roll out of the MenAfriVac meningococcal A vaccine in the African Meningitis Belt represents a paradigm shift in vaccines against poverty: the development of a vaccine primarily targeted at LMICs. Global health vaccine institutes and increasing capacity of vaccine manufacturers in emerging economies are helping drive forward new vaccines for LMICs. Above all, partnership is needed between those developing and manufacturing LMIC vaccines and the scientists, health care professionals, and policy makers in LMICs where such vaccines will be implemented.

  15. The cost of vaccination throughout life: A western European overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethgen, Olivier; Cornier, Murielle; Chriv, Emilie; Baron-Papillon, Florence

    2016-08-02

    Despite the interest of policy makers, the actual investment in vaccination is poorly documented. Our study assessed the costs of vaccination throughout life for a fully immunized Western European citizen. National vaccination calendars for England, France, Germany, Italy, Portugal, Spain and Sweden were retrieved. We differentiated men from women and healthy individuals from those suffering from underlying conditions who require specific additional vaccinations. Vaccine costs and administration fees were retrieved from official national source and calculated from the national healthcare perspective. Vaccinating an individual against up to 17 diseases throughout his entire life and in full compliance with national vaccination calendars cost between €328 and €2,352 (vaccines costs only) and between €443 and €3,395 (administration costs included), the lowest range corresponds to a healthy man in Sweden and the highest to a woman with underlying conditions in England. Vaccination costs varied among countries due to heterogeneous national vaccination calendars and organization. In all countries, adults (18-64 y) and elderly (≥65 y) accounted for the lowest vaccines costs compared with infants (0-24 m) and children/adolescents (2-17 y). In comparison, other mass secondary preventive therapies may be at least 3 times more costly. Vaccination requires a relatively low level of investment per individual. Our estimates should be considered to be the maximum potential costs due to our 100% compliance assumption. Increasing coverage rates would bring additional public health benefits for a relatively low incremental cost. A life-course approach of vaccination should also be encouraged because some missed opportunities remain in senior vaccinations.

  16. An overview of FDA-approved vaccines & their innovators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesenauer, Rebekah H; Kinch, Michael S

    2017-09-25

    A survey of FDA-approved biologicals focused upon the development of immunotherapies over time to gain insight on the challenges and trends of vaccine development today. Areas covered: A total of 135 different immune-based therapies were broadly divided into passive or active immunotherapies. Whereas just over half of passive immunotherapies targeted infectious diseases, the vast majority of active immunotherapy products (vaccines) were directed against a handful of viral and bacterial pathogens. We also analyze changes in vaccine strategy, including the use of viable antigens and subunit approaches. Expert commentary: An analysis of vaccine innovators revealed an ever-increasing presence of the private sector and a relatively diminishing role for the public sector . Whereas North American companies have contributed to the approval of two-thirds of vaccines, European companies have regained parity in terms of hosting innovators of vaccine research and development.

  17. Vaccine Associated Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of the cases of vaccine associated myocarditis have been following small pox vaccination. Reports have also been there after streptococcal pneumonia vaccine and influenza vaccine. In some cases, autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA used in the vaccine have been implicated. Exclusion of other causes is very important in the diagnostic process, especially that of acute coronary syndrome. Management is similar to that of other etiologies of myocarditis. These rare instances of myocarditis should not preclude one from taking necessary immunization for vaccine preventable diseases.

  18. Vaccines and Immunization Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Michael D; Meador, Anna E

    2016-03-01

    Vaccines are among most cost-effective public health strategies. Despite effective vaccines for many bacterial and viral illnesses, tens of thousands of adults and hundreds of children die each year in the United States from vaccine-preventable diseases. Underutilization of vaccines requires rethinking the approach to incorporating vaccines into practice. Arguably, immunizations could be a part all health care encounters. Shared responsibility is paramount if deaths are to be reduced. This article reviews the available vaccines in the US market, as well as practice recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Immune Interference After Sequential Alphavirus Vaccine Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    containing 50gmL−1 each of neomycin and streptomycin and supplemented with 0.5% human serum albumin , U.S.P. The lyophilized vaccine is the filtered...vaccine was prepared from specific pathogen-free eggs infected with the attenuated CM4884 strain of WEE virus. The supernatant was harvested and filtered...supernatant harvested from primary chicken embryo cell cultures. The vaccine was prepared from spe- cific pathogen-free eggs infected with the

  20. Steps toward a globally available malaria vaccine: harnessing the potential of algae for future low cost vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Carla S; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease that threatens half of the world's population. This debilitating disease is caused by infection from parasites of the genus Plasmodium. Insecticides, bed nets and drug therapies have lowered the prevalence and death rate associated with malaria but this disease continues to plague many populations around the world. In recent years, many organizations have suggested developing methods for a complete eradication of malaria. The most straightforward and effective method for this potential eradication will be through the development of a low-cost vaccine. To achieve eradication, it will be necessary to develop new vaccine candidates and novel systems for both the production and delivery of these vaccines. Recently, the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used for the recombinant expression of malaria vaccine candidates including the transmission blocking vaccine candidate Pfs48/45. Here, we discuss the potential of this research on the future development of a low-cost malaria vaccine candidate.

  1. Novel therapeutic vaccines [(HSP65 + IL-12)DNA-, granulysin- and Ksp37-vaccine] against tuberculosis and synergistic effects in the combination with chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Yoko; Hashimoto, Satomi; Nakajima, Toshihiro; Nakatani, Hitoshi; Nishimatsu, Shiho; Nishida, Yasuko; Kanamaru, Noriko; Kaneda, Yasuhumi; Takamori, Yasushi; McMurray, David; Tan, Esterlina V.; Cang, Marjorie L.; Saunderson, Paul; Dela Cruz, E.C.; Okada, Masaji

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extremely drug resistant (XDR) TB are big problems in the world. We have developed novel TB therapeutic vaccines, HVJ-Envelope/HSP65 + IL-12 DNA vaccine (HSP65-vaccine), granulysin vaccine and killer specific secretory protein of 37kDa (Ksp37) vaccine. Methods and Results: HSP65 vaccine showed strong therapeutic effect against both MDR-TB and XDR-TB in mice. Intradermal immunization of HSP65-vaccine showed stronger therapeutic effect against TB than intramuscular or subcutaneous immunization. Furthermore, the synergistic therapeutic effect was observed when the vaccine was administrated in combination with Isoniazid (INH), which is a first line drug for chemotherapy. The combination of types of vaccines (HSP65- and granulysin- vaccines) also showed synergistic therapeutic effect. In the monkey model, granulysin-vaccine prolonged the survival period after the infection of TB and long-term survival was observed in vaccine-treated group. We examined the potential of two kinds of novel DNA vaccines (Ksp37-vaccine and granulysin-vaccine). Both vaccines augmented in vivo differentiation of CTL against TB. We measured the amount of Ksp37 protein in human serum and revealed that the level of Ksp37 protein of patients with tuberculosis was lower than that of healthy volunteers. Therefore, we established Ksp37 transgenic mice as well as granulysin transgenic mice to elucidate the function of those proteins. Both transgenic mice were resistant to TB infection. Conclusion: These data indicate the potential of combinational therapy; the combination of two DNA vaccines or combination of DNA vaccine with antibiotic drug. Thus, it will provide a novel strategy for the treatment of MDR-TB. PMID:23249609

  2. Identity of zinc finger nucleases with specificity to herpes simplex virus type II genomic DNA: novel HSV-2 vaccine/therapy precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayengera Misaki

    2011-06-01

    5' and 3' ends of the HSV-2 genome (genomic context coordinates 0.02 and 0.98, respectively were specificity sites of ZFNs suited for the complete excision of over 60% of HSV-2 genomic material from within infected human cells, through the process of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ. Furthermore, a model concerning a recombinant (ICP10-PK mutant replication competent HSV-2 viral vector for delivering and transducing a diploid copy (or pair of the HSV-2-genome-specific ZFN genotype within neuronal tissue, is presented. Conclusion ZFNs with specificity to HSV-2 genomic DNA that are precursors of novel host-genome expressed HSV-2 gene-therapeutics or vaccines were identified.

  3. ORAL LIVE TULAREMIA VACCINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previously reported data on the pathogenesis and immunogenicity of live vaccine strain LVS have been sufficiently encouraging to warrant an...potential for oral immunization with live tularemia vaccine prepared from strain LVS.

  4. Vaccine Safety Datalink

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Vaccine Safety Datalink is part of the National Immunization Program within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and was started in recognition of gaps in the scientific knowledge of rare vaccine side effects.

  5. Vaccine Policy Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thaul, Susan

    2005-01-01

    .... Whether a vaccine's target is naturally occurring or present because of hostile intent, the issues policy makers must deal with include vaccine development, production, availability, safety, effectiveness, and access...

  6. Vaccinating against cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Parry, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Since last year, it has become possible to vaccinate against the human papillomavirus (HPV) that causes most cases of cervical cancer, but countries face tough decisions before making the vaccine widely available.

  7. Vaccines and animal welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, D B

    2007-04-01

    Vaccination promotes animal welfare by protecti